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Sample records for spectral functions

  1. The Spectral Shift Function and Spectral Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azamov, N. A.; Carey, A. L.; Sukochev, F. A.

    2007-11-01

    At the 1974 International Congress, I. M. Singer proposed that eta invariants and hence spectral flow should be thought of as the integral of a one form. In the intervening years this idea has lead to many interesting developments in the study of both eta invariants and spectral flow. Using ideas of [24] Singer’s proposal was brought to an advanced level in [16] where a very general formula for spectral flow as the integral of a one form was produced in the framework of noncommutative geometry. This formula can be used for computing spectral flow in a general semifinite von Neumann algebra as described and reviewed in [5]. In the present paper we take the analytic approach to spectral flow much further by giving a large family of formulae for spectral flow between a pair of unbounded self-adjoint operators D and D + V with D having compact resolvent belonging to a general semifinite von Neumann algebra {mathcal{N}} and the perturbation V in {mathcal{N}} . In noncommutative geometry terms we remove summability hypotheses. This level of generality is made possible by introducing a new idea from [3]. There it was observed that M. G. Krein’s spectral shift function (in certain restricted cases with V trace class) computes spectral flow. The present paper extends Krein’s theory to the setting of semifinite spectral triples where D has compact resolvent belonging to {mathcal{N}} and V is any bounded self-adjoint operator in {mathcal{N}} . We give a definition of the spectral shift function under these hypotheses and show that it computes spectral flow. This is made possible by the understanding discovered in the present paper of the interplay between spectral shift function theory and the analytic theory of spectral flow. It is this interplay that enables us to take Singer’s idea much further to create a large class of one forms whose integrals calculate spectral flow. These advances depend critically on a new approach to the calculus of functions of non

  2. Spectral action with zeta function regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkov, Maxim A.; Lizzi, Fedele; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Watcharangkool, Apimook

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we propose a novel definition of the bosonic spectral action using zeta function regularization, in order to address the issues of renormalizability and spectral dimensions. We compare the zeta spectral action with the usual (cutoff-based) spectral action and discuss its origin and predictive power, stressing the importance of the issue of the three dimensionful fundamental constants, namely the cosmological constant, the Higgs vacuum expectation value, and the gravitational constant. We emphasize the fundamental role of the neutrino Majorana mass term for the structure of the bosonic action.

  3. Spectral Functions for Generalized Piston Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Almazan, Pedro Fernando

    In this work we explore various piston configurations with different types of potentials. We analyze Laplace-type operators P = --gij 1Ei1Ej + V where V is the potential. First we study delta potentials and rectangular potentials as examples of non-smooth potentials and find the spectral zeta functions for these piston configurations on manifolds I x N , where I is an interval and N is a smooth compact Riemannian d - 1 dimensional manifold. Then we consider the case of any smooth potential with a compact support and develop a method to find spectral functions by finding the asymptotic behavior of the characteristic function of the eigenvalues for P. By means of the spectral zeta function on these various configurations, we obtain the Casimir force and the one-loop effective action for these systems as the values at s = -1/2 and the derivative at s = 0. Information about the heat kernel coefficients can also be found in the spectral zeta function in the form of residues, which provide an indirect way of finding this geometric information about the manifold and the operator.

  4. Dissipative effects on quarkonium spectral functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdag, Yusuf; Young, Clint

    2015-04-01

    Quarkonium at finite temperature is described as an open quantum system whose dynamics are determined by a potential VR(x ) and drag coefficient η , using a path integral with a nonlocal term. Path-integral Monte Carlo calculations determine the Euclidean Green function for this system to an accuracy greater than one part in a thousand and the maximum entropy method is used to determine the spectral function; challenges facing any kind of deconvolution are discussed in detail with the aim of developing intuition for when deconvolution is possible. Significant changes to the quarkonium spectral function in the 1 S channel are found, suggesting that any description of quarkonium at finite temperature, using a potential, must also carefully consider the effect of dissipation.

  5. Correlated Strength in the Nuclear Spectral Function

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rohe; C. S. Armstrong; R. Asaturyan; O. K. Baker; S. Bueltmann; C. Carasco; D. Day; R. Ent; H. C. Fenker; K. Garrow; A. Gasparian; P. Gueye; M. Hauger; A. Honegger; J. Jourdan; C. E. Keppel; G. Kubon; R. Lindgren; A. Lung; D. J. Mack; J. H. Mitchell; H. Mkrtchyan; D. Mocelj; K. Normand; T. Petitjean; O. Rondon; E. Segbefia; I. Sick; S. Stepanyan; L. Tang; F. Tiefenbacher; W. F. Vulcan; G. Warren; S. A. Wood; L. Yuan; M. Zeier; H. Zhu; B. Zihlmann

    2004-10-01

    We have carried out an (e,ep) experiment at high momentum transfer and in parallel kinematics to measure the strength of the nuclear spectral function S(k,E) at high nucleon momenta k and large removal energies E. This strength is related to the presence of short-range and tensor correlations, and was known hitherto only indirectly and with considerable uncertainty from the lack of strength in the independent-particle region. This experiment locates by direct measurement the correlated strength predicted by theory.

  6. Spectral functionals, nonholonomic Dirac operators, and noncommutative Ricci flows

    SciTech Connect

    Vacaru, Sergiu I.

    2009-07-15

    We formulate a noncommutative generalization of the Ricci flow theory in the framework of spectral action approach to noncommutative geometry. Grisha Perelman's functionals are generated as commutative versions of certain spectral functionals defined by nonholonomic Dirac operators and corresponding spectral triples. We derive the formulas for spectral averaged energy and entropy functionals and state the conditions when such values describe (non)holonomic Riemannian configurations.

  7. Generalized -deformed correlation functions as spectral functions of hyperbolic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Bytsenko, A. A.; Guimarães, M. E. X.

    2014-08-01

    We analyze the role of vertex operator algebra and 2d amplitudes from the point of view of the representation theory of infinite-dimensional Lie algebras, MacMahon and Ruelle functions. By definition p-dimensional MacMahon function, with , is the generating function of p-dimensional partitions of integers. These functions can be represented as amplitudes of a two-dimensional c = 1 CFT, and, as such, they can be generalized to . With some abuse of language we call the latter amplitudes generalized MacMahon functions. In this paper we show that generalized p-dimensional MacMahon functions can be rewritten in terms of Ruelle spectral functions, whose spectrum is encoded in the Patterson-Selberg function of three-dimensional hyperbolic geometry.

  8. Effective Spectral Function for Neutrino Quasielastic Scattering Event Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopersmith, Brian; Bodek, Arie; Christy, M. Eric

    2014-03-01

    The spectral functions that are used in modeling of quasi elastic scattering in neutrino event generators such as GENIE, NEUT, NUANCE and NUWRO event generators include (Global) Fermi gas, local Fermi gas, Bodek-Ritche Fermi gas with high momentum tail, and the Benhar Fantoni spectral function. We find that these spectral functions do not agree with the prediction of ψ' superscaling functions that are extracted from electron quasi elastic scattering data on nuclear targets. It is known that spectral functions do not fully describe quasi elastic scattering because they only model the initial state. Final state interactions distort the shape of the quasi elastic peak, reduce the cross section at the peak and increase the cross section at the tail of the distribution for large energy transfer to final state nucleons. We show that an ``effective spectral function'' can be constructed to reliably reproduce the kinematic distributions predicted by the ψ' super scaling formalism.

  9. Propagation of spectral functions and dilepton production at SIS energies

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Gy.; Kaempfer, B.; Zetenyi, M.

    2012-06-15

    The time evolution of vector meson spectral functions is studied within a BUU-type transport model. Applications focus on {rho} and {omega} mesons being important pieces for the interpretation of the dielectron invariant mass spectrum. Since the evolution of the spectral functions is driven by the local density, the inmedium modifications turn out to compete, in this approach, with the known vacuum contributions.

  10. Effective spectral function for quasielastic scattering on nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodek, A.; Christy, M. E.; Coopersmith, B.

    2014-10-01

    Spectral functions that are used in neutrino event generators to model quasielastic (QE) scattering from nuclear targets include Fermi gas, Local Thomas Fermi gas (LTF), Bodek-Ritchie Fermi gas with high momentum tail, and the Benhar-Fantoni two dimensional spectral function. We find that the $\

  11. Construction of spectral sensitivity function using polychromatic UV sources.

    PubMed

    Modos, K; Gaspar, S; Kirsch, P; Gay, M; Ronto, G

    1999-04-01

    A procedure is presented for constructing the spectral sensitivity functions of biological dosimeters, using five polychromatic UV sources possessing different emission spectra. Phage T7 and uracil biological dosimeters have been used for measuring the dose rates of the lamps. Their spectral sensitivity functions consisting of two exponential terms have been constructed. The parameters of the spectral sensitivity functions have been determined by comparing the directly measured and calculated dose-rate values. The parameters of the sensitivity function are accepted as correct values when the deviation of the measured and calculated values is a minimum. Based on the deviations between the constructed and the experimentally determined spectral sensitivities with monochromatic sources, the differences between the measured and calculated results are interpreted. The importance of the correct spectral sensitivity data is demonstrated through the effectiveness spectra of a TL 01 lamp for phage T7 killing, uracil dimerization and erythema induction. PMID:10392466

  12. Spectral function and kinetic equation for a normal Fermi liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, M.; Siddique, I.; Kondratyev, A. S.

    2007-08-01

    On the basis of the Kadanoff-Baym (KB) version of the time-dependent Green's function method, an Ansatz for the approximation of a spectral function is offered. The Ansatz possesses all the advantages of quasiparticle and extended quasiparticle approximations and satisfies the KB equation for a spectral function in the case of slightly nonequilibrium system when disturbances in space and time are taken into consideration in the gradient approximation. This feature opens opportunities for the microscopic derivation of the Landau kinetic equation for the quasiparticle distribution function of the normal Fermi liquid and provides the widening of these equations' temperature range of validity.

  13. Effective Spectral Function for Quasielastic Scattering on Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodek, Arie; Christy, M. Eric; Coopersmith, Brian

    2014-09-01

    Spectral functions that are used in neutrino event generators (such as GENIE, NEUT, NUANCE, NUWRO, and GiBUU) to model quasielastic (QE) scattering from nuclear targets include Fermi gas, Local Thomas Fermi gas (LTF), Bodek-Ritche Fermi gas with high momentum tail, and the Benhar Fantoni two dimensional spectral function. We find that the predictions of these spectral functions for the dσ/dν distribution of QE events are in disagreement with the prediction of the Φ ' superscaling function which is extracted from fits to quasielastic electron scattering data on nuclear targets. It is known that spectral functions do not fully describe quasielastic scattering because they only model the initial state. Final state interactions distort the shape of dσ/dν, reduce the cross section at the peak and increase the cross section at the tails of the distribution. We show that the kinematic distributions predicted by the Φ ' superscaling formalism can be well described with a modified effective spectral function (EFS).

  14. Quark Spectral Function above T{sub c}

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Sixue; Chang Lei; Liu Yuxin; Roberts, Craig D.

    2011-05-24

    The maximum entropy method is used to calculate the dressed-quark spectral density from the self-consistent solution of the rainbow-truncated gap equation of QCD at temperatures above T{sub c}, the critical temperature for chiral symmetry restoration. We find that, besides the normal and plasmino modes, the spectral function exhibits an essentially nonperturbative zero mode at the temperatures above but near T{sub c}. In the vicinity of T{sub c}, this long-wavelength mode contains the bulk of the spectral strength. So long as this mode persists, the system may reasonably be described as a strongly-coupled state of matter.

  15. Spectral function and Fermi surface in high- Tc cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Y.; Tsutsui, K.; Koshibae, W.; Shimozato, T.; Maekawa, S.

    1993-05-01

    An exact-diagonalization technique on small clusters is used to calculate the single-particle spectral function for the one-band and three-band Hubbard models. We show that the strongly momentum-dependent spectral-weight transfer induced by carrier doping leads to the evolution of the dispersion of low-enegy states. The quasiparticle-like band narrowing is examined.

  16. Data driven analytic continuation for one particle spectral functions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In this proceeding, an idea is outlined suggesting a generic treatment on any type of input data for a numerical analytic continuation problem, which is needed when dynamical information is to be extracted from a calculationally convenient one particle imaginary time Green function. The quality of the resulting spectral function will rely only on the data to be treated, viz, data-driven. This is different from the Maximum Entropy or the Stochastic method which relies on an entropy term to guide convergence of the resulting spectral function.

  17. Applications of spectral inversion to understanding vegetation functional trait relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiklomanov, A. N.; Dietze, M.; Viskari, T.; Townsend, P. A.; Serbin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral data from both field observations and remote sensing platforms are a rich source of information for studying plant traits. Traditional approaches to using spectral data for studying vegetation have proven effective in sensor-, site-, or plant type-specific settings, but differences in model assumptions and failure to account for uncertainties have hindered efforts to synthesize observations from different sources and use spectral data in a predictive capacity. Here we present a novel approach that uses Bayesian inversion of the PROSPECT 5 leaf radiative transfer model (RTM) to investigate the ability of spectral data to inform our understanding of plant functional traits. First, we validated our method by comparing inversion results to independent measurements of relevant leaf structural and biochemical parameters. Second, we tested the accuracy and precision of RTM parameter retrieval as a function of spectral resolution and quality by performing inversions on simulated observations for a variety of common remote sensing platforms. We observed predictable increases in parameter uncertainty and covariance with declining spectral resolution, but we also found that the measurement characteristics of all sensors are capable of providing information about at least some of the parameters of interest. Finally, we applied our inversion to a large database of field spectra and plant traits spanning tropical, temperate, and boreal forests, agricultural plots, arid shrublands, and tundra to identify dominant sources of variability and characterize trade-offs in plant functional traits. We found substantial intraspecific variability in traits and explored the extent to which this variability falls along the same axes as the interspecific leaf economics spectrum. Ultimately, our results show that Bayesian RTM inversion provides a powerful framework for using spectral data to inform our understanding of plant functional traits and how they are linked with ecosystem

  18. Quarkonium correlators and spectral functions at zero and finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Jakovac, A.; Petreczky, P.; Petrov, K.; Velytsky, A.

    2007-01-01

    We study quarkonium correlators and spectral functions at zero and finite temperature using the anisotropic Fermilab lattice formulation with anisotropy {xi}=2 and 4. To control cut-off effects we use several different lattice spacings. The spectral functions were extracted from lattice correlators with maximum entropy method based on a new algorithm. We find evidence for the survival of 1S quarkonium states in the deconfined medium till relatively high temperatures as well as for dissolution of 1P quarkonium states right above the deconfinement temperature.

  19. Relativistic spectral function of nucleons in hot nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Sarkar, Sourav; Mallik, S.

    2010-10-01

    We present a simple calculation of the nucleon self-energy in nuclear matter at finite temperature in a relativistic framework, using the real-time thermal field theory. The imaginary parts of one-loop graphs are identified with discontinuities across the unitary and the Landau cuts. We find that in general both the cuts contribute significantly to the spectral function in the region of (virtual) nucleon mass usually considered, even though the unitary cut is ignored in the literature. Furthermore, our relativistic spectral function differs from the one in nonrelativistic approximation, used in some earlier calculations.

  20. More on volume dependence of spectral weight functions

    SciTech Connect

    Niu Zhiyuan; Du Dechuan; Guo Baozhong; Li Ning; Liu Hang; Liu Chuan

    2010-09-01

    Spectral weight functions are easily obtained from two-point correlation functions, and they might be used to distinguish single-particle from multiparticle states in a finite-volume lattice calculation, a problem crucial for many lattice QCD simulations. In previous studies, it has been shown that the spectral weight function for a broad resonance shares the typical volume dependence of a two-particle scattering state, i.e. proportional to 1/L{sup 3} in a large cubic box of size L, while the narrow resonance case requires further investigation. In this paper, a generalized formula is found for the spectral weight function which incorporates both the narrow and broad resonance cases. Within Luescher's formalism, it is shown that the volume dependence of the spectral weight function exhibits a single-particle behavior for an extremely narrow resonance and a two-particle behavior for a broad resonance. The corresponding formulas for both A{sub 1}{sup +} and T{sub 1}{sup -} channels are derived. The potential application of these formulas in the extraction of resonance parameters are also discussed.

  1. Spectral functions of isolated Ce adatoms on paramagnetic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gardonio, S; Wehling, T O; Petaccia, L; Lizzit, S; Vilmercati, P; Goldoni, A; Karolak, M; Lichtenstein, A I; Carbone, C

    2011-07-01

    We report photoemission experiments revealing the full valence electron spectral function of Ce adatoms on Ag(111), W(110), and Rh(111) surfaces. A transfer of Ce 4f spectral weight from the ionization peak towards the Fermi level is demonstrated upon changing the substrate from Ag(111) to Rh(111). In the intermediate case of Ce on W(110) the ionization peak is found to be split. This evolution of the spectra is explained by means of first-principles theory, which clearly demonstrates that a reliable understanding of magnetic adatoms on metal surfaces requires simultaneous low and high energy spectroscopic information. PMID:21797632

  2. TE-dependent spatial and spectral specificity of functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changwei W; Gu, Hong; Zou, Qihong; Lu, Hanbing; Stein, Elliot A; Yang, Yihong

    2012-02-15

    Previous studies suggest that spontaneous fluctuations in the resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI) signal may reflect fluctuations in transverse relaxation time (T(2)(*)) rather than spin density (S(0)). However, such S(0) and T(2)(*) features have not been well characterized. In this study, spatial and spectral characteristics of functional connectivity on sensorimotor, default-mode, dorsal attention, and primary visual systems were examined using a multiple gradient-echo sequence at 3T. In the spatial domain, we found broad, local correlations at short echo times (TE ≤ 14 ms) due to dominant S(0) contribution, whereas long-range connections mediated by T(2)(*) became explicit at TEs longer than 22 ms. In the frequency domain, compared with the flat spectrum of S(0), spectral power of the T(2)(*)-weighted signal elevated significantly with increasing TE, particularly in the frequency ranges of 0.008-0.023 Hz and 0.037-0.043 Hz. Using the S(0) spectrum as a reference, we propose two indices to measure spectral signal change (SSC) and spectral contrast-to-noise ratio (SCNR), respectively, for quantifying the RS-fMRI signal. These indices demonstrated TE dependency of connectivity-related fluctuation strength, resembling functional contrasts in activation-based fMRI. These findings further confirm that large-scale functional circuit connectivity based on BOLD contrast may be constrained within specific frequency ranges in every brain network, and the spectral features of S(0) and T(2)(*) could be valuable for interpreting and quantifying RS-fMRI data. PMID:22119650

  3. Light-Front Dynamics and the {{3He}} Spectral Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Emanuele; Del Dotto, Alessio; Kaptari, Leonid; Rinaldi, Matteo; Salmé, Giovanni; Scopetta, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    Two topics are presented. The first one is a novel approach for a Poincaré covariant description of nuclear dynamics based on light-front Hamiltonian dynamics. The key quantity is the light-front spectral function, where both normalization and momentum sum rule can be satisfied at the same time. Preliminary results are discussed for an initial analysis of the role of relativity in the EMC effect in {{3He}}. A second issue, very challenging, is considered in a non-relativistic framework, namely a distorted spin-dependent spectral function for {{3He}} in order to take care of the final state interaction between the observed pion and the remnant in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering off polarized {{3He}}. The generalization of the analysis within the light-front dynamics is outlined.

  4. Quark spectral function and deconfinement at nonzero temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Si-xue; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2013-09-01

    The maximum entropy method is used to compute the quark spectral function at nonzero temperature. We solve the gap equation of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) self-consistently, employing a rainbow kernel which phenomenologically models results from Dyson-Schwinger equations and lattice QCD. We use the criterion of positivity restoration of the spectral function as a signal for deconfinement. Our calculation indicates that the critical temperature of deconfinement Td is slightly smaller than the one of chiral symmetry restoration Tc: Td˜94%Tc in the chiral limit and Td˜96%Tc with physical light quark masses. Since these deviations are within the systematic error of our approach, it is reasonable to conclude that chiral symmetry restoration and deconfinement coincide at zero chemical potential.

  5. Spectral function and photoemission spectra in antiferromagnetically correlated metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kampf, A.P.; Schrieffer, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    Antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations in a two-dimensional metal, such as doped high-{Tc} superconductors, lead to a pseudogap in the electronic spectrum. In the spectral function weight is shifted from the single quasiparticle peak of the Fermi-liquid regime to the incoherent particle and hole backgrounds, which evolve into the upper and lower Mott-Hubbard bands of the antiferromagnetic insulator. Precursors of these split bands show up as shadow bands'' in angle-resolved photoemission spectra.

  6. Charmonium correlators and spectral functions at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ding,H.T.; Kaczmarek, O.; Karsch, F.; Satz, H.

    2008-09-01

    We present an operational approach to address the in-medium behavior of charmonium and analyze the reliability of maximum entropy method (MEM). We study the dependences of the ratio of correlators to the reconstructed one and the free one on the resonance's width and the continuum's threshold. Furthermore, we discuss the issue of the default model dependence of the spectral function obtained from MEM.

  7. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showedmore » that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.« less

  8. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showed that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.

  9. A Critical Examination of Wind-Wave Spectral Functional Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Long, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally, data from random ocean waves are presented in spectral functions. The spectra are the result of Fourier analysis. Fourier spectral analysis has dominated data analysis for, at least, the last hundred years. It has been the standard method for is examining the global amplitude-frequency distributions. Although Fourier transform valid under extremely general conditions, there are some crucial restrictions for the Fourier spectral analysis. The system must be linear, and the data must be stationary- otherwise, the resulting spectrum will make little physical sense. The stationarity requirement is also a common required criterion for most of other available data analysis methods. Nevertheless, few, if any, natural phenomena are linear and stationary. To compound these complications is the imperfection of our probes or numerical schemes the interactions of the imperfect probes even with a perfect linear system can make the final data nonlinear. Furthermore, all the available data are usually of finite duration. Under these conditions, Fourier analysis is of limited use, For lack of alternatives, however, Fourier analysis is still used to process such data. The loose application of Fourier analysis and the insouciant adoption of the stationary and linear assumptions may lead to misleading conclusions. Ocean waves are know to be nonlinear, and the wind system generating the wave field are seldom stationary- As a result, the traditional examination of the spectral form hardly made physical sense. A new method for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data has been developed. The key part is the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method with which any complicated data set can be decomposed into a finite and often small number of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) that serve as the basis of the representation of the data, This decomposition method is adaptive, and, therefore, highly efficient. The IMFs admit well-behaved Hilbert transforms, and yield instantaneous

  10. Polarized spectral complexes of optical functions of monovalent mercury iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V. V.; Sobolev, V. Val.; Anisimov, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral complexes of optical functions of monovalent mercury iodide Hg2I2 were determined for E ⊥ c and E || c polarizations in the range from 2 to 5.5 eV at 4.2 K. The permittivity and characteristic electron energy loss spectra were expanded in simple components with the determination of their main parameters, including the energy of the maximum and the oscillator strength. The calculations were performed based on known reflectance spectra. Computer programs based on Kramers-Kronig relations and the improved parameter-free method of Argand diagrams were used.

  11. Determining Ionospheric Irregularity Spectral Density Function from Japan GEONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, E. H.; Light, M. E.; Parker, P. A.; Carrano, C. S.; Haaser, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Japan's GEONET GPS network is the densest GPS monitoring network in the world, with 1200+ receivers over the area of Japan. Measuring and calibrating the integrated total electron content (TEC) from each station has been done in many cases to provide detailed maps of ionospheric disturbances over Japan. We use TEC measurements from Japan's GEONET array to determine an empirically derived description of the 2-dimensional scale sizes of spatial irregularities above Japan. The contributions from various scale sizes will be included in a statistical description for the irregularity spectral density (ISD) function. We will compare the statistics of the spatial irregularities between calm and moderately scintillated conditions.

  12. Moments of spectral functions: Monte Carlo evaluation and verification.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Cristian

    2005-11-01

    The subject of the present study is the Monte Carlo path-integral evaluation of the moments of spectral functions. Such moments can be computed by formal differentiation of certain estimating functionals that are infinitely differentiable against time whenever the potential function is arbitrarily smooth. Here, I demonstrate that the numerical differentiation of the estimating functionals can be more successfully implemented by means of pseudospectral methods (e.g., exact differentiation of a Chebyshev polynomial interpolant), which utilize information from the entire interval . The algorithmic detail that leads to robust numerical approximations is the fact that the path-integral action and not the actual estimating functional are interpolated. Although the resulting approximation to the estimating functional is nonlinear, the derivatives can be computed from it in a fast and stable way by contour integration in the complex plane, with the help of the Cauchy integral formula (e.g., by Lyness' method). An interesting aspect of the present development is that Hamburger's conditions for a finite sequence of numbers to be a moment sequence provide the necessary and sufficient criteria for the computed data to be compatible with the existence of an inversion algorithm. Finally, the issue of appearance of the sign problem in the computation of moments, albeit in a milder form than for other quantities, is addressed. PMID:16383787

  13. Perturbative Expansion of τ Hadronic Spectral Function Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boito, Diogo

    2014-12-01

    In the extraction of αs from hadronic τ decay data several moments of the spectral functions have been employed. Furthermore, different renormalization group improvement (RGI) frameworks have been advocated, leading to conflicting values of αs. Recently, we performed a systematic study of the perturbative behavior of these moments in the context of the two main-stream RGI frameworks: Fixed Order Perturbation Theory (FOPT) and Contour Improved Perturbation Theory (CIPT). The yet unknown higher order coefficients of the perturbative series were modelled using the available knowledge of the renormalon singularities of the QCD Adler function. We were able to show that within these RGI frameworks some of the commonly employed moments should be avoided due to their poor perturbative behavior. Furthermore, under reasonable assumptions about the higher order behavior of the perturbative series FOPT provides the preferred RGI framework.

  14. The Generating Function Approach for Peptide Identification in Spectral Networks

    PubMed Central

    Guthals, Adrian; Boucher, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometry has become the method of choice for protein identification and has launched a quest for the identification of every translated protein and peptide. However, computational developments have lagged behind the pace of modern data acquisition protocols and have become a major bottleneck in proteomics analysis of complex samples. As it stands today, attempts to identify MS/MS spectra against large databases (e.g., the human microbiome or 6-frame translation of the human genome) face a search space that is 10–100 times larger than the human proteome, where it becomes increasingly challenging to separate between true and false peptide matches. As a result, the sensitivity of current state-of-the-art database search methods drops by nearly 38% to such low identification rates that almost 90% of all MS/MS spectra are left as unidentified. We address this problem by extending the generating function approach to rigorously compute the joint spectral probability of multiple spectra being matched to peptides with overlapping sequences, thus enabling the confident assignment of higher significance to overlapping peptide–spectrum matches (PSMs). We find that these joint spectral probabilities can be several orders of magnitude more significant than individual PSMs, even in the ideal case when perfect separation between signal and noise peaks could be achieved per individual MS/MS spectrum. After benchmarking this approach on a typical lysate MS/MS dataset, we show that the proposed intersecting spectral probabilities for spectra from overlapping peptides improve peptide identification by 30–62%. PMID:25423621

  15. The generating function approach for Peptide identification in spectral networks.

    PubMed

    Guthals, Adrian; Boucher, Christina; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-05-01

    Tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometry has become the method of choice for protein identification and has launched a quest for the identification of every translated protein and peptide. However, computational developments have lagged behind the pace of modern data acquisition protocols and have become a major bottleneck in proteomics analysis of complex samples. As it stands today, attempts to identify MS/MS spectra against large databases (e.g., the human microbiome or 6-frame translation of the human genome) face a search space that is 10-100 times larger than the human proteome, where it becomes increasingly challenging to separate between true and false peptide matches. As a result, the sensitivity of current state-of-the-art database search methods drops by nearly 38% to such low identification rates that almost 90% of all MS/MS spectra are left as unidentified. We address this problem by extending the generating function approach to rigorously compute the joint spectral probability of multiple spectra being matched to peptides with overlapping sequences, thus enabling the confident assignment of higher significance to overlapping peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs). We find that these joint spectral probabilities can be several orders of magnitude more significant than individual PSMs, even in the ideal case when perfect separation between signal and noise peaks could be achieved per individual MS/MS spectrum. After benchmarking this approach on a typical lysate MS/MS dataset, we show that the proposed intersecting spectral probabilities for spectra from overlapping peptides improve peptide identification by 30-62%. PMID:25423621

  16. A rapid retrieval methodology based on the spectrally integrated Voigt function for space observation spectral radiance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quine, Brendan M.; Abrarov, Sanjar M.; Jagpal, Raj K.

    2014-06-01

    In our recent publication, we proposed the application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) to a line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer modelling1. We applied the GENSPECT LBL radiative transfer model that utilizes the HITRAN database to generate synthetic spectral data due to thermal or solar radiation of the Earth or planetary atmosphere2. It has been shown that the SIVF methodology enables the computation of a LBL radiative transfer at reduced spectral resolution model without loss in accuracy. In contrast to the traditional method of computation, the SIVF implementation accounts for the area under the Voigt function between adjacent grid points resulting in well-preserved shape of a spectral radiance even at low spectral resolution. This significant advantage of the SIVF methodology can be applied in the rapid retrieval of the space observation data, required for real-time control and decision making in future generation of the Argus3 remote-sensing microspectrometers. The spectrally integrated methodology can be generalized to other linebroadening profiles, such as Galatry, Rautian-Sobelman or speed dependent profiles, to prevent underestimation of the spectral radiance that always occurs at reduced spectral resolution1 in any LBL radiative transfer model using a traditional method of computation.

  17. Spectral loudness summation as a function of duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhey, Jesko L.; Kollmeier, Birger

    2002-03-01

    Loudness was measured as a function of signal bandwidth for 10-, 100-, and 1000-ms-long signals. The test and reference signals were bandpass-filtered noise spectrally centered at 2 kHz. The bandwidth of the test signal was varied from 200 to 6400 Hz. The reference signal had a bandwidth of 3200 Hz. The reference levels were 45, 55, and 65 dB SPL. The level to produce equal loudness was measured with an adaptive, two-interval, two-alternative forced-choice procedure. A loudness matching procedure was used, where the tracks for all signal pairs to be compared were interleaved. Mean results for nine normal-hearing subjects showed that the magnitude of spectral loudness summation depends on signal duration. For all reference levels, a 6- to 8-dB larger level difference between equally loud signals with the smallest (Δf=200 Hz) and largest (Δf=6400 Hz) bandwidth is found for 10-ms-long signals than for the 1000-ms-long signals. The duration effect slightly decreases with increasing reference loudness. As a consequence, loudness models should include a duration-dependent compression stage. Alternatively, if a fixed loudness ratio between signals of different duration is assumed, this loudness ratio should depend on the signal spectrum.

  18. Electron Spectral Function for the t-J Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullen, T.; Gibbs, Zane P.; Bishop, Marilyn F.

    1996-03-01

    Computed electron spectral functions for the t-J model(Z. Wang, Y. Bang, and G. Kotliar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67), 2733, (1991). are presented. Large-\\cal N expansion techniques are used in which all self energies are evaluated to leading order in 1/\\cal N. Slave bosons are employed to enforce the non-double-occupancy constraint. Results are given for several values of the exchange coupling J/t and doping δ, including those appropriate to cuprate superconductors. A sharp dispersive quasiparticle peak is found near the Fermi energy. Additional spectral weight occurs at lower frequencies, which arises from the form of the normal self-energy. This is qualitatively similar to the self-energy obtained by Kampf and Schrieffer(A. Kampf and J. R. Schrieffer, Phys. Rev. B 41), 6399 (1990). from a parameterized model of an electron coupled to antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations, which is characterized by shadow bands. The lower shadow band in their calculation is analogous to the lower band in our results.

  19. Thermal 2-loop master spectral function at finite momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, M.

    2013-05-01

    When considering NLO corrections to thermal particle production in the "relativistic" regime, in which the invariant mass squared of the produced particle is {{{K}}^2} ( πT)2, then the production rate can be expressed as a sum of a few universal "master" spectral functions. Taking the most complicated 2-loop master as an example, a general strategy for obtaining a convergent 2-dimensional integral representation is suggested. The analysis applies both to bosonic and fermionic statistics, and shows that for this master the non-relativistic approximation is only accurate for {{{K}}^2} (8 πT)2, whereas the zero-momentum approximation works surprisingly well. Once the simpler masters have been similarly resolved, NLO results for quantities such as the right-handed neutrino production rate from a Standard Model plasma or the dilepton production rate from a QCD plasma can be assembled for {{{K}}^2} ( πT)2.

  20. Specification of optical components using the power spectral density function

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.K.; Wolfe, C.R.; Manes, K.R.; Trenholme, J.B.; Aikens, D.M.; English, R.E. Jr.

    1995-06-20

    This paper describes the use of Fourier techniques to characterize the wavefront of optical components, specifically, the use of the power spectral density, (PSD), function. The PSDs of several precision optical components will be shown. Many of the optical components of interest to us have square, rectangular or irregularly shaped apertures with major dimensions up-to 800 mm. The wavefronts of components with non-circular apertures cannot be analyzed with Zernicke polynomials since these functions are an orthogonal set for circular apertures only. Furthermore, Zernicke analysis is limited to treating low frequency wavefront aberrations; mid-spatial scale and high frequency error are expressed only as ``residuals.`` A more complete and powerful representation of the optical wavefront can be obtained by Fourier analysis in 1 or 2 dimensions. The PSD is obtained from the amplitude of frequency components present in the Fourier spectrum. The PSD corresponds to the scattered intensity as a function of scattering angle in the wavefront and can be used to describe the intensity distribution at focus. The shape of a resultant wavefront or the focal spot of a complex multi-component laser system can be calculated and optimized using the PSDs of individual optical components which comprise it.

  1. Spectral functions of 1D Peierls and Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, Johannes

    1998-03-01

    We construct the spectral function of the Luther-Emery model which describes one-dimensional Peierls and Mott insulators with a spin resp. charge gap, using symmetries and known limits and equivalences to other models. For the Peierls insulator, we find a true singularity with interaction dependent exponents on the gapped spin dispersion and a finite maximum depending on the magnitude of the spin gap, on a charge dispersion shifted by Δ_σ, as well as strong shadow bands with the same functional form as the main bands. For 1D Mott insulators, one or two singularities with universal inverse-square-root singularities are found depending on whether the charge velocity is larger or smaller than the spin velocity. The shadow band has a single singularity on the renormalized charge dispersion. These results could apply to the description of photoemission experiments in systems like K_0.3 Mo O_3, TTF-TCNQ, or Sr Cu O_2.

  2. Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions As A Function Of Physical Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Shonda; Ganguly, R.; Stark, M. A.; Derseweh, J. A.; Richmond, J. M.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). In turn, models of outflows have shown particular sensitivity to the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED), depending on the UV luminosity to transfer momentum to the gas, the X-ray luminosity to regulate how efficiently that transfer can be, etc. To investigate how SED changes with physical properties, we follow up on Richards et al. (2006), who constructed SEDs with varying luminosity. Here, we construct SEDs as a function of redshift, and physical property (black hole mass, bolometric luminosity, Eddington ratio) for volume limited samples drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with photometry supplemented from 2MASS, WISE, GALEX, ROSAT, and Chandra. To estimate black hole masses, we adopt the scaling relations from Greene & Ho (2005) based on the H-alpha emission line FWHM. This requires redshifts less than 0.4. To construct volume-limited subsamples, we begin by adopting g=19.8 as a nominal limiting magnitude over which we are guaranteed to detect z<0.4 quasars. At redshift 0.4, we are complete down to Mg=-21.8, which yields 3300 objects from Data Release 7. At z=0.1, we are complete down to Mg=-18.5. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. 09-ADP09-0016 issued through the Astrophysics Data Analysis Program.

  3. New method for evaluation of finite-energy few-electron spectral function expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Penc, K.; Sacramento, P. D.; Claessen, R.

    2004-04-01

    We present a method for the calculation of few-electron spectral functions of the one-dimen- sional Hubbard model which relies on a pseudofermion description introduced recently in Ref. [6]. The spectral functions are expressed as a convolution of pseudofermion dynamical correlation functions. Our general method involves the direct evaluation of the matrix elements of pseudofermion operators between the ground state and the excited states. We briefly discuss the application of our general method to the study of the unusual finite-energy spectral properties observed in the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor TTF-TCNQ. Key words. correlation effects spectral properties organic conductors

  4. Least square based method for obtaining one-particle spectral functions from temperature Green functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun

    2013-02-01

    A least square based fitting scheme is proposed to extract an optimal one-particle spectral function from any one-particle temperature Green function. It uses the existing non-negative least square (NNLS) fit algorithm to do the fit, and Tikhonov regularization to help with possible numerical singular behaviors. By flexibly adding delta peaks to represent very sharp features of the target spectrum, this scheme guarantees a global minimization of the fitted residue. The performance of this scheme is manifested with diverse physical examples. The proposed scheme is shown to be comparable in performance to the standard Padé analytic continuation scheme.

  5. Adjusting spectral indices for spectral response function differences of very high spatial resolution sensors simulated from field spectra.

    PubMed

    Cundill, Sharon L; van der Werff, Harald M A; van der Meijde, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices' values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important. PMID:25781511

  6. Adjusting Spectral Indices for Spectral Response Function Differences of Very High Spatial Resolution Sensors Simulated from Field Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cundill, Sharon L.; van der Werff, Harald M. A.; van der Meijde, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices’ values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important. PMID:25781511

  7. A Variational Framework for Spectral Approximations of Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Cindy; Blesgen, Thomas; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Ortiz, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We reformulate the Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KSDFT) as a nested variational problem in the one-particle density operator, the electrostatic potential and a field dual to the electron density. The corresponding functional is linear in the density operator and thus amenable to spectral representation. Based on this reformulation, we introduce a new approximation scheme, termed spectral binning, which does not require smoothing of the occupancy function and thus applies at arbitrarily low temperatures. We prove convergence of the approximate solutions with respect to spectral binning and with respect to an additional spatial discretization of the domain.

  8. Application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function to line-by-line radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quine, B. M.; Abrarov, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    We show that a new approach based on the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) enables the computation of line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer at reduced spectral resolution without loss of accuracy. The algorithm provides rapid and accurate computation of area under the Voigt function in a way that preserves spectral radiance and, consequently, radiant intensity. The error analysis we provide shows the high-accuracy of the proposed SIVF approximations. A comparison of the performance of the method with that of the traditional LBL approach is presented. Motivations for the use and advantage of the SIVF as a replacement for conventional line function computations in radiative transfer are discussed.

  9. MTF formalism for measurement of spectral resolution of acousto-optical devices with synthesized transmission function.

    PubMed

    Yushkov, Konstantin B; Molchanov, Vladimir Ya

    2013-09-15

    We demonstrate use of the modulation transfer function method in the spectral domain for dynamic measurement of the spectral resolution and modulation contrast of acousto-optic light dispersive delay lines and programmable filters with synthesized transmission. The method is useful for performance characterization of acousto-optic devices for ultrafast pulse shaping and adaptive spectroscopy. PMID:24104818

  10. Using speech sounds to test functional spectral resolution in listeners with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Matthew B.; Litovsky, Ruth Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spectral properties of speech sounds were used to test functional spectral resolution in people who use cochlear implants (CIs). Specifically, perception of the /ba/-/da/ contrast was tested using two spectral cues: Formant transitions (a fine-resolution cue) and spectral tilt (a coarse-resolution cue). Higher weighting of the formant cues was used as an index of better spectral cue perception. Participants included 19 CI listeners and 10 listeners with normal hearing (NH), for whom spectral resolution was explicitly controlled using a noise vocoder with variable carrier filter widths to simulate electrical current spread. Perceptual weighting of the two cues was modeled with mixed-effects logistic regression, and was found to systematically vary with spectral resolution. The use of formant cues was greatest for NH listeners for unprocessed speech, and declined in the two vocoded conditions. Compared to NH listeners, CI listeners relied less on formant transitions, and more on spectral tilt. Cue-weighting results showed moderately good correspondence with word recognition scores. The current approach to testing functional spectral resolution uses auditory cues that are known to be important for speech categorization, and can thus potentially serve as the basis upon which CI processing strategies and innovations are tested. PMID:25786954

  11. On line contribution functions and examining spectral line formation in 3D model stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarsi, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    Line contribution functions are useful diagnostics for studying spectral line formation in stellar atmospheres. I derive an expression for the contribution function to the absolute flux depression that emerges from three-dimensional `box-in-a-star' model stellar atmospheres. I illustrate the result by comparing the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) spectral line formation of the high-excitation permitted OI 777 nm lines with the non-LTE case.

  12. [Comparison among remotely sensed image fusion methods based on spectral response function].

    PubMed

    Dou, Wen; Sun, Hong-quan; Chen, Yun-hao

    2011-03-01

    Remotely sensed image fusion is a critical issue, and many methods have been developed to inject features from a high spatial resolution panchromatic sensor into low spatial resolution multi-spectral images, trying to preserve spectral signatures while improving spatial resolution of multi-spectral images. However, no explicit physical information of the detection system has been taken into account in usual methods, which might lead to undesirable effects such as severe spectral distortion. Benefiting from the proper decomposition of the image fusion problem by a concise image fusion mathematical model, the present paper focuses on comparing reasonable modulation coefficient of spatial details based on analysis of the spectral response function (SRF). According to the classification of former methods, three modulation coefficients based on SRF of sensors were concluded, which lead to three image fusion methods incorporating spatial detail retrieved by Gaussian high-pass filter. All these methods were validated on Ikonos data compared to GS and HPM method. PMID:21595232

  13. Spectral Methods Using Rational Basis Functions on an Infinite Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, John P.

    1987-03-01

    By using the map y = L cot( t) where L is a constant, differential equations on the interval yɛ [- ∞, ∞] can be transformed into tɛ [0, π] and solved by an ordinary Fourier series. In this article, earlier work by Grosch and Orszag ( J. Comput. Phys.25, 273 (1977)), Cain, Ferziger, and Reynolds ( J. Comput. Phys.56, 272 (1984)), and Boyd ( J. Comput. Phys.25, 43 (1982); 57, 454 (1985); SIAM J. Numer. Anal. (1987)) is extended in several ways. First, the series of orthogonal rational functions converge on the exterior of bipolar coordinate surfaces in the complex y-plane. Second, Galerkin's method will convert differential equations with polynomial or rational coefficients into banded matrix problems. Third, with orthogonal rational functions it is possible to obtain exponential convergence even for u( y) that asymptote to a constant although this behavior would wreck alternatives such as Hermite or sinc expansions. Fourth, boundary conditions are usually "natural" rather than "essential" in the sense that the singularities of the differential equation will force the numerical solution to have the correct behavior at infinity even if no constraints are imposed on the basis functions. Fifth, mapping a finite interval to an infinite one and then applying the rational Chebyshev functions gives an exponentially convergent method for functions with bounded endpoint singularities. These concepts are illustrated by five numerical examples.

  14. Moments of ϕ meson spectral functions in vacuum and nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubler, Philipp; Weise, Wolfram

    2015-12-01

    Moments of the ϕ meson spectral function in vacuum and in nuclear matter are analyzed, combining a model based on chiral SU (3) effective field theory (with kaonic degrees of freedom) and finite-energy QCD sum rules. For the vacuum we show that the spectral density is strongly constrained by a recent accurate measurement of the e+e- →K+K- cross section. In nuclear matter the ϕ spectrum is modified by interactions of the decay kaons with the surrounding nuclear medium, leading to a significant broadening and an asymmetric deformation of the ϕ meson peak. We demonstrate that both in vacuum and nuclear matter, the first two moments of the spectral function are compatible with finite-energy QCD sum rules. A brief discussion of the next-higher spectral moment involving strange four-quark condensates is also presented.

  15. Efficient application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function to radiative transfer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrarov, Sanjar

    We present a new application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) to the radiative transfer spectroscopy that enables computation of the spectral radiance and radiance at reduced spectral resolution. Applying a technique based on the Fourier expansion of the exponential multiplier we obtain the series approximations providing high-accuracy and rapid SIVF computation. In contrast to traditional line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer models, the proposed SIVF algorithm prevents underestimation in the absorption coefficients and, therefore, preserves the radiant energy. LBL sample computations utilizing SIVF algorithm show the advantages of the proposed methodology in terms of the accuracy and computational speed.

  16. A Spectral Lyapunov Function for Exponentially Stable LTV Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. Jim; Liu, Yong; Hang, Rui

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the formulation of a Lyapunov function for an exponentially stable linear timevarying (LTV) system using a well-defined PD-spectrum and the associated PD-eigenvectors. It provides a bridge between the first and second methods of Lyapunov for stability assessment, and will find significant applications in the analysis and control law design for LTV systems and linearizable nonlinear time-varying systems.

  17. Spectral Data Captures Important Variability Between and Among Species and Functional Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, P. A.; Serbin, S. P.; Kingdon, C.; Singh, A.; Couture, J. J.; Gamon, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Narrowband spectral data in the visible, near and shortwave infrared (400-2500 nm) are being used increasingly in plant ecology to characterize the biochemical, physiological and water status of vegetation, as well as community composition. In particular, spectroscopic data have recently received considerable attention for their capacity to discriminate plants according to functional properties or 'optical types.' Such measurements can be acquired from airborne/satellite remote sensing imagery or field spectrometers and are commonly used to directly estimate or infer properties important to photosynthesis, carbon and water fluxes, nutrient dynamics, phenology, and disturbance. Spectral data therefore represent proxies for measurements that are otherwise time consuming or expensive to make, and - more importantly - provide the opportunity to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of taxonomic or functional groups. We have found that spectral variation within species and functional types can in fact exceed the variation between types. As such, we recommend that the traditional quantification of characteristics defining species and/or functional types must be modified to include the range of variability in those properties. We provide four examples of the importance of spectral data for describing within-species/functional type variation. First, within temperate forests, the spectral properties of foliage vary considerably with canopy position. This variability is strongly related to differences in specific leaf area between shade- and sun-lit leaves, and the resulting differences among leaves in strategies for light harvesting, photosynthesis, and leaf longevity. These results point to the need to better characterize leaf optical properties throughout a canopy, rather than basing the characterization of ecosystem functioning on only the sunlit portion of the canopy crown. Second, we show considerable differences in optical properties of foliage from

  18. On the spectral expansion of the electric and magnetic dyadic Green's functions in cylindrical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, L. W.

    1983-04-01

    The expansions of the electric and magnetic dyadic Green's functions are constructed in terms of the solenoidal Hansen vector wave functions in cylindrical coordinates. A static term is shown to arise in the course of conducting the radial spectral integral. This pole term has apparently not been identified in previously published expansions and is similar to recently identified static terms in Cartesian and spherical wave function expansions. The integration in the longitudinal spectral variable is considered, too, and forms which offer two alternative integration paths are constructed.

  19. Spectral pattern recognition in under-sampled functions

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtz, R.F.

    1988-08-01

    Fourier optics and an optical bench model are used to construct an ensemble of candidate functions representing variational patterns in an undersampled two dimensional function g(x,y). The known sample function s(x,y) is the product of g(x,y) and a set of unit impulses on the sample point pattern p(x,y) which, from the optical point of view, is an aperture imposing strict mathematical limits on what the sample can tell g(x,y). The laws of optics enforce much needed - and often lacking - conceptual discipline in reconstructing candidate variational patterns in g(x,y). The Fourier transform (FT) of s(x,y) is the convolution of the FT's of g(x,y) and p(x,y). If the convolution shows aliasing or confounding of frequencies undersampling is surely present and all reconstructions are indeterminate. Then information from outside s(x,y) is required and it is easily expressed in frequency terms so that the principles of optical filtering and image reconstruction can be applied. In the application described and pictured the FT of s(x,y) was filtered to eliminate unlikely or uninteresting high frequency amplitude maxima. A menu of the 100 strongest remaining terms was taken as indicating the principle variations patterns in g(x,y). Subsets of 10 terms from the menu were chosen using stepwise regression. By so restricting the subset size both the variance and the span of their inverse transforms were made consistent with those of the data. The amplitudes of the patterns being overdetermined, it was possible to estimate the phases also. The inverse transforms of 9 patterns so selected are regarded as ensembles of reconstructions, that is as stochastic process models, from which estimates of the mean and other moments can be calculated.

  20. On Spectral Approach to Pascal White Noise Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barhoumi, Abdessatar; Ouerdiane, Habib; Riahi, Anis

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a one-mode type interacting Fock space {F}NB ( {H}) naturally associated to the negative binomial distribution μr,α. The Fourier transform in generalized joint eigenvectors of a family {Jϕ ; ϕ ∈ ɛ} of Pascal Jacobi fields provides a way to explicit a unitary isomorphism {U}{r,α } between {F}NB ( {H}) and the so-called Pascal white noise space L2(ɛ', Λr,α). Then, we derive a chaotic decomposition property of the quadratic integrable functionals of the Pascal white noise process in terms of an appropriate wick tensor product.

  1. Time-dependence of the holographic spectral function: diverse routes to thermalisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Souvik; Ishii, Takaaki; Joshi, Lata Kh; Mukhopadhyay, Ayan; Ramadevi, P.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a new method for computing the holographic retarded propagator in generic (non-)equilibrium states using the state/geometry map. We check that our method reproduces the thermal spectral function given by the Son-Starinets prescription. The time-dependence of the spectral function of a relevant scalar operator is studied in a class of non-equilibrium states. The latter are represented by AdS-Vaidya geometries with an arbitrary parameter characterising the timescale for the dual state to transit from an initial thermal equilibrium to another due to a homogeneous quench. For long quench duration, the spectral function indeed follows the thermal form at the instantaneous effective temperature adiabatically, although with a slight initial time delay and a bit premature thermalisation. At shorter quench durations, several new non-adiabatic features appear: (i) time-dependence of the spectral function is seen much before than that in the effective temperature (advanced time-dependence), (ii) a big transfer of spectral weight to frequencies greater than the initial temperature occurs at an intermediate time (kink formation) and (iii) new peaks with decreasing amplitudes but in greater numbers appear even after the effective temperature has stabilised (persistent oscillations). We find four broad routes to thermalisation for lower values of spatial momenta. At higher values of spatial momenta, kink formations and persistent oscillations are suppressed, and thermalisation time decreases. The general thermalisation pattern is globally top-down, but a closer look reveals complexities.

  2. Statistical Study of Turbulence: Spectral Functions and Correlation Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenkiel, Francois N.

    1958-01-01

    In reading the publications on turbulence of different authors, one often runs the risk of confusing the various correlation coefficients and turbulence spectra. We have made a point of defining, by appropriate concepts, the differences which exist between these functions. Besides, we introduce in the symbols a few new characteristics of turbulence. In the first chapter, we study some relations between the correlation coefficients and the different turbulence spectra. Certain relations are given by means of demonstrations which could be called intuitive rather than mathematical. In this way we demonstrate that the correlation coefficients between the simultaneous turbulent velocities at two points are identical, whether studied in Lagrange's or in Euler's systems. We then consider new spectra of turbulence, obtained by study of the simultaneous velocities along a straight line of given direction. We determine some relations between these spectra and the correlation coefficients. Examining the relation between the spectrum of the turbulence measured at a fixed point and the longitudinal-correlation curve given by G. I. Taylor, we find that this equation is exact only when the coefficient is very small.

  3. Protein structure, spectral properties, and photobiological function of lumazine protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, John W.; Bradley, Elizabeth A.; O'Kane, Dennis J.

    1992-04-01

    Protein sequence analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance, and fluorescence dynamics have been applied in a determination of the interactions of the lumazine derivative with the amino acid residues in the proposed ligand binding site of lumazine protein. It is these interactions that `tune' the excited state properties of the bound lumazine so that it can perform its photobiological function as the emitter of bioluminescence in Photobacterium species. A three- way sequence alignment shows that lumazine protein is homologous with the yellow- fluorescent protein of Vibrio fischeri and the riboflavin synthase from Bacillus subtilis. This last enzyme is ubiquitous in procaryotes, and utilizes two of these same lumazines as substrates for the production of riboflavin. By analogy with riboflavin synthase, a short sequence in the lumazine protein has been suggested as the ligand binding site. In riboflavin synthase there is a second binding site, but this is absent in lumazine protein, thus negating any synthase activity for this protein. Hydrogen bonds to the residues in this binding domain and `freeze' the lumazine structure into the highly polar tautomer deduced from NMR evidence. This also accounts for the rigidity of binding shown by the 23 ns (2 degree(s)C) rotational correlation time of the bound ligand as well as the strong blue shift of the fluorescence maximum, from 490 nm free to 475 nm when bound.

  4. Cross-spectral recognition method of bridge deck aerodynamic admittance function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Ge, Yaojun

    2015-12-01

    This study proposes a new identification algorithm about the admittance function, which can estimate the full set of six aerodynamic admittance functions considering cross power spectral density functions about the forces and the turbulence components. The method was first numerically validated through Monte Carlo simulations, and then adopted to estimate the aerodynamic admittance of a streamlined bridge deck. The identification method was further validated through a comparison between the numerical calculation and wind tunnel tests on a moving bridge section.

  5. Massive Yang-Mills for vector and axial-vector spectral functions at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohler, Paul M.; Rapp, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    The hadronic mechanism which leads to chiral symmetry restoration is explored in the context of the ρπa1 system using Massive Yang-Mills, a hadronic effective theory which governs their microscopic interactions. In this approach, vector and axial-vector mesons are implemented as gauge bosons of a local chiral gauge group. We have previously shown that this model can describe the experimentally measured vector and axial-vector spectral functions in vacuum. Here, we carry the analysis to finite temperatures by evaluating medium effects in a pion gas and calculating thermal spectral functions. We find that the spectral peaks in both channels broaden along with a noticeable downward mass shift in the a1 spectral peak and negligible movement of the ρ peak. The approach toward spectral function degeneracy is accompanied by a reduction of chiral order parameters, i.e., the pion decay constant and scalar condensate. Our findings suggest a mechanism where the chiral mass splitting induced in vacuum is burned off. We explore this mechanism and identify future investigations which can further test it.

  6. Local Least Squares Spectral Filtering and Combination by Harmonic Functions on the Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, L.

    2011-01-01

    Least squares spectral combination is a well-known technique in physical geodesy. The established technique either suffers from the assumption of no correlations of errors between degrees or from a global optimisation of the variance or mean square error of the estimator. Today Earth gravitational models are available together with their full covariance matrices to rather high degrees, extra information that should be properly taken care of. Here we derive the local least squares spectral filter for a stochastic function on the sphere based on the spectral representation of the observable and its error covariance matrix. Second, the spectral combination of two erroneous harmonic series is derived based on their full covariance matrices. In both cases the transition from spectral representation of an estimator to an integral representation is demonstrated. Practical examples are given. Taking advantage of the full covariance matrices in the spectral combination implies a huge computational burden in determining the least squares filters and combinations for high-degree spherical harmonic series. A reasonable compromise between accuracy of estimator and workload could be to consider only one weight parameter/degree, yielding the optimum filtering and combination of Laplace series.

  7. Empirical relaxation function and spectral density for underdamped vibrations at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2009-03-01

    A new relaxation function which accounts for electronic dephasing (electronic phase loss and excited state lifetime) is presented, whose applicability for underdamped motion at low temperatures is examined in detail. This new empirical relaxation function φ(t ) yields linear and nonlinear spectral/temporal profiles that render accurate dephasing time in the underdamped regime. The relaxation function φ(t ) is normally expressed in terms of the coupling functions Mj' and Mj″ on which the time evolution of the vibrational modes in question depends. The corresponding spectral density, which is a central quantity in probing dynamics, is derived and compared to that of the multimode Brownian oscillator model. Derivation and discussion of the new position and momentum autocorrelation functions in terms of our new spectral density are presented. While the position autocorrelation function plays a key role in representing solvation structure in polar or nonpolar medium, the momentum correlation function projects out the molecular vibrational motion. The Liouville space generating function (LGF) for harmonic and anharmonic systems is expressed in terms of our new empirical φ(t ) and spectral density, leading to more physical observation. Several statistical quantities are derived from the position and momentum correlation function, which in turn contribute to LGF. Model calculations reflecting the infinite population decay in the low temperature limit in linear and nonlinear spectroscopic signals are presented. The herein quantum dipole moment correlation function is compared to that derived in [M. Toutounji, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 5319 (2003)] using mixed quantum-classical dynamics framework, yielding reasonable results, in fact identical at higher temperatures. The results herein are found to be informative, useful, and consistent with experiments.

  8. Empirical relaxation function and spectral density for underdamped vibrations at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2009-03-01

    A new relaxation function which accounts for electronic dephasing (electronic phase loss and excited state lifetime) is presented, whose applicability for underdamped motion at low temperatures is examined in detail. This new empirical relaxation function phi(t) yields linear and nonlinear spectral/temporal profiles that render accurate dephasing time in the underdamped regime. The relaxation function phi(t) is normally expressed in terms of the coupling functions M(j) (') and M(j) (") on which the time evolution of the vibrational modes in question depends. The corresponding spectral density, which is a central quantity in probing dynamics, is derived and compared to that of the multimode Brownian oscillator model. Derivation and discussion of the new position and momentum autocorrelation functions in terms of our new spectral density are presented. While the position autocorrelation function plays a key role in representing solvation structure in polar or nonpolar medium, the momentum correlation function projects out the molecular vibrational motion. The Liouville space generating function (LGF) for harmonic and anharmonic systems is expressed in terms of our new empirical phi(t) and spectral density, leading to more physical observation. Several statistical quantities are derived from the position and momentum correlation function, which in turn contribute to LGF. Model calculations reflecting the infinite population decay in the low temperature limit in linear and nonlinear spectroscopic signals are presented. The herein quantum dipole moment correlation function is compared to that derived in [M. Toutounji, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 5319 (2003)] using mixed quantum-classical dynamics framework, yielding reasonable results, in fact identical at higher temperatures. The results herein are found to be informative, useful, and consistent with experiments. PMID:19275403

  9. Spectral function of the Tomonaga-Luttinger model revisited: Power laws and universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markhof, L.; Meden, V.

    2016-02-01

    We reinvestigate the momentum-resolved single-particle spectral function of the Tomonaga-Luttinger model. In particular, we focus on the role of the momentum dependence of the two-particle interaction V (q ) . Usually, V (q ) is assumed to be a constant and integrals are regularized in the ultraviolet "by hand" employing an ad hoc procedure. As the momentum dependence of the interaction is irrelevant in the renormalization group sense, this does not affect the universal low-energy properties of the model, e.g., exponents of power laws, if all energy scales are sent to zero. If, however, the momentum k is fixed away from the Fermi momentum kF, with |k - kF| setting a nonvanishing energy scale, the details of V (q ) start to matter. We provide strong evidence that any curvature of the two-particle interaction at small transferred momentum q destroys power-law scaling of the momentum-resolved spectral function as a function of energy. Even for |k - kF| much smaller than the momentum-space range of the interaction the spectral line shape depends on the details of V (q ) . The significance of our results for universality in the Luttinger liquid sense, for experiments on quasi-one-dimensional metals, and for recent results on the spectral function of one-dimensional correlated systems taking effects of the curvature of the single-particle dispersion into account ("nonlinear LL phenomenology") is discussed.

  10. The spectral shift function and Levinson's theorem for quantum star graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Demirel, Semra

    2012-08-15

    We consider the Schroedinger operator on a star shaped graph with n edges joined at a single vertex. We derive an expression for the trace of the difference of the perturbed and unperturbed resolvent in terms of a Wronskian. This leads to representations for the perturbation determinant and the spectral shift function, and to an analog of Levinson's formula.

  11. On the use of the noncentral chi-square density function for the distribution of helicopter spectral estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, Donald P.

    1993-01-01

    A probability density function for the variability of ensemble averaged spectral estimates from helicopter acoustic signals in Gaussian background noise was evaluated. Numerical methods for calculating the density function and for determining confidence limits were explored. Density functions were predicted for both synthesized and experimental data and compared with observed spectral estimate variability.

  12. Spectral imaging reveals microvessel physiology and function from anastomoses to thromboses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankhede, Mamta; Agarwal, Nikita; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A.; Dedeugd, Casey; Raizada, Mohan K.; Oh, S. Paul; Sorg, Brian S.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal microvascular physiology and function is common in many diseases. Numerous pathologies include hypervascularity, aberrant angiogenesis, or abnormal vascular remodeling among the characteristic features of the disease, and quantitative imaging and measurement of microvessel function can be important to increase understanding of these diseases. Several optical techniques are useful for direct imaging of microvascular function. Spectral imaging is one such technique that can be used to assess microvascular oxygen transport function with high spatial and temporal resolution in microvessel networks through measurements of hemoglobin saturation. We highlight novel observation made with our intravital microscopy spectral imaging system employed with mouse dorsal skin-fold window chambers for imaging hemoglobin saturation in microvessel networks. Specifically, we image acute oxygenation fluctuations in a tumor microvessel network, the development of arteriovenous malformations in a mouse model of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and the formation of spontaneous and induced microvascular thromboses and occlusions.

