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  1. Retinoic acid induces Sertoli cell paracrine signals for spermatogonia differentiation but cell autonomously drives spermatocyte meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Raverdeau, Mathilde; Gely-Pernot, Aurore; Féret, Betty; Dennefeld, Christine; Benoit, Gérard; Davidson, Irwin; Chambon, Pierre; Mark, Manuel; Ghyselinck, Norbert B.

    2012-01-01

    Direct evidence for a role of endogenous retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A in the initial differentiation and meiotic entry of spermatogonia, and thus in the initiation of spermatogenesis is still lacking. RA is synthesized by dedicated enzymes, the retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALDH), and binds to and activates nuclear RA receptors (RARA, RARB, and RARG) either within the RA-synthesizing cells or in the neighboring cells. In the present study, we have used a combination of somatic genetic ablations and pharmacological approaches in vivo to show that during the first, prepubertal, spermatogenic cycle (i) RALDH-dependent synthesis of RA by Sertoli cells (SC), the supporting cells of the germ cell (GC) lineage, is indispensable to initiate differentiation of A aligned into A1 spermatogonia; (ii) RARA in SC mediates the effects of RA, possibly through activating Mafb expression, a gene whose Drosophila homolog is mandatory to GC differentiation; (iii) RA synthesized by premeiotic spermatocytes cell autonomously induces meiotic initiation through controlling the RAR-dependent expression of Stra8. Furthermore, we show that RA of SC origin is no longer necessary for the subsequent spermatogenic cycles but essential to spermiation. Altogether, our data establish that the effects of RA in vivo on spermatogonia differentiation are indirect, via SC, but direct on meiotic initiation in spermatocytes, supporting thereby the notion that, contrary to the situation in the female, RA is necessary to induce meiosis in the male. PMID:23012458

  2. High telomerase is a hallmark of undifferentiated spermatogonia and is required for maintenance of male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pech, Matthew F; Garbuzov, Alina; Hasegawa, Kazuteru; Sukhwani, Meena; Zhang, Ruixuan J; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Brockman, Stephanie A; Lin, Shengda; Brunet, Anne; Orwig, Kyle E; Artandi, Steven E

    2015-12-01

    Telomerase inactivation causes loss of the male germline in worms, fish, and mice, indicating a conserved dependence on telomere maintenance in this cell lineage. Here, using telomerase reverse transcriptase (Tert) reporter mice, we found that very high telomerase expression is a hallmark of undifferentiated spermatogonia, the mitotic population where germline stem cells reside. We exploited these high telomerase levels as a basis for purifying undifferentiated spermatogonia using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Telomerase levels in undifferentiated spermatogonia and embryonic stem cells are comparable and much greater than in somatic progenitor compartments. Within the germline, we uncovered an unanticipated gradient of telomerase activity that also enables isolation of more mature populations. Transcriptomic comparisons of Tert(High) undifferentiated spermatogonia and Tert(Low) differentiated spermatogonia by RNA sequencing reveals marked differences in cell cycle and key molecular features of each compartment. Transplantation studies show that germline stem cell activity is confined to the Tert(High) cKit(-) population. Telomere shortening in telomerase knockout strains causes depletion of undifferentiated spermatogonia and eventual loss of all germ cells after undifferentiated spermatogonia drop below a critical threshold. These data reveal that high telomerase expression is a fundamental characteristic of germline stem cells, thus explaining the broad dependence on telomerase for germline immortality in metazoans. PMID:26584619

