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Sample records for spectral radiometric spatial

  1. Spectral, spatial and radiometric factors in cover type discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, D.; Buis, J.; Acevedo, W.; Wrigley, R.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of spatial, spectral, and radiometric resolutions on the utilization of Thematic Mapper (TM) and Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data is assessed quantitatively using a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design experiment. Eight possible factor combinations were examined for agricultural, urban, forestry, range, and water types of land covers for three levels of information. Spectral bandwidths were configured to simulate all four Landsat MSS channels and Landsat TM channels 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7. By means of bar charts and tables it is shown that the 8-bit radiometric and 75-meter spatial resolutions provide a higher overall accuracy than the 6-bit radiometric and 25-meter spatial resolutions. Spectrally, the difference between the four MSS channels and five TM channel configurations is noted to be insignificant.

  2. The effect of spatial, spectral and radiometric factors on classification accuracy using thematic mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.; Acevedo, W.; Alexander, D.; Buis, J.; Card, D.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment of a factorial design was conducted to test the effects on classification accuracy of land cover types due to the improved spatial, spectral and radiometric characteristics of the Thematic Mapper (TM) in comparison to the Multispectral Scanner (MSS). High altitude aircraft scanner data from the Airborne Thematic Mapper instrument was acquired over central California in August, 1983 and used to simulate Thematic Mapper data as well as all combinations of the three characteristics for eight data sets in all. Results for the training sites (field center pixels) showed better classification accuracies for MSS spatial resolution, TM spectral bands and TM radiometry in order of importance.

  3. Evaluation of spatial, radiometric and spectral Thematic Mapper performance for coastal studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V.; Ackleson, S. G.; Hardisky, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    On 31 March 1983, the University of Delaware's Center for Remote Sensing initiated a study to evaluate the spatial, radiometric and spectral performance of the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper for coastal and estuarine studies. The investigation was supported by Contract NAS5-27580 from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The research was divided into three major subprojects: (1) a comparison of LANDSAT TM to MSS imagery for detecting submerged aquatic vegetation in Chesapeake Bay; (2) remote sensing of submerged aquatic vegetation - a radiative transfer approach; and (3) remote sensing of coastal wetland biomass using Thematic Mapper wavebands.

  4. Investigation of LANDSAT follow-on thematic mapper spatial, radiometric and spectral resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalepka, R. F. (Principal Investigator); Morgenstern, J. P.; Kent, E. R.; Erickson, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Fine resolution M7 multispectral scanner data collected during the Corn Blight Watch Experiment in 1971 served as the basis for this study. Different locations and times of year were studied. Definite improvement using 30-40 meter spatial resolution over present LANDSAT 1 resolution and over 50-60 meter resolution was observed, using crop area mensuration as the measure. Simulation studies carried out to extrapolate the empirical results to a range of field size distributions confirmed this effect, showing the improvement to be most pronounced for field sizes of 1-4 hectares. Radiometric sensitivity study showed significant degradation of crop classification accuracy immediately upon relaxation from the nominally specified values of 0.5% noise equivalent reflectance. This was especially the case for data which were spectrally similar such as that collected early in the growing season and also when attempting to accomplish crop stress detection.

  5. The Moon Mineralogy (M3) Imaging Spectrometer: Early Assessment of the Spectral, Radiometric, Spatial and Uniformity Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Pieters, C. M.; Boardman, J.; Barr, D.; Bruce, C.; Bousman, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eastwood, M.; Essandoh, V.; Geier, S.; Glavich, T.; Green, R.; Haemmerle, V.; Hyman, S.; Hovland, L.; Koch, T.; Lee, K.; Lundeen, S.; Motts, E.; Mouroulis, P.; Paulson, S.; Plourde, K.; Racho, C.; Robinson, D.; Rodriquez, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Moon Mineralogy Mapper's (M3) is a high uniformity and high signal-to-noise ratio NASA imaging spectrometer that is a guest instrument on the Indian Chandrayaan-1 Mission to the Moon. The laboratory measured spectral, radiometric, spatial, and uniformity characteristics of the M3 instrument are given. The M3 imaging spectrometer takes advantage of a suite of critical enabling capabilities to achieve its measurement requirement with a mass of 8 kg, power usage of 15 W, and volume of 25X18X12 cm. The M3 detector and spectrometer are cooled by a multi-stage passive cooler. This paper presents early M3 performance assessment results.

  6. Evaluation of spatial, radiometric and spectral Thematic Mapper performance for coastal studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    The effect different wetland plant canopies have upon observed reflectance in Thematic Mapper bands is studied. The three major vegetation canopy types (broadleaf, gramineous and leafless) produce unique spectral responses for a similar quantity of live biomass. The spectral biomass estimate of a broadleaf canopy is most similar to the harvest biomass estimate when a broadleaf canopy radiance model is used. All major wetland vegetation species can be identified through TM imagery. Simple regression models are developed equating the vegetation index and the infrared index with biomass. The spectral radiance index largely agreed with harvest biomass estimates.

  7. Evaluation of spatial, radiometric and spectral Thematic Mapper performance for coastal studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    The effect different wetland plant canopies have upon observed reflectance in Thematic Mapper bands is examined. The three major vegetation canopy types (broadleaf, gramineous and leafless) produce unique spectral responses for a similar quantity of live biomass. Biomass estimates computed from spectral data were most similar to biomass estimates determined from harvest data when models developed for a specific canopy were used. Precise determination of regression coefficients for each canopy type and modeling changes in the coefficients with various combinations of canopy types are being tested. The multispectral band scanner vegetation index estimates are very similar to the vegetation index estimates.

  8. Evaluation of spatial, radiometric and spectral thematic mapper performance for coastal studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    An area along the southeastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay was subsetted from TM imagery. The subsetted image was then enhanced and classified using an ERDAS 400 system. Results obtained were compared with a chart showing the distribution of both Zolsters marina and Rupplia martime in the Vaucluse Shores and which supports a large community of SAV. Radiative transfer models describing the irradiance reflectance of a water column containing SAV are being refined. Radiative transfer theory was used to model upwelling radiance for an orbiting sensor viewing an estuarine environment. Upwelling radiance was calculated for a clear maritime atmosphere, an optically shallow estuary of either clear or turbid water, and one of three bottom types: vegetation, sand, or mud using TM bands 1, 2, and 3 and MSS bands 4 and 5. A spectral quality index was defined similar to the equation for apparent contrast and used to evaluate the relative effectiveness of TM and MSS bands in detecting submerged vegetation.

  9. Study of Spectral/Radiometric Characteristics of the Thematic Mapper for Land Use Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A. (Principal Investigator); Metzler, M. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    An investigation conducted in support of the LANDSAT 4/5 Image Data Quality Analysis (LIDQA) Program is discussed. Results of engineering analyses of radiometric, spatial, spectral, and geometric properties of the Thematic Mapper systems are summarized; major emphasis is placed on the radiometric analysis. Details of the analyses are presented in appendices, which contain three of the eight technical papers produced during this investigation; these three, together, describe the major activities and results of the investigation.

  10. Radiometric and Spatial Characterization of High-Spatial Resolution Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Zanoni, Vicki (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The development and improvement of commercial hyperspatial sensors in recent years has increased the breadth of information that can be retrieved from spaceborne and airborne imagery. NASA, through it's Scientific Data Purchases, has successfully provided such data sets to its user community. A key element to the usefulness of these data are an understanding of the radiometric and spatial response quality of the imagery. This proposal seeks funding to examine the absolute radiometric calibration of the Ikonos sensor operated by Space Imaging and the recently-launched Quickbird sensor from DigitalGlobe. In addition, we propose to evaluate the spatial response of the two sensors. The proposed methods rely on well-understood, ground-based targets that have been used by the University of Arizona for more than a decade.

  11. Sentinel-3 OLCI Radiometric and Spectral Performance Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, L.; Blanot, L.; Lamquin, N.; Bruniquel, V.; Meskini, N.; Nieke, J.; Bouvet, M.; Fougnie, B.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the activities to be undertaken by ACRI-ST under ESA/ESTEC coordination for the assessment of OLCI Radiometric and Spectral Performances during the SENTINEL-3 Commissioning Phase. As an introduction, it briefly describes the instrument concept and available on-board calibration hardware, the context and main objective of the work. Insisting on the fact that radiometric calibration of OLCI is based on in-flight measurements, as was for MERIS, it then describes the methodology and tools to be used during Commissioning. Finally, as in-flight based radiometry implies the need for independent validation, it describes the corresponding methods and tools.

  12. Spectrally and Radiometrically Stable, Wideband, Onboard Calibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, James B.; Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Sarture, Charles M.; Quetin, Gregory R.; Porter, Michael D.; Green, Robert O.; Nolte, Scott H.; Hernandez, Marco A.; Knoll, Linley A.

    2013-01-01

    The Onboard Calibration (OBC) source incorporates a medical/scientific-grade halogen source with a precisely designed fiber coupling system, and a fiber-based intensity-monitoring feedback loop that results in radiometric and spectral stabilities to within less than 0.3 percent over a 15-hour period. The airborne imaging spectrometer systems developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory incorporate OBC sources to provide auxiliary in-use system calibration data. The use of the OBC source will provide a significant increase in the quantitative accuracy, reliability, and resulting utility of the spectral data collected from current and future imaging spectrometer instruments.

  13. Determination of in-flight AVIRIS spectral, radiometric, spatial and signal-to-noise characteristics using atmospheric and surface measurements from the vicinity of the rare-earth-bearing carbonatite at Mountain Pass, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Vane, Gregg; Conel, James E.

    1988-01-01

    An assessment of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) performance was made for a flight over Mountain Pass, California, July 30, 1987. The flight data were reduced to reflectance using an empirical algorithm which compensates for solar, atmospheric and instrument factors. AVIRIS data in conjunction with surface and atmospheric measurements acquired concurrently were used to develop an improved spectral calibration. An accurate in-flight radiometric calibration was also performed using the LOWTRAN 7 radiative transfer code together with measured surface reflectance and atmospheric optical depths. A direct comparison with coincident Thematic Mapper imagery of Mountain Pass was used to demonstrate the high spatial resolution and good geometric performance of AVIRIS. The in-flight instrument noise was independently determined with two methods which showed good agreement. A signal-to-noise ratio was calculated using data from a uniform playa. This ratio was scaled to the AVIRIS reference radiance model, which provided a basis for comparison with laboratory and other in-flight signal-to-noise determinations.

  14. IRCM spectral signature measurements instrumentation featuring enhanced radiometric accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantagne, Stéphane; Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Roy, Claude; Willers, Cornelius J.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral Infrared (IR) signature measurements are performed in military applications including aircraft- and -naval vessel stealth characterization, detection/lock-on ranges, and flares efficiency characterization. Numerous military applications require high precision measurement of infrared signature characterization. For instance, Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) systems and Infrared Counter-Countermeasure (IRCCM) system are continuously evolving. Infrared flares defeated IR guided seekers, IR flares became defeated by intelligent IR guided seekers and Jammers defeated the intelligent IR guided seekers [7]. A precise knowledge of the target infrared signature phenomenology is crucial for the development and improvement of countermeasure and counter-countermeasure systems and so precise quantification of the infrared energy emitted from the targets requires accurate spectral signature measurements. Errors in infrared characterization measurements can lead to weakness in the safety of the countermeasure system and errors in the determination of detection/lock-on range of an aircraft. The infrared signatures are analyzed, modeled, and simulated to provide a good understanding of the signature phenomenology to improve the IRCM and IRCCM technologies efficiency [7,8,9]. There is a growing need for infrared spectral signature measurement technology in order to further improve and validate infrared-based models and simulations. The addition of imagery to Spectroradiometers is improving the measurement capability of complex targets and scenes because all elements in the scene can now be measured simultaneously. However, the limited dynamic range of the Focal Plane Array (FPA) sensors used in these instruments confines the ranges of measurable radiance intensities. This ultimately affects the radiometric accuracy of these complex signatures. We will describe and demonstrate how the ABB hyperspectral imaging spectroradiometer features enhanced the radiometric accuracy

  15. Performance and Results from a Space Borne, Uncooled Microbolometer Array Spectral Radiometric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James M; Scott, V. Stan; Lancaster, Redgie S.; Manizade, Kathrine; Palm, Steven P.

    2000-01-01

    The Infrared Spectral Imaging Radiometer experiment was flown on a space shuttle mission as a shuttle hitchhiker experiment in August of 1997. The goals of the experiment were to test uncooled array detectors for infrared spectral imaging from space and to apply for the first time retrieval from space of brightness temperatures of cloud, land and sea along with direct laser measurements of cloud top height. The instrument operates in 3 narrow and one broad spectral band, all between 7 and 13 microns in either stare or time-delay and integration mode. The nominal spatial resolution was 1/4 kilometer. Using onboard calibrations along with periodic views of deep space, radiometric calibration of imagery was carried out and performance analyzed. The noise equivalent temperature difference and absolute accuracy reported here varied with operating mode, spectral band and scene temperature but were within requirements. This paper provides a description of the instrument, its operating modes, the method of brightness temperature retrieval, the method of spectral registration and results from the flight.

  16. Bandwidth and spectral stray light effects in the NASA GSFC Radiometric Calibration Facility primary transfer radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Robert A.; Cooper, John W.; Marketon, John E.; Brown, Steven W.; Johnson, B. Carol; Butler, James J.

    2006-08-01

    As part of an effort to reduce uncertainties in the radiometric calibrations of integrating sphere sources and standard lamp irradiance sources, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Radiometric Calibration Facility's (RCF) primary radiometer was characterized at the NIST facility for Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Calibrations with Uniform Sources (SIRCUS). Based on those measurements, a nominal slit scattering function was developed for the radiometer. This allowed calculations of band averaged spectral radiances and irradiances for the radiometer's measurements of sphere and standard lamp sources, respectively. From these calculations the effects of bandwidth and spectral stray light were isolated for measurements in the blue spectral region. These effects, which depend on the spectral distribution of the source being measured, can be as large as 8% for measurements at 400 nm. The characterization results and a correction algorithm for these effects are presented here.

  17. Spectral and radiometric calibration of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, Gregg; Chrien, Thomas G.; Miller, Edward A.; Reimer, John H.

    1987-01-01

    The laboratory spectral and radiometric calibration of the AVIRIS science data collected since 1987 is described. The instrumentation and procedures used in the calibration are discussed and the accuracy achieved in the laboratory as determined by measurement and calculation is compared with the requirements. Instrument performance factors affecting radiometry are described. The paper concludes with a discussion of future plans.

  18. Analyzing Spectral Characteristics of Shadow Area from ADS-40 High Radiometric Resolution Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Ta; Wu, Shou-Tsung; Chen, Chaur-Tzuhn; Chen, Jan-Chang

    2016-06-01

    The shadows in optical remote sensing images are regarded as image nuisances in numerous applications. The classification and interpretation of shadow area in a remote sensing image are a challenge, because of the reduction or total loss of spectral information in those areas. In recent years, airborne multispectral aerial image devices have been developed 12-bit or higher radiometric resolution data, including Leica ADS-40, Intergraph DMC. The increased radiometric resolution of digital imagery provides more radiometric details of potential use in classification or interpretation of land cover of shadow areas. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to analyze the spectral properties of the land cover in the shadow areas by ADS-40 high radiometric resolution aerial images, and to investigate the spectral and vegetation index differences between the various shadow and non-shadow land covers. According to research findings of spectral analysis of ADS-40 image: (i) The DN values in shadow area are much lower than in nonshadow area; (ii) DN values received from shadowed areas that will also be affected by different land cover, and it shows the possibility of land cover property retrieval as in nonshadow area; (iii) The DN values received from shadowed regions decrease in the visible band from short to long wavelengths due to scattering; (iv) The shadow area NIR of vegetation category also shows a strong reflection; (v) Generally, vegetation indexes (NDVI) still have utility to classify the vegetation and non-vegetation in shadow area. The spectral data of high radiometric resolution images (ADS-40) is potential for the extract land cover information of shadow areas.

  19. [VMTBB-Based Spectral Radiometric Calibration of NIR Fiber Coupled Spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feng; Liu, Li-ying; Liu, Xiao-xi; Li, Ye; Shi, Xiao-guang; Zhang, Guo-yu; Huan, Ke-wei

    2015-09-01

    The medium temperature black body (MTBB) is conventional high precision equipment used as spectral radiometric scale in infrared spectral region. However, in near-infrared (NIR) spectral region, there are few papers about spectral radiometric calibration by using MTBB, that is because NIR spectral region is the borderland of its effective spectral region. The main research of this paper is spectral radiometric calibration method by using MTBB in NIR spectral region. Accordingly, this paper is devoted mostly to a discussion of how the calibration precision could be affected by selecting different structural parameters of calibration model. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of research and provide technical reference for improving the traceability in NIR spectral radiometric calibration. In this paper, a NIR fiber coupled spectrometer, whose wavelength range covers from 950 to 1700 nm, has been calibrated by a MTBB with adjustable temperature range from 50 to 1050 °C. Concentrating on calibration process, two key points have been discussed. For one thing, the geometric factors of radiation transfer model of the calibration systems have been compared between traditional structure and fiber direct-coupled structure. Because the fiber direct-coupled model is simple and effective, it has been selected instead of traditional model based on the radiation transfer between two coaxial discs. So, it is an advantaged radiation transfer model for radiometric calibration of fiber coupled spectrometer. For another thing, the relation between calibration accuracy and structural parameters of calibration model has been analyzed intensively. The root cause is scale feature of attribute of calibration data itself, which is the nonlinear structure in scales of spectral data. So, the high precision calibration needs nonlinear calibration model, and the uniform sampling for scale feature is also very important. Selecting sample is an inevitable problem when the

  20. Impact of the cameras radiometric resolution on the accuracy of determining spectral reflectance coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orych, A.; Walczykowski, P.; Jenerowicz, A.; Zdunek, Z.

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays remote sensing plays a very important role in many different study fields, i.e. environmental studies, hydrology, mineralogy, ecosystem studies, etc. One of the key areas of remote sensing applications is water quality monitoring. Understanding and monitoring of the water quality parameters and detecting different water contaminants is an important issue in water management and protection of whole environment and especially the water ecosystem. There are many remote sensing methods to monitor water quality and detect water pollutants. One of the most widely used method for substance detection with remote sensing techniques is based on usage of spectral reflectance coefficients. They are usually acquired using discrete methods such as spectrometric measurements. These however can be very time consuming, therefore image-based methods are used more and more often. In order to work out the proper methodology of obtaining spectral reflectance coefficients from hyperspectral and multispectral images, it is necessary to verify the impact of cameras radiometric resolution on the accuracy of determination of them. This paper presents laboratory experiments that were conducted using two monochromatic XEVA video sensors (400-1700 nm spectral data registration) with two different radiometric resolutions (12 and 14 bits). In view of determining spectral characteristics from images, the research team used set of interferometric filters. All data collected with multispectral digital video cameras were compared with spectral reflectance coefficients obtained with spectroradiometer. The objective of this research is to find the impact of cameras radiometric resolution on reflectance values in chosen wavelength. The main topic of this study is the analysis of accuracy of spectral coefficients from sensors with different radiometric resolution. By comparing values collected from images acquired with XEVA sensors and with the curves obtained with spectroradiometer it

  1. Radiometric Calibration Assessment of Commercial High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Image Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara; Aaron, David; Thome, Kurtis

    2006-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can better understand their properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent team member to determine the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The combined results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of these commercially available high spatial resolution sensors' absolute calibration values.

  2. Pre-flight radiometric and spectral calibration of Resourcesat-2A-LISS3* payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Harish; Detroja, M. P.; Padmanabhan, Deepa; Raj, Vedant; Kumar, Anil; Sarkar, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    Resourcesat-2A is a follow-on mission of Resourcesat-2, belongs to Indian Remote Sensing Program. It is expected to be launched in 2016 and is dedicated mainly to agricultural applications. One of the payloads, LISS3* is a medium resolution (23.5 m) sensor having four multispectral bands from 450 to 1650 nm. These spectral bands are named as B2 (550 nm), B3 (650 nm), B4 (815 nm) and B5 (1625 nm) respectively covering Visible, Near Infrared (NIR) and Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) regions. In order to provide quality data to the user community for long term scientific applications pre-flight ground calibration is carried out. This paper describes pre-flight spectral and radiometric calibration of LISS3* payload and its performance evaluation. Since it is a continuity mission to Resourcesat-2, which was launched in April 2011 so for generating long-term data record and correlation with previous observations, its parameters are compared with Resourcesat-2 LISS3* payload. The main spectral parameters like central wavelength, and pass band is determined using system level spectral response and compared for both the mission and differences are outlined. The next important exercise is pre-flight radiometric calibration, which was carried out in laboratory using a standard integrating sphere traceable to NIST standards. This paper highlights the technique adopted during pre-flight calibration of the radiometric response and performance assessment of all 4 bands of LISS3* in terms of major electro-optical parameters like Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), Saturation Radiance (SR) etc. The observed SR shows that the sensor can measure spectral radiance from Earth up to 100% albedo.

  3. Lunar Spectral Irradiance and Radiance (LUSI): New Instrumentation to Characterize the Moon as a Space-Based Radiometric Standard

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Allan W.; Lorentz, Steven R.; Stone, Thomas C.; Datla, Raju V.

    2012-01-01

    The need to understand and monitor climate change has led to proposed radiometric accuracy requirements for space-based remote sensing instruments that are very stringent and currently outside the capabilities of many Earth orbiting instruments. A major problem is quantifying changes in sensor performance that occur from launch and during the mission. To address this problem on-orbit calibrators and monitors have been developed, but they too can suffer changes from launch and the harsh space environment. One solution is to use the Moon as a calibration reference source. Already the Moon has been used to remove post-launch drift and to cross-calibrate different instruments, but further work is needed to develop a new model with low absolute uncertainties capable of climate-quality absolute calibration of Earth observing instruments on orbit. To this end, we are proposing an Earth-based instrument suite to measure the absolute lunar spectral irradiance to an uncertainty1 of 0.5 % (k=1) over the spectral range from 320 nm to 2500 nm with a spectral resolution of approximately 0.3 %. Absolute measurements of lunar radiance will also be acquired to facilitate calibration of high spatial resolution sensors. The instruments will be deployed at high elevation astronomical observatories and flown on high-altitude balloons in order to mitigate the effects of the Earth’s atmosphere on the lunar observations. Periodic calibrations using instrumentation and techniques available from NIST will ensure traceability to the International System of Units (SI) and low absolute radiometric uncertainties. PMID:26900523

  4. Re-evaluation of pulsed photothermal radiometric profiling in samples with spectrally varied infrared absorption coefficient.

    PubMed

    Majaron, Boris; Milanic, Matija

    2007-02-21

    Spectral variation of the sample absorption coefficient in mid-infrared (muIR) demands caution in photothermal radiometric measurements, because a constant muIR is regularly assumed in inverse analysis of the acquired signals. Adverse effects of such approximation were recently demonstrated in numerical simulations of pulsed photothermal radiometric (PPTR) temperature profiling in soft biological tissues, utilizing a general-purpose optimization code in the reconstruction process. We present here an original reconstruction code, which combines a conjugate gradient minimization algorithm with non-negativity constraint to the sought temperature vector. For the same test examples as in the former report (hyper-Gaussian temperature profiles, InSb detector with 3-5 microm acquisition band, signal-to-noise ratio SNR=300) we obtain markedly improved reconstruction results, both when using a constant value mueff and when the spectral variation muIR(lambda) is accounted for in the analysis. By comparing the results, we find that the former approach introduces observable artefacts, especially in the superficial part of the profile (z<100 microm). However, the artefacts are much less severe than previously reported and are almost absent in the case of a deeper, single-lobed test profile. We demonstrate that the observed artefacts do not result from sub-optimal selection of mueff, and that they vary with specific realizations of white noise added to the simulated signals. The same holds also for a two-lobed test profile. PMID:17264372

  5. In-flight calibration of the spectral and radiometric characteristics of AVIRIS in 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Conel, James E.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Margolis, Jack S.; Carrere, Veronique; Vane, Gregg; Hoover, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    On 7 Mar. 1991, an in-flight calibration experiment was held at the Ivanpah Playa in southeastern California for the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) imaging spectrometer. Five AVIRIS overflights were acquired of a calibration target designated on the Ivanpah Playa surface. At the time of the overflights, the reflectance of the calibration target was measured with a field spectrometer. In addition, the atmospheric optical depths and water vapor abundance were measured from a radiometer station adjacent to the calibration target. These in-situ measurements were used to constrain the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to model the upwelling spectral radiance incident to the sensor aperture during the overflights. Analyses of this modeled radiance in conjunction with the laboratory-calibrated radiance were used to determine the spectral and radiometric calibration of AVIRIS while in flight.

  6. Radiometric spectral and band rendering of targets using anisotropic BRDFs and measured backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgers, John W.; Hoffman, Jeffrey A.; Reynolds, William R.; Jafolla, James C.

    2000-07-01

    Achievement of ultra-high fidelity signature modeling of targets requires a significant level of complexity for all of the components required in the rendering process. Specifically, the reflectance of the surface must be described using the bi-directional distribution function (BRDF). In addition, the spatial representation of the background must be high fidelity. A methodology and corresponding model for spectral and band rendering of targets using both isotropic and anisotropic BRDFs is presented. In addition, a set of tools will be described for generating theoretical anisotropic BRDFs and for reducing data required for a description of an anisotropic BRDF by 5 orders of magnitude. This methodology is hybrid using a spectrally measured panoramic of the background mapped to a large hemisphere. Both radiosity and ray-tracing approaches are incorporated simultaneously for a robust solution. In the thermal domain the spectral emission is also included in the solution. Rendering examples using several BRDFs will be presented.

  7. Improved capabilities of the Chinese high-resolution remote sensing satellite GF-1 for monitoring suspended particulate matter (SPM) in inland waters: Radiometric and spatial considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Chen, Xiaoling; Tian, Liqiao; Huang, Jue; Feng, Lian

    2015-08-01

    Dominated by high dynamic and small-scale variability, remote sensing of inland or coastal waters is frequently impended by insufficient spatial resolutions from conventional ocean color sensors. With the urgent need and the rapid progress in high-resolution earth observation systems (HR), it is critical to assess the capabilities of HR in inland water monitoring. In this study, the radiometric and spatial performance of the Chinese high-resolution GF-1 Wide Field Imager (WFI) data for water quality monitoring were evaluated in term of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), sensitivity to suspended particulate matter (SPM) variations and spatial depiction ability. The SNR was statistically estimated from variable moving window method, and the radiometric sensitivity was simulated using the Moderate Resolution Atmospheric Transmission (MODTRAN) under varied surface and atmospheric conditions. Results indicated that both the SNR and the radiometric sensitivity of the GF-1 WFI were enhanced by 3-5 times than its predecessor (Chinese HJ-1 CCD) or Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), and were comparable to Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) medium-resolution bands (250 and 500 m), which have been extensively applied in inland water environment monitoring. Cross comparisons demonstrated high consistency of the spatial distribution and concentration of SPM maps between GF-1 WFI and Landsat 8 OLI. Furthermore, more than 75% of the spatial variations in high turbid waters were resolved from GF-1 WFI data, whereas the ability dropped to 40% when the spatial resolution was degraded to 250 m (MODIS-like sensors). Overall, GF-1 WFI is extraordinarily promising with an enhanced SNR, an increased spectral sensitivity to SPM variations and an advanced spatial resolution. With the ongoing plans of the successive GF series (2-7), the findings would serve as a reference for forthcoming applications, and are critical

  8. Apparatus description and data analysis of a radiometric technique for measurements of spectral and total normal emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, S. F.; Kantsios, A. G.; Voros, J. P.; Stewart, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a radiometric technique for determining the spectral and total normal emittance of materials heated to temperatures of 800, 1100, and 1300 K by direct comparison with National Bureau of Standards (NBS) reference specimens is discussed. Emittances are measured over the spectral range of 1 to 15 microns and are statistically compared with NBS reference specimens. Results are included for NBS reference specimens, Rene 41, alundum, zirconia, AISI type 321 stainless steel, nickel 201, and a space-shuttle reusable surface insulation.

  9. Effect of radiometric errors on accuracy of temperature-profile measurement by spectral scanning using absorption-emission pyrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The spectral-scanning method may be used to determine the temperature profile of a jet- or rocket-engine exhaust stream by measurements of gas radiation and transmittance, at two or more wavelengths. A single, fixed line of sight is used, using immobile radiators outside of the gas stream, and there is no interference with the flow. At least two sets of measurements are made, each set consisting of the conventional three radiometric measurements of absorption-emission pyrometry, but each set is taken over a different spectral interval that gives different weight to the radiation from a different portion of the optical path. Thereby, discrimination is obtained with respect to location along the path. A given radiometric error causes an error in computed temperatures. The ratio between temperature error and radiometric error depends on profile shape, path length, temperature level, and strength of line absorption, and the absorption coefficient and its temperature dependency. These influence the choice of wavelengths, for any given gas. Conditions for minimum temperature error are derived. Numerical results are presented for a two-wavelength measurement on a family of profiles that may be expected in a practical case of hydrogen-oxygen combustion. Under favorable conditions, the fractional error in temperature approximates the fractional error in radiant-flux measurement.

  10. Extraction of auxiliary data from AVIRIS distribution tape for spectral, radiometric, and geometric quality assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Peter; Green, Robert O.; Chrien, Thomas G.

    1993-01-01

    Remotely sensed data are affected by system (sensor and platform), and scene related effects. For quantitative investigations the spectral, radiometric characteristics of the system and scene have to be known. The relevant effects and their possible influence on an image have to be specifically determined for every remote sensing system and adequate description parameters need to be updated and reported on a regular basis as they are carried out, e.g., for the AVIRIS system. It is evident that the strength of the influence of similar effects in very dependent on the accessibility of auxiliary information about such sensor systems. Degradation in a spaceborne system can normally be just reported and cannot be corrected. In contrast, an airborne sensor can be evaluated, maintained and improved periodically. Such maintenance efforts are particularly important because airborne systems are exposed to extreme and changing environments. These include tens of takeoffs and landing each year as well as extreme changes in temperature and humidity on the tarmac and in flight. For the AVIRIS system there are environmental stresses such as changes in temperature, air pressure, humidity, vibration of the platform or scene-related reasons like atmospheric conditions, and topography. The information contained in the auxiliary files included with the AVIRIS data can be used to assess these effects and compensate for them. In addition the spectral, radiometer and geometric calibration data contained in the auxiliary file are required for quantitative analysis of the data. The paper describes tools to access the auxiliary information that characterizes the AVIRIS system. These tools allow the examination of parameters that may impact the quality of the measured AVIRIS image. An example of the use of this auxiliary data was carried out with regard to a parametric geocoding approach. Emphasis is placed on the reported auxiliary information that describes the geometric character of the

  11. Study on spectral/radiometric characteristics of the Thematic Mapper for land use applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Metzler, M. D. (Principal Investigator); Crist, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    Previous characterization of scan-related low-frequency noise was extended and refined through detailed analysis of shutter calibration data on CCT-ADDS tapes and reflective-band data from nighttime acquisitions. A recommended correction procedure was identified that uses calibration shutter data both as a diagnostic and to obtain correction values. Through comparison of coincident TM and MSS data, illustrations of the added information content of TM data for agricultural applications were developed. The capability of improved spatial resolution to better define boundaries and to resolve spatial details is shown. Spectral analysis of tasseled-cap transformations of TM and MSS data shows high correlation between greenness features, greater signal range for TM, and indications that a subset of TM bands could accurately simulate MSS data, if required.

  12. Electronic transport characterization of silicon wafers by spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qian; Li, Bincheng

    2015-09-28

    Spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric (PCR) imaging technique is developed to characterize the electronic transport properties of silicon wafers. Based on a nonlinear PCR theory, simulations are performed to investigate the effects of electronic transport parameters (the carrier lifetime, the carrier diffusion coefficient, and the front surface recombination velocity) on the steady-state PCR intensity profiles. The electronic transport parameters of an n-type silicon wafer are simultaneously determined by fitting the measured steady-state PCR intensity profiles to the three-dimensional nonlinear PCR model. The determined transport parameters are in good agreement with the results obtained by the conventional modulated PCR technique with multiple pump beam radii.

  13. On-ground characterization of Rosetta/VIRTIS-M. II. Spatial and radiometric calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Filacchione, G.; Ammannito, E.; Coradini, A.; Capaccioni, F.; Piccioni, G.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Dami, M.; Barbis, A.

