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Sample records for spectral induced polarization

  1. Spectral Induced Polarization of Sandstones: Temperature Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, A.; Kruschwitz, S.; Lesmes, D.

    2007-12-01

    There is growing interest in the use of spectral induced polarization (SIP) for a wide range of environmental applications, in particular those focused on hydrogeological investigations. Recent experimental work has demonstrated that the mean relaxation time of electrical impedance spectra measured in sandstones is linked to the grain surface area and strongly correlated to some measure of a dominant pore throat size. Such empirically derived relationships lead to potential models of SIP - hydraulic conductivity, which has immense value for the hydrological community. Furthermore, the links between surface area and electrical response may lead to other, equally exciting, applications, such as in characterizing geochemical reactivity of sediments. However, there is a need to understand the fundamental behavior of SIP in such porous media in order for such models to be applied usefully. In an attempt to address this, we focus here on the influence of temperature on the SIP behavior of a range of sandstones. Classical models of dielectric dispersion in colloids have proposed direct inverse relationships between relaxation time and temperature. Through a series of experimental trials we have studied this behavior: examining the impedance spectra (in the 1 mHz to 1 kHz range) of four different sandstones over a temperature range of 5 to 30 degrees Celsius. Analysis of the spectra with the widely used Pelton Cole-Cole model has confirmed hypothesized effects on a mean relaxation time but revealed that the responses to temperature change is a function of physical properties of the sandstone. In addition, the analysis has illustrated how temperature effects on surface complex conductivity of the sandstones differ as a function of pore fluid and formation factor. The results add to the growing experimental evidence of controls on spectral impedance in porous media and help ascertain generalized petrophysical models for a wide range of applications.

  2. Spectral Induced Polarization of Goethite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, J. A.; Moradi, S.; Zimmermann, E.; Bosch, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Goethite nanoparticles are being considered as a tool to enhance in situ remediation of aquifers contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons. Injection of goethite nanoparticles into the plume is expected to enhance microbial iron reduction and associated beneficial oxidation of hydrocarbons in a cost-effective manner. Amongst others, current challenges associated with this novel approach are the monitoring of nanoparticle delivery and the nanoparticle and contaminant concentration dynamics over time. Obviously, non-invasive monitoring of these properties would be highly useful. In this study, we aim to evaluate whether spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements of the complex electrical conductivity are suitable for such non-invasive characterization. In principle, this is not unreasonable because the electrical double layers of the goethite nanoparticles are expected to affect electrical polarization and thus the imaginary part of the complex electrical conductivity. In a first set of measurements, we determined the complex electrical conductivity of goethite nanoparticle suspensions with different nanoparticle concentrations, pH, and ionic strength in the mHz to kHz frequency range. In a second set of measurements, mixtures of sand and different concentrations of goethite nanoparticles and variable pH and ionic strengths were analyzed. Finally, flow experiments were monitored with SIP in a 1-m long laboratory column to investigate dynamic effects associated with goethite nanoparticle injection and delivery. The results showed that the imaginary part of the electrical conductivity was only affected in the high frequency range (Hz - kHz), which is expected from the small size of the goethite nanoparticles. Overall, we found that the goethite nanoparticles are associated with a small increase in the imaginary electrical conductivity at 1 kHz that can be measured in situ using recently improved borehole electrical impedance tomography measurement equipment that provides the required accuracy for frequencies above 100 Hz.

  3. On the spectral induced polarization signature of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, N.; Furman, A.

    2014-01-01

    Although often composing a non-negligible fraction of soil cation exchange capacity (CEC), the impact of soil organic matter (OM) on the electrical properties of soil has not been thoroughly investigated. In this research the impact of soil OM on the spectral induced polarization (SIP) signature of soil was investigated. Electrical and chemical measurements for two experiments using the same soil, one with calcium as the dominant cation and the other with sodium, with different concentration of OM were performed. Our results show that despite the high CEC of OM, a decrease in polarization and an increase in relaxation time with increasing concentration of OM is observed. For the soil with calcium as the dominant cation, the decreases in polarization and the increase in relaxation time were stronger. We explain these non-trivial results by accounting for the interactions between the OM and the soil minerals. We suggest that the formation of organo-mineral complexes reduce ionic mobility, explaining both the decrease in polarization and the increase in relaxation time. These results demonstrate the important role of OM on SIP response of soil, and call for a further research in order to establish a new polarization model that will include the impact of OM on soil polarization.

  4. Spectral Induced Polarization Signature of Soil Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Nimrod; Furman, Alex

    2015-04-01

    Although often composing a non-negligible fraction of soil cation exchange capacity (CEC), the impact of soil organic matter (OM) on the electrical properties of soil has not been thoroughly investigated. In this research the impact of soil OM on the spectral induced polarization (SIP) signature of soil was investigated. Electrical and chemical measurements for two experiments using the same soil, one with calcium as the dominant cation and the other with sodium, with different concentration of OM were performed. Our results show that despite the high CEC of OM, a decrease in polarization and an increase in relaxation time with increasing concentration of OM is observed. For the soil with calcium as the dominant cation, the decreases in polarization and the increase in relaxation time were stronger. We explain these non-trivial results by accounting for the interactions between the OM and the soil minerals. We suggest that the formation of organo-mineral complexes reduce ionic mobility, explaining both the decrease in polarization and the increase in relaxation time. These results demonstrate the important role of OM on SIP response of soil, and call for a further research in order to establish a new polarization model that will include the impact of OM on soil polarization.

  5. Spectral induced polarization for monitoring electrokinetic remediation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, Matteo; Losito, Gabriella

    2015-12-01

    Electrokinetic remediation is an emerging technology for extracting heavy metals from contaminated soils and sediments. This method uses a direct or alternating electric field to induce the transport of contaminants toward the electrodes. The electric field also produces pH variations, sorption/desorption and precipitation/dissolution of species in the porous medium during remediation. Since heavy metal mobility is pH-dependent, the accurate control of pH inside the material is required in order to enhance the removal efficiency. The common approach for monitoring the remediation process both in laboratory and in the field is the chemical analysis of samples collected from discrete locations. The purpose of this study is the evaluation of Spectral Induced Polarization as an alternative method for monitoring geochemical changes in the contaminated mass during remediation. The advantage of this technique applied to field-scale is to offer higher resolution mapping of the remediation site and lower cost compared to the conventional sampling procedure. We carried out laboratory-scale electrokinetic remediation experiments on fine-grained marine sediments contaminated by heavy metal and we made Spectral Induced Polarization measurements before and after each treatment. Measurements were done in the frequency range 10- 3-103 Hz. By the deconvolution of the spectra using the Debye Decomposition method we obtained the mean relaxation time and total chargeability. The main finding of this work is that a linear relationship exists between the local total chargeability and pH, with good agreement. The observed behaviour of chargeability is interpreted as a direct consequence of the alteration of the zeta potential of the sediment particles due to pH changes. Such relationship has a significant value for the interpretation of induced polarization data, allowing the use of this technique for monitoring electrokinetic remediation at field-scale.

  6. Spectral induced polarization signatures of abiotic FeS precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Doherty, R.; Williams, K. H.

    2010-01-15

    In recent years, geophysical methods have been shown to be sensitive to microbial induced mineralization processes. The spectral induced polarization (SIP) method appears to be very promising for monitoring mineralization and microbial processes. With this work, we study the links of mineralization and SIP signals, in the absence of microbial activity. We recorded the SIP response during abiotic FeS precipitation. We show that the SIP signals are diagnostic of FeS mineralization and can be differentiated from SIP signals from bio-mineralization processes. More specifically the imaginary conductivity shows almost linear dependence on the amount of FeS precipitating out of solution, above the threshold value 0.006 gr under our experimental conditions. This research has direct implications for the use of the SIP method as a monitoring, and decision making, tool for sustainable remediation of metals in contaminated soils and groundwater.

  7. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Parviainen, Annika; Slater, Lee; Leveinen, Jussi

    2015-02-01

    Mine tailings impoundments are a source of leachates known as acid mine drainage (AMD) which can pose a contamination risk for surrounding surface and groundwater. Methodologies which can help management of this environmental issue are needed. We carried out a laboratory study of the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of tailings from the Haveri Au-Cu mine, SW Finland. The primary objectives were, (1) to determine possible correlations between SIP parameters and textural properties associated with oxidative-weathering mechanisms, mineralogical composition and metallic content, and (2) to evaluate the effects of the pore water chemistry on SIP parameters associated with redox-inactive and redox-active electrolytes varying in molar concentration, conductivity and pH. The Haveri tailings exhibit well defined relaxation spectra between 100 and 10,000 Hz. The relaxation magnitudes are governed by the in-situ oxidative-weathering conditions on sulphide mineral surfaces contained in the tailings, and decrease with the oxidation degree. The oxidation-driven textural variation in the tailings results in changes to the frequency peak of the phase angle, the imaginary conductivity and chargeability, when plotted versus the pore water conductivity. In contrast, the real and the formation electrical conductivity components show a single linear dependence on the pore water conductivity. The increase of the pore water conductivity (dominated by the increase of ions concentration in solution) along with a transition to acidic conditions shifts the polarization peak towards higher frequencies. These findings show the unique sensitivity of the SIP method to potentially discriminate AMD discharges from reactive oxidation zones in tailings, suggesting a significant advantage for monitoring threatened aquifers.

  8. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Parviainen, Annika; Slater, Lee; Leveinen, Jussi

    2015-02-01

    Mine tailings impoundments are a source of leachates known as acid mine drainage (AMD) which can pose a contamination risk for surrounding surface and groundwater. Methodologies which can help management of this environmental issue are needed. We carried out a laboratory study of the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of tailings from the Haveri Au-Cu mine, SW Finland. The primary objectives were, (1) to determine possible correlations between SIP parameters and textural properties associated with oxidative-weathering mechanisms, mineralogical composition and metallic content, and (2) to evaluate the effects of the pore water chemistry on SIP parameters associated with redox-inactive and redox-active electrolytes varying in molar concentration, conductivity and pH. The Haveri tailings exhibit well defined relaxation spectra between 100 and 10,000Hz. The relaxation magnitudes are governed by the in-situ oxidative-weathering conditions on sulphide mineral surfaces contained in the tailings, and decrease with the oxidation degree. The oxidation-driven textural variation in the tailings results in changes to the frequency peak of the phase angle, the imaginary conductivity and chargeability, when plotted versus the pore water conductivity. In contrast, the real and the formation electrical conductivity components show a single linear dependence on the pore water conductivity. The increase of the pore water conductivity (dominated by the increase of ions concentration in solution) along with a transition to acidic conditions shifts the polarization peak towards higher frequencies. These findings show the unique sensitivity of the SIP method to potentially discriminate AMD discharges from reactive oxidation zones in tailings, suggesting a significant advantage for monitoring threatened aquifers. PMID:25528133

  9. Temperature dependence of spectral induced polarization data: experimental results and membrane polarization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairlein, Katharina; Bücker, Matthias; Hördt, Andreas; Hinze, Björn

    2016-04-01

    Spectral induced polarization measurements are affected by temperature variations due to a variety of temperature-dependent parameters that control the complex electrical conductivity. Most important is the influence of the ion mobility, which increases with increasing temperature. It is responsible for the increase of the conductivity of the fluid in the pores with temperature and influences the electrical double layer on the mineral surface. This work is based on laboratory measurements of 13 sandstone samples from different sources with different geological and petrophysical characteristics. We measured the complex impedance in a frequency range from 0.01 to 100 Hz and a temperature range from 0 to 40 °C. The main observation is a decrease of the characteristic time (defined by the inverse of the frequency, at which the phase shift is maximum) with increasing temperature. The strength of this decrease differs from one sample to another. The temperature dependence of the phase shift magnitude cannot easily be generalized, as it depends on the particular sample. The experimental findings suggest that neglecting the influence of temperature on complex conductivity may lead to significant errors when estimating hydraulic conductivity from relaxation time. We also simulate the temperature dependence with a theoretical model of membrane polarization and review some of the model properties, with an emphasis on the temperature dependence of the parameters. The model reproduces several features characterizing the measured data, including the temperature dependence of the characteristic times. Computed tomography and microscope images of the pore structure of three samples also allow us to associate differences in the geometrical parameters used in the modelling with pore scale parameters of the actual samples.

  10. Spectral Induced Polarization Signatures of Ethanol in Sand-Clay Medium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) method has previously been investigated as a tool for detecting physicochemical changes occurring as result of clay-organic interactions in porous media. We performed SIP measurements with a dynamic signal analyzer (NI-4551) on laboratory ...

  11. Compressive spectral polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chen; Arguello, Henry; Arce, Gonzalo R.; Lorenz, Virginia O.

    2014-05-01

    We present a compressive spectral polarization imager driven by a rotating prism and a colored detector with a micropolarizer array. The prism which shears the scene along one spatial axis according to its wavelength components is successively rotated to different angles as measurement shots are taken. With 0°, 45°, 90°, 135° linear micropolarizers randomly distributed, the micropolarizer array is matched to the detector thus the the first three Stokes parameters of the scene are compressively sensed. The four dimensional (4D) data cube is thus projected onto the two dimensional (2D) FPA. Multiple snapshots are obtained for scenes with detailed spatial and spectral content. The 4D spectral-polarization data cube is reconstructed from the 2D measurements via nonlinear optimization with sparsity constraints. Polarization state planes (degree of linear polarization and angle of polarization) for each spectral slice of the hypercube are presented.

  12. Time-Domain Spectral Induced Polarization Based on Pseudo-random Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; Wei, Wenbo; Luo, Weibin; Xu, Qindong

    2013-12-01

    To reduce noise during electrical prospecting, we hereby propose a new method using correlation identification technology and conventional electrical exploration devices. A correlation operation can be carried out with the transmitted pseudo-random sequence and received time signal to suppress the random noise, and the time-domain impulse response and frequency response of the frequency domain of the underground media can be obtained. At the same time, using a dual Cole-Cole model to fit a complex resistivity spectrum, which is close to the frequency response, we can get a variety of induced polarization parameters and electromagnetic parameters of subsurface, which can provide more useful information for the exploration of mineral resources. This time domain prospecting method can effectively improve the efficiency of the spectral induced polarization method. In this article, we have carried out theoretical calculations and a simulation to prove the feasibility of such a method.

  13. Spectral and polarization structure of field-induced photonic bands in cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Palto, S P; Barnik, M I; Geivandov, A R; Kasyanova, I V; Palto, V S

    2015-09-01

    Transmission of planar layers of cholesteric liquid crystals is studied in pulsed electric fields perpendicular to the helix axis at normal incidence of both linearly polarized and unpolarized light. Spectral and light polarization properties of the primary photonic band and the field-induced bands up to fourth order of Bragg selective reflection are studied in detail. In our experiments we have achieved an electric field strength several times higher than the theoretical values corresponding to the critical field of full helix unwinding. However, the experiments show that despite the high strength of the electric field applied the helix does not unwind, but strongly deforms, keeping its initial spatial period. Strong helix deformation results in distinct spectral band splitting, as well as very high field-induced selective reflectance that can be applied in lasers and other optoelectronic devices. Peculiarities of inducing and splitting the bands are discussed in terms of the scattering coefficient approach. All observed effects are confirmed by numerical simulations. The simulations also show that liquid crystal surface anchoring is not the factor that prevents the helix unwinding. Thus, the currently acknowledged concept of continuous helix unwinding in the electric field should be reconsidered. PMID:26465485

  14. Spectral and polarization structure of field-induced photonic bands in cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palto, S. P.; Barnik, M. I.; Geivandov, A. R.; Kasyanova, I. V.; Palto, V. S.

    2015-09-01

    Transmission of planar layers of cholesteric liquid crystals is studied in pulsed electric fields perpendicular to the helix axis at normal incidence of both linearly polarized and unpolarized light. Spectral and light polarization properties of the primary photonic band and the field-induced bands up to fourth order of Bragg selective reflection are studied in detail. In our experiments we have achieved an electric field strength several times higher than the theoretical values corresponding to the critical field of full helix unwinding. However, the experiments show that despite the high strength of the electric field applied the helix does not unwind, but strongly deforms, keeping its initial spatial period. Strong helix deformation results in distinct spectral band splitting, as well as very high field-induced selective reflectance that can be applied in lasers and other optoelectronic devices. Peculiarities of inducing and splitting the bands are discussed in terms of the scattering coefficient approach. All observed effects are confirmed by numerical simulations. The simulations also show that liquid crystal surface anchoring is not the factor that prevents the helix unwinding. Thus, the currently acknowledged concept of continuous helix unwinding in the electric field should be reconsidered.

  15. Pore-scale spectral induced polarization (SIP) signaturesassociated with FeS biomineral transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Personna, Yves R.; Hubbard, Susan

    2007-10-01

    The authors measured Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) signatures in sand columns during (1) FeS biomineralization produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (D. vulgaris) under anaerboci conditions, and (2) subsequent biomineral dissolution upon return to an aerobic state. The low-frequency (0.1-10 Hz peak) relaxations produced during biomineralization can be modeled with a Cole-Cole formulation, from which the evolution of the polarization magnitude and relaxation length scale can be estimated. They find that the modeled time constant is consistent with the polarizable elements being biomineral encrused pores. Evolution of the model parameters is consistent with FeS surface area increases and pore-size reduction during biomineral growth, and subsequent biomineral dissolution (FeS surface area decreases and pore expansion) upon return to the aerobic state. They conclude that SIP signatures are diagnostic of pore-scale geometrical changes associated with FeS biomineralization by sulfate reducing bacteria.

  16. Spectral induced polarization signatures of hydroxide adsorption and mineral precipitation in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Zhang; Lee Slater; George Redden; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy Johnson; Don Fox

    2012-04-01

    The spectral induced polarization (SIP) technique is a promising approach for delineating subsurface physical and chemical property changes in a minimally invasive manner. We investigated spatiotemporal variations in complex conductivity during evolution of urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation reaction fronts within a silica gel column. The real and imaginary parts of complex conductivity were shown to be sensitive to changes in both solution chemistry and calcium carbonate precipitation. Distinct changes in imaginary conductivity coincided with increased hydroxide ion concentration during urea hydrolysis. In a separate experiment focused on the effect of hydroxide concentration on interfacial polarization of silica gel and well-sorted sand, we found a strong dependence of the polarization response on pH changes of the solution. We propose a conceptual model describing hydroxide ion adsorption behavior in silica gel and its control on interfacial polarizability. Our results demonstrate the utility of SIP for non-invasive monitoring of reaction fronts, and indicate its potential for quantifying geochemical processes that control the polarization responses of porous media at larger spatial scales in the natural environment.

  17. Spectral Induced Polarization Signatures of Hydroxide Adsorption and Mineral Precipitation in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chi; Slater, Lee; Redden, George D.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Johnson, Timothy C.; Fox, Don

    2012-04-17

    The spectral induced polarization (SIP) technique is a promising approach for delineating subsurface physical and chemical property changes in a minimally invasive manner. To facilitate the understanding of position and chemical properties of reaction fronts that involve mineral precipitation in porous media, we investigated spatiotemporal variations in complex conductivity during evolution of urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation reaction fronts within a silica gel column. The real and imaginary parts of complex conductivity were shown to be sensitive to changes in both solution chemistry and calcium carbonate precipitation. Distinct changes in imaginary conductivity coincided with increased hydroxide ion concentration during urea hydrolysis. In a separate experiment focused on the effect of hydroxide concentration on interfacial polarization of silica gel and well-sorted sand, we found a significant dependence of the polarization response on pH changes of the solution. We propose a conceptual model describing hydroxide ion adsorption behavior in silica gel and its control on interfacial polarizability. Our results demonstrate the utility of SIP for noninvasive monitoring of reaction fronts, and indicate its potential for quantifying geochemical processes that control the polarization responses of porous media at larger spatial scales in the natural environment.

  18. Evaluation of Surface Sorption Processes Using Spectral Induced Polarization and a (22)Na Tracer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Na; Moysey, Stephen M J; Powell, Brian A; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

    2015-08-18

    We investigate mechanisms controlling the complex electrical conductivity of a porous media using noninvasive spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements of a silica gel during a pH dependent surface adsorption experiment. Sorption of sodium on silica gel surfaces was monitored as the pH of a column was equilibrated at 5.0 and then successively raised to 6.5 and 8.0, but the composition of the 0.01 M NaCl solution was otherwise unchanged. SIP measurements show an increase in the imaginary conductivity of the sample (17.82 0.07 ?S/cm) in response to the pH change, interpreted as deprotonation of silanol groups on the silica gel surface followed by sorption of sodium cations. Independent measurements of Na(+) accumulation on grain surfaces performed using a radioactive (22)Na tracer support the interpretation of pH-dependent sorption as a dominant process controlling the electrical properties of the silica gel (R(2) = 0.99) and confirms the importance of grain polarization (versus membrane polarization) in influencing SIP measurements of silicate minerals. The number of surface sorption sites estimated by fitting a mechanistic, triple-layer model for the complex conductivity to the SIP data (13.22 10(16) sites/m(2)) was 2.8 times larger than that estimated directly by a (22)Na mass balance (5.13 10(16) sites/m(2)), suggesting additional contributions to polarization exist. PMID:26191613

  19. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of biodegraded oil in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Aal, Gamal Z.; Atekwana, Estella A.

    2014-02-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of different oil saturation (0.2-0.8), wetting conditions (water-wet and oil-wet), and the addition of asphaltene on the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of biodegraded and fresh crude oil in sand columns. In the water-wet case, no significant differences were observed for both the fresh and biodegraded oil and both displayed an increase in the magnitude of the phase (ϕ) and decrease in the magnitudes of the real (σ') and imaginary (σ'') conductivity components with increasing oil saturation. In this instance the SIP response is most likely controlled by the conduction and polarization of the electric double layer at the mineral-water interface. However, when oil is the wetting phase there were considerable differences in the magnitude of the SIP parameters between the fresh and biodegraded oil. The magnitude of ϕ and σ'' increased with increasing oil saturation, whereas σ' decreased. The magnitude of σ' and σ'' for the biodegraded oil-wetted sands were relatively higher compared to fresh oil-wetted sands. In experiments with fresh and biodegraded oil-wet sand, the addition of 1 per cent asphaltene increased σ' and σ'' with the biodegraded oil showing the highest magnitude. Asphaltenes are the most dipolar fraction of crude oil and increase in concentration with increasing biodegradation. Asphaltene creates a surface charge due to the ionization and complexation reactions of functional groups at interfaces. Therefore, the enhancement in the conduction and polarization observed with the biodegraded oil-wetted sands may be due to the increase in polar components (e.g. asphaltene) from the biodegradation process and the interactions of the polar components with the surfaces of water and mineral grains. Further studies are required to investigate the effect of other components in biodegraded oil such as resins, trace metals, biogenic metallic minerals (e.g. magnetite) and organic acids on the SIP response of porous media.

  20. Spectral induced polarization and electrodic potential monitoring of microbially mediated iron sulfide transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Personna, Yves Robert; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Slater, Lee; Yee, Nathan; O'Brien, Michael; Hubbard, Susan

    2008-06-01

    Stimulated sulfate-reduction is a bioremediation technique utilized for the sequestration of heavy metals in the subsurface. We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the geoelectrical response of iron sulfide transformations by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Two geoelectrical methods, (1) spectral induced polarization (SIP), and (2) electrodic potential measurements, were investigated. Aqueous geochemistry (sulfate, lactate, sulfide, and acetate), observations of precipitates (identified from electron microscopy as iron sulfide), and electrodic potentials on bisulfide ion (HS-) sensitive silver-silver chloride (Ag-AgCl) electrodes (˜-630 mV) were diagnostic of induced transitions between anaerobic iron sulfide forming conditions and aerobic conditions promoting iron sulfide dissolution. The SIP data showed ˜10 mrad anomalies during iron sulfide mineralization accompanying microbial activity under an anaerobic transition. These anomalies disappeared during iron sulfide dissolution under the subsequent aerobic transition. SIP model parameters based on a Cole-Cole relaxation model of the polarization at the mineral-fluid interface were converted to (1) estimated biomineral surface area to pore volume (Sp), and (2) an equivalent polarizable sphere diameter (d) controlling the relaxation time. The temporal variation in these model parameters is consistent with filling and emptying of pores by iron sulfide biofilms, as the system transitions between anaerobic (pore filling) and aerobic (pore emptying) conditions. The results suggest that combined SIP and electrodic potential measurements might be used to monitor spatiotemporal variability in microbial iron sulfide transformations in the field.

  1. Two-dimensional inversion of spectral induced polarization data using MPI parallel algorithm in data space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Tan, Han-Dong; Wang, Kun-Peng; Lin, Chang-Hong; Zhang, Bin; Xie, Mao-Bi

    2016-03-01

    Traditional two-dimensional (2D) complex resistivity forward modeling is based on Poisson's equation but spectral induced polarization (SIP) data are the coproducts of the induced polarization (IP) and the electromagnetic induction (EMI) effects. This is especially true under high frequencies, where the EMI effect can exceed the IP effect. 2D inversion that only considers the IP effect reduces the reliability of the inversion data. In this paper, we derive differential equations using Maxwell's equations. With the introduction of the Cole-Cole model, we use the finite-element method to conduct 2D SIP forward modeling that considers the EMI and IP effects simultaneously. The data-space Occam method, in which different constraints to the model smoothness and parametric boundaries are introduced, is then used to simultaneously obtain the four parameters of the Cole—Cole model using multi-array electric field data. This approach not only improves the stability of the inversion but also significantly reduces the solution ambiguity. To improve the computational efficiency, message passing interface programming was used to accelerate the 2D SIP forward modeling and inversion. Synthetic datasets were tested using both serial and parallel algorithms, and the tests suggest that the proposed parallel algorithm is robust and efficient.

  2. Spectral induced polarization and electrodic potential monitoring of microbially mediated iron sulfide transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Susan; Personna, Y.R.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.; O'Brien, M.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-02-15

    Stimulated sulfate-reduction is a bioremediation technique utilized for the sequestration of heavy metals in the subsurface.We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the geoelectrical response of iron sulfide transformations by Desulfo vibriovulgaris. Two geoelectrical methods, (1) spectral induced polarization (SIP), and (2) electrodic potential measurements, were investigated. Aqueous geochemistry (sulfate, lactate, sulfide, and acetate), observations of precipitates (identified from electron microscopy as iron sulfide), and electrodic potentials on bisulfide ion (HS) sensitive silver-silver chloride (Ag-AgCl) electrodes (630 mV) were diagnostic of induced transitions between an aerobic iron sulfide forming conditions and aerobic conditions promoting iron sulfide dissolution. The SIP data showed 10m rad anomalies during iron sulfide mineralization accompanying microbial activity under an anaerobic transition. These anomalies disappeared during iron sulfide dissolution under the subsequent aerobic transition. SIP model parameters based on a Cole-Cole relaxation model of the polarization at the mineral-fluid interface were converted to (1) estimated biomineral surface area to pore volume (Sp), and (2) an equivalent polarizable sphere diameter (d) controlling the relaxation time. The temporal variation in these model parameters is consistent with filling and emptying of pores by iron sulfide biofilms, as the system transitions between anaerobic (pore filling) and aerobic (pore emptying) conditions. The results suggest that combined SIP and electrodic potential measurements might be used to monitor spatiotemporal variability in microbial iron sulfide transformations in the field.

  3. Spectral induced polarization and the hydraulic properties of New Zealand sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, S.; Ingham, M.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory measurements of spectral induced polarization (SIP) and permeability have been made on unconsolidated samples representative of shallow coastal aquifers in New Zealand. The samples consisted of sands sieved into different fractions ranging from a mean grain size of 1.0 mm to 0.125 mm. Although the occurrence in New Zealand natural sands of titomagnetite means that the magnitude of the SIP phase response is significantly greater than is generally found for "clean" sands, the peak in SIP phase shows a clear dependence on grain size. The SIP spectra have been represented in terms of a Cole-Cole model and the relaxation times derived from this show a strong linear correlation with the measured values of permeability. The SIP and permeability measurements are then extended to mixtures of sieved sands, sand with varying amount of clay, samples with varying amount of magnetic minerals and also natural samples from various locations in New Zealand.

  4. Induced Polarization with Electromagnetic Coupling: 3D Spectral Imaging Theory, EMSP Project No. 73836

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, F. Dale; Sogade, John

    2004-12-14

    This project was designed as a broad foundational study of spectral induced polarization (SIP) for characterization of contaminated sites. It encompassed laboratory studies of the effects of chemistry on induced polarization, development of 3D forward modeling and inversion codes, and investigations of inductive and capacitive coupling problems. In the laboratory part of the project a physico-chemical model developed in this project was used to invert laboratory IP spectra for the grain size and the effective grain size distribution of the sedimentary rocks as well as the formation factor, porosity, specific surface area, and the apparent fractal dimension. Furthermore, it was established that the IP response changed with the solution chemistry, the concentration of a given solution chemistry, valence of the constituent ions, and ionic radius. In the field part of the project, a 3D complex forward and inverse model was developed. It was used to process data acquired at two frequencies (1/16 Hz and 1/ 4Hz) in a cross-borehole configuration at the A-14 outfall area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) during March 2003 and June 2004. The chosen SRS site was contaminated with Tetrachloroethylene (TCE) and Trichloroethylene (PCE) that were disposed in this area for several decades till the 1980s. The imaginary conductivity produced from the inverted 2003 data correlated very well with the log10 (PCE) concentration derived from point sampling at 1 ft spacing in five ground-truth boreholes drilled after the data acquisition. The equivalent result for the 2004 data revealed that there were significant contaminant movements during the period March 2003 and June 2004, probably related to ground-truth activities and nearby remediation activities. Therefore SIP was successfully used to develop conceptual models of volume distributions of PCE/TCE contamination. In addition, the project developed non-polarizing electrodes that can be deployed in boreholes for years. A total of 28 of these electrodes were deployed at the SRS site in September of 2002. The project found that (1) currently available field instrumentation need to be faster by an order of magnitude for full SIP to be engaged for broadband characterization in the field, (2) some aspects of the capacitive coupling problem in borehole geometries can be solved by use of a high impedance receiver, (3) a careful investigation of ways to adequately compare inversion results to ground-truth data is warranted, (4) more laboratory studies should be directed to understand the influence of micro-organisms and long residence time of contaminants (aging) on spectral IP properties.

  5. Spectral induced polarization measurements for environmental purposes and predicting the hydraulic conductivity in sandy aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwa, M.; Günther, T.

    2013-04-01

    Low-frequency field and laboratory induced polarization measurements are carried out to characterize the hydrogeological conditions at Schillerslage test site in Germany. The laboratory spectral induced polarization (SIP) data are analyzed to derive an empirical relationship for predicting the hydraulic conductivity (K) in the field scale. On the other hand, the results from SIP sounding and profiling field data indicate that the method identifies the lithological layers with sufficient resolution to achieve our objectives. Two main Quaternary groundwater aquifers separated by a till layer can be well differentiated. Furthermore, the phase images are also capable of monitoring thin peat layers within the sandy groundwater aquifer. However, the field results show limitations of decreasing resolution with depth and/or low data coverage. Similarly, the SIP laboratory results show a certain shift in SIP response due to different compaction and sorting of the samples. The overall results obtained show that the integration of field and laboratory SIP measurements is an efficient tool to avoid a hydrogeological misinterpretation. In particular, two significant but weak correlations between individual real resistivities (ρ') and relaxation times (τ), based on a Debye decomposition (DD) model, with measured K are found for the upper groundwater aquifer. While the maximum relaxation time (τmax) and logarithmically weighted average relaxation time (τlw) show a better relation with K values than the median value τ50, however, the single relationships are weak. A combined power law relation between individual ρ' and/or τ with K is developed with an expression of A · (ρ')B · (τlw)C, where A, B and C are determined using a least-squares fit between the measured and predicted K. The suggested approach with the calculated coefficients of the first aquifer is applied for the second one. The results indicate a good correlation with the measured K and prove to be superior to single phase angle models as the Börner or Slater models.

  6. Preliminary results of spectral induced polarization measurements, Wadi Bidah District, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Bruce D.; Tippens, C.L.; Flanigan, V.J.; Sadek, Hamdy

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements on 29 carbonaceous schist samples from the Wadi Bidah district show that most are associated with very long polarization decays or, equivalently, large time constants. In contrast, measurements on two massive sulfide samples indicate shorter polarization decays or smaller time constants. This difference in time constants for the polarization process results in two differences in the phase spectra in the frequency range of from 0.06 to 1Hz. First, phase values of carbonaceous rocks generally decrease as a function of increasing frequency. Second, phase values of massive sulfide-bearing rocks increase as a function of increasing frequency. These results from laboratory measurements agree well with those from other reported SIP measurements on graphites and massive sulfides from the Canadian Shield. Four SIP lines, measured by using a 50-m dipole-dipole array, were surveyed at the Rabathan 4 prospect to test how well the results of laboratory sample measurements can be applied to larger scale field measurements. Along one line, located entirely over carbonaceous schists, the phase values decreased as a function of increasing frequency. Along a second line, located over both massive sulfides and carbonaceous schists as defined by drilling, the phase values measured over carbonaceous schists decreased as a function of increasing frequency, whereas those measured over massive sulfides increased. In addition, parts of two lines were surveyed down the axes of the massive sulfide and carbonaceous units. The phase values along these lines showed similar differences between the carbonaceous schists and massive sulfides. To date, the SIP survey and the SIP laboratory measurements have produced the only geophysical data that indicate an electrical difference between the massive sulfide-bearing rocks and the surrounding carbonaceous rocks in the Wadi Bidah district. However, additional sample and field measurements in areas of known mineralization would fully evaluate the SIP method as applied to various geologic environments and styles of massive sulfide mineralization. Additionally, the efficiency of SIP surveys in delineating areas of sulfide mineralization might be improved by surveying lines down the axes of known electrical conductors. An evaluation of the applied research done on the SIP method to date suggests that this technique offers significant exploration applications to massive sulfide exploration in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

  7. Spectral induced polarization response to nanoparticles in a saturated sand matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Ryan A.; Glaser, Danney R.; Werkema, D. Dale; Atekwana, Estella A.

    2012-02-01

    Nanoparticles have grown in importance over the last decade with significant consumer and industrial applications. Yet, the behavior (fate and transport) of nanoparticles in the environment is virtually unknown. Research is needed to identify, characterize, and monitor nanomaterials in the subsurface. Here, we investigate the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of nanometallic powders (nZVI, nAg, nTiO 2, nZnO, and nCeO 2) in porous geologic media. Our main objective is to determine the sensitivity of the SIP response (0.1-10,000 Hz) to the presence of nanoparticles (metals and metal oxides) in porous media. The SIP response was tested under various conditions: increasing particle concentration under constant solution chemistry; varying solution molarity (0.0 M-1.0 M), and varying solution valence (+ 1, + 2, + 3 valence) under constant particle volume. We examine the results in terms of phase shift and resistance magnitude. Our data suggest that the oxide nanoparticles do not show SIP responses to increasing particle concentration, solution valence, and molarity, while the metallic particles show a clear response to increasing particle concentration, and frequency. Silver was the only material to show any significant response to increasing solution molarity, valence, and frequency. Because of the high propensity of the nanoparticles to form aggregates, they essentially behave as colloidal and clay particles allowing us to apply conventional SIP theory to our interpretation. We suggest that the oxidation state of the metals diminishes their SIP response consistent with more recent studies that have documented that polarization decreases with oxidation of metallic particles. We infer from our results that nanoparticle crystalline composition and aggregation effects control the SIP response of nanoparticles in porous media.

  8. Spectral induced polarization measurements for predicting the hydraulic conductivity in sandy aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwa, M.; Günther, T.

    2013-10-01

    Field and laboratory spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements are integrated to characterize the hydrogeological conditions at the Schillerslage test site in Germany. The phase images are capable of monitoring thin peat layers within the sandy aquifers. However, the field results show limitations of decreasing resolution with depth. In comparison with the field inversion results, the SIP laboratory measurements show a certain shift in SIP response due to different compaction and sorting of the samples. The SIP data are analyzed to derive an empirical relationship for predicting the hydraulic conductivity (K). In particular, two significant but weak correlations between individual real resistivities (ρ') and relaxation times (τ), based on a Debye decomposition (DD) model, with measured K are found for the upper groundwater aquifer. The maximum relaxation time (τmax) and logarithmically weighted average relaxation time (τlw) show a better relation with K values than the median value τ50. A combined power law relation between individual ρ' and τ with K is developed with an expression of A · (ρ')B · (τlw)C, where A, B and C are determined using a least-squares fit between the measured and predicted K. The suggested approach with the calculated coefficients of the first aquifer is applied for the second. Results show good correlation with the measured K indicating that the derived relationship is superior to single phase angle models as Börner or Slater models.

  9. Spectral induced polarization monitoring of CO2 injection in saturated sands: a laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, T.; Schmutz, M.; Agrinier, P.; Maineult, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    During the last decade, the interest of induced polarization methods for environmental studies has undoubtly grown. Here, we present a set of laboratory experiments aimed at assessing the ability of spectral induced polarisation (SIP) method to detect and monitor CO2 transfers in the subsurface. The objectives were the quantification of the influence of various parameters on the SIP response, such as the water conductivity, the chemical reactivity of the solid and of the gas phases, and the injection rate. SIP measurements in the frequency range 50 mHz - 20 kHz were thus performed during gas (N2 or CO2) injections in a metric-scaled, cylindrical tank filled with unconsolidated granular material (quartz or carbonate sands) and fully saturated with water. The system was most reactive to gas injection in the high frequency range (>1 kHz). In quartz sand, the presence of gas in the medium tends to decrease the measured values of the phase angle. This effect becomes more important when increasing the injection rate, and thus the amount of gas trapped in the medium. The magnitude of this effect decreases when the water conductivity increases. Dissolution processes (CO2 in water and also solid matrix in the case of carbonate sand) were evidenced from chemical measurements (pH, conductivity and anionic concentrations). The increased ionic strength resulted in a decrease of the bulk resistivity and in an increase of the phase values at high frequency. An interesting parameter is the ratio of the increase in phase to the decrease in resistivity. When dissolution processes are involved, this ratio increases strongly with the initial conductivity of the saturating fluid. Hence, in some cases the measured phase values still bring measurable information on the system evolution even if resistivity variations are very small.

  10. The effect of organic acid on the spectral-induced polarization response of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, N.; Shalem, T.; Furman, A.

    2014-04-01

    In spectral-induced polarization (SIP) studies of sites contaminated by organic hydrocarbons, it was shown that biodegradation by-products in general, and organic acids in particular, significantly alter the SIP signature of the subsurface. Still a systematic study that considers the effect of organic acid on the physicochemical and electrical (SIP) properties of the soil is missing. The goal of this work is to relate between the effect of organic acid on the physicochemical properties of the soil, and the soil electrical properties. To do so, we measured the temporal changes of the soil chemical (ion content) and electrical (low-frequency SIP) properties in response to influx of organic acid at different concentrations, gradually altering the soil pH. Our results show that organic acid reduces the soil pH, enhances mineral weathering and consequently reduces both the in-phase and quadrature conductivity. At the pH range where mineral weathering is most significant (pH 6-4.5) a negative linear relation between the soil pH and the soil formation factor was found, suggesting that mineral weathering changes the pore space geometry and hence affecting the in-phase electrical conductivity. In addition, we attribute the reduction in the quadrature conductivity to an exchange process between the natural cation adsorbed on the mineral surface and hydronium, and to changes in the width of the pore bottleneck that results from the mineral weathering. Overall, our results allow a better understanding of the SIP signature of soil undergoing acidification process in general and as biodegradation process in particular.

  11. Monitoring of CO2-induced geochemical changes in a shallow aquifer by time domain spectral induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetsch, Joseph; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders V.; Cahill, Aaron G.; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2014-05-01

    Contamination of potable groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment, we investigate if surface monitoring of electrical resistivity and induced polarization can detect geochemical changes induced by CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose, we injected CO2 at a depth of 5 and 10 m and monitored its migration using 320 electrodes on a 126 m × 25 m surface grid. A fully automated acquisition system continuously collected direct current (DC) resistivity and full-decay induced polarization (IP) data and uploaded it into an online database. CO2 was injected for a period of 72 days and DC/IP monitoring started 20 days before and continued until 120 days after the beginning of the injection. The DC/IP data were supplemented by chemical analysis of water samples collected in 29 wells at time intervals of approximately 10 days. DC/IP data are inverted using a 2-D algorithm (AarhusInv) that incorporates the full voltage decay of the IP response to resolve DC resistivity, intrinsic chargeability and spectral IP content parameterized using the Cole-Cole model. Borehole information and a baseline inversion reveals the geology at the site consisting of aeolian sands near the surface, glacial sands between 5 and 10 m depth and marine sands below 10 m depth. Following the injection, we use a time-lapse inversion where differences in the DC/IP data are inverted for changes to the Cole-Cole parameters. Two different geochemical signatures that occur due to the injected CO2 are evident both in the geophysical inversions and the water samples. The first and clearest subsurface signal is a decrease in DC resistivity that moves advectively with the groundwater. The area of resistivity decrease expands with time in the direction of the groundwater flow and there is good correlation between geophysical and geochemical results. A chargeability decrease after the injection has been also observed, but in contrast to the decrease in DC resistivity, the chargeability anomaly remains localized around and slightly downstream of the injection wells throughout the experiment. This chargeability decrease correlates in space and time with a decrease in pH, which is observed in the water samples. Consequently, we attribute this change in chargeability to pH-induced changes to the grains surfaces. These results highlight the potential for monitoring of field scale geochemical changes by means of surface DC/IP measurements. Especially the different development of the DC resistivity and chargeability anomalies and the different associated geochemical processes, highlight the added value of induced polarization to resistivity monitoring.

  12. Monitoring microbial growth and activity using spectral induced polarization and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Keating, Kristina; Revil, Andre

    2015-04-01

    Microbes and microbial activities in the Earth's subsurface play a significant role in shaping subsurface environments and are involved in environmental applications such as remediation of contaminants in groundwater and oil fields biodegradation. Stimulated microbial growth in such applications could cause wide variety of changes of physical/chemical properties in the subsurface. It is critical to monitor and determine the fate and transportation of microorganisms in the subsurface during such applications. Recent geophysical studies demonstrate the potential of two innovative techniques, spectral induced polarization (SIP) and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for monitoring microbial growth and activities in porous media. The SIP measures complex dielectric properties of porous media at low frequencies of exciting electric field, and NMR studies the porous structure of geologic media and characterizes fluids subsurface. In this laboratory study, we examined both SIP and NMR responses from bacterial growth suspension as well as suspension mixed with silica sands. We focus on the direct contribution of microbes to the SIP and NMR signals in the absence of biofilm formation or biomineralization. We used Zymomonas mobilis and Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1) for SIP and NMR measurements, respectively. The SIP measurements were collected over the frequency range of 0.1 - 1 kHz on Z. mobilis growth suspension and suspension saturated sands at different cell densities. SIP data show two distinct peaks in imaginary conductivity spectra, and both imaginary and real conductivities increased as microbial density increased. NMR data were collected using both CPMG pulse sequence and D-T2 mapping to determine the T2-distribution and diffusion properties on S. oneidensis suspension, pellets (live and dead), and suspension mixed with silica sands. NMR data show a decrease in the T2-distribution in S. oneidensis suspension saturated sands as microbial density increase. A clear distinction in the T2-distribution and D-T2 plots between live and dead cell pellets was also observed. These results will provide a basis for understanding the effect of microbes within geologic media on SIP and low-field NMR measurements. This research suggests that both SIP and NMR have the potential to monitor microbial growth and activities in the subsurface and could provide spatiotemporal variations in bacterial abundance in porous media.

  13. Characterizing structural and textural subsurface patterns using spectral induced polarization: Effects of saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breede, K.; Esser, O.; Zimmermann, E.; Huisman, J. A.; Kemna, A.

    2010-05-01

    Groundwater is a vulnerable resource that is endangered by pollutants and contaminants. Soil is an important protective buffer for groundwater and, therefore, the understanding of flow and transport processes in soils is very important. However, the prediction capabilities of unsaturated flow and transport models in the vadose zone are often limited due to an insufficient knowledge about the structural and textural heterogeneity of the soil. To obtain more information about soil structure, texture and heterogeneity, as well as hydraulic parameters, non-invasive electrical methods may be employed in field-scale studies. To investigate the potential of the approach, a laboratory measurement setup was developed which allows combined electrical and hydraulic measurements. The latter are conducted via a multi-step outflow device. Various pressure steps are applied to a saturated sample and the outflow is recorded. When equilibrium is reached, spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements are conducted before the next pressure step is applied. The electrical measurements are carried out with a high-accuracy impedance spectrometer. Combined electrical and hydraulic measurements were conducted on packed sand-clay mixtures. The measured resistivity magnitude and phase spectra and their dependence on water content are clearly different for each mixture. For pure sand, the phase values increase with decreasing water content over the entire frequency range and a phase peak is present for low water content. The increasing phase is due to the increasing resistivity and an associated increasing chargeability of the sample. The phase spectrum of a sand-clay mixture with 5 % clay shows the same behaviour like the pure sand; however, the shift of the phase peak to higher frequencies is much stronger. This shift suggests that relaxation time and length become smaller with decreasing water content, which is related to the smaller pores that are active at lower water content. The sand-clay mixture with 20 % clay shows a significantly different behaviour. At full saturation, the phase spectrum exhibits a weak peak at about 0.2 Hz. With decreasing saturation, first a distinct phase peak is formed at about 0.02 Hz; then phase values decrease, and simultaneously a shift to higher frequencies occurs. The phase values are also much smaller than for the other mixtures. This unique dataset is used to investigate relationships between electrical and hydraulic properties.

  14. A new model for the spectral induced polarization signature of bacterial growth in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Revil, A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Jardani, A.; Smith, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent biogeophysics studies demonstrated the sensitivity of complex conductivity to bacterial growth and microbial mediated mineral transformations in porous media. Frequency-domain induced polarization is a minimally invasive manner to measure the complex conductivity of a material over a broad range of frequencies. The real component of complex conductivity is associated with electromigration of the charge carriers, and the imaginary component represents reversible energy storage of charge carriers at polarization length scales. Quantitative relationship between frequency-domain induced polarization responses and bacterial growth and decay in porous media is analyzed in this study using a new developed model. We focus on the direct contribution of bacteria themselves to the complex conductivity in porous media in the absence of biomineralization. At low frequencies, the induced polarization of bacteria (α-polarization) is related to the properties of the electrical double layer surrounding the membrane surface of bacteria. Surface conductivity and α-polarization are due to the Stern layer of the counterions occurring in a brush of polymers coating the surface of the bacteria, and can be related to the cation exchange capacity of the bacteria. From the modeling results, at low frequencies (< 10 Hz), the mobility of the counterions (K+) in the Stern layer of bacteria is found to be extremely small (4.7×10-10 m2s-1 V-1 at 25°C), and is close to the mobility of the same counterions along the surface of clay minerals (Na+, 1.5×10-10 m2s-1 V-1 at 25°C). This result is in agreement with experimental observations and it indicates a very low relaxation frequency for the α-polarization of the bacteria cells (typically around 0.1 to 5 Hertz). By coupling this new model with reactive transport modeling in which the evolution of bacterial populations are usually described by Monod kinetics, we show that the changes in imaginary conductivity with time can be used to determine bacterial growth kinetics parameters such as the growth and endogenous decay coefficient.

  15. Influence of oil saturation upon spectral induced polarization of oil-bearing sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutz, M.; Revil, A.; Vaudelet, P.; Batzle, M.; Viñao, P. Femenía; Werkema, D. D.

    2010-10-01

    The induced polarization model developed recently by Revil and Florsch to understand the complex conductivity of fully saturated granular materials has been extended to partial saturation conditions. It is an improvement over previous models like the Vinegar and Waxman model, which do not account explicitly for the effect of frequency. The Vinegar and Waxman model can be considered as a limiting case of the Revil and Florsch model in the limit where the distribution of relaxation times is very broad. The extended model is applied to the case of unconsolidated sands partially saturated with oil and water. Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the influence of oil saturation, frequency, grain size, and conductivity of the pore water upon the complex resistivity response of oil-bearing sands. The low-frequency polarization (below 100 Hz) is dominated by the polarization of the Stern layer (the inner part of the electrical double layer coating the surface of the grains in contact with water). The phase exhibits a well-defined relaxation peak with a peak frequency that is dependent on the mean grain diameter as predicted by the model. Both the resistivity and the magnitude of the phase increase with the relative saturation of the oil. The imaginary (quadrature) component of the complex conductivity is observed to decrease with the oil saturation. All these observations are reproduced by the new model.

  16. Polarization in Spectral Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.; Landolfi, M.

    2004-08-01

    The scientific research based on spectropolarimetric techniques is undergoing a phase of rapid growth. Instruments of unprecedented sensitivity are nowadays available, particularly for solar observations. To fully exploit the rich diagnostic content of such observations, it is necessary to understand the physical mechanisms involved in the generation and transfer of polarized radiation in astrophysical (or laboratory) plasmas. After an introductory part based on classical physics, this book tackles the subject by a rigorous quantum-mechanical approach. The transfer equations for polarized radiation and the statistical equilibrium equations for the atomic density matrix are derived directly from the principles of Quantum Electrodynamics. The two sets of equations are then used to present a number of applications, mainly concerning the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields. This book is primarily addressed to scientists working in the field of spectropolarimetry. It may also serve as a textbook for a course at the graduate or advanced undergraduate level. Link: http://www.springeronline.com/sgw/cda/frontpage/0,11855,5-40109-22-33912609-0,00.html

  17. Accounting for the effects of pore fluid chemistry on spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements: the specific polarizability concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, L. D.; Weller, A.; Zhang, C.; Breede, K.; Johnson, T. J.; Nordsiek, S.; Redden, G. D.; Fox, D. T.

    2011-12-01

    Recent spectral induced polarization (SIP) research has advanced our understanding of the controls of the physical and hydraulic properties of porous media on both the polarization magnitude and relaxation length scales in porous media. A critical current challenge is to improve our understanding of how pore fluid chemistry modifies the interfacial polarization measured with the SIP technique. We report results from two laboratory-scale experiments designed to advance this understanding. In the first experiment, we analyzed the influence of electrolyte concentration and valence on the interfacial polarization of three sandstones with differing porosity and permeability. A Debye decomposition (DD) approach was used to determine normalized chargeability and average relaxation time from spectral data. We find that SIP measurements of the polarization magnitude (single frequency imaginary conductivity and normalized chargeability derived from the DD) of sandstone samples can be described by the product of the pore space related internal surface and a quantity that represents the polarizability of the mineral-fluid interface and depends on electrolyte concentration and valence. We introduce a new parameter, the specific polarizability, describing this dependence. In the second experiment, we investigated the effect of pH and hydroxyl ion concentration on the interfacial polarization of both silica gel and well-sorted sand. We find a strong dependence of the polarization on pH in the silica gel. Evidence for the same dependence exists for the sand, although the signal is only just above the noise threshold (~0.1 mrad) of the instrument. We relate the weaker signal observed in the sands to the much smaller pore space related internal surface relative to silica gel, a unique substance with surface area in excess of 500 m2/g. These observations suggest that the specific polarizability is also a function of pH, although the pH dependence is likely to be weak in SIP measurements of porous media characterized by an internal surface typical of natural unconsolidated rocks and soils. Our findings provide a framework for quantifying structural characteristics of porous media from SIP data in the presence of variable fluid chemistry.

  18. Investigating the effect of electro-active ion concentration on spectral induced polarization signatures arising from biomineralization pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Williams, K. H.; Hubbard, S. S.; Wu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) is a proven geophysical method for detecting biomineral formation with promising applications for monitoring biogeochemical products during microbial induced sequestration of heavy metals and radionuclides in soils. SIP has been used to monitor the evolution of bioremediation-induced end-products at the uranium-contaminated U.S. Department of Energy Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Colorado. Although a significant SIP response was detected, the quantitative interpretation is non-trivial as the polarization of metallic minerals depends both on the mineral surface properties and the electrolyte chemistry. In previous experiments SIP mechanisms were studied under complex environments and individual source mechanisms could not be evaluated. Here we examine the role of electrolyte chemistry by comparing the effect of redox active / inactive ions on metallic polarization. In these abiotic experiments magnetite was used as a proxy biomineral and dispersed within columns packed with sand. Parallel columns were saturated with solutions of different concentrations of active (Fe2+) and inactive (Ca2+) ions (0.01mM-10mM) and SIP measurements made (0.1-1000 Hz). Experimental results show small, but detectable, differences in the effect of active ion and inactive ion concentration on the SIP response. To better characterize the effect of electro-active ions on metallic minerals we used a Cole - Cole type relaxation model, to describe the SIP responses. In order to better resolve the relaxation model parameters, we followed a two-step approach whereby we started with a Bayesian based inversion to resolve for the initial parameter estimates, and subsequently used these estimates as a starting model for a deterministic solution. Our results suggest that changes in the active ion concentration, in the presence of magnetite, alone are unlikely to fully explain recent SIP monitoring data from the Rifle site.

  19. Influence of Surface Sorption Processes on Spectral Induced Polarization Evaluated Using in-Situ Monitoring of a Na-22 Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, N.; Moysey, S. M.; Powell, B. A.; Ntarlagiannis, D.

    2014-12-01

    Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) has been used to monitor subsurface biogeochemical processes in a variety of lab and field studies. However, there are several competing mechanisms that have been proposed to explain the SIP effect. This work targets the influence of ion sorption to mineral surfaces as a controlling factor on SIP utilizing a pH dependent surface adsorption experiment. In this experiment we use silica gel as an idealized medium where the number of available sites for cation sorption, which in this case is limited to Na+ and H+ ions, is influenced by changes in pH via protonation/deprotonation of silanol groups. The experiment uses 22Na as an in situ tracer as the radioactive decay of this nuclide can be continuously and non-invasively monitored using sensors placed outside of a column. The experiment was conducted by continuously pumping a 0.01M NaCl solution spiked with of 1μCi/L 22Na in to the column under three pH conditions (pH 5.0, 6.0 and 8.0). In the experiment, we observed an increasing number of gamma counts caused by the accumulation of sorbed 22Na in the column as we increased the pH from 5.0 to 6.5, and finally to 8.0. Simultaneously, we observed a linearly correlated (R2 = 0.99) rise in the imaginary conductivity response of the SIP measurements. Using the triple layer electrochemical polarization model for grain polarization to simulate our experimental SIP responses, we found that the estimated surface site density is within a factor of two of that estimated from the mass accumulation of sodium. Since the accumulation of sodium on the silica gel surface is responsible for both the increase in gamma radiation and the change in the electrical response, these observations support the theory that mobile ions in the Stern layer of mineral surfaces provide the primary control on SIP signals in silicate materials.

  20. Investigating the Effect of Saturation and Wettability on Spectral Induced Polarization of Biodegraded Oil in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Aal, G. Z.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) has been suggested as the technique most sensitive to the presence of contaminants as well as accompanying bio-physicochemical processes associated with hydrocarbon biodegradation. Previous laboratory investigations have suggested that wettability is an important factor to consider when investigating the SIP response of oil bearing sands. The results to date provide experimental data for mostly fresh oil. However, these results differ significantly from field investigations where the oil is mostly in the degraded form. In this study we extend the work of Schmutz and others and Revil and others by investigating the SIP response of biodegraded oil in porous media. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of different oil saturation (0.2-0.8) and wettability (water wet and oil wet) on SIP of biodegraded and fresh oil in sand columns. The laboratory experiments were performed using a sand column filled with a mix of oil, artificial ground water (AGW) with a conductivity of 0.01 S/m and fine sands. Each experiment was conducted with clean sands mixed with oil (oil wet case) or AGW (water wet case). The proportions of oil and water were calculated to obtain the desired oil and water saturations, and using the same amount of sand. SIP measurements were made using a National Instruments NI 4551 dynamic signal analyzer and four electrodes technique. Phase shift between current stimulus-voltage signal and conductivity magnitude were measured between 0.1 and 1000 Hz and the real and imaginary components of the complex surface conductivity were calculated. The same experimental procedure was repeated using fresh oil as background and for comparison with biodegraded oil results. The results show that when water is the wetting phase, there is no significant difference in the IP parameters measured for both the fresh and degraded oil. Furthermore, both the fresh and biodegraded oil showed an increase in the magnitude of the phase and a decrease in the magnitudes of the real and imaginary conductivity components with increasing oil saturation. However, when oil is the wetting phase there is a noticeable difference in the magnitude of the IP parameters between the fresh and biodegraded oil. The magnitude of the phase and imaginary conductivity component increased with increasing oil saturation whereas real conductivity decreased. At the same time, the magnitude of the real and imaginary conductivity components for the biodegraded oil wet sands were relatively higher compared to fresh oil wet sand. Our results suggest that the biodegraded oil enhances the polarization only for the case where oil is the wetting phase. The enhancement in the polarization (imaginary conductivity) observed with the biodegraded oil wet sands may be attributed to the increase in polar components and nanoparticulate metals (magnetite, vanadium, nickel, etc.) content resulting from the biodegradation process.

  1. Spectral and spectral-polarization characteristics of potato leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, B. I.; Belyaev, Yu. V.; Chumakov, A. V.; Nekrasov, V. P.; Shuplyak, V. I.

    2000-07-01

    The results of laboratory investigations of the spectral and spectral-polarization characteristics of radiation reflected from the leaves of potato (Solanum tuberosum) of different varieties are discussed. During the vegetation season of 1997, the angular dependence of the degree and azimuth of polarization of radiation reflected from potato leaves as well as the scattering indicatrices in the range 380 1080 nm were determined by a specially developed method with the use of a laboratory goniometric setup. The relationship between the spectral polarization characteristics of radiation and biological parameters of the potato has been obtained with the help of different methods of statistical analysis and explained on the basis of the known physical mechanisms.

  2. Spectral degree of polarization uniformity for polarization-sensitive OCT

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Bernhard; Zotter, Stefan; Pircher, Michael; Götzinger, Erich; Rauscher, Sabine; Glösmann, Martin; Lammer, Jan; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Gröger, Marion; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2015-01-01

    Depolarization of light can be measured by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) and has been used to improve tissue discrimination as well as segmentation of pigmented structures. Most approaches to depolarization assessment for PS-OCT – such as the degree of polarization uniformity (DOPU) – rely on measuring the uniformity of polarization states using spatial evaluation kernels. In this article, we present a different approach which exploits the spectral dimension. We introduce the spectral DOPU for the pixelwise analysis of polarization state variations between sub-bands of the broadband light source spectrum. Alongside a comparison with conventional spatial and temporal DOPU algorithms, we demonstrate imaging in the healthy human retina, and apply the technique for contrasting hard exudates in diabetic retinopathy and investigating the pigment epithelium of the rat iris. PMID:26689829

  3. Coded aperture snapshot spectral polarization imaging.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Brady, David J

    2013-04-01

    We describe a single-shot polarization spectral imager that combines two birefringent crystals with a binary coded aperture to encode the spatial, spectral and polarization data cube for compressive sampling on a two-dimensional (2D) detector array. We use a total variation prior to reconstruct the four-dimensional (4D) data cube from the single 2D measurement. The 4D data cube includes 15001240 pixels in the spatial domain, 19 wavelength channels between 400 and 680 nm and two Stokes parameters. PMID:23545971

  4. A comparison between single- and multi-objective optimization to fit spectral induced polarization data from laboratory measurements on alluvial sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inzoli, S.; Giudici, M.

    2015-11-01

    Spectral induced polarization measurements on unconsolidated and saturated alluvial samples, sand-clay mixtures and well sorted sandy samples, are modelled with the generalized Cole-Cole phenomenological model and two simplified models: the standard Cole-Cole and the Cole-Davidson model. The goodness of fit is evaluated, as a first step, through the root mean square error, weighted on the data errors of the real and the imaginary component. At a later stage a multi-objective optimization is proposed, based on two different indicators for the resistivity amplitude and phase misfit. The analysis of the misfits variations among all the tested parameters associations is conducted to identify the Pareto set of optimal solutions. Both procedures lead to model parameter estimates comparable with literature values. However, the multi-objective approach provides information about the uncertainty of the parameter estimates and highlights the presence of more than one characteristic value for the relaxation time and the frequency exponent in many samples, thus suggesting the possible occurrence of different polarization processes in the investigated frequency range.

  5. The effect of free-phase NAPL on the spectral induced polarization signature of variably saturated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shefer, I.; Schwartz, N.; Furman, A.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the influence of a free phase nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL), decane, on the soil's SIP signature was experimentally investigated. The complex electrical conductivity was determined using the SIP measurement system and compared between two main treatment types: clean and decane contaminated. Complementary chemical and temporal measurements were conducted. The results show a clear decrease in the imaginary part of the complex conductivity for the decane contaminated soil. Moreover, a shift of the relaxation frequency was observed for the contaminated soil. Our chemical analysis suggests that there was no change in the chemical composition of the Stern layer, and clearly, the grain size distribution did not change as well. Therefore, these results are attributed to membrane polarization. The decane addition to the unsaturated porous media changes the pore-scale liquid phase distribution, thus affecting membrane polarization. Further, the electrical signature is a time-related process associated with liquid phase arrangement time. The findings of this study can enable a better understanding of the SIP response for soils contaminated with free-phase organic compounds.

  6. Measuring time-domain spectral induced polarization in the on-time: decreasing acquisition time and increasing signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Per-Ivar; Dahlin, Torleif; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben

    2015-12-01

    Combined resistivity and time-domain direct current induced polarization (DCIP) measurements are traditionally carried out with a 50% duty cycle current waveform, taking the resistivity measurements during the on-time and the IP measurements during the off-time. One drawback with this method is that only half of the acquisition time is available for resistivity and IP measurements, respectively. In this paper, this limitation is solved by using a current injection with 100% duty cycle and also taking the IP measurements in the on-time. With numerical modelling of current waveforms with 50% and 100% duty cycles we show that the waveforms have comparable sensitivity for the spectral Cole-Cole parameters and that signal level is increased up to a factor of 2 if the 100% duty cycle waveform is used. The inversion of field data acquired with both waveforms confirms the modelling results and shows that it is possible to retrieve similar inversion models with either of the waveforms when inverting for the spectral Cole-Cole parameters with the waveform of the injected current included in the forward computations. Consequently, our results show that on-time measurements of IP can reduce the acquisition time by up to 50% and increase the signal-to-noise ratio by up to 100% almost without information loss. Our findings can contribute and have a large impact for DCIP surveys in general and especially for surveys where time and reliable data quality are important factors. Specifically, the findings are of value for DCIP surveys conducted in urban areas where anthropogenic noise is an issue and the heterogeneous subsurface demands time-consuming 3D acquisitions.

  7. A comparison between Gauss-Newton and Markov chain Monte Carlo basedmethods for inverting spectral induced polarization data for Cole-Coleparameters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong; Kemna, Andreas; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2008-05-15

    We develop a Bayesian model to invert spectral induced polarization (SIP) data for Cole-Cole parameters using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. We compare the performance of the MCMC based stochastic method with an iterative Gauss-Newton based deterministic method for Cole-Cole parameter estimation through inversion of synthetic and laboratory SIP data. The Gauss-Newton based method can provide an optimal solution for given objective functions under constraints, but the obtained optimal solution generally depends on the choice of initial values and the estimated uncertainty information is often inaccurate or insufficient. In contrast, the MCMC based inversion method provides extensive global information on unknown parameters, such as the marginal probability distribution functions, from which we can obtain better estimates and tighter uncertainty bounds of the parameters than with the deterministic method. Additionally, the results obtained with the MCMC method are independent of the choice of initial values. Because the MCMC based method does not explicitly offer single optimal solution for given objective functions, the deterministic and stochastic methods can complement each other. For example, the stochastic method can first be used to obtain the means of the unknown parameters by starting from an arbitrary set of initial values and the deterministic method can then be initiated using the means as starting values to obtain the optimal estimates of the Cole-Cole parameters.

  8. Considerations on sample holder design and custom-made non-polarizable electrodes for Spectral Induced Polarization measurements on unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaouane, C.; Chouteau, M. C.; Fauchard, C.; Cote, P.

    2014-12-01

    Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) is a geophysical method sensitive to water content, saturation and grain size distribution. It could be used as an alternative to nuclear probes to assess the compaction of soils in road works. To evaluate the potential of SIP as a practical tool, we designed an experiment for complex conductivity measurements on unsaturated soil samples.Literature presents a large variety of sample holders and designs, each depending on the context. Although we might find some precise description about the sample holder, exact replication is not always possible. Furthermore, the potential measurements are often done using custom-made Ag/AgCl electrodes and very few indications are given on their reliability with time and temperature. Our objective is to perform complex conductivity measurements on soil samples compacted in a PVC cylindrical mould (10 cm-long, 5 cm-diameter) according to geotechnical standards. To expect homogeneous current density, electrical current is transmitted through the sample via chambers filled with agar gel. Agar gel is a good non-polarizable conductor within the frequency range (1 mHz -20kHz). Its electrical properties are slightly known. We measured increasing of agar-agar electrical conductivity in time. We modelled the influence of this variation on the measurement. If the electrodes are located on the sample, it is minimized. Because of the dimensions at stake and the need for simple design, potential electrodes are located outside the sample, hence the gel contributes to the measurements. Since the gel is fairly conductive, we expect to overestimate the sample conductivity. Potential electrodes are non-polarizable Ag/AgCl electrodes. To avoid any leakage, the KCl solution in the electrodes is replaced by saturated KCl-agar gel. These electrodes are low cost and show a low, stable, self-potential (<1mV). In addition, the technique of making electrode can be easily reproduced and storage and maintenance are simple. We measured a variation of less than 1 mS/m of the electrolyte conductivity during the time of measurement (~1h40) for a conductivity range 25-100 mS/m, showing no ionic contamination of the solution by the electrodes. An improvement to the cell design would be to control the internal temperature of the sample.

  9. Inductive source induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, David; Haber, Eldad; Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    2013-02-01

    Induced polarization (IP) surveys are commonly performed to map the distribution of electrical chargeability that is a diagnostic physical property in mineral exploration and in many environmental problems. Although these surveys have been successful in the past, the galvanic sources required for traditional IP and magnetic IP (MIP) surveys prevent them from being applied in some geological settings. We develop a new methodology for processing frequency domain EM data to identify the presence of IP effects in observations of the magnetic fields arising from an inductive source. The method makes use of the asymptotic behaviour of the secondary magnetic fields at low frequency. A new quantity, referred to as the ISIP datum, is defined so that it equals zero at low frequencies for any frequency-independent (non-chargeable) conductivity distribution. Thus, any non-zero response in the ISIP data indicates the presence of chargeable material. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the method can be applied even in complicated geological situations. A 3-D inversion algorithm is developed to recover the chargeability from the ISIP data and the inversion is demonstrated on synthetic examples.

  10. The Effect of Systematics on Polarized Spectral Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehus, I. K.; Fuskeland, U.; Eriksen, H. K.

    2013-02-01

    We study four particularly bright polarized compact objects (Tau A, Vir A, 3C 273, and For A) in the 7 year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) sky maps, with the goal of understanding potential systematics involved in the estimation of foreground spectral indices. First, we estimate the spectral index, the polarization angle, the polarization fraction, and the apparent size and shape of these objects when smoothed to a nominal resolution of 1° FWHM. Second, we compute the spectral index as a function of polarization orientation, α. Because these objects are approximately point sources with constant polarization angle, this function should be constant in the absence of systematics. However, for the K and Ka band WMAP data we find strong index variations for all four sources. For Tau A, we find a spectral index of β = -2.59 ± 0.03 for α = 30°, and β = -2.03 ± 0.01 for α = 50°. On the other hand, the spectral index between the Ka and Q bands is found to be stable. A simple elliptical Gaussian toy model with parameters matching those observed in Tau A reproduces the observed signal, and shows that the spectral index is particularly sensitive to the detector polarization angle. Based on these findings, we first conclude that estimation of spectral indices with the WMAP K band polarization data at 1° scales is not robust. Second, we note that these issues may be of concern for ground-based and sub-orbital experiments that use the WMAP polarization measurements of Tau A for calibration of gain and polarization angles.