  3. Benzo(a)pyrene Is Mutagenic in Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells and Dividing Spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Jason M.; Beal, Marc A.; Yauk, Carole L.; Marchetti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Although many environmental agents are established male germ cell mutagens, few are known to induce mutations in spermatogonial stem cells. Stem cell mutations are of great concern because they result in a permanent increase in the number of mutations carried in sperm. We investigated mutation induction during mouse spermatogenesis following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). MutaMouse males were given 0, 12.5, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg bw/day BaP for 28 days by oral gavage. Germ cells were collected from the cauda epididymis and seminiferous tubules 3 days after exposure and from cauda epididymis 42 and 70 days after exposure. This design enabled targeted investigation of effects on post-spermatogonia, dividing spermatogonia, and spermatogonial stem cells, respectively. BaP increased lacZ mutant frequency (MF) in cauda sperm after exposure of dividing spermatogonia (4.2-fold at highest dose, P < .01) and spermatogonial stem cells (2.1-fold at highest dose, P < .01). No significant increases in MF were detected in cauda sperm or seminiferous tubule cells collected 3 days post-exposure. Dose-response modelling suggested that the mutational response in male germ cells to BaP is sub-linear at low doses. Our results demonstrate that oral exposure to BaP causes spermatogonial stem cell mutations, that different phases of spermatogenesis exhibit varying sensitivities to BaP, with dividing spermatogonia representing a window of peak sensitivity, and that sampling spermatogenic cells from the seminiferous tubules at earlier time-points may underestimate germ cell mutagenicity. This information is critical to optimize the use of the international test guideline for transgenic rodent mutation assays for detecting germ cell mutagens. PMID:27208087

  4. Benzo(a)pyrene Is Mutagenic in Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells and Dividing Spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jason M; Beal, Marc A; Yauk, Carole L; Marchetti, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Although many environmental agents are established male germ cell mutagens, few are known to induce mutations in spermatogonial stem cells. Stem cell mutations are of great concern because they result in a permanent increase in the number of mutations carried in sperm. We investigated mutation induction during mouse spermatogenesis following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). MutaMouse males were given 0, 12.5, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg bw/day BaP for 28 days by oral gavage. Germ cells were collected from the cauda epididymis and seminiferous tubules 3 days after exposure and from cauda epididymis 42 and 70 days after exposure. This design enabled targeted investigation of effects on post-spermatogonia, dividing spermatogonia, and spermatogonial stem cells, respectively. BaP increased lacZ mutant frequency (MF) in cauda sperm after exposure of dividing spermatogonia (4.2-fold at highest dose, P < .01) and spermatogonial stem cells (2.1-fold at highest dose, P < .01). No significant increases in MF were detected in cauda sperm or seminiferous tubule cells collected 3 days post-exposure. Dose-response modelling suggested that the mutational response in male germ cells to BaP is sub-linear at low doses. Our results demonstrate that oral exposure to BaP causes spermatogonial stem cell mutations, that different phases of spermatogenesis exhibit varying sensitivities to BaP, with dividing spermatogonia representing a window of peak sensitivity, and that sampling spermatogenic cells from the seminiferous tubules at earlier time-points may underestimate germ cell mutagenicity. This information is critical to optimize the use of the international test guideline for transgenic rodent mutation assays for detecting germ cell mutagens. PMID:27208087

  5. Retinoic Acid Receptors Control Spermatogonia Cell-Fate and Induce Expression of the SALL4A Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Gely-Pernot, Aurore; Raverdeau, Mathilde; Teletin, Marius; Vernet, Nadège; Féret, Betty; Klopfenstein, Muriel; Dennefeld, Christine; Davidson, Irwin; Benoit, Gérard; Mark, Manuel; Ghyselinck, Norbert B

    2015-10-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is instrumental to male germ cell differentiation, but its mechanism of action remains elusive. To address this question, we have analyzed the phenotypes of mice lacking, in spermatogonia, all rexinoid receptors (RXRA, RXRB and RXRG) or all ATRA receptors (RARA, RARB and RARG). We demonstrate that the combined ablation of RXRA and RXRB in spermatogonia recapitulates the set of defects observed both upon ablation of RAR in spermatogonia. We also show that ATRA activates RAR and RXR bound to a conserved regulatory region to increase expression of the SALL4A transcription factor in spermatogonia. Our results reveal that this major pluripotency gene is a target of ATRA signaling and that RAR/RXR heterodimers are the functional units driving its expression in spermatogonia. They add to the mechanisms through which ATRA promote expression of the KIT tyrosine kinase receptor to trigger a critical step in spermatogonia differentiation. Importantly, they indicate also that meiosis eventually occurs in the absence of a RAR/RXR pathway within germ cells and suggest that instructing this process is either ATRA-independent or requires an ATRA signal originating from Sertoli cells. PMID:26427057

  6. Retinoic Acid Receptors Control Spermatogonia Cell-Fate and Induce Expression of the SALL4A Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Gely-Pernot, Aurore; Raverdeau, Mathilde; Teletin, Marius; Vernet, Nadège; Féret, Betty; Klopfenstein, Muriel; Dennefeld, Christine; Davidson, Irwin; Benoit, Gérard; Mark, Manuel; Ghyselinck, Norbert B.