  13. Analytic representations of bath correlation functions for ohmic and superohmic spectral densities using simple poles

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschel, Gerhard; Eisfeld, Alexander

    2014-09-07

    We present a scheme to express a bath correlation function (BCF) corresponding to a given spectral density (SD) as a sum of damped harmonic oscillations. Such a representation is needed, for example, in many open quantum system approaches. To this end we introduce a class of fit functions that enables us to model ohmic as well as superohmic behavior. We show that these functions allow for an analytic calculation of the BCF using pole expansions of the temperature dependent hyperbolic cotangent. We demonstrate how to use these functions to fit spectral densities exemplarily for cases encountered in the description of photosynthetic light harvesting complexes. Finally, we compare absorption spectra obtained for different fits with exact spectra and show that it is crucial to take properly into account the behavior at small frequencies when fitting a given SD.

  14. Spectral discrete probability density function of measured wind turbine noise in the far field.

    PubMed

    Ashtiani, Payam; Denison, Adelaide

    2015-01-01

    Of interest is the spectral character of wind turbine noise at typical residential set-back distances. In this paper, a spectral statistical analysis has been applied to immission measurements conducted at three locations. This method provides discrete probability density functions for the Turbine ONLY component of the measured noise. This analysis is completed for one-third octave sound levels, at integer wind speeds, and is compared to existing metrics for measuring acoustic comfort as well as previous discussions on low-frequency noise sources. PMID:25905097

  15. Matrix Methods for Estimating the Coherence Functions from Estimates of the Cross-Spectral Density Matrix

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smallwood, D. O.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the usual method for estimating the coherence functions (ordinary, partial, and multiple) for a general multiple-input! multiple-output problem can be expressed as a modified form of Cholesky decomposition of the cross-spectral density matrix of the input and output records. The results can be equivalently obtained using singular value decomposition (SVD) of the cross-spectral density matrix. Using SVD suggests a new form of fractional coherence. The formulation as a SVD problem also suggests a way to order the inputs when a natural physical order of the inputs is absent.

  16. Individual classification of buried transistors in live microprocessors by functional infrared emission spectral microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oblefias, Wilma; Soriano, Maricor; Tarun, Alvarado; Saloma, Caesar

    2006-10-01

    The authors classify good, leaky, and broken field effect transistors (FET's) in a live 90nm flip-chip microprocessor using functional infrared emission spectral microscopy. The FET's are in the active layer that is sandwiched between a thick heat-absorbing silicon material and a highly reflecting grid of metal interconnects. Together they are optically imaged only as a single bright blob. They classify FET's individually from their distinct electroluminescence spectra that are recovered efficiently by spectral decomposition of the detected composite spectrum. Leaky FET's have no apparent structural damage and are detectable only in live microprocessors.

  17. Spectral Discrete Probability Density Function of Measured Wind Turbine Noise in the Far Field

    PubMed Central

    Ashtiani, Payam; Denison, Adelaide

    2015-01-01

    Of interest is the spectral character of wind turbine noise at typical residential set-back distances. In this paper, a spectral statistical analysis has been applied to immission measurements conducted at three locations. This method provides discrete probability density functions for the Turbine ONLY component of the measured noise. This analysis is completed for one-third octave sound levels, at integer wind speeds, and is compared to existing metrics for measuring acoustic comfort as well as previous discussions on low-frequency noise sources. PMID:25905097

  18. Self-adjoint Operators as Functions I. Lattices, Galois Connections, and the Spectral Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Andreas; Dewitt, Barry

    2014-06-01

    Observables of a quantum system, described by self-adjoint operators in a von Neumann algebra or affiliated with it in the unbounded case, form a conditionally complete lattice when equipped with the spectral order. Using this order-theoretic structure, we develop a new perspective on quantum observables. In this first paper (of two), we show that self-adjoint operators affiliated with a von Neumann algebra can equivalently be described as certain real-valued functions on the projection lattice of the algebra, which we call q-observable functions. Bounded self-adjoint operators correspond to q-observable functions with compact image on non-zero projections. These functions, originally defined in a similar form by de Groote (Observables II: quantum observables, 2005), are most naturally seen as adjoints (in the categorical sense) of spectral families. We show how they relate to the daseinisation mapping from the topos approach to quantum theory (Döring and Isham , New Structures for Physics, Springer, Heidelberg, 2011). Moreover, the q-observable functions form a conditionally complete lattice which is shown to be order-isomorphic to the lattice of self-adjoint operators with respect to the spectral order. In a subsequent paper (Döring and Dewitt, 2012, preprint), we will give an interpretation of q-observable functions in terms of quantum probability theory, and using results from the topos approach to quantum theory, we will provide a joint sample space for all quantum observables.

  19. Spectral function of the two-dimensional large-N t-J model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Marilyn F.; Gibbs, Zane P.; McMullen, T.

    1999-06-01

    Calculations of the one-electron spectral function of the t-J model on a two-dimensional square lattice are described. A large-N generalization of the t-J model is used to develop 1/N expansions, and the t-J model constraint is enforced by slave bosons. The saddle point about which the 1/N expansion is carried out is chosen to be uniform in both space and time, and self-energies are calculated to next-to-leading order in 1/N as in the work of Z. Wang et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 2733 (1991)]. The results of computations of the one-electron electron spectral functions for wave vectors throughout the Brillouin zone are presented for several values of the exchange coupling J/t and doping δ. A sharp dispersive quasiparticle peak is found near the Fermi energy. Additional spectral weight occurs at lower frequencies, and this arises from features in the normal self-energy. These features are qualitatively similar to the self-energy obtained by Kampf and Schrieffer [Phys. Rev. B 41, 6399 (1990)] from a parametrized model of an electron coupled to antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations that leads to shadow band structure in the one-electron spectral function.

  20. Bilayer graphene spectral function in the random phase approximation and self-consistent GW approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabashvili, Andro; Östlund, Stellan; Granath, Mats

    2013-08-01

    We calculate the single-particle spectral function for doped bilayer graphene in the low energy limit, described by two parabolic bands with zero band gap and long range Coulomb interaction. Calculations are done using thermal Green's functions in both the random phase approximation (RPA) and the fully self-consistent GW approximation. Consistent with previous studies RPA yields a spectral function which, apart from the Landau quasiparticle peaks, shows additional coherent features interpreted as plasmarons, i.e., composite electron-plasmon excitations. In the GW approximation the plasmaron becomes incoherent and peaks are replaced by much broader features. The deviation of the quasiparticle weight and mass renormalization from their noninteracting values is small which indicates that bilayer graphene is a weakly interacting system. The electron energy loss function, Im[-ɛq-1(ω)] shows a sharp plasmon mode in RPA which in the GW approximation becomes less coherent and thus consistent with the weaker plasmaron features in the corresponding single-particle spectral function.

  1. Spread function of acousto-optic filter with high-speed spectral image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadorin, Anatoly S.; Nemtchenko, Andrei S.

    1998-08-01

    The contradictory requirements are presented to acousto- optic tunable filters (AOF) of spectral image analysis. On the one hand AOF should have high speed. On the other hand it should have good spectral resolution and wide angular aperture. Thus when AOF is fastly tuned with chirp transients, the diffracted wave intensity at different moments of transient process can considerably diverge form its quasistatic level. It means that spread function (SF) depends on the velocity of frequency tuning, i.e., it is described by 2D function with variables - wave length and velocity of frequency tuning. In Cartesian frame this dependence is presented by some surface being dynamic SF (DSF). It characterizes speed and selectivity properties of AOF. In this work DCF mathematical model was constructed and basic properties of spectral image analysis AOF were investigated. It has been established that the greatest distortions of DSF occur if velocity of frequency tuning has exceeded some critical value connected with acousto-optic interaction geometry and aperture sizes of beams. In this case the side lobes of SF will make 'false' maxima which begin to prevail over the basic. In addition under the conditions of phase mismatch DSF loses the symmetry to position of the main maximum. These effects reduce the accuracy of spectral measurements when tuning velocity is high.

  2. Single-particle spectral function for the classical one-component plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortmann, C.

    2009-01-01

    The spectral function for an electron one-component plasma is calculated self-consistently using the GW(0) approximation for the single-particle self-energy. In this way, correlation effects that go beyond the mean-field description of the plasma are contained, i.e., the collisional damping of single-particle states, the dynamical screening of the interaction, and the appearance of collective plasma modes. Second, a nonperturbative analytic solution for the on-shell GW(0) self-energy as a function of momentum is presented. It reproduces the numerical data for the spectral function with a relative error of less than 10% in the regime where the Debye screening parameter is smaller than the inverse Bohr radius, κ<1aB-1 . In the limit of low density, the nonperturbative self-energy behaves as n1/4 , whereas a perturbation expansion leads to the unphysical result of a density-independent self-energy [Fennel and Wilfer, Ann. Phys. (Leipzig) 32, 265 (1974)]. The derived expression will greatly facilitate the calculation of observables in correlated plasmas (transport properties, equation of state) that need the spectral function as an input quantity. This is demonstrated for the shift of the chemical potential, which is computed from the analytical formulas and compared to the GW(0) result. At a plasma temperature of 100eV and densities below 1021cm-3 , the two approaches deviate by less than 10% from each other.

  3. Energetic Particle Spectral Shapes in Planetary Magnetospheres; Assessment of the Kappa Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B.

    2015-12-01

    In assessing the efficacy of the kappa distribution function in space environments, it is useful to follow two paths. First, to what extent do we consider the kappa function (or any function) to represent some kind of universal spectral shape that indicates common physical processes occurring in a wide diversity of space environments? Second, how useful is the kappa function in quantitatively characterizing observed spectral shapes, particularly for the purpose permitting further quantitative analyses of the environment (e. g. wave growth). In this report I evaluate the efficacy of the kappa distribution in representing energetic particle spectral shapes in planetary magnetospheres from both perspectives. In particular, I expand on the extensive treatment provided by Carbary et al. (2014) by taking a more explicit comparative approach between the different planets (Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) and also focusing on the most intense (and therefore from my perspective the most interesting) spectra within each of these different planets. There is no question that the "power law tail" represents as close to a universal characteristic of planetary space environments as one could hope to find. Such a universal shape must represent some universality in the energization and/or equilibrating processes. Also, there is no question that such tails must (to be non-divergent) and do roll over to flatter shapes at lower energies. In a number of applications, this basic characteristic has been usefully characterized by the kappa function to extract such parameters of the system as flow velocities. However, at least for the more intense spectra at Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, the kappa function in fact does a relatively poor job in representing the low energy roll-over of energetic particle spectra. Other functional forms have been found to be much more useful for characterizing these spectral shapes over a broad range of energies. And specifically, a very

  4. A Light-Front Approach to the 3He Spectral Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopetta, Sergio; Del Dotto, Alessio; Kaptari, Leonid; Pace, Emanuele; Rinaldi, Matteo; Salmè, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering off polarized 3He at finite momentum transfers, aimed at the extraction of the quark transverse-momentum distributions in the neutron, requires the use of a distorted spin-dependent spectral function for 3He, which takes care of the final state interaction effects. This quantity is introduced in the non-relativistic case, and its generalization in a Poincaré covariant framework, in plane wave impulse approximation for the moment being, is outlined. Studying the light-front spin-dependent spectral function for a J = 1/2 system, such as the nucleon, it is found that, within the light-front dynamics with a fixed number of constituents and in the valence approximation, only three of the six leading twist T-even transverse-momentum distributions are independent.

  5. Spectral Function and Quasiparticle Damping of Interacting Bosons in Two Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Sinner, Andreas; Kopietz, Peter; Hasselmann, Nils

    2009-03-27

    We employ the functional renormalization group to study dynamical properties of the two-dimensional Bose gas. Our approach is free of infrared divergences, which plague the usual diagrammatic approaches, and is consistent with the exact Nepomnyashchy identity, which states that the anomalous self-energy vanishes at zero frequency and momentum. We recover the correct infrared behavior of the propagators and present explicit results for the spectral line shape, from which we extract the quasiparticle dispersion and dampi0008.

  6. Spectra and essential spectral radii of composition operators on weighted Banach spaces of analytic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonet, José; Galindo, Pablo; Lindström, Mikael

    2008-04-01

    We determine the spectra of composition operators acting on weighted Banach spaces of analytic functions on the unit disc defined for a radial weight v, when the symbol of the operator has a fixed point in the open unit disc. We also investigate in this case the growth rate of the Koenigs eigenfunction and its relation with the essential spectral radius of the composition operator.

  7. A perturbative approach to the spectral zeta functions of strings, drums, and quantum billiards

    SciTech Connect

    Amore, Paolo

    2012-12-15

    We show that the spectral zeta functions of inhomogeneous strings and drums can be calculated using Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory. The inhomogeneities that can be treated with this method are small but otherwise arbitrary and include the previously studied case of a piecewise constant density. In two dimensions the method can be used to derive the spectral zeta function of a domain obtained from the small deformation of a square. We also obtain exact sum rules that are valid for arbitrary densities and that correspond to the values taken by the spectral zeta function at integer positive values; we have tested numerically these sum rules in specific examples. We show that the Dirichlet or Neumann Casimir energies of an inhomogeneous string, evaluated to first order in perturbation theory, contain in some cases an irremovable divergence, but that the combination of the two is always free of divergences. Finally, our calculation of the Casimir energies of a string with piecewise constant density and of two perfectly conducting concentric cylinders, of similar radius, reproduce the results previously published.

  8. Spectral correlation functions of the sum of two independent complex Wishart matrices with unequal covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akemann, Gernot; Checinski, Tomasz; Kieburg, Mario

    2016-08-01

    We compute the spectral statistics of the sum H of two independent complex Wishart matrices, each of which is correlated with a different covariance matrix. Random matrix theory enjoys many applications including sums and products of random matrices. Typically ensembles with correlations among the matrix elements are much more difficult to solve. Using a combination of supersymmetry, superbosonisation and bi-orthogonal functions we are able to determine all spectral k-point density correlation functions of H for arbitrary matrix size N. In the half-degenerate case, when one of the covariance matrices is proportional to the identity, the recent results by Kumar for the joint eigenvalue distribution of H serve as our starting point. In this case the ensemble has a bi-orthogonal structure and we explicitly determine its kernel, providing its exact solution for finite N. The kernel follows from computing the expectation value of a single characteristic polynomial. In the general non-degenerate case the generating function for the k-point resolvent is determined from a supersymmetric evaluation of the expectation value of k ratios of characteristic polynomials. Numerical simulations illustrate our findings for the spectral density at finite N and we also give indications how to do the asymptotic large-N analysis.

  9. Variation in spectral-shape discrimination weighting functions at different stimulus levels and signal strengths.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer J

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated whether weights for spectral-shape discrimination depend on overall stimulus level and signal strength (the degree of spectral-shape change between two stimuli). Five listeners discriminated between standard stimuli that were the sum of six equal-amplitude tones and signal stimuli created by decreasing the amplitudes of three low-frequency components and increasing the amplitudes of three high-frequency components. Weighting functions were influenced by stimulus level in that the relative contribution of the low-frequency (decremented) components to the high-frequency (incremented) components decreased with increasing stimulus level. Although individual variability was present, a follow-up experiment suggested that the level dependence was due to greater reliance on high-frequency components rather than incremented components. Excitation-pattern analyses indicated that the level dependence is primarily, but not solely, driven by cochlear factors. In general, different signal strengths had no effect on the weighting functions (when normalized), but two of the five listeners showed variability in the shape of the weighting function across signal strengths. Results suggest that the effects of stimulus level on weighting functions and individual variability in the shapes of the weighting functions should be considered when comparing weighting functions across conditions and groups that might require different stimulus levels and signal strengths. PMID:17927430

  10. A spectral Phase-Amplitude method for propagating a wave function to large distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawitscher, George

    2015-06-01

    The phase and amplitude (Ph-A) of a wave function vary slowly with distance, in contrast to the wave function that can be highly oscillatory. Hence the Ph-A representation of a wave function requires far fewer computational mesh points than the wave function itself. In 1930 Milne presented an equation for the phase and the amplitude functions (which is different from the one developed by Calogero), and in 1962 Seaton and Peach solved these equations iteratively. The objective of the present study is to implement Seaton and Peach's iteration procedure with a spectral Chebyshev expansion method, and at the same time present a non-iterative analytic solution to an approximate version of the iterative equations. The iterations converge rapidly for the case of attractive potentials. Two numerical examples are given: (1) for a potential that decreases with distance as 1 /r3, and (2) a Coulomb potential ∝ 1 / r. In both cases the whole radial range of [0-2000] requires only between 25 and 100 mesh points and the corresponding accuracy is between 10-3 and 10-6. The 0th iteration (which is the WKB approximation) gives an accuracy of 10-2. This spectral method permits one to calculate a wave function out to large distances reliably and economically.

  11. Fractal dimensions of wave functions and local spectral measures on the Fibonacci chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macé, Nicolas; Jagannathan, Anuradha; Piéchon, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical framework for understanding the wave functions and spectrum of an extensively studied paradigm for quasiperiodic systems, namely the Fibonacci chain. Our analytical results, which are obtained in the limit of strong modulation of the hopping amplitudes, are in good agreement with published numerical data. In the perturbative limit, we show a symmetry of wave functions under permutation of site and energy indices. We compute the wave-function renormalization factors and from them deduce analytical expressions for the fractal exponents corresponding to individual wave functions, as well as their global averages. The multifractality of wave functions is seen to appear at next-to-leading order in ρ . Exponents for the local spectral density are given, in extremely good accord with numerical calculations. Interestingly, our analytical results for exponents are observed to describe the system rather well even for values of ρ well outside the domain of applicability of perturbation theory.

  12. Effects of finite spectral bandwidth and focusing error on the transfer function in stellar speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsubo, J.

    1985-05-01

    The normal model of light propagation through a turbulent atmosphere is used to investigate the telescope-atmosphere transfer function in stellar speckle interferometry. The effect of the finite bandwidth of a spectral filter on the transfer function is considered. The permissible focusing errors for successful processing in stellar speckle interferometry are obtained based on the normal model. Some observational results are presented and compared with theory. The normal model leads to an analytically simple solution and properly describes light scattering from turbulent atmosphere. The results for the normal model are compared with those for the log-normal model.

  13. Spectral Library Generating Function for Assessing Spectrum-Spectrum Match Significance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingxun; Bandeira, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) continues to be the technology of choice for high-throughput analysis of complex proteomics samples. While MS/MS spectra are commonly identified by matching against a database of known protein sequences, the complementary approach of spectral library searching against collections of reference spectra consistently outperforms sequence-based searches by resulting in significantly more identified spectra. But while spectral library searches benefit from the advance knowledge of the expected peptide fragmentation patterns recorded in library spectra, estimation of the statistical significance of Spectrum-Spectrum Matches (SSMs) continues to be hindered by difficulties in finding an appropriate definition of ‘random’ SSMs to use as a null model when estimating the significance of true SSMs. We propose to avoid this problem by changing the null hypothesis - instead of determining the probability of observing a high SSM score between randomly matched spectra, we estimate the probability of observing a low SSM score between replicate spectra of the same molecule. To this end, we explicitly model the variation in instrument measurements of MS/MS peak intensities and show how these models can be used to determine a theoretical distribution of SSM scores between reference and query spectra of the same molecule. While the proposed Spectral Library Generating Function (SLGF) approach can be used to calculate theoretical distributions for any additive SSM score (e.g., any dot product), we further show how it can be used to calculate the distribution of expected cosines between reference and query spectra. We developed a spectral library search tool, Tremolo, and demonstrate that this SLGF-based search tool significantly outperform current state-of-the-art spectral library search tools and provide a detailed discussion of the multiple reasons behind the observed differences in the sets of identified MS/MS spectra. PMID:23808827

  14. Spectral sensitivity measurements reveal partial success in restoring missing rod function with gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Caterina; Henning, G Bruce; Robbie, Scott J; Sundaram, Venki; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Casteels, Ingele; de Ravel, Thomy J L; Moore, Anthony T; Smith, Alexander J; Bainbridge, James W; Ali, Robin R; Stockman, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Restored rod visual function after gene therapy can be established unequivocally by demonstrating that, after dark adaptation, spectral sensitivity has the shape characteristic of rods and that this shape collapses to a cone-like shape before rods have recovered after an intense bleach. We used these tests to assess retinal function in eight young adults and children with early-onset severe retinal dystrophy from Phase II of a clinical gene-therapy trial for RPE65 deficiency that involved the subretinal delivery of a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector carrying RPE65. We found substantial improvements in rod sensitivity in two participants: dark-adapted spectral sensitivity was rod-like after treatment and was cone-like before rods had recovered after a bleach. After 40 min of dark adaptation, one participant showed up to 1,000-fold sensitivity improvements 4 months after treatment and the second up to 100-fold improvements 6 months after treatment. The dark-adapted spectral sensitivities of the other six participants remained cone-like and showed little improvement in sensitivity. PMID:26605849

  15. In-medium Spectral Functions in a Coarse-Graining Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Stephan; van Hees, Hendrik; Weil, Janus; Bleicher, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    We use a coarse-graining approach to extract local thermodynamic properties from simulations with a microscopic transport model by averaging over a large ensemble of events. Setting up a grid of small space-time cells and going into each cell's rest frame allows to determine baryon and energy density. With help of an equation of state we get the corresponding temperature T and baryon-chemical potential μB. These results are used for the calculation of the thermal dilepton yield. We apply and compare two different spectral functions for the ρ meson, firstly a calculation from hadronic many-body theory and secondly a calculation from experimental scattering amplitudes. The results obtained with our approach are compared to measurements of the NA60 Collaboration. A relatively good description of the data is achieved with both spectral functions. However, the hadronic many-body calculation is found to be closer to the experimental data with regard to the in-medium broadening of the spectral shape.

  16. MR-guided dynamic PET reconstruction with the kernel method and spectral temporal basis functions.

    PubMed

    Novosad, Philip; Reader, Andrew J

    2016-06-21

    Recent advances in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve markedly improved end-point kinetic parameter maps by incorporating a temporal model of the radiotracer directly into the reconstruction algorithm. In this work we have developed a highly constrained, fully dynamic PET reconstruction algorithm incorporating both spectral analysis temporal basis functions and spatial basis functions derived from the kernel method applied to a co-registered T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) image. The dynamic PET image is modelled as a linear combination of spatial and temporal basis functions, and a maximum likelihood estimate for the coefficients can be found using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Following reconstruction, kinetic fitting using any temporal model of interest can be applied. Based on a BrainWeb T1-weighted MR phantom, we performed a realistic dynamic [(18)F]FDG simulation study with two noise levels, and investigated the quantitative performance of the proposed reconstruction algorithm, comparing it with reconstructions incorporating either spectral analysis temporal basis functions alone or kernel spatial basis functions alone, as well as with conventional frame-independent reconstruction. Compared to the other reconstruction algorithms, the proposed algorithm achieved superior performance, offering a decrease in spatially averaged pixel-level root-mean-square-error on post-reconstruction kinetic parametric maps in the grey/white matter, as well as in the tumours when they were present on the co-registered MR image. When the tumours were not visible in the MR image, reconstruction with the proposed algorithm performed similarly to reconstruction with spectral temporal basis functions and was superior to both conventional frame-independent reconstruction and frame-independent reconstruction with kernel spatial basis functions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a joint spectral

  17. MR-guided dynamic PET reconstruction with the kernel method and spectral temporal basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosad, Philip; Reader, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve markedly improved end-point kinetic parameter maps by incorporating a temporal model of the radiotracer directly into the reconstruction algorithm. In this work we have developed a highly constrained, fully dynamic PET reconstruction algorithm incorporating both spectral analysis temporal basis functions and spatial basis functions derived from the kernel method applied to a co-registered T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) image. The dynamic PET image is modelled as a linear combination of spatial and temporal basis functions, and a maximum likelihood estimate for the coefficients can be found using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Following reconstruction, kinetic fitting using any temporal model of interest can be applied. Based on a BrainWeb T1-weighted MR phantom, we performed a realistic dynamic [18F]FDG simulation study with two noise levels, and investigated the quantitative performance of the proposed reconstruction algorithm, comparing it with reconstructions incorporating either spectral analysis temporal basis functions alone or kernel spatial basis functions alone, as well as with conventional frame-independent reconstruction. Compared to the other reconstruction algorithms, the proposed algorithm achieved superior performance, offering a decrease in spatially averaged pixel-level root-mean-square-error on post-reconstruction kinetic parametric maps in the grey/white matter, as well as in the tumours when they were present on the co-registered MR image. When the tumours were not visible in the MR image, reconstruction with the proposed algorithm performed similarly to reconstruction with spectral temporal basis functions and was superior to both conventional frame-independent reconstruction and frame-independent reconstruction with kernel spatial basis functions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a joint spectral

  18. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Spectral Calculations Are Stable to Adding Diffuse Basis Functions.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Chad E; Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-11-01

    Time-dependent Kohn-Sham density functional theory (TD-KS-DFT) is useful for calculating electronic excitation spectra of large systems, but the low-energy spectra are often complicated by artificially lowered higher-energy states. This affects even the lowest energy excited states. Here, by calculating the lowest energy spin-conserving excited state for atoms from H to K and for formaldehyde, we show that this problem does not occur in multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT). We use the tPBE on-top density functional, which is a translation of the PBE exchange-correlation functional. We compare to a robust multireference method, namely, complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2), and to TD-KS-DFT with two popular exchange-correlation functionals, PBE and PBE0. We find for atoms that the mean unsigned error (MUE) of MC-PDFT with the tPBE functional improves from 0.42 to 0.40 eV with a double set of diffuse functions, whereas the MUEs for PBE and PBE0 drastically increase from 0.74 to 2.49 eV and from 0.45 to 1.47 eV, respectively. PMID:26722961

  19. Techniques for estimating the unknown functions of incomplete experimental spectral and correlation response matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Jose; Borsoi, Laurent; Delaune, Xavier; Piteau, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose analytical and numerical straightforward approximate methods to estimate the unknown terms of incomplete spectral or correlation matrices, when the cross-spectra or cross-correlations available from multiple measurements do not cover all pairs of transducer locations. The proposed techniques may be applied whenever the available data includes the auto-spectra at all measurement locations, as well as selected cross-spectra which implicates all measurement locations. The suggested methods can also be used for checking the consistency between the spectral or correlation functions pertaining to measurement matrices, in cases of suspicious data. After presenting the proposed spectral estimation formulations, we discuss their merits and limitations. Then we illustrate their use on a realistic simulation of a multi-supported tube subjected to turbulence excitation from cross-flow. Finally, we show the effectiveness of the proposed techniques by extracting the modal responses of the simulated flow-excited tube, using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) method, from an incomplete response matrix 1

  20. Structure and spectral properties of triphenylamine dye functionalized with 3,4-propylenedioxythiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, B. F.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Slepets, A. A.

    2012-06-01

    Based on the density functional theory with the B3LYP, BMK, and PBE1PBE hybrid functionals and 6-31G( d) atomic-orbital basis set, the structure and electronic-spectral properties of a triphenylamine dye sensitizer for photoelectric converters that is functionalized with 3,4-propylenedioxythiophene have been studied. The nature of an intense color of the sensitizer is elucidated. The relation of the orbital structure of the first excited state to the mechanism by which the intensity and polarization of the visible absorption band are formed, as well as the electron injection efficiency into the conduction band of titanium oxide, are explained. In terms of the Bader theory, a complete analysis of the electron density distribution in the dye molecule under study has been performed and the role played by nonvalent interactions in its stabilization has been determined.

  1. Assessing Dynamic Spectral Causality by Lagged Adaptive Directed Transfer Function and Instantaneous Effect Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haojie; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhu, Shanan

    2014-01-01

    It is of significance to assess the dynamic spectral causality among physiological signals. Several practical estimators adapted from spectral Granger causality have been exploited to track dynamic causality based on the framework of time-varying multivariate autoregressive (tvMVAR) models. The non-zero covariance of the model’s residuals has been used to describe the instantaneous effect phenomenon in some causality estimators. However, for the situations with Gaussian residuals in some autoregressive models, it is challenging to distinguish the directed instantaneous causality if the sufficient prior information about the “causal ordering” is missing. Here, we propose a new algorithm to assess the time-varying causal ordering of tvMVAR model under the assumption that the signals follow the same acyclic causal ordering for all time lags and to estimate the instantaneous effect factor (IEF) value in order to track the dynamic directed instantaneous connectivity. The time-lagged adaptive directed transfer function (ADTF) is also estimated to assess the lagged causality after removing the instantaneous effect. In the present study, we firstly investigated the performance of the causal-ordering estimation algorithm and the accuracy of IEF value. Then, we presented the results of IEF and time-lagged ADTF method by comparing with the conventional ADTF method through simulations of various propagation models. Statistical analysis results suggest that the new algorithm could accurately estimate the causal ordering and give a good estimation of the IEF values in the Gaussian residual conditions. Meanwhile, the time-lagged ADTF approach is also more accurate in estimating the time-lagged dynamic interactions in a complex nervous system after extracting the instantaneous effect. In addition to the simulation studies, we applied the proposed method to estimate the dynamic spectral causality on real visual evoked potential (VEP) data in a human subject. Its usefulness in

  2. A "melanopic" spectral efficiency function predicts the sensitivity of melanopsin photoreceptors to polychromatic lights.

    PubMed

    Enezi, Jazi al; Revell, Victoria; Brown, Timothy; Wynne, Jonathan; Schlangen, Luc; Lucas, Robert

    2011-08-01

    Photoreception in the mammalian retina is not restricted to rods and cones but extends to a small number of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells expressing the photopigment melanopsin. These mRGCs are especially important contributors to circadian entrainment, the pupil light reflex, and other so-called nonimage-forming (NIF) responses. The spectral sensitivity of melanopsin phototransduction has been addressed in several species by comparing responses to a range of monochromatic stimuli. The resultant action spectra match the predicted profile of an opsin:vitamin A-based photopigment (nomogram) with a peak sensitivity (λ(max)) around 480 nm. It would be most useful to be able to use this spectral sensitivity function to predict melanopsin's sensitivity to broad-spectrum, including "white," lights. However, evidence that melanopsin is a bistable pigment with an intrinsic light-dependent bleach recovery mechanism raises the possibility of a more complex relationship between spectral quality and photoreceptor response. Here, we set out to empirically determine whether simply weighting optical power at each wavelength according to the 480-nm nomogram and integrating across the spectrum could predict melanopsin sensitivity to a variety of polychromatic stimuli. We show that pupillomotor and circadian responses of mice relying solely on melanopsin for their photosensitivity (rd/rd cl) can indeed be accurately predicted using this methodology. Our data therefore suggest that the 480-nm nomogram may be employed as the basis for a new photometric measure of light intensity (which we term "melanopic") relevant for melanopsin photoreception. They further show that measuring light in these terms predicts the melanopsin response to light of divergent spectral composition much more reliably than other methods for quantifying irradiance or illuminance currently in widespread use. PMID:21775290

  3. Holographic vector mesons from spectral functions at finite baryon or isospin density

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Kaminski, Matthias; Rust, Felix

    2008-02-15

    We consider gauge/gravity duality with flavor for the finite-temperature field theory dual of the AdS-Schwarzschild black hole background with embedded D7-brane probes. In particular, we investigate spectral functions at finite baryon density in the black hole phase. We determine the resonance frequencies corresponding to meson-mass peaks as function of the quark mass over temperature ratio. We find that these frequencies have a minimum for a finite value of the quark mass. If the quotient of quark mass and temperature is increased further, the peaks move to larger frequencies. At the same time the peaks narrow, in agreement with the formation of nearly stable vector meson states which exactly reproduce the meson-mass spectrum found at zero temperature. We also calculate the diffusion coefficient, which has finite value for all quark mass to temperature ratios, and exhibits a first-order phase transition. Finally we consider an isospin chemical potential and find that the spectral functions display a resonance peak splitting, similar to the isospin meson-mass splitting observed in effective QCD models.

  4. Spectral Function of the One-Dimensional Hubbard Model away from Half Filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benthien, H.; Gebhard, F.; Jeckelmann, E.

    2004-06-01

    We calculate the photoemission spectral function of the one-dimensional Hubbard model away from half filling using the dynamical density-matrix renormalization group method. An approach for calculating momentum-dependent quantities in finite open chains is presented. Comparison with exact Bethe ansatz results demonstrates the unprecedented accuracy of our method. Our results show that the photoemission spectrum of the quasi-one-dimensional conductor TTF-TCNQ provides evidence for spin-charge separation on the scale of the conduction bandwidth.

  5. Spectral function of the one-dimensional Hubbard model away from half filling.

    PubMed

    Benthien, H; Gebhard, F; Jeckelmann, E

    2004-06-25

    We calculate the photoemission spectral function of the one-dimensional Hubbard model away from half filling using the dynamical density-matrix renormalization group method. An approach for calculating momentum-dependent quantities in finite open chains is presented. Comparison with exact Bethe ansatz results demonstrates the unprecedented accuracy of our method. Our results show that the photoemission spectrum of the quasi-one-dimensional conductor TTF-TCNQ provides evidence for spin-charge separation on the scale of the conduction bandwidth. PMID:15245039

  6. Unified Description of Electron-Nucleus Scattering within the Spectral Function Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocco, Noemi; Lovato, Alessandro; Benhar, Omar

    2016-05-01

    The formalism based on factorization and nuclear spectral functions has been generalized to treat transition matrix elements involving two-nucleon currents, whose contribution to the nuclear electromagnetic response in the transverse channel is known to be significant. We report the results of calculations of the inclusive electron-carbon cross section, showing that the inclusion of processes involving two-nucleon currents appreciably improves the agreement between theory and data in the dip region, between the quasielastic and Δ -production peaks. The relation to approaches based on the independent particle of the nucleus and the implications for the analysis of flux-integrated neutrino-nucleus cross sections are discussed.

  7. Effective spectral function for quasielastic scattering on nuclei from 2H1 to 82 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodek, A.; Christy, M. E.; Coopersmith, B.

    2015-10-01

    Final state interactions distort the shape of the differential cross section at the peak and increase the cross section at the tails of the distribution. We show that the kinematic distributions predicted by the ψ' superscaling formalism can be well described with a modified effective spectral function (ESF). By construction, models using ESF in combination with the transverse enhancement contribution correctly predict electron QE scattering data. Our values for the binding energy parameter Δ are smaller than ɛ ¯ extracted within the Fermi gas model from pre 1971 data by Moniz [8], probably because these early cross sections were not corrected for coulomb effects.

  8. Rayleigh radiance computations for satellite remote sensing: accounting for the effect of sensor spectral response function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2016-05-30

    To understand and assess the effect of the sensor spectral response function (SRF) on the accuracy of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) Rayleigh-scattering radiance computation, new TOA Rayleigh radiance lookup tables (LUTs) over global oceans and inland waters have been generated. The new Rayleigh LUTs include spectral coverage of 335-2555 nm, all possible solar-sensor geometries, and surface wind speeds of 0-30 m/s. Using the new Rayleigh LUTs, the sensor SRF effect on the accuracy of the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation has been evaluated for spectral bands of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1, showing some important uncertainties for VIIRS-SNPP particularly for large solar- and/or sensor-zenith angles as well as for large Rayleigh optical thicknesses (i.e., short wavelengths) and bands with broad spectral bandwidths. To accurately account for the sensor SRF effect, a new correction algorithm has been developed for VIIRS spectral bands, which improves the TOA Rayleigh radiance accuracy to ~0.01% even for the large solar-zenith angles of 70°-80°, compared with the error of ~0.7% without applying the correction for the VIIRS-SNPP 410 nm band. The same methodology that accounts for the sensor SRF effect on the Rayleigh radiance computation can be used for other satellite sensors. In addition, with the new Rayleigh LUTs, the effect of surface atmospheric pressure variation on the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation can be calculated precisely, and no specific atmospheric pressure correction algorithm is needed. There are some other important applications and advantages to using the new Rayleigh LUTs for satellite remote sensing, including an efficient and accurate TOA Rayleigh radiance computation for hyperspectral satellite remote sensing, detector-based TOA Rayleigh radiance computation, Rayleigh radiance calculations for high altitude

  9. A spectral scheme for Kohn-Sham density functional theory of clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Amartya S.; Elliott, Ryan S.; James, Richard D.

    2015-04-01

    Starting from the observation that one of the most successful methods for solving the Kohn-Sham equations for periodic systems - the plane-wave method - is a spectral method based on eigenfunction expansion, we formulate a spectral method designed towards solving the Kohn-Sham equations for clusters. This allows for efficient calculation of the electronic structure of clusters (and molecules) with high accuracy and systematic convergence properties without the need for any artificial periodicity. The basis functions in this method form a complete orthonormal set and are expressible in terms of spherical harmonics and spherical Bessel functions. Computation of the occupied eigenstates of the discretized Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian is carried out using a combination of preconditioned block eigensolvers and Chebyshev polynomial filter accelerated subspace iterations. Several algorithmic and computational aspects of the method, including computation of the electrostatics terms and parallelization are discussed. We have implemented these methods and algorithms into an efficient and reliable package called ClusterES (Cluster Electronic Structure). A variety of benchmark calculations employing local and non-local pseudopotentials are carried out using our package and the results are compared to the literature. Convergence properties of the basis set are discussed through numerical examples. Computations involving large systems that contain thousands of electrons are demonstrated to highlight the efficacy of our methodology. The use of our method to study clusters with arbitrary point group symmetries is briefly discussed.

  10. Two-Flux Green's Function Analysis for Transient Spectral Radiation in a Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    An analysis is developed for obtaining transient temperatures in a two-layer semitransparent composite with spectrally dependent properties. Each external boundary of the composite is subjected to radiation and convection. The two-flux radiative transfer equations are solved by deriving a Green's function. This yields the local radiative heat source needed to numerically solve the transient energy equation. An advantage of the two-flux method is that isotropic scattering is included without added complexity. The layer refractive indices are larger than one. This produces internal reflections at the boundaries and the internal interface; the reflections are assumed diffuse. Spectral results using the Green's function method are verified by comparing with numerical solutions using the exact radiative transfer equations. Transient temperature distributions are given to illustrate the effect of radiative heating on one side of a composite with external convective cooling. The protection of a material from incident radiation is illustrated by adding scattering to the layer adjacent to the radiative source.

  11. Numerical modeling of wave propagation in functionally graded materials using time-domain spectral Chebyshev elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Bui, Tinh Quoc; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Lim, Chee Wah

    2014-02-01

    Numerical modeling of the Lamb wave propagation in functionally graded materials (FGMs) by a two-dimensional time-domain spectral finite element method (SpFEM) is presented. The high-order Chebyshev polynomials as approximation functions are used in the present formulation, which provides the capability to take into account the through thickness variation of the material properties. The efficiency and accuracy of the present model with one and two layers of 5th order spectral elements in modeling wave propagation in FGM plates are analyzed. Different excitation frequencies in a wide range of 28-350 kHz are investigated, and the dispersion properties obtained by the present model are verified by reference results. The through thickness wave structure of two principal Lamb modes are extracted and analyzed by the symmetry and relative amplitude of the vertical and horizontal oscillations. The differences with respect to Lamb modes generated in homogeneous plates are explained. Zero-crossing and wavelet signal processing-spectrum decomposition procedures are implemented to obtain phase and group velocities and their dispersion properties. So it is attested how this approach can be practically employed for simulation, calibration and optimization of Lamb wave based nondestructive evaluation techniques for the FGMs. The capability of modeling stress wave propagation through the thickness of an FGM specimen subjected to impact load is also investigated, which shows that the present method is highly accurate as compared with other existing reference data.

  12. A spectral scheme for Kohn–Sham density functional theory of clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Amartya S. Elliott, Ryan S. James, Richard D.

    2015-04-15

    Starting from the observation that one of the most successful methods for solving the Kohn–Sham equations for periodic systems – the plane-wave method – is a spectral method based on eigenfunction expansion, we formulate a spectral method designed towards solving the Kohn–Sham equations for clusters. This allows for efficient calculation of the electronic structure of clusters (and molecules) with high accuracy and systematic convergence properties without the need for any artificial periodicity. The basis functions in this method form a complete orthonormal set and are expressible in terms of spherical harmonics and spherical Bessel functions. Computation of the occupied eigenstates of the discretized Kohn–Sham Hamiltonian is carried out using a combination of preconditioned block eigensolvers and Chebyshev polynomial filter accelerated subspace iterations. Several algorithmic and computational aspects of the method, including computation of the electrostatics terms and parallelization are discussed. We have implemented these methods and algorithms into an efficient and reliable package called ClusterES (Cluster Electronic Structure). A variety of benchmark calculations employing local and non-local pseudopotentials are carried out using our package and the results are compared to the literature. Convergence properties of the basis set are discussed through numerical examples. Computations involving large systems that contain thousands of electrons are demonstrated to highlight the efficacy of our methodology. The use of our method to study clusters with arbitrary point group symmetries is briefly discussed.

  13. Performance evaluation of spectral vegetation indices using a statistical sensitivity function

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, L.; Peters, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    A great number of spectral vegetation indices (VIs) have been developed to estimate biophysical parameters of vegetation. Traditional techniques for evaluating the performance of VIs are regression-based statistics, such as the coefficient of determination and root mean square error. These statistics, however, are not capable of quantifying the detailed relationship between VIs and biophysical parameters because the sensitivity of a VI is usually a function of the biophysical parameter instead of a constant. To better quantify this relationship, we developed a "sensitivity function" for measuring the sensitivity of a VI to biophysical parameters. The sensitivity function is defined as the first derivative of the regression function, divided by the standard error of the dependent variable prediction. The function elucidates the change in sensitivity over the range of the biophysical parameter. The Student's t- or z-statistic can be used to test the significance of VI sensitivity. Additionally, we developed a "relative sensitivity function" that compares the sensitivities of two VIs when the biophysical parameters are unavailable. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Coupled-cluster representation of Green function employing modified spectral resolutions of similarity transformed Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, K.; Bhaskaran-Nair, K.; Shelton, W. A.

    2014-09-07

    In this paper we discuss a new formalism for producing an analytic coupled-cluster (CC) Green's function for an N-electron system by shifting the poles of similarity transformed Hamiltonians represented in N - 1 and N + 1 electron Hilbert spaces. Simple criteria are derived for the states in N - 1 and N + 1 electron spaces that are then corrected in the spectral resolution of the corresponding matrix representations of the similarity transformed Hamiltonian. The accurate description of excited state processes within a Green's function formalism would be of significant importance to a number of scientific communities ranging from physics and chemistry to engineering and the biological sciences. This is because the Green's function methodology provides a direct path for not only calculating properties whose underlying origins come from coupled many-body interactions but also provides a straightforward path for calculating electron transport, response, and correlation functions that allows for a direct link with experiment. Finally, as a special case of this general formulation, we discuss the application of this technique for Green's function defined by the CC with singles and doubles representation of the ground-state wave function.

  15. Coupled-cluster representation of Green function employing modified spectral resolutions of similarity transformed Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, K. Bhaskaran-Nair, K.; Shelton, W. A.

    2014-09-07

    In this paper we discuss a new formalism for producing an analytic coupled-cluster (CC) Green's function for an N-electron system by shifting the poles of similarity transformed Hamiltonians represented in N − 1 and N + 1 electron Hilbert spaces. Simple criteria are derived for the states in N − 1 and N + 1 electron spaces that are then corrected in the spectral resolution of the corresponding matrix representations of the similarity transformed Hamiltonian. The accurate description of excited state processes within a Green's function formalism would be of significant importance to a number of scientific communities ranging from physics and chemistry to engineering and the biological sciences. This is because the Green's function methodology provides a direct path for not only calculating properties whose underlying origins come from coupled many-body interactions but also provides a straightforward path for calculating electron transport, response, and correlation functions that allows for a direct link with experiment. As a special case of this general formulation, we discuss the application of this technique for Green's function defined by the CC with singles and doubles representation of the ground-state wave function.

  16. Velocity and attenuation of scalar and elastic waves in random media: a spectral function approach.

    PubMed

    Calvet, Marie; Margerin, Ludovic

    2012-03-01

    This paper investigates the scattering of scalar and elastic waves in two-phase materials and single-mineral-cubic, hexagonal, orthorhombic-polycrystalline aggregates with randomly oriented grains. Based on the Dyson equation for the mean field, explicit expressions for the imaginary part of Green's function in the frequency-wavenumber domain (ω, p), also known as the spectral function, are derived. This approach allows the identification of propagating modes with their relative contribution, and the computation of both attenuation and phase velocity for each mode. The results should be valid from the Rayleigh (low-frequency) to the geometrical optics (high-frequency) regime. Comparisons with other approaches are presented for both scalar and elastic waves. PMID:22423683

  17. Perturbative expansion of τ hadronic spectral function moments and α s extractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneke, Martin; Boito, Diogo; Jamin, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Various moments of the hadronic spectral functions have been employed in the determination of the strong coupling α s from tau decays. In this work we study the behaviour of their perturbative series under different assumptions for the large-order behaviour of the Adler function, extending previous work on the tau hadronic width. We find that the moments can be divided into a small number of classes, whose characteristics depend only on generic features of the moment weight function and Adler function series. Some moments that are commonly employed in α s analyses from τ decays should be avoided because of their perturbative instability. This conclusion is corroborated by a simplified α s extraction from individual moments. Furthermore, under reasonable assumptions for the higher-order behaviour of the perturbative series, fixed-order perturbation theory (FOPT) provides the preferred framework for the renormalization group improvement of all moments that show good perturbative behaviour. Finally, we provide further evidence for the plausibility of the description of the Adler function in terms of a small number of leading renormalon singularities.

  18. [A Detection Technique for Gas Concentration Based on the Spectral Line Shape Function].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mo; Yang, Bing-chu; Tao, Shao-hua

    2015-04-01

    The methods that can rapidly and precisely measure concentrations of various gases have extensive applications in the fields such as air quality analysis, environmental pollution detection, and so on. The gas detection method based on the tunable laser absorption spectroscopy is considered a promising technique. For the infrared spectrum detection techniques, the line shape function of an absorption spectrum of a gas is an important parameter in qualitative and quantitative analysis of a gas. Specifically, how to obtain the line shape function of an absorption spectrum of a gas quickly and accurately is a key problem in the gas detection fields. In this paper we analyzed several existing line shape functions and proposed a method to calculate precisely the line shape function of a gas, and investigated the relation between the gas concentration and the peak value of a line shape function. Then we experimentally measured the absorption spectra of an acetylene gas in the wavelength range of 1,515-1,545 nm with a tunable laser source and a built-in spectrometer. With Lambert-Beer law we calculated the peak values of the line shape function of the gas at the given frequencies, and obtained a fitting curve for the line shape function in the whole waveband by using a computer program. Comparing the measured results with the calculated results of the Voigt function, we found that there was a deviation-between the experimental results and the calculated results. And we found that the measured concentration of the acetylene gas by using the fitting curve of the line shape function was more accurate and compatible with the actual situation. Hence, the empirical formula for the line shape function obtained from the experimental results would be more suitable for the concentration measurement of a gas. As the fitting curve for the line shape function of the acetylene gas has been deduced from the experiment, the corresponding peak values of the spectral lines can be

  19. Spectral and structural studies of the anti-cancer drug Flutamide by density functional theoretical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariappan, G.; Sundaraganesan, N.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive screening of the more recent DFT theoretical approach to structural analysis is presented in this section of theoretical structural analysis. The chemical name of 2-methyl-N-[4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-propanamide is usually called as Flutamide (In the present study it is abbreviated as FLT) and is an important and efficacious drug in the treatment of anti-cancer resistant. The molecular geometry, vibrational spectra, electronic and NMR spectral interpretation of Flutamide have been studied with the aid of density functional theory method (DFT). The vibrational assignments of the normal modes were performed on the basis of the PED calculations using the VEDA 4 program. Comparison of computational results with X-ray diffraction results of Flutamide allowed the evaluation of structure predictions and confirmed B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) as accurate for structure determination. Application of scaling factors for IR and Raman frequency predictions showed good agreement with experimental values. This is supported the assignment of the major contributors of the vibration modes of the title compound. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions leading to its bioactivity, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The comparison of measured FTIR, FT-Raman, and UV-Visible data to calculated values allowed assignment of major spectral features of the title molecule. Besides, Frontier molecular orbital analyze was also investigated using theoretical calculations.

  20. Effect of Doping on the Electron Spectral Function of One-Dimensional Spin-Charge-Well-Separated Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yong; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Xiaowei; Lu, Junwang; Zhao, Hua

    2016-07-01

    The electron spectral function has been studied based on a model suitable for one-dimensional (1D) systems with spin and charge degrees of freedom well-separated. The result can permit a qualitative description of the spin-charge separated spectral feature observed in 1D cuprates. We find that the electron chemical potential shifts downward rapidly with hole doping, making the separated spectral feature harder and harder to be entirely detected in an angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurement, which explains the ARPES result strangely observed in the 1/4-filled Cu-O chains in PrBa2Cu4O8. Additionally, doping evolution of the spectral function is found to show rich physics, and an essential feature is that a new coherent band gradually appears with hole doping just about the top of the lower Hubbard band, which is very similar to that observed in two-dimensional cuprates.

  1. Time-dependent density functional theory for open systems with a positivity-preserving decomposition scheme for environment spectral functions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, RuLin; Zheng, Xiao; Kwok, YanHo; Xie, Hang; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-14

    Understanding electronic dynamics on material surfaces is fundamentally important for applications including nanoelectronics, inhomogeneous catalysis, and photovoltaics. Practical approaches based on time-dependent density functional theory for open systems have been developed to characterize the dissipative dynamics of electrons in bulk materials. The accuracy and reliability of such approaches depend critically on how the electronic structure and memory effects of surrounding material environment are accounted for. In this work, we develop a novel squared-Lorentzian decomposition scheme, which preserves the positive semi-definiteness of the environment spectral matrix. The resulting electronic dynamics is guaranteed to be both accurate and convergent even in the long-time limit. The long-time stability of electronic dynamics simulation is thus greatly improved within the current decomposition scheme. The validity and usefulness of our new approach are exemplified via two prototypical model systems: quasi-one-dimensional atomic chains and two-dimensional bilayer graphene.

  2. Time-dependent density functional theory for open systems with a positivity-preserving decomposition scheme for environment spectral functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, RuLin; Zheng, Xiao; Kwok, YanHo; Xie, Hang; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-01

    Understanding electronic dynamics on material surfaces is fundamentally important for applications including nanoelectronics, inhomogeneous catalysis, and photovoltaics. Practical approaches based on time-dependent density functional theory for open systems have been developed to characterize the dissipative dynamics of electrons in bulk materials. The accuracy and reliability of such approaches depend critically on how the electronic structure and memory effects of surrounding material environment are accounted for. In this work, we develop a novel squared-Lorentzian decomposition scheme, which preserves the positive semi-definiteness of the environment spectral matrix. The resulting electronic dynamics is guaranteed to be both accurate and convergent even in the long-time limit. The long-time stability of electronic dynamics simulation is thus greatly improved within the current decomposition scheme. The validity and usefulness of our new approach are exemplified via two prototypical model systems: quasi-one-dimensional atomic chains and two-dimensional bilayer graphene.

  3. First Measurement of the {rho} Spectral Function in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Specht, H.J.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.

    2006-04-28

    We report on a precision measurement of low-mass muon pairs in 158 AGeV indium-indium collisions at the CERN SPS. A significant excess of pairs is observed above the yield expected from neutral meson decays. The unprecedented sample size of 360 000 dimuons and the good mass resolution of about 2% allow us to isolate the excess by subtraction of the decay sources. The shape of the resulting mass spectrum is consistent with a dominant contribution from {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{yields}{rho}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} annihilation. The associated space-time averaged {rho} spectral function shows a strong broadening, but essentially no shift in mass. This may rule out theoretical models linking hadron masses directly to the chiral condensate.

  4. Bayesian Approach to Spectral Function Reconstruction for Euclidean Quantum Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnier, Yannis; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel approach to the inference of spectral functions from Euclidean time correlator data that makes close contact with modern Bayesian concepts. Our method differs significantly from the maximum entropy method (MEM). A new set of axioms is postulated for the prior probability, leading to an improved expression, which is devoid of the asymptotically flat directions present in the Shanon-Jaynes entropy. Hyperparameters are integrated out explicitly, liberating us from the Gaussian approximations underlying the evidence approach of the maximum entropy method. We present a realistic test of our method in the context of the nonperturbative extraction of the heavy quark potential. Based on hard-thermal-loop correlator mock data, we establish firm requirements in the number of data points and their accuracy for a successful extraction of the potential from lattice QCD. Finally we reinvestigate quenched lattice QCD correlators from a previous study and provide an improved potential estimation at T=2.33TC.

  5. Probing the {rho} spectral function in hot and dense nuclear matter by dileptons

    SciTech Connect

    Cassing, W.; Bratkovskaya, E.L.; Rapp, R.; Wambach, J.

    1998-02-01

    We present a dynamical study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN-SPS energies on the basis of the covariant transport approach HSD employing a momentum-dependent {rho}-meson spectral function that includes the pion modifications in the nuclear medium as well as the polarization of the {rho} meson due to resonant {rho}-N scattering. We find that the experimental data from the CERES and HELIOS-3 Collaborations can be described equally well as within the dropping {rho}-mass scenario. Whereas corresponding dilepton q{sub T} spectra are found to be very similar, the inclusive dilepton yield in the invariant mass range 0.85{le}M{le}1.0 GeV should allow us to disentangle the two scenarios experimentally. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Multi-spectral Metasurface for Different Functional Control of Reflection Waves.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Pan, Wenbo; Ma, Xiaoliang; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Metasurface have recently generated much interest due to its strong manipulation of electromagnetic wave and its easy fabrication compared to bulky metamaterial. Here, we propose the design of a multi-spectral metasurface that can achieve beam deflection and broadband diffusion simultaneously at two different frequency bands. The metasurface is composed of two-layered metallic patterns backed by a metallic ground plane. The top-layer metasurface utilizes the cross-line structures with two different dimensions for producing 0 and π reflection phase response, while the bottom-layer metasurface is realized by a topological morphing of the I-shaped patterns for creating the gradient phase distribution. The whole metasurface is demonstrated to independently control the reflected waves to realize different functions at two bands when illuminated by a normal linear-polarized wave. Both simulation and experimental results show that the beam deflection is achieved at K-band with broadband diffusion at X-Ku band. PMID:27001206

  7. Multi-spectral Metasurface for Different Functional Control of Reflection Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng; Pan, Wenbo; Ma, Xiaoliang; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-03-01

    Metasurface have recently generated much interest due to its strong manipulation of electromagnetic wave and its easy fabrication compared to bulky metamaterial. Here, we propose the design of a multi-spectral metasurface that can achieve beam deflection and broadband diffusion simultaneously at two different frequency bands. The metasurface is composed of two-layered metallic patterns backed by a metallic ground plane. The top-layer metasurface utilizes the cross-line structures with two different dimensions for producing 0 and π reflection phase response, while the bottom-layer metasurface is realized by a topological morphing of the I-shaped patterns for creating the gradient phase distribution. The whole metasurface is demonstrated to independently control the reflected waves to realize different functions at two bands when illuminated by a normal linear-polarized wave. Both simulation and experimental results show that the beam deflection is achieved at K-band with broadband diffusion at X-Ku band.

  8. An AC constant-response method for electrophysiological measurements of spectral sensitivity functions.

    PubMed

    de Souza, J M; DeVoe, R D; Schoeps, C; Ventura, D F

    1996-10-01

    A number of methods have been used in the past to measure spectral sensitivity (S(lambda)) functions of electric responses in the visual system. We present here a microcomputer based, AC, constant-response method for automatic on-line measurement of S(lambda) in cells with or without a sustained tonic response. It is based on feedback adjustment of light intensity to obtain constant peak-to-peak amplitudes of response to a flickering stimulus as the spectrum is scanned between 300 and 700 nm in 4 nm steps. It combines the advantages of: (1) on-line presentation of S(lambda) curves; (2) constant light adaptation; (3) sampling of many points; and (4) fast data collection time. The system can be applied to sensitivity or threshold (e.g., S(lambda), dark adaptation, receptive field) measurements of any electrically recorded visual response. PMID:8912193

  9. Multi-spectral Metasurface for Different Functional Control of Reflection Waves

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng; Pan, Wenbo; Ma, Xiaoliang; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Metasurface have recently generated much interest due to its strong manipulation of electromagnetic wave and its easy fabrication compared to bulky metamaterial. Here, we propose the design of a multi-spectral metasurface that can achieve beam deflection and broadband diffusion simultaneously at two different frequency bands. The metasurface is composed of two-layered metallic patterns backed by a metallic ground plane. The top-layer metasurface utilizes the cross-line structures with two different dimensions for producing 0 and π reflection phase response, while the bottom-layer metasurface is realized by a topological morphing of the I-shaped patterns for creating the gradient phase distribution. The whole metasurface is demonstrated to independently control the reflected waves to realize different functions at two bands when illuminated by a normal linear-polarized wave. Both simulation and experimental results show that the beam deflection is achieved at K-band with broadband diffusion at X-Ku band. PMID:27001206

  10. Confronting QCD with the experimental hadronic spectral functions from tau decay

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, C. A.; Nasrallah, N. F.; Schilcher, K.

    2009-09-01

    The (nonstrange) vector and axial-vector spectral functions extracted from {tau} decay by the ALEPH Collaboration are confronted with QCD in the framework of a finite energy sum rule involving a polynomial kernel tuned to suppress the region beyond the kinematical end point where there is no longer data. This effectively allows for a QCD finite energy sum rule analysis to be performed beyond the region of the existing data. Results show excellent agreement between data and perturbative QCD in the remarkably wide energy range s=3-10 GeV{sup 2}, leaving room for a dimension d=4 vacuum condensate consistent with values in the literature. A hypothetical dimension d=2 term in the operator product expansion is found to be extremely small, consistent with zero. Fixed order and contour improved perturbation theory are used, with both leading to similar results within errors. Full consistency is found between vector and axial-vector channel results.

  11. Effects of motor programming on the power spectral density function of finger and wrist movements.

    PubMed

    Van Galen, G P; Van Doorn, R R; Schomaker, L R

    1990-11-01

    Power spectral density analysis was applied to the frequency content of the acceleration signal of pen movements in line drawing. The relative power in frequency bands between 1 and 32 Hz was measured as a function of motoric and anatomic task demands. Results showed a decrease of power at the lower frequencies (1-4 Hz) of the spectrum and an increase in the middle (9-12 Hz), with increasing motor demands. These findings evidence the inhibition of visual control and the disinhibition of physiological tremor under conditions of increased programming demands. Adductive movements displayed less power than abductive movements in the lower end of the spectrum, with a simultaneous increase at the higher frequencies. The relevance of the method for the measurement of neuromotor noise as a possible origin of delays in motor behavior is discussed. PMID:2148590

  12. Spectral methods for the equations of classical density-functional theory: relaxation dynamics of microscopic films.

    PubMed

    Yatsyshin, Petr; Savva, Nikos; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2012-03-28

    We propose a numerical scheme based on the Chebyshev pseudo-spectral collocation method for solving the integral and integro-differential equations of the density-functional theory and its dynamic extension. We demonstrate the exponential convergence of our scheme, which typically requires much fewer discretization points to achieve the same accuracy compared to conventional methods. This discretization scheme can also incorporate the asymptotic behavior of the density, which can be of interest in the investigation of open systems. Our scheme is complemented with a numerical continuation algorithm and an appropriate time stepping algorithm, thus constituting a complete tool for an efficient and accurate calculation of phase diagrams and dynamic phenomena. To illustrate the numerical methodology, we consider an argon-like fluid adsorbed on a Lennard-Jones planar wall. First, we obtain a set of phase diagrams corresponding to the equilibrium adsorption and compare our results obtained from different approximations to the hard sphere part of the free energy functional. Using principles from the theory of sub-critical dynamic phase field models, we formulate the time-dependent equations which describe the evolution of the adsorbed film. Through dynamic considerations we interpret the phase diagrams in terms of their stability. Simulations of various wetting and drying scenarios allow us to rationalize the dynamic behavior of the system and its relation to the equilibrium properties of wetting and drying. PMID:22462841

  13. Spectral function in electro-weak interactions and its impact on neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, C.-M.

    2015-10-15

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have entered the high-precision era in the last few years. The oscillation parameters, as a measure of the neutrino properties, are extracted from the energy-dependent oscillation probability function. Different types of nuclear dynamics deeply influence the determination of neutrino energies in neutrino oscillation experiments. As a consequence, a comprehensive understanding of various nuclear dynamics interprets the scenario behind the neutrino interaction with nucleus and nuclei. The initial ground-state structure of the target nucleus is categorized in one typical nuclear dynamics, and its realistic description is generally referred as the spectral function (SF). Implementing the SF for each target nucleus into the GENIE neutrino event generator is the preliminary step necessary to obtain a reliable determination of the kinematics of all detectable final-products from neutrino interactions. At the intermedium-range of neutrino energies (∼ 1 GeV), the kinematic energy reconstruction is the vastly used approach and consists in identifying final-products as coming from the charged-current quasi-elastic-like (CCQE-like) neutrino interactions.

