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Sample records for spectral edge frequency

  1. Fermi edge singularity and finite-frequency spectral features in a semi-infinite one-dimensional wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhan, A.; Snyman, I.

    2012-08-01

    We theoretically study a charge qubit interacting with electrons in a semi-infinite one-dimensional wire. The system displays the physics of the Fermi edge singularity. Our results generalize known results for the Fermi edge system to the regime where excitations induced by the qubit can resolve the spatial structure of the scattering region. We find resonant features in the qubit tunneling rate as a function of the qubit level splitting. They occur at integer multiples of hvF/l. Here vF is the Fermi velocity of the electrons in the wire, and l is the distance from the tip of the wire to the point where it interacts with the qubit. These features are due to the constructive interference of the amplitudes for creating single coherent left- or right-moving charge fluctuation (plasmon) in the electron gas. As the coupling between the qubit and the wire is increased, the resonances are washed out. This is a clear signature of the increasingly violent Fermi sea shake-up, associated with the creation of many plasmons whose individual energies are too low to meet the resonance condition.

  2. Dynamic representation of spectral edges in guinea pig primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Montejo, Noelia

    2015-01-01

    The central representation of a given acoustic motif is thought to be strongly context dependent, i.e., to rely on the spectrotemporal past and present of the acoustic mixture in which it is embedded. The present study investigated the cortical representation of spectral edges (i.e., where stimulus energy changes abruptly over frequency) and its dependence on stimulus duration and depth of the spectral contrast in guinea pig. We devised a stimulus ensemble composed of random tone pips with or without an attenuated frequency band (AFB) of variable depth. Additionally, the multitone ensemble with AFB was interleaved with periods of silence or with multitone ensembles without AFB. We have shown that the representation of the frequencies near but outside the AFB is greatly enhanced, whereas the representation of frequencies near and inside the AFB is strongly suppressed. These cortical changes depend on the depth of the AFB: although they are maximal for the largest depth of the AFB, they are also statistically significant for depths as small as 10 dB. Finally, the cortical changes are quick, occurring within a few seconds of stimulus ensemble presentation with AFB, and are very labile, disappearing within a few seconds after the presentation without AFB. Overall, this study demonstrates that the representation of spectral edges is dynamically enhanced in the auditory centers. These central changes may have important functional implications, particularly in noisy environments where they could contribute to preserving the central representation of spectral edges. PMID:25744885

  3. Spectral Information Retrieval for Sub-Pixel Building Edge Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avbelj, J.

    2012-07-01

    Building extraction from imagery has been an active research area for decades. However, the precise building detection from hyperspectral (HSI) images solely is a less often addressed research question due to the low spatial resolution of data. The building boundaries are usually represented by spectrally mixed pixels, and classical edge detector algorithms fail to detect borders with sufficient completeness. The idea of the proposed method is to use fraction of materials in mixed pixels to derive weights for adjusting building boundaries. The building regions are detected using seeded region growing and merging in a HSI image; for the initial seed point selection the digital surface model (DSM) is used. Prior to region growing, the seeds are statistically tested for outliers on the basis of their spectral characteristics. Then, the border pixels of building regions are compared in spectrum to the seed points by calculating spectral dissimilarity. From this spectral dissimilarity the weights for weighted and constrained least squares (LS) adjustment are derived. We used the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) for spectral similarity measure, but the proposed boundary estimation method could benefit from soft classification or spectral unmixing results. The method was tested on a HSI image with spatial resolution of 4 m, and buildings of rectangular shape. The importance of constraints to the relations between building parts, e.g. perpendicularity is shown on example with a building with inner yards. The adjusted building boundaries are compared to the laser DSM, and have a relative accuracy of boundaries 1/4 of a pixel.

  4. Red edge spectral measurements from sugar maple leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogelmann, J. E.; Rock, B. N.; Moss, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    Many sugar maple stands in the northeastern United States experienced extensive insect damage during the 1988 growing season. Chlorophyll data and high spectral resolution spectrometer laboratory reflectance data were acquired for multiple collections of single detached sugar maple leaves variously affected by the insect over the 1988 growing season. Reflectance data indicated consistent and diagnostic differences in the red edge portion (680-750 nm) of the spectrum among the various samples and populations of leaves. These included differences in the red edge inflection point (REIP), a ratio of reflectance at 740-720 nm (RE3/RE2), and a ratio of first derivative values at 715-705 nm (D715/D705). All three red edge parameters were highly correlated with variation in total chlorophyll content. Other spectral measures, including the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Simple Vegetation Index Ratio (VI), also varied among populations and over the growing season, but did not correlate well with total chlorophyll content. Leaf stacking studies on light and dark backgrounds indicated REIP, RE3/RE2 and D715/D705 to be much less influenced by differences in green leaf biomass and background condition than either NDVI or VI.

  5. Spectral CT using multiple balanced K-edge filters.

    PubMed

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; Worstell, William; El Fakhri, Georges; Bian, Junguo; Lorsakul, Auranuch; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2015-03-01

    Our goal is to validate a spectral computed tomography (CT) system design that uses a conventional X-ray source with multiple balanced K-edge filters. By performing a simultaneously synthetic reconstruction in multiple energy bins, we obtained a good agreement between measurements and model expectations for a reasonably complex phantom. We performed simulation and data acquisition on a phantom containing multiple rods of different materials using a NeuroLogica CT scanner. Five balanced K-edge filters including Molybdenum, Cerium, Dysprosium, Erbium, and Tungsten were used separately proximal to the X-ray tube. For each sinogram bin, measured filtered vector can be defined as a product of a transmission matrix, which is determined by the filters and is independent of the imaging object, and energy-binned intensity vector. The energy-binned sinograms were then obtained by inverting the transmission matrix followed by a multiplication of the filter measurement vector. For each energy bin defined by two consecutive K-edges, a synthesized energy-binned attenuation image was obtained using filtered back-projection reconstruction. The reconstructed attenuation coefficients for each rod obtained from the experiment was in good agreement with the corresponding simulated results. Furthermore, the reconstructed attenuation coefficients for a given energy bin, agreed with National Institute of Standards and Technology reference values when beam hardening within the energy bin is small. The proposed cost-effective system design using multiple balanced K-edge filters can be used to perform spectral CT imaging at clinically relevant flux rates using conventional detectors and integrating electronics. PMID:25252276

  6. Spectral CT Using Multiple Balanced K-Edge Filters

    PubMed Central

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; Worstell, William; Fakhri, Georges El; Bian, Junguo; Lorsakul, Auranuch; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Our goal is to validate a spectral CT system design that uses a conventional X-ray source with multiple balanced K-edge filters. By performing a simultaneously synthetic reconstruction in multiple energy bins, we obtained a good agreement between measurements and model expectations for a reasonably complex phantom. We performed simulation and data acquisition on a phantom containing multiple rods of different materials using a NeuroLogica CT scanner. Five balanced K-edge filters including Molybdenum, Cerium, Dysprosium, Erbium, and Tungsten were used separately proximal to the X-ray tube. For each sinogram bin, measured filtered vector can be defined as a product of a transmission matrix, which is determined by the filters and is independent of the imaging object, and energy-binned intensity vector. The energy-binned sinograms were then obtained by inverting the transmission matrix followed by a multiplication of the filter measurement vector. For each energy bin defined by two consecutive K-edges, a synthesized energy-binned attenuation image was obtained using filtered back-projection reconstruction. The reconstructed attenuation coefficients for each rod obtained from the experiment was in good agreement with the corresponding simulated results. Furthermore, the reconstructed attenuation coefficients for a given energy bin, agreed with National Institute of Standards and Technology reference values when beam hardening within the energy bin is small. The proposed cost-effective system design using multiple balanced K-edge filters can be used to perform spectral CT imaging at clinically relevant flux rates using conventional detectors and integrating electronics. PMID:25252276

  7. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Ilchenko, V S; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz(-1) at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10(-10) at 1-100 s integration time-orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  8. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than −60 dBc Hz−1 at 10 Hz, −90 dBc Hz−1 at 100 Hz and −170 dBc Hz−1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10−10 at 1–100 s integration time—orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  9. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz-1 at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz-1 at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz-1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10-10 at 1-100 s integration time--orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption.

  10. Spectrally balanced detection for optical frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yueli; de Bruin, Daniel M; Kerbage, Charles; de Boer, Johannes F

    2007-12-10

    In optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) or swept-source optical coherence tomography, balanced detection is required to suppress relative intensity noise (RIN). A regular implementation of balanced detection by combining reference and sample arm signal in a 50/50 coupler and detecting the differential output with a balanced receiver is however, not perfect. Since the splitting ratio of the 50/50 coupler is wavelength dependent, RIN is not optimally canceled at the edges of the wavelength sweep. The splitting ratio has a nearly linear shift of 0.4% per nanometer. This brings as much as +/-12% deviation at the margins of wavelength-swept range centered at 1060nm. We demonstrate a RIN suppression of 33dB by spectrally corrected balanced detection, 11dB more that regular balanced detection. PMID:19550929

  11. Joint spatio-spectral based edge detection for multispectral infrared imagery.

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Bender, Steven C.; Sharma, Yagya D.; Jang, Woo-Yong; Paskalva, Biliana S.

    2010-06-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important and difficult tasks in digital image processing. It represents a key stage of automated image analysis and interpretation. Segmentation algorithms for gray-scale images utilize basic properties of intensity values such as discontinuity and similarity. However, it is possible to enhance edge-detection capability by means of using spectral information provided by multispectral (MS) or hyperspectral (HS) imagery. In this paper we consider image segmentation algorithms for multispectral images with particular emphasis on detection of multi-color or multispectral edges. More specifically, we report on an algorithm for joint spatio-spectral (JSS) edge detection. By joint we mean simultaneous utilization of spatial and spectral characteristics of a given MS or HS image. The JSS-based edge-detection approach, termed Spectral Ratio Contrast (SRC) edge-detection algorithm, utilizes the novel concept of matching edge signatures. The edge signature represents a combination of spectral ratios calculated using bands that enhance the spectral contrast between the two materials. In conjunction with a spatial mask, the edge signature give rise to a multispectral operator that can be viewed as a three-dimensional extension of the mask. In the extended mask, the third (spectral) dimension of each hyper-pixel can be chosen independently. The SRC is verified using MS and HS imagery from a quantum-dot in a well infrared (IR) focal plane array, and the Airborne Hyperspectral Imager.

  12. Dynamic spectra of radio frequency bursts associated with edge-localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatipamula, Shekar G.; Yun, G. S.; Leem, J.; Park, H. K.; Kim, K. W.; Akiyama, T.; Lee, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Electromagnetic emissions in the radio frequency (RF) range are detected in the high-confinement-mode (H-mode) plasma using a fast RF spectrometer on the KSTAR tokamak. The emissions at the crash events of edge-localized modes (ELMs) are found to occur as strong RF bursts with dynamic features in intensity and spectrum. The RF burst spectra (obtained with frequency resolution better than 10 MHz) exhibit diverse spectral features and evolve in multiple steps before the onset and through the ELM crash: (1) a narrow-band spectral line around 200 MHz persistent for extended duration in the pre-ELM crash times, (2) harmonic spectral lines with spacing comparable to deuterium or hydrogen ion cyclotron frequency at the pedestal, (3) rapid onset (faster than ~1 μs) of intense RF burst with wide-band continuum in frequency which coincides with the onset of ELM crash, and (4) a few additional intense RF bursts with chirping-down narrow-band spectrum during the crash. These observations indicate plasma waves are excited in the pedestal region and strongly correlated with the ELM dynamics such as the onset of the explosive crash. Thus the investigation of RF burst occurrence and their dynamic spectral features potentially offers the possibility of exploring H-mode physics in great detail.

  13. SENTINEL-2A red-edge spectral indices suitability for discriminating burn severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Manso, Alfonso; Fernández-Manso, Oscar; Quintano, Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Fires are a problematic and recurrent issue in Mediterranean ecosystems. Accurate discrimination between burn severity levels is essential for the rehabilitation planning of burned areas. Sentinel-2A MultiSpectral Instrument (MSI) record data in three red-edge wavelengths, spectral domain especially useful on agriculture and vegetation applications. Our objective is to find out whether Sentinel-2A MSI red-edge wavelengths are suitable for burn severity discrimination. As study area, we used the 2015 Sierra Gata wildfire (Spain) that burned approximately 80 km2. A Copernicus Emergency Management Service (EMS)-grading map with four burn severity levels was considered as reference truth. Cox and Snell, Nagelkerke and McFadde pseudo-R2 statistics obtained by Multinomial Logistic Regression showed the superiority of red-edge spectral indices (particularly, Modified Simple Ratio Red-edge, Chlorophyll Index Red-edge, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Red-edge) over conventional spectral indices. Fisher's Least Significant Difference test confirmed that Sentinel-2A MSI red-edge spectral indices are adequate to discriminate four burn severity levels.

  14. An Array of Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSB) for the Spectral Energy Distribution (SPEED) Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Ali, S.; O'Dell, C.; Timbie, P. T.; Bier, A.; Campano, B.; Chen, T. C.; Cottingham, D. A.; Sharp, E.; Cheng, E. S.

    2003-01-01

    The SPEED camera is being developed to study the spectral energy distributions of high redshift galaxies using the Heinrich Hertz Telescope (HHT) in Arizona. SPEED requires a small cryogenic detector array of 2x2 pixels with each pixel having four frequency bands in the 150-350 GHz range. Here we describe the development of the detector array of these high efficiency FSBs. The FSB design provides the multi-pixel multi-spectral band capability required for SPEED in a compact stackable array. The SPEED bolometers will use proximity effect superconducting transition edge sensors as their temperature-sensing element allowing for higher levels of multiplexing in future applications.

  15. Angular and spectral distribution of infrared synchrotron radiation emitted by an undulator and its edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucara, Alessandro; Cestelli Guidi, Mariangela; Marcouille, Oliver; Roy, Pascale; Calvani, Paolo; Giura, P.; Paolone, A.; Mathis, Yves-Laurent

    1999-10-01

    Both the angular and the spectral distribution of the Infrared Synchrotron Radiation emitted by an undulator of Super-ACO have been measured. Structures due to undulator edges, as well as contributions from the edge emission of a bending magnet placed behind the undulator, have been observed. Detailed calculations including all these sources are in excellent agreement with the measurements, provided that both velocity and acceleration terms are considered.

  16. Edge effects in graphene nanostructures: Semiclassical theory of spectral fluctuations and quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurm, Jürgen; Richter, Klaus; Adagideli, Inanç

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the effect of different edge types on the statistical properties of both the energy spectrum of closed graphene billiards and the conductance of open graphene cavities in the semiclassical limit. To this end, we use the semiclassical Green's function for ballistic graphene flakes [see J. Wurm, K. Richter, and İ. Adagideli, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.84.075468 84, 075468 (2011)]. First, we study the spectral two-point correlation function or, more precisely, its Fourier transform the spectral form factor, starting from the graphene version of Gutzwiller's trace formula for the oscillating part of the density of states. We calculate the two leading-order contributions to the spectral form factor, paying particular attention to the influence of the edge characteristics of the system. Then, we consider transport properties of open graphene cavities. We derive generic analytical expressions for the classical conductance, the weak localization correction, the size of the universal conductance fluctuations, and the shot-noise power of a ballistic graphene cavity. Again, we focus on the effects of the edge structure. For both the conductance and the spectral form factor, we find that edge-induced pseudospin interference affects the results significantly. In particular, intervalley coupling mediated through scattering from armchair edges is the key mechanism that governs the coherent quantum interference effects in ballistic graphene cavities.

  17. Effects of relative and absolute frequency in the spectral weighting of loudness.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Suyash Narendra; Wróblewski, Marcin; Schmid, Kendra K; Jesteadt, Walt

    2016-01-01

    The loudness of broadband sound is often modeled as a linear sum of specific loudness across frequency bands. In contrast, recent studies using molecular psychophysical methods suggest that low and high frequency components contribute more to the overall loudness than mid frequencies. In a series of experiments, the contribution of individual components to the overall loudness of a tone complex was assessed using the molecular psychophysical method as well as a loudness matching task. The stimuli were two spectrally overlapping ten-tone complexes with two equivalent rectangular bandwidth spacing between the tones, making it possible to separate effects of relative and absolute frequency. The lowest frequency components of the "low-frequency" and the "high-frequency" complexes were 208 and 808 Hz, respectively. Perceptual-weights data showed emphasis on lowest and highest frequencies of both the complexes, suggesting spectral-edge related effects. Loudness matching data in the same listeners confirmed the greater contribution of low and high frequency components to the overall loudness of the ten-tone complexes. Masked detection thresholds of the individual components within the tone complex were not correlated with perceptual weights. The results show that perceptual weights provide reliable behavioral correlates of relative contributions of the individual frequency components to overall loudness of broadband sounds. PMID:26827032

  18. Sparsity-regularized image reconstruction of decomposed K-edge data in spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiaofeng; Sawatzky, Alex; Anastasio, Mark A.; Schirra, Carsten O.

    2014-05-01

    The development of spectral computed tomography (CT) using binned photon-counting detectors has garnered great interest in recent years and has enabled selective imaging of K-edge materials. A practical challenge in CT image reconstruction of K-edge materials is the mitigation of image artifacts that arise from reduced-view and/or noisy decomposed sinogram data. In this note, we describe and investigate sparsity-regularized penalized weighted least squares-based image reconstruction algorithms for reconstructing K-edge images from few-view decomposed K-edge sinogram data. To exploit the inherent sparseness of typical K-edge images, we investigate use of a total variation (TV) penalty and a weighted sum of a TV penalty and an ℓ1-norm with a wavelet sparsifying transform. Computer-simulation and experimental phantom studies are conducted to quantitatively demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed reconstruction algorithms.

  19. A GIHS-based spectral preservation fusion method for remote sensing images using edge restored spectral modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiran; Liu, Jun; Liu, Shuguang; Cao, Lei; Zhou, Qiming; Huang, Huawen

    2014-02-01

    High spatial resolution and spectral fidelity are basic standards for evaluating an image fusion algorithm. Numerous fusion methods for remote sensing images have been developed. Some of these methods are based on the intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) transform and the generalized IHS (GIHS), which may cause serious spectral distortion. Spectral distortion in the GIHS is proven to result from changes in saturation during fusion. Therefore, reducing such changes can achieve high spectral fidelity. A GIHS-based spectral preservation fusion method that can theoretically reduce spectral distortion is proposed in this study. The proposed algorithm consists of two steps. The first step is spectral modulation (SM), which uses the Gaussian function to extract spatial details and conduct SM of multispectral (MS) images. This method yields a desirable visual effect without requiring histogram matching between the panchromatic image and the intensity of the MS image. The second step uses the Gaussian convolution function to restore lost edge details during SM. The proposed method is proven effective and shown to provide better results compared with other GIHS-based methods.

  20. Multitaper spectral analysis of high-frequency seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeffrey; Lindberg, Craig R.; Vernon, Frank L., III

    1987-11-01

    Spectral estimation procedures which employ several prolate spheroidal sequences as tapers have been shown to yield better results than standard single-taper spectral analysis when used on a variety of engineering data. We apply the adaptive multitaper spectral estimation method of Thomson (1982) to a number of high-resolution digital seismic records and compare the results to those obtained using standard single-taper spectral estimates. Single-taper smoothed-spectrum estimates are plagued by a trade-off between the variance of the estimate and the bias caused by spectral leakage. Applying a taper to reduce bias discards data, increasing the variance of the estimate. Using a taper also unevenly samples the record. Throwing out data from the ends of the record can result in a spectral estimate which does not adequately represent the character of the spectrum of nonstationary processes like seismic waveforms. For example, a discrete Fourier transform of an untapered record (i.e., using a boxcar taper) produces a reasonable spectral estimate of the large-amplitude portion of the seismic source spectrum but cannot be trusted to provide a good estimate of the high-frequency roll-off. A discrete Fourier transform of the record multiplied by a more severe taper (like the Hann taper) which is resistant to spectral leakage leads to a reliable estimate of high-frequency spectral roll-off, but this estimate weights the analyzed data unequally. Therefore single-taper estimators which are less affected by leakage not only have increased variance but also can misrepresent the spectra of nonstationary data. The adaptive multitaper algorithm automatically adjusts between these extremes. We demonstrate its advantages using 16-bit seismic data recorded by instruments in the Anza Telemetered Seismic Network. We also present an analysis demonstrating the superiority of the multitaper algorithm in providing low-variance spectral estimates with good leakage resistance which do not

  1. Joint demosaicking and zooming using moderate spectral correlation and consistent edge map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dengwen; Dong, Weiming; Chen, Wengang

    2014-07-01

    The recently published joint demosaicking and zooming algorithms for single-sensor digital cameras all overfit the popular Kodak test images, which have been found to have higher spectral correlation than typical color images. Their performance perhaps significantly degrades on other datasets, such as the McMaster test images, which have weak spectral correlation. A new joint demosaicking and zooming algorithm is proposed for the Bayer color filter array (CFA) pattern, in which the edge direction information (edge map) extracted from the raw CFA data is consistently used in demosaicking and zooming. It also moderately utilizes the spectral correlation between color planes. The experimental results confirm that the proposed algorithm produces an excellent performance on both the Kodak and McMaster datasets in terms of both subjective and objective measures. Our algorithm also has high computational efficiency. It provides a better tradeoff among adaptability, performance, and computational cost compared to the existing algorithms.

  2. Time frequency analysis of Jovian and Saturnian radio spectral patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Galopeau, Patrick H. M.; Al-Haddad, Emad; Lammer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Prominent radio spectral patterns were observed by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science experiment (RPWS) principally at Jupiter and Saturn. The spectral shapes are displayed in the usual dynamic spectra showing the flux density versus the time and the frequency. Those patterns exhibit well-organized shapes in the time-frequency plane connected with the rotation of the planet. We consider in this analysis the auroral emissions which occurred in the frequency range between 10 kHz and approximately 3 MHz. It concerns the Jovian hectometric emission (HOM) and the Saturnian kilometric radiation (SKR). We show in the case of Jupiter's HOM that the spectral patterns are well-arranged arc structures with curvatures depending on the Jovian rotation. Regarding the SKR emission, the spectral shapes exhibit generally complex patterns, and only sometimes arc structures are observed. We emphasize the curve alterations from vertex-early to vertex-late arcs (and vice versa) and we study their dependences, or not, on the planetary rotations. We also discuss the common physical process at the origin of the HOM and SKR emissions, specifically the spectral patterns created by the interaction between planetary satellites (e.g. Io or Dione) and the Jovian and Saturnian magnetospheres.

  3. On the location of spectral edges in \\ {Z}-periodic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exner, Pavel; Kuchment, Peter; Winn, Brian

    2010-11-01

    Periodic second-order ordinary differential operators on \\ {R} are known to have the edges of their spectra to occur only at the spectra of periodic and anti-periodic boundary value problems. The multi-dimensional analog of this property is false, as was shown in a 2007 paper by some of the authors of this paper. However, one sometimes encounters the claims that in the case of a single periodicity (i.e., with respect to the lattice \\ {Z}), the 1D property still holds, and spectral edges occur at the periodic and anti-periodic spectra only. In this work, we show that even in the simplest case of quantum graphs this is not true. It is shown that this is true if the graph consists of a 1D chain of finite graphs connected by single edges, while if the connections are formed by at least two edges, the spectral edges can already occur away from the periodic and anti-periodic spectra. This paper is dedicated to the memory of P Duclos.

  4. K-edge ratio method for identification of multiple nanoparticulate contrast agents by spectral CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiri, H; Ay, M R; Shiran, M B; Soltanian-Zadeh, H

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recently introduced energy-sensitive X-ray CT makes it feasible to discriminate different nanoparticulate contrast materials. The purpose of this work is to present a K-edge ratio method for differentiating multiple simultaneous contrast agents using spectral CT. Methods: The ratio of two images relevant to energy bins straddling the K-edge of the materials is calculated using an analytic CT simulator. In the resulting parametric map, the selected contrast agent regions can be identified using a thresholding algorithm. The K-edge ratio algorithm is applied to spectral images of simulated phantoms to identify and differentiate up to four simultaneous and targeted CT contrast agents. Results: We show that different combinations of simultaneous CT contrast agents can be identified by the proposed K-edge ratio method when energy-sensitive CT is used. In the K-edge parametric maps, the pixel values for biological tissues and contrast agents reach a maximum of 0.95, whereas for the selected contrast agents, the pixel values are larger than 1.10. The number of contrast agents that can be discriminated is limited owing to photon starvation. For reliable material discrimination, minimum photon counts corresponding to 140 kVp, 100 mAs and 5-mm slice thickness must be used. Conclusion: The proposed K-edge ratio method is a straightforward and fast method for identification and discrimination of multiple simultaneous CT contrast agents. Advances in knowledge: A new spectral CT-based algorithm is proposed which provides a new concept of molecular CT imaging by non-iteratively identifying multiple contrast agents when they are simultaneously targeting different organs. PMID:23934964

  5. Laser frequency stabilization using regenerative spectral hole burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, N. M.; Sellin, P. B.; Sun, Y.; Carlsten, J. L.; Cone, R. L.

    2000-07-01

    We demonstrate laser frequency stabilization using a continuously regenerated transient spectral hole in an inhomogeneously broadened resonance of a solid. Regenerative transient holes provide extreme stabilization for time scales appropriate for spectroscopy, signal processing, ranging, and interferometry. Stabilization to 20 Hz on a 10-ms time scale using spectral holes at 793 nm in Tm3+:Y3Al5O12 gives substantial improvement in the reliability of stimulated photon echoes in the same material and enables the observation of a third population storage mechanism for hole burning in Tm3+:Y3Al5O12.

  6. Convergence of oscillator spectral estimators for counted-frequency measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A common intermediary connecting frequency-noise calibration or testing of an oscillator to useful applications is the spectral density of the frequency-deviating process. In attempting to turn test data into predicts of performance characteristics, one is naturally led to estimation of statistical values by sample-mean and sample-variance techniques. However, sample means and sample variances themselves are statistical quantities that do not necessarily converge (in the mean-square sense) to actual ensemble-average means and variances, except perhaps for excessively large sample sizes. This is especially true for the flicker noise component of oscillators. This article shows, for the various types of noises found in oscillators, how sample averages converge (or do not converge) to their statistical counterparts. The convergence rate is shown to be the same for all oscillators of a given spectral type.

  7. Measurement of microresonator frequency comb coherence by spectral interferometry.

    PubMed

    Webb, K E; Jang, J K; Anthony, J; Coen, S; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2016-01-15

    We experimentally investigate the spectral coherence of microresonator optical frequency combs. Specifically, we use a spectral interference method, typically used in the context of supercontinuum generation, to explore the variation of the magnitude of the complex degree of first-order coherence across the full comb bandwidth. We measure the coherence of two different frequency combs and observe wholly different coherence characteristics. In particular, we find that the observed dynamical regimes are similar to the stable and unstable modulation instability regimes reported in previous theoretical studies. Results from numerical simulations are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations. In addition to demonstrating a new technique to assess comb stability, our results provide strong experimental support for previous theoretical analyses. PMID:26766693

  8. Noise Reduction using Frequency Sub-Band Adaptive Spectral Subtraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David

    2000-01-01

    A frequency sub-band based adaptive spectral subtraction algorithm is developed to remove noise from noise-corrupted speech signals. A single microphone is used to obtain both the noise-corrupted speech and the estimate of the statistics of the noise. The statistics of the noise are estimated during time frames that do not contain speech. These statistics are used to determine if future time frames contain speech. During speech time frames, the algorithm determines which frequency sub-bands contain useful speech information and which frequency sub-bands contain only noise. The frequency sub-bands, which contain only noise, are subtracted off at a larger proportion so the noise does not compete with the speech information. Simulation results are presented.

  9. Edge technique for measurement of laser frequency shifts including the Doppler shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, Larry (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining the frequency shift in a laser system by transmitting an outgoing laser beam. An incoming laser beam having a frequency shift is received. A first signal is acquired by transmitting a portion of the incoming laser beam to an energy monitor detector. A second signal is acquired by transmitting a portion of the incoming laser beam through an edge filter to an edge detector, which derives a first normalized signal which is proportional to the transmission of the edge filter at the frequency of the incoming laser beam. A second normalized signal is acquired which is proportional to the transmission of the edge filter at the frequency of the outgoing laser beam. The frequency shift is determined by processing the first and second normalized signals.

  10. Relationships between Electroencephalographic Spectral Peaks Across Frequency Bands

    PubMed Central

    van Albada, S. J.; Robinson, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    The degree to which electroencephalographic spectral peaks are independent, and the relationships between their frequencies have been debated. A novel fitting method was used to determine peak parameters in the range 2–35 Hz from a large sample of eyes-closed spectra, and their interrelationships were investigated. Findings were compared with a mean-field model of thalamocortical activity, which predicts near-harmonic relationships between peaks. The subject set consisted of 1424 healthy subjects from the Brain Resource International Database. Peaks in the theta range occurred on average near half the alpha peak frequency, while peaks in the beta range tended to occur near twice and three times the alpha peak frequency on an individual-subject basis. Moreover, for the majority of subjects, alpha peak frequencies were significantly positively correlated with frequencies of peaks in the theta and low and high beta ranges. Such a harmonic progression agrees semiquantitatively with theoretical predictions from the mean-field model. These findings indicate a common or analogous source for different rhythms, and help to define appropriate individual frequency bands for peak identification. PMID:23483663

  11. A novel edge-preserving nonnegative matrix factorization method for spectral unmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenxing; Ma, Ruishi

    2015-12-01

    Spectral unmixing technique is one of the key techniques to identify and classify the material in the hyperspectral image processing. A novel robust spectral unmixing method based on nonnegative matrix factorization(NMF) is presented in this paper. This paper used an edge-preserving function as hypersurface cost function to minimize the nonnegative matrix factorization. To minimize the hypersurface cost function, we constructed the updating functions for signature matrix of end-members and abundance fraction respectively. The two functions are updated alternatively. For evaluation purpose, synthetic data and real data have been used in this paper. Synthetic data is used based on end-members from USGS digital spectral library. AVIRIS Cuprite dataset have been used as real data. The spectral angle distance (SAD) and abundance angle distance(AAD) have been used in this research for assessment the performance of proposed method. The experimental results show that this method can obtain more ideal results and good accuracy for spectral unmixing than present methods.

  12. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Spectral and spectral-frequency methods of investigating atmosphereless bodies of the Solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busarev, Vladimir V.; Prokof'eva-Mikhailovskaya, Valentina V.; Bochkov, Valerii V.

    2007-06-01

    A method of reflectance spectrophotometry of atmosphereless bodies of the Solar system, its specificity, and the means of eliminating basic spectral noise are considered. As a development, joining the method of reflectance spectrophotometry with the frequency analysis of observational data series is proposed. The combined spectral-frequency method allows identification of formations with distinctive spectral features, and estimations of their sizes and distribution on the surface of atmospherelss celestial bodies. As applied to investigations of asteroids 21 Lutetia and 4 Vesta, the spectral frequency method has given us the possibility of obtaining fundamentally new information about minor planets.

  13. Hybrid integrated photodetector with flat-top steep-edge spectral response.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinye; Huang, Yongqing; Ren, Xiaomin; Duan, Xiaofeng; Hu, Fuquan; Wang, Qi; Cai, Shiwei; Zhang, Xia

    2012-08-20

    Hybrid integrated photodetectors with flat-top steep-edge spectral responses that consist of an Si-based multicavity Fabry-Perot (F-P) filter and an InP-based p-i-n absorption structure (with a 0.2 μm In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As absorption layer), have been designed and fabricated. The performance of the hybrid integrated photodetectors is theoretically investigated by including key factors such as the thickness of each cavity, the pairs of each reflecting mirror, and the thickness of the benzocyclobutene bonding layer. The device is fabricated by bonding an Si-based multicavity F-P filter with an InP-based p-i-n absorption structure. A hybrid integrated photodetector with a peak quantum efficiency of 55% around 1549.2 nm, the -0.5 dB band of 0.43 nm, the 25 dB band of 1.06 nm, and 3 dB bandwidth more than 16 GHz, is simultaneously obtained. Based on multicavity F-P structure, this device has good flat-top steep-edge spectral response. PMID:22907001

  14. Spectral tomography with diffuse near-infrared light: inclusion of broadband frequency domain spectral data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Davis, Scott C; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) region-based spectroscopy is examined for accuracy with spectral recovery using frequency domain data at a discrete number of wavelengths, as compared to that with broadband continuous wave data. Data with more wavelengths in the frequency domain always produce superior quantitative spectroscopy results with reduced noise and error in the chromophore concentrations. Performance of the algorithm in the situation of doing region-guided spectroscopy within the MRI is also considered, and the issue of false positive prior regions being identified is examined to see the effect of added wavelengths. The results indicate that broadband frequency domain data are required for maximal accuracy. A broadband frequency domain experimental system was used to validate the predictions, using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser for the source between 690- and 850-nm wavelengths. The 80-MHz pulsed signal is heterodyned with photomultiplier tube detection, to lower frequency for data acquisition. Tissue-phantom experiments with known hemoglobin absorption and tissue-like scatter values are used to validate the system, using measurements every 10 nm. More wavelengths clearly provide superior quantification of total hemoglobin values. The system and algorithms developed here should provide an optimal way to quantify regions with the goal of image-guided breast tissue spectroscopy within the MRI. PMID:19021313

  15. Spectrally narrowed leaky waveguide edge emission and transient electrluminescent dynamics of OLEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhengqing, Gan

    2010-01-01

    In summary, there are two major research works presented in this dissertation. The first research project (Chapter 4) is spectrally narrowed edge emission from Organic Light Emitting Diodes. The second project (Chapter 5) is about transient electroluminescent dynamics in OLEDs. Chapter 1 is a general introduction of OLEDs. Chapter 2 is a general introduction of organic semiconductor lasers. Chapter 3 is a description of the thermal evaporation method for OLED fabrication. The detail of the first project was presented in Chapter 4. Extremely narrowed spectrum was observed from the edge of OLED devices. A threshold thickness exists, above which the spectrum is narrow, and below which the spectrum is broad. The FWHM of spectrum depends on the material of the organic thin films, the thickness of the organic layers, and length of the OLED device. A superlinear relationship between the output intensity of the edge emission and the length of the device was observed, which is probably due to the misalignment of the device edge and the optical fiber detector. The original motivation of this research is for organic semiconductor laser that hasn't been realized due to the extremely high photon absorption in OLED devices. Although we didn't succeed in fabricating an electrically pumped organic laser diode, we made a comprehensive research in edge emission of OLEDs which provides valuable results in understanding light distribution and propagation in OLED devices. Chapter 5 focuses on the second project. A strong spike was observed at the falling edge of a pulse, and a long tail followed. The spike was due to the recombination of correlated charge pair (CCP) created by trapped carriers in guest molecules of the recombination zone. When the bias was turned off, along with the decreasing of electric field in the device, the electric field induced quenching decreases and the recombination rate of the CCP increases which result in the spike. This research project provides a

  16. Laser line shape and spectral density of frequency noise

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, G.M.; Blin, S.; Besnard, P.; Tam, T.T.; Tetu, M.

    2005-04-01

    Published experimental results show that single-mode laser light is characterized in the microwave range by a frequency noise which essentially includes a white part and a 1/f (flicker) part. We theoretically show that the spectral density (the line shape) which is compatible with these results is a Voigt profile whose Lorentzian part or homogeneous component is linked to the white noise and the Gaussian part to the 1/f noise. We measure semiconductor laser line profiles and verify that they can be fit with Voigt functions. It is also verified that the width of the Lorentzian part varies like 1/P where P is the laser power while the width of the Gaussian part is more of a constant. Finally, we theoretically show from first principles that laser line shapes are also described by Voigt functions where the Lorentzian part is the laser Airy function and the Gaussian part originates from population noise.

  17. High resolution atomic coherent control via spectral phase manipulation of an optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Matthew C; Cruz, Flavio C; Marian, Adela; Ye, Jun

    2006-04-21

    We demonstrate high resolution coherent control of cold atomic rubidium utilizing spectral phase manipulation of a femtosecond optical frequency comb. Transient coherent accumulation is directly manifested by the enhancement of signal amplitude and spectral resolution via the pulse number. The combination of frequency comb technology and spectral phase manipulation enables coherent control techniques to enter a new regime with natural linewidth resolution. PMID:16712153

  18. High Resolution Atomic Coherent Control via Spectral Phase Manipulation of an Optical Frequency Comb

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, Matthew C.; Cruz, Flavio C.; Marian, Adela; Ye Jun

    2006-04-21

    We demonstrate high resolution coherent control of cold atomic rubidium utilizing spectral phase manipulation of a femtosecond optical frequency comb. Transient coherent accumulation is directly manifested by the enhancement of signal amplitude and spectral resolution via the pulse number. The combination of frequency comb technology and spectral phase manipulation enables coherent control techniques to enter a new regime with natural linewidth resolution.

  19. Experimental spectral measurements of heavy K-edge filtered beams for x-ray computed mammotomography

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, D J; McKinley, R L; Tornai, M P

    2012-01-01

    A dual modality computed mammotomography (CmT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system for dedicated 3D breast imaging is in development. Using heavy K-edge filtration, the CmT component narrows the energy spectrum of the cone-shaped x-ray beam incident on the patient’s pendant, uncompressed breast. This quasi-monochromatic beam is expected to improve discrimination of tissue with similar attenuation coefficients while restraining absorbed dose to below that of dual view mammography. Previous simulation studies showed the optimal energy that maximizes dose efficiency for a 50/50% adipose/glandular breast is between 30 and 40 keV. This study experimentally validates these results using pre-breast and post-breast spectral measurements made under tungsten tube voltages between 40 and 100 kVp using filter materials with K-edge values ranging from 15 to 70 keV. Different filter material thicknesses are used, approximately equivalent to the 200th and 500th attenuating value layer (VL) thickness. Cerium (K = 40.4 keV) filtered post-breast spectra for 8–18 cm breasts are measured for a range of breast compositions. Figures of merit include mean beam energy, spectral full-width at tenth-maximum, beam hardening and dose for the range of breast sizes. Measurements corroborate simulation results, indicating that for a given dose, a 200th VL of cerium filtration may have optimal performance in the dedicated mammotomography paradigm. PMID:17228108

  20. Photon counting spectral CT: improved material decomposition with K-edge-filtered x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2012-03-01

    Photon counting spectral computed tomography (PCSCT) provides material selective CT imaging at a single CT scan and fixed tube voltage. The PCSCT data are acquired in several energy ranges (bins) arranged over the x-ray spectrum. The quasi-monoenergetic CT images are acquired in these energy bins and are used for material decomposition. The PCSCT exhibits inherent limitations when material decomposition is performed using energy bins. For effective material decomposition, the energy bins used for material decomposition should be sufficiently narrow and well separated. However, when narrow bins are used, a large fraction of the detected x-ray counts is lost and statistical noise is increased. Alternatively, the x-ray spectrum can be split into a few larger bins with no gap in between and all detected x-ray photons can be used for material decomposition. However, in this case the energy bins are too wide and not well separated, which results in suboptimal material decomposition. The above contradictory requirements can be resolved if the x-ray photons are physically removed from the regions of the energy spectrum between the energy bins. Such a selective removal can be performed using filtration of the x-ray beam by high-Z filter materials with appropriate positions of K-edge energies. The K-edge filtration of x-rays can, therefore, provide necessary gaps between the energy bins with no dose penalty to the patient. In the current work, we proposed using selective K-edge filtration of x-rays in PCSCT and performed the first experimental investigation of this approach. The PCSCT system included a cadmium zinc telluride semiconductor detector with 2 × 256 pixels and 1 × 1 mm2 pixel size, and five energy bins. The CT phantom had 14 cm diameter and included contrast elements of iodine, gold and calcifications with clinically relevant concentrations. The tube voltages of 60, 90 and 120 kVp were used. K-edge filters based on Ba (Ek = 37.44 keV) were used for a 60 kVp tube

  1. On the Estimate of Frequency Break and Spectral Index at Ion Scales for Interplanetary Magnetic Field Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telloni, D.; Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L.

    2014-12-01

    We exploited radial alignments between MESSENGER and WIND spacecraft to study: 1) the radial dependence of the spectral break located at the border between fluid and kinetic regimes; 2) the dependence, if any, of the spectral slope, around the frequency break, on the type of wind, either fast or slow.We found that this spectral break moves to lower and lower frequencies as heliocentric distance increases, following a power-law dependence. Moreover, we found evidence that a cyclotron-resonant dissipation mechanism must participate into the spectral energy cascade together with other possible kinetic noncyclotron-resonant mechanisms.On the other hand, the spectral slope shows a large variability between -3.75 and -1.75 with an average value around -2.8 and a robust tendency for this parameter to be steeper within the trailing edge of high speed streams and to be flatter within the subsequent slower wind, following a gradual transition between these two states. The value of the spectral index seems to depend firmly on the power associated to the fluctuations within the inertial range, higher the power steeper the slope. Research partially supported by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, contract ASI/INAF I/013/12/0 and by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 313038/STORM

  2. Small Pitch Transition-Edge Sensors with Broadband High Spectral Resolution for Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Adams, J. S.; Eckart, M. E.; Smith, Adams; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chevenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing small pitch transition-edge sensor (TES) X-ray detectors optimized for solar astronomy. These devices are fabricated on thick Si substrates with embedded Cu heat-sink layer. We use 35 x 35 square micrometers Mo/Au TESs with 4.5 micrometer thick Au absorbers. We have tested devices with different geometric absorber stem contact areas with the TES and surrounding substrate area. This allows us to investigate the loss of athermal phonons to the substrate. Results show a correlation between thc stem contact area and a broadening in the spectral line shape indicative of athermal phonon loss. When the contact area is minimized we have obtained exceptional broadband spectral resolution of 1.28 plus or minus 0.03 eV at an energy of 1.5 keV, 1.58 plus or minus 0.07 eV at 5.9 keV and 1.96 plus or minus 0.08 eV at 8 keV. The linearity in the measured gain scale is understood in the context of the longitudinal proximity effect from the electrical bias leads resulting in transition characteristics that are strongly dependent upon TES size.

  3. High Broadband Spectral Resolving Transition-Edge Sensors for High Count-Rate Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We are developing arrays of transition-edge sensor (TES) X-ray detectors optimized for high count-rate solar astronomy applications where characterizing the high velocity motions of X-ray jets in solar flares is of particular interest. These devices are fabricated on thick Si substrates and consist of 35x35micron^2 TESs with 4.5micron thick, 60micron pitch, electroplated absorbers. We have tested devices fabricated with different geometric stem contact areas with the TES and surrounding substrate area, which allows us to investigate the loss of athermal phonons to the substrate. Results show a correlation between the stem contact area and a non-Gaussian broadening in the spectral line shape consistent with athermal phonon loss. When the contact area is minimized we have obtained remarkable board-band spectral resolving capabilities of 1.3 plus or minus 0.leV at an energy of 1.5 keV, 1.6 plus or minus 0.1 eV at 5.9 keV and 2.0 plus or minus 0.1 eV at 8 keV. This, coupled with a capability of accommodating 100's of counts per second per pixel makes these devices an exciting prospect of future x-ray astronomy applications.

  4. Estimation of ground range on the sweep frequency backscatter leading edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Fanfan; Zhao, Zhengyu; Deng, Feng; Li, Shipeng

    2011-04-01

    The high frequency management system with backscatter radar supplies the real time ionosphere channel conditions to high frequency users, which leads to the demand for the ground range between the radar location and the scatters on the distant ground. The ionosphere electron density profile is usually inversed to obtain the ground range. An inversion algorithm, with which the ground range on the leading edge of the backscatter ionograms can be obtained without electron density, is presented in this paper. The ray path geometry of the backscatter sounding and the change in the group path on the leading edge with operating frequency are used to derive the ground range. Synthesized backscatter ionogram and experimental backscatter ionograms are processed to validate the algorithm. The results indicate that the algorithm is usable for high frequency management system.

  5. A frequency selective bolometer camera for measuring millimeter spectral energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Daniel William

    2009-06-01

    Bolometers are the most sensitive detectors for measuring millimeter and submillimeter wavelength astrophysical signals. Cameras comprised of arrays of bolometers have already made significant contributions to the field of astronomy. A challenge for bolometer cameras is obtaining observations at multiple wavelengths. Traditionally, observing in multiple bands requires a partial disassembly of the instrument to replace bandpass filters, a task which prevents immediate spectral interrogation of a source. More complex cameras have been constructed to observe in several bands using beam splitters and dichroic filters, but the added complexity leads to physically larger instruments with reduced efficiencies. The SPEctral Energy Distribution camera (SPEED) is a new type of bolometer camera designed to efficiently observe in multiple wavebands without the need for excess bandpass filters and beam splitters. SPEED is a ground-based millimeter-wave bolometer camera designed to observe at 2.1, 1.3, 1.1, and 0.85 mm simultaneously. SPEED makes use of a new type of bolometer, the frequency selective bolometer (FSB), to observe all of the wavebands within each of the camera's four pixels. FSBs incorporate frequency selective dipole surfaces as absorbing elements allowing each detector to absorb a single, narrow band of radiation and pass all other radiation with low loss. Each FSB also contains a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) that acts as a sensitive thermistor for measuring the temperature of the FSB. This thesis describes the development of the SPEED camera and FSB detectors. The design of the detectors used in the instrument is described as well as the the general optical performance of frequency selective dipole surfaces. Laboratory results of both the optical and thermal properties of millimeter- wave FSBs are also presented. The SPEED instrument and its components are highlighted and the optical design of the optics which couple SPEED to the Heinrich Hertz

  6. Frequency-domain readout multiplexing of transition-edge sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanting, T. M.; Arnold, K.; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Clarke, John; Dobbs, Matt; Holzapfel, William; Lee, Adrian T.; Lueker, M.; Richards, P. L.; Smith, A. D.; Spieler, H. G.

    2006-04-01

    We have demonstrated frequency-domain readout multiplexing of eight channels for superconducting transition-edge sensor bolometer arrays. The multiplexed readout noise is 6.5 pA/√Hz, well below the bolometer dark noise of 15-20 pA/√Hz. We measure an upper limit on crosstalk of 0.004 between channels adjacent in frequency which meets our design requirement of 0.01. We have observed vibration insensitivity in our frequency-domain multiplexed transition-edge sensors, making this system very attractive for telescope and satellite observations. We also discuss extensions to our multiplexed readout. In particular, we are developing a SQUID flux-locked loop that is entirely cold and collaborating on digital multiplexer technology in order to scale up the number of multiplexed channels.

  7. Frequency doubling of fiber laser radiation of large spectral bandwidths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyga, Sebastian; Geiger, Jens; Jungbluth, Bernd

    2010-02-01

    In this work the reduction of conversion efficiency due to spectral bandwidth of fiber laser radiation is investigated. Subsequently, compensation optics to correct the spectral phase mismatching inside the nonlinear crystal is dimensioned and tested. For the experimental study a laboratory fiber laser setup is used consisting of a seed diode and a three stage fiber amplifier. The laser delivers an average output power of up to 100 W at 1 MHz. Even below the Raman threshold the output is far away from Fourier limit, providing a nearly Lorentzian spectral shape and a temporal pulse width of 800 ps. As the bandwidth increases nearly linearly with the pump power of the third amplifier stage, this parameter could be controlled for the experiments. All conversion experiments are conducted with a moderate load of the nonlinear crystals, i.e. intensity less than 150 MW/cm2. Without compensation of the spectral phase mismatch, a maximum conversion efficiency of 15 % is attained for a Type I configuration with a 20mm long LBO crystal. Using the compensation setup 27 W of green light are obtained from 60 W infrared light at a bandwidth of 4.7 nm. Therefore the efficiency rises to 44% at the same load.

  8. Comparative analysis of spectral coherence in microresonator frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Torres-Company, Victor; Castelló-Lurbe, David; Silvestre, Enrique

    2014-02-24

    Microresonator combs exploit parametric oscillation and nonlinear mixing in an ultrahigh-Q cavity. This new comb generator offers unique potential for chip integration and access to high repetition rates. However, time-domain studies reveal an intricate spectral coherence behavior in this type of platform. In particular, coherent, partially coherent or incoherent combs have been observed using the same microresonator under different pumping conditions. In this work, we provide a numerical analysis of the coherence dynamics that supports the above experimental findings and verify particular design rules to achieve spectrally coherent microresonator combs. A particular emphasis is placed in understanding the differences between so-called Type I and Type II combs. PMID:24663786

  9. Analysis of nonlinear frequency mixing in 1D waveguides with a breathing crack using the spectral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2015-11-01

    A breathing crack, due to its bilinear stiffness characteristics, modifies the frequency spectrum of a propagating dual-frequency elastic wave, and gives rise to sidebands around the probing frequency. This paper presents an analytical-numerical method to investigate such nonlinear frequency mixing resulting from the modulation effects induced by a breathing crack in 1D waveguides, such as axial rods and the Euler-Bernoulli beams. A transverse edge-crack is assumed to be present in both the waveguides, and the local flexibility caused by the crack is modeled using an equivalent spring approach. A simultaneous treatment of both the waveguides, in the framework of the Fourier transform based spectral finite element method, is presented for analyzing their response to a dual frequency excitation applied in the form of a tone-burst signal. The intermittent contact between the crack surfaces is accounted for by introducing bilinear contact forces acting at the nodes of the damage spectral element. Subsequently, an iterative approach is outlined for solving the resulting system of nonlinear simultaneous equations. Applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by considering several test cases. The existence of sidebands and the higher order harmonics is confirmed in the frequency domain response of both the waveguides under investigation. A qualitative comparison with the previous experimental observations accentuates the utility of the proposed solution method. Additionally, the influence of the two constituent frequencies in the dual frequency excitation is assessed by varying the relative strengths of their amplitudes. A brief parametric study is performed for bringing out the effects of the relative crack depth and crack location on the degree of modulation, which is quantified in terms of the modulation parameter. Results of the present investigation can find their potential use in providing an analytical-numerical support to the studies geared towards the

  10. Edge pinch instability of liquid metal sheet in a transverse high-frequency ac magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Priede, Jānis; Etay, Jacqueline; Fautrelle, Yves

    2006-06-01

    We analyze the linear stability of the edge of a thin liquid metal layer subject to a transverse high-frequency ac magnetic field. The layer is treated as a perfectly conducting liquid sheet that allows us to solve the problem analytically for both a semi-infinite geometry with a straight edge and a thin disk of finite radius. It is shown that the long-wave perturbations of a straight edge are monotonically unstable when the wave number exceeds the critical value k(c) = F0/(gamma l0), which is determined by the linear density of the electromagnetic force F0 acting on the edge, the surface tension gamma, and the effective arclength of edge thickness l0. Perturbations with wavelength shorter than critical are stabilized by the surface tension, whereas the growth rate of long-wave perturbations reduces as similar to k for k --> 0. Thus, there is the fastest growing perturbation with the wave number k max = 2/3 k(c). When the layer is arranged vertically, long-wave perturbations are stabilized by the gravity, and the critical perturbation is characterized by the capillary wave number k(c) = square root of (g rho/gamma), where g is the acceleration due to gravity and rho is the density of metal. In this case, the critical linear density of electromagnetic force is F(0,c) = 2k(c)l0 gamma, which corresponds to the critical current amplitude I(0,c) = 4 square root of (pi k(c) l0L gamma/mu 0) when the magnetic field is generated by a straight wire at the distance L directly above the edge. By applying the general approach developed for the semi-infinite sheet, we find that a circular disk of radius R0 placed in a transverse uniform high-frequency ac magnetic field with the induction amplitude B0 becomes linearly unstable with respect to exponentially growing perturbation with the azimuthal wave number m = 2 when the magnetic Bond number exceeds Bm(c) = B(0)2 R(0)2 / (2 mu 0 l0 gamma) = 3 pi. For Bm > Bm(c), the wave number of the fastest growing perturbation is m(max) = [2

  11. Self-similar spectral structures and edge-locking hierarchy in open-boundary spin chains

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Masudul

    2010-07-15

    For an anisotropic Heisenberg (XXZ) spin chain, we show that an open boundary induces a series of approximately self-similar features at different energy scales, high up in the eigenvalue spectrum. We present a nonequilibrium phenomenon related to this fractal structure, involving states in which a connected block near the edge is polarized oppositely to the rest of the chain. We show that such oppositely polarized blocks can be 'locked' to the edge of the spin chain and that there is a hierarchy of edge-locking effects at various orders of the anisotropy. The phenomenon enables dramatic control of quantum-state transmission and magnetization control.

  12. Multi-frequency and edge localized modes in mechanical and electrical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Lars; Palmero, Faustino; Kevrekidis, Panayotis

    We present experimental evidence for the existence of a type of dynamical, self-localized mode called a multi-frequency breather in both a mechanical lattice of pendula and an electrical lattice. These modes were excited and stabilized by subharmonic driving. We also experimentally characterize dynamical modes that are localized on the edges of the pendulum chain, as well as in 2D electrical lattices. In the latter system, we briefly discuss the role of lattice topology in the stability of such modes.

  13. Terahertz-frequency waveguide HEB mixers for spectral line astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussaha, Faouzi; Kawamura, Jonathan; Stern, Jeffery; Jung, Cecile; Skalare, Anders; White, Victor

    2012-09-01

    We report on the development of waveguide-based mixers for operation beyond 2 THz. The mixer element is a superconducting hot-electron bolometer (HEB) fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. Because it is beyond the capability of conventional machining techniques to produce the fine structures required for the waveguide embedding circuit for use at such high frequencies, we employ two lithography-based approaches to produce the waveguide circuit: a metallic micro-plating process akin to 3-D printing and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) silicon micromachining. Various mixer configurations have been successfully produced using these approaches. A single-ended mixer produced by the metal plating technique has been demonstrated with a receiver noise temperature of 970 K (DSB) at a localoscillator frequency of 2.74 THz. A similar mixer, produced using a silicon-based micro-machining technique, has a noise temperature of 2000 K (DSB) at 2.56 THz. In another example, we have successfully produced a waveguide RF hybrid for operation at 2.74 THz. This is a key component in a balanced mixer, a configuration that efficiently utilizes local oscillator power, which is scarce at these frequencies. In addition to allowing us to extend the frequency of operation of waveguide-based receivers beyond 2 THz, these technologies we employ here are amenable to the production of large array receivers, where numerous copies of the same circuit, precisely the same and aligned to each other, are required.

  14. Etalon of optical frequency for the telecommunication spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Josef; Ruzicka, Bohdan; Cip, Ondrej

    2004-09-01

    We present a design of a stabilized laser system, an etalon of the optical frequency at the 1.5 μm band following the demands of the telecommunication industry in the Czech Republic. Our laser system employs a DFB laser diode in a two stage fully digital stabilizing scheme. The linear absorption arrangement with an acetylene filled absorption cell of a pressure about 1 kPa is used to lock the laser to the Doppler-broadened lines. To achieve a reliable and robust stabilization of the laser frequency we arranged a two-loop digital servo-system overcoming the problem of a narrow locking range of the detected transition. The wavelength of the laser is modulated by current and the servo-control and tuning is performed by a fast and precise thermal control. To achieve the resolution of the weak sub-Doppler transitions we assembled a locking scheme via frequency-modulation spectroscopy to the high finesse cavity. The system is assembled using predominantly fibre-optic components. A technology of acetylene absorption cells with AR coated windows is presented as well.

  15. Technological aspects of frequency domain data storage using persistent spectral hole burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberg, F. M.; Lenth, W.; Bjorklund, G. C.

    1986-09-01

    Persistent spectral hole burning permits use of optical frequency for encoding digital information at cryogenic temperatures, with storage densities far beyond the limits of conventional laser-disk recording. In the work presented here, several key technological issues of such a storage system have been investigated. Data were encoded with high spatial and spectral resolution using a specially designed cryostat. The fast tuning characteristics of semiconductor diode lasers were studied to test the feasibility of fast data access in the frequency domain. Fast readout was investigated in a simulation experiment using heterodyne detection with frequency modulated diode lasers.

  16. High-frequency spectral distribution of the equilibrium radiation energy in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, V. B.; Trigger, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    We establish that the difference of the spectral distribution of the equilibrium radiation energy in matter from the Planck formula in the high-frequency range is determined by the imaginary part of the transverse dielectric permittivity of the matter. Based on this, we show that in a rarified high-temperature fully ionized nonrelativistic plasma, the high-frequency spectral distribution of the equilibrium radiation energy differs essentially from the Planck formula because of the power-law character of the decrease in the frequency, which is due to the presence of matter.

  17. Unravelling remote sensing signatures of plants contaminated with gasoline and diesel: an approach using the red edge spectral feature.

    PubMed

    Sanches, I D; Souza Filho, C R; Magalhães, L A; Quitério, G C M; Alves, M N; Oliveira, W J

    2013-03-01

    Pipeline systems used to transport petroleum products represent a potential source of soil pollution worldwide. The design of new techniques that may improve current monitoring of pipeline leakage is imperative. This paper assesses the remote detection of small leakages of liquid hydrocarbons indirectly, through the analysis of spectral features of contaminated plants. Leaf and canopy spectra of healthy plants were compared to spectra of plants contaminated with diesel and gasoline, at increasing rates of soil contamination. Contamination effects were observed both visually in the field and thorough changes in the spectral reflectance patterns of vegetation. Results indicate that the remote detection of small volumes of gasoline and diesel contaminations is feasible based on the red edge analysis of leaf and canopy spectra of plants. Brachiaria grass ranks as a favourable choice to be used as an indicator of HCs leakages along pipelines. PMID:23246622

  18. Finite Frequency Upper Mantle Tomography Using the Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekic, V.; Romanowicz, B.