  11. [Research on New Type of Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement Technology].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Zhou, Feng; Li, Huan; Zhao, Hai-bo

    2015-10-01

    Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement technology (SMPM) is a new type of polarization modulation technology, with an achromatic /4 retarder, a multiple-order retarder and a polarizer the polarization information of incident light can be encoded into the spectral dimension, sinusoidal which amplitude scales with the degree of the linear polarization and phase scales with the angle of the linear polarization can be acquired directly. With a dedicated algorithm for the modulated spectrum, we can get degree and angle of the linear polarization, spectral information and radiation information of the target. This paper expounds the basic principle of SMPM and concrete implementation scheme is proposed. Demodulation algorithm is designed before experimental platform are set up. Experiment which verified the correctness on the SMPM has carried on. The experimental results show the correctness and feasibility of SMPM. Compared with traditional polarization modulate techniques no moving parts and electronic components are including in this scheme. It's also has the advantages of compact and low mass. We can get all the polarization information through one single measurement rather than get Stokes parameters for further calculations. This study provides a new kind of technological approaches for the development of new space polarization detecting sensor. PMID:26904842

  12. Formation of polarized spectral lines in atmospheres with horizontal inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, A.; Štěpán, J.; Bueno, J. Trujillo; Kubát, J.

    2015-10-01

    We study the problem of the generation and transfer of spectral line intensity and polarization in models of stellar atmospheres with horizontal plasma inhomogeneities. We solve the non-LTE radiative transfer problem in full 3D geometry taking into account resonant scattering polarization and its modification by magnetic fields via the Hanle effect. We show that horizontal fluctuations of the thermodynamical conditions of stellar atmospheres can have a significant impact on the linear polarization of the emergent spectral line radiation and its center-to-limb variation.

  13. Spectral broadening of interacting pigments: polarized absorption by photosynthetic proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Somsen, O J; van Grondelle, R; van Amerongen, H

    1996-01-01

    Excitonic interaction between pigment molecules is largely responsible for the static and dynamic spectroscopic properties of photosynthetic pigment-proteins. This paper provides a new description of its effect on polarized absorption spectroscopy, in particular on circular dichroism (CD). We investigate excitonic spectra of finite width and use "spectral moments" to compare 1) inhomogeneously broadened excitonic spectra, 2) spectra that are (homogeneously broadened by vibrations or electron-phonon interaction, and 3) spectra that are simulated by applying convolution after the interaction has been evaluated. Two cases are distinguished. If the excitonic splitting is smaller than the width of the interacting absorption bands, the broadening of the excitonic spectrum can be approximated by a convolution approach, although a correction is necessary for CD spectra. If the excitonic splitting exceeds the bandwidth, the well-known exchange narrowing occurs. We demonstrate that this is accompanied by redistribution of dipole strength and spectral shifts. The magnitude of a CD spectrum is conveniently expressed by its first spectral moment. As will be shown, this is independent of spectral broadening as well as dispersive shifts induced by pigment-protein interactions. Consequently, it provides a simple tool to relate the experimental CD spectrum of a pigment complex to the excitonic interactions from which it originates. To illustrate the potential of the presented framework, the spectroscopy of the LH2 pigment-protein complex from purple bacteria is analyzed and compared for dimer-like and ring-like structures. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the variability of the CD of chlorosomes from green bacteria can be explained by small changes in the structure of their cylindrical bacteriochlorophyll c subunits. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:8889168

  14. Polarization diversity scheme on spectral polarization coding optical code-division multiple-access network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Chih-Ta; Huang, Jen-Fa; Chang, Yao-Tang; Chen, Bo-Hau

    2010-12-01

    We present an experiment demonstrating the spectral-polarization coding optical code-division multiple-access system introduced with a nonideal state of polarization (SOP) matching conditions. In the proposed system, the encoding and double balanced-detection processes are implemented using a polarization-diversity scheme. Because of the quasiorthogonality of Hadamard codes combining with array waveguide grating routers and a polarization beam splitter, the proposed codec pair can encode-decode multiple code words of Hadamard code while retaining the ability for multiple-access interference cancellation. The experimental results demonstrate that when the system is maintained with an orthogonal SOP for each user, an effective reduction in the phase-induced intensity noise is obtained. The analytical SNR values are found to overstate the experimental results by around 2 dB when the received effective power is large. This is mainly limited by insertion losses of components and a nonflattened optical light source. Furthermore, the matching conditions can be improved by decreasing nonideal influences.

  15. Spectral distortions in the cosmic microwave background polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Renaux-Petel, Sébastien; Fidler, Christian; Pitrou, Cyril; Pettinari, Guido W. E-mail: christian.fidler@port.ac.uk E-mail: g.pettinari@sussex.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We compute the spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization induced by non-linear effects in the Compton interactions between CMB photons and the flow of intergalactic electrons. This signal is of the y-type and is dominated by contributions arising from the reionized era. We stress that it is not shadowed by the thermal SZ effect which has no equivalent for polarization. We decompose its angular dependence into E- and B-modes, and we calculate the corresponding power spectra, both exactly and using a suitable Limber approximation that allows a simpler numerical evaluation. We find that B-modes are of the same order of magnitude as E-modes. Both spectra are relatively flat, peaking around ℓ = 280, and their overall amplitude is directly related to the optical depth to reionization. Moreover, we find this effect to be one order of magnitude larger than the non-linear kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in galaxy clusters. Finally, we discuss how to improve the detectability of our signal by cross-correlating it with other quantities sourced by the flow of intergalactic electrons.

  16. Study on backscattering spectral polarization characteristics of turbid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuezhen; Wang, Qinghua; Lai, Jiancheng; Li, Zhenhua

    2015-10-01

    Noninvasive monitoring of blood glucose is the current international academic research focus. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is the most prospective method of the present study, however, with the flaw of insufficient specificity to glucose. Tissue polarimetry has recently received considerable attention due to its specificity to glucose. Thus the glucose predicting accuracy would be improved by combining spectral intensity and polarization characteristics. However the backscattering spectral polarization characteristics of turbid media have not been reported within the wavelength range from visible to near-infrared light. In this paper, we simulated the backscattering spectral Mueller matrix of turbid medium by vector Monte Carlo. And the polarization characteristics, which are linear/circular degree of polarization (DOP) and linear/circular diattenuation, can be extracted from the simulated Mueller matrix by polar decomposition. Circular diattenuation is not discussed because it remains almost zero on the backscattering plane. While reduced scattering coefficient increases linearly with increasing wavelength, the spectral curves show distinct wavelength dependencies. Interestingly, the wavelength dependencies at center position are different from those at off-center position for linear/circular DOP and linear diattenuation. As expected, it is shown that both linear DOP and linear diattenuation increase with the increasing wavelength. However it is not the case for linear DOP in the central area around the incident point. In this area linear DOP decays approximately exponentially with increasing wavelength. As for circular DOP, it varies with wavelength non-monotonically. These results should be meaningful when spectral polarization characteristics are used to combine with spectral intensity to extract glucose concentration by chemometrics.

  17. Is there spectral variation in the polarized reflectance of leaves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.

    2014-05-01

    The light scattered by plant canopies depends in part on the light scattering/absorbing properties of the leaves and is key to understanding the remote sensing process in the optical domain. Here we specifically looked for evidence of fine spectral detail in the polarized portion of the light reflected from the individual leaves of five species of plants measured at Brewsters angle over the wavelength range 450 to 2300nm. Our results show no strong, unambiguous evidence of narrow band spectral variation of the polarized portion of the reflectance factor.

  18. Comment on: Tarasov, A. & Titov, K., 2013, On the use of the Cole-Cole equations in spectral induced polarization, Geophys. J. Int., 195, 352-356

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macnae, James

    2015-07-01

    A recent paper by Tarasov and Titov suggested that the Cole-Cole conductivity models should be preferred to the Pelton resistivity model in fitting induced polarization responses. Each model has four parameters: resistivity ρ (or its inverse conductivity σ), chargeability m, time parameter τ and frequency dependence c. Tarasov and Titov showed that in fitting experimental data, 3 of the parameters directly correspond across the two formulations, but that there is a difference between the Pelton and Cole-Cole model in that parameter τ is only the same at low frequency, but is an entangled function with m and c at high frequencies in the Pelton formulation. This claim of inconsistent τ was based on using the Pelton complex resistivity formulation and the Cole-Cole complex conductivity equation to analyse complex conductivity data as a function of frequency. However, if Pelton and Cole-Cole models are used to fit complex resistivity, rather than fitting conductivity, then it is the Cole-Cole model that has an entangled parameter at high chargeability m values. Simple testing shows that a Pelton model used to fit resistivity has all four model parameters directly corresponding with conductivity data fitted with a Cole-Cole model. The conclusion is that Cole-Cole and Pelton models in fact require identical independent parameters that can fit experimental or synthetic data, provided the Pelton resistivity formulation is restricted to fitting to resistivity data, and the Cole-Cole conductivity formulation is restricted to fitting conductivity results.

  19. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    SciTech Connect

    D. Budker, M.P. Ledbetter, S. Appelt, L.S. Bouchard, B. Wojtsekhowski

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast ({approx}100 HZ) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  20. NON-ZEEMAN CIRCULAR POLARIZATION OF MOLECULAR ROTATIONAL SPECTRAL LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Houde, Martin; Jones, Scott; Rajabi, Fereshte; Hezareh, Talayeh

    2013-02-10

    We present measurements of circular polarization from rotational spectral lines of molecular species in Orion KL, most notably {sup 12}CO (J = 2 {yields} 1), obtained at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory with the Four-Stokes-Parameter Spectral Line Polarimeter. We find levels of polarization of up to 1%-2% in general; for {sup 12}CO (J = 2 {yields} 1) this level is comparable to that of linear polarization also measured for that line. We present a physical model based on resonant scattering in an attempt to explain our observations. We discuss how slight differences in scattering amplitudes for radiation polarized parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, responsible for the alignment of the scattering molecules, can lead to the observed circular polarization. We also show that the effect is proportional to the square of the magnitude of the plane of the sky component of the magnetic field and therefore opens up the possibility of measuring this parameter from circular polarization measurements of Zeeman insensitive molecules.

  1. Method for induced polarization logging

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1987-04-14

    A method is described for generating a log of the formation phase shift, resistivity and spontaneous potential of an earth formation from data obtained from the earth formation with a multi-electrode induced polarization logging tool. The method comprises obtaining data samples from the formation at measurement points equally spaced in time of the magnitude and phase of the induced voltage and the magnitude and phase of the current supplied by a circuit through a reference resistance R/sub 0/ to a survey current electrode associated with the tool.

  2. Broad spectral range measurement of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers using spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.; Martynkien, T.; Mergo, P.; Urbańczyk, W.

    2011-05-01

    Chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers is measured over a broad spectral range (e.g. 500-1600 nm) using two white-light spectral interferometric techniques. First, a technique employing an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fiber in the test arm is used to measure the wavelength dependence of the differential group effective index, or equivalently the chromatic dispersion of one polarization mode supported by the fiber. Second, a technique employing a tandem configuration of a Michelson interferometer and the optical fiber under test is used to measure the group modal birefringence in the fiber. From these measurements, the chromatic dispersion of the other polarization mode supported by the fiber is retrieved. We measured by these techniques the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in four air-silica holey fibers and revealed the dependence of zero-dispersion wavelength on the geometry of the holey fiber.

  3. Spectral decomposition at a complex laser polarization configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hai-Feng; Gao, Wei; Cheng, Hong; Liu, Hong-Ping

    2013-05-01

    We study the role of laser polarization in the diamagnetic spectrum for the transition from the ground state to the highly excited Rydberg states through a single photon absorption. For simplicity, one usually polarizes the irradiation laser to the selected main quantum axis, which is along the applied external electric or magnetic field. The transition selection rule is simply expressed as Δm = 0, which corresponds to the π transition. When the polarization is circularly polarized around the main axis, the σ+ or σ- transition occurs, corresponding to the selection rule of Δm = 1 or Δm = -1, respectively. A slightly more complex case is that the laser is linearly polarized perpendicular to the main axis. The numerical calculation shows that we can decompose the transition into the sum of σ+ and σ- transitions, it is noted as the σ transition. For the more complex case in which the laser is linearly polarized with an arbitrary angle with respect to the main axis, we have to decompose the polarization into one along the main axis and the other one perpendicular to the main axis. They correspond to π and σ transitions, respectively. We demonstrate that these transitions in the diamagnetic spectrum and the above spectral decomposition well explain the experimentally observed spectra.

  4. An Integrated Imaging Detector of Polarization and Spectral Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Thompson, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    A new type of image detector has been designed to simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The Integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beamsplitter bonded to a charge-coupled device (CCD), with signal-analysis circuitry and analog-to-digital converters, all integrated on a silicon chip. It should be capable of 1:10(exp 4) polarization discrimination. The IDID should simplify the design and operation of imaging polarimeters and spectroscopic imagers used, for example, in atmospheric and solar research. Innovations in the IDID include (1) two interleaved 512 x 1024-pixel imaging arrays (one for each polarization plane); (2) large dynamic range (well depth of 10(exp 6) electrons per pixel); (3) simultaneous readout of both images at 10 million pixels per second each; (4) on-chip analog signal processing to produce polarization maps in real time; (5) on-chip 10-bit A/D conversion. When used with a lithium-niobate Fabry-Perot etalon or other color filter that can encode spectral information as polarization, the IDID can collect and analyze simultaneous images at two wavelengths. Precise photometric analysis of molecular or atomic concentrations in the atmosphere is one suggested application. When used in a solar telescope, the IDID will charge the polarization, which can then be converted to maps of the vector magnetic fields on the solar surface.

  5. Polarization of photons scattered by electrons in any spectral distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan; Jiang, Yunguo

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of the quantum electrodynamics, we present a generic formalism of the polarization for beamed monochromatic photons scattered by electrons in any spectral distribution. The formulae reduce to the components of the Fano matrix when electrons are at rest. We mainly investigate the polarization in three scenarios, i.e., electrons at rest, isotropic electrons with a power-law spectrum, and thermal electrons. If the incident beam is polarized, the polarization is reduced significantly by isotropic electrons at large viewing angles; the degree of polarization caused by thermal electrons is about half of that caused by power-law electrons. If the incident bean is unpolarized, soft γ-rays can lead to about 15% polarization at viewing angles around π/4. For isotropic electrons, one remarkable feature is that the polarization as a function of the incident photon energy always peaks roughly at 1 MeV; this is valid for both the thermal and power-law cases. This feature can be used to distinguish the model of the inverse Compton scattering from that of the synchrotron radiation.

  6. Quantitative polarized light microscopy using spectral multiplexing interferometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2015-06-01

    We propose an interferometric spectral multiplexing method for measuring birefringent specimens with simple configuration and high sensitivity. The retardation and orientation of sample birefringence are simultaneously encoded onto two spectral carrier waves, generated interferometrically by a birefringent crystal through polarization mixing. A single interference spectrum hence contains sufficient information for birefringence determination, eliminating the need for mechanical rotation or electrical modulation. The technique is analyzed theoretically and validated experimentally on cellulose film. System simplicity permits the possibility of mitigating system birefringence background. Further analysis demonstrates the technique's exquisite sensitivity as high as ∼20  pm for retardation measurement. PMID:26030573

  7. Simultaneous Teleportation of the Spectral and Polarization States of a Photon

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Bennink, Ryan S; Grice, Warren P

    2008-01-01

    We describe how spectrally multimode, polarization-entangled photons simultaneously teleport quantum information encoded into the spectral and polarization degrees of freedom of a single photon using sum frequency generation to implement a Bell-state measurement.

  8. Efficient and spectrally bright source of polarization-entangled photons

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Friedrich; Mason, Elliott J.; Wong, Franco N. C.; Albota, Marius A.

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate an efficient fiber-coupled source of nondegenerate polarization-entangled photons at 795 and 1609 nm using bidirectionally pumped parametric down-conversion in bulk periodically poled lithium niobate. The single-mode source has an inferred bandwidth of 50 GHz and a spectral brightness of 300 pairs/(s GHz mW) of pump power that is suitable for narrowband applications such as entanglement transfer from photonic to atomic qubits.

  9. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, S.T.; Bailey, P.L.; Gille, J.C.; Lee, E.C.; Mergenthaler, J.L.; Roche, A.E.; Kumer, J.B.; Fishbein, E.F.; Waters, J.W.; Lahoz, W.A.

    1994-10-15

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605 cm{sup {minus}1} (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 {mu}m) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheroidal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculation and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles. 47 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.; Bailey, P. L.; Gille, J. C.; Lee, E. C.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Roche, A. E.; Kumer, J. B.; Fishbein, E. F.; Waters, J. W.; Lahoz, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605/cm (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 micrometers) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheriodal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculations and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles.

  11. Self-induced polarization anisoplanatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckinridge, James B.

    2013-09-01

    This paper suggests that the astronomical science data recorded with low F# telescopes for applications requiring a known point spread function shape and those applications requiring instrument polarization calibration may be compromised unless the effects of vector wave propagation are properly modeled and compensated. Exoplanet coronagraphy requires "matched filter" masks and explicit designs for the real and imaginary parts for the mask transmittance. Three aberration sources dominate image quality in astronomical optical systems: amplitude, phase and polarization. Classical ray-trace aberration analysis used today by optical engineers is inadequate to model image formation in modern low F# highperformance astronomical telescopes. We show here that a complex (real and imaginary) vector wave model is required for high performance, large aperture, very wide-field, low F# systems. Self-induced polarization anisoplanatism (SIPA) reduces system image quality, decreases contrast and limits the ability of image processing techniques to restore images. This paper provides a unique analysis of the image formation process to identify measurements sensitive to SIPA. Both the real part and the imaginary part of the vector complex wave needs to be traced through the entire optical system, including each mirror surface, optical filter, and all masks. Only at the focal plane is the modulus squared taken to obtain an estimate of the measured intensity. This paper also discusses the concept of the polarization conjugate filter, suggested by the author to correct telescope/instrument corrupted phase and amplitude and thus mitigate6, in part the effects of phase and amplitude errors introduced by reflections of incoherent white-light from metal coatings.

  12. Time domain para hydrogen induced polarization.

    PubMed

    Ratajczyk, Tomasz; Gutmann, Torsten; Dillenberger, Sonja; Abdulhussaein, Safaa; Frydel, Jaroslaw; Breitzke, Hergen; Bommerich, Ute; Trantzschel, Thomas; Bernarding, Johannes; Magusin, Pieter C M M; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Para hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) is a powerful hyperpolarization technique, which increases the NMR sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. However the hyperpolarized signal is created as an anti-phase signal, which necessitates high magnetic field homogeneity and spectral resolution in the conventional PHIP schemes. This hampers the application of PHIP enhancement in many fields, as for example in food science, materials science or MRI, where low B(0)-fields or low B(0)-homogeneity do decrease spectral resolution, leading to potential extinction if in-phase and anti-phase hyperpolarization signals cannot be resolved. Herein, we demonstrate that the echo sequence (45-?-180-?) enables the acquisition of low resolution PHIP enhanced liquid state NMR signals of phenylpropiolic acid derivatives and phenylacetylene at a low cost low-resolution 0.54 T spectrometer. As low field TD-spectrometers are commonly used in industry or biomedicine for the relaxometry of oil-water mixtures, food, nano-particles, or other systems, we compare two variants of para-hydrogen induced polarization with data-evaluation in the time domain (TD-PHIP). In both TD-ALTADENA and the TD-PASADENA strong spin echoes could be detected under conditions when usually no anti-phase signals can be measured due to the lack of resolution. The results suggest that the time-domain detection of PHIP-enhanced signals opens up new application areas for low-field PHIP-hyperpolarization, such as non-invasive compound detection or new contrast agents and biomarkers in low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Finally, solid-state NMR calculations are presented, which show that the solid echo (90y-?-90x-?) version of the TD-ALTADENA experiment is able to convert up to 10% of the PHIP signal into visible magnetization. PMID:22365288

  13. Multilayer thin film design for far ultraviolet polarizers using an induced transmission and absorption technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    An explanation of induced transmission for spectral regions excluding the far ultraviolet (FUV) is given to better understand how induced transmission and absorption can be used to design effective polarizers in the FUV spectral region. We achieve high s-polarization reflectance and a high degree of polarization (P equals (Rs-Rp)/(Rs+Rp)) by means of a MgF2/Al/MgF2 three layer structure on an opaque thick film of Al as the substrate. For example, our polarizer designed for the Lyman-alpha line (lambda equals 121.6 nm) has 87.95 percent reflectance for the s-polarization case and 0.43 percent for the p-polarization case, with a degree of polarization of 99.03 percent. If a double reflection polarizer is made with this design, it will have a degree of polarization of 99.99 percent and s-polarization throughput of 77.35 percent.

  14. Polarized spectral complexes of optical functions of monovalent mercury iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V. V.; Sobolev, V. Val.; Anisimov, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral complexes of optical functions of monovalent mercury iodide Hg2I2 were determined for E ? c and E || c polarizations in the range from 2 to 5.5 eV at 4.2 K. The permittivity and characteristic electron energy loss spectra were expanded in simple components with the determination of their main parameters, including the energy of the maximum and the oscillator strength. The calculations were performed based on known reflectance spectra. Computer programs based on Kramers-Kronig relations and the improved parameter-free method of Argand diagrams were used.

  15. Spectral and polarization properties of photospheric emission from stratified jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Matsumoto, Jin; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Tolstov, Alexey; Mao, Jirong; Dainotti, Maria; Mizuta, Akira

    2014-07-10

    We explore the spectral and polarization properties of photospheric emissions from stratified jets in which multiple components, separated by sharp velocity shear regions, are distributed in lateral directions. Propagation of thermal photons injected at a high optical depth region are calculated until they escape from the photosphere. It is found that the presence of the lateral structure within the jet leads to the nonthermal feature of the spectra and significant polarization signal in the resulting emission. The deviation from thermal spectra, as well as the polarization degree, tends to be enhanced as the velocity gradient in the shear region increases. In particular, we show that emissions from multicomponent jet can reproduce the typical observed spectra of gamma-ray bursts irrespective of the position of the observer when a velocity shear region is closely spaced in various lateral (θ) positions. The degree of polarization associated with the emission is significant (>few percent) at a wide range of observer angles and can be higher than 30%.

  16. Correlation-induced spectral changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Emil; James, Daniel F. V.

    1996-06-01

    This paper presents a review of research, both theoretical and experimental, concerning the influence of coherence properties of fluctuating light sources and of correlation properties of scattering media on the spectra of radiated and scattered fields. Much of this research followed a discovery made in 1986, that the spectrum of light may change on propagation, even in free space. More than 100 papers on this topic have been published to date and many of them are reviewed, or at least mentioned, in this article. After an introduction and a summary of some of the main mathematical results relating to second-order coherence theory of statistically stationary optical fields, spectral changes that may take place on superposing fields produced by two partially correlated sources are discussed. Spectral effects in fields produced by two-dimensional secondary sources and by three-dimensional primary sources are then considered. The section which follows describes spectral changes that may arise when polychromatic light is scattered on media whose physical properties vary randomly either in space and/or in time. A review is also presented of recent research, which has revealed that under certain circumstances the changes in the spectrum of light scattered on random media may imitate the Doppler effect, even though the source, the medium and the observer are all at rest with respect to one another. In the final section a brief review is given of a new emerging technique sometimes called spatial-coherence spectroscopy. It is based on the discovery that it is possible, under certain circumstances, to determine field correlations from spectral measurements.

  17. Radiative interactions with micromachined surfaces: Spectral polarized emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Zemel, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    The spectral, angular, polarized emittance (SAPE) is a simple means for observing the allowed electromagnetic energy states associated with periodic structures whose dimensions are comparable to the wavelength of the observed light. Other methods for measuring absorption are far more time consuming when a broad survey is of interest. An extensive body of SAPE data was obtained on 350-- 400{degrees}C intrinsic silicon lamellar gratings. Current approximations to the vector wave equation such as guided wave, modal and Bloch wave methods provided insight into our experiments. A qualitative picture of the stationary electromagnetic states (SES) of lamellar gratings has been developed which agrees with experiment for a number of polarizations, and angular orientations of the emission k vector relative to the gratings. However, one type of emission does not fit any simple model we have examined and raises intriguing questions about emission from grating structures. A new, higher angular resolution emissometer (0.8{degrees} instead of 5{degrees}) has been completed. This system significantly increases the wavelength range from the current 3--14 {mu}m range to 2-25{mu}m, a doubling of the spectral regime. The system is currently in a shakedown'' mode. Preliminary data indicates that the new emissometer meets the design goals. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  18. THE IMPACT OF QUANTUM INTERFERENCE BETWEEN DIFFERENT J-LEVELS ON SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SPECTRAL LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Belluzzi, Luca; Bueno, Javier Trujillo

    2011-12-10

    The spectral line polarization produced by optically pumped atoms contains a wealth of information on the thermal and magnetic structure of a variety of astrophysical plasmas, including that of the solar atmosphere. A correct decoding of such information from the observed Stokes profiles requires a clear understanding of the effects that radiatively induced quantum interference (or coherence) between pairs of magnetic sublevels produces on these observables, in the absence of and in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary strength. Here we present a detailed theoretical investigation of the role of coherence between pairs of sublevels pertaining to different fine-structure J-levels, clarifying when it can be neglected for facilitating the modeling of the linear polarization produced by scattering processes in spectral lines. To this end, we apply the quantum theory of spectral line polarization and calculate the linear polarization patterns of the radiation scattered at 90 Degree-Sign by a slab of stellar atmospheric plasma, both taking into account and neglecting the above-mentioned quantum interference. Particular attention is given to the {sup 2}S - {sup 2}P, {sup 5}S - {sup 5}P, and {sup 3}P - {sup 3}S multiplets. We point out the observational signatures of this kind of interference and analyze its sensitivity to the energy separation between the interfering levels, to the amount of emissivity in the background continuum radiation, to lower-level polarization, and to the presence of a magnetic field. Some interesting applications to the following spectral lines are also presented: Ca II H and K, Mg II h and k, Na I D{sub 1} and D{sub 2}, the Ba II 4554 #Angstrom# and 4934 #Angstrom# resonance lines, the Cr I triplet at 5207 #Angstrom#, the O I triplet at 7773 #Angstrom#, the Mg I b-lines, and the H{alpha} and Ly{alpha} lines of H I.

  19. Spectral properties of BADAN in solutions with different polarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonin, A. V.; Kuznetsova, I. M.; Turoverov, K. K.

    2015-06-01

    Spectral characteristics (absorption spectra, excitation and emission spectra of solvatochromic dye 6-bromo-acetyl-2-dimethylamino-naphtalene (BADAN) were studied in solvents with different polarities. Comparison of BADAN fluorescence excitation spectra corrected for the primary inner filter effect and absorption spectra of this dye allowed to conclude that the long-wavelength absorption band of BADAN is determined by the superposition of two BADAN tautomeric forms having different conformation (planar and non-planar) and different distribution of electronic density. The analysis of BADAN excitation and emission spectra has shown that in non-polar solvents (hexane) fluoresces only one dye form which absorbs in more short-wave part of the spectrum than other conformer. In polar solvents (acetonitrile, mixture of acetonitrile/water) both forms fluoresce. It is concluded that the fluorescence of the dye in hexane and short-wavelength component of BADAN fluorescence at excitation in short-wavelength region of absorption spectrum are due to the locally excited state of the planar BADAN molecule. Fluorescence of BADAN in acetonitrile at excitation in long-wavelength part of long-wavelength absorption band and long-wavelength component of BADAN fluorescence spectrum in acetonitrile at excitation in short-wavelength region of absorption spectrum are due to non-planar BADAN conformers with internal charge transfer state.

  20. Polarized spectral combs probe optical fiber surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Caucheteur, Christophe; Voisin, Valérie; Albert, Jacques

    2013-02-11

    The high-order cladding modes of conventional single mode fiber come in semi-degenerate pairs corresponding to mostly radially or mostly azimuthally polarized light. Using tilted fiber Bragg gratings to excite these mode families separately, we show how plasmonic coupling to a thin gold coating on the surface of the fiber modifies the effective indices of the modes differently according to polarization and to mode order. In particular, we show the existence of a single "apolarized" grating resonance, with equal effective index for all input polarization states. This special resonance provides direct evidence of the excitation of a surface plasmon on the metal surface but also an absolute wavelength reference that allows for the precise localization of the most sensitive resonances in refractometric and biochemical sensing applications. Two plasmon interrogation methods are proposed, based on wavelength and amplitude measurements. Finally, we use a biotin-streptavidin biomolecular recognition experiment to demonstrate that differential spectral transmission measurements of a fine comb of cladding mode resonances in the vicinity of the apolarized resonance provide the most accurate method to extract information from plasmon-assisted Tilted fiber Bragg gratings, down to pM concentrations and at least 10(-5) refractive index changes. PMID:23481763

  1. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  2. Non-Zeeman circular polarization of molecular maser spectral lines

    SciTech Connect

    Houde, Martin

    2014-11-01

    We apply the anisotropic resonant scattering model developed to explain the presence of non-Zeeman circular polarization signals recently detected in the {sup 12}CO (J = 2 → 1) and (J = 1 → 0) transitions in molecular clouds to Stokes V spectra of SiO v = 1 and v = 2, (J = 1 → 0) masers commonly observed in evolved stars. It is found that the observed antisymmetric 'S'- and symmetric '∪'- or '∩'-shaped spectral profiles naturally arise when the maser radiation scatters off populations of foreground molecules located outside the velocity range covered by the background maser radiation. Using typical values for the relevant physical parameters, it is estimated that magnetic field strengths on the order of a few times 15 mG are sufficient to explain the observational results found in the literature.

  3. [Design of full-polarized and multi-spectral imaging system based on LCVR].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Hui-jie; Cheng, Xuan; Xiong, Sheng-jun

    2011-05-01

    A new full-polarized multi-spectral imaging system is described, which uses electronically controlled LCVR (liquid crystal variable retarder) to modulate the full-polarized state of light in the visible to IR range. The system consisted of optical lenses, LCVRs, filters and CCD. Firstly, the system structure, working theory and optical design are introduced in the present paper. A polarization calibration method is provided and the calibration system was set up, which realized high-precision polarization calibration using a small polarized source. Then, a field experiment with the imaging system was carried out. Polarized spectral images with higher spectral and spatial resolution were collected. Finally, the data acquired were rough processed to get polarization degree image of the targets. It is concluded that the experiment has proved that the imaging system is effective in obtaining full-polarized and multi- spectral data. The image captured by the system can be applied to object identification and object classification. PMID:21800604

  4. Optical Polarization and Spectral Variability in the M87 Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Adams, Steven C.; Cara, Mihai; Bourque, Matthew; Harris, D. E.; Madrid, Juan P.; Simons, Raymond C.; Clausen-Brown, Eric; Cheung, C. C.; Stawarz, Lukasz; Georganopoulos, Markos; Sparks, William B.; Biretta, John A.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, M87's jet has been the site of an extraordinary variability event, with one knot (HST-1) increasing by over a factor 100 in brightness. Variability was also seen on timescales of months in the nuclear flux. Here we discuss the optical-UV polarization and spectral variability of these components, which show vastly different behavior. HST -1 shows a highly significant correlation between flux and polarization, with P increasing from approx 20% at minimum to > 40% at maximum, while the orientation of its electric vector stayed constant. HST-l's optical-UV spectrum is very hard (alpha(sub uv-0) approx. 0.5, F(sub v) varies as (v(exp -alpha)), and displays "hard lags" during epochs 2004.9-2005.5, including the peak of the flare, with soft lags at later epochs. We interpret the behavior of HST-1 as enhanced particle acceleration in a shock, with cooling from both particle aging and the relaxation of the compression. We set 2alpha upper limits of 0.5 delta parsecs and 1.02c on the size and advance speed of the flaring region. The slight deviation of the electric vector orientation from the jet PA, makes it likely that on smaller scales the flaring region has either a double or twisted structure. By contrast, the nucleus displays much more rapid variability, with a highly variable electric vector orientation and 'looping' in the (I, P) plane. The nucleus has a much steeper spectrum ((alpha(sub uv-0) approx. 1.5) but does not show UV-optical spectral variability. Its behavior can be interpreted as either a helical distortion to a steady jet or a shock propagating through a helical jet.

  5. How and why are uniformly polarization-sensitive retinae subject to polarization-related artefacts? Correction of some errors in the theory of polarization-induced false colours.

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, R Ramón; Horváth, G Gábor

    2004-09-01

    If the photoreceptors of a colour vision system are polarization sensitive, the system detects polarization-induced false colours. Based on the functional similarities between polarization vision and colour vision, earlier it was believed that a uniformly polarization-sensitive (insect) retina (UPSR)-in which receptors of all spectral types have the same polarization sensitivity ratio and microvilli direction-cannot detect polarization-induced false colours. Here we show that, contrary to this belief, a colour vision based on a UPSR is subject to polarization-related artefacts, because both the degree and the angle of polarization of light reflected from natural surfaces depend on wavelength. Our second goal is to correct certain errors in the theory of polarizational false colours. The quantitative estimation of the influence of polarization sensitivity on colour vision was recently motivated by the suggestion that certain Papilio butterflies detect such false colours. The theoretical basis of this subject is to calculate the colour loci in the colour space of a visual system from the quantum catches of polarization-sensitive receptors of different spectral types. Horváth et al. (J. Exp. Biol. 205 (2002) 3281) gave the first exact mathematical and receptor-physiological derivation of formulae for these calculations. Here we prove that the two formulae given earlier by others are inappropriate or erroneous. This, however, does not influence the validity of the experimental data and the principal conclusions drawn about the colour vision and polarization sensitivity in Papilio butterflies. PMID:15276002

  6. Exploration of polar lipid accumulation profiles in Euglena gracilis using LipidBlast, an MS/MS spectral library constructed in silico.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takumi; Furuhashi, Takeshi; Okazawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Rai; Nakazawa, Masami; Kind, Tobias; Fiehn, Oliver; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Arita, Masanori; Ohta, Daisaku

    2014-01-01

    A rapid protocol for polar lipid profiling was applied to Euglena gracilis lipid metabolism by LipidBlast, an MS/MS spectral similarity search tool. The similarity search results suggested anoxia-induced polar lipid metabolism in Euglena characterized by the accumulation of differential lipid classes, carbon chain lengths, and unsaturated bond numbers. The informatics-supported MS spectral search provides an alternative option for global lipid profiling studies. PMID:25036478

  7. Polar motion-induced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Variations in the geocentric position of the earth's rotation axis (polar motion) cause deformation within the earth. The effects of this deformation on surface gravity and on radial and horizontal positions of points on the earth's surface are estimated. The effects of the oceans and of the earth's anelasticity on this deformation are found to be negligible. Peak-to-peak variations in surface gravity of 10 microgals or more, and in radial motion of 1-2 cm are possible over six months or so. These numbers are small enough that they can probably not be used to learn about the earth; however, they are large enough to noticeably affect present high-quality geodetic observations.

  8. Two long-wave infrared spectral polarimeters for use in understanding polarization phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sposato, Stephanie H.; Fetrow, Matthew P.; Bishop, Kenneth P.; Caudill, Thomas R.

    2002-05-01

    Spectrally varying long-wave infrared (LWIR) polarization measurements can be used to identify materials and to discriminate samples from a cluttered background. Two LWIR instruments have been built and fielded by the Air Force Research Laboratory: a multispectral LWIR imaging polarimeter (LIP) and a full-Stokes Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral polarimeter (FSP), constructed for higher spectral resolution measurements of materials. These two instruments have been built to gain an understanding of the polarization signatures expected from different types of materials in a controlled laboratory and in varying field environments. We discuss the instruments, calibration methods, general operation, and measurements characterizing the emitted polarization properties of materials as a function of wavelength. The results show that we are able to make polarization measurements with a relative accuracy of 0.5% degree of polarization (DOP) between two different instruments that are calibrated with the same techniques, and that these measurements can improve the understanding of polarization phenomenology.

  9. SPECTRAL MAPPING OF THE INTERMEDIATE POLAR DQ HERCULIS

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, R. K.; Baptista, R.; Horne, K.; Martell, P.

    2010-06-15

    We report an eclipse-mapping study of the intermediate polar DQ Her based on time-resolved optical spectroscopy ({Delta}{lambda} {approx} 3800-5000 A) covering four eclipses. The spectra were sliced into 295 narrow passbands in the continuum and in the lines, and the corresponding light curves were analyzed to solve for a set of monochromatic maps of the disk brightness distribution and for the flux of an additional uneclipsed component in each band. Eclipse maps of the He II {lambda}4686 line indicate that an azimuthally and vertically extended bright spot at disk rim is an important source of the reprocessing of X-rays from the magnetic poles. The disk spectrum is flat with no Balmer or Helium lines in the inner regions, and shows double-peaked emission lines in the intermediate and outer disk regions, while the slope of the continuum becomes progressively redder with increasing radius. The inferred disk temperatures are in the range T {approx_equal} 13500-5000 K and can be reasonably well described by a steady-state disk with mass accretion rate of M-dot =(2.7{+-}1.0)x10{sup -9} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. A comparison of the radial intensity distribution for the Balmer lines reveals a linear correlation between the slope of the distribution and the transition energy. The spectrum of the uneclipsed light is dominated by Balmer and He I lines in emission (probably from the extended nova shell) with narrow absorption cores (likely from a collimated and optically thick wind from the accretion disk). The observed narrow and redshifted Ca II {lambda}3934 absorption line in the total light spectra plus the inverse P-Cygni profiles of the Balmer and He II {lambda}4686 emission lines in spectra of the asymmetric component indicate radial inflow of gas in the innermost disk regions and are best explained in terms of magnetically controlled accretion inside the white dwarf magnetosphere. We infer projected radial inflow velocities of {approx}200-500 km s{sup -1}, significantly lower than both the rotational and the free-fall velocities for the corresponding range of radii. A combined net emission He II plus H{beta} low-velocity eclipse map reveals a twisted dipole emitting pattern near disk center. This is interpreted as being the projection of accretion curtains onto the orbital plane at two specific spin phases, as a consequence of the selection in velocity provided by the spectral eclipse mapping.

  10. Spectral Mapping of the Intermediate Polar DQ Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, R. K.; Baptista, R.; Horne, K.; Martell, P.

    2010-06-01

    We report an eclipse-mapping study of the intermediate polar DQ Her based on time-resolved optical spectroscopy (Δλ ~ 3800-5000 Å) covering four eclipses. The spectra were sliced into 295 narrow passbands in the continuum and in the lines, and the corresponding light curves were analyzed to solve for a set of monochromatic maps of the disk brightness distribution and for the flux of an additional uneclipsed component in each band. Eclipse maps of the He II λ4686 line indicate that an azimuthally and vertically extended bright spot at disk rim is an important source of the reprocessing of X-rays from the magnetic poles. The disk spectrum is flat with no Balmer or Helium lines in the inner regions, and shows double-peaked emission lines in the intermediate and outer disk regions, while the slope of the continuum becomes progressively redder with increasing radius. The inferred disk temperatures are in the range T ~= 13500-5000 K and can be reasonably well described by a steady-state disk with mass accretion rate of \\dot{M}=(2.7± 1.0)× 10^{-9} M_{⊙} yr^{-1}. A comparison of the radial intensity distribution for the Balmer lines reveals a linear correlation between the slope of the distribution and the transition energy. The spectrum of the uneclipsed light is dominated by Balmer and He I lines in emission (probably from the extended nova shell) with narrow absorption cores (likely from a collimated and optically thick wind from the accretion disk). The observed narrow and redshifted Ca II λ3934 absorption line in the total light spectra plus the inverse P-Cygni profiles of the Balmer and He II λ4686 emission lines in spectra of the asymmetric component indicate radial inflow of gas in the innermost disk regions and are best explained in terms of magnetically controlled accretion inside the white dwarf magnetosphere. We infer projected radial inflow velocities of ~200-500 km s-1, significantly lower than both the rotational and the free-fall velocities for the corresponding range of radii. A combined net emission He II plus Hβ low-velocity eclipse map reveals a twisted dipole emitting pattern near disk center. This is interpreted as being the projection of accretion curtains onto the orbital plane at two specific spin phases, as a consequence of the selection in velocity provided by the spectral eclipse mapping.

  11. Polarization lifetime near an induced depolarizing resonance

    SciTech Connect

    von Przewoski, B.; Doskow, J.; Dzemidzic, M.; Meyer, H.O.; Pollock, R.E.; Rinckel, T.; Sperisen, F.; Thoerngren Engblom, P.; Daehnick, W.W.; Flammang, R.W.; Saha, S.K.; Lorentz, B.; Quin, P.; Schwartz, B.; Wise, T.; Pancella, P.V.; Ugorowski, P.

    1998-09-01

    The time dependence of the polarization of a stored proton beam was measured near an induced depolarizing resonance. The resonance was created by a magnetic field which oscillated along the beam axis. The distance to the resonance was varied by changing the frequency of the oscillating field. The resonance was approached from either side and the time dependence of the polarization was found to be symmetric with respect to the resonance, and in agreement with an earlier measurement that involved an intrinsic depolarizing resonance. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Electric field induced spin-polarized current

    DOEpatents

    Murakami, Shuichi; Nagaosa, Naoto; Zhang, Shoucheng

    2006-05-02

    A device and a method for generating an electric-field-induced spin current are disclosed. A highly spin-polarized electric current is generated using a semiconductor structure and an applied electric field across the semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure can be a hole-doped semiconductor having finite or zero bandgap or an undoped semiconductor of zero bandgap. In one embodiment, a device for injecting spin-polarized current into a current output terminal includes a semiconductor structure including first and second electrodes, along a first axis, receiving an applied electric field and a third electrode, along a direction perpendicular to the first axis, providing the spin-polarized current. The semiconductor structure includes a semiconductor material whose spin orbit coupling energy is greater than room temperature (300 Kelvin) times the Boltzmann constant. In one embodiment, the semiconductor structure is a hole-doped semiconductor structure, such as a p-type GaAs semiconductor layer.

  13. A Compact Imaging Detector of Polarization and Spectral Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Kumar, A.; Thompson, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    A new type of image detector will simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beam splitter bonded to a charge-coupled device (CCD), with signal-analysis circuitry and analog-to-digital converters, all integrated on a silicon chip. The polarizing beam splitter can be either a Ronchi ruling, or an array of cylindrical lenslets, bonded to a birefringent wafer. The wafer, in turn, is bonded to the CCD so that light in the two orthogonal planes of polarization falls on adjacent pairs of pixels. The use of a high-index birefringent material, e.g., rutile, allows the IDID to operate at f-numbers as high as f/3.5. Other aspects of the detector are discussed.

  14. Inducing electric polarization in ultrathin insulating layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Castro, Jose; Piantek, Marten; Persson, Mats; Serrate, David; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.

    Studies of ultrathin polar oxide films have attracted the interest of researchers for a long time due to their different properties compared to bulk materials. However they present several challenges such as the difficulty in the stabilization of the polar surfaces and the limited success in tailoring their properties. Moreover, recently developed Van der Waals materials have shown that the stacking of 2D-layers trigger new collective states thanks to the interaction between layers. Similarly, interface phenomena emerge in polar oxides, like induced ferroelectricity. This represents a promising way for the creation of new materials with customized properties that differ from those of the isolated layers. Here we present a new approach for the fabrication and study of atomically thin insulating films. We show that the properties of insulating polar layers of sodium chloride (NaCl) can be engineered when they are placed on top of a charge modulated template of copper nitride (Cu2N). STM studies carried out in ultra-high vacuum and at low temperatures over NaCl/Cu2N/Cu(001) show that we are able to build up and stabilize interfaces of polar surface at the limit of one atomic layer showing new properties not present before at the atomic scale.

  15. The Interfacial Polarization-Induced Electrorheological Effect.

    PubMed

    Hao

    1998-10-01

    The Wagner theory, which describes the interfacial polarization in heterogeneous systems, was employed to model the electrorheological (ER) effect under the presumption that the shear stress increment is induced by the interfacial polarization. The currently observed experimental facts, such as the yield stress of some ER fluids, decreases with the applied field frequency increasing or the environment temperature decreasing, while that of other fluids increases with the frequency decreasing or temperature increasing; the strongest ER effect is usually observed in the suspension with the dispersed particle conductivity around 10(-7) S/m; the particle dielectric loss tangent of a good ER fluid usually is above 0.10 at 1000 Hz; and the fluid with a high conductive particle usually has a short response time, can be satisfactorily understood with the extended Wagner model. The Wagner-polarization-induced maximum yield stress of a heterogeneous-type ER fluid is estimated around 7 kPa under the presumption that the dielectric constants of the solid particle and the liquid medium are 10 and 2, respectively, the particle volume fraction is 35%, and the applied electric field strength is 3 kV/mm. It is concluded that the ER effect may substantially correlate with the Wagner polarization, which would help in understanding the mechanism of the ER effect and would provide a strategy for designing high performance ER fluids. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9761649

  16. Polarization studies of Zeeman affected spectral lines using the MSFC magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; West, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph records polarization images of absorption lines that are sensitive to magnetic fields. A method is presented for analyzing the Stokes spectral-line profiles of a photospheric Fe I absorption line (5250.2 A) which is influenced by the Zeeman effect. Using nonlinear least-square optimization, the observed Stokes profiles are compared with those generated from the theoretical solution of the polarized radiative transfer equations. The optimization process accounts for the spectral convolution of the source and the MSFC vector magnetograph. The resulting physical properties of the active region producing the polarized light are discussed.

  17. New Methods for Studying Interstellar Continuum and Spectral Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messinger, David W.

    Polarization studies have been shown to provide information about the aligned component of interstellar dust particles. These particles are aligned with respect to the local magnetic field and as such, models of polarization observations provide morphological information in addition to the determination of grain characteristics. Continuum polarization in molecular clouds observed to have a change in the polarization position angle indicates a region with at least two distinct components in the line of sight. A slab model is developed using the Stokes parameters to separate the competing effects of these multiple components and investigate the properties of the ``clump'' within the larger cloud complex. This model is applied to two lines of sight in the Taurus Molecular Cloud toward HD 29647 and HD 283809. For this model, a third line of sight, toward HD 283812, is used to probe the ``standard'' properties of the larger cloud. It is shown that within these clumps, the average aligned grain size is larger than in the overall cloud complex. The degree of alignment toward HD 29647 is higher than toward HD 283809, but both ``clumps'' show a dramatic change in polarization position angle. It is hypothesized that this change in the local magnetic field direction is a remnant of, or reason for, the collapse of the material in the region of TMC-1. Spectropolarization provides further constraints on the aligned grain population in the line of sight compared when with spectroscopy studies. A model is developed to study these two datasets, absorption and polarization, simultaneously for the water-ice absorption feature at ~3.1 μm in particular. This model investigates the individual grain population properties through a multiple slab structure. The grain sizes, shapes, mantle thicknesses, compositions, and alignment characteristics are all parameters in the model. The water-ice mantle is modeled with a Lorentz oscillator model to simplify the process and remove any differences between the actual ice compositions and water-ices created in laboratory experiments. This model is applied to the Becklin - Neugebauer (BN) object water-ice absorption and polarization data. The data are best fit with a three component model containing silicate cores with mantles of water-ice formed at a range of temperatures. Alignment differences between the components account for differences in the observed absorption and polarization peaks. The observed 3.47 μm feature and polarization position angle rotation, observed for the first time in this dataset, are also modeled here.

  18. Radio emission from RS CVn binaries. II - Polarization and spectral properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutel, R. L.; Morris, D. H.; Doiron, D. J.; Lestrade, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    Multiepoch radio observations of circular polarization and spectral characteristics of several close, late-type stellar binaries are reported. The median luminosity of four well-studied systems ranged from 16.2 to 17.1 ergs/s/Hz. For individual systems, the fractional circular polarization decreases with increasing luminosity, particularly at frequencies above 5 GHz. Eclipsing binaries have significantly lower average circular polarization compared with noneclipsing systems. Helicity reversal is almost always observed between 1.4 and 4.9 GHz for systems with high orbital inclination. Comparison with ten years of previously published polarization observations for two RS CVn stellar systems show that the same helicity occurs at a given frequency for a given source, indicating a very stable, large-scale magnetic field geometry. These spectral and polarization characteristics strongly support a model of inhomogeneous gyrosynchrotron emission arising from electrons with power law energy spectra interacting with inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  19. Recognition of camouflage targets with hyper-spectral polarization imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi-chao; Wang, Jia-chun; Zhao, Da-peng; Ma, Li-fang; Chen, Zong-sheng; Li, Zhi-gang

    2013-08-01

    On the basis of the principle of polarization detection, a hyper-spectral polarization imaging system, which is based on linear polarizer and acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF), was designed to detect and recognize camouflage target intelligently and rapidly in this paper. Our design has neither moving parts nor modulation, and has fast and electronically tuning property, so a quick scan of spectrum at 400 nm~1000 nm can be realized electronically. At the same time, it not only could obtain the intensity image, hyper-spectral information, but also could acquire polarization signatures of the scene. Then the spectral polarization experiment about aluminous plane which covered with the bottle green, shallow green and khaki camouflage pigments within meadow were conducted at specifically wavelength by the instrument. Finally, the polarization information of the man-made targets and natural background in the scene, and the fusion image based on HIS color space were deduced through processing the experiment data. The experimental result demonstrates that the polarization characteristics of camouflage pigments were different from that of natural background. As the contrast of target and background could be enhanced by polarization information, the camouflage target could be identified effectively from the image according to polarization information. On the other hand, the camouflage target is more obvious in the fused image. Therefore, the proposed method and the system in this paper are reasonable and effective. Consequently, the hyper-spectral polarization detection technique which relative to the classical intensity detection is of significance to improve the accuracy of recognition of camouflage targets in mixed background under proper detection condition.

  20. Sensing and compensation of femtosecond waveform distortion induced by all-order polarization mode dispersion at selected polarization states.

    PubMed

    Miao, Houxun; Weiner, Andrew M; Langrock, Carsten; Roussev, Rostislav V; Fejer, Martin M

    2007-02-15

    We demonstrate full characterization of femtosecond pulse distortion induced by all-order polarization mode dispersion (PMD) at selected polarization states via second-harmonic generation (SHG) frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) measurements at an average power of under 28 nW. By applying the inverse of the measured spectral phase via a programmable pulse shaper, we compress the distorted pulses from more than 3 ps to nearly bandwidth-limited durations of less than 500 fs. Our results show that SHG FROG measurements performed by using fiber-pigtailed aperiodically poled lithium niobate waveguides can serve as a robust and sensitive tool for characterization of PMD-induced spectral phase. PMID:17356674

  1. A peculiar spectral unit in the Southern Amazonian polar layered deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, C.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Altieri, F.; Giacomini, L.

    South Polar regions were previously mapped by Tanaka and Scott (1987), revealing different geological units ranging from Noachian crater terrains to Amazonian polar layered and polar ice deposits (Apl and Api, respectively). In particular the Apl deposits are characterized by alternating dark and light lithologies in a smooth, medium albedo material with sparse craters (Milkovich et al., 2002). Recently, a spectral parameters analysis, around 1 mu m (see Carrozzo et al., 2012), highlighted how a portion of the Apl can be differentiated from a spectroscopical point of view respect to the rest. In particular this peculiar area seems different in composition from the surrounding Apl terrains, but spectrally similar to some craters dominated by dark dunes. This region was considered as a new spectral unit enriched in pyroxene content (Carrozzo et al., 2013). Here we have considered the spectral features from this region of interest and we have preliminary mapped it using the Spectral Angle Mapper (Kruse et al., 1993) supervised classifier to OMEGA mosaic of successive Solar longitude (Ls). The results evidence that this portion of the Apl area is the only region spectrally mapped, confirming that it is peculiar from a spectroscopical point of view compared to the rest of the South Polar regions. Here we will show morphological and spectroscopical characteristics of this region to better address the characteristic of this smooth region and understand its possible formation and evolution.

  2. Polarization spectral synthesis for Type Ia supernova explosion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulla, M.; Sim, S. A.; Kromer, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a Monte Carlo radiative transfer technique for calculating synthetic spectropolarimetry for multidimensional supernova explosion models. The approach utilizes `virtual-packets' that are generated during the propagation of the Monte Carlo quanta and used to compute synthetic observables for specific observer orientations. Compared to extracting synthetic observables by direct binning of emergent Monte Carlo quanta, this virtual-packet approach leads to a substantial reduction in the Monte Carlo noise. This is not only vital for calculating synthetic spectropolarimetry (since the degree of polarization is typically very small) but also useful for calculations of light curves and spectra. We first validate our approach via application of an idealized test code to simple geometries. We then describe its implementation in the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code ARTIS and present test calculations for simple models for Type Ia supernovae. Specifically, we use the well-known one-dimensional W7 model to verify that our scheme can accurately recover zero polarization from a spherical model, and to demonstrate the reduction in Monte Carlo noise compared to a simple packet-binning approach. To investigate the impact of aspherical ejecta on the polarization spectra, we then use ARTIS to calculate synthetic observables for prolate and oblate ellipsoidal models with Type Ia supernova compositions.

  3. Measured polarized spectral responsivity of JPSS J1 VIIRS using the NIST T-SIRCUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntire, Jeff; Young, James B.; Moyer, David; Waluschka, Eugene; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2015-09-01

    Recent pre-launch measurements performed on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) J1 Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) using the NIST T-SIRCUS monochromatic source have provided wavelength dependent polarization sensitivity for select spectral bands and viewing conditions. Measurements were made at a number of input linear polarization states (twelve in total) and initially at thirteen wavelengths across the bandpass (later expanded to seventeen for some cases). Using the source radiance information collected by an external monitor, a spectral responsivity function was constructed for each input linear polarization state. Additionally, an unpolarized spectral responsivity function was derived from these polarized measurements. An investigation of how the centroid, bandwidth, and detector responsivity vary with polarization state was weighted by two model input spectra to simulate both ground measurements as well as expected on-orbit conditions. These measurements will enhance our understanding of VIIRS polarization sensitivity, improve the design for future flight models, and provide valuable data to enhance product quality in the post-launch phase.

  4. Smoking Induced Hemolysis: Spectral and microscopic investigations

    PubMed Central

    Masilamani, Vadivel; AlZahrani, Khalid; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; AlQahtani, Hadi; AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is one of the major causes of lifestyle associated mortality and morbidity such as cancer of the oral cavity and lungs, and also cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we have provided evidences for the smoking-induced hemolysis using two methods: spectra of blood components and atomic force microscopic analysis of surface morphology. A total of 62 subjects (control = 31; smoker = 31: 21 male; 10 female in each set) were considered for the study. The findings indicate that smoking leads to potholes on the surface, swelling of shape, rupturing of erythrocytes, removal of hematoporphyrin and flushing into the plasma as metabolites of the erythrocyte. The overall morphology of the erythrocytes of the smoker group appears more like a Mexican hat. The mean surface roughness was 5.5 ± 3 nm for the smoker group, but 1.2 ± 0.2 nm for the control group. Such damages might help the toxins, (CO, peroxidants, aldehydes etc.,) to gain easy access and get strongly absorbed by the hemoglobin, leading to enhanced rates of hemolysis as shown by the spectral features of metabolites. This indicates that the average life span of the smoker’s erythrocytes is significantly less than that of the control group. PMID:26891995

  5. Smoking Induced Hemolysis: Spectral and microscopic investigations.

    PubMed

    Masilamani, Vadivel; AlZahrani, Khalid; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; AlQahtani, Hadi; AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is one of the major causes of lifestyle associated mortality and morbidity such as cancer of the oral cavity and lungs, and also cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we have provided evidences for the smoking-induced hemolysis using two methods: spectra of blood components and atomic force microscopic analysis of surface morphology. A total of 62 subjects (control = 31; smoker = 31: 21 male; 10 female in each set) were considered for the study. The findings indicate that smoking leads to potholes on the surface, swelling of shape, rupturing of erythrocytes, removal of hematoporphyrin and flushing into the plasma as metabolites of the erythrocyte. The overall morphology of the erythrocytes of the smoker group appears more like a Mexican hat. The mean surface roughness was 5.5 ± 3 nm for the smoker group, but 1.2 ± 0.2 nm for the control group. Such damages might help the toxins, (CO, peroxidants, aldehydes etc.,) to gain easy access and get strongly absorbed by the hemoglobin, leading to enhanced rates of hemolysis as shown by the spectral features of metabolites. This indicates that the average life span of the smoker's erythrocytes is significantly less than that of the control group. PMID:26891995

  6. Spectral-temporal-polarization encoding of photons for multi-user secure quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkor, Eric

    2014-05-01

    We describe a Quantum Key Distribution protocol that combines temporal-, spectraland polarization-encoding of photons for secure communication over an interconnected network of users. Temporal encoding is used to identify a user's location or address on the network. Polarization encoding is used to generate private cryptographic key. Polarization encoded information is locally and randomly generated by users and exchanged only over a dedicated secure channel. Spectral encoding allows for the detection of eavesdropping and tampering by a malicious agent. Temporal-spectral signals sent from the network administrator (Alice) to a user are bright light source. On the other hand spectral-temporal signal from a network user (Bob) to the administrator (Alice) are single photons. Signals are sent across the network as ordered light pairs. The ordering format is randomly chosen and are revealed only at the time of key selection between the parties so that a secure one-time cryptographic pad can be generated

  7. Spectral degree of linear polarization of light from healthy skin and melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ceolato, Romain; Golzio, Muriel; Riou, Cécile; Orlik, Xavier; Riviere, Nicolas

    2015-05-18

    A non-invasive optical technique, based on a supercontinuum laser source and hyperspectral sensors, is established to measure the spectral degree of linear polarization (DOLP) in a broad spectral range from 525 nm to 1000 nm. Several biomaterials of interest, such as healthy and cancerous skins, are considered. The spectral DOLP of melanoma, from 5 mm to 9 mm diameter, are measured and analyzed. An increase of the spectral DOLP is reported for 100% of the melanoma samples compared to healthy skin samples. The spectral DOLP of a given melanoma appears to be correlated to the stage of its development: the larger the melanoma, the higher the DOLP. Such trend could be explained by a decrease of the surface roughness along the evolution of the disease. In addition, a significant spectral dependence of the DOLP is reported for melanoma samples as it exhibits a decrease in the near infrared from 750 nm to 1000 nm. PMID:26074609

  8. Birefringence imaging of biological tissue by spectral domain polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Zhijun; Fan, Chuanmao; Jiang, Jingying; Gong, Qiang; Ma, Zhenhe; Zhang, Fan; Yao, Jianquan; Wang, R. K.

    2007-02-01

    A spectral domain Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (SDPS-OCT) system has been developed to acquire depth images of biological tissues such as porcine tendon, rabbit eye. The Stocks vectors (I, Q, U, and V) of the backscattered light from the biological tissues have been reconstructed. Further, the phase retardation and polarization degree between the two orthogonal polarizing states have been computed. Reconstructed images, i.e. birefringence images, from Stokes parameters, retardation and polarization degree of biological tissues show significant local variations in the polarization state. And the birefringence contrast of biological tissue possibly changes by some outside force. In addition, the local thickness of the birefringence layer determined with our system is significant. The results presented show SDPS-OCT is a potentially powerful technique to investigate tissue structural properties on the basis of the fact that any fibrous structure with biological tissues can influence the polarization state of light.

  9. IR spectral properties of dust and ice at the Mars south polar cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, T. N.; Kieffer, H. H.

    2001-11-01

    Removal of atmospheric dust effects is required to derive surface IR spectral emissivity. Commonly, the atmospheric-surface separation is based on radiative transfer (RT) spectral inversion methods using nadir-pointing observations. This methodology depends on a priori knowledge of the spectral shape of each atmospheric aerosol (e.g. dust or water ice) and a large thermal contrast between the surface and atmosphere. RT methods fail over the polar caps due to low thermal contrast between the atmosphere and the surface. We have used multi-angle Emission Phase Function (EPF) observations to estimate the opacity spectrum of dust over the springtime south polar cap and the underlying surface radiance, and thus, the surface emissivity. We include a few EPFs from Hellas Basin as a basis for comparisons between the spectral shape of polar and non-polar dust. Surface spectral emissivities over the seasonal cap are compared to CO2 models. Our results show that the spectral shape of the polar dust opacity is not constant, but is a two-parameter family that can be characterized by the 9 um and 20 um opacities. The 9 um opacity varies from 0.15 to 0.45 and characterizes the overall atmospheric conditions. The 9 um to 20 um opacity ratio varies from 2.0 to 5.1, suggesting changes in dust size distribution over the polar caps. Derived surface temperatures from the EPFs confirm that the slightly elevated temperatures (relative to CO2 frost temperature) observed in ``cryptic'' regions are a surface effect, not atmospheric. Comparison of broad-band reflectivity and surface emissivities to model spectra suggest the bright regions (e.g. perennial cap, Mountains of Mitchell) have higher albedos due to a thin surface layer of fine-grain CO2 (perhaps either frost or fractured ice) with an underlying layer of either coarse grain or slab CO2 ice.

  10. Spectral interferometric implementation with passive polarization optics of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Littleton, Brad; Kavanagh, Thomas; Festy, Frederic; Richards, David

    2013-09-01

    We have developed an interferometric implementation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering which enables broadband coherent Raman spectroscopy free from the nonresonant background, with a signal strength proportional to concentration. Spectra encode mode symmetry information into the amplitude response, which can be directly compared to polarized spontaneous Raman spectra. The method requires only passive polarization optics and is suitable for a wide range of laser linewidths and pulse durations. The method's application to Raman spectral imaging is demonstrated. PMID:25166670

  11. Apparatus for focused electrode induced polarization logging

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1986-04-15

    An induced polarization logging tool is described for measuring parameters of a formation surrounding a borehole. The logging tool consists of: a non-conductive logging sonde; a plurality of electrodes disposed on the sonde, the electrodes including at least a survey current electrode and guard electrodes disposed on opposite sides of the survey current electrode, a non-polarizing voltage measuring electrode, a non-polarizing voltage reference electrode and a current return electrode, both the voltage reference and current return electrodes being located a greater distance from the survey current electrode than the guard electrodes; means connected to the survey current electrode and the guard electrodes for generating a signal representative of the potential difference in the formation between the survey current electrode and the guard electrodes; first control means directly coupled to the survey current electrode, the first control means controlling the current flow to the survey current electrode in response to the potential difference signal; a second control means directly coupled to the guard electrodes to control the current flow to the guard electrodes in response to the potential difference signal; a source of alternating current located at the surface, one end of the source being coupled to the two control means and the other to the current return electrode, the source supplying alternating current at various discrete frequencies between substantially 0.01 and 100 Hz; measurement means directly coupled to the voltage measurement and survey current electrodes to measure the amplitude and phase of the voltage induced in the formation and the amplitude and phase of the current flow to the survey electrode; and transmission means for transmitting the measurements to the surface.

  12. Spectral response of polarization properties of fiber Bragg grating under local pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yang; Zhu, Yong; Zhang, Baofu; Zhou, Hua; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Feng

    2015-10-01

    A study of the spectral characterization of polarization properties of locally pressed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is presented. The evolutions of the first Stokes (s1) parameter of a FBG as function of the incident angle, the load magnitude, the loaded position and the loaded length of the grating are investigated. The numerical simulation based on the modified transfer matrix method is used to calculate the s1 response and the state of polarization (SOP) of the FBG. The theoretical analysis and numerical simulation demonstrate that the evolutions of polarization dependent parameters contain the information about the transverse load and have potential applications for distributed diametric load sensor.

  13. Noninvasive Contaminant Site Characterization Using Geophysical Induced Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, F.D.; Sogade, J.; Lesmes, D.; Coles, D.; Vichabian, Y.; Scira-Scappuzzo, F.; Shi, W.; Vandiver, A.; Rodi, W.

    2003-03-27

    Results of aspects of a broad foundational study of time domain IP (TDIP) and spectral IP (SIP) for contaminant site characterization are presented. This ongoing study encompassed laboratory studies of coupled effects of rock/soil microgeometry and contaminant chemistry on induced polarization (IP), an investigation of electromagnetic coupling (EMC) noise and development of 3D modeling and inversion codes. SIP requires extensions to higher frequencies (above the typical 100Hz threshold) and EMC becomes the major limitation for field implementation, because conventional correction methods are inadequate at required higher frequencies. A proposed methodology is outlined, based on a model of all EMC components, that addresses the EMC problem by coupling IP and electromagnetic induction in modeling and inversion. Examples of application of IP and SIP to contaminant mapping and detection for TDIP and SIP will be presented for FS-12 plume at Massachusetts Military Reservation and a suspected DNAPL plume at Savannah River Site.

  14. Reflective and transmissive broadband coating polarizers in a spectral range centered at 121.6 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larruquert, Juan I.; Malvezzi, A. Marco; Giglia, Angelo; Aznárez, José A.; Rodríguez-de Marcos, Luis; Méndez, José A.; Miotti, Paolo; Frassetto, Fabio; Massone, Giuseppe; Nannarone, Stefano; Crescenzio, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Gerardo; Fineschi, Silvano

    2014-12-01

    Polarimetry is a powerful tool for the interpretation of the role of the coronal plasma in the energy transfer processes from the inner parts of the Sun to the outer space. One of the key lines for observations is H I Lyman α (121.6 nm) among few spectral lines in the far ultraviolet (FUV), and hence efficient linear polarizers at this line are demanded. New designs based on (Al/MgF2)n multilayer coatings have been developed to obtain the smallest possible reflectance in the parallel plane of polarization (Rpar) with a simultaneous high reflectance in the perpendicular plane of polarization (Rper). Samples stored in nitrogen for ˜8-17 months resulted in efficient polarizers at 121.6 nm, with Rpar ˜ 0.01-0.017 and Rper ˜ 0.69-0.725. The designs with a number n = 3-4 bilayers of Al/MgF2 result in a wider spectral range of efficient linear polarizers, compared to what can be obtained with n = 2. Coatings following various designs with good polarizing performance in a 7-8 nm wide FUV range were prepared. For the first time, a transmissive coating polarizer has been developed for this range, which has the benefit that it involves no deviation of the beam; it is based on another design of (Al/MgF2)3 multilayer coating. The transmissive polarizer has a good transmittance ratio between the two polarization components and, even though its figure of merit is not as high as that of the reflective polarizers, it incorporates filtering properties to reject wavelengths both below and above 121.6 nm; this property might enable a polarimeter for solar physics with an improved global figure of merit if a filter to isolate the H I Lyman α line could be avoided.

  15. High speed spectral domain polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography of the human retina

    PubMed Central

    Götzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a high-speed polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) system for retinal imaging based on spectral domain OCT. The system uses two spectrometers, one for each polarization channel, that operate in parallel at 20000 A-lines/s each. It provides reflectivity, retardation, and cumulative optic axis orientation simultaneously. We present our instrument and discuss the requirements for the alignment of the two spectrometers specific for our setup. We show 2D spectral domain PS-OCT images and – to the best of our knowledge – the first 3D spectral domain PS-OCT data sets in form of fly-through movies and volume rendered data sets recorded in human retina in vivo. PMID:19503236

  16. TEMPORAL SPECTRAL SHIFT AND POLARIZATION OF A BAND-SPLITTING SOLAR TYPE II RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Guohui; Chen, Yao; Lv, Maoshui; Kong, Xiangliang; Feng, Shiwei; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2014-10-01

    In many type II solar radio bursts, the fundamental and/or the harmonic branches of the bursts can split into two almost parallel bands with similar spectral shapes and frequency drifts. However, the mechanisms accounting for this intriguing phenomenon remain elusive. In this study, we report a special band-splitting type II event in which spectral features appear systematically earlier on the upper band (with higher frequencies) than on the lower band (with lower frequencies) by several seconds. Furthermore, the emissions carried by the splitting band are moderately polarized with the left-hand polarized signals stronger than the right-hand ones. The polarization degree varies in a range of –0.3 to –0.6. These novel observational findings provide important constraints on the underlying physical mechanisms of band-splitting of type II radio bursts.

  17. Spectrally efficient polarization multiplexed direct-detection OFDM system without frequency gap.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chia-Chien; Zeng, Wei-Siang; Lin, Chun-Ting

    2016-01-25

    We experimentally demonstrate a spectrally efficient direct-detection orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (DD-OFDM) system. In addition to polarization-division multiplexing, removing the frequency gap further improves the spectral efficiency of the OFDM system. The frequency gap between a reference carrier and OFDM subcarriers avoids subcarrier-to-subcarrier beating interference (SSBI) in traditional DD-OFDM systems. Without dynamic polarization control, the resulting interference after square-law direct detection in the proposed gap-less system is polarization-dependent and composed of linear inter-carrier interference (ICI) and nonlinear SSBI. Thus, this work proposes an iterative multiple-input multiple-output detection scheme to remove the mixed polarization-dependent interference. Compared to the previous scheme, which only removes ICI, the proposed scheme can further eliminate SSBI to achieve the improvement of ∼ 7 dB in signal-to-noise ratio. Without the need for polarization control, we successfully utilize 7-GHz bandwidth to transmit a 39.5-Gbps polarization multiplexed OFDM signal over 100 km. PMID:26832560

  18. Plasmonic planar antenna for spectral and spatial manipulation of the polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhsiyan, Mathilde; Lévesque, Quentin; Bouchon, Patrick; Pardo, Fabrice; Jaeck, Julien; Haïdar, Riad; Pelouard, Jean-Luc

    2015-05-01

    The ability to control the polarization state of an electromagnetic wave thanks to plasmonic metasurfaces is at the core of many various applications. We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that plasmonic planar L-shaped antennas can induce a 90°-rotation of the linear polarization of light with a nearly total efficiency in the mid-wavelength infrared. Then, we generalize these results with V-shaped antennas that can induce any rotation of the linear polarization by engineering the in-plane geometry of the antenna.