  14. Spectral function in electro-weak interactions and its impact on neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C.-M.

    2015-10-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have entered the high-precision era in the last few years. The oscillation parameters, as a measure of the neutrino properties, are extracted from the energy-dependent oscillation probability function. Different types of nuclear dynamics deeply influence the determination of neutrino energies in neutrino oscillation experiments. As a consequence, a comprehensive understanding of various nuclear dynamics interprets the scenario behind the neutrino interaction with nucleus and nuclei. The initial ground-state structure of the target nucleus is categorized in one typical nuclear dynamics, and its realistic description is generally referred as the spectral function (SF). Implementing the SF for each target nucleus into the GENIE neutrino event generator is the preliminary step necessary to obtain a reliable determination of the kinematics of all detectable final-products from neutrino interactions. At the intermedium-range of neutrino energies (˜ 1 GeV), the kinematic energy reconstruction is the vastly used approach and consists in identifying final-products as coming from the charged-current quasi-elastic-like (CCQE-like) neutrino interactions.

  15. An Evans-function approach to spectral stability of internal solitary waves in stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiber, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Frequently encountered in nature, internal solitary waves in stratified fluids have been investigated experimentally, theoretically, and numerically. Mathematically, these waves are exact solutions of the incompressible 2D Euler equations. Contrasting with a rich existence theory and the development of methods for their computation, their stability analysis has hardly received attention at a rigorous mathematical level. This paper proposes a new approach to the investigation of stability of internal solitary waves in a continuously stratified fluid and carries out the following four steps of this approach: (I) to formulate the eigenvalue problem as an infinite-dimensional spatial-dynamical system, (II) to introduce finite-dimensional truncations of the spatial-dynamics description, (III) to demonstrate that each truncation, of any order, permits a well-defined Evans function, (IV) to prove absence of small zeros of the Evans function in the small-amplitude limit. The latter notably implies the low-frequency spectral stability of small-amplitude waves to arbitrarily high truncation order.

  16. Resonant photoemission study of the 4f spectral function of cerium in Ce/Fe(100) interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowski, N.; Bertran, F.; Gourieux, T.; Kierren, B.; Malterre, D.; Panaccione, G. |

    1997-11-01

    In this paper, we present a resonant photoemission study of the cerium 4f spectral function in Ce/Fe(100) interfaces. By covering cerium ultrathin films with lanthanum, we completely suppress the surface contribution of the spectra. Then we show that the cerium atoms at the interface are in an intermediate valent state, whereas the f{sup 1} configuration is stabilized in the top layer. This method allows us to obtain the genuine 4f spectral function of the interface, and could be extended to a study of Ce-based compounds. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Quantitative determination of the discretization and truncation errors in numerical renormalization-group calculations of spectral functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitko, Rok

    2011-08-01

    In the numerical renormalization-group (NRG) calculations of spectral functions of quantum impurity models, the results are always affected by discretization and truncation errors. The discretization errors can be alleviated by averaging over different discretization meshes (“z-averaging”), but since each partial calculation is performed for a finite discrete system, there are always some residual discretization and finite-size errors. The truncation errors affect the energies of the states and result in the displacement of the delta-peak spectral contributions from their correct positions. The two types of errors are interrelated: for coarser discretization, the discretization errors increase, but the truncation errors decrease since the separation of energy scales is enhanced. In this work, it is shown that by calculating a series of spectral functions for a range of the total number of states kept in the NRG truncation, it is possible to estimate the errors and determine the error bars for spectral functions, which is important when making accurate comparison to the results obtained by other methods and for determining the errors in the extracted quantities (such as peak positions, heights, and widths). The closely related problem of spectral broadening is also discussed: it is shown that the overbroadening contorts the results without, surprisingly, reducing the variance of the curves. It is thus important to determine the results in the limit of zero broadening. The method is applied to determine the error bounds for the Kondo peak splitting in an external magnetic field. For moderately strong fields, the results are consistent with the Bethe ansatz study by Moore and Wen [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.85.1722 85, 1722 (2000)]. We also discuss the regime of large U/Γ ratio. It is shown that in the strong-field limit, a spectral step is observed in the spectrum precisely at the Zeeman frequency until the field becomes so strong that

  18. Use of power spectral density (PSD) functions in specifying optics for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikens, David M.; Wolfe, C. Robert; Lawson, Janice K.

    1995-08-01

    In the second half of the 1990's, LLNL and others will be designing and beginning construction of the National Ignition Facility. This new laser will be capable of producing the worlds first controlled fusion ignition and burn, completing a vital milestone on the path of Fusion Energy. This facility will use more than 7,000 optical components, most of which have a rectangular aperture, which measure greater than 600 mm on the diagonal. In order to optimize the performance versus cost of the laser system, we have determined that specifications based on the Power Spectral Density (PSD) functions are the most effective for controlling mid-spatial wavelength errors. The draft optics specifications based on a combination of PSD and conventional roughness and P-V requirements are presented, with a discussion of their origins. The emphasis is on the application of a PSD function for transmitted wavefront optical specifications, and the benefits thereof. The PSD function is the most appropriate way to characterize transmitted wavefront errors with spatial frequencies ranging from several centimeters to a few hundred nanometers, with amplitudes in the (lambda) /100 regime. Such errors are commonly generated by cost effective, deterministic finishing technologies, and can be damaging to the laser, as well as causing unnecessary energy loss and inability to focus, in a high energy laser application. In addition, periodic errors can occur as a result of errors at other steps in the fabrication process, such as machine vibration in a fixed abrasive step, or material homogeneity ripple. The control of such errors will be essential to the construction of future high energy lasers.

  19. Development of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for in vivo Functional Imaging of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lin

    Optical coherence tomography is a rapidly developing optical imaging modality capable of noninvasively providing depth resolved information of biological tissue at micrometer scale. In this thesis, we described several OCT technologies that can be used to double the imaging depth, realize functional vasculature imaging of biological tissue and increase the imaging speed of OCT system. Aim 1: Use of a scanner to introduce spatial frequency modulation to OCT spectral interferograms for in vivo full-range Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. A novel method was developed that could easily introduce a modulation frequency onto the X-direction (i.e., B-scan) of the FDOCT scanning system, enabling full-range Fourier-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (frFDOCT). Compared to the conventional FDOCT system, the newly developed frFDOCT system can provide increased system sensitivity and deeper imaging depth. The previous technology that can achieve frFDOCT either needed multiple steps for data capturing, which is time consuming, or required additional components which increased the system's complexity. The newly developed method generates a modulation spatial frequency in the spectral interferogram by simply offsetting the probe beam at the X-scanner. Aim 2: Using optical micro-angiography to achieve in vivo volumetric imaging of vascular perfusion within human retina and choroids. Optical Micro-Angiography (OMAG) is a functional extension of FDOCT technology. It can achieve visualization of vasculature network of biological tissue. In order to apply the OMAG method to image vasculature map of human retina and choroid, a phase compensation algorithm was developed, which could minimize the motion artifacts generated by the movements of human eye and head. Aim 3: Developing ultrahigh sensitive optical micro-angiography to achieve micro vasculature imaging of biological tissue. To improve the vasculature image quality, we developed ultrahigh sensitive OMAG (UHS

  20. Real-time Functional Analysis of Inertial Microfluidic Devices via Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Dong, Biqin; Chen, Siyu; Zhou, Fan; Chan, Christina H Y; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Hao F; Sun, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We report the application of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) technology that enables real-time functional analysis of sorting microparticles and cells in an inertial microfluidic device. We demonstrated high-speed, high-resolution acquisition of cross-sectional images at a frame rate of 350 Hz, with a lateral resolution of 3 μm and an axial resolution of 1 μm within the microfluidic channel filled with water. We analyzed the temporal sequence of cross-sectional SD-OCT images to determine the position and diameter of microspheres in a spiral microfluidic channel under various flow rates. We used microspheres with known diameters to validate the sub-micrometer precision of the particle size analysis based on a scattering model of spherical microparticles. An additional investigation of sorting live HT-29 cells in the spiral microfluidic channel indicated that the distribution of cells within in the microchannel has a close correspondence with the cells' size distribution. The label-free real-time imaging and analysis of microscale particles in flow offers robustness for practical applications with live cells and allows us to better understand the mechanisms of particle separations in microfluidic sorting systems. PMID:27619202

  1. Bayesian approach to spectral function reconstruction for Euclidean quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Burnier, Yannis; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel approach to the inference of spectral functions from Euclidean time correlator data that makes close contact with modern Bayesian concepts. Our method differs significantly from the maximum entropy method (MEM). A new set of axioms is postulated for the prior probability, leading to an improved expression, which is devoid of the asymptotically flat directions present in the Shanon-Jaynes entropy. Hyperparameters are integrated out explicitly, liberating us from the Gaussian approximations underlying the evidence approach of the maximum entropy method. We present a realistic test of our method in the context of the nonperturbative extraction of the heavy quark potential. Based on hard-thermal-loop correlator mock data, we establish firm requirements in the number of data points and their accuracy for a successful extraction of the potential from lattice QCD. Finally we reinvestigate quenched lattice QCD correlators from a previous study and provide an improved potential estimation at T=2.33T(C). PMID:24237510

  2. Experimental measurements of frequency transfer function due to smoothing by spectral dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, Jacques; Penninckx, Denis

    2013-02-01

    In order to avoid propagation nonlinearities (Kerr effect, Raman and Brillouin scattering) and optical damage, nanosecond high power lasers such as the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) amplify quasi-monochromatic pulses. But they generate a static speckle pattern in the focal spot. This speckle pattern needs to be smoothed in order to lower high intensity peaks which are detrimental during the propagation and the interaction with the plasma in the target. Different techniques are implemented to smooth the intensity nevertheless all high power lasers carry at least smoothing by spectral dispersion. It consists in broadening the spectrum through a phase modulator and focusing the different wavelengths at slightly different positions using a diffractive element such as a grating. In the temporal domain, it has been theoretically shown that the pulse power is thus filtered between near field and far field [1, 2]. The filtering allows techniques such as "picket fence" to increase conversion efficiency [1] and reduces detrimental effects of unwanted intensity distortions called FM-AM conversion [2, 3]. Here, to the best of our knowledge we show the first experimental measurement of the frequency transfer function of this filtering. Measurements are in perfect agreement with the numerical calculations.

  3. Psychomotor performance during ozone exposure: spectral and discriminant function analysis of EEG

    SciTech Connect

    Gliner, J.A.; Horvath, S.M; Sorich, R.A.; Hanley, J.

    1980-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of ozone on the electroencephalogram during psychomotor performance. The first experiment consisted of a 2-h visual sustained attention task in room air and 0.75 parts per million (ppM) ozone. The second experiment was a divided attention study which combined a visual choice reaction time situation with an auditory sustained attention task. Ozone levels in this experiment were 0.0 ppM, 0.3 ppM, and 0.75 ppM. Spectral and discriminant function analyses were performed on the EEG collected during these studies. Attempts were made to categorize the EEG between different ozone levels, at rest, during each task performance, and between task and no-task performance within each ambient air condition. Discriminations between conditions for individuals were quite good, but discriminations for the combined subjects were disappointing with the exception of those between task and no-task conditions, which were moderately good.

  4. Effects of Mg 2+on spectral characteristics and photosynthetic functions of spinach photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chen; Xiao, Wu; Hao, Huang; Xiaoqing, Liu; Chao, Liu; Lei, Zheng; Fashui, Hong

    2009-03-01

    In the present paper we report the results obtained with the photosystem II (PSII) isolated from spinach treated by MgCl 2, and studied the effect of Mg 2+ on spectral characteristics and photosynthetic functions of PSII. The results showed that Mg 2+ treatment at a suitable concentration could significantly increase the absorption intensity of PSII and the intensity ratio of Soret band to Q band of chlorophyll-a. The treatment also elevated the excited peak intensity at 230, 278 and 343 nm, and the emitted peak intensity at 304 and 682 nm, and the ratio of F278/ F230, respectively. The results implied that Mg 2+ increased absorbance for visible light, improving energy transfer among amino acids within PSII protein complex and accelerating energy transport from tyrosine residue to chlorophyll-a. The photochemical activity and oxygen evolving rate of PSII were also enhanced by Mg 2+. This is viewed as evidence that Mg 2+ can promote energy transfer and oxygen evolution in PSII of spinach.

  5. Melting of stripe phases and its signature in the single-particle spectral function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raczkowski, Marcin; Assaad, Fakher F.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the recent experimental data [J. Fink, E. Schierle, E. Weschke, J. Geck, D. Hawthorn, V. Soltwisch, H. Wadati, H.-H. Wu, H. A. Dürr, N. Wizent, B. Büchner, and G. A. Sawatzky, Phys. Rev. B 79, 100502 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevB.79.100502] indicating the existence of a pure stripe charge order over unprecedently wide temperature range in La1.8-xEu0.2SrxCuO4 , we investigate the temperature-induced melting of the metallic stripe phase. In spite of taking into account local dynamic correlations within a real-space dynamical mean-field theory of the Hubbard model, we observe a mean-field-like melting of the stripe order irrespective of the choice of the next-nearest-neighbor hopping. The temperature dependence of the single-particle spectral function shows the stripe induced formation of a flat band around the antinodal points accompanied by the opening a gap in the nodal direction.

  6. Efficiency of using correlation function for estimation of probability of substance detection on the base of THz spectral dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Peskov, Nikolay V.; Kirillov, Dmitry A.

    2012-10-01

    One of the problems arising in Time-Domain THz spectroscopy for the problem of security is the developing the criteria for assessment of probability for the detection and identification of the explosive and drugs. We analyze the efficiency of using the correlation function and another functional (more exactly, spectral norm) for this aim. These criteria are applied to spectral lines dynamics. For increasing the reliability of the assessment we subtract the averaged value of THz signal during time of analysis of the signal: it means deleting the constant from this part of the signal. Because of this, we can increase the contrast of assessment. We compare application of the Fourier-Gabor transform with unbounded (for example, Gaussian) window, which slides along the signal, for finding the spectral lines dynamics with application of the Fourier transform in short time interval (FTST), in which the Fourier transform is applied to parts of the signals, for the same aim. These methods are close each to other. Nevertheless, they differ by series of frequencies which they use. It is important for practice that the optimal window shape depends on chosen method for obtaining the spectral dynamics. The probability enhancements if we can find the train of pulses with different frequencies, which follow sequentially. We show that there is possibility to get pure spectral lines dynamics even under the condition of distorted spectrum of the substance response on the action of the THz pulse.

  7. Investigation of the spectral reflectance and bidirectional reflectance distribution function of sea foam layer by the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Ma, L X; Wang, F Q; Wang, C A; Wang, C C; Tan, J Y

    2015-11-20

    Spectral properties of sea foam greatly affect ocean color remote sensing and aerosol optical thickness retrieval from satellite observation. This paper presents a combined Mie theory and Monte Carlo method to investigate visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance and bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of sea foam layers. A three-layer model of the sea foam is developed in which each layer is composed of large air bubbles coated with pure water. A pseudo-continuous model and Mie theory for coated spheres is used to determine the effective radiative properties of sea foam. The one-dimensional Cox-Munk surface roughness model is used to calculate the slope density functions of the wind-blown ocean surface. A Monte Carlo method is used to solve the radiative transfer equation. Effects of foam layer thickness, bubble size, wind speed, solar zenith angle, and wavelength on the spectral reflectance and BRDF are investigated. Comparisons between previous theoretical results and experimental data demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed method. Sea foam can significantly increase the spectral reflectance and BRDF of the sea surface. The absorption coefficient of seawater near the surface is not the only parameter that influences the spectral reflectance. Meanwhile, the effects of bubble size, foam layer thickness, and solar zenith angle also cannot be obviously neglected. PMID:26836550

  8. Lunar phase function effects on spectral ratios used for resource assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, S. M.; Collins, J.; Singer, R. B.; Johnson, J. R.; Melendrez, D. E.

    1993-03-01

    Groundbased telescopic CCD images of 36 selected locations on the moon were obtained in five 'standard' bandpasses at 12 phase angles ranging from -78 deg to +75 deg to measure phase function effects on the ratio values used to quantify the abundance of TiO2 and qualitatively indicate soil maturity. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the moon is 'bluer' at small phase angles, but that the effect on the ratio values for TiO2 abundance for the phase angles of our data is on the order of the measurement uncertainties throughout the range of abundances found in the mare. The effect is more significant as seen from orbiting spacecraft over a range of selenographic latitude. Spectral ratio images (400/560 and 400/730 nm) were used to map the abundance of TiO2 using the empirical relation found by Charlette et al from analysis of returned lunar soils. Additionally, the 950/560 and 950/730 nm image ratios were used to define the regions of mature mare soil in which the relation is valid. Although the phase function dependence on wavelength was investigated and quantified for small areas and the integrated disc, the effect specifically on TiO2 mapping was not rigorously determined. For consistency and convenience in observing the whole lunar front side, our mapping utilized images taken -15 deg less than alpha less than 15 deg when the moon was fully illuminated from earth; however, this includes the strong opposition peak.

  9. Lunar phase function effects on spectral ratios used for resource assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, S. M.; Collins, J.; Singer, R. B.; Johnson, J. R.; Melendrez, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    Groundbased telescopic CCD images of 36 selected locations on the moon were obtained in five 'standard' bandpasses at 12 phase angles ranging from -78 deg to +75 deg to measure phase function effects on the ratio values used to quantify the abundance of TiO2 and qualitatively indicate soil maturity. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the moon is 'bluer' at small phase angles, but that the effect on the ratio values for TiO2 abundance for the phase angles of our data is on the order of the measurement uncertainties throughout the range of abundances found in the mare. The effect is more significant as seen from orbiting spacecraft over a range of selenographic latitude. Spectral ratio images (400/560 and 400/730 nm) were used to map the abundance of TiO2 using the empirical relation found by Charlette et al from analysis of returned lunar soils. Additionally, the 950/560 and 950/730 nm image ratios were used to define the regions of mature mare soil in which the relation is valid. Although the phase function dependence on wavelength was investigated and quantified for small areas and the integrated disc, the effect specifically on TiO2 mapping was not rigorously determined. For consistency and convenience in observing the whole lunar front side, our mapping utilized images taken -15 deg less than alpha less than 15 deg when the moon was fully illuminated from earth; however, this includes the strong opposition peak.

  10. Estimation of response-spectral values as functions of magnitude, distance, and site conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, David M.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed empirical predictive equations for the horizontal pseudo-velocity response at 5-percent damping for 12 different periods from 0.1 to 4.0 s. Using a multiple linear-regression method similar to the one we used previously for peak horizontal acceleration and velocity, we analyzed response spectra period by period for 64 records of 12 shallow earthquakes in western North America, including the recent Coyote Lake and Imperial Valley, California, earthquakes. The resulting predictive equations show amplification of the response values at soil sites for periods greater than or equal to 0.5 s, with maximum amplification exceeding a factor of 2 at 1.5 s. For periods less than 0.5 s there is no statistically significant difference between rock sites and the soil sites represented in the data set. These results are consistent with those of several earlier studies. A particularly significant aspect of the predictive equations is that the response values at different periods are different functions of magnitude (confirming earlier results by McGuire and by Trifunac and Anderson). The slope of the least-squares straight line relating log response to moment magnitude ranges from 0.21 at a period of 0.1 s to greater than 0.5 at periods of 1 s and longer. This result indicates that the conventional practice of scaling a constant spectral shape by peak acceleration will not give accurate answers. The Newmark and Hall method of spectral scaling, using both peak acceleration and peak velocity, largely avoids this error. Comparison of our spectra with the Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum anchored at the same value at 0.1 s shows that the Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum is exceeded at soil sites for a magnitude of 7.5 at all distances for periods greater than about 0.5 s. Comparison of our spectra for soil sites with the corresponding ATC-3 curve of lateral design force coefficients for the highest seismic zone indicates that the ATC-3 curve is exceeded within about 5 km

  11. Validation of Spectral Analysis as a Noninvasive Tool to Assess Autonomic Regulation of Cardiovascular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, Charles F.; Evans, Joyce M.

    1996-01-01

    A major focus of our program has been to develop a sensitive noninvasive procedure to quantify early weightlessness-induced changes in cardiovascular function or potential dysfunction. Forty studies of healthy young volunteers (10 men and 10 women, each studied twice) were conducted to determine changes in the sympatho-vagal balance of autonomic control of cardiovascular regulation during graded headward and footward blood volume shifts. Changes in sympatho-vagal balance were classified by changes in the mean levels and spectral content of cardiovascular variables and verified by changes in circulating levels of catecholamines and pancreatic polypeptide. Possible shifts in intra/extravascular fluid were assessed from changes in hematocrit and plasma mass density while changes in the stimulus to regulate plasma volume were determined from Plasma Renin Activity (PRA). Autonomic blockade was used to unmask the relative contribution of sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent influences in response to 10 min each of 0, 20 and 40 mmHg Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) and 15 and 30 mmHg Positive Pressure (LBPP). The combination of muscarinic blockade with graded LBNP and LBPP was used to evoke graded increases and decreases in sympathetic activity without parasympathetic contributions. The combination of beta blockade with graded LBNP and LBPP was used to produce graded increases and decreases in parasympathetic activity without beta sympathetic contributions. Finally, a combination of both beta and muscarinic blockades with LBNP and LBPP was used to determine the contribution from other, primarily alpha adrenergic, sources. Mean values, spectral analyses and time frequency analysis of R-R interval (HR), Arterial Pressure (AP), peripheral blood flow (RF), Stroke Volume (SV) and peripheral resistance (TPR) were performed for all phases of the study. Skin blood Flow (SF) was also measured in other studies and similarly analyzed. Spectra were examined for changes in

  12. Exact Green's function renormalization approach to spectral properties of open quantum systems driven by harmonically time-dependent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrachea, Liliana

    2007-01-01

    We present an efficient method and a fast algorithm to exactly calculate spectral functions and one-body observables of open quantum systems described by lattice Hamiltonians with harmonically time-dependent terms and without many-body interactions. The theoretical treatment is based in Keldysh nonequilibrium Green’s function formalism. We illustrate the implementation of the technique in a paradigmatic model of a quantum pump driven by local fields oscillating in time with one and two harmonic components.

  13. A search for X-ray reprocessing echoes in the power spectral density functions of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Papadakis, I. E.; Epitropakis, A.; Pecháček, T.; Dovčiak, M.; McHardy, I. M.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of a detailed study of the X-ray power spectral density (PSD) functions of 12 X-ray bright AGN, using almost all the archival XMM-Newton data. The total net exposure of the EPIC-pn light curves is larger than 350 ks in all cases (and exceeds 1 Ms in the case of 1H 0707-497). In a physical scenario in which X-ray reflection occurs in the inner part of the accretion disc of AGN, the X-ray reflection component should be a filtered echo of the X-ray continuum signal and should be equal to the convolution of the primary emission with the response function of the disc. Our primary objective is to search for these reflection features in the 5-7 keV (iron line) and 0.5-1 keV (soft) bands, where the X-ray reflection fraction is expected to be dominant. We fit to the observed periodograms two models: a simple bending power-law model (BPL) and a BPL model convolved with the transfer function of the accretion disc assuming the lamp-post geometry and X-ray reflection from a homogeneous disc. We do not find any significant features in the best-fitting BPL model residuals either in individual PSDs in the iron band, soft and full band (0.3-10 keV) or in the average PSD residuals of the brightest and more variable sources (with similar black hole mass estimates). The typical amplitude of the soft and full-band residuals is around 3-5 per cent. It is possible that the expected general relativistic effects are not detected because they are intrinsically lower than the uncertainty of the current PSDs, even in the strong relativistic case in which X-ray reflection occurs on a disc around a fast rotating black hole having an X-ray source very close above it. However, we could place strong constrains to the X-ray reflection geometry with the current data sets if we knew in advance the intrinsic shape of the X-ray PSDs, particularly its high-frequency slope.

  14. ESTIMATION OF RESPONSE-SPECTRAL VALUES AS FUNCTIONS OF MAGNITUDE, DISTANCE, AND SITE CONDITIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    Horizontal pseudo-velocity response was analyzed for twelve shallow earthquakes in western North America. Estimation of response-spectral values was related to magnitude, distance and site conditions. Errors in the methods are analyzed.

  15. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Understanding QGP through Spectral Functions and Euclidean Correlators (Volume 89)

    SciTech Connect

    Mocsy,A.; Petreczky, P.

    2008-06-27

    In the past two decades, one of the most important goals of the nuclear physics community has been the production and characterization of the new state of matter--Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Understanding how properties of hadrons change in medium, particularly, the bound state of a very heavy quark and its antiquark, known as quarkonium, as well as determining the transport coefficients is crucial for identifying the properties of QGP and for the understanding of the experimental data from RHIC. On April 23rd, more than sixty physicists from twenty-seven institutions gathered for this three-day topical workshop held at BNL to discuss how to understand the properties of the new state of matter obtained in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions (particularly at RHIC-BNL) through spectral functions. In-medium properties of the different particle species and the transport properties of the medium are encoded in spectral functions. The former could yield important signatures of deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration at high temperatures and densities, while the later are crucial for the understanding of the dynamics of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Participants at the workshop are experts in various areas of spectral function studies. The workshop encouraged direct exchange of scientific information among experts, as well as between the younger and the more established scientists. The workshops success is evident from the coherent picture that developed of the current understanding of transport properties and in-medium particle properties, illustrated in the current proceedings. The following pages show calculations of meson spectral functions in lattice QCD, as well as implications of these for quarkonia melting/survival in the quark gluon plasma; Lattice calculations of the transport coefficients (shear and bulk viscosities, electric conductivity); Calculation of spectral functions and transport coefficients in field theories using weak coupling

  16. S-functions, spectral functions of hyperbolic geometry, and vertex operators with applications to structure for Weyl and orthogonal group invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytsenko, A. A.; Chaichian, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyze the quantum homological invariants (the Poincaré polynomials of the slN link homology). In the case when the dimensions of homologies of appropriate topological spaces are precisely known, the procedure of the calculation of the Kovanov-Rozansky type homology, based on the Euler-Poincaré formula can be appreciably simplified. We express the formal character of the irreducible tensor representation of the classical groups in terms of the symmetric and spectral functions of hyperbolic geometry. On the basis of Labastida-Mariño-Ooguri-Vafa conjecture, we derive a representation of the Chern-Simons partition function in the form of an infinite product in terms of the Ruelle spectral functions (the cases of a knot, unknot, and links have been considered). We also derive an infinite-product formula for the orthogonal Chern-Simons partition functions and analyze the singularities and the symmetry properties of the infinite-product structures.

  17. Spectral emissivities and optical constants of electromagnetically levitated liquid metals as functions of temperature and wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, S.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a noncontact temperature measurement device utilizing rotating analyzer ellipsometry is described. The technique circumvents the necessity of spectral emissivity estimation by direct measurement concomittant with radiance brightness. Using this approach, the optical properties of electromagnetically levitated liquid metals Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt, and Zr were measured in situ at four wavelengths and up to 600 K superheat in the liquid. The data suggest an increase in the emissivity of the liquid compared with the incandescent solid. The data also show moderate temperature dependence of the spectral emissivity. A few measurements of the optical properties of undercooled liquid metals were also conducted. The data for both solids and liquids show excellent agreement with available values in the literature for the spectral emissivities as well as the optical constants.

  18. Exponents of the spectral functions and dynamical structure factor of the 1D Lieb-Liniger Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Sacramento, P. D.

    2016-06-01

    We study the (k , ω) -plane finite-energy line shape of the zero-temperature one-boson removal spectral function (ω < 0) , one-boson addition spectral function (ω > 0) , and charge dynamical structure factor (ω > 0) of the 1D Lieb-Liniger Bose gas with repulsive boson interaction c > 0. Our analysis of the problem focuses on the line shape at finite excitation energies in the vicinity of these functions spectrum upper (ω < 0) or lower (ω > 0) threshold. Specifically, we derive the exact momentum, interaction, and density dependences of the exponents controlling such a line shape in each of the N = 1 , 2 , 3 , … momentum subdomains k ∈ [(N - 1) 2 πn , N 2 πn ] . Here n = N / L is the boson density, N the boson number, and L the system length. In the thermodynamic limit considered in our study nearly all spectral weight of the dynamical correlation functions is for large values of n / c contained in the N = 1 momentum subdomain k ∈ [ 0 , 2 πn ] . As n / c decreases a small fraction of that weight is transferred to the remaining set of N = 2 , 3 , 4 , … momentum subdomains, particularly to the N = 2 subdomain. In the case of the momentum subdomain k ∈ [ 0 , 2 πn ] , our exact results agree with those of previous studies. For that subdomain the above exponents are plotted as a function of the momentum for several n / c values. Our derivation of the line shapes of the three dynamical correlation functions relies on the use of a simplified form of the pseudofermion dynamical theory of the fermionic 1D Hubbard model suitably modified in this paper for the 1D Bose gas.

  19. A comparative study of rhodopsin function in the great bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus nuchalis): Spectral tuning and light-activated kinetics.

    PubMed

    van Hazel, Ilke; Dungan, Sarah Z; Hauser, Frances E; Morrow, James M; Endler, John A; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-07-01

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment responsible for initiating the phototransduction cascade in vertebrate rod photoreceptors. Although well-characterized in a few model systems, comparative studies of rhodopsin function, particularly for nonmammalian vertebrates are comparatively lacking. Bowerbirds are rare among passerines in possessing a key substitution, D83N, at a site that is otherwise highly conserved among G protein-coupled receptors. While this substitution is present in some dim-light adapted vertebrates, often accompanying another unusual substitution, A292S, its functional relevance in birds is uncertain. To investigate functional effects associated with these two substitutions, we use the rhodopsin gene from the great bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus nuchalis) as a background for site-directed mutagenesis, in vitro expression and functional characterization. We also mutated these sites in two additional rhodopsins that do not naturally possess N83, chicken and bovine, for comparison. Both sites were found to contribute to spectral blue-shifts, but had opposing effects on kinetic rates. Substitutions at site 83 were found to primarily affect the kinetics of light-activated rhodopsin, while substitutions at site 292 had a larger impact on spectral tuning. The contribution of substitutions at site 83 to spectral tuning in particular depended on genetic background, but overall, the effects of substitutions were otherwise surprisingly additive, and the magnitudes of functional shifts were roughly similar across all three genetic backgrounds. By employing a comparative approach with multiple species, our study provides new insight into the joint impact of sites 83 and 292 on rhodopsin structure-function as well as their evolutionary significance for dim-light vision across vertebrates. PMID:26889650

  20. Temporal dynamics of spectral bioindicators evidence biological and ecological differences among functional types in a cork oak open woodland.

    PubMed

    Cerasoli, Sofia; Costa E Silva, Filipe; Silva, João M N

    2016-06-01

    The application of spectral vegetation indices for the purpose of vegetation monitoring and modeling increased largely in recent years. Nonetheless, the interpretation of biophysical properties of vegetation through their spectral signature is still a challenging task. This is particularly true in Mediterranean oak forest characterized by a high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. In this study, the temporal dynamics of vegetation indices expected to be related with green biomass and photosynthetic efficiency were compared for the canopy of trees, the herbaceous layer, and two shrub species: cistus (Cistus salviifolius) and ulex (Ulex airensis). coexisting in a cork oak woodland. All indices were calculated from in situ measurements with a FieldSpec3 spectroradiometer (ASD Inc., Boulder, USA). Large differences emerged in the temporal trends and in the correlation between climate and vegetation indices. The relationship between spectral indices and temperature, radiation, and vapor pressure deficit for cork oak was opposite to that observed for the herbaceous layer and cistus. No correlation was observed between rainfall and vegetation indices in cork oak and ulex, but in the herbaceous layer and in the cistus, significant correlations were found. The analysis of spectral vegetation indices with fraction of absorbed PAR (fPAR) and quantum yield of chlorophyll fluorescence (ΔF/Fm') evidenced strongest relationships with the indices Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI)512, respectively. Our results, while confirms the ability of spectral vegetation indices to represent temporal dynamics of biophysical properties of vegetation, evidence the importance to consider ecosystem composition for a correct ecological interpretation of results when the spatial resolution of observations includes different plant functional types. PMID:26449349

  1. Temporal dynamics of spectral bioindicators evidence biological and ecological differences among functional types in a cork oak open woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerasoli, Sofia; Costa e Silva, Filipe; Silva, João M. N.

    2016-06-01

    The application of spectral vegetation indices for the purpose of vegetation monitoring and modeling increased largely in recent years. Nonetheless, the interpretation of biophysical properties of vegetation through their spectral signature is still a challenging task. This is particularly true in Mediterranean oak forest characterized by a high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. In this study, the temporal dynamics of vegetation indices expected to be related with green biomass and photosynthetic efficiency were compared for the canopy of trees, the herbaceous layer, and two shrub species: cistus ( Cistus salviifolius) and ulex ( Ulex airensis). coexisting in a cork oak woodland. All indices were calculated from in situ measurements with a FieldSpec3 spectroradiometer (ASD Inc., Boulder, USA). Large differences emerged in the temporal trends and in the correlation between climate and vegetation indices. The relationship between spectral indices and temperature, radiation, and vapor pressure deficit for cork oak was opposite to that observed for the herbaceous layer and cistus. No correlation was observed between rainfall and vegetation indices in cork oak and ulex, but in the herbaceous layer and in the cistus, significant correlations were found. The analysis of spectral vegetation indices with fraction of absorbed PAR (fPAR) and quantum yield of chlorophyll fluorescence ( ΔF/ Fm') evidenced strongest relationships with the indices Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI)512, respectively. Our results, while confirms the ability of spectral vegetation indices to represent temporal dynamics of biophysical properties of vegetation, evidence the importance to consider ecosystem composition for a correct ecological interpretation of results when the spatial resolution of observations includes different plant functional types.

  2. Temporal dynamics of spectral bioindicators evidence biological and ecological differences among functional types in a cork oak open woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerasoli, Sofia; Costa e Silva, Filipe; Silva, João M. N.

    2015-10-01

    The application of spectral vegetation indices for the purpose of vegetation monitoring and modeling increased largely in recent years. Nonetheless, the interpretation of biophysical properties of vegetation through their spectral signature is still a challenging task. This is particularly true in Mediterranean oak forest characterized by a high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. In this study, the temporal dynamics of vegetation indices expected to be related with green biomass and photosynthetic efficiency were compared for the canopy of trees, the herbaceous layer, and two shrub species: cistus (Cistus salviifolius) and ulex (Ulex airensis). coexisting in a cork oak woodland. All indices were calculated from in situ measurements with a FieldSpec3 spectroradiometer (ASD Inc., Boulder, USA). Large differences emerged in the temporal trends and in the correlation between climate and vegetation indices. The relationship between spectral indices and temperature, radiation, and vapor pressure deficit for cork oak was opposite to that observed for the herbaceous layer and cistus. No correlation was observed between rainfall and vegetation indices in cork oak and ulex, but in the herbaceous layer and in the cistus, significant correlations were found. The analysis of spectral vegetation indices with fraction of absorbed PAR (fPAR) and quantum yield of chlorophyll fluorescence (ΔF/Fm') evidenced strongest relationships with the indices Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI)512, respectively. Our results, while confirms the ability of spectral vegetation indices to represent temporal dynamics of biophysical properties of vegetation, evidence the importance to consider ecosystem composition for a correct ecological interpretation of results when the spatial resolution of observations includes different plant functional types.

  3. Spectral imaging of microvascular function in a renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a vascular disrupting agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankhede, Mamta; deDeugd, Casey; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2009-02-01

    Tumors are highly metabolically active and thus require ample oxygen and nutrients to proliferate. Neovasculature generated by angiogenesis is required for tumors to grow beyond a size of about 1-2mm. Functional tumor vasculature also provides an access point for development of distant metastases. Due to the importance of the microvasculature for tumor growth, proliferation, and metastasis, the microvasculature has emerged as a therapeutic target for treatment of solid tumors. We employed spectral imaging in a rodent window chamber model to observe and measure the oxygen transport function of tumor microvasculature in a human renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a fast acting vascular disrupting agent. Human Caki-1 cells were grown in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber in athymic nude mice. Spectral imaging was used to measure hemoglobin saturation immediately before, immediately after and also at 2, 4, 6, 8, 24 and 48 hours after administration of the tubulin binding agent OXi4503. Up to 4 hours after treatment, tumor microvasculature was disrupted from the tumor core towards the periphery as seen in deoxygenation as well as structural changes of the vasculature. Reoxygenation and neovascularization commenced from the periphery towards the core from 6 - 48 hours after treatment. The timing of the effects of vascular disrupting agents can influence scheduling of repeat treatments and combinatorial treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Spectral imaging can potentially provide this information in certain laboratory models from endogenous signals with microvessel resolution.

  4. The Solar Spectral Irradiance as a Function of the Mg II Index for Atmosphere and Climate Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuillier, Gerard; DeLand, Matthew; Shapiro, Alexander; Schmutz, Werner; Bolsee, David; Melo, Stella

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method to reconstruct the solar spectrum irradiance in the Ly alpha-400 nm region, and its variability, based on the Mg II index and neutron monitor. Measurements of the solar spectral irradiance available in the literature have been made with different instruments at different times and different spectral ranges. However, climate studies require harmonized data sets. This new approach has the advantage of being independent of the absolute calibration and aging of the instruments. First, the Mg II index is derived using solar spectra from Ly alpha (121 nm) to 410 nm measured from 1978 to 2010 by several space missions. The variability of the spectra with respect to a chosen reference spectrum as a function of time and wavelength is scaled to the derived Mg II index. The set of coefficients expressing the spectral variability can be applied to the chosen reference spectrum to reconstruct the solar spectra within a given time frame or Mg II index values. The accuracy of this method is estimated using two approaches: by direct comparison with particular cases where solar spectra are available from independent measurements, and by calculating the standard deviation between the measured spectra and their reconstruction. From direct comparisons with measurements we obtain an accuracy of about 1 to 2 %, which degrades towards Ly alpha. In a further step, we extend our solar spectral irradiance reconstruction back to the Maunder Minimum introducing the relationship between the Mg II index and the neutron monitor data. Consistent measurements of the Mg II index are not available prior to 1978. However, we observe that over the last three solar cycles, the Mg II index shows strong correlation with the modulation potential determined from the neutron monitor data. Assuming that this correlation can be applied to the past, we reconstruct the Mg II index from the modulation potential back to the Maunder Minimum, and obtain the corresponding solar

  5. On estimating frequency response function envelopes using the spectral element method and fuzzy sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, R. F.; Klimke, A.; Arruda, J. R. F.

    2006-04-01

    The influence of uncertain input data on response spectra of dynamic structures is considered. Traditionally, frequency response analyses are based on finite or boundary element models of the objective structure. In the case of the mid-frequency range problem, however, a very fine mesh is required to correctly approximate the frequency response. This is particularly problematic in uncertainty modeling where the computational effort is usually increased significantly by the need for multiple runs (e.g. when conducting a Monte Carlo analysis) to achieve reliable results. In this paper, the spectral element method, combined with a fuzzy set-based uncertainty modeling approach, is presented as an appealing alternative, provided that the models are simple enough to yield a spectral element representation. To conduct the fuzzy analysis part, three different implementations of the extension principle of fuzzy arithmetic are applied and compared. The suitability of each method depends on the number of uncertain parameters, the problem characteristics, and the required accuracy of the results. The performance of the proposed approach is illustrated by two test problems, a simple coupled rod and a reinforced plate model. To verify the fuzzy-valued results, a Monte Carlo simulation has also been included.

  6. Spectral Tuning of Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Rhodopsin: Evidence for Positive Selection and Functional Adaptation in a Cetacean Visual Pigment.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Sarah Z; Kosyakov, Alexander; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-02-01

    Cetaceans have undergone a remarkable evolutionary transition that was accompanied by many sensory adaptations, including modification of the visual system for underwater environments. Recent sequencing of cetacean genomes has made it possible to begin exploring the molecular basis of these adaptations. In this study we use in vitro expression methods to experimentally characterize the first step of the visual transduction cascade, the light activation of rhodopsin, for the killer whale. To investigate the spectral effects of amino acid substitutions thought to correspond with absorbance shifts relative to terrestrial mammals, we used the orca gene as a background for the first site-directed mutagenesis experiments in a cetacean rhodopsin. The S292A mutation had the largest effect, and was responsible for the majority of the spectral difference between killer whale and bovine (terrestrial) rhodopsin. Using codon-based likelihood models, we also found significant evidence for positive selection in cetacean rhodopsin sequences, including on spectral tuning sites we experimentally mutated. We then investigated patterns of ecological divergence that may be correlated with rhodopsin functional variation by using a series of clade models that partitioned the data set according to phylogeny, habitat, and foraging depth zone. Only the model partitioning according to depth was significant. This suggests that foraging dives might be a selective regime influencing cetacean rhodopsin divergence, and our experimental results indicate that spectral tuning may be playing an adaptive role in this process. Our study demonstrates that combining computational and experimental methods is crucial for gaining insight into the selection pressures underlying molecular evolution. PMID:26486871

  7. The influence of the nuclear self energy function on the spectral lines of atoms with unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, R. Kh; Mutygullina, A. A.; Petrova, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Optical emission from atoms with radioactive nuclei is investigated. The self energy function of the unstable nucleus is constructed. A new arbitrary parameter characterizing the nuclear interaction is introduced. The instability of the atomic nucleus is shown to result in the essential broadening of optical emission lines. The spectral line shape is shown to be of the Lorentz form, with the width being a nonlinear combination of the nuclear and atomic decay widths multiplied by the parameter depending on the peculiarities of nuclear interaction.

  8. Spectral function of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: A density matrix renormalization group plus cluster perturbation theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun; Feiguin, Adrian E.

    2016-02-01

    We study the spectral function of the two-dimensional Hubbard model using cluster perturbation theory, and a density matrix renormalization group as a cluster solver. We reconstruct the two-dimensional dispersion at and away from half-filling using 2 ×L ladders, with L up to 80 sites, yielding results with unprecedented resolution in excellent agreement with quantum Monte Carlo. The main features of the spectrum can be described with a mean-field dispersion, with kinks and pseudogap traced back to scattering between spin and charge degrees of freedom.

  9. GX 3+1: THE STABILITY OF SPECTRAL INDEX AS A FUNCTION OF MASS ACCRETION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev E-mail: titarchuk@fe.infn.it

    2012-03-10

    We present an analysis of the spectral and timing properties observed in X-rays from neutron star (NS) binary GX 3+1 (4U 1744-26) during long-term transitions between the faint and bright phases superimposed on short-term transitions between lower banana (LB) and upper banana (UB) branches in terms of its color-color diagram. We analyze all observations of this source obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and Beppo SAX satellites. We find that the X-ray broadband energy spectra during these spectral transitions can be adequately reproduced by a composition of a low-temperature blackbody component, a Comptonized component (COMPTB), and a Gaussian component. We argue that the electron temperature kT{sub e} of the Compton cloud monotonically increases from 2.3 keV to 4.5 keV, when GX 3+1 makes a transition from UB to LB. We also detect an evolution of noise components (a very low frequency noise and a high-frequency noise) during these LB-UB transitions. Using a disk seed photon normalization of COMPTB, which is proportional to the mass accretion rate, we find that the photon power-law index {Gamma} is almost constant ({Gamma} = 2.00 {+-} 0.02) when mass accretion rate changes by a factor of four. In addition, we find that the emergent spectrum is dominated by the strong Comptonized component. We interpret this quasi-stability of the index {Gamma} and a particular form of the spectrum in the framework of a model in which the energy release in the transition layer located between the accretion disk and NS surface dominates that in the disk. Moreover, this index stability effect now established for GX 3+1 was previously found in the atoll source 4U 1728-34 and suggested for a number of other low-mass X-ray NS binaries (see Farinelli and Titarchuk). This intrinsic behavior of NSs, in particular for atoll sources, is fundamentally different from that seen in black hole binary sources where the index monotonically increases during spectral transition from the low

  10. GX 3+1: The Stability of Spectral Index as a Function of Mass Accretion Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifana, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the spectral and timing properties observed in X-rays from neutron star (NS) binary GX 3+1 (4U 1744-26) during long-term transitions between the faint and bright phases superimposed on short-term transitions between lower banana (LB) and upper banana (UB) branches in terms of its color-color diagram, We analyze all observations of this source obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and BeppoSAX satellites, We find that the X-ray broadband energy spectra during these spectral transitions can be adequately reproduced by a composition of a low-temperature blackbody component, a Comptonized component (COMPTB), and Gaussian component We argue that the electron temperature kTe of the Compton cloud monotonically increases from 2.3 keY to 4.5 keY, when GX 3+1 makes a transition from UB to LB. We also detect an evolution of noise components (a very low frequency noise and a high-frequency noise) during these LB-UB transitions. Using a disk seed photon normalization of COMPTB, which is proportional to the mass accretion rate, we find that the photon power-law index Gamma is almost constant (Gamma = 2.00 +/- 0.02) when mass accretion rate changes by factor four. In addition, we find that the emergent spectrum is dominated by the strong Comptonized component We interpret this quasi-stability of the index Gamma and a particular form of the spectrum in the framework of a model in which the energy release in the transition layer located between the accretion disk and NS surface dominates that in the disk. Moreover, this index stability effect now established for GX 3+ I was previously found in the atoll source 4U 1728-34 and suggested for a number of other low-mass X-ray NS binaries. This intrinsic behavior of NSs, in particular for atoll sources, is fundamentally different from that seen in black hole binary sources where the index monotonically increases during spectral transition from the low state to the high state and then finally saturates at

  11. Evolution of the electronic spectral function and dynamical conductivity across the disorder-tuned superconductor-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Nandini

    2015-03-01

    I will discuss the behavior of the single particle electronic spectral function, the bosonic (pair) spectral function P (ω) , and the dynamical conductivity σ (ω) across the superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) calculated using quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The transition is driven by tuning the charging energy relative to the Josephson coupling or by varying the degree of disorder. We identify a prominent Higgs mode in the superconductor, and characteristic energy scales in the insulator, that vanish at the transition due to enhanced quantum phase fluctuations, despite the persistence of a robust fermionic gap across the SIT. Disorder leads to increased absorption at low frequencies compared to the SIT in a clean system. Disorder also expands the quantum critical region, due to a change in the universality class, with an underlying T=0 critical point. Obtaining the conductivity at the transition has been problematical because of analytic continuation of numerical data. We propose a well-defined integrated low-frequency conductivity that can be reliably estimated and discuss its universality. I acknowledge support from DOE DE-FG02-07ER46423.

  12. Spectral determination of concentrations of functionally diverse pigments in increasingly complex arctic tundra canopies.

    PubMed

    Boelman, Natalie T; Magney, Troy S; Logan, Barry A; Griffin, Kevin L; Eitel, Jan U H; Greaves, Heather; Prager, Case M; Vierling, Lee A

    2016-09-01

    As the Arctic warms, tundra vegetation is becoming taller and more structurally complex, as tall deciduous shrubs become increasingly dominant. Emerging studies reveal that shrubs exhibit photosynthetic resource partitioning, akin to forests, that may need accounting for in the "big leaf" net ecosystem exchange models. We conducted a lab experiment on sun and shade leaves from S. pulchra shrubs to determine the influence of both constitutive (slowly changing bulk carotenoid and chlorophyll pools) and facultative (rapidly changing xanthophyll cycle) pigment pools on a suite of spectral vegetation indices, to devise a rapid means of estimating within canopy resource partitioning. We found that: (1) the PRI of dark-adapted shade leaves (PRIo) was double that of sun leaves, and that PRIo was sensitive to variation among sun and shade leaves in both xanthophyll cycle pool size (V + A + Z) (r (2) = 0.59) and Chla/b (r (2) = 0.64); (2) A corrected PRI (difference between dark and illuminated leaves, ΔPRI) was more sensitive to variation among sun and shade leaves in changes to the epoxidation state of their xanthophyll cycle pigments (dEPS) (r (2) = 0.78, RMSE = 0.007) compared to the uncorrected PRI of illuminated leaves (PRI) (r (2) = 0.34, RMSE = 0.02); and (3) the SR680 index was correlated with each of (V + A + Z), lutein, bulk carotenoids, (V + A + Z)/(Chla + b), and Chla/b (r (2) range = 0.52-0.69). We suggest that ΔPRI be employed as a proxy for facultative pigment dynamics, and the SR680 for the estimation of constitutive pigment pools. We contribute the first Arctic-specific information on disentangling PRI-pigment relationships, and offer insight into how spectral indices can assess resource partitioning within shrub tundra canopies. PMID:27193900

  13. THE FIRST HARD X-RAY POWER SPECTRAL DENSITY FUNCTIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2013-06-10

    We present results of our power spectral density (PSD) analysis of 30 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using the 58 month light curves from Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) in the 14-150 keV band. PSDs were fit using a Monte Carlo based algorithm to take into account windowing effects and measurement error. All but one source were found to be fit very well using an unbroken power law with a slope of {approx} - 1, consistent at low frequencies with previous studies in the 2-10 keV band, with no evidence of a break in the PSD. For five of the highest signal-to-noise ratio sources, we tested the energy dependence of the PSD and found no significant difference in the PSD at different energies. Unlike previous studies of X-ray variability in AGNs, we do not find any significant correlations between the hard X-ray variability and different properties of the AGN including luminosity and black hole mass. The lack of break frequencies and correlations seem to indicate that AGNs are similar to the high state of Galactic black holes.

  14. Downwelling spectral irradiance during evening twilight as a function of the lunar phase.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Glenn; Johnsen, Sönke

    2015-02-01

    We measured downwelling spectral vector irradiance (from 350 to 800 nm) during evening civil and nautical twilight (solar elevation down to -12°). Nine sets of measurements were taken to cover the first half of the lunar cycle (from the new to full moon) and were also used to calculate chromaticity (CIE 1976 u'v'). The lunar phase had no consistent effect on downwelling irradiance until solar elevation was less than -8°. For lower solar elevations, the effect of the moon increased with the fraction of the illuminated lunar disk until the fraction was approximately 50%. For fractions greater than 50%, the brightness and chromaticity of the downwelling irradiance were approximately independent of the fraction illuminated, likely because the greater brightness of a fuller moon was offset by its lower elevation during twilight. Given the importance of crepuscular periods to animal activity, including predation, reproductive cycles, and color vision in dim light, these results may have significant implications for animal ecology. PMID:25967843

  15. Compton profiles of NiO and TiO2 obtained from first principles GWA spectral function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, M. Khidzir; M, F. M. Halid; W, A. T. Wan Abdullah

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we first use momentum density studies to understand strongly correlated electron behavior, which is typically seen in transition metal oxides. We observe that correlated electron behavior as seen in bulk NiO is due to the Fermi break located in the middle of overlapping spectral functions obtained from a GW (G is Green’s function and W is the screened Coulomb interaction) approximation (GWA) calculation while in the case of TiO2 we can see that the origin of the constant momentum distribution in lower momenta is due to a pile up of spectra before the Fermi energy. These observations are then used to compare our calculated Compton profiles with previous experimental studies of Fukamachi and Limandri. Our calculations for NiO are observed to follow the same trend as the experimental profile but it is seen to have a wide difference in the case of TiO2before the Fermi break. The ground state momentum densities differ significantly from the quasiparticle momentum density, thus stressing the importance of the quasiparticle wave function as the input for the study of charge density and the electron localization function. Finally we perform a calculation of the quasiparticle renormalization function, giving a quantitative description of the discontinuity of the GWA momentum density.

  16. A SPECTRAL APPROACH INTEGRATING FUNCTIONAL GENOMIC ANNOTATIONS FOR CODING AND NONCODING VARIANTS

    PubMed Central

    IONITA-LAZA, IULIANA; MCCALLUM, KENNETH; XU, BIN; BUXBAUM, JOSEPH

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few years, substantial effort has been put into the functional annotation of variation in human genome sequence. Such annotations can play a critical role in identifying putatively causal variants among the abundant natural variation that occurs at a locus of interest. The main challenges in using these various annotations include their large numbers, and their diversity. Here we develop an unsupervised approach to integrate these different annotations into one measure of functional importance (Eigen), that, unlike most existing methods, is not based on any labeled training data. We show that the resulting meta-score has better discriminatory ability using disease associated and putatively benign variants from published studies (in both coding and noncoding regions) compared with the recently proposed CADD score. Across varied scenarios, the Eigen score performs generally better than any single individual annotation, representing a powerful single functional score that can be incorporated in fine-mapping studies. PMID:26727659

  17. Proposal for a new parameterisation of the instrumental spectral response function in DOAS retrievals and application to satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirle, Steffen; Lampel, Johannes; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The instrumental spectral response function (ISRF) is a key quantity in spectroscopy. Within DOAS retrievals, the ISRF is needed for an accurate wavelength calibration and for the convolution of trace gas cross-sections to instrumental resolution. DOAS analysis software like QDOAS or DOASIS allow the fitting of a high resolution solar spectrum to a measured spectrum based on a parameterized ISRF with predefined shape (e.g. Gauss, Lorentz, Voigt). For OMI, a more advanced ISRF ("broadened Gauss") was determined which allows for flat-top and asymmetric ISRF; however, this ISRF model is computationally expensive due to the high number of parameters. Here we propose a "Super Gaussian" as further model function for the ISRF, which is similar to a Gaussian, but with the exponent ξ as additional free parameter: F(x) = A ∗ exp(‑(|x|/w)ξ) The parameter w determines the width of F , while ξ basically determines the shape. Optionally, different values for ξ and w can be allowed for the left vs. right branch of F to construct asymmetric ISRFs. This model function was found to be a good compromise between good fit results (i.e., F represents the actual ISRF much better than a Gaussian) for a wide range of tested ISRF shapes on the one hand, and robustness of the fit and low computation time on the other hand due to the low number of free parameters. A further advantage of this description of the ISRF is that the two partial derivatives, representing changes of shape and width, respectively, allow to mimic potential spectral structures caused by temporal changes of the ISRF (e.g. due to changes of the detector temperature) by adding pseudo-absorbers in the DOAS analysis. We investigate how far this affects different trace gas retrievals from satellite measurements.

  18. Median-plane sound localization as a function of the number of spectral channels using a channel vocoder

    PubMed Central

    Goupell, Matthew J.; Majdak, Piotr; Laback, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Using a vocoder, median-plane sound localization performance was measured in eight normal-hearing listeners as a function of the number of spectral channels. The channels were contiguous and logarithmically spaced in the range from 0.3 to 16 kHz. Acutely testing vocoded stimuli showed significantly worse localization compared to noises and 100 pulse∕s click trains, both of which were tested after feedback training. However, localization for the vocoded stimuli was better than chance. A second experiment was performed using two different 12-channel spacings for the vocoded stimuli, now including feedback training. One spacing was from experiment 1. The second spacing (called the speech-localization spacing) assigned more channels to the frequency range associated with speech. There was no significant difference in localization between the two spacings. However, even with training, localizing 12-channel vocoded stimuli remained worse than localizing virtual wideband noises by 4.8° in local root-mean-square error and 5.2% in quadrant error rate. Speech understanding for the speech-localization spacing was not significantly different from that for a typical spacing used by cochlear-implant users. These experiments suggest that current cochlear implants have a sufficient number of spectral channels for some vertical-plane sound localization capabilities, albeit worse than normal-hearing listeners, without loss of speech understanding. PMID:20136221

  19. Comparison of simulated spectral bidirectional reflectance function of snow-covered austral summer sea ice with measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Zhou, X.

    2003-12-01

    The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is an important geophysical variable that provides patterns of surface directional reflectance due to direct beam incidence. Information of BRF is required to derive surface albedo from remote sensing data sets. Also, albedo under various conditions can be evaluated by integration of BRFs. Knowledge of BRF of snow covered sea ice surface is especially important because sea ice exerts a strong positive feedback effect on the surface energy budget, and snow covered sea ice exhibits a strong anisotropic pattern when the solar incidence angle is large. However, it is difficult to obtain a complete data set of snow-covered sea ice surface BRDF through field measurement because of the general paucity of clear sky conditions and the narrow range of solar incidence angles that occur during measurement. The information gap can be filled through validation of the modeled results from radiative transfer simulations. We performed a simulation of snow covered sea ice surface BRF using a multi-layered azimuth- and zenith-dependent plane parallel radiative transfer code. Combined with Mie scattering algorithm, the code takes the measured snow grain sizes, densities and thicknesses of individual layers as input, and generates snow-covered sea ice surface spectral BRF as output. The simulated surface spectral BRF is then compared with measurements. The discrepancies between the model simulation and measurements are analyzed and causes inferred.

  20. Vector meson spectral function and dilepton rate in the presence of strong entanglement effect between the chiral and the Polyakov loop dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Chowdhury Aminul; Majumder, Sarbani; Mustafa, Munshi G.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we have reexplored our earlier study on the vector meson spectral function and its spectral property in the form of dilepton rate in a two-flavor Polyakov loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model in the presence of a strong entanglement between the chiral and Polyakov loop dynamics. The entanglement considered here is generated through the four-quark scalar-type interaction in which the coupling strength depends on the Polyakov loop and runs with temperature and chemical potential. The entanglement effect is also considered for the four-quark vector-type interaction in the same manner. We observe that the entanglement effect relatively enhances the color degrees of freedom due to the running of both the scalar and vector couplings. This modifies the vector meson spectral function and, thus, the spectral property such as the dilepton production rate in the low invariant mass also gets modified.

  1. Resting State Functional Connectivity MRI among Spectral MEG Current Sources in Children on the Autism Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Datko, Michael; Gougelet, Robert; Huang, Ming-Xiong; Pineda, Jaime A

    2016-01-01

    Social and communicative impairments are among the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and a great deal of evidence supports the notion that these impairments are associated with aberrant functioning and connectivity of various cortical networks. The present study explored the links between sources of MEG amplitude in various frequency bands and functional connectivity MRI in the resting state. The goal of combining these modalities was to use sources of neural oscillatory activity, measured with MEG, as functionally relevant seed regions for a more traditional pairwise fMRI connectivity analysis. We performed a seed-based connectivity analysis on resting state fMRI data, using seed regions derived from frequency-specific amplitude sources in resting state MEG data in the same nine subjects with ASD (10-17 years of age). We then compared fMRI connectivity among these MEG-source-derived regions between participants with autism and typically developing, age-matched controls. We used a source modeling technique designed for MEG data to detect significant amplitude sources in six frequency bands: delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (12-30 Hz), low gamma (30-60 Hz), and high gamma (60-120 Hz). MEG-derived source maps for each participant were co-registered in standard MNI space, and group-level source maps were obtained for each frequency. For each frequency band, the 10 largest clusters resulting from these t-tests were used as regions of interest (ROIs) for the fMRI functional connectivity analysis. Pairwise BOLD signal correlations were obtained between each pair of these ROIs for each frequency band. Each pairwise correlation was compared between the ASD and TD groups using t-tests. We also constrained these pairwise correlations to known network structures, resulting in a follow-up set of correlation matrices specific to each network we considered. Frequency-specific MEG sources had distinct patterns of fMRI resting state functional

  2. Resting State Functional Connectivity MRI among Spectral MEG Current Sources in Children on the Autism Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Datko, Michael; Gougelet, Robert; Huang, Ming-Xiong; Pineda, Jaime A.

    2016-01-01

    Social and communicative impairments are among the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and a great deal of evidence supports the notion that these impairments are associated with aberrant functioning and connectivity of various cortical networks. The present study explored the links between sources of MEG amplitude in various frequency bands and functional connectivity MRI in the resting state. The goal of combining these modalities was to use sources of neural oscillatory activity, measured with MEG, as functionally relevant seed regions for a more traditional pairwise fMRI connectivity analysis. We performed a seed-based connectivity analysis on resting state fMRI data, using seed regions derived from frequency-specific amplitude sources in resting state MEG data in the same nine subjects with ASD (10–17 years of age). We then compared fMRI connectivity among these MEG-source-derived regions between participants with autism and typically developing, age-matched controls. We used a source modeling technique designed for MEG data to detect significant amplitude sources in six frequency bands: delta (2–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha (8–12 Hz), beta (12–30 Hz), low gamma (30–60 Hz), and high gamma (60–120 Hz). MEG-derived source maps for each participant were co-registered in standard MNI space, and group-level source maps were obtained for each frequency. For each frequency band, the 10 largest clusters resulting from these t-tests were used as regions of interest (ROIs) for the fMRI functional connectivity analysis. Pairwise BOLD signal correlations were obtained between each pair of these ROIs for each frequency band. Each pairwise correlation was compared between the ASD and TD groups using t-tests. We also constrained these pairwise correlations to known network structures, resulting in a follow-up set of correlation matrices specific to each network we considered. Frequency-specific MEG sources had distinct patterns of fMRI resting

  3. The spectral theory of a functional-difference operator in conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takhtajan, L. A.; Faddeev, L. D.

    2015-04-01

    We consider the functional-difference operator H=U+U-1+V, where U and V are the Weyl self-adjoint operators satisfying the relation UV=q2VU, q=eπ iτ, τ>0. The operator H has applications in the conformal field theory and representation theory of quantum groups. Using the modular quantum dilogarithm (a q-deformation of the Euler dilogarithm), we define the scattering solution and Jost solutions, derive an explicit formula for the resolvent of the self-adjoint operator H on the Hilbert space L2( R), and prove the eigenfunction expansion theorem. This theorem is a q-deformation of the well-known Kontorovich-Lebedev transform in the theory of special functions. We also present a formulation of the scattering theory for H.