    2015-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is instrumental to male germ cell differentiation, but its mechanism of action remains elusive. To address this question, we have analyzed the phenotypes of mice lacking, in spermatogonia, all rexinoid receptors (RXRA, RXRB and RXRG) or all ATRA receptors (RARA, RARB and RARG). We demonstrate that the combined ablation of RXRA and RXRB in spermatogonia recapitulates the set of defects observed both upon ablation of RAR in spermatogonia. We also show that ATRA activates RAR and RXR bound to a conserved regulatory region to increase expression of the SALL4A transcription factor in spermatogonia. Our results reveal that this major pluripotency gene is a target of ATRA signaling and that RAR/RXR heterodimers are the functional units driving its expression in spermatogonia. They add to the mechanisms through which ATRA promote expression of the KIT tyrosine kinase receptor to trigger a critical step in spermatogonia differentiation. Importantly, they indicate also that meiosis eventually occurs in the absence of a RAR/RXR pathway within germ cells and suggest that instructing this process is either ATRA-independent or requires an ATRA signal originating from Sertoli cells. PMID:26427057

  7. Quantitative detection of human spermatogonia for optimization of spermatogonial stem cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Y.; Thomas, A.; Schmidt, C.M.; Dann, C.T.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can human spermatogonia be detected in long-term primary testicular cell cultures using validated, germ cell-specific markers of spermatogonia? SUMMARY ANSWER Germ cell-specific markers of spermatogonia/spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are detected in early (1–2 weeks) but not late (> 6 weeks) primary testicular cell cultures; somatic cell markers are detected in late primary testicular cell cultures. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The development of conditions for human SSC culture is critically dependent on the ability to define cell types unequivocally and to quantify spermatogonia/SSCs. Growth by somatic cells presents a major challenge in the establishment of SSC cultures and therefore markers that define spermatogonia/SSCs, but are not also expressed by testicular somatic cells, are essential for accurate characterization of SSC cultures. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Testicular tissue from eight organ donors with normal spermatogenesis was used for assay validation and establishing primary testicular cell cultures. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Immunofluorescence analysis of normal human testicular tissue was used to validate antibodies (UTF1, SALL4, DAZL and VIM) and then the antibodies were used to demonstrate that primary testicular cells cultured in vitro for 1–2 weeks were composed of somatic cells and rare germ cells. Primary testicular cell cultures were further characterized by comparing to testicular somatic cell cultures using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (UTF1, FGFR3, ZBTB16, GPR125, DAZL, GATA4 and VIM) and flow cytometry (CD9 and SSEA4). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE UTF1, FGFR3, DAZL and ZBTB16 qRT–PCR and SSEA4 flow cytometry were validated for the sensitive, quantitative and specific detection of germ cells. In contrast, GPR125 mRNA and CD9 were found to be not specific to germ cells because they were also expressed in testicular somatic cell cultures. While the germ cell-specific markers were detected in

  8. Molecular Mechanisms Elicited by d-Aspartate in Leydig Cells and Spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, Maria Maddalena; Santillo, Alessandra; Falvo, Sara; Longobardi, Salvatore; Chieffi Baccari, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    A bulk of evidence suggests that d-aspartate (d-Asp) regulates steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in vertebrate testes. This review article focuses on intracellular signaling mechanisms elicited by d-Asp possibly via binding to the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in both Leydig cells, and spermatogonia. In Leydig cells, the amino acid upregulates androgen production by eliciting the adenylate cyclase-cAMP and/or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. d-Asp treatment enhances gene and protein expression of enzymes involved in the steroidogenic cascade. d-Asp also directly affects spermatogonial mitotic activity. In spermatogonial GC-1 cells, d-Asp induces phosphorylation of MAPK and AKT serine-threonine kinase proteins, and stimulates expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and aurora kinase B (AURKB). Further stimulation of spermatogonial GC-1 cell proliferation might come from estradiol/estrogen receptor β (ESR2) interaction. d-Asp modulates androgen and estrogen levels as well as the expression of their receptors in the rat epididymis by acting on mRNA levels of Srd5a1 and Cyp19a1 enzymes, hence suggesting involvement in spermatozoa maturation. PMID:27428949