  19. Induced polarization and self-potential geophysical signature of bacterial activity in porous media (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.

    2013-12-01

    The first part of the presentation will be dedicated to the spectral induced polarization signature of bacteria in porous media. We developed a quantitative model to investigate frequency-domain induced polarization response of suspensions of bacteria and bacteria growth in porous media. Induced polarization of bacteria (alpha-polarization) is related to the properties of the electrical double layer of the bacteria. Surface conductivity and alpha-polarization are due to the Stern layer of counterions occurring in a brush of polymers coating the surface of the bacteria. These phenomena can be related to the cation exchange capacity of the bacteria. The mobility of the counterions in this Stern layer is found to be very small (4.710-10 m2s-1 V-1 at 25C). This implies a very low relaxation frequency for the alpha-polarization of the bacteria cells (typically around 0.1 to 5 Hertz) in agreement with experimental observations. This new model can be coupled to reactive transport modeling codes in which the evolution of bacterial populations are usually described by Monod kinetics. We show that the growth rate and endogenous decay coefficients of bacteria in a porous sand can be inferred non-intrusively from time lapse frequency-domain induced polarization data. The second part of the presentation will concern the biogeobattery mechanism showing new data, the concept of transient biogeobattery and the influence of the concentration of the electron acceptors in the process.

  20. Subsurface imaging using the spectral polarization difference technique and NIR illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Alfano, R R; Demos, S G; Radousky, H B

    1999-01-26

    A subsurface imaging system is utilized to test the ability of the spectral polarization difference imaging technique for deep subsurface imaging in tissues. The illumination of the system is derived from compact class III lasers in the red and NIR spectral region and, alternatively, from a white light source and selection of the appropriate illumination wavelength using band-pass optical filters. The experimental results demonstrate detection and imaging of a high-scattering object located up to 1.5 cm underneath the surface of a host chicken tissue.

  1. Electric polarization induced by optical orientation of dipolar centers in non-polar piezoelectrics.

    PubMed

    Grachev, Alexander; Kamshilin, Alexei

    2005-10-17

    We predict new nonlinear optical phenomenon, static electric polarization induced in non-polar piezoelectric by linearly polarized light owing to orientation of the impurity centers with permanent dipole moment. Microscopic model of this effect for the crystals of cubic symmetry is proposed. Estimations of the model show that the induced polarization might be much higher than that caused by optical rectification. It is shown that a transient current Jd generated under non-steady-state illumination could be observed at extremely high modulation frequency. We expect that the effect could be applied for ultrafast optical signal processing. PMID:19498886

  2. Broad spectral range measurement of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers by interferometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.; Kadulová, M.; Martynkien, T.; Urbanczyk, W.

    2010-04-01

    We present the results of interferometric measurements of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers over a broad spectral range (e.g. 500-1600 nm). First, a spectral interferometric technique employing an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a birefringent holey fiber in the test arm is used for measuring the wavelength dependence of the differential group effective index of the one of the polarization modes supported by the fiber. We apply a five-term power series fit to the measured data and by its differentiation we obtain the chromatic dispersion. Second, a spectral interferometric technique employing a tandem configuration of a Michelson interferometer and the holey fiber under test is used for measuring the group modal birefringence in the fiber. From the measurements, the differential group effective index and the chromatic dispersion of the other polarization mode supported by the fiber are retrieved. We confirmed that the measurement results agree well with that specified by the manufacturer. We also measured by these techniques the chromatic dispersion in other birefringent holey fiber.

  3. Development of the ZJU polarized near-infrared high spectral resolution lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Cheng, Zhongtao; Huang, Hanlu; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Yibing

    2013-09-01

    Quantitative measurements of atmospheric aerosol optical properties are required for studies of the Earth's radiation budget and climate change. Taking advantage of the broad spectrum of the Cabannes-Brillouin scattering from atmospheric molecules, the high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) technique employs a narrow spectral filter to reject the aerosol Mie scattering component in the lidar return signals. Therefore, an HSRL can directly measure the extinction and backscatter coefficient as well as the lidar ratio. Since the backscattering signal is proportional to 1/λ4, it presents high requirements for the spectral filter to build a near-infrared HSRL. The atomic/molecular absorption filters are limited by the wavelength and it is also challenging for Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPI) due to their small field of view(FOV). The field-widened Michelson interferometer, which has a large FOV, is considered to be a good candidate for the spectral filter of near-infrared HSRL. A polarized near-infrared HSRL instrument, which employs a field-widened Michelson interferometer as the spectral filter, is under development at the Zhejiang University (ZJU), China. In this paper, the methodology and design process of the instrument will be described in detail. The capability of the HSRL in determining the properties of the atmosphere will be addressed. The retrieval of the aerosol optical properties, such as extinction-to-backscatter ratio and aerosol depolarization ratio, will be presented. Sensitivity of the aerosol retrieval to errors in characterizing the spectral filter will also be investigated.

  4. Speckle noise reduction in high speed polarization sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Götzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Baumann, Bernhard; Schmoll, Tilman; Sattmann, Harald; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high speed polarization sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography system based on polarization maintaining fibers and two high speed CMOS line scan cameras capable of retinal imaging with up to 128 k A-lines/s. This high imaging speed strongly reduces motion artifacts and therefore averaging of several B-scans is possible, which strongly reduces speckle noise and improves image quality. We present several methods for averaging retardation and optic axis orientation, the best one providing a 5 fold noise reduction. Furthermore, a novel scheme of calculating images of degree of polarization uniformity is presented. We quantitatively compare the noise reduction depending on the number of averaged frames and discuss the limits of frame numbers that can usefully be averaged. PMID:21934820

  5. Infrared polarizing beam-splitters for the 7 to 13 μm spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Guo, Yanen

    2011-09-01

    High performance infrared polarizing beam-splitters (PBS) with broad bands and wide angular fields are required for IR applications that use both transmitted and reflected polarizing beams equally from 3 to 14 μm. Existing infrared wire grid polarizers do not meet the requirements because they have good performance only in transmission, not in reflection. No practical IR PBS devices are yet available for this spectral region. In this paper, we propose to fabricate an infrared thin film polarizing beam-splitters based on previously described light interference and frustrated total internal reflection. The PBS coatings consist of Ge and fluorite layers on ZnSe prism substrates. Similar high performance PBS designs have been successfully made in the visible. However, it is more challenging to make such PBSs in the infrared region, mostly due to the use of soft IR coating materials, the low energy evaporation process and the optical contacting bonding technique. In the paper, we will report for the first time the measured performance of a prototype IR PBS for the 7-13 μm spectral region with an angular field +/-7.82° in air. We will also discuss the challenges in fabricating the prototype PBS, including optical constant characterization and device measurements.

  6. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ɛ, is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ɛ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  7. Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1991-01-01

    A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neutrons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

  8. Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neturons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

  9. GLOBAL SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF THE CRAB NEBULA IN THE PROSPECT OF THE PLANCK SATELLITE POLARIZATION CALIBRATION

    SciTech Connect

    MacIas-Perez, J. F.; Mayet, F.; Aumont, J.

    2010-03-01

    Within the framework of the Planck satellite polarization calibration, we present a study of the Crab Nebula spectral energy distribution (SED) over more than six decades in frequency ranging from 1 to 10{sup 6} GHz (from 299 to 2.99 x 10{sup -4} mm). The Planck satellite mission observes the sky from 30 to 857 GHz (from 9.99 to 0.3498 mm) and therefore we focus on the millimeter region. We use radio and submillimeter data from the WMAP satellite between 23 and 94 GHz (from 13 to 3.18 mm), from the Archeops balloon experiment between 143 (2.1 mm) and 545 GHz (0.55 mm), and a compendium of other Crab Nebula observations. The Crab SED is compared to models including three main components: synchrotron that is responsible for the emission at low and high frequencies, dust that explains the excess of flux observed by the IRAS satellite, and an extra component on the millimeter regime. From this analysis, we conclude that the unpolarized emission of the Crab Nebula at microwave and millimeter wavelengths is the same synchrotron emission as the one observed in the radio domain. Therefore, we expect the millimeter emission of the Crab Nebula to be polarized with the same degree of polarization and orientation as the radio emission. We set upper limits on the possible errors induced by any millimeter extra component on the reconstruction of the degree and angle of polarization at the percent level as a maximum. This result strongly supports the choice by the Planck collaboration of the Crab Nebula emission for performing polarization cross-checks in the range 30 (299 mm) to 353 GHz (0.849 mm).

  10. Global Spectral Energy Distribution of the Crab Nebula in the Prospect of the Planck Satellite Polarization Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Mayet, F.; Aumont, J.; Désert, F.-X.

    2010-03-01

    Within the framework of the Planck satellite polarization calibration, we present a study of the Crab Nebula spectral energy distribution (SED) over more than six decades in frequency ranging from 1 to 106 GHz (from 299 to 2.99 × 10-4 mm). The Planck satellite mission observes the sky from 30 to 857 GHz (from 9.99 to 0.3498 mm) and therefore we focus on the millimeter region. We use radio and submillimeter data from the WMAP satellite between 23 and 94 GHz (from 13 to 3.18 mm), from the Archeops balloon experiment between 143 (2.1 mm) and 545 GHz (0.55 mm), and a compendium of other Crab Nebula observations. The Crab SED is compared to models including three main components: synchrotron that is responsible for the emission at low and high frequencies, dust that explains the excess of flux observed by the IRAS satellite, and an extra component on the millimeter regime. From this analysis, we conclude that the unpolarized emission of the Crab Nebula at microwave and millimeter wavelengths is the same synchrotron emission as the one observed in the radio domain. Therefore, we expect the millimeter emission of the Crab Nebula to be polarized with the same degree of polarization and orientation as the radio emission. We set upper limits on the possible errors induced by any millimeter extra component on the reconstruction of the degree and angle of polarization at the percent level as a maximum. This result strongly supports the choice by the Planck collaboration of the Crab Nebula emission for performing polarization cross-checks in the range 30 (299 mm) to 353 GHz (0.849 mm).

  11. Time-Resolved Measurements of Polarized X-Ray Spectral Lines Emitted from Discharges of the Plasma-Focus Type

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, L.; Sadowski, M. J.; Stanislawski, J.; Baronova, E. O.

    2006-01-15

    The paper presents results of experimental studies of the polarization of the X-ray spectral lines observed during high-current Plasma-Focus (PF) discharges. Time-resolved measurements of the highly-ionized argon lines were performed within the MAJA-PF facility operated at 44 kJ. The detailed studies confirmed considerable differences in relative intensities of the investigated spectral lines, what could be treated as an evidence of their different polarization.

  12. Characterization of a polarization-resolved high spectral resolution UV-visible spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kim, D.

    2008-03-01

    To measure the degree of polarization of a plasma emission, a polarization-resolved UV-visible Czerny-Turner-type spectrometer was designed and constructed. For a high spectral resolution, F =1m mirrors were used as a focusing and collimating mirrors and the incidence angles to the mirrors were determined to eliminate coma. The effect of astigmatism was reduced by designing the incidence angles to the mirrors to be as small as possible. The flat focal plane condition proposed by Reader [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 59, 1189 (1969)] was used to determine the grating position. The measured spatial resolution was 170μm. To simultaneously measure the intensities with two perpendicular polarizations, a calcite crystal was placed after the entrance slit of the spectrometer. The change in the imaging property of the spectrometer due to the calcite crystal was measured and minimized. The spectral resolution was experimentally measured with a laser produced plasma to be 0.05nm at 348nm. The resolving power measured is 6600.

  13. Spectral regularisation: induced gravity and the onset of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Max A.; Sakellariadou, Mairi E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk

    2014-01-01

    Using spectral regularisation, we compute the Weyl anomaly and express the anomaly generating functional of the quantum effective action through a collective scalar degree of freedom of all quantum vacuum fluctuations. Such a formulation allows us to describe induced gravity on an equal footing with the anomaly-induced effective action, in a self-consistent way. We then show that requiring stability of the cosmological constant under loop quantum corrections, Sakharov's induced gravity and Starobinsky's anomaly-induced inflation are either both present or both absent, depending on the particle content of the theory.

  14. Antiresonance induced spin-polarized current generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Sun; Min, Wen-Jing; Gao, Kun; Xie, Shi-Jie; Liu, De-Sheng

    2011-12-01

    According to the one-dimensional antiresonance effect (Wang X R, Wang Y and Sun Z Z 2003 Phys. Rev. B 65 193402), we propose a possible spin-polarized current generation device. Our proposed model consists of one chain and an impurity coupling to the chain. The energy level of the impurity can be occupied by an electron with a specific spin, and the electron with such a spin is blocked because of the antiresonance effect. Based on this phenomenon our model can generate the spin-polarized current flowing through the chain due to different polarization rates. On the other hand, the device can also be used to measure the generated spin accumulation. Our model is feasible with today's technology.

  15. Surface spin polarization induced ferromagnetic Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Po-Hsun; Li, Wen-Hsien; Wu, Sheng Yun

    2016-05-01

    We report on the observation of ferromagnetic spin polarized moments in 4.5 nm Ag nanoparticles. Both ferromagnetic and diamagnetic responses to an applied magnetic field were detected. The spin polarized moments shown under non-linear thermoinduced magnetization appeared on the surface atoms, rather than on all the atoms in particles. The saturation magnetization departed substantially from the Bloch T3/2-law, showing the existence of magnetic anisotropy. The Heisenberg ferromagnetic spin wave model for Ha-aligned moments was then employed to identify the magnetic anisotropic energy gap of ~0.12 meV. Our results may be understood by assuming the surface magnetism model, in which the surface atoms give rise to polarized moments while the core atoms produce diamagnetic responses.

  16. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F.

    2015-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO3 single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO3 at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light.

  17. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO3 single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO3 at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light. PMID:25779918

  18. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO₃ single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO₃ at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light. PMID:25779918

  19. Influence of temporal-spectral effects on ultrafast fiber coherent polarization beam combining system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. L.; Ma, P. F.; Wang, X. L.; Su, R. T.; Zhou, P.; Chen, J. B.

    2015-10-01

    The active coherent polarization beam combining (CPBC) technique has been experimentally proved to be a promising approach for the energy and power scaling of ultrashort laser pulses, despite the tremendous challenge in temporal synchronization, dispersion management and nonlinearity control. In order to develop a comprehensive theoretical model to investigate the influence of temporal-spectral effects on ultrafast fiber active CPBC systems, a generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation carrying spectral factors is used to depict the propagation of ultrashort pulses in fiber amplifier channels and ultrashort-pulsed Gaussian beams (PGBs) carrying temporal-spatial factors are utilized to picture the propagation of ultrashort pulses in the free space. To the best of our knowledge, the influence of different temporal-spectral effects has been segregated for the first time and corresponding analytical equations have been strictly derived to link the combining efficiency with specific factors. Based on our analysis, the optical path difference (OPD) has the most detrimental impact on the combining efficiency because of the high controlling accuracy and anti-interference requirements. For instance, the OPD must be controlled in ~  ±14 μm to achieve a combining efficiency of above 95% for combining ultrashort laser pulses with a 3 dB spectral bandwidth of 13 nm centered at 1064 nm. Besides, the analytical expression also demonstrates that the impact of self-phase modulation on the combining efficiency has no dependence on spectral bandwidth and only depends on the B integral difference if neglecting the direct influence of the peak power difference. Our analysis also indicates that the group velocity dispersion has relatively small influence on the combining efficiency. These formulas can be used to diagnose the influence of temporal-spectral effects and provide useful guidelines for the design or optimization of the active CPBC system of ultrafast fiber chirped-pulse amplifiers.

  20. Polarization-based balanced detection for spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Black, Adam J; Akkin, Taner

    2015-08-20

    We present a new design for spectral-domain optical coherence tomography that allows balanced detection using a single camera. The design uses polarization optics to encode the light in reference and sample arms. Two parallel and highly aligned spectra, which carry out-of-phase interference signals, in-phase common noise, and auto-interference terms, are focused on the camera, which performs the digital balanced detection for each wavelength. The optical system is characterized and tested for tissue imaging. Results demonstrate consistent signal gains in depth and suppression of DC and sample auto-interference. The design could be further amended for polarization-sensitive imaging and might demonstrate a market for manufacturing dual-line cameras with analog-balanced detection capability. PMID:26368760

  1. Nonadiabatic molecular high-order harmonic generation from polar molecules: Spectral redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Bian Xuebin; Bandrauk, Andre D.

    2011-04-15

    Molecular high-order harmonic generation (MHOHG) from the polar diatomic molecule HeH{sup 2+} in short intense laser fields is studied numerically. Due to the nonadiabatic response of the molecular dipole to the rapid change of laser intensity, a spectral redshift is predicted in high-intensity and ultrashort laser pulses, contrary to the blueshift observed in the harmonics generated from atoms in long laser pulses. The MHOHG temporal structures are investigated by a wavelet time-frequency analysis, which shows that the enhanced excitation of localized long lifetime excited states shifts the harmonic generation spectrum in the falling part of short laser pulses, due to the presence of a permanent dipole moment, and thus is unique to polar molecules.

  2. Attometer resolution spectral analysis based on polarization pulling assisted Brillouin scattering merged with heterodyne detection.

    PubMed

    Preussler, Stefan; Schneider, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Spectral analysis is essential for measuring and monitoring advanced optical communication systems and the characterization of active and passive devices like amplifiers, filters and especially frequency combs. Conventional devices have a limited resolution or tuning range. Therefore, the true spectral shape of the signal remains hidden. In this work, a small part of the signal under test is preselected with help of the polarization pulling effect of stimulated Brillouin scattering where all unwanted spectral components are suppressed. Subsequently, this part is analyzed more deeply through heterodyne detection. Thereby, the local oscillator is generated from a narrow linewidth fiber laser which acts also as pump wave for Brillouin scattering. By scanning the pump wave together with the local oscillator through the signal spectrum, the whole signal is measured. The method is tunable over a broad wavelength range, is not affected by unwanted mixing products and utilizes a conventional narrow bandwidth photo diode. First proof of concept experiments show the measurement of the power spectral density function with a resolution in the attometer or lower kilohertz range at 1550 nm. PMID:26480198

  3. Inclination-induced polarization of scattered millimetre radiation from protoplanetary discs: the case of HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haifeng; Li, Zhi-Yun; Looney, Leslie; Stephens, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Spatially resolved polarized millimetre/submillimetre emission has been observed in the disc of HL Tau and two other young stellar objects. It is usually interpreted as coming from magnetically aligned grains, but can also be produced by dust scattering, as demonstrated explicitly by Kataoka et al. for face-on discs. We extend their work by including the polarization induced by disc inclination with respect to the line of sight. Using a physically motivated, semi-analytic model, we show that the polarization fraction of the scattered light increases with the inclination angle i, reaching 1/3 for edge-on discs. The inclination-induced polarization can easily dominate that intrinsic to the disc in the face-on view. It provides a natural explanation for the two main features of the polarization pattern observed in the tilted disc of HL Tau (i ˜ 45°): the polarized intensity concentrating in a region elongated more or less along the major axis, and polarization in this region roughly parallel to the minor axis. This broad agreement provides support to dust scattering as a viable mechanism for producing, at least in part, polarized millimetre radiation. In order to produce polarization at the observed level (˜1 per cent), the scattering grains must have grown to a maximum size of tens of microns. However, such grains may be too small to produce the opacity spectral index of β ≲ 1 observed in HL Tau and other sources; another population of larger, millimetre/centimetre-sized, grains may be needed to explain the bulk of the unpolarized continuum emission.

  4. Mixed polarity in polarization-induced p-n junction nanowire light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Santino D; Kent, Thomas F; Phillips, Patrick J; Sarwar, A T M G; Selcu, Camelia; Klie, Robert F; Myers, Roberto C

    2013-07-10

    Polarization-induced nanowire light emitting diodes (PINLEDs) are fabricated by grading the Al composition along the c-direction of AlGaN nanowires grown on Si substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). Polarization-induced charge develops with a sign that depends on the direction of the Al composition gradient with respect to the [0001] direction. By grading from GaN to AlN then back to GaN, a polarization-induced p-n junction is formed. The orientation of the p-type and n-type sections depends on the material polarity of the nanowire (i.e., Ga-face or N-face). Ga-face material results in an n-type base and a p-type top, while N-face results in the opposite. The present work examines the polarity of catalyst-free nanowires using multiple methods: scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), selective etching, conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM), and electroluminescence (EL) spectroscopy. Selective etching and STEM measurements taken in annular bright field (ABF) mode demonstrate that the preferred orientation for catalyst-free nanowires grown by PAMBE is N-face, with roughly 10% showing Ga-face orientation. C-AFM and EL spectroscopy allow electrical and optical differentiation of the material polarity in PINLEDs since the forward bias direction depends on the p-n junction orientation and therefore on nanowire polarity. Specifically, C-AFM reveals that the direction of forward bias for individual nanowire LEDs changes with the polarity, as expected, due to reversal of the sign of the polarization-induced charge. Electroluminescence measurements of mixed polarity PINLEDs wired in parallel show ambipolar emission due to the mixture of p-n and n-p oriented PINLEDs. These results show that, if catalyst-free III-nitride nanowires are to be used to form polarization-doped heterostructures, then it is imperative to understand their mixed polarity and to design devices using these nanowires accordingly. PMID:23756087

  5. Spectral Induced Polarization Measurements of Nanoparticles in Laboratory Column Experiments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nano sized materials are prevalent in consumer goods, manufacturing, industrial processes, and remediation technologies. The intentional and accidental introduction of nanoparticles (NP) into the subsurface pose a potential risk to the environment and public health. This resea...

  6. Trap for polarized atoms based on light-induced drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BuřiČ, F.; Hradečný, Č.; Slovák, J.; Těthal, T.; Yermolayev, I. M.

    1996-10-01

    A polarization of sodium atoms in a simple trap based on the light-induced drift effect is reported. A sapphire capillary with one side closed and heated up to high temperature was used as the trap. The capacity of the trap is about 5×1011 atoms. The achieved polarization of trapped atoms in the gas phase is about 90%. The full polarization of atoms in the trap is estimated at 25% at the temperature of 1400 °C. The adsorption energy of sodium atoms on a sapphire surface is determined to be 2.5 eV.

  7. Spectral selective radio frequency emissions from laser induced breakdown of target materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinoth Kumar, L.; Manikanta, E.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P.

    2014-08-11

    The radio frequency emissions scanned over broad spectral range (30 MHz–1 GHz) from single shot nanosecond (7 ns) and picosecond (30 ps) laser induced breakdown (LIB) of different target materials (atmospheric air, aluminum, and copper) are presented. The dominant emissions from ns-LIB, compared to those from the ps-LIB, indicate the presence and importance of atomic and molecular clusters in the plasma. The dynamics of laser pulse-matter interaction and the properties of the target materials were found to play an important role in determining the plasma parameters which subsequently determine the emissions. Thus, with a particular laser and target material, the emissions were observed to be spectral selective. The radiation detection capability was observed to be relatively higher, when the polarization of the input laser and the antenna is same.

  8. Influence of Solvent Polarity and DNA-Binding on Spectral Properties of Quaternary Benzo[c]phenanthridine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Rájecký, Michal; Šebrlová, Kristýna; Mravec, Filip; Táborský, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloids are secondary metabolites of the plant families Papaveraceae, Rutaceae, and Ranunculaceae with anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. Their spectral changes induced by the environment could be used to understand their interaction with biomolecules as well as for analytical purposes. Spectral shifts, quantum yield and changes in lifetime are presented for the free form of alkaloids in solvents of different polarity and for alkaloids bound to DNA. Quantum yields range from 0.098 to 0.345 for the alkanolamine form and are below 0.033 for the iminium form. Rise of fluorescence lifetimes (from 2–5 ns to 3–10 ns) and fluorescence intensity are observed after binding of the iminium form to the DNA for most studied alkaloids. The alkanolamine form does not bind to DNA. Acid-base equilibrium constant of macarpine is determined to be 8.2–8.3. Macarpine is found to have the highest increase of fluorescence upon DNA binding, even under unfavourable pH conditions. This is probably a result of its unique methoxy substitution at C12 a characteristic not shared with other studied alkaloids. Association constant for macarpine-DNA interaction is 700000 M-1. PMID:26091027

  9. Three-dimensional induced polarization data inversion for complex resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Commer, M.; Newman, G.A.; Williams, K.H.; Hubbard, S.S.

    2011-03-15

    The conductive and capacitive material properties of the subsurface can be quantified through the frequency-dependent complex resistivity. However, the routine three-dimensional (3D) interpretation of voluminous induced polarization (IP) data sets still poses a challenge due to large computational demands and solution nonuniqueness. We have developed a flexible methodology for 3D (spectral) IP data inversion. Our inversion algorithm is adapted from a frequency-domain electromagnetic (EM) inversion method primarily developed for large-scale hydrocarbon and geothermal energy exploration purposes. The method has proven to be efficient by implementing the nonlinear conjugate gradient method with hierarchical parallelism and by using an optimal finite-difference forward modeling mesh design scheme. The method allows for a large range of survey scales, providing a tool for both exploration and environmental applications. We experimented with an image focusing technique to improve the poor depth resolution of surface data sets with small survey spreads. The algorithm's underlying forward modeling operator properly accounts for EM coupling effects; thus, traditionally used EM coupling correction procedures are not needed. The methodology was applied to both synthetic and field data. We tested the benefit of directly inverting EM coupling contaminated data using a synthetic large-scale exploration data set. Afterward, we further tested the monitoring capability of our method by inverting time-lapse data from an environmental remediation experiment near Rifle, Colorado. Similar trends observed in both our solution and another 2D inversion were in accordance with previous findings about the IP effects due to subsurface microbial activity.

  10. Spectral albedo and emissivity of CO sub 2 in Martian polar caps: Model results

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.G. ); Wiscombe, W.J. ); Firestone, J.F. )

    1990-08-30

    A model originally developed to explain the spectral albedo and emissivity of terrestrial snow is extended to the case of carbon dioxide snow on Mars. The variation of albedo and emissivity with wavelength is caused by the spectral variation of the absorption coefficient of solid CO{sub 2}. The most important variables controlling the radiative properties are grain size and contamination by dust or water. Solar zenith angle and snowpack thickness are of less importance. The observation that red albedo is higher than blue albedo in the Martian south polar cap indicates that the snow is contaminated with red dust. The interband absorption coefficient of CO{sub 2} ice in the thermal infrared is 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than that of H{sub 2}O ice, due to the absence of hydrogen bonding in CO{sub 2}. This allows CO{sub 2} snow emissivity to be sensitive to grain size, emission angle, and impurities, in contrast to water snow which is nearly a blackbody under all conditions. The emissivity of CO{sub 2} snow varies substantially with wavelength, so energy budget modeling should be done in spectral detail. The addition of a thin layer of water frost over CO{sub 2} snow dramatically raises the thermal emissivity but causes little change to the spectrally averaged albedo unless the underlying CO{sub 2} snow is dirty. Remote sensing of CO{sub 2} grain size, H{sub 2}O content, and dust content may be possible. However, the design of a remote-sensing strategy awaits more accurate laboratory determination of the optical constants of CO{sub 2} ice.

  11. Birefringence and polarization rotator induced by electromagnetically induced transparency in rare earth ion-doped crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhixiang; Liu, Jianji; Yu, Ping; Zhang, Guoquan

    2016-05-01

    The birefringence induced by the electromagnetically induced transparency effect in a Pr^{3+}:Y_2 SiO_5 crystal was studied by using a balanced polarimeter technique. The results show that it is possible to control the polarization state of the output probe beam by adjusting the experimental conditions. Particularly, the coherently prepared Pr^{3+}:Y_2 SiO_5 crystal can serve as a polarization rotator for a linearly polarized input probe beam at the two-photon resonant condition. Such coherent control on the polarization of light should be useful for polarization-based classical and quantum information processing such as all-optical switching, polarization preserving light pulse memory and polarization qubits based on rare earth ion-doped solids.

  12. Large-field high-speed polarization sensitive spectral domain OCT and its applications in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Zotter, Stefan; Pircher, Michael; Torzicky, Teresa; Baumann, Bernhard; Yoshida, Hirofumi; Hirose, Futoshi; Roberts, Philipp; Ritter, Markus; Schütze, Christopher; Götzinger, Erich; Trasischker, Wolfgang; Vass, Clemens; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel spectral domain polarization sensitive OCT system (PS-OCT) that operates at an A-scan rate of 70 kHz and supports scan angles of up to 40° × 40°. The high-speed imaging allows the acquisition of up to 1024 × 250 A-scans per 3D scan, which, together with the large field of view, considerably increases the informative value of the images. To demonstrate the excellent performance of the new PS-OCT system, we imaged several healthy volunteers and patients with various diseases such as glaucoma, AMD, Stargardt’s disease, and albinism. The results are compared with clinically established methods such as scanning laser polarimetry and autofluorescence. PMID:23162711

  13. Polarized spectral emittance from periodic micromachined surfaces. II. Doped silicon: Angular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesketh, Peter J.; Zemel, Jay N.; Gebhart, Benjamin

    1988-06-01

    The polarized directional spectral (3 μm<=λ<=14 μm) emittances (PDSE's) of highly doped, micromachined, periodic structures on silicon were measured. These structures have dimensions that are comparable to the wavelengths of the measured radiation. Significant anisotropies and maxima were found for the s and p PDSE's measured in emittance planes parallel and perpendicular to the grating-repeat vector. Wood's singularities were clearly visible in the p PDSE on shallow gratings (depth <=1.5 μm). Periodic maxima were observed in both the s and p PDSE in the emittance plane perpendicular to the grating vector due to standing-wave modes in the slots of the grating. It is concluded that the PDSE provides detailed information on the characteristics of the electromagnetic modes associated with surface microstructures.

  14. Measurement of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers by white-light spectral interferometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadulová, M.; Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.; Martynkien, T.; Mergo, P.; Urbańczyk, W.

    2011-05-01

    We present two white-light spectral interferometric techniques for measurement of the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers over a broad spectral range (e.g. 500-1600 nm). First, a technique employing an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fiber in the test arm is used to measure the wavelength dependence of the differential group effective index, or equivalently the chromatic dispersion of one polarization mode supported by the fiber. Second, a technique employing a tandem configuration of a Michelson interferometer and the optical fiber under test is used to measure the group modal birefringence in the fiber. From these measurements, the chromatic dispersion of the other polarization mode supported by the fiber is retrieved. We measured by these techniques the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in three air-silica holey fibers and revealed the dependence of zero-dispersion wavelength on the geometry of the holey fiber.

  15. Assessing Cd-induced stress from plant spectral response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kancheva, Rumiana; Georgiev, Georgi

    2014-10-01

    Remote sensing plays a significant role in local, regional and global monitoring of land covers. Ecological concerns worldwide determine the importance of remote sensing applications for the assessment of soil conditions, vegetation health and identification of stress-induced changes. The extensive industrial growth and intensive agricultural land-use arise the serious ecological problem of environmental pollution associated with the increasing anthropogenic pressure on the environment. Soil contamination is a reason for degradation processes and temporary or permanent decrease of the productive capacity of land. Heavy metals are among the most dangerous pollutants because of their toxicity, persistent nature, easy up-take by plants and long biological half-life. This paper takes as its focus the study of crop species spectral response to Cd pollution. Ground-based experiments were performed, using alfalfa, spring barley and pea grown in Cd contaminated soils and in different hydroponic systems under varying concentrations of the heavy metal. Cd toxicity manifested itself by inhibition of plant growth and synthesis of photosynthetic pigments. Multispectral reflectance, absorbance and transmittance, as well as red and far red fluorescence were measured and examined for their suitability to detect differences in plant condition. Statistical analysis was performed and empirical relationships were established between Cd concentration, plant growth variables and spectral response Various spectral properties proved to be indicators of plant performance and quantitative estimators of the degree of the Cd-induced stress.

  16. Slippage in stacking of graphene nanofragments induced by spin polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yanyu; Jiang, Wanrun; Dai, Xing; Song, Ruixia; Wang, Bo; Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Spin polarization and stacking are interesting effects in complex molecular systems and are both presented in graphene-based materials. Their possible combination may provide a new perspective in understanding the intermolecular force. The nanoscale graphene structures with zigzag edges could possess spin-polarized ground states. However, the mechanical effect of spin polarization in stacking of graphene nanofragments is not clear. Here we demonstrate the displacement between two stacked rhombic graphene nanofragments induced by spin polarization, using first-principles density-functional methods. We found that, in stacking of two rhombic graphene nanofragments, a spin-polarized stacked conformation with zero total spin is energetically more favorable than the closed-shell stacking. The spin-polarized conformation gives a further horizontal interlayer displacement within 1 angstrom compared with the closed-shell structure. This result highlights that, besides the well-known phenomenologically interpreted van der Waals forces, a specific mechanism dependent on the monomeric spin polarization may lead to obvious mechanical effects in some intermolecular interactions. PMID:26078005

  17. Gamma Induced Attenuation In Polarization Maintaining And Single Mode Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D. M.; Barnes, C. E.; Greenwell, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The radiation sensitivity of single mode polarization maintaining optical fibers have been studied using fibers optimized for operation at 850 and 1300 nm. These fibers have Ge doped cores and rely on stress induced birefringence for their polarization retention. We have also measured a non-polarization preserving (PP) single mode fiber of similar doping to the PP 850 fiber as a comparison. The response of the 850 nm fibers is consistent and is inverted with respect to temperature. Thermal annealing of the radiation damage is not the dominant recovery mechanism. The 1300 nm PP fiber shows normal temperature response. Induced attenuation is much higher in 850 than in 1300 nm fibers. For FOG applications with a radiation tolerance requirement, fiber selection beginning with fiber optimized for operation at 1300 nm is indicated.

  18. Spectral invariance hypothesis study of polarized reflectance with Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Christine L.; Kupinski, Meredith; Diner, David J.; Xu, Feng; Chipman, Russell A.

    2015-09-01

    Many models used to represent the boundary condition for the separation of atmospheric scattering from the surface reflectance in polarized remote sensing measurements assume that the polarized surface reflectance is spectrally neutral. The Spectral Invariance Hypothesis asserts that the magnitude and shape of the polarized bidirectional reflectance factor (pBRF) is equal for all wavelengths. In order to test this hypothesis, JPL's Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI) is used to measure polarization information of different outdoor surface types. GroundMSPI measures the linear polarization Stokes parameters (I, Q, U), at three wavelengths, 470 nm, 660 nm, and 865 nm. The camera is mounted on a two-axis gimbal to accurately select the view azimuth and elevation directions. On clear sky days we acquired day-long scans of scenes that contain various surface types such as grass, dirt, cement, brick, and asphalt and placed a Spectralon panel in the camera field of view to provide a reflectance reference. Over the course of each day, changing solar position in the sky provides a large range of scattering angles for this study. The polarized bidirectional reflectance factor (pBRF) is measured for the three wavelengths and the best fit slope of the spectral correlation is reported. This work reports the range of best fit slopes measured for five region types.

  19. Spatial Variations in the Spectral Index of Polarized Synchrotron Emission in the 9 yr WMAP Sky Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuskeland, U.; Wehus, I. K.; Eriksen, H. K.; Næss, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    We estimate the spectral index, β, of polarized synchrotron emission as observed in the 9 yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe sky maps using two methods, linear regression ("T-T plot") and maximum likelihood. We partition the sky into 24 disjoint sky regions and evaluate the spectral index for all polarization angles between 0° and 85° in steps of 5°. Averaging over polarization angles, we derive a mean spectral index of βall-sky = -2.99 ± 0.01 in the frequency range of 23-33 GHz. We find that the synchrotron spectral index steepens by 0.14 from low to high Galactic latitudes, in agreement with previous studies, with mean spectral indices of βplane = -2.98 ± 0.01 and βhigh-lat = -3.12 ± 0.04. In addition, we find a significant longitudinal variation along the Galactic plane with a steeper spectral index toward the Galactic center and anticenter than toward the Galactic spiral arms. This can be well modeled by an offset sinusoidal, β(l) = -2.85 + 0.17sin (2l - 90°). Finally, we study synchrotron emission in the BICEP2 field, in an attempt to understand whether the claimed detection of large-scale B-mode polarization could be explained in terms of synchrotron contamination. Adopting a spectral index of β = -3.12, typical for high Galactic latitudes, we find that the most likely bias corresponds to about 2% of the reported signal (r = 0.003). The flattest index allowed by the data in this region is β = -2.5, and under the assumption of a straight power-law frequency spectrum, we find that synchrotron emission can account for at most 20% of the reported BICEP2 signal.

  20. Debye decomposition of time-lapse spectral induced polarisation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, M.; Kemna, A.

    2016-01-01

    Spectral induced polarisation (SIP) measurements capture the low-frequency electrical properties of soils and rocks and provide a non-invasive means to access lithological, hydrogeological, and geochemical properties of the subsurface. The Debye decomposition (DD) approach is now increasingly being used to analyse SIP signatures in terms of relaxation time distributions due to its flexibility regarding the shape of the spectra. Imaging and time-lapse (monitoring) SIP measurements, capturing SIP variations in space and time, respectively, are now more and more conducted and lead to a drastic increase in the number of spectra considered, which prompts the need for robust and reliable DD tools to extract quantitative parameters from such data. We here present an implementation of the DD method for the analysis of a series of SIP data sets which are expected to only smoothly change in terms of spectral behaviour, such as encountered in many time-lapse applications where measurement geometry does not change. The routine is based on a non-linear least-squares inversion scheme with smoothness constraints on the spectral variation and in addition from one spectrum of the series to the next to deal with the inherent ill-posedness and non-uniqueness of the problem. By means of synthetic examples with typical SIP characteristics we elucidate the influence of the number and range of considered relaxation times on the inversion results. The source code of the presented routines is provided under an open source licence as a basis for further applications and developments.

  1. Induced polarization of Lambda(1116) in kaon electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielyan, M; Raue, B A; Carman, D S; Park, K; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Amaryan, M J; Anefalos Pereira, S; Avakian, H; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Baturin, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Bono, J; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Cao, T; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Cortes, O; Crede, V; D’Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; ElFassi, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Fleming, J A; Forest, T A; Garillon, B; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Ho, D; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Jenkins, D; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Lenisa, P; Levine, W I; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J.D.; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mestayer, M D; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moody, C I; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Munevar, E; Munoz Camacho, C; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Osipenko, M; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Pasyuk, E; Peng, P; Phelps, W; Phillips, J J; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Protopopescu, D; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Sabatie, F; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Simonyan, A; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Tang, W; Ungaro, M; Vlassov, A V; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J

    2014-09-01

    We have measured the induced polarization of the Λ(1116) in the reaction ep→e′K+Λ, detecting the scattered e′ and K+ in the final state along with the proton from the decay Λ→pπ−.The present study used the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), which allowed for a large kinematic acceptance in invariant energy W (1.6≤W≤2.7 GeV) and covered the full range of the kaon production angle at an average momentum transfer Q2=1.90 GeV2.In this experiment a 5.50 GeV electron beam was incident upon an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen target. We have mapped out the W and kaon production angle dependencies of the induced polarization and found striking differences from photoproduction data over most of the kinematic range studied. However, we also found that the induced polarization is essentially Q2 independent in our kinematic domain, suggesting that somewhere below the Q2 covered here there must be a strong Q2 dependence. Along with previously published photo- and electroproduction cross sections and polarization observables, these data are needed for the development of models, such as effective field theories, and as input to coupled-channel analyses that can provide evidence of previously unobserved s-channel resonances.

  2. Polarization and spectral characteristics of the two-photon luminescence from colloidal gold nanoparticles excited by tunable laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yashunin, D. A. Korytin, A. I.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2015-12-15

    We have experimentally studied two-photon luminescence from a colloidal solution of spherical gold nanoparticles by tuning the wavelength of the exciting radiation. The measured polarization and spectral characteristics of the two-photon luminescence signal show that the observed nonlinear optical response is determined by the dimers present in the solution with a concentration of a few percent of total nanoparticle number.

  3. Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence for bioaerosols standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Stadnyk, Laurie; Rowsell, Susan; Simard, Jean-Robert; Ho, Jim; Déry, Bernard; McFee, John

    2007-09-01

    An efficient standoff biological warfare detection capability could become an important asset for both defence and security communities based on the increasing biological threat and the limits of the presently existing protection systems. Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This LIDAR system named SINBAHD monitors the spectrally resolved LIF originating from inelastic interactions with bioaerosols present in atmospheric cells customizable in size and in range. SINBAHD has demonstrated the capability of near real-time detection and classification of bioaerosolized threats at multi-kilometre ranges. In spring 2005, DRDC has initiated the BioSense demonstration project, which combines the SINBAHD technology with a geo-referenced Near InfraRed (NIR) LIDAR cloud mapper. SINBAHD is now being used to acquire more signatures to add in the spectral library and also to optimize and test the new BioSense algorithm strategy. In September 2006, SINBAHD has participated in a two-week trial held at DRDC-Suffield where different open-air wet releases of live and killed bioagent simulants, growth media and obscurants were performed. An autoclave killing procedure was performed on two biological materials (Bacillus subtilis var globigii or BG, and Bacillus thuringiensis or Bt) before being aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized with SINBAHD. The obtained results showed no significant impact of this killing process on their normalised spectral signature in comparison with their live counterparts. Correlation between the detection signals from SINBAHD, an array of slit samplers and a FLuorescent Aerosol Particle Sensor (C-FLAPS) was obtained and SINBAHD's sensitivity could then be estimated. At the 2006 trial, a detection limit of a few tens of Agent Containing Particles per Liter of Air (ACPLA) was obtained for a 15-m thick cloud of live BG located at a range of 400 m.

  4. Analysis of input-polarization-induced phase noise in interferometric fiber-optic sensors and its reduction using polarization scrambling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersey, Alan D.; Marrone, Michael J.; Dandridge, Anthony

    1990-06-01

    The dependence of the phase shift of an interferometric fiber sensor on the input state of polarization is analyzed, and it is shown that fluctuations in the input polarization to a fiber interferometer can lead to the generation of excess phase noise. The relationship between this effect and the variation in visibility with input polarization is described and theoretically confirmed. The use of depolarized source light to eliminate input-polarization-induced excess phase noise is theoretically and experimentally demonstrated.

  5. Induced Polarization Surveying for Acid Rock Screening in Highway Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, K. E.; Al, T.; Bishop, T.

    2004-05-01

    Highway and pipeline construction agencies have become increasingly vigilant in their efforts to avoid cutting through sulphide-bearing bedrock that has potential to produce acid rock drainage. Blasting and fragmentation of such rock increases the surface area available for sulphide oxidation and hence increases the risk of acid rock drainage unless the rock contains enough natural buffering capacity to neutralize the pH. In December, 2001, the New Brunswick Department of Transportation (NBOT) sponsored a field trial of geophysical surveying in order to assess its suitability as a screening tool for locating near-surface sulphides along proposed highway alignments. The goal was to develop a protocol that would allow existing programs of drilling and geochemical testing to be targeted more effectively, and provide design engineers with the information needed to reduce rock cuts where necessary and dispose of blasted material in a responsible fashion. Induced polarization (IP) was chosen as the primary geophysical method given its ability to detect low-grade disseminated mineralization. The survey was conducted in dipole-dipole mode using an exploration-style time domain IP system, dipoles 8 to 25 m in length, and six potential dipoles for each current dipole location (i.e. n = 1 - 6). Supplementary information was provided by resistivity and VLF-EM surveys sensitive to lateral changes in electrical conductivity, and by magnetic field surveying chosen for its sensitivity to the magnetic susceptibility of pyrrhotite. Geological and geochemical analyses of samples taken from several IP anomalies located along 4.3 line-km of proposed highway confirmed the effectiveness of the screening technique. IP pseudosections from a region of metamorphosed shales and volcaniclastic rocks identified discrete, well-defined mineralized zones. Stronger, overlapping, and more laterally extensive IP anomalies were observed over a section of graphitic and sulphide-bearing metasedimentary rocks. Attempts to use spectral IP characteristics to determine relative abundances of sulphides and graphite were not conclusive. The overall effectiveness of the screening technique however encouraged NBDOT to apply it to an additional 50 km of planned rock cuts along the corridor selected for the new Trans-Canada Highway.

  6. Field-induced percolation of polar nanoregions in relaxor ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Prosandeev, S; Wang, Dawei; Akbarzadeh, A R; Dkhil, B; Bellaiche, L

    2013-05-17

    A first-principles-based effective Hamiltonian is used to investigate low-temperature properties of Ba(Zr,Ti)O(3) relaxor ferroelectrics under an increasing dc electric field. This system progressively develops an electric polarization that is highly nonlinear with the dc field. This development leads to a maximum of the static dielectric response at a critical field, E(th), and involves four different field regimes. Each of these regimes is associated with its own behavior of polar nanoregions, such as shrinking, flipping, and elongation of dipoles or change in morphology. The clusters propagating inside the whole sample, with dipoles being parallel to the field direction, begin to form at precisely the E(th) critical field. Such a result, and further analysis we perform, therefore, reveal that field-induced percolation of polar nanoregions is the driving mechanism for the transition from the relaxor to ferroelectric state. PMID:25167451

  7. Macroscopic rotation of photon polarization induced by a single spin.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Christophe; Demory, Justin; Loo, Vivien; Lematre, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Glazov, Mikhal; Krebs, Olivier; Voisin, Paul; Senellart, Pascale; Lanco, Loc

    2015-01-01

    Entangling a single spin to the polarization of a single incoming photon, generated by an external source, would open new paradigms in quantum optics such as delayed-photon entanglement, deterministic logic gates or fault-tolerant quantum computing. These perspectives rely on the possibility that a single spin induces a macroscopic rotation of a photon polarization. Such polarization rotations induced by single spins were recently observed, yet limited to a few 10(-3) degrees due to poor spin-photon coupling. Here we report the enhancement by three orders of magnitude of the spin-photon interaction, using a cavity quantum electrodynamics device. A single hole spin in a semiconductor quantum dot is deterministically coupled to a micropillar cavity. The cavity-enhanced coupling between the incoming photons and the solid-state spin results in a polarization rotation by 6 when the spin is optically initialized in the up or down state. These results open the way towards a spin-based quantum network. PMID:25687134

  8. Macroscopic rotation of photon polarization induced by a single spin

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Christophe; Demory, Justin; Loo, Vivien; Lematre, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Glazov, Mikhal; Krebs, Olivier; Voisin, Paul; Senellart, Pascale; Lanco, Loc

    2015-01-01

    Entangling a single spin to the polarization of a single incoming photon, generated by an external source, would open new paradigms in quantum optics such as delayed-photon entanglement, deterministic logic gates or fault-tolerant quantum computing. These perspectives rely on the possibility that a single spin induces a macroscopic rotation of a photon polarization. Such polarization rotations induced by single spins were recently observed, yet limited to a few 10?3 degrees due to poor spinphoton coupling. Here we report the enhancement by three orders of magnitude of the spinphoton interaction, using a cavity quantum electrodynamics device. A single hole spin in a semiconductor quantum dot is deterministically coupled to a micropillar cavity. The cavity-enhanced coupling between the incoming photons and the solid-state spin results in a polarization rotation by 6 when the spin is optically initialized in the up or down state. These results open the way towards a spin-based quantum network. PMID:25687134

  9. [Wavelength conversion and spectral analysis in periodically polarized lithium niobate waveguide].

    PubMed

    Luo, Chuan-hong; Sun, Jun-qiang; Zhu, Yuan-xiang; Wang, Jian

    2008-06-01

    Wavelength conversion exploiting cascaded second harmonic and difference frequency generation (c(SHG/DFG)) in periodically polarized LiNbO3 (PPLN) waveguides was experimentally researched. While wavelength converter was pumped with a pulsed wave, the pump pulse can be used to carry the information and wavelength conversion occurs between the pump wave and converted wave, thus wavelength conversion transferring the information from the pump wave to the converted waves includes two processes of second order nonlinear reaction: the first wavelength conversion from pump wave to SH wave occurs with SHG process, and the second wavelength conversion from SH wave to converted wave occurs with DFG process. In the first process the group velocities mismatching (GVM) for pulses at different wavelengths due to material property load the temporal walk-off between pump pulse and SH pulse located in the 1.5 microm band and in the 0.8 microm band, respectively, so that SH pulse slowly propagates compared with pump pulse, and SH pulse width is broadened along propagation length. As a result, in the second process the converted DF pulse generates waveform distortion owing to the broadening of SH pulse in the first process. Both the waveform and the spectrum of converted pulse in our experimental results testify to the fact that SH pulse possesses a narrow spectral width, which is consistent with a long SH pulse, and the spectral width of converted DF pulse is compressed but its temporal width is broadened correspondingly. Therefore the influence of walk-off between pulses demonstrates that the pulsed pumping wavelength conversion is disadvantageous to the transparence of the data format. However, pulsed pumping wavelength conversion also presents great potential that can be applied in future optical networks. Tunable wavelength conversion can be easily implemented by changing the wavelength of control CW, and single-to-multiple channel wavelength conversion can be realized by increasing the number of the CW lasing pump channels. This is very important and it enhances the flexibility in the management of the multi-channel WDM network. Finally, a tunable and single-to-dual channel wavelength converter based on the scheme of pulsed pumping wavelength conversion achieved by our experiment setup, and two channel converted pulses simultaneously replicate the bit rate carried on pump pulses. It is pointed out that the quality such the signal-to-noise ratio of converted pulse is affected by spectral width of control CW. PMID:18800689

  10. COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND INDUCED POLARIZATION FROM SINGLE SCATTERING BY CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AND FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Elsa P. R. G.; Da Silva, Antonio J. C.; Liu, Guo-Chin

    2012-09-20

    We present light-cone-integrated simulations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization signal induced by a single scattering in the direction of clusters of galaxies and filaments. We characterize the statistical properties of the induced polarization signals from the presence of the CMB quadrupole component (pqiCMB) and as the result of the transverse motion of ionized gas clouds with respect to the CMB rest frame (p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ). From adiabatic N-body/hydrodynamic simulations, we generated 28 random sky patches integrated along the light cone, each with about 0.86 deg{sup 2} and angular resolution of 6''. Our simulation method involves a box-stacking scheme that allows to reconstruct the CMB quadrupole component and the gas physical properties along the line of sight. We find that the linear polarization degree in the logarithmic scale of both effects follows approximately a Gaussian distribution and the mean total signal is about 10{sup -8} and 10{sup -10} for the pqiCMB and p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ effects, respectively. The polarization angle is consistent with a flat distribution in both cases. From the mean distributions of the polarization degree with redshift, the highest peak is found at z {approx_equal} 1 for the induced CMB quadrupole and at z {approx_equal} 0.5 for the kinematic component. Our results suggest that most of the contribution for the total polarization signal arises from z {approx}< 4 for the pqiCMB and z {approx}< 3 for p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ. The spectral dependency of both integrated signals is strong, increasing with the frequency, especially in the case of the p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ signal, which increases by a factor of 100 from 30 GHz to 675 GHz. The maxima values found at the highest frequency are about 3 {mu}K and 13 {mu}K for the pqiCMB and p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ, respectively. The angular power spectra of these effects peak at large multipoles l > 10{sup 4}, being of the order of 10{sup -5} {mu}K{sup 2} for pqiCMB polarization and 10{sup -7} {mu}K{sup 2} for the p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ effect. Therefore, these effects will not be a relevant source of contamination for measurements of the primary polarization modes, and at larger multipoles of roughly l > 40, 000, pqiCMB may be the dominant component over the primary and lensing signals.

  11. Polarization induced two dimensional confinement of carriers in wedge shaped polar semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Deb, S; Bhasker, H P; Thakur, Varun; Shivaprasad, S M; Dhar, S

    2016-01-01

    A novel route to achieve two dimensional (2D) carrier confinement in a wedge shaped wall structure made of a polar semiconductor has been demonstrated theoretically. Tapering of the wall along the direction of the spontaneous polarization leads to the development of charges of equal polarity on the two inclined facades of the wall. Polarization induced negative (positive) charges on the facades can push the electrons (holes) inward for a n-type (p-type) material which results in the formation of a 2D electron (hole) gas at the central plane and ionized donors (acceptors) at the outer edges of the wall. The theory shows that this unique mode of 2D carrier confinement can indeed lead to a significant enhancement of carrier mobility. It has been found that the reduced dimensionality is not the only cause for the enhancement of mobility in this case. Ionized impurity scattering, which is one of the major contributer to carrier scattering, is significantly suppressed as the carriers are naturally separated from the ionized centers. A recent experimental finding of very high electron mobility in wedge shaped GaN nanowall networks has been analyzed in the light of this theoretical reckoning. PMID:27210269

  12. Spectral properties of identified polarized-light sensitive interneurons in the brain of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Michiyo; Pfeiffer, Keram; Homberg, Uwe

    2007-04-01

    Many migrating animals employ a celestial compass mechanism for spatial navigation. Behavioral experiments in bees and ants have shown that sun compass navigation may rely on the spectral gradient in the sky as well as on the pattern of sky polarization. While polarized-light sensitive interneurons (POL neurons) have been identified in the brain of several insect species, there are at present no data on the neural basis of coding the spectral gradient of the sky. In the present study we have analyzed the chromatic properties of two identified POL neurons in the brain of the desert locust. Both neurons, termed TuTu1 and LoTu1, arborize in the anterior optic tubercle and respond to unpolarized light as well as to polarized light. We show here that the polarized-light response of both types of neuron relies on blue-sensitive photoreceptors. Responses to unpolarized light depended on stimulus position and wavelength. Dorsal unpolarized blue light inhibited the neurons, while stimulation from the ipsilateral side resulted in opponent responses to UV light and green light. While LoTu1 was inhibited by UV light and was excited by green light, one subtype of TuTu1 was excited by UV and inhibited by green light. In LoTu1 the sensitivity to polarized light was at least 2 log units higher than the response to unpolarized light stimuli. Taken together, the spatial and chromatic properties of the neurons may be suited to signal azimuthal directions based on a combination of the spectral gradient and the polarization pattern of the sky. PMID:17401118

  13. Building Better Electrodes for Electrical Resistivity and Induced Polarization Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, P. L.; La Brecque, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    In the third year of a project to understand and mitigate the systematic noise in resistivity and induced polarization measurements, we put a significant effort into understanding and developing better electrodes. The simple metal electrodes commonly used for both transmitting and receiving of electrical geophysical data are likely the Achilles" heal of the resistivity method. Even stainless steel, a commonly used electrode material because of its durability, showed only average results in laboratory tests for electrode noise. Better results have been found with non-polarizing metal-metal salt electrodes, which are widely used as surface electrodes and in IP surveys. But although they produce small measurement errors, they are not durable enough for in-situ borehole resistivity surveys, and often contain compounds that are toxic to the environment. They are also very seldom used as transmitters. In laboratory studies, we are exploring other materials and configurations for low-noise compound electrodes that will be nontoxic, inexpensive, and durable and can be used as both transmitters and receivers. Testing of the electrical noise levels of electrodes is an arduous task involving repeated measurements under varying conditions at field scales. Thus it is important to find methods of sorting out likely candidates from the mass of possible electrode configurations and construction methods. Testing of electrode impedance versus current density appears to provide simple criteria for predicting the suitability of electrodes. The best electrodes show relatively low overall contact impedance, relatively small changes in impedance with increased current density, and relatively small changes in impedance with time. Furthermore it can be shown that resistivity and induced polarization performance of electrodes is strongly correlated, so that methods of finding electrodes with low impedance and good direct current performance usually provide better quality induced polarization data and vice- versa.

  14. Ex vivo assessment of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced chronic injury using polarized light spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Manzoor; Ali, Safdar; Mehmood, Malik Sajjad; Ali, Hamid; Khurshid, Ahmat; Firdous, Shamaraz; Muhammad, Saleh; Ikram, Masroor

    2013-12-01

    The liver performs various functions, such as the production and detoxification of chemicals; therefore, it is susceptible to hepatotoxins such as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), which causes chronic injury. Thus, assessment of injury and its status of severity are of prime importance. Current work reports an ex vivo study for probing the severance of hepatic injury induced by CCl4 with polarized light over the spectral range 400-800 nm. Different concentrations of CCl4 were used to induce varying severity of hepatic injury in a rat model. Linear retardance, depolarization rates, and diagonal Mueller matrix elements (m22, m33, and m44), were successfully used as the distinguishing criterion for normal and different liver injuries. Our results show that linear retardance for injured liver samples with lower doses of CCl4 tends to increase when compared with normal liver samples, while samples injured at higher doses of CCl4 offer almost no retardance. Total, linear, and circular depolarizations follow decreasing trends with increased liver injury severity over the entire investigated wavelength range. Linear polarization states were observed to be better maintained as compared to circular polarization states for all samples. Furthermore, numerical values of diagonal elements of the experimentally measured Mueller matrix also increase with increasing doses of CCl4. Liver fibroses, change in transport albedo, and the relative refractive index of the extracellular matrix caused by CCl4 are responsible for the observed differences. These results will provide a pathway to gauge the severity of injury caused by toxic chemicals. PMID:24359651

  15. Model-free methods to study membrane environmental probes: a comparison of the spectral phasor and generalized polarization approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malacrida, Leonel; Gratton, Enrico; Jameson, David M.

    2015-12-01

    In this note, we present a discussion of the advantages and scope of model-free analysis methods applied to the popular solvatochromic probe LAURDAN, which is widely used as an environmental probe to study dynamics and structure in membranes. In particular, we compare and contrast the generalized polarization approach with the spectral phasor approach. To illustrate our points we utilize several model membrane systems containing pure lipid phases and, in some cases, cholesterol or surfactants. We demonstrate that the spectral phasor method offers definitive advantages in the case of complex systems.

  16. Spectral binning for mitigation of polarization mode dispersion artifacts in catheter-based optical frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Villiger, Martin; Zhang, Ellen Ziyi; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.; Oh, Wang-Yuhl; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Bouma, Brett E.

    2013-01-01

    Polarization mode dispersion (PMD) has been recognized as a significant barrier to sensitive and reproducible birefringence measurements with fiber-based, polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography systems. Here, we present a signal processing strategy that reconstructs the local retardation robustly in the presence of system PMD. The algorithm uses a spectral binning approach to limit the detrimental impact of system PMD and benefits from the final averaging of the PMD-corrected retardation vectors of the spectral bins. The algorithm was validated with numerical simulations and experimental measurements of a rubber phantom. When applied to the imaging of human cadaveric coronary arteries, the algorithm was found to yield a substantial improvement in the reconstructed birefringence maps. PMID:23938487

  17. A spectral shift in cytochrome a induced by calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Wikström, M; Saari, H

    1975-11-11

    Ca2+ induces a red shift in the absorption spectrum of ferrocytochrome a when added to uncoupled mitochondria, sub-mitochondrial particles or isolated cytochrome aa3. The shift is identical within experimental error to the previously reported energy-linked shift in intact mitochondria (Wikström, M. K. F. (1972), Biochim. Biophys. Acta 283, 385-390). One mol of calcium produces the shift in one mole of cytochrome a, the KD being approx. 20-30 muM. The calcium-induced shift is readily reversed by chelating agents such as EDTA, ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and ATP and is insensitive to uncoupling agents and inhibitors of calcium transport (La3+ and ruthenium red). It is shown that the binding site for calcium that is responsible for the spectral shift is located on the outside of the permeability barrier of the mitochondrial cristae membrane. It is proposed that calcium simulates the energy-linked shift in cytochrome a by binding to a site of cytochrome aa3 that is occupied by protons in energized mitochondria and that is located at the external surface of the mitochondrial membrane. PMID:811258

  18. Eustatic sea level fluctuations induced by polar wander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabadini, Roberto; Doglioni, Carlo; Yuen, David A.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown here that polar wander of a viscoelastic, stratified earth can induce global sea level fluctuations comparable to the short-term component in eustatic sea-level curves. The sign of these fluctuations, which are very sensitive to the rheological stratification, depends on the geographical location of the observation point; rises and falls in sea level can thus be coeval in different parts of the world. This finding is a distinct contrast to the main assumption underlying the reconstruction of eustatic curves, namely that global sea-level events produce the same depositional sequence everywhere. It is proposed that polar wander should be added to the list of geophysical mechanisms that can control the third-order cycles in sea level.

  19. Design and fabrication of thin-film polarizer at wavelength of 1540 nm and investigation of its laser-induced damage threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahraee, Masoume; Fallah, Hamid Reza; Moradi, Badri; Zabolian, Hosein; Mahmoodzade, Morteza Haji

    2014-12-01

    In this paper a thin-film polarizer at a wavelength of 1540 nm was designed and fabricated. These types of polarizer are usually used in laser systems to obtain linearly polarized light beams. Our design consists of a system of eighteen dielectric thin-film layers from repeated pairs of titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide layers that are deposited on a BK7 glass substrate. Design was carried out based on theoretical principles and computer calculations. Thin-film design software was used for designing the polarizer. The angle of incidence was supposed to be 56° that is the Browster angle for BK7 glass. Performance and laser-induced damage threshold of the polarizer were enhanced by a suitable selection of various parameters including thickness of each layer, their number and the electric field distribution of layers. After several designs, fabrications and refinement of parameters, the final polarizer was designed. Then the final sample of the polarizer was prepared using the electron beam evaporation (EBE) technique with Balzers BAK 760 coating machine. Spectral transmittance of the sample was measured by Shimadzu 3100 UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer. Investigation of spectral transmittance showed that at a wavelength of 1540nm, the transmission of P polarization is 87.82 and the transmission of S polarization is 0.43 which show a ratio ( T P / T S of 204. So, this ratio is an acceptable value for our desired polarizer.

  20. How much information on permeability can we expect from induced polarization methods? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, A. M.; Slater, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    Recognizing the significance of permeability heterogeneity on solute transport in groundwater, the determination of qualitative and quantitative information on permeability has been a major focus in the field of hydrogeophysics for some time. This drive has been particularly encouraged due to the minimal invasive method of most geophysical techniques, and the ability to produce spatially dense datasets of geophysical properties. Whilst DC resistivity, as a method, has matured into an extremely robust and flexible technique, and despite its wide use for mapping lithologies, translation of DC resistivity, as a property, to permeability is extremely limited, principally because of the sensitivity to pore fluid states (e.g. salinity) and grain surface electrical conductivity. Induced polarization (IP), in contrast, is sensitive to properties related to the grain surface and/or pore throat geometry, and thus it is intuitive to assume that the permeability and induced polarization response may be closely linked. Spectral IP (SIP) potentially adds further valuable information, given the measure of distribution of polarization length scales. In fact, IP as a tool for hydrogeological studies has been recognized for over 50 years, although it is only over the past two decades that significant advances have been made in both methodology (e.g. instruments, data inversion, etc.) and hydrogeological interpretation. Attempts to link IP (including SIP) and permeability have been explored through laboratory, field and model studies. Mechanistic models have been proposed, along with several empirical relationships. Despite these efforts, the ability to link permeability to IP measurements remains challenging. Formation-specific relationships have been demonstrated, and yet a universal link continues to be elusive. Here, we discuss the principal constraints, illustrated using laboratory and field datasets from a number of studies. We highlight specific challenges, including: questionable treatment of one overarching mechanism of polarization (grain or pore-based) that is applicable to a wide range of porous media (e.g. from coarse unconsolidated to fine consolidated sediments); the weak signal sensitivity to significant variation in formation properties that influence permeability; limitations in field-based imaging due to unsaturated zone effects, the necessary treatment of salinity effects within polarization models; inverse model errors; particular limitations when dealing with highly permeable cobble dominated formations; the lack of well-constrained field investigations; practical difficulties in obtaining spectral IP information at the field scale. Despite these challenges, we assert that valuable information about permeability can be obtained from IP investigations, and offer suggestions for optimum strategies to achieve this.

  1. Polarizers for a spectral range centered at 121.6 nm operating by reflectance or by transmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larruquert, Juan I.; Malvezzi, A. Marco; Giglia, Angelo; Aznárez, José A.; Rodríguez-de Marcos, Luis; Méndez, José A.; Miotti, Paolo; Frassetto, Fabio; Massone, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Gerardo; Fineschi, Silvano; Nannarone, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    Polarimetry is a powerful tool to interpret how the coronal plasma is involved in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's inner parts to the outer space. Space polarimetry in the far ultraviolet (FUV) provides essential information of processes governed by the Doppler and Hanle resonant electron scattering effects. Among the key FUV spectral lines to observe these processes, H I Lyman α (121.6 nm) is the most intense. Some developing or proposed solar physics missions, such as CLASP, SolmeX, and COMPASS, plan to perform polarimetry at 121.6 nm. Classical solutions, such as a parallel plate of a transparent material, either MgF2 or LiF, result in a modest efficiency of the passing polarization component. The development of more efficient linear polarizers at this wavelength will benefit future space instruments. A research has been conducted to develop polarizers based on (Al/MgF2)n multilayer coatings in a band containing 121.6 nm, to obtain a significant efficiency increase over plates. Coatings operating by reflectance resulted in a high efficiency after approximately one year of storage under nitrogen. In parallel, coating polarizers operating by transmittance have been prepared for the first time. Transmissive polarizers have the advantage that they involve no deviation of the beam. As a further benefit, the developed transmittance polarizers additionally incorporate filtering properties to help reject wavelengths both shortwards and longwards of a band containing 121.6 nm. Hence a polarizer combined with a filter is obtained with a single device. The combined polarizer-filter could enable a higher performance polarimeter for solar physics if the use of a separate filter to isolate Lyman α turns unnecessary.

  2. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-14

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of reactions that do not satisfy the time-scale separability inherent to nonadiabatic kinetic models.

  3. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-01

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of reactions that do not satisfy the time-scale separability inherent to nonadiabatic kinetic models.

  4. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han-Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. For circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ. PMID:26450679

  5. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han-Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W; Mani, Ramesh G

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. For circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ. PMID:26450679

  6. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han -Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-10-09

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. As a result, for circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ.

  7. Induced polarization of clay-sand mixtures. Experiments and modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okay, G.; Leroy, P.

    2012-04-01

    The complex conductivity of saturated unconsolidated sand-clay mixtures was experimentally investigated using two types of clay minerals, kaolinite and smectite (mainly Na-Montmorillonite) in the frequency range 1.4 mHz - 12 kHz. The experiments were performed with various clay contents (1, 5, 20, and 100 % in volume of the sand-clay mixture) and salinities (distilled water, 0.1 g/L, 1 g/L, and 10 g/L NaCl solution). Induced polarization measurements were performed with a cylindrical four-electrode sample-holder associated with a SIP-Fuchs II impedance meter and non-polarizing Cu/CuSO4 electrodes. The results illustrate the strong impact of the CEC of the clay minerals upon the complex conductivity. The quadrature conductivity increases steadily with the clay content. We observe that the dependence on frequency of the quadrature conductivity of sand-kaolinite mixtures is more important than for sand-bentonite mixtures. For both types of clay, the quadrature conductivity seems to be fairly independent on the pore fluid salinity except at very low clay contents. The experimental data show good agreement with predicted values given by our SIP model. This complex conductivity model considers the electrochemical polarization of the Stern layer coating the clay particles and the Maxwell-Wagner polarization. We use the differential effective medium theory to calculate the complex conductivity of the porous medium constituted of the grains and the electrolyte. The SIP model includes also the effect of the grain size distribution upon the complex conductivity spectra.

  8. Electric field induced spin polarization in graphene nanodots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Weidong; Luo, Kaikai; Zhou, Aiping

    2014-08-01

    By employing a configuration interaction approach, we study the spin polarization induced by an electric field applied to graphene nanodots. The evolution of both the ground and excited states of the graphene nanodot with the applied electric field is calculated systematically. Three clearly separated field regimes have been identified for the spin gap in the model system, namely, (a) nearly constant in the nonmagnetic phase, (b) rapidly decreasing in the antiferromagnetic phase, and (c) exponential decay in the ferromagnetic phase. It is therefore demonstrated that ferromagnetism can be induced purely by applying an electric field to a nonmagnetic graphene nanodot. Electron-electron interactions which are greatly modified by the applied electric field are believed to account for the two consecutive magnetic phase transitions.