  4. Structural evolution of the one-dimensional spectral function from the low- to the high-energy limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maebashi, Hideaki; Takada, Yasutami

    2014-05-01

    By exactly analyzing the spin-1/2 Luttinger liquid (LL) and numerically solving a model of a mobile impurity electron in the LL, we obtain the one-electron spectral function A (p,ω) in a one-dimensional metal in an entire range of p at zero temperature. For |p| near the Fermi point pF, A (p,ω) is featured by two prominent peaks of spinon and (anti)holon representing spin-charge separation, but we also find an additional cusp structure between them. For |p|≫pF, this structure evolves as a main peak in A (p,ω) by swallowing the antiholon mode and its dispersion relation approaches that of a free electron, implying the existence of an electron excitation in the whole region, but not quite a quasiparticle in the Fermi liquid due to ever existing power-law decay of the excitation.

  5. Full-zone spectral envelope function formalism for the optimization of line and point tunnel field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Verreck, Devin Groeseneken, Guido; Verhulst, Anne S.; Mocuta, Anda; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron; Van de Put, Maarten; Magnus, Wim; Sorée, Bart

    2015-10-07

    Efficient quantum mechanical simulation of tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) is indispensable to allow for an optimal configuration identification. We therefore present a full-zone 15-band quantum mechanical solver based on the envelope function formalism and employing a spectral method to reduce computational complexity and handle spurious solutions. We demonstrate the versatility of the solver by simulating a 40 nm wide In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As lineTFET and comparing it to p-n-i-n configurations with various pocket and body thicknesses. We find that the lineTFET performance is not degraded compared to semi-classical simulations. Furthermore, we show that a suitably optimized p-n-i-n TFET can obtain similar performance to the lineTFET.

  6. Distorted spin dependent spectral function of {sup 3}He and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaptari, Leonya P.; Del Dotto, Alessio; Pace, Emanuele; Salme, Giovanni; Scopetta, Sergio

    2014-03-01

    The spin dependent spectral function, relevant to describe polarized electron scattering off polarized {sup 3}He, is studied, within the Plane Wave Impulse Approximation and taking into account final state interaction effects (FSI). In particular, the case of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SiDIS) is considered, evaluating the FSI of the hadronizing quark with the nuclear remnants. It is shown that particular kinematical regions can be selected to minimize the latter effects, so that parton distributions in the neutron can be accessed. On the other side, in the regions where FSI dominates, the considered reactions can elucidate the mechanism of hadronization of quarks during the propagation in the nuclear medium. It is shown that the obtained spin dependent spectral function can be directly applied to investigate the SiDIS reaction e-vector + {sup 3}He-vector to h+X, where the hadron h originates from the current fragmentation. Experiments of this type are being performed at JLab to extract neutron transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. As a case study, a different SiDIS process, with detection of slow (A-1) systems in the final state, is considered in more details, in order to establish when nuclear structure effects and FSI can be distinguished from elementary reactions on quasi-free nucleons. It is argued that, by a proper choice of kinematics, the origin of nuclear effects in polarized DIS phenomena and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which is not reachable in inclusive deep inelastic scattering.

  7. Spectral analysis of structure functions and their scaling exponents in forced isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkmann, Moritz; McComb, W. David; Yoffe, Samuel; Berera, Arjun

    2014-11-01

    The pseudospectral method, in conjunction with a new technique for obtaining scaling exponents ζn from the structure functions Sn (r) , is presented as an alternative to the extended self-similarity (ESS) method and the use of generalized structure functions. We propose plotting the ratio | Sn (r) /S3 (r) | against the separation r in accordance with a standard technique for analysing experimental data. This method differs from the ESS technique, which plots the generalized structure functions Gn (r) against G3 (r) , where G3 (r) ~ r . Using our method for the particular case of S2 (r) we obtain the new result that the exponent ζ2 decreases as the Taylor-Reynolds number increases, with ζ2 --> 0 . 679 +/- 0 . 013 as Rλ --> ∞ . This supports the idea of finite-viscosity corrections to the K41 prediction for S2, and is the opposite of the result obtained by ESS. The pseudospectral method permits the forcing to be taken into account exactly through the calculation of the energy input in real space from the work spectrum of the stirring forces. The combination of the viscous and the forcing corrections as calculated by the pseudospectral method is shown to account for the deviation of S3 from Kolmogorov's ``four-fifths''-law at all scales. This work has made use of the resources provided by the UK supercomputing service HECToR, made available through the Edinburgh Compute and Data Facility (ECDF). A. B. is supported by STFC, S. R. Y. and M. F. L. are funded by EPSRC.

  8. Breather turbulence versus soliton turbulence: Rogue waves, probability density functions, and spectral features.

    PubMed

    Akhmediev, N; Soto-Crespo, J M; Devine, N

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in integrable systems exhibits a noticeable scientific advantage: it can be expressed in terms of the nonlinear modes of these systems. Whether the majority of the excitations in the system are breathers or solitons defines the properties of the turbulent state. In the two extreme cases we can call such states "breather turbulence" or "soliton turbulence." The number of rogue waves, the probability density functions of the chaotic wave fields, and their physical spectra are all specific for each of these two situations. Understanding these extreme cases also helps in studies of mixed turbulent states when the wave field contains both solitons and breathers, thus revealing intermediate characteristics. PMID:27627303

  9. Spectral analysis of structure functions and their scaling exponents in forced isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    McComb, W D; Yoffe, S R; Linkmann, M F; Berera, A

    2014-11-01

    The pseudospectral method, in conjunction with a technique for obtaining scaling exponents ζ_{n} from the structure functions S_{n}(r), is presented as an alternative to the extended self-similarity (ESS) method and the use of generalized structure functions. We propose plotting the ratio |S_{n}(r)/S_{3}(r)| against the separation r in accordance with a standard technique for analyzing experimental data. This method differs from the ESS technique, which plots S_{n}(r) against S_{3}(r), with the assumption S_{3}(r)∼r. Using our method for the particular case of S_{2}(r) we obtain the result that the exponent ζ_{2} decreases as the Taylor-Reynolds number increases, with ζ_{2}→0.679±0.013 as R_{λ}→∞. This supports the idea of finite-viscosity corrections to the K41 prediction for S_{2}, and is the opposite of the result obtained by ESS. The pseudospectral method also permits the forcing to be taken into account exactly through the calculation of the energy input in real space from the work spectrum of the stirring forces. PMID:25493884

  10. An Efficient Spectral Method for Ordinary Differential Equations with Rational Function Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Torres, David; Hagstrom, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    We present some relations that allow the efficient approximate inversion of linear differential operators with rational function coefficients. We employ expansions in terms of a large class of orthogonal polynomial families, including all the classical orthogonal polynomials. These families obey a simple three-term recurrence relation for differentiation, which implies that on an appropriately restricted domain the differentiation operator has a unique banded inverse. The inverse is an integration operator for the family, and it is simply the tridiagonal coefficient matrix for the recurrence. Since in these families convolution operators (i.e. matrix representations of multiplication by a function) are banded for polynomials, we are able to obtain a banded representation for linear differential operators with rational coefficients. This leads to a method of solution of initial or boundary value problems that, besides having an operation count that scales linearly with the order of truncation N, is computationally well conditioned. Among the applications considered is the use of rational maps for the resolution of sharp interior layers.

  11. GPU accelerated real-time multi-functional spectral-domain optical coherence tomography system at 1300 nm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Oh, Christian M; Oliveira, Michael C; Islam, M Shahidul; Ortega, Arthur; Park, B Hyle

    2012-07-01

    We present a GPU accelerated multi-functional spectral domain optical coherence tomography system at 1300 nm. The system is capable of real-time processing and display of every intensity image, comprised of 512 pixels by 2048 A-lines acquired at 20 frames per second. The update rate for all four images with size of 512 pixels by 2048 A-lines simultaneously (intensity, phase retardation, flow and en face view) is approximately 10 frames per second. Additionally, we report for the first time the characterization of phase retardation and diattenuation by a sample comprised of a stacked set of polarizing film and wave plate. The calculated optic axis orientation, phase retardation and diattenuation match well with expected values. The speed of each facet of the multi-functional OCT CPU-GPU hybrid acquisition system, intensity, phase retardation, and flow, were separately demonstrated by imaging a horseshoe crab lateral compound eye, a non-uniformly heated chicken muscle, and a microfluidic device. A mouse brain with thin skull preparation was imaged in vivo and demonstrated the capability of the system for live multi-functional OCT visualization. PMID:22772175

  12. Heavy-impurity resonance, hybridization, and phonon spectral functions in Fe1-xMxSi, M=Ir,Os

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Delaire, O.; Al-Qasir, Iyad I.; May, Andrew F.; Sales, Brian C.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Ma, Jie; Matsuda, Masaaki; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Berlijn, Tom

    2015-03-31

    The vibrational behavior of heavy substitutional impurities (M=Ir,Os) in Fe1-xMxSi (x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.1) was investigated with a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), transport measurements, and first-principles simulations. In this paper, our INS measurements on single-crystals mapped the four-dimensional dynamical structure factor, S(Q;E), for several compositions and temperatures. Our results show that both Ir and Os impurities lead to the formation of a weakly dispersive resonance vibrational mode, in the energy range of the acoustic phonon dispersions of the FeSi host. We also show that Ir doping, which introduces free carriers and increases electron-phonon coupling, leads tomore » softened interatomic force-constants compared to doping with Os, which is isoelectronic to Fe. We analyze the phonon S(Q,E) from INS through a Green's function model incorporating the phonon self-energy based on first-principles density functional theory (DFT) simulations. Calculations of the quasiparticle spectral functions in the doped system reveal the hybridization between the resonance and the acoustic phonon modes. Finally, our results demonstrate a strong interaction of the host acoustic dispersions with the resonance mode, likely leading to the large observed suppression in lattice thermal conductivity.« less

  13. Expansions of τ hadronic spectral function moments in a nonpower QCD perturbation theory with tamed large order behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Gauhar; Ananthanarayan, B.; Caprini, Irinel; Fischer, Jan

    2013-08-01

    The moments of the hadronic spectral functions are of interest for the extraction of the strong coupling αs and other QCD parameters from the hadronic decays of the τ lepton. Motivated by the recent analyses of a large class of moments in the standard fixed-order and contour-improved perturbation theories, we consider the perturbative behavior of these moments in the framework of a QCD nonpower perturbation theory, defined by the technique of series acceleration by conformal mappings, which simultaneously implements renormalization-group summation and has a tame large-order behavior. Two recently proposed models of the Adler function are employed to generate the higher-order coefficients of the perturbation series and to predict the exact values of the moments, required for testing the properties of the perturbative expansions. We show that the contour-improved nonpower perturbation theories and the renormalization-group-summed nonpower perturbation theories have very good convergence properties for a large class of moments of the so-called “reference model,” including moments that are poorly described by the standard expansions. The results provide additional support for the plausibility of the description of the Adler function in terms of a small number of dominant renormalons.

  14. Heavy-impurity resonance, hybridization, and phonon spectral functions in Fe1-xMxSi (M =Ir , Os )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaire, O.; Al-Qasir, I. I.; May, A. F.; Li, C. W.; Sales, B. C.; Niedziela, J. L.; Ma, J.; Matsuda, M.; Abernathy, D. L.; Berlijn, T.

    2015-03-01

    The vibrational behavior of heavy substitutional impurities (M = Ir,Os) in Fe1-xMxSi (x =0 ,0.02 ,0.04 ,0.1 ) was investigated with a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), transport measurements, and first-principles simulations. Our INS measurements on single crystals mapped the four-dimensional dynamical structure factor, S (Q ,E ) , for several compositions and temperatures. Our results show that both Ir and Os impurities lead to the formation of a weakly dispersive resonance vibrational mode, in the energy range of the acoustic phonon dispersions of the FeSi host. We also show that Ir doping, which introduces free carriers, leads to softened interatomic force constants compared to doping with Os, which is isoelectronic to Fe. We analyze the phonon S (Q ,E ) from INS through a Green's-function model incorporating the phonon self-energy based on first-principles density functional theory simulations, and we study the disorder-induced lifetimes on large supercells. Calculations of the quasiparticle spectral functions in the doped system reveal the hybridization between the resonance and the acoustic phonon modes. Our results demonstrate a strong interaction of the host acoustic dispersions with the resonance mode, likely leading to the large observed suppression in lattice thermal conductivity.

  15. Heavy-impurity resonance, hybridization, and phonon spectral functions in Fe 1 x M x Si (M= Ir, Os)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Delaire, O.; Al-Qasir, Iyad I.; May, Andrew F.; Sales, Brian C.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Ma, Jie; Matsuda, Masaaki; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Berlijn, Tom

    2015-03-31

    The vibrational behavior of heavy substitutional impurities (M=Ir,Os) in Fe1􀀀xMxSi (x = 0; 0:02; 0:04; 0:1) was investigated with a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), transport measurements, and rst-principles simulations. Our INS measurements on single-crystals mapped the four-dimensional dynamical structure factor, S(Q;E), for several compositions and temperatures. Our results show that both Ir and Os impurities lead to the formation of a weakly dispersive resonance vibrational mode, in the energy range of the acoustic phonon dispersions of the FeSi host. We also show that Ir doping, which introduces free carriers and increases electron-phonon coupling, leads to softened interatomic force-constantsmore » compared to doping with Os, which is isoelectronic to Fe. We analyze the phonon S(Q;E) from INS through a Green's function model incorporating the phonon self-energy based on rst-principles density functional theory (DFT) simulations. Calculations of the quasiparticle spectral functions in the doped system reveal the hybridization between the resonance and the acoustic phonon modes. Our results demonstrate a strong interaction of the host acoustic dispersions with the resonance mode, likely leading to the large observed suppression in lattice thermal conductivity.« less

  16. A search for X-ray reprocessing echoes in the power spectral density functions of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Papadakis, I. E.; Epitropakis, A.; Pecháček, T.; Dovčiak, M.; McHardy, I. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a detailed study of the X-ray power spectra density (PSD) functions of twelve X-ray bright AGN, using almost all the archival XMM-Newton data. The total net exposure of the EPIC-pn light curves is larger than 350 ks in all cases (and exceeds 1 Ms in the case of 1H 0707-497). In a physical scenario in which X-ray reflection occurs in the inner part of the accretion disc of AGN, the X-ray reflection component should be a filtered echo of the X-ray continuum signal and should be equal to the convolution of the primary emission with the response function of the disc. Our primary objective is to search for these reflection features in the 5 - 7 keV (iron line) and 0.5 - 1 keV (soft) bands, where the X-ray reflection fraction is expected to be dominant. We fit to the observed periodograms two models: a simple bending power law model (BPL) and a BPL model convolved with the transfer function of the accretion disc assuming the lamp-post geometry and X-ray reflection from a homogeneous disc. We do not find any significant features in the best-fitting BPL model residuals either in individual PSDs in the iron band, soft and full band (0.3 - 10 keV) or in the average PSD residuals of the brightest and more variable sources (with similar black hole mass estimates). The typical amplitude of the soft and full-band residuals is around 3 - 5 per cent. It is possible that the expected general relativistic effects are not detected because they are intrinsically lower than the uncertainty of the current PSDs, even in the strong relativistic case in which X-ray reflection occurs on a disc around a fast rotating black hole having an X-ray source very close above it. However, we could place strong constrains to the X-ray reflection geometry with the current data sets if we knew in advance the intrinsic shape of the X-ray PSDs, particularly its high frequency slope.

  17. A comprehensive account of spectral, Hartree Fock, and Density Functional Theory studies of 2-chlorobenzothiazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daswani, Ujla; Sharma, Pratibha; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Benzothiazole moiety is found to play an important role in medicinal chemistry with a wide range of pharmacological activities. Herein, a simple, benzothiazole derivative viz., 2-chlorobenzothiazole (2CBT) has been analyzed. The spectroscopic properties of the target compound were examined by FT-IR (4400-450 cm-1), FT-Raman (4000-50 cm-1), and NMR techniques. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO. Theoretical calculations were performed by ab initio Hartree Fock and Density Functional Theory (DFT)/B3LYP method using varied basis sets combination. The scaled B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) results precisely complements with the experimental findings. Electronic absorption spectra along with energy and oscillator strength were obtained by TDDFT method. Atomic charges have also been reported. Total density isosurface and total density mapped with electrostatic potential surface (MESP) has been shown.

  18. Micro-optical elements functioning in non-visible spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Andy Z. Z.; Bergström, Andreas; Huo, Vicky Z. J.; Almqvist, Susanne; Kaplan, Wlodek; Andersson, Jan Y.

    2010-05-01

    Nowadays novel micro-fabrication and wafer-based manufacturing approach allows realizing micro-optics in a way scientists have dreamt for generations, in particular, utilizing nano-imprint lithography as fabrication tooling enables greatly accelerating the micro-optics technology to its frontier. In this report, we present wafer-scale fabrication of various types of micro-optical elements based on photoresist, benzocyclobutene, photocurable imprint resist, and semiconductor materials by using thermal reflow, reactive ion etching, and imprint techniques. Especially, several concave or convex 3-dimensional micro-optical structures shaped by imprint method are detailed. These micro-optical elements can be monolithically or hybrid integrated onto optoelectronics devices, such as photodetectors and emitters as optical beam focuser, collimator, filter, or anti-reflectance elements. As application examples, polymer microlenses were integrated directly on the top of UV dual functional devices and quantum dot long wavelength infrared photodetectors, respectively.

  19. Source functions of nuclear explosions from spectral synthesis and inversion. Scientific report No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Puster, P.; Jordan, T.H.

    1996-11-20

    We apply methods for the recovery of the frequency dependent moment rate tensor, M(w), to the study of Lop Nor nuclear explosions. This approach encompasses many source parameter diagnostics that have been traditionally used to discriminate nuclear explosions from chemical explosions and earthquakes and has the potential to provide new discrimination tools. We parameterize the source as M(w) = M1(a) + MD(a), where M1(co) and MD(O) are isotropic and deviatoric components, respectively. Our goal is to quantify both isotropic and deviatoric components, and investigate the different contributions to MD(a), in particular the tectonic release. Since tectonic release can bias estimates of M1(o) and may limit discrimination capabilities of sparse networks, it is important to be able to characterize the amount of tectonic release - in particular as a function of frequency. Our approach uses synthetic seismograms to improve the localization of signal measurements in both time and frequency domains. We adapt our earthquake-source inversion algorithms to account for isotropic sources at very shallow depths. We test our algorithms using a synthetic case with a known moment-tensor source composed in equal parts of isotropic and deviatoric sources; we successfully recover both MD and M using body waves and surface waves on horizontal and vertical components. We apply our methods to a data set containing both SH and Love waves as well as the body-wave portion between P and R1 and the minor-arc Rayleigh waves from the 92/5/21 Chinese nuclear test. We recover a significant tectonic release component for this event; the deviatoric moment tensor is a dip-slip reverse fault with a scalar moment MD = 1.9 +/- 0.2 x 10(17) Nm. The strike of the best-fitting double-couple is 320 deg. The source-time function derived from SH-polarized waves shows some complexity, with a sharp pulse i.

  20. Application of the three-component bidirectional reflectance distribution function model to Monte Carlo calculation of spectral effective emissivities of nonisothermal blackbody cavities.

    PubMed

    Prokhorov, Alexander; Prokhorova, Nina I

    2012-11-20

    We applied the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model consisting of diffuse, quasi-specular, and glossy components to the Monte Carlo modeling of spectral effective emissivities for nonisothermal cavities. A method for extension of a monochromatic three-component (3C) BRDF model to a continuous spectral range is proposed. The initial data for this method are the BRDFs measured in the plane of incidence at a single wavelength and several incidence angles and directional-hemispherical reflectance measured at one incidence angle within a finite spectral range. We proposed the Monte Carlo algorithm for calculation of spectral effective emissivities for nonisothermal cavities whose internal surface is described by the wavelength-dependent 3C BRDF model. The results obtained for a cylindroconical nonisothermal cavity are discussed and compared with results obtained using the conventional specular-diffuse model. PMID:23207311

  1. FURTHER DEFINING SPECTRAL TYPE 'Y' AND EXPLORING THE LOW-MASS END OF THE FIELD BROWN DWARF MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Davy Kirkpatrick, J.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Cushing, Michael C.; Mace, Gregory N.; Wright, Edward L.; McLean, Ian S.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Mainzer, Amanda K.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Tinney, C. G.; Parker, Stephen; Salter, Graeme

    2012-07-10

    We present the discovery of another seven Y dwarfs from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using these objects, as well as the first six WISE Y dwarf discoveries from Cushing et al., we further explore the transition between spectral types T and Y. We find that the T/Y boundary roughly coincides with the spot where the J - H colors of brown dwarfs, as predicted by models, turn back to the red. Moreover, we use preliminary trigonometric parallax measurements to show that the T/Y boundary may also correspond to the point at which the absolute H (1.6 {mu}m) and W2 (4.6 {mu}m) magnitudes plummet. We use these discoveries and their preliminary distances to place them in the larger context of the solar neighborhood. We present a table that updates the entire stellar and substellar constituency within 8 pc of the Sun, and we show that the current census has hydrogen-burning stars outnumbering brown dwarfs by roughly a factor of six. This factor will decrease with time as more brown dwarfs are identified within this volume, but unless there is a vast reservoir of cold brown dwarfs invisible to WISE, the final space density of brown dwarfs is still expected to fall well below that of stars. We also use these new Y dwarf discoveries, along with newly discovered T dwarfs from WISE, to investigate the field substellar mass function. We find that the overall space density of late-T and early-Y dwarfs matches that from simulations describing the mass function as a power law with slope -0.5 < {alpha} < 0.0; however, a power law may provide a poor fit to the observed object counts as a function of spectral type because there are tantalizing hints that the number of brown dwarfs continues to rise from late-T to early-Y. More detailed monitoring and characterization of these Y dwarfs, along with dedicated searches aimed at identifying more examples, are certainly required.

  2. Distorted spin-dependent spectral function of an A =3 nucleus and semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptari, L. P.; Del Dotto, A.; Pace, E.; Salmè, G.; Scopetta, S.

    2014-03-01

    The distorted spin-dependent spectral function of a nucleon inside an A =3 nucleus is introduced as a novel tool for investigating the polarized electron scattering off polarized He3 in the semi-inclusive DIS regime (SiDIS), going beyond the standard plane-wave impulse approximation. This distribution function is applied to the study of the spectator SiDIS, He3⃗(e⃗,e'H2)X, to properly take into account the final-state interaction between the hadronizing quark and the detected deuteron, with the final goal of a more reliable extraction of the polarized parton distribution g1(x) inside a bound proton. Our analysis allows one to single out two well-defined kinematical regions where the experimental asymmetries could yield very interesting information: the region where the final-state effects can be minimized, and therefore the direct access to the parton distributions in the proton is feasible, and the one where the final-state interaction dominates, and the spectator SiDIS reactions can elucidate the mechanism of the quark hadronization itself. The perspectives of extending our approach (i) to the mirror nucleus, H3, for achieving a less model-dependent flavor decomposition and (ii) to the asymmetries measured in the standard SiDIS reactions, e⃗+He3⃗→e'+h+X, with h a detected fast hadron, with the aim of extracting the neutron transversity, are discussed.

  3. Final Report on LDRD project 130784 : functional brain imaging by tunable multi-spectral Event-Related Optical Signal (EROS).

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Spahn, Olga Blum; Hsu, Alan Yuan-Chun

    2009-09-01

    Functional brain imaging is of great interest for understanding correlations between specific cognitive processes and underlying neural activity. This understanding can provide the foundation for developing enhanced human-machine interfaces, decision aides, and enhanced cognition at the physiological level. The functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) based event-related optical signal (EROS) technique can provide direct, high-fidelity measures of temporal and spatial characteristics of neural networks underlying cognitive behavior. However, current EROS systems are hampered by poor signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and depth of measure, limiting areas of the brain and associated cognitive processes that can be investigated. We propose to investigate a flexible, tunable, multi-spectral fNIRS EROS system which will provide up to 10x greater SNR as well as improved spatial and temporal resolution through significant improvements in electronics, optoelectronics and optics, as well as contribute to the physiological foundation of higher-order cognitive processes and provide the technical foundation for miniaturized portable neuroimaging systems.

  4. SPIDER VIII - constraints on the stellar initial mass function of early-type galaxies from a variety of spectral features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Barbera, F.; Ferreras, I.; Vazdekis, A.; de la Rosa, I. G.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Trevisan, M.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ricciardelli, E.

    2013-08-01

    We perform a spectroscopic study to constrain the stellar initial mass function (IMF) by using a large sample of 24 781 early-type galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-based Spheroids Panchromatic Investigation in Different Environmental Regions survey. Clear evidence is found of a trend between IMF and central velocity dispersion (σ0), evolving from a standard Kroupa/Chabrier IMF at σ0 ˜ 100 km s-1 towards a more bottom-heavy IMF with increasing σ0, becoming steeper than the Salpeter function at σ0 ≳ 220 km s-1. We analyse a variety of spectral indices, combining gravity-sensitive features, with age- and metallicity-sensitive indices, and we also consider the effect of non-solar abundance variations. The indices, corrected to solar scale by means of semi-empirical correlations, are fitted simultaneously with the (nearly solar-scaled) extended MILES (MIUSCAT) stellar population models. Similar conclusions are reached when analysing the spectra with a hybrid approach, combining constraints from direct spectral fitting in the optical with those from IMF-sensitive indices. Our analysis suggests that σ0, rather than [α/Fe], drives the variation of the IMF. Although our analysis cannot discriminate between a single power-law (unimodal) IMF and a low-mass (≲0.5 M⊙) tapered (bimodal) IMF, robust constraints can be inferred for the fraction in low-mass stars at birth. This fraction (by mass) is found to increase from ˜20 per cent at σ0 ˜ 100 km s-1, up to ˜80 per cent at σ0 ˜ 300 km s-1. However, additional constraints can be provided with stellar mass-to-light (M/L) ratios: unimodal models predict M/L significantly larger than dynamical M/L, across the whole σ0 range, whereas a bimodal IMF is compatible. Our results are robust against individual abundance variations. No significant variation is found in Na and Ca in addition to the expected change from the correlation between [α/Fe] and σ0.

  5. An algebraic formulation and implementation of the tetrahedron linear method for the Brillouin zone integration of spectral functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaprzyk, S.

    2012-02-01

    A package of FORTRAN subroutines is provided for the Brillouin zone (BZ) integration of the Green's functions (GF) and spectral functions. The relevant weighting factors at sampling points in the BZ are evaluated to high precision with the help of the formulas for both the real and imaginary parts. The analytical properties of implemented expressions are discussed, and their range of validity is determined. The limiting cases when values at the tetrahedron corners coincide are worked out in terms of the finite difference quotients and replaced by the derivatives. The present numerical algorithms are developed for one-, two- and three-dimensional simplexes, with the potential ability of handling simplexes with higher dimensions as well. As an example, the results of computation the simple cubic lattice GF's are presented. Program summaryProgram title: SimTet Catalogue identifier: AEKF_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3176 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 19 416 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran Computer: Any computer with a Fortran compiler Operating system: Unix, Linux, Windows RAM: 512 Mbytes Classification: 4.11, 7.3 Nature of problem: The integration of the Green's function over the Brillouin zone appears in the computations of many physical quantities in solid-state physics. Solution method: The integral over the Brillouin zone is computed with the tetrahedron linear method. The complex weights are generated with the novel algebraic formulas free of apparent singularities and well suited for automatic computations. Running time: A few μsec per integral.

  6. Power spectral density function and spatial autocorrelation of the ambient vibration full-wavefield generated by a distribution of spatially correlated surface sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunedei, Enrico; Albarello, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic dispersion curves are here computed in the frame of an ambient-vibration full-wavefield model, which relies on the description of both ambient-vibration ground displacement and its sources as stochastic fields defined on the Earth's surface, stationary in time and homogeneous in space. In this model, previously developed for computing synthetic Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio curves, the power spectral density function and the spatial autocorrelation of the displacement are naturally described as functions of the power spectral density function of the generating forces and of the subsoil properties (via the relevant Green's function), by also accounting for spatial correlation of these forces. Dispersion curves are computed from the displacement power spectral density function and from the spatial autocorrelation according with the well-known f-k and SPAC techniques, respectively. Two examples illustrate the way this new ambient-vibration model works, showing its possible use in better understanding the role of the surface waves in forming the dispersion curves, as well as its capability to capture some remarkable experimental findings.

  7. Estimation of uncertainties in the spectral response function of the water vapor channel of a meteorological imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Myoung-Hwan; Lee, Su Jeong; Kim, Dohyeong

    2015-06-01

    The five channel meteorological imager (MI) on-board the geostationary Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS) of Korea has been operationally used since April 2011. For a better utilization of the MI data, a rigorous characterization of the four infrared channel data has been conducted using the GSICS (Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System) approach with the IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) on-board the European Metop satellite as the reference instrument. Although all four channels show the uncertainty characteristics that are in line with the results from both the ground tests and the in-orbit-test, there shows an unexpected systematic bias in the water vapor channel of MI, showing a cold bias at the warm target temperature and a warm bias with the cold target temperature. It has been shown that this kind of systematic bias could be introduced by the uncertainties in the spectral response function (SRF) of the specific channel which is similar to the heritage instruments on-board GOES series satellite. An extensive radiative transfer simulation using a radiative transfer model has confirmed that the SRF uncertainty could indeed introduce such a systematic bias. By using the collocated data set consisting of the MI data and the hyperspectral IASI data, the first order correction value for the SRF uncertainty is estimated to be about 2.79 cm-1 shift of the central position of the current SRF.

  8. Synthesis, structural and spectral properties of diarylamino-functionalized pyrene derivatives via Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jian-Yong; Feng, Xing; Seto, Nobuyuki; Do, Jung-Hee; Zeng, Xi; Tao, Zhu; Yamato, Takehiko

    2013-03-01

    A new series of diarylamino-functionalized pyrene derivatives, namely, 1-(N,N-diarylamino)-substituted pyrenes (7), isomer of 1,6-bis- and 1,8-bis(N,N-diarylamino)-substituted pyrenes (8/9) and 1,3,6,8-tetrakis(N,N-diarylamino)-substituted pyrenes (10) have been synthesized. The structures of these synthesized compounds were determined on the basis of spectral data and elemental analysis. All compounds 7-10 have bright fluorescent emissions from sky-blue to green in solution condition (λmax = 464-500 nm in CH2Cl2) and high emission efficiency (Φf = 0.84-0.96 in dichloromethane). All compounds have high thermal stability and good solubility in common organic solvents. The electronic properties of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic methods such as UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence emission spectroscopy. Clear evidences were obtained that the longest wavelength bands of these compounds are bathochromically red-shifted as the number of the diarylamino-substituent increased.

  9. Functional imaging of hemodynamic stimulus response in the rat retina with ultrahigh-speed spectral / Fourier domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Baumann, Bernhard; Clermont, Allen C.; Feener, Edward P.; Boas, David A.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2013-03-01

    Measuring retinal hemodynamics in response to flicker stimulus is important for investigating pathophysiology in small animal models of diabetic retinopathy, because a reduction in the hyperemic response is thought to be one of the earliest changes in diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we investigated functional imaging of retinal hemodynamics in response to flicker stimulus in the rat retina using an ultrahigh speed spectral / Fourier domain OCT system at 840nm with an axial scan rate of 244kHz. At 244kHz the nominal axial velocity range that could be measured without phase wrapping was +/-37.7mm/s. Pulsatile total retinal arterial blood flow as a function of time was measured using an en face Doppler approach where a 200μm × 200μm area centered at the central retinal artery was repeatedly raster scanned at a volume acquisition rate of 55Hz. Three-dimensional capillary imaging was performed using speckle decorrelation which has minimal angle dependency compared to other angiography techniques based on OCT phase information. During OCT imaging, a flicker stimulus could be applied to the retina synchronously by inserting a dichroic mirror in the imaging interface. An acute transient increase in total retinal blood flow could be detected. At the capillary level, an increase in the degree of speckle decorrelation in capillary OCT angiography images could also be observed, which indicates an increase in the velocity of blood at the capillary level. This method promises to be useful for the investigation of small animal models of ocular diseases.

  10. The effect of age and vocal task on cepstral/spectral measures of vocal function in adult males.

    PubMed

    Watts, Christopher R; Ronshaugen, Rachelle; Saenz, Daniella

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of aging on cepstral/spectral acoustic measures calculated from clinical stimuli (vowels and sentences from the Consensus Auditory Perceptual Evaluation of Voice). Thirty younger adult males (20-49 years of age) and thirty older males (50-79 years of age) produced sustained vowels and read a connected speech stimulus which were applied to cepstral/spectral acoustic analyses to derive the multiparametric measure of Cepstral/Spectral Index of Dysphonia (CSID). Results indicated that older males exhibited significantly greater CSID measures than younger males in connected speech (p=0.001; d=0.98), but not the vowel. Linear regression revealed a moderate correlation between age and CSID in connected speech. These results further inform our understanding of how aging influences voice production in varied contexts and how commonly utilised clinical voice tasks subjected to cepstral/spectral acoustic analyses might differentially inform our knowledge of underlying vocal physiology. PMID:25651197

  11. Temperature dependent dielectric function in the near-infrared to vacuum-ultraviolet ultraviolet spectral range of alumina and yttria stabilized zirconia thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Grund, R. Lühmann, T.; Böntgen, T.; Franke, H.; Lorenz, M.; Grundmann, M.; Opper, D.

    2013-12-14

    The dielectric function of nano-/polycrystalline alumina and yttria stabilised zirconia thin films has been investigated in a wide spectral range from 1.0 eV to 7.5 eV and temperatures between 10 K and room temperature. In the near band-edge spectral range, we found a broad distribution of optical transitions within the band gap, the so-called Urbach absorption tail which is typical for amorphous or polycrystalline materials due to the lack of long range order in the crystal structure. The coupling properties of the electronic system to the optical phonon bath and thermal lattice vibrations strongly depend on the ratio of the spectral extent of these disorder states to the main phonon energy, which we correlate with the different crystalline structure of our samples. The films have been grown at room temperature and 650 °C by pulsed laser deposition.

  12. Study of hole pair condensation based on the SU(2) Slave-Boson approach to the t-J Hamiltonian: Temperature, momentum and doping dependences of spectral functions

    SciTech Connect

    Salk, S.H.S.; Lee, S.S.

    1999-11-01

    Based on the U(1) and SU(2) slave-boson approaches to the t-J Hamiltonian, the authors evaluate the one electron spectral functions for the hole doped high {Tc} cuprates for comparison with the angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data. They find that the observed quasiparticle peak in the superconducting state is correlated with the hump which exists in the normal state. They find that the spectral weight of the quasiparticle peak increases as doping rate increases, which is consistent with observation. As a consequence of the phase fluctuation effects of the spinon and holon pairing order parameters the spectral weight of the predicted peak obtained from the SU(2) theory is found to be smaller than the one predicted from U(1) mean field theory.

  13. Spectral transfer function analysis of respiratory hemodynamic fluctuations predicts end-diastolic stiffness in preserved ejection fraction heart failure.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Mahmoud; Leite, Sara; Alaa, Mohamed; Oliveira-Pinto, José; Tavares-Silva, Marta; Fontoura, Dulce; Falcão-Pires, Inês; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Lourenço, André P

    2016-01-01

    Preserved ejection fraction heart failure (HFpEF) diagnosis remains controversial, and invasive left ventricular (LV) hemodynamic evaluation and/or exercise testing is advocated by many. The stiffer HFpEF myocardium may show impaired stroke volume (SV) variation induced by fluctuating LV filling pressure during ventilation. Our aim was to investigate spectral transfer function (STF) gain from end-diastolic pressure (EDP) to indexed SV (SVi) in experimental HFpEF. Eighteen-week-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and ZSF1 lean (ZSF1 Ln) and obese rats (ZSF1 Ob) randomly underwent LV open-chest (OC, n = 8 each group) or closed-chest hemodynamic evaluation (CC, n = 6 each group) under halogenate anesthesia and positive-pressure ventilation at constant inspiratory pressure. Beat-to-beat fluctuations in hemodynamic parameters during ventilation were assessed by STF. End-diastolic stiffness (βi) and end-systolic elastance (Eesi) for indexed volumes were obtained by inferior vena cava occlusion in OC (multibeat) or single-beat method estimates in CC. ZSF1 Ob showed higher EDP spectrum (P < 0.001), higher STF gain between end-diastolic volume and EDP, and impaired STF gain between EDP and SVi compared with both hypertensive ZSF1 Ln and normotensive WKY controls (P < 0.001). Likewise βi was only higher in ZSF1 Ob while Eesi was raised in both ZSF1 groups. On multivariate analysis βi and not Eesi correlated with impaired STF gain from EDP to SVi (P < 0.001), and receiver-operating characteristics analysis showed an area under curve of 0.89 for higher βi prediction (P < 0.001). Results support further clinical testing of STF analysis from right heart catheterization-derived EDP surrogates to noninvasively determined SV as screening/diagnostic tool to assess myocardial stiffness in HFpEF. PMID:26475584

  14. Characterization and modelling of the spatially- and spectrally-varying point-spread function in hyperspectral imaging systems for computational correction of axial optical aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špiclin, Žiga; Bürmen, Miran; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-03-01

    Spatial resolution of hyperspectral imaging systems can vary significantly due to axial optical aberrations that originate from wavelength-induced index-of-refraction variations of the imaging optics. For systems that have a broad spectral range, the spatial resolution will vary significantly both with respect to the acquisition wavelength and with respect to the spatial position within each spectral image. Variations of the spatial resolution can be effectively characterized as part of the calibration procedure by a local image-based estimation of the pointspread function (PSF) of the hyperspectral imaging system. The estimated PSF can then be used in the image deconvolution methods to improve the spatial resolution of the spectral images. We estimated the PSFs from the spectral images of a line grid geometric caliber. From individual line segments of the line grid, the PSF was obtained by a non-parametric estimation procedure that used an orthogonal series representation of the PSF. By using the non-parametric estimation procedure, the PSFs were estimated at different spatial positions and at different wavelengths. The variations of the spatial resolution were characterized by the radius and the fullwidth half-maximum of each PSF and by the modulation transfer function, computed from images of USAF1951 resolution target. The estimation and characterization of the PSFs and the image deconvolution based spatial resolution enhancement were tested on images obtained by a hyperspectral imaging system with an acousto-optic tunable filter in the visible spectral range. The results demonstrate that the spatial resolution of the acquired spectral images can be significantly improved using the estimated PSFs and image deconvolution methods.

  15. Nuclear Transparency and Single Particle Spectral Functions from Quasielastic A(e,e'p) Reactions up to Q2=8.1 GeV2

    SciTech Connect

    David McKee

    2003-05-01

    High statistics elastic and quasielastic scattering measurements were performed on hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, and iron at squared momentum transfers up to 8.1 GeV2. Both the nuclear transparency and the single particle spectral functions were extracted by means of comparison with a Plane- Wave Impulse Approximation calculation. Our data provide no evidence of the onset of color transparency within our kinematic range.

  16. Onset of Time-Dependent 3-D spherical Mantle Convection using a Radial Basis Function-Pseudospectral Method ; Spectral-Finite Volume ; Spectral Higher-Order Finite- Difference Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, G.; Flyer, N.; Yuen, D. A.; Monnereau, M.; Zhang, S.; Wang, S. M.

    2009-05-01

    Many numerical methods, such as finite-differences, finite-volume, their yin-yang variants, finite-elements and spectral methods have been employed to study 3-D mantle convection. All have their own strengths, but also serious weaknesses. Spectrally accurate methods do not practically allow for node refinement and often involve cumbersome algebra while finite difference, volume, or element methods are generally low-order, adding excessive numerical diffusion to the model. For the 3-D mantle convection problem, we have introduced a new mesh-free approach, using radial basis functions (RBF). This method has the advantage of being algorithmic simple, spectrally accurate for arbitrary node layouts in multi-dimensions and naturally allows for node-refinement. One virtue of the RBF scheme allows the user to use a simple Cartesian geometry, while implementing the required boundary conditions for the temperature, velocities and stress components on a spherical surface at both the planetary surface and the core-mantle boundary. We have studied time- dependent mantle convection, using both a RBF-pseudospectral code and a code which uses spherical- harmonics in the angular direction and second-order finite volume in the radial direction. We have employed a third code , which uses spherical harmonics and higher-order finite-difference method a la Fornberg in the radial coordinate.We first focus on the onset of time-dependence at Rayleigh number Ra of 70,000. We follow the development of stronger time-dependence to a Ra of one million, using high enough resolution with 120 to 200 points in the radial direction and 128 to 256 spherical harmonics.

  17. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  18. Airborne in-situ spectral characterization and concentration estimates of fluorescent organics as a function of depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittle, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    The primary purpose of many in-situ airborne light scattering experiments in natural waters is to spectrally characterize the subsurface fluorescent organics and estimate their relative concentrations. This is often done by shining a laser beam into the water and monitoring its subsurface return signal. To do this with the proper interpretation, depth must be taken into account. If one disregards depth dependence when taking such estimates, both their spectral characteristics and their concentrations estimates can be rather ambiguous. A simple airborne lidar configuration is used to detect the subsurface return signal from a particular depth and wavelength. Underwater scatterometer were employed to show that in-situ subsurface organics are very sensitive to depth, but they also require the use of slow moving boats to cover large sample areas. Also, their very entry into the water disturbs the sample it is measuring. The method described is superior and simplest to any employed thus far.

  19. The role of spectral detail in the binaural transfer function on perceived externalization in a reverberant environment.

    PubMed

    Hassager, Henrik Gert; Gran, Fredrik; Dau, Torsten

    2016-05-01

    Individual binaural room impulse responses (BRIRs) were recorded at a distance of 1.5 m for azimuth angles of 0° and 50° in a reverberant room. Spectral details were reduced in either the direct or the reverberant part of the BRIRs by averaging the magnitude responses with band-pass filters. For various filter bandwidths, the modified BRIRs were convolved with broadband noise and listeners judged the perceived position of the noise when virtualized over headphones. Only reductions in spectral details of the direct part obtained with filter bandwidths broader than one equivalent rectangular bandwidth affected externalization. Reductions in spectral details of the reverberant part had only little influence on externalization. In both conditions, externalization was not as pronounced at 0° as at 50°. To characterize the auditory processes that may be involved in the perception of externalization, a quantitative model is proposed. The model includes an echo-suppression mechanism, a filterbank describing the frequency selectivity in the cochlea and a binaural stage that measures the deviations of the interaural level differences between the considered input and the unmodified input. These deviations, integrated across frequency, are then mapped to a value that corresponds to the perceived externalization. PMID:27250190

  20. Integrated airborne lidar and multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA) for plant species mapping across multiple functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlin, K.; Asner, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to map plant species distributions has long been one of the key goals of terrestrial remote sensing. Achieving this goal has been challenging, however, due to technical constraints and the difficulty in relating remote observations to ground measurements. Advances in both the types of data that can be collected remotely and in available analytical tools like multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA) are allowing for rapid improvements in this field. In 2007 the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) acquired high resolution lidar and hyperspectral imagery of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (Woodside, California). The site contains a mosaic of vegetation types, from grassland to chaparral to evergreen forest. To build a spectral library, 415 GPS points were collected in the field, made up of 44 plant species, six plant categories (for nonphotosynthetic vegetation), and four substrate types. Using the lidar data to select the most illuminated pixels as seen from the aircraft (based on canopy shape and viewing angle), we then reduced the spectral library to only the most fully lit pixels. To identify individual plant species in the imagery, first the hyperspectral data was used to calculate the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and then pixels with an NDVI less than 0.15 were removed from further analysis. The remaining image was stratified into five classes based on vegetation height derived from the lidar data. For each class, a suite of possible endmembers was identified and then three endmember selection procedures (endmember average RMS, minimum average spectral angle, and count based endmember selection) were employed to select the most representative endmembers from each species in each class. Two and three endmember models were then applied and each pixel was assigned a species or plant category based on the highest endmember fraction. To validate the approach, an independent set of 200 points was collected throughout the

  1. Synthesis, crystal structure, vibrational spectral and density functional studies of 4-(1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)antipyrine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zongxue; Sun, Gang; Liu, Zengwei; Yu, Cheng; Huang, Changliang; Sun, Yuxi

    2012-12-01

    The 4-(1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)antipyrine, C19H15N3O3, was synthesized by the condensation reaction of 4-aminoantipyrine and phthalic anhydride in ethanol solution using triethylamine as catalyst, and characterized by X-ray diffraction and spectral techniques. The experimental spectral bands were structurally assigned with the theoretical calculation, and the thermodynamic properties of the studied compound were obtained from the theoretically calculated frequencies. The linear polarizability (α0) and first hyperpolarizabilities (β0) calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level are of 33.6921 Å3 and 2.7835 × 10-30 cm5/esu, respectively. The NBO analysis reveals that the studied molecule presents a structural characteristic of long-range electron-transfer with the energy gap of ⩾3.639 eV. The frontier molecular orbitals are responsible for the electron polarization and long-range electron-transfer properties. The results indicate that the compound might be an excellent candidate of photo-responsive materials.

  2. Satellite structures in the spectral functions of the two-dimensional electron gas in semiconductor quantum wells: A GW plus cumulant study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Vigil-Fowler, Derek; Louie, Steven G.

    2014-03-01

    We present theoretical calculations for the spectral functions and single-particle densities of states of the two-dimensional electron gas in semiconductor quantum wells at different electron densities using the GW plus cumulant method. We compare our results to GW only calculations and find significant differences in the description of the satellites between the two theories: While GW theory predicts the existence of a plasmaron excitation, no such excitation is found in GW plus cumulant theory. We compare our results to experimental tunneling spectra from semiconductor quantum wells and find good agreement for the satellite properties.

  3. Spectral stratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to stratigraphic analysis is described which uses photogeologic and spectral interpretation of multispectral remote sensing data combined with topographic information to determine the attitude, thickness, and lithology of strata exposed at the surface. The new stratigraphic procedure is illustrated by examples in the literature. The published results demonstrate the potential of spectral stratigraphy for mapping strata, determining dip and strike, measuring and correlating stratigraphic sequences, defining lithofacies, mapping biofacies, and interpreting geological structures.

  4. Simulation of solid body motion in a Newtonian fluid using a vorticity-based pseudo-spectral immersed boundary method augmented by the radial basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabetghadam, Fereidoun; Soltani, Elshan

    2015-10-01

    The moving boundary conditions are implemented into the Fourier pseudo-spectral solution of the two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) in the vorticity-velocity form, using the radial basis functions (RBF). Without explicit definition of an external forcing function, the desired immersed boundary conditions are imposed by direct modification of the convection and diffusion terms. At the beginning of each time-step the solenoidal velocities, satisfying the desired moving boundary conditions, along with a modified vorticity are obtained and used in modification of the convection and diffusion terms of the vorticity evolution equation. Time integration is performed by the explicit fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and the boundary conditions are set at the beginning of each sub-step. The method is applied to a couple of moving boundary problems and more than second-order of accuracy in space is demonstrated for the Reynolds numbers up to Re = 550. Moreover, performance of the method is shown in comparison with the classical Fourier pseudo-spectral method.

  5. Synthesis, spectral characterization and density functional theory exploration of 1-(quinolin-3-yl)piperidin-2-ol.

    PubMed

    Suresh, M; Padusha, M Syed Ali; Bharanidharan, S; Saleem, H; Dhandapani, A; Manivarman, S

    2015-06-01

    The experimental and theoretical vibrational frequencies of a newly synthesized compound, namely 1-(quinolin-3-yl)piperidin-2-ol (QPPO) are analyzed. The experimental FT-IR (4000-400 cm(-1)) and FT-Raman (4000-100 cm(-1)) of the molecule in solid phase have been recorded. The optimized molecular structure, vibrational assignments of QPPO have been investigated experimentally and theoretically using Gaussian03W software package. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) is calculated to find its character in non-linear optics. Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method is used to calculate (1)H NMR chemical shift calculations were carried out and compared with experimental data. The electronic properties like UV-Visible spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO energies were reported. The energy gap shows that the charge transfer occurs within the molecule. Thermodynamic parameters of the title compound were calculated at various temperatures. PMID:25769121

  6. Synthesis, spectral characterization and density functional theory exploration of 1-(quinolin-3-yl)piperidin-2-ol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, M.; Syed Ali Padusha, M.; Bharanidharan, S.; Saleem, H.; Dhandapani, A.; Manivarman, S.

    2015-06-01

    The experimental and theoretical vibrational frequencies of a newly synthesized compound, namely 1-(quinolin-3-yl)piperidin-2-ol (QPPO) are analyzed. The experimental FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman (4000-100 cm-1) of the molecule in solid phase have been recorded. The optimized molecular structure, vibrational assignments of QPPO have been investigated experimentally and theoretically using Gaussian03W software package. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) is calculated to find its character in non-linear optics. Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method is used to calculate 1H NMR chemical shift calculations were carried out and compared with experimental data. The electronic properties like UV-Visible spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO energies were reported. The energy gap shows that the charge transfer occurs within the molecule. Thermodynamic parameters of the title compound were calculated at various temperatures.

  7. Spectral and geographical variability in the oceanic response to atmospheric pressure fluctuations, as inferred from “dynamic barometer” Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, N.; Dickman, S. R.

    2010-09-01

    A decade ago, a novel theoretical approach was developed (Dickman, 1998) for determining the dynamic response of the oceans to atmospheric pressure variations, a response nicknamed the "dynamic barometer" (DB), and the effects of that response on Earth's rotation. This approach employed a generalized, spherical harmonic ocean tide model to compute oceanic Green's functions, the oceans' fluid dynamic response to unit-amplitude pressure forcing on various spatial and temporal scales, and then construct rotational Green's functions, representing the rotational effects of that response. When combined with the observed atmospheric pressure field, the rotational Green's functions would yield the effects of the DB on Earth's rotation. The Green's functions reflect in some way the geographical and spectral sensitivity of the oceans to atmospheric pressure forcing. We have formulated a measure of that sensitivity using a simple combination of rotational Green's functions. We find that the DB response of the oceans to atmospheric pressure forcing depends significantly on geographic location and on frequency. Compared to the inverted barometer (IB) (the traditional static model), the DB effects differ slightly at long periods but become very different at shorter periods. Among all the responses, the prograde polar motion effects are the most dynamic, with large portions of the North Atlantic and some of the North Pacific no larger than one third of IB, but most of the Southern Hemisphere oceans at least 50% greater than IB.

  8. Spectral stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Harold R.

    1991-09-01

    Stratigraphic and structural studies of the Wind River and Bighorn basins, Wyoming, and the Guerrero-Morelos basin, Mexico, have resulted in development of ''spectral stratigraphy.'' This approach to stratigraphic analysis uses photogeologic and spectral interpretation of multispectral remote sensing data combined with topographic information to determine the attitude, thickness, and lithology of strata exposed at the surface. This paper reviews selected published examples that illustrate this new stratigraphic procedure. Visible to thermal infrared laboratory, spectral measurements of sedimentary rocks are the physical basis for spectral stratigraphy. Results show that laboratory, field, and remote spectroscopy can augment conventional laboratory and field methods for petrologic analysis, stratigraphic correlation, interpretation of depositional environments, and construction of facies models. Landsat thematic mapper data are used to map strata and construct stratigraphic columns and structural cross sections at 1:24,000 scale or less. Experimental multispectral thermal infrared aircraft data facilitate lithofacies/biofacies analyses. Visible short-wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer data allow remote determination of the stratigraphic distribution of iron oxides, quartz, calcite, dolomite, gypsum, specific clay species, and other minerals diagnostic of environments of deposition. Development of a desk-top, computer-based, geologic analysis system that provides for automated application of these approaches to coregistered digital image and topographic data portends major expansion in the use of spectral stratigraphy for purely scientific (lithospheric research) or practical (resource exploration) objectives.

  9. Measurement of the earth resources technology satellite /ERTS-1/ multi-spectral scanner OTF from operational imagery. [Optical Transfer Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowengerdt, R. A.; Antos, R. L.; Slater, P. N.

    1974-01-01

    The optical transfer function (OTF) of some typical ERTS-1 multispectral imagery was obtained by comparison of matched sets of aircraft underflight and ERTS photographic and digital images. One-dimensional OTF analysis consisted in obtaining U-2 and ERTS microdensitometer scans followed by density to transmission conversion, microdensitometer aperture correction, exposure calibration, scan correlation scale optimization, OTF calculation, obtaining a form weighted average of the OTFs, transformation of the OTFs back to the spatial domain (giving the line spread function or LSF), and application of a window function to the LSF resulting in a smoothed OTF. Date-to-date comparison of ERTS OTFs showed a drop in quality on April 4, 1973, compared with January 4, 1973.

  10. Comparability of red/near-infrared reflectance and NDVI based on the spectral response function between MODIS and 30 other satellite sensors using rice canopy spectra.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weijiao; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Xiuzhen; Wang, Fumin; Shi, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of regional and global environment changes often depends on the combined use of multi-source sensor data. The most widely used vegetation index is the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is a function of the red and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The reflectance and NDVI data sets derived from different satellite sensor systems will not be directly comparable due to different spectral response functions (SRF), which has been recognized as one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the multi-sensor data analysis. This study quantified the influence of SRFs on the red and NIR reflectances and NDVI derived from 31 Earth observation satellite sensors. For this purpose, spectroradiometric measurements were performed for paddy rice grown under varied nitrogen levels and at different growth stages. The rice canopy reflectances were convoluted with the spectral response functions of various satellite instruments to simulate sensor-specific reflectances in the red and NIR channels. NDVI values were then calculated using the simulated red and NIR reflectances. The results showed that as compared to the Terra MODIS, the mean relative percentage difference (RPD) ranged from -12.67% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, -8.52% to -0.23% for the NIR reflectance, and -9.32% to 3.10% for the NDVI. The mean absolute percentage difference (APD) compared to the Terra MODIS ranged from 1.28% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, 0.84% to 8.71% for the NIR reflectance, and 0.59% to 9.32% for the NDVI. The lowest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for Landsat5 TM for the red reflectance, CBERS02B CCD for the NIR reflectance and Landsat4 TM for the NDVI. In addition, the largest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for IKONOS for the red reflectance, AVHRR1 onboard NOAA8 for the NIR reflectance and IKONOS for the NDVI. The results also indicated that AVHRRs onboard NOAA7-17 showed

  11. Comparability of Red/Near-Infrared Reflectance and NDVI Based on the Spectral Response Function between MODIS and 30 Other Satellite Sensors Using Rice Canopy Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weijiao; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Xiuzhen; Wang, Fumin; Shi, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of regional and global environment changes often depends on the combined use of multi-source sensor data. The most widely used vegetation index is the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is a function of the red and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The reflectance and NDVI data sets derived from different satellite sensor systems will not be directly comparable due to different spectral response functions (SRF), which has been recognized as one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the multi-sensor data analysis. This study quantified the influence of SRFs on the red and NIR reflectances and NDVI derived from 31 Earth observation satellite sensors. For this purpose, spectroradiometric measurements were performed for paddy rice grown under varied nitrogen levels and at different growth stages. The rice canopy reflectances were convoluted with the spectral response functions of various satellite instruments to simulate sensor-specific reflectances in the red and NIR channels. NDVI values were then calculated using the simulated red and NIR reflectances. The results showed that as compared to the Terra MODIS, the mean relative percentage difference (RPD) ranged from −12.67% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, −8.52% to −0.23% for the NIR reflectance, and −9.32% to 3.10% for the NDVI. The mean absolute percentage difference (APD) compared to the Terra MODIS ranged from 1.28% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, 0.84% to 8.71% for the NIR reflectance, and 0.59% to 9.32% for the NDVI. The lowest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for Landsat5 TM for the red reflectance, CBERS02B CCD for the NIR reflectance and Landsat4 TM for the NDVI. In addition, the largest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for IKONOS for the red reflectance, AVHRR1 onboard NOAA8 for the NIR reflectance and IKONOS for the NDVI. The results also indicated that AVHRRs onboard NOAA7

  12. Development of regulation of the cardiac chronotropic function in albino rats during the early postnatal ontogeny according to the results of spectral analysis of heart rhythm variability.

    PubMed

    Kurjanova, E V; Teplyj, D L; Zereninova, N V

    2012-04-01

    Regulation of the cardiac chronotropic function was studied by spectral analysis of cardiac rhythm variability in HF, LF, and VLF bands in rats at various stages of the early postnatal ontogeny. The inadequacy of the regulatory mechanisms during the first days of life manifested by low power of all waves (particularly HF) in the cardiac rhythm variability spectrum. On day 14 of life, the cardiointerval variability was formed by HF waves, their low power together with increasing heart rate indicating more intense sympathetic effects. On day 21 of life, a potent elevation of the VLF power reflected a stronger centralization of regulation from higher autonomic centers. The age of 28 days was characterized by a sharp increase of HF activity and could be regarded as the turning point in the development of parasympathetic effects and activity of the autonomic regulation contour. From the age of 35 days, the wave power and the proportion of the spectral components of cardiac rhythm variability in albino rats corresponded to the adult pattern; a trend to the central regulation predominance and to greater rigidity of cardiac rhythm formed only with the onset of sexual maturation. PMID:22803162

  13. Understanding collision-induced dissociation of dofetilide: a case study in the application of density functional theory as an aid to mass spectral interpretation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Patricia; Alex, Alexander; Harvey, Sophie; Parsons, Teresa; Pullen, Frank

    2013-11-21

    Fragmentation of molecules under collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions is not well-understood. This may make interpretation of MSMS spectra difficult and limit the effectiveness of software tools intended to aid mass spectral interpretation. Density Functional Theory (DFT) has been successfully applied to explain the thermodynamics of fragmentation in the gas phase by the modelling the effect that protonation has on the bond lengths (and hence bond strengths). In this study, dofetilide and four methylated analogues were used to investigate further the potential for using DFT to understand and predict the CID fragmentation routes. The products ions present in the CID spectra of all five compounds were consistent with charge-directed fragmentation, with protonation adjacent to the cleavage site being required to initiate fragmentation. Protonation at the dissociative site may have occurred either directly or via proton migration. A correlation was observed between protonation-induced bond lengthening and the bonds which were observed to break in the CID spectra. This correlation was quantitative in that the bonds calculated to elongate to the greatest extent gave rise to the most abundant of the major product ions. Thus such quantum calculations may offer the potential for contributing to a predictive tool for aiding the accuracy and speed mass spectral interpretation by generating numerical data in the form of bond length increases to act as descriptors flagging potential bond cleavages. PMID:24071718

  14. Quantitative study of detection performance for LWIR hyperspectral imagers as a function of number of spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon R.; Priest, Richard G.

    2001-08-01

    Remote passive sensors can collect data that depict both the spatial distribution of objects in the scene and the spectral distributions for those objects within the scene. Target search techniques, such as matched filter algorithms, use highly resolved wavelength spectra (large number of bands) to help detect fine features in the spectrum in order to discriminate objects from the background. The use of a large number of bands during the target search, however, significantly slows image collection and area coverage rates. This study quantitatively examines how binning or integrating bands can affect target detection. Our study examines the long-wave infrared spectra of man-made targets and natural backgrounds obtained with the SEBASS (8-12 micrometers ) imager as part of the Dark HORSE 2 exercise during the HYDRA data collection in November, 1998. In this collection, at least 30 bands of data were obtained, but they were then binned to as few as 2 bands. This study examines the effect on detection performance of reducing the number of bands, through computation of the signal to clutter ratio (SCR) for a variety of target types. In addition, this study examines how band reduction affects the receiver operator curves (ROC) i.e. the target detection probability versus false alarm rate, for matched filter algorithms using in-scene target signatures and hyperspectral images. Target detection, as measured by SCR, for a variety of target types, improves with increasing number of bands. The enhancement in SCR levels off at approximately 10 bands, with only a small increase in SCR obtained from 10 to 30 bands. Variable number of bands within a bin (for fixed number of bins), generated by a genetic algorithm, increases SCR and ROC curve performance for multi-temporal studies. Thus, optimal selection of bands derived from one mission, may be robust and stable, and provide enhanced target detection for data collected on subsequent days. This investigation is confined to the

  15. Estimation of the propagation direction and spectral properties of the EEG signals registered during sevoflurane anaesthesia using Directed Transfer Function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejarczyk, Elzbieta; Kaminski, Maciej; Marciniak, Radoslaw; Byrczek, Tomasz; Stasiowski, Michal; Jalowiecki, Przemyslaw; Sobieszek, Aleksander; Zmyslowski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate spectral properties and propagation of the EEG signals registered during sevoflurane anaesthesia between individual EEG recording channels. The intensities of activity flows were calculated for delta, theta, alpha and beta waves using the Directed Transfer Function integration procedure. It was found that delta waves played the dominant role in the EEG signal propagation during anesthesia and it was suggested that theta and alpha waves propagation could be related to the processes participating in the wakefulness control. Data obtained with DTF method were compared with data received from the analysis of cerebral blood flow with the use of PET in other laboratory. This study showed that analysis of the EEG signal propagation is useful for better understanding and thus safer induction of anaesthesia procedure.