  9. Molecular Mechanisms Elicited by d-Aspartate in Leydig Cells and Spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, Maria Maddalena; Santillo, Alessandra; Falvo, Sara; Longobardi, Salvatore; Chieffi Baccari, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    A bulk of evidence suggests that d-aspartate (d-Asp) regulates steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in vertebrate testes. This review article focuses on intracellular signaling mechanisms elicited by d-Asp possibly via binding to the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in both Leydig cells, and spermatogonia. In Leydig cells, the amino acid upregulates androgen production by eliciting the adenylate cyclase-cAMP and/or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. d-Asp treatment enhances gene and protein expression of enzymes involved in the steroidogenic cascade. d-Asp also directly affects spermatogonial mitotic activity. In spermatogonial GC-1 cells, d-Asp induces phosphorylation of MAPK and AKT serine-threonine kinase proteins, and stimulates expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and aurora kinase B (AURKB). Further stimulation of spermatogonial GC-1 cell proliferation might come from estradiol/estrogen receptor β (ESR2) interaction. d-Asp modulates androgen and estrogen levels as well as the expression of their receptors in the rat epididymis by acting on mRNA levels of Srd5a1 and Cyp19a1 enzymes, hence suggesting involvement in spermatozoa maturation. PMID:27428949

  10. Conservation of spermatogonial stem cell marker expression in undifferentiated felid spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Vansandt, Lindsey M; Livesay, Janelle L; Dickson, Melissa Joy; Li, Lei; Pukazhenthi, Budhan S; Keefer, Carol L

    2016-09-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are distinct in their ability to self-renew, transmit genetic information, and persist throughout the life of an individual. These characteristics make SSCs a useful tool for addressing diverse challenges such as efficient transgenic production in nonrodent, biomedical animal models, or preservation of the male genome for species in which survival of frozen-thawed sperm is low. A requisite first step to access this technology in felids is the establishment of molecular markers. This study was designed to evaluate, in the domestic cat (Felis catus), the expression both in situ and following enrichment in vitro of six genes (GFRA1, GPR125, ZBTB16, POU5F1, THY1, and UCHL1) that had been previously identified as SSC markers in other species. Antibodies for surface markers glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor alpha 1, G protein-coupled receptor 125, and thymus cell antigen 1 could not be validated, whereas Western blot analysis of prepubertal, peripubertal, and adult cat testis confirmed protein expression for the intracellular markers ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase 1, zinc finger and BTB domain-containing protein 16, and POU domain, class 5, transcription factor 1. Colocalization of the markers by immunohistochemistry revealed that several cells within the subpopulation adjacent to the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules and identified morphologically as spermatogonia, expressed all three intracellular markers. Studies performed on cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) and Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) testis exhibited a conserved expression pattern in protein molecular weights, relative abundance, and localization of positive cells within the testis. The expression of the three intracellular SSC marker proteins in domestic and wild cat testes confirms conservation of these markers in felids. Enrichment of marker transcripts after differential plating was also observed. These markers will

  11. Classification of several types of maturational arrest of spermatogonia according to Sertoli cell morphology: an approach to aetiology.