    2007-12-01

    In the past quarter century, global tomography based on ray theory and first-order perturbation methods has imaged long-wavelength velocity heterogeneities of the Earth's mantle. While these models have contributed significantly to our understanding of mantle circulation, the development of higher resolution images of the Earth's interior holds tremendous promise for understanding the nature of the observed heterogeneities. This endeavor confronts us with two challenges. First, it requires extracting a far greater amount of information from the available seismograms than is generally used. Second, the approximate techniques upon which global tomographers have traditionally relied become inadequate when dealing with short-wavelength heterogeneity. We have developed a novel hybrid approach to long-period waveform tomography in which forward-modeling is performed using the Coupled Spectral Element Method (CSEM: Capdeville et al., 2003), which can accurately model seismic wave propagation in a 3D earth with both short and long wavelength structure, while in the inversion step, the sensitivity kernels are calculated using an approximate, non-linear normal mode summation approach (NACT: Li and Romanowicz, 1995). Our dataset consists of complete 3-component time domain seismograms filtered at periods greater than 80 s for 100 earthquakes observed at well over 100 stations of the IRIS/GSN, GEOSCOPE, GEOFON and various regional broadband networks. Modeling is performed in an iterative fashion, and convergence is achieved as long as the sign of the sensitivity kernels is correct. A further advantage of this hybrid approach is that it allows us - for the first time in global tomography - to accurately account for the effects of crustal structure on the observed seismograms. We illustrate these effects and the consequences of common assumptions such as linear crustal corrections. We present a preliminary model of velocity and radial anisotropy variations in the upper 800 km of

  19. Vegetation Red-edge Spectral Modeling for Solar-induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Retrieval at O2-B Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Zhang, L.; Qiao, N.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Remotely sensed solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) has been considered an ideal probe in monitoring global vegetation photosynthesis. However, challenges in accurate estimate of faint SIF (less than 5% of the total reflected radiation in near infrared bands) from the observed apparent reflected radiation greatly limit its wide applications. Currently, the telluric O2-B (~688nm) and O2-A (~761nm) have been proved to be capable of SIF retrieval based on Fraunhofer line depth (FLD) principle. They may still work well even using conventional ground-based commercial spectrometers with typical spectral resolutions of 2~5 nm and high enough signal-to-noise ratio (e.g., the ASD spectrometer). Nevertheless, almost all current FLD based algorithms were mainly developed for O2-A, a few concentrating on the other SIF emission peak in O2-B. One of the critical reasons is that it is very difficult to model the sudden varying reflectance around O2-B band located in the red-edge spectral region (about 680-800 nm). This study investigates a new method by combining the established inverted Gaussian reflectance model (IGM) and FLD principle using diurnal canopy spectra with relative low spectral resolutions of 1 nm (FluorMOD simulations) and 3 nm (measured by ASD spectrometer) respectively. The IGM has been reported to be an objective and good method to characterize the entire vegetation red-edge reflectance. Consequently, the proposed SIF retrieval method (hereinafter called IGMFLD) could exploit all the spectral information along the whole red-edge (680-800 nm) to obtain more reasonable reflectance and fluorescence correction coefficients than traditional FLD methods such as the iFLD. Initial results show that the IGMFLD can better capture the spectrally non-linear characterization of the reflectance in 680-800 nm and thereby yields much more accurate SIFs in O2-B than typical FLD methods, including sFLD, 3FLD and iFLD (see figure 1). Finally, uncertainties and prospect

  20. Fokker-Planck description of the scattering of radio frequency waves at the plasma edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Kominis, Yannis; Tsironis, Christos; Ram, Abhay K.

    2010-02-15

    In magnetic fusion devices, radio frequency (rf) waves in the electron cyclotron (EC) and lower hybrid (LH) range of frequencies are being commonly used to modify the plasma current profile. In ITER, EC waves are expected to stabilize the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) by providing current in the island region [R. Aymar et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The appearance of NTMs severely limits the plasma pressure and leads to the degradation of plasma confinement. LH waves could be used in ITER to modify the current profile closer to the edge of the plasma. These rf waves propagate from the excitation structures to the core of the plasma through an edge region, which is characterized by turbulence--in particular, density fluctuations. These fluctuations, in the form of blobs, can modify the propagation properties of the waves by refraction. In this paper, the effect on rf due to randomly distributed blobs in the edge region is studied. The waves are represented as geometric optics rays and the refractive scattering from a distribution of blobs is formulated as a Fokker-Planck equation. The scattering can have two diffusive effects--one in real space and the other in wave vector space. The scattering can modify the trajectory of rays into the plasma and it can affect the wave vector spectrum. The refraction of EC waves, for example, could make them miss the intended target region where the NTMs occur. The broadening of the wave vector spectrum could broaden the wave generated current profile. The Fokker-Planck formalism for diffusion in real space and wave vector space is used to study the effect of density blobs on EC and LH waves in an ITER type of plasma environment. For EC waves the refractive effects become important since the distance of propagation from the edge to the core in ITER is of the order of a meter. The diffusion in wave vector space is small. For LH waves the refractive effects are insignificant but the diffusion in wave vector space is

  1. Spectral quantum beating in mixed frequency/time-domain coherent multidimensional spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pakoulev, Andrei V; Rickard, Mark A; Mathew, Nathan A; Kornau, Kathryn M; Wright, John C

    2007-08-01

    Coherent multidimensional spectroscopy performed in the mixed frequency/time domain exhibits both temporal and spectral quantum beating when two quantum states are simultaneously excited. The excitation of both quantum states can occur because either the spectral width of the states or the excitation pulse exceeds the frequency separation of the quantum states. The quantum beating appears as a line that broadens and splits into two peaks and then recombines as the time delay between excitation pulses increases. The splitting depends on the spectral width of the excitation pulses. We observe the spectral quantum beating between the two nearly degenerate asymmetric carbonyl stretch modes in a nickel tricarbonyl chelate using the nonrephasing, ground state bleaching coherence pathway in triply vibrationally enhanced four-wave mixing as the time delay between the first two excitation pulses changes. PMID:17628051

  2. Frequency-domain prediction of broadband trailing edge noise from a blunt flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwang-Se; Cheong, Cheolung

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to develop an efficient methodology for frequency-domain prediction of broadband trailing edge noise from a blunt flat plate where non-zero pressure gradient may exist in its boundary layer. This is achieved in two ways: (i) by developing new models for point pressure spectra within the boundary layer over a flat plate, and (ii) by deriving a simple formula to approximate the effect of convective velocity on the radiated noise spectrum. Firstly, two types of point pressure spectra-required as input data to predict the trailing edge noise in the frequency domain-are used. One is determined using the semi-analytic (S-A) models based on the boundary-layer theory combined with existing empirical models. It is shown that the prediction using these models show good agreements with the measurements where zero-pressure gradient assumption is valid. However, the prediction show poor agreement with that obtained from large eddy simulation results where negative (favorable) pressure gradient is observed with the boundary layer. Based on boundary layer characteristics predicted using the large eddy simulations, new model for point wall pressure spectra is proposed to account for the effect of favorable pressure gradient over the blunt flat plate on the wall pressure spectra. Sound spectra that were predicted using these models are compared with measurements to validate the proposed prediction scheme. The advantage of the semi-analytic model is that it can be applied to problems at Reynolds numbers for which the empirical model is not available. In addition, it is expected that the current models can be applied to the cases where favorable pressure gradient exists in the boundary layer over a blunt flat plate. Secondly, in order to quantitatively analyze contributions of the pressure field within the turbulent boundary layer on the flat plate to trailing edge noise, total pressure over the surface of airfoil is decomposed into its two constituents

  3. Impact of High-Frequency Spectral Phase Modulation on the Temporal Profile of Short Optical Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrer, C.; Bromage, J.

    2008-03-18

    The impact of high-frequency spectral phase modulation on the temporal intensity of optical pulses is derived analytically and simulated in two different regimes. The temporal contrast of an optical pulse close to the Fourier-transform limit is degraded by a pedestal related to the power spectral density of the spectral phase modulation. When the optical pulse is highly chirped, its intensity modulation is directly related to the spectral phase variations with a transfer function depending on the second-order dispersion of the chirped pulse. The metrology of the spectral phase of an optical pulse using temporal-intensity measurements performed after chirping the pulse is studied. The effect of spatial averaging is also discussed.

  4. Recognition of temporally interrupted and spectrally degraded sentences with additional unprocessed low-frequency speech

    PubMed Central

    Başkent, Deniz; Chatterjee, Monita

    2010-01-01

    Recognition of periodically interrupted sentences (with an interruption rate of 1.5 Hz, 50% duty cycle) was investigated under conditions of spectral degradation, implemented with a noiseband vocoder, with and without additional unprocessed low-pass filtered speech (cutoff frequency 500 Hz). Intelligibility of interrupted speech decreased with increasing spectral degradation. For all spectral-degradation conditions, however, adding the unprocessed low-pass filtered speech enhanced the intelligibility. The improvement at 4 and 8 channels was higher than the improvement at 16 and 32 channels: 19% and 8%, on average, respectively. The Articulation Index predicted an improvement of 0.09, in a scale from 0 to 1. Thus, the improvement at poorest spectral-degradation conditions was larger than what would be expected from additional speech information. Therefore, the results implied that the fine temporal cues from the unprocessed low-frequency speech, such as the additional voice pitch cues, helped perceptual integration of temporally interrupted and spectrally degraded speech, especially when the spectral degradations were severe. Considering the vocoder processing as a cochlear-implant simulation, where implant users’ performance is closest to 4 and 8-channel vocoder performance, the results support additional benefit of low-frequency acoustic input in combined electric-acoustic stimulation for perception of temporally degraded speech. PMID:20817081

  5. Tuning of Kilopixel Transition Edge Sensor Bolometer Arrays with a Digital Frequency Multiplexed Readout System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDermid, Kevin; Hyland, Peter; Aubin, Francois; Bissonnette, Eric; Dobbs, Matt; Hubmayr, Johannes; Smecher, Graeme; Wairrach, Shahjahen

    2009-12-01

    A digital frequency multiplexing (DfMUX) system has been developed and used to tune large arrays of transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers read out with SQUID arrays for mm-wavelength cosmology telescopes. The DfMUX system multiplexes the input bias voltages and output currents for several bolometers on a single set of cryogenic wires. Multiplexing reduces the heat load on the camera's sub-Kelvin cryogenic detector stage. In this paper we describe the algorithms and software used to set up and optimize the operation of the bolometric camera. The algorithms are implemented on soft processors embedded within FPGA devices operating on each backend readout board. The result is a fully parallelized implementation for which the setup time is independent of the array size.

  6. Odd-frequency triplet superconductivity at the helical edge of a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crépin, François; Burset, Pablo; Trauzettel, Björn

    2015-09-01

    Nonlocal pairing processes at the edge of a two-dimensional topological insulator in proximity to an s -wave superconductor are usually suppressed by helicity. However, the additional proximity of a ferromagnetic insulator can substantially influence the helical constraint and therefore open a new conduction channel by allowing for crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) processes. We show a one-to-one correspondence between CAR and the emergence of odd-frequency triplet superconductivity. Hence, nonlocal transport experiments that identify CAR in helical liquids yield smoking-gun evidence for unconventional superconductivity. Interestingly, we identify a setup—composed of a superconductor flanked by two ferromagnetic insulators—that allows us to favor CAR over electron cotunneling, which is known to be a difficult but essential task to be able to measure CAR.

  7. Gate line edge roughness amplitude and frequency variation effects on intra die MOS device characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadeh, Emad; Gunther, Norman G.; Niemann, Darrell; Rahman, Mahmud

    2006-06-01

    Random fluctuations in fabrication process outcomes such as gate line edge roughness (LER) give rise to corresponding fluctuations in scaled down MOS device characteristics. A thermodynamic-variational model is presented to study the effects of LER on threshold voltage and capacitance of sub-50 nm MOS devices. Conceptually, we treat the geometric definition of the MOS devices on a die as consisting of a collection of gates. In turn, each of these gates has an area, A, and a perimeter, P, defined by nominally straight lines subject to random process outcomes producing roughness. We treat roughness as being deviations from straightness consisting of both transverse amplitude and longitudinal wavelength each having lognormal distribution. We obtain closed-form expressions for variance of threshold voltage ( Vth), and device capacitance ( C) at Onset of Strong Inversion (OSI) for a small device. Using our variational model, we characterized the device electrical properties such as σ and σC in terms of the statistical parameters of the roughness amplitude and spatial frequency, i.e., inverse roughness wavelength. We then verified our model with numerical analysis of Vth roll-off for small devices and σ due to dopant fluctuation. Our model was also benchmarked against TCAD of σ as a function of LER. We then extended our analysis to predict variations in σ and σC versus average LER spatial frequency and amplitude, and oxide-thickness. Given the intuitive expectation that LER of very short wavelengths must also have small amplitude, we have investigated the case in which the amplitude mean is inversely related to the frequency mean. We compare with the situation in which amplitude and frequency mean are unrelated. Given also that the gate perimeter may consist of different LER signature for each side, we have extended our analysis to the case when the LER statistical difference between gate sides is moderate, as well as when it is significantly large.

  8. Spectral Gap and Edge Excitations of d-Dimensional PVBS Models on Half-Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Michael; Nachtergaele, Bruno; Young, Amanda

    2016-03-01

    We analyze a class of quantum spin models defined on half-spaces in the d-dimensional hypercubic lattice bounded by a hyperplane with inward unit normal vector min {R}^d. The family of models was previously introduced as the single species Product Vacua with Boundary States (PVBS) model, which is a spin-1/2 model with a XXZ-type nearest neighbor interactions depending on parameters λ _jin (0,∞), one for each coordinate direction. For any given values of the parameters, we prove an upper bound for the spectral gap above the unique ground state of these models, which vanishes for exactly one direction of the normal vector m. For all other choices of m we derive a positive lower bound of the spectral gap, except for the case λ _1 =\\cdots =λ _d=1, which is known to have gapless excitations in the bulk.

  9. Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2009-01-01

    The ARM Shortwave Spectrometer (SWS) measures zenith radiance at 418 wavelengths between 350 and 2170 nm. Because of its 1-sec sampling resolution, the SWS provides a unique capability to study the transition zone between cloudy and clear sky areas. A spectral invariant behavior is found between ratios of zenith radiance spectra during the transition from cloudy to cloud-free. This behavior suggests that the spectral signature of the transition zone is a linear mixture between the two extremes (definitely cloudy and definitely clear). The weighting function of the linear mixture is a wavelength-independent characteristic of the transition zone. It is shown that the transition zone spectrum is fully determined by this function and zenith radiance spectra of clear and cloudy regions. An important result of these discoveries is that high temporal resolution radiance measurements in the clear-to-cloud transition zone can be well approximated by lower temporal resolution measurements plus linear interpolation.

  10. Fourier-spectral element approximation of the ion-electron Braginskii system with application to tokamak edge plasma in divertor configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minjeaud, Sebastian; Pasquetti, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Due to the extreme conditions required to produce energy by nuclear fusion in tokamaks, simulating the plasma behavior is an important but challenging task. We focus on the edge part of the plasma, where fluid approaches are probably the best suited, and our approach relies on the Braginskii ion-electron model. Assuming that the electric field is electrostatic, this yields a set of 10 strongly coupled and non-linear conservation equations that exhibit multiscale and anisotropy features. The computational domain is a torus of complex geometrical section, that corresponds to the divertor configuration, i.e. with an "X-point" in the magnetic surfaces. To capture the complex physics that is involved, high order methods are used: The time-discretization is based on a Strang splitting, that combines implicit and explicit high order Runge-Kutta schemes, and the space discretization makes use of the spectral element method in the poloidal plane together with Fourier expansions in the toroidal direction. The paper thoroughly describes the algorithms that have been developed, provides some numerical validations of the key algorithms and exhibits the results of preliminary numerical experiments. In particular, we point out that the highest frequency of the system is intermediate between the ion and electron cyclotron frequencies.

  11. Frequency Selective Surfaces as Near Infrared Electro-Magnetic Filters for Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect

    RF Kristensen; JF Beausang; DM DePoy

    2004-06-28

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSS) effectively filter electromagnetic radiation in the microwave band (1 mm to 100 mm). Interest exists in extending this technology to the near infrared (1 {micro}m to 10 {micro}m) for use as a filter of thermal radiation in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion. This paper assesses the ability of FSS to meet the strict spectral performance requirements of a TPV system. Inherent parasitic absorption, which is the result of the induced currents in the FSS metallization, is identified as a significant obstacle to achieving high spectral performance.

  12. Frequency Selective Surfaces as Near Infrared Electro-Magnetic Filters for Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan T. Kristensen; John F. Beausang; David M. DePoy

    2003-12-01

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSS) effectively filter electromagnetic radiation in the microwave band (1mm to 100mm). Interest exists in extending this technology to the near infrared (1 {micro}m to 10 {micro}m) for use as a filter of thermal radiation in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion. This paper assesses the ability of FSS to meet the strict spectral performance requirements of a TPV system. Inherent parasitic absorption, which is the result of the induced currents in the FSS metallization, is identified as a significant obstacle to achieving high spectral performance.

  13. Mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio-frequency sheath potentials on edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Gui, B.; Xu, X. Q.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2014-11-15

    The mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio frequency (RF) sheath potentials on the peeling-ballooning modes is studied non-linearly by employing a two-fluid three-field simulation model based on the BOUT++ framework. Additional shear flow and the Kelvin-Helmholtz effect due to the thermal and rectified RF sheath potential are induced. It is found that the shear flow increases the growth rate while the K-H effect decreases the growth rate slightly when there is a density gradient, but the energy loss of these cases is suppressed in the nonlinear phase. The stronger external electrostatic field due to the sheaths has a more significant effect on the energy loss suppression. From this study, it is found the growth rate in the linear phase mainly determines the onset of edge-localized modes, while the mode spectrum width in the nonlinear phase has an important impact on the turbulent transport. The wider mode spectrum leads to weaker turbulent transport and results in a smaller energy loss. Due to the thermal sheath and rectified RF sheath potential in the scrape-off-layer, the modified shear flow tears apart the peeling-ballooning filament and makes the mode spectrum wider, resulting in less energy loss. The perturbed electric potential and the parallel current near the sheath region is also suppressed locally due to the sheath boundary condition.

  14. Mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio-frequency sheath potentials on edge localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, B.; Xu, X. Q.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2014-11-01

    The mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio frequency (RF) sheath potentials on the peeling-ballooning modes is studied non-linearly by employing a two-fluid three-field simulation model based on the BOUT++ framework. Additional shear flow and the Kelvin-Helmholtz effect due to the thermal and rectified RF sheath potential are induced. It is found that the shear flow increases the growth rate while the K-H effect decreases the growth rate slightly when there is a density gradient, but the energy loss of these cases is suppressed in the nonlinear phase. The stronger external electrostatic field due to the sheaths has a more significant effect on the energy loss suppression. From this study, it is found the growth rate in the linear phase mainly determines the onset of edge-localized modes, while the mode spectrum width in the nonlinear phase has an important impact on the turbulent transport. The wider mode spectrum leads to weaker turbulent transport and results in a smaller energy loss. Due to the thermal sheath and rectified RF sheath potential in the scrape-off-layer, the modified shear flow tears apart the peeling-ballooning filament and makes the mode spectrum wider, resulting in less energy loss. The perturbed electric potential and the parallel current near the sheath region is also suppressed locally due to the sheath boundary condition.

  15. The Lockman Hole project: LOFAR observations and spectral index properties of low-frequency radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, E. K.; Morganti, R.; Prandoni, I.; van Bemmel, I. M.; Shimwell, T. W.; Brienza, M.; Best, P. N.; Brüggen, M.; Rivera, G. Calistro; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Harwood, J. J.; Heald, G.; Jarvis, M. J.; Mandal, S.; Miley, G. K.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Sabater, J.; Tasse, C.; van Velzen, S.; van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; White, G. J.

    2016-09-01

    The Lockman Hole is a well-studied extragalactic field with extensive multi-band ancillary data covering a wide range in frequency, essential for characterising the physical and evolutionary properties of the various source populations detected in deep radio fields (mainly star-forming galaxies and AGNs). In this paper we present new 150-MHz observations carried out with the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR), allowing us to explore a new spectral window for the faint radio source population. This 150-MHz image covers an area of 34.7 square degrees with a resolution of 18.6×14.7 arcsec and reaches an rms of 160 μJy beam-1 at the centre of the field. As expected for a low-frequency selected sample, the vast majority of sources exhibit steep spectra, with a median spectral index of α _{150}^{1400}=-0.78± 0.015. The median spectral index becomes slightly flatter (increasing from α _{150}^{1400}=-0.84 to α _{150}^{1400}=-0.75) with decreasing flux density down to S150 ˜10 mJy before flattening out and remaining constant below this flux level. For a bright subset of the 150-MHz selected sample we can trace the spectral properties down to lower frequencies using 60-MHz LOFAR observations, finding tentative evidence for sources to become flatter in spectrum between 60 and 150 MHz. Using the deep, multi-frequency data available in the Lockman Hole, we identify a sample of 100 Ultra-steep spectrum (USS) sources and 13 peaked spectrum sources. We estimate that up to 21 per cent of these could have z > 4 and are candidate high-z radio galaxies, but further follow-up observations are required to confirm the physical nature of these objects.

  16. Spectral filtering of gradient for l2-norm frequency-domain elastic waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ju-Won; Min, Dong-Joo

    2013-05-01

    To enhance the robustness of the l2-norm elastic full-waveform inversion (FWI), we propose a denoise function that is incorporated into single-frequency gradients. Because field data are noisy and modelled data are noise-free, the denoise function is designed based on the ratio of modelled data to field data summed over shots and receivers. We first take the sums of the modelled data and field data over shots, then take the sums of the absolute values of the resultant modelled data and field data over the receivers. Due to the monochromatic property of wavefields at each frequency, signals in both modelled and field data tend to be cancelled out or maintained, whereas certain types of noise, particularly random noise, can be amplified in field data. As a result, the spectral distribution of the denoise function is inversely proportional to the ratio of noise to signal at each frequency, which helps prevent the noise-dominant gradients from contributing to model parameter updates. Numerical examples show that the spectral distribution of the denoise function resembles a frequency filter that is determined by the spectrum of the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio during the inversion process, with little human intervention. The denoise function is applied to the elastic FWI of synthetic data, with three types of random noise generated by the modified version of the Marmousi-2 model: white, low-frequency and high-frequency random noises. Based on the spectrum of S/N ratios at each frequency, the denoise function mainly suppresses noise-dominant single-frequency gradients, which improves the inversion results at the cost of spatial resolution.

  17. Enhancing the resolution of non-stationary seismic data using improved time-frequency spectral modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huai-lai; Wang, Chang-cheng; Marfurt, Kurt J.; Jiang, Yi-wei; Bi, Jian-xia

    2016-04-01

    Maximizing vertical resolution is a key objective in seismic data processing. Early deconvolution and spectral balancing algorithms assumed that the seismic source wavelet was temporally invariant, or stationary. In practice, seismic scattering and attenuation give rise to non-stationary seismic source wavelets. To address this issue, most conventional time-varying deconvolution wavelet shaping and spectral modelling techniques using the stationary polynomial fitting assume the wavelet to be locally stationary within a small number of overlapping analysis windows while the fitting coefficients are invariant with all the frequencies. In this paper, we show an improvement obtained by modelling smoothly varying spectra of the seismic wavelet using non-stationary polynomial fitting in the time-frequency domain. We first decompose each seismic trace using a generalized S-transform that provides a good time-frequency distribution for the estimation of the time-varying wavelet spectra. We then model the slowly varying source wavelet spectrum at each time sample by a smooth low-order polynomial. Finally, we spectrally balance the modelled wavelet to flatten the seismic response, thereby increasing vertical resolution. We calibrate the algorithm on a simple synthetic and then apply it to a 3-D land survey acquired in western China, showing the value on both vertical slices through seismic amplitude and attribute time slices. Our new algorithm significantly improves the vertical resolution of the seismic signal, while not increasing the noise.

  18. Red-Edge Spectral Reflectance as an Indicator of Surface Moisture Content in an Alaskan Peatland Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPartland, M.; Kane, E. S.; Turetsky, M. R.; Douglass, T.; Falkowski, M. J.; Montgomery, R.; Edwards, J.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic and boreal peatlands serve as major reservoirs of terrestrial organic carbon (C) because Net Primary Productivity (NPP) outstrips C loss from decomposition over long periods of time. Peatland productivity varies as a function of water table position and surface moisture content, making C storage in these systems particularly vulnerable to the climate warming and drying predicted for high latitudes. Detailed spatial knowledge of how aboveground vegetation communities respond to changes in hydrology would allow for ecosystem response to environmental change to be measured at the landscape scale. This study leverages remotely sensed data along with field measurements taken at the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX) at the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research site to examine relationships between plant solar reflectance and surface moisture. APEX is a decade-long experiment investigating the effects of hydrologic change on peatland ecosystems using water table manipulation treatments (raised, lowered, and control). Water table levels were manipulated throughout the 2015 growing season, resulting in a maximum separation of 35 cm between raised and lowered treatment plots. Water table position, soil moisture content, depth to seasonal ice, soil temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), CO2 and CH4 fluxes were measured as predictors of C loss through decomposition and NPP. Vegetation was surveyed for percent cover of plant functional types. Remote sensing data was collected during peak growing season, when the separation between treatment plots was at maximum difference. Imagery was acquired via a SenseFly eBee airborne platform equipped with a Canon S110 red-edge camera capable of detecting spectral reflectance from plant tissue at 715 nm band center to within centimeters of spatial resolution. Here, we investigate empirical relationships between spectral reflectance, water table position, and surface moisture in relation to peat carbon balance.

  19. Time-frequency composition of mosquito flight tones obtained using Hilbert spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Aldersley, Andrew; Champneys, Alan; Homer, Martin; Robert, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Techniques for estimating temporal variation in the frequency content of acoustic tones based on short-time fast Fourier transforms are fundamentally limited by an inherent time-frequency trade-off. This paper presents an alternative methodology, based on Hilbert spectral analysis, which is not affected by this weakness, and applies it to the accurate estimation of mosquito wing beat frequencies. Mosquitoes are known to communicate with one another via the sounds generated by their flapping wings. Active frequency modulation between pairs of mosquitoes is thought to take place as a precursor to courtship. Studying the acoustically-based interactions of mosquitoes therefore relies on an accurate representation of flight frequency as a time-evolving property, yet conventional Fourier spectrograms are unable to capture the rapid modulations in frequency that mosquito flight tones exhibit. The algorithms introduced in this paper are able to automatically detect and extract fully temporally resolved frequency information from audio recordings. Application of the technique to experimental recordings of single tethered mosquitoes in flight reveals corroboration with previous reported findings. The advantages of the method for animal communication studies are discussed, with particular attention given to its potential utility for studying pairwise mosquito interactions. PMID:25324097

  20. Neuroimaging of speech recognition under conditions of spectral reduction and frequency upshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, C.-Y. Peter

    2003-04-01

    In the current study explored the cortical dynamics of speech recognition, given spectral reduction and frequency upshifts, using functional MRI. Subjects with normal hearing either rested or listened to speech under different conditions. In the 8-channel condition, natural speech was processed by an 8-channel sinewave vocoder to remove its fine spectral details [Shannon et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104, 2467 (1998)]. In the upshifted condition, the carrier center frequency of each of the 8 channels was further shifted upward in frequency from the corresponding analysis band by ``6 mm'' in cochlear frequency space [Fu and Shannon, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 1889 (1999)]. All subjects received a brief practice session with the speech stimuli prior to scanning. In Experiment 1, subjects listened to nonmonosyllabic words and pressed a key whenever they heard a concrete noun. In Experiment 2, subjects listened to high context sentences (SPIN) and pressed a key whenever they recognized all the words in a particular sentence. Preliminary data suggested that, compared to rest, all speech conditions evoked comparable activities in largely similar sets of bilateral superior temporal regions, with relatively minor differences between words and sentences. Activation appeared to be least diffuse in the natural speech condition.

  1. Spectral Decay Characteristics in High Frequency Range of Observed Records from Crustal Large Earthquakes (Part 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurugi, M.; Kagawa, T.; Irikura, K.

    2012-12-01

    Spectral decay characteristics in high frequency range of observed records from crustal large earthquakes occurred in Japan is examined. It is very important to make spectral decay characteristics clear in high frequency range for strong ground motion prediction in engineering purpose. The authors examined spectral decay characteristics in high frequency range of observed records among three events, the 2003 Miyagi-Ken Hokubu earthquake (Mw 6.1), the 2005 Fukuoka-Ken Seiho-oki earthquake (Mw 6.6), and the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake (Mw 6.9) in previous study [Tsurugi et al.(2010)]. Target earthquakes in this study are two events shown below. *EQ No.1 Origin time: 2011/04/11 17:16, Location of hypocenter: East of Fukushima pref., Mj: 7.0, Mw: 6.6, Fault type: Normal fault *EQ No.2 Origin time: 2011/03/15 22:31, Location of hypocenter: East of Shizuoka pref., Mj: 6.4, Mw: 5.9, Fault type: Strike slip fault The borehole data of each event are used in the analysis. The Butterworth type high-cut filter with cut-off frequency, fmax and its power coefficient of high-frequency decay, s [Boore(1983)], are assumed to express the high-cut frequency characteristics of ground motions. The four parameters such as seismic moment, corner frequency, cut-off frequency and its power coefficient of high-frequency decay are estimated by comparing observed spectra at rock sites with theoretical spectra. The theoretical spectra are calculated based on the omega squared source characteristics convolved with propagation-path effects and high-cut filter shapes. In result, the fmax's of the records from the earthquakes are estimated 8.0Hz for EQ No.1 and 8.5Hz for EQ No.2. These values are almost same with those of other large crustal earthquakes occurred in Japan. The power coefficient, s, are estimated 0.78 for EQ No.1 and 1.65 for EQ No.2. The value for EQ No.2 is notably larger than those of other large crustal earthquakes. It is seems that the value of the power coefficient, s

  2. Tidal frequencies in the spectral analysis of time series muon flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Catherine; Takai, Helio

    2016-03-01

    Tidal frequencies are observed in the spectral analysis of time series muon flux measurements performed by the MARIACHI experiment over a period of seven years. The prominent peaks from the frequency spectrum correspond to tidal frequencies S1,S2,S3,K1,P1 and Ψ1 . We will present these results and compare them to the regular density oscillations from balloon sounding data. We interpret the observed data as being the effect of regular atmospheric density oscillations induced by the thermal heating of layers in Earth's atmosphere. As the density of the atmosphere varies, the altitude where particles are produced varies accordingly. As a consequence, the muon decay path elongates or contracts, modulating the number of muons detected at ground level. The role of other tidal effects, including geomagnetic tides, will also be discussed.

  3. Spectral analysis of GEOS-3 altimeter data and frequency domain collocation. [to estimate gravity anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eren, K.

    1980-01-01

    The mathematical background in spectral analysis as applied to geodetic applications is summarized. The resolution (cut-off frequency) of the GEOS 3 altimeter data is examined by determining the shortest wavelength (corresponding to the cut-off frequency) recoverable. The data from some 18 profiles are used. The total power (variance) in the sea surface topography with respect to the reference ellipsoid as well as with respect to the GEM-9 surface is computed. A fast inversion algorithm for matrices of simple and block Toeplitz matrices and its application to least squares collocation is explained. This algorithm yields a considerable gain in computer time and storage in comparison with conventional least squares collocation. Frequency domain least squares collocation techniques are also introduced and applied to estimating gravity anomalies from GEOS 3 altimeter data. These techniques substantially reduce the computer time and requirements in storage associated with the conventional least squares collocation. Numerical examples given demonstrate the efficiency and speed of these techniques.

  4. The impact of spatial and spectral frequencies in structured light imaging of thick tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Jessie Ruth

    This research focuses on development of structured light imaging (SLI), a new optical imaging technique based on spatial frequency domain modulation. The goal of this method is to quantitatively measure and map tissue optical properties, absorption and scattering, to determine tissue biochemical structure and composition. The work presented here extends the technology's spatial and spectral frequency impact. First, to expand the depth sectioning capability of spatial frequency modulation, a layered tissue model was developed, validated and shown to accurately recover in vivo parameters in skin (epidermis and dermis), effectively filtering out signal from the underlying subcutaneous tissue. Next, to expand the impact of spectral frequency information, the SLI system was combined with a Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), which eliminates the need to scan through wavelengths when gathering multispectral information. A single SLI-CTIS measurement gathers 36 absorption maps and 36 scattering maps, with a resulting measurement speed ˜30 times faster than the liquid crystal tunable filter method currently employed in multispectral SLI systems. The multispectral information can be used to determine the concentrations of multiple tissue chromophores and the relative density of the tissue. This is immediately useful for monitoring the brain for signs of trauma, including monitoring of oxygen delivery across the brain, mapping of hemoglobin concentration to detect hemorrhage, mapping of water content to monitor edema, and mapping of tissue density to monitor swelling. A simple in vivo brain injury example is presented to demonstrate recovery of these parameters. Finally, to demonstrate the spatial, spectral and temporal resolution of the SLI-CTIS system, measurements were performed on in vivo mouse brain during seizure with electroencephalography (EEG) confirmation.

  5. Frequency interleaving towards spectrally efficient directly detected optical OFDM for next-generation optical access networks.

    PubMed

    Mehedy, Lenin; Bakaul, Masuduzzaman; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai

    2010-10-25

    In this paper, we theoretically analyze and demonstrate that spectral efficiency of a conventional direct detection based optical OFDM system (DDO-OFDM) can be improved significantly using frequency interleaving of adjacent DDO-OFDM channels where OFDM signal band of one channel occupies the spectral gap of other channel and vice versa. We show that, at optimum operating condition, the proposed technique can effectively improve the spectral efficiency of the conventional DDO-OFDM system as much as 50%. We also show that such a frequency interleaved DDO-OFDM system, with a bit rate of 48 Gb/s within 25 GHz bandwidth, achieves sufficient power budget after transmission over 25 km single mode fiber to be used in next-generation time-division-multiplexed passive optical networks (TDM-PON). Moreover, by applying 64- quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM), the system can be further scaled up to 96 Gb/s with a power budget sufficient for 1:16 split TDM-PON. PMID:21164657

  6. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, John C.; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A.; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  7. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads.

    PubMed

    Brigham, John C; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A; Diamessis, Peter J

    2011-01-15

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  8. Broadband radio-frequency spectrum analysis in spectral-hole-burning media.

    PubMed

    Colice, Max; Schlottau, Friso; Wagner, Kelvin H

    2006-09-01

    We demonstrate a 20 GHz spectrum analyzer with 1 MHz resolution and >40 dB dynamic range using spectral-hole-burning (SHB) crystals, which are cryogenically cooled crystal hosts lightly doped with rare-earth ions. We modulate a rf signal onto an optical carrier using an electro-optic intensity modulator to produce a signal beam modulated with upper and lower rf sidebands. Illuminating SHB crystals with modulated beams excites only those ions resonant with corresponding modulation frequencies, leaving holes in the crystal's absorption profile that mimic the modulation power spectrum and persist for up to 10 ms. We determine the spectral hole locations by probing the crystal with a chirped laser and detecting the transmitted intensity. The transmitted intensity is a blurred-out copy of the power spectrum of the original illumination as mapped into a time-varying signal. Scaling the time series associated with the transmitted intensity by the instantaneous chirp rate yields the modulated beam's rf power spectrum. The homogeneous linewidth of the rare-earth ions, which can be <100 kHz at cryogenic temperatures, limits the fundamental spectral resolution, while the medium's inhomogeneous linewidth, which can be >20 GHz, determines the spectral bandwidth. PMID:16912776

  9. Plasma ionization frequency, edge-to-axis density ratio, and density on axis of a cylindrical gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Palacio Mizrahi, J. H.

    2014-06-15

    A rigorous derivation of expressions, starting from the governing equations, for the ionization frequency, edge-to-axis ratio of plasma density, plasma density at the axis, and radially averaged plasma density in a cylindrical gas discharge has been obtained. The derived expressions are simple and involve the relevant parameters of the discharge: Cylinder radius, axial current, and neutral gas pressure. The found expressions account for ion inertia, ion temperature, and changes in plasma ion collisionality.

  10. High-frequency variations of hydrogen spectral lines in the B3V star η UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhvala, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    We reported the detection of high-frequency variations in the hydrogen Balmer lines in the hot star η UMa of spectral class B3V. Spectral observations of η UMa were carried out with slitless spectrograph (R˜100) installed on the 60 cm Carl Zeiss telescope in the Andrushivka Observatory. Spectra were obtained with a time resolution in the sub-second range. It has been found that the η UMa shows rapid variations in the hydrogen lines Hα, Hβ, Hγ, as well as variations in the atmospheric oxygen lines. The intensity variations in the hydrogen lines varies from 0.2% to 0.5% , and that of the oxygen lines is approximately 2%.

  11. Spectral selective radio frequency emissions from laser induced breakdown of target materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinoth Kumar, L.; Manikanta, E.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P.

    2014-08-11

    The radio frequency emissions scanned over broad spectral range (30 MHz–1 GHz) from single shot nanosecond (7 ns) and picosecond (30 ps) laser induced breakdown (LIB) of different target materials (atmospheric air, aluminum, and copper) are presented. The dominant emissions from ns-LIB, compared to those from the ps-LIB, indicate the presence and importance of atomic and molecular clusters in the plasma. The dynamics of laser pulse-matter interaction and the properties of the target materials were found to play an important role in determining the plasma parameters which subsequently determine the emissions. Thus, with a particular laser and target material, the emissions were observed to be spectral selective. The radiation detection capability was observed to be relatively higher, when the polarization of the input laser and the antenna is same.

  12. On estimating frequency response function envelopes using the spectral element method and fuzzy sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, R. F.; Klimke, A.; Arruda, J. R. F.

    2006-04-01

    The influence of uncertain input data on response spectra of dynamic structures is considered. Traditionally, frequency response analyses are based on finite or boundary element models of the objective structure. In the case of the mid-frequency range problem, however, a very fine mesh is required to correctly approximate the frequency response. This is particularly problematic in uncertainty modeling where the computational effort is usually increased significantly by the need for multiple runs (e.g. when conducting a Monte Carlo analysis) to achieve reliable results. In this paper, the spectral element method, combined with a fuzzy set-based uncertainty modeling approach, is presented as an appealing alternative, provided that the models are simple enough to yield a spectral element representation. To conduct the fuzzy analysis part, three different implementations of the extension principle of fuzzy arithmetic are applied and compared. The suitability of each method depends on the number of uncertain parameters, the problem characteristics, and the required accuracy of the results. The performance of the proposed approach is illustrated by two test problems, a simple coupled rod and a reinforced plate model. To verify the fuzzy-valued results, a Monte Carlo simulation has also been included.

  13. Spectrally efficient polarization multiplexed direct-detection OFDM system without frequency gap.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chia-Chien; Zeng, Wei-Siang; Lin, Chun-Ting

    2016-01-25

    We experimentally demonstrate a spectrally efficient direct-detection orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (DD-OFDM) system. In addition to polarization-division multiplexing, removing the frequency gap further improves the spectral efficiency of the OFDM system. The frequency gap between a reference carrier and OFDM subcarriers avoids subcarrier-to-subcarrier beating interference (SSBI) in traditional DD-OFDM systems. Without dynamic polarization control, the resulting interference after square-law direct detection in the proposed gap-less system is polarization-dependent and composed of linear inter-carrier interference (ICI) and nonlinear SSBI. Thus, this work proposes an iterative multiple-input multiple-output detection scheme to remove the mixed polarization-dependent interference. Compared to the previous scheme, which only removes ICI, the proposed scheme can further eliminate SSBI to achieve the improvement of ∼ 7 dB in signal-to-noise ratio. Without the need for polarization control, we successfully utilize 7-GHz bandwidth to transmit a 39.5-Gbps polarization multiplexed OFDM signal over 100 km. PMID:26832560

  14. Spectral and temporal phase measurement by optical frequency-domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robillart, Bruno; Calò, Cosimo; Fall, Abdoulaye; Lamare, François; Gottesman, Yaneck; Benkelfat, Badr-Eddine

    2014-03-01

    The capability of measuring the spectral and temporal phase of an optical signal is of fundamental importance for the advanced characterization of photonic and optoelectronic components, biochemical sensors, structural monitoring sensors and distributed sensor networks. To address this problem, several techniques have been developed (frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER), stepped-heterodyne technique, laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) and Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT)). However, such techniques often lack of versatility for the mentioned applications. Swept-wavelength interferometric techniques and, among these, optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR) are flexible and highly sensitive tools for complete characterization of amplitude and phase of target devices. In this work, we investigate the spectral and temporal phase measurement capabilities of OFDR. Precise characterization of spectral phase information is demonstrated by retrieving the phase response of a commercial optical filter, the Finisar Waveshaper 1000 S/X, programmable in attenuation and phase over C+L band (1530- 1625 nm). The presented results show accurate retrieval of group delay dispersion (GDD) and discrete phase shift as well as filter attenuation profile. Although some intrinsic accuracy limitations of OFDR phase measurements may be encountered (and herein specified), we show that information encoded in OFDR reflectogram data is very rich when adequately exploited. In addition to previously published results, we demonstrate the high sensitivity of the technique to Doppler effects. From practical point of view, such sensitivity can be beneficially exploited for the characterisation of dynamical aspects of samples under test. Unlike LDV, OFDR allows the simultaneous retrieval of the temporal position of several localised reflecting target along the beam path. All these aspects make OFDR a highly

  15. Spectral discrimination of breast pathologies in situ using spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Nationally, 25% to 50% of patients undergoing lumpectomy for local management of breast cancer require a secondary excision because of the persistence of residual tumor. Intraoperative assessment of specimen margins by frozen-section analysis is not widely adopted in breast-conserving surgery. Here, a new approach to wide-field optical imaging of breast pathology in situ was tested to determine whether the system could accurately discriminate cancer from benign tissues before routine pathological processing. Methods Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) was used to quantify near-infrared (NIR) optical parameters at the surface of 47 lumpectomy tissue specimens. Spatial frequency and wavelength-dependent reflectance spectra were parameterized with matched simulations of light transport. Spectral images were co-registered to histopathology in adjacent, stained sections of the tissue, cut in the geometry imaged in situ. A supervised classifier and feature-selection algorithm were implemented to automate discrimination of breast pathologies and to rank the contribution of each parameter to a diagnosis. Results Spectral parameters distinguished all pathology subtypes with 82% accuracy and benign (fibrocystic disease, fibroadenoma) from malignant (DCIS, invasive cancer, and partially treated invasive cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy) pathologies with 88% accuracy, high specificity (93%), and reasonable sensitivity (79%). Although spectral absorption and scattering features were essential components of the discriminant classifier, scattering exhibited lower variance and contributed most to tissue-type separation. The scattering slope was sensitive to stromal and epithelial distributions measured with quantitative immunohistochemistry. Conclusions SFDI is a new quantitative imaging technique that renders a specific tissue-type diagnosis. Its combination of planar sampling and frequency-dependent depth sensing is clinically pragmatic and appropriate for

  16. 2D Spatial Frequency Considerations in Comparing 1D Power Spectral Density Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Barber, S.; Church, E.L.; Kaznatcheev, K.; McKinney, W.R.; Yashchuk, V.Y.

    2010-06-14

    The frequency footprint of ID and 2D profiling instruments needs to be carefully considered in comparing ID surface roughness spectrum measurements made by different instruments. Contributions from orthogonal direction frequency components can not be neglected. The use of optical profiling instruments is ubiquitous in the measurement of the roughness of optical surfaces. Their ease-of-use and non-contact measurement method found widespread use in the optics industry for measuring the quality of delicate optical surfaces. Computerized digital data acquisition with these instruments allowed for quick and easy calculation of surface roughness statistics, such as root-mean-square (RMS) roughness. The computing power of the desktop computer allowed for the rapid conversion of spatial domain data into the frequency domain, enabling the application of sophisticated signal processing techniques to be applied to the analysis of surface roughness, the most powerful of which is the power spectral density (PSP) function. Application of the PSD function to surface statistics introduced the concept of 'bandwidth-limited' roughness, where the value of the RMS roughness depends critically upon the spatial frequency response of the instrument. Different instruments with different spatial frequency response characteristics give different answers when measuring the same surface.

  17. Spectral linewidth preservation in parametric frequency combs seeded by dual pumps.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhi; Wiberg, Andreas O J; Myslivets, Evgeny; Kuo, Bill P P; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2012-07-30

    We demonstrate new technique for generation of programmable-pitch, wideband frequency combs with low phase noise. The comb generation was achieved using cavity-less, multistage mixer driven by two tunable continuous-wave pump seeds. The approach relies on phase-correlated continuous-wave pumps in order to cancel spectral linewidth broadening inherent to parametric comb generation. Parametric combs with over 200-nm bandwidth were obtained and characterized with respect to phase noise scaling to demonstrate linewidth preservation over 100 generated tones. PMID:23038314

  18. Improved Frequency Fluctuation Model for Spectral Line Shape Calculations in Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, S.; Calisti, A.; Mossé, C.; Talin, B.; Lisitsa, V.

    2010-10-01

    A very fast method to calculate spectral line shapes emitted by plasmas accounting for charge particle dynamics and effects of an external magnetic field is proposed. This method relies on a new formulation of the Frequency Fluctuation Model (FFM), which yields to an expression of the dynamic line profile as a functional of the static distribution function of frequencies. This highly efficient formalism, not limited to hydrogen-like systems, allows to calculate pure Stark and Stark-Zeeman line shapes for a wide range of density, temperature and magnetic field values, which is of importance in plasma physics and astrophysics. Various applications of this method are presented for conditions related to fusion plasmas.

  19. A generalization of the double-corner-frequency source spectral model and its use in the SCEC BBP validation exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.; Di Alessandro, Carola; Abrahamson, Norman A.

    2014-01-01

    The stochastic method of simulating ground motions requires the specification of the shape and scaling with magnitude of the source spectrum. The spectral models commonly used are either single-corner-frequency or double-corner-frequency models, but the latter have no flexibility to vary the high-frequency spectral levels for a specified seismic moment. Two generalized double-corner-frequency ω2 source spectral models are introduced, one in which two spectra are multiplied together, and another where they are added. Both models have a low-frequency dependence controlled by the seismic moment, and a high-frequency spectral level controlled by the seismic moment and a stress parameter. A wide range of spectral shapes can be obtained from these generalized spectral models, which makes them suitable for inversions of data to obtain spectral models that can be used in ground-motion simulations in situations where adequate data are not available for purely empirical determinations of ground motions, as in stable continental regions. As an example of the use of the generalized source spectral models, data from up to 40 stations from seven events, plus response spectra at two distances and two magnitudes from recent ground-motion prediction equations, were inverted to obtain the parameters controlling the spectral shapes, as well as a finite-fault factor that is used in point-source, stochastic-method simulations of ground motion. The fits to the data are comparable to or even better than those from finite-fault simulations, even for sites close to large earthquakes.

  20. Extracting the frequencies of the pinna spectral notches in measured head related impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raykar, Vikas C.; Duraiswami, Ramani; Yegnanarayana, B.

    2005-07-01

    The head related impulse response (HRIR) characterizes the auditory cues created by scattering of sound off a person's anatomy. The experimentally measured HRIR depends on several factors such as reflections from body parts (torso, shoulder, and knees), head diffraction, and reflection/diffraction effects due to the pinna. Structural models (Algazi et al., 2002; Brown and Duda, 1998) seek to establish direct relationships between the features in the HRIR and the anatomy. While there is evidence that particular features in the HRIR can be explained by anthropometry, the creation of such models from experimental data is hampered by the fact that the extraction of the features in the HRIR is not automatic. One of the prominent features observed in the HRIR, and one that has been shown to be important for elevation perception, are the deep spectral notches attributed to the pinna. In this paper we propose a method to robustly extract the frequencies of the pinna spectral notches from the measured HRIR, distinguishing them from other confounding features. The method also extracts the resonances described by Shaw (1997). The techniques are applied to the publicly available CIPIC HRIR database (Algazi et al., 2001c). The extracted notch frequencies are related to the physical dimensions and shape of the pinna.

  1. Spectral element computation of high-frequency leaky modes in three-dimensional solid waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treyssède, F.

    2016-06-01

    A numerical method is proposed to compute high-frequency low-leakage modes in structural waveguides surrounded by infinite solid media. In order to model arbitrary shape structures, a waveguide formulation is used, which consists of applying to the elastodynamic equilibrium equations a space Fourier transform along the waveguide axis and then a discretization method to the cross-section coordinates. However several numerical issues must be faced related to the unbounded nature of the cross-section, the number of degrees of freedom required to achieve an acceptable error in the high-frequency regime as well as the number of modes to compute. In this paper, these issues are circumvented by applying perfectly matched layers (PML) along the cross-section directions, a high-order spectral element method for the discretization of the cross-section, and an eigensolver shift suited for the computation of low-leakage modes. First, computations are performed for an embedded cylindrical bar, for which literature results are available. The proposed PML waveguide formulation yields good agreement with literature results, even in the case of weak impedance contrast. Its performance with high-order spectral elements is assessed in terms of convergence and accuracy and compared to traditional low-order finite elements. Then, computations are performed for an embedded square bar. Dispersion curves exhibit strong similarities with cylinders. These results show that the properties of low-leakage modes observed in cylindrical bars can also occur in other types of geometry.

  2. Frequency-domain multiplexed readout of transition-edge sensor arrays with a superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanting, T. M.; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Clarke, John; Holzapfel, W. L.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lueker, M.; Richards, P. L.; Dobbs, Matt A.; Spieler, Helmuth; Smith, A.

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate an eight-channel frequency-domain readout multiplexer for superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs). Each sensor is biased with a sinusoidal voltage at a unique frequency. The sensor currents are summed and measured with a single superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array. The 100-element SQUID array is operated with shunt feedback electronics that have a slew rate of 1.2×107Φ0/s at 1MHz. The multiplexer readout noise is 6.5pA/√Hz , which is well below the expected sensor noise of 15pA /√Hz . We measure an upper limit on adjacent channel crosstalk of 0.004, which meets our design requirements. The demodulated noise spectra of multiplexed TESs are white at frequencies down to 200mHz.

  3. The distribution of spectral index of magnetic field and ion velocity in Pi2 frequency band in BBFs: THEMIS statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Du, A. M.; Volwerk, M.; Wang, G. Q.

    2016-09-01

    A statistical study of the THEMIS FGM and ESA data is performed on turbulence of magnetic field and velocity for 218 selected 12 min intervals in BBFs. The spectral index α in the frequency range of 0.005-0.06 Hz are Gaussian distributions. The peaks indexes of total ion velocity Vi and parallel velocity V‖ are 1.95 and 2.07 nearly the spectral index of intermittent low frequency turbulence with large amplitude. However, most probable α of perpendicular velocity V⊥ is about 1.75. It is a little bigger than 5/3 of Kolmogorov (1941). The peak indexes of total magnetic field BT is 1.70 similar to V⊥. Compression magnetic field B‖ are 1.85 which is smaller than 2 and bigger than 5/3 of Kolmogorov (1941). The most probable spectral index of shear B⊥ is about 1.44 which is close to 3/2 of Kraichnan (1965). Max V⊥ have little effect on the power magnitude of VT and V‖ but is positively correlated to spectral index of V⊥. The spectral power of BT, B‖ and B⊥ increase with max perpendicular velocity but spectral indexes of them are negatively correlated to V⊥. The spectral index and the spectral power of magnetic field over the frequency interval 0.005-0.06 Hz is very different from that over 0.08-1 Hz.

  4. Benefits of Red-Edge Spectral Band and Texture Features for the Object-based Classification using RapidEye sSatellite Image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. O.; Yeom, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Space-based remote sensing in agriculture is particularly relevant to issues such as global climate change, food security, and precision agriculture. Recent satellite missions have opened up new perspectives by offering high spatial resolution, various spectral properties, and fast revisit rates to the same regions. Here, we examine the utility of broadband red-edge spectral information in multispectral satellite image data for classifying paddy rice crops in South Korea. Additionally, we examine how object-based spectral features affect the classification of paddy rice growth stages. For the analysis, two seasons of RapidEye satellite image data were used. The results showed that the broadband red-edge information slightly improved the classification accuracy of the crop condition in heterogeneous paddy rice crop environments, particularly when single-season image data were used. This positive effect appeared to be offset by the multi-temporal image data. Additional texture information brought only a minor improvement or a slight decline, although it is well known to be advantageous for object-based classification in general. We conclude that broadband red-edge information derived from conventional multispectral satellite data has the potential to improve space-based crop monitoring. Because the positive or negative effects of texture features for object-based crop classification could barely be interpreted, the relationships between the textual properties and paddy rice crop parameters at the field scale should be further examined in depth.

  5. Spectral self-imaging of time-periodic coherent frequency combs by parabolic cross-phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Maram, Reza; Azaña, José

    2013-11-18

    Integer and fractional spectral self-imaging effects are induced on infinite-duration periodic frequency combs (probe signal) using cross-phase modulation (XPM) with a parabolic pulse train as pump signal. Free-spectral-range tuning (fractional effects) or wavelength-shifting (integer effects) of the frequency comb can be achieved by changing the parabolic pulse peak power or/and repetition rate without affecting the spectral envelope shape and bandwidth of the original comb. For design purposes, we derive the complete family of different pump signals that allow implementing a desired spectral self-imaging process. Numerical simulation results validate our theoretical analysis. We also investigate the detrimental influence of group-delay walk-off and deviations in the nominal temporal shape or power of the pump pulses on the generated output frequency combs. PMID:24514395

  6. High frequency pacing of edge localized modes by injection of lithium granules in DIII-D H-mode discharges

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Nagy, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jackson, G. L.; Gilson, E. P.; Lunsford, R.; et al

    2016-04-08

    A newly installed Lithium Granule Injector (LGI) was used to pace edge localized modes (ELM) in DIII-D. ELM pacing efficiency was studied injecting lithium granules of nominal diameter 0.3–0.9mm, speed of 50–120 m s-1 and average injection rates up to 100 Hz for 0.9mm granules and up to 700 Hz for 0.3mm granules. The efficiency of ELM triggering was found to depend strongly on size of the injected granules, with triggering efficiency close to 100% obtained with 0.9mm diameter granules, lower with smaller sizes, and weakly depending on granule velocity. Robust ELM pacing was demonstrated in ITER-like plasmas for themore » entire shot length, at ELM frequencies 3–5 times larger than the ‘natural’ ELM frequency observed in reference discharges. Within the range of ELM frequencies obtained, the peak ELM heat flux at the outer strike point was reduced with increasing pacing frequency. The peak heat flux reduction at the inner strike point appears to saturate at high pacing frequency. Lithium was found in the plasma core, with a concurrent reduction of metallic impurities and carbon. Altogether, high frequency ELM pacing using the lithium granule injection appears to be compatible with both H-mode energy confinement and attractive H-mode pedestal characteristics, but further assessment is need« less

  7. High frequency pacing of edge localized modes by injection of lithium granules in DIII-D H-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Nagy, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jackson, G. L.; Gilson, E. P.; Lunsford, R.; Parks, P. B.; Chrystal, C.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R.; Haskey, S. R.; Makowski, M. J.; Lasnier, C. J.; Nazikian, R.; Osborne, T.; Shiraki, D.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    A newly installed Lithium Granule Injector (LGI) was used to pace edge localized modes (ELM) in DIII-D. ELM pacing efficiency was studied injecting lithium granules of nominal diameter 0.3–0.9 mm, speed of 50–120 m s‑1 and average injection rates up to 100 Hz for 0.9 mm granules and up to 700 Hz for 0.3 mm granules. The efficiency of ELM triggering was found to depend strongly on size of the injected granules, with triggering efficiency close to 100% obtained with 0.9 mm diameter granules, lower with smaller sizes, and weakly depending on granule velocity. Robust ELM pacing was demonstrated in ITER-like plasmas for the entire shot length, at ELM frequencies 3–5 times larger than the ‘natural’ ELM frequency observed in reference discharges. Within the range of ELM frequencies obtained, the peak ELM heat flux at the outer strike point was reduced with increasing pacing frequency. The peak heat flux reduction at the inner strike point appears to saturate at high pacing frequency. Lithium was found in the plasma core, with a concurrent reduction of metallic impurities and carbon. Overall, high frequency ELM pacing using the lithium granule injection appears to be compatible with both H-mode energy confinement and attractive H-mode pedestal characteristics, but further assessment is needed to determine whether the projected heat flux reduction required for ITER can be met.

  8. Relationship between the durations of jumps in solar wind time series and the frequency of the spectral break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, John J.; Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2016-03-01

    Several physically motivated examples of stochastic processes that exhibit discontinuous jumps at random times are used to show that if the discontinuous jumps are replaced by continuous or smooth transitions with an average duration Δt, then the power spectral density of the process develops a high-frequency spectral break at a frequency of order ωb = π/Δt. Conversely, if the spectrum of the original process is altered by imposing a high-frequency spectral break, as may be accomplished by filtering with a low-pass filter of some kind, then the discontinuous jumps in the original signal are replaced by continuous jumps having a duration of magnitude Δt = π/ωb, where ωb is the break frequency of the altered spectrum. These results suggest that for any stochastic process containing randomly occurring jumps in the time domain and a high-frequency spectral break in the spectral domain with break frequency ωb, the average durations of the jumps are of order Δt = π/ωb. This result is closely connected with the sampling theorem and the uncertainty principle for Fourier transform pairs and demonstrates that the physical processes responsible for the dissipation of solar wind turbulence also determine the thicknesses of the strongest current sheets in the solar wind.

  9. T-x frequency filtering of high resolution seismic reflection data using singular spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekapalli, Rajesh; Tiwari, R. K.; Dhanam, K.; Seshunarayana, T.

    2014-06-01

    We develop here an efficient approach using singular spectral analysis (SSA) for frequency filtering of seismic reflection data in t-x domain. The abrupt change in geophysical records creates ringing artifacts in the Fourier based filtering operations. We use here complete data adaptive basis functions in SSA filtering, which enables the self-similarity of the data in reconstruction of such sudden changes. We first tested the SSA based filtering algorithm on synthetic seismic data and then applied to real seismic reflection data from Singareni coalfields, Andhra Pradesh, India. The individual trace from each channel in the shot gathers is processed and compared with Fourier and multichannel SSA filtered output. Our analysis demonstrates that SSA filtering attenuated the low frequency ground role and high frequency noise embedded in the seismic record in a more efficient way than the other two methods. The coal formations and faults identified in the stack section of filtered data match quite well with the geological information available in the study region.

  10. Separating Reflective and Fluorescent Components Using High Frequency Illumination in the Spectral Domain.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Lam, Antony; Sato, Imari; Okabe, Takahiro; Sato, Yoichi

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is beneficial to many applications but most traditional methods do not consider fluorescent effects which are present in everyday items ranging from paper to even our food. Furthermore, everyday fluorescent items exhibit a mix of reflection and fluorescence so proper separation of these components is necessary for analyzing them. In recent years, effective imaging methods have been proposed but most require capturing the scene under multiple illuminants. In this paper, we demonstrate efficient separation and recovery of reflectance and fluorescence emission spectra through the use of two high frequency illuminations in the spectral domain. With the obtained fluorescence emission spectra from our high frequency illuminants, we then describe how to estimate the fluorescence absorption spectrum of a material given its emission spectrum. In addition, we provide an in depth analysis of our method and also show that filters can be used in conjunction with standard light sources to generate the required high frequency illuminants. We also test our method under ambient light and demonstrate an application of our method to synthetic relighting of real scenes. PMID:26336113

  11. A spectral study of a radio-frequency plasma-generated flux of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batten, Carmen E.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Lewis, Beverley W.