  16. Preparation, crystal structure, vibrational spectral and density functional studies of bis (4-nitrophenol)-2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagathara, N.; Marchewka, M. K.; Drozd, M.; Renganathan, N. G.; Gunasekaran, S.; Anbalagan, G.

    2013-10-01

    An organic-organic salt, bis (4-nitrophenol) 2,4,6-triamino 1,3,5-triazine monohydrate (BNPM) has been prepared by slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that the compound crystallizes in triclinic system with centrosymmetric space group P-1. IR and Raman spectra of BNPM have been recorded and analyzed. The study has been extended to confocal Raman spectral analysis. Band assignments have been made for the melamine and p-nitrophenol molecules. Vibrational spectra have also been discussed on the basis of quantum chemical density functional theory calculations using Firefly (PC GAMESS) Version 7.1 G. Vibrational frequencies are calculated and scaled values are compared with the experimental one. The Mulliken charges, HOMO-LUMO orbital energies are calculated and analyzed. The chemical structure of the compound was established by 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra.

  17. IUE data reduction - The parameterization of the motion of the IUE reseau grids and spectral formats as a function of time and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. W.; Turnrose, B. E.; Bohlin, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Improvements are made on IUE data reduction using corrected reseau positions and dispersion constants for temperature variations and secular effects. Models describing the motion of the high dispersion spectral format as a function of THDA alone reduce the scatter in the predicted position of a given wavelength, and scatter is further reduced when a linear dependence on time is also allowed. A correction technique is presented for early data which reduces errors in wavelength assignments from over 30 km/s to less than 3 km/s in high dispersion. The reseau temperature correction helps locate the minimum background signal, centered between the echelle orders. The residual uncertainty of 2 km/s for SWP and 2.7 km/s for LWR makes the wavelength accuracy of time and temperature corrected IUE spectra comparable to that of temperature corrected data from the Copernicus satellite.

  18. The spectral green's function nodal method for multigroup slab-geometry fixed-source S{sub N} problems with anisotropic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, W. A.; Filho, H. A.; Barros, R. C.

    2013-07-01

    A generalization of the spectral Green's function (SGF) method is developed for multigroup, fixed-source, slab-geometry discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) problems with anisotropic scattering. The offered SGF method with the one-node block inversion (NBI) iterative scheme converges numerical solutions that are completely free from spatial truncation errors for multigroup slab-geometry S{sub N} problems with scattering anisotropy of order L, provided L < N. As a coarse-mesh numerical method, the SGF method generates numerical solutions that generally do not give detailed information on the problem solution profile, as the grid points can be located considerably away from each other. Therefore, presented here is a technique for the spatial reconstruction of the coarse-mesh solution generated by the multigroup SGF method. Numerical results are given to illustrate the method's accuracy. (authors)

  19. Preliminary study of the Suomi NPP VIIRS detector-level spectral response function effects for the long-wave infrared bands M15 and M16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padula, Francis; Cao, Changyong

    2014-09-01

    The Suomi NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Environmental Data Record (EDR) team observed an anomalous striping pattern in the SST data. To assess possible causes due to the detector-level Spectral Response Functions (SRFs), a study was conducted to compare the radiometric response of the detector-level and operation band averaged SRFs of VIIRS bands M15 & M16 using simulated blackbody radiance data and clear-sky ocean radiances under different atmospheric conditions. It was concluded that the SST product is likely impacted by small differences in detector-level SRFs, and that if users require optimal system performance detector-level processing is recommended. Future work will investigate potential SDR product improvements through detector-level processing in support of the generation of Suomi NPP VIIRS climate quality SDRs.

  20. Spectral functions of the uniform electron gas via coupled-cluster theory and comparison to the G W and related approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClain, James; Lischner, Johannes; Watson, Thomas; Matthews, Devin A.; Ronca, Enrico; Louie, Steven G.; Berkelbach, Timothy C.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2016-06-01

    We use ab initio coupled-cluster theory to compute the spectral function of the uniform electron gas at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs=4 . The coupled-cluster approximations we employ go significantly beyond the diagrammatic content of state-of-the-art G W theory. We compare our calculations extensively to G W and G W -plus-cumulant theory, illustrating the strengths and weaknesses of these methods in capturing the quasiparticle and satellite features of the electron gas. Our accurate calculations further allow us to address the long-standing debate over the occupied bandwidth of metallic sodium. Our findings indicate that the future application of coupled-cluster theory to condensed phase material spectra is highly promising.

  1. Anterior cingulate cortex-related connectivity in first-episode schizophrenia: a spectral dynamic causal modeling study with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Long-Biao; Liu, Jian; Wang, Liu-Xian; Li, Chen; Xi, Yi-Bin; Guo, Fan; Wang, Hua-Ning; Zhang, Lin-Chuan; Liu, Wen-Ming; He, Hong; Tian, Ping; Yin, Hong; Lu, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the neural basis of schizophrenia (SZ) is important for shedding light on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this mental disorder. Structural and functional alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) have been implicated in the neurobiology of SZ. However, the effective connectivity among them in SZ remains unclear. The current study investigated how neuronal pathways involving these regions were affected in first-episode SZ using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Forty-nine patients with a first-episode of psychosis and diagnosis of SZ—according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision—were studied. Fifty healthy controls (HCs) were included for comparison. All subjects underwent resting state fMRI. We used spectral dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to estimate directed connections among the bilateral ACC, DLPFC, hippocampus, and MPFC. We characterized the differences using Bayesian parameter averaging (BPA) in addition to classical inference (t-test). In addition to common effective connectivity in these two groups, HCs displayed widespread significant connections predominantly involved in ACC not detected in SZ patients, but SZ showed few connections. Based on BPA results, SZ patients exhibited anterior cingulate cortico-prefrontal-hippocampal hyperconnectivity, as well as ACC-related and hippocampal-dorsolateral prefrontal-medial prefrontal hypoconnectivity. In summary, spectral DCM revealed the pattern of effective connectivity involving ACC in patients with first-episode SZ. This study provides a potential link between SZ and dysfunction of ACC, creating an ideal situation to associate mechanisms behind SZ with aberrant connectivity among these cognition and emotion-related regions. PMID:26578933

  2. Functional double-shelled silicon nanocrystals for two-photon fluorescence cell imaging: spectral evolution and tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sourov; Ghosh, Batu; Beaune, Grégory; Nagarajan, Usharani; Yasui, Takao; Nakamura, Jin; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Baba, Yoshinobu; Shirahata, Naoto; Winnik, Françoise M.

    2016-04-01

    Functional near-IR (NIR) emitting nanoparticles (NPs) adapted for two-photon excitation fluorescence cell imaging were obtained starting from octadecyl-terminated silicon nanocrystals (ncSi-OD) of narrow photoluminescence (PL) spectra having no long emission tails, continuously tunable over the 700-1000 nm window, PL quantum yields exceeding 30%, and PL lifetimes of 300 μs or longer. These NPs, consisting of a Pluronic F127 shell and a core made up of assembled ncSi-OD kept apart by an octadecyl (OD) layer, were readily internalized into the cytosol, but not the nucleus, of NIH3T3 cells and were non-toxic. Asymmetrical field-flow fractionation (AF4) analysis was carried out to determine the size of the NPs in water. HiLyte Fluor 750 amine was linked via an amide link to NPs prepared with Pluronic-F127-COOH, as a first demonstration of functional NIR-emitting water dispersible ncSi-based nanoparticles.Functional near-IR (NIR) emitting nanoparticles (NPs) adapted for two-photon excitation fluorescence cell imaging were obtained starting from octadecyl-terminated silicon nanocrystals (ncSi-OD) of narrow photoluminescence (PL) spectra having no long emission tails, continuously tunable over the 700-1000 nm window, PL quantum yields exceeding 30%, and PL lifetimes of 300 μs or longer. These NPs, consisting of a Pluronic F127 shell and a core made up of assembled ncSi-OD kept apart by an octadecyl (OD) layer, were readily internalized into the cytosol, but not the nucleus, of NIH3T3 cells and were non-toxic. Asymmetrical field-flow fractionation (AF4) analysis was carried out to determine the size of the NPs in water. HiLyte Fluor 750 amine was linked via an amide link to NPs prepared with Pluronic-F127-COOH, as a first demonstration of functional NIR-emitting water dispersible ncSi-based nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01437b

  3. The near-equivalence of five species of spectrally-accurate radial basis functions (RBFs): Asymptotic approximations to the RBF cardinal functions on a uniform, unbounded grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, John P.

    2011-02-01

    Radial basis function (RBF) interpolants have become popular in computer graphics, neural networks and for solving partial differential equations in many fields of science and engineering. In this article, we compare five different species of RBFs: Gaussians, hyperbolic secant (sech's), inverse quadratics, multiquadrics and inverse multiquadrics. We show that the corresponding cardinal functions for a uniform, unbounded grid are all approximated by the same function: C(X) ∼ (1/(ρ)) sin (πX)/sinh (πX/ρ) for some constant ρ(α) which depends on the inverse width parameter (“shape parameter”) α of the RBF and also on the RBF species. The error in this approximation is exponentially small in 1/α for sech's and inverse quadratics and exponentially small in 1/α2 for Gaussians; the error is proportional to α4 for multiquadrics and inverse multiquadrics. The error in all cases is small even for α ∼ O(1). These results generalize to higher dimensions. The Gaussian RBF cardinal functions in any number of dimensions d are, without approximation, the tensor product of one dimensional Gaussian cardinal functions: Cd(x1,x2…,xd)=∏j=1dC(xj). For other RBF species, we show that the two-dimensional cardinal functions are well approximated by the products of one-dimensional cardinal functions; again the error goes to zero as α → 0. The near-identity of the cardinal functions implies that all five species of RBF interpolants are (almost) the same, despite the great differences in the RBF ϕ's themselves.

  4. Assessment of autonomic nervous system function in nursing students using an autonomic reflex orthostatic test by heart rate spectral analysis

    PubMed Central

    HASEGAWA, MAO; HAYANO, AZUSA; KAWAGUCHI, ATSUSHI; YAMANAKA, RYUYA

    2015-01-01

    Nursing students experience academic demands, such as tests, theoretical and practical coursework, research activities, various aspects of professional practice, and contact with health professionals and patients. Consequently, nursing students face numerous types of stress, and increased stress levels contribute to physical and psychological distress in nursing students. The aim of the present study was to investigate the autonomic nervous system function of nursing students by assessing active standing load using the autonomic reflex orthostatic tolerance test, which enables quantitative analysis of dynamic autonomic nervous system function. The autonomic nervous system activity in the resting state was low in fourth-year students, they had parasympathetic hypotension, and there was a tendency towards higher sympathetic nervous system activity of fourth-year students compared with first-, second- and third-year students. In the standing state, there was a trend towards a higher autonomic nervous system activity response of fourth-year students compared with first-, second- and third-year students. These results suggest that stress may influence autonomic nervous activity in fourth-year nursing students. By correcting stress in fourth-year nursing students, it may be possible to prevent the development of health problems. PMID:26623025

  5. Synthesis, structural and spectral analysis of 1-(pyrazin-2-yl) piperidin-2-ol by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, M.; Syed Ali Padusha, M.; Govindarasu, K.; Kavitha, E.

    2015-03-01

    The organic compound 1-(pyrazin-2-yl) piperidin-2-ol (abbreviated as PPOL) has been synthesized and characterized by IR, Raman, 1H NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The Fourier-transform Raman (3500-50 cm-1) and infrared spectra (4000-400 cm-1) were recorded in the solid state and interpreted by comparison with theoretical spectra derived from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of the compound was obtained by the density functional theory using 6-31G(d,p) basis set. In the optimized geometry results shows that geometry parameters are good agreement with XRD values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. In calculation of electronic absorption spectra, TD-DFT calculations were carried out in the both gas and solution phases. 1H NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. 1H NMR analysis is evident for O-H⋯O intermolecular interaction of the title molecule. The thermodynamic properties of the title compound have been calculated at different temperatures and the results reveal that the standard heat capacities (Cp,m), standard entropies (Sm) and standard enthalpy changes (Hm) increase with rise in temperature. In addition, HOMO and LUMO energies and the first-order hyperpolarizability have been computed.

  6. Functional double-shelled silicon nanocrystals for two-photon fluorescence cell imaging: spectral evolution and tuning.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Sourov; Ghosh, Batu; Beaune, Grégory; Nagarajan, Usharani; Yasui, Takao; Nakamura, Jin; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Baba, Yoshinobu; Shirahata, Naoto; Winnik, Françoise M

    2016-04-28

    Functional near-IR (NIR) emitting nanoparticles (NPs) adapted for two-photon excitation fluorescence cell imaging were obtained starting from octadecyl-terminated silicon nanocrystals (ncSi-OD) of narrow photoluminescence (PL) spectra having no long emission tails, continuously tunable over the 700-1000 nm window, PL quantum yields exceeding 30%, and PL lifetimes of 300 μs or longer. These NPs, consisting of a Pluronic F127 shell and a core made up of assembled ncSi-OD kept apart by an octadecyl (OD) layer, were readily internalized into the cytosol, but not the nucleus, of NIH3T3 cells and were non-toxic. Asymmetrical field-flow fractionation (AF4) analysis was carried out to determine the size of the NPs in water. HiLyte Fluor 750 amine was linked via an amide link to NPs prepared with Pluronic-F127-COOH, as a first demonstration of functional NIR-emitting water dispersible ncSi-based nanoparticles. PMID:27076260

  7. Integration of spectral domain optical coherence tomography with microperimetry generates unique datasets for the simultaneous identification of visual function and retinal structure in ophthalmological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulen, Peter; Gallimore, Gary; Vincent, Ryan D.; Sabates, Nelson R.; Sabates, Felix N.

    2011-06-01

    Conventional perimeters are used routinely in various eye disease states to evaluate the central visual field and to quantitatively map sensitivity. However, standard automated perimetry proves difficult for retina and specifically macular disease due to the need for central and steady fixation. Advances in instrumentation have led to microperimetry, which incorporates eye tracking for placement of macular sensitivity values onto an image of the macular fundus thus enabling a precise functional and anatomical mapping of the central visual field. Functional sensitivity of the retina can be compared with the observed structural parameters that are acquired with high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography and by integration of scanning laser ophthalmoscope-driven imaging. Findings of the present study generate a basis for age-matched comparison of sensitivity values in patients with macular pathology. Microperimetry registered with detailed structural data performed before and after intervention treatments provides valuable information about macular function, disease progression and treatment success. This approach also allows for the detection of disease or treatment related changes in retinal sensitivity when visual acuity is not affected and can drive the decision making process in choosing different treatment regimens and guiding visual rehabilitation. This has immediate relevance for applications in central retinal vein occlusion, central serous choroidopathy, age-related macular degeneration, familial macular dystrophy and several other forms of retina related visual disability.

  8. Heavy-impurity resonance, hybridization, and phonon spectral functions in Fe1-xMxSi, M=Ir,Os

    SciTech Connect

    Delaire, O.; Al-Qasir, Iyad I.; May, Andrew F.; Sales, Brian C.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Ma, Jie; Matsuda, Masaaki; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Berlijn, Tom

    2015-03-31

    The vibrational behavior of heavy substitutional impurities (M=Ir,Os) in Fe1-xMxSi (x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.1) was investigated with a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), transport measurements, and first-principles simulations. In this paper, our INS measurements on single-crystals mapped the four-dimensional dynamical structure factor, S(Q;E), for several compositions and temperatures. Our results show that both Ir and Os impurities lead to the formation of a weakly dispersive resonance vibrational mode, in the energy range of the acoustic phonon dispersions of the FeSi host. We also show that Ir doping, which introduces free carriers and increases electron-phonon coupling, leads to softened interatomic force-constants compared to doping with Os, which is isoelectronic to Fe. We analyze the phonon S(Q,E) from INS through a Green's function model incorporating the phonon self-energy based on first-principles density functional theory (DFT) simulations. Calculations of the quasiparticle spectral functions in the doped system reveal the hybridization between the resonance and the acoustic phonon modes. Finally, our results demonstrate a strong interaction of the host acoustic dispersions with the resonance mode, likely leading to the large observed suppression in lattice thermal conductivity.

  9. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization and Crystals Structure of some Arsane Derivatives of Gold (I) Complexes: A Comparative Density Functional Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Shawkataly, Omar bin; Goh, Chin-Ping; Tariq, Abu; Khan, Imthyaz Ahmad; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Rosli, Mohd Mustaqim

    2015-01-01

    A series of complexes of the type LAuCl where L = tris(p-tolylarsane), tris(m-tolylarsane), bis(diphenylarsano)ethane, and tris(naphthyl)arsane have been synthesized. All of the new complexes, 1-4, have been fully characterized by means of 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray crystallography. The structures of complexes 1-4 have been determined from X-ray diffraction data. The linear molecules have an average bond distance between gold-arsenic and gold-chlorine of 2.3390Å and 2.2846Å, respectively. Aurophilic interaction was prominent in complex 1 and 3, whereas complex 2 and 4 do not show any such interaction. The intermolecular gold interaction bond length was affected by the electronegativity of the molecule. The computed values calculated at DFT level using B3LYP function are in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:25798915

  10. Identification of segregated regions in the functional brain connectome of autistic patients by a combination of fuzzy spectral clustering and entropy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, João Ricardo; Balardin, Joana; Vidal, Maciel Calebe; Fujita, André

    2016-01-01

    Background Several neuroimaging studies support the model of abnormal development of brain connectivity in patients with autism-spectrum disorders (ASD). In this study, we aimed to test the hypothesis of reduced functional network segregation in autistic patients compared with controls. Methods Functional MRI data from children acquired under a resting-state protocol (Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange [ABIDE]) were submitted to both fuzzy spectral clustering (FSC) with entropy analysis and graph modularity analysis. Results We included data from 814 children in our analysis. We identified 5 regions of interest comprising the motor, temporal and occipito-temporal cortices with increased entropy (p < 0.05) in the clustering structure (i.e., more segregation in the controls). Moreover, we noticed a statistically reduced modularity (p < 0.001) in the autistic patients compared with the controls. Significantly reduced eigenvector centrality values (p < 0.05) in the patients were observed in the same regions that were identified in the FSC analysis. Limitations There is considerable heterogeneity in the fMRI acquisition protocols among the sites that contributed to the ABIDE data set (e.g., scanner type, pulse sequence, duration of scan and resting-state protocol). Moreover, the sites differed in many variables related to sample characterization (e.g., age, IQ and ASD diagnostic criteria). Therefore, we cannot rule out the possibility that additional differences in functional network organization would be found in a more homogeneous data sample of individuals with ASD. Conclusion Our results suggest that the organization of the whole-brain functional network in patients with ASD is different from that observed in controls, which implies a reduced modularity of the brain functional networks involved in sensorimotor, social, affective and cognitive processing. PMID:26505141

  11. Spectral Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  12. Spectral Dictionaries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangtae; Gupta, Nitin; Bandeira, Nuno; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2009-01-01

    Database search tools identify peptides by matching tandem mass spectra against a protein database. We study an alternative approach when all plausible de novo interpretations of a spectrum (spectral dictionary) are generated and then quickly matched against the database. We present a new MS-Dictionary algorithm for efficiently generating spectral dictionaries and demonstrate that MS-Dictionary can identify spectra that are missed in the database search. We argue that MS-Dictionary enables proteogenomics searches in six-frame translation of genomic sequences that may be prohibitively time-consuming for existing database search approaches. We show that such searches allow one to correct sequencing errors and find programmed frameshifts. PMID:18703573

  13. Spectral ratios of ambient noise based on the diffuse field theory: Improved inversion of H/V in layered media using analytical properties of Green functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Perton, M.; Piña, J.; Luzón, F.; Garcia-Jerez, A.; Rodriguez-Castellanos, A.

    2013-12-01

    It is well know the popularity of H/V spectral ratio to extract the dominant frequency of soil sites for microzonation studies (Nakamura, 1989). It is relatively easy to make measurements as only one station is needed. Despite its success, this approach had not solid theoretical basis until a proposal to link ambient noise vibrations with diffuse field theory was made (Sánchez-Sesma et al, 2011a). Based on this theory the average spectral density of a given motion of a point, also called directional energy density (Perton et al, 2009), is proportional to the imaginary part of Green function precisely at the observation point. The proportionality implies that vector components are all multiplied by the current spectral level of the diffuse illumination. Appropriate normalization is crucial to make the experimental spectral ratios closer to the theoretical counterpart. According to this theory the square of H/V is twice the ratio of ImG11 and ImG33, where ImG11 and ImG33 are the imaginary part of Green functions at the load point for horizontal and vertical components, respectively. From ImG11 it could be possible through Fourier analysis to extract pseudo reflections and thus constrain the inversion of soil profile. We propose to assess ImG11 removing the influence of illumination spectrum using the H/V spectral ratio and an estimate of ImG33 (obtained from a priori model) by means of ImG11=0.5(H/V)2*ImG33. It has been found that ImG33 is less sensitive to details of stratigraphy. In fact, the most relevant property is the Poisson ratio of the uppermost layer which controls the slope in high frequency (Sánchez-Sesma et al, 2011b). Pseudo-reflection seismograms are thus obtained from Fourier transform, back to time domain, of i{ImG11-ImG11HSS}, where ImG11HSS is the imaginary part of Green functions at the load point for horizontal load at the surface of a half-space with the properties of the uppermost layer. With the obtained model ImG33 can be updated and the

  14. Effects of spatial and spectral frequencies on wide-field functional imaging (wifi) characterization of preclinical breast cancer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Choi, Bernard

    2010-02-01

    A common strategy to study breast cancer is the use of the preclinical model. These models provide a physiologically relevant and controlled environment in which to study both response to novel treatments and the biology of the cancer. Preclinical models, including the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model, are very amenable to optical imaging and to this end, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument that is perfectly suited to studying tumor metabolism in preclinical models. WiFI combines two optical imaging modalities, spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm x 5 cm) field of view. Using SFDI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are determined, which are then used to extract tissue chromophore concentrations in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. In the current study, we employ Monte Carlo simulations of SFDI light propagation in order to characterize the penetration depth of light in both the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model. Preliminary results suggest that different spatial frequency and wavelength combinations have different penetration depths, suggesting the potential depth sectioning capability of the SFDI component of WiFI.

  15. Natural bond orbital analysis, electronic structure and vibrational spectral analysis of N-(4-hydroxyl phenyl) acetamide: A density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindasamy, P.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2014-09-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of N-(4-hydroxy phenyl) acetamide (N4HPA) of painkiller agent were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameter, atomic charges, and vibrational wavenumbers and intensity of the vibrational bands. The computed vibrational wave numbers were compared with the FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental data. The computational calculations at DFT/B3LYP level with 6-31G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes calculated using Vibrational energy distribution analysis (VEDA 4) program. The oscillator’s strength calculated by TD-DFT and N4HPA is approach complement with the experimental findings. The NMR chemical shifts 13C and 1H were recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) and electron density surfaces of the molecule were constructed. The Natural charges and intermolecular contacts have been interpreted using Natural Bond orbital (NBO) analysis the HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity and zero vibrational energy have been calculated.

  16. Solvation and Spectral Line Shifts of Chromium Atoms in Helium Droplets Based on a Density Functional Theory Approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of an electronically excited, single chromium (Cr) atom with superfluid helium nanodroplets of various size (10 to 2000 helium (He) atoms) is studied with helium density functional theory. Solvation energies and pseudo-diatomic potential energy surfaces are determined for Cr in its ground state as well as in the y7P, a5S, and y5P excited states. The necessary Cr–He pair potentials are calculated by standard methods of molecular orbital-based electronic structure theory. In its electronic ground state the Cr atom is found to be fully submerged in the droplet. A solvation shell structure is derived from fluctuations in the radial helium density. Electronic excitations of an embedded Cr atom are simulated by confronting the relaxed helium density (ρHe), obtained for Cr in the ground state, with interaction pair potentials of excited states. The resulting energy shifts for the transitions z7P ← a7S, y7P ← a7S, z5P ← a5S, and y5P ← a5S are compared to recent fluorescence and photoionization experiments. PMID:24906160

  17. Theoretical investigations into spectral and non-linear optical properties of brucine and strychnine using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nasarul; Niaz, Saba; Manzoor, Taniya; Pandith, Altaf Hussain

    2014-10-01

    The density functional theoretical (DFT) computations were performed at the B3LYP/6-311G++(d, p) level to calculate the equilibrium geometry, vibrational wave numbers, intensities, and various other molecular properties of brucine and strychnine, which were found in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The out-of-phase stretching modes of aromatic rings and carbonyl stretching modes in combination with CH stretching modes at stereogenic centers generate VCD signals, which are remarkably efficient configuration markers for these chiral molecular systems. NBOs analysis reveals that the large values of second order perturbation energy (47.24 kcal/mol for brucine and 46.93 kcal/mol for strychnine) confirms strong hyperconjugative interaction between the orbital containing the lone pair of electron of nitrogen and the neighboring Cdbnd O antibonding orbital. The molecular electrostatic potential map of strychnine molecule, with no polar groups other than the lone keto group, shows less polarization, which accounts for its lower susceptibility towards electrophilic attack as compared to brucine.

  18. Photovoltaic spectral responsivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.; Dunlavy, D.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T.

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the various elemental random and nonrandom error sources in typical spectral responsivity measurement systems. The authors focus specifically on the filter and grating monochrometer-based spectral responsivity measurement systems used by the Photovoltaic (PV) performance characterization team at NREL. A variety of subtle measurement errors can occur that arise from a finite photo-current response time, bandwidth of the monochromatic light, waveform of the monochromatic light, and spatial uniformity of the monochromatic and bias lights; the errors depend on the light source, PV technology, and measurement system. The quantum efficiency can be a function of he voltage bias, light bias level, and, for some structures, the spectral content of the bias light or location on the PV device. This paper compares the advantages and problems associated with semiconductor-detector-based calibrations and pyroelectric-detector-based calibrations. Different current-to-voltage conversion and ac photo-current detection strategies employed at NREL are compared and contrasted.

  19. Multipurpose spectral imager.

    PubMed

    Sigernes, F; Lorentzen, D A; Heia, K; Svenøe, T

    2000-06-20

    A small spectral imaging system is presented that images static or moving objects simultaneously as a function of wavelength. The main physical principle is outlined and demonstrated. The instrument is capable of resolving both spectral and spatial information from targets throughout the entire visible region. The spectral domain has a bandpass of 12 A. One can achieve the spatial domain by rotating the system's front mirror with a high-resolution stepper motor. The spatial resolution range from millimeters to several meters depends mainly on the front optics used and whether the target is fixed (static) or movable relative to the instrument. Different applications and examples are explored, including outdoor landscapes, industrial fish-related targets, and ground-level objects observed in the more traditional way from an airborne carrier (remote sensing). Through the examples, we found that the instrument correctly classifies whether a shrimp is peeled and whether it can disclose the spectral and spatial microcharacteristics of targets such as a fish nematode (parasite). In the macroregime, we were able to distinguish a marine vessel from the surrounding sea and sky. A study of the directional spectral albedo from clouds, mountains, snow cover, and vegetation has also been included. With the airborne experiment, the imager successfully classified snow cover, leads, and new and rafted ice, as seen from 10.000 ft (3.048 m). PMID:18345245

  20. Surface Roughness and Critical Exponent Analyses of Boron-Doped Diamond Films Using Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging: Application of Autocorrelation and Power Spectral Density Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Vierkant, G. P.

    2014-09-01

    The evolution of the surface roughness of growing metal or semiconductor thin films provides much needed information about their growth kinetics and corresponding mechanism. While some systems show stages of nucleation, coalescence, and growth, others exhibit varying microstructures for different process conditions. In view of these classifications, we report herein detailed analyses based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterization to extract the surface roughness and growth kinetics exponents of relatively low boron-doped diamond (BDD) films by utilizing the analytical power spectral density (PSD) and autocorrelation function (ACF) as mathematical tools. The machining industry has applied PSD for a number of years for tool design and analysis of wear and machined surface quality. Herein, we present similar analyses at the mesoscale to study the surface morphology as well as quality of BDD films grown using the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. PSD spectra as a function of boron concentration (in gaseous phase) are compared with those for samples grown without boron. We find that relatively higher boron concentration yields higher amplitudes of the longer-wavelength power spectral lines, with amplitudes decreasing in an exponential or power-law fashion towards shorter wavelengths, determining the roughness exponent ( α ≈ 0.16 ± 0.03) and growth exponent ( β ≈ 0.54), albeit indirectly. A unique application of the ACF, which is widely used in signal processing, was also applied to one-dimensional or line analyses (i.e., along the x- and y-axes) of AFM images, revealing surface topology datasets with varying boron concentration. Here, the ACF was used to cancel random surface "noise" and identify any spatial periodicity via repetitive ACF peaks or spatially correlated noise. Periodicity at shorter spatial wavelengths was observed for no doping and low doping levels, while smaller correlations were observed for relatively

  1. Spectral power and functional connectivity changes during mindfulness meditation with eyes open: A magnetoencephalography (MEG) study in long-term meditators.

    PubMed

    Wong, W P; Camfield, D A; Woods, W; Sarris, J; Pipingas, A

    2015-10-01

    Whilst a number of previous studies have been conducted in order to investigate functional brain changes associated with eyes-closed meditation techniques, there is a relative scarcity in the literature with regards to changes occurring during eyes-open meditation. The current project used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate differences in spectral power and functional connectivity between 11 long-term mindfulness meditators (LTMMs) with >5 years of experience and 12 meditation-naïve control participants both during baseline eyes-open rest and eyes-open open-monitoring (OM) mindfulness meditation. During resting with eyes-open, prior to meditating, greater mean alpha power was observed for LTMMs in comparison to controls. However, during the course of OM meditation, a significantly greater increase in theta power was observed over a broad fronto-centro-parietal region for control participants in comparison to LTMMs. In contrast, whole-head mean connectivity was found to be significantly greater for long-term meditators in comparison to controls in the theta band both during rest as well as during meditation. Additionally, mean connectivity was significantly lower for long-term meditators in the low gamma band during rest and significantly lower in both low and high gamma bands during meditation; and the variance of low-gamma connectivity scores for long-term meditators was significantly decreased compared to the control group. The current study provides important new information as to the trait functional changes in brain activity associated with long-term mindfulness meditation, as well as the state changes specifically associated with eyes-open open monitoring meditation techniques. PMID:26166440

  2. GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: spectral response functions and radiometric biases with the NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite evaluated for desert calibration sites.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, Aaron; Pogorzala, David; Cao, Changyong

    2013-11-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), which will be launched in late 2015 on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-series satellite, will be evaluated in terms of its data quality postlaunch through comparisons with other satellite sensors such as the recently launched Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite. The ABI has completed much of its prelaunch characterization and its developers have generated and released its channel spectral response functions (response versus wavelength). Using these responses and constraining a radiative transfer model with ground reflectance, aerosol, and water vapor measurements, we simulate observed top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectances for analogous visible and near infrared channels of the VIIRS and ABI sensors at the Sonoran Desert and White Sands National Monument sites and calculate the radiometric biases and their uncertainties. We also calculate sensor TOA reflectances using aircraft hyperspectral data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer to validate the uncertainties in several of the ABI and VIIRS channels and discuss the potential for validating the others. Once on-orbit, calibration scientists can use these biases to ensure ABI data quality and consistency to support the numerical weather prediction community and other data users. They can also use the results for ABI or VIIRS anomaly detection and resolution. PMID:24216671

  3. Site effects in the city of Port au Prince (Haiti) : A combined use of spectral ratio methods and empirical Greens functions simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Fleur, S.; Courboulex, F.; Bertrand, E.; Deschamps, A.; Mercier de Lepinay, B.; Prepetit, C.; Hough, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Haiti was struck in January 2010 by a strong Mw=7 earthquake that caused extensive damages in the city of Port au Prince. At this time, very few seismological stations were working in Haiti and the only one that recorded the mainshock in Port au Prince was saturated. Thus, there were no direct measurements of the ground motion produced by this large event. Quickly after the 2010 event, several permanent accelerometric stations were installed by the USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) and the BME (Bureau des Mines et de l'Energie d'Haiti) as well as broad-band stations by the GSC (Geological Survey of Canada). Since their installation, these stations recorded several tens of aftershocks. The aim of our work is to take advantage of this new dataset to better understand the ground motions generated by earthquakes in the city of Port au Prince. We have used first spectral ratio methods to obtain the transfer function of each station, and then an empirical Green's Function simulation approach to combine source and site effects. In order to estimate site effects under each station, we have used classical spectral ratio methods. In a first step, the H/V (Horizontal/Vertical) method was used to select a reference station (in Port au Prince) that should be ideally a station without any site effects. We selected two stations, HCEA and PAPH, as reference stations, as even if the shape of their H/V curves is not always equal to 1 in the entire frequency band. In a second step, we computed the transfer function at each station by a ratio between the spectra of each earthquake at each station and the spectra obtained at the reference station (we use successively HCEA, PAPH and a combination of both). The results were kept only for the frequencies where the signal to noise was larger than 3. In the frequency range 1 to 20 Hz, we found site/reference ratios that reach values from 3 to 8 and a large variability from one station to another one. In the low frequency band 0.5 to 1 Hz a peak

  4. Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics: a special issue in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics: a special issue in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowker, Fay; Elizalde, Emilio; Kirsten, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    extension that impacts particles never entering that region. What is the gravitational analogue for that situation? The analogue concerns the impact a localized curvature has, and the cone is an excellent example to shed light on that question. Related to the method of images, Stuart has done an enormous amount of work on the influence of topology and curvature on quantum field theory. An example is [17], where the vacuum stress-energy tensor for Clifford-Klein forms of the flat or spherical type were computed. Another strand we would like to mention is Stuart's interest in higher spin equations. In [18], Steven Weinberg wrote down a set of higher spin equations that took his fancy. They involved angular momentum theory, which has always pleased Stuart, and the description was an alternative to Roger Penrose's use of two-spinors. Investigating the inconsistencies that arose on coupling to gauge theories, Stuart extended the classic results in [19], from electromagnetism to gravity in accordance with his general philosophy; see, e.g., [20, 21, 22]. Lately, Stuart is best known for his many applications in the context of zeta function regularization and its applications to quantum field theory under external conditions and spectral theory. He can be considered the world expert on particular case calculations with a knowledge of the literature, old and recent, that is not seen very often and which originated in the many hours spent at different (mostly British) libraries. His attitude towards explicit computations is nicely summarized by himself: 'I have always been interested in exact solutions, even if unphysical, so long as they are pretty. They seem to be working mechanisms that fit together, complete in themselves, like a watch.' The following issue in honour of Stuart's 75th birthday contains contributions that touch upon the various topics he has worked on. References [1] de Broglie L 1928 La mécanique ondulatoire (Paris: Gauthier-Villars) [2] Castillejo L, Dalitz R H

  5. A transported probability density function/photon Monte Carlo method for high-temperature oxy-natural gas combustion with spectral gas and wall radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X. Y.; Haworth, D. C.; Ren, T.; Modest, M. F.

    2013-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics model for high-temperature oxy-natural gas combustion is developed and exercised. The model features detailed gas-phase chemistry and radiation treatments (a photon Monte Carlo method with line-by-line spectral resolution for gas and wall radiation - PMC/LBL) and a transported probability density function (PDF) method to account for turbulent fluctuations in composition and temperature. The model is first validated for a 0.8 MW oxy-natural gas furnace, and the level of agreement between model and experiment is found to be at least as good as any that has been published earlier. Next, simulations are performed with systematic model variations to provide insight into the roles of individual physical processes and their interplay in high-temperature oxy-fuel combustion. This includes variations in the chemical mechanism and the radiation model, and comparisons of results obtained with versus without the PDF method to isolate and quantify the effects of turbulence-chemistry interactions and turbulence-radiation interactions. In this combustion environment, it is found to be important to account for the interconversion of CO and CO2, and radiation plays a dominant role. The PMC/LBL model allows the effects of molecular gas radiation and wall radiation to be clearly separated and quantified. Radiation and chemistry are tightly coupled through the temperature, and correct temperature prediction is required for correct prediction of the CO/CO2 ratio. Turbulence-chemistry interactions influence the computed flame structure and mean CO levels. Strong local effects of turbulence-radiation interactions are found in the flame, but the net influence of TRI on computed mean temperature and species profiles is small. The ultimate goal of this research is to simulate high-temperature oxy-coal combustion, where accurate treatments of chemistry, radiation and turbulence-chemistry-particle-radiation interactions will be even more important.

  6. Scoring function for DNA-drug docking of anticancer and antiparasitic compounds based on spectral moments of 2D lattice graphs for molecular dynamics trajectories.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montoto, Lázaro G; Santana, Lourdes; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2009-11-01

    We introduce here a new class of invariants for MD trajectories based on the spectral moments pi(k)(L) of the Markov matrix associated to lattice network-like (LN) graph representations of Molecular Dynamics (MD) trajectories. The procedure embeds the MD energy profiles on a 2D Cartesian coordinates system using simple heuristic rules. At the same time, we associate the LN with a Markov matrix that describes the probabilities of passing from one state to other in the new 2D space. We construct this type of LNs for 422 MD trajectories obtained in DNA-drug docking experiments of 57 furocoumarins. The combined use of psoralens+ultraviolet light (UVA) radiation is known as PUVA therapy. PUVA is effective in the treatment of skin diseases such as psoriasis and mycosis fungoides. PUVA is also useful to treat human platelet (PTL) concentrates in order to eliminate Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi. Both are parasites that cause Leishmaniosis (a dangerous skin and visceral disease) and Chagas disease, respectively; and may circulate in blood products collected from infected donors. We included in this study both lineal (psoralens) and angular (angelicins) furocoumarins. In the study, we grouped the LNs on two sets; set1: DNA-drug complex MD trajectories for active compounds and set2: MD trajectories of non-active compounds or no-optimal MD trajectories of active compounds. We calculated the respective pi(k)(L) values for all these LNs and used them as inputs to train a new classifier that discriminate set1 from set2 cases. In training series the model correctly classifies 79 out of 80 (specificity=98.75%) set1 and 226 out of 238 (Sensitivity=94.96%) set2 trajectories. In independent validation series the model correctly classifies 26 out of 26 (specificity=100%) set1 and 75 out of 78 (sensitivity=96.15%) set2 trajectories. We propose this new model as a scoring function to guide DNA-docking studies in the drug design of new coumarins for anticancer or antiparasitic

  7. Spectral and spread-spectral teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.

    2010-06-15

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state may be teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of the teleported wave form can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread-spectral variant of teleportation. We calculate analytical expressions for the fidelities of spectral and spread-spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are transferred using a proposed experimental approach. Finally, we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  8. Effect of long-term training on sound localization performance with spectrally warped and band-limited head-related transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Majdak, Piotr; Walder, Thomas; Laback, Bernhard

    2013-09-01

    Sound localization in the sagittal planes, including the ability to distinguish front from back, relies on spectral features caused by the filtering effects of the head, pinna, and torso. It is assumed that important spatial cues are encoded in the frequency range between 4 and 16 kHz. In this study, in a double-blind design and using audio-visual training covering the full 3-D space, normal-hearing listeners were trained 2 h per day over three weeks to localize sounds which were either band limited up to 8.5 kHz or spectrally warped from the range between 2.8 and 16 kHz to the range between 2.8 and 8.5 kHz. The training effect for the warped condition exceeded that for procedural task learning, suggesting a stable auditory recalibration due to the training. After the training, performance with band-limited sounds was better than that with warped ones. The results show that training can improve sound localization in cases where spectral cues have been reduced by band-limiting or remapped by warping. This suggests that hearing-impaired listeners, who have limited access to high frequencies, might also improve their localization ability when provided with spectrally warped or band-limited sounds and adequately trained on sound localization. PMID:23967945

  9. VIIRS S-NPP Nighttime DNB Spectral Response Function (SRF): The At-launch Characteristics and How the SRF Changes with Time Due to Tungsten Oxides Chromaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, B.; Lei, N.; Moeller, C.

    2015-12-01

    The VIIRS Day-Night Band (DNB) is designed with 3 gain stages: Low (LGS), Mid (MGS) and High (HGS) to span bright daytime to moonlit night earth scene signal levels. The published at-launch DNB relative spectral response (RSR) is based upon the LGS spectral measurements, since it was well measured in the pre-launch test program and the LGS can be calibrated by the on-board solar diffuser (MGS and HGS saturate on the SD). The LGS RSR however does not fully represent the spectral characteristics of nighttime DNB data from the MGS and HGS. Nighttime data users who apply the detailed DNB spectral characteristics in their analyses should use modulated RSR appropriate to the MGS and HGS observations. The RSR modulation is due to spectral darkening of the 4 mirrors of the S-NPP VIIRS telescope, which were contaminated with tungsten oxides in fabrication. These tungsten oxides are 'in family' with transition lenses on eyeglasses that darken when exposed to sunlight but do not recover when VIIRS goes into darkness because VIIRS in space is in a vacuum (transition lenses require atmospheric oxygen to recover). The on-going mirror darkening has caused a time-dependent shift in DNB RSR towards blue wavelengths. This presentation will provide access to the correct RSR to use for S-NPP DNB nighttime data over the mission time on-orbit. The changes in characteristics will be described in engineering terms to facilitate clear user understanding of how to handle RSR for nighttime observations over the mission lifetime.

  10. The XMM-Newton survey of the ELAIS-S1 field. I. Number counts, angular correlation function and X-ray spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puccetti, S.; Fiore, F.; D'Elia, V.; Pillitteri, I.; Feruglio, C.; Grazian, A.; Brusa, M.; Ciliegi, P.; Comastri, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Mignoli, M.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.; La Franca, F.; Sacchi, N.; Franceschini, A.; Berta, S.; Buttery, H.; Dias, J. E.

    2006-10-01

    Aims.The formation and evolution of cosmic structures can be probed by studying the evolution of the luminosity function of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), galaxies and clusters of galaxies and of the clustering of the X-ray active Universe, compared to the IR-UV active Universe. Methods: .To this purpose, we have surveyed with XMM-Newton the central ~0.6 deg2 region of the ELAIS-S1 field down to flux limits of ~5.5 × 10-16 erg~cm-2~s-1 (0.5-2 keV, soft band, S), ~2 × 10-15 erg~cm-2~s-1 (2-10 keV, hard band, H), and ~4 × 10-15 erg~cm-2~s-1 (5-10 keV, ultra hard band, HH). We present here the analysis of the XMM-Newton observations, the number counts in different energy bands and the clustering properties of the X-ray sources. Results: .We detect a total of 478 sources, 395 and 205 of which detected in the S and H bands respectively. We identified 7 clearly extended sources and estimated their redshift through X-ray spectral fits with thermal models. In four cases the redshift is consistent with z=0.4, so we may have detected a large scale structure formed by groups and clusters of galaxies through their hot intra-cluster gas emission. We have computed the angular correlation function of the sources in the S and H bands finding best fit correlation angles θ_0=5.2 ± 3.8 arcsec and θ_0=12.8 ± 7.8 arcsec in the two bands respectively. The correlation angle of H band sources is therefore formally ~2.5 times that of the S band sources, although the difference is at only ~1σ confidence level. A rough estimate of the present-day correlation length r0 can be obtained inverting the Limber equation and assuming an appropriate redshift distribution dN/dz. The results range between 12.8 and 9.8 h-1 Mpc in the S band and between 17.9 and 13.4 h-1 Mpc in the H band, with 30-40% statistical errors, assuming either smooth redshift distributions or redshift distributions with spikes accounting for the presence of significant structure at z=0.4. The relative density of the

  11. Infrared spectral emittance profiles of spectrally selective solar absorbing layers at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Soule, D E; Smith, D W

    1977-11-01

    A study was made to characterize parametrically the spectrally selective absorptance profiles of typical interference, bulk absorption, and mixed-type absorbing layers for solar-thermal conversion at temperatures to 500 degrees C. A five parameter empirical Fermi function was used to model the spectral absorptance converted from the measured spectral reflectance. An alternative method using the Fermi model is presented for defining the ir spectral emittance profile, as scaled to the measured hemispherical total emittahce. PMID:20174248

  12. Temperature dependence of the dielectric function in the spectral range (0.5–8.5) eV of an In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Grund, R. Krauß, H.; Kranert, C.; Bonholzer, M.; Grundmann, M.

    2014-09-15

    We present the dielectric function of a bcc-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film in the wide spectral range from near-infrared to vacuum-ultraviolet and for temperatures 10 K–300 K, determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. From the temperature dependence of electronic transition energies, we derive electron-phonon coupling properties and found hints that the direct parabolic band-band transitions involve In-d states. Further we discuss possible excitonic contributions to the dielectric function.

  13. Different approaches of spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacoume, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several approaches to the problem of the calculation of spectral power density of a random function from an estimate of the autocorrelation function were studied. A comparative study was presented of these different methods. The principles on which they are based and the hypothesis implied were pointed out. Some indications on the optimization of the length of the estimated correlation function was given. An example of application of the different methods discussed in this paper was included.

  14. Spectral correlations of fractional Brownian motion

    SciTech Connect

    Oigaard, Tor Arne; Hanssen, Alfred; Scharf, Louis L.

    2006-09-15

    Fractional Brownian motion (fBm) is a ubiquitous nonstationary model for many physical processes with power-law time-averaged spectra. In this paper, we exploit the nonstationarity to derive the full spectral correlation structure of fBm. Starting from the time-varying correlation function, we derive two different time-frequency spectral correlation functions (the ambiguity function and the Kirkwood-Rihaczek spectrum), and one dual-frequency spectral correlation function. The dual-frequency spectral correlation has a surprisingly simple structure, with spectral support on three discrete lines. The theoretical predictions are verified by spectrum estimates of Monte Carlo simulations and of a time series of earthquakes with a magnitude of 7 and higher.

  15. Spectral geometry of symplectic spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilevich, Dmitri

    2015-10-01

    Symplectic spinors form an infinite-rank vector bundle. Dirac operators on this bundle were constructed recently by Habermann, K. ["The Dirac operator on symplectic spinors," Ann. Global Anal. Geom. 13, 155-168 (1995)]. Here we study the spectral geometry aspects of these operators. In particular, we define the associated distance function and compute the heat trace asymptotics.

  16. Spectral density method to Anderson-Holstein model

    SciTech Connect

    Chebrolu, Narasimha Raju Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-06-24

    Two-parameter spectral density function of a magnetic impurity electron in a non-magnetic metal is calculated within the framework of the Anderson-Holstein model using the spectral density approximation method. The effect of electron-phonon interaction on the spectral function is investigated.

  17. Spectral lineshapes of molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islampour, Reza; Mukamel, Shaul

    1984-06-01

    The electronic spectral lineshape of an impurity molecule in a cluster is calculated. Both a rigid (solid-like) and a non-rigid (droplet-like) model for the cluster are considered and compared. The spectrum is calculated using the spectral density J(ω) which is related to the correlation function of the time-dependent enegy gap between the two electronic states. Our calculations demonstrate how the information regarding individual eigenstates is lost under the broadened lineshape envelope in large clusters.

  18. Spectral Effects in Quantum Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Grice, Warren P

    2007-01-01

    We use a multimode description of polarization-encoded qubits to analyze the quantum teleportation protocol. Specifically, we investigate how the teleportation fidelity depends on the spectral correlations inherent to polarization-entangled photons generated by type-II spontaneous parametric down conversion. We find that the maximal obtainable fidelity depends on the spectral entanglement carried by the joint probability amplitude, a result which we quantify for the case of a joint spectrum approximated by a correlated Gaussian function. We contrast these results with a similar analysis of the visibility obtained in a polarization-correlation experiment.

  19. Spectral effects in quantum teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.; Grice, Warren P.

    2007-02-15

    We use a multimode description of polarization-encoded qubits to analyze the quantum teleportation protocol. Specifically, we investigate how the teleportation fidelity depends on the spectral correlations inherent to polarization-entangled photons generated by type-II spontaneous parametric down conversion. We find that the maximal obtainable fidelity depends on the spectral entanglement carried by the joint probability amplitude, a result which we quantify for the case of a joint spectrum approximated by a correlated Gaussian function. We contrast these results with a similar analysis of the visibility obtained in a polarization-correlation experiment.

  20. Low- and high-frequency variability as a function of spectral properties in the bright X-ray binary GX 5-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonker, P. G.; van der Klis, M.; Homan, J.; Méndez, M.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Wijnands, R.; Zhang, W.

    2002-07-01

    We report on a detailed analysis of data obtained over nearly four years with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer of the Z source GX 5-1. From a spectral analysis using a hardness-intensity diagram it was found that the source traced out the typical Z-shaped pattern. The study of the power spectral properties showed that when the source moved on the horizontal branch towards the normal branch the fractional rms amplitudes and time-scales of all variability decreased, while their FWHMs increased. The frequency separation of the two kHz QPO peaks decreased from 344+/-12 to 232+/-13Hz, while the frequency of the lower and upper kHz QPO increased from 172+/-10 to 608+/-6Hz and from 516+/-10 to 840+/-12Hz, respectively. At low frequencies, besides the horizontal branch oscillation (HBO) and its second harmonic, two additional broad Lorentzian components were needed to obtain acceptable fits. These broad Lorentzians have Q-values of ~1-2 and frequencies 0.5 and 1.5 times the HBO frequency. When interpreted as being related to the HBO, they seem to favour disc models for the HBO over the magnetic beat-frequency model. The frequency of the normal branch oscillations changed slightly and non-monotonically, while on the normal branch between ~6Hz at both ends and 5.25+/-0.05Hz near the middle of the branch. It evolved into a flat-topped noise component on the flaring branch. We compared the timing properties of the some of the Z sources. We also compare the timing properties and colour-colour diagrams (CDs) of GX 5-1 with those of the back hole candidate XTE J1550-564 and the atoll source 4U 1608-52. The CDs are strikingly similar when a colour scheme commonly employed in back hole studies is used. However, this may be a degeneracy as the CDs turn out to be more complicated when colours common in neutron star studies are employed. Apart from some remarkable similarities between the CD of XTE J1550-564 and that of 4U 1608-52, several differences can be seen between these CDs and

  1. Spectral tripartitioning of networks.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Thomas; Mucha, Peter J; Porter, Mason A

    2009-09-01

    We formulate a spectral graph-partitioning algorithm that uses the two leading eigenvectors of the matrix corresponding to a selected quality function to split a network into three communities in a single step. In so doing, we extend the recursive bipartitioning methods developed by Newman [M. E. J. Newman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 8577 (2006); Phys. Rev. E 74, 036104 (2006)] to allow one to consider the best available two-way and three-way divisions at each recursive step. We illustrate the method using simple "bucket brigade" examples and then apply the algorithm to examine the community structures of the coauthorship graph of network scientists and of U. S. Congressional networks inferred from roll call voting similarities. PMID:19905184

  2. Spectral and structural density functional theory on 4-ethyl and 4-(p-tolyl)-1-(pyridin-2-yl)thiosemicarbazides and their Pd(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rhman, Mohamed H.; Hassanian, Mohamed M.; El-Asmy, Ahmed A.

    2012-07-01

    The study deals with the experimental and theoretical calculations of 4-ethyl and 4-(p-tolyl)-1-(pyridin-2-yl)thiosemicarbazides and their Pd(II) complexes. Quantum chemical calculations of geometry, vibrational wavenumbers, 1H NMR and Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis of the ligands and their Pd(II) complexes have been carried out by DFT/B3LYP method combined with 6-311++G(d,p) and DGTZVP basis sets. The geometry optimized structures of the ligands confirming the involvement of N1H in intramolecular H-bond with the. The DFT calculated spectral data showed good agreement with the experimental data supporting the obtained geometries for the ligands and Pd(II) complexes. The NBO analysis confirmed the formation of bonds with sulfur, σ(Pd-S), and nitrogen (N1) described as donation of electron density from a lone pair orbital on each nitrogen atom to palladium orbitals.

  3. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  4. Spectral and parametric averaging for integrable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tao; Serota, R. A.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze two theoretical approaches to ensemble averaging for integrable systems in quantum chaos, spectral averaging (SA) and parametric averaging (PA). For SA, we introduce a new procedure, namely, rescaled spectral averaging (RSA). Unlike traditional SA, it can describe the correlation function of spectral staircase (CFSS) and produce persistent oscillations of the interval level number variance (IV). PA while not as accurate as RSA for the CFSS and IV, can also produce persistent oscillations of the global level number variance (GV) and better describes saturation level rigidity as a function of the running energy. Overall, it is the most reliable method for a wide range of statistics.

  5. Spectral analysis of time functions of plasma glucose and immunoreactive insulin during intravenous glucose tolerance testing on atherosclerosis and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinov, Igor A.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Malinova, Lidia I.; Brook, Sergey B.

    2000-04-01

    The time functions of plasma glucose and insulin obtained during intravenous glucose tolerance test were approximated by sections of Fourier series. The convincing quantitative and quality distinctions of amplitudes both phases of the first and second harmonics of decomposition of the indicated time functions are obtained. These distinctions were used as a basis of diagnostic algorithm of metabolic violations appropriate for atherosclerosis and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus in clinically obvious and preclinical stages.

  6. A practical approach to spectral volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Steven; Möller, Torsten; Tory, Melanie; Drew, Mark S

    2005-01-01

    To make a spectral representation of color practicable for volume rendering, a new low-dimensional subspace method is used to act as the carrier of spectral information. With that model, spectral light material interaction can be integrated into existing volume rendering methods at almost no penalty. In addition, slow rendering methods can profit from the new technique of postillumination-generating spectral images in real-time for arbitrary light spectra under a fixed viewpoint. Thus, the capability of spectral rendering to create distinct impressions of a scene under different lighting conditions is established as a method of real-time interaction. Although we use an achromatic opacity in our rendering, we show how spectral rendering permits different data set features to be emphasized or hidden as long as they have not been entirely obscured. The use of postillumination is an order of magnitude faster than changing the transfer function and repeating the projection step. To put the user in control of the spectral visualization, we devise a new widget, a "light-dial," for interactively changing the illumination and include a usability study of this new light space exploration tool. Applied to spectral transfer functions, different lights bring out or hide specific qualities of the data. In conjunction with postillumination, this provides a new means for preparing data for visualization and forms a new degree of freedom for guided exploration of volumetric data sets. PMID:15747643

  7. Evaluating Spectral Signals to Identify Spectral Error.

    PubMed

    Bazar, George; Kovacs, Zoltan; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2016-01-01

    Since the precision and accuracy level of a chemometric model is highly influenced by the quality of the raw spectral data, it is very important to evaluate the recorded spectra and describe the erroneous regions before qualitative and quantitative analyses or detailed band assignment. This paper provides a collection of basic spectral analytical procedures and demonstrates their applicability in detecting errors of near infrared data. Evaluation methods based on standard deviation, coefficient of variation, mean centering and smoothing techniques are presented. Applications of derivatives with various gap sizes, even below the bandpass of the spectrometer, are shown to evaluate the level of spectral errors and find their origin. The possibility for prudent measurement of the third overtone region of water is also highlighted by evaluation of a complex data recorded with various spectrometers. PMID:26731541

  8. Evaluating Spectral Signals to Identify Spectral Error

    PubMed Central

    Bazar, George; Kovacs, Zoltan; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2016-01-01

    Since the precision and accuracy level of a chemometric model is highly influenced by the quality of the raw spectral data, it is very important to evaluate the recorded spectra and describe the erroneous regions before qualitative and quantitative analyses or detailed band assignment. This paper provides a collection of basic spectral analytical procedures and demonstrates their applicability in detecting errors of near infrared data. Evaluation methods based on standard deviation, coefficient of variation, mean centering and smoothing techniques are presented. Applications of derivatives with various gap sizes, even below the bandpass of the spectrometer, are shown to evaluate the level of spectral errors and find their origin. The possibility for prudent measurement of the third overtone region of water is also highlighted by evaluation of a complex data recorded with various spectrometers. PMID:26731541

  9. Spectral methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Streett, Craig L.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of these notes is to provide a basic introduction to spectral methods with a particular emphasis on applications to computational fluid dynamics. Another objective is to summarize some of the most important developments in spectral methods in the last two years. The fundamentals of spectral methods for simple problems will be covered in depth, and the essential elements of several fluid dynamical applications will be sketched.

  10. Dielectric function in the NIR-VUV spectral range of (In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Grund, R. Kranert, C.; Böntgen, T.; Wenckstern, H. von; Krauß, H.; Grundmann, M.

    2014-08-07

    We determined the dielectric function of the alloy system (In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the wide spectral range from 0.5 eV to 8.5 eV and for In contents ranging from x = 0.02 to x = 0.61. The predicted optical transitions for binary, monoclinic β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and cubic bcc-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} are well reflected by the change of the dielectric functions' lineshape as a function of the In content. In an intermediate composition range with phase-separated material (x ≈ 0.3…0.4), the lineshape differs considerably, which we assign to the presence of the high-pressure rhombohedral InGaO{sub 3}-II phase, which we also observe in Raman experiments in this range. By model analysis of the dielectric function, we derived spectra of the refractive index and the absorption coefficient and energy parameters of electronic band-band transitions. We discuss the sub-band gap absorption tail in relation to the influence of the In 4d orbitals on the valence bands. The data presented here provide a basis for a deeper understanding of the electronic properties of this technologically important material system and may be useful for device engineering.

  11. Performance evaluation for on-orbit modulation transfer function of FengYun-3C medium resolution spectral imager (MERSI) using polar ice and snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Min; Hu, Xiuqing; Bai, Yu

    2014-11-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) can be used to evaluate spatial quality of an satellite imaging sensor using a sharp edge, a pulse target, or bar pattern target. This investigation evaluates on-orbit MTF performance of FengYun (FY)-3C MERSI with 20 Bands with 1 km and 250 m spatial resolutions using polar ice and snow as a sharp edge, which was launched on September 23 of 2013. The MTF is calculated by using a Fourier transformation on the line spread function (LSF) though a simple differentiation of the edge spread function (ESF). The final MTF Nyqusit frequencies of the most of MERSI Bands along FY-3C flight direction are higher than 0.30, which are satisfy the original design requirements of 0.25 (250 m) and 0.27 (1km). But the Nyquist frequencies of all Bands along FY-3C scanning direction are around 0.13 that are clearly lower than 0.25/0.27. This relatively worse spatial quality of image along FY-3C scanning direction is primarily attributed to the 27% overlapped scan mode of MERSI sensor for every pixel. The objective of design defect in FY-3C MERSI instrument system is to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of scanning image. To overcome the drawback, in future, we will develop some deblurring methods to restore FY-3C/MERSI image along scanning direction.

  12. Increasing the spectral shifts in LSPR biosensing using DNA-functionalized gold nanorods in a competitive assay format for the detection of interferon-γ.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ding-Zheng; Chuang, Po-Chun; Liao, Pei-Chen; Chen, Jung-Po; Chen, Yih-Fan

    2016-07-15

    We demonstrate an approach that utilizes DNA-functionalized gold nanorods (AuNRs) in an indirect competitive assay format to increase the spectra shift in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) biosensing. We use interferon gamma (IFN-γ) as a model analyte to demonstrate the feasibility of our detection method. The LSPR chips with periodic gold nanodot arrays are fabricated using a thermal lithography process and are functionalized with IFN-γ aptamers for detection. The DNA-functionalized AuNRs and IFN-γ compete with each other to bind to the aptamers during detection, and the spectra shifts are mainly caused by the AuNRs rather than IFN-γ. When using our approach, the target molecules do not need to be captured by two capture ligands simultaneously during detection and thus do not require multiple binding sites. Both experiments and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations show that making the AuNRs as close to the chip surface as possible is very critical for increasing LSPR shifts, and the simulated results also show that the orientation of the AuNR affects the plasmon coupling between the gold nanodots on the chip surface and the nearby AuNRs. Although only the detection of IFN-γ is demonstrated in this study, we expect that the LSPR biosensing method can be applied to label-free detection of a variety of molecules as long as suitable aptamers are available. PMID:26954787

  13. [Analyses of spectral emissivity in radiation temperature measurement].

    PubMed

    Fu, Tai-Ran; Cheng, Xiao-Fang; Zhong, Mao-Hua; Yang, Zang-Jian

    2008-01-01

    The complexity of the spectral emissivity of actual surfaces is the key point in the research and applications of radiation temperature measurement, resulting in the difficulty in the achievement of the temperature measurement. In the present paper, based on the discussions of the Taylor expansion, the non-dimension wavelength and the exponent, the authors describe the mathematical expression of the spectral emissivity of actual surfaces, and establish the general spectral emissivity function. Through the fitting of experimental data of the spectral emissivities of different metals at different temperatures, the applicability of the spectral emissivity function is verified which especially becomes the fundamental in the research of primary spectrum pyrometry. PMID:18422106

  14. Triatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 117 Triatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 55 triatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  15. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  16. Diatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 114 Diatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 121 diatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty, and reference are given for each transition reported.