    PubMed

    Nistal, M; De Mora, J C; Paniagua, R

    1998-12-01

    Bilateral testicular biopsies and clinical histories from 34 adult men with maturational arrest of spermatogonia were examined. According to the morphology of Sertoli cell nuclei, five testicular types of spermatogonial maturational arrest were established. In type I lesion, Sertoli cells resembled the immature Sertoli cells of infant testes. These cells had a round, regularly outlined, dark nucleus with a small nucleolus. The seminiferous tubules showed no apparent lumen and a poorly developed lamina propria lacking in elastic fibres. This lesion was found in patients exhibiting a eunuchoid phenotype, with small tests and low serum levels of gonadotrophins and testosterone (hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism). Type II lesion showed morphologically normal, mature, adult Sertoli cells which had a pale, irregularly outlined nucleus, many often triangle-shaped, with a large, centrally located nucleolus. The seminiferous tubules were reduced in diameter and showed a few spermatocytes and spermatids. This lesion was found in patients with varicocoele, epididymitis, testicular trauma or idiopathic infertility. Serum FSH levels were normal or increased while LH and testosterone levels were normal. In type III lesion, Sertoli cells resembled the involuting Sertoli cells found in the testes of aging men, and displayed very infolded nuclei, with abundant dense chromatin patches and a large nucleolus. The seminiferous tubules showed a slightly dilated lumen and a normal tubular wall. The most relevant clinical findings in patients with this lesion were alcoholism, varicocoele, falciform cell anaemia, epididymitis and germ cell tumour. Serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were normal or increased while luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone levels were normal. Type IV lesion Sertoli cells presented with a de-differentiated appearance. These cells had a small, round euchromatic nucleus with a small nucleolus and vacuolated cytoplasm. The seminiferous tubules were

  12. Improving the Efficacy of Cryopreservation of Spermatogonia Stem Cells by Antioxidant Supplements.

    PubMed

    Aliakbari, Fereshte; Gilani, Mohamad Ali Sedighi; Amidi, Fardin; Baazm, Maryam; Korouji, Morteza; Izadyar, Fariborz; Yazdekhasti, Hosein; Abbasi, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    Cryopreservation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is an applicable method for young males seeking fertility preservation before starting a treatment. It increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and oxidative stress, which damages cellular structures. In this study, we added two antioxidants, catalase and α-tocopherol (α-TCP), to the basic freezing medium to evaluate their effects on the efficiency of SSCs. SSCs were isolated from testes of 3- to 6-day-old male mice using enzymatic digestion. The enrichment of isolated cells was evaluated by flow cytometry and Stra8 antibody. Catalase (40 μg/mL), or α-TCP (200 μg/mL) was added to the basic freezing medium. The cell viability was evaluated by the methylthiazoltetrazolium (MTT) assay. After thawing, cells were cultured for 1 month, and the expression pattern of specific genes of SSCs and the ability of the cells to restore spermatogenesis were used to determine the efficiency of the cryopreservation method. The survival rate of the frozen cells in the presence of catalase or α-TCP was significantly higher than the control group (p < 0.05). The number of colonies and their diameter measured after 1 month were significantly higher in the antioxidant groups than in the control group (p < 0.05). Gene expression and resumption of spermatogenesis also followed the same pattern. Thus, adding antioxidants to the basic freezing medium can be helpful in increasing the quality and viability of SSCs after cryopreservation. This new approach to stem cells cryopreservation can also be a promising strategy for fertility preservation in patients who suffer from malignancy. PMID:27055629

  13. Induction of reciprocal translocations in rhesus monkey stem-cell spermatogonia: effects of low doses and low dose rates

    SciTech Connect

    van Buul, P.P.; Richardson, J.F. Jr.; Goudzwaard, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The induction of reciprocal translocation in rhesus monkey spermatogonial stem cells was studied following exposure to low doses of acute X rays (0.25 Gy, 300 mGy/min) or to low-dose-rate X rays (1 Gy, 2 mGy/min) and gamma rays (1 Gy, 0.2 mGy/min). The results obtained at 0.25 Gy of X rays fitted exactly the linear extrapolation down from the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy points obtained earlier. Extension of X-ray exposure reduced the yield of translocations similar to that in the mouse by about 50%. The reduction to 40% of translocation rate after chronic gamma exposure was clearly less than the value of about 80% reported for the mouse over the same range of dose rates. Differential cell killing with ensuing differential elimination of aberration-carrying cells is the most likely explanation for the differences between mouse and monkey.