    2006-10-15

    After having considered the spectral and geometrical performances of the Rosetta/VIRTIS-M experiment, we complete here the analysis by evaluating quantitatively the flat-field and radiometric responses. The purpose of this work is to retrieve the flat-field matrix necessary to homogenize the focal plane response. Moreover, the most important result is the determination of the instrument transfer function that allows to convert digital numbers in physical units of spectral radiance (W m{sup -2} {mu}m{sup -1} sterad{sup -1}). The strategy adopted to organize measurement sequence, a basic description of the on-ground experimental setups and the analysis of the collected data, is included in this article. An analysis of the instrumental stability has been performed as well by examining how the internal calibration data are affected by environmental conditions. These data allow to evaluate the cumulative effects of thermal and vibrational stresses on the instrumental performances: up to now we have verified that this effect is negligible. Finally the basic calibration pipeline used to calibrate in-flight data with on-ground parameters is fully described.

  14. Level 0 to 1 processing of the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Guggenmoser, T.; Höpfner, M.; Neubert, T.; Ribalda, R.; Sha, M. K.; Ungermann, J.; Blank, J.; Ebersoldt, A.; Kretschmer, E.; Latzko, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Olschewski, F.; Preusse, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer that is capable of operating on various high-altitude research aircraft. It measures the atmospheric emission in the thermal infrared spectral region in limb and nadir geometry. GLORIA consists of a classical Michelson interferometer combined with an infrared camera. The infrared detector has a usable area of 128 × 128 pixels, measuring up to 16 384 interferograms simultaneously. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometers impose a number of challenges with respect to instrument calibration and algorithm development. The optical setup with extremely high optical throughput requires the development of new methods and algorithms for spectral and radiometric calibration. Due to the vast amount of data there is a high demand for scientifically intelligent optimisation of the data processing. This paper outlines the characterisation and processing steps required for the generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra. Methods for performance optimisation of the processing algorithm are presented. The performance of the data processing and the quality of the calibrated spectra are demonstrated for measurements collected during the first deployments of GLORIA on aircraft.

  15. Level 0 to 1 processing of the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Guggenmoser, T.; Höpfner, M.; Neubert, T.; Ribalda, R.; Sha, M. K.; Ungermann, J.; Blank, J.; Ebersoldt, A.; Kretschmer, E.; Latzko, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Olschewski, F.; Preusse, P.

    2014-03-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer that is capable of operating on various high altitude research aircraft. It measures the atmospheric emission in the thermal infrared spectral region in limb and nadir geometry. GLORIA consists of a classical Michelson interferometer combined with an infrared camera. The infrared detector has a usable range of 128 × 128 pixels, measuring up to 16 384 interferograms simultaneously. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometers impose a number of challenges with respect to instrument calibration and algorithm development. The innovative optical setup with extremely high optical throughput requires the development of new methods and algorithms for spectral and radiometric calibration. Due to the vast amount of data there is a high demand for scientifically intelligent optimisation of the data processing. This paper outlines the characterisation and processing steps required for the generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra. Methods for performance optimisation of the processing algorithm are presented. The performance of the data processing and the quality of the calibrated spectra are demonstrated for measurements collected during the first deployments of GLORIA on aircraft.

  16. A spectral method for spatial downscaling.

    PubMed

    Reich, Brian J; Chang, Howard H; Foley, Kristen M

    2014-12-01

    Complex computer models play a crucial role in air quality research. These models are used to evaluate potential regulatory impacts of emission control strategies and to estimate air quality in areas without monitoring data. For both of these purposes, it is important to calibrate model output with monitoring data to adjust for model biases and improve spatial prediction. In this article, we propose a new spectral method to study and exploit complex relationships between model output and monitoring data. Spectral methods allow us to estimate the relationship between model output and monitoring data separately at different spatial scales, and to use model output for prediction only at the appropriate scales. The proposed method is computationally efficient and can be implemented using standard software. We apply the method to compare Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model output with ozone measurements in the United States in July 2005. We find that CMAQ captures large-scale spatial trends, but has low correlation with the monitoring data at small spatial scales. PMID:24965037

  17. A Spectral Method for Spatial Downscaling

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Brian J.; Chang, Howard H.; Foley, Kristen M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Complex computer models play a crucial role in air quality research. These models are used to evaluate potential regulatory impacts of emission control strategies and to estimate air quality in areas without monitoring data. For both of these purposes, it is important to calibrate model output with monitoring data to adjust for model biases and improve spatial prediction. In this article, we propose a new spectral method to study and exploit complex relationships between model output and monitoring data. Spectral methods allow us to estimate the relationship between model output and monitoring data separately at different spatial scales, and to use model output for prediction only at the appropriate scales. The proposed method is computationally efficient and can be implemented using standard software. We apply the method to compare Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model output with ozone measurements in the United States in July 2005. We find that CMAQ captures large-scale spatial trends, but has low correlation with the monitoring data at small spatial scales. PMID:24965037

  18. Spectral band difference effects on radiometric cross-calibration between multiple satellite sensors in the Landsat solar-reflective spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillet, Philippe M.; Fedosejevs, Gunar; Thome, Kurtis J.

    2004-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of radiometric calibration errors due to differences in spectral response functions between satellite sensors when attempting cross-calibration based on near-simultaneous imaging of common ground targets in analogous spectral bands. Five Earth observation sensors on three satellite platforms were included on the basis of their overpass times being within 45 minutes of each other on the same day (Landsat-7 ETM+; EO-1 ALI; Terra MODIS; Terra ASTER; Terra MISR). The simulation study encompassed spectral band difference effects (SBDE) on cross-calibration between all combinations of the sensors considered, using the Landsat solar reflective spectral domain as a framework. Scene content was simulated using ground target spectra for the calibration test sites at Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada and Niobrara Grassland, Nebraska. Results were obtained as a function of calibration test site, satellite sensor, and spectral region. Overall, in the absence of corrections for SBDE, the Railroad Valley Playa site is a "good" to "very good" ground target for cross-calibration between most but not all satellite sensors considered in most but not all spectral regions investigated. "Good" and "very good" are defined as SBDEs within +/- 3 % and +/- 1 %, respectively. Without SBDE corrections, the Niobrara test site is only "good" for cross-calibration between certain sensor combinations in some spectral regions. The paper includes recommendations for spectral data and tools that would facilitate cross-calibration between multiple satellite sensors.

  19. Cooperative spectral and spatial feature fusion for camouflaged target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungho; Shim, Min-Sheob

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a novel camouflaged target detection method using spectral and spatial feature fusion. Conventional unsupervised learning methods using spectral information only can be feasible solutions. Such approaches, however, sometimes produce incorrect detection results because spatial information is not considered. This paper proposes a novel band feature selection method by considering both the spectral distance and spatial statistics after spectral normalization for illumination invariance. The statistical distance metric can generate candidate feature bands and further analysis of the spatial grouping property can trim the useless feature bands. Camouflaged targets can be detected better with less computational complexity by the spectral-spatial feature fusion.

  20. Study of spectral/radiometric characteristics of the Thematic Mapper for land use applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A. (Principal Investigator); Metzler, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    Progress during the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan-ERIM's and 5 image data quality assessment program for the thematic mapper is described. Analyses of LANDSAT 5 TM radiometric characteristics were performed. Effects which had earlier been found in LANDSAT 4 TM data were found to be present in LANDSAT 5 data as well, including: (1) scan direction related signal droop; (2) scan correlated level shifts; and (3) low frequency coherent noise. Coincident LANDSAT 4 and 5 raw TM data were analyzed, and band by band relationships between the two sensors were derived. Earlier efforts which developed an information theoretic measure of multispectral information content were continued, comparing TM and MSS information content.

  1. Study on spectral/radiometric characteristics of the Thematic Mapper for land use applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A. (Principal Investigator); Metzler, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    Progress under the LANDSAT-4 and 5 Image Data Quality Assessment program for the Thematic Mapper is described. An initial screening of LANDSAT-5 data is performed. Tools are developed to allow access to TIPS-format data. Analysis of scan direction related signal droop is resumed with detailed analysis of nighttime data. A new mathematical model is developed to describe the effect. Coherent noise of a lower frequency than previously reported is discovered and analyzed. Coincident LANDSAT-4 TM and MSS data are analyzed to improve understanding of radiometric relationships between similar wavebands in the two sensors.

  2. In-flight validation and calibration of the spectral and radiometric characteristics of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Conel, James E.; Margolis, Jack S.; Carrere, Veronique; Bruegge, Carol J.; Rast, Michael; Hoover, Gordon

    1990-01-01

    Through an in-flight calibration experiment at Rogers Dry Lake, California on September 20, 1989, the radiometric and spectral properties of AVIRIS were determined. In-flight spectral channel positions and the spectral response function in 10 regions of the AVIRIS spectral range, taking in all four spectrometers, are shown to agree closely with the corresponding parameters measured in the laboratory. The intraflight stability for the Rogers Dry Lake calibration site is better than 2 percent with the exception of the strong atmospheric water absorptions where the measured radiance is close to zero. This experiment has provided both direct generation of an in-flight spectral and radiometric calibration and validation of the laboratory calibration at the reported level accuracy.

  3. Spatially resolved spectral-imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Joshua Simon; Tyson, John Anthony

    2016-02-09

    A spatially resolved spectral device comprising a dispersive array to receive an incident light comprising a principal ray. The dispersive array comprising a plurality of dichroic layers, each of the plurality of dichroic layers disposed in a path of a direction of the principal ray. Each of the plurality of dichroic layers configured to at least one of reflect or transmit a different wavelength range of the incident light. The device further comprising a detection array operatively coupled with the dispersive array. The detection array comprising a photosensitive component including a plurality of detection pixels, each of the plurality of detection pixels having a light-receiving surface disposed parallel to the direction of the principal ray to detect a respective one of the different wavelength ranges of incident light reflected from a corresponding one of the plurality of dichroic layers.

  4. Spatial and spectral evolution of turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Guercan, O. D.; Diamond, P. H.; Hahm, T. S.

    2007-05-15

    Spreading of turbulence as a result of nonlinear mode couplings and the associated spectral energy transfer is studied. A derivation of a simple two-field model is presented using the weak turbulence limit of the two-scale direct interaction approximation. This approach enables the approximate overall effect of nonlinear interactions to be written in the form of Fick's law and leads to a coupled reaction-diffusion system for turbulence intensity. For this purpose, various classes of triad interactions are examined, and the effects that do not lead to spreading are neglected. It is seen that, within this framework, large scale, radially extended eddies are the most effective structures in promoting spreading of turbulence. Thus, spectral evolution that tends toward such eddies facilitates spatial spreading. Self-consistent evolution of the background profile is also considered, and it is concluded that the profile is essentially slaved to the turbulence in this phase of rapid evolution, as opposed to the case of avalanches, where it is the turbulence intensity that would be slaved to the evolving profile. The characteristic quantity describing the evolving background profile is found to be the mean ''potential vorticity'' (PV). It is shown that the two-field model with self-consistent mean PV evolution can be reduced to a single Fisher-like turbulence intensity transport equation. In addition to the usual nonlinear diffusion term, this equation also contains a 'pinch' of turbulence intensity. It is also noted that internal energy spreads faster than kinetic energy because of the respective spectral tendencies of these two quantities.

  5. SeaWiFS technical report series. Volume 23: SeaWiFS prelaunch radiometric calibration and spectral characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Robert A.; Holmes, Alan W.; Barnes, William L.; Esaias, Wayne E.; Mcclain, Charles R.; Svitek, Tomas; Hooker, Stanford B.; Firestone, Elaine R.; Acker, James G.

    1994-01-01

    Based on the operating characteristics of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), calibration equations have been developed that allow conversion of the counts from the radiometer into Earth-existing radiances. These radiances are the geophysical properties the instrument has been designed to measure. SeaWiFS uses bilinear gains to allow high sensitivity measurements of ocean-leaving radiances and low sensitivity measurements of radiances from clouds, which are much brighter than the ocean. The calculation of these bilinear gains is central to the calibration equations. Several other factors within these equations are also included. Among these are the spectral responses of the eight SeaWiFS bands. A band's spectral response includes the ability of the band to isolate a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and the amount of light that lies outside of that region. The latter is termed out-of-band response. In the calibration procedure, some of the counts from the instrument are produced by radiance in the out-of-band region. The number of those counts for each band is a function of the spectral shape of the source. For the SeaWiFS calibration equations, the out-of-band responses are converted from those for the laboratory source into those for a source with the spectral shape of solar flux. The solar flux, unlike the laboratory calibration, approximates the spectral shape of the Earth-existing radiance from the oceans. This conversion modifies the results from the laboratory radiometric calibration by 1-4 percent, depending on the band. These and other factors in the SeaWiFS calibration equations are presented here, both for users of the SeaWiFS data set and for researchers making ground-based radiance measurements in support of Sea WiFS.

  6. High Altitude Measurements of Radiance at High Spectral and Spatial Resolution for SIMBIOS Sensor Calibration, Validation, and Intercomparisons. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Pavri, Betina; Chrien, Thomas G.

    2001-01-01

    The successful combination of data from different ocean color sensors depends on the correct interpretation of signal from each of these sensors. Ideally, the sensor measured signals are calibrated to geophysical units of spectral radiance, and sensor artifacts are removed and corrected. The calibration process resamples the signal into a common radiometric data space so that subsequent ocean color algorithms that are applied to the data are based on physical processes and are inherently sensor independent. The objective of this project is to calibrate and validate the on-orbit radiometric characteristics of Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) with underflights of NASA's calibrated Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). This objective is feasible because AVIRIS measures the same spectral range as SeaWIFS at higher spectral resolution. In addition to satellite sensor underflights, the AVIRIS project has supported comparison and analysis of the radiometric calibration standards used for AVIRIS and SeaWIFS. To date, both the OCTS and SeaWIFS satellite sensors have been underflown by AVIRIS with matching spectral, spatial, geometric, radiometric, and temporal domains. The calibration and validation objective of this project is pursued for the following reasons: (1) Calibration is essential for the quantitative use of SeaWIFS and other SIMBIOS (Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies) sensor data; (2) Calibration in the laboratory of spaceborne sensors is challenging; (3) Satellite sensors are subjected aging on the ground and to trauma during launch; (4) The Earth orbit environment is significantly different than the laboratory calibration environment; (5) Through years of effort AVIRIS has been demonstrated to be well calibrated; and (6) AVIRIS can match the spectral and spatial observation characteristics near the top of the atmosphere at the time of SeaWIFS measurements.

  7. Spectral feature classification and spatial pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.; Wilson, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    This paper introduces a spatial pattern recognition processing concept involving the use of spectral feature classification technology and coherent optical correlation. The concept defines a hybrid image processing system incorporating both digital and optical technology. The hybrid instrument provides simplified pseudopattern images as functions of pixel classification from information embedded within a real-scene image. These pseudoimages become simplified inputs to an optical correlator for use in a subsequent pattern identification decision useful in executing landmark pointing, tracking, or navigating functions. Real-time classification is proposed as a research tool for exploring ways to enhance input signal-to-noise ratio as an aid in improving optical correlation. The approach can be explored with developing technology, including a current NASA Langley Research Center technology plan that involves a series of related Shuttle-borne experiments. A first-planned experiment, Feature Identification and Location Experiment (FILE), is undergoing final ground testing, and is scheduled for flight on the NASA Shuttle (STS2/flight OSTA-1) in 1980. FILE will evaluate a technique for autonomously classifying earth features into the four categories: bare land; water; vegetation; and clouds, snow, or ice.

  8. TES Level 1 Algorithms: Interferogram Processing, Geolocation, Radiometric, and Spectral Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, Helen; Beer, Reinhard; Bowman, Kevin W.; Fisher, Brendan; Luo, Mingzhao; Rider, David; Sarkissian, Edwin; Tremblay, Denis; Zong, Jia

    2006-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura satellite measures the infrared radiance emitted by the Earth's surface and atmosphere using Fourier transform spectrometry. The measured interferograms are converted into geolocated, calibrated radiance spectra by the L1 (Level 1) processing, and are the inputs to L2 (Level 2) retrievals of atmospheric parameters, such as vertical profiles of trace gas abundance. We describe the algorithmic components of TES Level 1 processing, giving examples of the intermediate results and diagnostics that are necessary for creating TES L1 products. An assessment of noise-equivalent spectral radiance levels and current systematic errors is provided. As an initial validation of our spectral radiances, TES data are compared to the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) (on EOS Aqua), after accounting for spectral resolution differences by applying the AIRS spectral response function to the TES spectra. For the TES L1 nadir data products currently available, the agreement with AIRS is 1 K or better.

  9. [Validation of HJ-1B thermal infrared channels onboard radiometric calibration based on spectral response differences].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Fu, Qiao-yan; Shi, Ting-ting; Wang, Ai-chun; Zhang, Xue-wen

    2014-08-01

    Since HJ-1B was launched, 7 sets of blackbody data have been used to calculate onboard calibration coefficients, but the research work on the validation of coefficients is rare. According to the onboard calibration principle, calibration coefficients of HJ-1B thermal infrared channel on Sep 14th, 2009 were calculated with the half-width, moments and look-up table methods. MODIS was selected for the reference sensor, and algorithms of spectral match were improved between the HJ-1B thermal infrared channel and MODIS 31, 32 channels based on the spectral response divergence. The relationship of top of atmosphere (TOA) radiance between the remote sensors was calculated, based on which the surface leaving brightness temperature was calculated by Planck function to validate the brightness temperature calculated through the onboard calibration coefficients. The equivalent brightness temperature calculated by spectral response divergence method is 285.97 K, and the inversion brightness temperature calculated by half-width, moments and look-up table methods is 288.77, 274.52 and 285.97 K respectively. The difference between the inversion brightness temperature and the equivalent brightness temperature is 2.8, -11.46 and 0.02 K, respectively, which demonstrate that onboard calibration coefficients calculated by the look-up table method has better precision and feasibility. PMID:25508743

  10. [Validation of HJ-1B thermal infrared channels onboard radiometric calibration based on spectral response differences].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Fu, Qiao-yan; Shi, Ting-ting; Wang, Ai-chun; Zhang, Xue-wen

    2014-08-01

    Since HJ-1B was launched, 7 sets of blackbody data have been used to calculate onboard calibration coefficients, but the research work on the validation of coefficients is rare. According to the onboard calibration principle, calibration coefficients of HJ-1B thermal infrared channel on Sep 14th, 2009 were calculated with the half-width, moments and look-up table methods. MODIS was selected for the reference sensor, and algorithms of spectral match were improved between the HJ-1B thermal infrared channel and MODIS 31, 32 channels based on the spectral response divergence. The relationship of top of atmosphere (TOA) radiance between the remote sensors was calculated, based on which the surface leaving brightness temperature was calculated by Planck function to validate the brightness temperature calculated through the onboard calibration coefficients. The equivalent brightness temperature calculated by spectral response divergence method is 285.97 K, and the inversion brightness temperature calculated by half-width, moments and look-up table methods is 288.77, 274.52 and 285.97 K respectively. The difference between the inversion brightness temperature and the equivalent brightness temperature is 2.8, -11.46 and 0.02 K, respectively, which demonstrate that onboard calibration coefficients calculated by the look-up table method has better precision and feasibility. PMID:25474964

  11. Learning Hierarchical Spectral-Spatial Features for Hyperspectral Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yicong; Wei, Yantao

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a spectral-spatial feature learning (SSFL) method to obtain robust features of hyperspectral images (HSIs). It combines the spectral feature learning and spatial feature learning in a hierarchical fashion. Stacking a set of SSFL units, a deep hierarchical model called the spectral-spatial networks (SSN) is further proposed for HSI classification. SSN can exploit both discriminative spectral and spatial information simultaneously. Specifically, SSN learns useful high-level features by alternating between spectral and spatial feature learning operations. Then, kernel-based extreme learning machine (KELM), a shallow neural network, is embedded in SSN to classify image pixels. Extensive experiments are performed on two benchmark HSI datasets to verify the effectiveness of SSN. Compared with state-of-the-art methods, SSN with a deep hierarchical architecture obtains higher classification accuracy in terms of the overall accuracy, average accuracy, and kappa ( κ ) coefficient of agreement, especially when the number of the training samples is small. PMID:26241988

  12. A spatial-temporal-spectral blending model using satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Fu, D.; Sun, X.; Chen, H.; She, X.

    2016-04-01

    Due to the budget and technical limitations, remote sensing sensor designs trade spatial resolution, swath width and spectral resolution. Consequently, no sensor can provide high spatial resolution, high temporal resolution and high spectral resolution simultaneously. However, the ability of Earth observation at fine resolution is urgently needed for global change science. One possible solution is to “blend” the reflectance from a variety of satellite data sources, including those providing high spatial resolution and less frequent coverage (e.g., Landsat Thematic Mapper, TM), daily global data (e.g., Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS), and high spectral resolution and infrequent revisit cycle (e.g., Hyperion). However, the previous algorithms for blending multi-source remotely sensed data have some shortcomings, especially with regard to hyperspectral information. This study has developed a SPAtial-Temporal-Spectral blending model (SPATS) that can simulate surface reflectance with high spatial-temporal-spectral resolution. SPATS is based on an existing spatial-temporal image blending model and a spatial-spectral image blending model. The performance of SPATS was tested with both simulated and observed satellite data, using Landsat TM, Hyperion and MODIS data, as well as heterogeneous landscapes as examples. The results show that the high spatial-temporal-spectral resolution reflectance data can be applied to investigations of global landscapes that are changing at different temporal scales.

  13. Advances in Spectral-Spatial Classification of Hyperspectral Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fauvel, Mathieu; Tarabalka, Yuliya; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Tilton, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images are presented in this paper. Several techniques are investigated for combining both spatial and spectral information. Spatial information is extracted at the object (set of pixels) level rather than at the conventional pixel level. Mathematical morphology is first used to derive the morphological profile of the image, which includes characteristics about the size, orientation and contrast of the spatial structures present in the image. Then the morphological neighborhood is defined and used to derive additional features for classification. Classification is performed with support vector machines using the available spectral information and the extracted spatial information. Spatial post-processing is next investigated to build more homogeneous and spatially consistent thematic maps. To that end, three presegmentation techniques are applied to define regions that are used to regularize the preliminary pixel-wise thematic map. Finally, a multiple classifier system is defined to produce relevant markers that are exploited to segment the hyperspectral image with the minimum spanning forest algorithm. Experimental results conducted on three real hyperspectral images with different spatial and spectral resolutions and corresponding to various contexts are presented. They highlight the importance of spectral-spatial strategies for the accurate classification of hyperspectral images and validate the proposed methods.

  14. Spectral DAISY: a combined target spatial-spectral dense feature descriptor for improved tracking performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinheimer, Jeffrey J.; Villeneuve, Pierre; Beaven, Scott G.

    2011-09-01

    In EO tracking, target spatial and spectral features can be used to improve performance since they help distinguish the targets from each other when confusion occurs during normal kinematic tracking. In this paper we introduce a method to encode a target's descriptive spatial information into a multi-dimensional signature vector, allowing us to convert the problem of spatial template matching into a form similar to spectral signature matching. This allows us to leverage multivariate algorithms commonly used with hyperspectral data to the problem of exploiting panchromatic imagery. We show how this spatial signature formulation naturally leads to a hybrid spatial-spectral descriptor vector that supports exploitation using commonly-used spectral algorithms. We introduce a new descriptor called Spectral DAISY for encoding spatial information into a signature vector, based on the concept of the DAISY dense descriptor. We demonstrate the process on real data and show how the combined spatial/spectral feature can be used to improve target/track association over spectral or spatial features alone.

  15. Evaluation of AMOEBA: a spectral-spatial classification method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenson, Susan K.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Bryant, J.

    1982-01-01

    Muitispectral remotely sensed images have been treated as arbitrary multivariate spectral data for purposes of clustering and classifying. However, the spatial properties of image data can also be exploited. AMOEBA is a clustering and classification method that is based on a spatially derived model for image data. In an evaluation test, Landsat data were classified with both AMOEBA and a widely used spectral classifier. The test showed that irrigated crop types can be classified as accurately with the AMOEBA method as with the generally used spectral method ISOCLS; the AMOEBA method, however, requires less computer time.

  16. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  17. Small satellite radiometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    A critical need for the Mission to Planet Earth is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, flexible radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated data and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs). 12 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Spectrally and Radiometrically Stable Wide-Band on Board Calibration Source for In-Flight Data Validation in Imaging Spectroscopy Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, J. B.; Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Sarture, Charles M.; Quetin, Gregory R.; Hernandez, Marco A.; Kroll, Linley A.; Nolte, Scott H.; Porter, Michael D.; Green, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of the quantitative spectral data collected by an imaging spectrometer instrument is critically dependent upon the accuracy of the spectral and radiometric calibration of the system. In order for the collected spectra to be scientifically useful, the calibration of the instrument must be precisely known not only prior to but during data collection. Thus, in addition to a rigorous in-lab calibration procedure, the airborne instruments designed and built by the NASA/JPL Imaging Spectroscopy Group incorporate an on board calibrator (OBC) system with the instrument to provide auxiliary in-use system calibration data. The output of the OBC source illuminates a target panel on the backside of the foreoptics shutter both before and after data collection. The OBC and in-lab calibration data sets are then used to validate and post-process the collected spectral image data. The resulting accuracy of the spectrometer output data is therefore integrally dependent upon the stability of the OBC source. In this paper we describe the design and application of the latest iteration of this novel device developed at NASA/JPL which integrates a halogen-cycle source with a precisely designed fiber coupling system and a fiber-based intensity monitoring feedback loop. The OBC source in this Airborne Testbed Spectrometer was run over a period of 15 hours while both the radiometric and spectral stabilities of the output were measured and demonstrated stability to within 1% of nominal.

  19. Combined spectral and spatial processing of ERTS imagery data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.; Shanmugam, K. S.

    1974-01-01

    A general procedure is presented for extracting textural properties of blocks of image data. These features are calculated in the spatial domain, taking into account the statistical nature of texture. The procedure is based on the assumption that the texture information in an image is contained in the overall or 'average' spatial relationship which the gray tones in the image have to one another. The spatial gray-tone dependence matrix is discussed together with the spectral features used in the study and the land use classification studies conducted. The results of the study show the usefulness of using both spectral and textural characteristics of ERTS multispectral scanner data for developing classification procedures.

  20. Digital phantoms generated by spectral and spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Bonghwan; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Lee, Ji Youn; Allen, David W.; Rice, Joseph P.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2015-12-01

    A hyperspectral image projector (HIP) based on liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators is explained and demonstrated to generate data cubes. The HIP-constructed data cubes are three-dimensional images of the spatial distribution of spectrally resolved abundances of intracellular light-absorbing oxyhemoglobin molecules in single erythrocytes. Spectrally and spatially resolved image data indistinguishable from the real scene may be used as standard data cubes, so-called digital phantoms, to calibrate image sensors and validate image analysis algorithms for their measurement quality, performance consistency, and interlaboratory comparisons for quantitative biomedical imaging applications.

  1. Digital phantoms generated by spectral and spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Chon, Bonghwan; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Lee, Ji Youn; Allen, David W; Rice, Joseph P; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2015-01-01

    A hyperspectral image projector (HIP) based on liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators is explained and demonstrated to generate data cubes. The HIP-constructed data cubes are three-dimensional images of the spatial distribution of spectrally resolved abundances of intracellular light-absorbing oxyhemoglobin molecules in single erythrocytes. Spectrally and spatially resolved image data indistinguishable from the real scene may be used as standard data cubes, so-called digital phantoms, to calibrate image sensors and validate image analysis algorithms for their measurement quality, performance consistency, and interlaboratory comparisons for quantitative biomedical imaging applications. PMID:26361340

  2. Digital phantoms generated by spectral and spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Chon, Bonghwan; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Lee, Ji Youn; Allen, David W; Rice, Joseph P; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2015-12-01

    A hyperspectral image projector (HIP) based on liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators is explained and demonstrated to generate data cubes. The HIP-constructed data cubes are three-dimensional images of the spatial distribution of spectrally resolved abundances of intracellular light-absorbing oxyhemoglobin molecules in single erythrocytes. Spectrally and spatially resolved image data indistinguishable from the real scene may be used as standard data cubes, so-called digital phantoms, to calibrate image sensors and validate image analysis algorithms for their measurement quality, performance consistency, and interlaboratory comparisons for quantitative biomedical imaging applications. PMID:26502383

  3. Towards IASI-New Generation (IASI-NG): impact of improved spectral resolution and radiometric noise on the retrieval of thermodynamic, chemistry and climate variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crevoisier, C.; Clerbaux, C.; Guidard, V.; Phulpin, T.; Armante, R.; Barret, B.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chaboureau, J.-P.; Coheur, P.-F.; Crépeau, L.; Dufour, G.; Labonnote, L.; Lavanant, L.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Herbin, H.; Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Payan, S.; Péquignot, E.; Pierangelo, C.; Sellitto, P.; Stubenrauch, C.

    2014-12-01

    Besides their strong contribution to weather forecast improvement through data assimilation, thermal infrared sounders onboard polar-orbiting platforms are now playing a key role for monitoring atmospheric composition changes. The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instrument developed by the French space agency (CNES) and launched by EUMETSAT onboard the Metop satellite series is providing essential inputs for weather forecasting and pollution/climate monitoring owing to its smart combination of large horizontal swath, good spectral resolution and high radiometric performance. EUMETSAT is currently preparing the next polar-orbiting program (EPS-SG) with the Metop-SG satellite series that should be launched around 2020. In this framework, CNES is studying the concept of a new instrument, the IASI-New Generation (IASI-NG), characterized by an improvement of both spectral and radiometric characteristics as compared to IASI, with three objectives: (i) continuity of the IASI/Metop series; (ii) improvement of vertical resolution; and (iii) improvement of the accuracy and detection threshold for atmospheric and surface components. In this paper, we show that an improvement of spectral resolution and radiometric noise fulfil these objectives by leading to (i) a better vertical coverage in the lower part of the troposphere, thanks to the increase in spectral resolution; and (ii) an increase in the accuracy of the retrieval of several thermodynamic, climate and chemistry variables, thanks to the improved signal-to-noise ratio as well as less interference between the signatures of the absorbing species in the measured radiances. The detection limit of several atmospheric species is also improved. We conclude that IASI-NG has the potential to strongly benefit the numerical weather prediction, chemistry and climate communities now connected through the European GMES/Copernicus initiative.

  4. Towards IASI-New Generation (IASI-NG): impact of improved spectral resolution and radiometric noise on the retrieval of thermodynamic, chemistry and climate variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crevoisier, C.; Clerbaux, C.; Guidard, V.; Phulpin, T.; Armante, R.; Barret, B.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chaboureau, J.-P.; Coheur, P.-F.; Crépeau, L.; Dufour, G.; Labonnote, L.; Lavanant, L.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Herbin, H.; Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Payan, S.; Péquignot, E.; Pierangelo, C.; Sellitto, P.; Stubenrauch, C.

    2013-12-01

    Besides their strong contribution to weather forecast improvement through data assimilation, thermal infrared sounders onboard polar-orbiting platforms are now playing a key role for monitoring atmospheric composition changes. The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instrument developed by the French space agency (CNES) and launched by Eumetsat onboard the Metop satellite series is providing essential inputs for weather forecasting and pollution/climate monitoring owing to its smart combination of large horizontal swath, good spectral resolution and high radiometric performance. EUMETSAT is currently preparing the next polar-orbiting program (EPS-SG) with the Metop-SG satellite series that should be launched around 2020. In this framework, CNES is studying the concept of a new instrument, the IASI-New Generation (IASI-NG), characterized by an improvement of both spectral and radiometric characteristics as compared to IASI, with three objectives: (i) continuity of the IASI/Metop series; (ii) improvement of vertical resolution; (iii) improvement of the accuracy and detection threshold for atmospheric and surface components. In this paper, we show that an improvement of spectral resolution and radiometric noise fulfill these objectives by leading to (i) a better vertical coverage in the lower part of the troposphere, thanks to the increase in spectral resolution; (ii) an increase in the accuracy of the retrieval of several thermodynamic, climate and chemistry variables, thanks to the improved signal-to-noise ratio as well as less interferences between the signatures of the absorbing species in the measured radiances. The detection limit of several atmospheric species is also improved. We conclude that IASI-NG has the potential for strongly benefiting the numerical weather prediction, chemistry and climate communities now connected through the European GMES/Copernicus initiative.