    1994-01-01

    The active environment of a radio-frequency (RF) plasma generator, with and without low-pressure oxygen, has been characterized through the identification of emission lines in the spectral region from 250 to 900 nm. The environment is shown to be dependent on the partial pressure of oxygen and the power applied to the RF generator. Atomic oxygen has been found in significant amounts as well as atomic hydrogen and the molecular oxygen species O2((sup 1)Sigma). The only charged species observed was the singly charged molecular ion O2(+). With a polymer specimen in the plasma chamber, carbon monoxide was also observed. The significance of these observations with respect to previous studies using this type of generator to stimulate material degradation in space is discussed. The possibility of using these generators as atomic oxygen sources in the development of oxygen atom fluorescence sensors is explored.

  12. Combining total internal reflection sum frequency spectroscopy spectral imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Allgeyer, Edward S; Sterling, Sarah M; Gunewardene, Mudalige S; Hess, Samuel T; Neivandt, David J; Mason, Michael D

    2015-01-27

    Understanding surface and interfacial lateral organization in material and biological systems is critical in nearly every field of science. The continued development of tools and techniques viable for elucidation of interfacial and surface information is therefore necessary to address new questions and further current investigations. Sum frequency spectroscopy (SFS) is a label-free, nonlinear optical technique with inherent surface specificity that can yield critical organizational information on interfacial species. Unfortunately, SFS provides no spatial information on a surface; small scale heterogeneities that may exist are averaged over the large areas typically probed. Over the past decade, this has begun to be addressed with the advent of SFS microscopy. Here we detail the construction and function of a total internal reflection (TIR) SFS spectral and confocal fluorescence imaging microscope directly amenable to surface investigations. This instrument combines, for the first time, sample scanning TIR-SFS imaging with confocal fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25506739

  13. Cross-spectral coherence between geomagnetic disturbance and human cardiovascular variables at non-societal frequencies.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Hillman, D C; Otsuka, K; Bingham, C; Breus, T K; Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F

    1994-01-01

    A 35-year-old cardiologist monitored himself with an automatic ABPM-630 (Colin Electronics) monitor, mostly at 15-minute intervals around-the-clock for three years with a few interruptions. In this subject with a family history of high blood pressure and stroke, a cross-spectral analysis revealed a statistically significant coherence at 27.7 days between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate vs. the geomagnetic disturbance index, Kp. A lesser peak in coherence was found for systolic blood pressure with Kp at a trial period of 4.16 days (P = 0.046). These results suggest that changes in geomagnetism may influence the human circulation, at least in the presence of familial cardiovascular disease risk, and they may do so at frequencies that have no precise human-made cyclic worldwide match. PMID:7729242

  14. Spectral and angular characteristics of dielectric resonator metasurface at optical frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Longfang; López-García, Martin; Oulton, Ruth; Klemm, Maciej; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Fumeaux, Christophe; Shah, Charan M.; Mitchell, Arnan; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Sriram, Sharath

    2014-11-10

    The capability of manipulating light at subwavelength scale has fostered the applications of flat metasurfaces in various fields. Compared to metallic structure, metasurfaces made of high permittivity low-loss dielectric resonators hold the promise of high efficiency by avoiding high conductive losses of metals at optical frequencies. This letter investigates the spectral and angular characteristics of a dielectric resonator metasurface composed of periodic sub-arrays of resonators with a linearly varying phase response. The far-field response of the metasurface can be decomposed into the response of a single grating element (sub-array) and the grating arrangement response. The analysis also reveals that coupling between resonators has a non-negligible impact on the angular response. Over a wide wavelength range, the simulated and measured angular characteristics of the metasurface provide a definite illustration of how different grating diffraction orders can be selectively suppressed or enhanced through antenna sub-array design.

  15. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  16. Commissioning of a multiple-frequency modulation smoothing by spectral dispersion demonstration system on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschwitz, B. E.; Kelly, J. H.; Dorrer, C.; Okishev, A. V.; Waxer, L. J.; Balonek, G.; Begishev, I. A.; Bittle, W.; Consentino, A.; Cuffney, R.; Hill, E.; Marozas, J. A.; Moore, M.; Roides, R. G.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-02-01

    A one-dimensional smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) demonstration system for smoothing focal-spot nonuniformities using multiple modulation frequencies (multi-FM SSD) was commissioned on one long-pulse beamline of OMEGA EP—the first use of such a system in a high-energy laser. System models of frequency modulation-to-amplitude modulation (FM-to-AM) conversion in the OMEGA EP beamline and final optics were used to develop an AM budget. The AM budget in turn provided a UV power limit of 0.85 TW, based on accumulation of B-integral in the final optics. The front end of the demonstration system utilized a National Ignition Facility preamplifier module (PAM) with a custom SSD grating inserted into the PAM's multipass amplifier section. The dispersion of the SSD grating was selected to cleanly propagate the dispersed SSD bandwidth through various pinholes in the system while maintaining sufficient focal-spot smoothing performance. A commissioning plan was executed that systematically introduced the new features of the demonstration system into OMEGA EP. Ultimately, the OMEGA EP beamline was ramped to the UV power limit with various pulse shapes. The front-end system was designed to provide flexibility in pulse shaping. Various combinations of pickets and nanosecond-scale drive pulses were demonstrated, with multi-FM SSD selectively applied to portions of the pulse. Analysis of the dispersion measured by the far-field diagnostics at the outputs of the infrared beamline and the frequency-conversion crystals indicated that the SSD modulation spectrum was maintained through both the beamline and the frequency-conversion process. At the completion of the plan, a series of equivalent-target-plane measurements with distributed phase plates installed were conducted that confirmed the expected timeintegrated smoothing of the focal spot.

  17. Comparing Broad-Band and Red Edge-Based Spectral Vegetation Indices to Estimate Nitrogen Concentration of Crops Using Casi Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanjie; Liao, Qinhong; Yang, Guijun; Feng, Haikuan; Yang, Xiaodong; Yue, Jibo

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, many spectral vegetation indices (SVIs) have been proposed to estimate the leaf nitrogen concentration (LNC) of crops. However, most of these indices were based on the field hyperspectral reflectance. To test whether they can be used in aerial remote platform effectively, in this work a comparison of the sensitivity between several broad-band and red edge-based SVIs to LNC is investigated over different crop types. By using data from experimental LNC values over 4 different crop types and image data acquired using the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) sensor, the extensive dataset allowed us to evaluate broad-band and red edge-based SVIs. The result indicated that NDVI performed the best among the selected SVIs while red edge-based SVIs didn't show the potential for estimating the LNC based on the CASI data due to the spectral resolution. In order to search for the optimal SVIs, the band combination algorithm has been used in this work. The best linear correlation against the experimental LNC dataset was obtained by combining the 626.20nm and 569.00nm wavebands. These wavelengths correspond to the maximal chlorophyll absorption and reflection position region, respectively, and are known to be sensitive to the physiological status of the plant. Then this linear relationship was applied to the CASI image for generating an LNC map, which can guide farmers in the accurate application of their N fertilization strategies.

  18. Spectral features of a new crystal - Cr:KTP and its potential application for self-frequency doubling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Nee-Yin; Koker, Edmond B.; Barnes, Norman P.; Loiacono, Gabriel M.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a technique for growing Cr-doped single crystals of KTiOPO4 (Cr:KTP) and presents the spectral characteristics, lasing potential, and SHG properties of Cr:KTP. It is shown that the use of Cr:KTP as a lasing medium is potentially promising due to the combination of the wide spectral bandwidth and reasonable gain. The potential application of the crystal for self frequency doubling is discussed.

  19. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy C. (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  20. Applications of spectral analysis and filter design in laser frequency locking for Na Doppler lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, John A.; Chu, Xinzhao; Huang, Wentao; Tan, Bo

    2009-10-01

    A dye ring laser is stabilized to a D2a Doppler-free feature of sodium vapor using a LabVIEW®-based, phase-sensitive servo. Locking precision and stability, at better than +/-1 MHz, are suitable for Na lidar applications. This performance was achieved with improved digital filtering and new approaches to the problem. The inverse (type II) Chebyshev discrete filter employed demonstrates superior filtering and computational efficiency plus improved flexibility. New approaches include the determination of optimum modulation frequency, laser-tuning sensitivity, and bandwidth requirements via spectral analyses of the noise spectrum, derivative scan, and modulated spectrum. This practice guides a user in selecting the system operation parameters and negotiating the trade-offs involved when expanding the filter's passband. Allan deviation plots provide a quantitative description of the short- and long-term frequency excursions. A comparison of Allan deviation plots before and after locking shows a substantial improvement in stability throughout time scales from 0.10 to 10 s.

  1. Spectral analysis of temperature and Brunt-Vaisala frequency fluctuations observed by radiosondes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuda, T.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Kato, S.; Fukao, S.; Sato, T.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that vertical wave number spectra of wind velocity and temperture fluctuations in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere are fairly well explained by a saturated gravity wave spectrum. But N(2) (N:Brunt-Vaisala (BV) frequency) spectra seem to be better for testing the scaling of the vertical wave number spectra in layers with different stratifications, beause its energy density is proportional only to the background value of N(2), while that for temperature depends on both the BV frequency and the potential temperature. From temperature profiles observed in June to August 1987 over the MU Observatory, Japan, by using a radiosonde with 30 m height resolution, N(2) spectra are determined in the 2 to 8.5 km (troposphere) and 18.5 to 25 km (lower stratosphere) ranges. Although individual spectra show fairly large day-by-day variability, the slope of the median of 34 spectra agrees reasonably with the theoretical value of -1 in the wave number range of 6 x 10(-4) similar to 3 x 10(-3) (c/m). The ratio of the spectral energy between these two height regions is about equal to the ratio of N(2), consistent with the prediction of saturated gravity wave theory.

  2. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy Clay (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  3. Modulation-free laser frequency stabilization to a saturated sub-Doppler spectral line in a transversal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Sho; Iwakuni, Kana; Hasegawa, Taro

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate frequency stabilization of a modulation-free laser to a saturated absorption spectral line of atoms in a transversal magnetic field. This stabilization scheme has been proposed for wide capture range in comparison with the dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) scheme and demonstrated for a Doppler-broadened spectral line in J. Opt. Soc. Am. B, 26, 1216 (2009). In this paper, a 1083-nm external-cavity laser diode is frequency-stabilized to the sub-Doppler spectral line of helium transition (23S1,mJ=0↔23P0). Even though the error signal shape strongly depends on the pump beam polarization, the stabilized frequency is expected to be insensitive to the pump beam polarization.

  4. Investigations of the Low Frequency Spectral Density of Cytochrome c upon Equilibrium Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuhan; Karunakaran, Venugopal; Champion, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium unfolding process of ferric horse heart cytochrome c (cyt c), induced by guanidinium hydrochloride (GdHCl), was studied using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy and vibrational coherence spectroscopy (VCS). The unfolding process was successfully fit using a three-state model35 which included the fully folded (N) and unfolded (U) states, along with an intermediate (I) assigned to a Lys bound heme. The VCS spectra revealed for the first time several low frequency heme modes that are sensitive to cytochrome c unfolding: γa (~50 cm−1), γb (~80cm−1), γc (~100cm−1), and vs(His-Fe-His) at 205 cm−1. These out-of-plane modes have potential functional relevance and are activated by protein-induced heme distortions. The free energies for the N-I and the I-U transitions at pH 7.0 and 20°C were found to be 4.6 kcal/M and 11.6 kcal/M, respectively. Imidazole was also introduced to replace the methionine ligand so the unfolding can be modeled as a two-state system. The intensity of the mode γb~80 cm−1 remains nearly constant during the unfolding process, while the amplitudes of the other low frequency modes track with spectral changes observed at higher frequency. This confirms that the heme deformation changes are coupled to the protein tertiary structural changes that take place upon unfolding. These studies also reveal that damping of the coherent oscillations depends sensitively on the coupling between heme and the surrounding water solvent. PMID:23863217

  5. Collision frequencies in density-matrix kinetic equations describing nonlinear effects in the wings of spectral lines

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, Anatolii M

    2011-11-30

    Using the eikonal approximation, we have calculated effective collision frequencies in density-matrix kinetic equations describing nonlinear effects in the wings of spectral lines. We have established the relation between the probabilities of absorption and stimulated emission and the characteristics of the radiation and elementary scattering event. The example of the power interaction potential shows that quantum mechanical calculation of the collision frequencies in the eikonal approximation and previously known spectral line wing theory give similar results for the probability of radiation absorption.

  6. Comprehensive Analysis of RXTE Data from Cyg X-1. Spectral Index-Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency-Luminosity Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaposhnikov, Nickolai; Titarchuk, Lev

    2006-01-01

    We present timing and spectral analysis of approx. 2.2 Ms of Rossi X-ray Time Explorer (RXTE) archival data from Cyg X-1. Using the generic Comptonization model we reveal that the spectrum of Cyg X-1 consists of three components: a thermal seed photon spectrum, a Comptonized part of the seed photon spectrum and the iron line. We find a strong correlation between 0.1-20 Hz frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power-law index. Presence of two spectral phases (states) are clearly seen in the data when the spectral indices saturate at low and high values of QPO frequencies. This saturation effect was discovered earlier in a number of black hole candidate (BHC) sources and now we strongly confirm this phenomenon in Cyg X-1. In the soft state this index- QPO frequency correlation shows a saturation of the photon index Gamma approx. 2.1 at high values of the low frequency upsilon(sub L). The saturation level of Gamma approx. 2.1 is the lowest value found yet in BHCs. The bolometric luminosity does not show clear correlation with the index. We also show that Fe K(sub alpha) emission line strength (equivalent width, EW) correlates with the QPO frequency. EW increases from 200 eV in the low/hard state to 1.5 keV in the high/soft state. The revealed observational correlations allow us to propose a scenario for the spectral transition and iron line formation which occur in BHC sources. We also present the spectral state (the power-law index) evolution for eight years of Cyg X-1 observations by RXTE.

  7. Adaptation of frequency-domain readout for Transition Edge Sensor bolometers for the POLARBEAR-2 Cosmic Microwave Background experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Kaori; Arnold, Kam; Barron, Darcy; Dobbs, Matt; de Haan, Tijmen; Harrington, Nicholas; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hazumi, Masashi; Holzapfel, William L.; Keating, Brian; Lee, Adrian T.; Morii, Hideki; Myers, Michael J.; Smecher, Graeme; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tomaru, Takayuki

    2013-12-01

    The POLARBEAR-2 Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiment aims to observe B-mode polarization with high sensitivity to explore gravitational lensing of CMB and inflationary gravitational waves. POLARBEAR-2 is an upgraded experiment based on POLARBEAR-1, which had first light in January 2012. For POLARBEAR-2, we will build a receiver that has 7588 Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers coupled to two-band (95 and 150 GHz) polarization-sensitive antennas. For the large array's readout, we employ digital frequency-domain multiplexing and multiplex 32 bolometers through a single superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). An 8-bolometer frequency-domain multiplexing readout has been deployed with the POLARBEAR-1 experiment. Extending that architecture to 32 bolometers requires an increase in the bandwidth of the SQUID electronics to 3 MHz. To achieve this increase in bandwidth, we use Digital Active Nulling (DAN) on the digital frequency multiplexing platform. In this paper, we present requirements and improvements on parasitic inductance and resistance of cryogenic wiring and capacitors used for modulating bolometers. These components are problematic above 1 MHz. We also show that our system is able to bias a bolometer in its superconducting transition at 3 MHz.

  8. Unified treatment and measurement of the spectral resolution and temporal effects in frequency-resolved sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-12-14

    The emergence of sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BBSFG-VS) [Velarde et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2011, 135, 241102] has offered new opportunities in obtaining and understanding the spectral lineshape and temporal effects on the surface vibrational spectroscopy. Particularly, the high accuracy in the HR-BBSFG-VS spectral lineshape measurement provides detailed information on the complex coherent vibrational dynamics through spectral measurement. Here we present a unified formalism of the theoretical and experimental approaches for obtaining the accurate lineshape of the SFG response, and then present a analysis on the higher and lower spectral resolution SFG spectra as well as their temporal effects of the cholesterol molecules at the air/water interface. With the high spectral resolution and accurate lineshape, it is shown that the parameters from the sub-wavenumber resolution SFG spectra can be used not only to understand but also to quantitatively reproduce the temporal effects in the lower resolution SFG measurement. These not only provide a unified picture in understanding both the frequency-domain and the time-domain SFG response of the complex molecular interface, but also provide novel experimental approaches that can directly measure them.

  9. Low-frequency electromagnetic plasma waves at comet P/Grigg-Skjellerup: Overview and spectral characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Neubauer, Fritz M.

    1993-01-01

    Large-amplitude electromagnetic plasma waves are one of the dominant features of the solar wind-comet interaction. Wave characteristics strongly depend on parameters such as the solar wind flow and Alfven velocities and the angle between flow and interplanetary magnetic field as well as the production rate. With respect to the latter the flyby of the spacecraft Giotto at comet P/Griff-Skjellerup provides a unique possibility to study such waves in further detail. Pickup ion-related wave signatures have been observed up to a distance of 600,000 km from the nucleus. Peak spectral power in the spacecraft frame of reference occurs at frequencies mainly somewhat below the water group ion gyrofrequency. From this the waves are determined to be mainly left-hand polarized waves, causing one-sided pitch angle diffusion outbound. The wave activity strongly increases close to the comet; upstream it exhibits a quadratic dependence on the water group pickup ion free energy. Furthermore, a phenomenological study of the wave characteristics provides a unique description of the fine-structure of the interaction region. Indications of steepened magnetosonic waves have been found in the outbound magnetosheath region.

  10. Analysis of the time series of the EEG frequency spectra and of EEG spectral power densities.

    PubMed

    Dvorák, J; Formánek, J; Kubát, J; Plevová, J; Vanícková, M; Fires, M; Andél, J; Cipra, T; Tomásek, L; Prásková, Z; Holoubková, E; Fabián, Z

    1981-06-01

    Some examples of the use of the principal component model for the economic description of the structure of the multiple time series and for the data reduction in the quantitative EEG studies are presented. The broad-band EEG frequency spectra were measured with the use of an electronic system designed by J. Dvorák. The EEG spectral power densities were computed via the discrete Fourier Transform (namely FFT) algorithm. The estimated two or three first principal components account for the major part of the total variance of individual EEG variables: The results hold for the used elementary epoch of measurement, i.e. 5 sec. - With the use of the algorithms and FORTRAN IV programs developed by J. Andĕl, T. Cipra and L. Tomásek a data reduction by a factor of 1:2000 can be achieved without any substantial loss of biological information. - The described methods help to obtain a better insight into the structure of the data and represent a powerful tool for data reduction at least in a certain class of experimental EEG studies (experimental toxicology, pharmacology, experimental neurology). PMID:7270023

  11. Optimal spectral filtering in soliton self-frequency shift for deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Qiu, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Tunable optical solitons generated by soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) have become valuable tools for multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Recent progress in MPM using 1700 nm excitation enabled visualizing subcortical structures in mouse brain in vivo for the first time. Such an excitation source can be readily obtained by SSFS in a large effective-mode-area photonic crystal rod with a 1550-nm fiber femtosecond laser. A longpass filter was typically used to isolate the soliton from the residual in order to avoid excessive energy deposit on the sample, which ultimately leads to optical damage. However, since the soliton was not cleanly separated from the residual, the criterion for choosing the optimal filtering wavelength is lacking. Here, we propose maximizing the ratio between the multiphoton signal and the n'th power of the excitation pulse energy as a criterion for optimal spectral filtering in SSFS when the soliton shows dramatic overlapping with the residual. This optimization is based on the most efficient signal generation and entirely depends on physical quantities that can be easily measured experimentally. Its application to MPM may reduce tissue damage, while maintaining high signal levels for efficient deep penetration.

  12. Experimental measurements of frequency transfer function due to smoothing by spectral dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, Jacques; Penninckx, Denis

    2013-02-01

    In order to avoid propagation nonlinearities (Kerr effect, Raman and Brillouin scattering) and optical damage, nanosecond high power lasers such as the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) amplify quasi-monochromatic pulses. But they generate a static speckle pattern in the focal spot. This speckle pattern needs to be smoothed in order to lower high intensity peaks which are detrimental during the propagation and the interaction with the plasma in the target. Different techniques are implemented to smooth the intensity nevertheless all high power lasers carry at least smoothing by spectral dispersion. It consists in broadening the spectrum through a phase modulator and focusing the different wavelengths at slightly different positions using a diffractive element such as a grating. In the temporal domain, it has been theoretically shown that the pulse power is thus filtered between near field and far field [1, 2]. The filtering allows techniques such as "picket fence" to increase conversion efficiency [1] and reduces detrimental effects of unwanted intensity distortions called FM-AM conversion [2, 3]. Here, to the best of our knowledge we show the first experimental measurement of the frequency transfer function of this filtering. Measurements are in perfect agreement with the numerical calculations.

  13. Micron-scale Frequency Selective Surfaces for Thermo-Photovoltaic spectral control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynolds, James; Anderson, Ted

    2001-03-01

    Frequency Selective Surfaces (FSS) are two-dimensional periodic arrays of electromagnetic scattering centers (e.g. apertures in a metal screen) which have desirable reflection and transmission properties for filtering applications. Such filters have widespread applications in radar and microwave communications and have been developed over the past thirty years. The advent of recent lithography techniques has made possible the fabrication of FSS arrays containing micron- (and submicron) scale feature sizes, thus opening the door for infra-red applications such as Thermo-Photovoltaics (TPV). The spectral control filter is a crucial component in a TPV system as it acts to recycle waste heat thus boosting efficiency. For TPV applications it is essential to have low absorption in the filter. We have designed, fabricated, and analyzed FSS filters containing submicron-scale feature sizes. An important result of the present study is the fact that absorption processes (ohmic loss) are dependent on geometric parameters. Detailed comparisons between theory and measurements will be presented.

  14. Optimal spectral filtering in soliton self-frequency shift for deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Qiu, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Tunable optical solitons generated by soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) have become valuable tools for multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Recent progress in MPM using 1700 nm excitation enabled visualizing subcortical structures in mouse brain in vivo for the first time. Such an excitation source can be readily obtained by SSFS in a large effective-mode-area photonic crystal rod with a 1550-nm fiber femtosecond laser. A longpass filter was typically used to isolate the soliton from the residual in order to avoid excessive energy deposit on the sample, which ultimately leads to optical damage. However, since the soliton was not cleanly separated from the residual, the criterion for choosing the optimal filtering wavelength is lacking. Here, we propose maximizing the ratio between the multiphoton signal and the n'th power of the excitation pulse energy as a criterion for optimal spectral filtering in SSFS when the soliton shows dramatic overlapping with the residual. This optimization is based on the most efficient signal generation and entirely depends on physical quantities that can be easily measured experimentally. Its application to MPM may reduce tissue damage, while maintaining high signal levels for efficient deep penetration. PMID:25950644

  15. Performance of Frequency Division Multiplexing Readout System for AC-Biased Transition-Edge Sensor X-ray Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, R.; Sakai, K.; Takei, Y.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Mitsuda, K.

    2014-08-01

    Frequency division multiplexing (FDM) is a promising approach to read out a large format transition-edge sensor (TES) array for future astrophysical missions. We constructed a four channel FDM readout system using baseband feedback in the MHz band. We demonstrated the principle of our FDM method with an actual TES array, a multiplexing SQUID and LC band-pass filters under 100 mK. The resonant frequencies of LC filters were consistent with the design value with an accuracy of better than 3 %. We successfully obtained X-ray pulses from two TESs simultaneously but the energy resolution was degraded to about 100 eV at 5.9 keV and crosstalk effects were observed. The origin of the crosstalk effects is investigated by modified setups. Based on comparative experiments and numerical calculations, we conclude that the non-linearity of the SQUID is the cause of some of the crosstalk effects. Unlike the regular crosstalk effect from the adjoining channels, the crosstalk effect due to non-linearity observed in this paper occurs in all channels. Solving these problems will help us to obtain FDM readout with sufficient energy resolution.

  16. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.

  17. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signaturesmore » in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.« less

  18. Performance of short-time spectral parametric methods for reducing the variance of the Doppler ultrasound mean instantaneous frequency estimation.

    PubMed

    Sava, H; Durand, L G; Cloutier, G

    1999-05-01

    To achieve an accurate estimation of the instantaneous turbulent velocity fluctuations downstream of prosthetic heart valves in vivo, the variability of the spectral method used to measure the mean frequency shift of the Doppler signal (i.e. the Doppler velocity) should be minimised. This paper investigates the performance of various short-time spectral parametric methods such as the short-time Fourier transform, autoregressive modelling based on two different approaches, autoregressive moving average modelling based on the Steiglitz-McBride method, and Prony's spectral method. A simulated Doppler signal was used to evaluate the performance of the above mentioned spectral methods and Gaussian noise was added to obtain a set of signals with various signal-to-noise ratios. Two different parameters were used to evaluate the performance of each method in terms of variability and accurate matching of the theoretical Doppler mean instantaneous frequency variation within the cardiac cycle. Results show that autoregressive modelling outperforms the other investigated spectral techniques for window lengths varying between 1 and 10 ms. Among the autoregressive algorithms implemented, it is shown that the maximum entropy method based on a block data processing technique gives the best results for a signal-to-noise ratio of 20 dB. However, at 10 and 0 dB, the Levinson-Durbin algorithm surpasses the performance of the maximum entropy method. It is expected that the intrinsic variance of the spectral methods can be an important source of error for the estimation of the turbulence intensity. The range of this error varies from 0.38% to 24% depending on the parameters of the spectral method and the signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:10505377

  19. Spatially-dense, multi-spectral, frequency-domain diffuse optical tomography of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Han Yong

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) employs near-infrared light to image the concentration of chromophores and cell organelles in tissue and thereby providing access to functional parameters that can differentiate cancerous from normal tissues. This thesis describes research at the bench and in the clinic that explores and identifies the potential of DOT breast cancer imaging. The bench and clinic instrumentation differ but share important features: they utilize a very large, spatially dense, set of source-detector pairs (10 7) for imaging in the parallel-plate geometry. The bench experiments explored three-dimensional (3D) image resolution and fidelity as a function of numerous parameters and also ascertained the effects of a chest wall phantom. The chest wall is always present but is typically ignored in breast DOT. My experiments clarified chest wall influences and developed schemes to mitigate these effects. Mostly, these schemes involved selective data exclusion, but their efficacy also depended on reconstruction approach. Reconstruction algorithms based on analytic (fast) Fourier inversion and linear algebraic techniques were explored. The clinical experiments centered around a DOT instrument that I designed, constructed, and have begun to test (in-vitro and in-vivo). This instrumentation offers many features new to the field. Specifically, the imager employs spatially-dense, multi-spectral, frequency-domain data; it possesses the world's largest optical source-detector density yet reported, facilitated by highly-parallel CCD-based frequency-domain imaging based on gain-modulation heterodyne detection. The instrument thus measures both phase and amplitude of the diffusive light waves. Other features include both frontal and sagittal breast imaging capabilities, ancillary cameras for measurement of breast boundary profiles, real-time data normalization, and mechanical improvements for patient comfort. The instrument design and construction is my most significant

  20. Vibrational Spectral Signatures of Crystalline Cellulose Using High Resolution Broadband Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Art J.; Wang, Hongfei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Here we reported the first sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) study on both the C-H and O-H region spectra of crystalline cellulose. HR-BB-SFG-VS has about 10 times better resolution than the conventional scanning SFG-VS and is known to be able to measure the intrinsic spectral lineshape and to resolve much more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the OH regions were unique for different allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C-H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different behaviors of the crystalline cellulose in the O-H and C-H vibrational frequency regions is yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results provided new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and understand the basic crystalline structure, as well as variations, in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose structure.

  1. Determining the von Mises stress power spectral density for frequency domain fatigue analysis including out-of-phase stress components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, M. H. A.; de Boer, A.; Liebregts, R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper provides a new formula to take into account phase differences in the determination of an equivalent von Mises stress power spectral density (PSD) from multiple random inputs. The obtained von Mises PSD can subsequently be used for fatigue analysis. The formula was derived for use in the commercial vehicle business and was implemented in combination with Finite Element software to predict and analyse fatigue failure in the frequency domain.

  2. Effects of spectral smearing on the identification of speech in noise filtered into low- and mid-frequency regions.

    PubMed

    Léger, Agnès C; Moore, Brian C J; Gnansia, Dan; Lorenzi, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Léger et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 131, 1502-1514 (2012)] reported deficits in the identification of consonants in noise by hearing-impaired listeners using stimuli filtered into low- or mid-frequency regions in which audiometric thresholds were normal or near-normal. The deficits could not be fully explained in terms of reduced audibility or temporal-envelope processing. However, previous studies indicate that the listeners may have had reduced frequency selectivity, with auditory filters broadened by a factor of about 1.3, despite having normal or near-normal audiometric thresholds in the tested regions. The present study aimed to determine whether the speech-perception deficits could be explained by such a small reduction of frequency selectivity. Consonant identification was measured for normal-hearing listeners in quiet and in unmodulated and modulated noises using the same method as Léger et al. The signal-to-noise ratio was set to -3 dB for the masked conditions. Various amounts of reduced frequency selectivity were simulated using a spectral-smearing algorithm. Performance was reduced only for spectral-smearing factors greater than 1.7. For all conditions, identification scores for hearing-impaired listeners could not be explained by a mild reduction of frequency selectivity. PMID:22559383

  3. Edge-filter technique and dominant frequency analysis for high-speed railway monitoring with fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroussis, Georges; Kinet, Damien; Mendoza, Edgar; Dupuy, Julien; Moeyaert, Véronique; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Structural health and operation monitoring are of growing interest in the development of railway networks. Conventional systems of infrastructure monitoring already exist (e.g. axle counters, track circuits) but present some drawbacks. Alternative solutions are therefore studied and developed. In this field, optical fiber sensors, and more particularly fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, are particularly relevant due to their immunity to electromagnetic fields and simple wavelength-division-multiplexing capability. Field trials conducted up to now have demonstrated that FBG sensors provide useful information about train composition, positioning, speed, acceleration and weigh-in-motion estimations. Nevertheless, for practical deployment, cost-effectiveness should be ensured, specifically at the interrogator side that has also to be fast (>1 kHz repetition rate), accurate (∼1 pm wavelength shift) and reliable. To reach this objective, we propose in this paper to associate a low cost and high-speed interrogator coupled with an adequate signal-processing algorithm to dynamically monitor cascaded wavelength-multiplexed FBGs and to accurately capture the parameters of interest for railway traffic monitoring. This method has been field-tested with a Redondo Optics Inc. interrogator based on the well-known edge-filter demodulation technique. To determine the train speed from the raw data, a dominant frequency analysis has been implemented. Using this original method, we show that we can retrieve the speed of the trains, even when the time history strain signature is strongly affected by the measurement noise. The results are assessed by complimentary data obtained from a spectrometer-based FBG interrogator.

  4. Drug Treated Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective and Bipolar Disorder Patients Evaluated by qEEG Absolute Spectral Power and Mean Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wix-Ramos, Richard; Moreno, Xiomara; Capote, Eduardo; González, Gilbert; Uribe, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Research of electroencephalograph (EEG) power spectrum and mean frequency has shown inconsistent results in patients with schizophrenic, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders during medication when compared to normal subjects thus; the characterization of these parameters is an important task. Methods We applied quantitative EEG (qEEG) to investigate 38 control, 15 schizophrenic, 7 schizoaffective and 11 bipolar disorder subjects which remaine under the administration of psychotropic drugs (except control group). Absolute spectral power (ASP), mean frequency and hemispheric electrical asymmetry were measured by 19 derivation qEEG. Group mean values were compared with non parametrical Mann-Whitney test and spectral EEG maps with z-score method at p < 0.05. Results Most frequent drug treatments for schizophrenic patients were neuroleptic+antiepileptic (40% of cases) or 2 neuroleptics (33.3%). Schizoaffective patients received neuroleptic+benzodiazepine (71.4%) and for bipolar disorder patients neuroleptic+antiepileptic (81.8%). Schizophrenic (at all derivations except for Fp1, Fp2, F8 and T6) and schizoaffective (only at C3) show higher values of ASP (+57.7% and +86.1% respectively) compared to control group. ASP of bipolar disorder patients did not show differences against control group. The mean frequency was higher at Fp1 (+14.2%) and Fp2 (+17.4%) in bipolar disorder patients than control group, but no differences were found in frequencies between schizophrenic or schizoaffective patients against the control group. Majority of spectral differences were found at the left hemisphere in schizophrenic and schizoaffective but not in bipolar disorder subjects. Conclusion The present report contributes to characterize quantitatively the qEEG in drug treated schizophrenic, schizoaffective or bipolar disorder patients. PMID:24851121

  5. Spectral features of the quasielastic line in amorphous solids and supercooled liquids: a detailed low-frequency Raman scattering study.

    PubMed

    Yannopoulos, S N; Kastrissios, D Th

    2002-02-01

    The spectral features of the quasielastic light scattering in amorphous solids and supercooled liquids are investigated through a combined Stokes and antiStokes low-frequency Raman scattering study. Emphasis is given on the specific spectral details of the quasielastic line rather than on elucidating its microscopic origin. Our approach is quite general since it includes glass formers with a strong, an intermediate, and a fragile dynamic character. The results suggest that the quasielastic contribution is a symmetric spectral feature around the laser line. This finding makes possible the separation of the quasielastic line and the Boson peak. It further raises certain skepticism concerning reduction schemes followed up in the literature for the analysis of low-frequency Raman data and for models that combine these two contributions. The limiting (omega-->0) behavior of the product of the vibrational density of states and the Raman coupling coefficient has also been extracted. The validity of some phenomenological approaches is also discussed in light of the experimental facts presented in this paper and some suggestions are being advanced. PMID:11863533

  6. Statistical Analysis of the High-Frequency Spectral Break of the Solar Wind Turbulence at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovskii, S. A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Smith, Charles W.

    2008-03-01

    The physical mechanism responsible for the dissipation of the solar wind turbulence and the resulting plasma heating is not completely understood. To be a viable means of dissipation, any mechanism has to reproduce several observational features of the turbulence spectra. One important characteristic of the spectrum is its high-frequency break, where the spectral slope becomes considerably steeper than the Kolmogorov-like scaling law observed in the inertial range. The onset of the spectral steepening can be inferred from the observations fairly accurately, and it is a good benchmark to test various theories of the turbulence dissipation. In this paper, a large database of magnetic field spectra and plasma parameters at 1 AU measured by the ACE spacecraft is used to determine the spectral break. The statistical correlation of the data points calculated according to existing theoretical formulae for the break is analyzed, and the least-squares fits to the data are compared with the theoretically predicted scalings. It is concluded that the position of the spectral break is not determined just by a scale of the turbulent fluctuations, but by a combination of their scale and the amplitude at that scale. This suggests that the dissipation of the solar wind turbulence is an essentially nonlinear process.

  7. Statistical Analysis of the High-Frequency Spectral Break of the Solar Wind Turbulence at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovskii, S.; Vasquez, B.; Smith, C.

    2007-12-01

    The physical mechanism responsible for the dissipation of the solar wind turbulence and the resulting plasma heating is not completely understood. To be a viable means of dissipation, any mechanism has to reproduce several observational features of the turbulence spectra. One of the important characteristics of the spectrum is its high-frequency break where the spectral slope becomes considerably steeper than the Kolmogorov-like scaling law observed in the inertial range. The onset of the spectral steepening can be inferred from the observations fairly accurately and it is a good benchmark to test various theories of the turbulence dissipation. We use a large database of magnetic field spectra and plasma parameters at 1 AU measured by the ACE spacecraft to determine the spectral break. The statistical correlation of the data points calculated according to various theoretical formulas for the break is analyzed and the least squares fits to the data are compared with the theoretically predicted scalings. We conclude that the position of the spectral break is not determined just by a scale of the turbulent fluctuations but by a combination of their scale and the amplitude at that scale. This means that the dissipation of the solar wind turbulence is an essentially nonlinear process.

  8. Selective ensemble modeling load parameters of ball mill based on multi-scale frequency spectral features and sphere criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian; Yu, Wen; Chai, Tianyou; Liu, Zhuo; Zhou, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to model multi-frequency signal, such as mechanical vibration and acoustic signals of wet ball mill in the mineral grinding process. In this paper, these signals are decomposed into multi-scale intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) technique. A new adaptive multi-scale spectral features selection approach based on sphere criterion (SC) is applied to these IMFs frequency spectra. The candidate sub-models are constructed by the partial least squares (PLS) with the selected features. Finally, the branch and bound based selective ensemble (BBSEN) algorithm is applied to select and combine these ensemble sub-models. This method can be easily extended to regression and classification problems with multi-time scale signal. We successfully apply this approach to a laboratory-scale ball mill. The shell vibration and acoustic signals are used to model mill load parameters. The experimental results demonstrate that this novel approach is more effective than the other modeling methods based on multi-scale frequency spectral features.

  9. On-chip multi spectral frequency standard replication by stabilizing a microring resonator to a molecular line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zektzer, Roy; Stern, Liron; Mazurski, Noa; Levy, Uriel

    2016-07-01

    Stabilized laser lines are highly desired for myriad of applications ranging from precise measurements to optical communications. While stabilization can be obtained by using molecular or atomic absorption references, these are limited to specific frequencies. On the other hand, resonators can be used as wide band frequency references. Unfortunately, such resonators are unstable and inaccurate. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a chip-scale multispectral frequency standard replication operating in the spectral range of the near IR. This is obtained by frequency locking a microring resonator (MRR) to an acetylene absorption line. The MRR consists of a Si3N4 waveguides with microheater on top of it. The thermo-optic effect is utilized to lock one of the MRR resonances to an acetylene line. This locked MRR is then used to stabilize other laser sources at 980 nm and 1550 nm wavelength. By beating the stabilized laser to another stabilized laser, we obtained frequency instability floor of 4 ×10-9 at around 100 s in terms of Allan deviation. Such stable and accurate chip scale sources are expected to serve as important building block in diverse fields such as communication and metrology.

  10. Spectral hole-burning and stark effect: frequency dependence of the induced dipoe moment of a squaraine dye in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vauthey, Eric; Voss, Jochen; de Caro, Cosimo; Renn, Alois; Wild, Urs P.

    1994-06-01

    A study of the effect of an external electric field on spectral holes burnt at different frequencies in the inhomogeneous absorption band of a centrosymmetric squaraine dye, bis [4-(diethylamino)-2-hydroxyphenyl] squaraine (DEAH), in polymers of different polarity is presented. Average matrix induced dipole moment differences of about 1 D and 0.37 D were measured in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the long axis of DEAH. In all polymers investigated, the induced dipole moment difference decreased from the higher to the lower frequencies. Solvatochromic shift measurements were performed in order to elucidate the origin of this effect. The matrix field inducing the dipole moment is also partially responsible for the frequency shift of the absorption of DEAH. With increasing matrix field, the absorptiion frequency is shifted to the blue due to electrostatic interaction with the local dipoles of DEAH. The contribution of the electrostatic interactions to the frequency shift is smaller than the dispersion interactions by two orders of magnitude in polystyrene, but increases slightly in more polar polymers.

  11. An online algorithm for least-square spectral analysis: Applied to time-frequency analysis of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Leong, Philip H W

    2015-08-01

    We propose a novel online algorithm for computing least-square based periodograms, otherwise known as the Lomb-Scargle Periodogram. Our spectral analysis technique has been shown to be superior to traditional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods, and we introduce an algorithm which has O(N) time complexity per input sample. The technique is suitable for real-time embedded implementations and its utility is demonstrated through an application to the high resolution time-frequency domain analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). PMID:26736732

  12. Efficient spectral hole-burning and atomic frequency comb storage in Nd3+:YLiF4

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zong-Quan; Wang, Jian; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2013-01-01

    We present spectral hole-burning measurements of the 4I9/2 → 4F3/2 transition in Nd3+:YLiF4. The isotope shifts of Nd3+ can be directly resolved in the optical absorption spectrum. We report atomic frequency comb storage with an echo efficiency of up to 35% and a memory bandwidth of 60 MHz in this material. The interesting properties show the potential of this material for use in both quantum and classical information processing. PMID:24067549

  13. Topographic power spectral density study of the effect of surface treatment processes on niobium for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece, Hui Tian, Michael Kelley, Chen Xu

    2012-04-01

    Microroughness is viewed as a critical issue for attaining optimum performance of superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. The principal surface smoothing methods are buffered chemical polish (BCP) and electropolish (EP). The resulting topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power spectral density (PSD) of AFM data provides a more thorough description of the topography than a single-value roughness measurement. In this work, one dimensional average PSD functions derived from topography of BCP and EP with different controlled starting conditions and durations have been fitted with a combination of power law, K correlation, and shifted Gaussian models to extract characteristic parameters at different spatial harmonic scales. While the simplest characterizations of these data are not new, the systematic tracking of scale-specific roughness as a function of processing is new and offers feedback for tighter process prescriptions more knowledgably targeted at beneficial niobium topography for superconducting radio frequency applications.

  14. Power spectral density estimation by spline smoothing in the frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defigueiredo, R. J. P.; Thompson, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    An approach, based on a global averaging procedure, is presented for estimating the power spectrum of a second order stationary zero-mean ergodic stochastic process from a finite length record. This estimate is derived by smoothing, with a cubic smoothing spline, the naive estimate of the spectrum obtained by applying FFT techniques to the raw data. By means of digital computer simulated results, a comparison is made between the features of the present approach and those of more classical techniques of spectral estimation.

  15. Power spectral density estimation by spline smoothing in the frequency domain.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Figueiredo, R. J. P.; Thompson, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    An approach, based on a global averaging procedure, is presented for estimating the power spectrum of a second order stationary zero-mean ergodic stochastic process from a finite length record. This estimate is derived by smoothing, with a cubic smoothing spline, the naive estimate of the spectrum obtained by applying Fast Fourier Transform techniques to the raw data. By means of digital computer simulated results, a comparison is made between the features of the present approach and those of more classical techniques of spectral estimation.-

  16. Spectral evolution of two-dimensional kinetic plasma turbulence in the wavenumber-frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Comişel, H.; Verscharen, D.; Narita, Y.; Motschmann, U.

    2013-09-15

    We present a method for studying the evolution of plasma turbulence by tracking dispersion relations in the energy spectrum in the wavenumber-frequency domain. We apply hybrid plasma simulations in a simplified two-dimensional geometry to demonstrate our method and its applicability to plasma turbulence in the ion kinetic regime. We identify four dispersion relations: ion-Bernstein waves, oblique whistler waves, oblique Alfvén/ion-cyclotron waves, and a zero-frequency mode. The energy partition and frequency broadening are evaluated for these modes. The method allows us to determine the evolution of decaying plasma turbulence in our restricted geometry and shows that it cascades along the dispersion relations during the early phase with an increasing broadening around the dispersion relations.

  17. Spectral line shapes and frequencies of the molecular oxygen B-band R-branch transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domysławska, Jolanta; Wójtewicz, Szymon; Masłowski, Piotr; Cygan, Agata; Bielska, Katarzyna; Trawiński, Ryszard S.; Ciuryło, Roman; Lisak, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We present the line-shape parameters for the first 11 lines of the oxygen B-band R-branch self-broadened transitions measured at low pressures by the Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectrometer (PDH-locked FS-CRDS) linked to the optical frequency comb. The collisional self-broadening, shifting and narrowing parameters were determined together with the quadratic speed-dependence as well as phase- and velocity-changing correlations parameters. The absolute frequencies of the transitions with combined standard uncertainties below 150 kHz are reported. Dependence of line parameters on choice of the line-shape model is discussed.

  18. Spectral and temporal characterization of a fused-quartz-microresonator optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Scott B.; Diddams, Scott A.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the fabrication of high-Q, fused-quartz microresonators and the parametric generation of a frequency comb with 36-GHz line spacing using them. We have characterized the intrinsic stability of the comb in both the time and frequency domains to assess its suitability for future precision metrology applications. Intensity autocorrelation measurements and line-by-line comb control reveal near-transform-limited picosecond pulse trains that are associated with good relative phase and amplitude stability of the comb lines. The comb's 36-GHz line spacing can be readily photodetected, which enables measurements of its intrinsic and absolute phase fluctuations.

  19. Real-time automatic small infrared target detection using local spectral filtering in the frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Zhang, Hong; Li, Jiafeng; Yuan, Ding; Sun, Mingui

    2014-11-01

    Accurate and fast detection of small infrared target has very important meaning for infrared precise guidance, early warning, video surveillance, etc. Based on human visual attention mechanism, an automatic detection algorithm for small infrared target is presented. In this paper, instead of searching for infrared targets, we model regular patches that do not attract much attention by our visual system. This is inspired by the property that the regular patches in spatial domain turn out to correspond to the spikes in the amplitude spectrum. Unlike recent approaches using global spectral filtering, we define the concept of local maxima suppression using local spectral filtering to smooth the spikes in the amplitude spectrum, thereby producing the pop-out of the infrared targets. In the proposed method, we firstly compute the amplitude spectrum of an input infrared image. Second, we find the local maxima of the amplitude spectrum using cubic facet model. Third, we suppress the local maxima using the convolution of the local spectrum with a low-pass Gaussian kernel of an appropriate scale. At last, the detection result in spatial domain is obtained by reconstructing the 2D signal using the original phase and the log amplitude spectrum by suppressing local maxima. The experiments are performed for some real-life IR images, and the results prove that the proposed method has satisfying detection effectiveness and robustness. Meanwhile, it has high detection efficiency and can be further used for real-time detection and tracking.

  20. Sensitivity of a frequency-selective electrode based on spatial spectral properties of the extracellular AP of myelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Rossel, Olivier; Soulier, Fabien; Bernard, Serge; Cathébras, Guy

    2011-01-01

    In the context of functional electrical stimulation, neural recording is one of the main issues. For instance, the control of the limbs in people with motor deficiencies needs information about the muscle lengths and speeds that can be extracted from electroneurograms (ENG) carried on afferent peripheral nerves. The aim of this study is to propose an non-invasive and spatial-selective electrode (because specific informations are carried into different fascicles). To do so, we investigate the spatial properties of an extracellular action potential (AP). This properties are described qualitatively and quantitatively using analytical study on an inhomogeneous an anisotropic nerve model. Then, a spectral analysis on this spatial signal discriminates the different frequency components. Low spatial frequencies represent the global shape of the signal, whereas high frequencies are related to the type of fibers. We show that the latter is rapidly attenuated with the distance and thus, being a local phenomenon, can be used as a selective measurement. Finally, we propose a spatial filtering based on electrode design and an electronic architecture to extract this high frequencies. PMID:22255668

  1. Frequency spectral analysis of GPR data over a crude oil spill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, B.L.; Olhoeft, G.R.; Powers, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    A multi-offset ground penetrating radar (GPR) dataset was acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota, USA. The dataset consists of two, parallel profiles, each with 17 transmitter-receiver offsets ranging from 0.60 to 5.15m. One profile was acquired over a known oil pool floating on the water table, and the other profile was acquired over an uncontaminated area. The data appear to be more attenuated, or at least exhibit less reflectivity, in the area over the oil pool. In an attempt to determine the frequency dependence of this apparent attenuation, several attributes of the frequency spectra of the data were analyzed after accounting for the effects on amplitude of the radar system (radiation pattern), changes in antenna-ground coupling, and spherical divergence. The attributes analyzed were amplitude spectra peak frequency, 6 dB down, or half-amplitude, spectrum width, and the low and high frequency slopes between the 3 and 9 dB down points. The most consistent trend was observed for Fourier transformed full traces at offsets 0.81, 1.01, and 1.21m which displayed steeper low frequency slopes over the area corresponding to the oil pool. The Fourier-transformed time-windowed traces, where each window was equal to twice the airwave wavelet length, exhibited weakly consistent attribute trends from offset to offset and from window to window. The fact that strong, consistent oil indicators are not seen in this analysis indicates that another mechanism due to the presence of the oil, such as a gradient in the electromagnetic properties, may simply suppress reflections over the contaminated zone.

  2. Long-term, high-frequency water quality monitoring in an agricultural catchment: insights from spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Alice; Kirchner, James; Faucheux, Mikael; Merot, Philippe; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2013-04-01

    The choice of sampling frequency is a key issue in the design and operation of environmental observatories. The choice of sampling frequency creates a spectral window (or temporal filter) that highlights some timescales and processes, and de-emphasizes others (1). New online measurement technologies can monitor surface water quality almost continuously, allowing the creation of very rich time series. The question of how best to analyze such detailed temporal datasets is an important issue in environmental monitoring. In the present work, we studied water quality data from the AgrHys long-term hydrological observatory (located at Kervidy-Naizin, Western France) sampled at daily and 20-minute time scales. Manual sampling has provided 12 years of daily measurements of nitrate, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chloride and sulfate (2), and 3 years of daily measurements of about 30 other solutes. In addition, a UV-spectrometry probe (Spectrolyser) provides one year of 20-minute measurements for nitrate and DOC. Spectral analysis of the daily water quality time series reveals that our intensively farmed catchment exhibits universal 1/f scaling (power spectrum slope of -1) for a large number of solutes, confirming and extending the earlier discovery of universal 1/f scaling in the relatively pristine Plynlimon catchment (3). 1/f time series confound conventional methods for assessing the statistical significance of trends. Indeed, conventional methods assume that there is a clear separation of scales between the signal (the trend line) and the noise (the scatter around the line). This is not true for 1/f noise, since it overestimates the occurrence of significant trends. Our results raise the possibility that 1/f scaling is widespread in water quality time series, thus posing fundamental challenges to water quality trend analysis. Power spectra of the 20-minute nitrate and DOC time series show 1/f scaling at frequencies below 1/day, consistent with the longer-term daily

  3. Fabry-Pérot filter cavities for wide-spaced frequency combs with large spectral bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, T.; Wilken, T.; Araujo-Hauck, C.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.; Udem, T.

    2009-08-01

    We use low-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavities in series to generate frequency combs with a large mode spacing in a way that allows its application to a large optical bandwidth. The attenuation of laser modes closest to the pass bands of the cavity exceeds 70 dB for a filter ratio of m=20 relative to the resonant modes centered within the pass bands. We also identify the best cavity geometry to suppress spurious transmission of higher order transversal modes. Such a thinned out frequency comb can be used to calibrate traditional spectrographs for precision astronomy. In the time domain mode filtering generates a pulse train with a multiplied repetition rate. High-fidelity filtering, as described here, implies small variations of the pulse energies.

  4. High-frequency poly(vinylidene fluoride) copolymer transducers used for spectral characterization of settled microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melandsø, Frank; Wagle, Sanat; Decharat, Adit; Habib, Anowarul; Ahluwalia, Balpreet S.

    2016-07-01

    High-frequency ultrasonic polymer transducers are used to investigate backscattering from spherical microparticles. These microspheres are immersed in water and allowed to settle on a polymer substrate acting as an ultrasonic contact material between the immersion fluid and the transducer. The experimental study is complemented with a three-dimensional (3D) numerical investigation; both yield rather long scattered waveforms in the time domain for the largest microparticles. The corresponding frequency spectra typically contain a number of minima values arising from wave resonances in the microparticles. The locations of these resonances, or eigenvalues, correlate strongly to the particle size. Good agreement is obtained between the experiment and the numerical model, which will help to identify the wave mode responsible for the extended scattering.

  5. The seismic ambient noise spectral ratio H/V under de diffuse field approach for simple layered models: Asymptotic behavior for low and high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzón, F.; García-Jerez, A.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Lunedei, E.; Albarello, D.; Santoyo, M. A.; Almendros, J.

    2013-05-01

    The possibility of retrieving the elastodynamic Green's tensor between two points within an elastic medium from time-domain correlation of ambient noise recorded at such sites was duly confirmed in the pioneering seismic experiments by Campillo and Paul (2003) and Shapiro and Campillo (2004). Afterwards, several theoretical works on this subject have been conducted for simple models showing that such a possibility implies the condition of diffuse wavefield which requires isotropy of the illumination or the fulfillment of certain relationships between the energies of different types of waves (derived from the energy equipartition principle). In this work we examine the reliability of the usual assumptions that emerge from the Diffuse Field Approach (DFA). In particular we deal with the wavefield composition in applications regarding the passive seismic prospecting. We revise briefly the more general formulation of the DFA for full wavefield (FW). In this case the contribution of each wave to the horizontal-and vertical power spectra at surface are analyzed for a simple elastic waveguide (for instance the continental crust-upper mantle interface). Special attention is paid to their compositions at low-and high-frequencies, obtaining the relative powers of each surface wave (SW) type by means of a semi-analytical analysis. We found for some simple models that if body waves are removed from the analysis, the high-frequency horizontal asymptote of the H/V spectral ratio decreases slightly (from 1.33 for FW to around 1.14 for SW) and shows dependence on both the Poisson's ratio of the crust and the S-wave velocity contrast (while FW-H/V asymptote depends on the former only). Experimental tests for a broad band network deployed at SW Pyrenees edge provide H/V curves compatible with any of these values in the band 0.2-1Hz, approximately, supporting the applicability of the DFA approximation. Coexistence of multiple SW-modes produces distortion in the amplitude of both

  6. High frequency edge enhancement in the detection of fine pulmonary lines. Parity between storage phosphor digital images and conventional chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Oestmann, J W; Greene, R; Rubens, J R; Pile-Spellman, E; Hall, D; Robertson, C; Llewellyn, H J; McCarthy, K A; Potsaid, M; White, G

    1989-09-01

    Fine linear structures represent a severe test of the minimum spatial resolution that is needed for digital chest imaging. We studied the comparative observer performance of storage phosphor digital imaging (1760 X 2140 pixel matrix, 10 bits deep), and conventional radiography (Lanex medium screen, Ortho C film) in the detection of simulated fine pulmonary lines superimposed on the normal chest when exposure factors were identical (20mR skin entrance dose at 141 kVp). Receiver operating characteristics analysis of 2160 observations by six readers found that high frequency edge-enhanced digital images (ROC area: 0.78 +/- 0.06) performed better than unenhanced digital images (ROC area: 0.70 +/- 0.07) (P less than 0.01 for paired t-test), and that edge enhanced digital images performed on a par with conventional radiography (ROC area: 0.78 +/- 0.09). We conclude that for the detection of fine linear structures, storage phosphor digital images can perform on a par with higher resolution conventional chest radiographs when a high frequency edge-enhancement algorithm is employed. PMID:2807816

  7. Relic gravitational waves with a running spectral index and its constraints at high frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, M. L.; Zhang, Y.

    2009-10-15

    We study the impact of a running index {alpha}{sub t} on the spectrum of relic gravitational waves (RGWs) over the whole range of frequency (10{sup -18}{approx}10{sup 10}) Hz and reveal its implications in RGWs detections and in cosmology. Analytical calculations show that, although the spectrum of RGWs on low frequencies is less affected by {alpha}{sub t}{ne}0, on high frequencies, the spectrum is modified substantially. Investigations are made toward potential detections of the {alpha}{sub t}-modified RGWs for several kinds of current and planned detectors. The Advanced LIGO will likely be able to detect RGWs with {alpha}{sub t}{>=}0 for inflationary models with the inflation index {beta}=-1.956 and the tensor-scalar ratio r=0.55. The future LISA can detect RGWs for a much broader range of ({alpha}{sub t},{beta},r), and will have a better chance to break a degeneracy between them. Constraints on {alpha}{sub t} are estimated from several detections and cosmological observations. Among them, the most stringent one is from the bound of the big bang nucleosynthesis, and requires {alpha}{sub t}<0.008 rather conservatively for any reasonable ({beta},r), preferring a nearly power-law spectrum of RGWs. In light of this result, one would expect the scalar running index {alpha}{sub s} to be of the same magnitude as {alpha}{sub t}, if both RGWs and scalar perturbations are generated by the same scalar inflation.

  8. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  9. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  10. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor.

  11. Multi-frequency monitoring of γ-ray loud blazars. I. Light curves and spectral energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, U.; Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Buemi, C. S.; Larionov, V. M.; Letog, P.; Arkharov, A. A.; Coloma, J. M.; di Paola, A.; Dolci, M.; Efimova, N.; Forné, E.; Ibrahimov, M. A.; Hagen-Thorn, V.; Konstantinova, T.; Kopatskaya, E.; Lanteri, L.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Maccaferri, G.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Orlati, A.; Ros, J. A.; Tosti, G.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.

    2007-03-01

    Context: Being dominated by non-thermal emission from aligned relativistic jets, blazars allow us to elucidate the physics of extragalactic jets, and, ultimately, how the energy is extracted from the central black hole in radio-loud active galactic nuclei. Aims: Crucial information is provided by broad-band spectral energy distributions (SEDs), their trends with luminosity and correlated multi-frequency variability. With this study we plan to obtain a database of contemporaneous radio-to-optical spectra of a sample of blazars, which are and will be observed by current and future high-energy satellites. Methods: Since December 2004 we are performing a monthly multi-frequency radio monitoring of a sample of 35 blazars at the antennas in Medicina and Noto. Contemporaneous near-IR and optical observations for all our observing epochs are organised. Results: Until June 2006 about 4000 radio measurements and 5500 near-IR and optical measurements were obtained. Most of the sources show significant variability in all observing bands. Here we present the multi-frequency data acquired during the first eighteen months of the project, and construct the SEDs for the best-sampled sources.

  12. Dual-frequency radar Doppler spectral retrieval of rain drop size distributions and entangled dynamics variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tridon, F.; Battaglia, A.

    2015-06-01

    A novel technique based on Ka-W band dual-wavelength Doppler spectra has been developed for the simultaneous retrieval of binned rain drop size distributions (DSD) and air state parameters like vertical wind and air broadening caused by turbulence and wind shear. The rationale underpinning the method consists in exploiting the peculiar features observed in Doppler spectra caused by the wavelength dependence of scattering and absorption properties. A notional study based on a large data set of DSDs measured by a two-dimensional video disdrometer demonstrates that the retrieval performs best for small/moderate air broadening spectral width and when mean volume diameters exceed at least 1 mm. The retrieval is also limited to ranges below cloud base and where the signal-to-noise ratio of both radars exceed 10 dB, which rules out regions affected by strong attenuation. Broadly speaking, it is applicable to rain rates comprised between roughly 1 and 30 mm h-1. Preliminary retrieval for observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site shows very good agreement with independent reflectivity measurements from a 0.915 GHz wind profiler. The proposed methodology shows great potential in linking microphysics to dynamics in rainfall studies.