  14. Conditions for Long-Term Culture of Cattle Undifferentiated Spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Oatley, Melissa J; Kaucher, Amy V; Yang, Qi-En; Waqas, Muhammad Salman; Oatley, Jon M

    2016-07-01

    Continual and robust spermatogenesis relies on the actions of an undifferentiated spermatogonial population that contains stem cells. A remarkable feature of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is the capacity to regenerate spermatogenesis following isolation from a donor testis and transplantation into a permissive recipient testis. This capacity has enormous potential as a tool for enhancing the reproductive capacity of livestock, which can improve production efficiency. Because SSCs are a rare subset of the undifferentiated spermatogonial population, a period of in vitro amplification in number following isolation from donor testicular tissue is essential. Here, we describe methodology for isolation of a cell fraction from prepubertal bull testes that is enriched for undifferentiated spermatogonia and long-term maintenance of the cells in both the feeder cell coculture and the feeder-free format. To achieve this method, we derived bovine fetal fibroblasts (BFF) to serve as feeders for optimizing medium conditions that promote maintenance of bovine undifferentiated spermatogonia for at least 2 mo. In addition, we devised a feeder-free system with BFF-conditioned medium that sustained bovine undifferentiated spermatogonia for at least 1 mo in vitro. The methodologies described could be optimized to provide platforms for exponential expansion of bovine SSCs that will provide the numbers needed for transplantation into recipient testes. PMID:27251094

  15. Distinct purinergic signaling pathways in prepubescent mouse spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Fleck, David; Mundt, Nadine; Bruentgens, Felicitas; Geilenkirchen, Petra; Machado, Patricia A; Veitinger, Thomas; Veitinger, Sophie; Lipartowski, Susanne M; Engelhardt, Corinna H; Oldiges, Marco; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Spermatogenesis ranks among the most complex, yet least understood, developmental processes. The physiological principles that control male germ cell development in mammals are notoriously difficult to unravel, given the intricate anatomy and complex endo- and paracrinology of the testis. Accordingly, we lack a conceptual understanding of the basic signaling mechanisms within the testis, which control the seminiferous epithelial cycle and thus govern spermatogenesis. Here, we address paracrine signal transduction in undifferentiated male germ cells from an electrophysiological perspective. We identify distinct purinergic signaling pathways in prepubescent mouse spermatogonia, both in vitro and in situ. ATP-a dynamic, widespread, and evolutionary conserved mediator of cell to cell communication in various developmental contexts-activates at least two different spermatogonial purinoceptor isoforms. Both receptors operate within nonoverlapping stimulus concentration ranges, display distinct response kinetics and, in the juvenile seminiferous cord, are uniquely expressed in spermatogonia. We further find that spermatogonia express Ca(2+)-activated large-conductance K(+) channels that appear to function as a safeguard against prolonged ATP-dependent depolarization. Quantitative purine measurements additionally suggest testicular ATP-induced ATP release, a mechanism that could increase the paracrine radius of initially localized signaling events. Moreover, we establish a novel seminiferous tubule slice preparation that allows targeted electrophysiological recordings from identified testicular cell types in an intact epithelial environment. This unique approach not only confirms our in vitro findings, but also supports the notion of purinergic signaling during the early stages of spermatogenesis. PMID:27574293

  16. Data on in vivo phenotypes of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia stimulated by interstitial GDNF signals in mouse testes.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Aya; Kanai, Yoshiakira

    2016-09-01

    This article contains the data related to the research article "in vivo dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia stimulated by GDNF signals using a bead transplantation assay" (Uchida et al., 2016) [1]. A novel transplantation assay of growth factor-soaked beads into the mammalian testicular interstitium was developed, in order to examine the effects of various soluble factors on in vivo dynamics of the spermatogonia including spermatogonial stem cells (SSC). Here we provide the image data of GFRα1-positive stem/progenitor spermatogonia in mouse seminiferous tubules near the beads soaked in GDNF (glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor), one of the SSC niche factors. The data provide various phenotypes of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia induced by bead-derived GDNF signals, which are useful to understand the active state of GFRα1-positive stem/progenitor spermatogonia in vivo. PMID:27547806

  17. In vivo dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia stimulated by GDNF signals using a bead transplantation assay.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Aya; Kishi, Kasane; Aiyama, Yoshimi; Miura, Kento; Takase, Hinako M; Suzuki, Hitomi; Kanai-Azuma, Masami; Iwamori, Tokuko; Kurohmaru, Masamichi; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Kanai, Yoshiakira