  5. Multiple Spectral-Spatial Classification Approach for Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Yuliya; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Tilton, James C.

    2010-01-01

    A .new multiple classifier approach for spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. Several classifiers are used independently to classify an image. For every pixel, if all the classifiers have assigned this pixel to the same class, the pixel is kept as a marker, i.e., a seed of the spatial region, with the corresponding class label. We propose to use spectral-spatial classifiers at the preliminary step of the marker selection procedure, each of them combining the results of a pixel-wise classification and a segmentation map. Different segmentation methods based on dissimilar principles lead to different classification results. Furthermore, a minimum spanning forest is built, where each tree is rooted on a classification -driven marker and forms a region in the spectral -spatial classification: map. Experimental results are presented for two hyperspectral airborne images. The proposed method significantly improves classification accuracies, when compared to previously proposed classification techniques.

  6. A broadband spectral inversion method for spatial heterodyne spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qisheng; Bin, Xiangli; Du, Shusong

    2014-11-01

    Spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (SHS) is a Fourier-transform spectroscopic technique with many advantages, such as high throughput, good robustness (no moving parts), and high resolving power. However, in the basic theory of SHS, the relationship between the wavenumber and the frequency of the interferogram is approximated to be linear. This approximation limits the spectral range of a spatial heterodyne spectrometer to a narrow band near the Littrow wavenumber. Several methods have been developed to extend the spectral range of the SHS. They use echelle gratings or tunable pilot mirrors to make a SHS instrument work at multiple narrow spectral bands near different Littrow wavenumbers. These solutions still utilize the linear relationship between the wavenumber and the frequency of the interferogram. But they need to separate different spectral bands, and this will increase the difficulty of post processing and the complexity of the SHS system. Here, we solve this problem from another perspective: making a SHS system work at one broad spectral band instead of multiple narrow spectral bands. As in a broad spectral range, the frequency of the interferogram will not be linear with respect to the wavenumber anymore. According to this non-linear relationship, we propose a broadband spectral inversion method based on the stationary phase theory. At first, we describe the principles and the basic characters of SHS. Then, the narrow band limitation is analyzed and the broadband spectral inversion method is elaborated. In the end, we present a parameter design example of the SHS system according to a given spectral range, and the effectiveness of this method is validated with a spectral simulation example. This broadband spectral inversion method can be applied to the existing SHS system without changing or inserting any moving components. This method retains the advantages of SHS and there is almost no increase in complexity for post processing.

  7. Performance analysis of improved methodology for incorporation of spatial/spectral variability in synthetic hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlan, Neil W.; Schott, John R.; Brown, Scott D.

    2003-12-01

    measures used in this study will in combination attempt to determine which texture characterization models best capture the correct statistical and radiometric attributes of the corresponding real image textures in both the spatial and spectral domains. The motivation for this work is to refine our understanding of the complexities of texture phenomena so that an optimal texture characterization model that can accurately account for these complexities can be eventually implemented into a synthetic image generation (SIG) model. Further, conclusions will be drawn regarding which of the candidate texture models are able to achieve realistic levels of spatial and spectral clutter, thereby permitting more effective and robust testing of hyperspectral algorithms in synthetic imagery.

  8. Performance analysis of improved methodology for incorporation of spatial/spectral variability in synthetic hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlan, Neil W.; Schott, John R.; Brown, Scott D.

    2004-01-01

    measures used in this study will in combination attempt to determine which texture characterization models best capture the correct statistical and radiometric attributes of the corresponding real image textures in both the spatial and spectral domains. The motivation for this work is to refine our understanding of the complexities of texture phenomena so that an optimal texture characterization model that can accurately account for these complexities can be eventually implemented into a synthetic image generation (SIG) model. Further, conclusions will be drawn regarding which of the candidate texture models are able to achieve realistic levels of spatial and spectral clutter, thereby permitting more effective and robust testing of hyperspectral algorithms in synthetic imagery.

  9. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-05-25

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  10. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-11-23

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  11. Hyperspectral image segmentation using spatial-spectral graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, David B.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.

    2012-06-01

    Spectral graph theory has proven to be a useful tool in the analysis of high-dimensional data sets. Recall that, mathematically, a graph is a collection of objects (nodes) and connections between them (edges); a weighted graph additionally assigns numerical values (weights) to the edges. Graphs are represented by their adjacency whose elements are the weights between the nodes. Spectral graph theory uses the eigendecomposition of the adjacency matrix (or, more generally, the Laplacian of the graph) to derive information about the underlying graph. In this paper, we develop a spectral method based on the 'normalized cuts' algorithm to segment hyperspectral image data (HSI). In particular, we model an image as a weighted graph whose nodes are the image pixels, and edges defined as connecting spatial neighbors; the edge weights are given by a weighted combination of the spatial and spectral distances between nodes. We then use the Laplacian of the graph to recursively segment the image. The advantages of our approach are that, first, the graph structure naturally incorporates both the spatial and spectral information present in HSI; also, by using only spatial neighbors, the adjacency matrix is highly sparse; as a result, it is possible to apply our technique to much larger images than previous techniques. In the paper, we present the details of our algorithm, and include experimental results from a variety of hyperspectral images.

  12. Spatial and spectral effects in subcritical system pulsed experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dulla, S.; Nervo, M.; Ravetto, P.; Carta, M.

    2013-07-01

    Accurate neutronic models are needed for the interpretation of pulsed experiments in subcritical systems. In this work, the extent of spatial and spectral effects in the pulse propagation phenomena is investigated and the analysis is applied to the GUINEVERE experiment. The multigroup cross section data is generated by the Monte Carlo SERPENT code and the neutronic evolution following the source pulse is simulated by a kinetic diffusion code. The results presented show that important spatial and spectral aspects need to be properly accounted for and that a detailed energy approach may be needed to adequately capture the physical features of the system to the pulse injection. (authors)

  13. Spatial, Temporal and Spectral Satellite Image Fusion via Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huihui

    Remote sensing provides good measurements for monitoring and further analyzing the climate change, dynamics of ecosystem, and human activities in global or regional scales. Over the past two decades, the number of launched satellite sensors has been increasing with the development of aerospace technologies and the growing requirements on remote sensing data in a vast amount of application fields. However, a key technological challenge confronting these sensors is that they tradeoff between spatial resolution and other properties, including temporal resolution, spectral resolution, swath width, etc., due to the limitations of hardware technology and budget constraints. To increase the spatial resolution of data with other good properties, one possible cost-effective solution is to explore data integration methods that can fuse multi-resolution data from multiple sensors, thereby enhancing the application capabilities of available remote sensing data. In this thesis, we propose to fuse the spatial resolution with temporal resolution and spectral resolution, respectively, based on sparse representation theory. Taking the study case of Landsat ETM+ (with spatial resolution of 30m and temporal resolution of 16 days) and MODIS (with spatial resolution of 250m ~ 1km and daily temporal resolution) reflectance, we propose two spatial-temporal fusion methods to combine the fine spatial information of Landsat image and the daily temporal resolution of MODIS image. Motivated by that the images from these two sensors are comparable on corresponding bands, we propose to link their spatial information on available Landsat- MODIS image pair (captured on prior date) and then predict the Landsat image from the MODIS counterpart on prediction date. To well-learn the spatial details from the prior images, we use a redundant dictionary to extract the basic representation atoms for both Landsat and MODIS images based on sparse representation. Under the scenario of two prior Landsat

  14. Multisensor and multiscale survey and characterization for radiometric spatial uniformity and temporal stability of Railroad Valley Playa (Nevada) test site used for optical sensor calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannari, Abdou A.; Omari, K.; Teillet, Phillipe M.; Fedosejevs, Gunar

    2004-02-01

    In this study, we analyzed for the first time the potential of Getis statistics compared to the coefficient of variation for the study of the radiometric spatial uniformity and temporal stability of the Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada (RVPN) test site. We evaluated multi-sensor and multi-scale image data acquired for the RVPN, including four SPOT HRV images acquired in 1997 and 1998, five NOAA AVHRR images acquired in 1999, and one Landsat TM image acquired in 1998. The results show the potential and the importance of the synergy generated by these two methods for analyzing the radiometric spatial uniformity and temporal stability of the RVPN site. Getis statistics provide an excellent spatial analysis of the site while the coefficient of variation provides complementary information on the temporal evolution of the site.

  15. Spatial and spectral performance of a chromotomosynthetic hyperspectral imaging system.

    PubMed

    Bostick, Randall L; Perram, Glen P

    2012-03-01

    The spatial and spectral resolutions achievable by a prototype rotating prism chromotomosynthetic imaging (CTI) system operating in the visible spectrum are described. The instrument creates hyperspectral imagery by collecting a set of 2D images with each spectrally projected at a different rotation angle of the prism. Mathematical reconstruction techniques that have been well tested in the field of medical physics are used to reconstruct the data to produce the 3D hyperspectral image. The instrument operates with a 100 mm focusing lens in the spectral range of 400-900 nm with a field of view of 71.6 mrad and angular resolution of 0.8-1.6 μrad. The spectral resolution is 0.6 nm at the shortest wavelengths, degrading to over 10 nm at the longest wavelengths. Measurements using a point-like target show that performance is limited by chromatic aberration. The system model is slightly inaccurate due to poor estimation of detector spatial resolution, this is corrected based on results improving model performance. As with traditional dispersion technology, calibration of the transformed wavelength axis is required, though with this technology calibration improves both spectral and spatial resolution. While this prototype does not operate at high speeds, components exist which will allow for CTI systems to generate hyperspectral video imagery at rates greater than 100 Hz. PMID:22462909

  16. Spatial and spectral performance of a chromotomosynthetic hyperspectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostick, Randall L.; Perram, Glen P.

    2012-03-01

    The spatial and spectral resolutions achievable by a prototype rotating prism chromotomosynthetic imaging (CTI) system operating in the visible spectrum are described. The instrument creates hyperspectral imagery by collecting a set of 2D images with each spectrally projected at a different rotation angle of the prism. Mathematical reconstruction techniques that have been well tested in the field of medical physics are used to reconstruct the data to produce the 3D hyperspectral image. The instrument operates with a 100 mm focusing lens in the spectral range of 400-900 nm with a field of view of 71.6 mrad and angular resolution of 0.8-1.6 μrad. The spectral resolution is 0.6 nm at the shortest wavelengths, degrading to over 10 nm at the longest wavelengths. Measurements using a point-like target show that performance is limited by chromatic aberration. The system model is slightly inaccurate due to poor estimation of detector spatial resolution, this is corrected based on results improving model performance. As with traditional dispersion technology, calibration of the transformed wavelength axis is required, though with this technology calibration improves both spectral and spatial resolution. While this prototype does not operate at high speeds, components exist which will allow for CTI systems to generate hyperspectral video imagery at rates greater than 100 Hz.

  17. Assessing spatial and seasonal variations in grasslands with spectral reflectances from a helicopter platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walthall, Charles L.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    1992-11-01

    Helicopter-based radiometric measurements of grassland sites were acquired during the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) to quantify the spatial and spectral variations in surface reflectance contributing to variations in albedo and for comparison with surface fluxes. The helicopter instrumentation consisted of an eight-channel modular multiband radiometer (MMR), video, and photographic cameras. Seasonal and spatial variability of the entire FIFE study area were characterized using 20 MMR data sets from five FIFE sites during the four best ("Golden") data collection days of 1987. The means and coefficients of variation for each spectral band were calculated and analyzed as a function of spatial and seasonal domains. Linear models describing simple ratio (SR) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) as functions of several surface variables were tested. All eight MMR bands contributed information beneficial for characterizing spatial and temporal variations, and the most useful bands were the red (MMR3, 0.63-0.68 μm) and the third middle infrared (MMR7, 2.08-2.37 μm). The blue band (MMRl, 0.45-0.52 μm) proved to be valuable, whereas the often utilized near infrared band (MMR4, 0.75-0.88 μm) was among the least important bands for discriminating landscape variations. The SR was more sensitive than the NDVI to variations in the Konza grassland at all scales: intrasite and intersite, between management practices of burning and grazing, and over time. Furthermore, the relationship of the NDVI with leaf area index was curvilinear, whereas the relationship of the SR was linear at low-leaf area index and was improved by the addition of a second variable, the percent of green dry weight biomass. Improvements in data collection methodologies are recommended for future large scale experiments such as the Boreal Ecosystem and Atmosphere Study (BOREAS).

  18. Radiometric Calibration Assessment of Commercial High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Image Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurt; Leisso, Nathan; Buchanan, John

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the results of commercial high spatial resolution sensors. The topics include: 1) Reflectance-based approach; 2) U of A test sites; 3) Test Site Selection; 4) Resort Living; 5) Aerosol parameters; 6) Surface reflectance retrieval; 7) Accuracy/precision; 8) Data sets; 9) June 23, 2005 for Ikonos; 10) QuickBird Results; 11) Ikonos results; 12) Orbview results; 13) Ikonos redux; and 14) Overall results.

  19. Spatially explicit spectral analysis of point clouds and geospatial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The increasing use of spatially explicit analyses of high-resolution spatially distributed data (imagery and point clouds) for the purposes of characterising spatial heterogeneity in geophysical phenomena necessitates the development of custom analytical and computational tools. In recent years, such analyses have become the basis of, for example, automated texture characterisation and segmentation, roughness and grain size calculation, and feature detection and classification, from a variety of data types. In this work, much use has been made of statistical descriptors of localised spatial variations in amplitude variance (roughness), however the horizontal scale (wavelength) and spacing of roughness elements is rarely considered. This is despite the fact that the ratio of characteristic vertical to horizontal scales is not constant and can yield important information about physical scaling relationships. Spectral analysis is a hitherto under-utilised but powerful means to acquire statistical information about relevant amplitude and wavelength scales, simultaneously and with computational efficiency. Further, quantifying spatially distributed data in the frequency domain lends itself to the development of stochastic models for probing the underlying mechanisms which govern the spatial distribution of geological and geophysical phenomena. The software package PySESA (Python program for Spatially Explicit Spectral Analysis) has been developed for generic analyses of spatially distributed data in both the spatial and frequency domains. Developed predominantly in Python, it accesses libraries written in Cython and C++ for efficiency. It is open source and modular, therefore readily incorporated into, and combined with, other data analysis tools and frameworks with particular utility for supporting research in the fields of geomorphology, geophysics, hydrography, photogrammetry and remote sensing. The analytical and computational structure of the toolbox is described

  20. Spatially explicit spectral analysis of point clouds and geospatial data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of spatially explicit analyses of high-resolution spatially distributed data (imagery and point clouds) for the purposes of characterising spatial heterogeneity in geophysical phenomena necessitates the development of custom analytical and computational tools. In recent years, such analyses have become the basis of, for example, automated texture characterisation and segmentation, roughness and grain size calculation, and feature detection and classification, from a variety of data types. In this work, much use has been made of statistical descriptors of localised spatial variations in amplitude variance (roughness), however the horizontal scale (wavelength) and spacing of roughness elements is rarely considered. This is despite the fact that the ratio of characteristic vertical to horizontal scales is not constant and can yield important information about physical scaling relationships. Spectral analysis is a hitherto under-utilised but powerful means to acquire statistical information about relevant amplitude and wavelength scales, simultaneously and with computational efficiency. Further, quantifying spatially distributed data in the frequency domain lends itself to the development of stochastic models for probing the underlying mechanisms which govern the spatial distribution of geological and geophysical phenomena. The software packagePySESA (Python program for Spatially Explicit Spectral Analysis) has been developed for generic analyses of spatially distributed data in both the spatial and frequency domains. Developed predominantly in Python, it accesses libraries written in Cython and C++ for efficiency. It is open source and modular, therefore readily incorporated into, and combined with, other data analysis tools and frameworks with particular utility for supporting research in the fields of geomorphology, geophysics, hydrography, photogrammetry and remote sensing. The analytical and computational structure of the toolbox is

  1. Assessing spatial and seasonal variations in grasslands with spectral reflectances from a helicopter platform

    SciTech Connect

    Walthall, C.L. ); Middleton, E.M. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. The authors present radiometric measurements taken from a helicopter based platform. This base was chosen to serve as a platform at a height between the surface based instruments and the aircraft borne instruments. It is close enough to the ground to provide detailed spatial and spectral measurements comparable to the ground based systems, and can sample many sites in a two hour flight plan. The helicopter carried an eight channel modular multiband radiometer (MMR), video, and still camera. Data was analyzed for five separate sites on four seasonally different dates to get a measure of seasonal and spatial variation. Data from all eight channels was looked at, and compared with linear models which describe simple ratio (SR) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in terms of different surface variables.

  2. Microwave radiometric systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.

    1972-01-01

    Microwave radiometers measure thermal electromagnetic radiation at frequencies ranging over the entire radio spectrum, from audio to infrared. The temperatures of black-body radiators can be measured with sensitivities better than 0.01 K, and with absolute accuracies better than 0.5 K. Radiometric systems have been built with as many as 400 independent spectral channels. Frequency resolutions range from hertz to gigahertz; and integration times range from microseconds to hours. Radiometric systems have operated reliably on the ground, and in balloons, aircraft, and spacecraft, including the 1962 Mariner 2 planetary probe to Venus.

  3. Disentangling Overlapping Astronomical Sources Using Spatial and Spectral Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David E.; Kashyap, Vinay L.; van Dyk, David A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a powerful new algorithm that combines both spatial information (event locations and the point-spread function) and spectral information (photon energies) to separate photons from overlapping sources. We use Bayesian statistical methods to simultaneously infer the number of overlapping sources, to probabilistically separate the photons among the sources, and to fit the parameters describing the individual sources. Using the Bayesian joint posterior distribution, we are able to coherently quantify the uncertainties associated with all these parameters. The advantages of combining spatial and spectral information are demonstrated through a simulation study. The utility of the approach is then illustrated by analysis of observations of FK Aqr and FL Aqr with the XMM-Newton Observatory and the central region of the Orion Nebula Cluster with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  4. Shaping the spatial and spectral emissivity at the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhsiyan, Mathilde; Bouchon, Patrick; Jaeck, Julien; Pelouard, Jean-Luc; Haïdar, Riad

    2015-12-01

    Metasurfaces have attracted a growing interest for their ability to artificially tailor an electromagnetic response on various spectral ranges. In particular, thermal sources with unprecedented abilities, such as directionality or monochromaticity, have been achieved. However, these metasurfaces exhibit homogeneous optical properties whereas the spatial modulation of the emissivity up to the wavelength scale is at the crux of the design of original emitters. In this letter, we study an inhomogeneous metasurface made of a nonperiodic set of optical nano-antennas that spatially and spectrally control the emitted light up to the diffraction limit. Each antenna acts as an independent deep subwavelength emitter for given polarization and wavelength. Their juxtaposition at the subwavelength scale encodes far field multispectral and polarized images. This opens up promising breakthroughs for applications such as optical storage, anti-counterfeit devices, and multispectral emitters for biochemical sensing.

  5. Shaping the spatial and spectral emissivity at the diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Makhsiyan, Mathilde; Bouchon, Patrick Jaeck, Julien; Pelouard, Jean-Luc; Haïdar, Riad

    2015-12-21

    Metasurfaces have attracted a growing interest for their ability to artificially tailor an electromagnetic response on various spectral ranges. In particular, thermal sources with unprecedented abilities, such as directionality or monochromaticity, have been achieved. However, these metasurfaces exhibit homogeneous optical properties whereas the spatial modulation of the emissivity up to the wavelength scale is at the crux of the design of original emitters. In this letter, we study an inhomogeneous metasurface made of a nonperiodic set of optical nano-antennas that spatially and spectrally control the emitted light up to the diffraction limit. Each antenna acts as an independent deep subwavelength emitter for given polarization and wavelength. Their juxtaposition at the subwavelength scale encodes far field multispectral and polarized images. This opens up promising breakthroughs for applications such as optical storage, anti-counterfeit devices, and multispectral emitters for biochemical sensing.

  6. Spatial-spectral characterization of focused spatially chirped broadband laser beams.

    PubMed

    Greco, Michael J; Block, Erica; Meier, Amanda K; Beaman, Alex; Cooper, Samuel; Iliev, Marin; Squier, Jeff A; Durfee, Charles G

    2015-11-20

    Proper alignment is critical to obtain the desired performance from focused spatially chirped beams, for example in simultaneous spatial and temporal focusing (SSTF). We present a simple technique for inspecting the beam paths and focusing conditions for the spectral components of a broadband beam. We spectrally resolve the light transmitted past a knife edge as it was scanned across the beam at several axial positions. The measurement yields information about spot size, M2, and the propagation paths of different frequency components. We also present calculations to illustrate the effects of defocus aberration on SSTF beams. PMID:26836543

  7. TE-dependent spatial and spectral specificity of functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changwei W; Gu, Hong; Zou, Qihong; Lu, Hanbing; Stein, Elliot A; Yang, Yihong

    2012-02-15

    Previous studies suggest that spontaneous fluctuations in the resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI) signal may reflect fluctuations in transverse relaxation time (T(2)(*)) rather than spin density (S(0)). However, such S(0) and T(2)(*) features have not been well characterized. In this study, spatial and spectral characteristics of functional connectivity on sensorimotor, default-mode, dorsal attention, and primary visual systems were examined using a multiple gradient-echo sequence at 3T. In the spatial domain, we found broad, local correlations at short echo times (TE ≤ 14 ms) due to dominant S(0) contribution, whereas long-range connections mediated by T(2)(*) became explicit at TEs longer than 22 ms. In the frequency domain, compared with the flat spectrum of S(0), spectral power of the T(2)(*)-weighted signal elevated significantly with increasing TE, particularly in the frequency ranges of 0.008-0.023 Hz and 0.037-0.043 Hz. Using the S(0) spectrum as a reference, we propose two indices to measure spectral signal change (SSC) and spectral contrast-to-noise ratio (SCNR), respectively, for quantifying the RS-fMRI signal. These indices demonstrated TE dependency of connectivity-related fluctuation strength, resembling functional contrasts in activation-based fMRI. These findings further confirm that large-scale functional circuit connectivity based on BOLD contrast may be constrained within specific frequency ranges in every brain network, and the spectral features of S(0) and T(2)(*) could be valuable for interpreting and quantifying RS-fMRI data. PMID:22119650

  8. Rapid simulation of spatial epidemics: a spectral method.

    PubMed

    Brand, Samuel P C; Tildesley, Michael J; Keeling, Matthew J

    2015-04-01

    Spatial structure and hence the spatial position of host populations plays a vital role in the spread of infection. In the majority of situations, it is only possible to predict the spatial spread of infection using simulation models, which can be computationally demanding especially for large population sizes. Here we develop an approximation method that vastly reduces this computational burden. We assume that the transmission rates between individuals or sub-populations are determined by a spatial transmission kernel. This kernel is assumed to be isotropic, such that the transmission rate is simply a function of the distance between susceptible and infectious individuals; as such this provides the ideal mechanism for modelling localised transmission in a spatial environment. We show that the spatial force of infection acting on all susceptibles can be represented as a spatial convolution between the transmission kernel and a spatially extended 'image' of the infection state. This representation allows the rapid calculation of stochastic rates of infection using fast-Fourier transform (FFT) routines, which greatly improves the computational efficiency of spatial simulations. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of this fast spectral rate recalculation (FSR) method with two examples: an idealised scenario simulating an SIR-type epidemic outbreak amongst N habitats distributed across a two-dimensional plane; the spread of infection between US cattle farms, illustrating that the FSR method makes continental-scale outbreak forecasting feasible with desktop processing power. The latter model demonstrates which areas of the US are at consistently high risk for cattle-infections, although predictions of epidemic size are highly dependent on assumptions about the tail of the transmission kernel. PMID:25659478

  9. Radiometric terrain correction of SPOT5 image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiuli; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Ke

    2007-06-01

    Remote sensing SPOT5 images have been widely applied to the surveying of agriculture and forest resources and to the monitoring of ecology environment of mountain areas. However, the accuracy of land-cover classification of mountain areas is often influenced by the topographical shadow effect. Radiometric terrain correction is important for this kind of application. In this study, a radiometric terrain correction model which based on the rationale of moment matching was made in ERDAS IMAGINE by using the Spatial Modeler Language. Lanxi city in China as the study area, a SPOT5 multispectral image with the spatial resolution of 10 m of that mountain area was corrected by the model. Furthermore, in order to present the advantage of this new model in radiometric terrain correction of remote sensing SPOT5 image, the traditional C correction approach was also applied to the same area to see its difference with the result of the radiometric terrain correction model. The results show that the C correction approach keeps the overall statistical characteristics of spectral bands. The mean and the standard deviation value of the corrected image are the same as original ones. However, the standard deviation value became smaller by using the radiometric terrain correction model and the mean value changed accordingly. The reason of these changes is that before the correction, the histogram of the original image is represented as the 'plus-skewness distribution' due to the relief-caused shade effect, after the correction of the model, the histogram of the image is represented as the normal distribution and the shade effect of the relief has been removed. But as for the result of the traditional C approach, the skewness of the histogram remains the same after the correction. Besides, some portions of the mountain area have been over-corrected. So in my study area, the C correction approach can't remove the shade effect of the relief ideally. The results show that the radiometric

  10. Spatial super-resolution in code aperture spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguello, Henry; Rueda, Hoover F.; Arce, Gonzalo R.

    2012-06-01

    The Code Aperture Snapshot Spectral Imaging system (CASSI) senses the spectral information of a scene using the underlying concepts of compressive sensing (CS). The random projections in CASSI are localized such that each measurement contains spectral information only from a small spatial region of the data cube. The goal of this paper is to translate high-resolution hyperspectral scenes into compressed signals measured by a low-resolution detector. Spatial super-resolution is attained as an inverse problem from a set of low-resolution coded measurements. The proposed system not only offers significant savings in size, weight and power, but also in cost as low resolution detectors can be used. The proposed system can be efficiently exploited in the IR region where the cost of detectors increases rapidly with resolution. The simulations of the proposed system show an improvement of up to 4 dB in PSNR. Results also show that the PSNR of the reconstructed data cubes approach the PSNR of the reconstructed data cubes attained with high-resolution detectors, at the cost of using additional measurements.

  11. Mesospheric nightglow spectral survey taken by the ISO spectral spatial imager on ATLAS 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, J. K.; Torr, D. G.; Torr, M. R.; Chang, T.; Fennelly, J. A.; Richards, P. G.; Morgan, M. F.; Baldridge, T. W.; Fellows, C. W.; Dougani, H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the first comprehensive spectral survey of the mesospheric airglow between 260 and 832 nm taken by the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory on the ATLAS 1 mission. We select data taken in the spectral window between 275 and 300 nm to determine the variation with altitude of the Herzberg I bands originating from the vibrational levels v-prime = 3 to 8. These data provide the first spatially resolved spectral measurements of the system. The data are used to demonstrate that to within an uncertainty of +/- 10 percent, the vibrational distribution remains invariant with altitude. The deficit reported previously for the v-prime = 5 level is not observed although there is a suggestion of depletion in v-prime = 6. The data could be used to place tight constraints on the vibrational dependence of quenching rate coefficients, and on the abundance of atomic oxygen.

  12. Mesospheric nightglow spectral survey taken by the ISO spectral spatial imager on Atlas 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, J. K.; Torr, D. G.; Torr, M. R.; Chang, T.; Fennelly, J. A.; Richards, P. G.; Morgan, M. F.; Baldridge, T. W.; Dougani, H.; Swift, W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the first comprehensive spectral survey of the mesospheric airglow between 260 and 832 nm taken by the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) on the ATLAS I mission. We select data taken in the spectral window between 275 and 300 nm to determine the variation with altitude of the Herzberg I bands originating from the vibrational levels v' = 3 to 8. These data provide the first spatially resolved spectral measurements of the system. The data are used to demonstrate that to within an uncertainty of + 10%, the vibrational distribution remains invariant with altitude. The deficit reported previously for the v' = 5 level is not observed although there is a suggestion of depletion in v' = 6. The data could be used to place tight constraints on the vibrational dependence of quenching rate coefficients, and on the abundance of atomic oxygen.

  13. Spatial routing of optical beams through time-domain spatial-spectral filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbitt, W. R.; Mossberg, T. W.

    1995-04-01

    We propose a novel new method of temporal-waveform-controlled high-speed passive spatial routing of optical beams. The method provides for the redirection of optical signals contained within a single input beam into output directions that are specified entirely by temporal information encoded on the waveform of each incident signal. The routing is effected by means of deflection from spectrally structured spatial gratings that may be optically programmed into materials with or without intrinsic frequency selectivity.

  14. Spatial and spectral resolution necessary for remotely sensed vegetation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    An outline is presented of the required spatial and spectral resolution needed for accurate vegetation discrimination and mapping studies as well as for determination of state of health (i.e., detection of stress symptoms) of actively growing vegetation. Good success was achieved in vegetation discrimination and mapping of a heterogeneous forest cover in the ridge and valley portion of the Appalachians using multispectral data acquired with a spatial resolution of 15 m (IFOV). A sensor system delivering 10 to 15 m spatial resolution is needed for both vegetation mapping and detection of stress symptoms. Based on the vegetation discrimination and mapping exercises conducted at the Lost River site, accurate products (vegetation maps) are produced using broad-band spectral data ranging from the .500 to 2.500 micron portion of the spectrum. In order of decreasing utility for vegetation discrimination, the four most valuable TM simulator VNIR bands are: 6 (1.55 to 1.75 microns), 3 (0.63 to 0.69 microns), 5 (1.00 to 1.30 microns) and 4 (0.76 to 0.90 microns).

  15. Spatial, spectral, and temporal coherence of ultraintense twin beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peřina, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Using the model of parametric interaction based on the spatiospectral Schmidt modes and generalized parametric approximation, we analyze coherence and the mode structure of ultraintense twin beams generated in the regime with pump depletion. We show that the increase of spatial and spectral coherence with the increasing pump power observed for moderate powers is replaced by a decrease for the pump powers at which pump depletion occurs. This behavior of coherence is opposed to that exhibited by a number of spatiospectral modes effectively constituting the twin beam. The conditions for maximal coherence are analyzed by considering pump-beam parameters (spectral width and transverse radius). The existence of additional coherence maxima occurring at even higher pump powers is predicted and explained by the oscillatory evolution of the modes' populations.

  16. Spatial and Spectral Methods for Weed Detection and Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vioix, Jean-Baptiste; Douzals, Jean-Paul; Truchetet, Frédéric; Assémat, Louis; Guillemin, Jean-Philippe

    2002-12-01

    This study concerns the detection and localization of weed patches in order to improve the knowledge on weed-crop competition. A remote control aircraft provided with a camera allowed to obtain low cost and repetitive information. Different processings were involved to detect weed patches using spatial then spectral methods. First, a shift of colorimetric base allowed to separate the soil and plant pixels. Then, a specific algorithm including Gabor filter was applied to detect crop rows on the vegetation image. Weed patches were then deduced from the comparison of vegetation and crop images. Finally, the development of a multispectral acquisition device is introduced. First results for the discrimination of weeds and crops using the spectral properties are shown from laboratory tests. Application of neural networks were mostly studied.

  17. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. X. A Self-Consistent Radiometric All-Sky Network of Absolutely Calibrated Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G.; Carter, Brian; Hammersley, Peter; Kidger, Mark; Noguchi, Kunio

    1999-04-01

    We start from our six absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 μm for K0, K1.5, K3, K5, and M0 giants. These were constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer, and all have a common calibration pedigree. From these we spawn 422 calibrated ``spectral templates'' for stars with spectral types in the ranges G9.5-K3.5 III and K4.5-M0.5 III. We normalize each template by photometry for the individual stars using published and/or newly secured near- and mid-infrared photometry obtained through fully characterized, absolutely calibrated, combinations of filter passband, detector radiance response, and mean terrestrial atmospheric transmission. These templates continue our ongoing effort to provide an all-sky network of absolutely calibrated, spectrally continuous, stellar standards for general infrared usage, all with a common, traceable calibration heritage. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors, particularly low- to moderate-resolution spectrometers. We analyze the statistics of probable uncertainties, in the normalization of these templates to actual photometry, that quantify the confidence with which we can assert that these templates truly represent the individual stars. Each calibrated template provides an angular diameter for that star. These radiometric angular diameters compare very favorably with those directly observed across the range from 1.6 to 21 mas.