  13. Laser-Frequency Stabilization Based on Steady-State Spectral-Hole Burning in Eu(3+)∶Y(2)SiO(5).

    PubMed

    Cook, Shon; Rosenband, Till; Leibrandt, David R

    2015-06-26

    We present and analyze a method of laser-frequency stabilization via steady-state patterns of spectral holes in Eu(3+)∶Y(2)SiO(5). Three regions of spectral holes are created, spaced in frequency by the ground-state hyperfine splittings of (151)Eu(3+). The absorption pattern is shown not to degrade after days of laser-frequency stabilization. An optical frequency comparison of a laser locked to such a steady-state spectral-hole pattern with an independent cavity-stabilized laser and a Yb optical lattice clock demonstrates a spectral-hole fractional frequency instability of 1.0×10(-15)τ(-1/2) that averages to 8.5(-1.8)(+4.8)×10(-17) at τ=73  s. Residual amplitude modulation at the frequency of the rf drive applied to the fiber-coupled electro-optic modulator is reduced to less than 1×10(-6) fractional amplitude modulation at τ>1  s by an active servo. The contribution of residual amplitude modulation to the laser-frequency instability is further reduced by digital division of the transmission and incident photodetector signals to less than 1×10(-16) at τ>1  s. PMID:26197127

  14. Laser-Frequency Stabilization Based on Steady-State Spectral-Hole Burning in Eu3 +∶Y2SiO5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Shon; Rosenband, Till; Leibrandt, David R.

    2015-06-01

    We present and analyze a method of laser-frequency stabilization via steady-state patterns of spectral holes in Eu3 +∶Y2SiO5 . Three regions of spectral holes are created, spaced in frequency by the ground-state hyperfine splittings of 151Eu 3+. The absorption pattern is shown not to degrade after days of laser-frequency stabilization. An optical frequency comparison of a laser locked to such a steady-state spectral-hole pattern with an independent cavity-stabilized laser and a Yb optical lattice clock demonstrates a spectral-hole fractional frequency instability of 1.0 ×10-15τ-1 / 2 that averages to 8. 5-1.8+4.8×10-17 at τ =73 s . Residual amplitude modulation at the frequency of the rf drive applied to the fiber-coupled electro-optic modulator is reduced to less than 1 ×10-6 fractional amplitude modulation at τ >1 s by an active servo. The contribution of residual amplitude modulation to the laser-frequency instability is further reduced by digital division of the transmission and incident photodetector signals to less than 1 ×10-16 at τ >1 s .

  15. Relative velocity measurement from the spectral phase of a match-filtered linear frequency modulated pulse.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Samuel; Holland, Charles W

    2016-08-01

    Linear frequency modulated signals are commonly used to perform underwater acoustic measurements since they can achieve high signal-to-noise ratios with relatively low source levels. However, such signals present a drawback if the source or receiver or target is moving. The Doppler effect affects signal amplitude, delay, and resolution. To perform a correct match filtering that includes the Doppler shift requires prior knowledge of the relative velocity. In this paper, the relative velocity is extracted directly from the Doppler cross-power spectrum. More precisely, the quadratic coefficient of the Doppler cross-power-spectrum phase is proportional to the relative velocity. The proposed method achieves velocity estimates that compare favorably with Global Positioning System ground truth and the ambiguity method. PMID:27586779

  16. Broadband frequency-domain near-infrared spectral tomography using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Jiang, Shudong; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-01-01

    Frequency-domain near-infrared (NIR) diffuse spectral tomography with a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser is presented, providing tunable multiwavelength quantitative spectroscopy with maximal power for thick tissue imaging. The system was developed to show that intrinsically high stability can be achieved with many wavelengths in the NIR range, using a mode-locked signal of 80 MHz with heterodyned lock-in detection. The effect of cumulative noise from multiple wavelengths of data on the reconstruction process was studied, and it was shown that inclusion of more wavelengths can reduce skew in the noise distribution. This normalization of the data variance then minimizes errors in estimation of chromophore concentrations. Simulations and tissue phantom experiments were used to quantify this improvement in image accuracy for recovery of tissue hemoglobin and oxygen saturation. PMID:19340109

  17. Phase-sensitive optical detection of ballistic phonon heat pulses using frequency-modulation spectroscopy and persistent spectral holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, W. P.; Moerner, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    With the use of laser frequency-modulation (FM) spectroscopy and persistent spectral holes, time-resolved phase-sensitive probing of ballistic phonon heat pulses is accomplished in the interior of a NaF crystal. The ballistic phonon heat pulses are generated by the absorption of a Nd:YAG (neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet) laser pulse in a Cr film on the sample surface. Local measurement of the propagating stress-strain field is illustrated by detecting the modulation of a spectral hole in the inhomogeneously broadened 607-nm color-center absorption in x-irradiated NaF at liquid-helium temperatures. By examining the dependence of the observed phonon time-of-flight data on the polarization of the probing light, the position within the sample, and the phase of FM detection, an identification of the acoustic polarizations of the propagating phonons may be made. The effects of phonon focusing and mode conversion upon reflection must be taken into account to complete the identification. Along with the ability to determine the sign of the acoustic disturbance, this experiment features a strain detection limit of 4×10-9 at a time resolution of 50 ns.

  18. Spectral-Element Simulations of Wave Propagation in Porous Media: Finite-Frequency Sensitivity Kernels Based Upon Adjoint Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, C.; Tromp, J.

    2008-12-01

    The mathematical formulation of wave propagation in porous media developed by Biot is based upon the principle of virtual work, ignoring processes at the microscopic level, and does not explicitly incorporate gradients in porosity. Based on recent studies focusing on averaging techniques, we derive the macroscopic porous medium equations from the microscale, with a particular emphasis on the effects of gradients in porosity. In doing so, we are able to naturally determine two key terms in the momentum equations and constitutive relationships, directly translating the coupling between the solid and fluid phases, namely a drag force and an interfacial strain tensor. In both terms, gradients in porosity arise. One remarkable result is that when we rewrite this set of equations in terms of the well known Biot variables us, w), terms involving gradients in porosity are naturally accommodated by gradients involving w, the fluid motion relative to the solid, and Biot's formulation is recovered, i.e., it remains valid in the presence of porosity gradients We have developed a numerical implementation of the Biot equations for two-dimensional problems based upon the spectral-element method (SEM) in the time domain. The SEM is a high-order variational method, which has the advantage of accommodating complex geometries like a finite-element method, while keeping the exponential convergence rate of (pseudo)spectral methods. As in the elastic and acoustic cases, poroelastic wave propagation based upon the SEM involves a diagonal mass matrix, which leads to explicit time integration schemes that are well-suited to simulations on parallel computers. Effects associated with physical dispersion & attenuation and frequency-dependent viscous resistance are addressed by using a memory variable approach. Various benchmarks involving poroelastic wave propagation in the high- and low-frequency regimes, and acoustic-poroelastic and poroelastic-poroelastic discontinuities have been

  19. Determination of Black Hole Mass in Cyg X-1 by Scaling of Spectral Index-QPO Frequency Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaposhnikov, Nickolai; Titarchuk, Lev

    2007-01-01

    It is well established that timing and spectral properties of Galactic Black Hole (BH) X-ray binaries (XRB) are strongly correlated. In particular, it has been shown that low frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillation (QPO) nu(sub low) - photon index GAMMA correlation curves have a specific pattern. In a number of the sources studied the shape of the index-low frequency QPO correlations are self-similar with a position offset in the nu(sub low) - GAMMA plane determined by a BH mass M(sub BH). Specifically, Titarchuk & Fiorito (2004) gave strong theoretical and observational arguments that the QPO frequency values in this nu(sub low) - GAMMA correlation should be inversely proportional to M(sub BH). A simple translation of the correlation for a given source along frequency axis leads to the observed correlation for another source. As a result of this translation one can obtain a scaling factor which is simply a BH mass ratio for these particular sources. This property of the correlations offers a fundamentally new method for BH mass determination in XRBs. Here we use the observed QPO-index correlations observed in three BH sources: GRO J1655-40, GRS 1915+105 and Cyg X-1. The BH mass of (6.3 plus or minus 0.5) solar mass in GRO J1655-40 is obtained using optical observations. RXTE observations during the recent 2005 outburst yielded sufficient data to establish the correlation pattern during both rise and decay of the event. We use GRO J1655-40 as a standard reference source to measure the BH mass in Cyg X-1. We also revisit the GRS 1915+105 data as a further test of our scaling method. We obtain the BH mass in Cyg X-1 in the range 7.6-9.9.

  20. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: evaluation using cilia beat frequency assessment via spectral analysis of digital microscopy images

    PubMed Central

    Kögler, João E.; Macchione, Mariangela; Shoemark, Amelia; Saldiva, Paulo H. N.; Rodrigues, Joaquim C.

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) measurements provide valuable information for diagnosing of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). We developed a system for measuring CBF, used it in association with electron microscopy to diagnose PCD, and then analyzed characteristics of PCD patients.1 The CBF measurement system was based on power spectra measured through digital imaging. Twenty-four patients suspected of having PCD (age 1–19 yr) were selected from a group of 75 children and adolescents with pneumopathies of unknown causes. Ten healthy, nonsmoking volunteers (age ≥17 yr) served as a control group. Nasal brush samples were collected, and CBF and electron microscopy were performed. PCD was diagnosed in 12 patients: 5 had radial spoke defects, 3 showed absent central microtubule pairs with transposition, 2 had outer dynein arm defects, 1 had a shortened outer dynein arm, and 1 had a normal ultrastructure. Previous studies have reported that the most common cilia defects are in the dynein arm. As expected, the mean CBF was higher in the control group (P < 0.001) and patients with normal ultrastructure (P < 0.002), than in those diagnosed with cilia ultrastructural defects (i.e., PCD patients). An obstructive ventilatory pattern was observed in 70% of the PCD patients who underwent pulmonary function tests. All PCD patients presented bronchial wall thickening on chest computed tomography scans. The protocol and diagnostic techniques employed allowed us to diagnose PCD in 16% of patients in this study. PMID:21551013

  1. Rapid frequency control of sonar sounds by the FM bat, Miniopterus fuliginosus, in response to spectral overlap.

    PubMed

    Hase, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Takara; Kobayasi, Kohta I; Hiryu, Shizuko

    2016-07-01

    In the presence of multiple flying conspecifics, echolocating bats avoid jamming by adjusting the spectral and/or temporal features of their vocalizations. However, little is known about how bats alter their pulse acoustic characteristics to adapt to an acoustically jamming situation during flight. We investigated echolocation behavior in a bat (Miniopterus fuliginosus) during free flight under acoustic jamming conditions created by downward FM jamming sounds mimicking bat echolocation sounds. In an experimental chamber, the flying bat was exposed to FM jamming sounds with different terminal frequencies (TFs) from loudspeakers. Echolocation pulses emitted by the flying bat were recorded using a telemetry microphone (Telemike) mounted on the back of the bat. The bats immediately (within 150ms) shifted the TFs of emitted pulses upward when FM jamming sounds were presented. Moreover, the amount of upward TF shift differed depending on the TF ranges of the jamming sounds presented. When the TF range was lower than or overlapped the bat's mean TF, the bat TF shifted significantly upward (by 1-2kHz, Student's t-test, P<0.05), corresponding to 3-5% of the total bandwidth of their emitted pulses. These findings indicate that bats actively avoid overlap of the narrow frequency band around the TF. PMID:27157002

  2. Third order spectral analysis robust to mixing artifacts for mapping cross-frequency interactions in EEG/MEG

    PubMed Central

    Chella, F.; Marzetti, L.; Pizzella, V.; Zappasodi, F.; Nolte, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach to the third order spectral analysis, commonly called bispectral analysis, of electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data for studying cross-frequency functional brain connectivity. The main obstacle in estimating functional connectivity from EEG and MEG measurements lies in the signals being a largely unknown mixture of the activities of the underlying brain sources. This often constitutes a severe confounder and heavily affects the detection of brain source interactions. To overcome this problem, we previously developed metrics based on the properties of the imaginary part of coherency. Here, we generalize these properties from the linear to the nonlinear case. Specifically, we propose a metric based on an antisymmetric combination of cross-bispectra, which we demonstrate to be robust to mixing artifacts. Moreover, our metric provides complex-valued quantities that give the opportunity to study phase relationships between brain sources. The effectiveness of the method is first demonstrated on simulated EEG data. The proposed approach shows a reduced sensitivity to mixing artifacts when compared with a traditional bispectral metric. It also exhibits a better performance in extracting phase relationships between sources than the imaginary part of cross-spectrum for delayed interactions. The method is then applied to real EEG data recorded during resting state. A cross-frequency interaction is observed between brain sources at 10 Hz and 20 Hz, i.e., for alpha and beta rhythms. This interaction is then projected from signal to source level by using a fit-based procedure. This approach highlights a 10–20 Hz dominant interaction localized in an occipito-parieto-central network. PMID:24418509

  3. A 3-D spectral-element and frequency-wave number hybrid method for high-resolution seismic array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ping; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tseng, Tai-Lin; Hung, Shu-Huei; Chen, Chin-Wu; Basini, Piero; Liu, Qinya

    2014-10-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) hybrid method that interfaces the spectral-element method (SEM) with the frequency-wave number (FK) technique to model the propagation of teleseismic plane waves beneath seismic arrays. The accuracy of the resulting 3-D SEM-FK hybrid method is benchmarked against semianalytical FK solutions for 1-D models. The accuracy of 2.5-D modeling based on 2-D SEM-FK hybrid method is also investigated through comparisons to this 3-D hybrid method. Synthetic examples for structural models of the Alaska subduction zone and the central Tibet crust show that this method is capable of accurately capturing interactions between incident plane waves and local heterogeneities. This hybrid method presents an essential tool for the receiver function and scattering imaging community to verify and further improve their techniques. These numerical examples also show the promising future of the 3-D SEM-FK hybrid method in high-resolution regional seismic imaging based on waveform inversions of converted/scattered waves recorded by seismic array.

  4. Leading and trailing edge noise of an airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiet, R. K.

    Theoretical and experimental predictions of the noise produced when a rigid surface, e.g., an airfoil, with a sharp edge is introduced into a turbulent flow are compared. For an airfoil in rectilinear motion agreement is good. It is better for leading edge than for trailing edge noise because of lack of knowledge of boundary layer surface pressure. For a rotating airfoil, leading edge noise produces spectral peaking around harmonics of blade passage frequency because of multiple eddy chopping. Trailing edge noise produces a broad spectrum. For skewed inflow to a rotor, e.g., a helicopter in forward flight, narrow band tones rapidly degenerate because of the turbulent eddies in the rotor plane. Theory and measurement agree well for helicopters, but not as closely as for airfoils.

  5. The Explorer of Diffuse Galactic Emission (edge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, Robert F.; Cheng, Edward S.; Cottingham, David A.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Knox, Lloyd; Meyer, Stephan S.; Timbie, Peter; Wilson, Grant

    Measurements of the large-scale anisotropy of the Cosmic Infared Background (CIB) can be used to determine the characteristics of the distribution of galaxies at the largest spatial scales. With this information important tests of galaxy evolution models and primordial structure growth are possible. In this paper we describe the scientific goals instrumentation and observing strategy of EDGE a mission using an Antarctic Long Duration Balloon (LDB) platform. EDGE will observe the anisotropy in the CIB in 8 spectral bands from 270 GHz-1.5 THz with 6' angular resolution over a region ~400 square degrees. EDGE uses a one-meter class off-axis telescope and an array of Frequency Selective Bololmeters (FSB) to provide the compact and efficient multi- color high sensitivity radiometer required to achieve its scientific objectives.

  6. Reduction of edge localized mode intensity on DIII-D by on-demand triggering with high frequency pellet injection and implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, S. J.; Combs, S. K.; Isler, R. C.; Unterberg, E. A.; Brooks, N. H.; Evans, T. E.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Snyder, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Loarte, A.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Futatani, S.

    2013-08-15

    The injection of small deuterium pellets at high repetition rates up to 12× the natural edge localized mode (ELM) frequency has been used to trigger high-frequency ELMs in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The resulting pellet-triggered ELMs result in up to 12× lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed with pellets injected from the low field side pellet in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized β operation with input heating power just above the H-mode power threshold. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the injected pellets show that destabilization of ballooning modes by a local pressure perturbation is responsible for the pellet ELM triggering. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

  7. Reduction of Edge Localized Mode Intensity on DIII-D by On-demand triggering with High Frequency Pellet Injection and Implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, Steven J; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Isler, Ralph C; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Brooks, N. H.; Evans, T. E.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Snyder, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Loarte, A.; Huijsmans, G. T.A.; Futantani, S.

    2013-01-01

    The injection of small deuterium pellets at high repetition rates up to 12 the natural edge localized mode (ELM) frequency has been used to trigger high-frequency ELMs in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The resulting pellet-triggered ELMs result in up to 12 lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed with pellets injected from the low field side pellet in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized operation with input heating power just above the H-mode power threshold. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the injected pellets show that destabilization of ballooning modes by a local pressure perturbation is responsible for the pellet ELM triggering. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

  8. Fabrication and properties of high performance YBa2Cu3O7-δ radio frequency SQUIDs with step-edge Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Hao; Wei, Yu-Ke; Wang, Da; Zhang, Chen; Ma, Ping; Wang, Yue

    2014-09-01

    We describe the fabrication of high performance Yba2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) radio frequency (RF) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), which were prepared on 5 mm × 5 mm LaAlO3 (LAO) substrates by employing step-edge junctions (SEJs) and in flip-chip configuration with 12 mm × 12 mm resonators. The step in the substrate was produced by Ar ion etching with step angles ranging from 47° to 61°, which is steep enough to ensure the formation of grain boundaries (GBs) at the step edges. The YBCO film was deposited using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique with a film thickness half of the height of the substrate step. The inductance of the SQUID washer was designed to be about 157 pH. Under these circumstances, high performance YBCO RF SQUIDs were successfully fabricated with a typical flux-voltage transfer ratio of 83 mV/Φ0, a white flux noise of 29 μΦ0/√Hz, and the magnetic field sensitivity as high as 80 fT/√Hz. These devices have been applied in magnetocardiography and geological surveys.

  9. Ultralow-frequency Raman system down to 10 cm(-1) with longpass edge filters and its application to the interface coupling in t(2+2)LGs.

    PubMed

    Lin, M-L; Ran, F-R; Qiao, X-F; Wu, J-B; Shi, W; Zhang, Z-H; Xu, X-Z; Liu, K-H; Li, H; Tan, P-H

    2016-05-01

    Ultralow-frequency (ULF) Raman spectroscopy becomes increasingly important in the area of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials; however, such measurement usually requires expensive and nonstandard equipment. Here, the measurement of ULF Raman signal down to 10 cm(-1) has been realized with high throughput by combining a kind of longpass edge filters with a single monochromator, which are verified by the Raman spectrum of L-cystine using three laser excitations. Fine adjustment of the angle of incident laser beam from normal of the longpass edge filters and selection of polarization geometry are demonstrated how to probe ULF Raman signal with high signal-to-noise. Davydov splitting of the shear mode in twisted (2+2) layer graphenes (t(2+2)LG) has been observed by such system in both exfoliated and transferred samples. We provide a direct evidence of twist-angle dependent softening of the shear coupling in t(2+2)LG, while the layer-breathing coupling at twisted interfaces is found to be almost identical to that in bulk graphite. This suggests that the exfoliation and transferring techniques are enough good to make a good 2D heterostructures to demonstrate potential device application. This Raman system will be potentially applied to the research field of ULF Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27250407

  10. Hemodynamic scaling of fMRI-BOLD signal: validation of low-frequency spectral amplitude as a scalability factor.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Bharat B; Kannurpatti, Sridhar S; Rypma, Bart

    2007-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (fMRI-BOLD) signal representing neural activity may be optimized by discriminating MR signal components related to neural activity and those related to intrinsic properties of the cortical vasculature. The objective of this study was to reduce the hemodynamic change independent of neural activity to obtain a scaled fMRI-BOLD response using two factors, namely, low-frequency spectral amplitude (LFSA) and breath-hold amplitude (BHA). Ten subjects (age range, 22-38 years) were scanned during four task conditions: (a) rest while breathing room air, (b) bilateral finger tapping while breathing room air, (c) rest during a partial inspirational breath-hold, and (d) rest during moderate hypercapnia (breathing 5% CO2, 20% O2 and 75% N2). In all subjects who breathed 5% CO2, regions with significant BOLD response during breath-hold correlated significantly with the percent signal increase during 5% CO2 inhalation. Finger-tapping-induced responses in the motor cortex were diminished to a similar extent after scaling using either LFSA or BHA. Inter- and intrasubject variation in the amplitude of the BOLD signal response reduced after hemodynamic scaling using LFSA or BHA. The results validated the hemodynamic amplitude scaling using LFSA with the earlier established BHA. LFSA free from motor-task contamination can be used to calibrate the fMRI-BOLD response in lieu of BHA or hypercapnia to minimize intra- and intersubject variation arising from vascular anatomy and vasodilative capacity. PMID:17482411

  11. Six-bit all-optical quantization using photonic crystal fiber with soliton self-frequency shift and pre-chirp spectral compression techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhe; Yuan, Jin-Hui; Li, Sha; Xie, Song-Lin; Yan, Bin-Bin; Sang, Xin-Zhu; Yu, Chong-Xiu

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose an optical quantization scheme for all-optical analog-to-digital conversion that facilitates photonics integration. A segment of 10-m photonic crystal fiber with a high nonlinear coefficient of 62.8 W-1/km is utilized to realize large scale soliton self-frequency shift relevant to the power of the sampled optical signal. Furthermore, a 100-m dispersion-increasing fiber is used as the spectral compression module for further resolution enhancement. Simulation results show that 317-nm maximum wavelength shift is realized with 1550-nm initial wavelength and 6-bit quantization resolution is obtained with a subsequent spectral compression process.

  12. A spectral-timing analysis of the kHz QPOs in 4U 1636-53: the frequency-energy resolved RMS spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Evandro M.; Mendez, Mariano; Zhang, Guo-Bao; De Avellar, Márcio G. B.

    2016-07-01

    Our understanding of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) has been further advanced in the last few years by the use of combined spectral and timing techniques, and it is now clear that QPO properties are closely related to the spectral state of the source in which they appear. In this work we used all the available RXTE observations of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U~1636-53 to study the properties of the kilohertz QPO as a function of energy and frequency. By following the frequency evolution of the kHz QPOs we created frequency-resolved fractional RMS spectra. We also studied the connection between the frequency of the kHz QPOs and the parameters of the model that fits the X-ray energy spectrum. We show the dependence of the QPO properties in a multi-parameter space, and we discuss the implication of our results to the mechanism that produces the QPOs. Our results provide input to the next generation of spectral-timing models, which will help us understand the variability and the environment around the neutron star in these systems.

  13. Illuminating the Transition Between Steady Sliding and Episodic Tremor and Slow Slip Using Low Frequency Earthquakes at the Downdip Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creager, K. C.; Sweet, J.; Vidale, J. E.; Houston, H.

    2012-12-01

    Using data from the Array of Arrays and CAFE experiments, we have identified eight Low-Frequency Earthquake (LFE) families on the subduction plate interface, under the Olympic Peninsula, Washington State. We analyze the time history of each during the time interval 2007-2012. The updip-most family (LFE1) only lights up during the well-known northern Cascadia Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events that recur every 15 months. The recurrence intervals shorten from updip LFE1 to the downdip-most family (LFE4), which repeats every 14 days; 30 times more frequently. This presentation focuses on the downdip family. See the Sweet presentation, this session, for an analysis of the updip-most LFE family. LFEs from family 4 typically have durations of about one hour, with as many as 100 repeats during that time. Unlike their updip counterparts, they occur as discrete events without other LFEs or tremor visible during that time. They are strongly modulated by tidal shear stress. Twice as many LFEs occur during encouraging shear stress as during discouraging times. In contrast, these same LFEs occur when tidal normal stress is compressive which should inhibit slip. To reconcile LFE occurrence with favorable tidal Coulomb stress requires that the friction coefficient be less than 0.2 .This extreme sensitivity to very small shear stresses also suggests near lithostatic pore fluid pressures. We propose that the bursts of LFEs in this family correspond to discrete slow-slip events that occur with remarkable regularity. To add up to plate rates, each burst would correspond to a little more than 1 mm of slip, and each individual LFE to a little less than 0.1 mm, assuming all the slip occurs in the form of LFE activity and each LFE ruptures the same spot. One of these event sequences was captured by our 1-km aperture 80-element Big Skidder Array in 2008. Careful stacked correlation functions from 32 LFEs relative to a reference event showed S-P times varied only up to 0.02s, which

  14. Finite-width effects for the localized edge modes in zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Sharbaf, Arash; Cottam, Michael G.

    2016-06-01

    A matrix formalism is used to derive the analytical Green's functions describing correlations between any two atomic sites on a zigzag (ZZ) graphene nanoribbon, incorporating modified electronic hopping values between edge sites that may be distinct from the hopping between interior sites. An analysis of the poles of our Green's functions shows two distinct types of localized edge modes in the electronic spectrum. The first of these, the "zero" mode, is a topologically induced mode arising from the bipartite honeycomb lattice structure of graphene and is always present along ZZ edges. The second type of localized edge mode is present at edges when the edge-to-bulk hopping ratio deviates significantly from unity. The correlations between edge sites are found to exhibit strikingly different features when mediated by the zero edge mode compared with mediation by the "modified" edge mode. In particular, the zero-mode spectral intensity for correlations between two atomic sites along opposite edges can be comparable in strength with that between two sites on the same edge of a finite-width ribbon, before it eventually tends to zero as the ribbon width tends to infinity. This remarkable behavior shows a strong dependence on the sublattice labels of the sites and is in contrast with properties of the modified hopping edge modes. The explicit form of our analytical expressions for the electronic spectrum enables us to predict the zero-mode properties (including frequency, spatial attenuation, and intensity) when the hopping values along ZZ edges are modified.

  15. Intrinsic Chirality and Prochirality at Air/R-(+)- and S-(-)-Limonene Interfaces: Spectral Signatures with Interference Chiral Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Zhehao; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-06-04

    We report in this work detailed measurements on the chiral and achiral sum-frequency vibrational spectra in the C-H stretching vibration region (2800-3050cm-1) of the air/liquid interfaces of R-limonene and S-limonene, using the recently developed high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS). The achiral SFG spectra of R-limonene and S-limonene, as well as the equal amount (50/50) racemic mixture show that the enantiomers are with the same interfacial orientations. The interference chiral SFG spectra of the limonene enantiomers exhibit spectral signature from chiral response of the Cα-H stretching mode, and spectral signature from prochiral response of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode, respectively. The chiral spectral feature of the Cα-H stretching mode changes sign from R-limonene to S-limonene, and disappears for the 50/50 racemic mixture. While the prochiral spectral feature of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode is the same for R-limonene and S-limonene, and also surprisingly remains the same for the 50/50 racemic mixture. These results provided detail information in understanding the structure and chirality of molecular interfaces, and demonstrated the sensitivity and potential of SFG-VS as unique spectroscopic tool for chirality characterization and chiral recognition at the molecular interface.

  16. Spectral characteristics of a laser emitter designed for pumping and detecting a reference quantum transition of a caesium frequency standard

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A V; Kurnosov, V D; Kurnosov, K V; Romantsevich, V I; Chernov, Roman V; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Volkov, N A; Zholnerov, V S

    2011-08-31

    Experimental and calculated spectral characteristics of a diode laser with a Bragg grating soldered on a thermoelectric cooler are presented. A model of the laser is developed, which takes into account the pressure arising after soldering the Bragg grating on the thermoelectric cooler, as well as temperature and dispersion. Theoretical and experimental spectral characteristics of the laser are compared and their satisfactory agreement is shown. (control of radiation parameters)

  17. Flap-edge aeroacoustic measurements and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2003-03-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a small aperture directional array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that the prediction models capture much of the physics. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. The complexity of the directivity results demonstrate the strong role of edge source geometry and frequency in

  18. Probing the Orientation of Electrostatically Immobilized Protein G B1 by Time of Flight Secondary Ion Spectrometry, Sum Frequency Generation and Near-edge X-Ray Adsorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baio, Joe E.; Weidner, Tobias; Baugh, Loren; Gamble, Lara J.; Stayton, Patrick S.; Castner, David G.

    2011-01-01

    To fully develop techniques that provide an accurate description of protein structure at a surface, we must start with a relatively simple model system before moving on to increasingly complex systems. In this study, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG), near-edge x-ray adsorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used to probe the orientation of Protein G B1 (6 kDa) immobilized onto both amine (NH3+) and carboxyl (COO−) functionalized gold. Previously, we have shown that we could successful control orientation of a similar Protein G fragment via a cysteine-maleimide bond. In this investigation, to induce opposite end-on orientations, a charge distribution was created within the Protein G B1 fragment by first substituting specific negatively charged amino acids with neutral amino acids and then immobilizing the protein onto two oppositely charged self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces (NH3+ and COO−). Protein coverage, on both surfaces, was monitored by the change in the atomic % N, as determined by XPS. Spectral features within the SFG spectra, acquired for the protein adsorbed onto a NH3+-SAM surface, indicates that this electrostatic interaction does induce the protein to form an oriented monolayer on the SAM substrate. This corresponded to the polarization dependence of the spectral feature related to the NEXAFS N1s to π* transition of the β-sheet peptide bonds within the protein layer. ToF-SIMS data demonstrated a clear separation between the two samples based on the intensity differences of secondary ions stemming from amino acids located asymmetrically within Protein G B1 (Methionine: 62 and 105 m/z; Tyrosine: 107 and 137 m/z; Leucine: 86 m/z). For a more quantitative examination of orientation, we developed a ratio comparing the sum of the intensities of secondary-ions stemming from the amino acid residues at either end of the protein

  19. Frequency down-conversion of solid-state laser sources to the mid-infrared spectral range using non-oxide nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Valentin

    2015-07-01

    The development of parametric devices down-converting the laser frequency to the mid-infrared (3-30 μm) based on non-oxide nonlinear optical crystals is reviewed. Such devices, pumped by solid-state laser systems operating in the near-infrared, fill in this spectral gap where no such lasers exist, on practically all time scales, from continuous-wave to femtosecond regime. All important results obtained so far with difference-frequency generation, optical parametric oscillation, generation and amplification are presented in a comparative manner, illustrating examples of recent achievements are given in more detail, and some special issues such as continuum and frequency comb generation or pulse shaping are also discussed. The vital element in any frequency-conversion process is the nonlinear optical crystal and this represents one of the major limitations for achieving high energies and average powers in the mid-infrared although the broad spectral tunability seems not to be a problem. Hence, an overview of the available non-oxide nonlinear optical materials, emphasizing new developments such as wide band-gap, engineered (mixed), and quasi-phase-matched crystals, is also included.

  20. Experimental evaluation of trailing edge and incidence fluctuation noise theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were conducted to evaluate conflicting theories for trailing edge noise and for incidence fluctuation noise. A flat-plate airfoil with flush-mounted surface pressure transducers was tested in an anechoic wind tunnel at velocities from 31.5 to 177 m/sec and nominal 4 and 6% grid-generated turbulence levels. In one series of runs, the airfoil was faired into the tunnel nozzle and extended beyond the nozzle lip for studies of trailing edge noise without a leading edge and with flow on only one side. Such noise was found to vary with velocity to the fifth power and turbulence level squared as predicted by Ffowcs Williams and Hall (1970) and by Chase (1972). Power spectral density at high frequencies decayed approximately inversely with frequency to the 10/3 power as predicted by Chase. The data were poorly predicted by Hayden's correlation (1969, 1972).

  1. Investigation of atmospheric insect wing-beat frequencies and iridescence features using a multi-spectral kHz remote detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebru, Alem; Rohwer, Erich; Neethling, Pieter; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative investigation of insect activity in their natural habitat is a challenging task for entomologist. It is difficult to address questions such as flight direction, predation strength and overall activities using the current techniques such as traps and sweep nets. A multi-spectral kHz remote detection system using sunlight as an illumination source is presented. We explore possibilities of remote optical classification of insects based on their wing-beat frequencies and iridescence features. It is shown that the wing-beat frequency of the fast insect events can be resolved by implementing high sampling frequency. The iridescence features generated from the change of color in two channels (visible and near infrared) during wing-beat cycle is presented. We show that the shape of the wing-beat trajectory is different for different insects. The flight direction of atmospheric insect is also determined using silicon quadrant detector.

  2. Efficient Spectral Diffusion at the Air/Water Interface Revealed by Femtosecond Time-Resolved Heterodyne-Detected Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Morita, Akihiro; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-05-19

    Femtosecond vibrational dynamics at the air/water interface is investigated by time-resolved heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (TR-HD-VSFG) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The low- and high-frequency sides of the hydrogen-bonded (HB) OH stretch band at the interface are selectively excited with special attention to the bandwidth and energy of the pump pulses. Narrow bleach is observed immediately after excitation of the high-frequency side of the HB OH band at ∼3500 cm(-1), compared to the broad bleach observed with excitation of the low-frequency side at ∼3300 cm(-1). However, the time-resolved spectra observed with the two different excitations become very similar at 0.5 ps and almost indistinguishable by 1.0 ps. This reveals that efficient spectral diffusion occurs regardless of the difference of the pump frequency. The experimental observations are well-reproduced by complementary MD simulation. There is no experimental and theoretical evidence that supports extraordinary slow dynamics in the high-frequency side of the HB OH band, which was reported before. PMID:27120559

  3. Close-packed Arrays of Transition-edge X-ray Microcalorimeters with High Spectral Resolution at 5.9 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of high fill-factor arrays of superconducting transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters designed to provide rapid thermalization of the x-ray energy. We designed an x-ray absorber that is cantilevered over the sensitive part of the thermometer itself, making contact only at normal metal-features. With absorbers made of electroplated gold, we have demonstrated an energy resolution between 2.4 and 3.1 eV at 5.9 keV on 13 separate pixels. We have determined the thermal and electrical parameters of the devices throughout the superconducting transition, and, using these parameters, have modeled all aspects of the detector performance.

  4. Close-packed arrays of transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters with high spectral resolution at 5.9 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-07

    We present measurements of high fill-factor arrays of superconducting transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters designed to provide rapid thermalization of the x-ray energy. We designed an x-ray absorber that is cantilevered over the sensitive part of the thermometer itself, making contact only at normal-metal features. With absorbers made of electroplated gold, we have demonstrated an energy resolution between 2.4 and 3.1 eV at 5.9 keV on 13 separate pixels. We have determined the thermal and electrical parameters of the devices throughout the superconducting transition and, using these parameters, have modeled all aspects of the detector performance.

  5. Low- and high-frequency variability as a function of spectral properties in the bright X-ray binary GX 5-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonker, P. G.; van der Klis, M.; Homan, J.; Méndez, M.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Wijnands, R.; Zhang, W.

    2002-07-01

    We report on a detailed analysis of data obtained over nearly four years with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer of the Z source GX 5-1. From a spectral analysis using a hardness-intensity diagram it was found that the source traced out the typical Z-shaped pattern. The study of the power spectral properties showed that when the source moved on the horizontal branch towards the normal branch the fractional rms amplitudes and time-scales of all variability decreased, while their FWHMs increased. The frequency separation of the two kHz QPO peaks decreased from 344+/-12 to 232+/-13Hz, while the frequency of the lower and upper kHz QPO increased from 172+/-10 to 608+/-6Hz and from 516+/-10 to 840+/-12Hz, respectively. At low frequencies, besides the horizontal branch oscillation (HBO) and its second harmonic, two additional broad Lorentzian components were needed to obtain acceptable fits. These broad Lorentzians have Q-values of ~1-2 and frequencies 0.5 and 1.5 times the HBO frequency. When interpreted as being related to the HBO, they seem to favour disc models for the HBO over the magnetic beat-frequency model. The frequency of the normal branch oscillations changed slightly and non-monotonically, while on the normal branch between ~6Hz at both ends and 5.25+/-0.05Hz near the middle of the branch. It evolved into a flat-topped noise component on the flaring branch. We compared the timing properties of the some of the Z sources. We also compare the timing properties and colour-colour diagrams (CDs) of GX 5-1 with those of the back hole candidate XTE J1550-564 and the atoll source 4U 1608-52. The CDs are strikingly similar when a colour scheme commonly employed in back hole studies is used. However, this may be a degeneracy as the CDs turn out to be more complicated when colours common in neutron star studies are employed. Apart from some remarkable similarities between the CD of XTE J1550-564 and that of 4U 1608-52, several differences can be seen between these CDs and

  6. Spectral analysis of ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) wave field measurements in the Tara Central Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Golovato, S.N.; Horne, S.F.

    1987-12-01

    A simple spectral analysis technique has been developed to analyse the digital signals from an array of magnetic probes for ICRF field measurements in the Tara Tandem Mirror central cell. The wave dispersion relations of both the applied ICRF and the Alfven Ion Cyclotron Instability have been studied and the waves have been identified as slow in cyclotron waves. The radial profiles of field amplitude and wave vectors were also generated. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Use of the characteristic Raman lines of toluene (C7 H8) as a precise frequency reference on the spectral analysis of gasoline-ethanol blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Clavero, Valentin; Javahiraly, Nicolas; Weber, Andreas; Schröder, Werner; Curticapean, Dan; Meyrueis, Patrick P.

    2014-09-01

    In order to reduce some of the toxic emissions produced by internal combustion engines, the fossil-based fuels have been combined with less harmful materials in recent years. However, the fuels used in the automotive industry generally contain different additives, such as toluene, as anti-shock agents and as octane number enhancers. These materials can cause certain negative impact, besides the high volatility implied, on public health or environment due to its chemical composition. Toluene, among several other chemical compounds, is an additive widely used in the commercially-available gasoline-ethanol blends. Despite the negative aspects in terms of toxicity that this material might have, the Raman spectral information of toluene can be used to achieve certain level of frequency calibration without using any additional chemical marker in the sample or any other external device. Moreover, the characteristic and well-defined Raman line of this chemical compound at 1003 cm-1 (even at low v/v content) can be used to quantitatively determine certain aspects of the gasoline-ethanol blend under observation. By using an own-designed Fourier-Transform Raman spectrometer (FT-Raman), we have collected and analyzed different commercially-available and laboratory-prepared gasoline-ethanol blends. By carefully observing the main Raman peaks of toluene in these fuel blends, we have determined the frequency accuracy of the Raman spectra obtained. The spectral information has been obtained in the range of 0 cm-1 to 3500 cm-1 with a spectral resolution of 1.66 cm-1. The Raman spectra obtained presented only reduced frequency deviations in comparison to the standard Raman spectrum of toluene provided by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM).

  8. Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole (BH) Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in BHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources, in low hard states, steep power-law (soft) states and in transition between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectrum of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission indicated the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (less than 20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant ( i.e. 60-90% ). This evidence contradicts the dominant long standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model, that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of power-law flux component. We argue the existence of a bounded compact coronal region which is a natural consequence of the adjustment of Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approx. greater than 50 keV) producing photon upscattering via thermal Componization; the photon spectrum index Gamma appprox.1.5 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius; (2) a soft state which is optically thick and relatively cold (approx. less than 5 keV); the index for this state, Gamma approx. 2.8 is determined by soft

  9. How to Distinguish Neutron Star and Black Hole X-ray Binaries? Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nickolai

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed strong correlations between 1-10 Hz frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources when seen in the low/hard state, the steep power-law (soft) state, and in transition between these states. In the soft state these index-QPO frequency correlations show a saturation of the photon index GAMMA approximately equal to 2.7 at high values of the low frequency nu(sub L). This saturation effect was previously identified as a black hole signature. In this paper we argue that this saturation does not occur, at least for one neutron star (NS) source 4U 1728-34, for which the index GAMMA monotonically increases with nu(sub L) to the values of 6 and higher. We base this conclusion on our analysis of approximately 1.5 Msec of RXTE archival data for 4U 1728-34. We reveal the spectral evolution of the Comptonized blackbody spectra when the source transitions from the hard to soft states. The hard state spectrum is a typical thermal Comptonization spectrum of the soft photons which originate in the disk and the NS outer photospheric layers. The hard state photon index is GAMMA approximately 2. The soft state spectrum consists of two blackbody components which are only slightly Comptonized. Thus we can claim (as expected from theory) that in NS sources thermal equilibrium is established for the soft state. To the contrary in BH sources, the equilibrium is never established due to the presence of the BH horizon. The emergent BH spectrum, even in the high/soft state, has a power law component. We also identify the low QPO frequency nu(sub L) as a fundamental frequency of the quasi-spherical component of the transition layer (presumably related to the corona and the NS and disk magnetic closed field lines). The lower frequency nu(sub SL) is identified as the frequency of oscillations of a quasi-cylindrical configuration of the TL (presumably related to the NS and disk magnetic

  10. Spectral line-shapes investigation with Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cygan, A.; Wójtewicz, S.; Domysławska, J.; Masłowski, P.; Bielska, K.; Piwiński, M.; Stec, K.; Trawiński, R. S.; Ozimek, F.; Radzewicz, C.; Abe, H.; Ido, T.; Hodges, J. T.; Lisak, D.; Ciuryło, R.

    2013-10-01

    A review of recent experiments involving a newly developed Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy (PDH-locked FS-CRDS) system is presented. By comparison to standard FS-CRDS, the PDH lock of the probe laser to the ring-down cavity optimized coupling into the cavity, thus increasing the ring-down signal acquisition rate nearly 300-fold to 14 kHz and reducing the noise-equivalent absorption coefficient by more than an order of magnitude to 7 × 10-11 cm-1. We discuss how averaging approximately 1000 spectra yielded a signal-to-noise ratio of 220000. We also discuss how the spectrum frequency axis was linked to an optical frequency comb, thus enabling absolute frequency measurements of molecular optical transitions at sub-MHz levels. Applications of the spectrometer to molecular line-shape studies are also presented. For these investigations, we use semi-classical line-shape models that consider the influence of Dicke narrowing as well as the speed dependence of the pressure broadening and shifting to fit spectra. We show that the improved precision and spectrum fidelity of the spectrometer enable precise determinations of line-shape parameters. We also discuss the importance of line-shape analysis with regard to the development of new spectroscopic databases as well as in the optical determination of the Boltzmann constant.

  11. Single-sided deafness and directional hearing: contribution of spectral cues and high-frequency hearing loss in the hearing ear.

    PubMed

    Agterberg, Martijn J H; Hol, Myrthe K S; Van Wanrooij, Marc M; Van Opstal, A John; Snik, Ad F M

    2014-01-01

    Direction-specific interactions of sound waves with the head, torso, and pinna provide unique spectral-shape cues that are used for the localization of sounds in the vertical plane, whereas horizontal sound localization is based primarily on the processing of binaural acoustic differences in arrival time (interaural time differences, or ITDs) and sound level (interaural level differences, or ILDs). Because the binaural sound-localization cues are absent in listeners with total single-sided deafness (SSD), their ability to localize sound is heavily impaired. However, some studies have reported that SSD listeners are able, to some extent, to localize sound sources in azimuth, although the underlying mechanisms used for localization are unclear. To investigate whether SSD listeners rely on monaural pinna-induced spectral-shape cues of their hearing ear for directional hearing, we investigated localization performance for low-pass filtered (LP, <1.5 kHz), high-pass filtered (HP, >3kHz), and broadband (BB, 0.5-20 kHz) noises in the two-dimensional frontal hemifield. We tested whether localization performance of SSD listeners further deteriorated when the pinna cavities of their hearing ear were filled with a mold that disrupted their spectral-shape cues. To remove the potential use of perceived sound level as an invalid azimuth cue, we randomly varied stimulus presentation levels over a broad range (45-65 dB SPL). Several listeners with SSD could localize HP and BB sound sources in the horizontal plane, but inter-subject variability was considerable. Localization performance of these listeners strongly reduced after diminishing of their spectral pinna-cues. We further show that inter-subject variability of SSD can be explained to a large extent by the severity of high-frequency hearing loss in their hearing ear. PMID:25071433

  12. Camera Edge Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zisk, Stanley H.; Wittels, Norman

    1988-02-01

    Edge location is an important machine vision task. Machine vision systems perform mathematical operations on rectangular arrays of numbers that are intended to faithfully represent the spatial distribution of scene luminance. The numbers are produced by periodic sampling and quantization of the camera's video output. This sequence can cause artifacts to appear in the data with a noise spectrum that is high in power at high spatial frequencies. This is a problem because most edge detection algorithms are preferentially sensitive to the high-frequency content in an image. Solid state cameras can introduce errors because of the spatial periodicity of their sensor elements. This can result in problems when image edges are aligned with camera pixel boundaries: (a) some cameras introduce transients into the video signal while switching between sensor elements; (b) most cameras use analog low-pass filters to minimize sampling artifacts and these introduce video phase delays that shift the locations of edges. The problems compound when the vision system samples asynchronously with the camera's pixel rate. Moire patterns (analogous to beat frequencies) can result. In this paper, we examine and model quantization effects in a machine vision system with particular emphasis on edge detection performance. We also compare our models with experimental measurements.

  13. Relevance of different spectral techniques to describe estuarine suspended sediment dynamics based on a high-frequency, long-term turbidity dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalón Rojas, Isabel; Schmidt, Sabine; Sottolichio, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    Sediment dynamics in estuaries are complex and strongly variable over time scales ranging from seconds to years. Various forcings (turbulence, tides, river inflow, wind waves, morphological and climatic changes) may cause the temporal and spatial variability of suspended sediment (SS) concentrations. The evaluation of these SS dynamics by in-situ measurements have traditionally faced three difficulties: (1) the quantification of low-frequency variability that requires continuous measures over long time periods; (2) inevitable gaps in data limiting the post-processing; (3) the need for recording other environmental variables in the same period and at a coherent sampling frequency. To record a high-frequency and long-term turbidity dataset, an automatic monitoring network (MAGEST) has been implemented in the Gironde estuary, a macrotidal and highly turbid system in the South-West France, in 2004. This 10-year turbidity time series is rather unique in European estuaries, enabling the evaluation of SS dynamics at all the significant time scales in one single analysis of the dataset. To achieve this, several methodologies of data analysis using different approaches are available, but their relevance, especially for the more recently developed ones, is almost unexplored. In this work, we present the test of four spectral techniques to the analysis of a high-frequency turbidity time series of an estuary such as the Gironde, to discuss advantages and limitations of each method. We compare the Power Spectral Analysis (PSA), the Singular Spectral Analysis (SSA), the Wavelet Transform (WT) and the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). Advantages and limitations of each method are evaluated on the basis of five criteria: efficiency for incomplete time series, appropriateness for time-varying analysis, ability to recognize processes without the need of complementary environmental variables, capacity to calculate the relative importance of processes, and capacity to identify long

  14. Ultrawideband compressed sensing of arbitrary multi-tone sparse radio frequencies using spectrally encoded ultrafast laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Bosworth, Bryan T; Stroud, Jasper R; Tran, Dung N; Tran, Trac D; Chin, Sang; Foster, Mark A

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a photonic system for pseudorandom sampling of multi-tone sparse radio-frequency (RF) signals in an 11.95-GHz bandwidth using <1% of the measurements required for Nyquist sampling. Pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS) patterns are modulated onto highly chirped laser pulses, encoding the patterns onto the optical spectra. The pulses are partially compressed to increase the effective sampling rate by 2.07×, modulated with the RF signal, and fully compressed yielding optical integration of the PRBS-RF inner product prior to photodetection. This yields a 266× reduction in the required electronic sampling rate. We introduce a joint-sparsity-based matching-pursuit reconstruction via bagging to achieve accurate recovery of tones at arbitrary frequencies relative to the reconstruction basis. PMID:26125363

  15. Frequency-domain method for measuring spectral properties in multiple-scattering media: methemoglobin absorption spectrum in a tissuelike phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishkin, Joshua B.; So, Peter T. C.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    1995-03-01

    We have measured the optical absorption and scattering coefficient spectra of a multiple-scattering medium (i.e., a biological tissue-simulating phantom comprising a lipid colloid) containing methemoglobin by using frequency-domain techniques. The methemoglobin absorption spectrum determined in the multiple-scattering medium is in excellent agreement with a corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum obtained from a steady-state spectrophotometer measurement of the optical density of a minimally scattering medium. The determination of the corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum takes into account the scattering from impurities in the methemoglobin solution containing no lipid colloid. Frequency-domain techniques allow for the separation of the absorbing from the scattering properties of multiple-scattering media, and these techniques thus provide an absolute

  16. Effects of spatial and spectral frequencies on wide-field functional imaging (wifi) characterization of preclinical breast cancer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Choi, Bernard

    2010-02-01

    A common strategy to study breast cancer is the use of the preclinical model. These models provide a physiologically relevant and controlled environment in which to study both response to novel treatments and the biology of the cancer. Preclinical models, including the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model, are very amenable to optical imaging and to this end, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument that is perfectly suited to studying tumor metabolism in preclinical models. WiFI combines two optical imaging modalities, spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm x 5 cm) field of view. Using SFDI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are determined, which are then used to extract tissue chromophore concentrations in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. In the current study, we employ Monte Carlo simulations of SFDI light propagation in order to characterize the penetration depth of light in both the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model. Preliminary results suggest that different spatial frequency and wavelength combinations have different penetration depths, suggesting the potential depth sectioning capability of the SFDI component of WiFI.

  17. Efficient concept for generation of diffraction-limited green light by sum-frequency generation of spectrally combined tapered diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hasler, Karl-Heinz; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Andersen, Peter E; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2012-09-15

    In order to increase the power of visible diode laser systems in an efficient manner, we propose spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation. We show that this approach, in comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, can enhance the available power significantly. By combining two distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode lasers we achieve a 2.5-3.2 fold increase in power and a maximum of 3.9 W of diffraction-limited green light. At this power level, green diode laser systems have a high application potential, e.g., within the biomedical field. Our concept can be expanded combining multiple diode lasers to increase the power even further. PMID:23041848

  18. Long-term spectral and temporal behavior of the high-frequency peaked BL LAC object 1ES 1959+650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backes, M.; Uellenbeck, M.; Hayashida, M.; Satalecka, K.; Tescaro, D.; Terzić, T.; MAGIC Collaboration; Fuhrmann, L.; Nestoras, I.; F-GAMMA project; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tornikoski, M.; Nieppola, E.; Metsähovi; Böttcher, M.; Collmar, W.; Weidinger, M.

    2012-12-01

    The high-frequency peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 is well-known for an exceptional outburst, which was observed at very high energy (VHE) γ-rays by the Whipple 10m and HEGRA telescopes in 2002. Remarkably, this outburst lacked associated X-ray emission (a socalled "orphan flare") and by this cannot easily be described by standard Synchrotron Self Compton (SSC) models. Models based on hadronic emission processes have also been proposed to explain the observed behavior. Subsequent multi-wavelength observations during a low flux state at TeV energies in 2006 can, instead, be explained by a standard single-zone SSC model. In this context, 1ES 1959+650 has been regularly monitored by the MAGIC telescope since 2005. During these years, no significant variation in the VHE γ-ray flux has been observed. The low energy part of this is in very good agreement with the high-energy part of the time-integrated energy spectrum as measured by Fermi-LAT. Based on this constant flux level in VHE γ-rays, we assembled the time-integrated spectral energy distribution (SED) of 1ES 1959+650 from radio to VHE γ-rays. Despite the non-variability at very high energies, significant flux and spectral variations have been observed at optical and X-ray frequencies in the meanwhile. Furthermore, the shape of the SED at high energy γ-rays as measured by Fermi-LAT is essentially flat which cannot be explained by either conventional single-zone SSC models, or models invoking external radiation fields (EC).

  19. Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several black hole (BH) candidate sources, in low (hard) states, steep power law (soft) states, and transitions between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectra of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission, indicating the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (>20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant (i.e., 60%90%). This evidence contradicts the dominant, long-standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of the power-law flux component. We argue for the existence of a bounded compact coronal region that is a natural consequence of the adjustment of the Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) a hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approximately greater than 50 keV), producing photon upscattering via thermal Comptonization (the photon spectrum index Gamma approximates 1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius), and (2) a soft state that is optically thick and relatively cold (kT approximately less than 5 keV the index for this state, Gamma

  20. Edge Bioinformatics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in amore » genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance« less

  1. Edge Bioinformatics

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Chien-Chi

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in a genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance

  2. Spectral line polarization with angle-dependent partial frequency redistribution. I. A Stokes parameters decomposition for Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, H.

    2010-11-01

    Context. The linear polarization of a strong resonance lines observed near the solar limb is created by a multiple-scattering process. Partial frequency redistribution (PRD) effects must be accounted for to explain the polarization profiles. The redistribution matrix describing the scattering process is a sum of terms, each containing a PRD function multiplied by a Rayleigh type phase matrix. A standard approximation made in calculating the polarization is to average the PRD functions over all the scattering angles, because the numerical work needed to take the angle-dependence of the PRD functions into account is large and not always needed for reasonable evaluations of the polarization. Aims: This paper describes a Stokes parameters decomposition method, that is applicable in plane-parallel cylindrically symmetrical media, which aims at simplifying the numerical work needed to overcome the angle-average approximation. Methods: The decomposition method relies on an azimuthal Fourier expansion of the PRD functions associated to a decomposition of the phase matrices in terms of the Landi Degl'Innocenti irreducible spherical tensors for polarimetry T^K_Q(i, Ω) (i Stokes parameter index, Ω ray direction). The terms that depend on the azimuth of the scattering angle are retained in the phase matrices. Results: It is shown that the Stokes parameters I and Q, which have the same cylindrical symmetry as the medium, can be expressed in terms of four cylindrically symmetrical components I_Q^K (K = Q = 0, K = 2, Q = 0, 1, 2). The components with Q = 1, 2 are created by the angular dependence of the PRD functions. They go to zero at disk center, ensuring that Stokes Q also goes to zero. Each component I_Q^K is a solution to a standard radiative transfer equation. The source term S_Q^K are significantly simpler than the source terms corresponding to I and Q. They satisfy a set of integral equations that can be solved by an accelerated lambda iteration (ALI) method.

  3. Spectral edge: gradient-preserving spectral mapping for image fusion.

    PubMed

    Connah, David; Drew, Mark S; Finlayson, Graham D

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to image fusion for color display. Our goal is to generate an output image whose gradient matches that of the input as closely as possible. We achieve this using a constrained contrast mapping paradigm in the gradient domain, where the structure tensor of a high-dimensional gradient representation is mapped exactly to that of a low-dimensional gradient field which is then reintegrated to form an output. Constraints on output colors are provided by an initial RGB rendering. Initially, we motivate our solution with a simple "ansatz" (educated guess) for projecting higher-D contrast onto color gradients, which we expand to a more rigorous theorem to incorporate color constraints. The solution to these constrained optimizations is closed-form, allowing for simple and hence fast and efficient algorithms. The approach can map any N-D image data to any M-D output and can be used in a variety of applications using the same basic algorithm. In this paper, we focus on the problem of mapping N-D inputs to 3D color outputs. We present results in five applications: hyperspectral remote sensing, fusion of color and near-infrared or clear-filter images, multilighting imaging, dark flash, and color visualization of magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-tensor imaging. PMID:26831392

  4. A bolometer array for the spectral energy distribution (SPEED) camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Ali, S.; Bier, A.; Campano, B.; Chen, T. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Crawford, T. M.; Downes, T.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Fixsen, D. J.; Logan, D.; Meyer, S. S.; O'dell, C.; Perera, T.; Sharp, E. H.; Timbie, P. T.; Wilson, G. W.

    2004-03-01

    The Spectral Energy Distribution (SPEED) Camera is being developed to study the spectral energy distributions of high redshift galaxies. Its initial use will be on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope and eventually on the Large Millimeter Telescope. SPEED requires a small cryogenic detector array of 2×2 pixels with each pixel having four frequency bands in the 150-375GHz range. Here we describe the development of the detector array of these high-efficiency Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSB). The FSB design provides the multi-pixel, multi-spectral band capability required for SPEED in a compact stackable array. The SPEED bolometers will use proximity effect superconducting transition edge sensors as their temperature-sensing element, allowing for higher levels of electronic multiplexing in future applications.

  5. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimetre spectrally resolved CT system on high- and low-frequency imaging tasks: a simulation.

    PubMed

    Yveborg, Moa; Danielsson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans

    2012-04-21

    We are developing a photon-counting silicon strip detector with 0.4 × 0.5 mm² detector elements for clinical CT applications. Except for the limited detection efficiency of approximately 0.8 for a spectrum of 80 kVp, the largest discrepancies from ideal spectral behaviour have been shown to be Compton interactions in the detector and electronic noise. Using the framework of cascaded system analysis, we reconstruct the 3D MTF and NPS of a silicon strip detector including the influence of scatter and charge sharing inside the detector. We compare the reconstructed noise and signal characteristics with a reconstructed 3D MTF and NPS of an ideal energy-integrating detector system with unity detection efficiency, no scatter or charge sharing inside the detector, unity presampling MTF and 1 × 1 mm² detector elements. The comparison is done by calculating the dose-normalized detectability index for some clinically relevant imaging tasks and spectra. This work demonstrates that although the detection efficiency of the silicon detector rapidly drops for the acceleration voltages encountered in clinical computed tomography practice, and despite the high fraction of Compton interactions due to the low atomic number, silicon detectors can perform on a par with ideal energy-integrating detectors for routine imaging tasks containing low-frequency components. For imaging tasks containing high-frequency components, the proposed silicon detector system can perform approximately 1.1-1.3 times better than a fully ideal energy-integrating system. PMID:22469924

  6. FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral investigation; computed frequency estimation analysis and electronic structure calculations on 4-hydroxypteridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarajan, M.; Karabacak, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out by using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy in the range 100-4000 cm-1 and 400-4000 cm-1 respectively, for 4-hydroxypteridine (C6H4N4O, 4HDPETN) molecule. The potential energy curve shows that 4HDPETN molecule has two stable structures. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of the 4HDPETN as the S1 structure. The molecular structure, fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensities of the vibrational bands were interpreted with the aid of structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations based density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio HF methods and different basis sets combination. The complete vibrational assignments of wavenumbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The results of the calculations were applied to simulated spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. The scaled B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) results show the best agreement with the experimental values over the other method. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) complements with the experimental findings. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential, nonlinear optical and thermodynamic properties of the title compound were performed. Mulliken and natural charges of the title molecule were also calculated and interpreted.