    2016-08-01

    In mouse testes, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), a subpopulation of GFRα1 (GDNF family receptor-α1)-positive spermatogonia, are widely distributed along the convoluted seminiferous tubules. The proliferation and differentiation of the SSCs are regulated in part by local expression of GDNF (glial cell-derived neurotorphic factor), one of major niche factors for SSCs. However, the in vivo dynamics of the GDNF-stimulated GFRα1-positive spermatogonia remains unclear. Here, we developed a simple method for transplanting DiI-labeled and GDNF-soaked beads into the mouse testicular interstitium. By using this method, we examined the dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia in the tubular walls close to the transplanted GDNF-soaked beads. The bead-derived GDNF signals were able to induce the stratified aggregate formation of GFRα1-positive undifferentiated spermatogonia by day 3 post-transplantation. Each aggregate consisted of tightly compacted Asingle and marginal Apaired-Aaligned GFRα1-positive spermatogonia and was surrounded by Aaligned GFRα1-negative spermatogonia at more advanced stages. These data not only provide in vivo evidence for the inductive roles of GDNF in forming a rapid aggregation of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia but also indicate the usefulness of this in vivo assay system of various growth factors for the stem/progenitor spermatogonia in mammalian spermatogenesis. PMID:27255992

  18. Lung Cancer Stem Cell Lose Their Stemness Default State after Exposure to Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Pisanu, Maria Elena; Noto, Alessia; De Vitis, Claudia; Masiello, Maria Grazia; Coluccia, Pierpaolo; Proietti, Sara; Giovagnoli, Maria Rosaria; Ricci, Alberto; Giarnieri, Enrico; Cucina, Alessandra; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Bizzarri, Mariano; Mancini, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity influences cell differentiation by modifying the morphogenetic field in which stem cells are embedded. Preliminary data showed indeed that stem cells are committed to selective differentiation when exposed to real or simulated microgravity. Our study provides evidence that a similar event occurs when cancer stem cells (CSCs) are cultured in microgravity. In the same time, a significant increase in apoptosis was recorded: those data point out that microgravity rescues CSCs from their relative quiescent state, inducing CSCs to lose their stemness features, as documented by the decrease in ALDH and the downregulation of both Nanog and Oct-4 genes. Those traits were stably acquired and preserved by CSCs when cells were placed again on a 1 g field. Studies conducted in microgravity on CSCs may improve our understanding of the fundamental role exerted by biophysical forces in cancer cell growth and function. PMID:25276790

  19. AZFc deletions do not affect the function of human spermatogonia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nickkholgh, B.; Korver, C.M.; van Daalen, S.K.M.; van Pelt, A.M.M.; Repping, S.

    2015-01-01

    Azoospermic factor c (AZFc) deletions are the underlying cause in 10% of azoo- or severe oligozoospermia. Through extensive molecular analysis the precise genetic content of the AZFc region and the origin of its deletion have been determined. However, little is known about the effect of AZFc deletions on the functionality of germ cells at various developmental steps. The presence of normal, fertilization-competent sperm in the ejaculate and/or testis of the majority of men with AZFc deletions suggests that the process of differentiation from spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) to mature spermatozoa can take place in the absence of the AZFc region. To determine the functionality of AZFc-deleted spermatogonia, we compared in vitro propagated spermatogonia from six men with complete AZFc deletions with spermatogonia from three normozoospermic controls. We found that spermatogonia of AZFc-deleted men behave similar to controls during culture. Short-term (18 days) and long-term (48 days) culture of AZFc-deleted spermatogonia showed the same characteristics as non-deleted spermatogonia. This similarity was revealed by the same number of passages, the same germ cell clusters formation and similar level of genes expression of spermatogonial markers including ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal esterase L1 (UCHL1), zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16 (ZBTB16) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor alpha 1 (GFRA1), as well as germ cell differentiation markers including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), spermatogenesis and oogenesis specific basic helix-loophelix 2 (SOHLH2), v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) and synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SYCP3). The only exception was melanoma antigen family A4 (MAGEA4) which showed significantly lower expression in AZFc-deleted samples than controls in short-term culture while in long-term culture it was hardly detected in both AZFc-deleted and control