  9. Role of methyl-induced polarization in ion binding

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Mariana; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Rempe, Susan B.; Varma, Sameer

    2013-01-01

    The chemical property of methyl groups that renders them indispensable to biomolecules is their hydrophobicity. Quantum mechanical studies undertaken here to understand the effect of point substitutions on potassium (K-) channels illustrate quantitatively how methyl-induced polarization also contributes to biomolecular function. K- channels regulate transmembrane salt concentration gradients by transporting K+ ions selectively. One of the K+ binding sites in the channel’s selectivity filter, the S4 site, also binds Ba2+ ions, which blocks K+ transport. This inhibitory property of Ba2+ ions has been vital in understanding K-channel mechanism. In most K-channels, the S4 site is composed of four threonine amino acids. The K channels that carry serine instead of threonine are significantly less susceptible to Ba2+ block and have reduced stabilities. We find that these differences can be explained by the lower polarizability of serine compared with threonine, because serine carries one less branched methyl group than threonine. A T→S substitution in the S4 site reduces its polarizability, which, in turn, reduces ion binding by several kilocalories per mole. Although the loss in binding affinity is high for Ba2+, the loss in K+ binding affinity is also significant thermodynamically, which reduces channel stability. These results highlight, in general, how biomolecular function can rely on the polarization induced by methyl groups, especially those that are proximal to charged moieties, including ions, titratable amino acids, sulfates, phosphates, and nucleotides. PMID:23878238

  10. N-polar III-nitride quantum well light-emitting diodes with polarization-induced doping

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Jai; Simon, John; Protasenko, Vladimir; Kosel, Thomas; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep

    2011-10-24

    Nitrogen-polar III-nitride heterostructures present unexplored advantages over Ga(metal)-polar crystals for optoelectronic devices. This work reports N-polar III-nitride quantum-well ultraviolet light-emitting diodes grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy that integrate polarization-induced p-type doping by compositional grading from GaN to AlGaN along N-face. The graded AlGaN layer simultaneously acts as an electron blocking layer while facilitating smooth injection of holes into the active region, while the built-in electric field in the barriers improves carrier injection into quantum wells. The enhanced doping, carrier injection, and light extraction indicate that N-polar structures have the potential to exceed the performance of metal-polar ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

  11. Relationships between induced polarization relaxation time and hydraulic properties of sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Konstantin; Tarasov, Andrey; Ilyin, Yuri; Seleznev, Nikita; Boyd, Austin

    2010-03-01

    We investigated electrical and physical-chemical properties of six sandstone samples with contrasting mineralogical characteristics and with hydraulic conductivity varying in a wide range. The electrical data were obtained from time domain spectral induced polarization (IP) measurements. We inverted the IP decays to relaxation time distributions, and then compared the modal relaxation times with the dominant pore throat diameters obtained from the Mercury Injection Capillary Pressure (MICP) data. We found a positive logarithmic relationship between the relaxation time and the pore throat diameter. Also, we found the normalized chargeability (an integral IP parameter) to be positively correlated with the clay content. These two results suggest that the polarization of our sandstones is controlled by the pore throat distribution, and by the clay content. The logarithmic relationship contradicts previous theories, and is not universal. Adopting an approach of Kruschwitz and her co-workers, we calculated the effective diffusivity from IP and MICP data, and we found the effective diffusivity values ranging from 2.9 10-13 to 1.6 10-10 m2s-1. High diffusivity values, typical of surface diffusion, were obtained for clean sandstones. Low diffusivity values were obtained for clayey sandstones, and they were one to two orders of magnitude lower than those characteristic of the surface diffusion. We proposed two mechanisms to explain the `slow' diffusion: (1) the effect of surface tortuosity of pore throats filled with clay minerals and (2) the effect of pore geometry. These two effects represent an obstacle in assessing the pore throat diameter and hydraulic conductivity of sandstones with large specific surface and clay content on the basis of spectral IP measurements. However, we believe that the sandstones featuring `slow' diffusion can be discriminated based on the integral polarization parameters, and that the relaxation time remains a valuable parameter for assessing hydraulic properties of clean sandstones.

  12. The spectral dependence of circular polarization in Grw + 70 deg 8247.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.; Landstreet, J. D.; Oke, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Observation of sharp changes in circular polarization with wavelength in new observations of Grw + 70 deg 8247 made with 80 A resolution. Some of the structure is associated with the Minkowski bands. Continued broadband measurements show that while the polarization below 6000 A appears to remain constant, above this wavelength there have been significant changes in the past year.

  13. Imaging ambipolar two-dimensional carriers induced by the spontaneous electric polarization of a polar semiconductor BiTeI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohsaka, Y.; Kanou, M.; Takagi, H.; Hanaguri, T.; Sasagawa, T.

    2015-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) mobile carriers are a wellspring of quantum phenomena. Among various 2D-carrier systems, such as field effect transistors and heterostructures, polar materials hold a unique potential; the spontaneous electric polarization in the bulk could generate positive and negative 2D carriers at the surface. Although several experiments have shown ambipolar carriers at the surface of a polar semiconductor BiTeI, their origin is yet to be specified. Here we provide compelling experimental evidences that the ambipolar 2D carriers at the surface of BiTeI are induced by the spontaneous electric polarization. By imaging electron standing waves with spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy, we find that positive or negative carriers with Rashba-type spin splitting emerge at the surface corresponding to the polar directions in the bulk. The electron densities at the surface are constant independently of those in the bulk, corroborating that the 2D carriers are induced by the spontaneous electric polarization. We also successfully image that lateral p -n junctions are formed along the boundaries of submicron-scale domains with opposite polar directions. Our study presents a means to endow nonvolatile, spin-polarized, and ambipolar 2D carriers as well as, without elaborate fabrication, lateral p -n junctions of those carriers at atomically sharp interfaces.

  14. Effects of Buflomedil and Pentoxifylline on Hamster Skin-Flap Microcirculation: Prediction of Flap Viability Using Orthogonal Polarization Spectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Coelho da Mota, Denise Salles; Furtado, Eliane; Bottino, Daniel Alexandre; Bouskela, Eliete

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigated the effects of buflomedil and pentoxifylline, both of which are used in reconstructive surgery of hamster skin flap microcirculation, and evaluated the skin flap survival rate by orthogonal polarization spectral imaging. METHOD Twenty-four adult male Syrian golden hamsters were divided into three groups: a control (C, 0.1 ml 0.9% saline), buflomedil (B, 3 mg/kg/day), and pentoxifylline group (P, 14.5 mg/kg/day). Treatments administered intraperitoneally were initiated 1 hour before skin flap preparation and continued for 7 days post-operatively at 12-hour intervals. Preparations (skin flaps) were divided into 12 fields, which were organized into six bands. Functional capillary density (FCD, in mm/mm2), distance from the skin flap base to blood flow cessation (Distwith flow, in cm), percentage of viable skin (VA, in%), and qualitative analysis of blood flow by orthogonal polarization spectral imaging were performed at 1 and 24 hours and on the seventh post-operative day. RESULT Bands IV, V, and VI presented no flow independent of time. The functional capillary density group B was higher than that of groups C and P, primarily after 24 hours. All groups showed an increase in D with time but reached similar final distances (C = 2.73, B = 2.78 and P = 2.70 cm). Moreover, the percentage of viable areas remained at approximately 50%. The orthogonal polarization spectral imaging was useful to assess viability by counting fields with and without blood flow. CONCLUSIONS Functional capillary density values were higher in the buflomedil group compared to the control and pentoxifylline groups in this model. Functional capillary density did not influence D or the percentage of VA, and the technique showed favorable potential to assess/predict the viability of skin flaps within 1 h after surgery. PMID:19690666

  15. Spectral, kinetic and polarization characteristics of luminescence of acriflavine in polymeric matrix under pulsed excitation with different durations and intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaputskaya, I. A.; Ermilov, E. A.; Tannert, S.; Röder, B.; Gorbatsevich, S. K.

    2006-08-01

    Spectral, kinetic and polarization characteristics of fluorescence and thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) of dye solid solutions have been investigated. It was shown that the increasing of the excitation pulse duration results in rise of TADF decay time, but an increasing of the long pulse excitation intensity results in a faster TADF decay. In the presence of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) the fluorescence spectrum is shifting non-monotonically with time when the intensity of the excitation pulse is high. At the time moment when the excitation is switched off the polarization degree of luminescence of the concentrated dye solutions strongly reduces. The energy transfer from the molecules in the S 1 state to the molecules in the T 1 state reduces the depolarization of luminescence caused by FRET. Numerical simulations were made by means of Monte-Carlo integrations and results were compared with experimental data obtained for acriflavine in polyvinyl alcohol films.

  16. Satellite observations of polar mesospheric clouds by the solar backscattered ultraviolet spectral radiometer - Evidence of a solar cycle dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Gary E.; Mcpeters, Richard D.; Jensen, Eric J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on eight years of satellite observations of the polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) by the SBUV spectral radiometer, showing that PMCs occur in the summertime polar cap regions of both hemispheres and that they exhibit year-to-year variability. It was also found that the increase in the PMC occurrence frequency was inversely correlated with solar activity. Two kinds of hemispherical asymmetries could be identified: (1) PMCs in the Northern Hemisphere were significantly brighter than in the Southern Hemisphere, in accordance with previous results derived from SME data; and (2) the solar cycle response in the south is more pronounced than in the north. The paper also describes the cloud detection algorithm.

  17. Development of a field-widened Michelson spectroscopic filter for a polarized near-infrared high spectral resolution lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Cheng, Zhongtao; Ling, Tong; Huang, Hanlu; Zhou, Yudi; Zhang, Qiaoshuang; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Yibing

    2013-09-01

    Standard backscatter lidars encounter problems when solving the two unknowns (aerosol backscatter coefficient and extinction coefficient) from the only one recorded lidar equation. With the help of the high-spectral-resolution filter, high spectral resolution lidars (HSRLs) can provide unambiguous retrieval without critical assumptions. Spectral discrimination between scattering from molecules and aerosols or cloud particles is the basis of the HSRL technique, and several lidar approaches have been developed to obtain this discrimination. Iodine cell filter, which is a kind of atomic/molecular absorption filter, is robust, stable, and can achieve very good separation of aerosol Mie scattering from atmosphere molecular Cabannes scattering. However, absorption filters are lossy and gaseous absorption lines do not exist at many convenient laser wavelengths. Fabry-Perot interferometers are simple and can be tuned to any wavelength, but are limited by acceptance angle. Field-widened Michelson interferometer (FWMI) is considered to have the ability to overcome the deficiencies of the aforementioned filters as it can perform well at relatively large off-axis angles, is nearly lossless, and can be built to any wavelength. In this paper, the development process of an FWMI that is introduced to be the spectroscopic filter for a polarized near-infrared HSRL instrument will be present. The retrieval process of the aerosol optical properties, the design requirements with special focus on the selection of the free spectral range (FSR) of the FWMI, as well as the design result will be described in detail.

  18. Strain-induced Polarization Rotation in Epitaxial (001) BiFeO3 Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, J H; Baek, S H; Ortiz, D; Das, R; Folkman, C H; Chu, Y H; Shafer, Paul; Zhang, J X; S, Choudhury; Vaithyanathan, V; Chen, Y B; Felker, D A; Biegalski, Michael D; Rzchowski, M; Pan, X Q; Chen, Long-Qing; Schlom, Darrell; Ramesh, R.; Eom, Chang-Beom

    2008-01-01

    Direct measurement of the remanent polarization of high quality (001)-oriented epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films shows a strong strain-dependence, even larger than conventional (001)-oriented PbTiO3 films. Thermodynamic analysis reveals that a strain-induced polarization rotation mechanism is responsible for the large change in the out-of-plane polarization of (001) BiFeO3 with biaxial strain while the spontaneous polarization itself remains almost constant.

  19. Parahydrogen Induced Polarization by Pairwise Replacement on Pt and Ir Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Clifford; Zhou, Ronghui; Zhao, Evan; Cheng, Wei; Neal, Luke; Weaver, Helena

    2015-03-01

    Parahydrogen Induced Polarization (PHIP) is a robust and scalable method for production of bulk quantities of hyperpolarized fluids. The symmetrization order inherent in parahydrogen is transformed via symmetry breaking hydrogenation reaction into NMR-observable hyperpolarization. Spin polarization of order unity can be obtained. A key requirement of PHIP is pairwise hydrogenation by addition of H atoms originating from the same H2 molecule. PHIP using supported metal catalysts is a promising recent development because it exploits the advantages over homogeneous and supported metal complexes. The present work demonstrates a new PHIP mechanism involving the pairwise replacement of parahydrogen into propene (the substrate) over TiO2 supported Ir and Pt nanoparticle catalysts. Analysis of the stereoselectivity of the pairwise replacement process is facilitated by density matrix spectral simulations. The cis and trans dispositions of the symmetrization order give strikingly different PHIP spectra. The observed stereoselectivity of the pairwise replacement step, together with control experiments, rule out an alternative mechanism involving dehydrogenation of free propane over the catalyst.

  20. Optically induced rotation of Rayleigh particles by vortex beams with different states of polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Manman; Yan, Shaohui; Yao, Baoli; Liang, Yansheng; Lei, Ming; Yang, Yanlong

    2016-01-01

    Optical vortex beams carry optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) and can induce an orbital motion of trapped particles in optical trapping. We show that the state of polarization (SOP) of vortex beams will affect the details of this optically induced orbital motion to some extent. Numerical results demonstrate that focusing the vortex beams with circular, radial or azimuthal polarizations can induce a uniform orbital motion on a trapped Rayleigh particle, while in the focal field of the vortex beam with linear polarization the particle experiences a non-uniform orbital motion. Among the formers, the vortex beam with circular polarization induces a maximum optical torque on the particle. Furthermore, by varying the topological charge of the vortex beams, the vortex beam with circular polarization gives rise to an optimum torque superior to those given by the other three vortex beams. These facts suggest that the circularly polarized vortex beam is more suitable for rotating particles.

  1. Self-induced spectral splits in supernova neutrino fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2007-10-15

    In the dense-neutrino region above the neutrino sphere of a supernova (r < or approx. 400 km), neutrino-neutrino refraction causes collective flavor transformations. They can lead to 'spectral splits' where an energy E{sub split} splits the transformed spectrum sharply into parts of almost pure but different flavors. Unless there is an ordinary MSW resonance in the dense-neutrino region, E{sub split} is determined by flavor-lepton number conservation alone. Spectral splits are created by an adiabatic transition between regions of large and small neutrino density. We solve the equations of motion in the adiabatic limit explicitly and provide analytic expressions for a generic example.

  2. Multiple-view spectrally resolved x-ray imaging observations of polar-direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, R. C.; Johns, H. M.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Nagayama, T.; Hsu, S. C.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Bradley, P. A.; Hakel, P.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Wysocki, F. J.

    2014-12-15

    We present spatially, temporally, and spectrally resolved narrow- and broad-band x-ray images of polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on OMEGA. These self-emission images were obtained during the deceleration phase and bang time using several multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging instruments fielded along two or three quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight, including equatorial and polar views. The instruments recorded images based on K-shell lines from a titanium tracer located in the shell as well as continuum emission. These observations constitute the first such data obtained for PDD implosions. The image data show features attributed to laser imprinting and zero-order hydrodynamics. Equatorial-view images show a “double bun” structure that is consistent with synthetic images obtained from post-processing 2D and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment. Polar-view images show a pentagonal, petal pattern that correlates with the PDD laser illumination used on OMEGA, thus revealing a 3D aspect of PDD OMEGA implosions not previously observed. Differences are noted with respect to a PDD experiment performed at National Ignition Facility.

  3. Optimized Spectral Editing of 13C MAS NMR Spectra of Rigid Solids Using Cross-Polarization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangill, R.; Rastrupandersen, N.; Bildsoe, H.; Jakobsen, H. J.; Nielsen, N. C.

    Combinations of 13C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments employing cross polarization (CP), cross polarization-depolarization (CPD), and cross polarization-depolarization-repolarization are analyzed quantitatively to derive simple and general procedures for optimized spectral editing of 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids by separation of the 13C resonances into CH n subspectra ( n = 0, 1, 2, and 3). Special attention is devoted to a differentiation by CPD/MAS of CH and CH 2 resonances since these groups behave quite similarly during spin lock under Hartmann-Hahn match and are therefore generally difficult to distinguish unambiguously. A general procedure for the design of subexperiments and linear combinations of their spectra to provide optimized signal-to-noise ratios for the edited subspectra is described. The technique is illustrated by a series of edited 13C CP/MAS spectra for a number of rigid solids ranging from simple organic compounds (sucrose and l-menthol) to complex pharmaceutical products (calcipotriol monohydrate and vitamin D 3) and polymers (polypropylene, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl chloride, and polystyrene).

  4. Polarization induced electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the analysis of liquid, viscous and solid samples.

    PubMed

    Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a polarization-induced electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was developed. A micro-sized sample droplet was deposited on a naturally available dielectric substrate such as a fruit or a stone, and then placed close to (~2 mm) the orifice of a mass spectrometer applied with a high voltage. Taylor cone was observed from the sample droplet, and a spray emitted from the cone apex was generated. The analyte ion signals derived from the droplet were obtained by the mass spectrometer. The ionization process is similar to that in ESI although no direct electric contact was applied on the sample site. The sample droplet polarized by the high electric field provided by the mass spectrometer initiated the ionization process. The dielectric sample loading substrate facilitated further the polarization process, resulting in the formation of Taylor cone. The mass spectral profiles obtained via this approach resembled those obtained using ESI-MS. Multiply charged ions dominated the mass spectra of peptides and proteins, whereas singly charged ions dominated the mass spectra of small molecules such as amino acids and small organic molecules. In addition to liquid samples, this approach can be used for the analysis of solid and viscous samples. A small droplet containing suitable solvent (5-10 µl) was directly deposited on the surface of the solid (or viscous) sample, placed close the orifice of mass spectrometer applied with a high voltage. Taylor cone derived from the droplet was immediately formed followed by electrospray processes to generate gas-phase ions for MS analysis. Analyte ions derived from the main ingredients of pharmaceutical tablets and viscous ointment can be extracted into the solvent droplet in situ and observed using a mass spectrometer. PMID:25800179

  5. Quantifying Microbe-Mineral Interactions Leading to Remotely Detectable Induced Polarization Signals (Final Project Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Moysey, Stephen; Dean, Delphine; Dimitrios, Ntarlagiannis

    2013-11-13

    The objective of this project was to investigate controls on induced polarization responses in porous media. The approach taken in the project was to compare electrical measurements made on mineral surfaces with atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques to observations made at the column‐scale using traditional spectral induced polarization measurements. In the project we evaluated a number of techniques for investigating the surface properties of materials, including the development of a new AFM measurement protocol that utilizes an external electric field to induce grain‐scale polarizations that can be probed using a charged AFM tip. The experiments we performed focused on idealized systems (i.e., glass beads and silica gel) where we could obtain the high degree of control needed to understand how changes in the pore environment, which are determined by biogeochemical controls in the subsurface, affect mechanisms contributing to complex electrical conductivity, i.e., conduction and polarization, responses. The studies we performed can be classified into those affecting the chemical versus physical properties of the grain surface and pore space. Chemical alterations of the surface focused on evaluating how changes in pore fluid pH and ionic composition control surface conduction. These were performed as column flow through experiments where the pore fluid was exchanged in a column of silica gel. Given that silica gel has a high surface area due to internal grain porosity, high‐quality data could be obtained where the chemical influences on the surface are clearly apparent and qualitatively consistent with theories of grain (i.e., Stern layer) polarization controlled by electrostatic surface sorption processes (i.e., triple layer theory). Quantitative fitting of the results by existing process‐based polarization models (e.g., Leroy et al., 2008) has been less successful, however, due to what we have attributed to differences between existing models developed for spherical grains versus the actual geometry associated with the nano‐pores in the silica gel, though other polarization processes, e.g., proton hopping along the surface (Skold et al., 2013), may also be a contributing factor. As an alternative model‐independent approach to confirming the link between surface sorption and SIP we initiated a study that will continue (unfunded) beyond the completion of this project to independently measure the accumulation of gamma emitting isotopes on the silica gel during the SIP monitoring experiments. Though our analyses of the project data are ongoing, our preliminary analyses are generally supportive of the grain (Stern layer) polarization theory of SIP. Experiments focused on evaluating the impact of physical modifications of the medium on polarization included etching and biotic and abiotic facilitated precipitation of carbonate and iron oxides to alter the roughness and electrical conductivity of the surfaces. These experiments were performed for both silica gel and glass beads, the latter of which lacked the interior porosity and high surface area of the silica gel. The results appear to be more nuanced that the chemical modifications of the system. In general, however, it was found that deposition of iron oxides and etching had relatively minimal or negative impacts on the polarization response of the medium, whereas carbonate coatings increased the polarization response. These results were generally consistent with changes in surface charge observed via AFM. Abiotic and biotic column flow through experiments demonstrated that precipitation of carbonate within the medium significantly impacted the real and imaginary conductivity over time in a manner generally consistent with the carbonate precipitation as observed from the batch grain coating experiments. Biotic effects were not observed to provide distinctly different signatures, but may have contributed to differences in the rate of changes observed with SIP. AFM was used in a variety of different ways to investigate the grain surfaces throughout the course of the project. Standard imaging methods were used to evaluate surface roughness and charge density, which showed that these data could provide qualitative insights about consistency between surface trends and the electrical behavior at the column scale (for the case of glass beads). Polarization and conductive force microscopy (PCFM) measurements were developed by the original project PI (Treavor Kendall), which illustrated the importance of the initial few monolayers of water on the mineral surface for producing surface conductivity. The technique allowed for initial local estimates of complex electrical conductivity on mineral surfaces, but could not be pursued after Kendall left the project due to phase locking limitations with the AFM instrument at Clemson and an inability to perform measurements in solution, which limited their value for linking the measurements to column‐scale SIP responses. As a result, co‐PI Dean developed a new methodology for making AFM measurements within an externally applied electric field. In this method, the charged tip of an AFM probe is brought within the proximity of a polarization domain while an external electric field is applied to the sample. The premise of the approach is that the tip will be attracted to or rebound from charge accumulations on the surface, which allow for detection of the local polarization response. Initial experiments showed promise in terms of the general trends of responses observed, though we have not yet been able to develop a quantitative interpretation technique that can be applied to predicting column scale responses.

  6. Quantifying microbe‐mineral interactions leading to remotely detectable induced polarization signals

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Moysey, Stephen; Dean, Delphine

    2013-11-14

    The objective of this project was to investigate controls on induced polarization responses in porous media. The approach taken in the project was to compare electrical measurements made on mineral surfaces with atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques to observations made at the column-scale using traditional spectral induced polarization measurements. In the project we evaluated a number of techniques for investigating the surface properties of materials, including the development of a new AFM measurement protocol that utilizes an external electric field to induce grain-scale polarizations that can be probed using a charged AFM tip. The experiments we performed focused on idealized systems (i.e., glass beads and silica gel) where we could obtain the high degree of control needed to understand how changes in the pore environment, which are determined by biogeochemical controls in the subsurface, affect mechanisms contributing to complex electrical conductivity, i.e., conduction and polarization, responses. The studies we performed can be classified into those affecting the chemical versus physical properties of the grain surface and pore space. Chemical alterations of the surface focused on evaluating how changes in pore fluid pH and ionic composition control surface conduction. These were performed as column flow through experiments where the pore fluid was exchanged in a column of silica gel. Given that silica gel has a high surface area due to internal grain porosity, high-quality data could be obtained where the chemical influences on the surface are clearly apparent and qualitatively consistent with theories of grain (i.e., Stern layer) polarization controlled by electrostatic surface sorption processes (i.e., triple layer theory). Quantitative fitting of the results by existing process-based polarization models (e.g., Leroy et al., 2008) has been less successful, however, due to what we have attributed to differences between existing models developed for spherical grains versus the actual geometry associated with the nano-pores in the silica gel, though other polarization processes, e.g., proton hopping along the surface (Skold et al., 2013), may also be a contributing factor. As an alternative model-independent approach to confirming the link between surface sorption and SIP we initiated a study that will continue (unfunded) beyond the completion of this project to independently measure the accumulation of gamma emitting isotopes on the silica gel during the SIP monitoring experiments. Though our analyses of the project data are ongoing, our preliminary analyses are generally supportive of the grain (Stern layer) polarization theory of SIP. Experiments focused on evaluating the impact of physical modifications of the medium on polarization included etching and biotic and abiotic facilitated precipitation of carbonate and iron oxides to alter the roughness and electrical conductivity of the surfaces. These experiments were performed for both silica gel and glass beads, the latter of which lacked the interior porosity and high surface area of the silica gel. The results appear to be more nuanced that the chemical modifications of the system. In general, however, it was found that deposition of iron oxides and etching had relatively minimal or negative impacts on the polarization response of the medium, whereas carbonate coatings increased the polarization response. These results were generally consistent with changes in surface charge observed via AFM. Abiotic and biotic column flow through experiments demonstrated that precipitation of carbonate within the medium significantly impacted the real and imaginary conductivity over time in a manner generally consistent with the carbonate precipitation as observed from the batch grain coating experiments. Biotic effects were not observed to provide distinctly different signatures, but may have contributed to differences in the rate of changes observed with SIP. AFM was used in a variety of different ways to investigate the grain surfaces throughout the course of the project. Standard imaging methods were used to evaluate surface roughness and charge density, which showed that these data could provide qualitative insights about consistency between surface trends and the electrical behavior at the column scale (for the case of glass beads). Polarization and conductive force microscopy (PCFM) measurements were developed by the original project PI (Treavor Kendall), which illustrated the importance of the initial few monolayers of water on the mineral surface for producing surface conductivity. The technique allowed for initial local estimates of complex electrical conductivity on mineral surfaces, but could not be pursued after Kendall left the project due to phase locking limitations with the AFM instrument at Clemson and an inability to perform measurements in solution, which limited their value for linking the measurements to column-scale SIP responses. As a result, co-PI Dean developed a new methodology for making AFM measurements within an externally applied electric field. In this method, the charged tip of an AFM probe is brought within the proximity of a polarization domain while an external electric field is applied to the sample. The premise of the approach is that the tip will be attracted to or rebound from charge accumulations on the surface, which allow for detection of the local polarization response. Initial experiments showed promise in terms of the general trends of responses observed, though we have not yet been able to develop a quantitative interpretation technique that can be applied to predicting column scale responses.

  7. Time-resolved spectral investigations of laser light induced microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nánai, L.; Hevesi, I.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical and spectral properties of an optical breakdown microplasma created by pulses of different lasers on surfaces of insulators (KCI), metals (Cu) and semiconductors (V 2O 5), have been investigated. Experiments were carried out in air and vacuum using different wavelengths (λ = 0.694μm, type OGM-20,λ = 1.06μm with a home-made laser based on neodymium glass crystal, and λ = 10.6μm, similarly home-made) and pulse durations (Q-switched and free-running regimes). To follow the integral, dynamical and spectral characteristics of the luminous spot of microplasma we have used fast cameras (SFR-2M, IMACON-HADLAND), a high speed spectral camera (AGAT-2) and a spectrograph (STE-1). It has been shown that the microplasma consists of two parts: fast front (peak) with τ≈100 ns and slow front (tail) with τ≈1μs durations. The detonation front speed is of the order of ≈10 5 cm s -1 and follows the temporal dependence of to t0.4. It depends on the composition of the surrounding gas and its pressure and could be connected with quick evaporation of the material investigated (peak) and optical breakdown of the ambient gaseous atmosphere (tail). From the delay in appearance of different characteristic spectral lines of the target material and its gaseous surrounding we have shown that the evolution of the microplasma involves evaporation and ionization of the atoms of the parent material followed by optical breakdown due to the incident and absorbed laser light, together with microplasma expansion.

  8. Spectral analysis of dike-induced earthquakes in Afar, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepp, Gabrielle; Ebinger, Cynthia J.; Yun, Sang-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Shallow dike intrusions may be accompanied by fault slip above the dikes, a superposition which complicates seismic and geodetic data analyses. The diverse volcano-tectonic and low-frequency local earthquakes accompanying the 2005-2010 large-volume dike intrusions in the Dabbahu-Manda Hararo rift (Afar), some with fault displacements of up to 3 m at the surface, provide an opportunity to examine the relations among the earthquakes, dike intrusions, and surface ruptures. We apply the frequency index (FI) method to characterize the spectra of swarm earthquakes from six of the dikes. These earthquakes often have broad spectra with multiple peaks, making the usual peak frequency classification method unreliable. Our results show a general bimodal character with high FI earthquakes associated with deeper dikes (top > 3 km subsurface) and low FI earthquakes associated with shallow dikes, indicating that shallow dikes result in earthquakes with more low-frequency content and larger-amplitude surface waves. Low FI earthquakes are more common during dike emplacement, suggesting that interactions between the dike and faults may lead to lower FI. Taken together, likely source processes for low FI earthquakes are shallow hypocenters (<3 km) possibly with surface rupture, slow rupture velocities, and interactions with dike fluids. Strong site effects also heavily influence the earthquake spectral content. Additionally, our results suggest a continuum of spectral responses, implying either that impulsive volcano-tectonic earthquakes and the unusual, emergent earthquakes have similar source processes or that simple spectral analyses, such as FI, cannot distinguish different source processes.

  9. Effects of polarization on laser-induced electron-ion recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, T.; Fogle, M.; Madzunkov, S.; Schuch, R.; Andler, G.; Justiniano, E.

    2011-03-15

    The polarization dependence of laser-induced radiative recombination (LIR) to D{sup +} ions was investigated in the electron cooler of the CRYRING storage ring. The LIR gain as a function of wavelength into n = 3 principal quantum states of deuterium was measured at laser beam polarization angles of 0 deg. and 90 deg. with respect to the direction of the motional electric field in the interaction region. For the case of the polarization vector parallel to the external field, there is a double-peak structure in the gain curve that indicates a polarization effect in the LIR process. The two polarization directions also reveal a different width for the respective gain curves, giving additional evidence for the polarization effect, clearly seen by the behavior of a defined polarization parameter. The obtained polarization effect indicates a high sensitivity in recombination processes to external fields.

  10. Digital dispersion compensation for ultrabroad-bandwidth single-camera spectral-domain polarization-sensitive OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenburg, Amy L.; Chhetri, Raghav K.

    2011-03-01

    Polarization-sensitive OCT is used to examine tissue microstructure by providing imaging of birefringent properties. Single-camera spectral-domain polarization-sensitive OCT has been of recent interest, whereby a custom spectrometer is employed to simultaneously measure orthogonal polarization states scattered from the sample. This avoids synchronization and triggering issues associated with multiple-camera setups. It also has the advantage that the optic axis can be extracted without polarization modulating the incident light. However, the disadvantage is that the line camera pixel-to-wavenumber nonlinearity requires either careful spectrometer alignment, or digital compensation. In fact, this problem is further exacerbated in high resolution PSOCT systems as they require compensation over larger bandwidths. Here we report the construction of an ultrabroad-bandwidth PSOCT system using a single camera spectrometer similar to Baumann et al. In order to enjoy the benefits of this instrument, we outline a method for digital dispersion compensation that removes the necessity for special camera alignment. We find that there are three non-negligible types of dispersion to consider: 1) the aforementioned camera pixel-to-wavenumber nonlinearity, 2) the refractive index dispersion in the sample itself, and 3) the dispersion imbalance between the arms of the OCT interferometer. The latter two were previously recognized for time-domain high-resolution OCT, where a digital dispersion compensation method was successfully employed to treat them both. For our SDOCT application, we find that dispersion types 1 and 2 have the same functional effect and can be combined into one compensation step, and as such, much of the previous compensation method can be used. However, we find that it is necessary to add two steps to the analysis technique whereby the relative scaling and positioning of the two polarization images is adjusted to align the scatterers. We also find that better results are achieved by fitting to larger polynomial orders. We show how our technique provides high-resolution PSOCT with precise alignment between the orthogonal polarization images.

  11. Method And Apparatus For Examining A Tissue Using The Spectral Wing Emission Therefrom Induced By Visible To Infrared Photoexcitation.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Demos, Stavros G.; Zhang, Gang

    2003-12-16

    Method and an apparatus for examining a tissue using the spectral wing emission therefrom induced by visible to infrared photoexcitation. In one aspect, the method is used to characterize the condition of a tissue sample and comprises the steps of (a) photoexciting the tissue sample with substantially monochromatic light having a wavelength of at least 600 nm; and (b) using the resultant far red and near infrared spectral wing emission (SW) emitted from the tissue sample to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In one embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a continuous beam of light, and the resultant steady-state far red and near infrared SW emission from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a light pulse, and the resultant time-resolved far red and near infrared SW emission emitted from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In still another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a polarized light pulse, and the parallel and perpendicular components of the resultant polarized time-resolved SW emission emitted from the tissue sample are used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample.

  12. Phase-resolved X-ray spectroscopy and spectral energy distribution of the X-ray soft polar RS Caeli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traulsen, I.; Reinsch, K.; Schwope, A. D.; Schwarz, R.; Walter, F. M.; Burwitz, V.

    2014-02-01

    Context. RS Cae is the third target in our series of XMM-Newton observations of soft X-ray-dominated polars. Aims: Our observational campaign aims to better understand and describe the multiwavelength data, the physical properties of the system components, and the short- and long-term behavior of the component fluxes in RS Cae. Methods: We employ stellar atmosphere, stratified accretion-column, and widely used X-ray spectral models. We fit the XMM-Newton spectra, model the multiband light curves, and opt for a mostly consistent description of the spectral energy distribution. Results: Our XMM-Newton data of RS Cae are clearly dominated by soft X-ray emission. The X-ray light curves are shaped by emission from the main accretion region, which is visible over the whole orbital cycle, interrupted only by a stream eclipse. The optical light curves are formed by cyclotron and stream emission. The XMM-Newton X-ray spectra comprise a black-body-like and a plasma component at mean temperatures of 36 eV and 7 keV. The spectral fits give evidence of a partially absorbing and a reflection component. Multitemperature models, covering a broader temperature range in the X-ray emitting accretion regions, reproduce the spectra appropriately well. Including archival data, we describe the spectral energy distribution with a combination of models based on a consistent set of parameters and derive a lower limit estimate of the distance d ≳ 750 pc. Conclusions: The high bolometric soft-to-hard flux ratios and short-term variability of the (X-ray) light curves are characteristic of inhomogeneous accretion. RS Cae clearly belongs in the group of polars that show a very strong soft X-ray flux compared to their hard X-ray flux. The different black-body fluxes and similar hard X-ray and optical fluxes during the XMM-Newton and ROSAT observations show that soft and hard X-ray emission are not directly correlated. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA.

  13. Polarization force-induced changes in the dust sheath formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayout, Saliha; Bentabet, Karima; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-09-01

    The modifications arising in the dusty plasma sheath structure due to the presence of polarization forces acting on the dust grains are investigated. The corresponding appropriate Bohm criterion for sheath formation is obtained. It is found that the critical Mach number, beyond which the dusty plasma electrostatic sheath sets in, decreases whenever the polarization effects become important. In addition, when the polarization force dominates over the electrical one, the dust plasma sheath cannot set in. This happens whenever the dust grain size exceeds a critical threshold. Moreover, the sheath electrostatic potential-gradient becomes abruptly steep, and the sheath thickness becomes broader as the polarization force effects strengthen.

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and spectral imaging analysisof human oocytes and first polar bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Weier, Jingly F.; Oter Renom, Maria; Zheng,Xuezhong; Colls, Pere; Nureddin, Aida; Pham, Chau D.; Chu, Lisa W.; Racowsky, Catherine; Munne, Santiago

    2004-10-06

    We investigated the frequencies of abnormalities involving either chromosome 1, 16, 18 or 21 in failed-fertilized human oocytes.While abnormalities involving chromosome 16 showed an age-dependant increase, results for the other chromosomes did not show statistically significant differences between the three age groups <35 yrs, 35-39 yrs, and >39 yrs. The scoring of four chromosomes is likely to underestimate the true rate of aneuploid cells. Thus, for a pilot study investigating a more comprehensive analysis of oocytes and their corresponding first polar bodies (1PBs), we developed a novel 8-probe chromosome enumeration scheme using FISH and SIm.

  15. The inference of vector magnetic fields from polarization measurements with limited spectral resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lites, B. W.; Skumanich, A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for recovery of the vector magnetic field and thermodynamic parameters from polarization measurement of photospheric line profiles measured with filtergraphs. The method includes magneto-optic effects and may be utilized on data sampled at arbitrary wavelengths within the line profile. The accuracy of this method is explored through inversion of synthetic Stokes profiles subjected to varying levels of random noise, instrumental wave-length resolution, and line profile sampling. The level of error introduced by the systematic effect of profile sampling over a finite fraction of the 5 minute oscillation cycle is also investigated. The results presented here are intended to guide instrumental design and observational procedure.

  16. Darkfield orthogonal polarized spectral imaging for studying endovascular laser-tissue interactions in vivo a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heger, Michal; Beek, Johan F.; Stenback, Karin; Faber, Dirk J.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Ince, Can

    2005-02-01

    Due to the limited number of suitable intravital microscopy techniques, relatively little is known about the opto-thermal (endo)vascular responses to selective photothermolysis, used as a default treatment modality for superficial vascular anomalies such as port wine stains, telangiectasias, and hemangiomas. In this preliminary study we present a novel microscopy technique for studying (endo)vascular laser-tissue interactions in vivo, in which conventional orthogonal polarized spectral (OPS) imaging is combined with darkfield (DF) illumination. DFOPS imaging of rat mesenteric vasculature irradiated at increasing powers revealed the following (tissular) responses: formation of translucent aggregates, retrograde flow, gradual and immediate hemostasis, reinstatement of flow, vessel disappearance, and perivascular collagen damage. DFOPS imaging therefore constitutes a useful tool for examining (endo)vascular events following selective photothermolysis.

  17. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han -Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-10-09

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. As a result, for circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response ismore » hardly sensitive to θ.« less

  18. Spatial variability of oceanic phycoerythrin spectral types derived from airborne laser-induced fluorescence emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wright, C. Wayne; Kana, Todd M.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.

    1998-07-01

    We report spatial variability of oceanic phycoerythrin spectral types detected by means of a blue spectral shift in airborne laser-induced fluorescence emission. The blue shift of the phycoerythrobilin fluorescence is known from laboratory studies to be induced by phycourobilin chromophore substitution at phycoerythrobilin chromophore sites in some strains of phycoerythrin-containing marine cyanobacteria. The airborne 532-nm laser-induced phycoerythrin fluorescence of the upper oceanic volume showed distinct segregation of cyanobacterial chromophore types in a flight transect from coastal water to the Sargasso Sea in the western North Atlantic. High phycourobilin levels were restricted to the oceanic (oligotrophic) end of the flight transect, in agreement with historical ship findings. These remotely observed phycoerythrin spectral fluorescence shifts have the potential to permit rapid, wide-area studies of the spatial variability of spectrally distinct cyanobacteria, especially across interfacial regions of coastal and oceanic water masses. Airborne laser-induced phytoplankton spectral fluorescence observations also further the development of satellite algorithms for passive detection of phytoplankton pigments. Optical modifications to the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar are briefly described that permitted observation of the fluorescence spectral shifts.

  19. Spatial variability of oceanic phycoerythrin spectral types derived from airborne laser-induced fluorescence emissions.

    PubMed

    Hoge, F E; Wright, C W; Kana, T M; Swift, R N; Yungel, J K

    1998-07-20

    We report spatial variability of oceanic phycoerythrin spectral types detected by means of a blue spectral shift in airborne laser-induced fluorescence emission. The blue shift of the phycoerythrobilin fluorescence is known from laboratory studies to be induced by phycourobilin chromophore substitution at phycoerythrobilin chromophore sites in some strains of phycoerythrin-containing marine cyanobacteria. The airborne 532-nm laser-induced phycoerythrin fluorescence of the upper oceanic volume showed distinct segregation of cyanobacterial chromophore types in a flight transect from coastal water to the Sargasso Sea in the western North Atlantic. High phycourobilin levels were restricted to the oceanic (oligotrophic) end of the flight transect, in agreement with historical ship findings. These remotely observed phycoerythrin spectral fluorescence shifts have the potential to permit rapid, wide-area studies of the spatial variability of spectrally distinct cyanobacteria, especially across interfacial regions of coastal and oceanic water masses. Airborne laser-induced phytoplankton spectral fluorescence observations also further the development of satellite algorithms for passive detection of phytoplankton pigments. Optical modifications to the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar are briefly described that permitted observation of the fluorescence spectral shifts. PMID:18285931

  20. Rebuilding cytoskeleton roads: Active-transport-induced polarization of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, R. J.; Bénichou, O.; Piel, M.; Voituriez, R.

    2009-10-01

    Many cellular processes require a polarization axis which generally initially emerges as an inhomogeneous distribution of molecular markers in the cell. We present a simple analytical model of a general mechanism of cell polarization taking into account the positive feedback due to the coupled dynamics of molecular markers and cytoskeleton filaments. We find that the geometry of the organization of cytoskeleton filaments, nucleated on the membrane (e.g., cortical actin) or from a center in the cytoplasm (e.g., microtubule asters), dictates whether the system is capable of spontaneous polarization or polarizes only in response to external asymmetric signals. Our model also captures the main features of recent experiments of cell polarization in two considerably different biological systems, namely, mating budding yeast and neuron growth cones.

  1. Behavior of tight-junction, adherens-junction and cell polarity proteins during HNF-4{alpha}-induced epithelial polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Satohisa, Seiro; Chiba, Hideki . E-mail: hidchiba@sapmed.ac.jp; Osanai, Makoto; Ohno, Shigeo; Kojima, Takashi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2005-10-15

    We previously reported that expression of tight-junction molecules occludin, claudin-6 and claudin-7, as well as establishment of epithelial polarity, was triggered in mouse F9 cells expressing hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4{alpha} [H. Chiba, T. Gotoh, T. Kojima, S. Satohisa, K. Kikuchi, M. Osanai, N. Sawada. Hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4{alpha} triggers formation of functional tight junctions and establishment of polarized epithelial morphology in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, Exp. Cell Res. 286 (2003) 288-297]. Using these cells, we examined in the present study behavior of tight-junction, adherens-junction and cell polarity proteins and elucidated the molecular mechanism behind HNF-4{alpha}-initiated junction formation and epithelial polarization. We herein show that not only ZO-1 and ZO-2, but also ZO-3, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-B, JAM-C and cell polarity proteins PAR-3, PAR-6 and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) accumulate at primordial adherens junctions in undifferentiated F9 cells. In contrast, CRB3, Pals1 and PATJ appeared to exhibit distinct subcellular localization in immature cells. Induced expression of HNF-4{alpha} led to translocation of these tight-junction and cell polarity proteins to beltlike tight junctions, where occludin, claudin-6 and claudin-7 were assembled, in differentiated cells. Interestingly, PAR-6, aPKC, CRB3 and Pals1, but not PAR-3 or PATJ, were also concentrated on the apical membranes in differentiated cells. These findings indicate that HNF-4{alpha} provokes not only expression of tight-junction adhesion molecules, but also modulation of subcellular distribution of junction and cell polarity proteins, resulting in junction formation and epithelial polarization.

  2. Femtosecond measurements of gas temperatures using Raman- induced polarization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Lukas Erwin

    1997-06-01

    Raman induced polarization spectroscopy (RIPS) is developed as a new technique for the analysis of reactive flow systems such as combustion. RIPS is a time-domain spectroscopy that may be used to measure temperature and concentration of chemical species with sub-picosecond resolution. After a brief overview of the RIPS process, an analytical expression for the signal is derived in the semi-classical limit to determine its temperature dependence. Spectra for nitrogen are presented that were recorded using an oven at temperatures up to 1320 K. Theoretical fits to the spectra are produced and used to extract rotational temperatures. The observed RIPS temperatures agree to within about 5% of values recorded by a thermocouple. Improvements to the current scheme are proposed for increasing the accuracy of the temperature measurements. A homebuilt femtosecond (fs) Ti:sapphire laser system is used to conduct the experiments and its design is discussed in detail. The laser produces 1.4 W of 800 nm output at 3.3 kHz. Pulse durations of 50 fs are obtained routinely. Femtosecond pulses are produced in a self- mode-locked oscillator and amplified using the chirped- pulse amplification technique. A regenerative amplifier is pumped by a homebuilt, intra-cavity doubled Nd:YAG laser that produces 20 W of 532 nm output at 3.3 kHz. Drawings and specifications of the oscillator, pulse stretcher, amplifier, pump laser, and pulse compressor are provided, in addition to the procedure followed to build and operate each of these units.

  3. Experimental demonstrations of dual polarization CO-OFDM using mid-span spectral inversion for nonlinearity compensation.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Monir; Du, Liang B; Foo, Benjamin; Pelusi, Mark D; Corcoran, Bill; Lowery, Arthur J

    2014-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate fiber nonlinearity compensation in dual polarization coherent optical OFDM (DP CO-OFDM) systems using mid-span spectral inversion (MSSI). We use third-order nonlinearity between a pump and the signal in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) for MSSI. Maximum launch powers at FEC threshold for two 10 × 80-km 16-QAM OFDM systems were increased by 6.4 dB at a 121-Gb/s data rate and 2.8 dB at 1.2 Tb/s. The experimental results are the first demonstration of using MSSI for nonlinearity compensation in any dual polarization coherent system. Simulations show that these increases could support a 22% increase in total transmission distance at 1.2-Tb/s system without increasing the number of inline amplifiers, by extending the fiber spans from 90 to 110 km. When spans of 80 km are used, simulations reveal that MSSI system performance shows less degradation with increasing transmission distance, and an overall transmission distance increase of more than 70% is expected using MSSI. PMID:24921747

  4. Adaptation of the University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar for Polarization and Multiple Scattering Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Piironen, P. K.

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative lidar measurements of aerosol scattering are hampered by the need for calibrations and the problem of correcting observed backscatter profiles for the effects of attenuation. The University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) addresses these problems by separating molecular scattering contributions from the aerosol scattering; the molecular scattering is then used as a calibration target that is available at each point in the observed profiles. While the HSRl approach has intrinsic advantages over competing techniques, realization of these advantages requires implementation of a technically demanding system which is potentially very sensitive to changes in temperature and mechanical alignments. This paper describes a new implementation of the HSRL in an instrumented van which allows measurements during field experiments. The HSRL was modified to measure depolarization. In addition, both the signal amplitude and depolarization variations with receiver field of view are simultaneously measured. This allows for discrimination of ice clouds from water clouds and observation of multiple scattering contributions to the lidar return.

  5. Electron impact polarization of atomic spectral lines. I - A general theoretical scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Degl'innocenti, Egidio L.

    1992-01-01

    A suitable theoretical scheme able to describe, in a wide variety of astrophysical situations, the phenomenon of atomic line polarization by electron impact is developed. Starting from the general principles of quantum mechanics and assuming the Born approximation, the rate equations for the density matrix elements of a multilevel atomic system, interacting with a nonrelativistic electron beam having any kind of angular distribution, are derived in full generality. The resulting theory generalizes the previous ones by accounting for the collisional rates and the cross sections concerning both inelastic and superelastic collisions (in any geometrical situation), and, moreover, by taking into account the coherences among Zeeman sublevels split by a magnetic field. As an example of particular relevance, the general formulas derived in the first sections of the paper are subsequently particularized to the case of the electric dipole interaction.

  6. Defect-Induced Changes in the Spectral Properties of HIGH-Tc Cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vobornik, I.; Berger, H.; Rullier-Albenque, F.; Margaritondo, G.; Pavuna, D.; Grioni, L. Forroand M.

    Superconductivity in high-Tc cuprates is particularly sensitive to disorder due to the unconventional d-wave pairing symmetry. We investigated effects of disorder on the spectral properties of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x high-Tc superconductor. We found that already small defect densities suppress the characteristic spectral signature of the superconducting state. The spectral line shape clearly reflects new excitations within the gap, as expected for defect-induced pair breaking. At the lowest defect concentrations the normal state remains unaffected, while increased disorder leads to suppression of the normal quasiparticle peaks.

  7. Polarization decay of pulses of electromagnetically induced transparency on J=0→J=1→J=2 degenerate quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshkov, O. M.

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of radiation under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency in the scheme of degenerate quantum transitions J = 0 → J = 1 → J = 2 in the pulsed interaction regime of the fields and with allowance for the Doppler broadening of spectral lines has been analyzed numerically. It has been shown that, if the input coupling radiation is linearly polarized, the circularly polarized input probe pulse splits in the medium into pulses with mutually perpendicular linear polarizations. The direction of polarization of one of these pulses coincides with the direction of polarization of the input coupling field. The distance that the probe pulse travels in the medium until it completely decays decreases with a decrease in both the duration of the input probe pulse and the intensity of the input coupling radiation. A change in the power of the input probe pulse hardly affects the distance required for the decay and the velocity of propagation of linearly polarized pulses in the medium. An increase in the Doppler broadening of spectral lines leads to a decrease in this distance and, simultaneously, to an increase in the energy losses of the probe radiation. Qualitative considerations that explain the physical reason for the investigated effects have been presented.

  8. Spectral albedo and emissivity of CO2 in Martian polar caps - Model results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Stephen G.; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Firestone, John F.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, a snow albedo model previously developed for terrestrial snow is extended to the case of CO2 snow on Mars. Pure CO2 snow is calculated to have high albedo at visible wavelengths but not as high as that of water snow. At any given wavelength, the primary variable controlling albedo and emissivity is the snow grain size, with albedo decreasing and emissivity increasing as grain size increases. Observations that red albedo is much higher than blue albedo in the Martian south polar cap indicates that the snow or the atmosphere is contaminated with red dust. The absorption coefficient of CO2 ice in the thermal infrared is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that measured for H2O ice. CO2 snow emissivity is therefore much lower than H2O snow, varying substantially with wavelength and quite sensitive to grain size and emission angle. Factors tending to increase emissivity are large grain size, small emission angle, and large concentrations of dust or water.

  9. Photometric and spectral studies of the eclipsing polar CRTS CSS081231 J071126+440405

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, N. V.; Gabdeev, M. M.; Shimansky, V. V.; Katysheva, N. A.; Kolbin, A. I.; Shugarov, S. Yu.; Goranskij, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of the study of the eclipsing polar CRTS CSS081231 J071126+440405. Photometric observations allowed us to refine the orbital period of the system P_ circ = 0_ \\cdot ^d 0.08137673. Considerable changes in the appearance of the object's spectra have occurred over the period of September 20-21, 2001: the slope of the continuum changed from "red" to "blue", and the variability of the line profiles over the duration of the orbital period has also changed. Doppler maps have shown a shift of the emission line-forming region along the accretion stream closer to the white dwarf. We measured the duration of the eclipse of the system and imposed constraints on the inclination angle 78_ \\cdot ^ circ 7 < i < 79_ \\cdot ^ circ 3. The derived radial velocity amplitude was used to obtain the basic parameters of the system: M 1 = 0.86 ± 0.08 M ⊙, M 2 = 0.18 ± 0.02 M ⊙, q = 0.21 ± 0.01, R L2 = 0.20 ± 0.03 R ⊙, A = 0.80 ± 0.03 R ⊙. The spectra of the object exhibit cyclotron harmonics. Their comparison with model spectra allowed us to determine the parameters of the accretion column: B = 31-34 MG, T e = 10-12 keV, θ = 80-90°, and Λ = 105.

  10. Multi-array borehole resistivity and induced polarization method with mathematical inversion of redundant data

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Stanley H.

    1989-01-01

    Multiple arrays of electric or magnetic transmitters and receivers are used in a borehole geophysical procedure to obtain a multiplicity of redundant data suitable for processing into a resistivity or induced polarization model of a subsurface region of the earth.

  11. The dependence of induced polarization on natural iron concentration in wetland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, L. D.; Mansoor, N.

    2006-12-01

    Spectral Induced polarization (SIP) measurements in the frequency range 0.1-1000 Hz were conducted on clay and peat marsh soils, obtained from a contaminated freshwater weltand in New Jersey, that were subsequently analyzed for heavy metal concentrations, moisture content, organic matter, porosity, specific surface area, and pore fluid conductivity. A Cole-Cole relaxation model was fit to each of the samples and the model parameters analyzed in terms of the measured physiochemical properties. A linear relationship between the normalized chargeability (mn) and the estimated surface area to pore volume (Sp) is found when the iron content (ranging from 0.25 to 1.63 percent by volume between samples) is accounted for as a polarizable element of the soil. In fact, the dependence of mn on volumetric Fe concentration per unit volume of the bulk soil is described by a linear relationship with a correlation coefficient of 0.94. As the Fe concentration of soils is a critical biogeochemical parameter, these results suggest that SIP measurements may provide a hitherto unrecognized approach to probing soil geochemistry, iron cycling and anaerobic microbial activity. Furthermore, our results yield new insight into the physiochemical controls on SIP in natural, unconsolidated soils.

  12. Spin polarization induced by an electric field in the presence of weak localization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerci, Daniele; Borge, Juan; Raimondi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the spin polarization (Edelstein or inverse spin galvanic effect) and the spin Hall current induced by an applied electric field by including the weak localization corrections for a two-dimensional electron gas. We show that the weak localization effects yield logarithmic corrections to both the spin polarization conductivity relating the spin polarization and the electric field and to the spin Hall angle relating the spin and charge currents. The renormalization of both the spin polarization conductivity and the spin Hall angle combine to produce a zero correction to the total spin Hall conductivity as required by an exact identity. Suggestions for the experimental observation of the effect are given.

  13. Shock-induced polarized hydrogen emission lines in omicron Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Lèbre, A.; Gillet, D.

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen emission lines in Mira variable stars are a well-known phenomenon whose origin has been established as related to the propagation of radiative hypersonic shock waves throughout the stellar atmosphere. A polarimetric observation by McLean and Coyne [1] made on omicron Ceti (the prototype of Mira variable stars) has revealed the existence of linear polarization signatures associated with Balmer emission lines. However, the polarizing mechanism has never been properly explained so far. The study presented here is the first of its kind since it displays the results of a spectropolarimetric survey of omicron Ceti in the Balmer lines. The survey was made with the NARVAL spectropolarimeter (Telescope Bernard Lyot, France) in full Stokes mode. We did not just confirm the appearance of this polarization but we also and above all showed the temporal variation of the linear polarization in the lines. We conclude that the polarizing mechanism is definitely intrinsic to the shock wave propagation throughout the stellar atmosphere of Mira and give some leads about the nature of this mechanism.

  14. Polarization-induced pn diodes in wide-band-gap nanowires with ultraviolet electroluminescence.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Santino D; Kent, Thomas F; Phillips, Patrick J; Mills, Michael J; Rajan, Siddharth; Myers, Roberto C

    2012-02-01

    Almost all electronic devices utilize a pn junction formed by random doping of donor and acceptor impurity atoms. We developed a fundamentally new type of pn junction not formed by impurity-doping, but rather by grading the composition of a semiconductor nanowire resulting in alternating p and n conducting regions due to polarization charge. By linearly grading AlGaN nanowires from 0% to 100% and back to 0% Al, we show the formation of a polarization-induced pn junction even in the absence of any impurity doping. Since electrons and holes are injected from AlN barriers into quantum disk active regions, graded nanowires allow deep ultraviolet LEDs across the AlGaN band-gap range with electroluminescence observed from 3.4 to 5 eV. Polarization-induced p-type conductivity in nanowires is shown to be possible even without supplemental acceptor doping, demonstrating the advantage of polarization engineering in nanowires compared with planar films and providing a strategy for improving conductivity in wide-band-gap semiconductors. As polarization charge is uniform within each unit cell, polarization-induced conductivity without impurity doping provides a solution to the problem of conductivity uniformity in nanowires and nanoelectronics and opens a new field of polarization engineering in nanostructures that may be applied to other polar semiconductors. PMID:22268600

  15. Imprint Control of BaTiO3 Thin Films via Chemically Induced Surface Polarization Pinning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungwoo; Kim, Tae Heon; Patzner, Jacob J; Lu, Haidong; Lee, Jung-Woo; Zhou, Hua; Chang, Wansoo; Mahanthappa, Mahesh K; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Gruverman, Alexei; Eom, Chang-Beom

    2016-04-13

    Surface-adsorbed polar molecules can significantly alter the ferroelectric properties of oxide thin films. Thus, fundamental understanding and controlling the effect of surface adsorbates are crucial for the implementation of ferroelectric thin film devices, such as ferroelectric tunnel junctions. Herein, we report an imprint control of BaTiO3 (BTO) thin films by chemically induced surface polarization pinning in the top few atomic layers of the water-exposed BTO films. Our studies based on synchrotron X-ray scattering and coherent Bragg rod analysis demonstrate that the chemically induced surface polarization is not switchable but reduces the polarization imprint and improves the bistability of ferroelectric phase in BTO tunnel junctions. We conclude that the chemical treatment of ferroelectric thin films with polar molecules may serve as a simple yet powerful strategy to enhance functional properties of ferroelectric tunnel junctions for their practical applications. PMID:26901570

  16. Polarization-induced Zener tunnel junctions in wide-band-gap heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Simon, John; Zhang, Ze; Goodman, Kevin; Xing, Huili; Kosel, Thomas; Fay, Patrick; Jena, Debdeep

    2009-07-10

    The large electronic polarization in III-V nitrides allows for novel physics not possible in other semiconductor families. In this work, interband Zener tunneling in wide-band-gap GaN heterojunctions is demonstrated by using polarization-induced electric fields. The resulting tunnel diodes are more conductive under reverse bias, which has applications for zero-bias rectification and mm-wave imaging. Since interband tunneling is traditionally prohibitive in wide-band-gap semiconductors, these polarization-induced structures and their variants can enable a number of devices such as multijunction solar cells that can operate under elevated temperatures and high fields. PMID:19659229

  17. Nonvolatile data storage using mechanical force-induced polarization switching in ferroelectric polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Tang, Xin; Chen, Xiang-Zhong; Chen, Yu-Lei; Guo, Xu; Ge, Hai-Xiong; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric polymers offer the promise of low-cost and flexible electronic products. They are attractive for information storage due to their spontaneous polarization which is usually switched by electric field. Here, we demonstrate that electrical signals can be readily written on ultra-thin ferroelectric polymer films by strain gradient-induced polarization switching (flexoelectric effect). A force with magnitude as small as 64nN is enough to induce highly localized (40 nm feature size) change in the polarization states. The methodology is capable of realizing nonvolatile memory devices with miniaturized cell size and storage density of tens to hundreds Gbit per square inch.

  18. Nonvolatile data storage using mechanical force-induced polarization switching in ferroelectric polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xin; Tang, Xin; Chen, Xiang-Zhong; Chen, Yu-Lei; Shen, Qun-Dong; Guo, Xu; Ge, Hai-Xiong

    2015-01-26

    Ferroelectric polymers offer the promise of low-cost and flexible electronic products. They are attractive for information storage due to their spontaneous polarization which is usually switched by electric field. Here, we demonstrate that electrical signals can be readily written on ultra-thin ferroelectric polymer films by strain gradient-induced polarization switching (flexoelectric effect). A force with magnitude as small as 64nN is enough to induce highly localized (40 nm feature size) change in the polarization states. The methodology is capable of realizing nonvolatile memory devices with miniaturized cell size and storage density of tens to hundreds Gbit per square inch.

  19. Spectrally Consistent Scattering, Absorption, and Polarization Properties of Atmospheric Ice Crystals at Wavelengths from 0.2 to 100 um

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ping; Bi, Lei; Baum, Bryan A.; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Kattawar, George W.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Cole, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    A data library is developed containing the scattering, absorption, and polarization properties of ice particles in the spectral range from 0.2 to 100 microns. The properties are computed based on a combination of the Amsterdam discrete dipole approximation (ADDA), the T-matrix method, and the improved geometric optics method (IGOM). The electromagnetic edge effect is incorporated into the extinction and absorption efficiencies computed from the IGOM. A full set of single-scattering properties is provided by considering three-dimensional random orientations for 11 ice crystal habits: droxtals, prolate spheroids, oblate spheroids, solid and hollow columns, compact aggregates composed of eight solid columns, hexagonal plates, small spatial aggregates composed of 5 plates, large spatial aggregates composed of 10 plates, and solid and hollow bullet rosettes. The maximum dimension of each habit ranges from 2 to 10,000 microns in 189 discrete sizes. For each ice crystal habit, three surface roughness conditions (i.e., smooth, moderately roughened, and severely roughened) are considered to account for the surface texture of large particles in the IGOM applicable domain. The data library contains the extinction efficiency, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, six independent nonzero elements of the phase matrix (P11, P12, P22, P33, P43, and P44), particle projected area, and particle volume to provide the basic single-scattering properties for remote sensing applications and radiative transfer simulations involving ice clouds. Furthermore, a comparison of satellite observations and theoretical simulations for the polarization characteristics of ice clouds demonstrates that ice cloud optical models assuming severely roughened ice crystals significantly outperform their counterparts assuming smooth ice crystals.

  20. Current-induced spin polarization in transition metals and Bi/Ag bilayers observed by spin-polarized positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongjun; Yamamoto, Shunya; Fukaya, Yuki; Maekawa, Masaki; Li, Hui; Kawasuso, Atsuo; Seki, Takeshi; Saitoh, Eiji; Takanashi, Koki; JAEA Team; Tohoku Team

    2015-03-01

    Current-induced spin polarization (CISP) on the outermost surfaces of Au, Cu, Pt, Pd, Ta, and W films were studied by spin-polarized positron beam (SPPB). The Au and Cu surfaces showed no significant CISP. In contrast, the Pt, Pd, Ta, and W films exhibited large CISP (3 ~ 15% per charge current of 105 A/cm2) and the CISP of Ta and W were opposite to those of Pt and Pd. The sign of the CISP obeys the same rule in spin Hall effect suggesting that the spin-orbit coupling is mainly responsible for the CISP. The outermost spin poalrization of Bi/Ag/Al2O3andAg/Bi/Al2O3 (charge currents directly connected to Ag layers) were probed by SPPB. The opposite outermost spin polarization of Bi/Ag/Al2O3andAg/Bi/Al2O3 clarified the charge-to-spin conversion in Bi/Ag bilayers. Nevertheless, the magnitudes of the outermost spin polarization of Bi(0.3 ~5)/Ag(25)/Al2O3 (numbers in parentheses denote thickness in nm) and Ag(25 ~500)/Bi(8)/Al2O3 decrease exponentially with increasing Bi thickness and Ag thickness, respectively. This provides probably the first direct evidence for spin diffusion mechanism. Financial support from JSPS Kakenhi Grant 24310072.

  1. Leptonic and Hadronic Modeling of Fermi-Detected Blazars. Spectral Energy Distribution Modeling and High-Energy Polarization Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Markus; Reimer, Anita; Zhang, Haocheng

    2013-12-01

    We describe new implementations of leptonic and hadronic models for the broadband emission from relativistic jets in AGN in a temporary steady state. The new model implementations are used to fit snap-shot spectral energy distributions of a representative set of Fermi-LAT detected blazars from the first LAT AGN catalogue. We find that the leptonic model is capable of producing acceptable fits to the SEDs of almost all blazars with reasonable parameters close to equipartition between the magnetic field and the relativistic electron population. If charge neutrality in leptonic models is provided by cold protons, our fits indicate that the kinetic energy carried by the jet should be dominated by protons. We also find satisfactory representations of the snapshot SEDs of most blazars in our sample with the hadronic model presented here. All of our hadronic model fits require powers in relativistic protons in the range 1047 - 1049 erg/s. As a potential way to distinguish between the leptonic and hadronic high-energy emission models considered here, we suggest diagnostics based on the predicted X-ray and γ-ray polarization, which are drastically different for the two types of models.

  2. Continental lithospheric thickness and deglaciation induced true polar wander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, W. R.; Wu, P.

    1983-03-01

    Geophysical data are presented which strongly suggest a continental lithospheric thickness in excess of 250 km. The data are based on the polar motion record collected by the International Latitude Service since 1900. It is found that the dominant oscillatory signal produced by the 7 year beat between the 14 month Chandler wobble and the 12 month annual wobble is superimposed upon a secular drift which analysis shows corresponds to a polar wander speed of approximately 0.95 degrees/10 to the 6th years with the vector directed towards the centroid of the ancient Laurentide ice sheet. It is determined that this secular drift can be understood as a consequence of the rotational forcing due to deglaciation and that in order to fit the observed drift speed and direction a continental lithospheric thickness somewhat in excess of 250 km is required.

  3. Enhancement of self-phase modulation induced spectral broadening in silicon suspended membrane waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaojing; Cheng, Zhenzhou; Liu, Linghai; Zhu, Bingqing; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhou, Wen; Wu, Xinru; Tsang, Hon Ki

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally observed a possibly enhanced self-phase modulation (SPM) in silicon suspended membrane waveguides (SMWs) by measuring the spectral broadening of optical pulses. The nonlinear coefficient n 2 and the two-photon absorption coefficient β 2 of silicon SMWs were measured to be (4.6 ± 0.9) × 10-18 m2 W-1 and 0.46 cm GW-1 at 1555 nm wavelength. We also proposed a method of using SPM-induced spectral broadening to obtain the coupling loss of a single grating coupler and experimentally compared the spectra of two grating couplers in silicon SMWs and in silicon-on-insulator waveguides.

  4. Interference of spin states in resonant photoemission induced by circularly polarized light from magnetized Gd

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, N.; Khalil, T.; Pohl, M.; Uphues, T.; Heinzmann, U.; Polcik, M.; Rader, O.; Heigl, F.; Starke, K.; Fritzsche, S.; Kabachnik, N. M.

    2006-10-15

    We have observed the spin-state interference by measuring the photoelectron spin polarization in the resonant preedge 4d{yields}4f photoemission from magnetized Gd. The photoemission is induced by circularly polarized light which determines one preferential direction of electron spin orientation due to polarization transfer and spin-orbit interaction. Another direction perpendicular to the first one is determined by the target electron spin orientation connected with the target magnetization. We have measured the component of spin polarization perpendicular to those two directions which can only appear due to spin-state interference which implies coherence of the spin states produced by the two mechanisms of the photoelectron spin polarization.

  5. Chemically induced dynamic electron polarization generated through the interaction between singlet molecular oxygen and nitroxide radicals.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Claudia G; Jockusch, Steffen; Ruzzi, Marco; Sartori, Elena; Moscatelli, Alberto; Turro, Nicholas J; Buchachenko, Anatoly L

    2005-11-17

    An absorptive chemically induced dynamic electron polarization (CIDEP) was generated by the quenching of singlet oxygen by nitroxide radicals (TEMPO derivatives). The spin polarization decay time of the nitroxide (measured by time-resolved EPR) correlates with the lifetime of singlet oxygen (measured by singlet oxygen phosphorescence spectroscopy). In addition, a deuterium isotope effect on the spin polarization decay time was observed, a signature of singlet oxygen involvement. With use of isotope labeled nitroxides (15N, 14N), the relative spin polarization efficiencies of TEMPO, 4-oxo-TEMPO, and 4-hydroxy-TEMPO by singlet oxygen were determined. The relative spin polarization efficiencies (per quenching event) decrease in the order 4-hydroxy-TEMPO > TEMPO > 4-oxo-TEMPO, whereas an opposite trend was observed for the total quenching rate constants of singlet oxygen by the nitroxides where the order is 4-hydroxy-TEMPO < TEMPO < 4-oxo-TEMPO. PMID:16833314

  6. Passive polarization agile antenna based on the electromagnetically induced transparency-like effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lei; Meng, Fan-Yi; Wu, Qun; Dong, Liang; Chen, Wan; Fu, Jia-Hui

    2014-10-01

    We propose a design method for a passive polarization agile antenna based on the electromagnetically induced transparency-like (EIT-like) effect. Benefiting from strong dispersion properties governed by EIT-like effects, the proposed structure can endow electromagnetic waves transmitted through it with quite different polarization states at very close frequencies. The experimental measurement was conducted to demonstrate agile polarization controls by placing a designed EIT-like waveplate in front of a standard microwave horn antenna. Results show that the polarization state of radiated waves by the horn antenna with a waveplate can be easily transformed among linear, circular and elliptical polarizations through fine-tuning the operating frequency, which is extremely important for certain special applications, e.g. electronic countermeasures. Our scheme could also be utilized at higher operating frequencies by the simply scaling principle.

  7. Nonlocal effects on the polarization state of a photon, induced by distant absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryff, Luis Carlos B.