  18. Radiometric consistency assessment of hyperspectral infrared sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Jin, X.; Chen, Y.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    The radiometric and spectral consistency among the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is fundamental for the creation of long-term infrared (IR) hyperspectral radiance benchmark datasets for both inter-calibration and climate-related studies. In this study, the CrIS radiance measurements on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are directly compared with IASI on MetOp-A and -B at the finest spectral scale and with AIRS on Aqua in 25 selected spectral regions through one year of simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO) observations to evaluate radiometric consistency of these four hyperspectral IR sounders. The spectra from different sounders are paired together through strict spatial and temporal collocation. The uniform scenes are selected by examining the collocated Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) pixels. Their brightness temperature (BT) differences are then calculated by converting the spectra onto common spectral grids. The results indicate that CrIS agrees well with IASI on MetOp-A and IASI on MetOp-B at the longwave IR (LWIR) and middle-wave IR (MWIR) bands with 0.1-0.2 K differences. There are no apparent scene-dependent patterns for BT differences between CrIS and IASI for individual spectral channels. CrIS and AIRS are compared at the 25 spectral regions for both Polar and Tropical SNOs. The combined global SNO datasets indicate that, the CrIS-AIRS BT differences are less than or around 0.1 K among 21 of 25 comparison spectral regions and they range from 0.15 to 0.21 K in the remaining 4 spectral regions. CrIS-AIRS BT differences in some comparison spectral regions show weak scene-dependent features.

  19. Radiometric consistency assessment of hyperspectral infrared sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Jin, X.; Chen, Y.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    The radiometric and spectral consistency among the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is fundamental for the creation of long-term infrared (IR) hyperspectral radiance benchmark data sets for both intercalibration and climate-related studies. In this study, the CrIS radiance measurements on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are directly compared with IASI on MetOp-A and MetOp-B at the finest spectral scale and with AIRS on Aqua in 25 selected spectral regions through simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO) observations in 2013, to evaluate radiometric consistency of these four hyperspectral IR sounders. The spectra from different sounders are paired together through strict spatial and temporal collocation. The uniform scenes are selected by examining the collocated Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) pixels. Their brightness temperature (BT) differences are then calculated by converting the spectra onto common spectral grids. The results indicate that CrIS agrees well with IASI on MetOp-A and IASI on MetOp-B at the long-wave IR (LWIR) and middle-wave IR (MWIR) bands with 0.1-0.2 K differences. There are no apparent scene-dependent patterns for BT differences between CrIS and IASI for individual spectral channels. CrIS and AIRS are compared at the 25 spectral regions for both polar and tropical SNOs. The combined global SNO data sets indicate that the CrIS-AIRS BT differences are less than or around 0.1 K among 21 of 25 spectral regions and they range from 0.15 to 0.21 K in the remaining four spectral regions. CrIS-AIRS BT differences in some comparison spectral regions show weak scene-dependent features.

  20. Spatial and spectral characterization of laboratory shuttle glow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Leone, A.; Holtzclaw, K. W.; Caledonia, G. E.

    1991-05-01

    Laboratory experiments designed to uncover mechanistic information about the spectral and spatial characteristics of shuttle glow were conducted. Pulsed oxygen atoms traveling at orbital velocities were directed toward a substrate which was previously dosed with NO molecules. Heterogeneous recombination of the O and NO species resulted in NO*2 exiting the surface of the sample, and an associated emission was found to extend from the sample plane. In the experiments the materials investigated were Z306 Chemglaze‰ (a common baffle black paint), aluminum, and nickel. The sample temperatures were varied from 300 to 77 K, and the oxygen atom velocity was varied from 5 to 10 km s-1. The experimental results include the measure of (1) an effective NO*2 lifetime of 185 μs, (2) complete surface thermal accommodation of the formed NO*2, (3) a large NO*2 emission brightness which was inversely related to surface temperature, and (4) a spectral shape which indicates a red shifting to distance from the sample as well as (5) a slight spectral shift which appears to be material related. The preliminary experimental data from this experiment were presented by Caledonia et al. (1990).

  1. Radiometric calibration of optical microscopy and microspectroscopy apparata over a broad spectral range using a special thin-film luminescence standard

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, J. Greben, M.

    2015-04-15

    Application capabilities of optical microscopes and microspectroscopes can be considerably enhanced by a proper calibration of their spectral sensitivity. We propose and demonstrate a method of relative and absolute calibration of a microspectroscope over an extraordinary broad spectral range covered by two (parallel) detection branches in visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The key point of the absolute calibration of a relative spectral sensitivity is application of the standard sample formed by a thin layer of Si nanocrystals with stable and efficient photoluminescence. The spectral PL quantum yield and the PL spatial distribution of the standard sample must be characterized by separate experiments. The absolutely calibrated microspectroscope enables to characterize spectral photon emittance of a studied object or even its luminescence quantum yield (QY) if additional knowledge about spatial distribution of emission and about excitance is available. Capabilities of the calibrated microspectroscope are demonstrated by measuring external QY of electroluminescence from a standard poly-Si solar-cell and of photoluminescence of Er-doped Si nanocrystals.

  2. On the effects of spatial and spectral resolution on spatial-spectral target detection in SHARE 2012 and Bobcat 2013 hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Jason R.; Eismann, Michael T.; Ratliff, Bradley M.; Celenk, Mehmet

    2015-05-01

    Previous work with the Bobcat 2013 data set1 showed that spatial-spectral feature extraction on visible to near infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imagery (HSI) led to better target detection and discrimination than spectral-only techniques; however, the aforementioned study could not consider the possible benefits of the shortwaveinfrared (SWIR) portion of the spectrum due to data limitations. In addition, the spatial resolution of the Bobcat 2013 imagery was fixed at 8cm without exploring lower spatial resolutions. In this work, we evaluate the tradeoffs in spatial and spectral resolution and spectral coverage between for a common set of targets in terms of their effects on spatial-spectral target detection performance. We show that for our spatial-spectral target detection scheme and data sets, the adaptive cosine estimator (ACE) applied to S-DAISY and pseudo Zernike moment (PZM) spatial-spectral features can distinguish between targets better than ACE applied only to the spectral imagery. In particular, S-DAISY operating on bands uniformly selected from the SWIR portion of ProSpecTIR-VS sensor imagery in conjunction with bands closely corresponding to the Airborne Real-time Cueing Hyperspectral Reconnaissance (ARCHER) sensor's VNIR bands (80 total) led to the best overall average performance in both target detection and discrimination.

  3. Optical Imaging and Radiometric Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Kong Q.; Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Moiser, Gary E.; Howard, Joseph M.; Le, Chi M.

    2010-01-01

    OPTOOL software is a general-purpose optical systems analysis tool that was developed to offer a solution to problems associated with computational programs written for the James Webb Space Telescope optical system. It integrates existing routines into coherent processes, and provides a structure with reusable capabilities that allow additional processes to be quickly developed and integrated. It has an extensive graphical user interface, which makes the tool more intuitive and friendly. OPTOOL is implemented using MATLAB with a Fourier optics-based approach for point spread function (PSF) calculations. It features parametric and Monte Carlo simulation capabilities, and uses a direct integration calculation to permit high spatial sampling of the PSF. Exit pupil optical path difference (OPD) maps can be generated using combinations of Zernike polynomials or shaped power spectral densities. The graphical user interface allows rapid creation of arbitrary pupil geometries, and entry of all other modeling parameters to support basic imaging and radiometric analyses. OPTOOL provides the capability to generate wavefront-error (WFE) maps for arbitrary grid sizes. These maps are 2D arrays containing digital sampled versions of functions ranging from Zernike polynomials to combination of sinusoidal wave functions in 2D, to functions generated from a spatial frequency power spectral distribution (PSD). It also can generate optical transfer functions (OTFs), which are incorporated into the PSF calculation. The user can specify radiometrics for the target and sky background, and key performance parameters for the instrument s focal plane array (FPA). This radiometric and detector model setup is fairly extensive, and includes parameters such as zodiacal background, thermal emission noise, read noise, and dark current. The setup also includes target spectral energy distribution as a function of wavelength for polychromatic sources, detector pixel size, and the FPA s charge

  4. Statistical synthesis of multiantenna ultrawideband radiometric complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volosyuk, V. K.; Kravchenko, V. F.; Pavlikov, V. V.; Pustovoit, V. I.

    2016-04-01

    An optimum signal processing algorithm of radiometric imaging has been synthesized for the first time using multiantenna ultrawideband (UWB) radiometric complexes (RMCs). Radiometric images (RMI) are interpreted physically as intensity depending on the angular coordinates or the spectral radio brightness averaged in the operation frequency band. In accordance with the synthesized algorithm, a structural scheme of ultrawideband radiometric complexes has been developed. An analytical expression for the ambiguity function of radiometric complexes has been obtained. The ambiguity function is modeled in the case of processing narrowband and ultrawideband radiometric signals. As follows from the analysis of the results, new elements of the theory of optimum processing of UWB radiometric signals with the involvement of multielement antenna systems are an important tool in creating highly accurate, biologically and ecologically safe complexes for studying various media and objects.

  5. Spectral-Spatial Classification of Hyperspectral Images Using Hierarchical Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Yuliya; Tilton, James C.

    2011-01-01

    A new spectral-spatial method for hyperspectral data classification is proposed. For a given hyperspectral image, probabilistic pixelwise classification is first applied. Then, hierarchical step-wise optimization algorithm is performed, by iteratively merging neighboring regions with the smallest Dissimilarity Criterion (DC) and recomputing class labels for new regions. The DC is computed by comparing region mean vectors, class labels and a number of pixels in the two regions under consideration. The algorithm is converged when all the pixels get involved in the region merging procedure. Experimental results are presented on two remote sensing hyperspectral images acquired by the AVIRIS and ROSIS sensors. The proposed approach improves classification accuracies and provides maps with more homogeneous regions, when compared to previously proposed classification techniques.

  6. Spatial steadiness of individual disorder modes upon controlled spectral tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, Niccolò; Riboli, Francesco; Intonti, Francesca; La China, Federico; Biccari, Francesco; Gerardino, Annamaria; Gurioli, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Recent innovative applications in disordered photonics would strongly benefit from the possibility to achieve spectral tuning of the individual disorder localized photonic modes without affecting their spatial distributions. Here, we design and fabricate a two-dimensional disordered photonic system, made of a GaAs slab patterned with randomly distributed circular air scattering centers, supporting localized light modes with very small modal volume. The photoluminescence of InAs quantum dots embedded in the slab is used as a probe for near field experiments and gives direct access to the electric field intensity distribution of the localized random modes. We demonstrate that laser assisted oxidation of the GaAs slab performed by near field illumination can be used for a gentle tuning of the individual random modes without modifying the subtle balance leading to light localization given by multiple scattering.

  7. Multiple-image encryption using spectral cropping and spatial multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Pingke; Diao, Ming; Shan, Mingguang; Zhong, Zhi; Zhang, Yabin

    2016-01-01

    A multiple-image encryption scheme is proposed using spectral cropping and space multiplexing based on discrete multiple-parameter fractional Fourier transform (DMPFRFT). Spectrum of each original image is firstly cropped by a low-pass filter, and the image is then recovered with the same size of the filter. The recovered images are spatially shifted and multiplexed into a complex signal with the same size of original image. The complex signal is multiplied by a pixel scrambling operation and random phase mask, and then encrypted into one image by DMPFRFT. The multiplexing images can be retrieved with correct keys, and the original images can be then obtained by enlarging the demultiplexing images. Numerical simulations have been done to demonstrate the validity and the security of the proposed method.

  8. Understanding Spatial and Spectral Morphologies of Ultracompact H II Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-08-25

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of ultracompact H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of ultracompact H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  9. UNDERSTANDING SPATIAL AND SPECTRAL MORPHOLOGIES OF ULTRACOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Dullemond, Cornelis P.

    2010-08-10

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact (UC) H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears to be able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of UC H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of UC H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  10. GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: spectral response functions and radiometric biases with the NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite evaluated for desert calibration sites.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, Aaron; Pogorzala, David; Cao, Changyong

    2013-11-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), which will be launched in late 2015 on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-series satellite, will be evaluated in terms of its data quality postlaunch through comparisons with other satellite sensors such as the recently launched Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite. The ABI has completed much of its prelaunch characterization and its developers have generated and released its channel spectral response functions (response versus wavelength). Using these responses and constraining a radiative transfer model with ground reflectance, aerosol, and water vapor measurements, we simulate observed top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectances for analogous visible and near infrared channels of the VIIRS and ABI sensors at the Sonoran Desert and White Sands National Monument sites and calculate the radiometric biases and their uncertainties. We also calculate sensor TOA reflectances using aircraft hyperspectral data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer to validate the uncertainties in several of the ABI and VIIRS channels and discuss the potential for validating the others. Once on-orbit, calibration scientists can use these biases to ensure ABI data quality and consistency to support the numerical weather prediction community and other data users. They can also use the results for ABI or VIIRS anomaly detection and resolution. PMID:24216671

  11. Spatially Varying Spectrally Thresholds for MODIS Cloud Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, S. L.; Jedlovec, G. J.; Lafontaine, F.

    2004-01-01

    The EOS science team has developed an elaborate global MODIS cloud detection procedure, and the resulting MODIS product (MOD35) is used in the retrieval process of several geophysical parameters to mask out clouds. While the global application of the cloud detection approach appears quite robust, the product has some shortcomings on the regional scale, often over determining clouds in a variety of settings, particularly at night. This over-determination of clouds can cause a reduction in the spatial coverage of MODIS derived clear-sky products. To minimize this problem, a new regional cloud detection method for use with MODIS data has been developed at NASA's Global Hydrology and Climate Center (GHCC). The approach is similar to that used by the GHCC for GOES data over the continental United States. Several spatially varying thresholds are applied to MODIS spectral data to produce a set of tests for detecting clouds. The thresholds are valid for each MODIS orbital pass, and are derived from 20-day composites of GOES channels with similar wavelengths to MODIS. This paper and accompanying poster will introduce the GHCC MODIS cloud mask, provide some examples, and present some preliminary validation.

  12. COS External Spectroscopic Performance: Spectral and Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghavamian, Parviz; Froning, Cynthia; Osterman, Steve; Keyes, Charles (Tony); Sahnow, Dave

    2010-07-01

    During the SM4 Servicing Mission Observatory Verification (SMOV) we discovered that the on-orbit shape of the COS LSF with the HST optical telescope assembly (OTA) exhibits broad wings. The wings are caused by mid-frequency wave-front errors (MFWFEs) that are produced by the zonal (polishing) errors on the HST primary and secondary mirrors; these errors could not be simulated during ground testing. The MFWFEs are particularly noticeable in the FUV. The on-orbit LSF has up to 40% of its total power distributed in non-Gaussian wings (as compared to 26% for a Gaussian). The power in these wings is largest at the shortest wavelengths covered by the COS FUV medium-resolution gratings ( 1150 Å). The effect decreases with increasing wavelength but has a non-negligible effect on encircled energies even at the longest wavelengths. We have calculated optical models incorporating the MFWFE effects into the LSF for the whole spectral range covered by the FUV and NUV medium-resolution gratings. We show that for the FUV, the convolution of these model LSFs with high-resolution STIS echelle spectra yields an excellent match to the on-orbit COS spectra of the same targets. The model LSFs are available online and can be used by COS observers to assess the impact of the MFWFE broadening on their COS spectra. In ground tests it was shown that COS can spatially resolve two equally bright objects separated by 1 00 in the cross-dispersion direction in the FUV. Using the FUV spectra of white dwarfs acquired during the Cycle 17 COS Spectroscopic Sensitivity Monitoring program, we show the on-orbit spatial resolution (as defined by the full-width half maximum of the spectrum along cross-dispersion) meets this specification, though in a wavelength-dependent manner. The wavelength dependence is primarily due the astigmatism introduced by the FUV gratings in cross-dispersion. The spatial resolution also depends on the central wavelength (CENWAVE) setting used, with spatial resolution

  13. Cloud Filtering Using a Bi-Spectral Spatial Coherence Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillory, Anthony R.; Lecue, Juan M.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Whitworth, Brandon N.

    1998-01-01

    The research in this paper focuses on describing a technique developed for cloud filtering using a bi-spectral approach on GOES-8/9 Imager data. The application was developed for use with infrared retrievals of geophysical parameters in mind, where cloud cover contaminates the derived product. However, numerous potential applications of the technique exist. The technique will be described and a preliminary validation of the algorithm will be presented. Although initially based on the spatial coherence approach from Coakley and Brethereton (1982), it has evolved to utilize a difference image of the 11 and 3.9 micrometer channels on the GOES-8/9 Imager. This image is very similar to that produced by Nelson and Ellrod (1996). During the daytime the technique makes use of the varying solar reflectance in the 3.9 micrometer channel by clouds and land to identify cloudy pixels. While at night, the technique makes use of the varying emissivity of the clouds in the scene to discriminate between clear and cloudy pixels. The technique applies three basic threshold tests to produce the final cloud filtered image: 1) a standard deviation threshold to detect the spatial variance in the scene, 2) a difference threshold between adjacent pixels, and 3) a simple infrared temperature threshold. The first test is applied to the entire image at once, then in a second pass the next two tests are applied. The final infrared temperature threshold is only meant to identify the coldest clouds that might pass the previous tests. The technique performs well during the daytime, while nighttime performance is degraded but is promising. The technique has proven to be robust and shows great promise of meeting its original goal of cloud filtering for use in an infrared retrieval algorithm for use in climate studies.

  14. Simulation of the long term radiometric responses of the Terra MODIS and EO-1 ALI using Hyperion spectral responses over Railroad Valley Playa in Nevada (RVPN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Taeyoung; Xiong, Xiaoxiong J.; Angal, Amit; Chander, Gyanesh

    2010-10-01

    The Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) Hyperion instrument provides 220 spectral bands with wavelengths between 400 and 2500 nm at 30 m spatial resolution, which covers a 7.5 km by 100 km area on the ground. The EO-1 spacecraft has another multispectral sensor called the Advanced Land Imager (ALI), which has 10 spectral bands with wavelengths between 400 and 2350 nm at 30 m spatial resolution. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor onboard the Terra spacecraft was launched in Dec., 1999, and flies approximately 30 minutes behind EO-1. Nearsimultaneous observations from Terra MODIS, EO-1 ALI and Hyperion over a well characterized Railroad Valley Playa in Nevada (RVPN) target are chosen for this study. A uniform region of interest (ROI) within the playa within latitudes and longitudes of 38.48 and -115.71 to 38.53 and -115.66 was chosen for this analysis. A representation of the ground spectra during every near-simultaneous acquisition of MODIS and ALI is obtained using EO-1 Hyperion data. Using the EO-1 Hyperion derived top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance profile along with the ALI and MODIS relative spectral responses (RSR), simulated reflectance for the matching band pairs is calculated. The Hyperion simulated TOA reflectance results are compared to the measured TOA reflectance trends of ALI and MODIS. The long-term measured versus simulated reflectance results are used to examine the relationships and calibration differences between the ALI and MODIS sensors.

  15. Survey of emissivity measurement by radiometric methods.

    PubMed

    Honner, M; Honnerová, P

    2015-02-01

    A survey of the state of the art in the field of spectral directional emissivity measurements by using radiometric methods is presented. Individual quantity types such as spectral, band, or total emissivity are defined. Principles of emissivity measurement by various methods (direct and indirect, and calorimetric and radiometric) are discussed. The paper is focused on direct radiometric methods. An overview of experimental setups is provided, including the design of individual parts such as the applied reference sources of radiation, systems of sample clamping and heating, detection systems, methods for the determination of surface temperature, and procedures for emissivity evaluation. PMID:25967774

  16. Detection and correction of spectral and spatial misregistrations for hyperspectral data using phase correlation method.

    PubMed

    Yokoya, Naoto; Miyamura, Norihide; Iwasaki, Akira

    2010-08-20

    Hyperspectral imaging sensors suffer from spectral and spatial misregistrations due to optical-system aberrations and misalignments. These artifacts distort spectral signatures that are specific to target objects and thus reduce classification accuracy. The main objective of this work is to detect and correct spectral and spatial misregistrations of hyperspectral images. The Hyperion visible near-infrared subsystem is used as an example. An image registration method based on phase correlation demonstrates the accurate detection of the spectral and spatial misregistrations. Cubic spline interpolation using estimated properties makes it possible to modify the spectral signatures. The accuracy of the proposed postlaunch estimation of the Hyperion characteristics is comparable to that of the prelaunch measurements, which enables the accurate onboard calibration of hyperspectral sensors. PMID:20733628

  17. Spectral-spatial classification combined with diffusion theory based inverse modeling of hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Nordgaard, Hâvard B.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2016-02-01

    Hyperspectral imagery opens a new perspective for biomedical diagnostics and tissue characterization. High spectral resolution can give insight into optical properties of the skin tissue. However, at the same time the amount of collected data represents a challenge when it comes to decomposition into clusters and extraction of useful diagnostic information. In this study spectral-spatial classification and inverse diffusion modeling were employed to hyperspectral images obtained from a porcine burn model using a hyperspectral push-broom camera. The implemented method takes advantage of spatial and spectral information simultaneously, and provides information about the average optical properties within each cluster. The implemented algorithm allows mapping spectral and spatial heterogeneity of the burn injury as well as dynamic changes of spectral properties within the burn area. The combination of statistical and physics informed tools allowed for initial separation of different burn wounds and further detailed characterization of the injuries in short post-injury time.

  18. Spatial versus spectral compression ratio in compressive sensing of hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    August, Yitzhak; Vachman, Chaim; Stern, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    Compressive hyperspectral imaging is based on the fact that hyperspectral data is highly redundant. However, there is no symmetry between the compressibility of the spatial and spectral domains, and that should be taken into account for optimal compressive hyperspectral imaging system design. Here we present a study of the influence of the ratio between the compression in the spatial and spectral domains on the performance of a 3D separable compressive hyperspectral imaging method we recently developed.

  19. Sentinel-2 radiometric image quality commissioning: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachérade, S.; Lonjou, V.; Farges, M.; Gamet, P.; Marcq, S.; Raynaud, J.-L.; Trémas, T.

    2015-10-01

    In partnership with the European Commission and in the frame of the Copernicus program, the European Space Agency (ESA) is developing the Sentinel-2 optical imaging mission devoted to the operational monitoring of land and coastal areas. The Sentinel-2 mission is based on a satellites constellation deployed in polar sun-synchronous orbit. Sentinel-2 offers a unique combination of global coverage with a wide field of view (290km), a high revisit (5 days with two satellites), a high spatial resolution (10m, 20m and 60m) and multi-spectral imagery (13 spectral bands in visible and shortwave infrared domains). The first satellite, Sentinel-2A, has been launched in June 2015. The Sentinel-2A Commissioning Phase starts immediately after the Launch and Early Orbit Phase and continues until the In-Orbit Commissioning Review which is planned three months after the launch. The Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) supports ESA/ESTEC to insure the Calibration/Validation commissioning phase during the first three months in flight. This paper provides first an overview of the Sentinel-2 system and a description of the products delivered by the ground segment associated to the main radiometric specifications to achieve. Then the paper focuses on the preliminary radiometric results obtained during the in-flight commissioning phase. The radiometric methods and calibration sites used in the CNES image quality center to reach the specifications of the sensor are described. A status of the Sentinel-2A radiometric performances at the end of the first three months after the launch is presented. We will particularly address in this paper the results in term of absolute calibration, pixel to pixel relative sensitivity and MTF estimation.

  20. On combining spectral and spatial information of hyperspectral image for camouflaged target detecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Wenshen; Liu, Xun; Yang, Jia

    2013-12-01

    Detecting enemy's targets and being undetectable play increasingly important roles in modern warfare. Hyperspectral images can provide large spectral range and high spectral resolution, which are invaluable in discriminating between camouflaged targets and backgrounds. As supervised classification requires prior knowledge which cannot be acquired easily, unsupervised classification usually is adopted to process hyperspectral images to detect camouflaged target. But one of its drawbacks—low detecting accuracy confines its application for camouflaged target detecting. Most research on the processing of hyperspectral image tends to focus exclusively on spectral domain and ignores spatial domain. However current hyperspectral image provides high spatial resolution which contains useful information for camouflaged target detecting. A new method combining spectral and spatial information is proposed to increase the detecting accuracy using unsupervised classification. The method has two steps. In the first step, a traditional unsupervised classifier (i.e. K-MEANS, ISODATA) is adopted to classify the hyperspectral image to acquire basic classifications or clusters. During the second step, a 3×3 model and spectral angle mapping are utilized to test the spatial character of the hyperspectral image. The spatial character is defined as spatial homogeneity and calculated by spectral angle mapping. Theory analysis and experiment shows the method is reasonable and efficient. Camouflaged targets are extracted from the background and different camouflaged targets are also recognized. And the proposed algorithm outperforms K-MEANS in terms of detecting accuracy, robustness and edge's distinction. This paper demonstrates the new method is meaningful to camouflaged targets detecting.

  1. [Mixed-Spectral Spatial Information Decomposition Model of Water Hyperspectral Inversion].

    PubMed

    Pan, Bang-long; Wang, Xian-hua; Zhu, Jin; Yi, Wei-ning; Fang, Ting-yong

    2015-03-01

    The effect of Mixed-hyperspectral in the water is difficult in quantitative remote sensing of water. Studies have shown that the only scalar spectrum information is difficult to solve the problem of complex mixed spectra of water. Besides the spectral information, spatial distribution of information is one of the obvious characteristics of the broad waters pollution, and can be used as a useful complement to the remote sensing information and facilitate water complex spectral unmixing. Taking Chaohu as an example, the paper applies the HJ-1A HSI hyperspectral data and the supplemental surface spectral measurement data to discuss the mixed spectra of lake water by spatial statistics and genetic algorithm theory. By using the spatial variogram of geostatistics to simulate the distribution difference of two adjacent pixels, the space-informational decomposition model of mixed spectral in lake water is established by co-kriging genetic algorithm, which is a improved algorithm applying the spatial variogram function of neighborhood pixel as the constraint of the objective function of the genetic algorithm. Finally, the model inversion results of suspended matter concentration are verified. Compared with the conventional spectral unmixing model, the results show the correlation coefficient of the predicted and measured value of suspended sediment concentration is 0.82, the root mean square error 9.25 mg x L(-1) by mixed spectral space information decomposition model, so the correlation coefficient is increased by 8.9%, the root mean square error reduced by 2.78 mg x L(-1), indicating that the model of suspended matter concentration has a strong predictive ability. Therefore, the effective combination of spatial and spectral information of water, can avoid inversion result distortion due to weak spectral signal of water color parameters, and large amount of calculation of information extraction because of the high spectral band numbers, and also provides an effective way

  2. Research on spatial coding compressive spectral imaging and its applicability for rural survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuheng; Ji, Yiqun; Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Shen, Weimin

    Compressive spectral imaging combines traditional spectral imaging method with new concept of compressive sensing thus has the advantages such as reducing acquisition data amount, realizing snapshot imaging for large field of view and increasing image signal-to-noise and its preliminary application effectiveness has been explored by early usage on the occasions such as high-speed imaging and fluorescent imaging. In this paper, the application potentiality for spatial coding compressive spectral imaging technique on rural survey is revealed. The physical model for spatial coding compressive spectral imaging is built on which its data flow procession is analyzed and its data reconstruction issue is concluded. The existing sparse reconstruction methods are reviewed thus specific module based on the two-step iterative shrinkage/thresholding algorithm is built so as to execute the imaging data reconstruction. The simulating imaging experiment based on AVIRIS visible band data of a specific selected rural scene is carried out. The spatial identification and spectral featuring extraction capacity for different ground species are evaluated by visual judgment of both single band image and spectral curve. The data fidelity evaluation parameters (RMSE and PSNR) are put forward so as to verify the data fidelity maintaining ability of this compressive imaging method quantitatively. The application potentiality of spatial coding compressive spectral imaging on rural survey, crop monitoring, vegetation inspection and further agricultural development demand is verified in this paper.

  3. Spatial-Spectral Classification Based on the Unsupervised Convolutional Sparse Auto-Encoder for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaobing; Zhong, Yanfei; Zhang, Liangpei

    2016-06-01

    Current hyperspectral remote sensing imagery spatial-spectral classification methods mainly consider concatenating the spectral information vectors and spatial information vectors together. However, the combined spatial-spectral information vectors may cause information loss and concatenation deficiency for the classification task. To efficiently represent the spatial-spectral feature information around the central pixel within a neighbourhood window, the unsupervised convolutional sparse auto-encoder (UCSAE) with window-in-window selection strategy is proposed in this paper. Window-in-window selection strategy selects the sub-window spatial-spectral information for the spatial-spectral feature learning and extraction with the sparse auto-encoder (SAE). Convolution mechanism is applied after the SAE feature extraction stage with the SAE features upon the larger outer window. The UCSAE algorithm was validated by two common hyperspectral imagery (HSI) datasets - Pavia University dataset and the Kennedy Space Centre (KSC) dataset, which shows an improvement over the traditional hyperspectral spatial-spectral classification methods.

  4. TES radiometric assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, H.; Sarkissian, E.; Bowman, K.; Fisher, B.; Rider, D.; Aumann, H. H.; Apolinski, M.; Debaca, R. C.; Gluck, S.; Madatyan, M.; McDuffie, J.; Tremblay, D.; Shephard, M.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Tobin, D.; Revercomb, H.

    2005-01-01

    TES is an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer on board the EOS-Aura spacecraft launched July 15, 2004. Improvements to the radiometric calibration and consequent assessment of radiometric accuracy have been on-going since launch.

  5. Unsupervised Spectral-Spatial Feature Selection-Based Camouflaged Object Detection Using VNIR Hyperspectral Camera

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The detection of camouflaged objects is important for industrial inspection, medical diagnoses, and military applications. Conventional supervised learning methods for hyperspectral images can be a feasible solution. Such approaches, however, require a priori information of a camouflaged object and background. This letter proposes a fully autonomous feature selection and camouflaged object detection method based on the online analysis of spectral and spatial features. The statistical distance metric can generate candidate feature bands and further analysis of the entropy-based spatial grouping property can trim the useless feature bands. Camouflaged objects can be detected better with less computational complexity by optical spectral-spatial feature analysis. PMID:25879073

  6. Combined spectral and spatial processing of ERTS imagery data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.; Shanmugam, K. S.

    1973-01-01

    A procedure for extracting a set of textural features for ERTS-1 MSS data is presented. The textural features were combined with a set of spectral features and were used to develop a classification algorithm for identifying the land use categories of blocks of digital MSS data. The classification algorithm was derived from a training set of 314 blocks and tested on a set of 310 blocks. The overall accuracy of the classifier was found to be 83.5% on seven land use categories.

  7. Compressive sensing for spatial and spectral flame diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starling, David; Ranalli, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Compressive sensing has been a valuable resource for use in quantum imaging, low light level depth mapping of natural scenes, object tracking and even for the improvement of miniature spectrometers via post processing. Experimentally, many optical compressive sensing techniques utilize a single pixel camera composed of a digital micromirror device or spatial light modulator coupled to one shot-noise limited detector. This method has the advantages of fast acquisition time and high signal to noise ratio. One currently unexplored area of study is the use of these techniques in the context of flame diagnostics. Optical diagnostics are employed for a variety of purposes in flames, including imaging of the heat release region (via chemiluminescence) and spatially resolved species and temperature measurement (via spontaneous Raman scattering). Compressive sensing has a dual role in this field, where the signals of interest are generally sparse and the mean photon flux is very low at the appropriate wavelengths. We show here that compressive sensing is beneficial in particular for the study of laminar, steady flames using Raman spectroscopy and flame chemiluminescence imaging, without the use of intensified CCDs, commercial spectrometers or high intensity pulse lasers. We present results from a theoretical study with experimental data to follow.