  17. Calibration of DFT Functionals for the Prediction of 57Fe Mössbauer Spectral Parameters in Iron-Nitrosyl and Iron-Sulfur Complexes: Accurate Geometries Prove Essential

    PubMed Central

    Sandala, Gregory M.; Hopmann, Kathrin H.; Ghosh, Abhik

    2011-01-01

    Six popular density functionals in conjunction with the conductor-like screening (COSMO) solvation model have been used to obtain linear Mössbauer isomer shift (IS) and quadrupole splitting (QS) parameters for a test set of 20 complexes (with 24 sites) comprised of nonheme nitrosyls (Fe–NO) and non-nitrosyl (Fe–S) complexes. For the first time in an IS analysis, the Fe electron density was calculated both directly at the nucleus, ρ(0)N, which is the typical procedure, and on a small sphere surrounding the nucleus, ρ(0)S, which is the new standard algorithm implemented in the ADF software package. We find that both methods yield (near) identical slopes from each linear regression analysis but are shifted with respect to ρ(0) along the x-axis. Therefore, the calculation of the Fe electron density with either method gives calibration fits with equal predictive value. Calibration parameters obtained from the complete test set for OLYP, OPBE, PW91, and BP86 yield correlation coefficients (r2) of approximately 0.90, indicating that the calibration fit is of good quality. However, fits obtained from B3LYP and B3LYP* with both Slater-type and Gaussian-type orbitals are generally found to be of poorer quality. For several of the complexes examined in this study, we find that B3LYP and B3LYP* give geometries that possess significantly larger deviations from the experimental structures than OLYP, OPBE, PW91 or BP86. This phenomenon is particularly true for the di- and tetranuclear Fe complexes examined in this study. Previous Mössbauer calibration fit studies using these functionals have usually included mononuclear Fe complexes alone, where these discrepancies are less pronounced. An examination of spin expectation values reveals B3LYP and B3LYP* approach the weak-coupling limit more closely than the GGA exchange-correlation functionals. The high degree of variability in our calculated S2 values for the Fe–NO complexes highlights their challenging electronic

  18. In situ nondestructive imaging of functional pigments in Micro-Tom tomato fruits by multi spectral imaging based on Wiener estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishidate, Izumi; Ooe, Shintaro; Todoroki, Shinsuke; Asamizu, Erika

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the functional pigments in the tomato fruits nondestructively, we propose a method based on the multispectral diffuse reflectance images estimated by the Wiener estimation for a digital RGB image. Each pixel of the multispectral image is converted to the absorbance spectrum and then analyzed by the multiple regression analysis to visualize the contents of chlorophyll a, lycopene and β-carotene. The result confirms the feasibility of the method for in situ imaging of chlorophyll a, β-carotene and lycopene in the tomato fruits.

  19. Spectral Redundancy in Tissue Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Tomy

    1995-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscattered signals from material comprised of quasi-periodic scatterers exhibit redundancy over both its phase and magnitude spectra. This dissertation addresses the problem of estimating the mean scatterer spacing and scatterer density from the backscattered ultrasound signal using spectral redundancy characterized by the spectral autocorrelation (SAC) function. The SAC function exploits characteristic differences between the phase spectrum of the resolvable quasi-periodic (regular) scatterers and the unresolvable uniformly distributed (diffuse) scatterers to improve estimator performance over other estimators that operate directly on the magnitude spectrum. Analytical, simulation, and experimental results (liver and breast tissue) indicate the potential of utilizing phase information using the SAC function. A closed form analytical expression for the SAC function is derived for gamma distributed scatterer spacings. The theoretical expression for the SAC function demonstrate the increased regular-to-diffuse scatterer signal ratio in the off-diagonal components of the SAC function, since the diffuse component contributes only to the diagonal components (power spectrum). The A-scan is modelled as a cyclostationary signal whose statistical parameters vary in time with single or multiple periodicities. A-scan models consist of a collection of regular scatterers with gamma distributed spacings embedded in diffuse scatterers with uniform distributed spacings. The model accounts for attenuation by convolving the frequency dependent backscatter coefficients of the scatterer centers with a time-varying system response. Simulation results show that SAC-based estimates converge more reliably over smaller amounts of data than previously used cepstrum-based estimates. A major reason for the performance advantage is the use of phase information by the SAC function, while the cepstnun uses a phaseless power spectral density, that is directly affected by the system

  20. A spectral theory of color perception.

    PubMed

    Clark, James J; Skaff, Sandra

    2009-12-01

    The paper adopts the philosophical stance that colors are real and can be identified with spectral models based on the photoreceptor signals. A statistical setting represents spectral profiles as probability density functions. This permits the use of analytic tools from the field of information geometry to determine a new kind of color space and structure deriving therefrom. In particular, the metric of the color space is shown to be the Fisher information matrix. A maximum entropy technique for spectral modeling is proposed that takes into account measurement noise. Theoretical predictions provided by our approach are compared with empirical colorfulness and color similarity data. PMID:19956315

  1. Infrared measurements of organic radical anions in solution using mid-infrared optical fibers and spectral analyses based on density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Akira; Kuroda, Masahito; Harada, Tomohisa; Tasumi, Mitsuo

    2005-02-01

    By using ATR and transmission probes combined with bundles of mid-infrared optical fibers, high-quality infrared spectra are observed for the radical anions of biphenyl and naphthalene in deuterated tetrahydrofuran solutions. The ATR and transmission probes can be inserted into a glass-tube cell with O-rings under vacuum. Organic radical anions prepared separately in a vacuum system are transferred into the cell for infrared absorption measurements. Observed infrared spectra are in good agreement with those calculated by density functional theory. The origin of the strong infrared absorption intensities characteristic of the radical anions are discussed in terms of changes in electronic structures induced by specific normal vibrations (electron-molecular vibration interaction).

  2. Many-body Green's function theory for electron-phonon interactions: The Kadanoff-Baym approach to spectral properties of the Holstein dimer.

    PubMed

    Säkkinen, Niko; Peng, Yang; Appel, Heiko; van Leeuwen, Robert

    2015-12-21

    We present a Kadanoff-Baym formalism to study time-dependent phenomena for systems of interacting electrons and phonons in the framework of many-body perturbation theory. The formalism takes correctly into account effects of the initial preparation of an equilibrium state and allows for an explicit time-dependence of both the electronic and phononic degrees of freedom. The method is applied to investigate the charge neutral and non-neutral excitation spectra of a homogeneous, two-site, two-electron Holstein model. This is an extension of a previous study of the ground state properties in the Hartree (H), partially self-consistent Born (Gd) and fully self-consistent Born (GD) approximations published in Säkkinen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 234101 (2015)]. Here, the homogeneous ground state solution is shown to become unstable for a sufficiently strong interaction while a symmetry-broken ground state solution is shown to be stable in the Hartree approximation. Signatures of this instability are observed for the partially self-consistent Born approximation but are not found for the fully self-consistent Born approximation. By understanding the stability properties, we are able to study the linear response regime by calculating the density-density response function by time-propagation. This amounts to a solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation with a sophisticated kernel. The results indicate that none of the approximations is able to describe the response function during or beyond the bipolaronic crossover for the parameters investigated. Overall, we provide an extensive discussion on when the approximations are valid and how they fail to describe the studied exact properties of the chosen model system. PMID:26696041

  3. Many-body Green's function theory for electron-phonon interactions: The Kadanoff-Baym approach to spectral properties of the Holstein dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Säkkinen, Niko; Peng, Yang; Appel, Heiko; van Leeuwen, Robert

    2015-12-01

    We present a Kadanoff-Baym formalism to study time-dependent phenomena for systems of interacting electrons and phonons in the framework of many-body perturbation theory. The formalism takes correctly into account effects of the initial preparation of an equilibrium state and allows for an explicit time-dependence of both the electronic and phononic degrees of freedom. The method is applied to investigate the charge neutral and non-neutral excitation spectra of a homogeneous, two-site, two-electron Holstein model. This is an extension of a previous study of the ground state properties in the Hartree (H), partially self-consistent Born (Gd) and fully self-consistent Born (GD) approximations published in Säkkinen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 234101 (2015)]. Here, the homogeneous ground state solution is shown to become unstable for a sufficiently strong interaction while a symmetry-broken ground state solution is shown to be stable in the Hartree approximation. Signatures of this instability are observed for the partially self-consistent Born approximation but are not found for the fully self-consistent Born approximation. By understanding the stability properties, we are able to study the linear response regime by calculating the density-density response function by time-propagation. This amounts to a solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation with a sophisticated kernel. The results indicate that none of the approximations is able to describe the response function during or beyond the bipolaronic crossover for the parameters investigated. Overall, we provide an extensive discussion on when the approximations are valid and how they fail to describe the studied exact properties of the chosen model system.

  4. Many-body Green’s function theory for electron-phonon interactions: The Kadanoff-Baym approach to spectral properties of the Holstein dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Säkkinen, Niko; Peng, Yang; Appel, Heiko; Leeuwen, Robert van

    2015-12-21

    We present a Kadanoff-Baym formalism to study time-dependent phenomena for systems of interacting electrons and phonons in the framework of many-body perturbation theory. The formalism takes correctly into account effects of the initial preparation of an equilibrium state and allows for an explicit time-dependence of both the electronic and phononic degrees of freedom. The method is applied to investigate the charge neutral and non-neutral excitation spectra of a homogeneous, two-site, two-electron Holstein model. This is an extension of a previous study of the ground state properties in the Hartree (H), partially self-consistent Born (Gd) and fully self-consistent Born (GD) approximations published in Säkkinen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 234101 (2015)]. Here, the homogeneous ground state solution is shown to become unstable for a sufficiently strong interaction while a symmetry-broken ground state solution is shown to be stable in the Hartree approximation. Signatures of this instability are observed for the partially self-consistent Born approximation but are not found for the fully self-consistent Born approximation. By understanding the stability properties, we are able to study the linear response regime by calculating the density-density response function by time-propagation. This amounts to a solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation with a sophisticated kernel. The results indicate that none of the approximations is able to describe the response function during or beyond the bipolaronic crossover for the parameters investigated. Overall, we provide an extensive discussion on when the approximations are valid and how they fail to describe the studied exact properties of the chosen model system.

  5. Uncertainties in Interpolated Spectral Data

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, James L.

    2003-01-01

    Interpolation is often used to improve the accuracy of integrals over spectral data convolved with various response functions or power distributions. Formulae are developed for propagation of uncertainties through the interpolation process, specifically for Lagrangian interpolation increasing a regular data set by factors of 5 and 2, and for cubic-spline interpolation. The interpolated data are correlated; these correlations must be considered when combining the interpolated values, as in integration. Examples are given using a common spectral integral in photometry. Correlation coefficients are developed for Lagrangian interpolation where the input data are uncorrelated. It is demonstrated that in practical cases, uncertainties for the integral formed using interpolated data can be reliably estimated using the original data.

  6. Live Cells as Dynamic Laboratories: Time Lapse Raman Spectral Microscopy of Nanoparticles with Both IgE Targeting and pH-Sensing Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nowak-Lovato, Kristy L.; Rector, Kirk D.

    2012-01-01

    This review captures the use of live cells as dynamic microlaboratories through implementation of labeled nanoparticles (nanosensors) that have both sensing and targeting functions. The addition of 2,4-ε-dinitrophenol-L-lysine (DNP) as a FcεRI targeting ligand and 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) as a pH-sensing ligand enables spatial and temporal monitoring of FcεRI receptors and their pH environment within the endocytic pathway. To ensure reliability, the sensor is calibrated in vivo using the ionophore nigericin and standard buffer solutions to equilibrate the external [H+] concentration with that of the cell compartments. This review highlights the nanosensors, ability to traffic and respond to pH of receptor-bound nanosensors (1) at physiological temperature (37°C) versus room temperature (25°C), (2) after pharmacological treatment with bafilomycin, an H+ ATPase pump inhibitor, or amiloride, an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchange, and (3) in response to both temperature and pharmacological treatment. Whole-cell, time lapse images are demonstrated to show the ability to transform live cells into dynamic laboratories to monitor temporal and spatial endosomal pH. The versatility of these probes shows promise for future applications relevant to intracellular trafficking and intelligent drug design. PMID:22778738

  7. Live Cells as Dynamic Laboratories: Time Lapse Raman Spectral Microscopy of Nanoparticles with Both IgE Targeting and pH-Sensing Functions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nowak-Lovato, Kristy L.; Rector, Kirk D.

    2012-01-01

    Tmore » his review captures the use of live cells as dynamic microlaboratories through implementation of labeled nanoparticles (nanosensors) that have both sensing and targeting functions.he addition of 2,4-ε-dinitrophenol-L-lysine (DNP) as a FcεRI targeting ligand and 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) as a pH-sensing ligand enables spatial and temporal monitoring of FcεRI receptors and their pH environment within the endocytic pathway.o ensure reliability, the sensor is calibrated in vivo using the ionophore nigericin and standard buffer solutions to equilibrate the external [ H + ] concentration with that of the cell compartments.his review highlights the nanosensors, ability to traffic and respond to pH of receptor-bound nanosensors (1) at physiological temperature ( 37 ° C ) versus room temperature ( 25 ° C ) , (2) after pharmacological treatment with bafilomycin, an H + ATPase pump inhibitor, or amiloride, an inhibitor of Na + / H + exchange, and (3) in response to both temperature and pharmacological treatment. Whole-cell, time lapse images are demonstrated to show the ability to transform live cells into dynamic laboratories to monitor temporal and spatial endosomal pH.he versatility of these probes shows promise for future applications relevant to intracellular trafficking and intelligent drug design.« less

  8. Synthesis, structural, spectral (FTIR, FT-Raman, UV, NMR), NBO and first order hyperpolarizability analysis of N-phenylbenzenesulfonamide by density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Govindarasu, K; Kavitha, E; Sundaraganesan, N

    2014-12-10

    In this study sulfonamide compound, N-phenylbenzenesulfonamide (NPBS) has been synthesized and grown as a high quality single crystal by the slow evaporation solution growth technique. The grown crystals were characterized by the Fourier transform infrared (4000-400cm(-1)), Fourier transform Raman (3500-500cm(-1)), UV-Vis (200-800nm) and NMR spectroscopy. Density functional (DFT) calculations have been carried out for the compound NPBS by utilizing DFT level of theory using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) as basis set. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters such as bond lengths and bond angles have been calculated by using quantum chemical methods. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first order hyperpolarizability values were also computed. The chemical reactivity and ionization potential of NPBS were also calculated. In addition, Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP), Frontier Molecular Orbital (FMO) analysis was investigated using theoretical calculations. The thermodynamic properties of the compound were calculated at different temperatures and corresponding relations between the properties and temperature were also studied. Finally, geometric parameters, vibrational bands were compared with available experimental data of the molecules. PMID:24973782

  9. GW approximation study of late transition metal oxides: Spectral function clusters around Fermi energy as the mechanism behind smearing in momentum density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khidzir, S. M.; Ibrahim, K. N.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-05-01

    Momentum density studies are the key tool in Fermiology in which electronic structure calculations have proven to be the integral underlying methodology. Agreements between experimental techniques such as Compton scattering experiments and conventional density functional calculations for late transition metal oxides (TMOs) prove elusive. In this work, we report improved momentum densities of late TMOs using the GW approximation (GWA) which appears to smear the momentum density creating occupancy above the Fermi break. The smearing is found to be largest for NiO and we will show that it is due to more spectra surrounding the NiO Fermi energy compared to the spectra around the Fermi energies of FeO and CoO. This highlights the importance of the positioning of the Fermi energy and the role played by the self-energy term to broaden the spectra and we elaborate on this point by comparing the GWA momentum densities to their LDA counterparts and conclude that the larger difference at the intermediate level shows that the self-energy has its largest effect in this region. We finally analyzed the quasiparticle renormalization factor and conclude that an increase of electrons in the d-orbital from FeO to NiO plays a vital role in changing the magnitude of electron correlation via the self-energy.

  10. Soil spectral characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The spectral characterization of soils is discussed with particular reference to the bidirectional reflectance factor as a quantitative measure of soil spectral properties, the role of soil color, soil parameters affecting soil reflectance, and field characteristics of soil reflectance. Comparisons between laboratory-measured soil spectra and Landsat MSS data have shown good agreement, especially in discriminating relative drainage conditions and organic matter levels in unvegetated soils. The capacity to measure both visible and infrared soil reflectance provides information on other soil characteristics and makes it possible to predict soil response to different management conditions. Field and laboratory soil spectral characterization helps define the extent to which intrinsic spectral information is available from soils as a consequence of their composition and field characteristics.

  11. Commission 45: Spectral Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridhar, Sunetra; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.; Eyer, Laurent; Irwin, Michael J.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Majewski, Steven; Minniti, Dante; Nordström, Birgitta

    This report gives an update of developments (since the last General Assembly at Prague) in the areas that are of relevance to the commission. In addition to numerous papers, a new monograph entitled Stellar Spectral Classification with Richard Gray and Chris Corbally as leading authors will be published by Princeton University Press as part of their Princeton Series in Astrophysics in April 2009. This book is an up-to-date and encyclopedic review of stellar spectral classification across the H-R diagram, including the traditional MK system in the blue-violet, recent extensions into the ultraviolet and infrared, the newly defined L-type and T-type spectral classes, as well as spectral classification of carbon stars, S-type stars, white dwarfs, novae, supernovae and Wolf-Rayet stars.

  12. Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect

    DM DePoy; PM Fourspring; PF Baldasaro; JF Beausang; EJ Brown; MW Dashiel; KD Rahner; TD Rahmlow; JE Lazo-Wasem; EJ Gratrix; B Wemsman

    2004-06-09

    Spectral control is a key technology for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion systems because only a fraction (typically less than 25%) of the incident thermal radiation has energy exceeding the diode bandgap energy, E{sub g}, and can thus be converted to electricity. The goal for TPV spectral control in most applications is twofold: (1) Maximize TPV efficiency by minimizing transfer of low energy, below bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. (2) Maximize TPV surface power density by maximizing transfer of high energy, above bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. TPV spectral control options include: front surface filters (e.g. interference filters, plasma filters, interference/plasma tandem filters, and frequency selective surfaces), back surface reflectors, and wavelength selective radiators. System analysis shows that spectral performance dominates diode performance in any practical TPV system, and that low bandgap diodes enable both higher efficiency and power density when spectral control limitations are considered. Lockheed Martin has focused its efforts on front surface tandem filters which have achieved spectral efficiencies of {approx}83% for E{sub g} = 0.52 eV and {approx}76% for E{sub g} = 0.60 eV for a 950 C radiator temperature.

  13. Spectrally selective glazings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  14. Spectral topography of histopathological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Jeremy M.; Lu, Thomas T.; Vari, Sandor G.

    1998-06-01

    The goal of imaging spectroscopy is to obtain independent spectra from individual objects in a field-of-view. In the case of biological materials, such as histopathology samples, it has been well established that spectral characteristic can be indicative of specific diseases including cancer. Diagnosis can be enhanced by the use of probes and stains to indicate the presence of individual genome or other biologically active cell components or substances. To assess a specimen through a microscope is directly analogous to serving the Earth from space to assess natural features. This paper describes a simple and inexpensive imaging spectrometer, with an origin in remote sensing, that demonstrates that it is possible to rapidly identify evidence of disease in histopathology samples using spatially resolved spectral data. The PARISS imaging spectrometer enables a researcher to acquire multi-spectral images that yield functional maps, showing what and where biological molecules are located within a structure. It is the powerful combination of imaging and spectroscopy that provides the tools not readily available to the Life Sciences. The PARISS system incorporates a powerful hybrid neural network analysis to break the data logjam that is often associated with the acquisition and processing of multiple spectra.

  15. [Modeling and Simulation of Spectral Polarimetric BRDF].

    PubMed

    Ling, Jin-jiang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Ren-bin; Tang, Qian; Ye, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Under the conditions of the polarized light, The reflective surface of the object is affected by many factors, refractive index, surface roughness, and so the angle of incidence. For the rough surface in the different wavelengths of light exhibit different reflection characteristics of polarization, a spectral polarimetric BRDF based on Kirchhof theory is proposee. The spectral model of complex refraction index is combined with refraction index and extinction coefficient spectral model which were got by using the known complex refraction index at different value. Then get the spectral model of surface roughness derived from the classical surface roughness measuring method combined with the Fresnel reflection function. Take the spectral model of refraction index and roughness into the BRDF model, then the spectral polarimetirc BRDF model is proposed. Compare the simulation results of the refractive index varies with wavelength, roughness is constant, the refraction index and roughness both vary with wavelength and origin model with other papers, it shows that, the spectral polarimetric BRDF model can show the polarization characteristics of the surface accurately, and can provide a reliable basis for the application of polarization remote sensing, and other aspects of the classification of substances. PMID:27228737

  16. Spectral clustering for TRUS images

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Samar S; Salama, Magdy MA

    2007-01-01

    Background Identifying the location and the volume of the prostate is important for ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy. Prostate volume is also important for prostate cancer diagnosis. Manual outlining of the prostate border is able to determine the prostate volume accurately, however, it is time consuming and tedious. Therefore, a number of investigations have been devoted to designing algorithms that are suitable for segmenting the prostate boundary in ultrasound images. The most popular method is the deformable model (snakes), a method that involves designing an energy function and then optimizing this function. The snakes algorithm usually requires either an initial contour or some points on the prostate boundary to be estimated close enough to the original boundary which is considered a drawback to this powerful method. Methods The proposed spectral clustering segmentation algorithm is built on a totally different foundation that doesn't involve any function design or optimization. It also doesn't need any contour or any points on the boundary to be estimated. The proposed algorithm depends mainly on graph theory techniques. Results Spectral clustering is used in this paper for both prostate gland segmentation from the background and internal gland segmentation. The obtained segmented images were compared to the expert radiologist segmented images. The proposed algorithm obtained excellent gland segmentation results with 93% average overlap areas. It is also able to internally segment the gland where the segmentation showed consistency with the cancerous regions identified by the expert radiologist. Conclusion The proposed spectral clustering segmentation algorithm obtained fast excellent estimates that can give rough prostate volume and location as well as internal gland segmentation without any user interaction. PMID:17359549

  17. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusion–reaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are alsomore » satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.« less

  18. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    SciTech Connect

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusion–reaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are also satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.

  19. Interactive Spectral Analysis and Computation (ISAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Isaac is a task in the NSO external package for IRAF. A descendant of a FORTRAN program written to analyze data from a Fourier transform spectrometer, the current implementation has been generalized sufficiently to make it useful for general spectral analysis and other one dimensional data analysis tasks. The user interface for Isaac is implemented as an interpreted mini-language containing a powerful, programmable vector calculator. Built-in commands provide much of the functionality needed to produce accurate line lists from input spectra. These built-in functions include automated spectral line finding, least squares fitting of Voigt profiles to spectral lines including equality constraints, various filters including an optimal filter construction tool, continuum fitting, and various I/O functions.

  20. Rapid Chemometric Filtering of Spectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaman, Gregory; Pelletier, Michael; Seshadri, Suresh

    2004-01-01

    A method of rapid, programmable filtering of spectral transmittance, reflectance, or fluorescence data to measure the concentrations of chemical species has been proposed. By programmable is meant that a variety of spectral analyses can readily be performed and modified in software, firmware, and/or electronic hardware, without need to change optical filters or other optical hardware of the associated spectrometers. The method is intended to enable real-time identification of single or multiple target chemical species in applications that involve high-throughput screening of multiple samples. Examples of such applications include (but are not limited to) combinatorial chemistry, flow cytometry, bead assays, testing drugs, remote sensing, and identification of targets. The basic concept of the proposed method is to perform real-time crosscorrelations of a measured spectrum with one or more analytical function(s) of wavelength that could be, for example, the known spectra of target species. Assuming that measured spectral intensities are proportional to concentrations of target species plus background spectral intensities, then after subtraction of background levels, it should be possible to determine target species concentrations from cross-correlation values. Of course, the problem of determining the concentrations is more complex when spectra of different species overlap, but the problem can be solved by use of multiple analytical functions in combination with computational techniques that have been developed previously for analyses of this type. The method is applicable to the design and operation of a spectrometer in which spectrally dispersed light is measured by means of an active-pixel sensor (APS) array. The row or column dimension of such an array is generally chosen to be aligned along the spectral-dispersion dimension, so that each pixel intercepts light in a narrow spectral band centered on a wavelength that is a known function of the pixel position. The

  1. Use of SPECTRAL at LRBA's HWIL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurel, Frederic; Lesueur, Marc

    2002-07-01

    DGA/DCE/LRBA, the French MoD missiles and navigation evaluation center has developed several HWIL facilities in order to test the IR-autoguidance-loops of tactical missiles. LRBA has initiated the acquisition of SPECTRAL, a dedicated hardware and software configuration. SPECTRAL (Multipurpose System for Laboratory Evaluation of Image Processing Calculators) is a complete system including hardware and software designed for the evaluation of different missile functions or equipment (on-board image processing software, image processing calculators, imagers, terminal guidance and control performances). The main feature of this system is its capability to generate images representative of those elaborated by an infrared missile seeker, in real time. SPECTRAL is designed with an architecture for a multi-user environment including workstations carrying out several operations. Acceptance Test Procedures of SPECTRAL are being discussed and the first results are presented here. As a conclusion, we provide a comparison with existing image generating systems at LRBA's facilities.

  2. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  3. Feature Transformation Detection Method with Best Spectral Band Selection Process for Hyper-spectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Wen; McGurr, Mike; Brickhouse, Mark

    2015-11-01

    We present a newly developed feature transformation (FT) detection method for hyper-spectral imagery (HSI) sensors. In essence, the FT method, by transforming the original features (spectral bands) to a different feature domain, may considerably increase the statistical separation between the target and background probability density functions, and thus may significantly improve the target detection and identification performance, as evidenced by the test results in this paper. We show that by differentiating the original spectral, one can completely separate targets from the background using a single spectral band, leading to perfect detection results. In addition, we have proposed an automated best spectral band selection process with a double-threshold scheme that can rank the available spectral bands from the best to the worst for target detection. Finally, we have also proposed an automated cross-spectrum fusion process to further improve the detection performance in lower spectral range (<1000 nm) by selecting the best spectral band pair with multivariate analysis. Promising detection performance has been achieved using a small background material signature library for concept-proving, and has then been further evaluated and verified using a real background HSI scene collected by a HYDICE sensor.

  4. Spectral library searching in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Griss, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Spectral library searching has become a mature method to identify tandem mass spectra in proteomics data analysis. This review provides a comprehensive overview of available spectral library search engines and highlights their distinct features. Additionally, resources providing spectral libraries are summarized and tools presented that extend experimental spectral libraries by simulating spectra. Finally, spectrum clustering algorithms are discussed that utilize the same spectrum-to-spectrum matching algorithms as spectral library search engines and allow novel methods to analyse proteomics data. PMID:26616598

  5. Quantum graph as a quantum spectral filter

    SciTech Connect

    Turek, Ondrej; Cheon, Taksu

    2013-03-15

    We study the transmission of a quantum particle along a straight input-output line to which a graph {Gamma} is attached at a point. In the point of contact we impose a singularity represented by a certain properly chosen scale-invariant coupling with a coupling parameter {alpha}. We show that the probability of transmission along the line as a function of the particle energy tends to the indicator function of the energy spectrum of {Gamma} as {alpha}{yields}{infinity}. This effect can be used for a spectral analysis of the given graph {Gamma}. Its applications include a control of a transmission along the line and spectral filtering. The result is illustrated with an example where {Gamma} is a loop exposed to a magnetic field. Two more quantum devices are designed using other special scale-invariant vertex couplings. They can serve as a band-stop filter and as a spectral separator, respectively.

  6. Spectral likelihood expansions for Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Joseph B.; Sudret, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    A spectral approach to Bayesian inference is presented. It pursues the emulation of the posterior probability density. The starting point is a series expansion of the likelihood function in terms of orthogonal polynomials. From this spectral likelihood expansion all statistical quantities of interest can be calculated semi-analytically. The posterior is formally represented as the product of a reference density and a linear combination of polynomial basis functions. Both the model evidence and the posterior moments are related to the expansion coefficients. This formulation avoids Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation and allows one to make use of linear least squares instead. The pros and cons of spectral Bayesian inference are discussed and demonstrated on the basis of simple applications from classical statistics and inverse modeling.

  7. Microwave spectral line listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The frequency, intensity, and identification of 9615 spectral lines belonging to 75 molecules are tabulated in order of increasing frequency. Measurements for all 75 molecules were made in the frequency range from 26500 to 40000 MHz by a computer controlled spectrometer. Measurements were also made in the 18000 to 26500 MHz range for some of the molecules.

  8. Large Spectral Library Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Chilton, Lawrence K.; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2008-10-03

    Hyperspectral imaging produces a spectrum or vector at each image pixel. These spectra can be used to identify materials present in the image. In some cases, spectral libraries representing atmospheric chemicals or ground materials are available. The challenge is to determine if any of the library chemicals or materials exist in the hyperspectral image. The number of spectra in these libraries can be very large, far exceeding the number of spectral channels collected in the ¯eld. Suppose an image pixel contains a mixture of p spectra from the library. Is it possible to uniquely identify these p spectra? We address this question in this paper and refer to it as the Large Spectral Library (LSL) problem. We show how to determine if unique identi¯cation is possible for any given library. We also show that if p is small compared to the number of spectral channels, it is very likely that unique identi¯cation is possible. We show that unique identi¯cation becomes less likely as p increases.

  9. LCLS Spectral Flux Viewer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-10-25

    This application (FluxViewer) is a tool for displaying spectral flux data for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This tool allows the user to view sliced spatial and energy distributions of the photons selected for specific energies and positions transverse to the beam axis.

  10. Symmetries of Spectral Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabat, A.

    Deriving abelian KdV and NLS hierarchies, we describe non-abelian symmetries and "pre-Lax" elementary approach to Lax pairs. Discrete symmetries of spectral problems are considered in Sect. 4.2. Here we prove Darboux classical theorem and discuss a modern theory of dressing chains.

  11. Spectral imaging using forward-viewing spectrally encoded endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-01-01

    Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) enables miniature, small-diameter endoscopic probes for minimally invasive imaging; however, using the broadband spectrum to encode space makes color and spectral imaging nontrivial and challenging. By careful registration and analysis of image data acquired by a prototype of a forward-viewing dual channel spectrally encoded rigid probe, we demonstrate spectral and color imaging within a narrow cylindrical lumen. Spectral imaging of calibration cylindrical test targets and an ex-vivo blood vessel demonstrates high-resolution spatial-spectral imaging with short (10 μs/line) exposure times. PMID:26977348

  12. Spectral imaging using forward-viewing spectrally encoded endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-02-01

    Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) enables miniature, small-diameter endoscopic probes for minimally invasive imaging; however, using the broadband spectrum to encode space makes color and spectral imaging nontrivial and challenging. By careful registration and analysis of image data acquired by a prototype of a forward-viewing dual channel spectrally encoded rigid probe, we demonstrate spectral and color imaging within a narrow cylindrical lumen. Spectral imaging of calibration cylindrical test targets and an ex-vivo blood vessel demonstrates high-resolution spatial-spectral imaging with short (10 μs/line) exposure times. PMID:26977348

  13. On the shape of the mass-function of dense clumps in the Hi-GAL fields . I. Spectral energy distribution determination and global properties of the mass-functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, L.; Anglés-Alcázar, D.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Montier, L.; Pestalozzi, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Polychroni, D.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodon, J.; Schisano, E.; Smith, M. D.; Testi, L.; Thompson, M.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Stars form in dense, dusty clumps of molecular clouds, but little is known about their origin and evolution. In particular, the relationship between the mass distribution of these clumps (also known as the clump mass function or CMF) and the stellar initial mass function (IMF), is still poorly understood. Aims: To discern the "true" shape of the CMF and to better understand how the CMF may evolve toward the IMF, large samples of bona-fide pre- and proto-stellar clumps are required. The sensitive observations of the Herschel Space Observatory (HSO) are now allowing us to look at large clump populations in various clouds with different physical conditions. Methods: We analyze two fields in the Galactic plane mapped by HSO during its science demonstration phase (SDP), as part of the more complete and unbiased Herschel infrared GALactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL). These fields underwent a source-extraction and flux-estimation pipeline, which allowed us to obtain a sample with thousands of clumps. Starless and proto-stellar clumps were separated using both color and positional criteria to find those coincident with MIPS 24 μm sources. We describe the probability density functions of the power-law and lognormal models that were used to fit the CMFs. For the lognormal model we applied several statistical techniques to the data and compared their results. Results: The CMFs of the two SDP fields show very similar shapes, but very different mass scales. This similarity is confirmed by the values of the best-fit parameters of either the power-law or lognormal model. The power-law model leads to almost identical CMF slopes, whereas the lognormal model shows that the CMFs have similar widths. Conclusions: The similar CMF shape but different mass scale represents an evidence that the overall process of star formation in the two regions is very different. When comparing with the IMF, we find that the width of the IMF is narrower than the measured widths of the CMF in the two

  14. Peripheral absolute threshold spectral sensitivity in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Massof, R W; Johnson, M A; Finkelstein, D

    1981-01-01

    Dark-adapted spectral sensitivities were measured in the peripheral retinas of 38 patients diagnosed as having typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and in 3 normal volunteers. The patients included those having autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance patterns. Results were analysed by comparisons with the CIE standard scotopic spectral visibility function and with Judd's modification of the photopic spectral visibility function, with consideration of contributions from changes in spectral transmission of preretinal media. The data show 3 general patterns. One group of patients had absolute threshold spectral sensitivities that were fit by Judd's photopic visibility curve. Absolute threshold spectral sensitivities for a second group of patients were fit by a normal scotopic spectral visibility curve. The third group of patients had absolute threshold spectral sensitivities that were fit by a combination of scotopic and photopic spectral visibility curves. The autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes of inheritance were represented in each group of patients. These data indicate that RP patients have normal rod and/or cone spectral sensitivities, and support the subclassification of patients described previously by Massof and Finkelstein. PMID:7459312

  15. SPAM- SPECTRAL ANALYSIS MANAGER (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) was developed to allow easy qualitative analysis of multi-dimensional imaging spectrometer data. Imaging spectrometers provide sufficient spectral sampling to define unique spectral signatures on a per pixel basis. Thus direct material identification becomes possible for geologic studies. SPAM provides a variety of capabilities for carrying out interactive analysis of the massive and complex datasets associated with multispectral remote sensing observations. In addition to normal image processing functions, SPAM provides multiple levels of on-line help, a flexible command interpretation, graceful error recovery, and a program structure which can be implemented in a variety of environments. SPAM was designed to be visually oriented and user friendly with the liberal employment of graphics for rapid and efficient exploratory analysis of imaging spectrometry data. SPAM provides functions to enable arithmetic manipulations of the data, such as normalization, linear mixing, band ratio discrimination, and low-pass filtering. SPAM can be used to examine the spectra of an individual pixel or the average spectra over a number of pixels. SPAM also supports image segmentation, fast spectral signature matching, spectral library usage, mixture analysis, and feature extraction. High speed spectral signature matching is performed by using a binary spectral encoding algorithm to separate and identify mineral components present in the scene. The same binary encoding allows automatic spectral clustering. Spectral data may be entered from a digitizing tablet, stored in a user library, compared to the master library containing mineral standards, and then displayed as a timesequence spectral movie. The output plots, histograms, and stretched histograms produced by SPAM can be sent to a lineprinter, stored as separate RGB disk files, or sent to a Quick Color Recorder. SPAM is written in C for interactive execution and is available for two different

  16. Difference of cross-spectral densities.

    PubMed

    Santarsiero, M; Piquero, G; de Sande, J C G; Gori, F

    2014-04-01

    Generally speaking, the difference between two cross-spectral densities (CSDs) does not represent a correlation function. We will furnish a sufficient condition so that such difference be a valid CSD. Using such a condition, we will show through some examples how new classes of CSDs can be generated. PMID:24686586

  17. Gamma-ray spectral analysis algorithm library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-05-06

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithms library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from Ge semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  18. Gamma-ray Spectral Analysis Algorithm Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-09-25

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithm library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from GE semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  19. Spectrally tunable pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfelder, G.; Buffa, C.; Longoni, A. F.; Zaraga, F.

    2013-01-01

    They are here reported the developments and experimental results of fully operating matrices of spectrally tunable pixels based on the Transverse Field Detector (TFD). Unlike several digital imaging sensors based on color filter arrays or layered junctions, the TFD has the peculiar feature of having electrically tunable spectral sensitivities. In this way the sensor color space is not fixed a priori but can be real-time adjusted, e.g. for a better adaptation to the scene content or for multispectral capture. These advantages come at the cost of an increased complexity both for the photosensitive elements and for the readout electronics. The challenges in the realization of a matrix of TFD pixels are analyzed in this work. First experimental results on an 8x8 (x 3 colors) and on a 64x64 (x 3 colors) matrix will be presented and analyzed in terms of colorimetric and noise performance, and compared to simulation predictions.

  20. Ultraviolet Spectral Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally; Lindler, Don

    2009-01-01

    At redshifts, z>l, the rest-frame mid-UV is brought into view of large, ground-based telescopes. Here, we report on a study of the potential of the rest-frame UV spectrum for deriving the age since the last major episode of star formation in a galaxy. We base this investigation on wide-band (0.2-1.0 microns), low-resolution (R-1000) spectra of single stars in Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL). We find that a combination of mid-UV spectral indices and colors can indeed yield the age of a stellar population, but only if light from the stellar population is unreddened.

  1. Power spectral estimation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Manjit S.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms to estimate the power spectrum using Maximum Entropy Methods were developed. These algorithms were coded in FORTRAN 77 and were implemented on the VAX 780. The important considerations in this analysis are: (1) resolution, i.e., how close in frequency two spectral components can be spaced and still be identified; (2) dynamic range, i.e., how small a spectral peak can be, relative to the largest, and still be observed in the spectra; and (3) variance, i.e., how accurate the estimate of the spectra is to the actual spectra. The application of the algorithms based on Maximum Entropy Methods to a variety of data shows that these criteria are met quite well. Additional work in this direction would help confirm the findings. All of the software developed was turned over to the technical monitor. A copy of a typical program is included. Some of the actual data and graphs used on this data are also included.

  2. The Spectral Density of a Difference of Spectral Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushnitski, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Let H 0 and H be a pair of self-adjoint operators satisfying some standard assumptions of scattering theory. It is known from previous work that if belongs to the absolutely continuous spectrum of H 0 and H, then the difference of spectral projections in general is not compact and has non-trivial absolutely continuous spectrum. In this paper we consider the compact approximations of , given by where and is a smooth real-valued function which tends to as . We prove that the eigenvalues of concentrate to the absolutely continuous spectrum of as . We show that the rate of concentration is proportional to and give an explicit formula for the asymptotic density of these eigenvalues. It turns out that this density is independent of . The proof relies on the analysis of Hankel operators.

  3. Spectral tailoring device

    DOEpatents

    Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.; Carter, L.L.; Karnesky, R.A.

    1987-08-05

    A spectral tailoring device for altering the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in a fast reactor thereby selectively to enhance or inhibit the transmutation rate of a target metrical to form a product isotope. Neutron moderators, neutron filters, neutron absorbers and neutron reflectors may be used as spectral tailoring devices. Depending on the intended use for the device, a member from each of these four classes of materials could be used singularly, or in combination, to provide a preferred neutron energy spectra and flux of the neutrons in the region of the target material. In one embodiment of the invention, an assembly is provided for enhancing the production of isotopes, such as cobalt 60 and gadolinium 153. In another embodiment of the invention, a spectral tailoring device is disposed adjacent a target material which comprises long lived or volatile fission products and the device is used to shift the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in the region of the fission products to preferentially transmute them to produce a less volatile fission product inventory. 6 figs.

  4. Spectral Anonymization of Data

    PubMed Central

    Lasko, Thomas A.; Vinterbo, Staal A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of data anonymization is to allow the release of scientifically useful data in a form that protects the privacy of its subjects. This requires more than simply removing personal identifiers from the data, because an attacker can still use auxiliary information to infer sensitive individual information. Additional perturbation is necessary to prevent these inferences, and the challenge is to perturb the data in a way that preserves its analytic utility. No existing anonymization algorithm provides both perfect privacy protection and perfect analytic utility. We make the new observation that anonymization algorithms are not required to operate in the original vector-space basis of the data, and many algorithms can be improved by operating in a judiciously chosen alternate basis. A spectral basis derived from the data’s eigenvectors is one that can provide substantial improvement. We introduce the term spectral anonymization to refer to an algorithm that uses a spectral basis for anonymization, and we give two illustrative examples. We also propose new measures of privacy protection that are more general and more informative than existing measures, and a principled reference standard with which to define adequate privacy protection. PMID:21373375

  5. Spectral correlates lexical prosody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okobi, Anthony

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to derive a quantitative acoustic model of lexical-prosodic characteristics of stressed vowels by looking at several spectral properties associated with the articulatory mechanisms used in speech production. Native speakers of American English were asked to name disyllabic visualizable nouns. Words containing liquids or glides were not used in this study because of their effect on the spectra of adjacent vowels. Subjects uttered short phrases in which the target word was pitch accent half of the time and unaccented the other half. Results show that within the category of full vowels, unstressed and stressed vowels can be distinguished by syllable/vowel durations and spectral tilt. Spectral tilt (SpT) is an acoustic measure related to the degree of glottal spreading. Stressed full vowels had longer duration and less SpT. Distinction between unaccented and accented stressed vowels can be made by amplitude of voicing (AV), F0 (pitch), and intensity contour differences. Accented stressed vowels have higher pitch, and greater AV and intensity. These results suggest that there are acoustic correlates to lexical stress that can be used to determine the stressed syllable of a word, regardless of whether or not it is pitch accented. [Work supported by NIH T32-DC00038.

  6. Spectral estimators in elastography.

    PubMed

    Konofagou, E E; Varghese, T; Ophir, J

    2000-03-01

    Like velocity, strain induces a time delay and a time scaling to the received signal. Elastography typically uses time delay techniques to indirectly (i.e. via the displacement estimate) measure tissue strain induced by an applied compression, and considers time scaling as a source of distortion. More recently, we have shown that the time scaling factor can also be spectrally estimated and used as a direct measure of strain. Strain causes a Doppler-like frequency shift and a change in bandwidth of the bandpass power spectrum of the echo signal. Two frequency shift strain estimators are described that have been proven to be more robust but less precise when compared to time delay estimators, both in simulations and experiments. The increased robustness is due to the insensitivity of the spectral techniques to phase decorrelation noise. In this paper we discuss and compare the theoretical and experimental findings obtained with traditional time delay estimators and with the newly proposed spectral methods. PMID:10829698

  7. Modern spectral transmissometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgerson, Mark J.; Bartz, Robert; Zaneveld, J. Ronald V.; Kitchen, James C.

    1990-09-01

    We have evaluated a number of spectral attenuation meter designs based on constraints related to power consumption, spectral bandwidth, sampling time, accuracy and stability . Our fmal instrument design employs a unique optical bridge deve1oped1r Sea Tech with ONR support, a tungsten light source and a holographic grating monochromatorThe instrument design is summarized as follows: White light from a 10-Watt tungsten lamp with a 1mm2 filament is collected by a condensing lens and then spatially filtered by a 1mm diameter pinhole which is placed at the entrance port of a monochromator. The monochromator has a 45°, 1200 lines/mm, holographic grating 37 mm in diameter with a 91 mm focal length. The grating is rotated about its vertical axis with a sine arm driven by a stepping motor, allowing wavelength to be selected from 400 to 800 nm. At the exit port of the monochromator we use a 1mm diameter pinhole which spectrally filters the output light, resulting in a spectral bandwidth of 9. 1 nm. This nearly monochromatic light is then measured by a unique reference detector with a 0.5mm diameter pinhole at its center, allowing light to be transmitted through the center of the detector. The transmitted light has a bandwidth of 4.5 nm. The monochromatic light is then collimated by a 50mm focal length achromatic lens and stopped down to a beam 1 cm in diameter. This light then enters the sample chamber. After passing through the sample the light is received by a 61mm focal length achromatic lens and is focused onto a signal detector with a diameter of 1.25mm. Digitized ratios ofreference detector to signal detector voltages allow transmission to be measured with an accuracy of 0.05% and a resolution of 0.01%. By monitoring temperature we were able to temperature compensate the instrument to within 0.05% transmission from 00 C to 25° C. Based on these results it is now possible to construct a spectral attenuation meter with the required sensitivity and accuracy to measure

  8. SWOC: Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchti, G. R.

    2016-06-01

    SWOC (Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code) determines the wavelength ranges that provide the optimal amount of information to achieve the required science goals for a spectroscopic study. It computes a figure-of-merit for different spectral configurations using a user-defined list of spectral features, and, utilizing a set of flux-calibrated spectra, determines the spectral regions showing the largest differences among the spectra.

  9. Spectral response of multilayer optical structures to dynamic mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scripka, David; LeCroy, Garrett; Summers, Christopher J.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2015-05-01

    A computational study of Distributed Bragg Reflectors (DBR) and Optical Microcavities (OMC) was conducted to ascertain their potential as time-resolved mesoscale sensors due to their unique structure-driven spectral characteristics. Shock wave propagation simulations of polymer-based DBRs and glass/ceramic-based OMCs were coupled with spectral response calculations to demonstrate the combined dynamic mechanical and spectral response of the structures. Clear spectral shifts in both structures are predicted as a function of dynamic loading magnitude. Potential applications of the structures include high spatial and temporal resolution surface maps of material states, and in-situ probing of material interfaces during dynamic loading.

  10. Spectral optimization of CPV for integrated energy output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Mark; Barnes, Chris

    2008-08-01

    The series electrical nature of the multi-junction solar cell is both the source of its desirable overall efficiency and of its sensitivity to spectral balance. Owing to the series connection of the spectrally selective junctions, variations in the spectra of the solar input, optical transfer function, and cell quantum efficiency have significant impact on annual energy production despite being effectively indistinguishable in instantaneous power output. This paper will outline spectral filtering approaches for experimental characterization, and spectral simulation methods for estimating annual energy production. We will also present system level design to optimize for annual energy production.

  11. [A Terahertz Spectral Database Based on Browser/Server Technique].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-yong; Song, Yue

    2015-09-01

    With the solution of key scientific and technical problems and development of instrumentation, the application of terahertz technology in various fields has been paid more and more attention. Owing to the unique characteristic advantages, terahertz technology has been showing a broad future in the fields of fast, non-damaging detections, as well as many other fields. Terahertz technology combined with other complementary methods can be used to cope with many difficult practical problems which could not be solved before. One of the critical points for further development of practical terahertz detection methods depends on a good and reliable terahertz spectral database. We developed a BS (browser/server) -based terahertz spectral database recently. We designed the main structure and main functions to fulfill practical requirements. The terahertz spectral database now includes more than 240 items, and the spectral information was collected based on three sources: (1) collection and citation from some other abroad terahertz spectral databases; (2) collected from published literatures; and (3) spectral data measured in our laboratory. The present paper introduced the basic structure and fundament functions of the terahertz spectral database developed in our laboratory. One of the key functions of this THz database is calculation of optical parameters. Some optical parameters including absorption coefficient, refractive index, etc. can be calculated based on the input THz time domain spectra. The other main functions and searching methods of the browser/server-based terahertz spectral database have been discussed. The database search system can provide users convenient functions including user registration, inquiry, displaying spectral figures and molecular structures, spectral matching, etc. The THz database system provides an on-line searching function for registered users. Registered users can compare the input THz spectrum with the spectra of database, according to

  12. Spectral renormalization group theory on nonspatial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncer, Asli; Erzan, Ayse

    We recently proposed a ``spectral renormalization group'' scheme, for non-spatial networks with no metric defined on them. We implemented the spectral renormalization group on two deterministic non-spatial networks without translational invariance, namely the Cayley tree and diamond lattice . The thermodynamic critical exponents for the Gaussian model are only functions of the spectral dimension, d ~. The Gaussian fixed point is stable with respect to a Ψ4 perturbation up to second order on these lattices with d ~ = 2 , the lower critical dimension for the Ising universality class. This is expected for the Cayley tree, but for the diamond lattice it is an indication that the perturbation expansion up to second order breaks down at d ~ = 2 , as it does for the Wilson scheme on the square lattice. On generalized diamond lattices, with 2 < d ~ < 4 , we find non-Gaussian fixed points with non-trivial exponents. For d ~ > 4 , the critical behavior is once again mean field.

  13. Spectrally multiplexed chromatic confocal multipoint sensing.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, Matthias; Lorenz, Lucia; Kleindienst, Roman; Grewe, Adrian; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2013-11-15

    We present a concept for chromatic confocal distance sensing that employs two levels of spectral multiplexing for the parallelized evaluation of multiple lateral measurement points; at the first level, the chromatic confocal principle is used to encode distance information within the spectral distribution of the sensor signal. For lateral multiplexing, the total spectral bandwidth of the sensor is split into bands. Each band is assigned to a different lateral measurement point by a segmented diffractive element. Based on this concept, we experimentally demonstrate a chromatic confocal three-point sensor that is suitable for harsh production environments, since it works with a single-point spectrometer and does not require scanning functionality. The experimental system has a working distance of more than 50 mm, a measurement range of 9 mm, and an axial resolution of 50 μm. PMID:24322108

  14. Spectral Indices of Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Hansung B.; Hales, Christopher A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Yun, Min Su

    2015-01-01

    The significant improvement in bandwidth and the resultant sensitivity offered by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) allows us to explore the faint radio source population. Through the study of the radio continuum we can explore the spectral indices of these radio sources. Robust radio spectral indices are needed for accurate k-corrections, for example in the study of the radio - far-infrared (FIR) correlation. We present an analysis of measuring spectral indices using two different approaches. In the first, we use the standard wideband imaging algorithm in the data reduction package CASA. In the second, we use a traditional approach of imaging narrower bandwidths to derive the spectral indices. For these, we simulated data to match the observing parameter space of the CHILES Con Pol survey (Hales et al. 2014). We investigate the accuracy and precision of spectral index measurements as a function of signal-to noise, and explore the requirements to reliably probe possible evolution of the radio-FIR correlation in CHILES Con Pol.

  15. Spectral correlation of wideband target resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabio, Vincent

    1995-07-01

    The potential for automatic target recognition (ATR) processing of foliage-penetrating (FOPEN) synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) imagery requires very high bandwidth occupancies to achieve sufficient range resolution for the ATR task. The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) ultra-wideband (UWB) FOPEN SAR -- with greater than 95 percent bandwidth occupancy -- provides a suitable testbed for evaluation of resonance-based ATR approaches. Current resonance-extraction techniques (e.g., SEM) typically have poor performance in the presence of noise, and are often computationally intensive. Recently developed at ARL, the `spectral correlation method' uses linear transforms -- such as Fourier and wavelets -- to resolve resonant components; these transforms are generally quite fast, and have straightforward implementations. Creating a synthetic version of the ringdown and projecting onto the desired transform basis provides a set of expected spectral coefficients (the `spectral template'). The spectral template is correlated with the spectral coefficients acquired from the projection of the focused image data onto the same basis function set; the correlation coefficient is then passed through a simple threshold detector. This yields a fast, efficient scheme for recognition of target resonance effects in UWB imagery. Recent advances in this area include a reduction in false-alarm rate by two orders of magnitude, a reduction in processing time by three orders of magnitude, and recognition of a tactical target.

  16. The ultraviolet spectral albedo of planet earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, John E.; Serafino, George N.

    1987-01-01

    The solar backscattered ultraviolet spectral radiometer on the Nimbus 7 satellite provides a unique set of radiation measurements which allows an evaluation of the spectral albedo of the earth and its atmosphere in the wavelength range 300 to 340 nm. Near 340 nm, the derived spectral albedo expressed as a function of latitude and month exceeds that in the visible part of the spectrum, with values near 45 percent existing equatorward of 30 deg and an increase to 60-80 percent toward the poles. At middle to high latitudes, the monthly mean spectral albedo exceeds the contribution from Rayleigh scattering alone by factors of 1.4 to 2.2. At wavelengths from 300 to 310 nm, where absorption by stratospheric ozone is significant, the daylight averaged spectral albedos receive negligible contribution from scattering by tropospheric clouds, yet the derived values exceed those predicted for Rayleigh scattering from a clean stratosphere. These observations are consistent with the presence of an atmospheric scattering layer, distinct from cloudiness, located at an altitude above the tropopause.

  17. Calibration of the ROSAT HRI Spectral Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea H.; Silverman, John; McDowell, Jonathan; Callanan, Paul; Snowden, Steve

    2000-01-01

    The ROSAT High Resolution Imager has a limited (2-band) spectral response. This spectral capability can give X-ray hardness ratios on spatial scales of 5 arcseconds. The spectral response of the center of the detector was calibrated before the launch of ROSAT, but the gain decreases with time and also is a function of position on the detector. To complicate matters further, the satellite is 'wobbled', possibly moving a source across several spatial gain states. These difficulties have prevented the spectral response of the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) from being used for scientific measurements. We have used Bright Earth data and in-flight calibration sources to map the spatial and temporal gain changes, and written software which will allow ROSAT users to generate a calibrated XSPEC (an x ray spectral fitting package) response matrix and hence determine a calibrated hardness ratio. In this report, we describe the calibration procedure and show how to obtain a response matrix. In Section 2 we give an overview of the calibration procedure, in Section 3 we give a summary of HRI spatial and temporal gain variations. Section 4 describes the routines used to determine the gain distribution of a source. In Sections 5 and 6, we describe in detail how, the Bright Earth database and calibration sources are used to derive a corrected response matrix for a given observation. Finally, Section 7 describes how to use the software.

  18. Spectral and Instability Analysis of Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dum, C. T.

    2003-12-01

    Despite an abundance of data on plasma turbulence, obtained either by direct space observations or from computer simulation, most of the data are interpreted only in a qualitative way, rather than by a detailed analysis that would allow a quantitative comparison with theory. For such a comparison one needs to obtain, as a key ingredient, reliable wave spectra as a function of wave number and frequency. The free energy sources, linear instability mechanisms and nonlinear coupling mechanisms that generate these wave spectra should also be identified. In the case of micro turbulence these mechanisms depend on details of the particle distribution functions. Even the nature of wave modes, not only wave growth rates, may change as the plasma evolves. A particle simulation in which an electron beam excites a variety of wave modes is used as an example for such an analysis. The model corresponds to proposed mechanisms for ion conic generation on auroral field lines. The rather rapid evolution of plasma and turbulence requires that the spectral analysis is carried out over time intervals that are sufficiently short compared to time scales for spectral changes, whereas for statistical reasons and good frequency resolution long sampling intervals would be desirable. Straightforward periodograms are unsatisfactory under these conditions, even when applying windows (tapers) to the wave trains, in order to reduce spectral leakage. Modern spectral analysis methods which were mostly developed in the geophysics context, such as the maximum entropy method and the multiple taper method, can yield far better results. They are adopted for the analysis of plasma turbulence, in particular in connection with particle simulation codes, although, with other data limitations, the considerations mostly apply also to observations. Particular attention is paid to statistical tests for spectral lines which may correspond to eigenmodes (instabilities) of the plasma. For reliable results it is

  19. Reference data set for camera spectral sensitivity estimation.

    PubMed

    Darrodi, Maryam Mohammadzadeh; Finlayson, Graham; Goodman, Teresa; Mackiewicz, Michal

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we describe a spectral sensitivity measurement procedure at the National Physical Laboratory, London, with the aim of obtaining ground truth spectral sensitivity functions for Nikon D5100 and Sigma SD1 Merill cameras. The novelty of our data is that the potential measurement errors are estimated at each wavelength. We determine how well the measured spectral sensitivity functions represent the actual camera sensitivity functions (as a function of wavelength). The second contribution of this paper is to test the performance of various leading sensor estimation techniques implemented from the literature using measured and synthetic data and also evaluate them based on ground truth data for the two cameras. We conclude that the estimation techniques tested are not sufficiently accurate when compared with our measured ground truth data and that there remains significant scope to improve estimation algorithms for spectral estimation. To help in this endeavor, we will make all our data available online for the community. PMID:26366649

  20. Spectral Analysis in High Radiation Space Backgrounds with Robust Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasche, G. P.; Coldwell, R. L.; Nobel, L. A.; Rester, A. C.; Trombka, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral analysis software is tested for its ability to fit spectra from space. The approach, which emphasizes the background shape function, is uniquely suited to the identification of weak-strength nuclides in high-radiation background environments.

  1. Evolution of Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Amanda; Kennefick, J.; Mahmood, A.

    2012-05-01

    A common practice when formulating quasar luminosity functions (QLF) has been to adopt an average spectral index, $\\alpha$, for the sample even though it is well known that quasars exhibit a broad range of spectral energy distributions (SED.) We have investigated the possible evolution of $\\alpha$ as a function of redshift, as any evolution in this parameter would introduce or mask evolution in the QLF. We imaged 103 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars in the optical and near-infrared bands, near in time to mitigate the effects of variability, in three redshift bins centered at $z\\approx 1.9$, $2.7$, and $4.0$, corresponding to look-back times of 10-12 billion years. We present restframe UV-optical SED’s and spectral indices and discuss possible evolution in our sample. We also use single epoch spectra of the quasars to estimate the mass of the central black hole and discuss possible correlations of quasar properties such as mass, luminosity, and spectral shape.

  2. Spectrally Invariant Approximation within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    Certain algebraic combinations of single scattering albedo and solar radiation reflected from, or transmitted through, vegetation canopies do not vary with wavelength. These spectrally invariant relationships are the consequence of wavelength independence of the extinction coefficient and scattering phase function in vegetation. In general, this wavelength independence does not hold in the atmosphere, but in cloud-dominated atmospheres the total extinction and total scattering phase function vary only weakly with wavelength. This paper identifies the atmospheric conditions under which the spectrally invariant approximation can accurately describe the extinction and scattering properties of cloudy atmospheres. The validity of the assumptions and the accuracy of the approximation are tested with 1D radiative transfer calculations using publicly available radiative transfer models: Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) and Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART). It is shown for cloudy atmospheres with cloud optical depth above 3, and for spectral intervals that exclude strong water vapor absorption, that the spectrally invariant relationships found in vegetation canopy radiative transfer are valid to better than 5%. The physics behind this phenomenon, its mathematical basis, and possible applications to remote sensing and climate are discussed.

  3. Spectral Element Agglomerate AMGe

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, T; Falgout, R; Henson, V E; Jones, J E; Vassilevski, P S; Manteuffel, T A; McCormick, S F; Ruge, J W

    2005-05-20

    The purpose of this note is to describe an algorithm resulting from the uniting of two ideas introduced and applied elsewhere. For many problems, AMG has always been difficult due to complexities whose natures are difficult to discern from the entries of matrix A alone. Element-based interpolation has been shown to be an effective method for some of these problems, but it requires access to the element matrices on all levels. One way to obtain these has been to perform element agglomeration to form coarse elements, but in complicated situations defining the coarse degrees of freedom (dofs) is not easy. The spectral approach to coarse dof selection is very attractive due to its elegance and simplicity. The algorithm presented here combines the robustness of element interpolation, the ease of coarsening by element agglomeration, and the simplicity of defining coarse dofs through the spectral approach. As demonstrated in the numerical results, the method does yield a reasonable solver for the problems described. It can, however, be an expensive method due to the number and cost of the local, small dense linear algebra problems; making it a generally competitive method remains an area for further research.

  4. Spectral absorption coefficients of argon and silicon and spectral reflectivity of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krascella, N. L.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to estimate the spectral properties of argon as a function of pressure, temperature, and wave number. The spectral characteristics of the argon buffer gas exert a strong influence on radiative energy transfer in the in-reactor test configuration of the nuclear light bulb engine. An existing computer program was modified and used to calculate the spectral absorption coefficients of argon at total pressures of 50, 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 atm in the temperature interval between 1000 and 30,000 K. At each pressure and temperature, spectral properties were calculated for forty-seven wave numbers in the interval between 1000 and 1,000,000 cm/1. Estimates of the spectral absorption coefficients of silicon were made as part of an evaluation of silicon vapor as a possible buffer-gas seeding agent for the reference nuclear light bulb engine. Existing cross-section data were used to calculate the spectral characteristics of silicon at twenty-four temperatures in the interval between 2000 and 10,000 K.