    1994-01-01

    A variant of a Franson's two-photon correlation experiment is discussed, in which the linear polarization state of one of the photons depends on the path followed in the interferometer. It is shown that although the path difference is greater than the coherence length, the photon can be found in a polarization state represented by the superposition of the polarization states associated to the paths when there is coincident detection. Since the photons, produced via parametric down-conversion, are fairly well localized in space and time, the situation in which one of the photons is detected before the other can reach the interferometer raises an intriguing point: it seems that in some cases the second photon would have to be described by two wave packets simultaneously. Unlike previous experiments, in which nonlocal effects were induced by means of polarizers of phase shifters, in the proposed experiment nonlocal effects can be induced by means of variable absorbers.

  8. The application of induced polarization techniques to detect metal-bearing offshore anthropogenic waste and unexploded ordnance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeff; Roberts, William

    2009-01-01

    Raw sewage and industrial waste have been dumped into sensitive estuaries, bays, and sounds for centuries. The full extents of the resulting sludge deposits are largely unknown, because they move in response to tidal and long‐shore currents, and because they are often buried by younger inert sediments. USGS field and laboratory measurements of toxic mine waste and organic effluent samples suggest that anthropogenic wastes typically contain finely‐divided metal and metal‐sulfide particles. The anoxic environment provided by anthropogenic wastes promotes the growth of anaerobic bacteria, creating a self‐reducing environment. We suggest that the finely‐divided metal and metal‐sulfide particles are the products of bacterial reduction and precipitation. The fine‐grained metallic precipitates are ideal targets for a surface‐effect electrochemical detection methodology called Induced Polarization (IP). A USGS‐patented (1998/2001) marine IP streamer technology has recently been commercialized and used to map “black smoker” sulfide deposits and their disseminated halos in the Bismarck Sea (2005), and titanium‐sand deposits offshore of South Africa (2007). The marine induced polarization system can do this mapping in three dimensions, more rapidly (it is towed at 3 knots), and with far higher resolution that land‐based measurements or vibracoring. Laboratory‐scale studies at the USGS suggest that anthropogenic wastes may display a specific multi‐frequency IP spectral signature that may be applicable to waste‐deposit mapping.

  9. Femtosecond Raman induced polarization spectroscopy studies of coherent rotational dynamics in molecular fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Morgen, M M

    1997-05-01

    We develop a polarization-sensitive femtosecond pump probe technique, Raman induced polarization spectroscopy (RIPS), to study coherent rotation in molecular fluids. By observing the collisional dephasing of the coherently prepared rotational states, we are able to extract information concerning the effects of molecular interactions on the rotational motion. The technique is quite sensitive because of the zero background detection method, and is also versatile due to its nonresonant nature.

  10. Shock-Induced Polarized Hydrogen Emission Lines in Omicron Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Lèbre, A.; Gillet, D.

    2011-04-01

    We have performed a spectropolarimetric survey of the variable Mira star omicron Ceti along three pulsation cycles. We present those new data collected with the Narval instrument mounted on the Telescope Bernard Lyot (TBL) in Pic du Midi, France. We have detected time variable polarimetric signatures (on QUV Stokes spectra) associated with Balmer hydrogen emission lines supposed to be formed behind the front of a shock wave propagating throughout the stellar atmosphere. We associate the linear polarization of Balmer emission lines in Mira stars to the presence and the structure of the radiative shock wave.

  11. Shock induced polarized hydrogen emission lines in omicron Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Lèbre, A.; Gillet, D.

    2010-12-01

    We have performed a spectropolarimetric survey of the variable Mira star omicron Ceti along three pulsation cycles. We present those new data collected with the Narval instrument mounted on the Télescope Bernard Lyot in Pic du Midi, France. We have detected time variable polarimetric signatures (on QUV Stokes spectra) associated with Balmer hydrogen emission lines supposed to be formed behind the front of a shock wave propagating throughout the stellar atmosphere. We associate the linear polarization of Balmer emission lines in Mira stars to the presence and the structure of the radiative shock wave.

  12. Shock-Induced Polarized Hydrogen Emission Lines in omicron Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lèbre, A.; Fabas, N.; Gillet, D.

    2011-12-01

    We have performed a spectropolarimetric survey of the variable Mira star omicron Ceti along three pulsation cycles. We present those new data collected with the Narval instrument mounted on the Telescope Bernard Lyot (TBL) in Pic du Midi, France. We have detected time variable polarimetric signatures (on QUV Stokes spectra) associated with Balmer hydrogen emission lines supposed to be formed behind the front of a shock wave propagating throughout the stellar atmosphere. We associate the linear polarization of Balmer emission lines in Mira stars to the presence and the structure of the radiative shock wave.

  13. In-Plane Electric Polarization of Bilayer Graphene Nanoribbons Induced by an Interlayer Bias Voltage.

    PubMed

    Okugawa, Ryo; Tanaka, Junya; Koretsune, Takashi; Saito, Susumu; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-10-01

    We theoretically show that an interlayer bias voltage in the AB-stacked bilayer graphene nanoribbons with armchair edges induces an electric polarization along the ribbon. Both tight-binding and ab initio calculations consistently indicate that when the bias voltage is weak, the polarization shows opposite signs depending on the ribbon width modulo three. This nontrivial dependence is explained using a two-band effective model. A strong limit of the bias voltage in the tight-binding model shows either one-third or zero polarization, which agrees with the topological argument. PMID:26550741

  14. Polarization induced resistance switching effect in ferroelectric vinylidene-fluoride/trifluoroethylene copolymer ultrathin films

    SciTech Connect

    Usui, S. Nakajima, T.; Hashizume, Y.; Okamura, S.

    2014-10-20

    We observed a clear polarization reversal-induced resistance switching effect in ferroelectric Vinylidene-fluoride (VDF)/Trifluoroethylene (TrFE) copolymer thin films. Pt and Au were used as the bottom and top electrodes, respectively, and the thickness of the VDF/TrFE copolymer film was adjusted to be 10 nm. The conduction current was 100 times higher in the case of the spontaneous polarization of the VDF/TrFE film towards the Au electrode than that in the case of the opposite direction. This resistance switching was confirmed to be reproducible after 10 successive polarization reversals.

  15. Observation of linear-polarization-sensitivity in the microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, R. G.; Ramanayaka, A. N.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    We examine the linear polarization sensitivity of the radiation- induced magneto-resistance oscillations by investigating the effect of rotating in-situ the electric field of linearly polarized microwaves relative to the current, in the GaAs/AlGaAs system. We find that the frequency and the phase of the photo-excited magneto-resistance oscillations are insensitive to the polarization. On the other hand, the amplitude of the resistance oscillations are strongly sensitive to the relative orientation between the microwave antenna and the current-axis in the specimen.

  16. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  17. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N2) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  18. Modulated nematic structures induced by chirality and steric polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longa, Lech; PajÄ k, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    What kind of one-dimensional modulated nematic structures (ODMNS) can form nonchiral and chiral bent-core and dimeric materials? Here, using the Landau-de Gennes theory of nematics, extended to account for molecular steric polarization, we study a possibility of formation of ODMNS, both in nonchiral and intrinsically chiral liquid crystalline materials. Besides nematic and cholesteric phases, we find four bulk ODMNS for nonchiral materials, two of which, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported so far. These two structures are longitudinal (NLP) and transverse (NTP) periodic waves where the polarization field being periodic in one dimension stays parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the wave vector. The other two phases are the twist-bend nematic phase (NTB) and the splay-bend nematic phase (NSB), but their fine structure appears more complex than that considered so far. The presence of molecular chirality converts nonchiral NTP and NSB into new NTB phases. Surprisingly, the nonchiral NLP phase can stay stable even in the presence of intrinsic chirality.

  19. Oxidized LDL/CD36 interaction induces loss of cell polarity and inhibits macrophage locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Mi; Drazba, Judith A.; Vasanji, Amit; Egelhoff, Thomas; Febbraio, Maria; Silverstein, Roy L.

    2012-01-01

    Cell polarization is essential for migration and the exploratory function of leukocytes. However, the mechanism by which cells maintain polarity or how cells revert to the immobilized state by gaining cellular symmetry is not clear. Previously we showed that interaction between oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and CD36 inhibits macrophage migration; in the current study we tested the hypothesis that oxLDL/CD36-induced inhibition of migration is the result of intracellular signals that regulate cell polarity. Live cell imaging of macrophages showed that oxLDL actuated retraction of macrophage front end lamellipodia and induced loss of cell polarity. Cd36 null and macrophages null for Vav, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), did not show this effect. These findings were caused by Rac-mediated inhibition of nonmuscle myosin II, a cell polarity determinant. OxLDL induced dephosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) by increasing the activity of Rac. Six-thioguanine triphosphate (6-thio-GTP), which inhibits Vav-mediated activation of Rac, abrogated the effect of oxLDL. Activation of the Vav-Rac-myosin II pathway by oxidant stress may induce trapping of macrophages at sites of chronic inflammation such as atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:22718904

  20. Oxidized LDL/CD36 interaction induces loss of cell polarity and inhibits macrophage locomotion.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Mi; Drazba, Judith A; Vasanji, Amit; Egelhoff, Thomas; Febbraio, Maria; Silverstein, Roy L

    2012-08-01

    Cell polarization is essential for migration and the exploratory function of leukocytes. However, the mechanism by which cells maintain polarity or how cells revert to the immobilized state by gaining cellular symmetry is not clear. Previously we showed that interaction between oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and CD36 inhibits macrophage migration; in the current study we tested the hypothesis that oxLDL/CD36-induced inhibition of migration is the result of intracellular signals that regulate cell polarity. Live cell imaging of macrophages showed that oxLDL actuated retraction of macrophage front end lamellipodia and induced loss of cell polarity. Cd36 null and macrophages null for Vav, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), did not show this effect. These findings were caused by Rac-mediated inhibition of nonmuscle myosin II, a cell polarity determinant. OxLDL induced dephosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) by increasing the activity of Rac. Six-thioguanine triphosphate (6-thio-GTP), which inhibits Vav-mediated activation of Rac, abrogated the effect of oxLDL. Activation of the Vav-Rac-myosin II pathway by oxidant stress may induce trapping of macrophages at sites of chronic inflammation such as atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:22718904

  1. Spin Manipulation in Graphene by Chemically Induced Pseudospin Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tuan, Dinh; Roche, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Spin manipulation is one of the most critical challenges to realize spin-based logic devices and spintronic circuits. Graphene has been heralded as an ideal material to achieve spin manipulation, but so far new paradigms and demonstrators are limited. Here we show that certain impurities such as fluorine adatoms, which locally break sublattice symmetry without the formation of strong magnetic moment, could result in a remarkable variability of spin transport characteristics. The impurity resonance level is found to be associated with a long-range sublattice pseudospin polarization, which by locally decoupling spin and pseudospin dynamics provokes a huge spin lifetime electron-hole asymmetry. In the dilute impurity limit, spin lifetimes could be tuned electrostatically from 100 ps to several nanoseconds, providing a protocol to chemically engineer an unprecedented spin device functionality.

  2. Induced spin polarization effect in graphene by ferromagnetic nanocontact

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Sumit; Saha, Shyamal K.

    2015-03-07

    Chemically synthesized graphene contains large number of defects which act as localized spin moments at the defect sites. Cobalt nanosheets of variable thickness are grown on graphene surface to investigate spin/magnetotransport through graphene sheets containing large number of localized spins. Negative magnetoresistance (MR) is observed over the entire temperature range (5–300 K) for thin cobalt sheets, while a cross-over from negative to positive MR with increasing temperature is noticed for thicker cobalt sheets. The observed MR results are explained on the basis of recently reported spin polarization effect in graphene due to the presence of ferromagnetic atoms on the surface considering a spin valve like Co/graphene/Co nanostructures.

  3. Spin Manipulation in Graphene by Chemically Induced Pseudospin Polarization.

    PubMed

    Van Tuan, Dinh; Roche, Stephan

    2016-03-11

    Spin manipulation is one of the most critical challenges to realize spin-based logic devices and spintronic circuits. Graphene has been heralded as an ideal material to achieve spin manipulation, but so far new paradigms and demonstrators are limited. Here we show that certain impurities such as fluorine adatoms, which locally break sublattice symmetry without the formation of strong magnetic moment, could result in a remarkable variability of spin transport characteristics. The impurity resonance level is found to be associated with a long-range sublattice pseudospin polarization, which by locally decoupling spin and pseudospin dynamics provokes a huge spin lifetime electron-hole asymmetry. In the dilute impurity limit, spin lifetimes could be tuned electrostatically from 100 ps to several nanoseconds, providing a protocol to chemically engineer an unprecedented spin device functionality. PMID:27015500

  4. Polarization, temporal, and spectral parameters of solar flare hard X-rays as measured by the SPR-N instrument onboard the CORONAS-F satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitnik, I. A.; Logachev, Yu. I.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Denisov, Yu. I.; Kavanosyan, S. S.; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Morozov, O. V.; Myagkova, I. N.; Svertilov, S. I.; Ignat'ev, A. P.; Oparin, S. N.; Pertsov, A. A.; Tindo, I. P.

    2006-03-01

    The SPR-N polarimeter onboard the CORONAS-F satellite allows the X-ray polarization degree to be measured in energy ranges of 20 40, 40 60, and 60 100 keV. To measure the polarization, the method based on the Thompson scattering of solar X-ray photons in beryllium plates was used; the scattered photons were detected with a system of six CsI(Na) scintillation sensors. During the observation period from August 2001 to January 2005, the SPR-N instrument detected the hard X-rays of more than 90 solar flares. The October 29, 2003, event showed a significant polarization degree exceeding 70% in channels of E = 40 60 and 60 100 keV and about 50% in the 20-to 40-keV channel. The time profile of the polarization degree and the projection of the polarization plane onto the solar disk were determined. For 25 events, the upper limits of the part of polarized X-rays were estimated at 8 to 40%. For all the flares detected, time profiles (with a resolution of up to 4 s), hard X-ray radiation fluxes, and spectral index estimates were obtained.

  5. Contact-induced spin polarization in BNNT(CNT)/TM (TM=Co, Ni) nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzubov, Alexander A.; Kovaleva, Evgenia A. Avramov, Paul; Kuklin, Artem V.; Mikhaleva, Natalya S.; Tomilin, Felix N.; Sakai, Seiji; Entani, Shiro; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Naramoto, Hiroshi

    2014-08-28

    The interaction between carbon and BN nanotubes (NT) and transition metal Co and Ni supports was studied using electronic structure calculations. Several configurations of interfaces were considered, and the most stable ones were used for electronic structure analysis. All NT/Co interfaces were found to be more energetically favorable than NT/Ni, and conductive carbon nanotubes demonstrate slightly stronger bonding than semiconducting ones. The presence of contact-induced spin polarization was established for all nanocomposites. It was found that the contact-induced polarization of BNNT leads to the appearance of local conductivity in the vicinity of the interface while the rest of the nanotube lattice remains to be insulating.

  6. Spectrally resolved optical probing of laser induced magnetization dynamics in bismuth iron garnet.

    PubMed

    Koene, Benny; Deb, Marwan; Popova, Elena; Keller, Niels; Rasing, Theo; Kirilyuk, Andrei

    2016-07-13

    The spectrally resolved magnetization dynamics in bismuth iron garnet shows a fluence dependent light induced modification of the magneto-optical Faraday spectrum. It is demonstrated that the relative contributions from the tetrahedral and octahedral iron sites to the Faraday spectrum change due to the impact of the pump pulse. This change explains the observed deviation from a linear dependence of the amplitude of the oscillations on the fluence, as expected for the inverse Faraday effect. PMID:27213266

  7. Rho1-Wnd signaling regulates loss-of-cell polarity-induced cell invasion in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Chen, Y; Zhang, S; Xu, W; Shao, Y; Yang, Y; Li, W; Li, M; Xue, L

    2016-02-18

    Both cell polarity and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity are essential to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis, and disruption of either is commonly seen in cancer progression. Despite the established connection between loss-of-cell polarity and JNK activation, much less is known about the molecular mechanism by which aberrant cell polarity induces JNK-mediated cell migration and tumor invasion. Here we show results from a genetic screen using an in vivo invasion model via knocking down cell polarity gene in Drosophila wing discs, and identify Rho1-Wnd signaling as an important molecular link that mediates loss-of-cell polarity-triggered JNK activation and cell invasion. We show that Wallenda (Wnd), a protein kinase of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase family, by forming a complex with the GTPase Rho1, is both necessary and sufficient for Rho1-induced JNK-dependent cell invasion, MMP1 activation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, Wnd promotes cell proliferation and tissue growth through wingless production when apoptosis is inhibited by p35. Finally, Wnd shows oncogenic cooperation with Ras(V12) to trigger tumor growth in eye discs and causes invasion into the ventral nerve cord. Together, our data not only provides a novel mechanistic insight on how cell polarity loss contributes to cell invasion, but also highlights the value of the Drosophila model system to explore human cancer biology. PMID:25961917

  8. Dynamics of microvortices induced by ion concentration polarization.

    PubMed

    de Valença, Joeri C; Wagterveld, R Martijn; Lammertink, Rob G H; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the coupled dynamics of the local hydrodynamics and global electric response of an electrodialysis system, which consists of an electrolyte solution adjacent to a charge selective membrane under electric forcing. Under a dc electric current, counterions transport through the charged membrane while the passage of co-ions is restricted, thereby developing ion concentration polarization (ICP) or gradients. At sufficiently large currents, simultaneous measurements of voltage drop and flow field reveal several distinct dynamic regimes. Initially, the electrodialysis system displays a steady Ohmic voltage difference (ΔV_{ohm}), followed by a constant voltage jump (ΔV_{c}). Immediately after this voltage increase, microvortices set in and grow both in size and speed with time. After this growth, the resultant voltage levels off around a fixed value. The average vortex size and speed stabilize as well, while the individual vortices become unsteady and dynamic. These quantitative results reveal that microvortices set in with an excess voltage drop (above ΔV_{ohm}+ΔV_{c}) and sustain an approximately constant electrical conductivity, destroying the initial ICP with significantly low viscous dissipation. PMID:26465416

  9. Dynamics of microvortices induced by ion concentration polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Valença, Joeri C.; Wagterveld, R. Martijn; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the coupled dynamics of the local hydrodynamics and global electric response of an electrodialysis system, which consists of an electrolyte solution adjacent to a charge selective membrane under electric forcing. Under a dc electric current, counterions transport through the charged membrane while the passage of co-ions is restricted, thereby developing ion concentration polarization (ICP) or gradients. At sufficiently large currents, simultaneous measurements of voltage drop and flow field reveal several distinct dynamic regimes. Initially, the electrodialysis system displays a steady Ohmic voltage difference (Δ Vohm ), followed by a constant voltage jump (Δ Vc) . Immediately after this voltage increase, microvortices set in and grow both in size and speed with time. After this growth, the resultant voltage levels off around a fixed value. The average vortex size and speed stabilize as well, while the individual vortices become unsteady and dynamic. These quantitative results reveal that microvortices set in with an excess voltage drop (above Δ Vohm+Δ Vc ) and sustain an approximately constant electrical conductivity, destroying the initial ICP with significantly low viscous dissipation.

  10. Strain-gradient-induced polarization in SrTiO3 single crystals.

    PubMed

    Zubko, P; Catalan, G; Buckley, A; Welche, P R L; Scott, J F

    2007-10-19

    Piezoelectricity is inherent only in noncentrosymmetric materials, but a piezoelectric response can also be obtained in centrosymmetric crystals if subjected to inhomogeneous deformation. This phenomenon, known as flexoelectricity, can significantly affect the functional properties of insulators, particularly thin films of high permittivity materials. We have measured strain-gradient-induced polarization in single crystals of paraelectric SrTiO3 as a function of temperature and orientation down to and below the 105 K phase transition. Estimates were obtained for all the components of the flexoelectric tensor, and calculations based on these indicate that local polarization around defects in SrTiO3 may exceed the largest ferroelectric polarizations. A sign reversal of the flexoelectric response detected below the phase transition suggests that the ferroelastic domain walls of SrTiO3 may be polar. PMID:17995293

  11. Spin-transfer torque and current-induced switching in metallic spin valves with perpendicular polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baláž, Pavel; Zwierzycki, Maciej; Barnaś, Józef

    2013-09-01

    We present a theoretical description of spin-transfer torque in a spin valve with perpendicularly magnetized polarizer. The polarizer consisting of several ultrathin layers is considered as a single interfacial magnetic scatterer between two nonmagnetic layers, and is included in the theory based on diffusive transport via appropriate boundary conditions. The model has been used to study systematically the spin-transfer torque and current-induced switching in a spin valve with both perpendicular and in-plane polarizers and with in-plane magnetized free layer. The wave-function matching ab initio calculations have been used to determine transport parameters of the perpendicular polarizer. Additionally, the effect of disorder on the spin-transfer torque has been examined.

  12. Symmetry breaking and electrical frustration during tip-induced polarization switching in the non-polar cut of lithium niobate single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ievlev, Anton; Alikin, Denis O; Morozovska, A. N.; Varenyk, O. V.; Eliseev, E. A.; Kholkin, Andrei; Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    Polarization switching in ferroelectric materials is governed by a delicate interplay between bulk polarization dynamics and screening processes at surfaces and domain walls. Here we explore the mechanism of tip-induced polarization switching in the non-polar cuts of uniaxial ferroelectrics. In this case, in-plane component of polarization vector switches, allowing for detailed observations of resultant domain morphologies. We observe surprising variability of resultant domain morphologies stemming from fundamental instability of formed charged domain wall and associated electric frustration. In particular, we demonstrate that controlling vertical tip position allows the polarity of the switching to be controlled. This represents very unusual form of symmetry breaking where mechanical motion in vertical direction controls the lateral domain growth. The implication of these studies for ferroelectric devices and domain wall electronics are discussed.

  13. Symmetry breaking and electrical frustration during tip-induced polarization switching in the non-polar cut of lithium niobate single crystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ievlev, Anton; Alikin, Denis O; Morozovska, A. N.; Varenyk, O. V.; Eliseev, E. A.; Kholkin, Andrei; Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    Polarization switching in ferroelectric materials is governed by a delicate interplay between bulk polarization dynamics and screening processes at surfaces and domain walls. Here we explore the mechanism of tip-induced polarization switching in the non-polar cuts of uniaxial ferroelectrics. In this case, in-plane component of polarization vector switches, allowing for detailed observations of resultant domain morphologies. We observe surprising variability of resultant domain morphologies stemming from fundamental instability of formed charged domain wall and associated electric frustration. In particular, we demonstrate that controlling vertical tip position allows the polarity of the switching to be controlled. This represents very unusual formmore » of symmetry breaking where mechanical motion in vertical direction controls the lateral domain growth. The implication of these studies for ferroelectric devices and domain wall electronics are discussed.« less

  14. Novel function of the cell adhesion molecule uvomorulin as an inducer of cell surface polarity.

    PubMed

    McNeill, H; Ozawa, M; Kemler, R; Nelson, W J

    1990-07-27

    Na+,K(+)-ATPase has distinctly different distributions in mesenchymal cells, where it has an unrestricted distribution over the entire cell surface, compared with polarized epithelial cells, where it is restricted to the basal-lateral membrane domain. The generation of this restricted distribution is important in mesenchyme to epithelia conversion in development and the function of transporting epithelia, but the mechanisms involved are unknown. Here we show that expression of the epithelial CAM uvomorulin in transfected fibroblasts is sufficient to induce a redistribution of Na+,K(+)-ATPase to sites of uvomorulin-mediated cell-cell contacts, similar to that in polarized epithelial cells. This restricted distribution of Na+,K(+)-ATPase occurs in the absence of tight junctions but coincides with the reorganization of the membrane cytoskeleton. The results indicate a direct role for CAMs as inducers of cell surface polarity of selective cytoplasmic and membrane proteins. PMID:2164888

  15. Blue-light-induced PIN3 polarization for root negative phototropic response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun-Xiao; Xu, Heng-Hao; Yuan, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Liang; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2013-10-01

    Root negative phototropism is an important response in plants. Although blue light is known to mediate this response, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying root negative phototropism remain unclear. Here, we report that the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) 3 is involved in asymmetric auxin distribution and root negative phototropism. Unilateral blue-light illumination polarized PIN3 to the outer lateral membrane of columella cells at the illuminated root side, and increased auxin activity at the illuminated side of roots, where auxin promotes growth and causes roots bending away from the light source. Furthermore, root negative phototropic response and blue-light-induced PIN3 polarization were modulated by a brefeldin A-sensitive, GNOM-dependent, trafficking pathway and by phot1-regulated PINOID (PID)/PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A (PP2A) activity. Our results indicate that blue-light-induced PIN3 polarization is needed for asymmetric auxin distribution during root negative phototropic response. PMID:23888933

  16. MAPPING INDUCED POLARIZATION WITH NATURAL ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS FOR EXPLORATION AND RESOURCES CHARACTERIZATION BY THE MINING INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Nichols

    2002-01-15

    The objectives of this project is to demonstrate the use of a new geophysical system to collect economically competitive induced polarization (IP) data using natural electromagnetic (EM) field as a source. The proposed technology uses naturally-existing EM fields, which provides greater depth of exploration and significant economic, energy, environmental and safety benefits.

  17. Multi-array borehole resistivity and induced polarization method with mathematical inversion of redundant data

    DOEpatents

    Ward, S.H.

    1989-10-17

    Multiple arrays of electric or magnetic transmitters and receivers are used in a borehole geophysical procedure to obtain a multiplicity of redundant data suitable for processing into a resistivity or induced polarization model of a subsurface region of the earth. 30 figs.

  18. Selection of Spectral Data for Classification of Steels Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Haiyang; Sun, Lanxiang; Hu, Jingtao; Xin, Yong; Cong, Zhibo

    2015-11-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) combined with artificial neural networks was used to classify the spectra of 27 steel samples acquired using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Three methods of spectral data selection, selecting all the peak lines of the spectra, selecting intensive spectral partitions and the whole spectra, were utilized to compare the influence of different inputs of PCA on the classification of steels. Three intensive partitions were selected based on experience and prior knowledge to compare the classification, as the partitions can obtain the best results compared to all peak lines and the whole spectra. We also used two test data sets, mean spectra after being averaged and raw spectra without any pretreatment, to verify the results of the classification. The results of this comprehensive comparison show that a back propagation network trained using the principal components of appropriate, carefully selected spectral partitions can obtain the best results. A perfect result with 100% classification accuracy can be achieved using the intensive spectral partitions ranging of 357-367 nm. supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (863 Program) (No. 2012AA040608), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61473279, 61004131) and the Development of Scientific Research Equipment Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. YZ201247)

  19. [Laser induced breakdown spectra of coal sample and self-absorption of the spectral line].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-yin; Ji, Hui; Jin, Yi-dong

    2014-12-01

    The LIBS of one kind of household fuel coal was obtained with the first harmonic output 532 nm of an Nd·YAG laser as radiation source. With the assignment of the spectral lines, it was found that besides the elements C, Si, Mg, Fe, Al, Ca, Ti, Na and K, which are reported to be contained in coal, the presented sample also contains trace elements, such as Cd, Co, Hf, Ir, Li, Mn, Ni, Rb, Sr, V, W, Zn, Zr etc, but the spectral lines corresponding to O and H elements did not appear in the spectra. This is owing to the facts that the transition probability of H and O atoms is small and the energy of the upper level for transition is higher. The results of measurement also show that the intensity of spectral line increases with the laser pulse energy and self-absorption of the spectral lines K766.493 nm and K769.921 nm will appear to some extent. Increasing laser energy further will make self-absorption more obvious. The presence of self-absorption can be attributed to two factors. One is the higher transition rate of K atoms, and the other is that the increase in laser intensity induces the enhancement of the particle number density in the plasma. PMID:25881446

  20. [The current development of laser-induced plasma spectral analysis technique].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Jin-Zhong; Guo, Qing-Lin; Huai, Su-Fang; Wei, Yan-Hong

    2008-03-01

    In the present paper, the productions by applying laser-induced plasma spectral analysis technique in different research fields were summarized. Many examples of the application based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) methods were introduced, including the substance composition and correlative characteristics of the solid samples (e.g. metal alloy, soil, concrete, mineral, fossil, medicine etc.), liquid samples (e.g. solution, pure water, liquid jets etc.), and gaseous samples (e.g. air, pure gas, vapor and aerosol etc.). Some other investigations and applications were also included. The factors, which influence the detection capability, were discussed. Laser wavelength, pulse energy, power density, environmental atmosphere, external electric field, carbon layer on sample surface, sample material characteristic, and so on all have effects on the precision and the limit of detection. Finally, a simple introduction of the improvements in experimental equipment and methods was also covered. The development of laser-induced plasma spectral analysis technique creates favorable conditions, such as convenience and shortcut, for many science and application researches. It plays an important role in the progress in science and technology. PMID:18536436

  1. Spectral Enhancement of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Gao, Xun; Li, Qi; Song, Chao; Lin, Jingquan

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the spectral enhancement of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for copper plasma in the presence of a magnetic field is investigated and the temporal- and spatial-resolved plasma emission spectra are analyzed. Experimental results show that the copper plasma atomic and ion spectra have been enhanced in the presence of the external magnetic field. In addition, the Cu I 521.82 nm spectral intensity evolution with delay time appears to have a double peak around the delay time of 2 μs, but that of Cu II 507.57 nm has a sharp decrease because of the electron-atom three body recombination process. The plasma temperature with magnetic confinement is lower than that of the case in the absence of magnetic fields. Finally, the spectral enhancement mechanisms of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with magnetic confinement are analyzed. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61178022), the Natural Science Foundation of Jilin Province, China (No. 201215132) and the Doctoral Program of High Education of China (No. 20112216120006)

  2. Polarization-Induced Charge Distribution at Homogeneous Zincblende/Wurtzite Heterostructural Junctions in ZnSe Nanobelts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Jin, L.; Wang, J.; Smith, D. J.; Yin, W. J.; Yan, Y.; Sang, H.; Choy, W. C. H.; McCartney, M. R.

    2012-03-08

    Homogeneous heterostructural wurtzite (WZ)/zincblende (ZB) junctions are successfully fabricated in ZnSe nanobelts. Polarity continuity across the ZB/WZ interface is demonstrated. The saw-tooth-like potential profile induced by spontaneous polarization across the WZ/ZB/WZ interfaces is identified directly at the nanoscale. The polarization-induced charge distribution across the homogeneous heterostructural interfaces is proposed as a viable alternative approach towards charge tailoring in semiconductor nanostructures.

  3. Polarization and spectral properties of ion-implanted and oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, M. Yasin A.; Cao, Yang; Cooper, Guthrie H.; Aldwayyan, Abdullah; Wang, Charlie X.

    2002-03-01

    We conduct a comparative study of polarization properties of vertical-cavity surface- emitting lasers (VCSELs) from various sources, fabricated either by ion implantation or by the oxide-confinement method. An integrated test bench (ITB) for photonic devices is used to characterize the VCSELs. The ITB setup enabled simultaneous monitoring of the polarization state, transverse modes, wavelength spectrum, and optical power of the VCSELs under test. VCSELs commonly exhibit polarization noise, switching, and instability. The polarization behavior and related modal properties of various VCSELs are investigated based on aperture size, geometry, and fabrication processes. From the cw and pulsed pumping data, a general trend and inherent behavior is identified and polarization-related limitations are discussed.

  4. Spectral Broadening of Excitation induced by Ultralong-range Interaction in a Cold Gas of Rydberg Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Loboda, A. V.; Mischenko, E. V.; Gurnitskaya, E. P.; Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O. Yu.

    2008-10-22

    Preliminary results of calculating the broadening of spectral lines of excited atoms induced by ultralong- range (100 Bohr radii) interactions in a cold gas of Rb atoms within the 'own pressure' approximation and perturbation theory formalism are presented.

  5. Tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in ferroelectric amino acid glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyedhosseini, E.; Bdikin, I.; Ivanov, M.; Vasileva, D.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Rodriguez, B. J.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2015-08-01

    Bioorganic ferroelectrics and piezoelectrics are becoming increasingly important in view of their intrinsic compatibility with biological environment and biofunctionality combined with strong piezoelectric effect and a switchable polarization at room temperature. Here, we study tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in the smallest amino acid β-glycine, representing a broad class of non-centrosymmetric amino acids. We show that β-glycine is indeed a room-temperature ferroelectric and polarization can be switched by applying a bias to non-polar cuts via a conducting tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). Dynamics of these in-plane domains is studied as a function of an applied voltage and pulse duration. The domain shape is dictated by polarization screening at the domain boundaries and mediated by growth defects. Thermodynamic theory is applied to explain the domain propagation induced by the AFM tip. Our findings suggest that the properties of β-glycine are controlled by the charged domain walls which in turn can be manipulated by an external bias.

  6. A wound-induced Wnt expression program controls planarian regeneration polarity.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Christian P; Reddien, Peter W

    2009-10-01

    Regeneration requires specification of the identity of new tissues to be made. Whether this process relies only on intrinsic regulative properties of regenerating tissues or whether wound signaling provides input into tissue repatterning is not known. The head-versus-tail regeneration polarity decision in planarians, which requires Wnt signaling, provides a paradigm to study the process of tissue identity specification during regeneration. The Smed-wntP-1 gene is required for regeneration polarity and is expressed at the posterior pole of intact animals. Surprisingly, wntP-1 was expressed at both anterior- and posterior-facing wounds rapidly after wounding. wntP-1 expression was induced by all types of wounds examined, regardless of whether wounding prompted tail regeneration. Regeneration polarity was found to require new expression of wntP-1. Inhibition of the wntP-2 gene enhanced the polarity phenotype due to wntP-1 inhibition, with new expression of wntP-2 in regeneration occurring subsequent to expression of wntP-1 and localized only to posterior-facing wounds. New expression of wntP-2 required wound-induced wntP-1. Finally, wntP-1 and wntP-2 expression changes occurred even in the absence of neoblast stem cells, which are required for regeneration, suggesting that the role of these genes in polarity is independent of and instructive for tail formation. These data indicate that wound-induced input is involved in resetting the normal polarized features of the body axis during regeneration. PMID:19805089

  7. Second generation hybrid polar compounds are potent inducers of transformed cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Richon, V M; Webb, Y; Merger, R; Sheppard, T; Jursic, B; Ngo, L; Civoli, F; Breslow, R; Rifkind, R A; Marks, P A

    1996-01-01

    Hybrid polar compounds, of which hexamethylenebisacetamide (HMBA) is the prototype, are potent inducers of differentiation of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells and a wide variety of other transformed cells. HMBA has been shown to induce differentiation of neoplastic cells in patients, but is not an adequate therapeutic agent because of dose-limiting toxicity. We report on a group of three potent second generation hybrid polar compounds, diethyl bis-(pentamethylene-N,N-dimethylcarboxamide) malonate (EMBA), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), and m-carboxycinnamic acid bis-hydroxamide (CBHA) with optimal concentrations for inducing MEL cells of 0.4 mM, 2 microM, and 4 microM, respectively, compared to 5 mM for HMBA. All three agents induce accumulation of underphosphorylated pRB; increased levels of p2l protein, a prolongation of the initial G1 phase of the cell cycle; and accumulation of hemoglobin. However, based upon their effective concentrations, the cross-resistance or sensitivity of an HMBA-resistant MEL cell variant, and differences in c-myb expression during induction, these differentiation-inducing hybrid polar compounds can be grouped into two subsets, HMBA/EMBA and SAHA/CBHA. This classification may prove of value in selecting and planning prospective preclinical and clinical studies toward the treatment of cancer by differentiation therapy. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8650156

  8. Collision-induced Magnetic Reconnection and a Unified Interpretation of Polarization Properties of GRBs and Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei; Zhang, Haocheng; Zhang, Bing; Li, Hui

    2016-04-01

    The jet composition and energy dissipation mechanism of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and blazars are fundamental questions that remain not fully understood. One plausible model is to interpret the γ-ray emission of GRBs and optical emission of blazars as synchrotron radiation of electrons accelerated from the collision-induced magnetic dissipation regions in Poynting-flux-dominated jets. The polarization observation is an important and independent information to test this model. Based on our recent 3D relativistic MHD simulations of collision-induced magnetic dissipation of magnetically dominated blobs, here we perform calculations of the polarization properties of the emission in the dissipation region and apply the results to model the polarization observational data of GRB prompt emission and blazar optical emission. We show that the same numerical model with different input parameters can reproduce well the observational data of both GRBs and blazars, especially the 90° polarization angle (PA) change in GRB 100826A and the 180° PA swing in blazar 3C279. This supports a unified model for GRB and blazar jets, suggesting that collision-induced magnetic reconnection is a common physical mechanism to power the relativistic jet emission from events with very different black hole masses.

  9. Kondo-induced electric polarization modulated by magnetic flux through a triangular triple quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, M.; Matsumoto, M.; Kusunose, H.

    2015-03-01

    The Kondo effect plays an important role in emergence of electric polarization in a triangular triple-quantum-dot system, where one of the three dots is point-contacted with a single lead, and a magnetic flux penetrates through the triangular loop. The Kondo-induced electric polarization exhibits an Aharonov-Bohm type oscillation as a function of the magnetic flux. Our theoretical study shows various oscillation patterns associated with the field-dependent mixing of twofold orbitally degenerate ground states and their sensitivity to the point contact.

  10. Polar and nonpolar orderings in the electrically induced isotropic-nematic phase transition.

    PubMed

    Gu, Mingxia; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2008-10-01

    We study the dynamics of the isotropic-nematic phase transition caused by an applied electric field at the time scales of dielectric relaxation. In the classic Landau-Khalatnikov theory of the phase transition dynamics, the nematic (nonpolar) order parameter is an instantaneous function of the applied field. We demonstrate that, when the field is changing faster than the time of dielectric relaxation, the induced polar order dynamics influences the dynamics of the nonpolar order parameter. We develop a model based on the Langevin equation to describe the simultaneous dynamics of both polar and nonpolar order parameters; the model is supported by experiment. PMID:18999370

  11. Polarization-induced noise in a fiber-optic Michelson interferometer with Faraday rotator mirror elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. A.; Santos, J. L.; Farahi, F.

    1995-10-01

    Faraday rotator mirror elements have been used in a number of applications as compensators for induced birefringence in retracing paths. In interferometric systems, such as the fiber-optic Michelson interferometer, this approach proved to be useful in providing maximum fringe visibility and insensitivity to the polarization state of light injected into the interferometer. However, it is found that, when the characteristics of the fiber coupler depend on the polarization state of the input beam, the efficiency of the Faraday mirror elements is limited. Theoretical analysis and experimental results in support of this statement are presented.

  12. RATAN-600 radio telescope in the 24th solar-activity cycle. II. Multi-octave spectral and polarization high-resolution solar research system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogod, V. M.; Alesin, A. M.; Pervakov, A. A.

    2011-04-01

    Radio astronomy studies of the solar atmosphere possess a very important, not duplicated by other methods, place in the study of solar activity at all stages - from the birth of an active region until its collapse. A significant progress in these studies can be achieved in the implementation of new technical possibilities, such as an increase in the sensitivity of radio telescopes, a detailed spectral analysis over a wide frequency range, high temporal resolution and a broad coverage range in time. We report about the implementation of regular observations with a new spectral and polarization high-resolution system SPHRS, installed at the radio telescope RATAN-600.We describe the concept of the new system and the methods of its implementation.

  13. Spectral analysis of photo-induced delayed luminescence from human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumeci, Francesco; Lanzanò, Luca; Privitera, Simona; Tudisco, Salvatore; Scordino, Agata

    2007-07-01

    The UVA induced Delayed Luminescence (DL), has been measured in vivo in the forearm skin of some healthy volunteers of different sex and age during several periods of the year. An innovative instrument able to detect, in single photon counting mode, the spectrum and the time trend of the DL emission has been used. The measured differences in the time trends of the spectral components may be related to the sex and the age. The potential development of a new analysis technique based on this phenomenon is discussed.

  14. Dual-band wavelength tunable nonlinear polarization rotation mode-locked Erbium-doped fiber lasers induced by birefringence variation and gain curvature alteration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng-Fong; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2014-09-01

    With the combining effects of the fiber birefringence induced round-trip phase variation and the gain profile reshaping induced spectral filtering in the Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) cavity, the mechanism corresponding to the central wavelength tunability of the EDFL passively mode-locked by nonlinear polarization rotation is explored. Bending the intracavity fiber induces the refractive index difference between orthogonal axes, which enables the dual-band central wavelength shift of 2.9 nm at 1570 nm region and up to 10.2 nm at 1600 nm region. The difference between the wavelength shifts at two bands is attributed to the gain dispersion decided by the gain spectral curvature of the EDFA, and the spacing between two switchable bands is provided by the birefringence induced variation on phase delay which causes transmittance variation. In addition, the central wavelength shift can also be controlled by varying the pumping geometry. At 1570 nm regime, an offset of up to 5.9 nm between the central wavelengths obtained under solely forward or backward pumping condition is observed, whereas the bidirectional pumping scheme effectively compensates the gain spectral reshaping effects to minimize the central wavelength shift. In contrast, the wavelength offset shrinks to only 1.1 nm when mode-locking at 1600 nm under single-sided pumping, as the gain profile strongly depends on the spatial distribution of the excited erbium ions under different pumping schemes. Except the birefringence variation and the gain spectral filtering phenomena, the gain-saturation mechanism induced refractive index change and its influence to the dual-band central wavelength tunability are also observed and analyzed. PMID:25321587

  15. Modeling and inversion Matlab algorithms for resistivity, induced polarization and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoulis, M.; Revil, A.; Minsley, B. J.; Werkema, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    M. Karaoulis (1), D.D. Werkema (3), A. Revil (1,2), A., B. Minsley (4), (1) Colorado School of Mines, Dept. of Geophysics, Golden, CO, USA. (2) ISTerre, CNRS, UMR 5559, Université de Savoie, Equipe Volcan, Le Bourget du Lac, France. (3) U.S. EPA, ORD, NERL, ESD, CMB, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA . (4) USGS, Federal Center, Lakewood, 10, 80225-0046, CO. Abstract We propose 2D and 3D forward modeling and inversion package for DC resistivity, time domain induced polarization (IP), frequency-domain IP, and seismic refraction data. For the resistivity and IP case, discretization is based on rectangular cells, where each cell has as unknown resistivity in the case of DC modelling, resistivity and chargeability in the time domain IP modelling, and complex resistivity in the spectral IP modelling. The governing partial-differential equations are solved with the finite element method, which can be applied to both real and complex variables that are solved for. For the seismic case, forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wavepaths are materialized by Fresnel volumes rather than by conventional rays. This approach accounts for complicated velocity models and is advantageous because it considers frequency effects on the velocity resolution. The inversion can accommodate data at a single time step, or as a time-lapse dataset if the geophysical data are gathered for monitoring purposes. The aim of time-lapse inversion is to find the change in the velocities or resistivities of each model cell as a function of time. Different time-lapse algorithms can be applied such as independent inversion, difference inversion, 4D inversion, and 4D active time constraint inversion. The forward algorithms are benchmarked against analytical solutions and inversion results are compared with existing ones. The algorithms are packaged as Matlab codes with a simple Graphical User Interface. Although the code is parallelized for multi-core cpus, it is not as fast as machine code. In the case of large datasets, someone should consider transferring parts of the code to C or Fortran through mex files. This code is available through EPA's website on the following link http://www.epa.gov/esd/cmb/GeophysicsWebsite/index.html Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  16. Spectral and polarization properties of a ‘cholesteric liquid crystal—phase plate—metal’ structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrov, S. Ya; Pyatnov, M. V.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the localized surface modes in a structure consisting of the cholesteric liquid crystal layer, a phase plate, and a metal layer. These modes are analogous to the optical Tamm states. The nonreciprocal transmission of polarized light propagating in the forward and backward directions is established. It is demonstrated that the transmission spectrum can be controlled by external fields acting on the cholesteric liquid crystal and by varying the plane of polarization of the incident light.

  17. Polarization and collision-induced coherence in the beam-foil light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Bashkin, S.; Church, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Monatomic systems were excited by the beam-foil method in order to re-examine the possibility that a particular magnetic substate was preferentially populated. O II, Ar II and He I levels were used. The results reveal that: (1) with a tilted foil substantial polarization (up to 15%) may be achieved, (2) the polarization is due to the foil, (3) the foil induces coherence among Zeeman substates with the appearance of quantum beats among these substates and that their coherence is due to the externally applied magnetic field perpendicular to the beam direction, and (4) the angular momentum of the emitted photon is perpendicular to the ion velocity. The possibility for detecting separate effects of alignment and polarization is noted.

  18. Thickness and Temperature effect on tip induced polarization switching of Ni substituted PZT Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Shalini; Pradhan, Dhiren; Vasudevan, Rama; Strelcove, Eveghni; Ortega, Nora; Kumar, Ashok; Kalinin, Sergei; Katiyar, Ram

    Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is one of the most popular techniques used for the complex investigations of the ferroelectric materials, allowing visualization of the static ferroelectric domain structures. Substitution of Ni in B site of PZT has been chosen for the present study to reduce the optical band gap for phototovoltaic applications. Here we experimentally studied the effect of thickness and temperature on tip induced polarization reversal of Ni doped PZT thin films by band excitation PFM. The out of field and in field band excitation polarization spectroscopy along with poling experiment conclusively confirm the existence of ferroelectricity down to 5 nm. The decrease of piezoresponse is observed with increase of temperature. The ferroelectric phase transition is also probed by the temperature dependence of piezoresponse studies. Detailed studies on effect of thickness and temperature on coercive field, imprint, switchable polarization, nucleation bias of PZTNi30 will be discussed in the meeting.

  19. Electric polarization induced by the inverse DM interactions in canted antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Nobuo; Miyahara, Shin

    We investigate electric polarizations induced by antisymmetric spin pairs Si ×Sj on distorted lattices through the inverse Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya (DM) interaction. From an extended Hubbard model, We microscopically derive a generic form of the electric polarization, p = d& circ; (Si ×Sj) , with a tensor d& circ;. This includes components of the electric polarization other than those given by the Katsura-Nagaosa-Balatsky formula p ~eij × (Si ×Sj) . Our results indicate that various magnetic structures, such as canted antiferromagnetic as well as proper screw spin structures, show multiferroic properties owing to these non-Katsura-Nagaosa-Balatsky components of the coupling. We also discuss possible novel multiferroic behaviours through these couplings in various compounds.

  20. Surface polar states and pyroelectricity in ferroelastics induced by flexo-roto fields

    SciTech Connect

    Morozovska, A. N.; Eliseev, E. A.; Kalinin, Sergei V; Chen, L. Q.; Gopalana, V.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical analysis based on the Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory is used to show that the joint action of flexoelectric effect and rotostriction leads to a large spontaneous in-plane polarization (1-5 lC/cm2) and pyroelectric coefficient (103 C/m2K) in the vicinity of surfaces of otherwise non-ferroelectric ferroelastics, such as SrTiO3, with static octahedral rotations. The origin of the improper polarization and pyroelectricity is an electric field we name flexo-roto field whose strength is proportional to the convolution of the flexoelectric and rotostriction tensors with octahedral tilts and their gradients. Flexo-roto field should exist at surfaces and interfaces in all structures with static octahedral rotations, and thus, it can induce surface polar states and pyroelectricity in a large class of otherwise nonpolar materials. VC 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3701152

  1. Surface polar states and pyroelectricity in ferroelastics induced by flexo-roto field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozovska, A. N.; Eliseev, E. A.; Kalinin, S. V.; Qing Chen, Long; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2012-04-01

    Theoretical analysis based on the Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory is used to show that the joint action of flexoelectric effect and rotostriction leads to a large spontaneous in-plane polarization (˜1-5 μC/cm2) and pyroelectric coefficient (˜10-3 C/m2K) in the vicinity of surfaces of otherwise non-ferroelectric ferroelastics, such as SrTiO3, with static octahedral rotations. The origin of the improper polarization and pyroelectricity is an electric field we name flexo-roto field whose strength is proportional to the convolution of the flexoelectric and rotostriction tensors with octahedral tilts and their gradients. Flexo-roto field should exist at surfaces and interfaces in all structures with static octahedral rotations, and thus, it can induce surface polar states and pyroelectricity in a large class of otherwise nonpolar materials.

  2. Design and building of new spin polarized Positron Annihilation Induced Auger Electron Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Zheng Hui; Mishler, Michael; Joglekar, Prasad; Shastry, Karthik; Koymen, Ali; Sharma, Suresh; Weiss, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    We propose to develop a next generation high flux variable energy spin-polarized position beam facility for materials studies. This new system will have a higher efficiency than our current system, and it will also be the first in the world to combine spin polarization with a time of flight Positron Annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES). The spin polarized positrons are electromagnetically guided towards the sample with an axial magnetic field and perpendicular electric fields. These incident positrons get annihilated at the surface of the sample creating two gamma rays and auger electrons via Auger transitions. These signals are useful in characterizing material surface, surface magnetization, and energy sharing in valence band. This new spectrometer, which is currently under construction, will be a next generation positron system. NSF.

  3. Energy band engineering using polarization induced interface charges in MOCVD grown III-nitride heterojunction devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    Characteristics of III-nitride based heterojunction devices are greatly influenced by the presence of high density of polarization induced interface charges. Research undertaken in the current doctoral thesis demonstrates the effect of presence of one, three and six sheets of polarization induced charges in three different III-nitride based devices, namely in a photocathode, a high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) and a hyperspectral detector structure. Through a systematic set of experiments and theoretical modeling an in-depth study of the interaction between multiple sheets of polarization induced charges and their impact on energy band profile was undertaken. Various device designs were studied and optimized using device simulations. Subsequently device structures were grown using metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Growth conditions for III-nitride epilayers were optimized for pressure, temperature and V/III ratio. Devices were fabricated using photolithography and e-beam evaporation. Novel GaN and GaN/AlGaN photocathode structures were developed. First demonstration of effective negative electron affinity (ENEA) in a GaN photocathode without the use of Cs was made. Effect of polarization induced surface charges on photoemission characteristics was successfully explained using simulated energy band diagrams. AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN/SiO2 based back barrier HEMT structures were developed in which bandgap, thin film thicknesses and polarization induced charge density were engineered to demonstrate Normally OFF operation along with the ability to engineer turn ON voltage of the device. Further, AlGaN based tunable hyperspectral detector pixel with 6-heterojunctions, for application in wavelength spectrometry from UV to IR part of the spectrum, was developed. The novel device design used in the hyperspectral detector utilized voltage tunable internal photoemission (IPE) barriers to measure the energy of the incident photon. Detailed IPE measurements were performed on the device structures to distinguish between the hot electron and hot hole photoemission events, originating in both the semiconductor and the metal contact. Presence of high polarization induced electric fields was observed to result in counter intuitive device characteristics that were successfully explained by developing a systematic set of device structures and corresponding simulated energy band diagrams. Voltage controlled emission threshold variation from 3.9 eV to 4.5 eV was successfully demonstrated.

  4. Photo-induced Nanopattern Formation on Polarity Patterned Lithium Niobate with ZnO-Modified Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpuneet; Wang, Xingye; Eller, Brianna; Nemanich, Robert

    2015-03-01

    This research is focused on modifying the surface of polarity patterned lithium niobate (PPLN) templates with ultra thin layers of ZnO. Photo-induced nanopattern formation is employed to discern the effects of thin ZnO on PPLN. The spontaneous polarization of ZnO is intended to be used to enhance the photo-induced transport of electrons to the surface to reduce Ag + to Ag nanoparticles. The ZnO thin films were deposited by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) at 150 C with 0.2 nm/cycle. Photo-induced Ag nanopatterns were deposited on bare PPLN and 1, 2, 3 and 10 nm ZnO-PPLN heterostructures, immersed on an aqueous AgNO3 solution and illumination with 254 nm UV light. The photo-induced deposition of 1nm ZnO/PPLN results in enhanced Ag nanoparticle formation at domain boundaries. The positive domain selectivity is not observed on 2nm ZnO/PPLN templates, and the deposition becomes the same on both domains. The nanoparticle patterns were not evident for ZnO films thicker than 3nm. The amorphous structure of thick ZnO on PPLN tends to reduce the effect of the ZnO polarization. The effect of polarity patterned thin PEALD ZnO films is discussed to understand photo-induced electron transfer and AgNO3 reduction on ZnO-PPLN heterostructures. This research is supported by the NSF through Grant DMR-1206935.

  5. Spectral Induced Polarization Response of Unconsolidated Saturated Sand and Surfactant Solutions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL), such as chlorinated solvents, are common groundwater contaminants. Traditional pump-and-treat methods are often not effective at removing residual DNAPL from the subsurface. Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation is a promising remediatio...

  6. Influence of Oil Saturation Upon Spectral Induced Polarization of Oil Bearing Sands

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of oil in an unconsolidated granular porous material such as sand changes both the resistivity of the material and the value of the phase shift between the low-frequency current and the voltage. The resistivity and the phase angle can be written as a complex-valued r...

  7. Eliminating spectral distinguishability in ultrafast spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Poh, Hou Shun; Lim, Jiaqing; Lamas-Linares, Antia; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Marcikic, Ivan

    2009-10-15

    Generation of polarization-entangled photon pairs with a precise timing through down-conversion of femtosecond pulses is often faced with a degraded polarization entanglement quality. In a previous experiment, we have shown that this degradation is induced by spectral distinguishability between the two decay paths, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Here, we present an experimental study of the spectral compensation scheme proposed and first implemented by Kim and Grice [J. Mod. Opt. 49, 2309 (2002)]. By measuring the joint spectral properties of the polarization correlations of the photon pairs, we show that the spectral distinguishability between the down-converted components is eliminated. This scheme results in a polarization visibility of 97.9{+-}0.5% without any spectral filtering.

  8. Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization studies of yeast tRNA/sup Phe/

    SciTech Connect

    McCord, E.F.; Morden, K.M.; Tinoco, I. Jr.; Boxer, S.G.

    1984-04-24

    Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) has been observed from yeast tRNA/sup Phe/ following reaction with photoexcited riboflavin. At 20/sup 0/C, several resonances of tRNA in the native form show polarization; previous work predicts that only guanosine and its derivatives in single-stranded regions are likely to become polarized. The methyl protons of m/sub 2//sup 2/G-26 show strong negative spin polarization, indicating that this residue is accessible. The solvent accessibility of this residue has not been previously demonstrated. In addition, two positively polarized aromatic resonances are observed, which are likely due to two or more G(H8) protons, including those of G-20, m/sub 2//sup 2/G-26, and/or Gm-34. For temperatures below 50/sup 0/C, a negatively polarized signal in the aromatic region is shown to arise from cross relaxation with the methyl group protons of m/sub 2//sup 2/G-26. This indicates the proximity of an aromatic proton, probably H2 of A-44, to the methyl groups of m/sub 2//sup 2/G-26. At higher temperatures, the CIDNP spectra show polarization of several additional G resonances, including those of m/sup 2/G-10. These changes in the CIDNP spectra reflect melting of the tertiary and secondary structure of the tRNA. This work is the first use of CIDNP to study a large nucleic acid molecule and exemplifies the value of this technique in probing single-stranded and solvent-accessible regions of tRNA.

  9. MAUVE/SWIPE: an imaging instrument concept with multi-angular, -spectral, and -polarized capability for remote sensing of aerosols, ocean color, clouds, and vegetation from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouin, Robert; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves; Rothschild, Richard; Stephan, Edward; Leblanc, Philippe; Duttweiler, Fred; Ghaemi, Tony; Riedi, Jérôme

    2006-12-01

    The Monitoring Aerosols in the Ultraviolet Experiment (MAUVE) and the Short-Wave Infrared Polarimeter Experiment (SWIPE) instruments have been designed to collect, from a typical sun-synchronous polar orbit at 800 km altitude, global observations of the spectral, polarized, and directional radiance reflected by the earth-atmosphere system for a wide range of applications. Based on the heritage of the POLDER radiometer, the MAUVE/SWIPE instrument concept combines the merits of TOMS for observing in the ultra-violet, MISR for wide field-of-view range, MODIS, for multi-spectral aspects in the visible and near infrared, and the POLDER instrument for polarization. The instruments are camera systems with 2-dimensional detector arrays, allowing a 120-degree field-of-view with adequate ground resolution (i.e., 0.4 or 0.8 km at nadir) from satellite altitude. Multi-angle viewing is achieved by the along-track migration at spacecraft velocity of the 2-dimensional field-of-view. Between the cameras' optical assembly and detector array are two filter wheels, one carrying spectral filters, the other polarizing filters, allowing measurements of the first three Stokes parameters, I. Q, and V, of the incident radiation in 16 spectral bands optimally placed in the interval 350-2200 nm. The spectral range is 350-1050 nm for the MAUVE instrument and 1050-2200 nm for the SWIPE instrument. The radiometric requirements are defined to fully exploit the multi-angular, multi-spectral, and multi-polarized capability of the instruments. These include a wide dynamic range, a signal-to-noise ratio above 500 in all channels at maximum radiance level, i.e., when viewing a surface target of albedo equal to 1, and a noise-equivalent-differential reflectance better than 0.0005 at low signal level for a sun at zenith. To achieve daily global coverage, a pair of MAUVE and SWIPE instruments would be carried by each of two mini-satellites placed on interlaced orbits. The equator crossing time of the two satellites would be adjusted to allow simultaneous observations of the overlapping zone viewed from the two parallel orbits of the twin satellites. Using twin satellites instead of a single satellite would allow measurements in a more complete range of scattering angles. A MAUVE/SWIPE satellite mission would improve significantly the accuracy of ocean color observations from space, and will extend the retrieval of ocean optical properties to the ultra-violet, where they become very sensitive to detritus material and dissolved organic matter. It would also provide a complete description of the scattering and absorption properties of aerosol particles, as well as their size distribution and vertical distribution. Over land, the retrieved bidirectional reflectance function would allow a better classification of terrestrial vegetation and discrimination of surface types. The twin satellite concept, by providing stereoscopic capability, would offer the possibility to analyze the three-dimensional structure and radiative properties of cloud fields.

  10. Multilayer Thin Film Polarizer Design for Far Ultraviolet using Induced Transmission and Absorption Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Zukic, Muamer; Wilson, Michele M.; Park, Jung Ho; Torr, Douglas G.

    1994-01-01

    Good theoretical designs of far ultraviolet polarizers have been reported using a MgF2/Al/MgF2 three layer structure on a thick Al layer as a substrate. The thicknesses were determined to induce transmission and absorption of p-polarized light. In these designs Al optical constants were used from films produced in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV: 10(exp -10) torr). Reflectance values for polarizers fabricated in a conventional high vacuum (p approx. 10(exp -6 torr)) using the UHV design parameters differed dramatically from the design predictions. Al is a highly reactive material and is oxidized even in a high vacuum chamber. In order to solve the problem other metals have been studied. It is found that a larger reflectance difference is closely related to higher amplitude and larger phase difference of Fresnel reflection coefficients between two polarizations at the boundary of MgF2/metal. It is also found that for one material a larger angle of incidence from the surface normal brings larger amplitude and phase difference. Be and Mo are found good materials to replace Al. Polarizers designed for 121.6 nm with Be at 60 deg and with Mo at 70 deg are shown as examples.

  11. Optical Sensing of Ecosystem Carbon Fluxes Combining Spectral Reflectance Indices with Solar Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huemmrich, K. F.; Middleton, E.; Corp, L. A.; Campbell, P. K.; Kustas, W. P.

    2014-12-01

    Optical sampling of spectral reflectance and solar induced fluorescence provide information on the physiological status of vegetation that can be used to infer stress responses and estimates of production. Multiple repeated observations are required to observe the effects of changing environmental conditions on vegetation. This study examines the use of optical signals to determine inputs to a light use efficiency (LUE) model describing productivity of a cornfield where repeated observations of carbon flux, spectral reflectance and fluorescence were collected. Data were collected at the Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement (OPE3) fields (39.03°N, 76.85°W) at USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. Agricultural Research Service researchers measured CO2 fluxes using eddy covariance methods throughout the growing season. Optical measurements were made from the nearby tower supporting the NASA FUSION sensors. The sensor system consists of two dual channel, upward and downward looking, spectrometers used to simultaneously collect high spectral resolution measurements of reflected and fluoresced light from vegetation canopies. Estimates of chlorophyll fluorescence, combined with measures of vegetation pigment content and the Photosynthetic Reflectance Index (PRI) derived from the spectral reflectance are compared with CO2 fluxes over diurnal periods for multiple days. PRI detects changes in Xanthophyll cycle pigments using reflectance at 531 nm compared to a reference band at 570 nm. The relationships among the different optical measurements indicate that they are providing different types of information on the vegetation and that combinations of these measurements provide improved retrievals of CO2 fluxes than any index alone.

  12. Optical Sensing of Ecosystem Carbon Fluxes Combining Spectral Reflectance Indices with Solar Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huemmrich, K. F.; Corp, L.; Campbell, P. K.; Cook, B. D.; Middleton, E.; Cheng, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Russ, A.; Kustas, W. P.

    2013-12-01

    Optical sampling of spectral reflectance and solar induced fluorescence provide information on the physiological status of vegetation that can be used to infer stress responses and estimates of production. Multiple repeated observations can observe the effects of changing environmental conditions on vegetation. This study examines the use of optical signals to determine inputs to a light use efficiency (LUE) model describing productivity of a cornfield where repeated observations of carbon flux, spectral reflectance and fluorescence were collected. Data were collected at the Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement (OPE3) fields (39.03°N, 76.85°W) at USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. Agricultural Research Service researchers measured CO2 fluxes using eddy covariance methods throughout the growing season. Optical measurements were made from the nearby tower supporting the NASA FUSION sensors. This sensor system consists of two dual channel, upward and downward looking, spectrometers used to simultaneously collect high spectral resolution measurements of reflected and fluoresced light from vegetation canopies. Estimates of chlorophyll fluorescence, combined with measures of vegetation pigment content and the Photosynthetic Reflectance Index (PRI) derived from the spectral reflectance are compared with CO2 fluxes over diurnal periods for multiple days. PRI detects changes in Xanthophyll cycle pigments using reflectance at 531 nm compared to a reference band at 570 nm. The relationships among the different optical measurements indicate that they are providing different types of information on the vegetation and that combinations of these measurements provide improved retrievals of CO2 fluxes than any index alone.

  13. CPT transients induced by rapid changes in laser polarization: validation of a semi-empirical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C.

    2010-07-01

    In ultraminiature atomic physics (UAP), where the goal is to perform low-power, 'chip-scale' precision spectroscopy, stochastic-field/atom interactions can play a primary role in defining the limits of sensitivity. Unfortunately, the transient responses of a quantum system to random changes in the amplitude, phase or polarization of a resonant field are not well understood, forming the basis of what has come to be known as the stochastic-field/atom interaction problem. As the first step in understanding the more complicated stochastic problem, the present work considers the response of a coherent-population-trapping (CPT) signal to a sudden, step-function change in laser polarization. We find that the transient behaviour depends on both the redistribution of atomic population among the atom's Zeeman sublevels and the regeneration of atomic coherence between these sublevels. Despite the complicated nature of the dynamics, we develop and experimentally validate a semi-empirical, reasonably intuitive model of the CPT transient and demonstrate that in the 'typical' CPT signal the polarization-induced transients are dominated by redistribution of atomic population among the Zeeman sublevels. Further, the amplitudes of the polarization-induced transients are relatively large and could potentially 'swamp' the CPT signals of interest for UAP.

  14. [INVITED] Self-induced polarization tracking, tunneling effect and modal attraction in optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasoni, M.; Morin, P.; Bony, P.-Y.; Wabnitz, S.; Fatome, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report the observation and exploitation of the capability of light to self-organize its state-of-polarization, upon propagation in optical fibers, by means of a device called Omnipolarizer. The principle of operation of this system consists in a counter-propagating four-wave mixing interaction between an incident signal and its backward replica generated at the fiber output thanks to a reflective fiber loop. We have exploited this self-induced polarization tracking phenomenon for all-optical data processing and successfully demonstrated the spontaneous repolarization of a 40-Gbit/s On-Off keying optical signal without noticeable impairments. Moreover, the strong local coupling between the two counter-propagating waves has also revealed a fascinating aspect of the Omnipolarizer called polarization-based tunneling effect. This intrinsic property enables us to instantaneously let "jump" a polarization information onto the reflected signal, long before the expected time-of-flight induced by the round-trip along the fiber span. Finally, we discuss how the concept of self-organization could be generalized to multimode fibers, which paves the way to new important applications in the framework of spatial-mode-multiplexing.

  15. Suppression of the antiferroelectric phase during polarization cycling of an induced ferroelectric phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Tan, Xiaoli

    2015-08-01

    The ceramic Pb0.99Nb0.02[(Zr0.57Sn0.43)0.92Ti0.08]0.98O3 can exist in either an antiferroelectric or a ferroelectric phase at room temperature, depending on the thermal and electrical history. The antiferroelectric phase can be partially recovered from the induced ferroelectric phase when the applied field reverses polarity. Therefore, polarization cycling of the ferroelectric phase in the ceramic under bipolar fields at room temperature is accompanied with repeated phase transitions. In this letter, the stability of the recovered antiferroelectric phase upon electrical cycling of the ceramic is investigated. Ex-situ X-ray diffraction reveals that bipolar cycling suppresses the antiferroelectric phase; this is indirectly supported by piezoelectric coefficient d33 measurements. It is speculated that the accumulated charged point defects during polarization cycling stabilize the polar ferroelectric phase. The findings presented are important to the fundamental studies of electric fatigue and field-induced phase transitions in ferroelectrics.

  16. Suppression of the antiferroelectric phase during polarization cycling of an induced ferroelectric phase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaoming; Tan, Xiaoli

    2015-08-17

    The ceramic Pb{sub 0.99}Nb{sub 0.02}[(Zr{sub 0.57}Sn{sub 0.43}){sub 0.92}Ti{sub 0.08}]{sub 0.98}O{sub 3} can exist in either an antiferroelectric or a ferroelectric phase at room temperature, depending on the thermal and electrical history. The antiferroelectric phase can be partially recovered from the induced ferroelectric phase when the applied field reverses polarity. Therefore, polarization cycling of the ferroelectric phase in the ceramic under bipolar fields at room temperature is accompanied with repeated phase transitions. In this letter, the stability of the recovered antiferroelectric phase upon electrical cycling of the ceramic is investigated. Ex-situ X-ray diffraction reveals that bipolar cycling suppresses the antiferroelectric phase; this is indirectly supported by piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 33} measurements. It is speculated that the accumulated charged point defects during polarization cycling stabilize the polar ferroelectric phase. The findings presented are important to the fundamental studies of electric fatigue and field-induced phase transitions in ferroelectrics.

  17. Analysis and spectral assignments of mixed actinide oxide samples using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Barefield, James E; Judge, Elizabeth J; Berg, John M; Willson, Stephen P; Le, Loan A; Lopez, Leon N

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we report for the first time the identification and assignments of complex atomic emission spectra of mixed actinide oxides using laser-induced plasma spectroscopy or laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Preliminary results of LIBS measurements on samples of uranium dioxide (UO2)/plutonium dioxide (PuO2) and UO2/PuO2/americium dioxide (AmO2)/neptunium dioxide (NpO2) simulated fuel pellets (or mixed actinide oxide samples) are reported and discussed. We have identified and assigned >800 atomic emission lines for a UO2/PuO2/AmO2/NpO2 fuel pellet thus far. The identification and assignments of spectral emission lines for U, Pu, and Am are consistent with wavelength data from the literature. However, only a few emission lines have been assigned with a high degree of confidence for Np compared with atomic emission data from the literature. We also indicate where atomic emission lines for Cm would most likely appear in the spectral regions shown. Finally, we demonstrate that a LIBS system with a resolving power of approximately 20,000 is adequate for analyzing complex mixtures of actinide elements within the same sample. PMID:23601543

  18. Connectivity changes underlying spectral EEG changes during propofol-induced loss of consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Boly, Mélanie; Moran, Rosalyn; Murphy, Michael; Boveroux, Pierre; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Noirhomme, Quentin; Ledoux, Didier; Bonhomme, Vincent; Brichant, Jean-François; Tononi, Giulio; Laureys, Steven; Friston, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness remain a matter of debate. Recent electrophysiological reports suggest that while initial propofol infusion provokes an increase in fast rhythms (from beta to gamma range), slow activity (delta to alpha) rises selectively during loss of consciousness. Dynamic causal modeling was used to investigate the neural mechanisms mediating these changes in spectral power in humans. We analyzed source-reconstructed data from frontal and parietal cortices during normal wakefulness, propofol-induced mild sedation and loss of consciousness. Bayesian model selection revealed that the best model for explaining spectral changes across the three states involved changes in cortico-thalamic interactions. Compared to wakefulness, mild sedation was accounted for by an increase in thalamic excitability, which did not further increase during loss of consciousness. In contrast, loss of consciousness per se was accompanied by a decrease in backward cortico-cortical connectivity from frontal to parietal cortices, while thalamo-cortical connectivity remained unchanged. These results emphasize the importance of recurrent cortico-cortical communication in the maintenance of consciousness and suggest a direct effect of propofol on cortical dynamics. PMID:22593076

  19. Measurement of the Induced Proton Polarization Pn in the 12C(e, e', p) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, R J; Barkhuff, David; Bertozzi, William; Chen, Jian-ping; Dale, Dan; Dodson, G; Dow, K A; Epstein, Marty; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Finn, Mike; Gilad, Shalev; Jones, Mark K; Joo, Kyungseon; Kelly, James; Kowalski, Stanley; Lourie, Bob; Madey, Richard; Margaziotis, Dimitri; Markowitz, Pete; McIntyre, Justin; Mertz, Christoph; Milbrath, Brian; Mitchell, Joseph; Perdrisat, Charles F; Punjabi, Vina; Rutt, Paul; Sarty, Adam; Tieger, D; Tschalaer, C; Turchinetz, William; Ulmer, Paul E; Van Verst, S P; Vellidis, C; Warren, Glen; Weinstein, Lawrence

    1998-01-19

    The first measurements of the induced proton polarization Pn for the 12C(e,e',p) reaction are reported. The experiment was performed at quasifree kinematics for energy and momentum transfer (w,q) = (294 MeV, 765 MeV/c) and sampled a missing momentum range of 0-250 MeV/c. The induced polarization arises from final-state interactions and for these kinematics is dominated by the real part of the spin-orbit optical potential. The distorted-wave impulse approximation provides good agreement with data for the 1 p3/2 shell. The data for the continuum suggest that both the 1s1/2 shell and underlying l > 1 configurations contribute.