  7. FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral investigation: computed frequency estimation analysis and electronic structure calculations on chlorobenzene using HF and DFT.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, M; Karabacak, M; Udayakumar, V; Periandy, S

    2012-03-01

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out by using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy in the range 100-4000 cm(-1) and 400-4000 cm(-1) respectively, for the title molecule. The molecular structure, fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensity of the vibrational bands are interpreted with the aid of structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations based on Hartree Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) method and different basis sets combination. The complete vibrational assignments of wavenumbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The scaled B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) results show the best agreement with the experimental values over the other methods. The effects due to the substitution of halogen bond were investigated. The results of the calculations were applied to simulated spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), and thermodynamic properties were performed. The thermodynamic properties of the title compound at different temperatures have been calculated, revealing the correlations between heat capacity (C), entropy (S), and enthalpy changes (H) and temperatures. PMID:22197345

  8. FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral investigation: Computed frequency estimation analysis and electronic structure calculations on chlorobenzene using HF and DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarajan, M.; Karabacak, M.; Udayakumar, V.; Periandy, S.

    2012-03-01

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out by using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy in the range 100-4000 cm-1 and 400-4000 cm-1 respectively, for the title molecule. The molecular structure, fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensity of the vibrational bands are interpreted with the aid of structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations based on Hartree Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) method and different basis sets combination. The complete vibrational assignments of wavenumbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The scaled B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) results show the best agreement with the experimental values over the other methods. The effects due to the substitution of halogen bond were investigated. The results of the calculations were applied to simulated spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), and thermodynamic properties were performed. The thermodynamic properties of the title compound at different temperatures have been calculated, revealing the correlations between heat capacity (C), entropy (S), and enthalpy changes (H) and temperatures.

  9. A method for measuring the presampled MTF of digital radiographic systems using an edge test device.

    PubMed

    Samei, E; Flynn, M J; Reimann, D A

    1998-01-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) of radiographic systems is frequently evaluated by measuring the system's line spread function (LSF) using narrow slits. The slit method requires precise fabrication and alignment of a slit and high radiation exposure. An alternative method for determining the MTF uses a sharp, attenuating edge device. We have constructed an edge device from a 250-microm-thick lead foil laminated between two thin slabs of acrylic. The device is placed near the detector and aligned with the aid of a laser beam and a holder such that a polished edge is parallel to the x-ray beam. A digital image of the edge is processed to obtain the presampled MTF. The image processing includes automated determination of the edge angle, reprojection, sub-binning, smoothing of the edge spread function (ESF), and spectral estimation. This edge method has been compared to the slit method using measurements on standard and high-resolution imaging plates of a digital storage phosphor (DSP) radiography system. The experimental results for both methods agree with a mean MTF difference of 0.008. The edge method provides a convenient measurement of the presampled MTF for digital radiographic systems with good response at low frequencies. PMID:9472832

  10. Microwave spectral line listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The frequency, intensity, and identification of 9615 spectral lines belonging to 75 molecules are tabulated in order of increasing frequency. Measurements for all 75 molecules were made in the frequency range from 26500 to 40000 MHz by a computer controlled spectrometer. Measurements were also made in the 18000 to 26500 MHz range for some of the molecules.

  11. Edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildreth, E. C.

    1985-09-01

    For both biological systems and machines, vision begins with a large and unwieldly array of measurements of the amount of light reflected from surfaces in the environment. The goal of vision is to recover physical properties of objects in the scene such as the location of object boundaries and the structure, color and texture of object surfaces, from the two-dimensional image that is projected onto the eye or camera. This goal is not achieved in a single step: vision proceeds in stages, with each stage producing increasingly more useful descriptions of the image and then the scene. The first clues about the physical properties of the scene are provided by the changes of intensity in the image. The importance of intensity changes and edges in early visual processing has led to extensive research on their detection, description and use, both in computer and biological vision systems. This article reviews some of the theory that underlies the detection of edges, and the methods used to carry out this analysis.

  12. Continuous monitoring of depth of sedation by EEG spectral analysis in patients requiring mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Spencer, E M; Green, J L; Willatts, S M

    1994-11-01

    Twenty-three patients undergoing intensive therapy had continuous EEG recording in an attempt to assess depth of sedation using spectral analysis. Median power frequency (MPF) and spectral edge frequency (SEF) were calculated and correlated with the clinical sedation score and blood concentration of sedative drug. Fifteen patients received isoflurane and eight midazolam. There was no correlation between MPF or SEF and sedation score or blood concentration of drug. These results suggest that no simple measure of the EEG is likely to correlate with depth of sedation in critically ill patients. PMID:7826794

  13. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  14. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-10-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  15. Scaling relationship between corner frequencies and seismic moments of ultra micro earthquakes estimated with coda-wave spectral ratio -the Mponeng mine in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, N.; Kawakata, H.; Murakami, O.; Doi, I.; Yoshimitsu, N.; Nakatani, M.; Yabe, Y.; Naoi, M. M.; Miyakawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Ide, S.; Igarashi, T.; Morema, G.; Pinder, E.; Ogasawara, H.

    2011-12-01

    Scaling relationship between corner frequencies, fc, and seismic moments, Mo is an important clue to understand the seismic source characteristics. Aki (1967) showed that Mo is proportional to fc-3 for large earthquakes (cubic law). Iio (1986) claimed breakdown of the cubic law between fc and Mo for smaller earthquakes (Mw < 2), and Gibowicz et al. (1991) also showed the breakdown for the ultra micro and small earthquakes (Mw < -2). However, it has been reported that the cubic law holds even for micro earthquakes (-1 < Mw > 4) by using high quality data observed at a deep borehole (Abercrombie, 1995; Ogasawara et al., 2001; Hiramatsu et al., 2002; Yamada et al., 2007). In order to clarify the scaling relationship for smaller earthquakes (Mw < -1), we analyzed ultra micro earthquakes using very high sampling records (48 kHz) of borehole seismometers installed within a hard rock at the Mponeng mine in South Africa. We used 4 tri-axial accelerometers of three-component that have a flat response up to 25 kHz. They were installed to be 10 to 30 meters apart from each other at 3,300 meters deep. During the period from 2008/10/14 to 2008/10/30 (17 days), 8,927 events were recorded. We estimated fc and Mo for 60 events (-3 < Mw < -1) within 200 meters from the seismometers. Assuming the Brune's source model, we estimated fc and Mo from spectral ratios. Common practice is using direct waves from adjacent events. However, there were only 5 event pairs with the distance between them less than 20 meters and Mw difference over one. In addition, the observation array is very small (radius less than 30 m), which means that effects of directivity and radiation pattern on direct waves are similar at all stations. Hence, we used spectral ratio of coda waves, since these effects are averaged and will be effectively reduced (Mayeda et al., 2007; Somei et al., 2010). Coda analysis was attempted only for relatively large 20 events (we call "coda events" hereafter) that have coda energy

  16. Triatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 117 Triatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 55 triatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  17. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  18. Diatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 114 Diatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 121 diatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty, and reference are given for each transition reported.

  19. High-frequency-peaked BL Lacertae Objects as Spectral Candles to Measure the Extragalactic Background Light in the Fermi and Air Cherenkov Telescopes Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankuzhiyil, Nijil; Persic, Massimo; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2010-05-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) is the integrated light from all the stars that have ever formed, and spans the IR-UV range. The interaction of very high-energy (VHE: E > 100 GeV) γ-rays, emitted by sources located at cosmological distances, with the intervening EBL results in e - e + pair production that leads to energy-dependent attenuation of the observed VHE flux. This introduces a fundamental ambiguity into the interpretation of measured VHE γ-ray spectra: neither the intrinsic spectrum nor the EBL are separately known—only their combination is. In this Letter, we propose a method to measure the EBL photon number density. It relies on using simultaneous observations of BL Lac objects in the optical, X-ray, high-energy (HE: E > 100 MeV) γ-ray (from the Fermi telescope), and VHE γ-ray (from Cherenkov telescopes) bands. For each source, the method involves best-fitting the spectral energy distribution from optical through HE γ-rays (the latter being largely unaffected by EBL attenuation as long as z <~ 1) with a synchrotron self-Compton model. We extrapolate such best-fitting models into the VHE regime and assume they represent the BL Lacs' intrinsic emission. Contrasting measured versus intrinsic emission leads to a determination of the γγ opacity to VHE photons. Using, for each given source, different states of emission will only improve the accuracy of the proposed method. We demonstrate this method using recent simultaneous multifrequency observations of the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 and discuss how similar observations can more accurately probe the EBL.

  20. HIGH-FREQUENCY-PEAKED BL LACERTAE OBJECTS AS SPECTRAL CANDLES TO MEASURE THE EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT IN THE FERMI AND AIR CHERENKOV TELESCOPES ERA

    SciTech Connect

    Mankuzhiyil, Nijil; Persic, Massimo; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2010-05-20

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) is the integrated light from all the stars that have ever formed, and spans the IR-UV range. The interaction of very high-energy (VHE: E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-rays, emitted by sources located at cosmological distances, with the intervening EBL results in e {sup -} e {sup +} pair production that leads to energy-dependent attenuation of the observed VHE flux. This introduces a fundamental ambiguity into the interpretation of measured VHE {gamma}-ray spectra: neither the intrinsic spectrum nor the EBL are separately known-only their combination is. In this Letter, we propose a method to measure the EBL photon number density. It relies on using simultaneous observations of BL Lac objects in the optical, X-ray, high-energy (HE: E > 100 MeV) {gamma}-ray (from the Fermi telescope), and VHE {gamma}-ray (from Cherenkov telescopes) bands. For each source, the method involves best-fitting the spectral energy distribution from optical through HE {gamma}-rays (the latter being largely unaffected by EBL attenuation as long as z {approx_lt} 1) with a synchrotron self-Compton model. We extrapolate such best-fitting models into the VHE regime and assume they represent the BL Lacs' intrinsic emission. Contrasting measured versus intrinsic emission leads to a determination of the {gamma}{gamma} opacity to VHE photons. Using, for each given source, different states of emission will only improve the accuracy of the proposed method. We demonstrate this method using recent simultaneous multifrequency observations of the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 and discuss how similar observations can more accurately probe the EBL.

  1. The Accuracy of Measurements of the Spectral-Line Frequencies in the Studies of the Rotational Transitions of the 16O12C32S Molecule in the Millimeter and Submillimeter Wave Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubiatnikov, G. Yu; Belov, S. P.; Lapinov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The absolute error of determining the center frequency of the molecule spectral line during a single measurement, which is obtained by fitting the line shape to the model profile, is usually significantly smaller than the statistical spread in the frequencies of the repeated measurements. We discuss the possible causes of the systematic errors leading to an increase in the uncertainty of measurements of the line-center frequency. For an example of the multiple spectral measurements of the rotational transitions of the 16O12C32S molecule in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave ranges (with a frequency of up to 522 GHz), by the Lamb-dip method, we determine the absolute error of the performed measurements, which amounts to 0 .4 kHz. New precision values of the center frequencies of the rotational transitions of the 16O12C32S molecule and more accurate values of the rotational constants, which are calculated using the measured frequencies, are presented.

  2. Reduction of airfoil trailing edge noise by trailing edge blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, T.; Erbslöh, S.; Carolus, T.

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise and its reduction by trailing edge blowing. A Somers S834 airfoil section which originally was designed for small wind turbines is investigated. To mimic realistic Reynolds numbers the boundary layer is tripped on pressure and suction side. The chordwise position of the blowing slot is varied. The acoustic sources, i.e. the unsteady flow quantities in the turbulent boundary layer in the vicinity of the trailing edge, are quantified for the airfoil without and with trailing edge blowing by means of a large eddy simulation and complementary measurements. Eventually the far field airfoil noise is measured by a two-microphone filtering and correlation and a 40 microphone array technique. Both, LES-prediction and measurements showed that a suitable blowing jet on the airfoil suction side is able to reduce significantly the turbulence intensity and the induced surface pressure fluctuations in the trailing edge region. As a consequence, trailing edge noise associated with a spectral hump around 500 Hz could be reduced by 3 dB. For that a jet velocity of 50% of the free field velocity was sufficient. The most favourable slot position was at 90% chord length.

  3. Temporal registration of multispectral digital satellite images using their edge images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nack, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    An algorithm is described which will form an edge image by detecting the edges of features in a particular spectral band of a digital satellite image. It is capable also of forming composite multispectral edge images. In addition, an edge image correlation algorithm is presented which performs rapid automatic registration of the edge images and, consequently, the grey level images.

  4. The Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    6 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the edge (running diagonally from the lower left to the upper right) of a trough, which is part of a large pit crater complex in Noachis Terra. This type of trough forms through the collapse of surface materials into the subsurface, and often begins as a series of individual pit craters. Over time, continued collapse increases the diameter of individual pits until finally, adjacent pits merge to form a trough such as the one captured in this image. The deep shadowed area is caused in part by an overhang; layered rock beneath this overhang is less resistant to erosion, and thus has retreated tens of meters backward, beneath the overhang. A person could walk up inside this 'cave' formed by the overhanging layered material.

    Location near: 47.0oS, 355.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  5. Double-Edge Molecular Technique for Doppler Lidar Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flesia, Cristina; Korb, C. Laurence

    1998-01-01

    The double-edge lidar technique for measuring the wind using molecular backscatter is described. Two high spectral resolution edge filters are located in the wings of the Rayleigh-Brillouin profile. This doubles the signal change per unit Doppler shift, the sensitivity, and gives nearly a factor of two improvement in measurement accuracy. The use of a crossover region is described where the sensitivity of a molecular and aerosol-based measurement are equal. This desensitizes the molecular measurement to the effects of aerosol scattering over a frequency range of +/- 100 m/s. We give methods for correcting for short-term frequency jitter and drift using a laser reference frequency measurement and methods for long-term frequency correction using a servo control system. The effects of Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering on the measurement are shown to be significant and are included in the analysis. Simulations for a conical scanning satellite-based lidar at 355 nm show an accuracy of 2-3 m/s for altitudes of 2 to 15 km for a 1 km vertical resolution, a satellite altitude of 400 km and a 200 km x 200 km spatial resolution. Results of ground based wind measurements are presented.

  6. Edge-based correlation image registration for multispectral imaging

    DOEpatents

    Nandy, Prabal

    2009-11-17

    Registration information for images of a common target obtained from a plurality of different spectral bands can be obtained by combining edge detection and phase correlation. The images are edge-filtered, and pairs of the edge-filtered images are then phase correlated to produce phase correlation images. The registration information can be determined based on these phase correlation images.

  7. Edge technique lidar for high accuracy, high spatial resolution wind measurement in the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Gentry, Bruce M.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the Army Research Office (ARO) Geosciences Program is to measure the three dimensional wind field in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a measurement volume with a 50 meter spatial resolution and with measurement accuracies of the order of 20 cm/sec. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a high vertical resolution lidar experiment using the edge technique for high accuracy measurement of the atmospheric wind field to meet the ARO requirements. This experiment allows the powerful capabilities of the edge technique to be quantitatively evaluated. In the edge technique, a laser is located on the steep slope of a high resolution spectral filter. This produces large changes in measured signal for small Doppler shifts. A differential frequency technique renders the Doppler shift measurement insensitive to both laser and filter frequency jitter and drift. The measurement is also relatively insensitive to the laser spectral width for widths less than the width of the edge filter. Thus, the goal is to develop a system which will yield a substantial improvement in the state of the art of wind profile measurement in terms of both vertical resolution and accuracy and which will provide a unique capability for atmospheric wind studies.

  8. Unified EDGE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-06-18

    UEDGE is an interactive suite of physics packages using the Python or BASIS scripting systems. The plasma is described by time-dependent 2D plasma fluid equations that include equations for density, velocity, ion temperature, electron temperature, electrostatic potential, and gas density in the edge region of a magnetic fusion energy confinement device. Slab, cylindrical, and toroidal geometries are allowed, and closed and open magnetic field-line regions are included. Classical transport is assumed along magnetic field lines,more » and anomalous transport is assumed across field lines. Multi-charge state impurities can be included with the corresponding line-radiation energy loss. Although UEDGE is written in Fortran, for efficient execution and analysis of results, it utilizes either Python or BASIS scripting shells. Python is easily available for many platforms (http://www.Python.org/). The features and availability of BASIS are described in “Basis Manual Set” by P.F. Dubois, Z.C. Motteler, et al., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report UCRL-MA-1 18541, June, 2002 and http://basis.llnl.gov. BASIS has been reviewed and released by LLNL for unlimited distribution. The Python version utilizes PYBASIS scripts developed by D.P. Grote, LLNL. The Python version also uses MPPL code and MAC Perl script, available from the public-domain BASIS source above. The Forthon version of UEDGE uses the same source files, but utilizes Forthon to produce a Python-compatible source. Forthon has been developed by D.P. Grote at LBL (see http://hifweb.lbl.gov/Forthon/ and Grote et al. in the references below), and it is freely available. The graphics can be performed by any package importable to Python, such as PYGIST.« less

  9. Unified EDGE

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-18

    UEDGE is an interactive suite of physics packages using the Python or BASIS scripting systems. The plasma is described by time-dependent 2D plasma fluid equations that include equations for density, velocity, ion temperature, electron temperature, electrostatic potential, and gas density in the edge region of a magnetic fusion energy confinement device. Slab, cylindrical, and toroidal geometries are allowed, and closed and open magnetic field-line regions are included. Classical transport is assumed along magnetic field lines, and anomalous transport is assumed across field lines. Multi-charge state impurities can be included with the corresponding line-radiation energy loss. Although UEDGE is written in Fortran, for efficient execution and analysis of results, it utilizes either Python or BASIS scripting shells. Python is easily available for many platforms (http://www.Python.org/). The features and availability of BASIS are described in “Basis Manual Set” by P.F. Dubois, Z.C. Motteler, et al., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report UCRL-MA-1 18541, June, 2002 and http://basis.llnl.gov. BASIS has been reviewed and released by LLNL for unlimited distribution. The Python version utilizes PYBASIS scripts developed by D.P. Grote, LLNL. The Python version also uses MPPL code and MAC Perl script, available from the public-domain BASIS source above. The Forthon version of UEDGE uses the same source files, but utilizes Forthon to produce a Python-compatible source. Forthon has been developed by D.P. Grote at LBL (see http://hifweb.lbl.gov/Forthon/ and Grote et al. in the references below), and it is freely available. The graphics can be performed by any package importable to Python, such as PYGIST.

  10. On the wake flow of asymmetrically beveled trailing edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yaoyi; Pröbsting, Stefan; Stephens, David; Gupta, Abhineet; Morris, Scott C.

    2016-05-01

    Trailing edge and wake flows are of interest for a wide range of applications. Small changes in the design of asymmetrically beveled or semi-rounded trailing edges can result in significant difference in flow features which are relevant for the aerodynamic performance, flow-induced structural vibration and aerodynamically generated sound. The present study describes in detail the flow field characteristics around a family of asymmetrically beveled trailing edges with an enclosed trailing-edge angle of 25° and variable radius of curvature R. The flow fields over the beveled trailing edges are described using data obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. The flow topology for different trailing edges was found to be strongly dependent on the radius of curvature R, with flow separation occurring further downstream as R increases. This variation in the location of flow separation influences the aerodynamic force coefficients, which were evaluated from the PIV data using a control volume approach. Two-point correlations of the in-plane velocity components are considered to assess the structure in the flow field. The analysis shows large-scale coherent motions in the far wake, which are associated with vortex shedding. The wake thickness parameter yf is confirmed as an appropriate length scale to characterize this large-scale roll-up motion in the wake. The development in the very near wake was found to be critically dependent on R. In addition, high-speed PIV measurements provide insight into the spectral characteristics of the turbulent fluctuations. Based on the time-resolved flow field data, the frequency range associated with the shedding of coherent vortex pairs in the wake is identified. By means of time-correlation of the velocity components, turbulent structures are found to convect from the attached or separated shear layers without distinct separation point into the wake.

  11. Turbulence Measurements on a Flap-Edge Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarty, Patrick; Bradshaw, Peter; Cantwell, Brian; Ross, James

    1998-01-01

    Turbulence measurements have been made on a flap-edge and leading-edge slat model using hot-wire anemometry, and, later, particle image velocimetry. The properties of hot-wire anemometry were studied using facilities at NASA Ames Research Center. Hot-film probes were used because of their durability, but cross-films were limited by non-linear end effects. As a warm-up exercise, hot-film probes were used to measure velocities in the farfield wake of a cylinder with an airfoil in the near-field wake. The airfoil reduced the drag coefficient of the system by 10%. A single-wire hot-film probe was used to measure velocity profiles over the top of a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Mod. B wing with a Fowler flap and leading,-edge slat. Results showed the size of slat wake was dependent upon the slat deflection angle. Velocity increased through the slat gap with increased deflection. The acoustically modified slat decreased the chance of separation. Measurements were taken at the flap edge with a single hot-film. Trends in the data indicate velocity and turbulence levels increase at the flap edge. The acoustically modified flap modifies the mean flow near the flap edge. Correlations were made between the hot-film signal and the unsteady pressure transducers on the wing which were published in a NASA CDTM. The principles of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) were studied at Florida State University. Spectral PIV was used to measure the spectra of a subsonic jet. Measured frequencies were close to the predicted frequency of jet shedding. Spectral PIV will be used to measure the spectra of the slat flow in the second 7 x lO-ft. wind tunnel test. PIV has an advantage that it can measure velocity and spectra of the entire flowfield instantaneously. However, problems arise when trying, to store this massive amount of PIV data. Support for this research has continued through a NASA Graduate Student Program Fellowship which will end in June 1999. The thesis should be completed by this time.

  12. A bolometer array for the SPEctral Energy Distribution (SPEED) Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, Robert F.; Campano, Barbara; Chen, Tina C.; Cheng, Edward; Cottingham, David A.; Crawford, Thomas M.; Downes, Tom; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Logan, Dan; Meyer, Stephan S.; Perera, Thushara; Sharp, Elmer H.; Wilson, Grant W.

    2004-10-01

    The SPEED camera is being developed to study the spectral energy distributions of high redshift galaxies, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in X-ray clusters and other cold objects in the universe. Its initial runs will be done on the 10 m Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope (HHSMT), with later runs using the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). SPEED requires a 2x2 pixel cryogenic detector array of Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSB). Each of the pixels will have four frequency bands in the ~150-350 GHz range. Here we describe the development of the detector array of these high efficiency FSBs. The FSB design provides the multi-pixel multi-spectral band capability required for SPEED in a compact, light weight, stackable array. The SPEED FSB bolometers will use proximity effect superconducting transition edge sensors (TES) as their temperature-sensing element permitting significantly higher levels of electronic multiplexing in future applications where larger numbers of detectors may be required.

  13. Comparison of edges detected at different polarisations in MAESTRO data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caves, Ronald G.; Harley, Peter J.; Quegan, Shaun

    1992-01-01

    Edge detection would appear to be a crucial tool for analyzing multi-polarized, multi-frequency, and multi-temporal Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. Edge structure provides a simple means for comparing different polarizations and frequencies, and for detecting changes over time. Due to the fact that edges and segments (homogeneous regions) are dual concepts, edge detection has an important role to play in identifying segments within which mean backscatter measurements for use in image classification can be made. As part of a general investigation into edge detection in SAR imagery, an initial investigation was carried out into the detectability and nature of edges in multi-polarized and multi-frequency SAR images. The contrast ratio (CR) operator was used to detect edges. This operator was previously shown to perform well at detecting edges in single-polarized and single-frequency SAR images.

  14. Spectral anomalies of the effect of light-induced drift of caesium atoms caused by the velocity dependence of transport collision frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, A M

    2014-10-31

    The spectral features of the light-induced drift (LID) velocity of caesium atoms in inert buffer gases are studied theoretically. A strong temperature dependence of the spectral LID line shape of Cs atoms in Ar or Kr atmosphere in the vicinity of T ∼ 1000 K is predicted. It is shown that the anomalous LID of Cs atoms in binary buffer mixtures of two different inert gases can be observed at virtually any (including ambient) temperature, depending on the content of the components in these mixtures. The results obtained make it possible to precisely test the interatomic interaction potentials in the experiments on the anomalous LID. (quantum optics)

  15. Liquid-Crystal Light Valve Enhances Edges In Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show liquid-crystal light valve (LCLV) exhibits operating mode in which it enhances edges in images projected on it. Operates in edge-enhancing mode (or in combination of edge-enhancing and normal modes) by suitably adjusting bias voltage and frequency. Enhancement of edges one of most important preprocessing steps in optical pattern-recognition systems. Incorporated into image-processing system to enhance edges without introducing excessive optical noise.

  16. Improved stabilization of a 1.3 microm femtosecond optical frequency comb by use of a spectrally tailored continuum from a nonlinear fiber grating.

    PubMed

    Kim, K; Diddams, S A; Westbrook, P S; Nicholson, J W; Feder, K S

    2006-01-15

    We report significant enhancement (+24 dB) of the optical beat note between a 657 nm cw laser and the second-harmonic generation of the tailored continuum at 1314 nm generated with a femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser and a nonlinear fiber Bragg grating. The same continuum is used to stabilize the carrier-envelope offset frequency of the Cr:forsterite femtosecond laser and permits improved optical stabilization of the frequency comb from 1.0 to 2.2 microm. Using a common optical reference at 657 nm, a relative fractional frequency instability of 2.0 x 10(-15) is achieved between the repetition rates of Cr:forsterite and Ti:sapphire laser systems in 10 s averaging time. The fractional frequency offset between the optically stabilized frequency combs of the Cr:forsterite and Ti:sapphire lasers is +/-(0.024 +/- 6.1) x 10(-17). PMID:16441055

  17. Spatial-spectral characterization of focused spatially chirped broadband laser beams.

    PubMed

    Greco, Michael J; Block, Erica; Meier, Amanda K; Beaman, Alex; Cooper, Samuel; Iliev, Marin; Squier, Jeff A; Durfee, Charles G

    2015-11-20

    Proper alignment is critical to obtain the desired performance from focused spatially chirped beams, for example in simultaneous spatial and temporal focusing (SSTF). We present a simple technique for inspecting the beam paths and focusing conditions for the spectral components of a broadband beam. We spectrally resolve the light transmitted past a knife edge as it was scanned across the beam at several axial positions. The measurement yields information about spot size, M2, and the propagation paths of different frequency components. We also present calculations to illustrate the effects of defocus aberration on SSTF beams. PMID:26836543

  18. Spectral characterization of the LANDSAT thematic mapper sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, B. L.; Barker, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Data collected on the spectral characteristics of the LANDSAT-4 and LANDSAT-4 backup thematic mapper instruments, the protoflight (TM/PF) and flight (TM/F) models, respectively, are presented and analyzed. Tests were conducted on the instruments and their components to determine compliance with two sets of spectral specifications: band-by-band spectral coverage and channel-by-channel within-band spectral matching. Spectral coverage specifications were placed on: (1) band edges--points at 50% of peak response, (2) band edge slopes--steepness of rise and fall-off of response, (3) spectral flatness--evenness of response between edges, and (4) spurious system response--ratio of out-of-band response to in-band response. Compliance with the spectral coverage specifications was determined by analysis of spectral measurements on the individual components contributing to the overall spectral response: filters, detectors, and optical surfaces.

  19. Effect of amino acid dopants on the spectral, optical, mechanical and thermal properties of potassium acid phthalate crystals for possible optoelectronic and frequency doubling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, J. Thomas Joseph; Gnanaraj, J. Martin Sam; Dhavud, S. Shek; Ekadevasena, S.

    2015-09-01

    Undoped and amino acid (L-Arginine and L-Valine) doped KAP crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The changes in the structural, spectral, optical, mechanical and thermal properties were observed. The sharp prominent peaks in the indexed powder XRD pattern confirms the crystalline nature of the sample. Optical studies reveal that the crystal is transparent in the entire visible light region. Thermal stability was checked by TG/DTA analysis. The mechanical stability was evaluated from Vicker's microhardness test. The SHG efficiency for the title materials was tested with different particle sizes by the Kurtz and Perry powder method, which established the existence of phase matching.

  20. The edges of graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuyun; Xin, John; Ding, Feng

    2013-04-01

    The edge of two dimensional (2D) graphene, as the surface of a three dimensional (3D) crystal, plays a crucial role in the determination of its physical, electronic and chemical properties and thus has been extensively studied recently. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the study of graphene edges, including edge formation energy, edge reconstruction, method of graphene edge synthesis and the recent progress on metal-passivated graphene edges and the role of edges in graphene CVD growth. We expect this review to provide a guideline for readers to gain a clear picture of graphene edges from several aspects, especially the catalyst-passivated graphene edges and their role in graphene CVD growth. PMID:23420074

  1. The edges of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuyun; Xin, John; Ding, Feng

    2013-03-01

    The edge of two dimensional (2D) graphene, as the surface of a three dimensional (3D) crystal, plays a crucial role in the determination of its physical, electronic and chemical properties and thus has been extensively studied recently. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the study of graphene edges, including edge formation energy, edge reconstruction, method of graphene edge synthesis and the recent progress on metal-passivated graphene edges and the role of edges in graphene CVD growth. We expect this review to provide a guideline for readers to gain a clear picture of graphene edges from several aspects, especially the catalyst-passivated graphene edges and their role in graphene CVD growth.

  2. Frequency noise in frequency swept fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the spectral content of frequency shifted pulses generated by a lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper. We found that each pulse is shifted in frequency with very high accuracy. We also discovered that noise originating from light leaking through the acousto- optical modulators and forward propagating Brillouin scattering appear in the spectrum. PMID:23546253

  3. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  4. The EDGE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Stephan S.; Cheng, Edward S.; Cottingham, David A.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Knox, Lloyd; Silverberg, Robert F.; Timbie, Peter T.; Wilson, Grant

    2003-02-01

    EDGE is a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) borne instrument designed to measure the large-scale anisotropy of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB). The goal is to use this signal as a new observational tool to measure the character of the spatial distribution of galaxies at the largest spatial scales. With a 6\\arcmin\\ beam mapping more than 400 square degrees of sky at 8 frequency bands between 250GHz and 1.5 THz the experiment can determine the variation of galaxy density on spatial scales ranging from >200h-1 Mpc, where dark matter variations are determined directly from Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) anisotropy, to <5h-1 Mpc where the distribution of dark matter and galaxies is determined from galaxy redshift surveys and the underlying dynamics of structure growth is non-linear. The instrument consists of a 1-meter class off-axis telescope and a Frequency Selective Bolometer (FSB) array radiometer. The FSB design provides the compact, multi-chromatic, high sensitivity focal plane needed for this measurement.

  5. Absorption coefficients and frequency shifts measurement in the spectral range of 1071.88-1084.62 cm-1 vs. pressure for chlorodifluoromethane (CHClF2) using tunable CW CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hawat, Sharif

    2013-02-01

    Infrared (IR) absorption in the spectral range of (1071.88-1084.62 cm-1) vs. pressure in chlorodifluoromethane (CFC-22, F-22, and CHClF2) was studied using a tunable continuous wave (CW) CO2 laser radiation on 9R branch lines with a maximum output power of about 2.12 W, provided with an absorber cell located outside the laser cavity. The absorption coefficients were determined vs. the gas pressure between 0.2 mbar and 170 mbar at lines from 9R branch for CFC-22. The frequency shifts of the absorption lines of CFC-22 in relative to the central frequencies of laser lines were calculated vs. the pressure on the basis of these absorption coefficients. The chosen lines were selected according to IR spectrum of the studied gas given by HITRAN cross section database. So the absorption was achieved for CFC-22 at the spectral lines of 9R branch situated from 9R (10) to 9R (30) emitted by a tunable CW CO2 laser. The absorption cross sections of CFC-22 determined in this work were compared with the relevant data given by HITRAN cross section database and a reasonable agreement was observed.

  6. Ultrafast CARS with Improved Spectral Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütgens, M.; Chatzipapadopoulos, S.; Lochbrunner, S.

    2013-03-01

    Molecular vibrations are investigated by time and frequency resolved CARS applying ultrafast excitation and picosecond probing for high spectral resolution. Enhanced spectral structure and beating phenomena are demonstrated for coalescing Raman bands.

  7. Fundamental Vibration Frequency and Damping Estimation: A Comparison Using the Random Decrement Method, the Empirical Mode Decomposition, and the HV Spectral Ratio Method for Local Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Upegui Botero, F. M.; Pulliam, J.; Willemann, R. J.; Pasyanos, M.; Schmitz, M.; Rojas Mercedes, N.; Louie, J. N.; Moschetti, M. P.; Martinez-Cruzado, J. A.; Suárez, L.; Huerfano Moreno, V.; Polanco, E.

    2013-12-01

    Site characterization in civil engineering demands to know at least two of the dynamic properties of soil systems, which are: (i) dominant vibration frequency, and (ii) damping. As part of an effort to develop understanding of the principles of earthquake hazard analysis, particularly site characterization techniques using non invasive/non destructive seismic methods, a workshop (Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute: New Frontiers in Geophysical Research: Bringing New Tools and Techniques to Bear on Earthquake Hazard Analysis and Mitigation) was conducted during july 15-25, 2013 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic by the alliance of Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute (PASI) and Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS), jointly supported by Department of Energy (DOE) and National Science Foundation (NSF). Preliminary results of the site characterization in terms of fundamental vibration frequency and damping are here presented from data collected during the workshop. Three different methods were used in such estimations and later compared in order to identify the stability of estimations as well as the advantage or disadvantage among these methodologies. The used methods were the: (i) Random Decrement Method (RDM), to estimate fundamental vibration frequency and damping simultaneously; (ii) Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), to estimate the vibration modes, and (iii) Horizontal to Vertical Spectra ratio (HVSR), to estimate the fundamental vibration frequency. In all cases ambient vibration and induced vibration were used.

  8. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  9. The Explorer of Diffuse Galactic Emission (EDGE): Determining the Large-Scale Structure Evolution in the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Knox, L.; Timbie, P.; Wilson, G.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the large-scale anisotropy of the Cosmic Infared Background (CIB) can be used to determine the characteristics of the distribution of galaxies at the largest spatial scales. With this information important tests of galaxy evolution models and primordial structure growth are possible. In this paper, we describe the scientific goals, instrumentation, and operation of EDGE, a mission using an Antarctic Long Duration Balloon (LDB) platform. EDGE will osbserve the anisotropy in the CIB in 8 spectral bands from 270 GHz-1.5 THz with 6 arcminute angular resolution over a region -400 square degrees. EDGE uses a one-meter class off-axis telescope and an array of Frequency Selective Bololeters (FSB) to provide the compact and efficient multi-colar, high sensitivity radiometer required to achieve its scientific objectives.

  10. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amier, R. K.

    1981-11-01

    A two dimensional section of a helicopter main rotor blade was tested in an acoustic wind tunnel at close to full-scale Reynolds numbers to obtain boundary layer data and acoustic data for use in developing an acoustic scaling law and testing a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Results were extended to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a helicopter rotor trailing edge noise prediction. Comparisons of the calculated noise levels with helicopter flyover spectra demonstrate that trailing edge noise contributes significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies. This noise mechanism is expected to control the minimum rotor noise. In the case of noise radiation from a local blade segment, the acoustic directivity pattern is predicted by the first principles trailing edge noise theory. Acoustic spectra are predicted by a scaling law which includes Mach number, boundary layer thickness and observer position. Spectrum shape and sound pressure level are also predicted by the first principles theory but the analysis does not predict the Strouhal value identifying the spectrum peak.

  11. High-frequency spectral falloff of earthquakes, fractal dimension of complex rupture, b value, and the scaling of strength on faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.

    1991-01-01

    The high-frequency falloff ??-y of earthquake displacement spectra and the b value of aftershock sequences are attributed to the character of spatially varying strength along fault zones. I assume that the high frequency energy of a main shock is produced by a self-similar distribution of subevents, where the number of subevents with radii greater than R is proportional to R-D, D being the fractal dimension. In the model, an earthquake is composed of a hierarchical set of smaller earthquakes. The static stress drop is parameterized to be proportional to R??, and strength is assumed to be proportional to static stress drop. I find that a distribution of subevents with D = 2 and stress drop independent of seismic moment (?? = 0) produces a main shock with an ??-2 falloff, if the subevent areas fill the rupture area of the main shock. By equating subevents to "islands' of high stress of a random, self-similar stress field on a fault, I relate D to the scaling of strength on a fault, such that D = 2 - ??. Thus D = 2 corresponds to constant stress drop scaling (?? = 0) and scale-invariant fault strength. A self-similar model of aftershock rupture zones on a fault is used to determine the relationship between the b value, the size distribution of aftershock rupture zones, and the scaling of strength on a fault. -from Author

  12. Photonic generation of bipolar direct-sequence UWB signals based on optical spectral shaping and incoherent frequency-to-time conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Hongqian; Wang, Muguang; Ye, Jun; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel technology to obtain binary phase-coded ultrawideband (UWB) signals for direct-sequence spread-spectrum communication systems is investigated by using a cost-effective incoherent source. The bipolar encoding is performed based on an all-fiber spectrum shaper composed of two FBG arrays to tailor the optical spectrum, and a section of single-mode fiber to achieve incoherent frequency-to-time conversion. We demonstrate a 1.325-Gb/s UWB encoding system by the use of binary spreading codes of 4-chip length via computer simulations. The proposed bipolar UWB encoding technology can be applied to high-speed UWB-over-fiber communication systems.

  13. Effect of atomic density on propagation and spectral property of femtosecond chirped Gaussian pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhendong; Gao, Feng

    2015-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the effect of the atomic densities N on propagation and spectral property of femtosecond chirped Gaussian pulse in a three-level Λ-type atomic medium by using the numerical solution of the full Maxwell- Bloch equations. It is shown that, when the positive chirped pulse with area 3π, propagate in the medium with smaller N, pulse splitting doesn't occur and many small oscillations at the trailing edge of the pulse appear, in addition, the level |2< population ρ22 of the pulse exhibits an oscillation feature with time evolution, moreover, the spectral component near the central frequency of the pulse shows an oscillation characteristic too, and the propagation and spectral property of the negative chirped 3π pulse is very similar to that of the positive chirped 3π pulse. For the positive chirped 3π pulse pulses, propagate in the medium with larger N, pulse splitting also doesn't occur but many small oscillations both at leading edge and the trailing edge of the pulse appear, and the population ρ22 of the pulse only exhibits an scarcely oscillation feature with time evolution, at the same time many oscillations both in blue shift and red shift components of the pulse appear but the spectral component near the central frequency of the pulse oscillate more severely, and the propagation and spectral property of the negative chirped 3π pulse is very similar to that of the positive chirped 3π pulse, but comparing with the case of the negative chirped 3π pulse, the propagation of the positive chirped 3π pulse is delayed at the same distance and the delayed time becomes longer with the distance increasing.

  14. Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect

    DM DePoy; PM Fourspring; PF Baldasaro; JF Beausang; EJ Brown; MW Dashiel; KD Rahner; TD Rahmlow; JE Lazo-Wasem; EJ Gratrix; B Wemsman

    2004-06-09

    Spectral control is a key technology for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion systems because only a fraction (typically less than 25%) of the incident thermal radiation has energy exceeding the diode bandgap energy, E{sub g}, and can thus be converted to electricity. The goal for TPV spectral control in most applications is twofold: (1) Maximize TPV efficiency by minimizing transfer of low energy, below bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. (2) Maximize TPV surface power density by maximizing transfer of high energy, above bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. TPV spectral control options include: front surface filters (e.g. interference filters, plasma filters, interference/plasma tandem filters, and frequency selective surfaces), back surface reflectors, and wavelength selective radiators. System analysis shows that spectral performance dominates diode performance in any practical TPV system, and that low bandgap diodes enable both higher efficiency and power density when spectral control limitations are considered. Lockheed Martin has focused its efforts on front surface tandem filters which have achieved spectral efficiencies of {approx}83% for E{sub g} = 0.52 eV and {approx}76% for E{sub g} = 0.60 eV for a 950 C radiator temperature.

  15. The electronic absorption edge of petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, O.C.; Mitra-Kirtley, S.; Zhu, Yifu

    1992-09-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of more than 20 crude oils and asphaltenes are examined. The spectral location of the electronic absorption edge varies over a wide range, from the near-infrared for heavy oils and asphaltenes to the near-UV for gas condensates. The functional form of the electronic absorption edge for all crude oils (measured) is characteristic of the {open_quotes}Urbach tail,{close_quotes} a phenomenology which describes electronic absorption edges in wide-ranging materials. The crude oils all show similar Urbach widths, which are significantly larger than those generally found for various materials but are similar to those previously reported for asphaltenes. Monotonically increasing absorption at higher photon energy continues for all crude oils until the spectral region is reached where single-ring aromatics dominate absorption. However, the rate of increasing absorption at higher energies moderates, thereby deviating from the Urbach behavior. Fluorescence emission spectra exhibit small red shifts from the excitation wavelength and small fluorescence peak widths in the Urbach regions of different crude oils, but show large red shifts and large peak widths in spectral regions which deviate from the Urbach behavior. This observation implies that the Urbach spectral region is dominated by lowest-energy electronic absorption of corresponding chromophores. Thus, the Urbach tail gives a direct measure of the population distribution of chromophores in crude oils. Implied population distributions are consistent with thermally activated growth of large chromophores from small ones. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Noise dynamics of a prism-based Cr:forsterite laser frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shun; Washburn, Brian; Corwin, Kristan; Tillman, Karl

    2010-03-01

    Mode-locked Cr:forsterite lasers are of significant interest as infrared frequency combs due to their ability to generate stable high repetition rate femtosecond pulses. However, self-referenced Cr:forsterite frequency combs tend to exhibit wide carrier-envelope offset frequency (f0) linewidths. These large f0 linewidths can be attributed to significant frequency noise across the comb's spectral bandwidth and result in broad comb teeth. We have stabilized a prism-based Cr:forsterite frequency comb and observed narrowing of the f0 linewidth from ˜1 MHz down to <100 kHz when a knife edge is inserted into the intracavity beam as a spectral filter. This can also be further reduced after phase-locking the comb to a low-phase noise rf oscillator. Thus, the introduction of an intracavity knife edge significantly reduces the frequency noise of the system and enables more effective stabilization of the entire comb. A theoretical model has been used to investigate the noise dynamics of the phase-stabilized comb system. It includes: the pump laser power (P), the frequency dependence of the f0 response to pump power changes ((df0/dP)(ν)), and the frequency dependence of the femtosecond laser's relative intensity noise, RIN(ν). Supported by AFOSR FA9950-05-1-0304 and NSF ECS-0449295

  17. Spectral stratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to stratigraphic analysis is described which uses photogeologic and spectral interpretation of multispectral remote sensing data combined with topographic information to determine the attitude, thickness, and lithology of strata exposed at the surface. The new stratigraphic procedure is illustrated by examples in the literature. The published results demonstrate the potential of spectral stratigraphy for mapping strata, determining dip and strike, measuring and correlating stratigraphic sequences, defining lithofacies, mapping biofacies, and interpreting geological structures.

  18. Unsteady flow phenomena associated with leading-edge vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitsamter, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents selected results from extensive experimental investigations on turbulent flow fields and unsteady surface pressures caused by leading-edge vortices, in particular, for vortex breakdown flow. Such turbulent flows may cause severe dynamic aeroelastic problems like wing and/or fin buffeting on fighter-type aircraft. The wind tunnel models used include a generic delta wing as well as a detailed aircraft configuration of canard-delta wing type. The turbulent flow structures are analyzed by root-mean-square and spectral distributions of velocity and pressure fluctuations. Downstream of bursting local maxima of velocity fluctuations occur in a limited radial range around the vortex center. The corresponding spectra exhibit significant peaks indicating that turbulent kinetic energy is channeled into a narrow band. These quasi-periodic velocity oscillations arise from a helical mode instability of the breakdown flow. Due to vortex bursting there is a characteristic increase in surface pressure fluctuations with increasing angle of attack, especially when the burst location moves closer to the apex. The pressure fluctuations also show dominant frequencies corresponding to those of the velocity fluctuations. Using the measured flow field data, scaling parameters are derived for design purposes. It is shown that a frequency parameter based on the local semi-span and the sinus of angle of attack can be used to estimate the frequencies of dynamic loads evoked by vortex bursting.

  19. Spectral stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Harold R.

    1991-09-01

    Stratigraphic and structural studies of the Wind River and Bighorn basins, Wyoming, and the Guerrero-Morelos basin, Mexico, have resulted in development of ''spectral stratigraphy.'' This approach to stratigraphic analysis uses photogeologic and spectral interpretation of multispectral remote sensing data combined with topographic information to determine the attitude, thickness, and lithology of strata exposed at the surface. This paper reviews selected published examples that illustrate this new stratigraphic procedure. Visible to thermal infrared laboratory, spectral measurements of sedimentary rocks are the physical basis for spectral stratigraphy. Results show that laboratory, field, and remote spectroscopy can augment conventional laboratory and field methods for petrologic analysis, stratigraphic correlation, interpretation of depositional environments, and construction of facies models. Landsat thematic mapper data are used to map strata and construct stratigraphic columns and structural cross sections at 1:24,000 scale or less. Experimental multispectral thermal infrared aircraft data facilitate lithofacies/biofacies analyses. Visible short-wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer data allow remote determination of the stratigraphic distribution of iron oxides, quartz, calcite, dolomite, gypsum, specific clay species, and other minerals diagnostic of environments of deposition. Development of a desk-top, computer-based, geologic analysis system that provides for automated application of these approaches to coregistered digital image and topographic data portends major expansion in the use of spectral stratigraphy for purely scientific (lithospheric research) or practical (resource exploration) objectives.

  20. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  1. The Edge, Fall 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, 1999

    1999-01-01

    "The Edge" is a Canadian publication for youth. The mandate of the Edge is to support and celebrate all career journeys embraced by youth. This issue contains career profile articles covering three jobs: crane operator, indoor climbing instructor, and product certification tester. Career trends and the state of today's workplace are also…

  2. Characterization of Flap Edge Noise Radiation from a High-Fidelity Airframe Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Lockhard, David P.; Neuhart, Dan H.; Bahr, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the noise generated by a baseline high-fidelity airframe model are presented. The test campaign was conducted in the open-jet test section of the NASA Langley 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Tunnel on an 18%-scale, semi-span Gulfstream airframe model incorporating a trailing edge flap and main landing gear. Unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained from a series of sensors positioned along the two flap edges, and far field acoustic measurements were obtained using a 97-microphone phased array that viewed the pressure side of the airframe. The DAMAS array deconvolution method was employed to determine the locations and strengths of relevant noise sources in the vicinity of the flap edges and the landing gear. A Coherent Output Power (COP) spectral method was used to couple the unsteady surface pressures measured along the flap edges with the phased array output. The results indicate that outboard flap edge noise is dominated by the flap bulb seal cavity with very strong COP coherence over an approximate model-scale frequency range of 1 to 5 kHz observed between the array output and those unsteady pressure sensors nearest the aft end of the cavity. An examination of experimental COP spectra for the inboard flap proved inconclusive, most likely due to a combination of coherence loss caused by decorrelation of acoustic waves propagating through the thick wind tunnel shear layer and contamination of the spectra by tunnel background noise at lower frequencies. Directivity measurements obtained from integration of DAMAS pressure-squared values over defined geometric zones around the model show that the baseline flap and landing gear are only moderately directional as a function of polar emission angle.

  3. Evaluation of edge effect due to phase contrast imaging for mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Satoru; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Tohyama, Keiko; Morishita, Junji; Yamada, Katsuhiko; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2005-08-15

    It is well-known that the edge effect produced by phase contrast imaging results in the edge enhancement of x-ray images and thereby sharpens those images. It has recently been reported that phase contrast imaging using practical x-ray tubes with small focal spots has improved image sharpness as observed in the phase contrast imaging with x-ray from synchrotron radiation or micro-focus x-ray tubes. In this study, we conducted the phase contrast imaging of a plastic fiber and plant seeds using a customized mammography equipment with a 0.1 mm focal spot, and the improvement of image sharpness was evaluated in terms of spatial frequency response of the images. We observed that the image contrast of the plastic fiber was increased by edge enhancement, and, as predicted elsewhere, spectral analysis revealed that as the spatial frequencies of the x-ray images increased, so did the sharpness gained through phase contrast imaging. Thus, phase contrast imaging using a practical molybdenum anode tube with a 0.1 mm-focal spot would benefit mammography, in which the morphological detectability of small species such as micro-calcifications is of great concern. And detectability of tumor-surrounded glandular tissues in dense breast would be also improved by the phase contrast imaging.

  4. Losing your edge: climate change and the conservation value of range-edge populations.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Evan M; Olivas, Paulo; Stroud, James; Feeley, Kenneth J

    2015-10-01

    Populations occurring at species' range edges can be locally adapted to unique environmental conditions. From a species' perspective, range-edge environments generally have higher severity and frequency of extreme climatic events relative to the range core. Under future climates, extreme climatic events are predicted to become increasingly important in defining species' distributions. Therefore, range-edge genotypes that are better adapted to extreme climates relative to core populations may be essential to species' persistence during periods of rapid climate change. We use relatively simple conceptual models to highlight the importance of locally adapted range-edge populations (leading and trailing edges) for determining the ability of species to persist under future climates. Using trees as an example, we show how locally adapted populations at species' range edges may expand under future climate change and become more common relative to range-core populations. We also highlight how large-scale habitat destruction occurring in some geographic areas where many species range edge converge, such as biome boundaries and ecotones (e.g., the arc of deforestation along the rainforest-cerrado ecotone in the southern Amazonia), can have major implications for global biodiversity. As climate changes, range-edge populations will play key roles in helping species to maintain or expand their geographic distributions. The loss of these locally adapted range-edge populations through anthropogenic disturbance is therefore hypothesized to reduce the ability of species to persist in the face of rapid future climate change. PMID:26664681

  5. Shock capturing by the spectral viscosity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1989-01-01

    A main disadvantage of using spectral methods for nonlinear conservation laws lies in the formation of Gibbs phenomenon, once spontaneous shock discontinuities appear in the solution. The global nature of spectral methods than pollutes the unstable Gibbs oscillations overall the computational domain, and the lack of entropy dissipation prevents convergences in these cases. The Spectral Viscosity method, which is based on high frequency dependent vanishing viscosity regularization of the classical spectral methods is discussed. It is shown that this method enforces the convergence of nonlinear spectral approximations without sacrificing their overall spectral accuracy.

  6. Robotic Vision With Enhanced Detection Of Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. L.; Shawaga, L.; Walsh, P.; Kambies, K.

    1993-01-01

    Robotic vision subsystem provides enhanced detection of edges as it preprocesses image of target moving in six degrees of freedom. Subsystem designed to filter out high (spatial) frequency components in image, with frequency response tuned to size of object detected. Blurring and background noise reduced to avoid false detection of moving target. Image produced used by another vision subsystem guiding robot to mate with target. Produces less noise and operates more reliably.

  7. Reconstruction of Fractional Quantum Hall Edges: Numerical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xin; Yang, Kun; Rezayi, E. H.

    2003-03-01

    The interplay of electron-electron interaction and confining potential can lead to the reconstruction of fractional quantum Hall edges (Xin Wan, Kun Yang, and E. H. Rezayi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 056802 (2002).). We have performed exact diagonalization studies on microscopic models of fractional quantum Hall liquids, in finite size systems with disc geometry, and found numerical evidence that suggests edge reconstruction occurs under rather general conditions. Due to edge reconstruction, additional nonchiral edge modes can arise for both incompressible and compressible states. We have studied the electron dipole spectral function that is directly related to the microwave conductivity measurement of a two-dimensional electron gas with an array of antidots (P. D. Ye et al., Phys. Rev. B 65, 121305 (2002).). Our results are consistent with the enhanced microwave conductivity observed in experiments at low temperatures, and its suppression at higher temperatures. We also discuss the effects of the edge reconstruction on the fractional quantum Hall edge tunneling experiments.

  8. Agile robotic edge finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.

    1996-08-01

    Edge finishing processes have seemed like ideal candidates for automation. Most edge finishing processes are unpleasant, dangerous, tedious, expensive, not repeatable and labor intensive. Estimates place the cost of manual edge finishing processes at 12% of the total cost of fabricating precision parts. For small, high precision parts, the cost of hand finishing may be as high as 305 of the total part cost. Up to 50% of this cost could be saved through automation. This cost estimate includes the direct costs of edge finishing: the machining hours required and the 30% scrap and rework rate after manual finishing. Not included in these estimates are the indirect costs resulting from cumulative trauma disorders and retraining costs caused by the high turnover rate for finishing jobs.. Despite the apparent economic advantages, edge finishing has proven difficult to automate except in low precision and/or high volume production environments. Finishing automation systems have not been deployed successfully in Department of Energy defense programs (DOE/DP) production, A few systems have been attempted but have been subsequently abandoned for traditional edge finishing approaches: scraping, grinding, and filing the edges using modified dental tools and hand held power tools. Edge finishing automation has been an elusive but potentially lucrative production enhancement. The amount of time required for reconfiguring workcells for new parts, the time required to reprogram the workcells to finish new parts, and automation equipment to respond to fixturing errors and part tolerances are the most common reasons cited for eliminating automation as an option for DOE/DP edge finishing applications. Existing automated finishing systems have proven to be economically viable only where setup and reprogramming costs are a negligible fraction of overall production costs.

  9. Edge detection: a tutorial review

    SciTech Connect

    Kunt, M.

    1982-01-01

    Major edge detection methods are reviewed from the signal processing and artificial intelligence point of views. In the first class, images are processed first to enhance edges. Then a decision is made to label each picture point as edge or not edge. In the second class edges are viewed as the border-lines of regions whose points share a common property. 21 references.

  10. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady surface pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  11. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define, the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  12. Polychromator for the edge Thomson scattering system in ITERa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsuka, E.; Hatae, T.; Fujie, D.; Kurokawa, A.; Kusama, Y.

    2012-10-01

    A new type polychromator has been designed for the edge Thomson scattering system in ITER. Signal light is parallelly dispersed into two parts at the first interference filter. Spectral transmissivities for some spectral channels may enhance better than the conventional type polychromator. In the new type polychromator, the misalignment due to the machine accuracy is expected to be within the margin of APD area. In order to calibrate the spectral transmissivity using the dual-laser injection method during the plasma discharge, it is preferred that the spectral channels are separated at the geometric mean of the injected two wavelengths.

  13. FOCUSR: Feature Oriented Correspondence using Spectral Regularization–A Method for Precise Surface Matching

    PubMed Central

    Lombaert, Herve; Grady, Leo; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Cheriet, Farida

    2013-01-01

    Existing methods for surface matching are limited by the trade-off between precision and computational efficiency. Here we present an improved algorithm for dense vertex-to-vertex correspondence that uses direct matching of features defined on a surface and improves it by using spectral correspondence as a regularization. This algorithm has the speed of both feature matching and spectral matching while exhibiting greatly improved precision (distance errors of 1.4%). The method, FOCUSR, incorporates implicitly such additional features to calculate the correspondence and relies on the smoothness of the lowest-frequency harmonics of a graph Laplacian to spatially regularize the features. In its simplest form, FOCUSR is an improved spectral correspondence method that nonrigidly deforms spectral embeddings. We provide here a full realization of spectral correspondence where virtually any feature can be used as additional information using weights on graph edges, but also on graph nodes and as extra embedded coordinates. As an example, the full power of FOCUSR is demonstrated in a real case scenario with the challenging task of brain surface matching across several individuals. Our results show that combining features and regularizing them in a spectral embedding greatly improves the matching precision (to a sub-millimeter level) while performing at much greater speed than existing methods. PMID:23868776

  14. The influence of surface rounding on trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1988-11-01

    The sound produced by low Mach number turbulent flow over an asymmetrically rounded trailing edge of an airfoil is investigated. Results are given for angles of the trailing edge wedge of 90 deg and less. It is found that, for a given turbulence intensity, surface beveling has a significant effect on the radiation only at sufficiently high frequencies that the trailing edge may be regarded as a straight-sided wedge over distances of the order of the turbulence length scale.

  15. Broadband ringdown spectral photography.

    PubMed

    Scherer, J J; Paul, J B; Jiao, H; O'Keefe, A

    2001-12-20

    A new technique that enables frequency-resolved cavity ringdown absorption spectra to be obtained over a large optical bandwidth by a single laser shot is described. The technique, ringdown spectral photography (RSP), simultaneously employs two key principles to record the time and frequency response of an optical cavity along orthogonal axes of a CCD array detector. Previously, the principles employed in RSP were demonstrated with narrow-band laser light that was scanned in frequency [Chem. Phys. Lett. 292, 143 (1998)]. Here, the RSP method is demonstrated using single pulses of broadband visible laser light. The ability to obtain broad as well as rotationally resolved spectra over a large bandwidth with high sensitivity is demonstrated. PMID:18364983

  16. Spectral Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  17. Spectral Dictionaries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangtae; Gupta, Nitin; Bandeira, Nuno; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2009-01-01

    Database search tools identify peptides by matching tandem mass spectra against a protein database. We study an alternative approach when all plausible de novo interpretations of a spectrum (spectral dictionary) are generated and then quickly matched against the database. We present a new MS-Dictionary algorithm for efficiently generating spectral dictionaries and demonstrate that MS-Dictionary can identify spectra that are missed in the database search. We argue that MS-Dictionary enables proteogenomics searches in six-frame translation of genomic sequences that may be prohibitively time-consuming for existing database search approaches. We show that such searches allow one to correct sequencing errors and find programmed frameshifts. PMID:18703573

  18. Using new edges for anomaly detection in computer networks

    DOEpatents

    Neil, Joshua Charles

    2015-05-19

    Creation of new edges in a network may be used as an indication of a potential attack on the network. Historical data of a frequency with which nodes in a network create and receive new edges may be analyzed. Baseline models of behavior among the edges in the network may be established based on the analysis of the historical data. A new edge that deviates from a respective baseline model by more than a predetermined threshold during a time window may be detected. The new edge may be flagged as potentially anomalous when the deviation from the respective baseline model is detected. Probabilities for both new and existing edges may be obtained for all edges in a path or other subgraph. The probabilities may then be combined to obtain a score for the path or other subgraph. A threshold may be obtained by calculating an empirical distribution of the scores under historical conditions.