  5. Spectral Diffusion: An Algorithm for Robust Material Decomposition of Spectral CT Data

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Darin P.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical successes with dual energy CT, aggressive development of energy discriminating x-ray detectors, and novel, target-specific, nanoparticle contrast agents promise to establish spectral CT as a powerful functional imaging modality. Common to all of these applications is the need for a material decomposition algorithm which is robust in the presence of noise. Here, we develop such an algorithm which uses spectrally joint, piece-wise constant kernel regression and the split Bregman method to iteratively solve for a material decomposition which is gradient sparse, quantitatively accurate, and minimally biased. We call this algorithm spectral diffusion because it integrates structural information from multiple spectral channels and their corresponding material decompositions within the framework of diffusion-like denoising algorithms (e.g. anisotropic diffusion, total variation, bilateral filtration). Using a 3D, digital bar phantom and a material sensitivity matrix calibrated for use with a polychromatic x-ray source, we quantify the limits of detectability (CNR = 5) afforded by spectral diffusion in the triple-energy material decomposition of iodine (3.1 mg/mL), gold (0.9 mg/mL), and gadolinium (2.9 mg/mL) concentrations. We then apply spectral diffusion to the in vivo separation of these three materials in the mouse kidneys, liver, and spleen. PMID:25296173

  6. Spectral diffusion: an algorithm for robust material decomposition of spectral CT data.

    PubMed

    Clark, Darin P; Badea, Cristian T

    2014-11-01

    Clinical successes with dual energy CT, aggressive development of energy discriminating x-ray detectors, and novel, target-specific, nanoparticle contrast agents promise to establish spectral CT as a powerful functional imaging modality. Common to all of these applications is the need for a material decomposition algorithm which is robust in the presence of noise. Here, we develop such an algorithm which uses spectrally joint, piecewise constant kernel regression and the split Bregman method to iteratively solve for a material decomposition which is gradient sparse, quantitatively accurate, and minimally biased. We call this algorithm spectral diffusion because it integrates structural information from multiple spectral channels and their corresponding material decompositions within the framework of diffusion-like denoising algorithms (e.g. anisotropic diffusion, total variation, bilateral filtration). Using a 3D, digital bar phantom and a material sensitivity matrix calibrated for use with a polychromatic x-ray source, we quantify the limits of detectability (CNR = 5) afforded by spectral diffusion in the triple-energy material decomposition of iodine (3.1 mg mL(-1)), gold (0.9 mg mL(-1)), and gadolinium (2.9 mg mL(-1)) concentrations. We then apply spectral diffusion to the in vivo separation of these three materials in the mouse kidneys, liver, and spleen. PMID:25296173

  7. Spectral diffusion: an algorithm for robust material decomposition of spectral CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Darin P.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2014-10-01

    Clinical successes with dual energy CT, aggressive development of energy discriminating x-ray detectors, and novel, target-specific, nanoparticle contrast agents promise to establish spectral CT as a powerful functional imaging modality. Common to all of these applications is the need for a material decomposition algorithm which is robust in the presence of noise. Here, we develop such an algorithm which uses spectrally joint, piecewise constant kernel regression and the split Bregman method to iteratively solve for a material decomposition which is gradient sparse, quantitatively accurate, and minimally biased. We call this algorithm spectral diffusion because it integrates structural information from multiple spectral channels and their corresponding material decompositions within the framework of diffusion-like denoising algorithms (e.g. anisotropic diffusion, total variation, bilateral filtration). Using a 3D, digital bar phantom and a material sensitivity matrix calibrated for use with a polychromatic x-ray source, we quantify the limits of detectability (CNR = 5) afforded by spectral diffusion in the triple-energy material decomposition of iodine (3.1 mg mL-1), gold (0.9 mg mL-1), and gadolinium (2.9 mg mL-1) concentrations. We then apply spectral diffusion to the in vivo separation of these three materials in the mouse kidneys, liver, and spleen.

  8. Spectral analysis and the Riemann hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachaud, Gilles

    2003-11-01

    The explicit formulas of Riemann and Guinand-Weil relate the set of prime numbers with the set of nontrivial zeros of the zeta function of Riemann. We recall Alain Connes' spectral interpretation of the critical zeros of the Riemann zeta function as eigenvalues of the absorption spectrum of an unbounded operator in a suitable Hilbert space. We then give a spectral interpretation of the zeros of the Dedekind zeta function of an algebraic number field K of degree n in an automorphic setting. If K is a complex quadratic field, the torical forms are the functions defined on the modular surface X, such that the sum of this function over the "Gauss set" of K is zero, and Eisenstein series provide such torical forms. In the case of a general number field, one can associate to K a maximal torus T of the general linear group G. The torical forms are the functions defined on the modular variety X associated to G, such that the integral over the subvariety induced by T is zero. Alternately, the torical forms are the functions which are orthogonal to orbital series on X. We show here that the Riemann hypothesis is equivalent to certain conditions bearing on spaces of torical forms, constructed from Eisenstein series, the torical wave packets. Furthermore, we define a Hilbert space and a self-adjoint operator on this space, whose spectrum equals the set of critical zeros of the Dedekind zeta function of K.

  9. Orbit spectral density versus stimulus identity and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozowski, Andy G.

    2008-09-01

    A concept of orbit spectral density for a one-dimensional iterated function is presented. To compute orbit spectral density, a method of extracting low-order periodic orbits from the dynamical system defined by the iterated function is first used. All points of the dynamics are then partitioned among the periodic orbits according to a distance measure. Partition sizes estimate the density of trajectories around periodic orbits. Assigning these trajectory densities to the orbit indexes introduces the orbit spectral density. A practical computational example is presented in the context of a model olfactory system.

  10. Spectral Characteristics of Titan's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Turner, Jake D.; Penteado, Paulo; Khamsi, Tymon B.; Soderblom, Jason M.

    2014-11-01

    Cassini/Huygens and ground-based measurements of Titan reveal an eroded surface, with lakes, dunes, and sinuous washes. These features, coupled with measurements of clouds and rain, indicate the transfer of methane between Titan’s surface and atmosphere. The presence of methane-damp lowlands suggests further that the atmospheric methane (which is continually depleted through photolysis) may be supplied by sub-surface reservoirs. The byproducts of methane photolysis condense onto the surface, leaving layers of organic sediments that record Titan’s past atmospheres.Thus knowledge of the source and history of Titan's atmosphere requires measurements of the large scale compositional makeup of Titan's surface, which is shrouded by a thick and hazy atmosphere. Towards this goal, we analyzed roughly 100,000 spectra recorded by Cassini’s Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Our study is confined to the latitude region (20S—20N) surrounding the landing site of the Huygens probe (at 10S, 192W), which supplied only measurement of the vertical profiles of the methane abundance and haze scattering characteristics. VIMS near-IR spectral images indicate subtle latitudinal and temporal variations in the haze characteristics in the tropics. We constrain these small changes with full radiative transfer analyses of each of the thousands of VIMS spectra, which were recorded of different terrains and at different lighting conditions. The resulting models of Titan’s atmosphere as a function of latitude and year indicate the seasonal migration of Titan’s tropical haze and enable the derivation of Titan’s surface albedo at 8 near-IR wavelength regions where Titan’s atmosphere is transparent enough to allow visibility to the surface. The resultant maps of Titan’s surface indicate a number of terrain types with distinct spectral characteristics that are suggestive of atmospheric and surficial processes, including the deposition of organic material, erosion of

  11. Spectral filtering for plant production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Roy E.; Mcmahon, Margaret J.; Rajapakse, Nihal C.; Decoteau, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Both plants and animals have one general commonality in their perception of light. They both are sensitive primarily to the 400 to 700 nm wavelength portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. This is referred to as the visible spectrum for animals and as the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectrum for plants. Within this portion of the spectrum, animals perceive colors. Relatively recently it has been learned that within this same spectral range plants also demonstrate varying responses at different wavelengths, somewhat analogous to the definition of various colors at specific wavelengths. Although invisible to the human eye, portions of the electromagnetic spectrum on either side of the visible range are relatively inactive photosynthetically but have been found to influence important biological functions. These portions include the ultraviolet (UV approximately equal to 280-400 nm) and the far-red (FR approximately equal to 700-800 nm). The basic photoreceptor of plants for photosynthesis is chlorophyll. It serves to capture radiant energy which combined with carbon dioxide and water produces oxygen and assimulated carbon, used for the synthesis of cell wall polysaccarides, proteins, membrane lipids and other cellular constituents. The energy and carbon building blocks of photosynthesis sustain growth of plants. On the other hand, however, there are other photoreceptors, or pigments, that function as signal transducers to provide information that controls many physiological and morphological responses of how a plant grows. Known photomorphogenic receptors include phytochrome (the red/far-red sensor in the narrow bands of 655-665 nm and 725-735 nm ranges, respectively) and 'cryptochrome' (the hypothetical UV-B sensor in the 280-320 nm range). Since the USDA team of W. L. Butler, S. B. Hendricks, H. A. Borthwick, H. A. Siegleman and K. Norris in Beltsville, MD detected by spectroscopy, extracted and identified phytochrome as a protein in the 1950's, many

  12. Sparse-view spectral CT reconstruction using spectral patch-based low-rank penalty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungsang; Ye, Jong Chul; Worstell, William; Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges; Li, Quanzheng

    2015-03-01

    Spectral computed tomography (CT) is a promising technique with the potential for improving lesion detection, tissue characterization, and material decomposition. In this paper, we are interested in kVp switching-based spectral CT that alternates distinct kVp X-ray transmissions during gantry rotation. This system can acquire multiple X-ray energy transmissions without additional radiation dose. However, only sparse views are generated for each spectral measurement; and the spectra themselves are limited in number. To address these limitations, we propose a penalized maximum likelihood method using spectral patch-based low-rank penalty, which exploits the self-similarity of patches that are collected at the same position in spectral images. The main advantage is that the relatively small number of materials within each patch allows us to employ the low-rank penalty that is less sensitive to intensity changes while preserving edge directions. In our optimization formulation, the cost function consists of the Poisson log-likelihood for X-ray transmission and the nonconvex patch-based low-rank penalty. Since the original cost function is difficult to minimize directly, we propose an optimization method using separable quadratic surrogate and concave convex procedure algorithms for the log-likelihood and penalty terms, which results in an alternating minimization that provides a computational advantage because each subproblem can be solved independently. We performed computer simulations and a real experiment using a kVp switching-based spectral CT with sparse-view measurements, and compared the proposed method with conventional algorithms. We confirmed that the proposed method improves spectral images both qualitatively and quantitatively. Furthermore, our GPU implementation significantly reduces the computational cost. PMID:25532170

  13. Broadband ringdown spectral photography.

    PubMed

    Scherer, J J; Paul, J B; Jiao, H; O'Keefe, A

    2001-12-20

    A new technique that enables frequency-resolved cavity ringdown absorption spectra to be obtained over a large optical bandwidth by a single laser shot is described. The technique, ringdown spectral photography (RSP), simultaneously employs two key principles to record the time and frequency response of an optical cavity along orthogonal axes of a CCD array detector. Previously, the principles employed in RSP were demonstrated with narrow-band laser light that was scanned in frequency [Chem. Phys. Lett. 292, 143 (1998)]. Here, the RSP method is demonstrated using single pulses of broadband visible laser light. The ability to obtain broad as well as rotationally resolved spectra over a large bandwidth with high sensitivity is demonstrated. PMID:18364983

  14. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R. R.; Macconochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  15. Spectral Label Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wachinger, Christian; Golland, Polina

    2012-01-01

    We present a new segmentation approach that combines the strengths of label fusion and spectral clustering. The result is an atlas-based segmentation method guided by contour and texture cues in the test image. This offers advantages for datasets with high variability, making the segmentation less prone to registration errors. We achieve the integration by letting the weights of the graph Laplacian depend on image data, as well as atlas-based label priors. The extracted contours are converted to regions, arranged in a hierarchy depending on the strength of the separating boundary. Finally, we construct the segmentation by a region-wise, instead of voxel-wise, voting, increasing the robustness. Our experiments on cardiac MRI show a clear improvement over majority voting and intensity-weighted label fusion. PMID:23286157

  16. Multi Spectral Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiering, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An optical imaging system provides automatic co-registration of a plurality of multi spectral images of an object which are generated by a plurality of video cameras or other optical detectors. The imaging system includes a modular assembly of beam splitters, lens tubes, camera lenses and wavelength selective filters which facilitate easy reconfiguration and adjustment of the system for various applications. A primary lens assembly generates a real image of an object to be imaged on a reticle which is positioned at a fixed length from a beam splitter assembly. The beam splitter assembly separates a collimated image beam received from the reticle into multiple image beams, each of which is projected onto a corresponding one of a plurality of video cameras. The lens tubes which connect the beam splitter assembly to the cameras are adjustable in length to provide automatic co-registration of the images generated by each camera.

  17. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  18. Method of multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2004-01-06

    A method of determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used to analyze X-ray spectral data generated by operating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an attached Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  19. Spectral Automorphisms in Quantum Logics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Alexandru; Caragheorgheopol, Dan

    2010-12-01

    In quantum mechanics, the Hilbert space formalism might be physically justified in terms of some axioms based on the orthomodular lattice (OML) mathematical structure (Piron in Foundations of Quantum Physics, Benjamin, Reading, 1976). We intend to investigate the extent to which some fundamental physical facts can be described in the more general framework of OMLs, without the support of Hilbert space-specific tools. We consider the study of lattice automorphisms properties as a “substitute” for Hilbert space techniques in investigating the spectral properties of observables. This is why we introduce the notion of spectral automorphism of an OML. Properties of spectral automorphisms and of their spectra are studied. We prove that the presence of nontrivial spectral automorphisms allow us to distinguish between classical and nonclassical theories. We also prove, for finite dimensional OMLs, that for every spectral automorphism there is a basis of invariant atoms. This is an analogue of the spectral theorem for unitary operators having purely point spectrum.

  20. Functional characterization of spectral tuning mechanisms in the great bowerbird short-wavelength sensitive visual pigment (SWS1), and the origins of UV/violet vision in passerines and parrots

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the most striking features of avian vision is the variation in spectral sensitivity of the short wavelength sensitive (SWS1) opsins, which can be divided into two sub-types: violet- and UV- sensitive (VS & UVS). In birds, UVS has been found in both passerines and parrots, groups that were recently shown to be sister orders. While all parrots are thought to be UVS, recent evidence suggests some passerine lineages may also be VS. The great bowerbird (Chlamydera nuchalis) is a passerine notable for its courtship behaviours in which males build and decorate elaborate bower structures. Results The great bowerbird SWS1 sequence possesses an unusual residue combination at known spectral tuning sites that has not been previously investigated in mutagenesis experiments. In this study, the SWS1 opsin of C. nuchalis was expressed along with a series of spectral tuning mutants and ancestral passerine SWS1 pigments, allowing us to investigate spectral tuning mechanisms and explore the evolution of UV/violet sensitivity in early passerines and parrots. The expressed C. nuchalis SWS1 opsin was found to be a VS pigment, with a λmax of 403 nm. Bowerbird SWS1 mutants C86F, S90C, and C86S/S90C all shifted λmax into the UV, whereas C86S had no effect. Experimentally recreated ancestral passerine and parrot/passerine SWS1 pigments were both found to be VS, indicating that UV sensitivity evolved independently in passerines and parrots from a VS ancestor. Conclusions Our mutagenesis studies indicate that spectral tuning in C. nuchalis is mediated by mechanisms similar to those of other birds. Interestingly, our ancestral sequence reconstructions of SWS1 in landbird evolution suggest multiple transitions from VS to UVS, but no instances of the reverse. Our results not only provide a more precise prediction of where these spectral sensitivity shifts occurred, but also confirm the hypothesis that birds are an unusual exception among vertebrates where some descendants re

  1. Spectral distribution of solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecherikunnel, A. T.; Richmond, J.

    1980-01-01

    Available quantitative data on solar total and spectral irradiance are examined in the context of utilization of solar irradiance for terrestrial applications of solar energy. The extraterrestrial solar total and spectral irradiance values are also reviewed. Computed values of solar spectral irradiance at ground level for different air mass values and various levels of atmospheric pollution or turbidity are presented. Wavelengths are given for computation of solar, absorptance, transmittance and reflectance by the 100 selected-ordinate method and by the 50 selected-ordinate method for air mass 1.5 and 2 solar spectral irradiance for the four levels of atmospheric pollution.

  2. Adaptive spectral imager for space-based sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujkovic-Cvijin, Pajo; Goldstein, Neil; Fox, Marsha J.; Higbee, Shawn D.; Becker, Latika S.; Ooi, Teng K.

    2006-05-01

    Optical sensors aboard space vehicles designated to perform seeker functions need to generate multispectral images in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectral regions in order to investigate and classify man-made space objects, and to distinguish them relative to the interfering scene clutter. The spectral imager part of the sensor collects spectral signatures of the observed objects in order to extract information on surface emissivity and target temperature, both important parameters for object-discrimination algorithms. The Adaptive Spectral Imager described in this paper fulfills two functions simultaneously: one output produces instantaneous two-dimensional polychromatic imagery for object acquisition and tracking, while the other output produces multispectral images for object discrimination and classification. The spectral and temporal resolution of the data produced by the spectral imager are adjustable in real time, making it possible to achieve optimum tradeoff between different sensing functions to match dynamic monitoring requirements during a mission. The system has high optical collection efficiency, with output data rates limited only by the readout speed of the detector array. The instrument has no macro-scale moving parts, and can be built in a robust, small-volume and lightweight package, suitable for integration with space vehicles. The technology is also applicable to multispectral imaging applications in diverse areas such as surveillance, agriculture, process control, and biomedical imaging, and can be adapted for use in any spectral domain from the ultraviolet (UV) to the LWIR region.

  3. [Review of digital ground object spectral library].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Hu; Zhou, Ding-Wu

    2009-06-01

    A higher spectral resolution is the main direction of developing remote sensing technology, and it is quite important to set up the digital ground object reflectance spectral database library, one of fundamental research fields in remote sensing application. Remote sensing application has been increasingly relying on ground object spectral characteristics, and quantitative analysis has been developed to a new stage. The present article summarized and systematically introduced the research status quo and development trend of digital ground object reflectance spectral libraries at home and in the world in recent years. Introducing the spectral libraries has been established, including desertification spectral database library, plants spectral database library, geological spectral database library, soil spectral database library, minerals spectral database library, cloud spectral database library, snow spectral database library, the atmosphere spectral database library, rocks spectral database library, water spectral database library, meteorites spectral database library, moon rock spectral database library, and man-made materials spectral database library, mixture spectral database library, volatile compounds spectral database library, and liquids spectral database library. In the process of establishing spectral database libraries, there have been some problems, such as the lack of uniform national spectral database standard and uniform standards for the ground object features as well as the comparability between different databases. In addition, data sharing mechanism can not be carried out, etc. This article also put forward some suggestions on those problems. PMID:19810544

  4. Multiway spectral community detection in networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Newman, M E J

    2015-11-01

    One of the most widely used methods for community detection in networks is the maximization of the quality function known as modularity. Of the many maximization techniques that have been used in this context, some of the most conceptually attractive are the spectral methods, which are based on the eigenvectors of the modularity matrix. Spectral algorithms have, however, been limited, by and large, to the division of networks into only two or three communities, with divisions into more than three being achieved by repeated two-way division. Here we present a spectral algorithm that can directly divide a network into any number of communities. The algorithm makes use of a mapping from modularity maximization to a vector partitioning problem, combined with a fast heuristic for vector partitioning. We compare the performance of this spectral algorithm with previous approaches and find it to give superior results, particularly in cases where community sizes are unbalanced. We also give demonstrative applications of the algorithm to two real-world networks and find that it produces results in good agreement with expectations for the networks studied. PMID:26651745

  5. Spectral Properties of Unimodular Lattice Triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Benedikt; Schmidt, Ella M.; Mecke, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Random unimodular lattice triangulations have been recently used as an embedded random graph model, which exhibit a crossover behavior between an ordered, large-world and a disordered, small-world behavior. Using the ergodic Pachner flips that transform such triangulations into another and an energy functional that corresponds to the degree distribution variance, Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations can be applied to study these graphs. Here, we consider the spectra of the adjacency and the Laplacian matrix as well as the algebraic connectivity and the spectral radius. Power law dependencies on the system size can clearly be identified and compared to analytical solutions for periodic ground states. For random triangulations we find a qualitative agreement of the spectral properties with well-known random graph models. In the microcanonical ensemble analytical approximations agree with numerical simulations. In the canonical ensemble a crossover behavior can be found for the algebraic connectivity and the spectral radius, thus combining large-world and small-world behavior in one model. The considered spectral properties can be applied to transport problems on triangulation graphs and the crossover behavior allows a tuning of important transport quantities.

  6. Calibration of the ROSAT HRI Spectral Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea

    1998-01-01

    The ROSAT High Resolution Imager has a limited (2-band) spectral response. This spectral capability can give X-ray hardness ratios on spatial scales of 5 arcseconds. The spectral response of the center of the detector was calibrated before the launch of ROSAT, but the gain decreases-with time and also is a function of position on the detector. To complicate matters further, the satellite is "wobbled", possibly moving a source across several spatial gain states. These difficulties have prevented the spectral response of the ROSAT HRI from being used for scientific measurements. We have used Bright Earth data and in-flight calibration sources to map the spatial and temporal gain changes, and written software which will allow ROSAT users to generate a calibrated XSPEC response matrix and hence determine a calibrated hardness ratio. In this report, we describe the calibration procedure and show how to obtain a response matrix. In Section 2 we give an overview of the calibration procedure, in Section 3 we give a summary of HRI spatial and temporal gain variations. Section 4 describes the routines used to determine the gain distribution of a source. In Sections 5 and 6, we describe in detail how the Bright Earth database and calibration sources are used to derive a corrected response matrix for a given observation. Finally, Section 7 describes how to use the software.

  7. Multiway spectral community detection in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Newman, M. E. J.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most widely used methods for community detection in networks is the maximization of the quality function known as modularity. Of the many maximization techniques that have been used in this context, some of the most conceptually attractive are the spectral methods, which are based on the eigenvectors of the modularity matrix. Spectral algorithms have, however, been limited, by and large, to the division of networks into only two or three communities, with divisions into more than three being achieved by repeated two-way division. Here we present a spectral algorithm that can directly divide a network into any number of communities. The algorithm makes use of a mapping from modularity maximization to a vector partitioning problem, combined with a fast heuristic for vector partitioning. We compare the performance of this spectral algorithm with previous approaches and find it to give superior results, particularly in cases where community sizes are unbalanced. We also give demonstrative applications of the algorithm to two real-world networks and find that it produces results in good agreement with expectations for the networks studied.

  8. Dependence of the spectral diffuse-direct irradiance ratio on aerosol spectral distribution and single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kambezidis, H. D.; Dumka, U. C.; Psiloglou, B. E.

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates the modification of the clear-sky spectral diffuse-direct irradiance ratio (DDR) as a function of solar zenith angle (SZA), spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The solar spectrum under various atmospheric conditions is derived with Simple Model of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer of Sunshine (SMARTS) radiative transfer code, using the urban and continental aerosol models as inputs. The spectral DDR can be simulated with great accuracy by an exponentially decreasing curve, while the aerosol optical properties strongly affect the scattering processes in the atmosphere, thus modifying the DDR especially in the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. Furthermore, the correlation between spectral DDR and spectral AOD can be represented precisely by an exponential function and can give valuable information about the dominance of specific aerosol types. The influence of aerosols on spectral DDR increases with increasing SZA, while the simulations using the urban aerosol model as input in SMARTS are closer to the measurements taken in the Athens urban environment. The SMARTS simulations are interrelated with spectral measurements and can be used for indirect estimations of SSA. Overall, the current work provides some theoretical approximations and functions that help in understanding the dependence of DDR on astronomical and atmospheric parameters.

  9. Fuzzy stochastic elements method. Spectral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sniady, Pawel; Mazur-Sniady, Krystyna; Sieniawska, Roza; Zukowski, Stanislaw

    2013-05-01

    We study a complex dynamic problem, which concerns a structure with uncertain parameters subjected to a stochastic excitation. Formulation of such a problem introduces fuzzy random variables for parameters of the structure and fuzzy stochastic processes for the load process. The uncertainty has two sources, namely the randomness of structural parameters such as geometry characteristics, material and damping properties, load process and imprecision of the theoretical model and incomplete information or uncertain data. All of these have a great influence on the response of the structure. By analyzing such problems we describe the random variability using the probability theory and the imprecision by use of fuzzy sets. Due to the fact that it is difficult to find an analytic expression for the inversion of the stochastic operator in the stochastic differential equation, a number of approximate methods have been proposed in the literature which can be connected to the finite element method. To evaluate the effects of excitation in the frequency domain we use the spectral density function. The spectral analysis is widely used in stochastic dynamics field of linear systems for stationary random excitation. The concept of the evolutionary spectral density is used in the case of non-stationary random excitation. We solve the considered problem using fuzzy stochastic finite element method. The solution is based on the idea of a fuzzy random frequency response vector for stationary input excitation and a transient fuzzy random frequency response vector for the fuzzy non-stationary one. We use the fuzzy random frequency response vector and the transient fuzzy random frequency response vector in the context of spectral analysis in order to determine the influence of structural uncertainty on the fuzzy random response of the structure. We study a linear system with random parameters subjected to two particular cases of stochastic excitation in a frequency domain. The first one

  10. Spectral methods on arbitrary grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Gottlieb, David

    1995-01-01

    Stable and spectrally accurate numerical methods are constructed on arbitrary grids for partial differential equations. These new methods are equivalent to conventional spectral methods but do not rely on specific grid distributions. Specifically, we show how to implement Legendre Galerkin, Legendre collocation, and Laguerre Galerkin methodology on arbitrary grids.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF SPECTRAL IMAGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of remote sensing using spectral imaging is just being realized through the investigation to a wide variety of environmental issues. Improved spectral and spatial resolution is very important to the detection of effects once regarded as unobservable. A current researc...

  12. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, andmore » provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.« less

  13. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, and provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.

  14. Covariance Propagation in Spectral Indices

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.

    2015-01-15

    The dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This paper identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, and provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.

  15. Covariance Propagation in Spectral Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This paper identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, and provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.

  16. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  17. Constructing Polynomial Spectral Models for Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rix, Hans-Walter; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Hogg, David W.

    2016-08-01

    Stellar spectra depend on the stellar parameters and on dozens of photospheric elemental abundances. Simultaneous fitting of these { N } ˜ 10–40 model labels to observed spectra has been deemed unfeasible because the number of ab initio spectral model grid calculations scales exponentially with { N }. We suggest instead the construction of a polynomial spectral model (PSM) of order { O } for the model flux at each wavelength. Building this approximation requires a minimum of only ≤ft(≥nfrac{}{}{0em}{}{{ N }+{ O }}{{ O }}\\right) calculations: e.g., a quadratic spectral model ({ O }=2) to fit { N }=20 labels simultaneously can be constructed from as few as 231 ab initio spectral model calculations; in practice, a somewhat larger number (˜300–1000) of randomly chosen models lead to a better performing PSM. Such a PSM can be a good approximation only over a portion of label space, which will vary case-by-case. Yet, taking the APOGEE survey as an example, a single quadratic PSM provides a remarkably good approximation to the exact ab initio spectral models across much of this survey: for random labels within that survey the PSM approximates the flux to within 10‑3 and recovers the abundances to within ˜0.02 dex rms of the exact models. This enormous speed-up enables the simultaneous many-label fitting of spectra with computationally expensive ab initio models for stellar spectra, such as non-LTE models. A PSM also enables the simultaneous fitting of observational parameters, such as the spectrum’s continuum or line-spread function.

  18. Spectral envelope sensitivity of musical instrument sounds.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, David; Sen, D

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that the spectral envelope is a perceptually salient attribute in musical instrument timbre perception. While a number of studies have explored discrimination thresholds for changes to the spectral envelope, the question of how sensitivity varies as a function of center frequency and bandwidth for musical instruments has yet to be addressed. In this paper a two-alternative forced-choice experiment was conducted to observe perceptual sensitivity to modifications made on trumpet, clarinet and viola sounds. The experiment involved attenuating 14 frequency bands for each instrument in order to determine discrimination thresholds as a function of center frequency and bandwidth. The results indicate that perceptual sensitivity is governed by the first few harmonics and sensitivity does not improve when extending the bandwidth any higher. However, sensitivity was found to decrease if changes were made only to the higher frequencies and continued to decrease as the distorted bandwidth was widened. The results are analyzed and discussed with respect to two other spectral envelope discrimination studies in the literature as well as what is predicted from a psychoacoustic model. PMID:18177177

  19. Spectral Fingerprints of Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenegger, L.; Selsis, F.

    2010-01-01

    The emerging field of extrasolar planet search has shown an extraordinary ability to combine research by astrophysics, chemistry, biology and geophysics into a new and exciting interdisciplinary approach to understand our place in the universe. Are there other worlds like ours? How can we characterize those planets and assess if they are habitable? After a decade rich in giant exoplanet detections, observation techniques have now reached the ability to find planets of less than 10 M_Earth (so called Super-Earths) that may potentially be habitable. The detection and characterization of Earth-like planet is approaching rapidly with dedicated space observatories already in operation (Corot) or in development phase (Kepler, James Webb Space Telescope, Extremely Large Telescope (ELT), Darwin/TPF). Space missions like CoRoT (CNES, Rouan et al. 1998) and Kepler (NASA, Borucki et al. 1997) will give us statistics on the number, size, period and orbital distance of planets, extending to terrestrial planets on the lower mass range end as a first step, while missions like Darwin/TPF are designed to characterize their atmospheres. In this chapter we discuss how we can read a planet's spectral fingerprint and characterize if it is potentially habitable. We discuss the first steps to detect a habitable planet and set biomarker detection in context in Section 1. In Section 2 we focus on biomarkers, their signatures at different wavelengths, abiotic sources and cryptic photosynthesis - using Earth as our primary example - the only habitable planet we know of so far. Section 3 concentrates on planets around different stars, and Section 4 summarizes the chapter.

  20. CCN Spectral Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, James G.

    2009-02-27

    Detailed aircraft measurements were made of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra associated with extensive cloud systems off the central California coast in the July 2005 MASE project. These measurements include the wide supersaturation (S) range (2-0.01%) that is important for these polluted stratus clouds. Concentrations were usually characteristic of continental/anthropogenic air masses. The most notable feature was the consistently higher concentrations above the clouds than below. CCN measurements are so important because they provide a link between atmospheric chemistry and cloud-climate effects, which are the largest climate uncertainty. Extensive comparisons throughout the eleven flights between two CCN spectrometers operated at different but overlapping S ranges displayed the precision and accuracy of these difficult spectral determinations. There are enough channels of resolution in these instruments to provide differential spectra, which produce more rigorous and precise comparisons than traditional cumulative presentations of CCN concentrations. Differential spectra are also more revealing than cumulative spectra. Only one of the eleven flights exhibited typical maritime concentrations. Average below cloud concentrations over the two hours furthest from the coast for the 8 flights with low polluted stratus was 614?233 at 1% S, 149?60 at 0.1% S and 57?33 at 0.04% S cm-3. Immediately above cloud average concentrations were respectively 74%, 55%, and 18% higher. Concentration variability among those 8 flights was a factor of two. Variability within each flight excluding distances close to the coast ranged from 15-56% at 1% S. However, CN and probably CCN concentrations sometimes varied by less than 1% over distances of more than a km. Volatility and size-critical S measurements indicated that the air masses were very polluted throughout MASE. The aerosol above the clouds was more polluted than the below cloud aerosol. These high CCN concentrations from

  1. Spectral quantification of Southern Baltic seabed roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szefler, K.; Tegowski, J.; Nowak, J.

    2012-12-01

    The work presents the fast and efficient tool for seafloor classification, where scales and shapes of geomorphological forms were taken into account. The precise bathymetry and seafloor texture was developed with multibeam echosounder at six different areas of size up to 10 by 20 km. This areas demonstrate typical geomorphological seafloor features of bottom relief at the southern Baltic Sea coastal waters. The acoustical measurements were accompanied by geological sampling and video inspection. High resolution mosaic maps were obtained as a result of multi-survey measurements with maximal spatial resolution of 0.05m. Such accuracy of the measurements allows to observe small geomorphologic forms as ripplemarks or pebbles. The most investigated polygons have bottom relief of polygenetic origin with relicts of periglacial forms together with contemporary forms of marine origin. In the studied areas different forms of sand accumulation were found, beginning with small ripplemarks ending at big sandy waves. In the seabed erosion zones the bottom surface is rough and varied with clearly formed embankments, abrasive platforms, inselbergs and stony gravely abrasive pavements on the bottom surface. Such geomorphic diversity of the bottom surface has allowed for development of consistent geomorphological classification system based mainly on spectral properties of seafloor roughness. Each analysed area was divided into squares (200 by 200 m) with an overlap between adjacent subareas of 75% a square size. Next, subdivided areas were spectrally transformed using a two dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D FFT). The spectral parameters as maximal value of spectral density function, spectral exponent and strength, spectral moments, mean frequency, spectral width and skewness for each characteristic type of bottom surface were determined relaying on the calculated 2D spectra. Moreover, other features characterised the corrugated surface as fractal dimension, radius of

  2. Aviation spectral camera infinity target simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinyue; Ming, Xing; Liu, Jiu; Guo, Wenji; Lv, Gunbo

    2014-11-01

    With the development of science and technology, the applications of aviation spectral camera becoming more widely. Developing a test system of dynamic target is more important. Aviation spectral camera infinity target simulation system can be used to test the resolution and the modulation transfer function of camera. The construction and work principle of infinity target simulation system were introduced in detail. Dynamic target generator based digital micromirror device (DMD) and required performance of collimation System were analyzed and reported. The dynamic target generator based on DMD had the advantages of replacing image convenient, size small and flexible. According to the requirement of tested camera, by rotating and moving mirror, has completed a full field infinity dynamic target test plan.

  3. SLICC: Spectral LInear Combination for Coronagraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Andrew W.; Grady, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    The STIS corongraph is the only remaining working coronagraph on HST, but one, due to use of the unfiltered CCD, which has a bandpass spanning from 2000-10,000 A. This resulted in extreme sensitivity to the color of a source (Grady et al. 2005), and prompted use of adhoc linear combinations of point spread function template observations to reveal the circumstellar disks associated with T Tauri stars. A limited set of T Tauri stars have low resolution spectrophotometry spanning 1150-10,000 A, with sufficiently many epochs to permit us to fit both the imagery and the broadband optical spectral energy distribution. We present the results of this quantitative test of spectral deconvolution of STIS coronagraphy.

  4. Spectral-based inferential measurement of grey-body's temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Feng; Liu, Liying; Zhu, Lingxi; Huan, Kewei; Li, Ye; Shi, Xiaoguang

    2015-11-01

    Aiming at the problems of temperature measurement and the defects of radiance thermometry theory, one method of spectral-based inferential measurement is proposed, which adopts the Empirical Risk Minimization (ERM) functional model as the temperature measurement model. Then, the radiance thermometry theory and inferential measurement technology are discussed comparatively. Temperatures of some targets, such and tungsten lamp and solar surface, are measured by spectral-based inferential measurement.

  5. Forest Species Identification with High Spectral Resolution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, C. E., Jr.; Zhu, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Data collected over the Sleeping Bear Sand Dunes Test Site and the Saginaw Forest Test Site (Michigan) with the JPL Airborne Imaging Spectrometer and the Collins' Airborne Spectroradiometer are being used for forest species identification. The linear discriminant function has provided higher identification accuracies than have principal components analyses. Highest identification accuracies are obtained in the 450 to 520 nm spectral region. Spectral bands near 1,300, 1,685 and 2,220 nm appear to be important, also.

  6. Evolutionary Computing Methods for Spectral Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrile, Richard; Fink, Wolfgang; Huntsberger, Terrance; Lee, Seugwon; Tisdale, Edwin; VonAllmen, Paul; Tinetti, Geivanna

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for processing spectral images to retrieve information on underlying physical, chemical, and/or biological phenomena is based on evolutionary and related computational methods implemented in software. In a typical case, the solution (the information that one seeks to retrieve) consists of parameters of a mathematical model that represents one or more of the phenomena of interest. The methodology was developed for the initial purpose of retrieving the desired information from spectral image data acquired by remote-sensing instruments aimed at planets (including the Earth). Examples of information desired in such applications include trace gas concentrations, temperature profiles, surface types, day/night fractions, cloud/aerosol fractions, seasons, and viewing angles. The methodology is also potentially useful for retrieving information on chemical and/or biological hazards in terrestrial settings. In this methodology, one utilizes an iterative process that minimizes a fitness function indicative of the degree of dissimilarity between observed and synthetic spectral and angular data. The evolutionary computing methods that lie at the heart of this process yield a population of solutions (sets of the desired parameters) within an accuracy represented by a fitness-function value specified by the user. The evolutionary computing methods (ECM) used in this methodology are Genetic Algorithms and Simulated Annealing, both of which are well-established optimization techniques and have also been described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. These are embedded in a conceptual framework, represented in the architecture of the implementing software, that enables automatic retrieval of spectral and angular data and analysis of the retrieved solutions for uniqueness.

  7. A GIHS-based spectral preservation fusion method for remote sensing images using edge restored spectral modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiran; Liu, Jun; Liu, Shuguang; Cao, Lei; Zhou, Qiming; Huang, Huawen

    2014-02-01

    High spatial resolution and spectral fidelity are basic standards for evaluating an image fusion algorithm. Numerous fusion methods for remote sensing images have been developed. Some of these methods are based on the intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) transform and the generalized IHS (GIHS), which may cause serious spectral distortion. Spectral distortion in the GIHS is proven to result from changes in saturation during fusion. Therefore, reducing such changes can achieve high spectral fidelity. A GIHS-based spectral preservation fusion method that can theoretically reduce spectral distortion is proposed in this study. The proposed algorithm consists of two steps. The first step is spectral modulation (SM), which uses the Gaussian function to extract spatial details and conduct SM of multispectral (MS) images. This method yields a desirable visual effect without requiring histogram matching between the panchromatic image and the intensity of the MS image. The second step uses the Gaussian convolution function to restore lost edge details during SM. The proposed method is proven effective and shown to provide better results compared with other GIHS-based methods.

  8. Interpretations of cosmological spectral shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østvang, Dag

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that for Robertson-Walker models with flat or closed space sections, all of the cosmological spectral shift can be attributed to the non-flat connection (and thus indirectly to space-time curvature). For Robertson-Walker models with hyperbolic space sections, it is shown that cosmological spectral shifts uniquely split up into "kinematic" and "gravitational" parts provided that distances are small. For large distances no such unique split-up exists in general. A number of common, but incorrect assertions found in the literature regarding interpretations of cosmological spectral shifts, is pointed out.

  9. Undecidability of the spectral gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubitt, Toby S.; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M.

    2015-12-01

    The spectral gap—the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system—is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding ‘halting problem’. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics.

  10. The Simple Spectral Access protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolensky, Markus; Tody, Doug

    2004-09-01

    The goal of the Simple Spectral Access (SSA) specification is to define a uniform interface to spectral data including spectral energy distributions (SEDs), 1D spectra, and time series data. In contrast to 2D images, spectra are stored in a wide variety of formats and there is no widely used standard in astronomy for representing spectral data, hence part of the challenge of specifying SSA was defining a general spectrophotometric data model as well as definitions of standard serializations in a variety of data formats including XML and FITS. Access is provided to both atlas (pre-computed) data and to virtual data which is computed on demand. The term simple in Simple Spectrum Access refers to the design goal of simplicity in both implementing spectral data services and in retrieving spectroscopic data from distributed data collections. SSA is a product of the data access layer (DAL) working group of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). The requirements were derived from a survey among spectral data providers and data consumers and were further refined in a broad discussion in meetings and electronic forums as well as by prototyping efforts within the European Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) and the US National Virtual Observatory (NVO).

  11. Undecidability of the spectral gap.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Toby S; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M

    2015-12-10

    The spectral gap--the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system--is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding 'halting problem'. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics. PMID:26659181

  12. A spectral algorithm for the seriation problem

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, J.E.; Boman, E.G.; Hendrickson, B.

    1994-11-01

    Given a set of objects and a correlation function f reflecting the desire for two items to be near each other, find all sequences {pi} of the items so that correlation preferences are preserved; that is if {pi}(i) < {pi}(j) < {pi}(k) then f(i,j) {ge} f(i,k) and f(j,k) {ge} f(i,k). This seriation problem has numerous applications, for instance, solving it yields a solution to the consecutive ones problem. We present a spectral algorithm for this problem that has a number of interesting features. Whereas most previous applications of spectral techniques provided bounds or heuristics, our result is an algorithm for a nontrivial combinatorial problem. Our analysis introduces powerful tools from matrix theory to the theoretical computer science community. Also, spectral methods are being applied as heuristics for a variety of sequencing problems and our result helps explain and justify these applications. Although the worst case running time for our approach is not competitive with that of existing methods for well posed problem instances, unlike combinatorial approaches our algorithm remains a credible heuristic for the important cases where there are errors in the data.

  13. Mixed-Precision Spectral Deferred Correction: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Grout, Ray W. S.

    2015-09-02

    Convergence of spectral deferred correction (SDC), where low-order time integration methods are used to construct higher-order methods through iterative refinement, can be accelerated in terms of computational effort by using mixed-precision methods. Using ideas from multi-level SDC (in turn based on FAS multigrid ideas), some of the SDC correction sweeps can use function values computed in reduced precision without adversely impacting the accuracy of the final solution. This is particularly beneficial for the performance of combustion solvers such as S3D [6] which require double precision accuracy but are performance limited by the cost of data motion.

  14. Spectral action models of gravity on packed swiss cheese cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Adam; Marcolli, Matilde

    2016-06-01

    We present a model of (modified) gravity on spacetimes with fractal structure based on packing of spheres, which are (Euclidean) variants of the packed swiss cheese cosmology models. As the action functional for gravity we consider the spectral action of noncommutative geometry, and we compute its expansion on a space obtained as an Apollonian packing of three-dimensional spheres inside a four-dimensional ball. Using information from the zeta function of the Dirac operator of the spectral triple, we compute the leading terms in the asymptotic expansion of the spectral action. They consist of a zeta regularization of the divergent sum of the leading terms of the spectral actions of the individual spheres in the packing. This accounts for the contribution of points 1 and 3 in the dimension spectrum (as in the case of a 3-sphere). There is an additional term coming from the residue at the additional point in the real dimension spectrum that corresponds to the packing constant, as well as a series of fluctuations coming from log-periodic oscillations, created by the points of the dimension spectrum that are off the real line. These terms detect the fractality of the residue set of the sphere packing. We show that the presence of fractality influences the shape of the slow-roll potential for inflation, obtained from the spectral action. We also discuss the effect of truncating the fractal structure at a certain scale related to the energy scale in the spectral action.

  15. Spectral Information System for Australian Spectroscopy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, L. A.; Ong, C.; Hueni, A.; Suarez, L.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.

    2013-12-01

    Inherently field spectroscopy involves the study of the interrelationships between the spectral characteristics of objects and their biophysical attributes in the field environment (Bauer et al., 1986; Milton, 1987). Spectroscopy measurements taken of vegetated surfaces provide spectral characteristics indicative of the status, composition and structure of the components measured. However, additional elements are present that add undesired effects to the overall signal such as the soil background or the viewing and illumination geometry (Suarez etal 2013). Further, the leaf spectrum is affected by several factors including leaf age, phenology, a highly variable range of stressors, any of which may be the actual focus of study, and additionally influenced by a range of environmental conditions. There is a critical need to use acquired spectra to infer vegetation function, understand phenological cycles, characterise biodiversity or as part of the process to assess biogeochemical processes. However the collection of leaf spectra during field campaigns is undertaken on a project basis, where a large number of spectra tend to be collected, yet the value and ability to share and confidently re-use such collections is often restricted. Often this is because the data are stored in disparate silos with little, if any, consistency in formatting and content, and most importantly, lack metadata to aid their discovery and re-use. These datasets have significant potential for vegetation scientists but also benefit the wider earth observation remote sensing and other earth science communities. In Australia this problem has been addressed by the adoption and enhancement of the existing SPECCHIO system (Hueni et al. 2009) as a suitable standard for spectral data exchange. As a spectral database, the system provides storage of spectra and associated metadata, retrieval of spectral data using metadata space queries, information on provenance, all of which facilitate repeatability of

  16. [The study on spectral reflectance reconstruction based on wideband multi-spectral acquisition system].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Wan, Xiao-Xia; Huang, Xin-Guo; Liu, Qiang; Li, Chan

    2013-04-01

    The multispectral image acquisition oriented to reproduction requests that the data is device independent and scenes independent, and can realize the characterization of the original color information. Aiming at disturbance, noise error of system, and the requirement for training samples' typical representative and correlation, the authors proposed orthogonal regression spectral algorithm and training samples selection algorithm based on subspace tracking, through the mapping function between the spectral space and color space, by selecting the best samples in typical representative and correlation samples between target samples and selected samples. The modified Sinar 75H trichromatic digital camera combined with bandpass filter glasses were used for experiment, the data show that our method has higher spectral and chromaticity accuracy, the training samples selected by subspace tracking method are uniformly distributed in the sample space, and have good orthogonality. The statistics experimental results indicate that the performance of the proposed method is obviously better than that of previous method, in both color difference error and spectral reflectance error. PMID:23841432

  17. Spectral and spectral-polarization characteristics of potato leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, B. I.; Belyaev, Yu. V.; Chumakov, A. V.; Nekrasov, V. P.; Shuplyak, V. I.

    2000-07-01

    The results of laboratory investigations of the spectral and spectral-polarization characteristics of radiation reflected from the leaves of potato (Solanum tuberosum) of different varieties are discussed. During the vegetation season of 1997, the angular dependence of the degree and azimuth of polarization of radiation reflected from potato leaves as well as the scattering indicatrices in the range 380 1080 nm were determined by a specially developed method with the use of a laboratory goniometric setup. The relationship between the spectral polarization characteristics of radiation and biological parameters of the potato has been obtained with the help of different methods of statistical analysis and explained on the basis of the known physical mechanisms.

  18. Direct experimental determination of spectral densities of molecular complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-11-07

    Determining the spectral density of a molecular system immersed in a proteomic scaffold and in contact to a solvent is a fundamental challenge in the coarse-grained description of, e.g., electron and energy transfer dynamics. Once the spectral density is characterized, all the time scales are captured and no artificial separation between fast and slow processes need to be invoked. Based on the fluorescence Stokes shift function, we utilize a simple and robust strategy to extract the spectral density of a number of molecular complexes from available experimental data. Specifically, we show that experimental data for dye molecules in several solvents, amino acid proteins in water, and some photochemical systems (e.g., rhodopsin and green fluorescence proteins), are well described by a three-parameter family of sub-Ohmic spectral densities that are characterized by a fast initial Gaussian-like decay followed by a slow algebraic-like decay rate at long times.

  19. Direct experimental determination of spectral densities of molecular complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Determining the spectral density of a molecular system immersed in a proteomic scaffold and in contact to a solvent is a fundamental challenge in the coarse-grained description of, e.g., electron and energy transfer dynamics. Once the spectral density is characterized, all the time scales are captured and no artificial separation between fast and slow processes need to be invoked. Based on the fluorescence Stokes shift function, we utilize a simple and robust strategy to extract the spectral density of a number of molecular complexes from available experimental data. Specifically, we show that experimental data for dye molecules in several solvents, amino acid proteins in water, and some photochemical systems (e.g., rhodopsin and green fluorescence proteins), are well described by a three-parameter family of sub-Ohmic spectral densities that are characterized by a fast initial Gaussian-like decay followed by a slow algebraic-like decay rate at long times.

  20. Morita equivalence and spectral triples on noncommutative orbifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harju, Antti J.

    2016-08-01

    Let G be a finite group. Noncommutative geometry of unital G-algebras is studied. A geometric structure is determined by a spectral triple on the crossed product algebra associated with the group action. This structure is to be viewed as a representative of a noncommutative orbifold. Based on a study of classical orbifold groupoids, a Morita equivalence for the crossed product spectral triples is developed. Noncommutative orbifolds are Morita equivalence classes of the crossed product spectral triples. As a special case of this Morita theory one can study freeness of the G-action on the noncommutative level. In the case of a free action, the crossed product formalism reduced to the usual spectral triple formalism on the algebra of G-invariant functions.

  1. Solar Spectral Irradiance and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.; Cahalan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrally resolved solar irradiance is recognized as being increasingly important to improving our understanding of the manner in which the Sun influences climate. There is strong empirical evidence linking total solar irradiance to surface temperature trends - even though the Sun has likely made only a small contribution to the last half-century's global temperature anomaly - but the amplitudes cannot be explained by direct solar heating alone. The wavelength and height dependence of solar radiation deposition, for example, ozone absorption in the stratosphere, absorption in the ocean mixed layer, and water vapor absorption in the lower troposphere, contribute to the "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms that have been proposed as possible amplifiers of the solar signal. New observations and models of solar spectral irradiance are needed to study these processes and to quantify their impacts on climate. Some of the most recent observations of solar spectral variability from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared have revealed some unexpected behavior that was not anticipated prior to their measurement, based on an understanding from model reconstructions. The atmospheric response to the observed spectral variability, as quantified in climate model simulations, have revealed similarly surprising and in some cases, conflicting results. This talk will provide an overview on the state of our understanding of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance, its variability over many time scales, potential climate impacts, and finally, a discussion on what is required for improving our understanding of Sun-climate connections, including a look forward to future observations.

  2. Snapshot colored compressive spectral imager.

    PubMed

    Correa, Claudia V; Arguello, Henry; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2015-10-01

    Traditional spectral imaging approaches require sensing all the voxels of a scene. Colored mosaic FPA detector-based architectures can acquire sets of the scene's spectral components, but the number of spectral planes depends directly on the number of available filters used on the FPA, which leads to reduced spatiospectral resolutions. Instead of sensing all the voxels of the scene, compressive spectral imaging (CSI) captures coded and dispersed projections of the spatiospectral source. This approach mitigates the resolution issues by exploiting optical phenomena in lenses and other elements, which, in turn, compromise the portability of the devices. This paper presents a compact snapshot colored compressive spectral imager (SCCSI) that exploits the benefits of the colored mosaic FPA detectors and the compression capabilities of CSI sensing techniques. The proposed optical architecture has no moving parts and can capture the spatiospectral information of a scene in a single snapshot by using a dispersive element and a color-patterned detector. The optical and the mathematical models of SCCSI are presented along with a testbed implementation of the system. Simulations and real experiments show the accuracy of SCCSI and compare the reconstructions with those of similar CSI optical architectures, such as the CASSI and SSCSI systems, resulting in improvements of up to 6 dB and 1 dB of PSNR, respectively. PMID:26479928

  3. Onboard spectral imager data processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, Leonard J.; Meigs, Andrew D.; Franklin, Abraham J.; Sears, Robert D.; Robison, Mark W.; Rafert, J. Bruce; Fronterhouse, Donald C.; Grotbeck, Ronald L.

    1999-10-01

    Previous papers have described the concept behind the MightySat II.1 program, the satellite's Fourier Transform imaging spectrometer's optical design, the design for the spectral imaging payload, and its initial qualification testing. This paper discusses the on board data processing designed to reduce the amount of downloaded data by an order of magnitude and provide a demonstration of a smart spaceborne spectral imaging sensor. Two custom components, a spectral imager interface 6U VME card that moves data at over 30 MByte/sec, and four TI C-40 processors mounted to a second 6U VME and daughter card, are used to adapt the sensor to the spacecraft and provide the necessary high speed processing. A system architecture that offers both on board real time image processing and high-speed post data collection analysis of the spectral data has been developed. In addition to the on board processing of the raw data into a usable spectral data volume, one feature extraction technique has been incorporated. This algorithm operates on the basic interferometric data. The algorithm is integrated within the data compression process to search for uploadable feature descriptions.

  4. On the Application of Hilbert Spectral Analysis for Climate Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Hilbert spectral analysis (Huang et al, 1998, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, A 454, pp 903-995) consisted of two steps: First, the data has to be reduced into a finite number of Intrinsic Mode Function by the Empirical Mode Decomposition method, then the resulting Intrinsic Mode Functions are converted to time-frequency-energy distribution through Hilbert transform. In this approach, the Empirical Mode Functions served as the basis functions with which the data is expanded. This basis function is adaptive, and the decomposition is nonlinear. Furthermore, as the Hilbert transform is a singular transform, it retains a high degree of local information. The instantaneous frequency is determined by differentiation of the phase function; therefore, there is no restriction of the 'uncertainty principle' for all the time-frequency analysis resulting from a priori basis approach. With the adaptive basis and the instantaneous frequency, the Hilbert Spectral analysis can represent data from nonlinear and nonstationary processes without resorting to the harmonics. Another advantage of using instantaneous frequency is the ability to find out frequency from limited length of data, which is a critical problem in climate studies. As the processes driving the climate changes could be both nonlinear and nonstationary, the Hilbert Spectral Analysis could be of great use in examining the underlying mechanisms. A preliminary study based on the length of day data will be presented as example for the application of the Hilbert Spectral Analysis for climate study.

  5. Synthesis, structural, spectral (FT-IR, FT-Ra, and UV-Vis), thermal, and density functional studies on p-methylaniline complexes of Mn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) bromides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardakçı, Tayyibe; Altun, Ahmet; Golcuk, Kurtulus; Kumru, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    Transition metal complexes of the form MBr2L2, where M = Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II); L = p-methylaniline, were prepared and characterized by elemental and thermogravimetric analyses, magnetic moment measurements, and UV-vis, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral studies. Geometries, spin-state energetics, and vibrational spectra of the complexes were obtained at the B3LYP/def2-TZVP level. The present experimental and theoretical data suggest 5-coordinate polymeric bromide bridged structure for the Mn complex, distorted tetrahedral structure for the Co complex, and distorted octahedral coordination site for the Ni complex. The experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman bands of the complexes were assigned based on the computational results expressed in terms of internal coordinates with percent potential energy distributions. The vibrational spectra suggest that the coordination occurs via nitrogen atom of p-methylaniline. The thermal characteristics of the complexes indicate that their decompositions start through p-methylaniline.

  6. Efficient transmission calculations for polydisperse water sprays using spectral scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy, William F.; Desjardin, Paul E.

    2007-12-01

    Analytical expressions are developed to scale the extinction, scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of the Sauter mean diameter for polydisperse water sprays in fire suppression systems. A scaling procedure is introduced to avoid prohibitive exact integration of the functions obtained from Mie theory resulting in several orders in magnitude of computational savings. Spectral-based and total transmission of real spray distributions using the scaling procedure are compared to exact results and experimental data. Results show the proposed scaling procedure yields significant computational savings with little loss in accuracy for predictions of spectral and total transmission.

  7. SIM PlanetQuest Spectral Calibration Development Unit Beam Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    The beam combiner of an astronomical long-baseline interferometer combines the two beams of starlight to form white-light fringes. We describe beam combiner in the SIM PlanetQuest Spectral Calibration Development Unit (SCDU). In addition to forming white light fringes, the beam combiner provides other functions such as separating the light for guiding, fringe tracking, and science measurement. It is designed to function over the optical bandpass 450-950 nm. Coating design is critical to beam combiner as residual dispersion and mismatches affect the ability to accurately measure the position of stars of varying spectral types.

  8. Experimental realization of spectral shaping using nonlinear optical holograms.

    PubMed

    Leshem, Anat; Shiloh, Roy; Arie, Ady

    2014-09-15

    We experimentally demonstrate the spectral shaping of a signal generated by a three-wave mixing process using a nonlinear spectral hologram. These holograms are based on binary spatial modulation of the second-order nonlinear coefficient. Here we present the first experimental realization, to the best of our knowledge, of this concept, encoding a nonlinear hologram in a KTiOPO(4) crystal by electric field poling. Two different spectra in the form of the second-order Hermite-Gauss function and the Airy function are shown using the sum-frequency generation process. PMID:26466274

  9. An adaptive pseudo-spectral method for reaction diffusion problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Gottlieb, D.; Matkowsky, B. J.; Minkoff, M.

    1987-01-01

    The spectral interpolation error was considered for both the Chebyshev pseudo-spectral and Galerkin approximations. A family of functionals I sub r (u), with the property that the maximum norm of the error is bounded by I sub r (u)/J sub r, where r is an integer and J is the degree of the polynomial approximation, was developed. These functionals are used in the adaptive procedure whereby the problem is dynamically transformed to minimize I sub r (u). The number of collocation points is then chosen to maintain a prescribed error bound. The method is illustrated by various examples from combustion problems in one and two dimensions.

  10. Spectral reflectance of rice seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Alois J.; Herden, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of young rice plants was measured in the visible and near-IR region of the spectrum using a commercially available fiber optic contact probe and miniature spectrometer. This work aims to identify an empirical spectral index which changes when rice is exposed to increased levels of chloride anions in the irrigation water and soil. The ratio of near IR reflectance to that of green, R750/555 is known to be a quantitative measure of chlorophyll content in the leaf but int his study does not show a consistent shift for sample which are exposed to chloride levels equal to or less than 0.1 percent by mass of soil. However, leaf contact spectral reflectance measurements did reveal a significant and consistent increase in R750/555 along the length of the leaves, and this variation should represent an important factor in modeling remote and proximal sensing data.

  11. Limulus psychophysics: spectral sensitivity of the ventral eye.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, G S

    1976-09-01

    The ventral eye of Limulus contains only one type of photoreceptor. Behaviors mediated by the ventral eye provide an unambiguous representation of the function of that single-receptor type. Such behaviors can be compared with the results of acute, single-cell investigations to assay for the contributions of candidate neural codes in the regulation of behavior (cf. Uttal, 1973). Using an unconditioned tail movement as the response, the psychophysical spectral sensitivity function mediated by the ventral eye of Limulus was measured. This psychophysical function peaked at 525 nm and showed evidence of strong absorption by the cuticle in the short-wavelength portion of the spectrum. Under the conditions of the present experiment, the threshold was 4.5 quanta absorbed per receptor per msec at 525 nm. The spectral transmission of the ventral eye cuticle was also measured. After correction for cuticle absorption, the psychophysical spectral sensitivity function was compared with previously reported spectral sensitivity functions obtained either from electrophysiologic (Millecchia, Bradbury, and Mauro, 1966; Nolte and Brown, 1970) or from microspectrophotometric (Murry, 1966) recordings from single, isolated ventral eye photoreceptor cells. All three functions exhibit a sensitivity peak near 525 nm; the corrected psychophysical and microspectrophotometric functions both display a second peak near 425 nm. A second experiment confirmed the reliability and validity of the 425-nm peak. The coding implications of these findings were explored. A preliminary finding is that, in dichromatic or trichromatic visual systems, two-peaked receptor spectral sensitivity functions produce central, opponent response systems that are qualitatively the same as those produced by single-peaked receptors. PMID:978142

  12. Spectral properties of strongly correlated bosons in two-dimensional optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Knap, Michael; Arrigoni, Enrico; Linden, Wolfgang von der

    2010-01-01

    Spectral properties of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model, which emulates ultracold gases of atoms confined in optical lattices, are investigated by means of the variational cluster approach. The phase boundary of the quantum phase transition from Mott phase to superfluid phase is calculated and compared to recent work. Moreover the single-particle spectral functions in both the first and the second Mott lobe are presented and the corresponding densities of states and momentum distributions are evaluated. A qualitatively similar intensity distribution of the spectral weight can be observed for spectral functions in the first and the second Mott lobe.

  13. Spectral methods in fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Zang, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of spectral methods are introduced. Recent developments in spectral methods are reviewed with an emphasis on collocation techniques. Their applications to both compressible and incompressible flows, to viscous as well as inviscid flows, and also to chemically reacting flows are surveyed. The key role that these methods play in the simulation of stability, transition, and turbulence is brought out. A perspective is provided on some of the obstacles that prohibit a wider use of these methods, and how these obstacles are being overcome.

  14. Radar spectral measurements of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.

    1973-01-01

    Spectral data of 4-8 GHz radar backscatter were gathered during the 1972 growing season at look angles between 0 and 70 deg and for all four possible polarization linear combinations. The data covers four crop types (corn, milo, alfalfa, and soybeans) and a wide range of soil moisture content. To insure statistical representation of the results, measurements were conducted over 128 fields corresponding to a total of about 40,000 data points. The use of spectral response signatures to separate different crop types and to separate healthy corn from blighted corn was investigated.

  15. Stingray: Spectral-timing software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Bachetti, Matteo; Stevens, Abigail L.; Migliari, Simone; Balm, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Stingray is a spectral-timing software package for astrophysical X-ray (and more) data. The package merges existing efforts for a (spectral-)timing package in Python and is composed of a library of time series methods (including power spectra, cross spectra, covariance spectra, and lags); scripts to load FITS data files from different missions; a simulator of light curves and event lists that includes different kinds of variability and more complicated phenomena based on the impulse response of given physical events (e.g. reverberation); and a GUI to ease the learning curve for new users.

  16. Spectral characterization of lithographic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, C.

    1993-06-01

    Spectral data collected in recent laser-plasma experiments at LLNL for Sn are compared to simulation results in order to more fully characterize the plasma properties, especially electron temperature and density. These plasma conditions determine the ionization states achieved by the material and the consequent radiative emission. Synthetic spectra are produced using very detailed radiating line positions and oscillator strengths calculated from extensive multi-configuration Dirac-Fock computations. Better quantitative agreement with experimental conversion efficiencies in the laser intensity regime of interest to projection soft x-ray lithography is obtained using this atomic database. The spectral characterization thus validates the general reliability of the simulations.