  20. Apparatus and Method for Elimination of Polarization-Induced Fading in Fiber-optic Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Parker, Jr., Allen R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method of eliminating polarization-induced fading in interferometric fiber-optic sensor system having a wavelength-swept laser optical signal. The interferometric return signal from the sensor arms are combined and provided to a multi-optical path detector assembly and ultimately to a data acquisition and processing unit by way of a switch that is time synchronized with the laser scan sweep cycle.

  1. Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids Regulate Macrophage Polarization and Prevent LPS-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Meiyan; Wu, Lujin; He, Zuowen; Zhang, Shasha; Chen, Chen; Xu, Xizhen; Wang, Peihua; Gruzdev, Artiom; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Wang, Dao Wen

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages, owning tremendous phenotypic plasticity and diverse functions, were becoming the target cells in various inflammatory, metabolic and immune diseases. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase 2J2 (CYP2J2) metabolizes arachidonic acid to form epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), which possess various beneficial effects on cardiovascular system. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of EETs treatment on macrophage polarization and recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated CYP2J2 expression on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac dysfunction, and sought to investigate the underlying mechanisms. In vitro studies showed that EETs (1μmol/L) significantly inhibited LPS-induced M1 macrophage polarization and diminished the proinflammatory cytokines at transcriptional and post-transcriptional level; meanwhile it preserved M2 macrophage related molecules expression and upregulated antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10. Furthermore, EETs down-regulated NF-κB activation and up-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα/γ) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression, which play important roles in regulating M1 and M2 polarization. In addition, LPS treatment in mice induced cardiac dysfunction, heart tissue damage and infiltration of M1 macrophages, as well as the increase of inflammatory cytokines in serum and heart tissue, but rAAV-mediated CYP2J2 expression increased EETs generation in heart and significantly attenuated the LPS-induced harmful effects, which mechanisms were similar as the in vitro study. Taken together, the results indicate that CYP2J2/EETs regulates macrophage polarization by attenuating NF-κB signaling pathway via PPARα/γ and HO-1 activation and its potential use in treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25626689

  2. Induced circularly polarized luminescence arising from anion or protein binding to racemic emissive lanthanide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Rachel; Puckrin, Robert; McMahon, Brian K.; Pal, Robert; Parker, David; Pålsson, Lars-Olof

    2014-06-01

    A circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) spectrometer has been built and used to study the binding interaction of lactate and four different proteins with racemic EuIII and TbIII complexes in aqueous solution. Lactate binding gives rise to strong induced CPL spectra, and the observed emission dissymmetry factors vary linearly with enantiomeric composition. Particularly strong induced TbIII CPL also characterizes the binding interaction of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein with a dissociation constant, Kd, of 2.5 μM.

  3. Multiphoton polarization and generalized polarization microscopy reveal oleic-acid-induced structural changes in intercellular lipid layers of the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yen; Lo, Wen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2004-09-01

    We have demonstrated that both multiphoton polarization and generalized polarization (GP) microscopy may be combined to characterize the structural changes of intercellular lipids in skin. Both polarization and GP (at 440- and 490-nm emission) images obtained by analysis of Laurdan fluorescence suggest that the treatment of oleic acid results in a skin surface with a more random packing of lipid molecules, which allows easier water penetration. Our results show that combined polarization and GP microscopy can be used to characterize the physical and chemical changes in biological structures.

  4. Pentameric Thiophene-Based Ligands that Spectrally Discriminate Amyloid-β and Tau Aggregates Display Distinct Solvatochromism and Viscosity-Induced Spectral Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Rozalyn A; Shirani, Hamid; Åslund, K O Andreas; Bäck, Marcus; Haroutunian, Vahram; Gandy, Sam; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the deposition of multiple protein aggregates. Ligands for molecular characterization and discrimination of these pathological hallmarks are thus important for understanding their potential role in pathogenesis as well as for clinical diagnosis of the disease. In this regard, luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) have proven useful for spectral discrimination of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), two of the pathological hallmarks associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Herein, the solvatochromism of a library of anionic pentameric thiophene-based ligands, as well as their ability to spectrally discriminate Aβ and tau aggregates, were investigated. Overall, the results from this study identified distinct solvatochromic and viscosity-dependent behavior of thiophene-based ligands that can be applied as indices to direct the chemical design of improved LCOs for spectral separation of Aβ and tau aggregates in brain tissue sections. The results also suggest that the observed spectral transitions of the ligands are due to their ability to conform by induced fit to specific microenvironments within the binding interface of each particular protein aggregate. We foresee that these findings might aid in the chemical design of thiophene-based ligands that are increasingly selective for distinct disease-associated protein aggregates. PMID:25111601

  5. Pentameric thiophene-based ligands that spectrally discriminate amyloid-β and tau aggregates display distinct solvatochromism and viscosity-induced spectral shifts.

    PubMed

    Simon, Rozalyn A; Shirani, Hamid; Aslund, K O Andreas; Bäck, Marcus; Haroutunian, Vahram; Gandy, Sam; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2014-09-22

    A wide range of neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the deposition of multiple protein aggregates. Ligands for molecular characterization and discrimination of these pathological hallmarks are thus important for understanding their potential role in pathogenesis as well as for clinical diagnosis of the disease. In this regard, luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) have proven useful for spectral discrimination of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), two of the pathological hallmarks associated with Alzheimer's disease. Herein, the solvatochromism of a library of anionic pentameric thiophene-based ligands, as well as their ability to spectrally discriminate Aβ and tau aggregates, were investigated. Overall, the results from this study identified distinct solvatochromic and viscosity-dependent behavior of thiophene-based ligands that can be applied as indices to direct the chemical design of improved LCOs for spectral separation of Aβ and tau aggregates in brain tissue sections. The results also suggest that the observed spectral transitions of the ligands are due to their ability to conform by induced fit to specific microenvironments within the binding interface of each particular protein aggregate. We foresee that these findings might aid in the chemical design of thiophene-based ligands that are increasingly selective for distinct disease-associated protein aggregates. PMID:25111601

  6. Polarization induced effects in group-III-nitride heterostructures and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambacher, Oliver

    2001-03-01

    Two dimensional electron and hole gases in AlInGaN/GaN hetero- and quantum well structures suitable for high electron mobility transistors (HEMT´s) are induced by strong polarization effects. The sheet carrier concentration and the confinement of the two dimensional carrier gases located close to one of the AlInGaN/GaN interfaces are sensitive to a high number of different physical properties such as polarity, alloy composition, strain, thickness and doping of the barriers. We have investigated the structural quality, the carrier concentration profiles and electrical transport properties of undoped, silicon and magnesium doped structures by a combination of high resolution X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, PL-spectroscopy, Hall effect, C-V profiling and Shubnikov-de Haas measurements. The investigated samples with N- and Ga-face polarity were grown by metalorganic vapor phase (MOCVD) or plasma induced molecular beam epitaxy (PIMBE) covering a broad range of alloy compositions, barrier and quantum well thicknesses. We have measured and calculated the polarization induced sheet charge based on different sets of piezoelectric constants available in the literature and the sheet carrier concentration for 2DEGS and 2DHGs self-consistently from a coupled Schrödinger and Poisson equation for different alloy compositions and degree of relaxation of the barrier. By comparison of theoretical and experimental results we demonstrate that the formation of two dimensional carrier gases in AlGaInN/GaN structures both rely on the difference of piezoelectric and spontaneous polarization between the AlGaInN and the GaN layer. In addition, the experimental evidence for accumulation of free carriers at interfaces of lattice matched AlInN/GaN heterostructures and pseudomorphic InGaN/GaN quatum well structures due to gradients in spontaneous or piezoelectric polarization will be presented. The influence and relevance of the resulting carrier distribution on the performance of electronic and optoelectronic devices will be discussed in detail. O. Ambacher, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 31 (1998) 2653. O. Ambacher et al., J. Appl. Phys. 85 (1999) 3222. O. Ambacher et al., J. Appl. Phys. 87 (2000) 334.

  7. Induced polarized state in intentionally grown oxygen deficient KTaO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, D. A.; Romaguera-Barcelay, Y.; Tkach, A.; Agostinho Moreira, J.; Almeida, A.; Perez de la Cruz, J.; Vilarinho, P. M.; Tavares, P. B.

    2013-07-21

    Deliberately oxygen deficient potassium tantalate thin films were grown by RF magnetron sputtering on Si/SiO{sub 2}/Ti/Pt substrates. Once they were structurally characterized, the effect of oxygen vacancies on their electric properties was addressed by measuring leakage currents, dielectric constant, electric polarization, and thermally stimulated depolarization currents. By using K{sub 2}O rich KTaO{sub 3} targets and specific deposition conditions, KTaO{sub 3-{delta}} oxygen deficient thin films with a K/Ta = 1 ratio were obtained. Room temperature X-ray diffraction patterns show that KTaO{sub 3-{delta}} thin films are under a compressive strain of 2.3% relative to KTaO{sub 3} crystals. Leakage current results reveal the presence of a conductive mechanism, following the Poole-Frenkel formalism. Furthermore, dielectric, polarization, and depolarization current measurements yield the existence of a polarized state below T{sub pol} {approx} 367 Degree-Sign C. A Cole-Cole dipolar relaxation was also ascertained apparently due to oxygen vacancies induced dipoles. After thermal annealing the films in an oxygen atmosphere at a temperature above T{sub pol}, the aforementioned polarized state is suppressed, associated with a drastic oxygen vacancies reduction emerging from annealing process.

  8. Spontaneous polarization induced electric field in zinc oxide nanowires and nanostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, S.; Choi, M.; Datta, D.; Stroscio, M. A.; Dutta, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the detection mechanism of spontaneous polarization using electrostatic force microscopy in zinc oxide nanowires and nanostars grown by vapor-liquid-solid technique. Optical and structural properties are investigated in detail to understand the complex ZnO nanostructures comprehensively. Calculations are carried out to estimate the electric field from the change in interleave amplitude induced by the electrostatic force due to the spontaneous polarization effects. Attraction of the probe between the tip and the sample varies for different structures with a stronger attraction for nanostars as compared to nanowires. Strength of electric field is dependent on the orientation of nanowires and nanostars c-axis with measured magnitude of electric field to be ˜107 V/m and 108 V/m respectively. This technique presents a unique detection mechanism of built-in spontaneous polarization and electric field from polar ZnO nanowires with applications in voltage gated ion channels, nano-bio interfaces, optoelectronic and photonic devices.

  9. Study of xenon binding in cryptophane-A using laser-induced NMR polarization enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmer, M.; Goodson, B.M.; Song, Y.Q.; Laws, D.D.; Kaiser, L.; Pines, A.

    1999-04-14

    Xenon is chemically inert, yet exhibits NMR parameters that are highly sensitive to its chemical environment. Considerable work has therefore capitalized on the utility of {sup 129}Xe (I = 1/2) as a magnetic resonance probe of molecules, materials, and biological systems. In solution, spin-polarization transfer between laser-polarized xenon and the hydrogen nuclei of nearby molecules leads to signal enhancements in the resolved {sup 1}H NMR spectrum, offering new opportunities for probing the chemical environment of xenon atoms. Following binding of laser-polarized xenon to molecules of cryptophane-A, selective enhancements of the {sup 1}H NMR signals were observed. A theoretical framework for the interpretation of such experimental results is provided, and the spin polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effects are shown to yield information about the molecular environment of xenon. The observed selective {sup 1}H enhancements allowed xenon-proton internuclear distances to be estimated. These distances reveal structural characteristics of the complex, including the preferred molecular conformations adopted by cryptophane-A upon binding of xenon.

  10. Influence of non-aqueous phase liquid configuration on induced polarization parameters: Conceptual models applied to a time-domain field case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sara; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Dahlin, Torleif

    2015-12-01

    Resistivity and induced polarization (IP) measurements on soil contaminated with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) show a great variety in results in previous research. Several laboratory studies have suggested that the presence of NAPLs in soil samples generally decrease the magnitude of the IP-effect, while others have indicated the opposite. A number of conceptual models have been proposed suggesting that NAPLs can alter the pore space in different ways, e.g. by coating the grain surfaces and thus inhibiting grain polarization, or by changing the pore throat size and thus affecting the membrane polarization mechanism. The main aim of this paper is to review previously published conceptual models and to introduce some new concepts of possible residual NAPL configurations in the pore space. Time domain induced polarization measurements were performed at a NAPL contaminated field site, and the data were inverted using the Constant Phase Angle (CPA) model and the Cole-Cole model respectively. No significant phase anomalies were observed in the source area of the contamination when the CPA inverted profiles were compared with soil sampling results of free-phase contaminant concentrations. However, relatively strong phase and normalized phase anomalies appeared next to the source area, where residual free-phase presence could be expected according to the chemical data. We conclude that depending on the NAPL configuration, different spectral IP responses can be expected. In previous research, the NAPL configurations in different samples or field sites are often unknown, and this may to some extent explain why different results have been achieved by different authors. In our field case, we believe that the NAPL forms a more or less continuous phase in the pore space of the source zone leading to an absence of IP anomalies. The increase in phase and normalized phase angle observed next to the source zone is interpreted as a degradation zone. The ongoing biodegradation may have led to a fractionation of the continuous NAPL in the outer part of the original source zone, leading to residual presence of isolated NAPL droplets in the soil pores. With such NAPL configurations, an increased polarization can be expected according to the electrochemical- and membrane polarization mechanisms. More research is needed to confirm the effects of different NAPL configuration on spectral IP parameters.

  11. Electronic spill-out induced spectral broadening in quantum hydrodynamic nanoplasmonics.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Fang, Hui; Weng, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Lichao; Dou, Xiujie; Yang, Aiping; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2015-11-16

    The hydrodynamic theory is a powerful tool to study the nonlocal effects in metallic nanostructures that are too small to obey classical electrodynamics while still too large to be handled with a full quantum-mechanical theory. The existing hydrodynamic model can give accurate quantitative predictions for the plasmonic resonance shifts in metallic nanoplasmonics, yet is not able to predict the spectral width which is usually taken as a pre-set value instead. By taking account the fact that due to electron density spill-out from a surface, the Coulomb interaction screening is less efficient close the surface thus leads to a higher electron-electron scattering rate in this paper, we study how the electron-density-related damping rate induced by such Coulomb interaction will affect the plasmonic spectral broadening. We perform the simulation on a Na nanowire, which shows that the absorption spectra width is wider when the size of the nanowire becomes smaller. This result is consistent well with the reported experiment. Therefore, our theoretical model extends the existing hydrodynamic model and can provide much more quantum insight about nonlocal effects in metallic nanostructures. PMID:26698456

  12. Polarization of macrophages induced by Toxoplasma gondii and its impact on abnormal pregnancy in rats.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lanting; Zhang, Qian; Chao, Jing; Wen, Huiqin; Zhang, Yihua; Chen, He; Pappoe, Faustina; Zhang, Aimei; Xu, Xiucai; Cai, Yihong; Li, Min; Luo, Qingli; Zhang, Linjie; Shen, Jilong

    2015-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection is the leading cause of fetal intrauterine growth retardation among the five kinds of pathogens termed as TORCH, including Toxoplasma, Rubella virus, Cytomegalo virus, herpes virus and others during pregnancy. Pathogens infect the fetus through the placenta. T. gondii infection may result in congenital toxoplasmosis, miscarriage, stillbirth, and preemie, and increase pregnancy complications. Adaptive immune response induced by T. gondii infection stimulates T cells and macrophages to produce high levels of cytokines. Physiologically, the microenvironment of pregnancy was Th2-dominant. Here we set up a pregnant Sprague-Dawley rat model, and reported the polarization of macrophages induced by genotype Chinese 1 strain (Wh6) of Toxoplasma, and its adverse impact on pregnancy. The results showed that Wh6 infection pre- or in-gestation both led to abnormal pregnancy outcomes. Peritoneal macrophages in pre-gestation infection were polarized toward classically activated macrophages (M1), while in-gestation infection drove macrophages to polarize toward M2 activation. The Th2-dominant immune response in pregnant rat somewhat inhibits the excessive bias of the macrophages toward M1, and partially, toward M2. Infection of pre- and in-gestation may alter the physiological immune microenvironment in pregnant rats, giving rise to abnormal pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25496968

  13. An open-source, massively parallel code for non-LTE synthesis and inversion of spectral lines and Zeeman-induced Stokes profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socas-Navarro, H.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Ruiz Cobo, B.

    2015-05-01

    With the advent of a new generation of solar telescopes and instrumentation, interpreting chromospheric observations (in particular, spectropolarimetry) requires new, suitable diagnostic tools. This paper describes a new code, NICOLE, that has been designed for Stokes non-LTE radiative transfer, for synthesis and inversion of spectral lines and Zeeman-induced polarization profiles, spanning a wide range of atmospheric heights from the photosphere to the chromosphere. The code features a number of unique features and capabilities and has been built from scratch with a powerful parallelization scheme that makes it suitable for application on massive datasets using large supercomputers. The source code is written entirely in Fortran 90/2003 and complies strictly with the ANSI standards to ensure maximum compatibility and portability. It is being publicly released, with the idea of facilitating future branching by other groups to augment its capabilities. The source code is currently hosted at the following repository: http://https://github.com/hsocasnavarro/NICOLE

  14. Contact-Induced Mitochondrial Polarization Supports HIV-1 Virological Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Groppelli, Elisabetta; Starling, Shimona

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rapid HIV-1 spread between CD4 T lymphocytes occurs at retrovirus-induced immune cell contacts called virological synapses (VS). VS are associated with striking T cell polarization and localized virus budding at the site of contact that facilitates cell-cell spread. In addition to this, spatial clustering of organelles, including mitochondria, to the contact zone has been previously shown. However, whether cell-cell contact specifically induces dynamic T cell remodeling during VS formation and what regulates this process remain unclear. Here, we report that contact between an HIV-1-infected T cell and an uninfected target T cell specifically triggers polarization of mitochondria concomitant with recruitment of the major HIV-1 structural protein Gag to the site of cell-cell contact. Using fixed and live-cell imaging, we show that mitochondrial and Gag polarization in HIV-1-infected T cells occurs within minutes of contact with target T cells, requires the formation of stable cell-cell contacts, and is an active, calcium-dependent process. We also find that perturbation of mitochondrial polarization impairs cell-cell spread of HIV-1 at the VS. Taken together, these data suggest that HIV-1-infected T cells are able to sense and respond to contact with susceptible target cells and undergo dynamic cytoplasmic remodeling to create a synaptic environment that supports efficient HIV-1 VS formation between CD4 T lymphocytes. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 remains one of the major global health challenges of modern times. The capacity of HIV-1 to cause disease depends on the virus's ability to spread between immune cells, most notably CD4 T lymphocytes. Cell-cell transmission is the most efficient way of HIV-1 spread and occurs at the virological synapse (VS). The VS forms at the site of contact between an infected cell and an uninfected cell and is characterized by polarized assembly and budding of virions and clustering of cellular organelles, including mitochondria. Here, we show that cell-cell contact induces rapid recruitment of mitochondria to the contact site and that this supports efficient VS formation and consequently cell-cell spread. Additionally, we observed that cell-cell contact induces a mitochondrion-dependent increase in intracellular calcium, indicative of cellular signaling. Taken together, our data suggest that VS formation is a regulated process and thus a potential target to block HIV-1 cell-cell spread. PMID:25320323

  15. Method and apparatus for determining shaliness and oil saturations in earth formations using induced polarization in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1982-11-16

    An apparatus is disclosed for borehole measurements of the induced polarization of earth formations. The apparatus consists of an induced polarization logger capable of measuring both in-phase and quadrature conductivities in the frequency domain. A method is described which uses these measurements to determine cation exchange capacity per unit pore volume, Qv, brine conductivity, Cw, and oil and water saturations, So and Sw, in shaly sands.

  16. Strain-Induced Spatial and Spectral Isolation of Quantum Emitters in Mono- and Bilayer WSe2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductors are intriguing hosts for quantum light sources due to their unique optoelectronic properties. Here, we report that strain gradients, either unintentionally induced or generated by substrate patterning, result in spatially and spectrally isolated quantum emitters in mono- and bilayer WSe2. By correlating localized excitons with localized strain variations, we show that the quantum emitter emission energy can be red-tuned up to a remarkable ∼170 meV. We probe the fine-structure, magneto-optics, and second-order coherence of a strained emitter. These results raise the prospect of strain-engineering quantum emitter properties and deterministically creating arrays of quantum emitters in two-dimensional semiconductors. PMID:26480237

  17. Heat-induced changes to lipid molecular structure in Vimy flaxseed: Spectral intensity and molecular clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peiqiang; Damiran, Daalkhaijav

    2011-06-01

    Autoclaving was used to manipulate nutrient utilization and availability. The objectives of this study were to characterize any changes of the functional groups mainly associated with lipid structure in flaxseed ( Linum usitatissimum, cv. Vimy), that occurred on a molecular level during the treatment process using infrared Fourier transform molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included lipid CH 3 asymmetric (ca. 2959 cm -1), CH 2 asymmetric (ca. 2928 cm -1), CH 3 symmetric (ca. 2871 cm -1) and CH 2 symmetric (ca. 2954 cm -1) functional groups, lipid carbonyl C dbnd O ester group (ca. 1745 cm -1), lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C dbnd C) (ca. 3010 cm -1) as well as their ratios. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were conducted to identify molecular spectral differences. Flaxseed samples were kept raw for the control or autoclaved in batches at 120 °C for 20, 40 or 60 min for treatments 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Molecular spectral analysis of lipid functional group ratios showed a significant decrease ( P < 0.05) in the CH 2 asymmetric to CH 3 asymmetric stretching band peak intensity ratios for the flaxseed. There were linear and quadratic effects ( P < 0.05) of the treatment time from 0, 20, 40 and 60 min on the ratios of the CH 2 asymmetric to CH 3 asymmetric stretching vibration intensity. Autoclaving had no significant effect ( P > 0.05) on lipid carbonyl C dbnd O ester group and lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C dbnd C) (with average spectral peak area intensities of 138.3 and 68.8 IR intensity units, respectively). Multivariate molecular spectral analyses, CLA and PCA, were unable to make distinctions between the different treatment original spectra at the CH 3 and CH 2 asymmetric and symmetric region (ca. 2988-2790 cm -1). The results indicated that autoclaving had an impact to the mid-infrared molecular spectrum of flaxseed to identify heat-induced changes in lipid conformation. A future study is needed to quantify the relationship between lipid molecular structure changes and functionality/availability.

  18. Semiclassical description of TRI asymmetry in ternary fission induced by cold polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. G.

    2011-11-15

    The possibility of semiclassically describing T-even TRI-type asymmetry in ternary fission induced by polarized neutrons is considered on the basis of employing Coriolis interaction that takes into account the coupling of a light charged particle to the collective rotation of a polarized fissile nucleus. It is shown that allowance for this interaction makes it possible to explain qualitatively the magnitudes of two asymmetry effects observed in light-charge-particle emission both within the semiclassical and within the quantum-mechanical approach. The difference in the relative magnitudes and signs of the effects between different target nuclei is associated with the interference contributions to the cross section from neighboring neutron resonances and therefore cannot be explained within the semiclassical approach.

  19. Polarization dependent formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures near stepped features

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Torralva, Ben; Adams, David P.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2014-06-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are formed near 110 nm-tall Au microstructured edges on Si substrates after single-pulse femtosecond irradiation with a 150 fs pulse centered near a 780 nm wavelength. We investigate the contributions of Fresnel diffraction from step-edges and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation to LIPSS formation on Au and Si surfaces. For certain laser polarization vector orientations, LIPSS formation is dominated by SPP excitation; however, when SPP excitation is minimized, Fresnel diffraction dominates. The LIPSS orientation and period distributions are shown to depend on which mechanism is activated. These results support previous observations of the laser polarization vector influencing LIPSS formation on bulk surfaces.

  20. Ferroelectric polarization-induced memristive hysteresis behaviors in Ti- and Mn-codoped ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Namhyun; Lee, Hwauk; Sharma, Sanjeev K.; Lee, Youngmin; Kim, Deuk Young; Lee, Sejoon

    2016-04-01

    ZnTiMnO layers grown on Pt (111)/Al2O3 (0001) substrates exhibit lattice displacement-induced ferroelectric features, which arise from a modulation in the lattice translation symmetry and originate from the substitution of Ti and Mn ions at Zn sites in ZnO's host lattices. After annealing at 900°C, the ZnTiMnO layer shows a clear hysteresis loop, where the maximum polarization is fully saturated within wide electric-field regions. The top-to-bottom Pt/ZnTiMnO/Pt device reveals a polarization-dependent asymmetric hysteresis ( i.e., ferroelectric memristive-switching); in addition, the device shows > 60% data-retention per 10 years. These results suggest that ZnTiMnO holds great promise for use in ferroelectric memristive-switching devices.

  1. 13C hyperpolarization of a barbituric acid derivative via parahydrogen induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Meike; Koch, Achim; Kindervater, Petra; Bargon, Joachim; Spiess, Hans Wolfgang; Münnemann, Kerstin

    2010-05-01

    Significant 13C NMR signal enhancement by a factor of 5000 of a barbituric acid derivative (5-methyl-5-propenyl-barbituric acid) via parahydrogen induced polarization is presented. This hyperpolarization is achieved by hydrogenating 5-methyl-5-propargyl-barbituric acid with 98% enriched para-H 2 under elevated temperature and pressure and transferring the initially created 1H hyperpolarization with an INEPT-derived pulse sequence to 13C. The polarization can be selectively transferred to different carbons in the barbituric acid derivative by applying different pulse delays in the INEPT pulse sequence. These results demonstrate the potential of using hyperpolarized barbituric acid derivatives as " active" contrast agents in MRI and visualizing their pharmacokinetics in vivo.

  2. (13)C hyperpolarization of a barbituric acid derivative via parahydrogen induced polarization.

    PubMed

    Roth, Meike; Koch, Achim; Kindervater, Petra; Bargon, Joachim; Spiess, Hans Wolfgang; Münnemann, Kerstin

    2010-05-01

    Significant (13)C NMR signal enhancement by a factor of 5000 of a barbituric acid derivative (5-methyl-5-propenyl-barbituric acid) via parahydrogen induced polarization is presented. This hyperpolarization is achieved by hydrogenating 5-methyl-5-propargyl-barbituric acid with 98% enriched para-H(2) under elevated temperature and pressure and transferring the initially created (1)H hyperpolarization with an INEPT-derived pulse sequence to (13)C. The polarization can be selectively transferred to different carbons in the barbituric acid derivative by applying different pulse delays in the INEPT pulse sequence. These results demonstrate the potential of using hyperpolarized barbituric acid derivatives as "active" contrast agents in MRI and visualizing their pharmacokinetics in vivo. PMID:20207180

  3. Semiclassical description of TRI asymmetry in ternary fission induced by cold polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. G.

    2011-11-01

    The possibility of semiclassically describing T-even TRI-type asymmetry in ternary fission induced by polarized neutrons is considered on the basis of employing Coriolis interaction that takes into account the coupling of a light charged particle to the collective rotation of a polarized fissile nucleus. It is shown that allowance for this interaction makes it possible to explain qualitatively the magnitudes of two asymmetry effects observed in light-charge-particle emission both within the semiclassical and within the quantum-mechanical approach. The difference in the relative magnitudes and signs of the effects between different target nuclei is associated with the interference contributions to the cross section from neighboring neutron resonances and therefore cannot be explained within the semiclassical approach.

  4. Vector magnetometry based on electromagnetically induced transparency in linearly polarized light

    SciTech Connect

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Dudin, Y. O.; Velichansky, V. L.; Zibrov, A. S.; Zibrov, S. A.

    2010-09-15

    We develop a generalized principle of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) vector magnetometry based on high-contrast EIT resonances and the symmetry of atom-light interaction in the linearly polarized bichromatic fields. Operation of such vector magnetometer on the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb has been demonstrated. The proposed compass-magnetometer has an increased immunity to shifts produced by quadratic Zeeman and ac-Stark effects, as well as by atom-buffer gas and atom-atom collisions. In our proof-of-principle experiment the detected angular sensitivity to magnetic field orientation is 10{sup -3} deg/Hz{sup 1/2}, which is limited by laser intensity fluctuations, light polarization quality, and magnitude of the magnetic field.

  5. Statistics of polarization mode dispersion-induced gain fluctuations in Raman amplified optical transmissions.

    PubMed

    Bessa dos Santos, Alexandre; von der Weid, Jean Pierre

    2004-06-15

    A systematic experimental evaluation of polarization mode dispersion (PMD) -induced polarization-dependent gain (PDG) in forward pumped Raman amplification in dispersion-shifted and in dispersion-compensating fiber was performed. Good agreement was obtained between the measured statistical parameters and the current analytical model for PDG fluctuation statistics. The probability distribution of the PDG was approximately Maxwellian within the range PMD >0.05 ps/km(1/2). The interplay between PMD and gain fluctuations is discussed; random birefringence strongly reduces PDG fluctuations. However, the trade-off between reduction of the power penalties for PDG and increase of the penalties for PMD distortion precludes the use of PMD instead of source depolarization techniques for reduction of PDG. PMID:15233423

  6. Shock-induced polarized hydrogen emission lines in the Mira star o Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Lèbre, A.; Gillet, D.

    2011-11-01

    Context. In the spectra of variable pulsating stars, especially Mira stars, the detection of intense hydrogen emission lines has been explained by the presence of a radiative and hypersonic shock wave, periodically propagating throughout the stellar atmosphere. Previous observation of the Mira star o Ceti around one of its brightest maximum light led to the detection of a strong level of linear polarization associated to Balmer emissions, although the origin of this phenomenon is not fully explained yet. Aims: With the help of spectropolarimetry, we propose to investigate the nature of shock waves propagating throughout the stellar atmosphere and present, for o Ceti (the prototype of Mira stars), a full observational study of hydrogen emission lines formed in the radiative region of such a shock. Methods: Using the instrument NARVAL mounted on the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL) in Pic du Midi Observatory (France), we performed a spectropolarimetric monitoring of o Ceti during three consecutive pulsation cycles. For this survey, the four Stokes parameters (I for intensity, Q and U for linear polarization, and V for circular polarization) were systematically collected, with a particular emphasis on the maxima of luminosity, i.e. when a radiative shock wave is supposed to emerge from the photosphere and starts to propagate outward. Results: On hydrogen Balmer lines, over a large part of the luminosity cycle, we report clear detection of polarimetric structures in Q and U Stokes spectra (and also in V Stokes spectra but to a lesser extent). We report a temporal evolution of these spectropolarimetric signatures, which appear strongly correlated to the presence of an intense shock wave responsible for the hydrogen emission lines. We establish that the hydrogen lines are polarized by a physical process inherent to the mechanism responsible for the emission line formation: the shock wave itself. Two mechanisms are thus considered: a global one that implies a polarization induced by some giant convective cells located around the photosphere and a local one that implies a charge separation due to the passage of the shock wave, inducing an electrical current. Combined with the existing turbulence, this may generate a magnetic field, hence polarization. Based on spectropolarimetric observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL at Observatoire du Pic du Midi, CNRS and Université de Toulouse, France).

  7. Texture transformation in circular domain of polar smectic films: Chiral elasticity induced by coupling of flexoelectric and spontaneous polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Taguchi, Dai; Ou-Yang, Zhong-can

    2015-05-01

    Both pure tangential and radial textures in circular domains of polar SmC* LCs are shown to be solutions satisfying the equations for bulk- and boundary-orientation, and for domain shape derived via the Frank free energy, with pure tangential and normal line tensions. The stability of both textures is studied in terms of the elastic anisotropy. Results show that, at a critical domain diameter, both textures switch to reversing spiral textures. By considering the chiral elasticity contributed by the coupling of flexoelectric and spontaneous polarizations the existence of an inverse relation of the critical radius and the spontaneous polarization is revealed.

  8. Dysregulation of cell polarity proteins synergize with oncogenes or the microenvironment to induce invasive behavior in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Samit; Seifried, Laurie; Feigin, Michael E; Gibbons, Don L; Scuoppo, Claudio; Lin, Wei; Rizvi, Zain H; Lind, Evan; Dissanayake, Dilan; Kurie, Jonathan; Ohashi, Pam; Muthuswamy, Senthil K

    2012-01-01

    Changes in expression and localization of proteins that regulate cell and tissue polarity are frequently observed in carcinoma. However, the mechanisms by which changes in cell polarity proteins regulate carcinoma progression are not well understood. Here, we report that loss of polarity protein expression in epithelial cells primes them for cooperation with oncogenes or changes in tissue microenvironment to promote invasive behavior. Activation of ErbB2 in cells lacking the polarity regulators Scribble, Dlg1 or AF-6, induced invasive properties. This cooperation required the ability of ErbB2 to regulate the Par6/aPKC polarity complex. Inhibition of the ErbB2-Par6 pathway was sufficient to block ErbB2-induced invasion suggesting that two polarity hits may be needed for ErbB2 to promote invasion. Interestingly, in the absence of ErbB2 activation, either a combined loss of two polarity proteins, or exposure of cells lacking one polarity protein to cytokines IL-6 or TNFα induced invasive behavior in epithelial cells. We observed the invasive behavior only when cells were plated on a stiff matrix (Matrigel/Collagen-1) and not when plated on a soft matrix (Matrigel alone). Cells lacking two polarity proteins upregulated expression of EGFR and activated Akt. Inhibition of Akt activity blocked the invasive behavior identifying a mechanism by which loss of polarity promotes invasion of epithelial cells. Thus, we demonstrate that loss of polarity proteins confers phenotypic plasticity to epithelial cells such that they display normal behavior under normal culture conditions but display aggressive behavior in response to activation of oncogenes or exposure to cytokines. PMID:22529912

  9. Microring resonator composed of vertical slot waveguides with minimum polarization mode dispersion over a wide spectral range.

    PubMed

    Fu, Po-Han; Chiang, Tsung-Yu; Cheng, Nai-Chia; Ma, Yao-Feng; Huang, Ding-Wei

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes the design of a vertical slot waveguide-based optical ring resonator on a silicon photonic platform with minimized polarization mode dispersion (PMD) in the presence of waveguide dispersion over a wide band. Slot waveguides provide more degrees of freedom in the design, thereby achieving the minimum PMD over the communication wavelengths. The minimum PMD leads to nearly identical accumulated phase in the optical ring resonator for quasi-TE and TM modes, and thus the resonant wavelength mismatch between the quasi-TE and TM modes can be minimized from 1510 to 1590 nm. PMID:27140380

  10. Optically thin composite resonant absorber at the near-infrared band: a polarization independent and spectrally broadband configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boratay Alici, Kamil; Burak Turhan, Adil; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2011-07-01

    We designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized thin absorbers utilizing both electrical and magnetic impedance matching at the near-infrared regime. The absorbers consist of four main layers: a metal back plate, dielectric spacer, and two artificial layers. One of the artificial layers provides electrical resonance and the other one provides magnetic resonance yielding a polarization independent broadband perfect absorption. The structure response remains similar for the wide angle of incidence due to the sub-wavelength unit cell size of the constituting artificial layers. The design is useful for applications such as thermal photovoltaics, sensors, and camouflage.

  11. GSI promotes vincristine-induced apoptosis by enhancing multi-polar spindle formation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akannsha; Zapata, Mariana C; Choi, Yong Sung; Yoon, Sun-Ok

    2014-01-01

    Gamma secretase inhibitors (GSI), cell-permeable small-molecule inhibitors of gamma secretase activity, had been originally developed for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. In recent years, it has been exploited in cancer research to inhibit Notch signaling that is aberrantly activated in various cancers. We previously found that GSI could synergize with anti-microtubule agent, vincristine (VCR) in a Notch-independent manner. Here, we delineate the underlying cell cycle-related mechanism using HeLa cells, which have strong mitotic checkpoints. GSI enhanced VCR-induced cell death, although GSI alone did not affect cell viability at all. GSI augmented VCR-induced mitotic arrest in a dose-dependent manner, which was preceded by apoptotic cell death, as shown by an increase in Annexin V-positive and caspase-positive cell population. Furthermore, GSI amplified multi-polar spindle formation triggered by VCR. Altogether, we show the evidence that GSI enhances VCR-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells via multi-polar mitotic spindle formation, independent of Notch signaling. These data suggest that one or more GS substrates, yet to be identified, in a post-GS processed form, may play a role in maintaining functional centrosomes/mitotic spindles. More significantly, the synergistic effect of GSI in combination with VCR could be exploited in clinical setting to improve the efficacy of VCR. PMID:24200971

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosislpdC, Rv0462, induces dendritic cell maturation and Th1 polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Deok Rim; Shin, Sung Jae; Kim, Woo Sik; Noh, Kyung Tae; Park, Jin Wook; Son, Kwang Hee; Park, Won Sun; Lee, Min-Goo; Kim, Daejin; Shin, Yong Kyoo; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Research Institute of Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Beom-eo Ri, Mulgum Eop, Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do 626-770

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Rv0462 induces the expression of surface molecules and the production of cytokines in DCs. {yields} Rv0462 induces the activation of MAPKs. {yields} Rv0462-treated DCs enhances the proliferation of CD4{sup +} T cells. -- Abstract: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological factor of pulmonary tuberculosis, causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Activation of host immune responses for containment of mycobacterial infections involves participation of innate immune cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we demonstrated that the gene encoding lipoamide dehydrogenase C (lpdC) from M. tuberculosis, Rv0462, induce maturation and activation of DCs involved in the MAPKs signaling pathway. Moreover, Rv0462-treated DCs activated naive T cells, polarized CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells to secrete IFN-{gamma} in syngeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions, which would be expected to contribute to Th1 polarization of the immune response. Our results suggest that Rv0462 can contribute to the innate and adaptive immune responses during tuberculosis infection, and thus modulate the clinical course of tuberculosis.

  13. Cytokine responses induced by diesel exhaust particles are suppressed by PAR-2 silencing and antioxidant treatment, and driven by polar and non-polar soluble constituents.

    PubMed

    Bach, Nicolai; Bølling, Anette Kocbach; Brinchmann, Bendik C; Totlandsdal, Annike I; Skuland, Tonje; Holme, Jørn A; Låg, Marit; Schwarze, Per E; Øvrevik, Johan

    2015-10-14

    Adsorbed soluble organics seem to be the main drivers of inflammatory responses induced by diesel exhaust particles (DEP). The specific compounds contributing to this process and the cellular mechanisms behind DEP-induced inflammation are not well known. We have assessed pro-inflammatory effects of DEP and various soluble DEP fractions, in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). DEP increased the expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and CXCL8. Silencing of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by siRNA or pretreatment with AhR-antagonists did not attenuate DEP-induced IL-6 and CXCL8 responses. However, the halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (HAH)-selective AhR antagonist CH223191 caused a considerable reduction in DEP-induced CYP1A1 expression indicating that this response may be due to dioxin or dioxin-like constituents in DEP. Knock-down of protease activated receptor (PAR)-2 attenuated IL-6 responses without affecting CXCL8. Antioxidants did not affect IL-6 expression after 4h DEP-exposure and only partly reduced CXCL8 expression. However, after 24h exposure antioxidant treatment partly suppressed IL-6 protein release and completely blocked CXCL8 release. Furthermore, a heptane-soluble (non-polar) extract of DEP induced both IL-6 and CXCL8 release, whereas a PBS-soluble (highly polar) extract induced only IL-6. Thus, pro-inflammatory responses in DEP-exposed epithelial cells appear to be the result of both reactive oxygen species and receptor signaling, mediated through combinatorial effects between both non-polar and polar constituents adhered to the particle surface. PMID:26160521

  14. Cytochalasin-Induced Actin Disruption of Polarized Enterocytes Can Augment Internalization of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Carol L.; van de Westerlo, Elisabeth M. A.; Jechorek, Robert P.; Haines, Holly M.; Erlandsen, Stanley L.

    1998-01-01

    Cytochalasin-induced actin disruption has often been associated with decreased bacterial internalization by cultured epithelial cells, although polarized enterocytes have not been systematically studied. In assays using confluent polarized HT-29 enterocytes, cytochalasin D appeared to increase internalization of wild-type Salmonella typhimurium, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli. HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells, as well as HT-29 and Caco-2 enterocytes, were used to clarify this unexpected observation. Resulting data showed that cytochalasin D was associated with increased internalization of S. typhimurium and P. mirabilis by both HT-29 and Caco-2 enterocytes and with increased internalization of E. coli by HT-29 enterocytes; with either HeLa or HEp-2 cells, cytochalasin was associated with no change or a decrease in internalization of these same bacterial strains. Cytochalasin caused decreased internalization of Listeria monocytogenes by HT-29, Caco-2, HeLa, and HEp-2 cells, indicating that cytochalasin did not consistently augment bacterial internalization by polarized enterocytes. Fluorescein-labeled phalloidin confirmed marked disruption of filamentous actin in cytochalasin-treated HT-29, Caco-2, HeLa, and HEp-2 cells. Cytochalasin had no noticeable effect on epithelial viability but caused distorted apical microvilli, cell rounding, and separation of adjacent enterocytes in confluent cultures (with a corresponding decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance). Scanning electron microscopy showed that cytochalasin-induced enhanced bacterial internalization was associated with preferential bacterial adherence on the exposed enterocyte lateral surface. Colchicine, used to disrupt microtubules, had no noticeable effect on bacterial internalization by HT-29 or Caco-2 enterocytes. These data indicated that for HT-29 and Caco-2 enterocytes, cytochalasin-induced disruption of filamentous actin might augment internalization of some bacterial species by a mechanism that appeared to involve exposure of the enterocyte lateral surface. PMID:9596696

  15. M2 macrophage polarization modulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cisplatin-induced tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chia-Cherng; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Chang, Tzu-Ching

    2016-03-01

    Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity leaded to apoptosis of tubular epithelial cells (ECs) and tubulointerstitial fibrosis through ROS stress and inflammatory cytokines. Tubulointerstitial fibrosis caused by cisplatin might be via activation of resident fibroblasts and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tubular ECs. Inflammatory niche was crucial for progression of fibroblast activation or EMT. It had been reported that M1/M2 macrophage polarization regulated pro-inflammation or pro-resolving phase in damage repairing. However, the role of macrophage polarization on cisplatin-induced EMT of tubular ECs had not been well elucidated. In this study, we used co-cultured cell model and condition medium to examine the interaction between tubular ECs, fibroblasts and M1/M2 macrophages. Our data showed that cisplatin alone induced incomplete EMT of tubular ECs, whereas fibroblasts co-cultured with cisplatin-treated ECs could lead to fibroblast activation by detection of α-SMA and collagen-1. Moreover, decrease of iNOS and increase of argenase-1 and CD206 expression indicated that macrophages co-cultured with cisplatin-treated ECs would turn to M2 phenotype. Finally, we found that condition medium of M2 macrophages could promote complete EMT of cisplatin-treated ECs. Taken together, cisplatin created an inflammatory niche via tubular ECs to activate fibroblasts and stimulated M2 macrophage polarization. M2 macrophages could turn back to promote EMT of cisplatin-treated ECs. These results revealed the cooperative roles of tubular ECs, fibroblast and M2 macrophages to facilitate the progression of renal fibroblasis. PMID:26872813

  16. Self-screening of the quantum confined Stark effect by the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tiam Tan, Swee; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Wei Sun, Xiao; Volkan Demir, Hilmi

    2014-06-01

    InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown along the polar orientations significantly suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) caused by the strong polarization induced electric field in the quantum wells, which is a fundamental problem intrinsic to the III-nitrides. Here, we show that the QCSE is self-screened by the polarization induced bulk charges enabled by designing quantum barriers. The InN composition of the InGaN quantum barrier graded along the growth orientation opportunely generates the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barrier, which well compensate the polarization induced interface charges, thus avoiding the electric field in the quantum wells. Consequently, the optical output power and the external quantum efficiency are substantially improved for the LEDs. The ability to self-screen the QCSE using polarization induced bulk charges opens up new possibilities for device engineering of III-nitrides not only in LEDs but also in other optoelectronic devices.

  17. The Spectral Emission Characteristics of Laser Induced Plasma on Tea Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Peichao; Shi, Minjie; Wang, Jinmei; Liu, Hongdi

    2015-08-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides a useful technique for food security as well as determining nutrition contents. In this paper, optical emission studies of laser induced plasma on commercial tea samples were carried out. The spectral intensities of Mg, Mn, Ca, Al, C and CN vibration bands varying with laser energy and the detection delay time of an intensified charge coupled device were studied. In addition, the relative concentrations of six microelements, i.e., Mg, Mn, Ca, Al, Na and K, were analyzed semi-quantitatively as well as H, for four kinds of tea samples. Moreover, the plasma parameters were explored, including electron temperature and electron number density. The electron temperature and electron number density were around 11000 K and 1017 cm-3, respectively. The results show that it is reasonable to consider the LIBS technique as a new method for analyzing the compositions of tea leaf samples. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61205149), the Scientific and Technological Talents Training Project of Chongqing, China (No. CSTC2013kjrc-qnrc40002), the Scientific and Technological Project of Nan'an District (2011) and the Visiting Scholarship of State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment & System Security and New Technology at Chongqing University, China (No. 2007DA10512714409)

  18. Accommodation-induced variations in retinal thickness measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanhui; Sun, Yong; Dai, Cuixia; Zheng, Haihua; Ren, Qiushi; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2014-09-01

    To research retinal stretching or distortion with accommodation, accommodation-induced changes in retinal thickness (RT) in the macular area were investigated in a population of young adults (n=23) by using a dual-channel spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system manufactured in-house for this study. This dual-channel SD-OCT is capable of imaging the cornea and retina simultaneously with an imaging speed of 24 kHz A-line scan rate, which can provide the anatomical dimensions of the eye, including the RT and axial length. Thus, the modification of the RT with accommodation can be calculated. A significant decrease in the RT (13.50±1.25 μm) was observed during maximum accommodation. In the 4 mm×4 mm macular area centered at the fovea, we did not find a significant quadrant-dependent difference in retinal volume change, which indicates that neither retinal stretching nor distortion was quadrant-dependent during accommodation. We speculate that the changes in RT with maximum accommodation resulted from accommodation-induced ciliary muscle contractions.

  19. Pressure-induced commensurate phase with potential giant polarization in YMn2O5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, M.; Hansen, T. C.; Fernandez-Diaz, M. T.; Forget, A.; Colson, D.; Porcher, F.; Mirebeau, I.

    2015-08-01

    We have studied multiferroic YMn2O5 by high-pressure neutron diffraction in a large pressure range from 0.5 to 6.3 GPa. We observe a pressure-induced commensurate (PCM) phase with a propagation vector (1/2 0 1/2 ) that is different from those observed at ambient pressure. It coexists with the ambient pressure phases up to the highest pressure, with an increased contribution as the pressure increases. The PCM phase, which is likely generic in the R Mn2O5 family, should be taken into account to understand the strong variation of the electric polarization under pressure.

  20. Shear wave induced resonance elastography of spherical masses with polarized torsional waves.

    PubMed

    Henni, Anis Hadj; Schmitt, Cédric; Trop, Isabelle; Cloutier, Guy

    2012-03-26

    Shear Wave Induced Resonance (SWIR) is a technique for dynamic ultrasound elastography of confined mechanical inclusions. It was developed for breast tumor imaging and tissue characterization. This method relies on the polarization of torsional shear waves modeled with the Helmholtz equation in spherical coordinates. To validate modeling, an in vitro set-up was used to measure and image the first three eigenfrequencies and eigenmodes of a soft sphere. A preliminary in vivo SWIR measurement on a breast fibroadenoma is also reported. Results revealed the potential of SWIR elastography to detect and mechanically characterize breast lesions for early cancer detection. PMID:23687384

  1. Degeneracy doubling and sublattice polarization in strain-induced pseudo-Landau levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, Charles; Arkinstall, Jake; Schomerus, Henning

    2014-10-01

    The degeneracy and spatial support of pseudo-Landau levels (pLLs) in strained honeycomb lattices systematically depends on the geometry; for instance, in hexagonal and rectangular flakes the zeroth pLL displays a twofold increased degeneracy, while the characteristic sublattice polarization of the zeroth pLL is only fully realized in a zigzag-terminated triangle. These features are dictated by algebraic constraints in the atomistic theory and signify a departure from the standard picture in which all qualitative differences between pLLs and Landau levels induced by a magnetic field trace back to the valley antisymmetry of the pseudomagnetic field.

  2. Frequency-dependent polarization-angle-phase-shift in the microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Han-Chun; Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2015-02-14

    Linear polarization angle, θ, dependent measurements of the microwave radiation-induced oscillatory magnetoresistance, R{sub xx}, in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron devices have shown a θ dependence in the oscillatory amplitude along with magnetic field, frequency, and extrema-dependent phase shifts, θ{sub 0}. Here, we suggest a microwave frequency dependence of θ{sub 0}(f) using an analysis that averages over other smaller contributions, when those contributions are smaller than estimates of the experimental uncertainty.

  3. Altered Landscapes and Groundwater Sustainability — Exploring Impacts with Induced Polarization, DC Resistivity, and Thermal Tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy-Miller, C.; Caldwell, R.; Wheeler, J.; McCarthy, P.; Binley, A. M.; Constantz, J. E.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Anthropogenically impacted landscapes constitute rising proportions of the Earth’s surface that are characterized by generally elevated nutrient and sediment loadings concurrent with increased consumptive water withdrawals. In recent years a growing number of hydraulically engineered riparian habitat restoration projects have attempted to ameliorate negative impacts of land use on groundwater-surface water systems resulting, e.g., from agricultural practices and urban development. Often the nature of groundwater-surface water interactions in pre- and minimally altered systems is poorly known, making it difficult to assess the impacts of land use and restoration projects on groundwater sustainability. Traditional assessments of surface water parameters (flow, temperature, dissolved oxygen, biotic composition, etc.) can be complemented by hydraulic and thermal measurements to better understand the important role played by groundwater-surface water interactions. Hydraulic and thermal measurements are usually limited to point samples, however, making non-invasive and spatially extensive geophysical characterizations an attractive additional tool. Groundwater-surface water interactions along the Smith River, a tributary to the Missouri River in Montana, and Fish Creek and Flat Creek, tributaries to the Snake River in Wyoming, are being examined using a combination of hydraulic measurements, thermal tracing, and electrical-property imaging. Ninety-two direct-current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization cross sections were obtained at stream transects covering a wide variety of hydrogeologic settings ranging from shallow bedrock to thick alluvial sequences, nature of groundwater-surface water interactions (always gaining, always losing, or seasonally varying) and anthropogenic impacts (minimal low-intensity agriculture to major landscape engineering, including channel reconstruction). DC resistivity and induced polarization delineated mutually distinct features related to hydraulic architecture. For example, induced polarization imaging resolved channel-edge muck deposits that are presumed to be sites of low hydraulic conductivity, chemical reduction, and metal accumulation. DC resistivity delineated bedrock-alluvium contacts and showed potential for tracking changes in salinization. While electrical properties cannot substitute for hydraulic and thermal data, the addition of relatively rapidly acquired, spatially extensive resistivity and induced polarization imaging offers synergistic opportunities for interpretive hydrologic investigations.

  4. Integration of Induced Polarization Imaging, Ground Penetrating Radar and geochemical analysis to characterize hydrocarbon spills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Orozco, Adrian; Kreutzer, Ingrid; Bücker, Matthias; Nguyen, Frederic; Hofmann, Thilo; Döberl, Gernot

    2015-04-01

    Because of their capability to provide spatially continuous data, Induced Polarization (IP) Imaging and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) have recently emerged as alternative non-invasive methods for the characterization of contaminated sites. In particular, the IP method has demonstrated to be sensitive to both, changes in the chemical composition of groundwater as a result of dissolved pollutants, and to the geometry of the pore space due to the occurrence of contaminants in non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). Although promising, an adequate interpretation of the IP imaging results requires geochemical information obtained from the analysis of soil and water samples. However, to date just rare studies have investigated the IP response at the field scale due to different contaminant concentrations. To demonstrate the advantages of an integrated geophysical and geochemical site investigation, we present studies from different hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. We observed a linear correlation between the polarization effect and the contaminant concentration for dissolved contaminants in the saturated zone. A negligible polarization effect was observed, however, in areas associated with the occurrence of contaminants in NAPL. Compared to the contaminant distribution obtained from the geochemical analysis only, the images obtained from time-domain IP measurements significantly improved the delineation of the contaminant plume. As a first step, GPR data collected along the same profiles provided complementary structural information and improved the interpretation of the IP images. The resolution of the electrical images was further improved using regularization constraints, based on the GPR and geochemical data, in the inversion of IP data.

  5. Mapping the chemical potential dependence of current-induced spin polarization in a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Sue; Richardella, Anthony; Hickey, Danielle Reifsnyder; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Samarth, Nitin

    2015-10-01

    We report electrical measurements of the current-induced spin polarization of the surface current in topological insulator devices where contributions from bulk and surface conduction can be disentangled by electrical gating. The devices use a ferromagnetic tunnel junction (permalloy/Al 2O3 ) as a spin detector on a back-gated (Bi,Sb ) 2Te3 channel. We observe hysteretic voltage signals as the magnetization of the detector ferromagnet is switched parallel or antiparallel to the spin polarization of the surface current. The amplitude of the detected voltage change is linearly proportional to the applied dc bias current in the (Bi,Sb ) 2Te3 channel. As the chemical potential is tuned from the bulk bands into the surface state band, we observe an enhancement of the spin-dependent voltages up to 300% within the range of the electrostatic gating. Using a simple model, we extract the spin polarization near charge neutrality (i.e., the Dirac point).

  6. Detection of gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming in Chara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, M. P.; Wayne, R.; Leopold, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    Gravity induces a polarity of cytoplasmic streaming in vertically-oriented internodal cells of characean algae. The motive force that powers cytoplasmic streaming is generated at the ectoplasmic/endoplasmic interface. The velocity of streaming, which is about 100 micrometers/s at this interface, decreases with distance from the interface on either side of the cell to 0 micrometers/s near the middle. Therefore, when discussing streaming velocity it is necessary to specify the tangential plane through the cell in which streaming is being measured. This is easily done with a moderate resolution light microscope (which has a lateral resolution of 0.6 micrometers and a depth of field of 1.4 micrometers), but is obscured when using any low resolution technique, such as low magnification light microscopy or laser Doppler spectroscopy. In addition, the effect of gravity on the polarity of cytoplasmic streaming declines with increasing physiological age of isolated cells. Using a classical mechanical analysis, we show that the effect of gravity on the polarity of cytoplasmic streaming cannot result from the effect of gravity acting directly on individual cytoplasmic particles. We suggest that gravity may best be perceived by the entire cell at the plasma membrane-extracellular matrix junction.

  7. Magnetically-induced electric polarization in an organo-metallic magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Zapf, W S; Fabris, F W; Balakirev, F F; Francoual, S M; Kenzelmann, M; Chen, Y

    2009-01-01

    The coupling between magnetic order and ferroelectricity has been under intense investigation in a wide range of transition metal oxides. The strongest coupling is obtained in so-called magnetically induced multiferroics where ferroelectricity arises directly from magnetic order that breaks inversion symmetry. However, it has been difficult to find non-oxide based materials in which these effects occur. Here we present a study of copper dimethyl sulfoxide dichloride (CDC), an organometallic quantum magnet containing S =1/1 Cu spins, in which a switchable electric polarization arises from field-tuned magnetic order. Fast magnetic field pulses allow us to perform sensitive measurements of the electric polarization and demonstrate that the electric state is present only if the magnetic order is non-collinear. Furthermore, we show that the electric polarization can be switched in a stunning hysteretic fashion. Because the magnetic order in CDC is mediated by large organic molecules, our study shows that magnetoelectric interactions can exist in this important class of materials, opening the road to designing magnetoelectrics and multiferroics using large molecules as building blocks. Further, we demonstrate that CDC undergoes a magnetoelectric quantum phase transition -the first of its kind, where both ferroelectric and magnetic order emerge simultaneously as a function of magnetic field at very low temperatures.

  8. Electric field-induced polarization rotation and ultrahigh piezoelectricity in PbTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenhui; Hao, Aize

    2014-03-01

    Polarization rotation, phase changes, and piezoelectric property of PbTiO3 under high electric field have been investigated using a Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire phenomenological approach. Electric field versus temperature phase diagram has been constructed. Tetragonal (T)-monoclinic (MA)-rhombohedral (R) phase transition occurs when electric field is applied along pseudo-cubic [111] axis, and piezoelectric coefficient d33 is remarkably enhanced near the critical electric field for MA-R transition. With electric field applied along pseudo-cubic [011] axis, the polarization rotation involves the other two monoclinic phases (MB and MC), and ultrahigh d33 over 8000 pC/N has been found at the monoclinic-orthorhombic (M-O) transition region. The critical field for M-O transition (˜1000 MV/m) can be greatly lowered under hydrostatic pressure. Based on the reported strain gradient induced polarization rotation in epitaxial film, flexoelectric coefficient μ12 of PbTiO3 is estimated to be ˜156-312 nC/m at room temperature.

  9. Observation of spectral composition and polarization of sub-terahertz emission from dense plasma during relativistic electron beam–plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burmasov, V. S.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Postupaev, V. V.; Sinitsky, S. L.; Vyacheslavov, L. N.; Burdakov, A. V.; Gavrilenko, D. E.; Kasatov, A. A.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Sklyarov, V. F.

    2014-08-15

    The paper presents results of measurements of sub-terahertz electromagnetic emission from magnetized plasma during injection of a powerful relativistic electron beam of microsecond duration in plasma with the density of 3 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −3}. It was found that the spectrum of the radiation concentrated in three distinct regions with high level of spectral power density. The first region is located near f{sub 1} = 100 GHz; the second one is in the vicinity of 190 GHz, and the third region is in the frequency interval f{sub 3} = 280–340 GHz. Polarization vectors of the emission in the first and third regions (f{sub 1} and f{sub 3}) are directed mainly perpendicular to the magnetic field in the plasma. At the same time, the polarization of the radiation in the vicinity of f{sub 2} = 190 GHz is parallel to the magnetic field. The most likely mechanism of electromagnetic wave generation in the frequency regions f{sub 1} and f{sub 2} is the linear conversion of the plasma oscillations into the electromagnetic waves on strong gradients of the plasma density. The third region is situated in the vicinity of second harmonic of electron plasma frequency, and we explain this emission by the coalescence of the upper-hybrid oscillations at high level turbulence in plasma.

  10. Fourier transform infrared spectral detection of life in polar subsurface environments and its application to Mars exploration.

    PubMed

    Preston, Louisa J; Johnson, Diane; Cockell, Charles S; Grady, Monica M

    2015-09-01

    Cryptoendolithic lichen communities of the Dry Valleys, Antarctica, survive in an extremely inhospitable environment, finding refuge in microscopic niches where conditions suitable for life exist. Such "within-rock" communities may have evolved on Mars when conditions for life on the surface deteriorated to such an extent that they could no longer survive. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of unprepared whole-rock Antarctic Beacon sandstones was used to vertically profile molecular vibrations of fatty acids, proteins, and carboxylic acids created by endolithic communities. Spectral biosignatures were found localized to lichen-rich areas and were absent in crustal regions and the bulk rock substrate. These cryptoendolithic profiles will aid similar spectroscopic investigations of organic biosignatures during future Martian subsurface studies and will help in the identification of similar communities in other localities across the Earth. PMID:26414525

  11. Growth and polarized spectral properties of Sm3+ doped in Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yeqing; Chen, Aixi; Tu, Chaoyang

    2015-09-01

    A Sm3+-doped Ca3La2(BO3)4 single crystal was grown by the Czochralski method. Its polarized absorption, emission spectra and fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out at room temperature. Based on the Judd-Ofelt theory, the spectroscopic parameters Ωt (t = 2, 4, 6), radiative transition probabilities, radiative lifetime and fluorescence branching ratios were obtained. The stimulated emission cross section, the fluorescence lifetime and the quantum efficiency of the promising laser transition were also calculated and compared with other reported crystals. The results showed that Sm3+:Ca3La2(BO3)4 is a promising candidate for the orange-yellow laser emission.

  12. Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization studies of guanosine in nucleotides, dinucleotides, and oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    McCord, E.F.; Morden, K.M.; Pardi, A.; Tinoco, I. Jr.; Boxer, S.G.

    1984-04-24

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique of chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) has been used to study the reactions between photoexcited flavins and a wide variety of nucleotides, dinucleotides, and oligonucleotides. The greatest emphasis is placed on the purine nucleosides adenosine (A), inosine (I), and guanosine (G), particularly guanosine. The presence of G suppresses the CIDNP effect for A, although A by itself shows very strong CIDNP. Very intense CIDNP signals are observed for the H8 proton in G-containing mononucleotides, but no nuclear polarization is detected for the sugar H1' proton. In contrast, both H8 and H1' protons exhibit CIDNP for G in a wide range of dinucleotides and higher oligonucleotides. Several possible mechanisms are analyzed to explain the H1' polarization, and it is concluded that the sugar H1' proton probably obtains spin density through interaction with guanine nitrogen 3. The proximity of the H1' proton to N3 depends explicity on the glycosidic torsion angle, chi. CIDNP studies of several model compounds in which chi is fixed are consistent with this suggestion. CIDNP for the self-complementary tetramer ApGpCpU was studied as a function of temperature. Strong CIDNP from G is only observed at temperatures above the double-strand melting temperature, suggesting that CIDNP is only detected in single-stranded regions, where the base is accessible to solvent. The use of brominated riboflavin as the photoreagent in place of riboflavin is shown to selectively invert the sign of A, I, and 1-methylguanosine polarization, providing a convenient method for distinguishing the NMR spectra of these residues in complex oligonucleotides.

  13. Effect of pulse polarity and energy on ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage in adult rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frizzell, Leon A.; Zachary, James F.; O'Brien, William D.

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this study was to further assess the role of inertial cavitation in ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage by examining the effect of pulse polarity at a common in situ (at the lung surface) peak rarefactional pressure [pr(in situ)] and at a common in situ pulse intensity integral (PIIin situ). A total of 60 rats was divided into three experimental groups of 20 animals per group and randomly exposed to pulsed ultrasound. The groups were exposed as follows: Group 1 to 0° polarity pulses (compression followed by rarefraction) at a pr(in situ) of 3.48 MPa and a PIIin situ of 4.78 Ws/m2, group 2 to 180° polarity pulses (rarefraction followed by compression) at a pr(in situ) of 3.72 MPa and a PIIin situ of 2.55 Ws/m2, and group 3 to 180° polarity pulses at a pr(in situ) of 4.97 MPa and a PIIin situ of 4.79 Ws/m2. For all experimental groups, the frequency was 2.46 MHz, the exposure duration was 240 s, the pulse repetition frequency was 2.5 kHz, and the pulse duration was 0.42 μs. Six sham animals were also randomly distributed among the experimental animals. The lesion surface area and depth were determined for each rat as well as lesion occurrence (percentage of rats with lesions) per group. It was found that lesion occurrence and size correlated better with PIIin situ than with pr(in situ), suggesting that a mechanism other than inertial cavitation was responsible for the damage.

  14. Humidity effects on tip-induced polarization switching in lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Ievlev, A. V.; Morozovska, A. N.; Shur, V. Ya.; Kalinin, S. V.

    2014-03-03

    In the last several decades, ferroelectrics have attracted much attention as perspective materials for nonlinear optics and data storage devices. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has emerged as a powerful tool both for studies of domain structures with nanoscale spatial resolution and for writing the isolated nanodomains by local application of the electric field. Quantitative analysis of the observed behavior requires understanding the role of environmental factors on imaging and switching process. Here, we study the influence of the relative humidity in the SPM chamber on tip-induced polarization switching. The observed effects are attributed to existence of a water meniscus between the tip and the sample surface in humid atmosphere. These results are important for a deeper understanding of complex investigations of ferroelectric materials and their applications and suggest the necessity for fundamental studies of electrocapillary phenomena at the tip-surface junction and their interplay with bias-induced materials responses.

  15. Polarization induced 2D hole gas in GaN/AlGaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackenbuchner, S.; Majewski, J. A.; Zandler, G.; Vogl, P.

    2001-09-01

    The generation of high density 2D hole gases is crucial for further progress in the electronic and optoelectronic nitride devices. In this paper, we present systematic theoretical studies of Mg-doped GaN/AlGaN gated heterostructures and superlattices. Our calculations are based on a self-consistent solution of the multiband k. p Schrödinger and Poisson equation and reveal that the hole 2D sheet density is mainly determined by the polarization induced interface charges. For an aluminium concentration of 30%, the induced hole density in the heterostructure can reach values up to 1.5×10 13 cm -2. In the GaN/AlGaN superlattices, the hole sheet density increases with the superlattice period and saturates for a period of 40 nm at a value of 1.5×10 13 cm -2.

  16. Wave trains induced by circularly polarized electric fields in cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Juan-Mei; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, cardiac fibrillation caused by spiral and turbulent waves can be terminated by globally resetting electric activity in cardiac tissues with a single high-voltage electric shock, but it is usually associated with severe side effects. Presently, a promising alternative uses wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a sequence of low-voltage uniform electric field pulses. Nevertheless, this method can only emit waves locally near obstacles in turbulent waves and thereby requires multiple obstacles to globally synchronize myocardium and thus to terminate fibrillation. Here we propose a new approach using wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a low-voltage circularly polarized electric field (i.e., a rotating uniform electric field). We find that, this approach can generate circular wave trains near obstacles and they propagate outwardly. We study the characteristics of such circular wave trains and further find that, the higher-frequency circular wave trains can effectively suppress spiral turbulence. PMID:26302781

  17. Wave trains induced by circularly polarized electric fields in cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Juan-Mei; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, cardiac fibrillation caused by spiral and turbulent waves can be terminated by globally resetting electric activity in cardiac tissues with a single high-voltage electric shock, but it is usually associated with severe side effects. Presently, a promising alternative uses wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a sequence of low-voltage uniform electric field pulses. Nevertheless, this method can only emit waves locally near obstacles in turbulent waves and thereby requires multiple obstacles to globally synchronize myocardium and thus to terminate fibrillation. Here we propose a new approach using wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a low-voltage circularly polarized electric field (i.e., a rotating uniform electric field). We find that, this approach can generate circular wave trains near obstacles and they propagate outwardly. We study the characteristics of such circular wave trains and further find that, the higher-frequency circular wave trains can effectively suppress spiral turbulence. PMID:26302781

  18. Humidity effects on tip-induced polarization switching in lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Ievlev, Anton; Morozovska, A. N.; Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    In the last several decades, ferroelectrics have attracted much attention as perspective materials for nonlinear optics and data storage devices. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has emerged as a powerful tool both for studies of domain structures with nanoscale spatial resolution and for writing the isolated nanodomains by local application of the electric field. Quantitative analysis of the observed behavior requires understanding the role of environmental factors on imaging and switching process. Here we study the influence of the relative humidity in the SPM chamber on tip-induced polarization switching. The observed effects are attributed to existence of a water meniscus between the tip and the sample surface in humid atmosphere. These results are important for a deeper understanding of complex investigations of ferroelectric materials and their applications, and suggest the necessity for fundamental studies of electrocapillary phenomena at the tip-surface junction and their interplay with bias-induced materials responses.