  19. Spectral clustering with epidemic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura M; Lerman, Kristina; Garcia-Cardona, Cristina; Percus, Allon G; Ghosh, Rumi

    2013-10-01

    Spectral clustering is widely used to partition graphs into distinct modules or communities. Existing methods for spectral clustering use the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the graph Laplacian, an operator that is closely associated with random walks on graphs. We propose a spectral partitioning method that exploits the properties of epidemic diffusion. An epidemic is a dynamic process that, unlike the random walk, simultaneously transitions to all the neighbors of a given node. We show that the replicator, an operator describing epidemic diffusion, is equivalent to the symmetric normalized Laplacian of a reweighted graph with edges reweighted by the eigenvector centralities of their incident nodes. Thus, more weight is given to edges connecting more central nodes. We describe a method that partitions the nodes based on the componentwise ratio of the replicator's second eigenvector to the first and compare its performance to traditional spectral clustering techniques on synthetic graphs with known community structure. We demonstrate that the replicator gives preference to dense, clique-like structures, enabling it to more effectively discover communities that may be obscured by dense intercommunity linking. PMID:24229231

  20. Spectral clustering with epidemic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Laura M.; Lerman, Kristina; Garcia-Cardona, Cristina; Percus, Allon G.; Ghosh, Rumi

    2013-10-01

    Spectral clustering is widely used to partition graphs into distinct modules or communities. Existing methods for spectral clustering use the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the graph Laplacian, an operator that is closely associated with random walks on graphs. We propose a spectral partitioning method that exploits the properties of epidemic diffusion. An epidemic is a dynamic process that, unlike the random walk, simultaneously transitions to all the neighbors of a given node. We show that the replicator, an operator describing epidemic diffusion, is equivalent to the symmetric normalized Laplacian of a reweighted graph with edges reweighted by the eigenvector centralities of their incident nodes. Thus, more weight is given to edges connecting more central nodes. We describe a method that partitions the nodes based on the componentwise ratio of the replicator's second eigenvector to the first and compare its performance to traditional spectral clustering techniques on synthetic graphs with known community structure. We demonstrate that the replicator gives preference to dense, clique-like structures, enabling it to more effectively discover communities that may be obscured by dense intercommunity linking.

  1. Red edge measurements for remotely sensing plant chlorophyll content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Dockray, M.; Barber, J.; Barringer, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using the wavelength of the maximum slope of the red edge of leaf reflectance spectra, Lambda(re), as an indication of plant chlorophyll status was examined in the laboratory for single leaves of several species. Lambda(re) for each sample was determined by derivative reflectance spectroscopy. A high positive correlation was found between Lambda(re) and leaf chlorophyll content for all species, although there were some differences in the quantitative nature of the relationship for plants of different types. The position of the red edge was found to be unaffected by simulated change in ground cover, but multiple leaf layers produced a shift in its position. Appropriate spectral measurements and processing for obtaining useful information from the red edge are discussed, and the potential of the red edge in relation to other spectral measurements is considered.

  2. Spectral estimators in elastography.

    PubMed

    Konofagou, E E; Varghese, T; Ophir, J

    2000-03-01

    Like velocity, strain induces a time delay and a time scaling to the received signal. Elastography typically uses time delay techniques to indirectly (i.e. via the displacement estimate) measure tissue strain induced by an applied compression, and considers time scaling as a source of distortion. More recently, we have shown that the time scaling factor can also be spectrally estimated and used as a direct measure of strain. Strain causes a Doppler-like frequency shift and a change in bandwidth of the bandpass power spectrum of the echo signal. Two frequency shift strain estimators are described that have been proven to be more robust but less precise when compared to time delay estimators, both in simulations and experiments. The increased robustness is due to the insensitivity of the spectral techniques to phase decorrelation noise. In this paper we discuss and compare the theoretical and experimental findings obtained with traditional time delay estimators and with the newly proposed spectral methods. PMID:10829698

  3. Image enhancement based on edge boosting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngernplubpla, Jaturon; Chitsobhuk, Orachat

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a technique for image enhancement based on proposed edge boosting algorithm to reconstruct high quality image from a single low resolution image is described. The difficulty in single-image super-resolution is that the generic image priors resided in the low resolution input image may not be sufficient to generate the effective solutions. In order to achieve a success in super-resolution reconstruction, efficient prior knowledge should be estimated. The statistics of gradient priors in terms of priority map based on separable gradient estimation, maximum likelihood edge estimation, and local variance are introduced. The proposed edge boosting algorithm takes advantages of these gradient statistics to select the appropriate enhancement weights. The larger weights are applied to the higher frequency details while the low frequency details are smoothed. From the experimental results, the significant performance improvement quantitatively and perceptually is illustrated. It can be seen that the proposed edge boosting algorithm demonstrates high quality results with fewer artifacts, sharper edges, superior texture areas, and finer detail with low noise.

  4. The Edge supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  5. Power spectral estimation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Manjit S.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms to estimate the power spectrum using Maximum Entropy Methods were developed. These algorithms were coded in FORTRAN 77 and were implemented on the VAX 780. The important considerations in this analysis are: (1) resolution, i.e., how close in frequency two spectral components can be spaced and still be identified; (2) dynamic range, i.e., how small a spectral peak can be, relative to the largest, and still be observed in the spectra; and (3) variance, i.e., how accurate the estimate of the spectra is to the actual spectra. The application of the algorithms based on Maximum Entropy Methods to a variety of data shows that these criteria are met quite well. Additional work in this direction would help confirm the findings. All of the software developed was turned over to the technical monitor. A copy of a typical program is included. Some of the actual data and graphs used on this data are also included.

  6. The pulsar spectral index distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, S. D.; Lorimer, D. R.; Verbiest, J. P. W.

    2013-05-01

    The flux-density spectra of radio pulsars are known to be steep and, to first order, described by a power-law relationship of the form Sν ∝ να, where Sν is the flux density at some frequency ν and α is the spectral index. Although measurements of α have been made over the years for several hundred pulsars, a study of the intrinsic distribution of pulsar spectra has not been carried out. From the result of pulsar surveys carried out at three different radio frequencies, we use population synthesis techniques and a likelihood analysis to deduce what underlying spectral index distribution is required to replicate the results of these surveys. We find that in general the results of the surveys can be modelled by a Gaussian distribution of spectral indices with a mean of -1.4 and unit standard deviation. We also consider the impact of the so-called gigahertz-peaked spectrum pulsars proposed by Kijak et al. The fraction of peaked-spectrum sources in the population with any significant turnover at low frequencies appears to be at most 10 per cent. We demonstrate that high-frequency (>2 GHz) surveys preferentially select flatter spectrum pulsars and the converse is true for lower frequency (<1 GHz) surveys. This implies that any correlations between α and other pulsar parameters (for example age or magnetic field) need to carefully account for selection biases in pulsar surveys. We also expect that many known pulsars which have been detected at high frequencies will have shallow, or positive, spectral indices. The majority of pulsars do not have recorded flux density measurements over a wide frequency range, making it impossible to constrain their spectral shapes. We also suggest that such measurements would allow an improved description of any populations of pulsars with `non-standard' spectra. Further refinements to this picture will soon be possible from the results of surveys with the Green Bank Telescope and LOFAR.

  7. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between O and 3000 GHz (such as; wavelengths longer than 100 m) is discussed. The catalogue was used as a planning guide and as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances.

  8. Temperature dependence of the absorption edge of vitreous silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, C. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    During an investigation of the optical properties of high-purity vitreous silica (fused quartz), which is being developed by NASA as a reflective and ablative heat shield, some interesting properties of theoretical and experimental nature have become apparent which otherwise may have remained unnoticed. Of particular interest for the NASA application is the shift of the absorption edge toward longer wavelengths with increasing temperature. The results of studies of this shift and of the spectral dependence of the absorption edge are summarized in the present paper. Plots of the absorption edge and the absorption spectrum of fused quartz vs temperature are given and discussed.

  9. Edge localized mode control with an edge resonant magnetic perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, R.A.; Boedo, J.A.; Rudakov, D.L.; Evans, T.E.; Osborne, T.H.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; Jackson, G.L.; La Haye, R.J.; Leonard, A.W.; Schaffer, M.J.; Snyder, P.B.; West, W.P.; Thomas, P.R.; Becoulet, M.; Harris, J.; Finken, K.-H.; Doyle, E.J.; Rhodes, T.L.; Wang, G.

    2005-05-15

    A low amplitude ({delta}b{sub r}/B{sub T}=1 part in 5000) edge resonant magnetic field perturbation with toroidal mode number n=3 and poloidal mode numbers between 8 and 15 has been used to suppress most large type I edge localized modes (ELMs) without degrading core plasma confinement. ELMs have been suppressed for periods of up to 8.6 energy confinement times when the edge safety factor q{sub 95} is between 3.5 and 4. The large ELMs are replaced by packets of events (possibly type II ELMs) with small amplitude, narrow radial extent, and a higher level of magnetic field and density fluctuations, creating a duty cycle with long 'active' intervals of high transport and short 'quiet' intervals of low transport. The increased transport associated with these events is less impulsive and slows the recovery of the pedestal profiles to the values reached just before the large ELMs without the n=3 perturbation. Changing the toroidal phase of the perturbation by 60 deg. with respect to the best ELM suppression case reduces the ELM amplitude and frequency by factors of 2-3 in the divertor, produces a more stochastic response in the H-mode pedestal profiles, and displays similar increases in small scale events, although significant numbers of large ELMs survive. In contrast to the best ELM suppression case where the type I ELMs are also suppressed on the outboard midplane, the midplane recycling increases until individual ELMs are no longer discernable. The ELM response depends on the toroidal phase of the applied perturbation because intrinsic error fields make the target plasma nonaxisymmetric, and suggests that at least some of the variation in ELM behavior in a single device or among different devices is due to differences in the intrinsic error fields in these devices. These results indicate that ELMs can be suppressed by small edge resonant magnetic field perturbations. Extrapolation to next-step burning plasma devices will require extending the regime of operation to

  10. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  11. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  12. An experimental study of airfoil instability tonal noise with trailing edge serrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Tze Pei; Joseph, Phillip F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the effect of trailing edge serrations on airfoil instability noise. Detailed aeroacoustic measurements are presented of the noise radiated by an NACA-0012 airfoil with trailing edge serrations in a low to moderate speed flow under acoustical free field conditions. The existence of a separated boundary layer near the trailing edge of the airfoil at an angle of attack of 4.2 degree has been experimentally identified by a surface mounted hot-film arrays technique. Hot-wire results have shown that the saw-tooth surface can trigger a bypass transition and prevent the boundary layer from becoming separated. Without the separated boundary layer to act as an amplifier for the incoming Tollmien-Schlichting waves, the intensity and spectral characteristic of the radiated tonal noise can be affected depending upon the serration geometry. Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of the airfoil wakes for a straight and serrated trailing edge are also reported in this paper. These measurements show that localized normal-component velocity fluctuations that are present in a small region of the wake from the laminar airfoil become weakened once serrations are introduced. Owing to the above unique characteristics of the serrated trailing edges, we are able to further investigate the mechanisms of airfoil instability tonal noise with special emphasis on the assessment of the wake and non-wake based aeroacoustic feedback models. It has been shown that the instability tonal noise generated at an angle of attack below approximately one degree could involve several complex mechanisms. On the other hand, the non-wake based aeroacoustic feedback mechanism alone is sufficient to predict all discrete tone frequencies accurately when the airfoil is at a moderate angle of attack. Larger Δf, which is defined as (fn+1-fn). In other words, a larger margin of velocity increase is required in order to "shift" the fn and fn+1 across fs

  13. Body edge delineation in 2D DC resistivity imaging using differential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, Kusnahadi; Fitrah Bahari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    DC resistivity is widely used to identify the kind of rock and the lithology contact. However, the image resulting from resistivity processing is shown in a contour image. There is be a problem to interpret where the edge of body location is. This study uses differential method to delineate the edge of body in DC resistivity contour. This method was applied to the boundary between gravel and underlying clay layer. The first and the second order differential method is applied to the delineation of lithology contact. The profiling curve has to be sliced and extracted from the resistivity contour before the differential method can be used. The spectral analysis shows the frequency and wavenumber of the profiling curve used to make gridding. The slicing process was conducted horizontally and vertically in order to get the mesh size which will be used in the differential method. The second order differential, the Laplace operator, is able to show the edge of body more clearly than the first order differential and shows the contact between gravel and clay.

  14. Floquet edge states in germanene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Tahir, M; Zhang, Q Y; Schwingenschlögl, U

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate versatile electronic properties of germanene monolayers under circularly, linearly, and elliptically polarized light. We show for the high frequency regime that the edge states can be controlled by tuning the amplitude of the light and by applying a static electric field. For circularly polarized light the band gap in one valley is reduced and in the other enhanced, enabling single valley edge states. For linearly polarized light spin-split states are found for both valleys, being connected by time reversal symmetry. The effects of elliptically polarized light are similar to those of circularly polarized light. The transport properties of zigzag nanoribbons in the presence of disorder confirm a nontrivial nature of the edge states under circularly and elliptically polarized light. PMID:27550632

  15. Floquet edge states in germanene nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, M.; Zhang, Q. Y.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate versatile electronic properties of germanene monolayers under circularly, linearly, and elliptically polarized light. We show for the high frequency regime that the edge states can be controlled by tuning the amplitude of the light and by applying a static electric field. For circularly polarized light the band gap in one valley is reduced and in the other enhanced, enabling single valley edge states. For linearly polarized light spin-split states are found for both valleys, being connected by time reversal symmetry. The effects of elliptically polarized light are similar to those of circularly polarized light. The transport properties of zigzag nanoribbons in the presence of disorder confirm a nontrivial nature of the edge states under circularly and elliptically polarized light. PMID:27550632

  16. Swords with Blunt Edges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2004-01-01

    Many U.S. educators now wonder whether they're teachers or targets. This mentality stems from the specter of their school being sanctioned for failing the state accountability tests mandated under No Child Left Behind (NCLB). According to this author, most of those tests are like blunt-edged swords: They function badly in two directions. While…

  17. Oscillating edge-flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Zhang, Yi

    1999-09-01

    It has been known for some years that when a near-limit flame spreads over a liquid pool of fuel, the edge of the flame can oscillate. It is also known that when a near-asphyxiated candle-flame burns in zero gravity, the edge of the (hemispherical) flame can oscillate violently prior to extinction. We propose that these oscillations are nothing more than a manifestation of the large Lewis number instability well known in chemical reactor studies and in combustion studies, one that is exacerbated by heat losses. As evidence of this we examine an edge-flame confined within a fuel-supply boundary and an oxygen-supply boundary, anchored by a discontinuity in data at the fuel-supply boundary. We show that when the Lewis number of the fuel is 2, and the Lewis number of the oxidizer is 1, oscillations of the edge occur when the Damköhler number is reduced below a critical value. During a single oscillation period there is a short premixed propagation stage and a long diffusion stage, behaviour that has been observed in flame spread experiments. Oscillations do not occur when both Lewis numbers are equal to 1.

  18. The Inner Urban Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferebee, Ann; Carpenter, Edward K.

    1974-01-01

    In this article, renewal of the inner urban edge is discussed. Norfolk (Virginia) is attempting to blur the difference between old and new neighbor hoods through zoning and architectural controls. Cincinnati (Ohio) is developing an environmentally sound hillside design. Reading (Pennsylvania) is utilizing old railyards for greenbelts of hiking and…

  19. Spectral correlations of fractional Brownian motion

    SciTech Connect

    Oigaard, Tor Arne; Hanssen, Alfred; Scharf, Louis L.

    2006-09-15

    Fractional Brownian motion (fBm) is a ubiquitous nonstationary model for many physical processes with power-law time-averaged spectra. In this paper, we exploit the nonstationarity to derive the full spectral correlation structure of fBm. Starting from the time-varying correlation function, we derive two different time-frequency spectral correlation functions (the ambiguity function and the Kirkwood-Rihaczek spectrum), and one dual-frequency spectral correlation function. The dual-frequency spectral correlation has a surprisingly simple structure, with spectral support on three discrete lines. The theoretical predictions are verified by spectrum estimates of Monte Carlo simulations and of a time series of earthquakes with a magnitude of 7 and higher.

  20. Edge Minority Heating Experiment in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; J.L. Terry; P. Bonoli; R. Budny; C.S. Chang; C. Fiore; G. Schilling; S. Wukitch; J. Hughes; Y. Lin; R. Perkins; M. Porkolab; the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2005-03-25

    An attempt was made to control global plasma confinement in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak by applying ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power to the plasma edge in order to deliberately create a minority ion tail loss. In theory, an edge fast ion loss could modify the edge electric field and so stabilize the edge turbulence, which might then reduce the H-mode power threshold or improve the H-mode barrier. However, the experimental result was that edge minority heating resulted in no improvement in the edge plasma parameters or global stored energy, at least at power levels of radio-frequency power is less than or equal to 5.5 MW. A preliminary analysis of these results is presented and some ideas for improvement are discussed.

  1. The red edge of plant leaf reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Dockray, M.; Barber, J.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed study of the red edge spectral feature of green vegetation based on laboratory reflectance spectrophotometry is presented. A parameter lambda is defined as the wavelength is defined as the wavelength of maximum slope and found to be dependent on chlorophyll concentration. Species, development stage, leaf layering, and leaf water content of vegetation also influences lambda. The maximum slope parameter is found to be independent of simulated ground area coverage. The results are interpreted in terms of Beer's Law and Kubelka-Munk theory. The chlorophyll concentration dependence of lambda seems to be explained in terms of a pure absorption effect, and it is suggested that the existence of two lambda components arises from leaf scattering properties. The results indicate that red edge measurements will be valuable for assessment of vegetative chlorophyll status and leaf area index independently of ground cover variations, and will be particularly suitable for early stress detection.

  2. Near-infrared spectral imaging of the female breast for quantitative oximetry in optical mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yang; Liu Ning; Sassaroli, Angelo; Fantini, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    We present a hybrid continuous-wave, frequency-domain instrument for near-infrared spectral imaging of the female breast based on a tandem, planar scanning of one illumination optical fiber and one collection optical fiber configured in a transmission geometry. The spatial sampling rate of 25 points/cm{sup 2} is increased to 400 points/cm{sup 2} by postprocessing the data with a 2D cubic spline interpolation. We then apply a previously developed spatial second-derivative algorithm to an edge-corrected intensity image (N-image) to enhance the visibility and resolution of optical inhomogeneities in breast tissue such as blood vessels and tumors. The spectral data at each image pixel consist of 515-point spectra over the 650-900 nm wavelength range, thus featuring a spectral density of two data points per nanometer. We process the measured spectra with a paired-wavelength spectral analysis method to quantify the oxygen saturation of detected optical inhomogeneities, under the assumption that they feature a locally higher hemoglobin concentration. Our initial measurements on two healthy human subjects have generated high-resolution optical mammograms displaying a network of blood vessels with values of hemoglobin saturation typically falling within the 60%-95% range, which is physiologically reasonable. This approach to spectral imaging and oximetry of the breast has the potential to efficiently exploit the high intrinsic contrast provided by hemoglobin in breast tissue and to contribute a useful tool in the detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of breast pathologies.

  3. Symmetric airfoil geometry effects on leading edge noise.

    PubMed

    Gill, James; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2013-10-01

    Computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with various airfoil geometries at zero angle of attack. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and independently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Increases in both leading edge radius and thickness are found to reduce the predicted noise. This noise reduction effect becomes greater with increasing frequency and Mach number. The dominant noise reduction mechanism for airfoils with real geometry is found to be related to the leading edge stagnation region. It is shown that accurate leading edge noise predictions can be made when assuming an inviscid meanflow, but that it is not valid to assume a uniform meanflow. Analytic flat plate predictions are found to over-predict the noise due to a NACA 0002 airfoil by up to 3 dB at high frequencies. The accuracy of analytic flat plate solutions can be expected to decrease with increasing airfoil thickness, leading edge radius, gust frequency, and Mach number. PMID:24116405

  4. Numerical simulation of the edge tone phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, N. S.; Liu, B. L.; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Time accurate Navier-Stokes computations were performed to study a class 2 (acoustic) whistle, the edge tone, and to gain knowledge of the vortex-acoustic coupling mechanisms driving production of these tones. Results were obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible air flow of a two dimensional jet issuing from a slit interacting with a wedge. Cases considered were determined by varying the distance from the slit to the wedge. Flow speed was kept constant at 1,750 cm/s as was the slit thickness of 0.1 cm, corresponding to conditions in the experiments of Brown. The analytical computations revealed edge tones to be present in four harmonic stages of jet flow instability over the wedge as the jet length was varied from 0.3 to 1.6 cm. Excellent agreement was obtained in all four edge tone stage cases between the present computational results and the experimentally obtained frequencies and flow visualization results of Brown. Specific edge tone generation phenomena and further confirmation of certain theories and empirical formulas concerning these phenomena were brought to light in this analytical simulation of edge tones.

  5. Superpixel edges for boundary detection

    DOEpatents

    Moya, Mary M.; Koch, Mark W.

    2016-07-12

    Various embodiments presented herein relate to identifying one or more edges in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image comprising a plurality of superpixels. Superpixels sharing an edge (or boundary) can be identified and one or more properties of the shared superpixels can be compared to determine whether the superpixels form the same or two different features. Where the superpixels form the same feature the edge is identified as an internal edge. Where the superpixels form two different features, the edge is identified as an external edge. Based upon classification of the superpixels, the external edge can be further determined to form part of a roof, wall, etc. The superpixels can be formed from a speckle-reduced SAR image product formed from a registered stack of SAR images, which is further segmented into a plurality of superpixels. The edge identification process is applied to the SAR image comprising the superpixels and edges.

  6. The Effect of Nozzle Trailing Edge Thickness on Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Kinzie, Kevin; Haskin, Henry

    2004-01-01

    The effect of nozzle trailing edge thickness on broadband acoustic radiation and the production of tones is investigated for coannular nozzles. Experiments were performed for a core nozzle trailing edge thickness between 0.38 mm and 3.17 mm. The on-set of discrete tones was found to be predominantly affected by the velocity ratio, the ratio of the fan velocity to the core velocity, although some dependency on trailing edge thickness was also noted. For a core nozzle trailing edge thickness greater than or equal to 0.89 mm, tones were produced for velocity ratios between 0.91 and 1.61. For a constant nozzle trailing edge thickness, the frequency varied almost linearly with the core velocity. The Strouhal number based on the core velocity changed with nozzle trailing edge thickness and varied between 0.16 and 0.2 for the core nozzles used in the experiments. Increases in broadband noise with increasing trailing edge thickness were observed for tone producing and non-tone producing conditions. A variable thickness trailing edge (crenellated) nozzle resulted in no tonal production and a reduction of the broadband trailing edge noise relative to that of the corresponding constant thickness trailing edge.

  7. Basic elements of power spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1974-01-01

    The basic elements of power spectral analysis with emphasis on the Blackman-Tukey method are presented. Short discussions are included on the topics of pre-whitening, frequency and spectral windows, and statistical reliability. Examples are included whenever possible, and a FORTRAN subroutine for calculating a power spectrum is presented.

  8. Spectroscopic behavior in whispering-gallery modes by edge formation of printed microdisk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cong; Li, Jifeng; Ryu, Soichiro; Yoshioka, Hiroaki; Ozawa, Masaaki; Oki, Yuji

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic and rapid spectral shifts of whispering-gallery mode (WGM) from microdisk laser were studied. The microdisks with diameter about 100 μm were fabricated by ink-jet printing of Rhodamine 590 doped polymer. Sharper edge microdisk and rounder edge microdisk were pumped with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser(@532 nm). A spectral shift -3.77×10-3 nm/(μJ·mm-2) was occurred in the case of the rounder edge microdisk, which is smaller than the spectral shift -4.21×10-3 nm/(μJ·mm-2) in the case of the sharper edge microdisk. Expecting the anomalous dispersion and Rhodamine 590 degradation affect, under the same excitation condition, the WGM spatial modification can also led to the shifts. And the modification was caused by interaction between the sharpened-edge and the increased optical gain.

  9. Spectral characterization of the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, B. L.; Barker, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The spectral coverage characteristics of the two thematic mapper instruments were determined by analyses of spectral measurements of the optics, filters, and detectors. The following results are presented: (1) band 2 and 3 flatness was slightly below specification, and band 7 flatness was below specification; (2) band 5 upper-band edge was higher than specifications; (3) band 2 band edges were shifted upward about 9 nm relative to nominal; and (4) band 4, 5, and 7 lower band edges were 16 to 18 nm higher then nominal.

  10. Differentiator design and performance for edge sharpening

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pan, Jeng-Jong; Domingue, Julia O.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional differentiator is useful for edge sharpening in digital image processing. In the design of a differentiator, differentiator coefficients that satisfy the specification of frequency response must be approximated. Four mathematical techniques - the minimax method, least-squares method, nonlinear programming, and linear programming - can be applied to solve the approximation problem. Results indicated that the differentiator derived from linear programming gives the highest resolution. -from Authors

  11. Edge detection by nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yiu-fai

    1994-07-01

    We demonstrate how the formulation of a nonlinear scale-space filter can be used for edge detection and junction analysis. By casting edge-preserving filtering in terms of maximizing information content subject to an average cost function, the computed cost at each pixel location becomes a local measure of edgeness. This computation depends on a single scale parameter and the given image data. Unlike previous approaches which require careful tuning of the filter kernels for various types of edges, our scheme is general enough to be able to handle different edges, such as lines, step-edges, corners and junctions. Anisotropy in the data is handled automatically by the nonlinear dynamics.

  12. Airfoil noise reductions through leading edge serrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, S.; Chaitanya, P.; Haeri, S.; Joseph, P.; Kim, J. W.; Polacsek, C.

    2015-02-01

    This paper provides an experimental investigation into the use of leading edge (LE) serrations as a means of reducing the broadband noise generated due to the interaction between the aerofoil's LE and impinging turbulence. Experiments are performed on a flat plate in an open jet wind tunnel. Grids are used to generate isotropic homogeneous turbulence. The leading edge serrations are in the form of sinusoidal profiles of wavelengths, λ, and amplitudes, 2h. The frequency and amplitude characteristics are studied in detail in order to understand the effect of LE serrations on noise reduction characteristics and are compared with straight edge baseline flat plates. Noise reductions are found to be insignificant at low frequencies but significant in the mid frequency range (500 Hz-8 kHz) for all the cases studied. The flat plate results are also compared to the noise reductions obtained on a serrated NACA-65 aerofoil with the same serration profile. Noise reductions are found to be significantly higher for the flat plates with a maximum noise reduction of around 9 dB compared with about 7 dB for the aerofoil. In general, it is observed that the sound power reduction level (ΔPWL) is sensitive to the amplitude, 2h of the LE serrations but less sensitive to the serration wavelength, λ. Thus, this paper sufficiently demonstrates that the LE amplitude acts as a key parameter for enhancing the noise reduction levels in flat plates and aerofoils.

  13. Vegetation's red edge: a possible spectroscopic biosignature of extraterrestrial plants.

    PubMed

    Seager, S; Turner, E L; Schafer, J; Ford, E B

    2005-06-01

    Earth's deciduous plants have a sharp order-of-magnitude increase in leaf reflectance between approximately 700 and 750 nm wavelength. This strong reflectance of Earth's vegetation suggests that surface biosignatures with sharp spectral features might be detectable in the spectrum of scattered light from a spatially unresolved extrasolar terrestrial planet. We assess the potential of Earth's step-function-like spectroscopic feature, referred to as the "red edge," as a tool for astrobiology. We review the basic characteristics and physical origin of the red edge and summarize its use in astronomy: early spectroscopic efforts to search for vegetation on Mars and recent reports of detection of the red edge in the spectrum of Earthshine (i.e., the spatially integrated scattered light spectrum of Earth). We present Earthshine observations from Apache Point Observatory (New Mexico) to emphasize that time variability is key to detecting weak surface biosignatures such as the vegetation red edge. We briefly discuss the evolutionary advantages of vegetation's red edge reflectance, and speculate that while extraterrestrial "light-harvesting organisms" have no compelling reason to display the exact same red edge feature as terrestrial vegetation, they might have similar spectroscopic features at different wavelengths than terrestrial vegetation. This implies that future terrestrial-planet-characterizing space missions should obtain data that allow time-varying, sharp spectral features at unknown wavelengths to be identified. We caution that some mineral reflectance edges are similar in slope and strength to vegetation's red edge (albeit at different wavelengths); if an extrasolar planet reflectance edge is detected care must be taken with its interpretation. PMID:15941381

  14. Gabor wavelets for texture edge extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Juliang; Foerstner, Wolfgang

    1994-08-01

    Textures in images have a natural order, both in orientation and multiple narrow-band frequency, which requires the user to employ multichannel local spatial/frequency filtering and orientation selectivity, and to have a multiscale characteristic. Each channel covers one part of a whole frequency domain, which indicates different information for the different texton. Gabor filter, as a near orthogonal wavelet used in this paper, has orientation selectivity, multiscale property, linear phase, and good localization both in spatial and frequency domains, which are suitable for texture analysis. Gabor filters are employed for clustering the similarity of the same type of textons. Gaussian filters are also used for detection of normal image edges. Then hybrid texture and nontexture gradient measurement is based on fusion of the difference of amplitude of the filter responses between Gabor and Gaussian filters at neighboring pixels by mainly using average squared gradient. Normalization, based on the noise response and based on maximum response, is computed.

  15. Study of a mode-locked erbium-doped frequency-shifted-feedback fiber laser incorporating a broad bandpass filter: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Zuniga, Luis Alonso; Jeong, Yoonchan

    2013-10-01

    We present rigorous experimental studies on the spectral and temporal behaviors of an erbium-doped frequency-shifted-feedback fiber laser (FSFL), with respect to various parameters of the laser cavity, including the direction of the frequency-shift mechanism, the quantity of frequency-shift, and the output coupling ratio (OCR) of the cavity. We show that if the filter bandwidth is much broader than the laser linewidth, the laser spectrum tends to split and form a secondary spectral band (SSB) on the shorter or longer wavelength side of the primary spectrum, depending on whether the direction of the frequency-shift mechanism is upward or downward, respectively. We found that the SSB forms a parasitic pulse with much lower peak power traveling on the leading or trailing edge of the primary pulse, which leads to a significant asymmetry in the whole pulse formation in the time domain.

  16. High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed transition-edge sensor array

    SciTech Connect

    Noroozian, Omid; Mates, John A. B.; Bennett, Douglas A.; Brevik, Justus A.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gao, Jiansong; Hilton, Gene C.; Horansky, Robert D.; Irwin, Kent D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Vale, Leila R.; Ullom, Joel N.; Kang, Zhao

    2013-11-11

    We demonstrate very high resolution photon spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed two-pixel transition-edge sensor (TES) array. We measured a {sup 153}Gd photon source and achieved an energy resolution of 63 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 97 keV and an equivalent readout system noise of 86 pA/√(Hz) at the TES. The readout circuit consists of superconducting microwave resonators coupled to radio-frequency superconducting-quantum-interference-devices and transduces changes in input current to changes in phase of a microwave signal. We use flux-ramp modulation to linearize the response and evade low-frequency noise. This demonstration establishes one path for the readout of cryogenic X-ray and gamma-ray sensor arrays with more than 10{sup 3} elements and spectral resolving powers R=λ/Δλ>10{sup 3}.

  17. Wisps in the outer edge of the Keeler Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Arnault, Ethan G.

    2015-11-01

    Superposed upon the relatively smooth outer edge of the Keeler Gap are a system of "wisps," which appear to be ring material protruding inward into the gap, usually with a sharp trailing edge and a smooth gradation back to the background edge location on the leading side (Porco et al. 2005, Science). The radial amplitude of wisps is usually 0.5 to 1 km, and their azimuthal extent is approximately a degree of longitude (~2400 km). Wisps are likely caused by an interplay between Daphnis (and perhaps other moons) and embedded moonlets within the ring, though the details remain unclear.Aside from the wisps, the Keeler Gap outer edge is the only one of the five sharp edges in the outer part of Saturn's A ring that is reasonably smooth in appearance (Tiscareno et al. 2005, DPS), with occultations indicating residuals less than 1 km upon a possibly non-zero eccentricity (R.G. French, personal communication, 2014). The other four (the inner and outer edges of the Encke Gap, the inner edge of the Keeler Gap, and the outer edge of the A ring itself) are characterized by wavy structure at moderate to high spatial frequencies, with amplitudes ranging from 2 to 30 km (Tiscareno et al. 2005, DPS).We will present a catalogue of wisp detections in Cassini images. We carry out repeated gaussian fits of the radial edge location in order to characterize edge structure and visually scan those fitted edges in order to detect wisps. With extensive coverage in longitude and in time, we will report on how wisps evolve and move, both within an orbit period and on longer timescales. We will also report on the frequency and interpretation of wisps that deviate from the standard morphology. We will discuss the implications of our results for the origin and nature of wisps, and for the larger picture of how masses interact within Saturn's rings.

  18. Relation between efficiency of second harmonic generation and spectral properties of a one-dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaporozhchenko, R. G.

    2003-12-01

    Numerical calculation of second harmonic generation in a photonic crystal consisting of alternating quarter-wave layers of ZnS and SeF2 pumped by a femtosecond tunable laser is carried out. The results are compared with the spectral characteristics of the photonic crystal obtained with the use of a matrix method for calculating transmission coefficients. It is shown that the maximum efficiency of conversion to the second harmonic takes place at a minimum group velocity mismatch of the pump and second harmonic waves, corresponding to pump frequencies in the range below the band gap edge of the photonic crystal.

  19. Significant reduction in arc frequency biased solar cells: Observations, diagnostics, and mitigation technique(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upschulte, B. L.; Weyl, G. M.; Marinelli, W. J.; Aifer, E.; Hastings, D.; Snyder, D.

    1991-01-01

    A variety of experiments were performed which identify key factors contributing to the arcing of negatively biased high voltage solar cells. These efforts have led to reduction of greater than a factor of 100 in the arc frequency of a single cell following proper remediation procedures. Experiments naturally lead to and focussed on the adhesive/encapsulant that is used to bond the protective cover slip to the solar cell. An image-intensified charge coupled device (CCD) camera system recorded UV emission from arc events which occurred exclusively along the interfacial edge between the cover slip and the solar cell. Microscopic inspection of this interfacial region showed a bead of encapsulant along this entire edge. Elimination of this encapsulant bead reduced the arc frequency by two orders of magnitude. Water contamination was also identified as a key contributor which enhances arcing of the encapsulant bead along the solar cell edge. Spectrally resolved measurements of the observable UV light shows a feature assignable to OH(A-X) electronic emission, which is common for water contaminated discharges. Experiments in which the solar cell temperature was raised to 85 C showed a reduced arcing frequency, suggesting desorption of H2O. Exposing the solar cell to water vapor was shown to increase the arcing frequency. Clean dry gases such as O2, N2, and Ar show no enhancement of the arcing rate. Elimination of the exposed encapsulant eliminates any measurable sensitivity to H2O vapor.

  20. Majorana edge modes in Kitaev model on honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakurathi, Manisha; Sengupta, Krishnendu; Sen, Diptiman

    2015-03-01

    We study the Majorana modes, both equilibrium and Floquet, which can appear at the edges of the Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice. We first present the analytical solutions known for the equilibrium Majorana edge modes for both zigzag and armchair edges of a semi-infinite Kitaev model and chart the parameter regimes of the model in which they appear. We then examine how edge modes can be generated if the Kitaev coupling on the bonds perpendicular to the edge is varied periodically in time as periodic δ-function kicks. We derive a general condition for the appearance and disappearance of the Floquet edge modes as a function of the drive frequency for a generic d-dimensional integrable system. We confirm this general condition for the Kitaev model with a finite width by mapping it to a one-dimensional model. Our numerical and analytical study of this problem shows that Floquet Majorana modes can appear on some edges in the kicked system even when the corresponding equilibrium Hamiltonian has no Majorana mode solutions on those edges. We support our analytical studies by numerics for finite sized system which show that periodic kicks can generate modes at the edges and the corners of the lattice. We thank CSIR, India and DST, India for financial support.

  1. Effects of shallow trench isolation on low frequency noise characteristics of source-follower transistors in CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sung-Kyu; Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Choi, Woon-Il; Song, Hyeong-Sub; Lee, Hi-Deok

    2016-05-01

    The effects of the shallow trench isolation (STI) edge on low frequency noise characteristics of source-follower (SF) transistors in CMOS image sensors (CIS) were investigated. Random telegraph signal (RTS) noise and 1/f noise were measured in a CIS operating voltage region for a realistic assessment. SF transistor with STI edge in contact with channel shows a lower probability of generating RTS noise but greater RTS amplitude due to the enhanced trap density induced by STI-induced damage. SF MOSFETs without STI exhibit a much lower 1/f noise power spectral density in spite of the greater RTS generation probability, which is due to the decreased trap density. Therefore, SF transistors without STI edge in contact with channel are promising candidates for low noise CIS applications.

  2. Competing edge networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Mark; Grindrod, Peter

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a model for a pair of nonlinear evolving networks, defined over a common set of vertices, subject to edgewise competition. Each network may grow new edges spontaneously or through triad closure. Both networks inhibit the other's growth and encourage the other's demise. These nonlinear stochastic competition equations yield to a mean field analysis resulting in a nonlinear deterministic system. There may be multiple equilibria; and bifurcations of different types are shown to occur within a reduced parameter space. This situation models competitive communication networks such as BlackBerry Messenger displacing SMS; or instant messaging displacing emails.

  3. The cutting edge.

    PubMed

    Hagland, M; Lumsdon, K; Montague, J; Serb, C

    1995-08-01

    With managed care payment becoming the norm, employers actively pursuing keener benefits management, health care markets evolving at warp speed, and clinical and information technologies spawning new capabilities every day, the cutting edge in health care keeps slicing ever-deeper. With that in mind, we at Hospitals & Health Networks have developed a browser's compendium of some of the leading people, places (organizations and programs) and technologies that are helping move the field forward into the next stage. Each entry is unique; what they all share is an innovative quality that others will emulate. PMID:7627230

  4. Variations in the Sea Ice Edge and the Marginal Ice Zone on Different Spatial Scales as Observed from Different Satellite Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Thorsten; Henrichs, John

    2006-01-01

    The Marginal sea Ice Zone (MIZ) and the sea ice edge are the most dynamic areas of the sea ice cover. Knowledge of the sea ice edge location is vital for routing shipping in the polar regions. The ice edge is the location of recurrent plankton blooms, and is the habitat for a number of animals, including several which are under severe ecological threat. Polar lows are known to preferentially form along the sea ice edge because of induced atmospheric baroclinicity, and the ice edge is also the location of both vertical and horizontal ocean currents driven by thermal and salinity gradients. Finally, sea ice is both a driver and indicator of climate change and monitoring the position of the ice edge accurately over long time periods enables assessment of the impact of global and regional warming near the poles. Several sensors are currently in orbit that can monitor the sea ice edge. These sensors, though, have different spatial resolutions, different limitations, and different repeat frequencies. Satellite passive microwave sensors can monitor the ice edge on a daily or even twice-daily basis, albeit with low spatial resolution - 25 km for the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) or 12.5 km for the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E). Although special methods exist that allow the detection of the sea ice edge at a quarter of that nominal resolution (PSSM). Visible and infrared data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) provide daily coverage at 1 km and 250 m, respectively, but the surface observations me limited to cloud-free periods. The Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) has a resolution of 15 to 30 m but is limited to cloud-free periods as well, and does not provide daily coverage. Imagery from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instruments has resolutions of tens of meters to 100 m, and can be used to distinguish open water and sea ice on the basis of surface

  5. Spectral residual method of saliency detection based on the two-dimensional fractional Fourier transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jiangxue; Qi, Lin; Wang, Yaxing

    2015-12-01

    As one of classic methods of frequency domain based saliency detection, Spectral residual (SR) method has shown several advantages. However, it usually produces higher saliency values at object edges instead of generating maps that uniformly cover the whole object, which results from failing to exploit all the spatial frequency content of the original image. The Two-Dimensional Fractional Fourier transform (2D-FRFT) is a generalized form of the traditional Fourier Transform (FT) which can abstract more meaningful information of the image under certain conditions. Based on this property, we propose a new method which detects the salient region based on 2D-FRFT domain. Moreover, we also use Hough transform detection and a band-pass filter to refine the saliency map. We conduct experiments on a common used dataset: MSRA. The proposed method is compared with several other saliency detection methods and shown to achieve superior result.

  6. Topological number of edge states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Kimura, Taro

    2016-05-01

    We show that the edge states of the four-dimensional class A system can have topological charges, which are characterized by Abelian/non-Abelian monopoles. The edge topological charges are a new feature of relations among theories with different dimensions. From this novel viewpoint, we provide a non-Abelian analog of the TKNN number as an edge topological charge, which is defined by an SU(2) 't Hooft-Polyakov BPS monopole through an equivalence to Nahm construction. Furthermore, putting a constant magnetic field yields an edge monopole in a noncommutative momentum space, where D-brane methods in string theory facilitate study of edge fermions.

  7. Application of Passive Porous Treatment to Slat Trailing Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2003-01-01

    Porous trailing-edge treatment is investigated as a passive means for slat noise reduction by using time-accurate simulations based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. For the model scale high-lift configuration used during previous experiments in the Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, application of the proposed treatment over a minute fraction of the slat surface area is shown to mitigate the noise impact of the trailing edge, with no measurable aerodynamic penalty. Assessment of the pressure fluctuations in the vicinity of the treated edge indicates a potential noise reduction in excess of 20 dB. The primary mechanism underlying this reduction is related to the reduced strength of Strouhal shedding from the finite thickness trailing edge. A secondary effect of the treatment involves an upward shift in the Strouhal-shedding frequency to a frequency band of reduced auditory sensitivity in a full-scale application.

  8. Edge plasmons and cut-off behavior of graphene nano-ribbon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Haowen; Teng, Jinghua; Palacios, Tomás; Chua, Soojin

    2016-07-01

    Graphene nano-ribbon waveguides with ultra-short plasmon wavelength are a promising candidate for nanoscale photonic applications. Graphene edge plasmons are the fundamental and lowest losses mode. Through finite element method, edge plasmons show large effective refractive index and strong field confinement on nanoscale ribbons. The edge plasmons follow a k1/2 dispersion relation. The wavelengths of the edge plasmons and center plasmons differ by a fixed factor. The width of edge plasmon is inversely proportional to wave vector of edge plasmon kedge. Edge defects associate with graphene nano-ribbon induce extra losses and reduce the propagation length. Cut-off width of edge plasmons reduces with increasing frequency. Cut-off width of center plasmon is enlarged by edge component but the enlargement effect diminishing with the increase of kedge. The results are important for the application of graphene plasmon towards ultra-compact photonic devices.

  9. Effect of spectral correlations on spectral switches in the diffraction of partially coherent light.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jixiong; Nemoto, Shojiro; Lü, Baida

    2003-10-01

    The subject is the spectral characteristics of partially coherent light whose spectral degree of coherence satisfies or violates the scaling law in diffraction by a circular aperture. Three kinds of spectral correlations of the incident light are considered. It is shown that no matter whether the partially coherent light satisfies or violates the scaling law, a spectral switch defined as a rapid transition of spectral shifts is always found in the diffraction field. Different spectral correlations of the incident field in the aperture result in different points at which the spectral switch occurs. With an increment in the correlations, the position at which the spectral switch takes place moves toward the point at which the phase of the center frequency component omega0 becomes singular for illumination by spatially fully coherent light. For light that satisfies the scaling law, the spectral switch is attributed to the diffraction-induced spectral changes; for partially coherent light that violates the scaling law, the spectral switch is attributed to both the diffraction-induced spectral changes and the correlation-induced spectral changes. PMID:14570106

  10. Spectral and spread-spectral teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.

    2010-06-15

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state may be teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of the teleported wave form can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread-spectral variant of teleportation. We calculate analytical expressions for the fidelities of spectral and spread-spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are transferred using a proposed experimental approach. Finally, we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  11. Edge states and phase diagram for graphene under polarized light

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Yi -Xiang; Li, Fuxiang

    2016-03-22

    In this paper, we investigate the topological phase transitions in graphene under the modulation of circularly polarized light, by analyzing the changes of edge states and its topological structures. A full phase diagram, with several different topological phases, is presented in the parameter space spanned by the driving frequency and light strength. We find that the high-Chern number behavior is very common in the driven system. While the one-photon resonance can create the chiral edge states in the π-gap, the two-photon resonance will induce the counter-propagating edge modes in the zero-energy gap. When the driving light strength is strong, themore » number and even the chirality of the edge states may change in the π-gap. The robustness of the edge states to disorder potential is also examined. We close by discussing the feasibility of experimental proposals.« less

  12. Edge states and phase diagram for graphene under polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Xiang; Li, Fuxiang

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the topological phase transitions in graphene under the modulation of circularly polarized light, by analyzing the changes of edge states and its topological structures. A full phase diagram, with several different topological phases, is presented in the parameter space spanned by the driving frequency and light strength. We find that the high-Chern number behavior is very common in the driven system. While the one-photon resonance can create the chiral edge states in the π-gap, the two-photon resonance will induce the counter-propagating edge modes in the zero-energy gap. When the driving light strength is strong, the number and even the chirality of the edge states may change in the π-gap. The robustness of the edge states to disorder potential is also examined. We close by discussing the feasibility of experimental proposals.

  13. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise. [noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amier, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    A two dimensional section of a helicopter main rotor blade was tested in an acoustic wind tunnel at close to full-scale Reynolds numbers to obtain boundary layer data and acoustic data for use in developing an acoustic scaling law and testing a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Results were extended to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a helicopter rotor trailing edge noise prediction. Comparisons of the calculated noise levels with helicopter flyover spectra demonstrate that trailing edge noise contributes significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies. This noise mechanism is expected to control the minimum rotor noise. In the case of noise radiation from a local blade segment, the acoustic directivity pattern is predicted by the first principles trailing edge noise theory. Acoustic spectra are predicted by a scaling law which includes Mach number, boundary layer thickness and observer position. Spectrum shape and sound pressure level are also predicted by the first principles theory but the analysis does not predict the Strouhal value identifying the spectrum peak.

  14. Edge Detection Techniques for Automatic Location of Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarate, N.; Labrie, K.

    2012-09-01

    To improve the processing of multi-object or cross-dispersed spectroscopic data, especially for systems resulting in curved 2-D spectra, we have implemented in Python edge detection techniques widely used in the photo processing and remote sensing world. The software uses the discontinuity found in a spectral image to precisely locate each dispersed 2-D spectrum on the pixel array. A valid spectrum image edge is defined as continuous and sharp. To this end the best input data is a well illuminated flat field. The algorithm applies a discontinuity detection filter to the image. We find that a 3 × 3 Sobel kernel reliably produces easily traceable edges on our data. Some instruments produce data with large background noise. In those cases, a mild smoothing filter is first applied to reduce noise spikes that would otherwise confuse the edge tracing algorithm. The edges highlighted by the filtering are traced using the SciPy function label. Each edge is represented by a second degree polynomial that follows each slit edge. Currently the software assumes that the spectra are nearly horizontal or nearly vertical. This constraint can easily be lifted with the choice of a different convolution kernel.

  15. The Red Edge Problem in asteroid band parameter analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Sean S.; Dunn, Tasha L.; Emery, Joshua P.; Bowles, Neil E.

    2016-04-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectra of S-type asteroids contain two absorptions at 1 and 2 μm (band I and II) that are diagnostic of mineralogy. A parameterization of these two bands is frequently employed to determine the mineralogy of S(IV) asteroids through the use of ordinary chondrite calibration equations that link the mineralogy to band parameters. The most widely used calibration study uses a Band II terminal wavelength point (red edge) at 2.50 μm. However, due to the limitations of the NIR detectors on prominent telescopes used in asteroid research, spectral data for asteroids are typically only reliable out to 2.45 μm. We refer to this discrepancy as "The Red Edge Problem." In this report, we evaluate the associated errors for measured band area ratios (BAR = Area BII/BI) and calculated relative abundance measurements. We find that the Red Edge Problem is often not the dominant source of error for the observationally limited red edge set at 2.45 μm, but it frequently is for a red edge set at 2.40 μm. The error, however, is one sided and therefore systematic. As such, we provide equations to adjust measured BARs to values with a different red edge definition. We also provide new ol/(ol+px) calibration equations for red edges set at 2.40 and 2.45 μm.

  16. Noise, Edge Extraction and Visibility of Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zia-ur; Jobson, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    Noise, whether due to the image-gathering device or some other reason, reduces the visibility of fine features in an image. Several techniques attempt to mitigate the impact of noise by performing a low-pass filtering operation on the acquired data. This is based on the assumption that the uncorrelated noise has high-frequency content and thus will be suppressed by low-pass filtering. A result of this operation is that edges in a noisy image also tend to get blurred, and, in some cases, may get completely lost due to the low-pass filtering. In this paper, we quantitatively assess the impact of noise on fine feature visibility by using computer-generated targets of known spatial detail. Additionally, we develop a new scheme for noise-reduction based on the connectivity of edge-features. The overall impact of this scheme is to reduce overall noise, yet retain the high frequency content that make edge-features sharp.

  17. Highly dispersive photonic band-gap-edge optofluidic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, S.; Mortensen, N. A.

    2006-11-01

    Highly dispersive photonic band-gap-edge optofluidic biosensors are studied theoretically. We demonstrate that these structures are strongly sensitive to the refractive index of the liquid, which is used to tune dispersion of the photonic crystal. The upper frequency band-gap edge shifts about 1.8 nm for δ n=0.002, which is quite sensitive. Results from transmission spectra agree well with those obtained from the band structure theory.

  18. Floquet generation of Majorana edge modes and topological invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Diptiman; Thakurathi, Manisha; Patel, Aavishkar; Dutta, Amit; Sengupta, Krishnendu

    2014-03-01

    We show that periodic driving of one of the parameters in the Hamiltonian of a system can produce Majorana modes at its edges. The systems studied include a p-wave superconducting wire and the Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice. For the wire, we show that periodic δ-function kicks of the on-site potential can produce a number of Majorana modes at the two ends; these modes can appear or disappear as the driving frequency is varied. The end modes correspond to eigenvalues of the Floquet operator equal to +/- 1 . Using Floquet theory for the bulk, we derive a topological invariant which correctly predicts the number of these modes as a function of the frequency and the Floquet eigenvalue. We also discuss the generation of end modes by periodic kicking of the hopping and superconducting terms. For the Kitaev model, we derive the phase diagram where Majorana edge modes appear on zigzag and armchair edges. We then show that if one of the couplings is given periodic δ-function kicks, modes can appear on some edges even when the corresponding equilibrium Hamiltonian has no modes on those edges. The Floquet theory of the bulk can again be used to predict the frequencies at which edge modes appear or disappear for different values of the momentum of the modes. This work was supported by DST and CSIR, India.

  19. Phosphorus K-edge XANES spectroscopy of mineral standards

    PubMed Central

    Ingall, Ellery D.; Brandes, Jay A.; Diaz, Julia M.; de Jonge, Martin D.; Paterson, David; McNulty, Ian; Elliott, W. Crawford; Northrup, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was performed on phosphate mineral specimens including (a) twelve specimens from the apatite group covering a range of compositional variation and crystallinity; (b) six non-apatite calcium-rich phosphate minerals; (c) 15 aluminium-rich phosphate minerals; (d) ten phosphate minerals rich in either reduced iron or manganese; (e) four phosphate minerals rich in either oxidized iron or manganese; (f) eight phosphate minerals rich in either magnesium, copper, lead, zinc or rare-earth elements; and (g) four uranium phosphate minerals. The identity of all minerals examined in this study was independently confirmed using X-ray powder diffraction. Minerals were distinguished using XANES spectra with a combination of pre-edge features, edge position, peak shapes and post-edge features. Shared spectral features were observed in minerals with compositions dominated by the same specific cation. Analyses of apatite-group minerals indicate that XANES spectral patterns are not strongly affected by variations in composition and crystallinity typical of natural mineral specimens. PMID:21335905

  20. Phosphorus K-edge XANES spectroscopy of mineral standards.

    PubMed

    Ingall, Ellery D; Brandes, Jay A; Diaz, Julia M; de Jonge, Martin D; Paterson, David; McNulty, Ian; Elliott, W Crawford; Northrup, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was performed on phosphate mineral specimens including (a) twelve specimens from the apatite group covering a range of compositional variation and crystallinity; (b) six non-apatite calcium-rich phosphate minerals; (c) 15 aluminium-rich phosphate minerals; (d) ten phosphate minerals rich in either reduced iron or manganese; (e) four phosphate minerals rich in either oxidized iron or manganese; (f) eight phosphate minerals rich in either magnesium, copper, lead, zinc or rare-earth elements; and (g) four uranium phosphate minerals. The identity of all minerals examined in this study was independently confirmed using X-ray powder diffraction. Minerals were distinguished using XANES spectra with a combination of pre-edge features, edge position, peak shapes and post-edge features. Shared spectral features were observed in minerals with compositions dominated by the same specific cation. Analyses of apatite-group minerals indicate that XANES spectral patterns are not strongly affected by variations in composition and crystallinity typical of natural mineral specimens. PMID:21335905

  1. Phosphorus K-edge XANES Spectroscopy of Mineral Standards

    SciTech Connect

    E Ingall; J Brandes; J Diaz; M de Jonge; D Paterson; I McNulty; C Elliott; P Northrup

    2011-12-31

    Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was performed on phosphate mineral specimens including (a) twelve specimens from the apatite group covering a range of compositional variation and crystallinity; (b) six non-apatite calcium-rich phosphate minerals; (c) 15 aluminium-rich phosphate minerals; (d) ten phosphate minerals rich in either reduced iron or manganese; (e) four phosphate minerals rich in either oxidized iron or manganese; (f) eight phosphate minerals rich in either magnesium, copper, lead, zinc or rare-earth elements; and (g) four uranium phosphate minerals. The identity of all minerals examined in this study was independently confirmed using X-ray powder diffraction. Minerals were distinguished using XANES spectra with a combination of pre-edge features, edge position, peak shapes and post-edge features. Shared spectral features were observed in minerals with compositions dominated by the same specific cation. Analyses of apatite-group minerals indicate that XANES spectral patterns are not strongly affected by variations in composition and crystallinity typical of natural mineral specimens.

  2. Edge remap for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R.; Love, Edward; Robinson, Allen C.; Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-12-01

    We review the edge element formulation for describing the kinematics of hyperelastic solids. This approach is used to frame the problem of remapping the inverse deformation gradient for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations of solid dynamics. For hyperelastic materials, the stress state is completely determined by the deformation gradient, so remapping this quantity effectively updates the stress state of the material. A method, inspired by the constrained transport remap in electromagnetics, is reviewed, according to which the zero-curl constraint on the inverse deformation gradient is implicitly satisfied. Open issues related to the accuracy of this approach are identified. An optimization-based approach is implemented to enforce positivity of the determinant of the deformation gradient. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated with numerical examples.

  3. Edge-on!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-08-01

    Peering at Uranus's Rings as they Swing Edge-on to Earth for the First Time Since their Discovery in 1977 As Uranus coasts through a brief window of time when its rings are edge-on to Earth - a view of the planet we get only once every 42 years - astronomers peering at the rings with ESO's Very Large Telescope and other space or ground-based telescopes are getting an unprecedented view of the fine dust in the system, free from the glare of the bright rocky rings. They may even find a new moon or two. ESO PR Photo 37/07 ESO PR Photo 37/07 The Uranus System "ESO's VLT took data at the precise moment when the rings were edge-on to Earth," said Imke de Pater, of University of California, Berkeley who coordinated the worldwide campaign. She worked with two team members observing in Chile: Daphne Stam of the Technical University Delft in the Netherlands and Markus Hartung of ESO. The observations were done with NACO, one of the adaptive optics instruments installed at the VLT. With adaptive optics, it is possible to obtain images almost free from the blurring effect of the atmosphere. It is as if the 8.2-m telescope were observing from space. Observations were also done with the Keck telescope in Hawaii, the Hubble Space Telescope, and at the Palomar Observatory. "Using different telescopes around the world allows us to observe as much of the changes during the ring-plane crossing as possible: when Uranus sets as seen from the VLT, it can still be observed by the Keck," emphasised Stam. Uranus orbits the Sun in 84 years. Twice during a Uranian year, the rings appear edge-on to Earth for a brief period. The rings were discovered in 1977, so this is the first time for a Uranus ring-crossing to be observed from Earth. The advantage of observations at a ring-plane crossing is that it becomes possible to look at the rings from the shadowed or dark side. From that vantage point, the normally bright outer rings grow fainter because their centimetre- to metre-sized rocks obscure

  4. The interpretation of spectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holter, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics and extent of data which is obtainable by electromagnetic spectrum sensing and the application to earth resources survey are discussed. The wavelength and frequency ranges of operation for various remote sensors are tabulated. The spectral sensitivities of various sensing instruments are diagrammed. Examples of aerial photography to show the effects of lighting and seasonal variations on earth resources data are provided. Specific examples of multiband photography and multispectral imagery to crop analysis are included.

  5. Cross-spectrally pure light, cross-spectrally pure fields and statistical similarity in electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingjing; Lu, RongSheng; Chen, Feinan; Li, Jia

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the concept of cross-spectrally pure light, implications of statistical similarity of an optical field on its cross-spectral purity and cross-spectrally pure fields. First, the concept of cross-spectral purity of light is analysed in the space-frequency domain by taking into account the vectorial nature of the radiation, and the conditions and reduction formula are obtained. Then, by utilizing statistical similarity, the relationship between cross-spectral purity and spatial coherence is explored in the electromagnetic field. Last, the conditions for cross-spectrally pure fields are discussed, the polychromatic plane wave and the far field produced by a planar, secondary, stochastic electromagnetic source are studied as examples, and moreover, the relationship between cross-spectral purity and spatial coherence, which we have drawn, is verified during the study.