  8. Hyperspectral Imagery Super-Resolution by Compressive Sensing Inspired Dictionary Learning and Spatial-Spectral Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Xiao, Liang; Liu, Hongyi; Wei, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Due to the instrumental and imaging optics limitations, it is difficult to acquire high spatial resolution hyperspectral imagery (HSI). Super-resolution (SR) imagery aims at inferring high quality images of a given scene from degraded versions of the same scene. This paper proposes a novel hyperspectral imagery super-resolution (HSI-SR) method via dictionary learning and spatial-spectral regularization. The main contributions of this paper are twofold. First, inspired by the compressive sensing (CS) framework, for learning the high resolution dictionary, we encourage stronger sparsity on image patches and promote smaller coherence between the learned dictionary and sensing matrix. Thus, a sparsity and incoherence restricted dictionary learning method is proposed to achieve higher efficiency sparse representation. Second, a variational regularization model combing a spatial sparsity regularization term and a new local spectral similarity preserving term is proposed to integrate the spectral and spatial-contextual information of the HSI. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively recover spatial information and better preserve spectral information. The high spatial resolution HSI reconstructed by the proposed method outperforms reconstructed results by other well-known methods in terms of both objective measurements and visual evaluation. PMID:25608212

  9. Hyperspectral imagery super-resolution by compressive sensing inspired dictionary learning and spatial-spectral regularization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Xiao, Liang; Liu, Hongyi; Wei, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Due to the instrumental and imaging optics limitations, it is difficult to acquire high spatial resolution hyperspectral imagery (HSI). Super-resolution (SR) imagery aims at inferring high quality images of a given scene from degraded versions of the same scene. This paper proposes a novel hyperspectral imagery super-resolution (HSI-SR) method via dictionary learning and spatial-spectral regularization. The main contributions of this paper are twofold. First, inspired by the compressive sensing (CS) framework, for learning the high resolution dictionary, we encourage stronger sparsity on image patches and promote smaller coherence between the learned dictionary and sensing matrix. Thus, a sparsity and incoherence restricted dictionary learning method is proposed to achieve higher efficiency sparse representation. Second, a variational regularization model combing a spatial sparsity regularization term and a new local spectral similarity preserving term is proposed to integrate the spectral and spatial-contextual information of the HSI. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively recover spatial information and better preserve spectral information. The high spatial resolution HSI reconstructed by the proposed method outperforms reconstructed results by other well-known methods in terms of both objective measurements and visual evaluation. PMID:25608212

  10. Joint Spatial-Spectral Reconstruction and k-t Spirals for Accelerated 2D Spatial/1D Spectral Imaging of 13C Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jeremy W.; Niles, David J.; Fain, Sean B.; Johnson, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a novel imaging technique to reduce the number of excitations and required scan time for hyperpolarized 13C imaging. Methods A least-squares based optimization and reconstruction is developed to simultaneously solve for both spatial and spectral encoding. By jointly solving both domains, spectral imaging can potentially be performed with a spatially oversampled single echo spiral acquisition. Digital simulations, phantom experiments, and initial in vivo hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate experiments were performed to assess the performance of the algorithm as compared to a multi-echo approach. Results Simulations and phantom data indicate that accurate single echo imaging is possible when coupled with oversampling factors greater than six (corresponding to a worst case of pyruvate to metabolite ratio < 9%), even in situations of substantial T2* decay and B0 heterogeneity. With lower oversampling rates, two echoes are required for similar accuracy. These results were confirmed with in vivo data experiments, showing accurate single echo spectral imaging with an oversampling factor of 7 and two echo imaging with an oversampling factor of 4. Conclusion The proposed k-t approach increases data acquisition efficiency by reducing the number of echoes required to generate spectroscopic images, thereby allowing accelerated acquisition speed, preserved polarization, and/or improved temporal or spatial resolution. Magn Reson Med PMID:23716402

  11. High-Resolution Image Classification Integrating Spectral-Spatial-Location Cues by Conditional Random Fields.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ji; Zhong, Yanfei; Shu, Hong; Zhang, Liangpei

    2016-09-01

    With the increase in the availability of high-resolution remote sensing imagery, classification is becoming an increasingly useful technique for providing a large area of detailed land-cover information by the use of these high-resolution images. High-resolution images have the characteristics of abundant geometric and detail information, which are beneficial to detailed classification. In order to make full use of these characteristics, a classification algorithm based on conditional random fields (CRFs) is presented in this paper. The proposed algorithm integrates spectral, spatial contextual, and spatial location cues by modeling the probabilistic potentials. The spectral cues modeled by the unary potentials can provide basic information for discriminating the various land-cover classes. The pairwise potentials consider the spatial contextual information by establishing the neighboring interactions between pixels to favor spatial smoothing. The spatial location cues are explicitly encoded in the higher order potentials. The higher order potentials consider the nonlocal range of the spatial location interactions between the target pixel and its nearest training samples. This can provide useful information for the classes that are easily confused with other land-cover types in the spectral appearance. The proposed algorithm integrates spectral, spatial contextual, and spatial location cues within a CRF framework to provide complementary information from varying perspectives, so that it can address the common problem of spectral variability in remote sensing images, which is directly reflected in the accuracy of each class and the average accuracy. The experimental results with three high-resolution images show the validity of the algorithm, compared with the other state-of-the-art classification algorithms. PMID:27295673

  12. Spectral and spatial characterization of protein loaded PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zidan, Ahmed S; Rahman, Ziyaur; Habib, Muhammad J; Khan, Mansoor A

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and imaging as approaches to assess drug contents in poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) based nanoparticles of a model protein, cyclosporine A (CyA). A 6-factors 12-runs designed set of experiments with Plackett-Burman (PB) screening was applied in order to examine the effects of drug loading (X(1)), polymer loading (X(2)), emulsifier concentration (X(3)), stirring rate (X(4)), type of organic solvent (X(5)), and ratio of organic to aqueous phases' volumes (X(6)), on drug entrapment efficiency (EFF). After omitting the factors with nonsignificant influences on EFF, a reduced mathematical relationship, EFF = 48.34 + 7.3X(1) - 29.95X(3), was obtained to explain the effect of the significant factors on EFF. Using two different sets for calibration and validation, the developed NIR calibration model was able to assess CyA contents within the 12 PB formulations. NIR spectral imaging was capable of clearly distinguishing the 12 formulations, both qualitatively and quantitatively. A good correlation with a coefficient of 0.9727 was obtained for constructing a quantile-quantile plot for the actual drug loading percentage and the % standard deviation obtained for the drug loading prediction using the hyperspectral images. PMID:19774658

  13. Spectral analysis and filtering techniques in digital spatial data processing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pan, Jeng-Jong

    1989-01-01

    A filter toolbox has been developed at the EROS Data Center, US Geological Survey, for retrieving or removing specified frequency information from two-dimensional digital spatial data. This filter toolbox provides capabilities to compute the power spectrum of a given data and to design various filters in the frequency domain. Three types of filters are available in the toolbox: point filter, line filter, and area filter. Both the point and line filters employ Gaussian-type notch filters, and the area filter includes the capabilities to perform high-pass, band-pass, low-pass, and wedge filtering techniques. These filters are applied for analyzing satellite multispectral scanner data, airborne visible and infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) data, gravity data, and the digital elevation models (DEM) data. -from Author

  14. On the spectral analysis of quantum electrodynamics with spatial cutoffs. I

    SciTech Connect

    Takaesu, Toshimitsu

    2009-06-15

    In this paper, we consider the spectrum of a model in quantum electrodynamics with a spatial cutoff. It is proven that (1) the Hamiltonian is self-adjoint; (2) under the infrared regularity condition, the Hamiltonian has a unique ground state for sufficiently small values of coupling constants. The spectral scattering theory is studied as well and it is shown that asymptotic fields exist and the spectral gap is closed.

  15. INTRABAND RADIOMETRIC PERFORMANCE OF THE LANDSAT 4 THEMATIC MAPPER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, Hugh H.; Eliason, Eric M.; Chavez, Pat S., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This preliminary report examines those radiometric characteristics of the Landsat 4 Thematic Mapper (TM) that can be established without absolute calibration of spectral data. Analysis is based largely on radiometrically raw (B type) data of three daytime and two nighttime scenes; in most scenes, a set of 512 lines were examined on an individual-detector basis. Subscenes selected for uniform-radiance were used to characterize subtle radiometric differences and noise problems.

  16. Adjusting spectral indices for spectral response function differences of very high spatial resolution sensors simulated from field spectra.

    PubMed

    Cundill, Sharon L; van der Werff, Harald M A; van der Meijde, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices' values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important. PMID:25781511

  17. Adjusting Spectral Indices for Spectral Response Function Differences of Very High Spatial Resolution Sensors Simulated from Field Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cundill, Sharon L.; van der Werff, Harald M. A.; van der Meijde, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices’ values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important. PMID:25781511

  18. S4: A Spatial-spectral model for Speckle Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergus, Rob; Hogg, David W.; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Brenner, Douglas; Pueyo, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    High dynamic range imagers aim to block or eliminate light from a very bright primary star in order to make it possible to detect and measure far fainter companions; in real systems, a small fraction of the primary light is scattered, diffracted, and unocculted. We introduce S4, a flexible data-driven model for the unocculted (and highly speckled) light in the P1640 spectroscopic coronagraph. The model uses principal components analysis (PCA) to capture the spatial structure and wavelength dependence of the speckles, but not the signal produced by any companion. Consequently, the residual typically includes the companion signal. The companion can thus be found by filtering this error signal with a fixed companion model. The approach is sensitive to companions that are of the order of a percent of the brightness of the speckles, or up to 10-7 times the brightness of the primary star. This outperforms existing methods by a factor of two to three and is close to the shot-noise physical limit.

  19. S4: A spatial-spectral model for speckle suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Fergus, Rob; Hogg, David W.; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Brenner, Douglas; Pueyo, Laurent

    2014-10-20

    High dynamic range imagers aim to block or eliminate light from a very bright primary star in order to make it possible to detect and measure far fainter companions; in real systems, a small fraction of the primary light is scattered, diffracted, and unocculted. We introduce S4, a flexible data-driven model for the unocculted (and highly speckled) light in the P1640 spectroscopic coronagraph. The model uses principal components analysis (PCA) to capture the spatial structure and wavelength dependence of the speckles, but not the signal produced by any companion. Consequently, the residual typically includes the companion signal. The companion can thus be found by filtering this error signal with a fixed companion model. The approach is sensitive to companions that are of the order of a percent of the brightness of the speckles, or up to 10{sup –7} times the brightness of the primary star. This outperforms existing methods by a factor of two to three and is close to the shot-noise physical limit.

  20. The Importance of High Spatial and Appropriate Spectral Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Many diverse astronomical sources are resolved with diffraction-limited large telescopes. Application of appropriate dispersion spectroscopy unveils much information on the physics of these objects ranging from gamma ray bursters in host galaxies, star-formation regions and central engines in nearby galaxies, structures in galactic nebulae, resolved binaries with mass exchange, extended winds of massive stars, protoplanetary systems, and comets, asteroids and planets within our own solar system. Active optics and interferometers coupled with spectrographs can provide near-diffraction-limited spectroscopy from the ground but only longward of one micron. Below one micron, and certainly below 6000A, we must turn to space-based large telescopes equipped with spectrographs capable of providing spatially diffraction-limited spectroscopy of astronomical sources. Examples will be presented from the HST/STIS, ground-based and other instruments on science that has been accomplished. Suggestions will be made of what might be possible, and limitations thereof, with future large monolithic, multiple mirror or interferometric telescopes equipped with spectrographs that would be matched to the diffraction limit of the telescope.

  1. Spectral Preferences and the Role of Spatial Coherence in Simultaneous Integration in Gray Treefrogs (Hyla chrysoscelis)

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    The perceptual analysis of acoustic scenes may often require the integration of simultaneous sounds arising from a single source. Few studies have investigated the cues that promote simultaneous integration in the context of acoustic communication in nonhuman animals. This study of Cope’s gray treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) examined female preferences based on spectral features of conspecific male advertisement calls to test the hypothesis that cues related to common spatial origin promote the perceptual integration of simultaneous signal elements (harmonics). The typical advertisement call comprises two harmonically related spectral peaks near 1.1 kHz and 2.2 kHz. Subjects generally exhibited preferences for calls with two spatially coherent harmonics over alternatives with just one harmonic. When given a choice between a spatially coherent call (both harmonics originating from the same speaker) and a spatially incoherent call (each harmonic from different spatially separated speakers), subjects preferentially chose the former in the same relative proportions in which it was chosen over single-harmonic alternatives. Preferences for spatially coherent calls over spatially incoherent alternatives did not appear to result from greater difficulty localizing the spatially incoherent sources. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that spatial coherence promotes perceptual integration of simultaneous signal elements in frogs. PMID:20853948

  2. Time-resolved spatial phase measurements with 2-dimensional spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, Colby; Planchon, Thomas; Amir, Wafa; Squier, Jeff A.; Durfee, Charles G.

    2007-03-01

    We are using 2-dimensional spectral interferometry for sensitive measurements of spatial phase distortions. The reference pulse and the time-delayed probe pulse are coincident on an imaging spectrometer, yielding spectral and spatial phase information. This technique offers the potential of higher sensitivity than traditional spatial interferometry since there are many fringes of data for each spatial point. We illustrate this technique with measurements of the thermal lensing profile in a cryogenically cooled Ti:sapphire amplifier crystal that is pumped by tens of watts of power from four frequency-doubled Nd:YLF lasers running at 1 kHz. By adjusting the relative delay of the probe and reference pulses, we characterize the thermal transients during and after the pump pulses. We compare the measured transient thermal profiles with those calculated with a finite-element model.

  3. Assessment of spectral, misregistration, and spatial uncertainties inherent in the cross-calibration study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Helder, D.L.; Aaron, D.; Mishra, N.; Shrestha, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-calibration of satellite sensors permits the quantitative comparison of measurements obtained from different Earth Observing (EO) systems. Cross-calibration studies usually use simultaneous or near-simultaneous observations from several spaceborne sensors to develop band-by-band relationships through regression analysis. The investigation described in this paper focuses on evaluation of the uncertainties inherent in the cross-calibration process, including contributions due to different spectral responses, spectral resolution, spectral filter shift, geometric misregistrations, and spatial resolutions. The hyperspectral data from the Environmental Satellite SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY and the EO-1 Hyperion, along with the relative spectral responses (RSRs) from the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (TM) Plus and the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer sensors, were used for the spectral uncertainty study. The data from Landsat 5 TM over five representative land cover types (desert, rangeland, grassland, deciduous forest, and coniferous forest) were used for the geometric misregistrations and spatial-resolution study. The spectral resolution uncertainty was found to be within 0.25%, spectral filter shift within 2.5%, geometric misregistrations within 0.35%, and spatial-resolution effects within 0.1% for the Libya 4 site. The one-sigma uncertainties presented in this paper are uncorrelated, and therefore, the uncertainties can be summed orthogonally. Furthermore, an overall total uncertainty was developed. In general, the results suggested that the spectral uncertainty is more dominant compared to other uncertainties presented in this paper. Therefore, the effect of the sensor RSR differences needs to be quantified and compensated to avoid large uncertainties in cross-calibration results.

  4. Advanced Remote-sensing Imaging Emission Spectrometer (ARIES): AIRS Spectral Resolution with MODIS Spatial Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; OCallaghan, Fred G.; Broberg, Steve E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a space based instrument concept that will provide scientists with data needed to support key ongoing and future Earth System Science investigations. The measurement approach builds on the observations made by AIRS and MODIS and exceeds their capability with improved spatial and spectral resolution. This paper describes the expected products and the instrument concept that can meet those requirements.

  5. Different response patterns between auditory spectral and spatial temporal order judgment (TOJ).

    PubMed

    Fostick, Leah; Babkoff, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Temporal order judgment (TOJ) thresholds have been widely reported as valid estimates of the temporal disparity necessary for correctly identifying the order of two stimuli. Data for two auditory TOJ paradigms are often reported in the literature: (1) spatially-based TOJ in which the order of presentation of the same stimulus to the right and left ear differs; and (2) spectrally-based TOJ in which the order of two stimuli differing in frequency is presented to one ear or to both ears simultaneously. Since the thresholds reported using the two paradigms differ, the aim of the current study was to compare their response patterns. The results from three different experiments showed that: (1) while almost none of the participants were able to perform the spatial TOJ task when ISI = 5 ms, with the spectral task, 50% reached an accuracy level of 75% when ISI = 5 ms; (2) temporal separation was only a partial predictor for performance in the spectral task, while it fully predicted performance in the spatial task; and (3) training improved performance markedly in the spectral TOJ task, but had no effect on spatial TOJ. These results suggest that the two paradigms may reflect different perceptual mechanisms. PMID:23820944

  6. Spatial variability of oceanic phycoerythrin spectral types derived from airborne laser-induced fluorescence emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wright, C. Wayne; Kana, Todd M.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.

    1998-07-01

    We report spatial variability of oceanic phycoerythrin spectral types detected by means of a blue spectral shift in airborne laser-induced fluorescence emission. The blue shift of the phycoerythrobilin fluorescence is known from laboratory studies to be induced by phycourobilin chromophore substitution at phycoerythrobilin chromophore sites in some strains of phycoerythrin-containing marine cyanobacteria. The airborne 532-nm laser-induced phycoerythrin fluorescence of the upper oceanic volume showed distinct segregation of cyanobacterial chromophore types in a flight transect from coastal water to the Sargasso Sea in the western North Atlantic. High phycourobilin levels were restricted to the oceanic (oligotrophic) end of the flight transect, in agreement with historical ship findings. These remotely observed phycoerythrin spectral fluorescence shifts have the potential to permit rapid, wide-area studies of the spatial variability of spectrally distinct cyanobacteria, especially across interfacial regions of coastal and oceanic water masses. Airborne laser-induced phytoplankton spectral fluorescence observations also further the development of satellite algorithms for passive detection of phytoplankton pigments. Optical modifications to the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar are briefly described that permitted observation of the fluorescence spectral shifts.

  7. Spatially mapping the spectral density of a single C60 molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xinghua; Grobis, M.; Khoo, K.H.; Louie, Steve G.; Crommie, M.F.

    2002-07-01

    We have used scanning tunneling spectroscopy to spatially map the energy-resolved local density of states of individual C60 molecules on the Ag(100) surface. Spectral maps were obtained for molecular states derived from the C60 HOMO, LUMO, and LUMO + 1 orbitals, revealing new details of the spatially inhomogeneous C60 local electronic structure. Spatial inhomogeneities are explained using ab initio pseudopotential density functional calculations. These calculations emphasize the need for explicitly including the C60-Ag interaction and STM tip trajectory to understand the observed C60 local electronic structure.

  8. Application of spatial features to satellite land-use analysis. [spectral signature variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.; Hornung, R.; Berry, J.

    1975-01-01

    A Level I land-use analysis of selected training areas of the Colorado Front Range was carried out using digital ERTS-A satellite imagery. Level I land-use categories included urban, agriculture (irrigated and dryland farming), rangeland, and forests. The spatial variations in spectral response for these land-use classes were analyzed using discrete two-dimensional Fourier transforms to isolate and extract spatial features. Analysis was performed on ERTS frame 1352-17134 (July 10, 1973) and frame number 1388-17131 (August 15, 1973). On training sets, spatial features yielded 80 to 100 percent classification accuracies with commission errors ranging from 0 to 20 percent.

  9. Hyperspectral Region Classification Using Three-Dimensional Spectral/Spatial Gabor Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Tien Cheng

    A three-dimensional (3D) spectral/spatial DFT can be used to represent a hyperspectral image region using a dense sampling in the frequency domain. In many cases, a more compact frequency-domain representation that preserves the three-dimensional structure of the data can be exploited. For this purpose, we have developed a new model for spectral/spatial information based on 3D Gabor filters. These filters capture specific orientation, scale, and wavelength-dependent properties of hyperspectral image data and provide an efficient means of sampling a three-dimensional frequency-domain representation. Since 3D Gabor filters allow for a large number of spectral/spatial features to be used to represent an image region, the performance and efficiency of algorithms that use this representation can be further improved if methods are available to reduce the size of the model. Thus, we have derived methods for selecting features that emphasize the most significant spectral/spatial differences for a set of classes. In addition, the orientation and scale selective properties of the filters allow the development of new algorithms that are invariant to rotation and scale. The new approach can also adapt to changes in the environmental conditions. The analysis of 3D textures under changing environmental conditions is addressed using an invariant recognition algorithm. The new features are compared against pure spectral features and multiband generalizations of gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) features using both synthesized and real-world data. We have demonstrated that the 3D Gabor features can be used to improve the classification of hyperspectral regions over using only spectral features.

  10. Importance of spatial and spectral data reduction in the detection of internal defects in food products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuechen; Nansen, Christian; Aryamanesh, Nader; Yan, Guijun; Boussaid, Farid

    2015-04-01

    Despite the importance of data reduction as part of the processing of reflection-based classifications, this study represents one of the first in which the effects of both spatial and spectral data reductions on classification accuracies are quantified. Furthermore, the effects of approaches to data reduction were quantified for two separate classification methods, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and support vector machine (SVM). As the model dataset, reflection data were acquired using a hyperspectral camera in 230 spectral channels from 401 to 879 nm (spectral resolution of 2.1 nm) from field pea (Pisum sativum) samples with and without internal pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum) infestation. We deployed five levels of spatial data reduction (binning) and eight levels of spectral data reduction (40 datasets). Forward stepwise LDA was used to select and include only spectral channels contributing the most to the separation of pixels from non-infested and infested field peas. Classification accuracies obtained with LDA and SVM were based on the classification of independent validation datasets. Overall, SVMs had significantly higher classification accuracies than LDAs (P < 0.01). There was a negative association between pixel resolution and classification accuracy, while spectral binning equivalent to up to 98% data reduction had negligible effect on classification accuracies. This study supports the potential use of reflection-based technologies in the quality control of food products with internal defects, and it highlights that spatial and spectral data reductions can (1) improve classification accuracies, (2) vastly decrease computer constraints, and (3) reduce analytical concerns associated with classifications of large and high-dimensional datasets. PMID:25742260

  11. Small satellite radiometric measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the earth`s radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs). An example of the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite is given. Significant benefits derive from simultaneous measurements of specific narrow (in wavelength) spectral features; such data may be obtained by combining LARI with a compact spectrometer on the same platform. Well-chosen satellite orbits allow one to use data from other satellites (e.g. DMSP) to enhance the data product, or to provide superior coverage of specific locations. 23 refs.

  12. 3D spatial resolution and spectral resolution of interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Obara, Masaki; Yoshimori, Kyu

    2016-04-01

    Recently developed interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry (J. Opt. Soc. Am A18, 765 [2001]1084-7529JOAOD610.1364/JOSAA.18.000765) enables obtainment of the spectral information and 3D spatial information for incoherently illuminated or self-luminous object simultaneously. Using this method, we can obtain multispectral components of complex holograms, which correspond directly to the phase distribution of the wavefronts propagated from the polychromatic object. This paper focuses on the analysis of spectral resolution and 3D spatial resolution in interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry. Our analysis is based on a novel analytical impulse response function defined over four-dimensional space. We found that the experimental results agree well with the theoretical prediction. This work also suggests a new criterion and estimate method regarding 3D spatial resolution of digital holography. PMID:27139648

  13. Bobcat 2013: a hyperspectral data collection supporting the development and evaluation of spatial-spectral algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Jason; Celenk, Mehmet; White, A. K.; Stocker, Alan D.

    2014-06-01

    The amount of hyperspectral imagery (HSI) data currently available is relatively small compared to other imaging modalities, and what is suitable for developing, testing, and evaluating spatial-spectral algorithms is virtually nonexistent. In this work, a significant amount of coincident airborne hyperspectral and high spatial resolution panchromatic imagery that supports the advancement of spatial-spectral feature extraction algorithms was collected to address this need. The imagery was collected in April 2013 for Ohio University by the Civil Air Patrol, with their Airborne Real-time Cueing Hyperspectral Enhanced Reconnaissance (ARCHER) sensor. The target materials, shapes, and movements throughout the collection area were chosen such that evaluation of change detection algorithms, atmospheric compensation techniques, image fusion methods, and material detection and identification algorithms is possible. This paper describes the collection plan, data acquisition, and initial analysis of the collected imagery.

  14. A Real-Time Infrared Ultra-Spectral Signature Classification Method via Spatial Pyramid Matching

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Xiaoguang; Ma, Yong; Li, Chang; Fan, Fan; Huang, Jun; Ma, Jiayi

    2015-01-01

    The state-of-the-art ultra-spectral sensor technology brings new hope for high precision applications due to its high spectral resolution. However, it also comes with new challenges, such as the high data dimension and noise problems. In this paper, we propose a real-time method for infrared ultra-spectral signature classification via spatial pyramid matching (SPM), which includes two aspects. First, we introduce an infrared ultra-spectral signature similarity measure method via SPM, which is the foundation of the matching-based classification method. Second, we propose the classification method with reference spectral libraries, which utilizes the SPM-based similarity for the real-time infrared ultra-spectral signature classification with robustness performance. Specifically, instead of matching with each spectrum in the spectral library, our method is based on feature matching, which includes a feature library-generating phase. We calculate the SPM-based similarity between the feature of the spectrum and that of each spectrum of the reference feature library, then take the class index of the corresponding spectrum having the maximum similarity as the final result. Experimental comparisons on two publicly-available datasets demonstrate that the proposed method effectively improves the real-time classification performance and robustness to noise. PMID:26205263

  15. A Real-Time Infrared Ultra-Spectral Signature Classification Method via Spatial Pyramid Matching.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xiaoguang; Ma, Yong; Li, Chang; Fan, Fan; Huang, Jun; Ma, Jiayi

    2015-01-01

    The state-of-the-art ultra-spectral sensor technology brings new hope for high precision applications due to its high spectral resolution. However, it also comes with new challenges, such as the high data dimension and noise problems. In this paper, we propose a real-time method for infrared ultra-spectral signature classification via spatial pyramid matching (SPM), which includes two aspects. First, we introduce an infrared ultra-spectral signature similarity measure method via SPM, which is the foundation of the matching-based classification method. Second, we propose the classification method with reference spectral libraries, which utilizes the SPM-based similarity for the real-time infrared ultra-spectral signature classification with robustness performance. Specifically, instead of matching with each spectrum in the spectral library, our method is based on feature matching, which includes a feature library-generating phase. We calculate the SPM-based similarity between the feature of the spectrum and that of each spectrum of the reference feature library, then take the class index of the corresponding spectrum having the maximum similarity as the final result. Experimental comparisons on two publicly-available datasets demonstrate that the proposed method effectively improves the real-time classification performance and robustness to noise. PMID:26205263

  16. NASA IKONOS Radiometric Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Frisbee, Troy; Zanoni, Vicki; Blonski, Slawek; Daehler, Erik; Grant, Brennan; Holekamp, Kara; Ryan, Robert; Sellers, Richard; Smith, Charles

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this program: Perform radiometric vicarious calibrations of IKQNOS imagery and compare with Space Imaging calibration coefficients The approach taken: utilize multiple well-characterized sites which are widely used by the NASA science community for radiometric characterization of airborne and spaceborne sensors; and to Perform independent characterizations with independent teams. Each team has slightly different measurement techniques and data processing methods.

  17. Dual window method for processing spectroscopic optical coherence tomography signals with high spectral and spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Francisco E.; Graf, Robert N.; Wax, Adam

    2009-02-01

    The generation of spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (SOCT) signals suffers from an inherent trade off between spatial and spectral resolution. Here, we present a dual window (DW) method that uses two Gaussian windows to simultaneously obtain high spectral and spatial resolution. We show that the DW method probes the Winger time-frequency distribution (TFD) with two orthogonal windows set by the standard deviation of the Gaussian windows used for processing. We also show that in the limit of an infinitesimally narrow window, combined with a large window, this method is equivalent to the Kirkwood & Richaczek TFD and, if the real part is taken, it is equivalent to the Margenau & Hill (MH) TFD. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by simulating a signal with four components separated in depth or center frequency. Six TFD are compared: the ideal, the Wigner, the MH, narrow window short time Fourier transform (STFT), wide window STFT, and the DW. The results show that the DW method contains features of the Wigner TFD, and that it contains the highest spatial and spectral resolution that is free of artifacts. This method can enable powerful applications, including accurate acquisition of the spectral information for cancer diagnosis.

  18. Combining spatial and spectral information to improve crop/weed discrimination algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, L.; Jones, G.; Villette, S.; Paoli, J. N.; Gée, C.

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of herbicide spraying is an important key to environmentally and economically improve weed management. To achieve this, remote sensors such as imaging systems are commonly used to detect weed plants. We developed spatial algorithms that detect the crop rows to discriminate crop from weeds. These algorithms have been thoroughly tested and provide robust and accurate results without learning process but their detection is limited to inter-row areas. Crop/Weed discrimination using spectral information is able to detect intra-row weeds but generally needs a prior learning process. We propose a method based on spatial and spectral information to enhance the discrimination and overcome the limitations of both algorithms. The classification from the spatial algorithm is used to build the training set for the spectral discrimination method. With this approach we are able to improve the range of weed detection in the entire field (inter and intra-row). To test the efficiency of these algorithms, a relevant database of virtual images issued from SimAField model has been used and combined to LOPEX93 spectral database. The developed method based is evaluated and compared with the initial method in this paper and shows an important enhancement from 86% of weed detection to more than 95%.

  19. Comparing spatial tuning curves, spectral ripple resolution, and speech perception in cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Elizabeth S.; Nelson, David A.; Kreft, Heather; Nelson, Peggy B.; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral ripple discrimination thresholds were measured in 15 cochlear-implant users with broadband (350–5600 Hz) and octave-band noise stimuli. The results were compared with spatial tuning curve (STC) bandwidths previously obtained from the same subjects. Spatial tuning curve bandwidths did not correlate significantly with broadband spectral ripple discrimination thresholds but did correlate significantly with ripple discrimination thresholds when the rippled noise was confined to an octave-wide passband, centered on the STC’s probe electrode frequency allocation. Ripple discrimination thresholds were also measured for octave-band stimuli in four contiguous octaves, with center frequencies from 500 Hz to 4000 Hz. Substantial variations in thresholds with center frequency were found in individuals, but no general trends of increasing or decreasing resolution from apex to base were observed in the pooled data. Neither ripple nor STC measures correlated consistently with speech measures in noise and quiet in the sample of subjects in this study. Overall, the results suggest that spectral ripple discrimination measures provide a reasonable measure of spectral resolution that correlates well with more direct, but more time-consuming, measures of spectral resolution, but that such measures do not always provide a clear and robust predictor of performance in speech perception tasks. PMID:21786905

  20. A combined spatial-spectral method for automated white blood cells segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingli; Wang, Yiting; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Jianbiao; Guo, Fangmin

    2013-12-01

    To overcome the shortcomings in the traditional white blood cells (WBCs) identification methods based on the color or gray images captured by light microscopy, a microscopy hyperspectral imaging system was used to analyze the blood smears. The system was developed by coupling an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) adapter to a microscopy and driven by a SPF Model AOTF controller, which can capture hyperspectral images from 550 nm to 1000 nm with the spectral resolution 2-5 nm. Moreover, a combined spatial-spectral algorithm is proposed to segment the nuclei and cytoplasm of WBCs from the microscopy hyperspectral images. The proposed algorithm is based on the pixel-wise improved spectral angle mapper (ISAM) segmentation, followed by the majority voting within the active contour model regions. Experimental results show that the accuracy of the proposed algorithm is 91.06% (nuclei) and 85.59% (cytoplasm), respectively, which is higher than that of the spectral information divergence (SID) algorithm because the new method can jointly use both the spectral and spatial information of blood cells.

  1. A model-based approach to the spatial and spectral calibration of NIRSpec onboard JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorner, B.; Giardino, G.; Ferruit, P.; Alves de Oliveira, C.; Birkmann, S. M.; Böker, T.; De Marchi, G.; Gnata, X.; Köhler, J.; Sirianni, M.; Jakobsen, P.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The NIRSpec instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) can be operated in multiobject spectroscopy (MOS), long-slit, and integral field unit (IFU) mode with spectral resolutions from 100 to 2700. Its MOS mode uses about a quarter of a million individually addressable minislits for object selection, covering a field of view of ~9 arcmin2. Aims: The pipeline used to extract wavelength-calibrated spectra from NIRSpec detector images relies heavily on a model of NIRSpec optical geometry. We demonstrate how dedicated calibration data from a small subset of NIRSpec modes and apertures can be used to optimize this parametric model to the necessary levels of fidelity. Methods: Following an iterative procedure, the initial fiducial values of the model parameters are manually adjusted and then automatically optimized, so that the model predicted location of the images and spectral lines from the fixed slits, the IFU, and a small subset of the MOS apertures matches their measured location in the main optical planes of the instrument. Results: The NIRSpec parametric model is able to reproduce the spatial and spectral position of the input spectra with high fidelity. The intrinsic accuracy (1-sigma, rms) of the model, as measured from the extracted calibration spectra, is better than 1/10 of a pixel along the spatial direction and better than 1/20 of a resolution element in the spectral direction for all of the grating-based spectral modes. This is fully consistent with the corresponding allocation in the spatial and spectral calibration budgets of NIRSpec.