  17. Spectral moments of fullerene cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxing; Balasubramanian, K.

    Based on the symmetric method, analytical expression or recursive relations for the spectral moments of the C20, C24, C26, C28, C30, C32, C36, C38, C40, C42, C44, C50 and C60 fullerene cage clusters are obtained by factoring the original graphs and the corresponding characteristic polynomials into their smaller subgraphs and subpolynomials. We also give numerical results for the spectral moments. It is demonstrated that the symmetric method is feasible in enumerating the moments as well as factoring the characteristic polynomials for fullerene cages.

  18. Solar cell spectral response characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalewski, E. F.; Geist, J.

    1979-01-01

    The absolute spectral response of solar cells is reported in the 400-1000-nm spectral region. Measurements were performed using two different types of monochromatic sources: amplitude-stabilized CW laser lines and interference filters with an incandescent lamp. Both types of calibration procedures use electrical substitution radiometry as the basis of traceability to absolute SI units. The accuracy of the calibration is shown to be limited by the nonideal characteristics of the solar cells themselves, specifically spatial nonuniformities and nonlinearities induced by high light levels.

  19. Measurement Of Spectral Power Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. R.

    1980-11-01

    The majority of spectroradiometers make measurements at a number of discrete wavelength settings spaced evenly across the spectrum. Many modern light sources such as fluorescent or metal halide lamps have complex line spectra which may not be properly evaluated by this method. An automated spectroradiometer system involving a non-stop spectral scan with continuous integration of the output signal from the detector is described. The method is designed to make accurate measurements of all types of spectral power distribution whether made up of lines or continuum or any mixture of the two.

  20. Spectral decomposition of nonlinear systems with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenkeson, Adam; Glaz, Bryan; Stanton, Samuel; West, Bruce J.

    2016-02-01

    We present an alternative approach to the analysis of nonlinear systems with long-term memory that is based on the Koopman operator and a Lévy transformation in time. Memory effects are considered to be the result of interactions between a system and its surrounding environment. The analysis leads to the decomposition of a nonlinear system with memory into modes whose temporal behavior is anomalous and lacks a characteristic scale. On average, the time evolution of a mode follows a Mittag-Leffler function, and the system can be described using the fractional calculus. The general theory is demonstrated on the fractional linear harmonic oscillator and the fractional nonlinear logistic equation. When analyzing data from an ill-defined (black-box) system, the spectral decomposition in terms of Mittag-Leffler functions that we propose may uncover inherent memory effects through identification of a small set of dynamically relevant structures that would otherwise be obscured by conventional spectral methods. Consequently, the theoretical concepts we present may be useful for developing more general methods for numerical modeling that are able to determine whether observables of a dynamical system are better represented by memoryless operators, or operators with long-term memory in time, when model details are unknown.

  1. Spectral subtraction-based speech enhancement for cochlear implant patients in background noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2005-03-01

    A single-channel speech enhancement algorithm utilizing speech pause detection and nonlinear spectral subtraction is proposed for cochlear implant patients in the present study. The spectral subtraction algorithm estimates the short-time spectral magnitude of speech by subtracting the estimated noise spectral magnitude from the noisy speech spectral magnitude. The artifacts produced by spectral subtraction (such as ``musical noise'') were significantly reduced by combining variance-reduced gain function and spectral flooring. Sentence recognition by seven cochlear implant subjects was tested under different noisy listening conditions (speech-shaped noise and 6-talker speech babble at +9, +6, +3, and 0 dB SNR) with and without the speech enhancement algorithm. For speech-shaped noise, performance for all subjects at all SNRs was significantly improved by the speech enhancement algorithm; for speech babble, performance was only modestly improved. The results suggest that the proposed speech enhancement algorithm may be beneficial for implant users in noisy listening. .

  2. SpectralPlasmaSolver: a Spectral Code for Multiscale Simulations of Collisionless, Magnetized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vencels, Juris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Manzini, Gianmarco; Markidis, Stefano; Peng, Ivy Bo; Roytershteyn, Vadim

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and implementation of a spectral code, called SpectralPlasmaSolver (SPS), for the solution of the multi-dimensional Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The method is based on a Hermite-Fourier decomposition of the particle distribution function. The code is written in Fortran and uses the PETSc library for solving the non-linear equations and preconditioning and the FFTW library for the convolutions. SPS is parallelized for shared- memory machines using OpenMP. As a verification example, we discuss simulations of the two-dimensional Orszag-Tang vortex problem and successfully compare them against a fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell simulation. An assessment of the performance of the code is presented, showing a significant improvement in the code running-time achieved by preconditioning, while strong scaling tests show a factor of 10 speed-up using 16 threads.

  3. Spectral characterization and tuning with liquid-crystal retarders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-López, María. del Mar; Moreno, Ignacio; Vargas, Asticio; García-Martínez, Pascuala

    2015-09-01

    An accurate characterization of the retardance function of liquid-crystal retarders (LCR) is essential for a proper use of instruments that include these devices. In this paper a simple technique to characterize the retardance of a LCR, both as a function of wavelength and applied voltage, is presented. With the proposed analysis we can describe the spectral modulation properties of the device using few parameters. The method is then extended to the case of non-normal incidence, thus allowing to distinguish between the extraordinary and ordinary axes. The accounting of Fabry-Perot interference effects are used to obtain a very accurate determination of the spectral phase shifts. Finally, such a full characterization of the LCR retardance is applied to a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator and an optical architecture is designed where the spectral content of the light beam can be engineered at will.

  4. Spectral ophthalmoscopy based on supercontinuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yueh-Hung; Yu, Jiun-Yann; Wu, Han-Hsuan; Huang, Bo-Jyun; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2010-02-01

    Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (CSLO) has been established to be an important diagnostic tool for retinopathies like age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetes. Compared to a confocal laser scanning microscope, CSLO is also capable of providing optical sectioning on retina with the aid of a pinhole, but the microscope objective is replaced by the optics of eye. Since optical spectrum is the fingerprint of local chemical composition, it is attractive to incorporate spectral acquisition into CSLO. However, due to the limitation of laser bandwidth and chromatic/geometric aberration, the scanning systems in current CSLO are not compatible with spectral imaging. Here we demonstrate a spectral CSLO by combining a diffraction-limited broadband scanning system and a supercontinuum laser source. Both optical sectioning capability and sub-cellular resolution are demonstrated on zebrafish's retina. To our knowledge, it is also the first time that CSLO is applied onto the study of fish vision. The versatile spectral CSLO system will be useful to retinopathy diagnosis and neuroscience research.

  5. BEO Tram Spectral Data 2014

    DOE Data Explorer

    Torn, Margaret; Serbin, Shawn

    2015-06-10

    Visible to near-infrared (350-1100nm) vegetation spectral reflectance data collected on the BEO automated tram measurement platform during the 2014 growing season. The spectra were collected using a PP Systems UniSpec-DC instrument and was processed to at-surface reflectance and interpolated to 1nm.

  6. Rayleigh imaging in spectral mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berggren, Karl; Danielsson, Mats; Fredenberg, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Spectral imaging is the acquisition of multiple images of an object at different energy spectra. In mammography, dual-energy imaging (spectral imaging with two energy levels) has been investigated for several applications, in particular material decomposition, which allows for quantitative analysis of breast composition and quantitative contrast-enhanced imaging. Material decomposition with dual-energy imaging is based on the assumption that there are two dominant photon interaction effects that determine linear attenuation: the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering. This assumption limits the number of basis materials, i.e. the number of materials that are possible to differentiate between, to two. However, Rayleigh scattering may account for more than 10% of the linear attenuation in the mammography energy range. In this work, we show that a modified version of a scanning multi-slit spectral photon-counting mammography system is able to acquire three images at different spectra and can be used for triple-energy imaging. We further show that triple-energy imaging in combination with the efficient scatter rejection of the system enables measurement of Rayleigh scattering, which adds an additional energy dependency to the linear attenuation and enables material decomposition with three basis materials. Three available basis materials have the potential to improve virtually all applications of spectral imaging.

  7. SPECTRAL IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR GRAIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three spectral imaging techniques were employed for the purpose of assessing the quality of cereal grains. Each of these techniques provided unique, yet complementary, information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), also called magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was used to detect mobile components ...

  8. Spectral clustering with epidemic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura M; Lerman, Kristina; Garcia-Cardona, Cristina; Percus, Allon G; Ghosh, Rumi

    2013-10-01

    Spectral clustering is widely used to partition graphs into distinct modules or communities. Existing methods for spectral clustering use the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the graph Laplacian, an operator that is closely associated with random walks on graphs. We propose a spectral partitioning method that exploits the properties of epidemic diffusion. An epidemic is a dynamic process that, unlike the random walk, simultaneously transitions to all the neighbors of a given node. We show that the replicator, an operator describing epidemic diffusion, is equivalent to the symmetric normalized Laplacian of a reweighted graph with edges reweighted by the eigenvector centralities of their incident nodes. Thus, more weight is given to edges connecting more central nodes. We describe a method that partitions the nodes based on the componentwise ratio of the replicator's second eigenvector to the first and compare its performance to traditional spectral clustering techniques on synthetic graphs with known community structure. We demonstrate that the replicator gives preference to dense, clique-like structures, enabling it to more effectively discover communities that may be obscured by dense intercommunity linking. PMID:24229231

  9. Spectral clustering with epidemic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Laura M.; Lerman, Kristina; Garcia-Cardona, Cristina; Percus, Allon G.; Ghosh, Rumi

    2013-10-01

    Spectral clustering is widely used to partition graphs into distinct modules or communities. Existing methods for spectral clustering use the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the graph Laplacian, an operator that is closely associated with random walks on graphs. We propose a spectral partitioning method that exploits the properties of epidemic diffusion. An epidemic is a dynamic process that, unlike the random walk, simultaneously transitions to all the neighbors of a given node. We show that the replicator, an operator describing epidemic diffusion, is equivalent to the symmetric normalized Laplacian of a reweighted graph with edges reweighted by the eigenvector centralities of their incident nodes. Thus, more weight is given to edges connecting more central nodes. We describe a method that partitions the nodes based on the componentwise ratio of the replicator's second eigenvector to the first and compare its performance to traditional spectral clustering techniques on synthetic graphs with known community structure. We demonstrate that the replicator gives preference to dense, clique-like structures, enabling it to more effectively discover communities that may be obscured by dense intercommunity linking.

  10. Towards spectral geometric methods for Euclidean quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panine, Mikhail; Kempf, Achim

    2016-04-01

    The unification of general relativity with quantum theory will also require a coming together of the two quite different mathematical languages of general relativity and quantum theory, i.e., of differential geometry and functional analysis, respectively. Of particular interest in this regard is the field of spectral geometry, which studies to which extent the shape of a Riemannian manifold is describable in terms of the spectra of differential operators defined on the manifold. Spectral geometry is hard because it is highly nonlinear, but linearized spectral geometry, i.e., the task to determine small shape changes from small spectral changes, is much more tractable and may be iterated to approximate the full problem. Here, we generalize this approach, allowing, in particular, nonequal finite numbers of shape and spectral degrees of freedom. This allows us to study how well the shape degrees of freedom are encoded in the eigenvalues. We apply this strategy numerically to a class of planar domains and find that the reconstruction of small shape changes from small spectral changes is possible if enough eigenvalues are used. While isospectral nonisometric shapes are known to exist, we find evidence that generically shaped isospectral nonisometric shapes, if existing, are exceedingly rare.

  11. [Colorimetric characterization of LCD based on wavelength partition spectral model].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Xue; Cui, Gui-Hua; Huang, Min; Wu, Bing; Xu, Yan-Fang; Luo, Ming

    2013-10-01

    To establish a colorimetrical characterization model of LCDs, an experiment with EIZO CG19, IBM 19, DELL 19 and HP 19 LCDs was designed and carried out to test the interaction between RGB channels, and then to test the spectral additive property of LCDs. The RGB digital values of single channel and two channels were given and the corresponding tristimulus values were measured, then a chart was plotted and calculations were made to test the independency of RGB channels. The results showed that the interaction between channels was reasonably weak and spectral additivity property was held well. We also found that the relations between radiations and digital values at different wavelengths varied, that is, they were the functions of wavelength. A new calculation method based on piecewise spectral model, in which the relation between radiations and digital values was fitted by a cubic polynomial in each piece of wavelength with measured spectral radiation curves, was proposed and tested. The spectral radiation curves of RGB primaries with any digital values can be found out with only a few measurements and fitted cubic polynomial in this way and then any displayed color can be turned out by the spectral additivity property of primaries at given digital values. The algorithm of this method was discussed in detail in this paper. The computations showed that the proposed method was simple and the number of measurements needed was reduced greatly while keeping a very high computation precision. This method can be used as a colorimetrical characterization model. PMID:24409730

  12. SHJAR Jet Noise Data and Power Spectral Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2009-01-01

    High quality jet noise spectral data measured at the Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center is used to examine a number of jet noise scaling laws. Configurations considered in the present study consist of convergent and convergent-divergent axisymmetric nozzles. The measured spectral data are shown in narrow band and cover 8193 equally spaced points in a typical Strouhal number range of 0.0 to 10.0. The measured data are reported as lossless (i.e., atmospheric attenuation is added to measurements), and at 24 equally spaced angles (50deg to 165deg) on a 100-diameter (200-in.) arc. Following the work of Viswanathan, velocity power factors are evaluated using a least squares fit on spectral power density as a function of jet temperature and observer angle. The goodness of the fit and the confidence margins for the two regression parameters are studied at each angle, and alternative relationships are proposed to improve the spectral collapse when certain conditions are met. As an immediate application of the velocity power laws, spectral density in shockcontaining jets are decomposed into components attributed to jet mixing noise and shock noise. From this analysis, jet noise prediction tools can be developed with different spectral components derived from different physics.

  13. Short-Term EEG Spectral Pattern as a Single Event in EEG Phenomenology

    PubMed Central

    Fingelkurts, Al. A; Fingelkurts, An. A

    2010-01-01

    Spectral decomposition, to this day, still remains the main analytical paradigm for the analysis of EEG oscillations. However, conventional spectral analysis assesses the mean characteristics of the EEG power spectra averaged out over extended periods of time and/or broad frequency bands, thus resulting in a “static” picture which cannot reflect adequately the underlying neurodynamic. A relatively new promising area in the study of EEG is based on reducing the signal to elementary short-term spectra of various types in accordance with the number of types of EEG stationary segments instead of using averaged power spectrum for the whole EEG. It is suggested that the various perceptual and cognitive operations associated with a mental or behavioural condition constitute a single distinguishable neurophysiological state with a distinct and reliable spectral pattern. In this case, one type of short-term spectral pattern may be considered as a single event in EEG phenomenology. To support this assumption the following issues are considered in detail: (a) the relations between local EEG short-term spectral pattern of particular type and the actual state of the neurons in underlying network and a volume conduction; (b) relationship between morphology of EEG short-term spectral pattern and the state of the underlying neurodynamical system i.e. neuronal assembly; (c) relation of different spectral pattern components to a distinct physiological mechanism; (d) relation of different spectral pattern components to different functional significance; (e) developmental changes of spectral pattern components; (f) heredity of the variance in the individual spectral pattern and its components; (g) intra-individual stability of the sets of EEG short-term spectral patterns and their percent ratio; (h) discrete dynamics of EEG short-term spectral patterns. Functional relevance (consistency) of EEG short-term spectral patterns in accordance with the changes of brain functional state

  14. The pulsar spectral index distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, S. D.; Lorimer, D. R.; Verbiest, J. P. W.

    2013-05-01

    The flux-density spectra of radio pulsars are known to be steep and, to first order, described by a power-law relationship of the form Sν ∝ να, where Sν is the flux density at some frequency ν and α is the spectral index. Although measurements of α have been made over the years for several hundred pulsars, a study of the intrinsic distribution of pulsar spectra has not been carried out. From the result of pulsar surveys carried out at three different radio frequencies, we use population synthesis techniques and a likelihood analysis to deduce what underlying spectral index distribution is required to replicate the results of these surveys. We find that in general the results of the surveys can be modelled by a Gaussian distribution of spectral indices with a mean of -1.4 and unit standard deviation. We also consider the impact of the so-called gigahertz-peaked spectrum pulsars proposed by Kijak et al. The fraction of peaked-spectrum sources in the population with any significant turnover at low frequencies appears to be at most 10 per cent. We demonstrate that high-frequency (>2 GHz) surveys preferentially select flatter spectrum pulsars and the converse is true for lower frequency (<1 GHz) surveys. This implies that any correlations between α and other pulsar parameters (for example age or magnetic field) need to carefully account for selection biases in pulsar surveys. We also expect that many known pulsars which have been detected at high frequencies will have shallow, or positive, spectral indices. The majority of pulsars do not have recorded flux density measurements over a wide frequency range, making it impossible to constrain their spectral shapes. We also suggest that such measurements would allow an improved description of any populations of pulsars with `non-standard' spectra. Further refinements to this picture will soon be possible from the results of surveys with the Green Bank Telescope and LOFAR.

  15. Multi-spectral imaging with mid-infrared semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yang; Le, Han Q.

    2006-01-01

    Multi-spectral laser imaging can be a useful technology for target discrimination, classification, and identification based on object spectral signatures. The mid-IR region (~3-14 μm) is particularly rich of molecular spectroscopic fingerprints, but the technology has been under utilized. Compact, potentially inexpensive semiconductor lasers may allow more cost-effective applications. This paper describes a development of semiconductor-laser-based multi-spectral imaging for both near-IR and mid-IR, and demonstrates the potential of this technology. The near-IR study employed 7 wavelengths from 0.635-1.55 μm, and used for system engineering evaluation as well as for studying the fundamental aspects of multi-spectral laser imaging. These include issues of wavelength-dependence scattering as a function of incident and receiving angle and the polarization effects. Stokes vector imaging and degree-of-linear-polarization were shown to reveal significant information to characterize the targets. The mid-IR study employed 4 wavelengths from 3.3-9.6 μm, and was applied to diverse targets that consist of natural and man-made materials and household objects. It was shown capable to resolve and distinguish small spectral differences among various targets, thanks to the laser radiometric and spectral accuracy. Colorless objects in the visible were shown with "colorful" signatures in the mid-IR. An essential feature of the study is an advanced system architecture that employs wavelength-division-multiplexed laser beams for high spectral fidelity and resolution. In addition, unlike conventional one-transmitter and one receiver design, the system is based on a scalable CDMA network concept with multiple transmitters and receivers to allow efficient information acquisition. The results suggest that multi-spectral laser imaging in general can be a unique and powerful technology for wide ranging applications.

  16. Spectral-peak selection in spectral-shape discrimination by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer J

    2006-08-01

    Spectral-shape discrimination thresholds were measured in the presence and absence of noise to determine whether normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners rely primarily on spectral peaks in the excitation pattern when discriminating between stimuli with different spectral shapes. Standard stimuli were the sum of 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 20, or 30 equal-amplitude tones with frequencies fixed between 200 and 4000 Hz. Signal stimuli were generated by increasing and decreasing the levels of every other standard component. The function relating the spectral-shape discrimination threshold to the number of components (N) showed an initial decrease in threshold with increasing N and then an increase in threshold when the number of components reached 10 and 6, for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners, respectively. The presence of a 50-dB SPL/Hz noise led to a 1.7 dB increase in threshold for normal-hearing listeners and a 3.5 dB increase for hearing-impaired listeners. Multichannel modeling and the relatively small influence of noise suggest that both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners rely on the peaks in the excitation pattern for spectral-shape discrimination. The greater influence of noise in the data from hearing-impaired listeners is attributed to a poorer representation of spectral peaks. PMID:16938982

  17. Interferometric and nonlinear-optical spectral-imaging techniques for outer space and live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    Multidimensional signals such as the spectral images allow us to have deeper insights into the natures of objects. In this paper the spectral imaging techniques that are based on optical interferometry and nonlinear optics are presented. The interferometric imaging technique is based on the unified theory of Van Cittert-Zernike and Wiener-Khintchine theorems and allows us to retrieve a spectral image of an object in the far zone from the 3D spatial coherence function. The retrieval principle is explained using a very simple object. The promising applications to space interferometers for astronomy that are currently in progress will also be briefly touched on. An interesting extension of interferometric spectral imaging is a 3D and spectral imaging technique that records 4D information of objects where the 3D and spectral information is retrieved from the cross-spectral density function of optical field. The 3D imaging is realized via the numerical inverse propagation of the cross-spectral density. A few techniques suggested recently are introduced. The nonlinear optical technique that utilizes stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) for spectral imaging of biomedical targets is presented lastly. The strong signals of SRS permit us to get vibrational information of molecules in the live cell or tissue in real time. The vibrational information of unstained or unlabeled molecules is crucial especially for medical applications. The 3D information due to the optical nonlinearity is also the attractive feature of SRS spectral microscopy.

  18. Spectral Deception: Understanding Misleading Spectral Features Using Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummels, Cameron B.; Silvia, Devin W.; Smith, Britton

    2016-01-01

    Quasar absorption line studies are our primary source of information for revealing the state of the intergalactic and circumgalacic media (IGM and CGM). Using quasars as bright background sources, tenuous intervening gas clouds imprint absorption features in the resulting spectra providing clues to the clouds' density, temperature, metallicity, and ionization state. Correctly interpreting these spectra is crucial to understanding the distribution of baryons in the universe.Using the Trident code to generate synthetic spectra from high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we examine how spectral noise, instrument smoothing, and certain configurations of gas can mask the true nature of gas absorbers. We demonstrate how cold gas filaments can create broad spectral features mimicking hot absorbers, and chimneys of hot gas viewed side-on appear as narrow, cold absorbers. Understanding how commonly these conditions occur is critical for correctly characterizing the physical conditions in the media galactic.

  19. Global spectral irradiance variability and material discrimination at Boulder, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhihong; Healey, Glenn; Slater, David

    2003-03-01

    We analyze 7,258 global spectral irradiance functions over 0.4-2.2 microm that were acquired over a wide range of conditions at Boulder, Colorado, during the summer of 1997. We show that low-dimensional linear models can be used to capture the variability in these spectra over both the visible and the 0.4-2.2 microm spectral ranges. Using a linear model, we compare the Boulder data with the previous study of Judd et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 54, 1031 (1964)] over the visible wavelengths. We also examine the agreement of the Boulder data with a spectral database generated by using the MODTRAN 4.0 radiative transfer code. We use a database of 223 minerals to consider the effect of the spectral variability in the global spectral irradiance functions on hyperspectral material identification. We show that the 223 minerals can be discriminated accurately over the variability in the Boulder data with subspace projection techniques. PMID:12630837

  20. Spectral image analysis of mutual illumination between florescent objects.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Shoji; Kato, Keiji; Hirai, Keita; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a method for modeling and component estimation of the spectral images of the mutual illumination phenomenon between two fluorescent objects. First, we briefly describe the bispectral characteristics of a single fluorescent object, which are summarized as a Donaldson matrix. We suppose that two fluorescent objects with different bispectral characteristics are located close together under a uniform illumination. Second, we model the mutual illumination between two objects. It is shown that the spectral composition of the mutual illumination is summarized with four components: (1) diffuse reflection, (2) diffuse-diffuse interreflection, (3) fluorescent self-luminescence, and (4) interreflection by mutual fluorescent illumination. Third, we develop algorithms for estimating the spectral image components from the observed images influenced by the mutual illumination. When the exact Donaldson matrices caused by the mutual illumination influence are unknown, we have to solve a non-linear estimation problem to estimate both the spectral functions and the location weights. An iterative algorithm is then proposed to solve the problem based on the alternate estimation of the spectral functions and the location weights. In our experiments, the feasibility of the proposed method is shown in three cases: the known Donaldson matrices, weak interreflection, and strong interreflection. PMID:27505645

  1. Individual Sensitivity to Spectral and Temporal Cues in Listeners With Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Richard A.; Blackburn, Michael C.; Tatman, Rachael; Gallun, Frederick J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The present study was designed to evaluate use of spectral and temporal cues under conditions in which both types of cues were available. Method Participants included adults with normal hearing and hearing loss. We focused on 3 categories of speech cues: static spectral (spectral shape), dynamic spectral (formant change), and temporal (amplitude envelope). Spectral and/or temporal dimensions of synthetic speech were systematically manipulated along a continuum, and recognition was measured using the manipulated stimuli. Level was controlled to ensure cue audibility. Discriminant function analysis was used to determine to what degree spectral and temporal information contributed to the identification of each stimulus. Results Listeners with normal hearing were influenced to a greater extent by spectral cues for all stimuli. Listeners with hearing impairment generally utilized spectral cues when the information was static (spectral shape) but used temporal cues when the information was dynamic (formant transition). The relative use of spectral and temporal dimensions varied among individuals, especially among listeners with hearing loss. Conclusion Information about spectral and temporal cue use may aid in identifying listeners who rely to a greater extent on particular acoustic cues and applying that information toward therapeutic interventions. PMID:25629388

  2. SPAM- SPECTRAL ANALYSIS MANAGER (DEC VAX/VMS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) was developed to allow easy qualitative analysis of multi-dimensional imaging spectrometer data. Imaging spectrometers provide sufficient spectral sampling to define unique spectral signatures on a per pixel basis. Thus direct material identification becomes possible for geologic studies. SPAM provides a variety of capabilities for carrying out interactive analysis of the massive and complex datasets associated with multispectral remote sensing observations. In addition to normal image processing functions, SPAM provides multiple levels of on-line help, a flexible command interpretation, graceful error recovery, and a program structure which can be implemented in a variety of environments. SPAM was designed to be visually oriented and user friendly with the liberal employment of graphics for rapid and efficient exploratory analysis of imaging spectrometry data. SPAM provides functions to enable arithmetic manipulations of the data, such as normalization, linear mixing, band ratio discrimination, and low-pass filtering. SPAM can be used to examine the spectra of an individual pixel or the average spectra over a number of pixels. SPAM also supports image segmentation, fast spectral signature matching, spectral library usage, mixture analysis, and feature extraction. High speed spectral signature matching is performed by using a binary spectral encoding algorithm to separate and identify mineral components present in the scene. The same binary encoding allows automatic spectral clustering. Spectral data may be entered from a digitizing tablet, stored in a user library, compared to the master library containing mineral standards, and then displayed as a timesequence spectral movie. The output plots, histograms, and stretched histograms produced by SPAM can be sent to a lineprinter, stored as separate RGB disk files, or sent to a Quick Color Recorder. SPAM is written in C for interactive execution and is available for two different

  3. Prediction of spectral acceleration response ordinates based on PGA attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graizer, V.; Kalkan, E.

    2009-01-01

    Developed herein is a new peak ground acceleration (PGA)-based predictive model for 5% damped pseudospectral acceleration (SA) ordinates of free-field horizontal component of ground motion from shallow-crustal earthquakes. The predictive model of ground motion spectral shape (i.e., normalized spectrum) is generated as a continuous function of few parameters. The proposed model eliminates the classical exhausted matrix of estimator coefficients, and provides significant ease in its implementation. It is structured on the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) database with a number of additions from recent Californian events including 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. A unique feature of the model is its new functional form explicitly integrating PGA as a scaling factor. The spectral shape model is parameterized within an approximation function using moment magnitude, closest distance to the fault (fault distance) and VS30 (average shear-wave velocity in the upper 30 m) as independent variables. Mean values of its estimator coefficients were computed by fitting an approximation function to spectral shape of each record using robust nonlinear optimization. Proposed spectral shape model is independent of the PGA attenuation, allowing utilization of various PGA attenuation relations to estimate the response spectrum of earthquake recordings.

  4. Spectrally based mapping of riverbed composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legleiter, Carl J.; Stegman, Tobin K.; Overstreet, Brandon T.

    2016-07-01

    Remote sensing methods provide an efficient means of characterizing fluvial systems. This study evaluated the potential to map riverbed composition based on in situ and/or remote measurements of reflectance. Field spectra and substrate photos from the Snake River, Wyoming, USA, were used to identify different sediment facies and degrees of algal development and to quantify their optical characteristics. We hypothesized that accounting for the effects of depth and water column attenuation to isolate the reflectance of the streambed would enhance distinctions among bottom types and facilitate substrate classification. A bottom reflectance retrieval algorithm adapted from coastal research yielded realistic spectra for the 450 to 700 nm range; but bottom reflectance-based substrate classifications, generated using a random forest technique, were no more accurate than classifications derived from above-water field spectra. Additional hypothesis testing indicated that a combination of reflectance magnitude (brightness) and indices of spectral shape provided the most accurate riverbed classifications. Convolving field spectra to the response functions of a multispectral satellite and a hyperspectral imaging system did not reduce classification accuracies, implying that high spectral resolution was not essential. Supervised classifications of algal density produced from hyperspectral data and an inferred bottom reflectance image were not highly accurate, but unsupervised classification of the bottom reflectance image revealed distinct spectrally based clusters, suggesting that such an image could provide additional river information. We attribute the failure of bottom reflectance retrieval to yield more reliable substrate maps to a latent correlation between depth and bottom type. Accounting for the effects of depth might have eliminated a key distinction among substrates and thus reduced discriminatory power. Although further, more systematic study across a broader range

  5. Shock capturing by the spectral viscosity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1989-01-01

    A main disadvantage of using spectral methods for nonlinear conservation laws lies in the formation of Gibbs phenomenon, once spontaneous shock discontinuities appear in the solution. The global nature of spectral methods than pollutes the unstable Gibbs oscillations overall the computational domain, and the lack of entropy dissipation prevents convergences in these cases. The Spectral Viscosity method, which is based on high frequency dependent vanishing viscosity regularization of the classical spectral methods is discussed. It is shown that this method enforces the convergence of nonlinear spectral approximations without sacrificing their overall spectral accuracy.

  6. Reflective type objective based spectral-domain phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography for high-sensitive structural and functional imaging of cochlear microstructures through intact bone of an excised guinea pig cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Chen, Fangyi; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2013-03-01

    Most of the optical coherence tomographic (OCT) systems for high resolution imaging of biological specimens are based on refractive type microscope objectives, which are optimized for specific wave length of the optical source. In this study, we present the feasibility of using commercially available reflective type objective for high sensitive and high resolution structural and functional imaging of cochlear microstructures of an excised guinea pig through intact temporal bone. Unlike conventional refractive type microscopic objective, reflective objective are free from chromatic aberrations due to their all-reflecting nature and can support a broadband of spectrum with very high light collection efficiency.

  7. [Spectral classification based on Bayes decision].

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Jin, Hong-Mei; Duan, Fu-Qing

    2010-03-01

    The rapid development of astronomical observation has led to many large sky surveys such as SDSS (Sloan digital sky survey) and LAMOST (large sky area multi-object spectroscopic telescope). Since these surveys have produced very large numbers of spectra, automated spectral analysis becomes desirable and necessary. The present paper studies the spectral classification method based on Bayes decision theory, which divides spectra into three types: star, galaxy and quasar. Firstly, principal component analysis (PCA) is used in feature extraction, and spectra are projected into the 3D PCA feature space; secondly, the class conditional probability density functions are estimated using the non-parametric density estimation technique, Parzen window approach; finally, the minimum error Bayes decision rule is used for classification. In Parzen window approach, the kernel width affects the density estimation, and then affects the classification effect. Extensive experiments have been performed to analyze the relationship between the kernel widths and the correct classification rates. The authors found that the correct rate increases with the kernel width being close to some threshold, while it decreases with the kernel width being less than this threshold. PMID:20496722

  8. A comprehensive comparison of spectral scatterometry hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensing, Kevin; Stirton, Broc; Starnes, Brian; Synoradzki, Joseph; Swain, Bryan; Lane, Lawrence

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, three different types of spectral scatterometry hardware are compared using Timbre Technologies' Optical Digital Profiler (ODP) as a common software platform. The hardware under consideration includes a spectroscopic reflectometer (R), polarizing spectroscopic reflectometer (RP) and a spectroscopic ellipsometer (SE). Four advanced lithographic applications are evaluated-two from Spansion's 110-nm Flash memory technology line, and two from AMD's 90-nm logic process. ODP models are developed and optimized for each application and each type of hardware. Results include static and dynamic repeatability, throughput, correlation to incumbent metrology and correlation to cross-section. For each application, the authors also attempt to determine the level of model complexity supported by each hardware type, with special attention paid to the relative sensitivity of each system to changes in critical dimension (CD) and resist profile. The results generally indicate that the SE is the most sensitive hardware type while the R is the most stable. The RP occupies some form of middle ground on both counts. These generalizations are largely application dependent and clear differentiations do not always exist. Selecting the right spectral scatterometry hardware, therefore, is a function of one"s application complexity and control objectives.

  9. Kernel spectral clustering with memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langone, Rocco; Alzate, Carlos; Suykens, Johan A. K.

    2013-05-01

    Evolving graphs describe many natural phenomena changing over time, such as social relationships, trade markets, metabolic networks etc. In this framework, performing community detection and analyzing the cluster evolution represents a critical task. Here we propose a new model for this purpose, where the smoothness of the clustering results over time can be considered as a valid prior knowledge. It is based on a constrained optimization formulation typical of Least Squares Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM), where the objective function is designed to explicitly incorporate temporal smoothness. The latter allows the model to cluster the current data well and to be consistent with the recent history. We also propose new model selection criteria in order to carefully choose the hyper-parameters of our model, which is a crucial issue to achieve good performances. We successfully test the model on four toy problems and on a real world network. We also compare our model with Evolutionary Spectral Clustering, which is a state-of-the-art algorithm for community detection of evolving networks, illustrating that the kernel spectral clustering with memory effect can achieve better or equal performances.

  10. On gigahertz spectral turnovers in pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajwade, K.; Lorimer, D. R.; Anderson, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsars are known to emit non-thermal radio emission that is generally a power-law function of frequency. In some cases, a turnover is seen at frequencies around 100 MHz. Kijak et al. have reported the presence of a new class of `Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum' (GPS) pulsars that show spectral turnovers at frequencies around 1 GHz. We apply a model based on free-free thermal absorption to explain these turnovers in terms of surrounding material such as the dense environments found in H II regions, pulsar wind nebulae, or in cold, partially ionized molecular clouds. We show that the turnover frequency depends on the electron temperature of the environment close to the pulsar, as well as the emission measure along the line of sight. We fitted this model to the radio fluxes of known GPS pulsars and show that it can replicate the GHz turnover. From the thermal absorption model, we demonstrate that normal pulsars would exhibit a GPS-like behaviour if they were in a dense environment. We discuss the application of this model in the context of determining the population of neutron stars within the central parsec of the Galaxy. We show that a non-negligible fraction of this population might exhibit high-frequency spectral turnovers, which has implications on the detectability of these sources in the Galactic Centre.

  11. The interpretation of spectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holter, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics and extent of data which is obtainable by electromagnetic spectrum sensing and the application to earth resources survey are discussed. The wavelength and frequency ranges of operation for various remote sensors are tabulated. The spectral sensitivities of various sensing instruments are diagrammed. Examples of aerial photography to show the effects of lighting and seasonal variations on earth resources data are provided. Specific examples of multiband photography and multispectral imagery to crop analysis are included.

  12. Correlation-induced spectral changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Emil; James, Daniel F. V.

    1996-06-01

    This paper presents a review of research, both theoretical and experimental, concerning the influence of coherence properties of fluctuating light sources and of correlation properties of scattering media on the spectra of radiated and scattered fields. Much of this research followed a discovery made in 1986, that the spectrum of light may change on propagation, even in free space. More than 100 papers on this topic have been published to date and many of them are reviewed, or at least mentioned, in this article. After an introduction and a summary of some of the main mathematical results relating to second-order coherence theory of statistically stationary optical fields, spectral changes that may take place on superposing fields produced by two partially correlated sources are discussed. Spectral effects in fields produced by two-dimensional secondary sources and by three-dimensional primary sources are then considered. The section which follows describes spectral changes that may arise when polychromatic light is scattered on media whose physical properties vary randomly either in space and/or in time. A review is also presented of recent research, which has revealed that under certain circumstances the changes in the spectrum of light scattered on random media may imitate the Doppler effect, even though the source, the medium and the observer are all at rest with respect to one another. In the final section a brief review is given of a new emerging technique sometimes called spatial-coherence spectroscopy. It is based on the discovery that it is possible, under certain circumstances, to determine field correlations from spectral measurements.

  13. Remote application for spectral collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cone, Shelli R.; Steele, R. J.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Firpi, Alexer H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the area of collecting field spectral data using a spectrometer, it is common to have the instrument over the material of interest. In certain instances it is beneficial to have the ability to remotely control the spectrometer. While several systems have the ability to use a form of connectivity to capture the measurement it is essential to have the ability to control the settings. Additionally, capturing reference information (metadata) about the setup, system configuration, collection, location, atmospheric conditions, and sample information is necessary for future analysis leading towards material discrimination and identification. This has the potential to lead to cumbersome field collection and a lack of necessary information for post processing and analysis. The method presented in this paper describes a capability to merge all parts of spectral collection from logging reference information to initial analysis as well as importing information into a web-hosted spectral database. This allows the simplification of collecting, processing, analyzing and storing field spectra for future analysis and comparisons. This concept is developed for field collection of thermal data using the Designs and Prototypes (D&P) Hand Portable FT-IR Spectrometer (Model 102). The remote control of the spectrometer is done with a customized Android application allowing the ability to capture reference information, process the collected data from radiance to emissivity using a temperature emissivity separation algorithm and store the data into a custom web-based service. The presented system of systems allows field collected spectra to be used for various applications by spectral analysts in the future.

  14. Spectral response from blackbody measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, W. J.

    1981-07-01

    Far-infrared and submillimeter detector responsivity and spectral response measurements can be performed simultaneously by sweeping the temperature of a cooled blackbody. Such measurements yield n simultaneous linear equations for n blackbody temperatures. Matrix inversion solutions are observed to fail due to a matrix ill-conditioned for inversion. However, an unconditionally convergent iterative solution can be performed. Results for a gallium-doped germanium detector are described.

  15. Dielectric function in the spectral range (0.5–8.5)eV of an (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film with continuous composition spread

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Grund, R. Kranert, C.; Wenckstern, H. von; Zviagin, V.; Lorenz, M.; Grundmann, M.

    2015-04-28

    We determined the dielectric function of the alloy system (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the wide spectral range from 0.5 eV to 8.5 eV and for Al contents ranging from x = 0.11 to x = 0.55. For the composition range x < 0.4, we observe single phase material in the β-modification and for larger Al content also the occurrence of γ-(Al,Ga){sub 2}O{sub 3}. We derived spectra of the refractive index and the absorption coefficient as well as energy parameters of electronic band-band transitions by model analysis of the dielectric function. The dependence of the dielectric functions lineshape and the energy parameters on x is highly continuous, reflecting theoretical expectations. The data presented here provide a basis for a deeper understanding of the electronic properties of this material system and may be useful for device engineering.

  16. Spectral deblurring: an algorithm for high-resolution, hybrid spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. P.; Badea, C. T.

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a hybrid, dual-source micro-CT system based on the combined use of an energy integrating (EID) x-ray detector and a photon counting x-ray detector (PCXD). Due to their superior spectral resolving power, PCXDs have the potential to reduce radiation dose and to enable functional and molecular imaging with CT. In most current PCXDs, however, spatial resolution and field of view are limited by hardware development and charge sharing effects. To address these problems, we propose spectral deblurring—a relatively simple algorithm for increasing the spatial resolution of hybrid, spectral CT data. At the heart of the algorithm is the assumption that the underlying CT data is piecewise constant, enabling robust recovery in the presence of noise and spatial blur by enforcing gradient sparsity. After describing the proposed algorithm, we summarize simulation experiments which assess the trade-offs between spatial resolution, contrast, and material decomposition accuracy given realistic levels of noise. When the spatial resolution between imaging chains has a ratio of 5:1, spectral deblurring results in a 52% increase in the material decomposition accuracy of iodine, gadolinium, barium, and water vs. linear interpolation. For a ratio of 10:1, a realistic representation of our hybrid imaging system, a 52% improvement was also seen. Overall, we conclude that the performance breaks down around high frequency and low contrast structures. Following the simulation experiments, we apply the algorithm to ex vivo data acquired in a mouse injected with an iodinated contrast agent and surrounded by vials of iodine, gadolinium, barium, and water.

  17. Spectral density of Cooper pairs in two level quantum dot-superconductors Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhyani, A.; Rawat, P. S.; Tewari, B. S.

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, we report the role of quantum dot energy levels on the electronic spectral density for a two level quantum dot coupled to s-wave superconducting leads. The theoretical arguments in this work are based on the Anderson model so that it necessarily includes dot energies, single particle tunneling and superconducting order parameter for BCS superconductors. The expression for single particle spectral function is obtained by using the Green's function equation of motion technique. On the basis of numerical computation of spectral function of superconducting leads, it has been found that the charge transfer across such junctions can be controlled by the positions and availability of the dot levels.

  18. Ultrafast CARS with Improved Spectral Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütgens, M.; Chatzipapadopoulos, S.; Lochbrunner, S.

    2013-03-01

    Molecular vibrations are investigated by time and frequency resolved CARS applying ultrafast excitation and picosecond probing for high spectral resolution. Enhanced spectral structure and beating phenomena are demonstrated for coalescing Raman bands.

  19. Argentina spectral-agronomic multitemporal data set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmer, D.; Kinzler, C.; Tomppkins, M. A.; Badhwar, G. D.

    1983-01-01

    A multitemporal LANDSAT spectral data set was created. The data set is over five 5 nm-by-6 nm areas over Argentina and contains by field, the spectral data, vegetation type and cloud cover information.

  20. Utilization of the Crawford transformation in evaluation of the spectral efficiency of solid state light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwick, H.; Edsall, P.; Ness, J.; Hare, L.; Stuck, B.

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop procedures for evaluating the transient effects of solid state light sources used as illumination sources at night. Traditional light sources used at night are designed to preserve dark adaptation by employing long wavelength visible sources that minimally affect rod photoreceptor sensitivity, while new LED light sources provide a mix of visible spectral sources with visible spectral components that may effect rod function and possibly impede night vision. The Crawford transformation was used generate spectral dark adaptation functions for LED flashlight background effects on dark adaptation induced by background exposure conditions from four solid state light sources. Increment background spectral sensitivity functions were generated for each of four LED flashlight sources (S1, S2, & S3) as well as from a merger of each LED source with a broadband Goldman-Weekers (GW) dark adaptometer source (S5) to simulate transition for day to night light environments. Increment background spectral sensitivity for both methods of generating increment spectral sensitivity were consistent in showing similar spectral background effects on spectral sensitivity but differed in the dynamic range of recovery. Those spectra that had components in the middle wavelength region (S2 and S3) showed a more restricted rod function as compared with S1 and S2.

  1. Spectral band difference effects on radiometric cross-calibration between multiple satellite sensors in the Landsat solar-reflective spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillet, Philippe M.; Fedosejevs, Gunar; Thome, Kurtis J.

    2004-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of radiometric calibration errors due to differences in spectral response functions between satellite sensors when attempting cross-calibration based on near-simultaneous imaging of common ground targets in analogous spectral bands. Five Earth observation sensors on three satellite platforms were included on the basis of their overpass times being within 45 minutes of each other on the same day (Landsat-7 ETM+; EO-1 ALI; Terra MODIS; Terra ASTER; Terra MISR). The simulation study encompassed spectral band difference effects (SBDE) on cross-calibration between all combinations of the sensors considered, using the Landsat solar reflective spectral domain as a framework. Scene content was simulated using ground target spectra for the calibration test sites at Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada and Niobrara Grassland, Nebraska. Results were obtained as a function of calibration test site, satellite sensor, and spectral region. Overall, in the absence of corrections for SBDE, the Railroad Valley Playa site is a "good" to "very good" ground target for cross-calibration between most but not all satellite sensors considered in most but not all spectral regions investigated. "Good" and "very good" are defined as SBDEs within +/- 3 % and +/- 1 %, respectively. Without SBDE corrections, the Niobrara test site is only "good" for cross-calibration between certain sensor combinations in some spectral regions. The paper includes recommendations for spectral data and tools that would facilitate cross-calibration between multiple satellite sensors.

  2. Spectral Methods in General Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, David

    2012-03-01

    In this talk I discuss the use of spectral methods in improving the accuracy of a General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) computer code. I introduce SpecCosmo, a GRMHD code developed as a Cactus arrangement at UHCL, and show simulation results using both Fourier spectral methods and finite differencing. This work demonstrates the use of spectral methods with the FFTW 3.3 Fast Fourier Transform package integrated with the Cactus Framework to perform spectral differencing using MPI.

  3. Comparison of spectral estimators for characterizing fractionated atrial electrograms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex fractionated atrial electrograms (CFAE) acquired during atrial fibrillation (AF) are commonly assessed using the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), but this can lead to inaccuracy. In this study, spectral estimators derived by averaging the autocorrelation function at lags were compared to the DFT. Method Bipolar CFAE of at least 16 s duration were obtained from pulmonary vein ostia and left atrial free wall sites (9 paroxysmal and 10 persistent AF patients). Power spectra were computed using the DFT and three other methods: 1. a novel spectral estimator based on signal averaging (NSE), 2. the NSE with harmonic removal (NSH), and 3. the autocorrelation function average at lags (AFA). Three spectral parameters were calculated: 1. the largest fundamental spectral peak, known as the dominant frequency (DF), 2. the DF amplitude (DA), and 3. the mean spectral profile (MP), which quantifies noise floor level. For each spectral estimator and parameter, the significance of the difference between paroxysmal and persistent AF was determined. Results For all estimators, mean DA and mean DF values were higher in persistent AF, while the mean MP value was higher in paroxysmal AF. The differences in means between paroxysmals and persistents were highly significant for 3/3 NSE and NSH measurements and for 2/3 DFT and AFA measurements (p<0.001). For all estimators, the standard deviation in DA and MP values were higher in persistent AF, while the standard deviation in DF value was higher in paroxysmal AF. Differences in standard deviations between paroxysmals and persistents were highly significant in 2/3 NSE and NSH measurements, in 1/3 AFA measurements, and in 0/3 DFT measurements. Conclusions Measurements made from all four spectral estimators were in agreement as to whether the means and standard deviations in three spectral parameters were greater in CFAEs acquired from paroxysmal or in persistent AF patients. Since the measurements were consistent, use of

  4. Toda Systems, Cluster Characters, and Spectral Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Harold

    2016-07-01

    We show that the Hamiltonians of the open relativistic Toda system are elements of the generic basis of a cluster algebra, and in particular are cluster characters of nonrigid representations of a quiver with potential. Using cluster coordinates defined via spectral networks, we identify the phase space of this system with the wild character variety related to the periodic nonrelativistic Toda system by the wild nonabelian Hodge correspondence. We show that this identification takes the relativistic Toda Hamiltonians to traces of holonomies around a simple closed curve. In particular, this provides nontrivial examples of cluster coordinates on SL n -character varieties for n > 2 where canonical functions associated to simple closed curves can be computed in terms of quivers with potential, extending known results in the SL 2 case.

  5. Vertical-plane sound localization with distorted spectral cues

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, Ewan A.; Sabin, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    For human listeners, the primary cues for localization in the vertical plane are provided by the direction-dependent filtering of the pinnae, head, and upper body. Vertical-plane localization generally is accurate for broadband sounds, but when such sounds are presented at near-threshold levels or at high levels with short durations (<20 ms), the apparent location is biased toward the horizontal plane (i.e., elevation gain <1). We tested the hypothesis that these effects result in part from distorted peripheral representations of sound spectra. Human listeners indicated the apparent position of 100-ms, 50–60dB SPL, wideband noise-burst targets by orienting their heads. The targets were synthesized in virtual auditory space and presented over headphones. Faithfully synthesized targets were interleaved with targets for which the directional transfer function spectral notches were filled in, peaks were levelled off, or the spectral contrast of the entire profile was reduced or expanded. As notches were filled in progressively or peaks levelled progressively, elevation gain decreased in a graded manner similar to that observed as sensation level is reduced below 30dB or, for brief sounds, increased above 45dB. As spectral contrast was reduced, gain dropped only at the most extreme reduction (25% of normal). Spectral contrast expansion had little effect. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that loss of representation of spectral features contributes to reduced elevation gain at low and high sound levels. The results also suggest that perceived location depends on a correlation-like spectral matching process that is sensitive to the relative, rather than absolute, across-frequency shape of the spectral profile. PMID:24076423

  6. Spectral averaging techniques for Jacobi matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Rio, Rafael del; Martinez, Carmen; Schulz-Baldes, Hermann

    2008-02-15

    Spectral averaging techniques for one-dimensional discrete Schroedinger operators are revisited and extended. In particular, simultaneous averaging over several parameters is discussed. Special focus is put on proving lower bounds on the density of the averaged spectral measures. These Wegner-type estimates are used to analyze stability properties for the spectral types of Jacobi matrices under local perturbations.

  7. Radio-astro-tools and spectral cube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsburg, Adam

    2016-03-01

    SpectralCube is a toolkit for efficiently handling and performing simple analysis of spectral data cubes. It was designed for use with ALMA and JVLA data, but is readily and easily applicable to other data cubes including optical and infrared IFUs. This 5-minute "lightning talk" gives a brief overview and update of spectral_cube & the radio-astro-tools packages.

  8. Perturbative analysis of spectral singularities and their optical realizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafazadeh, Ali; Rostamzadeh, Saber

    2012-08-01

    We develop a perturbative method of computing spectral singularities of a Schrödinger operator defined by a general complex potential that vanishes outside a closed interval. These can be realized as zero-width resonances in optical gain media and correspond to a lasing effect that occurs at the threshold gain. Their time-reversed copies yield coherent perfect absorption of light that is also known as antilasing. We use our general results to establish the exactness of the nth-order perturbation theory for an arbitrary complex potential consisting of n delta functions, obtain an exact expression for the transfer matrix of these potentials, and examine spectral singularities of complex barrier potentials of arbitrary shape. In the context of optical spectral singularities, these correspond to inhomogeneous gain media.

  9. Spectral reflectance estimation using a six-color scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Shoji; Kohno, Satoshi; Kakinuma, Hirokazu; Nohara, Fuminori; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2009-01-01

    A method is proposed for estimating the spectral reflectance function of an object surface by using a six-color scanner. The scanner is regarded as a six-band spectral imaging system, since it captures six color channels in total from two separate scans using two difference lamps. First, we describe the basic characteristics of the imaging systems for a HP color scanner and a multiband camera used for comparison. Second, we describe a computational method for recovering surface-spectral reflectances from the noisy sensor outputs. A LMMSE estimator is presented as an optimal estimator. We discuss the reflectance estimation for non-flat surfaces with shading effect. A solution method is presented for the reliable reflectance estimation. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is examined in detail on experiments using the Macbeth Color Checker and non-flat objects.

  10. The Arcetri Spectral Code for optically thin plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Landini, M.

    2002-03-01

    The Arcetri Spectral Code allows one to evaluate the spectrum of the radiation emitted by hot and optically thin plasmas in the spectral range 1-2000 Å. The Arcetri Code consists of a series of files that contain the emissivity of the plasma as a function of electron temperature and density. Both line and continuum emission are considered. These quantities are calculated using a database of atomic data and transition probabilities, mostly taken from the CHIANTI database. In the present work we describe the updates to the spectrum and present the new results. A comparison with the previous version of the code allows us to assess the improvements to the spectrum; comparison with other spectral codes allows us to assess the completeness of the Arcetri Code and of the CHIANTI database.

  11. Adiabaticity and spectral splits in collective neutrino transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2007-12-15

    Neutrinos streaming off a supernova core transform collectively by neutrino-neutrino interactions, leading to 'spectral splits' where an energy E{sub split} divides the transformed spectrum sharply into parts of almost pure but different flavors. We present a detailed description of the spectral-split phenomenon which is conceptually and quantitatively understood in an adiabatic treatment of neutrino-neutrino effects. Central to this theory is a self-consistency condition in the form of two sum rules (integrals over the neutrino spectra that must equal certain conserved quantities). We provide explicit analytic and numerical solutions for various neutrino spectra. We introduce the concept of the adiabatic reference frame and elaborate on the relative adiabatic evolution. Violating adiabaticity leads to the spectral split being 'washed out'. The sharpness of the split appears to be represented by a surprisingly universal function.

  12. Irregular conformal block, spectral curve and flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang Kwan; Rim, Chaiho; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Irregular conformal block is motivated by the Argyres-Douglas type of N=2 super conformal gauge theory. We investigate the classical/NS limit of irregular conformal block using the spectral curve on a Riemann surface with irregular punctures, which is equivalent to the loop equation of irregular matrix model. The spectral curve is reduced to the second order (Virasoro symmetry, SU(2) for the gauge theory) and third order (W 3 symmetry, SU(3)) differential equations of a polynomial with finite degree. The conformal and W symmetry generate the flow equations in the spectral curve and determine the irregular conformal block, hence the partition function of the Argyres-Douglas theory ala AGT conjecture.

  13. Detection of arterial disorders by spectral analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2007-01-01

    This paper intends to an integrated view of the spectral analysis techniques in the detection of arterial disorders. The paper includes illustrative information about feature extraction from signals recorded from arteries. Short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and wavelet transform (WT) were used for spectral analysis of ophthalmic arterial (OA) Doppler signals. Using these spectral analysis methods, the variations in the shape of the Doppler spectra as a function of time were presented in the form of sonograms in order to obtain medical information. These sonograms were then used to compare the applied methods in terms of their frequency resolution and the effects in determination of OA stenosis. The author suggest that the content of the paper will assist to the people in gaining a better understanding of the STFT and WT in the detection of arterial disorders. PMID:17502695

  14. Bisector Area: A New Metric for Calculating Spectral Line Bisectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Kaitlin; Harker, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We present a study of a new metric for characterizing spectral line bisectors from integrated Sun-as-a-star measurements of photospheric spectral lines. This metric, which we call bisector area, differs from previous analysis methods in that it characterizes the entire bisector (up to a maximum intensity limit) with a single scalar quantity. In this preliminary study, we analyzed data from the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun Integrated Sunlight Spectrometer (SOLIS/ISS) during the decline and rise of solar cycles 23 and 24, respectively, to diagnose any potential correlations between bisector area and other known changes in spectral line properties as a function of time. This work was carried out through the National Solar Observatory Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  15. [Radiation thermometry based on calibration of spectral responsivity].

    PubMed

    Xin, Cheng-Yun; Cheng, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Zhong-Zheng

    2012-10-01

    Abstract True surface temperatures can be determined by measurements of radiation emitted by the object. The non-spectral parameter in the radiation measurement equation is the function of the relative position between the target and the lens, so calibration of space position is necessary for temperature measurement, when emissivity and temperature are measured simultaneously. In the present paper, the non-spectral parameter was included into the undetermined coefficients of emissivity modeled by finite series, which will not affect the solution of true surface temperature. Therefore, radiation thermometry can be accomplished without calibration of space position and normalization of measurement data. And not the true spectral emissivity but the trend of it can be measured. Two special examples were investigated, respectively. The results indicate that when the effective wavelength of each channel is different, multi-wavelength radiation thermometry equations have the unique solution, while the number of the multiband ones may be zero, one, two or even three. PMID:23285877

  16. Spectral properties of Shiba subgap states at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitko, Rok

    2016-05-01

    Using the numerical renormalization group (NRG), we analyze the temperature dependence of the spectral function of a magnetic impurity described by the single-impurity Anderson model with a superconducting host. With increasing temperature the spectral weight is gradually transferred from the δ peak to the continuous subgap background, and both spectral features coexist at finite temperatures: the δ peak persists to temperatures of order Δ . The continuous background is due to inelastic exchange scattering of Bogoliubov quasiparticles off the impurity, and it is thermally activated since it requires a finite thermal population of quasiparticles above the gap. In the singlet regime for strong hybridization or away from the particle-hole symmetric point (charge-fluctuation regime) an additional subgap structure is observed just below the gap edges. It has thermally activated behavior with an activation energy equal to the Shiba state excitation energy.

  17. Synthesis, crystal growth, thermal, electronic and vibrational spectral studies of 1-(4-Bromophenyl)-3-(3,4-dimethoxy-phenyl)prop-2-en-1-one: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, L.; Arunsasi, B. S.; Sajan, D.; Shettigar, V.

    2014-11-01

    A new chalcone derivative, 1-(4-Bromophenyl)-3-(3,4-dimethoxy-phenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (DMBC) was synthesized and single crystals were grown by slow evaporation technique. The FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra of the sample were recorded in the region 3500-50 cm-1 and 4000-400 cm-1 respectively. The spectra were interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis, following structure optimizations and force field calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. Normal coordinate calculations were performed using the DFT force field corrected by a recommended set of scaling factors yielding fairly good agreement between the observed and calculated wavenumbers. DMBC is thermally stable up to 265.0 °C and optically transparent in the visible region. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecules were constructed by Natural Bond Orbital analysis using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution, molecular shape, size, and dipole moments of the molecule. The electronic properties, HOMO and LUMO energies were measured.

  18. Multitask spectral clustering by exploring intertask correlation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ma, Zhigang; Yang, Yi; Nie, Feiping; Shen, Heng Tao

    2015-05-01

    Clustering, as one of the most classical research problems in pattern recognition and data mining, has been widely explored and applied to various applications. Due to the rapid evolution of data on the Web, more emerging challenges have been posed on traditional clustering techniques: 1) correlations among related clustering tasks and/or within individual task are not well captured; 2) the problem of clustering out-of-sample data is seldom considered; and 3) the discriminative property of cluster label matrix is not well explored. In this paper, we propose a novel clustering model, namely multitask spectral clustering (MTSC), to cope with the above challenges. Specifically, two types of correlations are well considered: 1) intertask clustering correlation, which refers the relations among different clustering tasks and 2) intratask learning correlation, which enables the processes of learning cluster labels and learning mapping function to reinforce each other. We incorporate a novel l2,p -norm regularizer to control the coherence of all the tasks based on an assumption that related tasks should share a common low-dimensional representation. Moreover, for each individual task, an explicit mapping function is simultaneously learnt for predicting cluster labels by mapping features to the cluster label matrix. Meanwhile, we show that the learning process can naturally incorporate discriminative information to further improve clustering performance. We explore and discuss the relationships between our proposed model and several representative clustering techniques, including spectral clustering, k -means and discriminative k -means. Extensive experiments on various real-world datasets illustrate the advantage of the proposed MTSC model compared to state-of-the-art clustering approaches. PMID:25252288

  19. HYMOSS signal processing for pushbroom spectral imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, David E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Pushbroom Spectral Imaging Program was to develop on-focal plane electronics which compensate for detector array non-uniformities. The approach taken was to implement a simple two point calibration algorithm on focal plane which allows for offset and linear gain correction. The key on focal plane features which made this technique feasible was the use of a high quality transimpedance amplifier (TIA) and an analog-to-digital converter for each detector channel. Gain compensation is accomplished by varying the feedback capacitance of the integrate and dump TIA. Offset correction is performed by storing offsets in a special on focal plane offset register and digitally subtracting the offsets from the readout data during the multiplexing operation. A custom integrated circuit was designed, fabricated, and tested on this program which proved that nonuniformity compensated, analog-to-digital converting circuits may be used to read out infrared detectors. Irvine Sensors Corporation (ISC) successfully demonstrated the following innovative on-focal-plane functions that allow for correction of detector non-uniformities. Most of the circuit functions demonstrated on this program are finding their way onto future IC's because of their impact on reduced downstream processing, increased focal plane performance, simplified focal plane control, reduced number of dewar connections, as well as the noise immunity of a digital interface dewar. The potential commercial applications for this integrated circuit are primarily in imaging systems. These imaging systems may be used for: security monitoring systems, manufacturing process monitoring, robotics, and for spectral imaging when used in analytical instrumentation.

  20. HYMOSS signal processing for pushbroom spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, David E.

    1991-06-01

    The objective of the Pushbroom Spectral Imaging Program was to develop on-focal plane electronics which compensate for detector array non-uniformities. The approach taken was to implement a simple two point calibration algorithm on focal plane which allows for offset and linear gain correction. The key on focal plane features which made this technique feasible was the use of a high quality transimpedance amplifier (TIA) and an analog-to-digital converter for each detector channel. Gain compensation is accomplished by varying the feedback capacitance of the integrate and dump TIA. Offset correction is performed by storing offsets in a special on focal plane offset register and digitally subtracting the offsets from the readout data during the multiplexing operation. A custom integrated circuit was designed, fabricated, and tested on this program which proved that nonuniformity compensated, analog-to-digital converting circuits may be used to read out infrared detectors. Irvine Sensors Corporation (ISC) successfully demonstrated the following innovative on-focal-plane functions that allow for correction of detector non-uniformities. Most of the circuit functions demonstrated on this program are finding their way onto future IC's because of their impact on reduced downstream processing, increased focal plane performance, simplified focal plane control, reduced number of dewar connections, as well as the noise immunity of a digital interface dewar. The potential commercial applications for this integrated circuit are primarily in imaging systems. These imaging systems may be used for: security monitoring systems, manufacturing process monitoring, robotics, and for spectral imaging when used in analytical instrumentation.