  6. Optical frequency comb spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Foltynowicz, A; Masłowski, P; Ban, T; Adler, F; Cossel, K C; Briles, T C; Ye, J

    2011-01-01

    Optical frequency combs offer enormous potential in the detection and control of atoms and molecules by combining their vast spectral coverage with the extremely high spectral resolution of each individual comb component. Sensitive and multiplexed trace gas detection via cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy has been demonstrated for various molecules and applications; however, previous demonstrations have been confined to the visible and near-infrared wavelength range. Future spectroscopic capabilities are created by developing comb sources and spectrometers for the deep ultraviolet and mid-infrared spectral regions. Here we present a broadband high resolution mid-infrared frequency comb-based Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the important molecular fingerprint spectral region of 2100-3600 cm(-1) (2.8-4.8 microm). The spectrometer, employing a multipass cell, allows simultaneous acquisition of broadband, high resolution spectra (down to 0.0035 cm(-1) of many molecular species at concentrations in the part-per-billion range in less than 1 min acquisition time. The system enables precise measurements of concentration even in gas mixtures that exhibit continuous absorption bands. The current sensitivity, 2 x 10(-8) cm(-1) Hz-1/2 per spectral element, is expected to improve by two orders of magnitude with an external enhancement cavity. We have demonstrated this sensitivity increase by combining cavity-enhanced frequency comb spectroscopy with a scanning Fourier transform spectrometer in the near-infrared region and achieving a sensitivity of 4.7 x 10(-10) cm(-1) Hz(-1/2). A cavity-enhanced mid-infrared comb spectrometer will provide a near real-time, high sensitivity, high resolution, precisely frequency calibrated, broad bandwidth system for many applications. PMID:22457942

  7. ENERGY-DEPENDENT POWER SPECTRAL STATES AND ORIGIN OF APERIODIC VARIABILITY IN BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Wenfei; Zhang Wenda

    2013-06-20

    We found that the black hole candidate MAXI J1659-152 showed distinct power spectra, i.e., power-law noise (PLN) versus band-limited noise (BLN) plus quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) below and above about 2 keV, respectively, in observations with Swift and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the 2010 outburst, indicating a high energy cutoff of the PLN and a low energy cutoff of the BLN and QPOs around 2 keV. The emergence of the PLN and the fading of the BLN and QPOs initially took place below 2 keV when the source entered the hard intermediate state and settled in the soft state three weeks later. The evolution was accompanied by the emergence of the disk spectral component and decreases in the amplitudes of variability in the soft and hard X-ray bands. Our results indicate that the PLN is associated with an optically thick disk in both hard and intermediate states, and the power spectral state is independent of the X-ray energy spectral state in a broadband view. We suggest that in the hard or intermediate state, the BLN and QPOs emerge from the innermost hot flow subjected to Comptonization, while the PLN originates from the optically thick disk farther out. The energy cutoffs of the PLN and the BLN or QPOs then follow the temperature of the seed photons from the inner edge of the optically thick disk, while the high frequency cutoff of the PLN follows the orbital frequency of the inner edge of the optically thick disk as well.

  8. Contributions to the theory of side edge flap noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    High and low frequency asymptotic formulas are derived which express the acoustic frequency spectrum in terms of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum of surface pressure fluctuations on the upper surface of a part span flap, measured in-board of the side edge. Interpolations between the results are used to predict the field shape and its dependence on the subsonic forward flight speed over the whole frequency range. The radiation has the characteristics of a semibaffled dipole at small values of the Strouhal number based on the chord of the flap and the forward flight speed. The degree of Doppler amplification due to forward flight speed of the aircraft is dependent on the Strouhal number; the radiation efficiency of side-edge noise sources is governed by the value of the mean side-edge gap Strouhal number, and is larger when this number is small. Theoretical predictions extrapolated to full scale suggest that the noise generated at a single side edge can exceed that generated along the whole of the trailing edge of the flap by 3 dB.

  9. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-07-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements.

  10. Edge phonons in black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, H B; Villegas, C E P; Bahamon, D A; Muraca, D; Castro Neto, A H; de Souza, E A T; Rocha, A R; Pimenta, M A; de Matos, C J S

    2016-01-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements. PMID:27412813

  11. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements. PMID:27412813

  12. Spectral and temporal integration of brief tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoglund, Evelyn M.

    Spectral and temporal processing have an extensive history of research for the discrimination and integration of tones. The integration of both dimensions simultaneously, however, has received little attention in psychoacoustics. This dual integration is vital to our daily processing of sounds around us, and has also not been effectively addressed in the ecological acoustics research. For this reason, we still have essentially no understanding of how the auditory system processes sounds that are changing in both frequency and time domains at the same time. This study was designed to begin the process of measuring the basic detection of signals that vary in both spectral and temporal dimensions. Baseline measures of detection for 10 msec pure tones were taken and the levels adjusted so that all the frequencies could be detected at the same level of attenuation. The thresholds were then obtained for spectral integration of the signals and for temporal integration, so that these results could be compared with prior research. The signals were then varied on both dimensions simultaneously in several ways: with equal spectral and temporal step sizes, different spectral and temporal step sizes, random presentation, and with doubled spectral or temporal information. The data were also analyzed along several differences: spectral step size, temporal step size, frequency range, direction, slope, and predictability. The spectral and temporal integration conditions showed a good match with the results of prior research, showing that the current procedures and signals could be used to reliably compare to existing results. The spectrotemporal integration conditions showed the threshold for overall detection of the signals to be limited by the ability to integrate spectral information, while the temporal integration was much better. Additionally, very little influence could be seen by most of the differences in signals. Surprisingly, random presentation of frequencies did not

  13. Mid-infrared frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schliesser, Albert; Picqué, Nathalie; Hänsch, Theodor W.

    2012-07-01

    Laser frequency combs are coherent light sources that emit a broad spectrum of discrete, evenly spaced narrow lines whose absolute frequency can be measured to within the accuracy of an atomic clock. Their development in the near-infrared and visible domains has revolutionized frequency metrology while also providing numerous unexpected opportunities in other fields such as astronomy and attosecond science. Researchers are now exploring how to extend frequency comb techniques to the mid-infrared spectral region. Versatile mid-infrared frequency comb generators based on novel laser gain media, nonlinear frequency conversion or microresonators promise to significantly expand the applications of frequency combs. In particular, novel approaches to molecular spectroscopy in the 'fingerprint region', with dramatically improved precision, sensitivity, recording time and/or spectral bandwidth may lead to new discoveries in the various fields relevant to molecular science.

  14. Measurement Of Trailing Edge Noise using Directional Array and Coherent Output Power Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    The use of a directional array of microphones for the measurement of trailing edge (TE) noise is described. The capabilities of this method are evaluated via measurements of TE noise from a NACA 63-215 airfoil model and from a cylindrical rod. This TE noise measurement approach is compared to one that is based on the cross spectral analysis of output signals from a pair of microphones (COP method). Advantages and limitations of both methods are examined. It is shown that the microphone array can accurately measures TE noise and captures its two-dimensional characteristic over a large frequency range for any TE configuration as long as noise contamination from extraneous sources is within bounds. The COP method is shown to also accurately measure TE noise but over a more limited frequency range that narrows for increased TE thickness. Finally, the applicability and generality of an airfoil self-noise prediction method was evaluated via comparison to the experimental data obtained using the COP and array measurement methods. The predicted and experimental results are shown to agree over large frequency ranges.

  15. Measurement of Trailing Edge Noise Using Directional Array and Coherent Output Power Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    The use of a directional (or phased) array of microphones for the measurement of trailing edge (TE) noise is described and tested. The capabilities of this method arc evaluated via measurements of TE noise from a NACA 63-215 airfoil model and from a cylindrical rod. This TE noise measurement approach is compared to one that is based on thc cross spectral analysis of output signals from a pair of microphones placed on opposite sides of an airframe model (COP method). Advantages and limitations of both methods arc examined. It is shown that the microphone array can accurately measures TE noise and captures its two-dimensional characteristic over a large frequency range for any TE configuration as long as noise contamination from extraneous sources is within bounds. The COP method is shown to also accurately measure TE noise but over a more limited frequency range that narrows for increased TE thickness. Finally, the applicability and generality of an airfoil self-noise prediction method was evaluated via comparison to the experimental data obtained using the COP and array measurement methods. The predicted and experimental results are shown to agree over large frequency ranges.

  16. Digital Frequency Synthesizer For Radar Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, Ramin; Satorius, Edgar; Robinett, J. Loris, Jr.; Olson, Erlend

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses conceptual digital frequency synthesizer part of programmable local oscillator in radar-astronomy system. Phase must remain continuous during adjustments of frequency, phase noise must be low, and spectral purity must be high. Discusses theory of operation in some mathematical detail and presents new analysis of spectral purity of output.

  17. Edge-based image restoration.

    PubMed

    Rareş, Andrei; Reinders, Marcel J T; Biemond, Jan

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a new image inpainting algorithm that relies on explicit edge information. The edge information is used both for the reconstruction of a skeleton image structure in the missing areas, as well as for guiding the interpolation that follows. The structure reconstruction part exploits different properties of the edges, such as the colors of the objects they separate, an estimate of how well one edge continues into another one, and the spatial order of the edges with respect to each other. In order to preserve both sharp and smooth edges, the areas delimited by the recovered structure are interpolated independently, and the process is guided by the direction of the nearby edges. The novelty of our approach lies primarily in exploiting explicitly the constraint enforced by the numerical interpretation of the sequential order of edges, as well as in the pixel filling method which takes into account the proximity and direction of edges. Extensive experiments are carried out in order to validate and compare the algorithm both quantitatively and qualitatively. They show the advantages of our algorithm and its readily application to real world cases. PMID:16238052

  18. Edge conduction in vacuum glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Simko, T.M.; Collins, R.E.; Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-03-01

    Vacuum glazing is a form of low-conductance double glazing using in internal vacuum between the two glass sheets to eliminate heat transport by gas conduction and convection. An array of small support pillars separates the sheets; fused solder glass forms the edge seal. Heat transfer through the glazing occurs by radiation across the vacuum gap, conduction through the support pillars, and conduction through the bonded edge seal. Edge conduction is problematic because it affects stresses in the edge region, leading to possible failure of the glazing; in addition, excessive heat transfer because of thermal bridging in the edge region can lower overall window thermal performance and decrease resistance to condensation. Infrared thermography was used to analyze the thermal performance of prototype vacuum glazings, and, for comparison, atmospheric pressure superwindows. Research focused on mitigating the edge effects of vacuum glazings through the use of insulating trim, recessed edges, and framing materials. Experimentally validated finite-element and finite-difference modeling tools were used for thermal analysis of prototype vacuum glazing units and complete windows. Experimental measurements of edge conduction using infrared imaging were found to be in good agreement with finite-element modeling results for a given set of conditions. Finite-element modeling validates an analytic model developed for edge conduction.

  19. [Impacts of different alkaline soil on canopy spectral characteristics of overlying vegetation].

    PubMed

    Jia, Ke-Li; Zhang, Jun-Hua

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between alkalinity and pH of the soil, reflectance spectra and red-edge parameters of the sunflower canopy in different growth periods under different alkalinity soil were analyzed, respectively. The results showed that the spectral reflectance of the sunflower canopy in different stage under different alkalinity soil is the same as the spectral reflectance characters of the other greenery canopy. Along with the advancement of the sunflower growth period, sunflower canopy spectral reflectance increases gradually at different stages, the spectral reflectance is higher at flowering stage than 7-leaf stage and budding stage, and there exists a high reflection peak at 809nm at flowering period. At the same time, the spectral reflectance is affected by salinity-alkalinity stress at different stages, in the near infrared shortwave band, the spectral reflectance of the sunflower canopy in different stage increases with the decreases in soil alkalinity. When the derivatives are applied to determine the wavelength of the red-edge, there is a shift phenomenon of the red edge. The red edges were at 702-720 nm during every growth period of the sunflower. The "blue shift" phenomenon is also emerged for red edge position and red edge sloped with the increase in the soil alkalinity. Conversely, at the same growth periods, the red edge positions and red edge slope move to longer wave bands with the decrease in soil alkalinity. There is a "red shift" phenomenon before flowering period and "blue shift" phenomenon after flowering period for the red edge position and red edge slope of canopy spectrum at the same soil alkalinity. Respectively. The red edges at different growth stages of the sunflower show very significant positive correlation and quadratic polynomial to alkalinity and pH of the soil. Therefore, we thought used the red edge features of greenery could indicate the soil alkalization degree, it providing scientific basis for monitoring soil alkalization

  20. The Facilitator's Edge: Group Sessions for Edge-ucators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handcock, Helen

    The Facilitator's Edge is a workshop series based on the life/work messages of The Edge magazine. The workshops are deigned to help educators, youth workers, and their career practitioners facilitate conscious career building. This manual consists of five group sessions, each focusing on a different career-building theme. "Megatrends and Making it…

  1. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A.; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron-electron interactions in these localized states.

  2. Edge-edge interactions in stacked graphene nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Silva, Eduardo; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Jia, Xiaoting; Sumpter, Bobby G; Dresselhaus, M; Meunier, V.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies show the dynamics of small graphene platelets on larger graphene layers. The platelets move nearly freely to eventually lock in at well-defined positions close to the edges of the larger underlying graphene sheet. While such movement is driven by a shallow potential energy surface described by an interplane interaction, the lock-in position occurs by via edge-edge interactions of the platelet and the graphene surface located underneath. Here we quantitatively study this behavior using van der Waals density functional calculations. Local interactions at the open edges are found to dictate stacking configurations that are different from Bernal (AB) stacking. These stacking configurations are known to be otherwise absent in edge-free two-dimensional (2D) graphene. The results explain the experimentally observed platelet dynamics and provide a detailed account of the new electronic properties of these combined systems.

  3. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A.; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron–electron interactions in these localized states. PMID:27181701

  4. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron-electron interactions in these localized states. PMID:27181701

  5. The Spectral Shift Function and Spectral Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azamov, N. A.; Carey, A. L.; Sukochev, F. A.

    2007-11-01

    At the 1974 International Congress, I. M. Singer proposed that eta invariants and hence spectral flow should be thought of as the integral of a one form. In the intervening years this idea has lead to many interesting developments in the study of both eta invariants and spectral flow. Using ideas of [24] Singer’s proposal was brought to an advanced level in [16] where a very general formula for spectral flow as the integral of a one form was produced in the framework of noncommutative geometry. This formula can be used for computing spectral flow in a general semifinite von Neumann algebra as described and reviewed in [5]. In the present paper we take the analytic approach to spectral flow much further by giving a large family of formulae for spectral flow between a pair of unbounded self-adjoint operators D and D + V with D having compact resolvent belonging to a general semifinite von Neumann algebra {mathcal{N}} and the perturbation V in {mathcal{N}} . In noncommutative geometry terms we remove summability hypotheses. This level of generality is made possible by introducing a new idea from [3]. There it was observed that M. G. Krein’s spectral shift function (in certain restricted cases with V trace class) computes spectral flow. The present paper extends Krein’s theory to the setting of semifinite spectral triples where D has compact resolvent belonging to {mathcal{N}} and V is any bounded self-adjoint operator in {mathcal{N}} . We give a definition of the spectral shift function under these hypotheses and show that it computes spectral flow. This is made possible by the understanding discovered in the present paper of the interplay between spectral shift function theory and the analytic theory of spectral flow. It is this interplay that enables us to take Singer’s idea much further to create a large class of one forms whose integrals calculate spectral flow. These advances depend critically on a new approach to the calculus of functions of non

  6. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 3000 GHZ (i.e., wavelengths longer than 100 mu m) is presented which can be used a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (133 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  7. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes a computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 10000 GHz (i.e., wavelengths longer than 30 micrometers). The catalogue can be used as a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue has been constructed using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (151 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available from the authors as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  8. A method to design blended rolled edges for compact range reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Inder J.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1989-01-01

    A method to design blended rolled edges for arbitrary rim shape compact range reflectors is presented. The reflectors may be center-fed or offset-fed. The method leads to rolled edges with minimal surface discontinuities. It is shown that the reflectors designed using the prescribed method can be defined analytically using simple expressions. A procedure to obtain optimum rolled edges parameter is also presented. The procedure leads to blended rolled edges that minimize the diffracted fields emanating from the junction between the paraboloid and the rolled edge surface while satisfying certain constraints regarding the reflector size and the minimum operating frequency of the system.

  9. Rock Segmentation through Edge Regrouping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Rockster is an algorithm that automatically identifies the locations and boundaries of rocks imaged by the rover hazard cameras (hazcams), navigation cameras (navcams), or panoramic cameras (pancams). The software uses edge detection and edge regrouping to identify closed contours that separate the rocks from the background.

  10. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  11. Dynamic fracture mechanics analysis for an edge delamination crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    A global/local analysis is applied to the problem of a panel with an edge delamination crack subject to an impulse loading to ascertain the dynamic J integral. The approach uses the spectral element method to obtain the global dynamic response and local resultants to obtain the J integral. The variation of J integral along the crack front is shown. The crack behavior is mixed mode (Mode 2 and Mode 3), but is dominated by the Mode 2 behavior.

  12. Edge-on Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has imaged an unusual edge-on galaxy, revealing remarkable details of its warped dusty disc and showing how colliding galaxies trigger the birth of new stars.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), is online at http://heritage.stsci.edu and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc. The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. During observations of the galaxy, the camera passed a milestone, taking its 100,000th image since shuttle astronauts installed it in Hubble in 1993.

    The dust and spiral arms of normal spiral galaxies, like our Milky Way, look flat when seen edge- on. The new image of the galaxy ESO 510-G13 shows an unusual twisted disc structure, first seen in ground-based photographs taken at the European Southern Observatory in Chile. ESO 510-G13 lies in the southern constellation Hydra, some 150 million light-years from Earth. Details of the galaxy's structure are visible because interstellar dust clouds that trace its disc are silhouetted from behind by light from the galaxy's bright, smooth central bulge.

    The strong warping of the disc indicates that ESO 510-G13 has recently collided with a nearby galaxy and is in the process of swallowing it. Gravitational forces distort galaxies as their stars, gas, and dust merge over millions of years. When the disturbances die out, ESO 510-G13 will be a single galaxy.

    The galaxy's outer regions, especially on the right side of the image, show dark dust and bright clouds of blue stars. This indicates that hot, young stars are forming in the twisted disc. Astronomers believe star formation may be triggered when galaxies collide and their interstellar clouds are compressed.

    The Hubble Heritage Team used WFPC2 to observe ESO 510-G13 in April 2001. Pictures obtained through blue, green, and red filters were combined to make this color-composite image, which emphasizes the contrast between the dusty

  13. Spectral ratio method for measuring emissivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral ratio method is based on the concept that although the spectral radiances are very sensitive to small changes in temperature the ratios are not. Only an approximate estimate of temperature is required thus, for example, we can determine the emissivity ratio to an accuracy of 1% with a temperature estimate that is only accurate to 12.5 K. Selecting the maximum value of the channel brightness temperatures is an unbiased estimate. Laboratory and field spectral data are easily converted into spectral ratio plots. The ratio method is limited by system signal:noise and spectral band-width. The images can appear quite noisy because ratios enhance high frequencies and may require spatial filtering. Atmospheric effects tend to rescale the ratios and require using an atmospheric model or a calibration site. ?? 1992.

  14. Si K Edge Measurements of the ISM with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Norbert S.; Corrales, Lia; Canizares, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Si K edge structure in X-ray spectra of the diffuse ISM is expected to exhibit substructure related to the fact that most absorption is due to silicates in dust. We surveyed high resolution X-ray spectra of a large number of bright low-mass X-ray binaries with column densities significantly larger than 10^22 cm^2. Using the to date unprecedented spectral resolution of the high energy transmission gratings onboard the Chandra X-ray observatory we find complex substructure in the Si K edge. The highest resolved spectra show two edges, one at the expected value for atomic, one at the value for most silicate compounds with the dominant contribution of the latter. There is specific subtructure from silicate optical depth caused by absorption and scattering. Some is also variable and can be attributed to ionized absorption in the vicinity of the X-ray sources.

  15. Estimating correlations of neighboring frequencies in ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2016-05-01

    Extracting accurate empirical Green's functions from the ambient seismic noise field requires the noise to be fully diffuse and that different frequency components are not correlated. Calculating a matrix of correlation coefficients of power spectral samples can be used to estimate deviations from a fully diffuse random noise field in the analyzed frequency range. A fully diffuse field has correlations only in a narrow region around the diagonal of the matrix, with frequency resolution inversely proportional to length of the used time window. Analysis of low frequency data (0.005-0.6 Hz) recorded by three broadband stations of the southern California seismic network reveals three common types of correlations, manifested in the correlation coefficient matrix as square, diagonal halo and correlated stripes. Synthetic calculations show that these types of signatures in the correlation coefficient matrix can result from certain combinations of cross-frequency correlated random components and diffuse field. The analysis of observed data indicates that the secondary microseismic peak around 0.15 Hz is correlated with its neighboring frequencies, while the primary peak around 0.06 Hz is more diffuse. This suggests that the primary and secondary peaks may be associated with somewhat different physical origins. In addition, significant correlation of frequencies below that of the primary microseismic peak suggests that the very low frequencies noise is less scattered during propagation. The power spectra recorded by a station close to the edge of the Los Angles basin is higher compared to data recorded by stations outside the basin perhaps because of enhanced basin reverberations and/or closer proximity to the ocean. This and other regional variations should be tested further using data from many more stations.

  16. Estimating correlations of neighbouring frequencies in ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2016-08-01

    Extracting accurate empirical Green's functions from the ambient seismic noise field requires the noise to be fully diffuse and that different frequency components are not correlated. Calculating a matrix of correlation coefficients of power spectral samples can be used to estimate deviations from a fully diffuse random noise field in the analysed frequency range. A fully diffuse field has correlations only in a narrow region around the diagonal of the matrix, with frequency resolution inversely proportional to length of the used time window. Analysis of low-frequency data (0.005-0.6 Hz) recorded by three broad-band stations of the southern California seismic network reveals three common types of correlations, manifested in the correlation coefficient matrix as square, diagonal halo and correlated stripes. Synthetic calculations show that these types of signatures in the correlation coefficient matrix can result from certain combinations of cross-frequency correlated random components and diffuse field. The analysis of observed data indicates that the secondary microseismic peak around 0.15 Hz is correlated with its neighbouring frequencies, while the primary peak around 0.06 Hz is more diffuse. This suggests that the primary and secondary peaks may be associated with somewhat different physical origins. In addition, significant correlation of frequencies below that of the primary microseismic peak suggests that the very low frequencies noise is less scattered during propagation. The power spectra recorded by a station close to the edge of the Los Angeles basin is higher compared to data recorded by stations outside the basin perhaps because of enhanced basin reverberations and/or closer proximity to the ocean. This and other regional variations should be tested further using data from many more stations.

  17. Fast multi-scale edge detection algorithm based on wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Jie; Song, Yanjun; Li, Shaojuan; Luo, Guoyun

    2011-11-01

    The traditional edge detection algorithms have certain noise amplificat ion, making there is a big error, so the edge detection ability is limited. In analysis of the low-frequency signal of image, wavelet analysis theory can reduce the time resolution; under high time resolution for high-frequency signal of the image, it can be concerned about the transient characteristics of the signal to reduce the frequency resolution. Because of the self-adaptive for signal, the wavelet transform can ext ract useful informat ion from the edge of an image. The wavelet transform is at various scales, wavelet transform of each scale provides certain edge informat ion, so called mult i-scale edge detection. Multi-scale edge detection is that the original signal is first polished at different scales, and then detects the mutation of the original signal by the first or second derivative of the polished signal, and the mutations are edges. The edge detection is equivalent to signal detection in different frequency bands after wavelet decomposition. This article is use of this algorithm which takes into account both details and profile of image to detect the mutation of the signal at different scales, provided necessary edge information for image analysis, target recognition and machine visual, and achieved good results.

  18. Effect of blunt trailing edge on rotor broadband noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-T.; George, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    The production of high-frequency broadband noise by turbulent vortex shedding from rotor blades with blunt trailing edges is investigated analytically. The derivation of the governing equations, analogous to that of Kim and George (1982) for boundary-layer/trailing-edge noise, is explained, and numerical results are compared with the experimental data of Hubbard et al. (1981) and Lowson et al. (1972) in graphs. It is shown that vortex-shedding noise is a significant component of blunt-trailing-edge rotor broadband noise and that the analytical method employed gives reasonable predictions. The need for a better empirical expression for the normalized spectrum and for more measurements of surface pressure fluctuations near blunt trailing edges is indicated.

  19. Optimal spectral windows for microwave diversity imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Nabil H.; Bai, Baocheng

    1991-01-01

    Tomographic microwave diversity imaging is analyzed using linear system theory concepts, and optimal spectral windows for data acquisition are obtained either by considering window position in the spectral domain or by using simulated annealing to find an optimal phase weighting of the object frequency response samples collected over the specified spectral window. This study provides a means of microwave image formation that is applicable under general assumptions. Results of numerical simulations and representative images reconstructed from realistic experimental microwave scattering data are given, demonstrating that the proposed approach is superior to previous image reconstruction methods.

  20. Hyperspectral image segmentation using spatial-spectral graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, David B.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.

    2012-06-01

    Spectral graph theory has proven to be a useful tool in the analysis of high-dimensional data sets. Recall that, mathematically, a graph is a collection of objects (nodes) and connections between them (edges); a weighted graph additionally assigns numerical values (weights) to the edges. Graphs are represented by their adjacency whose elements are the weights between the nodes. Spectral graph theory uses the eigendecomposition of the adjacency matrix (or, more generally, the Laplacian of the graph) to derive information about the underlying graph. In this paper, we develop a spectral method based on the 'normalized cuts' algorithm to segment hyperspectral image data (HSI). In particular, we model an image as a weighted graph whose nodes are the image pixels, and edges defined as connecting spatial neighbors; the edge weights are given by a weighted combination of the spatial and spectral distances between nodes. We then use the Laplacian of the graph to recursively segment the image. The advantages of our approach are that, first, the graph structure naturally incorporates both the spatial and spectral information present in HSI; also, by using only spatial neighbors, the adjacency matrix is highly sparse; as a result, it is possible to apply our technique to much larger images than previous techniques. In the paper, we present the details of our algorithm, and include experimental results from a variety of hyperspectral images.

  1. Time-Spectral Rotorcraft Simulations on Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leffell, Joshua I.; Murman, Scott M.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The Time-Spectral method is derived as a Fourier collocation scheme and applied to NASA's overset Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver OVERFLOW. The paper outlines the Time-Spectral OVERFLOWimplementation. Successful low-speed laminar plunging NACA 0012 airfoil simulations demonstrate the capability of the Time-Spectral method to resolve the highly-vortical wakes typical of more expensive three-dimensional rotorcraft configurations. Dealiasing, in the form of spectral vanishing viscosity (SVV), facilitates the convergence of Time-Spectral calculations of high-frequency flows. Finally, simulations of the isolated V-22 Osprey tiltrotor for both hover and forward (edgewise) flight validate the three-dimensional Time-Spectral OVERFLOW implementation. The Time-Spectral hover simulation matches the time-accurate calculation using a single harmonic. Significantly more temporal modes and SVV are required to accurately compute the forward flight case because of its more active, high-frequency wake.

  2. Nitrogen K-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure of pyrimidine-containing nucleotides in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Hiroyuki Minami, Hirotake; Okuizumi, Naoto; Sakuma, Ichiro; Ukai, Masatoshi; Fujii, Kentaro; Yokoya, Akinari; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Yuji

    2015-05-07

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) was measured at energies around the N K-edge of the pyrimidine-containing nucleotides, cytidine 5′-monophosphate (CMP), 2′-deoxythymidine 5′-monophosphate (dTMP), and uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP), in aqueous solutions and in dried films under various pH conditions. The features of resonant excitations below the N K-edge in the XANES spectra for CMP, dTMP, and UMP changed depending on the pH of the solutions. The spectral change thus observed is systematically explained by the chemical shift of the core-levels of N atoms in the nucleobase moieties caused by structural changes due to protonation or deprotonation at different proton concentrations. This interpretation is supported by the results of theoretical calculations using density functional theory for the corresponding nucleobases in the neutral and protonated or deprotonated forms.

  3. Nitrogen K-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure of pyrimidine-containing nucleotides in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Minami, Hirotake; Okuizumi, Naoto; Sakuma, Ichiro; Ukai, Masatoshi; Fujii, Kentaro; Yokoya, Akinari; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Yuji

    2015-05-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) was measured at energies around the N K-edge of the pyrimidine-containing nucleotides, cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP), 2'-deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP), and uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP), in aqueous solutions and in dried films under various pH conditions. The features of resonant excitations below the N K-edge in the XANES spectra for CMP, dTMP, and UMP changed depending on the pH of the solutions. The spectral change thus observed is systematically explained by the chemical shift of the core-levels of N atoms in the nucleobase moieties caused by structural changes due to protonation or deprotonation at different proton concentrations. This interpretation is supported by the results of theoretical calculations using density functional theory for the corresponding nucleobases in the neutral and protonated or deprotonated forms.

  4. X-ray absorption and reflection as probes of the GaN conduction bands: Theory and experiment of the N K-edge and Ga M{sub 2,3} edges

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrecht, W.R.L.; Rashkeev, S.N.; Segall, B.; Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Suski, T.; Gullikson, E.M.; Underwood, J.H.; Perera, R.C.C.; Rife, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    X-ray absorption and glancing angle reflectivity measurements in the energy range of the Nitrogen K-edge and Gallium M{sub 2,3} edges are reported. Linear muffin-tin orbital band-structure and spectral function calculations are used to interpret the data. Polarization effects are evidenced for the N-K-edge spectra by comparing X-ray reflectivity in s- and p-polarized light.

  5. Spectral fitting inversion of low-frequency normal modes with self-coupling and cross-coupling of toroidal and spheroidal multiplets: Numerical experiments to estimate the isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    The aspherical structure of the Earth is described in terms of lateral heterogeneity and anisotropy of the P- and S-wave velocities, density heterogeneity, ellipticity and rotation of the Earth, and undulation of the discontinuity interfaces of the seismic wave velocities. Its structure significantly influences the normal mode spectra of the Earth's free oscillation in the form of cross-coupling between toroidal and spheroidal multiplets and self-coupling between the singlets forming them. Thus, the aspherical structure must be conversely estimated from the free oscillation spectra influenced by the cross-coupling and self-coupling. In the present study, we improve a spectral fitting inversion algorithm which was developed in a previous study to retrieve the global structures of the isotropic and anisotropic velocities of the P and S waves from the free oscillation spectra. The main improvement is that the geographical distribution of the intensity of the S-wave azimuthal anisotropy is represented by a non-linear combination of structure coefficients for the anisotropic velocity structure, whereas in the previous study it was expanded into a generalized spherical harmonic series. Consequently, the improved inversion algorithm reduces the number of unknown parameters that must be determined compared to the previous inversion algorithm, and employs a one-step inversion method by which the structure coefficients for the isotropic and anisotropic velocities are directly estimated from the fee oscillation spectra. The applicability of the improved inversion is examined by several numerical experiments using synthetic spectral data, which are produced by supposing a variety of isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures, earthquake source parameters and station-event pairs. Furthermore, the robustness of the inversion algorithm is investigated with respect to the back-ground noise contaminating the spectral data as well as truncating the series expansions by finite

  6. Spectral fitting inversion of low-frequency normal modes with self-coupling and cross-coupling of toroidal and spheroidal multiplets: numerical experiments to estimate the isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    The aspherical structure of the Earth is described in terms of lateral heterogeneity and anisotropy of the P- and S-wave velocities, density heterogeneity, ellipticity and rotation of the Earth and undulation of the discontinuity interfaces of the seismic wave velocities. Its structure significantly influences the normal mode spectra of the Earth's free oscillation in the form of cross-coupling between toroidal and spheroidal multiplets and self-coupling between the singlets forming them. Thus, the aspherical structure must be conversely estimated from the free oscillation spectra influenced by the cross-coupling and self-coupling. In the present study, we improve a spectral fitting inversion algorithm which was developed in a previous study to retrieve the global structures of the isotropic and anisotropic velocities of the P and S waves from the free oscillation spectra. The main improvement is that the geographical distribution of the intensity of the S-wave azimuthal anisotropy is represented by a nonlinear combination of structure coefficients for the anisotropic velocity structure, whereas in the previous study it was expanded into a generalized spherical harmonic series. Consequently, the improved inversion algorithm reduces the number of unknown parameters that must be determined compared to the previous inversion algorithm and employs a one-step inversion method by which the structure coefficients for the isotropic and anisotropic velocities are directly estimated from the fee oscillation spectra. The applicability of the improved inversion is examined by several numerical experiments using synthetic spectral data, which are produced by supposing a variety of isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures, earthquake source parameters and station-event pairs. Furthermore, the robustness of the inversion algorithm is investigated with respect to the back-ground noise contaminating the spectral data as well as truncating the series expansions by finite terms

  7. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  8. Measurement of magnetic turbulence structure and nonlinear mode coupling of tearing fluctuations in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch edge

    SciTech Connect

    Assadi, S.

    1994-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of current-driven modes are studied in the MST reversed field pinch. Measured low frequency (f < 35 kHz) magnetic fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 35 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized and externally resonant. Discrete dynamo events, ``sawtooth oscillations,`` have been observed in the experimental RFP plasmas. This phenomenon causes the plasma to become unstable to m = 1 tearing modes. The modes that may be important in different phases of these oscillations are identified. These results then assist in nonlinear studies and also help to interpret the spectral broadening of the measured data during a discrete dynamo event. Three-wave nonlinear coupling of spectral Fourier modes is measured in the MST by applying bispectral analysis to magnetic fluctuations measured at the plasma edge at 64 toroidal locations and 16 poloidal locations, permitting observation of coupling over 8 poloidal and 32 toroidal modes. Comparison to bispectra predicted by resistive MHD computation indicates reasonably good agreement. However, during the crash phase of the sawtooth oscillation the nonlinear coupling is strongly enhanced, concomitant with a broadened k-spectrum. During the sawtooth formation the plasma is undergoing a pure diffusive process. The dynamo only occurs during the sawtooth crash. High frequency activity prior to a sawtooth crash is caused by nonlinear frequency (small-scale) mode coupling. Growth rate and coupling coefficients of toroidal mode spectra are calculated by statistical modeling. Temporal evolution of edge toroidal mode spectra has been predicted by transfer function analysis. The driving sources of electrostatic fields are different than for the magnetic fields. The characteristics of tearing modes can be altered by external field errors and addition of impurities to the plasma.

  9. Fast tracking using edge histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, Przemyslaw

    1997-04-01

    This paper proposes a new algorithm for tracking objects and objects boundaries. This algorithm was developed and applied in a system used for compositing computer generated images and real world video sequences, but can be applied in general in all tracking systems where accuracy and high processing speed are required. The algorithm is based on analysis of histograms obtained by summing along chosen axles pixels of edge segmented images. Edge segmentation is done by spatial convolution using gradient operator. The advantage of such an approach is that it can be performed in real-time using available on the market hardware convolution filters. After edge extraction and histograms computation, respective positions of maximums in edge intensity histograms, in current and previous frame, are compared and matched. Obtained this way information about displacement of histograms maximums, can be directly converted into information about changes of target boundaries positions along chosen axles.

  10. Objective evaluation of slanted edge charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornung, Harvey (.

    2015-01-01

    Camera objective characterization methodologies are widely used in the digital camera industry. Most objective characterization systems rely on a chart with specific patterns, a software algorithm measures a degradation or difference between the captured image and the chart itself. The Spatial Frequency Response (SFR) method, which is part of the ISO 122331 standard, is now very commonly used in the imaging industry, it is a very convenient way to measure a camera Modulation transfer function (MTF). The SFR algorithm can measure frequencies beyond the Nyquist frequency thanks to super-resolution, so it does provide useful information on aliasing and can provide modulation for frequencies between half Nyquist and Nyquist on all color channels of a color sensor with a Bayer pattern. The measurement process relies on a chart that is simple to manufacture: a straight transition from a bright reflectance to a dark one (black and white for instance), while a sine chart requires handling precisely shades of gray which can also create all sort of issues with printers that rely on half-toning. However, no technology can create a perfect edge, so it is important to assess the quality of the chart and understand how it affects the accuracy of the measurement. In this article, I describe a protocol to characterize the MTF of a slanted edge chart, using a high-resolution flatbed scanner. The main idea is to use the RAW output of the scanner as a high-resolution micro-densitometer, since the signal is linear it is suitable to measure the chart MTF using the SFR algorithm. The scanner needs to be calibrated in sharpness: the scanner MTF is measured with a calibrated sine chart and inverted to compensate for the modulation loss from the scanner. Then the true chart MTF is computed. This article compares measured MTF from commercial charts and charts printed on printers, and also compares how of the contrast of the edge (using different shades of gray) can affect the chart MTF

  11. Edge-preserving metal artifact reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Esther; Raupach, Rainer; Lell, Michael; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelriess, Marc

    2012-03-01

    Metal implants in the field of measurement lead to strong artifacts in CT images and reduce the image quality and the diagnostic value severely. We introduce frequency split metal artifact reduction (FSMAR), a conceptually new MAR method which is designed to reduce metal artifacts and preserve details and edges of structures even close to metal implants. There are many MAR methods which simply replace unreliable parts of the projection data by inpainting. FSMAR is a combination of an inpainting-based MAR method with a frequency split approach. Normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) is chosen as the inpainting-based MAR method in this work. The high frequencies of the original image, where all rawdata were used for the reconstruction, are combined with an NMAR-corrected image. NMAR uses a normalization step to reduce metal artifacts without introducing severe new artifacts. Algorithms using a frequency split were already used in CT for example to reduce cone-beam artifacts. FSMAR is tested for patient datasets with different metal implants. The study includes patients with hip prostheses, a neuro coil, and a spine fixation. All datasets were scanned with modern clinical dual source CT scanners. In contrast to other MAR methods, FSMAR yields images without the usual blurring close to metal implants.

  12. Ultrasonic testing of plates containing edge cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Karagulle, H.

    1986-01-01

    The stress wave factor (SWF) signal is utilized for the nondestructive evaluation of plates containing perpendicular edge cracks. The effects of the existence lateral location and depth of the crack on the magnitude spectra of individual reflections in the SWF signal are studied. If the reflections in the SWF signal are not overlapped the short time Fourier analysis is applied. If the reflections are overlapped the short time homomorphic analysis (cepstrum analysis) is applied. Several reflections which have average resonant frequencies approximately at 0.9, 1.3, and 1.7 MHz are analyzed. It is observed that the magnitude ratios evaluated at average resonant frequencies decrease more with increasing d/h if the crack is located between the transducers, where h is plate thickness and d is crack depth. Moreover, for the plates, crack geometries, reflections, and frequencies considered, the average decibel drop depends mainly on the dimensionless parameter d/h and it is approximately -1 dB per 0.07 d/h. Changes in the average resonant frequencies of the magnitude spectra are also observed due to changes in the location of the crack.

  13. Ultrasonic testing of plates containing edge cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Karagulle, H.; Lee, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The stress wave factor (SWF) signal is utilized for the nondestructive evaluation of plates containing perpendicular edge cracks. The effects of the existence lateral location and depth of the crack on the magnitude spectra of individual reflections in the SWF signal are studied. If the reflections in the SWF signal are not overlapped the short time Fourier analysis is applied. If the reflections are overlapped the short time homomorphic analysis (cepstrum analysis) is applied. Several reflections which have average resonant frequencies approximately at 0.9, 1.3, and 1.7 MHz are analyzed. It is observed that the magnitude ratios evaluated at average resonant frequencies decrease more with increasing d/h if the crack is located between the transducers, where h is plate thickness and d is crack depth. Moreover, for the plates, crack geometries, reflections, and frequencies considered, the average decibel drop depends mainly on the dimensionless parameter d/h and it is approximately -1 dB per 0.07 d/h. Changes in the average resonant frequencies of the magnitude spectra are also observed due to changes in the location of the crack.

  14. Edge equilibrium code for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujing; Drozdov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-15

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids.

  15. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes S.; Assaad, Fakher F.; Schnyder, Andreas P.

    2016-05-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground-state degeneracy. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry-broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. We examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of dx y-wave superconductors by performing a mean-field analysis in the Majorana basis of the edge states. The leading instabilities are Majorana mass terms, which correspond to coherent superpositions of particle-particle and particle-hole channels in the fermionic language. We find that attractive interactions induce three different mass terms. One is a coherent superposition of imaginary s -wave pairing and current order, and another combines a charge-density-wave and finite-momentum singlet pairing. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism together with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. Our quantum Monte Carlo simulations confirm these findings and demonstrate that these instabilities occur even in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. We discuss the implications of our results for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  16. Edge of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2016-04-01

    On the night of 4 December 2013, a sequence of polar cap patches was captured by an all-sky airglow imager (ASI) in Longyearbyen, Norway (78.1°N, 15.5°E). The 630.0 nm airglow images from the ASI of 4 second exposure time, oversampled the emission of natural lifetime (with quenching) of at least ˜30 sec, introduce no observational blurring effects. By using such high-quality ASI images, we succeeded in visualizing an asymmetry in the gradients between the leading/trailing edges of the patches in a 2-D fashion. The gradient in the leading edge was found to be 2-3 times steeper than that in the trailing edge. We also identified fingerlike structures, appearing only along the trailing edge of the patches, whose horizontal scale size ranged from 55 to 210 km. These fingers are considered to be manifestations of plasma structuring through the gradient-drift instability (GDI), which is known to occur only along the trailing edge of patches. That is, the current 2-D observations visualized, for the first time, how GDI stirs the patch plasma and such a mixing process makes the trailing edge more gradual. This result strongly implies a close connection between the GDI-driven plasma stirring and the asymmetry in the large-scale shape of patches and then suggests that the fingerlike structures can be used as markers to estimate the fine-scale structure in the plasma flow within patches.

  17. Radiative ablation with two ionizing fronts when opacity displays a sharp absorption edge.

    PubMed

    Poujade, Olivier; Bonnefille, Max; Vandenboomgaerde, Marc

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a strong flux of photons with matter through an ionizing front (I-front) is an ubiquitous phenomenon in the context of astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where intense sources of radiation put matter into motion. When the opacity of the irradiated material varies continuously in the radiation spectral domain, only one single I-front is formed. In contrast, as numerical simulations tend to show, when the opacity of the irradiated material presents a sharp edge in the radiation spectral domain, a second I-front (an edge front) can form. A full description of the mechanism behind the formation of this edge front is presented in this article. It allows us to understand extra shocks (edge-shocks), displayed by ICF simulations, that might affect the robustness of the design of fusion capsules in actual experiments. Moreover, it may have consequences in various domains of astrophysics where ablative flows occur. PMID:26651800

  18. Radiative ablation with two ionizing fronts when opacity displays a sharp absorption edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poujade, Olivier; Bonnefille, Max; Vandenboomgaerde, Marc

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a strong flux of photons with matter through an ionizing front (I-front) is an ubiquitous phenomenon in the context of astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where intense sources of radiation put matter into motion. When the opacity of the irradiated material varies continuously in the radiation spectral domain, only one single I-front is formed. In contrast, as numerical simulations tend to show, when the opacity of the irradiated material presents a sharp edge in the radiation spectral domain, a second I-front (an edge front) can form. A full description of the mechanism behind the formation of this edge front is presented in this article. It allows us to understand extra shocks (edge-shocks), displayed by ICF simulations, that might affect the robustness of the design of fusion capsules in actual experiments. Moreover, it may have consequences in various domains of astrophysics where ablative flows occur.

  19. Integrated filter and detector array for spectral imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A spectral imaging system having an integrated filter and photodetector array is disclosed. The filter has narrow transmission bands which vary in frequency along the photodetector array. The frequency variation of the transmission bands is matched to, and aligned with, the frequency variation of a received spectral image. The filter is deposited directly on the photodetector array by a low temperature deposition process. By depositing the filter directly on the photodetector array, permanent alignment is achieved for all temperatures, spectral crosstalk is substantially eliminated, and a high signal to noise ratio is achieved.

  20. A novel technique of image quality objective measurement by wavelet analysis throughout the spatial frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gaoyong

    2005-01-01

    An essential determinant of the value of surrogate digital images is their quality. Image quality measurement has become crucial for most image processing applications. Over the past years , there have been many attempts to develop models or metrics for image quality that incorporate elements of human visual sensitivity. However, there is no current standard and objective definition of spectral image quality. This paper proposes a reliable automatic method for objective image quality measurement by wavelet analysis throughout the spatial frequency range. This is done by a detailed analysis of an image for a wide range of spatial frequency content, using a combination of modulation transfer function (MTF), brightness, contrast, saturation, sharpness and noise, as a more revealing metric for quality evaluation. A fast lifting wavelet algorithm is developed for computationally efficient spatial frequency analysis, where fine image detail corresponding to high spatial frequencies and image sharpness in regard to lower and mid -range spatial frequencies can be examined and compared accordingly. The wavelet frequency deconstruction is actually to extract the feature of edges in sub-band images. The technique provides a means to relate the quality of an image to the interpretation and quantification throughout the frequency range, in which the noise level is estimated in assisting with quality analysis. The experimental results of using this method for image quality measurement exhibit good correlation to subjective visual quality assessments.

  1. A novel technique of image quality objective measurement by wavelet analysis throughout the spatial frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gaoyong

    2004-10-01

    An essential determinant of the value of surrogate digital images is their quality. Image quality measurement has become crucial for most image processing applications. Over the past years , there have been many attempts to develop models or metrics for image quality that incorporate elements of human visual sensitivity. However, there is no current standard and objective definition of spectral image quality. This paper proposes a reliable automatic method for objective image quality measurement by wavelet analysis throughout the spatial frequency range. This is done by a detailed analysis of an image for a wide range of spatial frequency content, using a combination of modulation transfer function (MTF), brightness, contrast, saturation, sharpness and noise, as a more revealing metric for quality evaluation. A fast lifting wavelet algorithm is developed for computationally efficient spatial frequency analysis, where fine image detail corresponding to high spatial frequencies and image sharpness in regard to lower and mid -range spatial frequencies can be examined and compared accordingly. The wavelet frequency deconstruction is actually to extract the feature of edges in sub-band images. The technique provides a means to relate the quality of an image to the interpretation and quantification throughout the frequency range, in which the noise level is estimated in assisting with quality analysis. The experimental results of using this method for image quality measurement exhibit good correlation to subjective visual quality assessments.

  2. Artifacts Of Spectral Analysis Of Instrument Readings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, James H.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents experimental and theoretical study of some of artifacts introduced by processing outputs of two nominally identical low-frequency-reading instruments; high-sensitivity servo-accelerometers mounted together and operating, in conjunction with signal-conditioning circuits, as seismometers. Processing involved analog-to-digital conversion with anti-aliasing filtering, followed by digital processing including frequency weighting and computation of different measures of power spectral density (PSD).

  3. Frequency curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, H.C.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes graphical and mathematical procedures for preparing frequency curves from samples of hydrologic data. It also discusses the theory of frequency curves, compares advantages of graphical and mathematical fitting, suggests methods of describing graphically defined frequency curves analytically, and emphasizes the correct interpretations of a frequency curve.

  4. Bifurcations of edge states—topologically protected and non-protected—in continuous 2D honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fefferman, C. L.; Lee-Thorp, J. P.; Weinstein, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Edge states are time-harmonic solutions to energy-conserving wave equations, which are propagating parallel to a line-defect or ‘edge’ and are localized transverse to it. This paper summarizes and extends the authors’ work on the bifurcation of topologically protected edge states in continuous two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structures. We consider a family of Schrödinger Hamiltonians consisting of a bulk honeycomb potential and a perturbing edge potential. The edge potential interpolates between two different periodic structures via a domain wall. We begin by reviewing our recent bifurcation theory of edge states for continuous 2D honeycomb structures (http://arxiv.org/abs/1506.06111). The topologically protected edge state bifurcation is seeded by the zero-energy eigenstate of a one-dimensional Dirac operator. We contrast these protected bifurcations with (more common) non-protected bifurcations from spectral band edges, which are induced by bound states of an effective Schrödinger operator. Numerical simulations for honeycomb structures of varying contrasts and ‘rational edges’ (zigzag, armchair and others), support the following scenario: (a) for low contrast, under a sign condition on a distinguished Fourier coefficient of the bulk honeycomb potential, there exist topologically protected edge states localized transverse to zigzag edges. Otherwise, and for general edges, we expect long lived edge quasi-modes which slowly leak energy into the bulk. (b) For an arbitrary rational edge, there is a threshold in the medium-contrast (depending on the choice of edge) above which there exist topologically protected edge states. In the special case of the armchair edge, there are two families of protected edge states; for each parallel quasimomentum (the quantum number associated with translation invariance) there are edge states which propagate in opposite directions along the armchair edge.

  5. Ca L2,3-edge XANES and Sr K-edge EXAFS study of hydroxyapatite and fossil bone apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zougrou, I. M.; Katsikini, M.; Brzhezinskaya, M.; Pinakidou, F.; Papadopoulou, L.; Tsoukala, E.; Paloura, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    Upon burial, the organic and inorganic components of hard tissues such as bone, teeth, and tusks are subjected to various alterations as a result of interactions with the chemical milieu of soil, groundwater, and presence of microorganisms. In this study, simulation of the Ca L 2,3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum of hydroxyapatite, using the CTM4XAS code, reveals that the different symmetry of the two nonequivalent Ca(1) and Ca(2) sites in the unit cell gives rise to specific spectral features. Moreover, Ca L 2,3-edge XANES spectroscopy is applied in order to assess variations in fossil bone apatite crystallinity due to heavy bacterial alteration and catastrophic mineral dissolution, compared to well-preserved fossil apatite, fresh bone, and geologic apatite reference samples. Fossilization-induced chemical alterations are investigated by means of Ca L 2,3-edge XANES and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and are related to histological evaluation using optical microscopy images. Finally, the variations in the bonding environment of Sr and its preference for substitution in the Ca(1) or Ca(2) sites upon increasing the Sr/Ca ratio is assessed by Sr K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy.

  6. Ca L2,3-edge XANES and Sr K-edge EXAFS study of hydroxyapatite and fossil bone apatite.

    PubMed

    Zougrou, I M; Katsikini, M; Brzhezinskaya, M; Pinakidou, F; Papadopoulou, L; Tsoukala, E; Paloura, E C

    2016-08-01

    Upon burial, the organic and inorganic components of hard tissues such as bone, teeth, and tusks are subjected to various alterations as a result of interactions with the chemical milieu of soil, groundwater, and presence of microorganisms. In this study, simulation of the Ca L 2,3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum of hydroxyapatite, using the CTM4XAS code, reveals that the different symmetry of the two nonequivalent Ca(1) and Ca(2) sites in the unit cell gives rise to specific spectral features. Moreover, Ca L 2,3-edge XANES spectroscopy is applied in order to assess variations in fossil bone apatite crystallinity due to heavy bacterial alteration and catastrophic mineral dissolution, compared to well-preserved fossil apatite, fresh bone, and geologic apatite reference samples. Fossilization-induced chemical alterations are investigated by means of Ca L 2,3-edge XANES and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and are related to histological evaluation using optical microscopy images. Finally, the variations in the bonding environment of Sr and its preference for substitution in the Ca(1) or Ca(2) sites upon increasing the Sr/Ca ratio is assessed by Sr K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. PMID:27379398

  7. Bounds on probability of state transfer with respect to readout time and edge weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Whitney; Kirkland, Steve; Li, Chi-Kwong; Plosker, Sarah; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the sensitivity of a spin chain modeled by an undirected weighted connected graph exhibiting perfect state transfer to small perturbations in readout time and edge weight in order to obtain physically relevant bounds on the probability of state transfer. At the heart of our analysis is the concept of the numerical range of a matrix; our analysis of edge weight errors additionally makes use of the spectral and Frobenius norms.

  8. Simultaneous Teleportation of the Spectral and Polarization States of a Photon

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Bennink, Ryan S; Grice, Warren P

    2008-01-01

    We describe how spectrally multimode, polarization-entangled photons simultaneously teleport quantum information encoded into the spectral and polarization degrees of freedom of a single photon using sum frequency generation to implement a Bell-state measurement.

  9. A study of slanted-edge MTF stability and repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Jackson K. M.

    2015-01-01

    The slanted-edge method of measuring the spatial frequency response (SFR) as an approximation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) has become a well known and widely used image quality testing method over the last 10 years. This method has been adopted by multiple international standards including ISO and IEEE. Nearly every commercially available image quality testing software includes the slanted-edge method and there are numerous open-source algorithms available. This method is one of the most important image quality algorithms in use today. This paper explores test conditions and the impacts they have on the stability and precision of the slanted-edge method as well as details of the algorithm itself. Real world and simulated data are used to validate the characteristics of the algorithm. Details of the target such as edge angle and contrast ratio are tested to determine the impact on measurement under various conditions. The original algorithm defines a near vertical edge so that errors introduced are minor but the theory behind the algorithm requires a perfectly vertical edge. A correction factor is introduced as a way to compensate for this problem. Contrast ratio is shown to have no impact on results in an absence of noise.

  10. Edge extraction of optical subaperture based on fractal dimension method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunqi; Hui, Mei; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Liu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Yuejin

    2015-09-01

    Optical synthetic aperture imaging technology is an effective approach to increase the aperture diameter of optical system for purpose of improving resolution. In optical synthetic aperture imaging system, the edge is more complex than that of traditional optical imaging system, and the relatively large size of the gaps between the subapertures makes cophasing a difficult problem. So it is significant to extract edge phase of each subaperture for achieving phase stitching and avoiding the loss of effective frequency. Fractal dimension as a measure feature of image surface irregularities can statistically evaluate the complexity which is consistent with human visual image perception of rough surface texture. Therefore, fractal dimension provides a powerful tool to describe surface characteristics of image and can be applied to edge extraction. In our research, the box-counting dimension was used to calculate fractal dimension of the whole image. Then the calculated fractal dimension is mapped to grayscale image. The region with large fractal dimension represents a sharper change of the gray scale in original image, which was accurately extracted as the edge region. Subaperture region and interference fringe edge was extracted from interference pattern of optical subaperture, which has laid the foundation for the subaperture edge phase detection in the future work.

  11. On the Red Edge an Optical Biomarker for Detecting Extrateresstrial Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, E. B.; Seager, S.; Turner, E. L.

    2005-12-01

    Earth's deciduous plants have a sharp order-of-magnitude increase in leaf reflectance between approximately 700 and 750 nm wavelength. This strong reflectance of Earth's vegetation suggests that surface biosignatures with sharp spectral features might be detectable in the spectrum of scattered light from a spatially unresolved extrasolar terrestrial planet. We assess the potential of Earth's step-function-like spectroscopic feature, referred to as the ``red edge,'' as a tool for astrobiology. First, we review the basic characteristics and physical origin of the red edge. Then, we discuss the challenges involved in detecting the red edge in Earthshine (i.e., a spatially integrated scattered light spectrum of the Earth), as evidenced by recent attempts to detect the red edge using spectroscopic observations of the dark side of the moon (which is illuminated by Eartshine). We present Earthshine observations from Apache Point Observatory (New Mexico) to emphasize that time variability is key to detecting weak surface biosignatures such as the vegetation red edge. We briefly discuss the evolutionary advantages of vegetation's red edge reflectance, and speculate that while extraterrestrial ``light-harvesting organisms'' have no compelling reason to display the exact same red edge feature as terrestrial vegetation, they might have similar spectroscopic features at different wavelengths than terrestrial vegetation. This implies that future terrestrial-planet characterizing space missions should obtain data that allow time-varying, sharp spectral features at unknown wavelengths to be identified. We caution that some mineral reflectance edges are similar in slope and strength to vegetation's red edge (albeit at different wavelengths). Due to the small amplitude of the terrestrial red edge, the temporal variability of atmospheric water vapor, and the potential for similar mineralogical features, we conclude that great care must be taken in the interpretation of any

  12. Decay patterns of edge states at reconstructed armchair graphene edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changwon; Ihm, Jisoon; Kim, Gunn

    Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the electronic structures of localized states at reconstructed armchair graphene edges. We consider graphene nanoribbons with two different edge types and obtain the energy band structures and charge densities of the edge states. By examining the imaginary part of the wave vector in the forbidden energy region, we reveal the decay behavior of the wave functions in graphene. The complex band structures of graphene in the armchair and zigzag directions are presented in the first-principles framework. G.K. acknowledges the support of the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Education (Grant No. 2013R1A1A2009131) and the Priority Research Center Program (Grant No. 2010-0020207).

  13. On the Edge: Haptic Discrimination of Edge Sharpness

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Andy L.; Kent, Christopher; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Benton, Christopher P.; Groen, Martin G. M.; Noyes, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing ubiquity of haptic displays (e.g., smart phones and tablets) necessitates a better understanding of the perceptual capabilities of the human haptic system. Haptic displays will soon be capable of locally deforming to create simple 3D shapes. This study investigated the sensitivity of our haptic system to a fundamental component of shapes: edges. A novel set of eight high quality shape stimuli with test edges that varied in sharpness were fabricated in a 3D printer. In a two alternative, forced choice task, blindfolded participants were presented with two of these shapes side by side (one the reference, the other selected randomly from the remaining set of seven) and after actively exploring the test edge of each shape with the tip of their index finger, reported which shape had the sharper edge. We used a model selection approach to fit optimal psychometric functions to performance data, and from these obtained just noticeable differences and Weber fractions. In Experiment 1, participants performed the task with four different references. With sharpness defined as the angle at which one surface meets the horizontal plane, the four JNDs closely followed Weber’s Law, giving a Weber fraction of 0.11. Comparisons to previously reported Weber fractions from other haptic manipulations (e.g. amplitude of vibration) suggests we are sufficiently sensitive to changes in edge sharpness for this to be of potential utility in the design of future haptic displays. In Experiment 2, two groups of participants performed the task with a single reference but different exploration strategies; one was limited to a single touch, the other unconstrained and free to explore as they wished. As predicted, the JND in the free exploration condition was lower than that in the single touch condition, indicating exploration strategy affects sensitivity to edge sharpness. PMID:24023852

  14. Evaluating Spectral Signals to Identify Spectral Error.

    PubMed

    Bazar, George; Kovacs, Zoltan; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2016-01-01

    Since the precision and accuracy level of a chemometric model is highly influenced by the quality of the raw spectral data, it is very important to evaluate the recorded spectra and describe the erroneous regions before qualitative and quantitative analyses or detailed band assignment. This paper provides a collection of basic spectral analytical procedures and demonstrates their applicability in detecting errors of near infrared data. Evaluation methods based on standard deviation, coefficient of variation, mean centering and smoothing techniques are presented. Applications of derivatives with various gap sizes, even below the bandpass of the spectrometer, are shown to evaluate the level of spectral errors and find their origin. The possibility for prudent measurement of the third overtone region of water is also highlighted by evaluation of a complex data recorded with various spectrometers. PMID:26731541

  15. Evaluating Spectral Signals to Identify Spectral Error

    PubMed Central

    Bazar, George; Kovacs, Zoltan; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2016-01-01

    Since the precision and accuracy level of a chemometric model is highly influenced by the quality of the raw spectral data, it is very important to evaluate the recorded spectra and describe the erroneous regions before qualitative and quantitative analyses or detailed band assignment. This paper provides a collection of basic spectral analytical procedures and demonstrates their applicability in detecting errors of near infrared data. Evaluation methods based on standard deviation, coefficient of variation, mean centering and smoothing techniques are presented. Applications of derivatives with various gap sizes, even below the bandpass of the spectrometer, are shown to evaluate the level of spectral errors and find their origin. The possibility for prudent measurement of the third overtone region of water is also highlighted by evaluation of a complex data recorded with various spectrometers. PMID:26731541

  16. Spectral moment estimation in MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Signal processing techniques used in Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST) radars are reviewed. Techniques which produce good estimates of the total power, frequency shift, and spectral width of the radar power spectra are considered. Non-linear curve fitting, autocovariance, autocorrelation, covariance, and maximum likelihood estimators are discussed.