  2. Radiometric assays for glycerol, glucose, and glycogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.C.; Kaslow, H.R. )

    1989-07-01

    We have developed radiometric assays for small quantities of glycerol, glucose and glycogen, based on a technique described by Thorner and Paulus for the measurement of glycerokinase activity. In the glycerol assay, glycerol is phosphorylated with (32P)ATP and glycerokinase, residual (32P)ATP is hydrolyzed by heating in acid, and free (32P)phosphate is removed by precipitation with ammonium molybdate and triethylamine. Standard dose-response curves were linear from 50 to 3000 pmol glycerol with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Of the substances tested for interference, only dihydroxyacetone gave a slight false positive signal at high concentration. When used to measure glycerol concentrations in serum and in media from incubated adipose tissue, the radiometric glycerol assay correlated well with a commonly used spectrophotometric assay. The radiometric glucose assay is similar to the glycerol assay, except that glucokinase is used instead of glycerokinase. Dose response was linear from 5 to 3000 pmol glucose with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine gave false positive signals when equimolar to glucose. When glucose concentrations in serum were measured, the radiometric glucose assay agreed well with hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H/GDH)-based and glucose oxidase/H2O2-based glucose assays. The radiometric method for glycogen measurement incorporates previously described isolation and digestion techniques, followed by the radiometric assay of free glucose. When used to measure glycogen in mouse epididymal fat pads, the radiometric glycogen assay correlated well with the H/GDH-based glycogen assay. All three radiometric assays offer several practical advantages over spectral assays.

  3. Radiometric assays for glycerol, glucose, and glycogen.

    PubMed

    Bradley, D C; Kaslow, H R

    1989-07-01

    We have developed radiometric assays for small quantities of glycerol, glucose and glycogen, based on a technique described by Thorner and Paulus (1971, J. Biol. Chem. 246, 3885-3894) for the measurement of glycerokinase activity. In the glycerol assay, glycerol is phosphorylated with [32P]ATP and glycerokinase, residual [32P]ATP is hydrolyzed by heating in acid, and free [32P]phosphate is removed by precipitation with ammonium molybdate and triethylamine. Standard dose-response curves were linear from 50 to 3000 pmol glycerol with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Of the substances tested for interference, only dihydroxyacetone gave a slight false positive signal at high concentration. When used to measure glycerol concentrations in serum and in media from incubated adipose tissue, the radiometric glycerol assay correlated well with a commonly used spectrophotometric assay. The radiometric glucose assay is similar to the glycerol assay, except that glucokinase is used instead of glycerokinase. Dose response was linear from 5 to 3000 pmol glucose with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine gave false positive signals when equimolar to glucose. When glucose concentrations in serum were measured, the radiometric glucose assay agreed well with hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H/GDH)-based and glucose oxidase/H2O2-based glucose assays. The radiometric method for glycogen measurement incorporates previously described isolation and digestion techniques, followed by the radiometric assay of free glucose. When used to measure glycogen in mouse epididymal fat pads, the radiometric glycogen assay correlated well with the H/GDH-based glycogen assay. All three radiometric assays offer several practical advantages over spectral assays. PMID:2817333

  4. Fast Multispectral Imaging by Spatial Pixel-Binning and Spectral Unmixing.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhi-Wei; Shen, Hui-Liang; Li, Chunguang; Chen, Shu-Jie; Xin, John H

    2016-08-01

    Multispectral imaging system is of wide application in relevant fields for its capability in acquiring spectral information of scenes. Its limitation is that, due to the large number of spectral channels, the imaging process can be quite time-consuming when capturing high-resolution (HR) multispectral images. To resolve this limitation, this paper proposes a fast multispectral imaging framework based on the image sensor pixel-binning and spectral unmixing techniques. The framework comprises a fast imaging stage and a computational reconstruction stage. In the imaging stage, only a few spectral images are acquired in HR, while most spectral images are acquired in low resolution (LR). The LR images are captured by applying pixel binning on the image sensor, such that the exposure time can be greatly reduced. In the reconstruction stage, an optimal number of basis spectra are computed and the signal-dependent noise statistics are estimated. Then the unknown HR images are efficiently reconstructed by solving a closed-form cost function that models the spatial and spectral degradations. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is evaluated using real-scene multispectral images. Experimental results validate that, in general, the method outperforms the state of the arts in terms of reconstruction accuracy, with additional 20× or more improvement in computational efficiency. PMID:27295668

  5. Visible/infrared radiometric calibration station

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, D.A.; Maier, W.B. II; Bender, S.C.; Holland, R.F.; Michaud, F.D.; Luettgen, A.L.; Christensen, R.W.; O`Brian, T.R.

    1994-07-01

    We have begun construction of a visible/infrared radiometric calibration station that will allow for absolute calibration of optical and IR remote sensing instruments with clear apertures less than 16 inches in diameter in a vacuum environment. The calibration station broadband sources will be calibrated at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and allow for traceable absolute radiometric calibration to within {plus_minus}3% in the visible and near IR (0.4--2.5 {mu}m), and less than {plus_minus}1% in the infrared, up to 12 {mu}m. Capabilities for placing diffraction limited images or for sensor full-field flooding will exist. The facility will also include the calibration of polarization and spectral effects, spatial resolution, field of view performance, and wavefront characterization. The configuration of the vacuum calibration station consists of an off-axis 21 inch, f/3.2, parabolic collimator with a scanning fold flat in collimated space. The sources are placed, via mechanisms to be described, at the focal plane of the off-axis parabola. Vacuum system pressure will be in the 10{sup {minus}6} Torr range. The broadband white-light source is a custom design by LANL with guidance from Labsphere Inc. The continuous operating radiance of the integrating sphere will be from 0.0--0.006 W/cm{sup 2}/Sr/{mu}m (upper level quoted for {approximately}500 nm wavelength). The blackbody source is also custom designed at LANL with guidance from NIST. The blackbody temperature will be controllable between 250--350{degrees}K. Both of the above sources have 4.1 inch apertures with estimated radiometric instability at less than 1%. The designs of each of these units will be described. The monochromator and interferometer light sources are outside the vacuum, but all optical relay and beam shaping optics are enclosed within the vacuum calibration station. These sources are described, as well as the methodology for alignment and characterization.

  6. Comparison of spatial variability in visible and near-infrared spectral images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The visible and near-infrared bands of the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and the Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) were analyzed to determine which band contained more spatial variability. It is important for applications that require spatial information, such as those dealing with mapping linear features and automatic image-to-image correlation, to know which spectral band image should be used. Statistical and visual analyses were used in the project. The amount of variance in an 11 by 11 pixel spatial filter and in the first difference at the six spacings of 1, 5, 11, 23, 47, and 95 pixels was computed for the visible and near-infrared bands. The results indicate that the near-infrared band has more spatial variability than the visible band, especially in images covering densely vegetated areas. -Author

  7. Experimental Estimation of CLASP Spatial and Spectral Resolutions: Results of the Instrument's Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giono, G.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Bando, T.; Kano, R.; Suematsu, Y.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Auchere, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter is a sounding rocket experiment design to measure for the first time the polarization signal of the Lyman-Alpha line (121.6nm), emitted in the solar upper-chromosphere and transition region. This instrument aims to detect the Hanle effect's signature hidden in the Ly-alpha polarization, as a tool to probe the chromospheric magnetic field. Hence, an unprecedented polarization accuracy is needed ((is) less than 10 (exp -3). Nevertheless, spatial and spectral resolutions are also crucial to observe chhromospheric feature such as spicules, and to have precise measurement of the Ly-alpha line core and wings. Hence, this poster will present how the telescope and the spectrograph were separately aligned, and their combined spatial and spectral resolutions.

  8. Enhanced-Resolution Single-Shot 2DFT Spectroscopy by Spatial Spectral Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Spokoyny, Boris; Harel, Elad

    2015-03-19

    We demonstrate use of spatial interference for the complete electric field reconstruction of two-dimensional (2D) coherent spectroscopic signals generated through four-wave mixing (4WM) in a single laser shot. Until now, the amplitude and phase characterization of 4WM signals has relied primarily on Fourier transform spectral interferometry (FTSI), which limits the measurement's sensitivity and resolution. We show that spatial spectral interferometry (SSI) is a generalized approach to 4WM signal detection that eliminates these inherent limitations of FTSI without introducing additional experimental complexity. SSI is used to measure the 2D photon echo spectra of two systems with dramatically different line widths, the coupled D line transitions in rubidium vapor and the energy-transfer dynamics in the light-harvesting protein LH2. PMID:26262850

  9. Spatial and spectral coherence in propagating high-intensity twin beams

    PubMed Central

    Haderka, Ondřej; Machulka, Radek; Peřina, Jan; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Spatial and spectral coherence of high-intensity twin-beam states propagating from the near-field to the far-field configurations is experimentally investigated by measuring intensity auto- and cross-correlation functions. The experimental setup includes a moving crystal and an iCCD camera placed at the output plane of an imaging spectrometer. Evolution from the tight near-field spatial position cross-correlations to the far-field momentum cross-correlations, accompanied by changeless spectral cross-correlations, is observed. Intensity autocorrelation functions and beam profiles are also monitored as they provide the number of degrees of freedom constituting the down-converted beams. The strength of intensity cross-correlations as an alternative quantity for the determination of the number of degrees of freedom is also measured. The relation between the beam coherence and the number of degrees of freedom is discussed. PMID:26403609

  10. Reconstruction algorithms for compressive hyperspectral imaging systems with separable spatial and spectral operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oiknine, Yaniv; August, Yitzhak; Stern, Adrian

    2014-09-01

    Recently we introduced a hyperspectral compressive sensing scheme that uses separable projections in the spatial and spectral domains. The separable encoding schemes facilitates the optical implementation, reduces the computational burden dramatically, and storage requirements. Owing to these benefits we have been able to encode the hyperspectral cube in all three dimensions. In this work we present a comparison between various reconstructions methods applied to the hyperspectral data captured with our separable compressive sensing systems.

  11. An adaptive spectral estimation technique to detect cavitation in HIFU with high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Probert Smith, Penny; Mayia, Fares; Ye, Guoliang

    2011-07-01

    In ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, the changes observed on tissue are subtle during treatment; some ultrasound-guided HIFU protocols rely on the observation of significant brightness changes as the indicator of tissue lesions. The occurrence of a distinct hyperechogenic region ("bright-up") around the focus is often associated with acoustic cavitation resulting in microbubble formation, but it may indicate different physical events such as larger bubbles from boiling (known to alter acoustic impedance) or sometimes lesion formation. A reliable method to distinguish and spatially localize these causes within the tissue would assist the control of HIFU delivery, which is the subject of this paper. Spectral analysis of the radio frequency (RF) signal underlying the B-mode image provides more information on the physical cause, but the usual techniques that are methods on the Fourier transform require a long series for good spectral resolution and so they give poor spatial resolution. This paper introduces an active spectral cavitation detection method to attain high spatial resolution (0.15 × 0.15 mm per pixel) through a parametric statistical method (ARMA modeling) used on finite-length data sets, which enables local changes to be identified more easily. This technique uses the characteristics of the signal itself to optimize the model parameters and structure. Its performance is assessed using synthesized cavitation RF data, and it is then demonstrated in ex vivo bovine liver during and after HIFU exposure. The results suggest that good spatial and spectral resolution can be obtained by the design of suitable algorithms. In ultrasound-guided HIFU, the technique provides a useful supplement to B-mode analysis, with no additional time penalty in data acquisition. PMID:21684454

  12. Radiometric correction procedure study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colby, C.; Sands, R.; Murphrey, S.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison of MSS radiometric processing techniques identified as a preferred radiometric processing technique a procedure which equalizes the mean and standard deviation of detector-specific histograms of uncalibrated scene data. Evaluation of MSS calibration data demonstrated that the relationship between detector responses is essentially linear over the range of intensities typically observed in MSS data, and that the calibration wedge data possess a high degree of temporal stability. An analysis of the preferred radiometric processing technique showed that it could be incorporated into the MDP-MSS system without a major redesign of the system, and with minimal impact on system throughput.

  13. Using Correlation Tracking to Disentangle Spatial and Spectral Data in a Slitless Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrier, Hans; Kankelborg, Charles

    2015-04-01

    In a typical slit style spectrograph, the limited field of view afforded by the entrance slit is overcome by rastering the slit across a feature of interest to build a composite image. While it is trivial to separate spatial and spectral data in such an instrument, the cadence of the raster results in a loss of temporal data when attempting to image a feature that is much larger than the entrance slit. The Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) is a slitless spectrograph that collects co-temporal spatial and spectral images in He II 304 Å over a 10’ x 20’ field of view through the use of a spherical diffraction grating. Local correlation tracking routines are used to disentangle the spatial and spectral data from images formed by the zero and both first orders of the MOSES instrument. The opposing dispersion direction of the outboard orders allows a diagnostic of the viability of the method when analyzing images obtained from the February 2006 MOSES sounding rocket flight.

  14. An approach for hyperspectral image classification utilization spatial-spectral combined kernel SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hailei; Sun, Bingyun; Gui, Yuanmiao; Chen, Yanping; Zhou, Dongbo; Wu, Xuelian

    2015-12-01

    Hyperspectral images belong to high-dimensional data having a lot of redundancy information when they are directly used to classification. Support vector machine (SVM) can be employed to map hyperspectral data to high dimensional space effectively and make them linearly separable. In this paper, spectral and spatial information of hyperspectral images were used to construct SVM kernel function respectively. This paper proposed a hyperspectral image classification method utilization spatial-spectral combined kernel SVM in order to improve classification accuracy. The proposed method was used to classify AVIRIS hyperspectral images. The results demonstrated that the proposed SVM method can achieve 96.13% overall accuracy for the single category classification and 84.81% overall accuracy for multi-class classification only using ten percent of the total samples as the training samples. That is to say, the proposed method can make full use of the spectral information and spatial information of hyperspectral data, and effectively distinguish different categories compared with the traditional SVM for classification.

  15. Anisotropic spectral-spatial total variation model for multispectral remote sensing image destriping.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi; Yan, Luxin; Fang, Houzhang; Luo, Chunan

    2015-06-01

    Multispectral remote sensing images often suffer from the common problem of stripe noise, which greatly degrades the imaging quality and limits the precision of the subsequent processing. The conventional destriping approaches usually remove stripe noise band by band, and show their limitations on different types of stripe noise. In this paper, we tentatively categorize the stripes in remote sensing images in a more comprehensive manner. We propose to treat the multispectral images as a spectral-spatial volume and pose an anisotropic spectral-spatial total variation regularization to enhance the smoothness of solution along both the spectral and spatial dimension. As a result, a more comprehensive stripes and random noise are perfectly removed, while the edges and detail information are well preserved. In addition, the split Bregman iteration method is employed to solve the resulting minimization problem, which highly reduces the computational load. We extensively validate our method under various stripe categories and show comparison with other approaches with respect to result quality, running time, and quantitative assessments. PMID:25706634

  16. A Linear Spatial Spectral Mixture Model for the Improved Estimation of Subpixel Saltcedar Cover along the Forgotten River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, C.; Wang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral unmixing is the process of decomposing the measured spectrum of a mixed pixel into a set of pure spectral signatures called endmembers and their corresponding abundances indicating the fractional area coverage of each endmember present in the pixel. A substantial number of spectral unmixing studies rely on a spectral mixture model which assumes that spectral mixing only occurs within the extent of a pixel. However, due to adjacency effect, the spectral measurement of the pixel may be contaminated by spatial interactions from materials that are present in its spatial neighborhood. In this paper, a linear spatial spectral mixture model is developed to improve the accuracy of the estimated abundance of invasive saltcedar along the Forgotten River reach of the Rio Grande. A spatial weights matrix which specifies for each pixel the locations and the weights of its neighborhood set is used to summarize the spatial relationships among pixels in the Landsat data. A spatial lag operator, defined as a weighted average of the values at neighboring locations, is adopted as an expression of spectral contribution from nearby pixels and added to the classic linear mixture model. The fractional abundances are iteratively estimated using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) algorithm. With the incorporation of adjacency effect, RMSEs of the fractional cover of ground classes were reduced. The derived sub-pixel abundances of saltcedar are beneficial for ecological management.

  17. A new method for spatial resolution enhancement of hyperspectral images using sparse coding and linear spectral unmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Nezhad Z.; Karami, A.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral images (HSI) have high spectral and low spatial resolutions. However, multispectral images (MSI) usually have low spectral and high spatial resolutions. In various applications HSI with high spectral and spatial resolutions are required. In this paper, a new method for spatial resolution enhancement of HSI using high resolution MSI based on sparse coding and linear spectral unmixing (SCLSU) is introduced. In the proposed method (SCLSU), high spectral resolution features of HSI and high spatial resolution features of MSI are fused. In this case, the sparse representation of some high resolution MSI and linear spectral unmixing (LSU) model of HSI and MSI is simultaneously used in order to construct high resolution HSI (HRHSI). The fusion process of HSI and MSI is formulated as an ill-posed inverse problem. It is solved by the Split Augmented Lagrangian Shrinkage Algorithm (SALSA) and an orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm. Finally, the proposed algorithm is applied to the Hyperion and ALI datasets. Compared with the other state-of-the-art algorithms such as Coupled Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (CNMF) and local spectral unmixing, the SCLSU has significantly increased the spatial resolution and in addition the spectral content of HSI is well maintained.

  18. Continuous spatial tuning of laser emissions in a full visible spectral range.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mi-Yun; Wu, Jeong Weon

    2011-01-01

    In order to achieve a continuous tuning of laser emission, the authors designed and fabricated three types of cholesteric liquid crystal cells with pitch gradient, a wedge cell with positive slope, a wedge cell with negative slope, and a parallel cell. The length of the cholesteric liquid crystal pitch could be elongated up to 10 nm, allowing the lasing behavior of continuous or discontinuous spatial tuning determined by the boundary conditions of the cholesteric liquid crystal cell. In the wedge cell with positive slope, the authors demonstrated a continuous spatial laser tuning in the near full visible spectral range, with a tuning resolution less than 1 nm by pumping with only a single 355 nm laser beam. This continuous tuning behavior is due to the fact that the concentration of pitch gradient matches the fixed helical pitch determined by the cell thickness. This characteristic continuous spatial laser tuning could be confirmed again by pumping with a 532 nm laser beam, over 90 nm in the visible spectral range. The scheme of the spatial laser tuning in the wedge cell bearing a pitch gradient enabled a route to designing small-sized optical devices that allow for a wide tunability of single-mode laser emissions. PMID:21673936

  19. Radiometric instrumentation and measurements guide for photovoltaic performance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.

    1997-04-01

    The Photovoltaic Module and Systems Performance and Engineering Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory performs indoor and outdoor standardization, testing, and monitoring of the performance of a wide range of photovoltaic (PV) energy conversion devices and systems. The PV Radiometric Measurements and Evaluation Team (PVSRME) within that project is responsible for measurement and characterization of natural and artificial optical radiation which stimulates the PV effect. The PV manufacturing and research and development community often approaches project members for technical information and guidance. A great area of interest is radiometric instrumentation, measurement techniques, and data analysis applied to understanding and improving PV cell, module, and system performance. At the Photovoltaic Radiometric Measurements Workshop conducted by the PVSRME team in July 1995, the need to communicate knowledge of solar and optical radiometric measurements and instrumentation, gained as a result of NREL`s long-term experiences, was identified as an activity that would promote improved measurement processes and measurement quality in the PV research and manufacturing community. The purpose of this document is to address the practical and engineering need to understand optical and solar radiometric instrument performance, selection, calibration, installation, and maintenance applicable to indoor and outdoor radiometric measurements for PV calibration, performance, and testing applications. An introductory section addresses radiometric concepts and definitions. Next, concepts essential to spectral radiometric measurements are discussed. Broadband radiometric instrumentation and measurement concepts are then discussed. Each type of measurement serves as an important component of the PV cell, module, and system performance measurement and characterization process.

  20. Spatial and spectral properties of entangled photons from spontaneous parametric down-conversion with a focused pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Chan; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-05-01

    The spatial and spectral properties of entangled photons from spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) with a focused pump are investigated with theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. Here, the spatial and spectral properties of down-converted photons are fully calculated without using the transverse momentum conservation assumption. We have obtained the spatial and spectral properties of SPDC photons under focused pumping in various SPDC configurations, including type-I, type-II for both positive and negative uniaxial crystals. Our result not only helps to understand the effect of pump focusing in SPDC better but also can find use in application of SPDC in realizing quantum information protocols.

  1. Lifetime radiometric calibration of HJ-1A/B CCD sensor using Dunhuang Gobi site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qijin; Zhang, Xuewen; Liu, Li; Wang, Aichun

    2014-11-01

    Dunhuang Gobi site, a pseudo-invariant ground target, has been extensively used to calibrate the remote sensing instruments because of its high spatial and spectral uniformity and good temporal stability. Four Charge Coupled Device (CCD) sensors onboard HUANGJING-A/B (HJ-1A/B) satellites have been running 5-years since launched in 2008, and provided important remote sensing data for land surface reflectance retrieval, bio/geophysical variables estimation and environment pollution /disaster monitoring. The radiometric performance of HJ-1A/B CCD may change after launched because of many factors, thus, we have carried out many ground measurement campaigns at a pseudo-invariant test site-Dunhuang gobi to perform radiometric calibration of these sensors. This article describes the characteristics of Dunhuang gobi site and lifetime radiometric calibration monitoring results obtained for four CCD sensors. The results indicate that the long-term changes in calibration coefficients trending exceeding the dark-noise changes are primarily due to the drifts in the CCD radiometric responsivity, and the degradations of HJ-1A/B CCD are from -2.3%/year to -9.5%/year.

  2. [Study on three-dimension spatial variability of regional soil salinity based on spectral indices].

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang-Ming; Wu, Ya-Kun; Yang, Jin-Song; Yu, Shi-Peng

    2013-10-01

    In order to illustrate the three-dimension spatial variability of soil salinity in central China flood area of the Yellow river, integrated soil sampling data and remote sensing data, spectral indices and inverse distance weighting (IDW) method were applied to the estimation and simulation of three-dimension spatial distribution of soil salinity. The study was carried out in typical central China flood area of the Yellow river in Fengqiu County, Henan Province, China. The electrical conductivity of the saturation extract (EC1: 5) of 505 soil samples collected at 101 points was measured. The results indicated that the coefficient of variation of soil salinity at each soil layer is from 0.218 to 0.324 and exhibited the moderate spatial variability. The average of soil electrical conductivity is from 0.121 to 0.154 ds x m(-1). The 2 820 three-dimension spatial scattered data for soil electrical conductivity were taken at soil salinity mapping interpreted by spectral indices and soil electrical conductivity. Three-dimension IDW interpolation showed that a large area of high soil salinity mainly located in the region of Tianran canal and the along of the Yellow river. The shape of the soil salinity profile was downward flowed, revealing soil salinity increasing with depth in whole soil profile and soil salinity accumulated in the subsoil. The accuracy of the predictions was tested using 20 soil sampled points. The root mean square error (RMSE) of calibration for three-dimension distribution of soil salinity showed that the IDW method based on spectral indices was ideal. The research results can provide theoretical foundations to the management and utilization of salt-affected land in China flood area, especially in the Yellow river zone. PMID:24409731

  3. The impact of spatial and spectral frequencies in structured light imaging of thick tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Jessie Ruth

    This research focuses on development of structured light imaging (SLI), a new optical imaging technique based on spatial frequency domain modulation. The goal of this method is to quantitatively measure and map tissue optical properties, absorption and scattering, to determine tissue biochemical structure and composition. The work presented here extends the technology's spatial and spectral frequency impact. First, to expand the depth sectioning capability of spatial frequency modulation, a layered tissue model was developed, validated and shown to accurately recover in vivo parameters in skin (epidermis and dermis), effectively filtering out signal from the underlying subcutaneous tissue. Next, to expand the impact of spectral frequency information, the SLI system was combined with a Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), which eliminates the need to scan through wavelengths when gathering multispectral information. A single SLI-CTIS measurement gathers 36 absorption maps and 36 scattering maps, with a resulting measurement speed ˜30 times faster than the liquid crystal tunable filter method currently employed in multispectral SLI systems. The multispectral information can be used to determine the concentrations of multiple tissue chromophores and the relative density of the tissue. This is immediately useful for monitoring the brain for signs of trauma, including monitoring of oxygen delivery across the brain, mapping of hemoglobin concentration to detect hemorrhage, mapping of water content to monitor edema, and mapping of tissue density to monitor swelling. A simple in vivo brain injury example is presented to demonstrate recovery of these parameters. Finally, to demonstrate the spatial, spectral and temporal resolution of the SLI-CTIS system, measurements were performed on in vivo mouse brain during seizure with electroencephalography (EEG) confirmation.

  4. 3D high spectral and spatial resolution imaging of ex vivo mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Foxley, Sean Karczmar, Gregory S.; Domowicz, Miriam; Schwartz, Nancy

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Widely used MRI methods show brain morphology both in vivo and ex vivo at very high resolution. Many of these methods (e.g., T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging, phase-sensitive imaging, or susceptibility-weighted imaging) are sensitive to local magnetic susceptibility gradients produced by subtle variations in tissue composition. However, the spectral resolution of commonly used methods is limited to maintain reasonable run-time combined with very high spatial resolution. Here, the authors report on data acquisition at increased spectral resolution, with 3-dimensional high spectral and spatial resolution MRI, in order to analyze subtle variations in water proton resonance frequency and lineshape that reflect local anatomy. The resulting information compliments previous studies based on T{sub 2}{sup *} and resonance frequency. Methods: The proton free induction decay was sampled at high resolution and Fourier transformed to produce a high-resolution water spectrum for each image voxel in a 3D volume. Data were acquired using a multigradient echo pulse sequence (i.e., echo-planar spectroscopic imaging) with a spatial resolution of 50 × 50 × 70 μm{sup 3} and spectral resolution of 3.5 Hz. Data were analyzed in the spectral domain, and images were produced from the various Fourier components of the water resonance. This allowed precise measurement of local variations in water resonance frequency and lineshape, at the expense of significantly increased run time (16–24 h). Results: High contrast T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted images were produced from the peak of the water resonance (peak height image), revealing a high degree of anatomical detail, specifically in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In images produced from Fourier components of the water resonance at −7.0 Hz from the peak, the contrast between deep white matter tracts and the surrounding tissue is the reverse of the contrast in water peak height images. This indicates the presence of a shoulder in

  5. Toward optimal spatial and spectral quality in widefield infrared spectromicroscopy of IR labelled single cells.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Eric C; Unger, Miriam; Clède, Sylvain; Lambert, François; Policar, Clotilde; Imtiaz, Asher; D'Souza, Roshan; Hirschmugl, Carol J

    2013-10-01

    Advancements in widefield infrared spectromicroscopy have recently been demonstrated following the commissioning of IRENI (InfraRed ENvironmental Imaging), a Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) chemical imaging beamline at the Synchrotron Radiation Center. The present study demonstrates the effects of magnification, spatial oversampling, spectral pre-processing and deconvolution, focusing on the intracellular detection and distribution of an exogenous metal tris-carbonyl derivative 1 in a single MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell. We demonstrate here that spatial oversampling for synchrotron-based infrared imaging is critical to obtain accurate diffraction-limited images at all wavelengths simultaneously. Resolution criteria and results from raw and deconvoluted images for two Schwarzschild objectives (36×, NA 0.5 and 74×, NA 0.65) are compared to each other and to prior reports for raster-scanned, confocal microscopes. The resolution of the imaging data can be improved by deconvolving the instrumental broadening that is determined with the measured PSFs, which is implemented with GPU programming architecture for fast hyperspectral processing. High definition, rapidly acquired, FTIR chemical images of respective spectral signatures of the cell 1 and shows that 1 is localized next to the phosphate- and Amide-rich regions, in agreement with previous infrared and luminescence studies. The infrared image contrast, localization and definition are improved after applying proven spectral pre-processing (principal component analysis based noise reduction and RMie scattering correction algorithms) to individual pixel spectra in the hyperspectral cube. PMID:23826609

  6. Real-time target detection in hyperspectral images based on spatial-spectral information extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing; Yang, Wei; Gao, Lianru; Chen, Dongmei

    2012-12-01

    Recently, real-time image data processing is a popular research area for hyperspectral remote sensing. In particular, target detection surveillance, which is an important military application of hyperspectral remote sensing, demands real-time or near real-time processing. The massive amount of hyperspectral image data seriously limits the processing speed. In this article, a strategy named spatial-spectral information extraction (SSIE) is presented to accelerate hyperspectral image processing. SSIE is composed of band selection and sample covariance matrix estimation. Band selection fully utilizes the high-spectral correlation in spectral image, while sample covariance matrix estimation fully utilizes the high-spatial correlation in remote sensing image. To overcome the inconsistent and irreproducible shortage of random distribution, we present an effective scalar method to select sample pixels. Meanwhile, we have implemented this target detection algorithm based on the SSIE strategy on the hardware of a digital signal processor (DSP). The implementation of a constrained energy minimization algorithm is composed of hardware and software architectures. The hardware architecture contains chips and peripheral interfaces, while software architecture contains a data transferring model. In the experiments, we compared the performance of hardware of DSP with that of Environment for Visualizing Images software. DSP speed up the data processing and also results in more effective in terms of recognition rate, which demonstrate that the SSIE implemented by DSP is sufficient to enable near real-time supervised target detection.

  7. DSP design for real-time hyperspectral target detection based on spatial-spectral information extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zhang, Bing; Gao, Lianru; Wu, Yuanfeng

    2012-06-01

    Military target detection is an important application of hyperspectral remote sensing. It highly demands real-time or near real-time processing. However, the massive amount of hyperspectral image data seriously limits the processing speed. Real-time image processing based on hardware platform, such as digital signal processor (DSP), is one of recent developments in hyperspectral target detection. In hyperspectral target detection algorithms, correlation matrix or covariance matrix calculation is always used to whiten data, which is a very time-consuming process. In this paper, a strategy named spatial-spectral information extraction (SSIE) is presented to accelerate the speed of hyperspectral image processing. The strategy is composed of bands selection and sample covariance matrix estimation. Bands selection fully utilizes the high-spectral correlation in spectral image, while sample covariance matrix estimation fully utilizes the high-spatial correlation in remote sensing image. Meanwhile, this strategy is implemented on the hardware platform of DSP. The hardware implementation of constrained energy minimization (CEM) algorithm is composed of hardware architecture and software architecture. The hardware architecture contains chips and peripheral interfaces, and software architecture establishes a data transferring model to accomplish the communication between DSP and PC. In experiments, the performance on software of ENVI with that on hardware of DSP is compared. Results show that the processing speed and recognition result on DSP are better than those on ENVI. Detection results demonstrate that the strategy implemented by DSP is sufficient to enable near real-time supervised target detection.

  8. Spatial and spectral selective characteristics of the plasmonic sensing using metallic nanoslit arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Caiwang; Guo, Zhongyi; Sun, Yongxuan; Shen, Fei; Tao, Yifei; Zhang, Jingran; Li, Rongzhen; Luo, Linbao

    2016-01-01

    A novel spatial and spectral selective plasmonic sensing based on the metal nanoslit arrays has been proposed and investigated theoretically, which shows a high performance in the multiplexing biomolecular detections. By properly tuning the geometric parameters of metal nanoslit arrays, the enhanced optical fields at different regions can be obtained selectively due to the excitation of SPP, cavity mode (CM), and their coupling effects. Simulation results show that the resonances of the metal nanoslit arrays at different spatial locations and different wavelengths can be achieved simultaneously. A relative bigger red-shift of 57 nm can be realized when a layer of biomolecular film is adsorbing at the slit walls, and the corresponding total intensity difference will be enhanced near 10 times compared to that at the top surface. In addition, when a BSA protein monolayer is adsorbing at slit walls with different slit widths, the corresponding wavelength shifts can reach to more than 80 nm by modulating the widths of the slit. The simulated results demonstrate that our designed metal nanoslit arrays can serve as a portable, low-cost biosensing with a high spatial and spectral selective performance.

  9. Synthesis of imagery with high spatial and spectral resolution from multiple image sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiberti, Daniel P.; Marsh, Stuart E.; Schowengerdt, Robert A.