  19. Inhibition of cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative stress in rat brain by polar and non-polar extracts of Annatto (Bixa orellana) seeds.

    PubMed

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Akomolafe, Toyin L; Adefegha, Stephen A; Adetuyi, Abayomi O

    2011-03-01

    Annatto (Bixa orellana) seeds are widely distributed throughout the Tropics and have been used to provide both colour and flavour to food. This study sought to assess the ability of dietary inclusion of polar (water) and non-polar (chloroform) extracts of Annatto (B. orellana) seeds on cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative stress in rat brain. The total phenol content and antioxidant activities of polar (water) and non-polar (chloroform) extracts of Annatto seeds were determined in vitro and in vivo. The results of the study showed that intraperitoneal administration of cyclophosphamide (75 mg/kg of body weight) caused a significant increase (P<0.05) in the malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the brain; however, dietary inclusion of Annatto seed extracts (0.1% and 0.2%) caused dose-dependent significant decrease (P<0.05) in the MDA content of the brain. Likewise, the extracts also caused dose-dependent inhibition of the elevated serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin. However, the non-polar extract had significantly higher inhibitory effects on the elevated MDA production in brain and serum liver function markers. This higher protective effect of the non-polar extract could be attributed to its higher antioxidant properties as typified by its significantly higher (P<0.05) reducing power, free-radical scavenging and Fe (II) chelating ability. Therefore, dietary inclusion of Annato seed extracts as food colourant could prevent oxidative stress occasioned by cyclophosphamide administration, but the non-polar extract is a better protectant. PMID:20137904

  20. Anisotropic lattice response induced by a linearly-polarized femtosecond optical pulse excitation in interfacial phase change memory material.

    PubMed

    Makino, Kotaro; Saito, Yuta; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alexander V; Nakano, Takashi; Tominaga, Junji; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-01-01

    Optical excitation of matter with linearly-polarized femtosecond pulses creates a transient non-equilibrium lattice displacement along a certain direction. Here, the pump and probe pulse polarization dependence of the photo-induced ultrafast lattice dynamics in (GeTe)2/(Sb2Te3)4 interfacial phase change memory material is investigated under obliquely incident conditions. Drastic pump polarization dependence of the coherent phonon amplitude is observed when the probe polarization angle is parallel to the c-axis of the sample, while the pump polarization dependence is negligible when the probe polarization angle is perpendicular to the c-axis. The enhancement of phonon oscillation amplitude due to pump polarization rotation for a specific probe polarization angle is only found in the early time stage (≤2 ps). These results indicate that the origin of the pump and probe polarization dependence is dominantly attributable to the anisotropically-formed photo-excited carriers which cause the directional lattice dynamics. PMID:26805401

  1. Anisotropic lattice response induced by a linearly-polarized femtosecond optical pulse excitation in interfacial phase change memory material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Kotaro; Saito, Yuta; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Nakano, Takashi; Tominaga, Junji; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-01-01

    Optical excitation of matter with linearly-polarized femtosecond pulses creates a transient non-equilibrium lattice displacement along a certain direction. Here, the pump and probe pulse polarization dependence of the photo-induced ultrafast lattice dynamics in (GeTe)2/(Sb2Te3)4 interfacial phase change memory material is investigated under obliquely incident conditions. Drastic pump polarization dependence of the coherent phonon amplitude is observed when the probe polarization angle is parallel to the c–axis of the sample, while the pump polarization dependence is negligible when the probe polarization angle is perpendicular to the c–axis. The enhancement of phonon oscillation amplitude due to pump polarization rotation for a specific probe polarization angle is only found in the early time stage (≤2 ps). These results indicate that the origin of the pump and probe polarization dependence is dominantly attributable to the anisotropically-formed photo-excited carriers which cause the directional lattice dynamics.

  2. Anisotropic lattice response induced by a linearly-polarized femtosecond optical pulse excitation in interfacial phase change memory material

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Kotaro; Saito, Yuta; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Nakano, Takashi; Tominaga, Junji; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-01-01

    Optical excitation of matter with linearly-polarized femtosecond pulses creates a transient non-equilibrium lattice displacement along a certain direction. Here, the pump and probe pulse polarization dependence of the photo-induced ultrafast lattice dynamics in (GeTe)2/(Sb2Te3)4 interfacial phase change memory material is investigated under obliquely incident conditions. Drastic pump polarization dependence of the coherent phonon amplitude is observed when the probe polarization angle is parallel to the c–axis of the sample, while the pump polarization dependence is negligible when the probe polarization angle is perpendicular to the c–axis. The enhancement of phonon oscillation amplitude due to pump polarization rotation for a specific probe polarization angle is only found in the early time stage (≤2 ps). These results indicate that the origin of the pump and probe polarization dependence is dominantly attributable to the anisotropically-formed photo-excited carriers which cause the directional lattice dynamics. PMID:26805401

  3. Hierarchical Bayesian method for mapping biogeochemical hot spots using induced polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, Haruko M.; Flores Orozco, Adrian; Bücker, Matthias; Dafflon, Baptiste; Chen, Jinsong; Hubbard, Susan S.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    In floodplain environments, a naturally reduced zone (NRZ) is considered to be a common biogeochemical hot spot, having distinct microbial and geochemical characteristics. Although important for understanding their role in mediating floodplain biogeochemical processes, mapping the subsurface distribution of NRZs over the dimensions of a floodplain is challenging, as conventional wellbore data are typically spatially limited and the distribution of NRZs is heterogeneous. In this study, we present an innovative methodology for the probabilistic mapping of NRZs within a three-dimensional (3-D) subsurface domain using induced polarization imaging, which is a noninvasive geophysical technique. Measurements consist of surface geophysical surveys and drilling-recovered sediments at the U.S. Department of Energy field site near Rifle, CO (USA). Inversion of surface time domain-induced polarization (TDIP) data yielded 3-D images of the complex electrical resistivity, in terms of magnitude and phase, which are associated with mineral precipitation and other lithological properties. By extracting the TDIP data values colocated with wellbore lithological logs, we found that the NRZs have a different distribution of resistivity and polarization from the other aquifer sediments. To estimate the spatial distribution of NRZs, we developed a Bayesian hierarchical model to integrate the geophysical and wellbore data. In addition, the resistivity images were used to estimate hydrostratigraphic interfaces under the floodplain. Validation results showed that the integration of electrical imaging and wellbore data using a Bayesian hierarchical model was capable of mapping spatially heterogeneous interfaces and NRZ distributions thereby providing a minimally invasive means to parameterize a hydrobiogeochemical model of the floodplain.

  4. Highly polarized Th17 cells induce EAE via a T-bet-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Grifka-Walk, Heather M.; Lalor, Stephen J.; Segal, Benjamin M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In the MOG35-55 induced EAE model, autoreactive Th17 cells that accumulate in the central nervous system (CNS) acquire Th1 characteristics via a T-bet dependent mechanism. It remains to be determined whether Th17 plasticity and encephalitogenicity are causally related to each other. Here we show that IL-23 polarized Tbet−/− Th17 cells are unimpaired in either activation or proliferation, and induce higher quantities of the chemokines RANTES and CXCL2 than wildtype (WT) Th17 cells. Unlike their WT counterparts, they retain an IL-17hiIFNγneg-lo cytokine profile following adoptive transfer into syngeneic hosts. This population of highly polarized Th17 effectors is capable of mediating EAE, albeit with a milder clinical course. It has previously been reported that the signature Th1 and Th17 effector cytokines, IFNγ and IL-17, are dispensable for the development of autoimmune demyelinating disease. The current study demonstrates that the “master regulator” transcription factor, T-bet, is also not universally required for encephalitogenicity. Our results contribute to a growing body of data showing heterogeneity of myelin-reactive T cells and the independent mechanisms they employ to inflict damage to CNS tissues, complicating the search for therapeutic targets relevant across the spectrum of individuals with multiple sclerosis. PMID:23878008

  5. The use of the multiple-gradient array for geoelectrical resistivity and induced polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizebeokhai, Ahzegbobor P.; Oyeyemi, Kehinde D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of most conventional electrode configurations in electrical resistivity survey is often time consuming and labour intensive, especially when using manual data acquisition systems. Often, data acquisition teams tend to reduce data density so as to speed up field operation thereby reducing the survey cost; but this could significantly degrade the quality and resolution of the inverse models. In the present work, the potential of using the multiple-gradient array, a non-conventional electrode configuration, for practical cost effective and rapid subsurface resistivity and induced polarization mapping was evaluated. The array was used to conduct 2D resistivity and time-domain induced polarization imaging along two traverses in a study site at Ota, southwestern Nigeria. The subsurface was characterised and the main aquifer delineated using the inverse resistivity and chargeability images obtained. The performance of the multiple-gradient array was evaluated by correlating the 2D resistivity and chargeability images with those of the conventional Wenner array as well as the result of some soundings conducted along the same traverses using Schlumberger array. The multiple-gradient array has been found to have the advantage of measurement logistics and improved image resolution over the Wenner array.

  6. The role of polarization fields in Auger-induced efficiency droop in nitride-based light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Vaxenburg, Roman; Lifshitz, Efrat; Rodina, Anna; Efros, Alexander L.

    2013-11-25

    The rates of non-radiative Auger recombination (AR) and radiative recombination (RR) in polar GaN/AlN quantum wells (QWs) are calculated. It is shown that in these QWs the polarization field not only suppresses the RR but also strongly enhances the rate of AR. As a result, the polarization field triggers the Auger-induced efficiency droop, which, according to the calculations, does not exist in non-polar GaN/AlN QWs. We demonstrate that in polar QWs the droop can be overcome by suppression of AR using a gradual variation of the QW layer composition, which compensates the effect of the electric field acting on holes.

  7. Stress-induced birefringence and fabrication of in-fiber polarization devices by controlled femtosecond laser irradiations.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lei; Cheng, Baokai; Huang, Jie; Liu, Jie; Wang, Hanzheng; Lan, Xinwei; Xiao, Hai

    2016-01-25

    Optical birefringence was created in a single-mode fiber by introducing a series of symmetric cuboid stress rods on both sides of the fiber core along the fiber axis using a femtosecond laser. The stress-induced birefringence was estimated to be 2.4 × 10(-4) at the wavelength of 1550 nm. By adding the desired numbers of stressed rods, an in-fiber quarter waveplate was fabricated with a insertion loss of 0.19 dB. The stress-induced birefringence was further explored to fabricate in-fiber polarizers based on the polarization-dependent long-period fiber grating (LPFG) structure. A polarization extinction ratio of more than 20 dB was observed at the resonant wavelength of 1523.9 nm. The in-fiber polarization devices may be useful in optical communications and fiber optic sensing applications. PMID:26832490

  8. Electric-field-induced polar biaxial order in a nontilted smectic phase of an asymmetric bent-core liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Yoshio; Gorecka, Ewa; Pociecha, Damian; Araoka, Fumito; Goto, Masanao; Takanishi, Yoichi; Ishikawa, Ken; Mieczkowski, Jozef; Gomola, Kinga; Takezoe, Hideo

    2006-09-15

    A polarization reorientation process has been studied by means of optical second-harmonic generation in an optically uniaxial smectic phase of an asymmetric bent-core liquid crystal. A nontilted polar smectic order with a biaxial order is induced by applying an electric field to the uniaxial nonpolar smectic phase. This phenomenon was well simulated by the two-dimensional Langevin process, i.e., electric-field-induced continuous molecular reorientation against thermal agitation. The simulation suggests that about 200s of molecules form a polar domain and cooperatively respond to the applied field. The existence of the polar domains and their reorientation are consistent to the dielectric measurement; a high dielectric constant of about 60 at the kHz range is markedly suppressed by applying a bias field. PMID:17025886

  9. Study case - Induced Polarization response from a BTEX contaminated site in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustra, A.; Elis, V.; Minozzo, M.

    2011-12-01

    A hydrocarbon contaminated site in Brazil was investigated using DC-resistivity and Induced Polarization (IP) methods. The study area is a chemical industry facility that manufactures paint for automobiles. The industrial process involves the use of many hydrocarbon derivative products, including BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene) and organic chlorides. The area was contaminated by some (not documented) accidental spills of BTEX throughout many years. Monitoring wells revealed concentrations from a few ppm to hundreds ppm of BTEX around the area, as well as other compounds. Two soil samples were collected from an area where some spills where known to have happened. Soil analyses of these samples found the presence of microbes, and therefore biodegradation is believed to be occurring at the site. The objective of this study is to relate the IP response distribution to the presence of contamination and/or microbial activity. The geophysical survey consisted in a rectangular mesh composed of 15 parallel lines with 60 meters of extension, using dipole-dipole array. Lines were spaced by 3 meters. Metallic electrodes were used for current injection, and non-polarizing electrodes (Cu/CuSO4) for potential measurement. Current was injected in cycles of 2 seconds. IP measurements were recorded after 160 milliseconds delay of current shut off, and integration time windows were 120, 220, 420, and 820 milliseconds. All data were concatenated into a single data set and submitted to 3D inversion routine. A conductive zone (resistivity less than 100 ohm.m and chargeability less than 2mV/V) was observed where microbes were found. This feature was interpreted as possibly due to natural biodegradation process, that increases total dissolved salts as a result of mineral weathering by organic acids produced in the degradation process. Normalized chargeability (chargeability divided by resistivity) showed an enhanced polarization zone where microbes were detected. This result was interpreted as possibly due to growth and attachment of microbes to grain surfaces, increasing grain surface area and therefore polarization. These results are in good agreement with published studies relating conductivity and polarization increase with microbial activity. However, further research is need on the effect of microbial activity on normalized chargeability, since this parameter is very sensitive to lithology and surface chemistry. The results from this work could assist the interpretation of IP surveys at hydrocarbon-contaminated sites undergoing natural degradation and at bioremediation sites.

  10. Macrophage Polarization in IL-10 Treatment of Particle-Induced Inflammation and Osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianhao; Jia, Tanghong; Gong, Weiming; Ning, Bin; Wooley, Paul H; Yang, Shang-You

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the therapeutic influence and potential mechanism of IL-10 in ameliorating orthopedic debris particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis. A murine air pouch with bone implantation and polyethylene particles was also used to evaluate the therapeutic effects of IL-10. The data suggested that the particle challenges significantly promoted macrophage activation and osteoclastogenesis, with dramatically increased macrophage infiltration into the pouch membranes and elevated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cell deposition. Immunohistochemical stains revealed a significantly higher ratio of induced nitric oxide synthase-expressing cells in the particle-challenged group; treatment with IL-10 resulted in marked switching to CD163(+) cells. Also, IL-10 effectively reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive stained cells in the pouch membranes, and minimized the bone mineral density loss compared with untreated samples. Real-time PCR and Western blot examination indicated that IL-10 treatment significantly diminished the particle-induced IL-1β expression but promoted expression of CD163, transforming growth factor-β1, and CCR2. Furthermore, IL-10 significantly inhibited the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene particle-elevated phospho-STAT1 and phospho-NF-κB p65 productions, and promoted phospho-STAT3 expression. Overall, the data indicate the pivotal effects of IL-10 on macrophage polarization. The effects of IL-10 in ameliorating local inflammation and osteolysis may be associated with macrophage polarization through the up-regulation of the Janus activating kinase/STAT3 signaling pathway, and the down-regulation of NF-κB and Janus activating kinase/STAT1 expression. PMID:26597885

  11. NOS Inhibition Modulates Immune Polarization and Improves Radiation-Induced Tumor Growth Delay.

    PubMed

    Ridnour, Lisa A; Cheng, Robert Y S; Weiss, Jonathan M; Kaur, Sukhbir; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Basudhar, Debashree; Heinecke, Julie L; Stewart, C Andrew; DeGraff, William; Sowers, Anastasia L; Thetford, Angela; Kesarwala, Aparna H; Roberts, David D; Young, Howard A; Mitchell, James B; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Wiltrout, Robert H; Wink, David A

    2015-07-15

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are important mediators of progrowth signaling in tumor cells, as they regulate angiogenesis, immune response, and immune-mediated wound healing. Ionizing radiation (IR) is also an immune modulator and inducer of wound response. We hypothesized that radiation therapeutic efficacy could be improved by targeting NOS following tumor irradiation. Herein, we show enhanced radiation-induced (10 Gy) tumor growth delay in a syngeneic model (C3H) but not immunosuppressed (Nu/Nu) squamous cell carcinoma tumor-bearing mice treated post-IR with the constitutive NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). These results suggest a requirement of T cells for improved radiation tumor response. In support of this observation, tumor irradiation induced a rapid increase in the immunosuppressive Th2 cytokine IL10, which was abated by post-IR administration of L-NAME. In vivo suppression of IL10 using an antisense IL10 morpholino also extended the tumor growth delay induced by radiation in a manner similar to L-NAME. Further examination of this mechanism in cultured Jurkat T cells revealed L-NAME suppression of IR-induced IL10 expression, which reaccumulated in the presence of exogenous NO donor. In addition to L-NAME, the guanylyl cyclase inhibitors ODQ and thrombospondin-1 also abated IR-induced IL10 expression in Jurkat T cells and ANA-1 macrophages, which further suggests that the immunosuppressive effects involve eNOS. Moreover, cytotoxic Th1 cytokines, including IL2, IL12p40, and IFNγ, as well as activated CD8(+) T cells were elevated in tumors receiving post-IR L-NAME. Together, these results suggest that post-IR NOS inhibition improves radiation tumor response via Th1 immune polarization within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25990221

  12. Current-induced nonequilibrium spin polarization in semiconductor-nanowire/s-wave superconductor junctions with strong spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nai-Qing, Liu; Li-Jie, Huang; Rui-Qiang, Wang; Liang-Bin, Hu

    2016-02-01

    We have studied the characteristics of current-induced nonequilibrium spin polarization in semiconductor-nanowire/s-wave superconductor junctions with strong spin-orbit coupling. It was found that within some parameter regions the magnitude of the current-induced nonequilibrium spin polarization density in such structures will increase (or decrease) with the decrease (or increase) of the charge current density, in contrast to that found in normal spin-orbit coupled semiconductor structures. It was also found that the unusual characteristics of the current-induced nonequilibrium spin polarization in such structures can be well explained by the effect of the Andreev reflection. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474106).

  13. Composition Changes in the Polar Stratosphere and Mesosphere Induced by the 2003 Solar Proton Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Clarmann, T. V.; Fischer, H.; Gil-Lopez, S.; Glatthor, N.; Grabowski, U.; Hopfner, M.; Kellmann, S.; Kaufmann, M.; Kiefer, M.; Koukouli, M. E.; Linden, A.; Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Milz, M.; Steck, T.; Stiller, G. P.; Wang, D. Y.; Dudhia, A.

    2004-12-01

    The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) is a high-resolution limb sounder on board the European Space Agency ENVISAT satellite, successfully launched on March 1, 2002. MIPAS measures the atmospheric emission in the 4.15-14.6 ? m range with a spectral resolution of 0.05 cm-1 (apodised). The instrument scans the limb operationally from 6 km up to 68 km with a near-global latitude coverage both at day and nighttime. From MIPAS spectra many atmospheric constituents are retrieved, including O3, H2O, CH4, CO, and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2). We show in this paper the significant depletions measured in O3 at high latitudes above 35~km after the solar protons events of 28th October and 4th November 2003 in North and South polar caps. Depletions are also observed in water vapour. The temporal evolution of decreases in O3 of the changes in NOx (NO+NO2) and NOy (NOx, HNO3, N2O5, ClONO2) are shown. Increases of lower mesospheric NO2 of near 100 ppbv were measured by MIPAS. The temporal evolution of NO2, O3, and HNO3 along the winter 2003-2004 are also presented. The simultaneous measurements of such a large number of atmospheric species, with global coverage, obtained by MIPAS constitute an unprecedented dataset to study the atmospheric effects caused by large solar proton events.

  14. Orthogonal polarization mode coupling for pure twisted polarization maintaining fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Fang, Zujie; Pan, Zhengqing; Ye, Qing; Cai, Haiwen; Qu, Ronghui

    2012-12-17

    Spectral characteristics of orthogonal polarization mode coupling for pure twisted polarization maintaining fiber Bragg gratings (PM-FBG) are proposed and analyzed experimentally and theoretically. Different from the polarization mode coupling in PM-FBG due to side pressure, a resonant peak at the middle of two orthogonal polarization modes is found when the PM-FBG is twisted purely which is attributed to the cross coupling of polarization modes. Its intensity increases with the twisting rate. A new coupled mode equation is built to describe the pure twist polarization mode coupling, in which both the normal strain induced by strain-applied parts and the tangential strain induced by twisting are taken into consideration and expressed in a unified coordinate. The novel phenomenon and its explanation are believed to be helpful for PM-FBG applications in fiber sensor and laser technologies. PMID:23263124

  15. The X-ray spectrum and spectral energy distribution of FIRST J155633.8+351758: a LoBAL quasar with a probable polar outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrington, Robert C.; Brotherton, Michael S.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Ganguly, Rajib; Shang, Zhaohui; DiPompeo, Michael; Chatterjee, Ritaban; Lacy, Mark; Gregg, Michael D.; Hall, Patrick B.; Laurent-Muehleisen, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    We report the results of a new 60 ks Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer S-array (ACIS-S) observation of the reddened, radio-selected, highly polarized `FeLoBAL' quasar FIRST J1556+3517. We investigated a number of models of varied sophistication to fit the 531-photon spectrum. These models ranged from simple power laws to power laws absorbed by hydrogen gas in differing ionization states and degrees of partial covering. Preferred fits indicate that the intrinsic X-ray flux is consistent with that expected for quasars of similarly high luminosity, i.e. an intrinsic, dereddened and unabsorbed optical to X-ray spectral index of -1.7. We cannot tightly constrain the intrinsic X-ray power-law slope, but find indications that it is flat (photon index Γ = 1.7 or flatter at a >99 per cent confidence for a neutral hydrogen absorber model). Absorption is present, with a column density a few times 1023 cm-2, with both partially ionized models and partially covering neutral hydrogen models providing good fits. We present several lines of argument that suggest the fraction of X-ray emissions associated with the radio jet is not large. We combine our Chandra data with observations from the literature to construct the spectral energy distribution of FIRST J1556+3517 from radio to X-ray energies. We make corrections for Doppler beaming for the pole-on radio jet, optical dust reddening and X-ray absorption, in order to recover a probable intrinsic spectrum. The quasar FIRST J1556+3517 seems to be an intrinsically normal radio-quiet quasar with a reddened optical/UV spectrum, a Doppler-boosted but intrinsically weak radio jet and an X-ray absorber not dissimilar from that of other broad absorption line quasars.

  16. Influence of physical parameters to time domain induced polarization (TDIP) response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatini, Santoso, D.; Laesanpura, A.; Sulistijo, B.

    2016-03-01

    Induced Polarization (IP) method is one of geophysical method. This method is develop the resistivity method with additional measurement in ability of the ground to store electrical charge. Electrode polarization process is a major factor to the IP response in medium that contain metallic minerals. The relationship between the metallic mineral content and TDIP will be quantized. The TDIP response is influenced by porosity, grainsize, clay and metallic mineral content. Measurement is performed of artificial samples that made of iron ore mixed with quartz and cement. The samples are varied in iron ore content (0%-80%), grainsize (65-300) micron and clay content (0%-25%). If Fe-total content greather, then rise exponentially in chargeability M=1.53exp(0.029Fe). When the density becomes larger, chargeability rise exponentially M=0.347exp(0.852Dens). The presence of clay will enlarge the chargeability and minimize resistivity exponentially Rho=15.06exp(0.02C). Chargeability is lower and resistivity is higher for larger grainsize. Increasing water saturation will reduce the value of resistivity Rho=600,7exp(-0.028W) and Rho=191.4exp(- 0.025W) for Fe-total content of 28.3% and 21.2%, respectively.

  17. Induced polarization dependence on pore space geometry: Empirical observations and mechanistic predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, A.; Slater, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    We use an extensive database to compare empirical observations and previously proposed empirical models against recently developed mechanistic formulations for the induced polarization (IP) response in porous media as a function of pore space geometry and interfacial chemistry. These comparisons support the argument that the pore-volume normalized internal surface (Spor) is the most important geometric parameter influencing the polarization. The specific polarizability derived from the empirical relationship between imaginary conductivity σ″ and Spor is independent of the porosity. By contrast, equivalent specific polarizability terms in recently proposed mechanistic models are found to be significantly correlated with porosity, and thus do not appear to represent an interfacial chemistry factor independent of the pore space geometry. Furthermore, the database shows no evidence for a significant decrease in the counterion mobility of clayey materials relative to clay-free materials, as postulated in recent studies. On the contrary, a single value of cp is consistent with no significant differences in ionic mobility given that all samples were saturated with a NaCl solution close to a common salinity of about 100 mS/m.

  18. Nesprin-3 regulates endothelial cell morphology, perinuclear cytoskeletal architecture, and flow-induced polarization

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Joshua T.; Pfeiffer, Emily R.; Thirkill, Twanda L.; Kumar, Priyadarsini; Peng, Gordon; Fridolfsson, Heidi N.; Douglas, Gordon C.; Starr, Daniel A.; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in blood flow regulate gene expression and protein synthesis in vascular endothelial cells, and this regulation is involved in the development of atherosclerosis. How mechanical stimuli are transmitted from the endothelial luminal surface to the nucleus is incompletely understood. The linker of nucleus and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes have been proposed as part of a continuous physical link between the plasma membrane and subnuclear structures. LINC proteins nesprin-1, -2, and -4 have been shown to mediate nuclear positioning via microtubule motors and actin. Although nesprin-3 connects intermediate filaments to the nucleus, no functional consequences of nesprin-3 mutations on cellular processes have been described. Here we show that nesprin-3 is robustly expressed in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and localizes to the nuclear envelope. Nesprin-3 regulates HAEC morpho­logy, with nesprin-3 knockdown inducing prominent cellular elongation. Nesprin-3 also organizes perinuclear cytoskeletal organization and is required to attach the centrosome to the nuclear envelope. Finally, nesprin-3 is required for flow-induced polarization of the centrosome and flow-induced migration in HAECs. These results represent the most complete description to date of nesprin-3 function and suggest that nesprin-3 regulates vascular endothelial cell shape, perinuclear cytoskeletal architecture, and important aspects of flow-mediated mechanotransduction. PMID:21937718

  19. Creation of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Gases via Strain Induced Polarization at an Otherwise Nonpolar Complex Oxide Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Trier, Felix; Kasama, Takeshi; Christensen, Dennis V.; Bovet, Nicolas; Balogh, Zoltan I.; Li, Han; Thydén, Karl Tor Sune; Zhang, Wei; Yazdi, Sadegh; Norby, Poul; Pryds, Nini; Linderoth, Søren

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in SrTiO3-based heterostructures provides new opportunities for nanoelectronics. Herein, we create a new type of oxide 2DEG by the epitaxial-strain-induced polarization at an otherwise nonpolar perovskite-type interface of CaZrO3/SrTiO3. Remarkably, this heterointerface is atomically sharp, and exhibits a high electron mobility exceeding 60,000 cm2V-1s-1 at low temperatures. The 2DEG carrier density exhibits a critical dependence on the film thickness, in good agreement with the polarization induced 2DEG scheme.

  20. Creation of high mobility two-dimensional electron gases via strain induced polarization at an otherwise nonpolar complex oxide interface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunzhong; Trier, Felix; Kasama, Takeshi; Christensen, Dennis V; Bovet, Nicolas; Balogh, Zoltan I; Li, Han; Thydén, Karl Tor Sune; Zhang, Wei; Yazdi, Sadegh; Norby, Poul; Pryds, Nini; Linderoth, Søren

    2015-03-11

    The discovery of two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in SrTiO3-based heterostructures provides new opportunities for nanoelectronics. Herein, we create a new type of oxide 2DEG by the epitaxial-strain-induced polarization at an otherwise nonpolar perovskite-type interface of CaZrO3/SrTiO3. Remarkably, this heterointerface is atomically sharp and exhibits a high electron mobility exceeding 60,000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at low temperatures. The 2DEG carrier density exhibits a critical dependence on the film thickness, in good agreement with the polarization induced 2DEG scheme. PMID:25692804

  1. Angular distribution of products of ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bunakov, V. E. Kadmensky, S. G. Kadmensky, S. S.

    2008-11-15

    Within quantum fission theory, angular distributions of products originating from the ternary fission of nuclei that is induced by polarized cold and thermal neutrons are investigated on the basis of a non-evaporative mechanism of third-particle emission and a consistent description of fission-channel coupling. It is shown that the inclusion of Coriolis interaction both in the region of the discrete and in the region of the continuous spectrum of states of the system undergoing fission leads to T-odd correlations in the aforementioned angular distributions. The properties of the TRI and ROT effects discovered recently, which are due to the interference between the fission amplitudes of neutron resonances, are explored. The results obtained here are compared with their counterparts from classic calculations based on the trajectory method.

  2. Laser-induced damage in nonlinear crystals on irradiation direction and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hidetsugu; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Fujita, Hisanori; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Kamimura, Tomosumi; Yoshimura, Masashi; Sasaki, Takatomo; Miyamoto, Akio; Yoshida, Kunio

    2000-03-01

    Nonlinear-optical crystals are attractive materials for the high-power frequency converter with high damage threshold, phase matching characteristics, wide transparency range, and large effective nonlinear coefficients. Especially as to the power laser applications, its laser-induced damage threshold determines the limit of performance in the optical system. The threshold depends not only on the intrinsic material parameters but also on the laser beam parameters is use. We have investigated the bulk damage threshold of several crystals at a single-shot operation for frequency converter depending on the laser irradiation direction and its polarization. For KDP and CLBO crystals, the damage threshold in the direction of c-axis is about tow times higher than that in the a- or b-axis at 1.064 micrometers of wavelength. This result is consistent with the molecular bonding structure in different directions of the crystal. The relation between the bulk damage pattern and the crystal structure is also discussed.

  3. Electric field induced spin and valley polarization within a magnetically confined silicene channel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yiman; Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhou, Ma; Zhou, Guanghui; Long, Meng-Qiu

    2014-12-28

    We study the electronic structure and transport properties of Dirac electrons along a channel created by an exchange field through the proximity of ferromagnets on a silicene sheet. The multiple total internal reflection induces localized states in the channel, which behaves like an electron waveguide. An effect of spin- and valley-filtering originating from the coupling between valley and spin degrees is predicted for such a structure. Interestingly, this feature can be tuned significantly by locally applying electric and exchange fields simultaneously. The parameter condition for observing fully spin- and valley-polarized current is obtained. These findings may be observable in todays' experimental technique and useful for spintronic and valleytronic applications based on silicene.

  4. Mapping polarization induced surface band bending on the Rashba semiconductor BiTeI

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Christopher John; Yang, Hung-Hsiang; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Hsu, Shih-Hao; Sankar, Raman; Lu, Chun-I; Lu, Hsin-Yu; Yang, Kui-Hon Ou; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Kaun, Chao-Cheng; Shu, Guo-Jiun; Chou, Fang-Cheng; Lin, Minn-Tsong

    2014-01-01

    Surfaces of semiconductors with strong spin-orbit coupling are of great interest for use in spintronic devices exploiting the Rashba effect. BiTeI features large Rashba-type spin splitting in both valence and conduction bands. Either can be shifted towards the Fermi level by surface band bending induced by the two possible polar terminations, making Rashba spin-split electron or hole bands electronically accessible. Here we demonstrate the first real-space microscopic identification of each termination with a multi-technique experimental approach. Using spatially resolved tunnelling spectroscopy across the lateral boundary between the two terminations, a previously speculated on p-n junction-like discontinuity in electronic structure at the lateral boundary is confirmed experimentally. These findings realize an important step towards the exploitation of the unique behaviour of the Rashba semiconductor BiTeI for new device concepts in spintronics. PMID:24898943

  5. COMPLEX RESISTIVITY OF FAULT GOUGE AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE FOR EARTHQUAKE LIGHTS AND INDUCED POLARIZATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, David A.; Byerlee, James D.

    1985-01-01

    The authors measured complex resistivity of 2 water-saturated San Andreas fault gouges from 10** minus **3 to 10**6 Hz and confining pressures of 0. 2 to 200 MPa. Consistent with earlier observations of clays and common rocks, large low-frequency permittivities were observed in all cases. Comparisons were made to induced polarization (IP) measurements by inversion of the data into the time domain, where it was found that principal features of the IP response curves were due to these large low-frequency permittivities. The results also suggest that following large earthquakes, significant electrical charge could remain for many seconds and could result in a variety of reported electromagnetic effects. Refs.

  6. Power spectral analysis of hypoglossal nerve activity during intermittent hypoxia-induced long-term facilitation in mice.

    PubMed

    ElMallah, Mai K; Stanley, David A; Lee, Kun-Ze; Turner, Sara M F; Streeter, Kristi A; Baekey, David M; Fuller, David D

    2016-03-01

    Power spectral analyses of electrical signals from respiratory nerves reveal prominent oscillations above the primary rate of breathing. Acute exposure to intermittent hypoxia can induce a form of neuroplasticity known as long-term facilitation (LTF), in which inspiratory burst amplitude is persistently elevated. Most evidence indicates that the mechanisms of LTF are postsynaptic and also that high-frequency oscillations within the power spectrum show coherence across different respiratory nerves. Since the most logical interpretation of this coherence is that a shared presynaptic mechanism is responsible, we hypothesized that high-frequency spectral content would be unchanged during LTF. Recordings of inspiratory hypoglossal (XII) activity were made from anesthetized, vagotomized, and ventilated 129/SVE mice. When arterial O2 saturation (SaO2) was maintained >96%, the XII power spectrum and burst amplitude were unchanged for 90 min. Three, 1-min hypoxic episodes (SaO2 = 50 ± 10%), however, caused a persistent (>60 min) and robust (>400% baseline) increase in burst amplitude. Spectral analyses revealed a rightward shift of the signal content during LTF, with sustained increases in content above ∼125 Hz following intermittent hypoxia and reductions in power at lower frequencies. Changes in the spectral content during LTF were qualitatively similar to what occurred during the acute hypoxic response. We conclude that high-frequency content increases during XII LTF in this experimental preparation; this may indicate that intermittent hypoxia-induced plasticity in the premotor network contributes to expression of XII LTF. PMID:26683067

  7. Spectral lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA) and collision-induced light scattering (CILS) for molecular nitrogen using isotropic intermolecular potential. New insights and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kader, M. S. A.; Mostafa, S. I.; Bancewicz, T.; Maroulis, G.

    2014-08-01

    The rototranslational collision-induced absorption (CIA) at different temperatures and collision-induced light scattering (CILS) at room temperature of nitrogen gas are analyzed in terms of new isotropic intermolecular potential, multipole-induced dipole functions and interaction-induced pair polarizability models, using quantum spectral lineshape computations. The irreducible spherical form for the induced operator of light scattering mechanisms was determined. The high frequency wings are discussed in terms of the collision-induced rotational Rayleigh effect and estimates for the dipole-octopole polarizability E4, is obtained and checked with the ab initio theoretical value. The quality of the present potential has been checked by comparing between calculated and experimental thermo-physical and transport properties over a wide temperature range, which are found to be in good agreement.

  8. Field Trials of the Multi-Source Approach for Resistivity and Induced Polarization Data Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBrecque, D. J.; Morelli, G.; Fischanger, F.; Lamoureux, P.; Brigham, R.

    2013-12-01

    Implementing systems of distributed receivers and transmitters for resistivity and induced polarization data is an almost inevitable result of the availability of wireless data communication modules and GPS modules offering precise timing and instrument locations. Such systems have a number of advantages; for example, they can be deployed around obstacles such as rivers, canyons, or mountains which would be difficult with traditional 'hard-wired' systems. However, deploying a system of identical, small, battery powered, transceivers, each capable of injecting a known current and measuring the induced potential has an additional and less obvious advantage in that multiple units can inject current simultaneously. The original purpose for using multiple simultaneous current sources (multi-source) was to increase signal levels. In traditional systems, to double the received signal you inject twice the current which requires you to apply twice the voltage and thus four times the power. Alternatively, one approach to increasing signal levels for large-scale surveys collected using small, battery powered transceivers is it to allow multiple units to transmit in parallel. In theory, using four 400 watt transmitters on separate, parallel dipoles yields roughly the same signal as a single 6400 watt transmitter. Furthermore, implementing the multi-source approach creates the opportunity to apply more complex current flow patterns than simple, parallel dipoles. For a perfect, noise-free system, multi-sources adds no new information to a data set that contains a comprehensive set of data collected using single sources. However, for realistic, noisy systems, it appears that multi-source data can substantially impact survey results. In preliminary model studies, the multi-source data produced such startling improvements in subsurface images that even the authors questioned their veracity. Between December of 2012 and July of 2013, we completed multi-source surveys at five sites with depths of exploration ranging from 150 to 450 m. The sites included shallow geothermal sites near Reno Nevada, Pomarance Italy, and Volterra Italy; a mineral exploration site near Timmins Quebec; and a landslide investigation near Vajont Dam in northern Italy. These sites provided a series of challenges in survey design and deployment including some extremely difficult terrain and a broad range of background resistivity and induced values. Despite these challenges, comparison of multi-source results to resistivity and induced polarization data collection with more traditional methods support the thesis that the multi-source approach is capable of providing substantial improvements in both depth of penetration and resolution over conventional approaches.

  9. Vapor-liquid Equilibria and Polarization Behavior of the GCP Water Model: Gaussian Charge-on-spring versus Dipole Self-consistent Field approaches to induced polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Moucka, Filip; Vlcek, Lukas; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    We implemented the Gaussian charge-on-spring (GCOS) version of the original self-consistent field implementation of the Gaussian Charge Polarizable water model and test its accuracy to represent the polarization behavior of the original model involving smeared charges and induced dipole moments. For that purpose we adapted the recently developed multiple-particle-move (MPM) within the Gibbs and isochoric-isothermal ensembles Monte Carlo methods for the efficient simulation of polarizable fluids. We assessed the accuracy of the GCOS representation by a direct comparison of the resulting vapor-liquid phase envelope, microstructure, and relevant microscopic descriptors of water polarization along the orthobaric curve against the corresponding quantities from the actual GCP water model.

  10. Vapor-liquid Equilibria and Polarization Behavior of the GCP Water Model: Gaussian Charge-on-spring versus Dipole Self-consistent Field approaches to induced polarization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Moucka, Filip; Vlcek, Lukas; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    We implemented the Gaussian charge-on-spring (GCOS) version of the original self-consistent field implementation of the Gaussian Charge Polarizable water model and test its accuracy to represent the polarization behavior of the original model involving smeared charges and induced dipole moments. For that purpose we adapted the recently developed multiple-particle-move (MPM) within the Gibbs and isochoric-isothermal ensembles Monte Carlo methods for the efficient simulation of polarizable fluids. We assessed the accuracy of the GCOS representation by a direct comparison of the resulting vapor-liquid phase envelope, microstructure, and relevant microscopic descriptors of water polarization along the orthobaric curve against the corresponding quantitiesmore » from the actual GCP water model.« less

  11. Detector-level spectral characterization of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite long-wave infrared bands M15 and M16.

    PubMed

    Padula, Francis; Cao, Changyong

    2015-06-01

    The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor data record (SDR) product achieved validated maturity status in March 2014 after roughly two years of on-orbit characterization (S-NPP spacecraft launched on 28 October 2011). During post-launch analysis the VIIRS Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Environmental Data Record (EDR) team observed an anomalous striping pattern in the daytime SST data. Daytime SST retrievals use the two VIIRS long-wave infrared bands: M15 (10.7 μm) and M16 (11.8 μm). To assess possible root causes due to detector-level spectral response function (SRF) effects, a study was conducted to compare the radiometric response of the detector-level and operational-band averaged SRFs of VIIRS bands M15 and M16. The study used simulated hyperspectral blackbody radiance data and clear-sky ocean hyperspectral radiances under different atmospheric conditions. It was concluded that the SST product is likely impacted by small differences in detector-level SRFs and that if users require optimal radiometric performance, detector-level processing is recommended for both SDR and EDR products. Future work should investigate potential SDR product improvements through detector-level processing in support of the generation of Suomi NPP VIIRS climate quality SDRs. PMID:26192672

  12. Enhancing Inhibition-Induced Plasticity in Tinnitus – Spectral Energy Contrasts in Tailor-Made Notched Music Matter

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Alwina; Engell, Alva; Lau, Pia; Wunderlich, Robert; Junghoefer, Markus; Wollbrink, Andreas; Bruchmann, Maximilian; Rudack, Claudia; Pantev, Christo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus seems to be caused by reduced inhibition among frequency selective neurons in the auditory cortex. One possibility to reduce tinnitus perception is to induce inhibition onto over-activated neurons representing the tinnitus frequency via tailor-made notched music (TMNM). Since lateral inhibition is modifiable by spectral energy contrasts, the question arises if the effects of inhibition-induced plasticity can be enhanced by introducing increased spectral energy contrasts (ISEC) in TMNM. Eighteen participants suffering from chronic tonal tinnitus, pseudo randomly assigned to either a classical TMNM or an ISEC-TMNM group, listened to notched music for three hours on three consecutive days. The music was filtered for both groups by introducing a notch filter centered at the individual tinnitus frequency. For the ISEC-TMNM group a frequency bandwidth of 3/8 octaves on each side of the notch was amplified, additionally, by about 20 dB. Before and after each music exposure, participants rated their subjectively perceived tinnitus loudness on a visual analog scale. During the magnetoencephalographic recordings, participants were stimulated with either a reference tone of 500 Hz or a test tone with a carrier frequency representing the individual tinnitus pitch. Perceived tinnitus loudness was significantly reduced after TMNM exposure, though TMNM type did not influence the loudness ratings. Tinnitus related neural activity in the N1m time window and in the so called tinnitus network comprising temporal, parietal and frontal regions was reduced after TMNM exposure. The ISEC-TMNM group revealed even enhanced inhibition-induced plasticity in a temporal and a frontal cortical area. Overall, inhibition of tinnitus related neural activity could be strengthened in people affected with tinnitus by increasing spectral energy contrast in TMNM, confirming the concepts of inhibition-induced plasticity via TMNM and spectral energy contrasts. PMID:25951605

  13. Frequency-induced polarization bistability in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with orthogonal optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gatare, I.; Panajotov, K.; Sciamanna, M.

    2007-02-15

    We report theoretically on a pure frequency-induced polarization bistability in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) subject to orthogonal optical injection, i.e., the master laser light polarization is orthogonal to that of the slave VCSEL. As the frequency detuning is scanned from negative to positive values and for a fixed injected power, the VCSEL exhibits two successive and possibly bistable polarization switchings. The first switching (from the slave laser polarization to the injected light polarization) exhibits a bistable region whose width is maximum for a given value of the injected power. Such a dependency of hysteresis width on the injected power is similar to that recently found experimentally by Hong et al.[Electron. Lett. 36, 2019 (2000)]. The bistability accompanying the second switching (from the injected light polarization back to the slave laser free-running polarization) exhibits, however, significantly different features related to the occurrence of optical chaos. Interestingly, the width of the bistable region can be tuned over a large range not only by modifying the injection parameters but also by modifying the device parameters, in particular the VCSEL linewidth enhancement factor.

  14. Luminescence of nuclear-induced rare-gas plasmas in near infrared spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, A. A.; Gorbunov, V. V.; Melnikov, S. P.; Mukhamatullin, A. Kh.; Pikulev, A. A.; Sinitsyn, A. V.; Sinyanskii, A. A.; Tsvetkov, V. M.

    2006-05-01

    The investigation results of the spectral-luminescent characteristics of rare gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe and their binary mixtures He-Ne(Ar,Kr,Xe), Ne-Ar(Kr,Xe), Ar-Kr(Xe), and Kr-Xe under high pressures in the 740-1100 nm spectral range are presented. Excitation of gas media was carried out by uranium fission fragments. The information on the absolute intensities of the spectral lines belonging to the transitions of Nel, An, KrI, and XeI was obtained. The lines belonging to atomic transitions of 0, N, and C were also observed.

  15. Laser induced infrared spectral shift of the MgB2:Cr superconductor films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlZayed, N. S.; Kityk, I. V.; Soltan, S.; El-Naggar, A. M.; Shahabuddin, M.

    2015-02-01

    During illumination of the MgB2:Cr2O3 films it was established substantial spectral shift of the infrared spectra in the vicinity of 20-50 cm-1. The excitations were performed by nanosecond Er:glass laser operating at 1.54 μm and by microsecond 10.6 μm CO2 laser. The spectral shifts of the IR maxima were in opposite spectral directions for the two types of lasers. This one observed difference correlates well with spectral shift of their critical temperatures. The possible explanation is given by performance of DFT calculations of the charge density redistribution and the time kinetics of the photovoltaic response. To understand the kinetics of the photoinduced processes the time kinetics of photoresponse was done for the particular laser wavelengths.

  16. Interferon Tau Alleviates Obesity-Induced Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Insulin Resistance by Regulating Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wei; Kanameni, Srikanth; Chang, Cheng-An; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Safe, Stephen; Bazer, Fuller W.; Zhou, Beiyan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic adipose tissue inflammation is a hallmark of obesity-induced insulin resistance and anti-inflammatory agents can benefit patients with obesity-associated syndromes. Currently available type I interferons for therapeutic immunomodulation are accompanied by high cytotoxicity and therefore in this study we have examined anti-inflammatory effects of interferon tau (IFNT), a member of the type I interferon family with low cellular toxicity even at high doses. Using a diet-induced obesity mouse model, we observed enhanced insulin sensitivity in obese mice administered IFNT compared to control mice, which was accompanied by a significant decrease in secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and elevated anti-inflammatory macrophages (M2) in adipose tissue. Further investigations revealed that IFNT is a potent regulator of macrophage activation that favors anti-inflammatory responses as evidenced by activation of associated surface antigens, production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and activation of selective cell signaling pathways. Thus, our study demonstrates, for the first time, that IFNT can significantly mitigate obesity-associated systemic insulin resistance and tissue inflammation by controlling macrophage polarization, and thus IFNT can be a novel bio-therapeutic agent for treating obesity-associated syndromes and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24905566

  17. Non-coherent continuum scattering as a line polarization mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Del Pino Alemán, T.; Manso Sainz, R.; Trujillo Bueno, J. E-mail: rsainz@iac.es

    2014-03-20

    Line scattering polarization can be strongly affected by Rayleigh scattering at neutral hydrogen and Thomson scattering at free electrons. Often a depolarization of the continuum results, but the Doppler redistribution produced by the continuum scatterers, which are light (hence, fast), induces more complex interactions between the polarization in spectral lines and in the continuum. Here we formulate and solve the radiative transfer problem of scattering line polarization with non-coherent continuum scattering consistently. The problem is formulated within the spherical tensor representation of atomic and light polarization. The numerical method of solution is a generalization of the Accelerated Lambda Iteration that is applied to both the atomic system and the radiation field. We show that the redistribution of the spectral line radiation due to the non-coherence of the continuum scattering may modify the shape of the emergent fractional linear polarization patterns significantly, even yielding polarization signals above the continuum level in intrinsically unpolarizable lines.

  18. Solar-blind AlxGa1-xN/AlN/SiC photodiodes with a polarization-induced electron filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodak, L. E.; Sampath, A. V.; Gallinat, C. S.; Chen, Y.; Zhou, Q.; Campbell, J. C.; Shen, H.; Wraback, M.

    2013-08-01

    Heterogeneous n-III-nitride/i-p silicon carbide (SiC) photodetectors have been demonstrated that enable the tailoring of the spectral response in the solar blind region below 280 nm. The negative polarization induced charge at the aluminum gallium nitride (AlxGa1-xN)/aluminum nitride (AlN) interface in conjunction with the positive polarization charge at the AlN/SiC interface creates a large barrier to carrier transport across the interface that results in the selective collection of electrons photoexcited to the Γ and L valleys of SiC while blocking the transport of electrons generated in the M valley. In addition, the AlxGa1-xN alloys act as transparent windows that enhance the collection of carriers generated by high energy photons in the fully depleted SiC absorption regions. These two factors combine to create a peak external quantum efficiency of 76% at 242 nm, along with a strong suppression of the long-wavelength response from 260 nm to 380 nm.

  19. Temperature dependence of carrier spin polarization determined from current-induced domain wall motion in a Co/Ni nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, K.; Koyama, T.; Hiramatsu, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Ono, T.; Chiba, D.; Fukami, S.; Tanigawa, H.; Suzuki, T.; Ohshima, N.; Ishiwata, N.; Nakatani, Y.

    2012-05-14

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion in a perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni nanowire at various temperatures and with various applied currents. The carrier spin polarization was estimated from the measured domain wall velocity. We found that it decreased more with increasing temperature from 100 K to 530 K than the saturation magnetization did.

  20. The spectral maps of dynamic speckle patterns: A new perspective to look at the motion-induced spatiotemporal cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dake; Ranger, James

    2015-06-01

    We introduce the spectral map method as a means to visualize the spatiotemporal correlation in dynamic speckles. Dynamic speckle patterns of moving diffuse objects are Fourier transformed to construct spectral maps in spatial domain (r-space) and spatial-frequency domain (k-space). The periodic patterns in r-space spectral maps demonstrate the spatiotemporal cross-correlation induced by the directional motions. To resolve the spectral bands in k-space spectral maps, and to observe the concomitant appearance of the periodic pattern in r-space spectral maps, the frequency must exceed the minimum values given by the speckle size and the speed. A bigger speckle size helps to reveal fast dynamics, and to ease the requirement on the minimum frequency. The transition from ordered translational speckles to chaotic boiling speckles at different speeds and speckle sizes is elucidated in connection with the change observed in spectral maps.

  1. Over-limiting currents and deionization "shocks" in current-induced polarization: local-equilibrium analysis.

    PubMed

    Yaroshchuk, Andriy

    2012-11-15

    The problem is considered theoretically of dynamics of current-induced concentration polarization of interfaces between ideally perm-selective and non-ideally perm-selective ("leaky") ion-exchange media in binary electrolyte solutions under galvanostatic conditions and at negligible volume flow. In contrast to the previous studies, the analysis is systematically carried out in terms of local thermodynamic equilibrium in the approximation of local electric neutrality in virtual solution. For macroscopically homogeneous media, this enables one to obtain model-independent results in quadratures for the stationary state as well as an approximate scaling-form solution for the transient response to the step-wise increase in electric-current density. These results are formulated in terms of such phenomenological properties of the "leaky" medium as ion transport numbers, diffusion permeability to salt and specific chemical capacity. An easy-to-solve numerically 1D PDE is also formulated in the same terms. A systematic parametric study is carried out within the scope of fine-pore model of "leaky" medium in terms of such properties as volumetric concentration of fixed electric charges and diffusivities of ions of symmetrical electrolyte. While previous studies paid principal attention to the shape and propagation rate of the so-called deionization "shocks", we also consider in detail the time evolution of voltage drop and interface salt concentration. Our analysis confirms the previously predicted pattern of propagating deionization "shocks" within the "leaky" medium but also reveals several novel features. In particular, we demonstrate that the deionization-shock pattern is really pronounced only at intermediate ratios of fixed-charge concentration to the initial salt concentration and at quite high steady-state voltages where the model used in this and previous studies is applicable only at relatively early stages of concentration-polarization process. PMID:22947188

  2. Application of time domain induced polarization to the mapping of lithotypes in a landfill site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazoty, A.; Fiandaca, G.; Pedersen, J.; Auken, E.; Christiansen, A. V.; Pedersen, J. K.

    2012-06-01

    A direct current (DC) resistivity and time domain induced polarization (TDIP) survey was undertaken at a decommissioned landfill site situated in Hørløkke, Denmark, for the purpose of mapping the waste deposits and to discriminate important geological units that control the hydrology of the surrounding area. It is known that both waste deposits and clay have clear signatures in TDIP data, making it possible to enhance the resolution of geological structures compared to DC surveys alone. Four DC/TDIP profiles were carried out crossing the landfill, and another seven profiles in the surroundings provide a sufficiently dense coverage of the entire area. The whole dataset was inverted using a 1-D laterally constrained inversion scheme, recently implemented for TDIP data, in order to use the entire decay curves for reconstructing the electrical parameters of the soil in terms of the Cole-Cole polarization model. Results show that it is possible to resolve both the geometry of the buried waste body and key geological structures. In particular, it was possible to find a silt/clay lens at depth that correlates with the flow direction of the pollution plume spreading out from the landfill and to map a shallow sandy layer rich in clay that likely has a strong influence on the hydrology of the site. This interpretation of the geophysical findings was constrained by borehole data, in terms of geology and gamma ray logging. The results of this study are important for the impact of the resolved geological units on the hydrology of the area, making it possible to construct more realistic scenarios of the variation of the pollution plume as a function of the climate change.

  3. Application of time domain induced polarization to the mapping of lithotypes in a landfill site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazoty, A.; Fiandaca, G.; Pedersen, J.; Auken, E.; Christiansen, A. V.; Pedersen, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    A DC resistivity (DC) and Time Domain Induced Polarization (TDIP) survey was undertaken at a decommissioned landfill site situated in Hørløkke, Denmark, for the purpose of mapping the waste deposits and to discriminate important geological units that control the hydrology of the surrounding area. It is known that both waste deposits and clay have clear signatures in TDIP data, making possible to enhance the resolution of geological structures, when compared to DC surveys alone. Four DC/TDIP profiles were carried out crossing the landfill and another seven profiles in the surroundings, giving a dense coverage over the entire area. The whole dataset was inverted using a 1-D Laterally Constrained Inversion scheme, recently implemented for IP data, in order to use the entire decay curves for reconstructing the electrical parameters of the soil in terms of the Cole-Cole polarization model. Results show that it is possible to both resolve the geometry of the buried waste body and key geological structures. In particular, it was possible to find a silt/clay lens at depth, which correlates with the flow direction of the pollution plume spreading out from the landfill, and to map a shallow sandy layer rich in clay that likely has a strong influence on the hydrology of the site. This interpretation of the geophysical findings was constrained by boreholes data, in terms of geology and gamma ray logging. The results of this study are important for the impact that the resolved geological units have in the hydrology of the area, making it possible to construct more realistic scenarios of the variation of the pollution plume as a function of the climate change.

  4. Resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of salt transport under natural hydraulic gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, L.D.; Sandberg, S.K.

    2000-04-01

    The authors demonstrate the use of resistivity/induced polarization (IP) monitoring of salt transport under natural hydraulic loads. Electrical monitoring of saline tracer transport during forced injection has been demonstrated previously. Detection of tracer transport under natural hydraulic loading is difficult because neither the hydraulic load nor the tracer resistivity can be controlled. In one study, the authors identify the electrical response to salt transport in a dynamic beach environment. Resistivity/IP imagine resolved the structure of the saltwater-freshwater interface and evidence for tide-induced groundwater transport. Resistivity increases in the near surface and at depth, upbeach of the high-tide mark, accompanied by tidal transgression. They attribute this to desaturation and decreasing salinity in the near surface and to decreasing salinity at depth, despite tidal transgression. Monitoring of groundwater levels indicates a phase lag between the tide level and groundwater level, supporting the electrical data. IP was insensitive to groundwater salinity variation. In a second study, the authors identify the electrical response to recharge-induced salt transport from a road-sale storage facility. Conductivity and IP models for monitoring lines, located on the basis of an EM31 survey, resolved the subsurface salt distribution, IP modeling resolved the sediment-bedrock interface. Modeling of monthly conductivity differences revealed conductivity increases and decreases at the locations of salt contamination, which correlate with the recharge pattern. They attribute near-surface conductivity increases after heavy rainfall to increasing saturation and ion dissolution. Corresponding conductivity decreases at depth are attributed to flushing of the bedrock with freshwater. Essentially, the opposite response was observed during a quiet monitoring period following heavy recharge. Near-surface IP changes are consistent with this interpretation. Salt transport occurring under natural hydraulic conditions was monitored with resistivity imaging. IP improved characterization of the hydrogeologic framework but was of limited value in monitoring salt transport in these environments.

  5. Residual-Charge Induced Memory Effect of Electric Polarization in Multiferroic CuFe1-xGaxO2 as Seen via Polarized Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Taro; Mitsuda, Setsuo; Yamazaki, Hiroe; Matsuura, Masato

    2013-02-01

    We have investigated ferroelectric polarization memory effect in a magneto-electric (ME) multiferroic CuFe1-x GaxO2 (CFGO) with x=0.035, which exhibits a spin-driven ferroelectric phase below TC 7 K in zero magnetic field. In a previous study on CFGO(x=0.035), we have reported that the ferroelectric polarization induced by an applied electric field is retrieved after heating the sample to a non-ferroelectric high-temperature phase and then cooling down to the ferroelectric phase without electric field. [Mitsuda et al. Physica B 404 (2009) 2532] By measuring thermally stimulated electric current in detail, the previous study has elucidated that residual charges trapped in the sample are relevant to the memory effect. In the present study, we have performed polarized neutron diffraction measurements on CFGO(x=0.035) with applied electric fields, in order to investigate the multiferroic domain structure, which can reflect spatial distribution of internal electric fields due to the trapped charges. The present results have shown that the effect of the internal electric fields is significantly different from that of the ``uniform'' electric field applied on the first cooling. To explain the present results, we suggest a model that the residual charges are trapped on boundaries between the three types of magnetic domains originating from the trigonal symmetry of the crystal, implying that the presence of the bound charges of the ferroelectric polarization on the domain boundaries is a key to the memory effect in this system.

  6. Gamma-Ray Polarization Induced by Cold Electrons via Compton Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhe; Jiang, Yunguo; Lin, Hai-Nan

    2013-05-01

    The polarization measurement is an important tool to probe the prompt emission mechanism in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The synchrotron photons can be scattered by cold electrons in the outflow via Compton scattering (CS) processes. The observed polarization depends on both the photon energy and the viewing angle. With the typical bulk Lorentz factor Γ ~ 200, photons with energy E > 10 MeV tend to have smaller polarization than photons with energy E < 1 MeV. At the right viewing angle, i.e., θ ~ Γ-1, the polarization achieves its maximal value, and the polarization angle changes 90° relative to the initial polarization direction. Thus, the synchrotron radiation plus CS model can naturally explain the 90° change of the polarization angle in GRB 100826A.

  7. Enhanced inline conversion of fiber Bragg grating spectra based on increased polarization controllability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Wook; Sung Koo, Ja; Wan Lee, Yong; Oh, Junghwan; Wook Lee, Yong

    2013-04-01

    We have demonstrated enhanced spectral conversion of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) incorporating a polarization-diversity loop configuration (PDLC) with increased degree of freedom (DOF) in polarization control through the addition of wave plates. The proposed apparatus for spectral conversion consists of a four-port polarization beam splitter for constructing the PDLC, an FBG, and three wave plates including one half-wave and two quarter-wave plates. In the previous study using only two wave plates, slight birefringence of single-mode fibers connecting optical elements within the polarization-diversity loop induced random changes of states of polarization (SOPs), resulting in the spectral degradation. In this approach, the increased number of wave plates could complement it by providing a higher DOF in controlling SOPs and significantly improve spectral performances of the fabricated filter such as an insertion loss, side-mode suppression ratio, and band-rejection ratio.

  8. Temporal evolution of the spectral lines emission and temperatures in laser induced plasmas through characteristic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredice, F.; Pacheco Martinez, P.; Sánchez-Aké, C.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose an extended Boltzmann plot method to determine the usefulness of spectral lines for plasma parameter calculations. Based on the assumption that transient plasmas are under ideal conditions during an specific interval of time Δt, (i.e. thin, homogeneous and in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE)), the associated Boltzmann plots describe a surface in the space defined by the coordinates X = Energy, Y = Time and Z = ln (λjlIj/gjAjl), where Ij is the integrated intensity of the spectral line, gj is the statistical weight of the level j, λjl is the wavelength of the considered line and Ajl is its transition rate. In order to express the Boltzmann plot surface in terms of a reduced set of constants Bi, and δi, we developed as a power series of time, the logarithm of In(t)/In(t0), where In(t) is the integrated intensity of any spectral line at time t, and In(t0) at initial time. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the intensity of any spectral line and consequently the temperature of the plasma can be also expressed with these constants. The comparison of the temporal evolution of the line intensity calculated using these constants with their experimental values, can be used as a criterion for selecting useful lines in plasma analysis. Furthermore, this method can also be applied to determine self-absorption or enhancement of the spectral lines, to evaluate a possible departure of LTE, and to check or estimate the upper level energy value of any spectral line. An advantage of this method is that the value of these constants does not depend on the spectral response of the detection system, the uncertainty of the transition rates belonging to the analyzed spectral lines or any other time-independent parameters. In order to prove our method, we determined the constants Bi and δi and therefore the Boltzmann plot surface from the temporal evolution of carbon lines obtained from a plasma generated by a Nd:YAG laser. The plasma was produced in vacuum and was observed at different distances from the target. A good agreement between the temperature calculated by the traditional Boltzmann plot and by this method was obtained.

  9. Note: reducing polarization induced sidebands in Rayleigh backscattering spectra for accurate distributed strain measurement using optical frequency-domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhenyang; Yao, X Steve; Liu, Tiegen; Du, Yang; Liu, Kun; Han, Qun; Meng, Zhuo; Li, Dingjie

    2013-02-01

    We describe a phenomenon called polarization-induced sidebands (PIS) in Rayleigh backscatter spectra (RBS) and discuss its deteriorating effects on the distributed strain measurement using an optical frequency-domain reflectometry. We propose using a special polarization diversity detection scheme to remove PIS and successfully demonstrate accurate distributed strain measurement in the range of 0.75 με-225 με in a 50 m standard single mode fiber, with a good linearity between the strain and the spectra shift in RBS. PMID:23464263

  10. Variable light environments induce plastic spectral tuning by regional opsin coexpression in the African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Brian E; Lu, Jessica; Leips, Jeff; Cronin, Thomas W; Carleton, Karen L

    2015-08-01

    Critical behaviours such as predation and mate choice often depend on vision. Visual systems are sensitive to the spectrum of light in their environment, which can vary extensively both within and among habitats. Evolutionary changes in spectral sensitivity contribute to divergence and speciation. Spectral sensitivity of the retina is primarily determined by visual pigments, which are opsin proteins bound to a chromophore. We recently discovered that photoreceptors in different regions of the retina, which view objects against distinct environmental backgrounds, coexpress different pairs of opsins in an African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra. This coexpression tunes the sensitivity of the retinal regions to the corresponding backgrounds and may aid in detection of dark objects, such as predators. Although intraretinal regionalization of spectral sensitivity in many animals correlates with their light environments, it is unknown whether variation in the light environment induces developmentally plastic alterations of intraretinal sensitivity regions. Here, we demonstrate with fluorescent in situ hybridization and qPCR that the spectrum and angle of environmental light both influence the development of spectral sensitivity regions by altering the distribution and level of opsins across the retina. Normally, M. zebra coexpresses LWS opsin with RH2Aα opsin in double cones of the ventral but not the dorsal retina. However, when illuminated from below throughout development, adult M. zebra coexpressed LWS and RH2Aα in double cones both dorsally and ventrally. Thus, environmental background spectra alter the spectral sensitivity pattern that develops across the retina, potentially influencing behaviours and related evolutionary processes such as courtship and speciation. PMID:26175094

  11. Laser-induced polarization of a quantum spin system in the steady-state regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagin, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of the circularly polarized laser field on quantum spin systems in the steady-state regime, in which relaxation plays the central role, has been studied. The dynamical mean-field-like theory predicts several general results for the behavior of the time-average magnetization caused by the laser field. The induced magnetization oscillates with the frequency of the laser field (while Rabi-like oscillations, which modulate the latter in the dynamical regime, are damped by the relaxation in the steady-state regime). At high frequencies, that magnetization is determined by the value to which the relaxation process is directed. At low frequencies the slope of that magnetization as a function of the frequency is determined by the strength of the laser field. The anisotropy determines the resonance behavior of the time-averaged magnetization in both the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic cases with nonzero magnetic anisotropy. Nonlinear effects (in the magnitude of the laser field) have been considered. The effect of the laser field on quantum spin systems is maximal in resonance, where the time-averaged magnetization, caused by the laser field, is changed essentially. Out of resonance the changes in the magnetization are relatively small. The resonance effect is caused by the nonzero magnetic anisotropy. The resonance frequency is small (proportional to the anisotropy value) for spin systems with ferromagnetic interactions and enhanced by exchange interactions in the spin systems with antiferromagnetic couplings. We show that it is worthwhile to study the laser-field-induced magnetization of quantum spin systems caused by the high-frequency laser field in the steady-state regime in "easy-axis" antiferromagnetic spin systems (e.g., in Ising-like antiferromagnetic spin-chain materials). The effects of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and the spin-frustration couplings (in the case of the zigzag spin chain) have been analyzed.

  12. Characterization of Natural Attenuation in a uranium-contaminated site by means of Induced Polarization Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Orozco, Adrián; Bücker, Matthias; Williams, Kenneth

    2014-05-01

    Field experiments at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Integrated Field Research Challenge site (IFRC) in Rifle, Colorado (USA) have repeatedly demonstrated the ability of microorganisms to reductively immobilize uranium (U) in U tailings-contaminated groundwater accompanying organic carbon amendment. At the same time, geophysical monitoring during such amendment experiments has proven that Induced Polarization (IP) datasets can provide valuable information regarding geochemical changes induced by stimulated microbial activity, such as precipitation of metallic minerals (e.g. FeS) and accumulation of reactive, electroactive ions (Fe[II]). Based on these findings, we present a novel, modified application of the IP imaging method. Specifically, we utilized an IP characterization approach to delineate areas where fluvially deposited organic material, within aquifer sediments, naturally stimulates the activity of subsurface microflora, leading to both the natural immobilization of uranium and accumulation of reduced end-products (minerals and pore fluids) capable of generating anomalous IP signatures. These so-called 'naturally reduced zones' (NRZ's) are characterized by elevated rates of microbial activity relative to sediments having a lower concentration of organic matter. As noted and based on our previous experiments at the site, the accumulation of metallic minerals represents suitable targets for the exploration with IP tomographic methods. Here, we explore the application of the IP imaging method for the characterization of NRZ's at the scale of the floodplain. We present imaging results obtained through the inversion of 70 independent lines distributed along the floodplain (~600 m2). Imaging results are validated through comparisons with lithological data obtained from wells drilled at the site and laboratory analysis of sediment and groundwater samples. Our results show the applicability of the IP method for characterizing regions of the subsurface having a greater propensity for elevated rates of microbial activity, with such regions (themselves often highly localized within a larger sedimentary matrix) exerting an outsized control on contaminant (e.g. U) fate and transport.

  13. Polarized linewidth-controllable double-trapping electromagnetically induced transparency spectra in a resonant plasmon nanocavity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luojia; Gu, Ying; Chen, Hongyi; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Cui, Yiping; Gerardot, Brian D.; Gong, Qihuang

    2013-01-01

    Surface plasmons with ultrasmall optical mode volume and strong near field enhancement can be used to realize nanoscale light-matter interaction. Combining surface plasmons with the quantum system provides the possibility of nanoscale realization of important quantum optical phenomena, including the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), which has many applications in nonlinear quantum optics and quantum information processing. Here, using a custom-designed resonant plasmon nanocavity, we demonstrate polarized position-dependent linewidth-controllable EIT spectra at the nanoscale. We analytically obtain the double coherent population trapping conditions in a double-Λ quantum system with crossing damping, which give two transparent points in the EIT spectra. The linewidths of the three peaks are extremely sensitive to the level spacing of the excited states, the Rabi frequencies and detunings of pump fields, and the Purcell factors. In particular the linewidth of the central peak is exceptionally narrow. The hybrid system may have potential applications in ultra-compact plasmon-quantum devices. PMID:24096943

  14. The Formation of Ion Concentration Polarization Layer Induced by Bifurcated Current Path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junsuk; Lee, Hyomin; Cho, Inhee; Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Sung Jae; EES Team; MFM Team

    2015-11-01

    Ion Concentration Polarization (ICP) is a fundamental electrokinetic phenomenon that occurs near a perm-selective membrane and, thus, the characteristics can be significantly altered by the current path through the Nafion nanoporous membrane. In this work, a new ICP device that bifurcated the current path was fabricated using micro/micro-nano/nano/micro hybrid channel connection, while a conventional ICP device has employed micro/nano/micro channel connection. The propagation of ICP layer was initiated from the nano-channel at high concentration regime and from micro-nano connection at low concentration regime. Interestingly, the reverse propagation was observed at low concentration regime as well. These combined effects conveyed a competition between two distinguishable propagations at intermediate concentration regime, caused by singularity of the bifurcated current path. Experiments and an equivalent circuit analysis were conducted for this bifurcation. As a result, the conductance ratio of electrolyte to Nafion governed the bifurcation. Conclusively, the bifurcation-induced ICP layer formation was able to be characterized by analyzing current-time characteristic which have two distinct RC delay times. 2013R1A1A1008125, CISS- 2011-0031870 and 2012-0009563 by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning and HI13C1468, HI14C0559.