  17. 47 CFR 2.1515 - Spectral measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spectral measurements. 2.1515 Section 2.1515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS FCC Procedure for Testing Class A, B and S Emergency Position Indicating Radiobeacons (EPIRBs) Environmental...

  18. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  19. Design of blended rolled edges for compact range main reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericksen, K. P.; Gupta, I. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure to design blended rolled edge terminations for arbitrary rim shape compact range main reflectors is presented. The reflector may be center-fed or offset-fed. The design procedure leads to a reflector which has a continuous and smooth surface. This procedure also ensures small diffracted fields from the junction between the paraboloid and the blended rolled edge while satisfying certain constraints regarding the maximum height of the reflector and minimum operating frequency of the system. The prescribed procedure is used to design several reflectors and the performance of these reflectors is presented.

  20. Resonant Edge Magnetoplasmons and Their Decay in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, N.; Roulleau, P.; Roche, B.; Hashisaka, M.; Hibino, H.; Petković, I.; Glattli, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate resonant edge magnetoplasmons (EMPs) and their decay in graphene by high-frequency electronic measurements. From EMP resonances in disk shaped graphene, we show that the dispersion relation of EMPs is nonlinear due to interactions, giving rise to the intrinsic decay of EMP wave packets. We also identify extrinsic dissipation mechanisms due to interaction with localized states in bulk graphene from the decay time of EMP wave packets. We indicate that, owing to the linear band structure and the sharp edge potential, EMP dissipation in graphene can be lower than that in GaAs systems.

  1. Quantum pump in quantum spin Hall edge states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Fang

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for quantum pump in a quantum spin Hall bar with two quantum point contacts (QPCs). The pump currents can be generated by applying harmonically modulating gate voltages at QPCs. The phase difference between the gate voltages introduces an effective gauge field, which breaks the time-reversal symmetry and generates pump currents. The pump currents display very different pump frequency dependence for weak and strong e-e interaction. These unique properties are induced by the helical feature of the edge states, and therefore can be used to detect and control edge state transport.

  2. Spectral methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Streett, Craig L.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of these notes is to provide a basic introduction to spectral methods with a particular emphasis on applications to computational fluid dynamics. Another objective is to summarize some of the most important developments in spectral methods in the last two years. The fundamentals of spectral methods for simple problems will be covered in depth, and the essential elements of several fluid dynamical applications will be sketched.

  3. The development of a tunable, single-frequency ultraviolet laser source for UV filtered Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkelstein, N.; Gambogi, J.; Lempert, Walter R.; Miles, Richard B.; Rines, G. A.; Finch, A.; Schwarz, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    We present the development of a flexible, high power, narrow line width, tunable ultraviolet source for diagnostic application. By frequency tripling the output of a pulsed titanium-sapphire laser, we achieve broadly tunable (227-360 nm) ultraviolet light with high quality spatial and spectral resolution. We also present the characterization of a mercury vapor cell which provides a narrow band, sharp edge absorption filter at 253.7 nm. These two components form the basis for the extension of the Filtered Rayleigh Scattering technique into the ultraviolet. The UV-FRS system is comprised of four pieces: a single frequency, cw tunable Ti:Sapphire seeding source; a high-powered pulsed Ti:Sapphire oscillator; a third harmonic generator system; and an atomic mercury vapor filter. In this paper we discuss the development and characterization of each of these elements.

  4. X-ray timing and spectral observations of galactic black hole candidate XTE J1550-564 during outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Kaice Theodore

    2003-09-01

    The timing and spectral properties of the soft X-ray transient (SXT) and microquasar XTE J1550-564 during outburst are studied, emphasizing observations made by the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) Experiment. USA data show a low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO) with a centroid frequency that tends to increase with increasing flux and a fractional rms amplitude which is correlated with the USA hardness ratio. Several high- frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) were detected by RXTE, during periods where the LFQPO is seen to be weakening or not detectable at all. The evolution of the USA hardness ratio with time and source flux is examined. The hardness-intensity diagram shows counterclockwise cyclical evolution and possibly indicates the presence of two independent accretion flows: a geometrically thin, optically thick accretion disk and a hot sub-Keplerian flow. A model for production of the LFQPO in XTE J1550-564 is proposed, assuming that the LFQPO is a result of acoustic oscillations in a hot sub-Keplerian transition layer (TL). Under this acoustic oscillation model (AOM), the TL is an acoustic cavity having an outer boundary at RTL, where R TL ≈ Rinner, with Rinner being the radius of the accretion disk inner edge. TL resonance is interpreted as a mechanism for the LFQPO and the eigenfrequencies are associated with the LFQPO frequencies, ν LFQPO. This LFQPO mechanism requires the presence of a TL, capable of inverse-Compton scattering, with RTL regulated by a cool Keplerian accretion disk. Support for the AOM is provided by the correlation of the LFQPO percent rms amplitude with the USA hardness ratio, and other correlations and anti-correlations found in the USA, RXTE and BATSE observations. LFQPO data show increasing rms amplitude with increasing high energy flux and increasing νLFQPO with increasing low energy flux. These observations indicate that ν LFQPO is set by the accretion disk inner edge. The spectrally inferred Rinner

  5. Watson-Crick and sugar-edge base pairing of cytosine in the gas phase: UV and infrared spectra of cytosine·2-pyridone.

    PubMed

    Frey, Jann A; Ottiger, Philipp; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-01-23

    While keto-amino cytosine is the dominant species in aqueous solution, spectroscopic studies in molecular beams and in noble gas matrices show that other cytosine tautomers prevail in apolar environments. Each of these offers two or three H-bonding sites (Watson-Crick, wobble, sugar-edge). The mass- and isomer-specific S1 ← S0 vibronic spectra of cytosine·2-pyridone (Cyt·2PY) and 1-methylcytosine·2PY are measured using UV laser resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI), UV/UV depletion, and IR depletion spectroscopy. The UV spectra of the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge isomers of Cyt·2PY are separated using UV/UV spectral hole-burning. Five different isomers of Cyt·2PY are observed in a supersonic beam. We show that the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge dimers of keto-amino cytosine with 2PY are the most abundant in the beam, although keto-amino-cytosine is only the third most abundant tautomer in the gas phase. We identify the different isomers by combining three different diagnostic tools: (1) methylation of the cytosine N1-H group prevents formation of both the sugar-edge and wobble isomers and gives the Watson-Crick isomer exclusively. (2) The calculated ground state binding and dissociation energies, relative gas-phase abundances, excitation and the ionization energies are in agreement with the assignment of the dominant Cyt·2PY isomers to the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge complexes of keto-amino cytosine. (3) The comparison of calculated ground state vibrational frequencies to the experimental IR spectra in the carbonyl stretch and NH/OH/CH stretch ranges strengthen this identification. PMID:24383817

  6. Continued Growth on Graphene Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhengtang

    Previously, we have shown that the large-size single crystal graphene can be obtained by suppressing the nucleation density during Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) growth. Here we demonstrate that the graphene single crystal can be amplified by a continued growth method. In this process, we used a mild oxidation step after the first-growth, which lead to the observed fromation of oxides at the vicinity of graphene edges, which allows the graphene growth at seed edges due to reduced activation energy. Consequently, we successful grown a secondary single-crystal graphene structures with the same lattice structure, orientation on the graphene edges. This amplification method would enable the production of graphene electronics with controlled properties.

  7. Edges and Corners With Shearlets.

    PubMed

    Duval-Poo, Miguel A; Odone, Francesca; De Vito, Ernesto

    2015-11-01

    Shearlets are a relatively new and very effective multi-scale framework for signal analysis. Contrary to the traditional wavelets, shearlets are capable to efficiently capture the anisotropic information in multivariate problem classes. Therefore, shearlets can be seen as the valid choice for multi-scale analysis and detection of directional sensitive visual features like edges and corners. In this paper, we start by reviewing the main properties of shearlets that are important for edge and corner detection. Then, we study algorithms for multi-scale edge and corner detection based on the shearlet representation. We provide an extensive experimental assessment on benchmark data sets which empirically confirms the potential of shearlets feature detection. PMID:26353351

  8. Edge waves and resonances in two-dimensional phononic crystal plates

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Jin-Chen Hsu, Chih-Hsun

    2015-05-07

    We present a numerical study on phononic band gaps and resonances occurring at the edge of a semi-infinite two-dimensional (2D) phononic crystal plate. The edge supports localized edge waves coupling to evanescent phononic plate modes that decay exponentially into the semi-infinite phononic crystal plate. The band-gap range and the number of edge-wave eigenmodes can be tailored by tuning the distance between the edge and the semi-infinite 2D phononic lattice. As a result, a phononic band gap for simultaneous edge waves and plate waves is created, and phononic cavities beside the edge can be built to support high-frequency edge resonances. We design an L3 edge cavity and analyze its resonance characteristics. Based on the band gap, high quality factor and strong confinement of resonant edge modes are achieved. The results enable enhanced control over acoustic energy flow in phononic crystal plates, which can be used in designing micro and nanoscale resonant devices and coupling of edge resonances to other types of phononic or photonic crystal cavities.

  9. Spectral properties of zinc sulfide sols stabilized by high-molecular polyvinylpyrrolidone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstrop'ev, S. K.; Gatchin, Yu. A.; Evstrop'ev, K. S.; Dukel'skii, K. V.; Kislyakov, I. M.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral properties of zinc sulfide sols stabilized by high-molecular polyvinylpyrrolidone have been studied. It is shown that the absorption spectra of colloidal solutions in the UV spectral range are determined by the quantum-confinement effect, exhibiting a dependence of the absorption edge on the size of zinc sulfide nanocrystals.

  10. Spectrally narrow mid-infrared optically pumped lasers with partial surface DBR.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi; Kaspi, Ron; Tilton, Michael L; Chavez, Joseph R; Ongstad, Andrew P; Dente, Gregory C

    2012-05-01

    An optically pumped mid-infrared edge-emitting laser is described, in which a Distributed Bragg Reflector grating partially occupies the surface, and provides spectral narrowing in a high power device. A quasi-continuous-wave power of 3 Watts is obtained at 3.6 µm that is contained within a spectral width of 7 nm. PMID:22565707

  11. Quickbird Satellite in-orbit Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) Measurement Using Edge, Pulse and Impulse Methods for Summer 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helder, Dennis; Choi, Taeyoung; Rangaswamy, Manjunath

    2005-01-01

    the zero-crossing points in the frequency domain from a pulse, the pulse width should be less than the width of two pixels (or 2 GSD's), but the short extent of the pulse results in a poor signal-to-noise ratio. Similarly, for a high-resolution satellite imaging system such as Quickbird, the input pulse width was critical because of the zero crossing points and noise present in the background area. It is important, therefore, that the width of the input pulse be appropriately sized. Finally, the MTF was calculated by taking ratio between Fourier transform of output and Fourier transform of input. Regardless of whether the edge, pulse and impulse target method is used, the orientation of the targets is critical in order to obtain uniformly spaced sub-pixel data points. When the orientation is incorrect, sample data points tend to be located in clusters that result in poor reconstruction of the edge or pulse profiles. Thus, a compromise orientation must be selected so that all spectral bands can be accommodated. This report continues by outlining the objectives in Section 2, procedures followed in Section 3, descriptions of the field campaigns in Section 4, results in Section 5, and a brief summary in Section 6.

  12. Control of Spectral Phase of Ultrafast Optical Pulses with Grisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, Charles; Field, Jeff; Squier, Jeff; Kane, Steve

    2008-10-01

    High-quality dispersion management is critical for ultrafast optics. Grisms are a combination of diffraction gratings and prisms. We can use grisms for high-fidelity control of the spectral phase of ultrafast pulses, making systems much more compact and easy to adjust. While the spectral phase of a given system can be obtained with ray-tracing, analytic expressions are desirable for exploring and optimizing new designs. We show that we can analytically calculate the spectral phase of a range of grism-like structures by making a superposition of basic tilted window modules. For example, a prism pair can be described by starting with a tilted slab of glass, which defines the outer edges of the prism pair. The inner edges of the prism pair are then created by superposing a tilted slab of air, which removes glass between the prisms. We will discuss the applications of these grism designs to ultrafast amplifiers and pulse shapers.

  13. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics of edge localized mode precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Z. B.; Wang, Lu; Wang, X. G.

    2015-02-15

    A possible origin of edge-localized-mode (ELM) precursors based on nonlinear ideal peeling-ballooning mode is reported. Via nonlinear variational principle, a nonlinear evolution equation of the radial displacement is derived and solved, analytically. Besides an explosive growth in the initial nonlinear phase, it is found that the local displacement evolves into an oscillating state in the developed nonlinear phase. The nonlinear frequency of the ELM precursors scales as ω{sub pre}∼x{sup 1/3}ξ{sup ^}{sub ψ,in}{sup 2/3}n, with x position in radial direction, ξ{sup ^}{sub ψ,in} strength of initial perturbation, and n toroidal mode number.

  14. Edge convection driven by externally applied potentials

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2000-08-01

    A theoretical model of convection in collisional tokamak edge and scrape-off-layer plasmas is described. In the linear theory, any mechanism for poloidal and toroidal symmetry breaking of the equilibrium will drive ExB flows; this result stems from the parallel thermal and pressure forces in Ohm's law. In the nonlinear theory, the quadratic coupling of the perturbations leads to quasilinear-type fluxes in the vorticity, density, and temperature equations. If the convection is strong enough, these fluxes lead to an ambipolarity constraint on the equilibrium electric field and to increased transport of particles and energy. The theory shows qualitative agreement with some tokamak experiments in which potential perturbations are externally driven by radio frequency antennas. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Edge shape and comfort of rigid lenses.

    PubMed

    La Hood, D

    1988-08-01

    One of the main factors determining the comfort of a rigid contact lens is the shape of the edge. The comfort of four different contact lens edge shapes was assessed with four unadapted subjects in a randomized masked trial. Lenses with well rounded anterior edge profiles were found to be significantly more comfortable than lenses with square anterior edges. There was no significant difference in subjective comfort between a rounded and square posterior edge profile. The results suggest that the interaction of the edge with the eyelid is more important in determining comfort than edge effects on the cornea, when lenses are fitted according to a corneal alignment philosophy. PMID:3177585

  16. Critical review of the trailing edge condition in steady and unsteady flow. Blade flutter in compressors and fans: Numerical simulation of the aerodynamic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radwan, S. F.; Rockwell, D. O.; Johnson, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Existing interpretations of the trailing edge condition, addressing both theoretical and experimental works in steady, as well as unsteady flows are critically reviewed. The work of Kutta and Joukowski on the trailing edge condition in steady flow is reviewed. It is shown that for most practical airfoils and blades (as in the case of most turbomachine blades), this condition is violated due to rounded trailing edges and high frequency effects, the flow dynamics in the trailing edge region being dominated by viscous forces; therefore, any meaningful modelling must include viscous effects. The question of to what extent the trailing edge condition affects acoustic radiation from the edge is raised; it is found that violation of the trailing edge condition leads to significant sound diffraction at the tailing edge, which is related to the problem of noise generation. Finally, various trailing edge conditions in unsteady flow are discussed, with emphasis on high reduced frequencies.

  17. Improved time-frequency analysis of ASDEX Upgrade reflectometry data using the reassigned spectrogram technique.

    PubMed

    Varela, P; Silva, A; da Silva, F; da Graça, S; Manso, M E; Conway, G D

    2010-10-01

    The spectrogram is one of the best-known time-frequency distributions suitable to analyze signals whose energy varies both in time and frequency. In reflectometry, it has been used to obtain the frequency content of FM-CW signals for density profile inversion and also to study plasma density fluctuations from swept and fixed frequency data. Being implemented via the short-time Fourier transform, the spectrogram is limited in resolution, and for that reason several methods have been developed to overcome this problem. Among those, we focus on the reassigned spectrogram technique that is both easily automated and computationally efficient requiring only the calculation of two additional spectrograms. In each time-frequency window, the technique reallocates the spectrogram coordinates to the region that most contributes to the signal energy. The application to ASDEX Upgrade reflectometry data results in better energy concentration and improved localization of the spectral content of the reflected signals. When combined with the automatic (data driven) window length spectrogram, this technique provides improved profile accuracy, in particular, in regions where frequency content varies most rapidly such as the edge pedestal shoulder. PMID:21061480

  18. Decays of electron Bernstein waves near plasma edge

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Nong; Cary, John R.

    2011-12-15

    Nonlinear wave-wave couplings near the upper hybrid resonance are studied via particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the decay of an electron Bernstein wave (EBW) depends on the ratio of the incident frequency and electron cyclotron frequency. For ratios less than two, parametric decay into a lower hybrid wave (or an ion Bernstein wave) and EBWs at a lower frequency is observed. For ratios larger than two, the daughter waves could be an electron cyclotron quasi-mode and another EBW or an ion wave and EBW. For sufficiently high incident power, the former process may dominate. Because of the electron cyclotron quasi-mode, electrons can be strongly heated by nonlinear Landau damping. As a result, the bulk of the incident power can be absorbed near plasma edge at high power. The increase in number of decay channels with frequency implies that the allowable power into the plasma must decrease with frequency.

  19. [Plant Spectral Discrimination Based on Phenological Features].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Jian-long; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiao-song

    2015-10-01

    Spectral analysis plays a significant role onplant characteristic identification and mechanism recognition, there were many papers published on the aspects of absorption features in the spectra of chlorophyll and moisture, spectral analysis onvegetation red edge effect, spectra profile feature extraction, spectra profile conversion, vegetation leaf structure and chemical composition impacts on the spectra in past years. However, fewer researches issued on spectral changes caused by plant seasonal changes of life form, chlorophyll, leaf area index. This paper studied on spectral observation of 11 plants of various life form, plant leaf structure and its size, phenological characteristics, they include deciduous forest with broad vertical leaf, needle leaf evergreen forest, needle leaf deciduous forest, deciduous forest with broadflat leaf, high shrub with big leaf, high shrub with little leaf, deciduous forest with broad little leaf, short shrub, meadow, steppe and grass. Field spectral data were observed with SVC-HR768 (Spectra Vista company, USA), the band width covers 350-2 500 nm, spectral resolution reaches 1-4 nm. The features of NDVI, spectral maximum absorption depth in green band, and spectral maximum absorption depth in red band were measured after continuum removal processing, the mean, amplitude and gradient of these features on seasonal change profile were analyzed, meanwhile, separability research on plant spectral feature of growth period and maturation period were compared. The paper presents a calculation method of separability of vegetation spectra which consider feature spatial distances. This index is carried on analysis of the vegetation discrimination. The results show that: the spectral features during plant growth period are easier to distinguish than them during maturation period. With the same features comparison, plant separability of growth period is 3 points higher than it during maturation period. The overall separabilityof vegetation

  20. Improving Self-Guiding of an Ultra-Intense Laser by Tailoring the Longitudinal Profile of the Leading Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Warren; Tzoufras, Michail; Tsung, Frank; Sahai, Aakash

    2013-10-01

    Self-guiding of an ultra-intense laser pulse requires the refractive index to build up rapidly to a sufficient value before the main body of the pulse passes by. For short single-frequency pulses this occurs within a plasma period and a large portion of the leading edge is subject to diffraction. Nevertheless, if the body of the pulse survives long enough, the concomitant changes in its spectral content result in highly localized absorption, such that a large amount of the energy of the leading edge of the pulse is absorbed before it can diffract. To illustrate these mechanisms and optimize laser wakefield accelerators we propose a pulse profile with a ``bulbous bow,'' that is a lower-intensity low-energy precursor, that can produce the necessary buildup for the index of refraction to guide the body of the laser. The wake-field behind such a pulse is more stable, contains more energy, is sustained longer, and the corresponding de-phasing length is extended.

  1. The effect of acoustic forcing on trailing edge separation and near wake development of an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, L. S.; Bryant, T. D.; Maestrello, L.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of acoustic forcing on flow fields near the trailing edge of a symmetric airfoil at zero angle of attack. At low chord Reynolds numbers, the boundary layers separate from the surfaces in the rear part of the airfoil and create recirculation regions near the trailing edge. It is shown that with the introduction of acoustic forcing through a slot in the vicinity of the separation point, periodic large-scale structures are generated in the trailing edge region. Significant reduction of trailing edge separation is achieved. It is also found that the most effective forcing frequency to control trailing edge separation is the wake vortex shedding frequency. As a result of forcing, applied only on the upper surface, the upper boundary layer is accelerated and the flow over the lower surface decelerated. Consequently, an asymmetric wake is formed. The results presented indicate that the development of the near wake varies with forcing conditions.

  2. Shape-dependent canny edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, Karen A.; Agaian, Sos S.; Nercessian, Shahan C.; Almunstashri, Ali A.

    2011-08-01

    Edges characterize the boundaries of objects in images and are informative structural cues for computer vision and target/object detection and recognition systems. The Canny edge detector is widely regarded as the edge detection standard. It is fairly adaptable to different environments, as its parametric nature attempts to tailor the detection of edges based on image-dependent characteristics or the particular requirements of a given implementation. Though it has been used in a myriad of image processing tasks, the Canny edge detector is still vulnerable to edge losses, localization errors, and noise sensitivity. These issues are largely due to the key tradeoff made in the scale and size of the edge detection filters used by the algorithm. Small-scaled filters are sensitive to edges but also to noise, whereas large-scaled filters are robust to noise but could filter out fine details. In this paper, novel edge detection kernel generalizations and a shape-dependent edge detector are introduced to alleviate these shortcomings. While most standard edge detection algorithms are based on convolving the input image with fixed size square kernels, this paper will illustrate the benefits of different filter sizes, and more importantly, different kernel shapes for edge detection. Moreover, new edge fusion methods are introduced to more effectively combine the individual edge responses. Existing edge detectors, including the Canny edge detector, can be obtained from the generalized edge detector by specifying corresponding parameters and kernel shapes. The proposed representations and edge detector have been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on several different types of image data. Computer simulations demonstrate that nonsquare kernel approaches can outperform square kernel approaches such as Canny, Sobel, Prewitt, Roberts, and others, providing better tradeoffs between noise rejection, accurate edge localization, and resolution. Where possible, Pratt's figure of

  3. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral investigation, computed IR intensity and Raman activity analysis and frequency estimation analysis on 4-chloro-2-bromoacetophenone using HF and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalingam, S.; Anbusrinivasan, P.; Periandy, S.

    2011-02-01

    In this work, the experimental and theoretical spectra of 4-chloro-2-bromoacetophenone (4C2BAP) are studied. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of title molecule have been recorded in the region 4000-100 cm -1. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state have been calculated by using Hartree-Fock and density functional method (B3LYP) with the 6-31G (d, p) and 6-311G (d, p) basis sets. The vibrational frequencies are calculated and scaled values are compared with the experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The DFT (B3LYP/6-311G (d, p)) calculations are more reliable than the ab initio HF/6-311G (d, p) calculations for the vibrational study of 4C2BAP. The optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) are compared with experimental values of the molecule. The alteration of vibrational bands of the carbonyl and acetyl groups due to the presence of halogens (Cl and Br) in the base molecule is also investigated from their characteristic region of linked spectrum.

  4. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral investigation, computed IR intensity and Raman activity analysis and frequency estimation analysis on 4-chloro-2-bromoacetophenone using HF and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, S; Anbusrinivasan, P; Periandy, S

    2011-02-01

    In this work, the experimental and theoretical spectra of 4-chloro-2-bromoacetophenone (4C2BAP) are studied. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of title molecule have been recorded in the region 4000-100 cm(-1). The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state have been calculated by using Hartree-Fock and density functional method (B3LYP) with the 6-31G (d, p) and 6-311G (d, p) basis sets. The vibrational frequencies are calculated and scaled values are compared with the experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The DFT (B3LYP/6-311G (d, p)) calculations are more reliable than the ab initio HF/6-311G (d, p) calculations for the vibrational study of 4C2BAP. The optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) are compared with experimental values of the molecule. The alteration of vibrational bands of the carbonyl and acetyl groups due to the presence of halogens (Cl and Br) in the base molecule is also investigated from their characteristic region of linked spectrum. PMID:21216662

  5. Planck 2013 results. IX. HFI spectral response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) spectral response was determined through a series of ground based tests conducted with the HFI focal plane in a cryogenic environment prior to launch. The main goal of the spectral transmission tests was to measure the relative spectral response (includingthe level of out-of-band signal rejection) of all HFI detectors to a known source of electromagnetic radiation individually. This was determined by measuring the interferometric output of a continuously scanned Fourier transform spectrometer with all HFI detectors. As there is no on-board spectrometer within HFI, the ground-based spectral response experiments provide the definitive data set for the relative spectral calibration of the HFI. Knowledge of the relative variations in the spectral response between HFI detectors allows for a more thorough analysis of the HFI data. The spectral response of the HFI is used in Planck data analysis and component separation, this includes extraction of CO emission observed within Planck bands, dust emission, Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources, and intensity to polarization leakage. The HFI spectral response data have also been used to provide unit conversion and colour correction analysis tools. While previous papers describe the pre-flight experiments conducted on the Planck HFI, this paper focusses on the analysis of the pre-flight spectral response measurements and the derivation of data products, e.g. band-average spectra, unit conversion coefficients, and colour correction coefficients, all with related uncertainties. Verifications of the HFI spectral response data are provided through comparisons with photometric HFI flight data. This validation includes use of HFI zodiacal emission observations to demonstrate out-of-band spectral signal rejection better than 108. The accuracy of the HFI relative spectral response data is verified through comparison with complementary flight-data based unit conversion coefficients and colour correction

  6. The Problem of the Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faatz, Judith A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a field study in a local ecosystem which allows high school students to investigate the edge effect, where a meadow and a forest meet. Students measure soil moisture content, soil temperature, air temperature, relative humidity, wind intensity, and illumination level. Teachers can help students apply their findings to understand problems…

  7. Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    Much of modern research in the field of atomic, molecular, and optical science relies on lasers, which were invented some 50 years ago and perfected in five decades of intense research and development. Today, lasers and photonic technologies impact most fields of science and they have become indispensible in our daily lives. Laser frequency combs were conceived a decade ago as tools for the precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Through the development of optical frequency comb techniques, technique a setup of the size 1 ×1 m2, good for precision measurements of any frequency, and even commercially available, has replaced the elaborate previous frequency-chain schemes for optical frequency measurements, which only worked for selected frequencies. A true revolution in optical frequency measurements has occurred, paving the way for the creation of all-optical clocks clock with a precision that might approach 10-18. A decade later, frequency combs are now common equipment in all frequency metrology-oriented laboratories. They are also becoming enabling tools for an increasing number of applications, from the calibration of astronomical spectrographs to molecular spectroscopy. This chapter first describes the principle of an optical frequency comb synthesizer. Some of the key technologies to generate such a frequency comb are then presented. Finally, a non-exhaustive overview of the growing applications is given.

  8. Spectral Element Modeling of 3D Site Effects in the Alpine Valley of Grenoble, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaljub, E.; Cornou, C.; Gueguen, P.; Causse, M.; Komatitsch, D.

    2004-12-01

    Sitting on top of a 3D Y-shaped basin filled mostly with late quaternary deposits, the city of Grenoble (French Alps) is subject to strong amplification of seismic motion (see the SISMOVALP web site). In order to assess the magnitude and 3D complexity of these site effects, we propose a spectral element modeling approach previously applied to the prediction of strong ground motion in the Los Angeles sedimentary basin (Komatitstch et al., 2004). The spectral element method naturally accounts for depth variations of the free surface and of internal interfaces, such as the contact between the sediments and the bedrock. It is also well suited to model the propagation of surface waves generated at the basin edges. The 3D spectral element mesh honors the stiff surface topography of the mountains surrounding the city, as well as the bedrock depth obtained from extensive gravimetric measurements. In the basin, we use a generic 1D velocity model derived from geophysical measurements performed in a deep borehole that reached the substratum at 550 m depth in 1999. Results and comparison to data are shown in the time and frequency domain for small-size (Mw=2.5 and Mw=3.5) local events recorded in the past years. Then, a Mw=5.5 strike-slip event is simulated on the eastern border of the basin along the Belledonne fault, and the results are compared to those obtained by the method of Empirical Green Functions. References: http://www-lgit.obs.ujf-grenoble.fr/sismovalp/ Simulations of ground motion in the Los Angeles basin based upon the spectral- element method, Dimitri Komatitsch, Qinya Liu, Jeroen Tromp, Peter Süss, Christiane Stidham and John H. Shaw, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, vol. 94, p 187-206 (2004).

  9. Advantages of horizontal directional Theta method to detect the edges of full tensor gravity gradient data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan; Gao, Jin-Yao; Chen, Ling-Na

    2016-07-01

    Full tensor gravity gradient data contain nine signal components. They include higher frequency signals than traditional gravity data, which can extract the small-scale features of the sources. Edge detection has played an important role in the interpretation of potential-field data. There are many methods that have been proposed to detect and enhance the edges of geological bodies based on horizontal and vertical derivatives of potential-field data. In order to make full use of all the measured gradient components, we need to develop a new edge detector to process the full tensor gravity gradient data. We first define the directional Theta and use the horizontal directional Theta to define a new edge detector. This method was tested on synthetic and real full tensor gravity gradient data to validate its feasibility. Compared the results with other balanced detectors, the new detector can effectively delineate the edges and does not produce any additional false edges.

  10. Development of edge effects around experimental ecosystem hotspots is affected by edge density and matrix type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecological edge effects are sensitive to landscape context. In particular, edge effects can be altered by matrix type and by the presence of other nearby edges. We experimentally altered patch configurations in an African savanna to determine how edge density and matrix type influence edge effect de...

  11. Filterscope edge plasma diagnostic for the W7-X stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Jeffrey; Unterberg, Ezekial; Lore, Jeremy; Stephey, Laurie; Schmitz, Oliver; Wurden, Glen; Biedermann, Christoph; Krychowiak, Maciej; Koenig, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    W7-X is a large (R = 5.5m, a = 0.5m, B <3T, P>10 MW) superconducting stellarator at the Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik in Greifswald, Germany, which will begin plasma operations in the last quarter of 2015. We describe here the first measurements with a 24-channel filterscope diagnostic [E. A. Unterberg et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D722, (2012)] of edge plasma characteristics and spectral emission from impurities near the test limiters installed for initial plasma experiments. These measurements, together with high resolution IR thermography imaging of the limiter, will be used as inputs for edge transport modeling using the EMC3 code [J. D. Lore et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 0540 (2012)]. This work is sponsored by DOE Contract No. DE-AC05- 00OR22725 with UT-Battelle.

  12. A physical interpretation of the variability power spectral components in accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Adam; Done, Chris

    2010-07-01

    We propose a physical framework for interpreting the characteristic frequencies seen in the broad-band power spectra from black hole and neutron star binaries. We use the truncated disc/hot inner flow geometry, and assume that the hot flow is generically turbulent. Each radius in the hot flow produces fluctuations, and we further assume that these are damped on the viscous frequency. Integrating over radii gives broad-band continuum noise power between low- and high-frequency breaks which are set by the viscous time-scale at the outer and inner edge of the hot flow, respectively. Lense-Thirring (vertical) precession of the entire hot flow superimposes the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) on this continuum power. We test this model on the power spectra seen in the neutron star systems (atolls) as these have the key advantage that the (upper) kHz QPO most likely independently tracks the truncation radius. These show that this model can give a consistent solution, with the truncation radius decreasing from 20 to 8Rg while the inner radius of the flow remains approximately constant at ~4.5Rg i.e. 9.2 km. We use this very constrained geometry to predict the low-frequency QPO from Lense-Thirring precession of the entire hot flow from ro to ri. The simplest assumption of a constant surface density in the hot flow matches the observed QPO frequency to within 25 per cent. This match can be made even better by considering that the surface density should become increasingly centrally concentrated as the flow collapses into an optically thick boundary layer during the spectral transition. The success of the model opens up the way to use the broad-band power spectra as a diagnostic of accretion flows in strong gravity.

  13. A mechanism for mitigation of blade-vortex interaction using leading edge blowing flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, Chris; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2009-09-01

    The interaction of a vortical unsteady flow with structures is often encountered in engineering applications. Such flow structure interactions (FSI) can be responsible for generating significant loads and can have many detrimental structural and acoustic side effects, such as structural fatigue, radiated noise and even catastrophic results. Amongst the different types of FSI, the parallel blade-vortex interaction (BVI) is the most common, often encountered in helicopters and propulsors. In this work, we report on the implementation of leading edge blowing (LEB) active flow control for successfully minimizing the parallel BVI. Our results show reduction of the airfoil vibrations up to 38% based on the root-mean-square of the vibration velocity amplitude. This technique is based on displacing an incident vortex using a jet issued from the leading edge of a sharp airfoil effectively increasing the stand-off distance of the vortex from the body. The effectiveness of the method was experimentally analyzed using time-resolved digital particle image velocimetry (TRDPIV) recorded at an 800 Hz rate, which is sufficient to resolve the spatio-temporal dynamics of the flow field and it was combined with simultaneous accelerometer measurements of the airfoil, which was free to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the freestream. Analysis of the flow field spectra and a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) of the TRDPIV data of the temporally resolved planar flow fields indicate that the LEB effectively modified the flow field surrounding the airfoil and increased the convecting vortices stand-off distance for over half of the airfoil chord length. It is shown that LEB also causes a redistribution of the flow field spectral energy over a larger range of frequencies.

  14. Resolution-enhancing hybrid, spectral CT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. P.; Badea, C. T.

    2016-04-01

    Spectral x-ray imaging based on photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXD) is an area of growing interest. By measuring the energy of x-ray photons, a spectral CT system can better differentiate elements using a single scan. However, the spatial resolution achievable with most PCXDs limits their application, particularly in preclinical CT imaging. Consequently, our group is developing a hybrid micro-CT scanner based on a high-resolution, energy-integrating (EID) detector and a lower-resolution, PCXD. To complement this system, we propose and demonstrate a hybrid, spectral CT reconstruction algorithm which robustly combines the spectral contrast of the PCXD with the spatial resolution of the EID. Specifically, the high-resolution, spectrally resolved data (X) is recovered as the sum of two matrices: one with low column rank (XL) determined from the EID data and one with intensity gradient sparse columns (XS) corresponding to the upsampled spectral contrast obtained from the PCXD data. We test the proposed algorithm in a feasibility study focused on molecular imaging of atherosclerotic plaque using activatable iodine and gold nanoparticles. The results show accurate estimation of material concentrations at increased spatial resolution for a voxel size ratio between the PCXD and the EID of 500 μm3:100 μm3. Specifically, regularized, iterative reconstruction of the MOBY mouse phantom around the K-edges of iodine (33.2 keV) and gold (80.7 keV) reduces the reconstruction error by more than a factor of three relative to least-squares, algebraic reconstruction. Likewise, the material decomposition accuracy into iodine, gold, calcium, and water improves by more than a factor of two.

  15. A broadband spectral inversion method for spatial heterodyne spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qisheng; Bin, Xiangli; Du, Shusong

    2014-11-01

    Spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (SHS) is a Fourier-transform spectroscopic technique with many advantages, such as high throughput, good robustness (no moving parts), and high resolving power. However, in the basic theory of SHS, the relationship between the wavenumber and the frequency of the interferogram is approximated to be linear. This approximation limits the spectral range of a spatial heterodyne spectrometer to a narrow band near the Littrow wavenumber. Several methods have been developed to extend the spectral range of the SHS. They use echelle gratings or tunable pilot mirrors to make a SHS instrument work at multiple narrow spectral bands near different Littrow wavenumbers. These solutions still utilize the linear relationship between the wavenumber and the frequency of the interferogram. But they need to separate different spectral bands, and this will increase the difficulty of post processing and the complexity of the SHS system. Here, we solve this problem from another perspective: making a SHS system work at one broad spectral band instead of multiple narrow spectral bands. As in a broad spectral range, the frequency of the interferogram will not be linear with respect to the wavenumber anymore. According to this non-linear relationship, we propose a broadband spectral inversion method based on the stationary phase theory. At first, we describe the principles and the basic characters of SHS. Then, the narrow band limitation is analyzed and the broadband spectral inversion method is elaborated. In the end, we present a parameter design example of the SHS system according to a given spectral range, and the effectiveness of this method is validated with a spectral simulation example. This broadband spectral inversion method can be applied to the existing SHS system without changing or inserting any moving components. This method retains the advantages of SHS and there is almost no increase in complexity for post processing.

  16. Estimation of Wheat Agronomic Parameters using New Spectral Indices

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiu-liang; Diao, Wan-ying; Xiao, Chun-hua; Wang, Fang-yong; Chen, Bing; Wang, Ke-ru; Li, Shao-kun

    2013-01-01

    Crop agronomic parameters (leaf area index (LAI), nitrogen (N) uptake, total chlorophyll (Chl) content ) are very important for the prediction of crop growth. The objective of this experiment was to investigate whether the wheat LAI, N uptake, and total Chl content could be accurately predicted using spectral indices collected at different stages of wheat growth. Firstly, the product of the optimized soil-adjusted vegetation index and wheat biomass dry weight (OSAVI×BDW) were used to estimate LAI, N uptake, and total Chl content; secondly, BDW was replaced by spectral indices to establish new spectral indices (OSAVI×OSAVI, OSAVI×SIPI, OSAVI×CIred edge, OSAVI×CIgreen mode and OSAVI×EVI2); finally, we used the new spectral indices for estimating LAI, N uptake, and total Chl content. The results showed that the new spectral indices could be used to accurately estimate LAI, N uptake, and total Chl content. The highest R2 and the lowest RMSEs were 0.711 and 0.78 (OSAVI×EVI2), 0.785 and 3.98 g/m2 (OSAVI×CIred edge) and 0.846 and 0.65 g/m2 (OSAVI×CIred edge) for LAI, nitrogen uptake and total Chl content, respectively. The new spectral indices performed better than the OSAVI alone, and the problems of a lack of sensitivity at earlier growth stages and saturation at later growth stages, which are typically associated with the OSAVI, were improved. The overall results indicated that this new spectral indices provided the best approximation for the estimation of agronomic indices for all growth stages of wheat. PMID:24023639

  17. Time dependent electronic transport in chiral edge channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-02-01

    We study time dependent electronic transport along the chiral edge channels of the quantum Hall regime, focusing on the role of Coulomb interaction. In the low frequency regime, the a.c. conductance can be derived from a lumped element description of the circuit. At higher frequencies, the propagation equations of the Coulomb coupled edge channels need to be solved. As a consequence of the interchannel coupling, a charge pulse emitted in a given channel fractionalized in several pulses. In particular, Coulomb interaction between channels leads to the fractionalization of a charge pulse emitted in a given channel in several pulses. We finally study how the Coulomb interaction, and in particular the fractionalization process, affects the propagation of a single electron in the circuit. All the above-mentioned topics are illustrated by experimental realizations.

  18. Reprint of : Time dependent electronic transport in chiral edge channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-08-01

    We study time dependent electronic transport along the chiral edge channels of the quantum Hall regime, focusing on the role of Coulomb interaction. In the low frequency regime, the a.c. conductance can be derived from a lumped element description of the circuit. At higher frequencies, the propagation equations of the Coulomb coupled edge channels need to be solved. As a consequence of the interchannel coupling, a charge pulse emitted in a given channel fractionalized in several pulses. In particular, Coulomb interaction between channels leads to the fractionalization of a charge pulse emitted in a given channel in several pulses. We finally study how the Coulomb interaction, and in particular the fractionalization process, affects the propagation of a single electron in the circuit. All the above-mentioned topics are illustrated by experimental realizations.

  19. Oscillations of a Turbulent Jet Incident Upon an Edge

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2000-09-19

    For the case of a jet originating from a fully turbulent channel flow and impinging upon a sharp edge, the possible onset and nature of coherent oscillations has remained unexplored. In this investigation, high-image-density particle image velocimetry and surface pressure measurements are employed to determine the instantaneous, whole-field characteristics of the turbulent jet-edge interaction in relation to the loading of the edge. It is demonstrated that even in absence of acoustic resonant or fluid-elastic effects, highly coherent, self-sustained oscillations rapidly emerge above the turbulent background. Two clearly identifiable modes of instability are evident. These modes involve large-scale vortices that are phase-locked to the gross undulations of the jet and its interaction with the edge, and small-scale vortices, which are not phase-locked. Time-resolved imaging of instantaneous vorticity and velocity reveals the form, orientation, and strength of the large-scale concentrations of vorticity approaching the edge in relation to rapid agglomeration of small-scale vorticity concentrations. Such vorticity field-edge interactions exhibit rich complexity, relative to the simplified pattern of vortex-edge interaction traditionally employed for the quasi-laminar edgetone. Furthermore, these interactions yield highly nonlinear surface pressure signatures. The origin of this nonlinearity, involving coexistence of multiple frequency components, is interpreted in terms of large- and small-scale vortices embedded in distributed vorticity layers at the edge. Eruption of the surface boundary layer on the edge due to passage of the large-scale vortex does not occur; rather apparent secondary vorticity concentrations are simply due to distension of the oppositely-signed vorticity layer at the tip of the edge. The ensemble-averaged turbulent statistics of the jet quickly take on an identity that is distinct from the statistics of the turbulent boundary layer in the channel

  20. Fuzzy Logic Based Edge Detection in Smooth and Noisy Clinical Images

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Izhar

    2015-01-01

    Edge detection has beneficial applications in the fields such as machine vision, pattern recognition and biomedical imaging etc. Edge detection highlights high frequency components in the image. Edge detection is a challenging task. It becomes more arduous when it comes to noisy images. This study focuses on fuzzy logic based edge detection in smooth and noisy clinical images. The proposed method (in noisy images) employs a 3×3 mask guided by fuzzy rule set. Moreover, in case of smooth clinical images, an extra mask of contrast adjustment is integrated with edge detection mask to intensify the smooth images. The developed method was tested on noise-free, smooth and noisy images. The results were compared with other established edge detection techniques like Sobel, Prewitt, Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG), Roberts and Canny. When the developed edge detection technique was applied to a smooth clinical image of size 270×290 pixels having 24 dB ‘salt and pepper’ noise, it detected very few (22) false edge pixels, compared to Sobel (1931), Prewitt (2741), LOG (3102), Roberts (1451) and Canny (1045) false edge pixels. Therefore it is evident that the developed method offers improved solution to the edge detection problem in smooth and noisy clinical images. PMID:26407133

  1. Shear wave attenuation estimated from the spectral decay rate in the vicinity of the Petropavlovsk station, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.; Guseva, E. M.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters of S-wave attenuation (the total effect of absorption and scattering) near the Petropavlovsk (PET) station in Kamchatka were estimated by means of the spectral method through an original procedure. The spectral method typically analyzes the changes with distance of the shape of spectra of the acceleration records assuming that the acceleration spectrum at the earthquake source is flat. In reality, this assumption is violated: the source acceleration spectra often have a high-frequency cutoff (the source-controlled f max) which limits the spectral working bandwidth. Ignoring this phenomenon not only leads to a broad scatter of the individual estimates but also causes systematic errors in the form of overestimation of losses. In the approach applied in the present study, we primarily estimated the frequency of the mentioned high-frequency cutoff and then constructed the loss estimates only within the frequency range where the source spectrum is approximately flat. The shape of the source spectrum was preliminarily assessed by the approximate loss compensation technique. For this purpose, we used the tentative attenuation estimates which are close to the final ones. The difference in the logarithms of the spectral amplitudes at the edges of the working bandwidth is the input for calculating the attenuation. We used the digital accelerograms from the PET station, with 80 samples per second digitization rate, and based on them, we calculated the averaged spectrum of the S-waves as the root mean square along two horizontal components. Our analysis incorporates 384 spectra from the local earthquakes with M = 4-6.5 at the hypocentral distances ranging from 80 to 220 km. By applying the nonlinear least-square method, we found the following parameters of the loss model: the Q-factor Q 0 = 156 ± 33 at frequency f = 1 Hz for the distance interval r = 0-100 km; the exponent in the power-law relationship describing the growth of the Q-factor with frequency,

  2. An asymmetric BODIPY triad with panchromatic absorption for high-performance red-edge laser emission.

    PubMed

    Duran-Sampedro, Gonzalo; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Garcia-Moreno, Inmaculada; Gartzia-Rivero, Leire; de la Moya, Santiago; Bañuelos, Jorge; López-Arbeloa, Íñigo; Ortiz, María J

    2015-07-21

    A rational design of an unprecedented asymmetric cassette triad based entirely on BODIPY chromophores allows efficient light harvesting over the UV-vis spectral region, leading to a bright and stable red-edge laser emission via efficient energy-transfer processes. PMID:26084606

  3. Nonreciprocity of edge modes in 1D magnonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenkov, I.; Kalyabin, D.; Osokin, S.; Klos, J. W.; Krawczyk, M.; Nikitov, S.

    2015-03-01

    Spin waves propagation in 1D magnonic crystals is investigated theoretically. Mathematical model based on plane wave expansion method is applied to different types of magnonic crystals, namely bi-component magnonic crystal with symmetric/asymmetric boundaries and ferromagnetic film with periodically corrugated top surface. It is shown that edge modes in magnonic crystals may exhibit nonreciprocal behaviour at much lower frequencies than in homogeneous films.

  4. Electron interferometry in integer quantum Hall edge channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rech, J.; Wahl, C.; Jonckheere, T.; Martin, T.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the electronic analog of the Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer from quantum optics. In this realistic condensed matter device, single electrons are injected and travel along opposite chiral edge states of the integer quantum Hall effect, colliding at a quantum point contact (QPC). We monitor the fate of the colliding excitations by calculating zero-frequency current correlations at the output of the QPC. In the simpler case of filling factor $\

  5. Spectral compression of single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, J.; Donohue, J. M.; Wright, L. G.; Fedrizzi, A.; Resch, K. J.

    2013-05-01

    Photons are critical to quantum technologies because they can be used for virtually all quantum information tasks, for example, in quantum metrology, as the information carrier in photonic quantum computation, as a mediator in hybrid systems, and to establish long-distance networks. The physical characteristics of photons in these applications differ drastically; spectral bandwidths span 12 orders of magnitude from 50 THz (ref. 6) for quantum-optical coherence tomography to 50 Hz for certain quantum memories. Combining these technologies requires coherent interfaces that reversibly map centre frequencies and bandwidths of photons to avoid excessive loss. Here, we demonstrate bandwidth compression of single photons by a factor of 40 as well as tunability over a range 70 times that bandwidth via sum-frequency generation with chirped laser pulses. This constitutes a time-to-frequency interface for light capable of converting time-bin to colour entanglement, and enables ultrafast timing measurements. It is a step towards arbitrary waveform generation for single and entangled photons.

  6. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak power and amplified spectral bandwidth and can be performed at any wavelength range of conventional amplification schemes, however, with the capability to amplify single cycles of light. The key idea for amplification of octave-spanning spectra without loss of spectral bandwidth is to amplify the broad spectrum ``slice by slice'' in the frequency domain, i.e. in the Fourier plane of a 4f-setup. The striking advantages of this scheme, are its capability to amplify (more than) one octave of bandwidth without shorting the corresponding pulse duration. This is because ultrabroadband phase matching is not defined by the properties of the nonlinear crystal employed but the number of crystals employed. In the same manner, to increase the output energy one simply has to increase the spectral extension in the Fourier plane and to add one more crystal. Thus, increasing pulse energy and shortening its duration accompany each other. A proof of principle experiment was carried out at ALLS on the sub-two cycle IR beam line and yielded record breaking performance in the field of few-cycle IR lasers. 100 μJ two-cycle pulses from a hollow core fibre compression setup were amplified to 1.43mJ without distorting spatial or temporal properties. Pulse duration at the input of FOPA and after FOPA remains the same. Recently, we have started upgrading this system to be pumped by 250 mJ to reach 40 mJ two-cycle IR few-cycle pulses and latest results will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, the extension of the concept of FOPA to other nonlinear optical processes will be discussed. Frequency domain nonlinear optics.

  7. BLAZAR SPECTRAL PROPERTIES AT 74 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S.; Giroletti, M.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.

    2013-10-01

    Blazars are the most extreme class of active galactic nuclei. Despite a previous investigation at 102 MHz for a small sample of BL Lac objects and our recent analysis of blazars detected in the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, a systematic study of the blazar spectral properties at frequencies below 100 MHz has been never carried out. In this paper, we present the first analysis of the radio spectral behavior of blazars based on the recent Very Large Array Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) at 74 MHz. We search for blazar counterparts in the VLSS catalog, confirming that they are detected at 74 MHz. We then show that blazars present radio-flat spectra (i.e., radio spectral indices of ∼0.5) when evaluated, which also about an order of magnitude in frequency lower than previous analyses. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the blazars-radio galaxies connection since the low-frequency radio data provide a new diagnostic tool to verify the expectations of the unification scenario for radio-loud active galaxies.

  8. Spectral envelope sensitivity of musical instrument sounds.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, David; Sen, D

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that the spectral envelope is a perceptually salient attribute in musical instrument timbre perception. While a number of studies have explored discrimination thresholds for changes to the spectral envelope, the question of how sensitivity varies as a function of center frequency and bandwidth for musical instruments has yet to be addressed. In this paper a two-alternative forced-choice experiment was conducted to observe perceptual sensitivity to modifications made on trumpet, clarinet and viola sounds. The experiment involved attenuating 14 frequency bands for each instrument in order to determine discrimination thresholds as a function of center frequency and bandwidth. The results indicate that perceptual sensitivity is governed by the first few harmonics and sensitivity does not improve when extending the bandwidth any higher. However, sensitivity was found to decrease if changes were made only to the higher frequencies and continued to decrease as the distorted bandwidth was widened. The results are analyzed and discussed with respect to two other spectral envelope discrimination studies in the literature as well as what is predicted from a psychoacoustic model. PMID:18177177

  9. Saddle-node dynamics for edge detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Y.F.

    1994-09-01

    The author demonstrates how the formulation of a nonlinear scale-space filter can be used for edge detection and junction analysis. By casting edge-preserving filtering in terms of maximizing information content subject to an average cost function, the computed cost at each pixel location becomes a local measure of edgeness. This computation depends on a single scale parameter and the given image data. Unlike previous approaches which require careful tuning of the filter kernels for various types of edges, this scheme is general enough to be able to handle different edges, such as lines, step edges, corners and junctions. Anisotropy in the data is handled automatically by the nonlinear dynamics.

  10. Fuzzy stochastic elements method. Spectral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sniady, Pawel; Mazur-Sniady, Krystyna; Sieniawska, Roza; Zukowski, Stanislaw

    2013-05-01

    We study a complex dynamic problem, which concerns a structure with uncertain parameters subjected to a stochastic excitation. Formulation of such a problem introduces fuzzy random variables for parameters of the structure and fuzzy stochastic processes for the load process. The uncertainty has two sources, namely the randomness of structural parameters such as geometry characteristics, material and damping properties, load process and imprecision of the theoretical model and incomplete information or uncertain data. All of these have a great influence on the response of the structure. By analyzing such problems we describe the random variability using the probability theory and the imprecision by use of fuzzy sets. Due to the fact that it is difficult to find an analytic expression for the inversion of the stochastic operator in the stochastic differential equation, a number of approximate methods have been proposed in the literature which can be connected to the finite element method. To evaluate the effects of excitation in the frequency domain we use the spectral density function. The spectral analysis is widely used in stochastic dynamics field of linear systems for stationary random excitation. The concept of the evolutionary spectral density is used in the case of non-stationary random excitation. We solve the considered problem using fuzzy stochastic finite element method. The solution is based on the idea of a fuzzy random frequency response vector for stationary input excitation and a transient fuzzy random frequency response vector for the fuzzy non-stationary one. We use the fuzzy random frequency response vector and the transient fuzzy random frequency response vector in the context of spectral analysis in order to determine the influence of structural uncertainty on the fuzzy random response of the structure. We study a linear system with random parameters subjected to two particular cases of stochastic excitation in a frequency domain. The first one

  11. Soil spectral characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The spectral characterization of soils is discussed with particular reference to the bidirectional reflectance factor as a quantitative measure of soil spectral properties, the role of soil color, soil parameters affecting soil reflectance, and field characteristics of soil reflectance. Comparisons between laboratory-measured soil spectra and Landsat MSS data have shown good agreement, especially in discriminating relative drainage conditions and organic matter levels in unvegetated soils. The capacity to measure both visible and infrared soil reflectance provides information on other soil characteristics and makes it possible to predict soil response to different management conditions. Field and laboratory soil spectral characterization helps define the extent to which intrinsic spectral information is available from soils as a consequence of their composition and field characteristics.

  12. Commission 45: Spectral Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridhar, Sunetra; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.; Eyer, Laurent; Irwin, Michael J.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Majewski, Steven; Minniti, Dante; Nordström, Birgitta

    This report gives an update of developments (since the last General Assembly at Prague) in the areas that are of relevance to the commission. In addition to numerous papers, a new monograph entitled Stellar Spectral Classification with Richard Gray and Chris Corbally as leading authors will be published by Princeton University Press as part of their Princeton Series in Astrophysics in April 2009. This book is an up-to-date and encyclopedic review of stellar spectral classification across the H-R diagram, including the traditional MK system in the blue-violet, recent extensions into the ultraviolet and infrared, the newly defined L-type and T-type spectral classes, as well as spectral classification of carbon stars, S-type stars, white dwarfs, novae, supernovae and Wolf-Rayet stars.

  13. Linear array optical edge sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, Antal K. (Inventor); Primus, Howard C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A series of independent parallel pairs of light emitting and detecting diodes for a linear pixel array, which is laterally positioned over an edge-like discontinuity in a workpiece to be scanned, is disclosed. These independent pairs of light emitters and detectors sense along intersecting pairs of separate optical axes. A discontinuity, such as an edge in the sensed workpiece, reflects a detectable difference in the amount of light from that discontinuity in comparison to the amount of light that is reflected on either side of the discontinuity. A sequentially sychronized clamping and sampling circuit detects that difference as an electrical signal which is recovered by circuitry that exhibits an improved signal-to-noise capability for the system.

  14. Edge-on thick discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparova, A.; Katkov, I.; Chilingarian, I.; Silchenko, O.; Moiseev, A.; Borisov, S.

    2016-06-01

    Although thick stellar discs are detected in nearly all edge-on disc galaxies, their formation scenarios still remain a matter of debate. Due to observational difficulties, there is a lack of information about their stellar populations. Using the Russian 6-m telescope BTA we collected deep spectra of thick discs in three edge-on early-type disc galaxies located in different environments: NGC4111 in a dense group, NGC4710 in the Virgo cluster, and NGC5422 in a sparse group. We see intermediate age (4 ‑ 5 Gyr) metal rich ([Fe/H] ~ ‑0.2 ‑ 0.0 dex) stellar populations in NGC4111 and NGC4710. On the other hand, NGC5422 does not harbour young stars, its only disc is thick and old (10 Gyr) and its α-element abundance suggests a long formation epoch implying its formation at high redshift. Our results prove the diversity of thick disc formation scenarios.

  15. Gyrosheath near the tokamak edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Xiao, H.; Valanju, P.M.

    1993-03-01

    A new model for the structure of the radial electric field profile in the edge during the H-mode is proposed. Charge separation caused by the difference between electron and ion gyromotion, or more importantly in a tokamak, the banana motion (halo effect) can self-consistently produce an electric dipole moment that causes the sheared radial electric field. The calculated results based on the model are consistent with D-III D and TEXTOR experimental results.

  16. Topological edge states in pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Cody; Ghaemi, Pouyan; Kargarian, Mehdi

    In some members of the ferro-pnictides, non-trivial topology in the bulk band-structure is related to potentially observable gapless edge states. We study these states numerically and analytically for a range of parameters, with and without superconductivity and antiferromagnetic SDW ordering, and their relation to the symmetries and topologically non-trivial aspects of our model Hamiltonian. Support was provided by the Doctoral Student Research Grant program at the Graduate Center, CUNY.

  17. Etching Of Semiconductor Wafer Edges

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.; Piwczyk, Bernhard P.

    2003-12-09

    A novel method of etching a plurality of semiconductor wafers is provided which comprises assembling said plurality of wafers in a stack, and subjecting said stack of wafers to dry etching using a relatively high density plasma which is produced at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is focused magnetically and said stack is rotated so as to expose successive edge portions of said wafers to said plasma.

  18. Edge effects and delamination failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1989-01-01

    The fundamental relationship between the morphology of a composite laminate and the resulting free edge effects is explored and related to delamination failures. Cross-ply, angle-ply, and quasi-isotropic laminates are discussed in detail. It is shown that the local mismatch in elastic properties of adjacent layers and the global stacking sequence of a laminate both have a significant influence on the interlaminar stresses and delamination failures.

  19. Spectral image fusion using band reduction and contourlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yoonsuk; Sharifahmadian, Ershad; Latifi, Shahram

    2014-06-01

    Spectral images have relatively low spatial resolution, compared to high-resolution single band panchromatic (PAN) images. Therefore, fusing a spectral image with a PAN image has been widely studied to produce a high-resolution spectral image. However, raw spectral images are too large to process and contain redundant information that is not utilized in the fusion process. In this study, we propose a novel fusion method that employs a spectral band reduction and contourlets. The band reduction begins with the best two band combination, and this two-band combination is subsequently augmented to three, four, and more until the desired number of bands is selected. The adopted band selection algorithm using the endmember extraction concept employs a sequential forward search strategy. Next, the image fusion is performed with two different spectral images based on the frequency components that are newly obtained by contourlet transform (CT). One spectral image that is used as a dataset is multispectral (MS) image and the other is hyperspectral (HS) image. Each original spectral image is pre-processed by spectrally integrating over the entire spectral range to obtain a PAN source image that is used in the fusion process. This way, we can eliminate the step of image co-registration since the obtained PAN image is already perfectly aligned to the spectral image. Next, we fuse the band-reduced spectral images with the PAN images using contourlet-based fusion framework. The resultant fusion image provides enhanced spatial resolution while preserving the spectral information. In order to analyze the band reduction performance, the original spectral images are fused with the same PAN images to serve as a reference image, which is then compared to the band-reduced spectral image fusion results using six different quality metrics.

  20. Spectrally selective glazings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.