    1994-08-01

    We demonstrate how a realistic scene with high spatial and spectral resolution can be synthesized from color aerial photography and AVIRIS hyperspectral imagery. A review of techniques for image fusion is first presented. Image processing techniques were developed to extract a digital elevation model from stereo aerial photography in order to correct temporal shading differences between two image sets and to fuse aerial photography with AVIRIS imagery. A unique contribution is the explicit inclusion of corrections for topography and differing solar angles in fusion process. Color infrared photography and an AVIRIS image from a site near Cuprite, Nevada, were used as a test of an improved high-frequency modulation technique for the creation of hybrid images. Comparison of spectra extracted from the synthesized image with library spectra demonstrated that our methodology successfully preserved the spectral signatures of the ground surface.

  10. Improved mid infrared detector for high spectral or spatial resolution and synchrotron radiation use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, Mbaye; Bordessoule, Michel; Kanouté, Brahim; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Manceron, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    When using bright, small effective size sources, such as synchrotron radiation light beam, for broadband spectroscopy at spectral or spatial high resolution for mid-IR FTIR measurements, a marked detectivity improvement can be achieved by setting up a device matching the detector optical étendue to that of the source. Further improvement can be achieved by reducing the background unmodulated flux and other intrinsic noise sources using a lower temperature cryogen, such as liquid helium. By the combined use of cooled apertures, cold reimaging optics, filters and adapted detector polarization, and preamplification electronics, the sensitivity of a HgCdTe photoconductive IR detector can be improved by a significant factor with respect to standard commercial devices (more than one order of magnitude on average over 6-20 μm region) and the usable spectral range extended to longer wavelengths. The performances of such an optimized detector developed on the AILES Beamline at SOLEIL are presented here.

  11. A spectral-spatial-dynamic hierarchical Bayesian (SSD-HB) model for estimating soybean yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, Yoriko; Kujirai, Toshihiro

    2014-10-01

    A method called a "spectral-spatial-dynamic hierarchical-Bayesian (SSD-HB) model," which can deal with many parameters (such as spectral and weather information all together) by reducing the occurrence of multicollinearity, is proposed. Experiments conducted on soybean yields in Brazil fields with a RapidEye satellite image indicate that the proposed SSD-HB model can predict soybean yield with a higher degree of accuracy than other estimation methods commonly used in remote-sensing applications. In the case of the SSD-HB model, the mean absolute error between estimated yield of the target area and actual yield is 0.28 t/ha, compared to 0.34 t/ha when conventional PLS regression was applied, showing the potential effectiveness of the proposed model.

  12. Improved mid infrared detector for high spectral or spatial resolution and synchrotron radiation use.

    PubMed

    Faye, Mbaye; Bordessoule, Michel; Kanouté, Brahim; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Manceron, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    When using bright, small effective size sources, such as synchrotron radiation light beam, for broadband spectroscopy at spectral or spatial high resolution for mid-IR FTIR measurements, a marked detectivity improvement can be achieved by setting up a device matching the detector optical étendue to that of the source. Further improvement can be achieved by reducing the background unmodulated flux and other intrinsic noise sources using a lower temperature cryogen, such as liquid helium. By the combined use of cooled apertures, cold reimaging optics, filters and adapted detector polarization, and preamplification electronics, the sensitivity of a HgCdTe photoconductive IR detector can be improved by a significant factor with respect to standard commercial devices (more than one order of magnitude on average over 6-20 μm region) and the usable spectral range extended to longer wavelengths. The performances of such an optimized detector developed on the AILES Beamline at SOLEIL are presented here. PMID:27370438

  13. Evaluation of atmospheric correction procedures for ocean color data processing using hyper- and multi-spectral radiometric measurements from the Long Island Sound Coastal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Gilerson, A.; Harmel, T.; Hlaing, S.; Tonizzo, A.; Weidemann, A.; Arnone, R.

    2012-06-01

    In Ocean Color (OC) data processing one of the most critical steps is the atmospheric correction procedure used to separate the water leaving radiance, which contains information on water constituents, from the total radiance measured by space borne sensors, which contains atmospheric contributions. To ensure reliability of retrieved water leaving radiance values, and OC information derived from them, the quality of the atmospheric correction procedures applied needs to be assessed and validated. In this regard, the Long Island Sound Coastal Observatory (LISCO), jointly established by the City College of New York and the Naval Research Laboratory is becoming one of the key elements for OC sensors validation efforts, in part because of its capabilities for co-located hyper and multi-spectral measurements using HyperSAS and SeaPRISM radiometers respectively, with the latter being part of the NASA AERONET - OC network. Accordingly, the impact of the procedures used for atmospheric correction on the retrieval of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) data can then be evaluated based on satellite OC data acquired from the LISCO site over the last two years. From this, the qualities of atmospheric correction procedures are assessed by performing matchup comparisons between the satellites retrieved atmospheric data and that of LISCO.

  14. Tomographic retrieval for scattered light limb measurements: multiple spectral fit windows to improve the spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukite, Janis; Dörner, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) on the ENVISAT satellite probed the atmosphere at the day side of Earth in alternating sequences of nadir and limb measurements from August 2002 to April 2012. Limb measurements allow the retrieval of stratospheric profiles of various trace gases on a global scale. It has been shown that combining measurements of the same air volume from different viewing positions along the orbit, 2D distribution fields of stratospheric trace gases can be acquired in one inversion step. Since the atmospheric scattering and absorption processes are wavelength dependent, the spatial sensitivity for limb observations also varies with wavelength. In general, for longer wavelengths, photons from more remote areas along the line of sight are contributing stronger to the measurement than for shorter wavelengths because of the lower probability of Rayleigh scattering. In addition, the radiative transfer is modified by the ozone absorption structures making longer light paths less probable within strong ozone absorption bands. In this study, additional information on the spatial distribution of NO2 is investigated by analysing results obtained by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in various spectral fit windows. Combing the fit results in one profile retrieval algorithm helps to improve the spatial sensitivity and resolution of the measurements. The largest improvements for the spatial resolution and sensitivity are expected for the upper troposphere/ lower stratosphere (UTLS) region where the variation of the spatial sensitivity with wavelength is strongest.

  15. Spatial and Spectral Representations of the Geoid-to-Quasigeoid Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenzer, Robert; Hirt, Christian; Claessens, Sten; Novák, Pavel

    2015-09-01

    In geodesy, the geoid and the quasigeoid are used as a reference surface for heights. Despite some similarities between these two concepts, the differences between the geoid and the quasigeoid (i.e. the geoid-to-quasigeoid correction) have to be taken into consideration in some specific applications which require a high accuracy. Over the world's oceans and marginal seas, the quasigeoid and the geoid are identical. Over the continents, however, the geoid-to-quasigeoid correction could reach up to several metres especially in the mountainous, polar and geologically complex regions. Various methods have been developed and applied to compute this correction regionally in the spatial domain using detailed gravity, terrain and crustal density data. These methods utilize the gravimetric forward modelling of the topographic density structure and the direct/inverse solutions to the boundary-value problems in physical geodesy. In this article, we provide a brief summary of existing theoretical and numerical studies on the geoid-to-quasigeoid correction. We then compare these methods with the newly developed procedure and discuss some numerical and practical aspects of computing this correction. In global applications, the geoid-to-quasigeoid correction can conveniently be computed in the spectral domain. For this purpose, we derive and present also the spectral expressions for computing this correction based on applying methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of global gravity, terrain and crustal structure models. We argue that the newly developed procedure for the regional gravity-to-potential conversion, applied for computing the geoid-to-quasigeoid correction in the spatial domain, is numerically more stable than the existing inverse models which utilize the gravity downward continuation. Moreover, compared to existing spectral expressions, our definition in the spectral domain takes not only the terrain geometry but also the mass density heterogeneities

  16. Spectral and spatial characteristics of x-ray film detectors in the wavelength range 20--150 {angstrom}

    SciTech Connect

    Fedin, D.A.; Fedorchuk, R.V.; Koshevoi, M.O.; Lukjantsev, I.V.; Rupasov, A.A.; Shikanov, A.S.; Gullikson, E.

    1995-12-31

    Investigations of spectral sensitivity, contrast coefficient, and spatial resolution of widely used x-ray films have been undertaken at the P.N. Lebedev Institute. A description of experimental methodologies and results are presented. These studies were carried out using synchrotron radiation in the range of 20--150 {angstrom}. Spectral sensitivity and contrast coefficient dependencies on wavelength for Kodak 10106, DEF, RAR2490, and TPF films and spatial resolution for Kodak 10106 and RAR2490 films are presented and discussed.

  17. Advanced Remote-Sensing Imaging Emission Spectrometer (ARIES): AIRS Spectral Resolution with MODIS Spatial Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; OCallaghan, Fred

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Remote-sensing Imaging Emission Spectrometer (ARIES) will measure a wide range of earth quantities fundamental to the study of global climate change. It will build upon the success of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instruments currently flying on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft. Both instruments are facility instruments for NASA providing data to thousands of scientists investigating land, ocean and atmospheric Earth System processes. ARIES will meet all the requirements of AIRS and MODIS in a single compact instrument, while providing the next-generation capability of improved spatial resolution for AIRS and improved spectral resolution for MODIS.

  18. Color camera computed tomography imaging spectrometer for improved spatial-spectral image accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor); Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Johnson, William R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography imaging spectrometers ("CTIS"s) having color focal plane array detectors are provided. The color FPA detector may comprise a digital color camera including a digital image sensor, such as a Foveon X3.RTM. digital image sensor or a Bayer color filter mosaic. In another embodiment, the CTIS includes a pattern imposed either directly on the object scene being imaged or at the field stop aperture. The use of a color FPA detector and the pattern improves the accuracy of the captured spatial and spectral information.

  19. Coherent Combining of Optical Pulses in Spatial, Spectral and Time Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong

    Petawatt-level laser pulses have many potential applications in science and industry, but will require three orders of magnitude increase in pulse repetition rate from existing solid-state laser technology. Fiber lasers can operate at such repetition rates, but are limited in pulse energy. To overcome the gap between current achievable fiber-laser pulse energies (˜mJ) and required pulse energies for high-energy applications (up to 10J), this dissertation work explores four novel techniques: (1) Coherent beam combining in the spatial domain; (2) Coherent spectral combining in spatial and spectral domains; (3) Coherent pulse stacking amplification in the time domain; (4) N-squared coherent combining in spatial and time domains. (1) We demonstrate coherent femtosecond pulse beam combining of up to four chirped-pulse fiber amplifier channels. Theoretical and experimental analysis of combining efficiency dependence on amplitude/phase noise shows the scalability to a large number of channels. (2) We demonstrate coherent femtosecond pulse spectral synthesis by combining three parallel fiber chirped-pulse amplifiers, each amplifying different pulse spectra. This technique simultaneously overcomes individual-amplifier energy/power limitations, and spectral gain narrowing in a single fiber amplifier. (3) We propose and demonstrate a new technique of coherent pulse stacking (CPS) amplification, which uses reflecting resonators to transform a sequence of phase/amplitude modulated optical pulses into a single output pulse. Experimental validation with a single resonator is demonstrated. We show theoretically that the extension to stacking a large number of equal-amplitude pulses can be achieved using multiple reflecting resonators, which enables the extraction of all stored energy in large-core fiber amplifiers. (4) We propose and demonstrate N-squared coherent combining using resonant optical cavities, a novel pulse combining technique based on both spatial combining and

  20. Assessing spatial and seasonal variations in grasslands with spectral reflectances from a helicopter platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walthall, Charles L.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    1992-01-01

    The helicopter system data acquisition technique has shown to be a viable means of gathering surface data with spectral detail adequate for intersite, intrasite, and temporal characterizations and for assessing temporal and spatial variability throughout the FIFE 1987 IFCs. The successful employment of nadir measurements for grassland assessments is notable given the reflectance anisotropy (Middleton, 1992). Though only five sites were repetitively observed, the conclusions reached from this particular sample of sites agree well with assessments from other data sources (Sellars et al., 1990 and Kittel et al., 1990).

  1. Results and Lessons from a Decade of Terra MODIS On-Orbit Spectral Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Choi, T.; Che, N.; Wang, Z.; Dodd, J.

    2010-01-01

    Since its launch in December 1999, the NASA EOS Terra MODIS has successfully operated for more than a decade. MODIS makes observations in 36 spectral bands from visible (VIS) to longwave infrared (LWIR) and at three nadir spatial resolutions: 250m (2 bands), 500m (5 bands), and 1km (29 bands). In addition to its on-board calibrators designed for the radiometric calibration, MODIS was built with a unique device, called the spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA). It can be configured in three different modes: radiometric, spatial, and spectral. When it is operated in the spectral modes, the SRCA can monitor changes in Sensor spectral performance for the VIS and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. For more than 10 years, the SRCA operation has continued to provide valuable information for MODIS on-orbit spectral performance. This paper briefly describes SRCA on-orbit operation and calibration activities; it presents decade-long spectral characterization results for Terra MODIS VIS and NIR spectral bands in terms of chances in their center wavelengths (CW) and bandwidths (BW). It is shown that the SRCA on-orbit wavelength calibration capability remains satisfactory. For most spectral bands, the changes in CW and BW are less than 0.5 and 1 nm, respectively. Results and lessons from Terra MODIS on-orbit spectral characterization have and will continue to benefit its successor, Aqua MODIS, and other future missions.

  2. Novel characterization of the nonlinear refractive response of materials using spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Amanda; Adams, Daniel; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Characterization of the nonlinear refractive index of a material is important in order to fully understand the nonlinear propagation of femtosecond laser pulses. The most common method to obtaining the nonlinear refractive index is Z-scan. However, since it averages over pulse duration and beam profile, Z-scan is not reliable when there is time- and intensity-dependence of the nonlinear response. The new method we are exploring to make these nonlinear refractive index measurements is spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry (SSRI). SSRI is a method that can give a simultaneous measurement of the spatial wave-front across the frequency or temporal profile of the pulse. The SSRI method proves better in measuring response at specific y and t, allowing it to measure both delayed response and saturation effects. The ability to make a measurement in both dimensions enables understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics in other experiments as cross-wave polarization and filamentation.

  3. Spatial hole burning and spectral stability of a quantum-dot laser

    SciTech Connect

    Savelyev, A. V. Korenev, V. V.; Maximov, M. V.; Zhukov, A. E.

    2015-11-15

    The inhomogeneous intensity distribution of the optical model along the axis of a semiconductor quantum-dot laser results in spatial hole burning. The influence of this phenomenon on the stability of the multifrequency emission spectrum is studied when the optical transition of the quantum dots is characterized by considerable homogeneous broadening. The results of two models—in which inhomogeneous broadening is disregarded and taken into account—regarding the stability of the radiation spectrum under the influence of slight variation of the spectral loss dependence in the resonator are compared. Inhomogeneous distribution of the charge carriers (spatial hole burning) is found to be a critical factor in determining the form and stability of the spectrum.

  4. Improved Cloud and Snow Screening in MAIAC Aerosol Retrievals Using Spectral and Spatial Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Laszlo, I.; Kokrkin, S.

    2012-01-01

    An improved cloud/snow screening technique in the Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm is described. It is implemented as part of MAIAC aerosol retrievals based on analysis of spectral residuals and spatial variability. Comparisons with AERONET aerosol observations and a large-scale MODIS data analysis show strong suppression of aerosol optical thickness outliers due to unresolved clouds and snow. At the same time, the developed filter does not reduce the aerosol retrieval capability at high 1 km resolution in strongly inhomogeneous environments, such as near centers of the active fires. Despite significant improvement, the optical depth outliers in high spatial resolution data are and will remain the problem to be addressed by the application-dependent specialized filtering techniques.

  5. A Boosting-Based Spatial-Spectral Model for Stroke Patients' EEG Analysis in Rehabilitation Training.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Min; Zhang, Liqing

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that a motor imagery electro encephalogram (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) system can be used as a rehabilitation tool for stroke patients. Efficient classification of EEG from stroke patients is fundamental in the BCI-based stroke rehabilitation systems. One of the most successful algorithms for EEG classification is the common spatial patterns (CSP). However, studies have reported that the performance of CSP heavily relies on its operational frequency band and channels configuration. To the best of our knowledge, there is no agreed upon clinical conclusion about motor imagery patterns of stroke patients. In this case, it is not available to obtain the active channels and frequency bands related to brain activities of stroke patients beforehand. Hence, for using the CSP algorithm, we usually set a relatively broad frequency range and channels, or try to find subject-related frequency bands and channels. To address this problem, we propose an adaptive boosting algorithm to perform autonomous selection of key channels and frequency band. In the proposed method, the spatial-spectral configurations are divided into multiple preconditions, and a new heuristic supervisor of stochastic gradient boost strategy is utilized to train weak classifiers under these preconditions. Extensive experiment comparisons have been performed on three datasets including two benchmark datasets from the famous BCI competition III and BCI competition IV as well as one self-acquired dataset from stroke patients. Results show that our algorithm yields relatively higher classification accuracies compared with seven state-of-the-art approaches. In addition, the spatial patterns (spatial weights) and spectral patterns (bandpass filters) determined by the algorithm can also be used for further analysis of the data, e.g., for brain source localization and physiological knowledge exploration. PMID:26302519

  6. Reduction of radiometric miscalibration--applications to pushbroom sensors.

    PubMed

    Rogass, Christian; Spengler, Daniel; Bochow, Mathias; Segl, Karl; Lausch, Angela; Doktor, Daniel; Roessner, Sigrid; Behling, Robert; Wetzel, Hans-Ulrich; Kaufmann, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of hyperspectral images is an important task in Remote Sensing. Foregoing radiometric calibration results in the assignment of incident electromagnetic radiation to digital numbers and reduces the striping caused by slightly different responses of the pixel detectors. However, due to uncertainties in the calibration some striping remains. This publication presents a new reduction framework that efficiently reduces linear and nonlinear miscalibrations by an image-driven, radiometric recalibration and rescaling. The proposed framework-Reduction Of Miscalibration Effects (ROME)-considering spectral and spatial probability distributions, is constrained by specific minimisation and maximisation principles and incorporates image processing techniques such as Minkowski metrics and convolution. To objectively evaluate the performance of the new approach, the technique was applied to a variety of commonly used image examples and to one simulated and miscalibrated EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program) scene. Other examples consist of miscalibrated AISA/Eagle VNIR (Visible and Near Infrared) and Hawk SWIR (Short Wave Infrared) scenes of rural areas of the region Fichtwald in Germany and Hyperion scenes of the Jalal-Abad district in Southern Kyrgyzstan. Recovery rates of approximately 97% for linear and approximately 94% for nonlinear miscalibrated data were achieved, clearly demonstrating the benefits of the new approach and its potential for broad applicability to miscalibrated pushbroom sensor data. PMID:22163960

  7. Reduction of Radiometric Miscalibration—Applications to Pushbroom Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Rogaß, Christian; Spengler, Daniel; Bochow, Mathias; Segl, Karl; Lausch, Angela; Doktor, Daniel; Roessner, Sigrid; Behling, Robert; Wetzel, Hans-Ulrich; Kaufmann, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of hyperspectral images is an important task in Remote Sensing. Foregoing radiometric calibration results in the assignment of incident electromagnetic radiation to digital numbers and reduces the striping caused by slightly different responses of the pixel detectors. However, due to uncertainties in the calibration some striping remains. This publication presents a new reduction framework that efficiently reduces linear and nonlinear miscalibrations by an image-driven, radiometric recalibration and rescaling. The proposed framework—Reduction Of Miscalibration Effects (ROME)—considering spectral and spatial probability distributions, is constrained by specific minimisation and maximisation principles and incorporates image processing techniques such as Minkowski metrics and convolution. To objectively evaluate the performance of the new approach, the technique was applied to a variety of commonly used image examples and to one simulated and miscalibrated EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program) scene. Other examples consist of miscalibrated AISA/Eagle VNIR (Visible and Near Infrared) and Hawk SWIR (Short Wave Infrared) scenes of rural areas of the region Fichtwald in Germany and Hyperion scenes of the Jalal-Abad district in Southern Kyrgyzstan. Recovery rates of approximately 97% for linear and approximately 94% for nonlinear miscalibrated data were achieved, clearly demonstrating the benefits of the new approach and its potential for broad applicability to miscalibrated pushbroom sensor data. PMID:22163960

  8. Infrared radiometric technique in temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazer, S.; Madding, R.

    1988-01-01

    One class of commercially available imaging infrared radiometers using cooled detectors is sensitive to radiation over the 3 to 12 micron wavelength band. Spectral filters can tailor instrument sensitivity to specific regions where the target exhibits optimum radiance. The broadband spectral response coupled with real time two-dimensional imaging and emittance/background temperature corrections make the instruments useful for remote measurement of surface temperatures from -20 C to +1500 C. Commonly used radiometric techniques and assumptions are discussed, and performance specifications for a typical modern commercial instrument are presented. The potential usefulness of an imaging infrared radiometer in space laboratories is highlighted through examples of research, nondestructive evaluation, safety, and routine maintenance applications. Future improvements in instrument design and application of the radiometric technique are discussed.

  9. Intraband radiometric performance of the Landsat Thematic Mappers.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, H.H.; Cook, D.A.; Eliason, E.M.; Eliason, P.T.

    1985-01-01

    Radiometric characteristics have been examined of the Landsat-4 and Landsat-5 Thematic Mappers (TMs) that can be established without absolute calibration of spectral data. This analysis is based on radiometrically and geometrically raw (B-type) data of both uniform (flat-field) and high-contrast scenes. Subscenes selected for uniform radiance were used to characterized subtle radiometric differences and noise problems. Although the general performance of the Thematic Mappers is excellent, various anomalies that have a magnitude of a few digital levels (DN) or less are quantified. -from Authors

  10. Radiometric cloud imaging with an uncooled microbolometer thermal infrared camera.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Joseph; Nugent, Paul; Pust, Nathan; Thurairajah, Brentha; Mizutani, Kohei

    2005-07-25

    An uncooled microbolometer-array thermal infrared camera has been incorporated into a remote sensing system for radiometric sky imaging. The radiometric calibration is validated and improved through direct comparison with spectrally integrated data from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). With the improved calibration, the Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) system routinely obtains sky images with radiometric uncertainty less than 0.5 W/(m(2 )sr) for extended deployments in challenging field environments. We demonstrate the infrared cloud imaging technique with still and time-lapse imagery of clear and cloudy skies, including stratus, cirrus, and wave clouds. PMID:19498585

  11. Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Spatial-Spectral Image Synthesis Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Leisawitz, David T.; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Sinukoff, Evan J.

    2012-01-01

    Developed is an algorithmic approach for wide field of view interferometric spatial-spectral image synthesis. The data collected from the interferometer consists of a set of double-Fourier image data cubes, one cube per baseline. These cubes are each three-dimensional consisting of arrays of two-dimensional detector counts versus delay line position. For each baseline a moving delay line allows collection of a large set of interferograms over the 2D wide field detector grid; one sampled interferogram per detector pixel per baseline. This aggregate set of interferograms, is algorithmically processed to construct a single spatial-spectral cube with angular resolution approaching the ratio of the wavelength to longest baseline. The wide field imaging is accomplished by insuring that the range of motion of the delay line encompasses the zero optical path difference fringe for each detector pixel in the desired field-of-view. Each baseline cube is incoherent relative to all other baseline cubes and thus has only phase information relative to itself. This lost phase information is recovered by having point, or otherwise known, sources within the field-of-view. The reference source phase is known and utilized as a constraint to recover the coherent phase relation between the baseline cubes and is key to the image synthesis. Described will be the mathematical formalism, with phase referencing and results will be shown using data collected from NASA/GSFC Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT).

  12. Retrieving LAI from Remotely Sensed Images: Spectral Indices vs. Spatial Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, C.; Gray, J. M.; Zhang, S.

    2008-12-01

    Leaves are the interface where energy and gas exchanges between the atmosphere and forest ecosystems occur. Accurate knowledge of the amount leaves is essential to successfully modeling the fluxes of water and carbon through the earth's forests. Leaf area index (LAI) is a parameter used to quantify the abundance of leaves in a given stand. Remote sensing offers the only feasible way to quantify LAI over large areas. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to this task by remote sensing scientists, but there is still a lack of concensus on how LAI can be best retrieved. Though global LAI products are available, their accuracy has remained unsatisfactory for regional applications. Previous work has primarily focused on using the spectral information in remotely sensed imagery. In this study, we compared the potential of LAI retrieval from various spectral indices derived from Landsat TM images with retrieval using the spatial information, image texture, derived from the Ikonos images. LAI on the ground was derived from allometry, LAI-2000 and the TRAC device in the Duke Forest area in central North Carolina. Our results show that the commonly used spectral indices, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and simple ratio vegetation index (SRVI) were not the best choice for LAI retrieval. We found that Landsat TM derived Structural Index (SI=TM4/TM5) and normalized difference water index (NDWI), as well as Ikonos image texture are much better alternatives.

  13. Mapping invasive Fallopia japonica by combined spectral, spatial, and temporal analysis of digital orthophotos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorigo, Wouter; Lucieer, Arko; Podobnikar, Tomaž; Čarni, Andraž

    2012-10-01

    Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) is listed among 100 of the World's worst invasive alien species and poses an increasing threat to ecosystems and agriculture in Northern America, Europe, and Oceania. This study proposes a remote sensing method to detect local occurrences of F. japonica from low-cost digital orthophotos taken in early spring and summer by concurrently exploring its temporal, spectral, and spatial characteristics. Temporal characteristics of the species are quantified by a band ratio calculated from the green and red spectral channels of both images. The normalized difference vegetation index was used to capture the high near-infrared (NIR) reflectance of F. japonica in summer while the characteristic texture of F. japonica is quantified by calculating gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) measures. After establishing the optimum kernel size to quantify texture, the different input features (spectral, spatial, and texture) were stacked and used as input to the random forest (RF) classifier. The proposed method was tested for a built-up and semi-natural area in Slovenia. The spectral, spatial, and temporal provided an equally important contribution for differentiating F. japonica from other land cover types. The combination of all signatures resulted in a producer accuracy of 90.3% and a user accuracy of 98.1% for F. japonica when validation was based on independent regions of interest. A producer accuracy of 61.4% was obtained for F. japonica when comparing the classification result with all occurrences of F. japonica identified during a field validation campaign. This is an encouraging result given the very small patches in which the species usually occur and the high degree of intermingling with other plants. All hot spots were identified and even likely infestations of F. japonica that had remained undiscovered during the field campaign were detected. The probability images resulting from the RF classifier can be used to reduce the

  14. Effects of decreasing resolution on spectral and spatial information content in an agricultural area. [Pottawatmie study site, Iowa and Nebraska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The effects of decreasing spatial resolution from 6 1/4 miles square to 50 miles square are described. The effects of increases in cell size is studied on; the mean and variance of spectral data; spatial trends; and vegetative index numbers. Information content changes on cadastral, vegetal, soil, water and physiographic information are summarized.

  15. SNPP VIIRS Spectral Bands Co-Registration and Spatial Response Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Tilton, James C.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tewari, Krishna P.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite was launched on 28 October 2011. The VIIRS has 5 imagery spectral bands (I-bands), 16 moderate resolution spectral bands (M-bands) and a panchromatic day/night band (DNB). Performance of the VIIRS spatial response and band-to-band co-registration (BBR) was measured through intensive pre-launch tests. These measurements were made in the non-aggregated zones near the start (or end) of scan for the I-bands and M-bands and for a limited number of aggregation modes for the DNB in order to test requirement compliance. This paper presents results based on a recently re-processed pre-launch test data. Sensor (detector) spatial impulse responses in the scan direction are parameterized in terms of ground dynamic field of view (GDFOV), horizontal spatial resolution (HSR), modulation transfer function (MTF), ensquared energy (EE) and integrated out-of-pixel (IOOP) spatial response. Results are presented for the non-aggregation, 2-sample and 3-sample aggregation zones for the I-bands and M-bands, and for a limited number of aggregation modes for the DNB. On-orbit GDFOVs measured for the 5 I-bands in the scan direction using a straight bridge are also presented. Band-to-band co-registration (BBR) is quantified using the prelaunch measured band-to-band offsets. These offsets may be expressed as fractions of horizontal sampling intervals (HSIs), detector spatial response parameters GDFOV or HSR. BBR bases on HSIs in the non-aggregation, 2-sample and 3-sample aggregation zones are presented. BBR matrices based on scan direction GDFOV and HSR are compared to the BBR matrix based on HSI in the non-aggregation zone. We demonstrate that BBR based on GDFOV is a better representation of footprint overlap and so this definition should be used in BBR requirement specifications. We propose that HSR not be used as the primary image quality indicator, since we

  16. SNPP VIIRS spectral bands co-registration and spatial response characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Tilton, James C.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tewari, Krishna P.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    The Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite was launched on 28 October 2011. The VIIRS has 5 imagery spectral bands (I-bands), 16 moderate resolution spectral bands (M-bands) and a panchromatic day/night band (DNB). Performance of the VIIRS spatial response and band-to-band co-registration (BBR) was measured through intensive pre-launch tests. These measurements were made in the non-aggregated zones near the start (or end) of scan for the I-bands and M-bands and for a limited number of aggregation modes for the DNB in order to test requirement compliance. This paper presents results based on a recently re-processed pre-launch test data. Sensor (detector) spatial impulse responses in the scan direction are parameterized in terms of ground dynamic field of view (GDFOV), horizontal spatial resolution (HSR), modulation transfer function (MTF), ensquared energy (EE) and integrated out-of-pixel (IOOP) spatial response. Results are presented for the non-aggregation, 2-sample and 3-sample aggregation zones for the I-bands and M-bands, and for a limited number of aggregation modes for the DNB. On-orbit GDFOVs measured for the 5 I-bands in the scan direction using a straight bridge are also presented. Band-to-band co-registration (BBR) is quantified using the prelaunch measured band-to-band offsets. These offsets may be expressed as fractions of horizontal sampling intervals (HSIs), detector spatial response parameters GDFOV or HSR. BBR bases on HSIs in the non-aggregation, 2-sample and 3-sample aggregation zones are presented. BBR matrices based on scan direction GDFOV and HSR are compared to the BBR matrix based on HSI in the non-aggregation zone. We demonstrate that BBR based on GDFOV is a better representation of footprint overlap and so this definition should be used in BBR requirement specifications. We propose that HSR not be used as the primary image quality indicator, since we

  17. Temporal, spectral, and spatial study of the automated vicarious calibration test site at Railroad Valley, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey S.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Cocilovo, Byron R.; McCorkel, Joel T.; Buchanan, John H.

    2008-08-01

    The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona has developed an automated methodology and instrument suite to measure the surface reflectance of the vicarious calibration test site at Railroad Valley, Nevada. Surface reflectance is a critical variable used as one of the inputs into a radiative transfer code to predict the top-of-atmosphere radiance, and inexpensive and robust ground-viewing radiometers have been present at the site since 2004. The goal of the automated approach is to retain RSG's current 2-3% level of uncertainty while increasing the number of data sets collected throughout the year without the need for on-site personnel. A previous study was completed to determine if the number and positions of the four radiometers were adequate to spatially sample the 1-km2 large-footprint site at Railroad Valley. The preliminary study utilized one set of panchromatic data from Digital Globe's QuickBird satellite. Results from this one day showed that the positions of the four ground-viewing radiometers adequately sample the site. The work presented here expands in a spectral and temporal sense by using high-spatial-resolution data from Ikonos, QuickBird, and Landsat-7 ETM+ to determine if the locations of the ground-viewing radiometers correctly sample the site. The multispectral capability of these sensors is used to establish if there are any spectral effects, which will also help RSG to determine what spectral bands should be chosen for the new ground-viewing radiometers that are currently in development for the automated test site at Railroad Valley.