  15. LabVIEW-based control software for para-hydrogen induced polarization instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Agraz, Jose; Grunfeld, Alexander; Li, Debiao; Cunningham, Karl; Willey, Cindy; Pozos, Robert; Wagner, Shawn

    2014-04-01

    The elucidation of cell metabolic mechanisms is the modern underpinning of the diagnosis, treatment, and in some cases the prevention of disease. Para-Hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) enhances magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10,000 fold, allowing for the MRI of cell metabolic mechanisms. This signal enhancement is the result of hyperpolarizing endogenous substances used as contrast agents during imaging. PHIP instrumentation hyperpolarizes Carbon-13 ((13)C) based substances using a process requiring control of a number of factors: chemical reaction timing, gas flow, monitoring of a static magnetic field (Bo), radio frequency (RF) irradiation timing, reaction temperature, and gas pressures. Current PHIP instruments manually control the hyperpolarization process resulting in the lack of the precise control of factors listed above, resulting in non-reproducible results. We discuss the design and implementation of a LabVIEW based computer program that automatically and precisely controls the delivery and manipulation of gases and samples, monitoring gas pressures, environmental temperature, and RF sample irradiation. We show that the automated control over the hyperpolarization process results in the hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate. The implementation of this software provides the fast prototyping of PHIP instrumentation for the evaluation of a myriad of (13)C based endogenous contrast agents used in molecular imaging. PMID:24784636

  16. LabVIEW-based control software for para-hydrogen induced polarization instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Agraz, Jose Grunfeld, Alexander; Li, Debiao; BIRI, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, West Hollywood, California 90048 ; Cunningham, Karl; Willey, Cindy; Pozos, Robert; Wagner, Shawn

    2014-04-15

    The elucidation of cell metabolic mechanisms is the modern underpinning of the diagnosis, treatment, and in some cases the prevention of disease. Para-Hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) enhances magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10 000 fold, allowing for the MRI of cell metabolic mechanisms. This signal enhancement is the result of hyperpolarizing endogenous substances used as contrast agents during imaging. PHIP instrumentation hyperpolarizes Carbon-13 ({sup 13}C) based substances using a process requiring control of a number of factors: chemical reaction timing, gas flow, monitoring of a static magnetic field (B{sub o}), radio frequency (RF) irradiation timing, reaction temperature, and gas pressures. Current PHIP instruments manually control the hyperpolarization process resulting in the lack of the precise control of factors listed above, resulting in non-reproducible results. We discuss the design and implementation of a LabVIEW based computer program that automatically and precisely controls the delivery and manipulation of gases and samples, monitoring gas pressures, environmental temperature, and RF sample irradiation. We show that the automated control over the hyperpolarization process results in the hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate. The implementation of this software provides the fast prototyping of PHIP instrumentation for the evaluation of a myriad of {sup 13}C based endogenous contrast agents used in molecular imaging.

  17. Induced polarization of disseminated electronically conductive minerals: a semi-empirical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurin, Grigory; Titov, Konstantin; Ilyin, Yuri; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-01

    We studied artificial ore models that contained galena, pyrite, magnetite, graphite and cryptomelane with the time domain induced polarization technique. The models were mixtures of sand and metallic-type, electronically conductive mineral particles. We varied the volumetric content of the particles, their mineral composition and average grain size, as well as the pore water salinity. Based on the Debye decomposition approach, we obtained relaxation time distributions, which contained peaks. From these distributions, we obtained the total chargeability and the peak relaxation time. We correlated these parameters with the particle mineral composition, grain size, particle content and the pore solution resistivity. We also compared the experimental data with the Wong model prediction, which was unable to explain the entire data set. The above-mentioned correlations, in conjunction with some previously published data, allowed us to formulate a new, semi-empirical model that links (1) the total chargeability with the volumetric content of the particles and the total chargeability of the host matrix and (2) the time constant with the particle mineralogy, the particle radius and the pore solution resistivity.

  18. Chiral Selective Chemistry Induced by Natural Selection of Spin-Polarized Electrons.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Richard A; Mishra, Debabrata; Naaman, Ron

    2015-06-15

    The search to understand the origin of homochirality in nature has been ongoing since the time of Pasteur. Previous work has shown that DNA can act as a spin filter for low-energy electrons and that spin-polarized secondary electrons produced by X-ray irradiation of a magnetic substrate can induce chiral selective chemistry. In the present work it is demonstrated that secondary electrons from a substrate that are transmitted through a chiral overlayer cause enantiomeric selective chemistry in an adsorbed adlayer. We determine the quantum yields (QYs) for dissociation of (R)- or (S)-epichlorohydrin adsorbed on a chiral self-assembled layer of DNA on gold and on bare gold (for control). The results show that there is a significant difference in the QYs between the two enantiomers when adsorbed on DNA, but none when they are adsorbed on bare Au. We propose that the effect results from natural spin filtering effects cause by the chiral monolayer. PMID:25950284

  19. Dirac R-Matrix Modeling of Spin-Induced Asymmetry in the Scattering of Polarized Electrons from Polarized Cesium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait-Tahar, S.; Grant, I. P.; Norrington, P. H.

    1997-10-01

    Recent experiments by Baum, Raith, and co-workers to measure the spin-induced asymmetries in electron scattering from cesium have stimulated theoretical work to interpret these measurements. We present Dirac R-matrix calculations of the interference asymmetry function, and of the spin-orbit and spin-exchange asymmetries, for comparison with experimental data at 7 and 13.5 eV and with nonrelativistic predictions of the spin-exchange asymmetry from the convergent close coupling method. We find that a simple relativistic target model provides a basis for the understanding and analysis of ongoing experiments.

  20. Strain-induced coupling of electrical polarization and structural defects in SrMnO3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becher, Carsten; Maurel, Laura; Aschauer, Ulrich; Lilienblum, Martin; Magén, César; Meier, Dennis; Langenberg, Eric; Trassin, Morgan; Blasco, Javier; Krug, Ingo P.; Algarabel, Pedro A.; Spaldin, Nicola A.; Pardo, José A.; Fiebig, Manfred

    2015-08-01

    Local perturbations in complex oxides, such as domain walls, strain and defects, are of interest because they can modify the conduction or the dielectric and magnetic response, and can even promote phase transitions. Here, we show that the interaction between different types of local perturbations in oxide thin films is an additional source of functionality. Taking SrMnO3 as a model system, we use nonlinear optics to verify the theoretical prediction that strain induces a polar phase, and apply density functional theory to show that strain simultaneously increases the concentration of oxygen vacancies. These vacancies couple to the polar domain walls, where they establish an electrostatic barrier to electron migration. The result is a state with locally structured room-temperature conductivity consisting of conducting nanosized polar domains encased by insulating domain boundaries, which we resolve using scanning probe microscopy. Our ‘nanocapacitor’ domains can be individually charged, suggesting stable capacitance nanobits with a potential for information storage technology.

  1. Disorder-induced reversal of spin polarization in the Heusler alloy Co{sub 2}FeSi

    SciTech Connect

    Bruski, P.; Ramsteiner, M.; Brandt, O.; Friedland, K.-J.; Farshchi, R.; Herfort, J.; Riechert, H.; Erwin, S. C.

    2011-04-01

    We study the spin polarization in the conduction band of Co{sub 2}FeSi layers with a different degree of structural order. The injected spin polarization in Co{sub 2}FeSi/(Al,Ga)As spin light-emitting diodes as well as the planar Hall effect measured for the Co{sub 2}FeSi injectors exhibit a sign reversal between injectors crystallized in the ordered L2{sub 1} phase and the Fe-Si disordered B2 phase. These results are explained by a disorder-induced change in the spin polarization at the Fermi energy of Co{sub 2}FeSi. Support for the occurrence of such a striking change in the electronic band structure is obtained by first principles calculations.

  2. Dynamics of nuclear spin polarization induced and detected by coherently precessing electron spins in fluorine-doped ZnSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisterkamp, F.; Kirstein, E.; Greilich, A.; Zhukov, E. A.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Pawlis, A.; Bayer, M.

    2016-02-01

    We study the dynamics of optically induced nuclear spin polarization in a fluorine-doped ZnSe epilayer via time-resolved Kerr rotation. The nuclear polarization in the vicinity of a fluorine donor is induced by interaction with coherently precessing electron spins in a magnetic field applied in the Voigt geometry. It is detected by nuclei-induced changes in the electron spin coherence signal. This all-optical technique allows us to measure the longitudinal spin relaxation time T1 of the 77Se isotope in a magnetic field range from 10 to 130 mT under illumination. We combine the optical technique with radio frequency methods to address the coherent spin dynamics of the nuclei and measure Rabi oscillations, Ramsey fringes, and the nuclear spin echo. The inhomogeneous spin dephasing time T2* and the spin coherence time T2 of the 77Se isotope are measured. While the T1 time is on the order of several milliseconds, the T2 time is several hundred microseconds. The experimentally determined condition T1≫T2 verifies the validity of the classical model of nuclear spin cooling for describing the optically induced nuclear spin polarization.

  3. Excitation mechanisms in 1 mJ picosecond laser induced low pressure He plasma and the resulting spectral quality enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Nasrullah; Lahna, Kurnia; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Ramli, Muliadi; Suyanto, Hery; Marpaung, Alion Mangasi; Pardede, Marincan; Jobiliong, Eric; Hedwig, Rinda; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Lie, Zener Sukra; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Tjia, May On; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik

    2015-06-01

    We report in this paper the results of an experimental study on the spectral and dynamical characteristics of plasma emission induced by 1 mJ picoseconds (ps) Nd-YAG laser using spatially resolved imaging and time resolved measurement of the emission intensities of copper sample. This study has provided the experimental evidence concerning the dynamical characteristics of the excitation mechanisms in various stages of the plasma formation, which largely consolidate the basic scenarios of excitation processes commonly accepted so far. However, it is also clearly shown that the duration of the shock wave excitation process induced by ps laser pulses is much shorter than those observed in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy employing nanosecond laser at higher output energy. This allows the detection of atomic emission due exclusively to He assisted excitation in low pressure He plasma by proper gating of the detection time. Furthermore, the triplet excited state associated with He I 587.6 nm is shown to be the one most likely involved in the process responsible for the excellent spectral quality as evidenced by its application to spectrochemical analysis of a number of samples. The use of very low energy laser pulses also leads to minimal destructive effect marked by the resulted craters of merely about 10 μm diameter and only 10 nm deep. It is especially noteworthy that the excellent emission spectrum of deuterium detected from D-doped titanium sample is free of spectral interference from the undesirable ubiquitous water molecules without a precleaning procedure as applied previously and yielding an impressive detection limit of less than 10 μg/g. Finally, the result of this study also shows a promising application to depth profiling of impurity distribution in the sample investigated.

  4. CTLA-4Ig immunotherapy of obesity-induced insulin resistance by manipulation of macrophage polarization in adipose tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Masakazu; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Innovation Center for Medical Redox Navigation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 ; Batchuluun, Battsetseg; Sugiyama, Naonobu; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Innovation Center for Medical Redox Navigation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 ; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •CTLA-4Ig completely alleviates HFD-induced insulin resistance. •CTLA-4Ig reduces epididymal and subcutaneous fat tissue weight and adipocyte size. •CTLA-4Ig alters ATM polarization from inflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2. •CTLA-4Ig may lead to a novel anti-obesity/inflammation/insulin resistance agent. •We identified the mechanism of the novel favorable effects of CTLA-4lg. -- Abstract: It has been established that obesity alters the metabolic and endocrine function of adipose tissue and, together with accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages, contributes to insulin resistance. Although numerous studies have reported that shifting the polarization of macrophages from M1 to M2 can alleviate adipose tissue inflammation, manipulation of macrophage polarization has not been considered as a specific therapy. Here, we determined whether cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4IgG1 (CTLA-4Ig) can ameliorate insulin resistance by induction of macrophages from proinflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2 polarization in the adipose tissues of high fat diet-induced insulin-resistant mice. CTLA4-Ig treatment prevented insulin resistance by changing gene expression to M2 polarization, which increased the levels of arginase 1. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis confirmed the alteration of polarization from CD11c (M1)- to CD206 (M2)-positive cells. Concomitantly, CTLA-4Ig treatment resulted in weight reductions of epididymal and subcutaneous adipose tissues, which may be closely related to overexpression of apoptosis inhibitors in macrophages. Moreover, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels decreased significantly. In contrast, CCAAT enhancer binding protein α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and adiponectin expression increased significantly in subcutaneous adipose tissue. This novel mechanism of CTLA-4lg immunotherapy may lead to an ideal anti-obesity/inflammation/insulin resistance agent.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Induced Polarization of Human Macrophage Orchestrates the Formation and Development of Tuberculous Granulomas In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yang; Chen, Jie; Xiong, Guoliang; Peng, Yiping; Ye, Jianqing; Li, Junming

    2015-01-01

    The tuberculous granuloma is an elaborately organized structure and one of the main histological hallmarks of tuberculosis. Macrophages, which are important immunologic effector and antigen-presenting cells, are the main cell type found in the tuberculous granuloma and have high plasticity. Macrophage polarization during bacterial infection has been elucidated in numerous recent studies; however, macrophage polarization during tuberculous granuloma formation and development has rarely been reported. It remains to be clarified whether differences in the activation status of macrophages affect granuloma formation. In this study, the variation in macrophage polarization during the formation and development of tuberculous granulomas was investigated in both sections of lung tissues from tuberculosis patients and an in vitro tuberculous granuloma model. The roles of macrophage polarization in this process were also investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infection was found to induce monocyte-derived macrophage polarization. In the in vitro tuberculous granuloma model, macrophage transformation from M1 to M2 was observed over time following M. tuberculosis infection. M2 macrophages were found to predominate in both necrotic and non-necrotic granulomas from tuberculosis patients, while both M1 and M2 polarized macrophages were found in the non-granulomatous lung tissues. Furthermore, it was found that M1 macrophages promote granuloma formation and macrophage bactericidal activity in vitro, while M2 macrophages inhibit these effects. The findings of this study provide insights into the mechanism by which M. tuberculosis circumvents the host immune system as well as a theoretical foundation for the development of novel tuberculosis therapies based on reprogramming macrophage polarization. PMID:26091535

  6. Comparison of different polar compounds-induced cytotoxicity in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinwei; Li, Xiaodan; Cai, Wenci; Liu, Yuanfa

    2016-01-01

    Total polar compounds (TPC) formed during successive frying have the negative healthy effects. However, little researches focused on the cytotoxicity of different parts of TPC. The present study was carried out to elucidate the different polar compounds-induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cells. The polar compounds of frying oil named oxidized triglycerides oligo (TGO), oxidized triglycerides dimer (TGD), and oxidize triglycerides (ox-TG) were isolated and collected via HPLC. MTT assay was selected to determine the cell viability, and apoptosis rate of the cells was analyzed with the help of flow cytometry. The results indicated that TGO, TGD, or ox-TG could suppress the proliferation of HepG2 cells and improve the cell apoptosis in the concentration- and time- dependent manner. Different polar compounds have the different activity of cytotoxicity and apoptosis (p < 0.05), and ox-TG was the most serious deleterious on HepG2 cell viability and apoptotic, followed by TGO and TGD. At the concentration of 2.00 mg/ml and incubated for 48 h, the cell inhibition rate and apoptotic rate of HepG2 induced by ox-TG could reach 23.0 % and 16.05 %, respectively. Cell cycle analysis showed that the inhibition of TGO, TGD, and ox-TG on HepG2 cells mainly occurred in S phase. PMID:26879050

  7. Tip-induced domain growth on the non-polar cuts of lithium niobate single-crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Alikin, D. O.; Turygin, A. P.; Lobov, A. I.; Shur, V. Ya.; Ievlev, A. V.; Kalinin, S. V.

    2015-05-04

    Currently, ferroelectric materials with designed domain structures are considered as a perspective material for new generation of photonic, data storage, and data processing devices. Application of external electric field is the most convenient way of the domain structure formation. Lots of papers are devoted to the investigation of domain kinetics on polar surface of crystals while the forward growth remains one of the most mysterious stages due to lack of experimental methods allowing to study it. Here, we performed tip-induced polarization reversal on X- and Y-non-polar cuts in single-crystal of congruent lithium niobate which allows us to study the forward growth with high spatial resolution. The revealed difference in the shape and length of domains induced on X- and Y-cuts is beyond previously developed theoretical approaches used for the theoretical consideration of the domains growth at non-polar ferroelectric surfaces. To explain experimental results, we used kinetic approach with anisotropy of screening efficiency along different crystallographic directions.

  8. Three-dimensional hole gas induced by polarization in (0001)-oriented metal-face III-nitride structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Ding, K.; Yan, J. C.; Wang, J. X.; Zeng, Y. P.; Wei, T. B.; Li, Y. Y.; Sun, B. J.; Duan, R. F.; Li, J. M.

    2010-08-01

    Polarization-doping via graded AlGaN layer on N-face (0001¯) GaN has been demonstrated as an inspiring p-type doping method for wide-band-gap nitrides. However, the polarity of III-nitrides grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition is metal-face typically. In this paper, we show that three-dimensional mobile hole gas induced by polarization can be formed in (0001)-oriented metal-face III-nitride structure. The hole concentration of a Mg-doped AlxGa1-xN layer with graded Al composition from x =0.3 to 0 grown on AlN buffer layer is remarkably enhanced, compared with that of a Mg-doped GaN layer grown under the same conditions. In addition, the hole concentration in the graded AlGaN layer is absence of freezeout as the temperature decreases, indicating that the hole is induced by polarization. This p-type doping method paves a way for achieving high-efficiency in wide-band-gap semiconductor light-emitting devices with p-type doping problem.

  9. Tip-induced domain growth on the non-polar cuts of lithium niobate single-crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikin, D. O.; Ievlev, A. V.; Turygin, A. P.; Lobov, A. I.; Kalinin, S. V.; Shur, V. Ya.

    2015-05-01

    Currently, ferroelectric materials with designed domain structures are considered as a perspective material for new generation of photonic, data storage, and data processing devices. Application of external electric field is the most convenient way of the domain structure formation. Lots of papers are devoted to the investigation of domain kinetics on polar surface of crystals while the forward growth remains one of the most mysterious stages due to lack of experimental methods allowing to study it. Here, we performed tip-induced polarization reversal on X- and Y-non-polar cuts in single-crystal of congruent lithium niobate which allows us to study the forward growth with high spatial resolution. The revealed difference in the shape and length of domains induced on X- and Y-cuts is beyond previously developed theoretical approaches used for the theoretical consideration of the domains growth at non-polar ferroelectric surfaces. To explain experimental results, we used kinetic approach with anisotropy of screening efficiency along different crystallographic directions.

  10. Aluminum-induced changes in properties and fouling propensity of DOM solutions revealed by UV-vis absorbance spectral parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghao; Meng, Fangang

    2016-04-15

    The integration of pre-coagulation with ultrafiltration (UF) is expected to not only reduce membrane fouling but also improve natural organic matter (NOM) removal. However, it is difficult to determine the proper coagulant dosage for different water qualities. The objective of this study was to probe the potential of UV-vis spectroscopic analysis to reveal the coagulant-induced changes in the fouling potentials of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and to determine the optimal coagulant dosage. The Zeta potentials (ZPs) and average particle size of the four DOM solutions (Aldrich humic acid (AHA), AHA-sodium alginate (SA), AHA-bovine serum albumin (BSA) and AHA-dextran (DEX)) coagulated with aluminum chloride (AlCl3) were measured. Results showed that increasing the aluminum coagulant dosage induced the aggregation of DOM. Meanwhile, the addition of aluminum coagulant resulted in an increase in DSlope325-375 (the slope of the log-transformed absorbance spectra from 325 to 375 nm) and a decrease in S275-295 (the slope of the log-transformed absorption coefficient from 275 to 295 nm) and SR (the ratio of Slope275-295 and Slope350-400). The variations of these spectral parameters (i.e., DSlope325-375, S275-295 and SR) correlated well with the aluminum-caused changes in ZPs and average particle size. This implies that spectral parameters have the potential to indicate DOM aggregation. In addition, good correlations of spectral parameters and membrane fouling behaviors (i.e., unified membrane fouling index (UMFI)) suggest that the changes in DSlope325-375, S275-295 and SR were indicative of the aluminum-caused alterations of fouling potentials of all DOM solutions. Interestingly, the optimal dosage of aluminum (40 μM for AHA, AHA-BSA, and AHA-DEX) was obtained based on the relation between spectral parameters and fouling behaviors. Overall, the spectroscopic analysis, particularly for the utilization of spectral parameters, provided a convenient approach for the exploration of combined coagulation and UF systems for DOM removal. PMID:26900968

  11. Evolution of the linear-polarization-angle-dependence of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance-oscillations with microwave power

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2014-11-10

    We examine the role of the microwave power in the linear polarization angle dependence of the microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system. The diagonal resistance R{sub xx} was measured at the fixed magnetic fields of the photo-excited oscillatory extrema of R{sub xx} as a function of both the microwave power, P, and the linear polarization angle, θ. Color contour plots of such measurements demonstrate the evolution of the lineshape of R{sub xx} versus θ with increasing microwave power. We report that the non-linear power dependence of the amplitude of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations distorts the cosine-square relation between R{sub xx} and θ at high power.

  12. Interface-induced chiral domain walls, spin spirals and skyrmions revealed by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bergmann, Kirsten; Kubetzka, André; Pietzsch, Oswald; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2014-10-01

    The spin textures of ultra-thin magnetic layers exhibit surprising variety. The loss of inversion symmetry at the interface of the magnetic layer and substrate gives rise to the so-called Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction which favors non-collinear spin arrangements with unique rotational sense. Here we review the application of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy to such systems, which has led to the discovery of interface-induced chiral domain walls and spin spirals. Recently, different interface-driven skyrmion lattices have been found, and the writing as well as the deleting of individual skyrmions based on local spin-polarized current injection has been demonstrated. These interface-induced non-collinear magnetic states offer new exciting possibilities to study fundamental magnetic interactions and to tailor material properties for spintronic applications.

  13. High-efficiency generation of circularly polarized light via symmetry-induced anomalous reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shang-Chi; Xiong, Xiang; Hu, Yuan-Sheng; Jiang, Sheng-Wei; Hu, Yu-Hui; Xu, Di-Hu; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2015-03-01

    Great efforts have been devoted to control the polarization state, the transmission direction, and the phase of light within a very confined space in recent decades. Here, we present a two-dimensional metastructure made of an array of unisized split rings with different opening orientations on the surface of a Si O2 -silver bilayer. This structure possesses an unexpectedly high polarization conversion ratio and generates significantly strong anomalous reflection beams (over 70% of incident light intensity) over a broad frequency range (1100-1750 nm). Functionally, it is able to turn either a linearly polarized incident light or natural light into two perfect circularly polarized beams with the same amplitude yet different handedness to different directions. These features demonstrate a clear example of momentum conservation and can be applied to detect/manipulate the propagation of circularly polarized light.

  14. Simultaneous electromagnetically induced transparency for two circularly polarized lasers coupled to the same linearly polarized laser in a four-level atomic system in the W scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrim, Cristian; Nelson, Chris

    2011-03-15

    Electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT) can be produced in a four-level atomic system in the W scheme using a linearly polarized optical field for simultaneously slowing down two {sigma}{sup +} and {sigma}{sup -} circularly polarized optical fields. This four-level atomic system can be set up with a |{sup 1}S{sub 0}> ground state and three Zeeman levels of the |{sup 1}P{sub 1}> excited state of any alkali-metal atom placed in a weak magnetic field. We apply our W scheme to ultracold magnesium atoms for neglecting the collisional dephasing. Atomic coherences are reported after solving a density matrix master equation including radiative relaxations from Zeeman states of the |{sup 1}P{sub 1}> multiplet to the |{sup 1}S{sub 0}> ground state. The EIT feature is analyzed using the transit time between the normal dispersive region and the EIT region. The evolution of the EIT feature with the variation of the coupling field is discussed using an intuitive dressed-state representation. We analyze the sensitivity of an EIT feature to pressure broadening of the excited Zeeman states.

  15. Signal enhancement in femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with a double-pulse configuration composed of two polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somekawa, Toshihiro; Otsuka, Masataka; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Fujita, Masayuki

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been performed with a double-pulse configuration composed of two polarizers. The effect of interpulse separation on the Cu I line at 510.55, 515.32, and 521.82 nm showed an optimum enhancement at 50–150 ps delays, which is more than 3–5 times greater compared with the single-pulse excitation case. This enhanced emission may open new possibilities for remote LIBS detection.

  16. Free radicals induced by sunlight in different spectral regions - in vivo versus ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Silke B; Müller, Robert; Albrecht, Stephanie; Mink, Kathrin; Tscherch, Kathrin; Ismaeel, Fakher; Lademann, Jürgen; Rohn, Sascha; Meinke, Martina C

    2016-05-01

    Sunlight represents an exogenous factor stimulating formation of free radicals which can induce cell damage. To assess the effect of the different spectral solar regions on the development of free radicals in skin, in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigations with human volunteers and ex vivo studies on excised human and porcine skin were carried out. For all skin probes, the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region stimulates the most intensive radical formation, followed by the visible (VIS) and the near infrared (NIR) regions. A comparison between the different skin models shows that for UV light, the fastest and highest production of free radicals could be detected in vivo, followed by excised porcine and human skin. The same distribution pattern was found for the VIS/NIR spectral regions, whereby the differences in radical formation between in vivo and ex vivo were less pronounced. An analysis of lipid composition in vivo before and after exposure to UV light clearly showed modifications in several skin lipid components; a decrease of ceramide subclass [AP2] and an increase of ceramide subclass [NP2], sodium cholesterol sulphate and squalene (SQ) were detectable. In contrast, VIS/NIR irradiation led to an increase of ceramides [AP2] and SCS, and a decrease of SQ. These results, which are largely comparable for the different skin models investigated in vivo and ex vivo, indicate that radiation exposure in different spectral regions strongly influences radical production in skin and also results in changes in skin lipid composition, which is essential for barrier function. PMID:26910569

  17. Dopamine induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages in rat C6 glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Tian; Wang, Chenlong; Chen, Xuewei; Duan, Chenfan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jing; Chai, Hongyan; Tang, Tian; Chen, Honglei; Yue, Jiang; Li, Ying; Yang, Jing

    2015-07-15

    Dopamine (DA), a monoamine catecholamine neurotransmitter with antiangiogenic activity, stabilizes tumor vessels in colon, prostate and ovarian cancers, thus increases chemotherapeutic efficacy. Here, in the rat C6 glioma models, we investigated the vascular normalization effects of DA and its mechanisms of action. DA (25, 50 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth, while a precursor of DA (levodopa) prolonged the survival time of rats bearing orthotopic C6 glioma. DA improved tumor perfusion, with significant effects from day 3, and a higher level at days 5 to 7. In addition, DA decreased microvessel density and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression in tumor tissues, while increasing the coverage of pericyte. Conversely, an antagonist of dopamine receptor 2 (DR2) (eticlopride) but not DR1 (butaclamol) abrogated DA-induced tumor regression and vascular normalization. Furthermore, DA improved the delivery and efficacy of temozolomide therapy. Importantly, DA increased representative M1 markers (iNOS, CXCL9, etc.), while decreasing M2 markers (CD206, arginase-1, etc.). Depletion of macrophages by clodronate or zoledronic acid attenuated the effects of DA. Notably, DA treatment induced M2-to-M1 polarization in RAW264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages, and enhanced the migration of pericyte-like cells (10T1/2), which was reversed by eticlopride or DR2-siRNA. Such changes were accompanied by the downregulation of VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling. In summary, DA induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages. Thus, targeting the tumor microvasculature by DA represents a promising strategy for human glioma therapy. - Highlights: • Dopamine induces tumor growth inhibition and vascular normalization in rat C6 glioma. • Dopamine switches macrophage phenotype from M2 to M1. • Dopamine-induced vascular normalization is mediated by macrophage polarization. • Dopamine is a promising agent targeting the microvasculature in tumor microenvironment.

  18. Chlorine detection in cement with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in the infrared and ultraviolet spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlen, Christoph Dominic; Wiens, Eugen; Noll, Reinhard; Wilsch, Gerd; Reichling, Kenji

    2009-10-01

    A significant parameter to monitor the status of concrete buildings like bridges or parking garages is the determination of the depth profile of the chlorine concentration below the exposed concrete surface. This information is required to define the needed volume of restoration for a construction. Conventional methods like wet chemical analysis are time- and cost-intensive so an alternative method is developed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The idea is to deploy LIBS to analyze drill cores by scanning the sample surface with laser pulses. Chlorine spectral lines in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV)-range were studied for chlorine detection in hydrated cement samples. The excitation energies of these spectral lines are above 9.2 eV. Hence high plasma temperatures and pulse energies in the range of some hundred millijoules are needed to induce sufficient line intensity levels at the required working distance. To further increase the line intensity and to lower the detection limit (LOD) of chlorine a measuring chamber is used where different ambient pressures and gases can be chosen for the measurements. The influences on the line intensity for pressures between 5 mbar and 400 mbar using helium as process gas and the influence of different laser burst modi like single and collinear double pulses are investigated. For the first time a LOD according to DIN 32 645 of 0.1 mass% was achieved for chlorine in hydrated cement using the UV line 134.72 nm.

  19. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency Experiments for the Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory: Suppression of Polarization Impurity and Stray Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Kaleb; Jackson, Richard; van Vleet, Matthew; Kuhnash, Kodi; Worth, Bradley; Day, Amanda; Bali, Samir

    2014-05-01

    We investigate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in rubidium vapor using a single laser beam and a scanning magnetic field co-aligned with the laser propagation direction. We show that polarization impurity, stray magnetic fields and imperfect optical alignments cause broadening of the EIT/EIA signal and other spurious effects. We describe a systematic approach to minimizing these undesired effects, which produces EIT/EIA signals nearly two orders of magnitude narrower than the natural linewidth. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund and Miami University. We also acknowledge the Miami University Instrumentation Laboratory for their invaluable contributions.

  20. Apparatus for inducing elliptically polarized shear waves in an earth medium

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.H.; Gergely, J.S.; Baumel, R.T.; Strecker, J.E.

    1990-05-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for generating elliptically polarized shear waves in an earth medium. It comprises: first mobile shear wave vibrator means to be positioned in engagement with the earth medium t a first position; second mobile shear vibrator means to be positioned in engagement with the earth medium adjacent the first position and in cross-polarity to the first mobile shear wave vibrator; and control means for driving the first and second vibrator means at frequencies that are phase-displaced by a preselected amount to produce a resultant wave propagation in the earth medium that is an elliptically polarized shear wave.

  1. Studies of X-ray Spectral Lines Polarization in Correlation with the Emission of Supra-thermal Electrons in Plasma-Focus Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, L.; Sadowski, M. J.; Baronova, E. O.

    2006-12-04

    The correlation of the emission of polarized X-ray lines from highly-ionized argon ions and the emission of intense electron pulses has been observed. The paper presents a review of research on the polarization of the selected X-ray lines and their correlation with pulsed electron beams investigated within the MAJA-PF facility at SINS in Swierk, Poland.

  2. Spectral and metabolic characteristics of mitochondrial fractions from rotenone-induced tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Gosálvez, M.; Díaz-Gil, J.; Coloma, J.; Salganicoff, L.

    1977-01-01

    Mitochondrial fractions isolated from tumours induced with the respiratory inhibitor rotenone lack respiratory control, oxidative phosphorylation, are partially or totally insensitive to cyanide and have a near-normal content of respiratory carriers. These characteristics are more similar to those of mitochondria from atrophic mammary gland than to those of mitochondria from spontaneous mammary adenomas. Thus, the characteristic structural and biochemical mitochondrial alteration of rotenone-induced tumours would represent a lack of mitochondrial differentiation as the tumour develops from the atrophic mammary gland. Slices of rotenone-induced tumours are insensitive to oligomycin and dinitrophenol, thus indicating that glycolysis would be their sole source of metabolic energy. Images Fig. 2 PMID:911663

  3. Multiparameter spectral representation of noise-induced competence in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Sargsyan, Khachik; Safta, Cosmin; Debusschere, Bert; Najm, Habib

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the problem of representing a stochastic forward model output with respect to a large number of input parameters is considered. The methodology is applied to a stochastic reaction network of competence dynamics in Bacillus subtilis bacterium. In particular, the dependence of the competence state on rate constants of underlying reactions is investigated. We base our methodology on Polynomial Chaos (PC) spectral expansions that allow effective propagation of input parameter uncertainties to outputs of interest. Given a number of forward model training runs at sampled input parameter values, the PC modes are estimated using a Bayesian framework. As an outcome, these PC modes are described with posterior probability distributions. The resulting expansion can be regarded as an uncertain response function and can further be used as a computationally inexpensive surrogate instead of the original reaction model for subsequent analyses such as calibration or optimization studies. Furthermore, the methodology is enhanced with a classification-based mixture PC formulation that overcomes the difficulties associated with representing potentially nonsmooth input-output relationships. Finally, the global sensitivity analysis based on the multiparameter spectral representation of an observable of interest provides biological insight and reveals the most important reactions and their couplings for the competence dynamics PMID:22868681

  4. IR laser induced spectral kinetics of AgGaGe3Se8:Cu chalcogenide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Harbi, E.; Wojciechowski, A.; AlZayed, N.; Parasyuk, O. V.; Gondek, E.; Armatys, P.; El-Naggar, A. M.; Kityk, I. V.; Karasinski, P.

    2013-07-01

    The possibility to operate by optical spectra near the absorption edge gap was discovered for the AgGaGe3Se8:Cu semiconducting chalcogenide crystals under influence of microsecond CO2 laser with pulse energy 60 mJ operating at wavelength 10.6 μm. An occurrence of substantial photoinduced optical density was observed at wavelengths in the spectral range of 610-620 nm. Introducing of Cu ions leads to substantial spectral asymmetry in the observed spectra. The process achieves its maximum value after the 80-120 s of CO2 laser treatment and relaxes with almost irreversible changes after the same time. The contribution of thermo heating did not exceed 5-6%. Only the irreversible changes of the sample's surface topography were observed during the CO2 laser treatment, which do not influence the treatment. So the surface states do not play a principal role and the effect is prevailingly originated from the. The observed effect may be used for control of the CO2 laser power density.

  5. Scaling depth-induced wave-breaking in two-dimensional spectral wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, J. E.; Holthuijsen, L. H.; Zijlema, M.; van Vledder, G. Ph.; Pietrzak, J. D.

    2015-03-01

    Wave breaking in shallow water is still poorly understood and needs to be better parameterized in 2D spectral wave models. Significant wave heights over horizontal bathymetries are typically under-predicted in locally generated wave conditions and over-predicted in non-locally generated conditions. A joint scaling dependent on both local bottom slope and normalized wave number is presented and is shown to resolve these issues. Compared to the 12 wave breaking parameterizations considered in this study, this joint scaling demonstrates significant improvements, up to ∼50% error reduction, over 1D horizontal bathymetries for both locally and non-locally generated waves. In order to account for the inherent differences between uni-directional (1D) and directionally spread (2D) wave conditions, an extension of the wave breaking dissipation models is presented. By including the effects of wave directionality, rms-errors for the significant wave height are reduced for the best performing parameterizations in conditions with strong directional spreading. With this extension, our joint scaling improves modeling skill for significant wave heights over a verification data set of 11 different 1D laboratory bathymetries, 3 shallow lakes and 4 coastal sites. The corresponding averaged normalized rms-error for significant wave height in the 2D cases varied between 8% and 27%. In comparison, using the default setting with a constant scaling, as used in most presently operating 2D spectral wave models, gave equivalent errors between 15% and 38%.

  6. Spectral evolution of Eu3+ doped Y3NbO7 niobate induced by temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.-Y.; Durand, A.; Heintz, J.-M.; Veillere, A.; Jubera, V.

    2016-03-01

    A Eu3+ doped Y3NbO7 niobate powder was synthetized using a polymerizable complex route. It gave rise to nanometric particles that crystallized in the fluorine structure, corresponding to the Y3NbO7 phase. The thermal evolution of this powder was followed up to 1600 °C, using X-ray diffraction and optical characterizations. The fluorine structure was maintained in the whole temperature range. However, spectral evolution of the samples calcined above 900 °C showed a more complex situation. Emission spectra of powders heat treated at different temperatures showed an evolution of the emission lines that can be attributed first to a better crystallization of the niobate phase and second to its partial decomposition in favor of the formation of YNbO4 and Y2O3. Although the Y3NbO7 phase appeared stable up to 1650 °C, from X-ray diffraction analysis, spectral analysis showed that the local environment of the doping element is modified from 1100 °C.

  7. Titanium induced polarity inversion in ordered (In,Ga)N/GaN nanocolumns.

    PubMed

    Kong, X; Li, H; Albert, S; Bengoechea-Encabo, A; Sanchez-Garcia, M A; Calleja, E; Draxl, C; Trampert, A

    2016-02-12

    We report on the formation of polarity inversion in ordered (In,Ga)N/GaN nanocolumns grown on a Ti-masked GaN-buffered sapphire substrate by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy reveal a stacking fault-like planar defect at the homoepitaxial GaN interface due to Ti incorporation, triggering the generation of N-polar domains in Ga-polar nanocolumns. Density functional theory calculations are applied to clarify the atomic configurations of a Ti monolayer occupation on the GaN (0002) plane and to prove the inversion effect. The polarity inversion leads to an enhanced indium incorporation in the subsequent (In,Ga)N segment of the nanocolumn. This study provides a deeper understanding of the effects of Ti mask in the well-controlled selective area growth of (In,Ga)N/GaN nanocolumns. PMID:26759358

  8. Interesting polarization-independent SERS detection performance induced by the rotation symmetry of multiparticle nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao; Zhao, Yan; Jiang, Yijian

    2016-01-01

    In this work, on the basis of finite difference time domain simulations and group theory, by employing regular nanosphere trimers as the main examples, we analyse and discuss the polarization-independent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) phenomenon arising from the rotation symmetry of coined metallic nanomultimers. The results demonstrate why the rotationally symmetrical nanomultimers can show polarization-independent SERS performance. Because of the dramatically hybridized polarization-independent SERS performance over the whole 360° range, rotationally symmetrical coined metal nanomultimers, such as regular trimers, regular triangular tetramers and regular pentamers, are reliable and reproducible SERS substrates, which have the potential for convenient and flexible practical SERS detection without the need for optimally incident polarization outside the laboratory setting.

  9. Titanium induced polarity inversion in ordered (In,Ga)N/GaN nanocolumns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Li, H.; Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.; Draxl, C.; Trampert, A.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the formation of polarity inversion in ordered (In,Ga)N/GaN nanocolumns grown on a Ti-masked GaN-buffered sapphire substrate by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy reveal a stacking fault-like planar defect at the homoepitaxial GaN interface due to Ti incorporation, triggering the generation of N-polar domains in Ga-polar nanocolumns. Density functional theory calculations are applied to clarify the atomic configurations of a Ti monolayer occupation on the GaN (0002) plane and to prove the inversion effect. The polarity inversion leads to an enhanced indium incorporation in the subsequent (In,Ga)N segment of the nanocolumn. This study provides a deeper understanding of the effects of Ti mask in the well-controlled selective area growth of (In,Ga)N/GaN nanocolumns.

  10. Route to polarization switching induced by optical injection in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sciamanna, M.; Panajotov, K.

    2006-02-15

    We perform a theoretical investigation of the polarization dynamics in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) subject to orthogonal optical injection, i.e., the injected field has a linear polarization (LP) orthogonal to that of the free-running VCSEL. In agreement with previous experiments [Z. G. Pan et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 63, 2999 (1993)], an increase of the injection strength may lead to a polarization switching accompanied by an injection locking. We find that this route to polarization switching is typically accompanied by a cascade of bifurcations to wave-mixing dynamics and time-periodic and possibly chaotic regimes. A detailed mapping of the polarization dynamics in the plane of the injection parameters (detuning, injection strength) unveils a large richness of dynamical scenarios. Of particular interest is the existence of another injection-locked solution for which the two LP modes both lock to the master laser frequency, i.e., an elliptically polarized injection-locked (EPIL) steady state. Modern continuation techniques allow us to unveil an unfolding mechanism of the EPIL solution as the detuning varies and also to link the existence of the EPIL solution to a resonance condition between the master laser frequency and the free-running frequency of the normally depressed LP mode in the slave laser. We furthermore report an additional case of bistability, in which the EPIL solution may coexist with the second injection-locked solution (the one being locked to the master polarization). This case of bistability is a result of the interaction between optical injection and the two-polarization-mode characteristics of VCSEL devices.

  11. Route to polarization switching induced by optical injection in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamanna, M.; Panajotov, K.

    2006-02-01

    We perform a theoretical investigation of the polarization dynamics in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) subject to orthogonal optical injection, i.e., the injected field has a linear polarization (LP) orthogonal to that of the free-running VCSEL. In agreement with previous experiments [Z. G. Pan , Appl. Phys. Lett. 63, 2999 (1993)], an increase of the injection strength may lead to a polarization switching accompanied by an injection locking. We find that this route to polarization switching is typically accompanied by a cascade of bifurcations to wave-mixing dynamics and time-periodic and possibly chaotic regimes. A detailed mapping of the polarization dynamics in the plane of the injection parameters (detuning, injection strength) unveils a large richness of dynamical scenarios. Of particular interest is the existence of another injection-locked solution for which the two LP modes both lock to the master laser frequency, i.e., an elliptically polarized injection-locked (EPIL) steady state. Modern continuation techniques allow us to unveil an unfolding mechanism of the EPIL solution as the detuning varies and also to link the existence of the EPIL solution to a resonance condition between the master laser frequency and the free-running frequency of the normally depressed LP mode in the slave laser. We furthermore report an additional case of bistability, in which the EPIL solution may coexist with the second injection-locked solution (the one being locked to the master polarization). This case of bistability is a result of the interaction between optical injection and the two-polarization-mode characteristics of VCSEL devices.

  12. Particle acceleration in laser-induced relativistic plasmas — a novel approach for polarized sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büscher, M.; Engin, I.; Gibbon, P.; Karmakar, A.; Lehrach, A.; Mennicken, Th; Raab, N.; Toncian, M.; Toncian, T.; Willi, O.

    2011-05-01

    The physics of laser-plasma interactions has undergone dramatic improvements in recent years. By directing a multi-TW, ultrashort laser pulse onto a thin foil or a gas jet, it is nowadays possible to produce multi-MeV proton, ion and electron beams. Although much progress has been made in characterizing and improving the quality of such laser-generated beams, it is still an untouched issue whether the laser-generated beams are or can be spin-polarized and, thus, whether laser-based polarized sources are conceivable. To this end, one may either think of a selection of certain spin states through the huge magnetic field gradients that are inherently generated in the laser-generated plasmas, or of pre-polarized target particles which maintain their polarization during the rapid acceleration procedure. We have developed a method to measure the degree of polarization of protons that have been accelerated at the 200 TW laser facility ARCturus at Düsseldorf University. As a next step, measurements with unpolarized H2 (for proton acceleration) and 3He gas (for 3He ions) are planned and, finally, pre-polarized 3He will be used.

  13. Tuning the polarization-induced free hole density in nanowires graded from GaN to AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Golam Sarwar, A. T. M.; Carnevale, Santino D.; Kent, Thomas F.; Yang, Fan; McComb, David W.; Myers, Roberto C.

    2015-01-19

    We report a systematic study of p-type polarization-induced doping in graded AlGaN nanowire light emitting diodes grown on silicon wafers by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The composition gradient in the p-type base is varied in a set of samples from 0.7%Al/nm to 4.95%Al/nm corresponding to negative bound polarization charge densities of 2.2 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3} to 1.6 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3}. Capacitance measurements and energy band modeling reveal that for gradients greater than or equal to 1.30%Al/nm, the deep donor concentration is negligible and free hole concentrations roughly equal to the bound polarization charge density are achieved up to 1.6 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3} at a gradient of 4.95%Al/nm. Accurate grading lengths in the p- and n-side of the pn-junction are extracted from scanning transmission electron microscopy images and are used to support energy band calculation and capacitance modeling. These results demonstrate the robust nature of p-type polarization doping in nanowires and put an upper bound on the magnitude of deep donor compensation.

  14. Experimental study of the spectral characteristics of laser-induced air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Zhaoxiang; Wu Jinquan; Sun Fenglou; Gong Shunsheng

    2010-05-01

    The characteristics of laser-induced air, N2, and O2 plasma spectra are investigated spectroscopically. The study concentrates mainly on the temporal behavior of laser-induced plasma after breakdown. We used delayed spectra and spectra evolution for this study. Except for the general one-beam laser-induced breakdown experiment, a second laser beam was added to further probe the behavior of plasma during its decay. We report the experimental results of spectra composition, spectra time evolution, and spectra affected by a second laser beam. We determined that all the laser-induced air plasma spectra are from a continuous spectrum and some line spectra superposed on the continuous spectrum. The stronger short wavelength continuous spectrum is caused by bremsstrahlung radiation of electrons in the plasma, and the weaker long wavelength continuous spectrum is caused by electron and ion recombination. Line spectra originate from excited molecules, atoms, and their first-order ions, but no line spectra form higher-order ions. The results show that the temporal behavior of some spectra is a decay-rise-redecay pattern. With the two laser beam experiment we found that all the spectra intensities are enhanced by the second laser beam, but the response of various spectra to the delay of the second laser beam is quite different, in particular, the intensity increments of some spectra increase with the delay of the second laser beam. Some microscopic processes of laser-induced plasma obtained from the experimental results are discussed. These results are useful for a better understanding of some laser-induced air plasma related applications, such as laser-guided lightning and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  15. Wire-grid polarizer using galvanic growth technology: demonstration of a wide spectral and angular bandwidth component with high extinction ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrier, Isabelle; Kämpfe, Thomas; Celle, Frederic; Cazier, Anthony; Guttmann, Markus; Matthis, Barbara; Laukkanen, Janne; Lacour, Frédéric; Veillas, Colette; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Parriaux, Olivier; Jourlin, Yves

    2015-04-01

    Functional demonstration of a wide band, wide angular width wire-grid polarizer has been made in the framework of a user project of the European project ACTMOST (Access To Micro-Optics Expertise, Services and Technologies). The polarization function relies on linear polarizers using the wire-grid polarizer principle by means of a metal grating of unusually large period, exhibiting a large extinction of the transmission of the TE polarization in the 850-nm wavelength range. This grating achieves a broadband and especially high angular aperture reflection with low loss and permits resorting to very low cost incoherent light sources for the transmitted TM polarization. This paper will describe the design, the modeling and optimization, as well as the complete technological process chain, that has been used, starting with the photoresist grating printing using phase-mask UV-based lithography to the uniform galvanic growth of a very shallow gold grating on transparent conductive layer deposited on a glass substrate. Transmission curves for both polarizations performed on the first demonstrators will be presented.

  16. Hyperoxia promotes polarization of the immune response in ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, leading to a TH17 cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Nagato, Akinori C; Bezerra, Frank S; Talvani, André; Aarestrup, Beatriz J; Aarestrup, Fernando M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that hyperoxia-induced stress and oxidative damage to the lungs of mice lead to an increase in IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β expression. Together, IL-6 and TGF-β have been known to direct T cell differentiation toward the TH17 phenotype. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that hyperoxia promotes the polarization of T cells to the TH17 cell phenotype in response to ovalbumin-induced acute airway inflammation. Airway inflammation was induced in female BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal sensitization and intranasal introduction of ovalbumin, followed by challenge methacholine. After the methacholine challenge, animals were exposed to hyperoxic conditions in an inhalation chamber for 24 h. The controls were subjected to normoxia or aluminum hydroxide dissolved in phosphate buffered saline. After 24 h of hyperoxia, the number of macrophages and lymphocytes decreased in animals with ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, whereas the number of neutrophils increased after ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation. The results showed that expression of Nrf2, iNOS, T-bet and IL-17 increased after 24 of hyperoxia in both alveolar macrophages and in lung epithelial cells, compared with both animals that remained in room air, and animals with ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation. Hyperoxia alone without the induction of airway inflammation lead to increased levels of TNF-α and CCL5, whereas hyperoxia after inflammation lead to decreased CCL2 levels. Histological evidence of extravasation of inflammatory cells into the perivascular and peribronchial regions of the lungs was observed after pulmonary inflammation and hyperoxia. Hyperoxia promotes polarization of the immune response toward the TH17 phenotype, resulting in tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and the migration of neutrophils to the lung and airways. Elucidating the effect of hyperoxia on ovalbumin-induced acute airway inflammation is relevant to preventing or treating asthmatic patients that require oxygen supplementation to reverse the hypoxemia. PMID:26417446

  17. Solar simulated radiation induced cell death depends on spectral distribution and irradiance but not output delivery.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Alanna; Lyng, Fiona M; Walsh, James E

    2010-07-01

    Photo-biological investigations are dependent on calibration and characterisation to determine the relevance of an artificial irradiator to the study at hand. The importance of this has been voiced in the literature. However, the importance of output delivery is relatively unknown. The biological relevance of a high-energy, rapidly pulsing solar simulator was investigated using the clonogenic assay and was found to be reciprocity law compliant despite an exaggerated ultraviolet (UV) irradiance in excess of 1600 W m(-2) delivered per pulse. In fact, it was found to be the least cytotoxic irradiator compared with a second solar simulator and a UVB fluorescent lamp with continuous UV irradiances of 55 and 6.4 W m(-2), respectively. The reduced survival observed with the continuous irradiators is attributed to differences in spectral irradiance and distribution, particularly in the UVB, which in the absence of thorough calibration and characterisation may have resulted in erroneous conclusions. PMID:20203123

  18. Arsenic- and selenium-induced changes in spectral reflectance and morphology of soybean plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, N.M.; Ager, C.M.; Eiswerth, B.A.; Power, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) plants were grown in hydroponic solutions treated with high concentrations of either arsenic or selenium. Spectral reflectance changes in arsenic-dosed plants included a shift to shorter wavelengths in the long-wavelength edge of the chlorophyll absorption band centered at 680 nm (the red edge) and higher reflectance in the 550-650 nm region. These results are consistent with vegetation reflectance anomalies observed in previous greenhouse experiments and in airborne radiometer studies. The selenium-dosed plants contrast, exhibited a shift to longer wavelengths of the red edge and lower reflectance between 550 nm and 650 wh when compared with control plants. Morphological effects of arsenic uptake included lower overall biomass, stunted and discolored roots, and smaller leaves oriented more vertically than leaves of control plants. Selenium-dosed plants also displayed morphological changes, but root and leaf biomass were less affected than were those of arsenic-dosed plants when compared to control plants. ?? 1989.

  19. Tunnel-injection quantum dot deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with polarization-induced doping in III-nitride heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Jai Islam, S. M.; Protasenko, Vladimir; Kumar Kandaswamy, Prem; Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2014-01-13

    Efficient semiconductor optical emitters in the deep-ultraviolet spectral window are encountering some of the most deep rooted problems of semiconductor physics. In III-Nitride heterostructures, obtaining short-wavelength photon emission requires the use of wide bandgap high Al composition AlGaN active regions. High conductivity electron (n-) and hole (p-) injection layers of even higher bandgaps are necessary for electrical carrier injection. This approach requires the activation of very deep dopants in very wide bandgap semiconductors, which is a difficult task. In this work, an approach is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to counter the challenges. The active region of the heterostructure light emitting diode uses ultrasmall epitaxially grown GaN quantum dots. Remarkably, the optical emission energy from GaN is pushed from 365 nm (3.4 eV, the bulk bandgap) to below 240 nm (>5.2 eV) because of extreme quantum confinement in the dots. This is possible because of the peculiar bandstructure and band alignments in the GaN/AlN system. This active region design crucially enables two further innovations for efficient carrier injection: Tunnel injection of carriers and polarization-induced p-type doping. The combination of these three advances results in major boosts in electroluminescence in deep-ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lays the groundwork for electrically pumped short-wavelength lasers.

  20. Temporal and spectral analysis of laser induced plasma in the ablation process of flexible printed circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryoo, Hoon C.; Kim, Seok; Hahn, Jae W.

    2008-02-01

    Flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), consisting of copper sheets laminated onto non conductive film substrates with multiple structures, are core elements in electronics with their flexibility and capability of high density 3 dimensional wiring characteristics. In laser applied FPCB processing, a better understanding of the ablation mechanism leads to precision control of the depth processing especially by monitoring of the material transition layer. For this purpose, here we investigate the temporal and spectral behavior of the plasma plum generated on the single sided structure of FPCB using the technique of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Using KrF excimer laser, the characteristic spectral emission lines of C II swan band at the wavelength of 516.5 nm and neutral copper at the wavelength range from 510 nm to 522 nm are acquired under ambient pressure in the ablation process of polyimide film and copper coated layer respectively. From a time delay from 50 ns to 4.05 μs from the beginning of the laser pulse, the temporal profiles of the spectral intensity are obtained in steps of 200 ns, which have a tendency of exponential decrease on both C II and neutral copper. In particular, we concentrate our attention on the temporal intensity behavior of the Bremsstrahlung continuum emission that decides the proper set of detection time window, by which the monitoring sensitivity of LIBS is determined. Finally, using the information of the temporal analysis for each molecular, atomic, and continuum emission, the transition layer between polyimide and copper film is distinguished by their characteristic peak information.

  1. Sensing the Presence and Transport of Engineered Nanoparticles in Saturated PorousMedia using Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) Method

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nano-materials are emerging into the global marketplace. Engineered Nano-particles, and other throwaway nanodevices may constitute a whole new class of non-biodegradable pollutants of which scientists have very little understanding. Therefore, the production of significant quanti...

  2. Myeloid cell-derived inducible nitric oxide synthase suppresses M1 macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Geming; Zhang, Ruihua; Geng, Shuo; Peng, Liang; Jayaraman, Padmini; Chen, Chun; Xu, Feifong; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Qin; Zheng, Hao; Shen, Kimberly; Wang, Juan; Liu, Xiyu; Wang, Weidong; Zheng, Zihan; Qi, Chen-Feng; Si, Chuanping; He, John Cijiang; Liu, Kebin; Lira, Sergio A.; Sikora, Andrew G.; Li, Liwu; Xiong, Huabao

    2015-01-01

    Here we show that iNOS-deficient mice display enhanced classically activated M1 macrophage polarization without major effects on alternatively activated M2 macrophages. eNOS and nNOS mutant mice show comparable M1 macrophage polarization compared with wild-type control mice. Addition of N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine dihydrochloride, an iNOS inhibitor, significantly enhances M1 macrophage polarization while S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, a NO donor, suppresses M1 macrophage polarization. NO derived from iNOS mediates nitration of tyrosine residues in IRF5 protein, leading to the suppression of IRF5-targeted M1 macrophage signature gene activation. Computational analyses corroborate a circuit that fine-tunes the expression of IL-12 by iNOS in macrophages, potentially enabling versatile responses based on changing microenvironments. Finally, studies of an experimental model of endotoxin shock show that iNOS deficiency results in more severe inflammation with an enhanced M1 macrophage activation phenotype. These results suggest that NO derived from iNOS in activated macrophages suppresses M1 macrophage polarization. PMID:25813085

  3. Polarization-induced transport in TIPS-pentacene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudari, Amrit; Guha, Suchi

    The dielectric constant of polymer ferroelectric dielectrics can be tuned by changing the temperature, offering a platform for monitoring the changes in interfacial transport in organic field-effect transistors (FETs), as the polarization strength is tuned. Temperature dependent transport studies of FETs have been carried out from a solution-processed organic semiconductor, 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), using both ferroelectric and non-ferroelectric gate insulators. Non-polar dielectric based TIPS-pentacene FETs show a clear activated transport in contrast to the ferroelectric dielectric polymer, poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE), where a negative temperature coefficient of the mobility is observed in the ferroelectric temperature range. We attribute the weak temperature-dependence of the charge carrier mobility to a polarization fluctuation driven transport resulting from a coupling of the charge carriers to the surface phonons of the polar dielectric. The negative coefficient of mobility (dμ/dT < 0) observed with ferroelectric dielectrics is not a signature of an extended-state conduction but rather denotes polarization fluctuation driven transport. This work was supported by National Science Foundation under Grant No. ECCS-1305642.

  4. N-single-helix photonic-metamaterial based broadband optical range circular polarizer by induced phase lags between helices.

    PubMed

    Behera, Saraswati; Joseph, Joby

    2015-02-10

    In this work, we have designed a photonic-metamaterial based broadband circular polarizer using N=4 phase-lagged aluminum single helices arranged in a square array as a unit cell. The effect of phase differences between the helices in an array on the optical performance of the structure is studied, and a comparative study is done with that of multi-intertwined helices. It is observed that the proposed metamaterial structure shows circular polarization sensitivity over a broad optical wavelength range (≈450-900  nm), with improved optical performance in average extinction ratio and broad positive circular dichroism in comparison to multiple intertwined helices. The induced phase lag between the helices in a square-array based unit cell reduces the linear birefringence and leads to the recovery of circular space symmetry in the structure. PMID:25968042

  5. Rotation of Nuclei as Observed in Ternary Fission of the Reaction 235U(nth,f) Induced by Polarized Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Goennenwein, F.; Gagarski, A.; Guseva, I.; Petrov, G.; Sokolov, V.; Zavarukhkina, T.; Mutterer, M.; Nesvizhevski, V.; Bunakov, V.; Kadmensky, S.

    2007-05-22

    Ternary fission of the standard reaction 235U(nth,f) induced by cold polarized neutrons has been investigated. Fission fragments and light charged particles were recorded in coincidence. Following cold neutron capture the compound nucleus 236U* has spin 3- or 4-. At the saddle point of the fissioning 236U* nucleus these states are collective. They are expected to retain a sizable collectivity down to the scission point. In fact, a collective rotation has been sensed by the shift in the angular distribution of the light charged particles which depends on the orientation of neutron polarization. Direct observation of the rotation of 236U* excited in a cold neutron reaction is reported here for the first time. It is proposed to call the new phenomenon the 'ROT-effect'.

  6. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of 29Si Nuclei Induced by Li and Li-O Centers in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mohammad R.; Itahashi, Tatsumasa; Vlasenko, Marina P.; Vlasenko, Leonid S.; Haller, Eugene E.; Itoh, Kohei M.

    2010-10-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of 29Si nuclear spins induced by saturation of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) transitions of lithium-related centers in float zone (FZ) grown silicon is reported. Both isolated Li and Li-O complex centers showed strong EPR absorption lines in the temperature range 3.4-10 K and led to very efficient orientation of 29Si nuclear spins. The temperature dependence and time constant of 29Si DNP are investigated in detail. The 29Si DNP of 0.72% was achieved at 3.4 K by excitation of the Li-O forbidden EPR transition under illumination, corresponding to a ˜352 fold increase with respect to the thermal equilibrium polarization.

  7. Spectral State Dependence of the 0.4-2 MeV Polarized Emission in Cygnus X-1 Seen with INTEGRAL/IBIS, and Links with the AMI Radio Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jérôme; Grinberg, Victoria; Laurent, Philippe; Cadolle Bel, Marion; Pottschmidt, Katja; Pooley, Guy; Bodaghee, Arash; Wilms, Jörn; Gouiffès, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Polarization of the ≳ 400 keV hard tail of the microquasar Cygnus X-1 has been independently reported by INTEGRAL/Imager on Board the INTEGRAL Satellite (IBIS), and INTEGRAL/SPectrometer on INTEGRAL and interpreted as emission from a compact jet. These conclusions were, however, based on the accumulation of all INTEGRAL data regardless of the spectral state. We utilize additional INTEGRAL exposure accumulated until 2012 December, and include the AMI/Ryle (15 GHz) radio data in our study. We separate the observations into hard, soft, and intermediate/transitional states and detect radio emission from a compact jet in hard and intermediate states (IS), but not in the soft. The 10-400 keV INTEGRAL (JEM-X and IBIS) state resolved spectra are well modeled with thermal Comptonization and reflection components. We detect a hard tail in the 0.4-2 MeV range for the hard state only. We extract the state dependent polarigrams of Cyg X-1, which are all compatible with no or an undetectable level of polarization except in the 400-2000 keV range in the hard state where the polarization fraction is 75% ± 32% and the polarization angle 40.°0 ± 14.°3. An upper limit on the 0.4-2 MeV soft state polarization fraction is 70%. Due to the short exposure, we obtain no meaningful constraint for the IS. The likely detection of a \\gt 400 keV polarized tail in the hard state, together with the simultaneous presence of a radio jet, reinforce the notion of a compact jet origin of the \\gt 400 keV emission.

  8. Correlation between aging grade of T91 steel and spectral characteristics of the laser-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Lu, Jidong; Dai, Yuan; Dong, Meirong; Zhong, Wanli; Yao, Shunchun

    2015-08-01

    T91 steel with favorable mechanical performance has become the representative heat-resistant steel used as heat exchange surfaces in supercritical and ultra-supercritical boilers. The organizational structure and mechanical properties change during the service period, called material aging, which affects the service life and the equipment safety. To develop a fast and easy aging predictive technique of heat exchange metal surfaces, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to investigate the plasma characteristics of T91 steel specimens with different aging grades. The metallographic structure, mechanical properties and spectral characteristics of the specimens were analyzed. Then, the correlations between the spectral characteristics and the aging grade were established. The analysis results show that the martensite substructure disappears, and the dimension of the carbide particles among the crystal lattices increases with aging. At the same time, the hardness of the samples gradually decreases. The peak intensities of both the matrix and the alloying element increases then decreases with aging, owing to the change of the metallography structure and mechanical properties. Furthermore, good unique value correlations between the intensity ratio of CrI/FeI, MoI/FeI and the aging grade are found. This demonstrates that LIBS is a possible new way to estimate the aging grade of metal materials.

  9. Use of the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy-based Martian geology and exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziemski, Leon; Cremers, David A.; Benelli, Katharine; Khoo, Cynthia; Harris, Ronny D.

    2005-02-01

    Several elements important to planetary geology (e.g. Br, C, Cl, P, S) and the human exploration of Mars (e.g. toxic elements such as As) have strong emission lines in the purge and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region (100 200 nm). This spectral region has not been extensively studied for space applications using geological samples. We studied emissions from the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) plasma in this region using a sample chamber filled with 7 torr (930 Pa) of CO2 to simulate the Martian atmosphere. Pressures down to 0.02 torr were also used to evaluate the effect of the residual CO2 on the spectra and to begin investigating the use of VUV-LIBS for airless bodies such as asteroids and the Moon. Spectra were recorded using a 0.3-m vacuum spectrometer with an intensified CCD (ICCD) camera. The effects of time delay and laser energy on LIBS detection at reduced pressure were examined. The effect of ambient CO2 on the detection of C in soil was also evaluated. Lines useful for the spectrochemical analysis of As, Br, C, Cl, P, and S were determined and calibration curves were prepared for these elements. Although LIBS is being developed for stand-off analysis at many meters distance, the experiments reported here were aimed at in-situ (close-up) analysis.

  10. Spectral analysis of paramagnetic centers induced in human tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, I. I.

    2010-03-01

    Based on study of spectral and relaxation characteristics, we have established that paramagnetic centers induced in tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation are identical in nature. We show that for the same exposure dose, the intensity of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal induced by x-radiation with effective energy 34 keV is about an order of magnitude higher than the amplitude of the signal induced by gamma radiation. We have identified a three-fold attenuation of the EPR signal along the path of the x-radiation from the buccal to the lingual side of a tooth, which is evidence that the individual had undergone diagnostic x-ray examination of the dentition or skull. We have shown that the x-ray exposure doses reconstructed from the EPR spectra are an order of magnitude higher than the applied doses, while the dose loads due to gamma radiation are equal to the applied doses. The data obtained indicate that for adequate reconstruction of individual absorbed doses from EPR spectra of tooth enamel in the population subjected to the combined effect of x-radiation and accidental external gamma radiation as a result of the disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, we need to take into account the contribution to the dose load from diagnostic x-rays in examination of the teeth, jaw, or skull.

  11. Enhanced carrier injection in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells LED with polarization-induced electron blocking barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengguo; Liu, Hongfei; Chua, Soo Jin

    2016-03-01

    In this report, we designed a light emitting diode (LED) structure in which an N-polar p-GaN layer is grown on top of Ga-polar In0.1Ga0.9N/GaN quantum wells (QWs) on an n-GaN layer. Numerical simulation reveals that the large polarization field at the polarity inversion interface induces a potential barrier in the conduction band, which can block electron overflow out of the QWs. Compared with a conventional LED structure with an Al0.2Ga0.8N electron blocking layer (EBL), the proposed LED structure shows much lower electron current leakage, higher hole injection, and a significant improvement in the internal quantum efficiency (IQE). These results suggest that the polarization induced barrier (PIB) is more effective than the AlGaN EBL in suppressing electron overflow and improving hole transport in GaN-based LEDs.

  12. Contact-induced spin polarization of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on Ni(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtomo, Manabu; Entani, Shiro; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Naramoto, Hiroshi; Sakai, Seiji; Yamauchi, Yasushi; Kuzubov, Alex A.; Eliseeva, Natalya S.; Avramov, Pavel V.

    2014-02-03

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a promising barrier material for graphene spintronics. In this Letter, spin-polarized metastable de-excitation spectroscopy (SPMDS) is employed to study the spin-dependent electronic structure of monolayer h-BN/Ni(111). The extreme surface sensitivity of SPMDS enables us to elucidate a partial filling of the in-gap states of h-BN without any superposition of Ni 3d signals. The in-gap states are shown to have a considerable spin polarization parallel to the majority spin of Ni. The positive spin polarization is attributed to the π-d hybridization and the effective spin transfer to the nitrogen atoms at the h-BN/Ni(111) interface.

  13. Asymmetries in electron-induced breakup of polarized {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Sirca, S.

    2011-10-24

    The Jefferson Lab Experiment E05-102 'Measurement of A{sub x}{sup '} and A{sub z}{sup '} asymmetries in the quasi-elastic {sup 3}He(e,e'd) reaction' was performed in Hall A in 2009. The main physics motivation of the experiment was to investigate the effects of small components of the {sup 3}He ground-state wave-function by a simultaneous measurement of double-polarization asymmetries in quasi-elastic kinematics for three exclusive channels, (e,e'd), (e,e'p), and (e,e'n), at almost identical momentum transfers, as well as for (e,e'). This experiment will help map the spin structure of the {sup 3}He nucleus onto the picture of the ''free'' polarized neutron. As such, it is of great relevance to the polarized-neutron programs at Jefferson Lab and beyond.

  14. Photoelectron angular distributions in bichromatic atomic ionization induced by circularly polarized VUV femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douguet, Nicolas; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Gryzlova, Elena V.; Staroselskaya, Ekaterina I.; Venzke, Joel; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    We investigate two-pathway interferences between nonresonant one-photon and resonant two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen. In particular, we analyze in detail the photoionization mediated by the fundamental frequency and the second harmonic of a femtosecond VUV pulse when the fundamental is tuned near an intermediate atomic state. Following our recent study [Phys. Rev. A 91, 063418 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.063418] of such effects with linearly polarized light, we analyze a similar situation with circularly polarized radiation. As a consequence of the richer structure in circularly polarized light, characterized by its right-handed or left-handed helicity, we present and discuss various important features associated with the photoelectron angular distribution.

  15. High intensity induced photocurrent polarity switching in lead sulfide nanowire field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yiming; Peng, Xingyue; Yu, Dong

    2014-05-01

    We report an optoelectronic investigation of lead sulfide nanowires (NWs) by scanning photocurrent microscopy. The photocurrent in p-type lead sulfide NW field effect transistors has demonstrated unusually nonlinear dependence on the intensity of local excitation. Surprisingly, the photocurrent polarity can be reversed under high illumination intensity on the order of 100 W cm-2. The origin of this photocurrent polarity switching is that the photo-injected carriers flip the direction of the electric field near the contact. These observations shed light on the nonlinear optoelectronic characteristics in semiconductor nanostructures and may provide an innovative method for optically tailoring local band structures.

  16. Polarization of near-field light induced with a plasmonic nanoantenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data