  18. Spectral discrimination of breast pathologies in situ using spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Nationally, 25% to 50% of patients undergoing lumpectomy for local management of breast cancer require a secondary excision because of the persistence of residual tumor. Intraoperative assessment of specimen margins by frozen-section analysis is not widely adopted in breast-conserving surgery. Here, a new approach to wide-field optical imaging of breast pathology in situ was tested to determine whether the system could accurately discriminate cancer from benign tissues before routine pathological processing. Methods Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) was used to quantify near-infrared (NIR) optical parameters at the surface of 47 lumpectomy tissue specimens. Spatial frequency and wavelength-dependent reflectance spectra were parameterized with matched simulations of light transport. Spectral images were co-registered to histopathology in adjacent, stained sections of the tissue, cut in the geometry imaged in situ. A supervised classifier and feature-selection algorithm were implemented to automate discrimination of breast pathologies and to rank the contribution of each parameter to a diagnosis. Results Spectral parameters distinguished all pathology subtypes with 82% accuracy and benign (fibrocystic disease, fibroadenoma) from malignant (DCIS, invasive cancer, and partially treated invasive cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy) pathologies with 88% accuracy, high specificity (93%), and reasonable sensitivity (79%). Although spectral absorption and scattering features were essential components of the discriminant classifier, scattering exhibited lower variance and contributed most to tissue-type separation. The scattering slope was sensitive to stromal and epithelial distributions measured with quantitative immunohistochemistry. Conclusions SFDI is a new quantitative imaging technique that renders a specific tissue-type diagnosis. Its combination of planar sampling and frequency-dependent depth sensing is clinically pragmatic and appropriate for

  19. Spectral Doppler estimation utilizing 2-D spatial information and adaptive signal processing.

    PubMed

    Ekroll, Ingvild K; Torp, Hans; Løvstakken, Lasse

    2012-06-01

    The trade-off between temporal and spectral resolution in conventional pulsed wave (PW) Doppler may limit duplex/triplex quality and the depiction of rapid flow events. It is therefore desirable to reduce the required observation window (OW) of the Doppler signal while preserving the frequency resolution. This work investigates how the required observation time can be reduced by adaptive spectral estimation utilizing 2-D spatial information obtained by parallel receive beamforming. Four adaptive estimation techniques were investigated, the power spectral Capon (PSC) method, the amplitude and phase estimation (APES) technique, multiple signal classification (MUSIC), and a projection-based version of the Capon technique. By averaging radially and laterally, the required covariance matrix could successfully be estimated without temporal averaging. Useful PW spectra of high resolution and contrast could be generated from ensembles corresponding to those used in color flow imaging (CFI; OW = 10). For a given OW, the frequency resolution could be increased compared with the Welch approach, in cases in which the transit time was higher or comparable to the observation time. In such cases, using short or long pulses with unfocused or focused transmit, an increase in temporal resolution of up to 4 to 6 times could be obtained in in vivo examples. It was further shown that by using adaptive signal processing, velocity spectra may be generated without high-pass filtering the Doppler signal. With the proposed approach, spectra retrospectively calculated from CFI may become useful for unfocused as well as focused imaging. This application may provide new clinical information by inspection of velocity spectra simultaneously from several spatial locations. PMID:22711413

  20. Making digital phantoms with spectral and spatial light modulators for quantitative applications of hyperspectral optical medical imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Bonghwan; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Lee, Ji Youn; Allen, David W.; Rice, Joseph P.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2015-03-01

    We present a procedure to generate digital phantoms with a hyperspectral image projector (HIP) consisting of two liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) spatial light modulators (SLMs). The digital phantoms are 3D image data cubes of the spatial distribution of spectrally resolved abundances of intracellular light-absorbing oxy-hemoglobin molecules in single erythrocytes. Spectrally and spatially resolved image data indistinguishable from the real scene may be used as standards to calibrate image sensors and validate image analysis algorithms for their measurement quality, performance consistency, and inter-laboratory comparisons for quantitative biomedical imaging applications.

  1. Spectral sensitivity, spatial resolution and temporal resolution and their implications for conspecific signalling in cleaner shrimp.

    PubMed

    Caves, Eleanor M; Frank, Tamara M; Johnsen, Sönke

    2016-02-01

    Cleaner shrimp (Decapoda) regularly interact with conspecifics and client reef fish, both of which appear colourful and finely patterned to human observers. However, whether cleaner shrimp can perceive the colour patterns of conspecifics and clients is unknown, because cleaner shrimp visual capabilities are unstudied. We quantified spectral sensitivity and temporal resolution using electroretinography (ERG), and spatial resolution using both morphological (inter-ommatidial angle) and behavioural (optomotor) methods in three cleaner shrimp species: Lysmata amboinensis, Ancylomenes pedersoni and Urocaridella antonbruunii. In all three species, we found strong evidence for only a single spectral sensitivity peak of (mean ± s.e.m.) 518 ± 5, 518 ± 2 and 533 ± 3 nm, respectively. Temporal resolution in dark-adapted eyes was 39 ± 1.3, 36 ± 0.6 and 34 ± 1.3 Hz. Spatial resolution was 9.9 ± 0.3, 8.3 ± 0.1 and 11 ± 0.5 deg, respectively, which is low compared with other compound eyes of similar size. Assuming monochromacy, we present approximations of cleaner shrimp perception of both conspecifics and clients, and show that cleaner shrimp visual capabilities are sufficient to detect the outlines of large stimuli, but not to detect the colour patterns of conspecifics or clients, even over short distances. Thus, conspecific viewers have probably not played a role in the evolution of cleaner shrimp appearance; rather, further studies should investigate whether cleaner shrimp colour patterns have evolved to be viewed by client reef fish, many of which possess tri- and tetra-chromatic colour vision and relatively high spatial acuity. PMID:26747903

  2. Photovoltaics radiometric issues and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents a summary of issues discussed at the photovoltaic radiometric measurements workshop. Topics included radiometric measurements guides, the need for well-defined goals, documentation, calibration checks, accreditation of testing laboratories and methods, the need for less expensive radiometric instrumentation, data correlations, and quality assurance.

  3. Radiometric Dating Does Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, G. Brent

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the accuracy of dating methods and creationist arguments that radiometric dating does not work. Explains the Manson meteorite impact and the Pierre shale, the ages of meteorites, the K-T tektites, and dating the Mount Vesuvius eruption. (Author/YDS)

  4. Spectrally and spatially resolved cathodoluminescence of nanodiamonds: local variations of the NV(0) emission properties.

    PubMed

    Tizei, L H G; Kociak, M

    2012-05-01

    Here we report the spectrally and spatially resolved cathodoluminescence of diamond nanoparticles using focused fast electron beams in a transmission electron microscope. We demonstrate the possibility of quickly detecting various individual colour centres of different kinds on wide areas (several micrometres square) contained in nanoparticles separated by subwavelength distances. Among them, nanoparticles containing one or more neutral nitrogen-vacancy (NV(0)) intensity maxima have been seen, attributable to individual emitters. Thanks to a spatial resolution which is solely limited by charge carrier diffusion in the case of a fast electron (80 keV) setup, the spectra of two individual NV(0) emitters separated by 80 nm inside a nanoparticle have been spatially discerned. A shift of the zero phonon line (ZPL) between the two emitters, which we attribute to internal stress, is shown to arise even within the same nanoparticle. Detailed emission spectra (ZPL, phonon lines and Huang-Rhys factor, directly linked to the relaxation energy of the colour centre) in 51 individual NV(0) centres have been measured in 39 particles. The ZPL and Huang-Rhys factor are found to be measurably dispersed, while the phonon energies keep constant. PMID:22481219

  5. 2D Spatial Frequency Considerations in Comparing 1D Power Spectral Density Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Barber, S.; Church, E.L.; Kaznatcheev, K.; McKinney, W.R.; Yashchuk, V.Y.

    2010-06-14

    The frequency footprint of ID and 2D profiling instruments needs to be carefully considered in comparing ID surface roughness spectrum measurements made by different instruments. Contributions from orthogonal direction frequency components can not be neglected. The use of optical profiling instruments is ubiquitous in the measurement of the roughness of optical surfaces. Their ease-of-use and non-contact measurement method found widespread use in the optics industry for measuring the quality of delicate optical surfaces. Computerized digital data acquisition with these instruments allowed for quick and easy calculation of surface roughness statistics, such as root-mean-square (RMS) roughness. The computing power of the desktop computer allowed for the rapid conversion of spatial domain data into the frequency domain, enabling the application of sophisticated signal processing techniques to be applied to the analysis of surface roughness, the most powerful of which is the power spectral density (PSP) function. Application of the PSD function to surface statistics introduced the concept of 'bandwidth-limited' roughness, where the value of the RMS roughness depends critically upon the spatial frequency response of the instrument. Different instruments with different spatial frequency response characteristics give different answers when measuring the same surface.

  6. Image slicing with a twist: spatial and spectral Nyquist sampling without anamorphic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecza, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Integral field spectrographs have become mainstream instruments at modern telescopes because of their efficient way of collecting data-cubes. Image slicer based integral field spectrographs achieve the highest fill-factor on the detector, but due to the need to Nyquist-sample the spectra, their spatial sampling on the sky is rectangular. Using anamorphic pre-optics before the image slicer overcomes this effect further maximising the fill-factor, but introduces optical aberrations, throughput losses, and additional alignment and calibration requirements, compromising overall instrument performance. In this paper I present a concept for an image-slicer that achieves both spatial and spectral Nyquist-sampling without anamorphic pre-optics. Rotating each slitlet by 45° with respect to the dispersion direction, and arranging them into a saw-tooth pseudo-slit, leads to a lozenge shaped sampling element on the sky, however, the centres of the lozenges lie on a regular and square grid, satisfying the Nyquist sampling criterion in both spatial directions.

  7. Radiometric Characterization of IKONOS Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Kelly, Michelle; Holekamp, Kara; Zanoni, Vicki; Thome, Kurtis; Schiller, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    A radiometric characterization of Space Imaging's IKONOS 4-m multispectral imagery has been performed by a NASA funded team from the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC), the University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group (UARSG), and South Dakota State University (SDSU). Both intrinsic radiometry and the effects of Space Imaging processing on radiometry were investigated. Relative radiometry was examined with uniform Antarctic and Saharan sites. Absolute radiometric calibration was performed using reflectance-based vicarious calibration methods on several uniform sites imaged by IKONOS, coincident with ground-based surface and atmospheric measurements. Ground-based data and the IKONOS spectral response function served as input to radiative transfer codes to generate a Top-of-Atmosphere radiance estimate. Calibration coefficients derived from each vicarious calibration were combined to generate an IKONOS radiometric gain coefficient for each multispectral band assuming a linear response over the full dynamic range of the instrument. These calibration coefficients were made available to Space Imaging, which subsequently adopted them by updating its initial set of calibration coefficients. IKONOS imagery procured through the NASA Scientific Data Purchase program is processed with or without a Modulation Transfer Function Compensation kernel. The radiometric effects of this kernel on various scene types was also investigated. All imagery characterized was procured through the NASA Scientific Data Purchase program.

  8. Self-Referencing, Spectrally, or Spatially Encoded Spectral Interferometry for the Complete Characterization of Attosecond Electromagnetic Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Eric; Walmsley, Ian A.; Kosik, Ellen M.; Wyatt, Adam S.; Corner, Laura; Dimauro, Louis F.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a method for the complete characterization of attosecond duration electromagnetic pulses produced by high harmonic generation in an atomic gas. Our method is based on self-referencing spectral interferometry of two spectrally sheared extreme ultraviolet pulses, which is achieved by pumping the harmonic source with two sheared optical driving pulses. The resulting interferogram contains sufficient information to completely reconstruct the temporal behavior of the electric field. We demonstrate that such a method is feasible, and outline two possible experimental configurations.

  9. Spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral data based on a stochastic minimum spanning forest approach.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Kévin; Tarabalka, Yuliya; Angulo, Jesús; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Benediktsson, Jón Atli

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, a new method for supervised hyperspectral data classification is proposed. In particular, the notion of stochastic minimum spanning forest (MSF) is introduced. For a given hyperspectral image, a pixelwise classification is first performed. From this classification map, M marker maps are generated by randomly selecting pixels and labeling them as markers for the construction of MSFs. The next step consists in building an MSF from each of the M marker maps. Finally, all the M realizations are aggregated with a maximum vote decision rule in order to build the final classification map. The proposed method is tested on three different data sets of hyperspectral airborne images with different resolutions and contexts. The influences of the number of markers and of the number of realizations M on the results are investigated in experiments. The performance of the proposed method is compared to several classification techniques (both pixelwise and spectral-spatial) using standard quantitative criteria and visual qualitative evaluation. PMID:22086502

  10. Spectral-spatial classification for noninvasive cancer detection using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolan; Halig, Luma; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2014-10-01

    Early detection of malignant lesions could improve both survival and quality of life of cancer patients. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) has emerged as a powerful tool for noninvasive cancer detection and diagnosis, with the advantage of avoiding tissue biopsy and providing diagnostic signatures without the need of a contrast agent in real time. We developed a spectral-spatial classification method to distinguish cancer from normal tissue on hyperspectral images. We acquire hyperspectral reflectance images from 450 to 900 nm with a 2-nm increment from tumor-bearing mice. In our animal experiments, the HSI and classification method achieved a sensitivity of 93.7% and a specificity of 91.3%. The preliminary study demonstrated that HSI has the potential to be applied in vivo for noninvasive detection of tumors.

  11. Accumulating pyramid spatial-spectral collaborative coding divergence for hyperspectral anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Zou, Huanxin; Zhou, Shilin

    2016-03-01

    Detection of anomalous targets of various sizes in hyperspectral data has received a lot of attention in reconnaissance and surveillance applications. Many anomaly detectors have been proposed in literature. However, current methods are susceptible to anomalies in the processing window range and often make critical assumptions about the distribution of the background data. Motivated by the fact that anomaly pixels are often distinctive from their local background, in this letter, we proposed a novel hyperspectral anomaly detection framework for real-time remote sensing applications. The proposed framework consists of four major components, sparse feature learning, pyramid grid window selection, joint spatial-spectral collaborative coding and multi-level divergence fusion. It exploits the collaborative representation difference in the feature space to locate potential anomalies and is totally unsupervised without any prior assumptions. Experimental results on airborne recorded hyperspectral data demonstrate that the proposed methods adaptive to anomalies in a large range of sizes and is well suited for parallel processing.

  12. Demosaicing: heterogeneity-projection hard-decision adaptive interpolation using spectral-spatial correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chi-Yi; Song, Kai-Tai

    2006-02-01

    A novel heterogeneity-projection hard-decision adaptive interpolation (HPHD-AI) algorithm is proposed in this paper for color reproduction from Bayer mosaic images. The proposed algorithm aims to estimate the optimal interpolation direction and perform hard-decision interpolation, in which the decision is made before interpolation. To do so, a new heterogeneity-projection scheme based on spectral-spatial correlation is proposed to decide the best interpolation direction from the original mosaic image directly. Exploiting the proposed heterogeneity-projection scheme, a hard-decision rule can be designed easily to perform the interpolation. We have compared this technique with three recently proposed demosaicing techniques: Lu's, Gunturk's and Li's methods, by utilizing twenty-five natural images from Kodak PhotoCD. The experimental results show that HPHD-AI outperforms all of them in both PSNR values and S-CIELab ▵Ε* ab measures.

  13. Spectral-spatial classification for noninvasive cancer detection using hyperspectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guolan; Halig, Luma; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Early detection of malignant lesions could improve both survival and quality of life of cancer patients. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) has emerged as a powerful tool for noninvasive cancer detection and diagnosis, with the advantage of avoiding tissue biopsy and providing diagnostic signatures without the need of a contrast agent in real time. We developed a spectral-spatial classification method to distinguish cancer from normal tissue on hyperspectral images. We acquire hyperspectral reflectance images from 450 to 900 nm with a 2-nm increment from tumor-bearing mice. In our animal experiments, the HSI and classification method achieved a sensitivity of 93.7% and a specificity of 91.3%. The preliminary study demonstrated that HSI has the potential to be applied in vivo for noninvasive detection of tumors. PMID:25277147

  14. Strain-Induced Spatial and Spectral Isolation of Quantum Emitters in Mono- and Bilayer WSe2.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Kaczmarczyk, A; Gerardot, B D

    2015-11-11

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductors are intriguing hosts for quantum light sources due to their unique optoelectronic properties. Here, we report that strain gradients, either unintentionally induced or generated by substrate patterning, result in spatially and spectrally isolated quantum emitters in mono- and bilayer WSe2. By correlating localized excitons with localized strain variations, we show that the quantum emitter emission energy can be red-tuned up to a remarkable ∼170 meV. We probe the fine-structure, magneto-optics, and second-order coherence of a strained emitter. These results raise the prospect of strain-engineering quantum emitter properties and deterministically creating arrays of quantum emitters in two-dimensional semiconductors. PMID:26480237

  15. Strain-Induced Spatial and Spectral Isolation of Quantum Emitters in Mono- and Bilayer WSe2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductors are intriguing hosts for quantum light sources due to their unique optoelectronic properties. Here, we report that strain gradients, either unintentionally induced or generated by substrate patterning, result in spatially and spectrally isolated quantum emitters in mono- and bilayer WSe2. By correlating localized excitons with localized strain variations, we show that the quantum emitter emission energy can be red-tuned up to a remarkable ∼170 meV. We probe the fine-structure, magneto-optics, and second-order coherence of a strained emitter. These results raise the prospect of strain-engineering quantum emitter properties and deterministically creating arrays of quantum emitters in two-dimensional semiconductors. PMID:26480237

  16. Real-Time Cardiac MRI using Prior Spatial-Spectral Information

    PubMed Central

    Brinegar, Cornelius; Zhang, Haosen; Wu, Yi-Jen L.; Foley, Lesley M.; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Ye, Qing; Pocci, Darren; Lam, Fan; Ho, Chien; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac MRI performed while the patient is breathing is typically achieved using non-real-time techniques such as ECG triggering with respiratory gating; however, modern dynamic imaging techniques are beginning to enable this type of imaging in real-time. One of these dynamic imaging techniques is based on forming a Partially Separable Function (PSF) model of the data, but the model fitting process is known to be sensitive even when truncated SVD regularization is used. As a result, physiologically meaningless artifacts can appear in the dynamic images when the total number of measurements is limited. To address this issue, the dynamic imaging problem is formulated as a generalized Tikhonov regularization problem with the PSF model as a component of the forward data model, and a penalty function is used to introduce spatial-spectral prior information. This new method both reduces data acquisition requirements and improves stability relative to the original PSF based method when applied to cardiac MRI. PMID:19964109

  17. Real-time cardiac MRI using prior spatial-spectral information.

    PubMed

    Brinegar, Cornelius; Zhang, Haosen; Wu, Yi-Jen L; Foley, Lesley M; Hitchens, T; Ye, Qing; Pocci, Darren; Lam, Fan; Ho, Chien; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac MRI performed while the patient is breathing is typically achieved using non-real-time techniques such as ECG triggering with respiratory gating; however, modern dynamic imaging techniques are beginning to enable this type of imaging in real-time. One of these dynamic imaging techniques is based on forming a Partially Separable Function (PSF) model of the data, but the model fitting process is known to be sensitive even when truncated SVD regularization is used. As a result, physiologically meaningless artifacts can appear in the dynamic images when the total number of measurements is limited. To address this issue, the dynamic imaging problem is formulated as a generalized Tikhonov regularization problem with the PSF model as a component of the forward data model, and a penalty function is used to introduce spatial-spectral prior information. This new method both reduces data acquisition requirements and improves stability relative to the original PSF based method when applied to cardiac MRI. PMID:19964109

  18. Multiple fano resonances in spatially compact and spectrally efficient spoof surface plasmon resonators with composite textures.

    PubMed

    Qin, F F; Xiao, J J; Zhang, Q; Liang, W G

    2016-01-01

    Spoof surface plasmons derive their properties from structure resonance rather than from electronic resonance, enabling an extremely high degree of freedom for tuning and modulating different resonances. Here, a composite resonator based on multiscale textured metal surface of different grooves is presented, and spoof localized surface plasmons (LSPs) are shown to emerge and interact coherently. Each band of the spoof LSPs resembles those generated by the homogenously textured surface with the corresponding groove. By adjusting the geometry and filling medium of each substructure in the composite system, we find that the multipole resonant modes sustained by one substructure can couple with those in the other, giving rise to multi-band Fano resonances. Such multiple-Fano resonance structures are spatially more compact while spectrally more comprehensive than usual spoof structures. They can be used for unique resonant devices such as microwave antennas and metasurfaces. PMID:26696158

  19. Spatial representations of temporal and spectral sound cues in human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Herdener, Marcus; Esposito, Fabrizio; Scheffler, Klaus; Schneider, Peter; Logothetis, Nikos K; Uludag, Kamil; Kayser, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Natural and behaviorally relevant sounds are characterized by temporal modulations of their waveforms, which carry important cues for sound segmentation and communication. Still, there is little consensus as to how this temporal information is represented in auditory cortex. Here, by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) optimized for studying the auditory system, we report the existence of a topographically ordered spatial representation of temporal sound modulation rates in human auditory cortex. We found a topographically organized sensitivity within auditory cortex to sounds with varying modulation rates, with enhanced responses to lower modulation rates (2 and 4 Hz) on lateral parts of Heschl's gyrus (HG) and faster modulation rates (16 and 32 Hz) on medial HG. The representation of temporal modulation rates was distinct from the representation of sound frequencies (tonotopy) that was orientated roughly orthogonal. Moreover, the combination of probabilistic anatomical maps with a previously proposed functional delineation of auditory fields revealed that the distinct maps of temporal and spectral sound features both prevail within two presumed primary auditory fields hA1 and hR. Our results reveal a topographically ordered representation of temporal sound cues in human primary auditory cortex that is complementary to maps of spectral cues. They thereby enhance our understanding of the functional parcellation and organization of auditory cortical processing. PMID:23706955

  20. Laboratory Measurement of Bidirectional Reflectance of Radiometric Tarps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowlton, Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: a) To determine the magnitude of radiometric tarp BRDF; b) To determine whether an ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer can be used to perform the experiment. Radiometric tarps with nominal reflectance values of 52%, 35%, and 3.5%, deployed for IKONOS. QuickBird, and OrbView-3 overpasses Ground-based spectroradiometric measurements of tarp and Spectralon@ panel taken during overpass using ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer, and tarp reflectance calculated. Reflectance data used in atmospheric radiative transfer model (MODTRAN) to predict satellite at-sensor radiance for radiometric calibration. Reflectance data also used to validate atmospheric correction of high-spatial-resolution multispectral image products

  1. JPSS-1 VIIRS pre-launch radiometric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudrari, Hassan; McIntire, Jeff; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, James; Efremova, Boryana; Ji, Qiang; Lee, Shihyan; Schwarting, Tom

    2015-09-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on-board the first Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) completed its sensor level testing on December 2014. The JPSS-1 (J1) mission is scheduled to launch in December 2016, and will be very similar to the Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) mission. VIIRS instrument was designed to provide measurements of the globe twice daily. It is a wide-swath (3,040 km) cross-track scanning radiometer with spatial resolutions of 370 and 740 m at nadir for imaging and moderate bands, respectively. It covers the wavelength spectrum from reflective to long-wave infrared through 22 spectral bands [0.412 μm to 12.01 μm]. VIIRS observations are used to generate 22 environmental data products (EDRs). This paper will briefly describe J1 VIIRS characterization and calibration performance and methodologies executed during the pre-launch testing phases by the independent government team, to generate the at-launch baseline radiometric performance, and the metrics needed to populate the sensor data record (SDR) Look-Up-Tables (LUTs). This paper will also provide an assessment of the sensor pre-launch radiometric performance, such as the sensor signal to noise ratios (SNRs), dynamic range, reflective and emissive bands calibration performance, polarization sensitivity, bands spectral performance, response-vs-scan (RVS), near field and stray light responses. A set of performance metrics generated during the pre-launch testing program will be compared to the SNPP VIIRS pre-launch performance.

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously. PMID:18794943

  3. ATLID receiving spatial and spectral filtering units: design and associated performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaché, Maxime; de Saint Seine, Diego; Leblay, Pierrick; Hélière, Arnaud; Pereira Do Carmo, João.; Berlioz, Philippe; Archer, Julien

    2015-09-01

    ATLID (ATmospheric LIDar) is one of the four key instruments of EarthCARE (Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiations Explorer) satellite. It is a program of and funded by the European Space Agency and under prime contractorship of Airbus Defence and Space. ATLID is dedicated to the understanding of aerosols and clouds contribution to earth climate. It is an atmospheric LIDAR that measures the emitted 354.8nm ultraviolet laser which is backscattered by the atmosphere. The molecules and the particles have different optical signatures and can consequently be distinguished thanks to polarization analyses and spectral filtering of the backscattered signal. The following optical units of ATLID receiver chain directly contribute to this function : after ATLID afocal telescope, the CAS-OA, the Optical Assembly of the Co Alignment Sensor, samples and images the beam on the CAS sensor in order to optimize the alignment of transmitting and receiving telescopes. The beam goes through the BF sub-assemblies, the Blocking Filter which has two filtering functions: (1) spatial with the ERO-BF, which is a Kepler afocal spatial filtering module that defines the instrument field of view and blocks the background and straylight out of the useful field of view; (2) spectral with the ERO-EFO, the Entrance Filtering Optic, which is mainly composed of a very narrow bandpass filter with a high rejection factor. This filter rejects the background from the useful signal and contributes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. The EFO also allows an on-ground adjustment of the orientation of the linear polarization of the input beam. After filtering and polarization adjustment, the beam is injected in several optical fibers and transported to the instrument detectors. This last transport function is done by the FCA, the Fiber Coupler Assembly. This paper presents the flight models of the previously described units, details the opto-mechanical design, and reviews the main achieved performances with a

  4. Are spectral or spatial methods better for pansharpening? An evaluation for four sample methods based on spatial modulation of pixel spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alparone, Luciano; Garzelli, Andrea; Vivone, Gemine

    2015-10-01

    The majority of pansharpening methods can be classified as spectral or spatial methods, depending on whether they are based on component substitution (CS) or multiresolution analysis (MRA). So far, the suitability of one class or methods rather than another has been seldom discussed. In this paper, through experiments on IKONOS and simulated Pléiades datasets, the authors demonstrate that the performances of spectral methods depend on the extent of spectral matching, measured by the coefficient of determination (CD) of the multivariate regression between MS and P. For data with simulated P, CD is very close to one and all methods perform almost identically. For true IKONOS datasets, the CD is few percent lower and spatial methods, once they have been optimized through the knowledge of the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the imaging system, are always more performing than spectral methods. Since spatial methods are unaffected by the spectral matching, they are preferable whenever such an issue is critical, e.g., for hyperspectral pansharpening.

  5. Lessons Learned from the AIRS Pre-Flight Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Weiler, Margie

    2013-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument flies on the NASA Aqua satellite and measures the upwelling hyperspectral earth radiance in the spectral range of 3.7-15.4 micron with a nominal ground resolution at nadir of 13.5 km. The AIRS spectra are achieved using a temperature controlled grating spectrometer and HgCdTe infrared linear arrays providing 2378 channels with a nominal spectral resolution of approximately 1200. The AIRS pre-flight tests that impact the radiometric calibration include a full system radiometric response (linearity), polarization response, and response vs scan angle (RVS). We re-derive the AIRS instrument radiometric calibration coefficients from the pre-flight polarization measurements, the response vs scan (RVS) angle tests as well as the linearity tests, and a recent lunar roll test that allowed the AIRS to view the moon. The data and method for deriving the coefficients is discussed in detail and the resulting values compared amongst the different tests. Finally, we examine the residual errors in the reconstruction of the external calibrator blackbody radiances and the efficacy of a new radiometric uncertainty model. Results show the radiometric calibration of AIRS to be excellent and the radiometric uncertainty model does a reasonable job of characterizing the errors.

  6. The influence of spectral and spatial resolution in classification approaches: Landsat TM data vs. Hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Galiano, Víctor; Garcia-Soldado, Maria José; Chica-Olmo, Mario

    The importance of accurate and timely information describing the nature and extent of land and natural resources is increasing especially in rapidly growing metropolitan areas. While metropolitan area decision makers are in constant need of current geospatial information on patterns and trends in land cover and land use, relatively little researchers has investigated the influence of the satellite data resolution for monitoring geo-enviromental information. In this research a suite of remote sensing and GIS techniques is applied in a land use mapping study. The main task is to asses the influence of the spatial and spectral resolution in the separability between classes and in the classificatiońs accuracy. This study has been focused in a very dynamical area with respect to land use, located in the province of Granada (SE of Spain). The classifications results of the Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner (AHS, Daedalus Enterprise Inc., WA, EEUU) at different spatial resolutions: 2, 4 and 6 m and Landsat 5 TM data have been compared.

  7. a Comparison Study of Different Marker Selection Methods for Spectral-Spatial Classification of Hyperspectral Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, D.; Safari, A. R.; Homayouni, S.; Khazai, S.

    2015-12-01

    An effective approach based on the Minimum Spanning Forest (MSF), grown from automatically selected markers using Support Vector Machines (SVM), has been proposed for spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images by Tarabalka et al. This paper aims at improving this approach by using image segmentation to integrate the spatial information into marker selection process. In this study, the markers are extracted from the classification maps, obtained by both SVM and segmentation algorithms, and then are used to build the MSF. The segmentation algorithms are the watershed, expectation maximization (EM) and hierarchical clustering. These algorithms are used in parallel and independently to segment the image. Moreover, the pixels of each class, with the largest population in the classification map, are kept for each region of the segmentation map. Lastly, the most reliable classified pixels are chosen from among the exiting pixels as markers. Two benchmark urban hyperspectral datasets are used for evaluation: Washington DC Mall and Berlin. The results of our experiments indicate that, compared to the original MSF approach, the marker selection using segmentation algorithms leads in more accurate classification maps.

  8. Optically sectioned spatial-spectral coded holographic fluorescence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsi-Hsun; Lin, Chen-Yen; Lin, Wei Tang; Luo, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Wide-field fluorescent imaging severely suffers low resolution and poor contrast from out-of-focus background to image biological samples. In order to enhance optical sectioning capability, Confocal approach has been developed to filter out-of-focus background using point-to-point detection through a spatial pinhole. Recently, active structured illumination in wide-field fashion has been developed to reduce the transversal scanning cost, but still requires scanning in axial direction. Here, we present a wide-field multi-focal fluorescence microscopy incorporating spatial-spectral volume holographic gratings (MVHGs) with 3D active structured illumination to obtain optically sectioned images without scanning is presented. In contrast to conventional holographic techniques, which in general can not obtain fluorescence images, our approach does not require the formation of a hologram during imaging and is compatible with fluorescence based methods of imaging. Our approach requires pair-wise multi-depth resolved images, one with 3D active illumination, and the other with standard uniform illumination. Our approach is configured such that 3D illuminated planes occur inside the specimen, and also serve as the structured modulation for multiple axial planes imaged by MVHGs and display laterally onto the camera. The system can also be combined with micro-objective and relay systems for endoscopic operation. We demonstrate the proposed system's ability to simultaneously obtain wide-field, optically sectioned, and multi-depth resolved images of fluorescently labeled tissue structures.

  9. Effects of spatial resolution and spectral purity on transvenous coronary angiography images

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D.; Thomlinson, W.; Gumer, N.F.

    1994-11-01

    Measurements have been made on the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Coronary Angiography X17B2 beamline under ideal and real imaging conditions to investigate the optimal imaging conditions for spatial resolution and spectral purity. The spatial resolution tests were performed using two multielement Si(Li) detectors (600 element, 0.5mm, pixel-pixel spacing; 1200 element, 0.25mm pixel-pixel spacing. Images were taken of phantoms containing iodine contrast agent over a wide range of incident beam absorption conditions. Patient images were also obtained using the same viewing projection with both detectors. Harmonics present in the imaging beam can be reduced by operating the superconducting wiggler source at reduced field strength. At regions of high absorption in the patient, the harmonics present can contribute to the detected signal. Iodine phantom images were obtained at a wiggler field strength of 3 Tesla (E{sub c}=13.3keV) and 4 Tesla (E{sub c}= I 7.8keV) for comparison. As before, patient images were obtained using the same projection at both wiggler fields. Results of the detector resolution and wiggler eld measurements will be presented for the phantoms as well as the patient scans.

  10. Two-Microphone Noise Reduction Using Spatial Information-Based Spectral Amplitude Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Guo, Yanmeng; Fu, Qiang; Li, Junfeng; Yan, Yonghong

    Traditional two-microphone noise reduction algorithms to deal with highly nonstationary directional noises generally use the direction of arrival or phase difference information. The performance of these algorithms deteriorate when diffuse noises coexist with nonstationary directional noises in realistic adverse environments. In this paper, we present a two-channel noise reduction algorithm using a spatial information-based speech estimator and a spatial-information-controlled soft-decision noise estimator to improve the noise reduction performance in realistic non-stationary noisy environments. A target presence probability estimator based on Bayes rules using both phase difference and magnitude squared coherence is proposed for soft-decision of noise estimation, so that they can share complementary advantages when both directional noises and diffuse noises are present. Performances of the proposed two-microphone noise reduction algorithm are evaluated by noise reduction, log-spectral distance (LSD) and word recognition rate (WRR) of a distant-talking ASR system in a real room's noisy environment. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm achieves better noises suppression without further distorting the desired signal components over the comparative dual-channel noise reduction algorithms.