  20. A Simple Method for Labeling Human Embryonic Stem Cells Destined to Lose Undifferentiated Potency.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Ayako; Suga, Mika; Yanagihara, Kana; Itoh, Yumi; Takemori, Hiroshi; Furue, Miho K

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is a major source of cellular ATP. Its usage as an energy source varies, not only according to the extracellular environment, but also during development and differentiation, as indicated by the reported changes in the flux ratio of glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. The fluorescent probe JC-1 allows visualization of changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Strong JC-1 signals were localized in the differentiated cells located at the edge of H9 ES colonies that expressed vimentin, an early differentiation maker. The JC-1 signals were further intensified when individual adjacent colonies were in contact with each other. Time-lapse analyses revealed that JC-1-labeled H9 cells under an overconfluent condition were highly differentiated after subculture, suggesting that monitoring oxidative phosphorylation in live cells might facilitate the prediction of induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as ES cells, that are destined to lose their undifferentiated potency. PMID:26819254

  1. HEB-deficient T-cell precursors lose T-cell potential and adopt an alternative pathway of differentiation.

    PubMed

    Braunstein, Marsela; Anderson, Michele K

    2011-03-01

    Early thymocytes possess multilineage potential, which is progressively restricted as cells transit through the double-negative stages of T-cell development. DN1 cells retain the ability to become natural killer cells, dendritic cells, B cells, and myeloid cells as well as T cells, but these options are lost by the DN3 stage. The Notch1 signaling pathway is indispensable for initiation of the T-cell lineage and inhibitory for the B-cell lineage, but the regulatory mechanisms by which the T-cell fate is locked in are largely undefined. Previously, we discovered that the E-protein transcription factor HEBAlt promoted T-cell specification. Here, we report that HEB(-/-) T-cell precursors have compromised Notch1 function and lose T-cell potential. Moreover, reconstituting HEB(-/-) precursors with Notch1 activity enforced fidelity to the T-cell fate. However, instead of becoming B cells, HEB(-/-) DN3 cells adopted a DN1-like phenotype and could be induced to differentiate into thymic NK cells. HEB(-/-) DN1-like cells retained GATA3 and Id2 expression but had lower levels of the Bcl11b gene, a Notch target gene. Therefore, our studies have revealed a new set of interactions between HEB, Notch1, and GATA3 that regulate the T-cell fate choice in developing thymocytes. PMID:21189289

  2. Bleomycin, unlike other male-mouse mutagens, is most effective in spermatogonia, inducing primarily deletions.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Kerley, M K; Johnson, D K; Shelby, M D

    2000-08-21

    Dominant-lethal tests [P.D. Sudman, J.C. Rutledge, J.B. Bishop, W.M. Generoso, Bleomycin: female-specific dominant lethal effects in mice, Mutat. Res. 296 (1992) 205-217] had suggested that Bleomycin sulfate (Blenoxane), BLM, might be a female-specific mutagen. While confirming that BLM is indeed a powerful inducer of dominant-lethal mutations in females that fails to induce such mutations in postspermatogonial stages of males, we have shown in a specific-locus test that BLM is, in fact, mutagenic in males. This mutagenicity, however, is restricted to spermatogonia (stem-cell and differentiating stages), for which the specific-locus mutation rate differed significantly (P<0.008) from the historical control rate. In treated groups, dominant mutations, also, originated only in spermatogonia. With regard to mutation frequencies, this germ-cell-stage pattern is different from that for radiation and for any other chemical studied to date, except ethylnitrosourea (ENU). However, the nature of the spermatogonial specific-locus mutations differentiates BLM from ENU as well, because BLM induced primarily (or, perhaps, exclusively) multilocus deletions. Heretofore, no chemical that induced specific-locus mutations in spermatogonia did not also induce specific-locus as well as dominant-lethal mutations in postspermatogonial stages, making the dominant lethal test, up till now, predictive of male mutagenicity in general. The BLM results now demonstrate that there are chemicals that can induce specific-locus mutations in spermatogonia without testing positive in postspermatogonial stages. Thus, BLM, while not female-specific, is unique, (a) in its germ-cell-stage specificity in males, and (b) in inducing a type of mutation (deletions) that is atypical for the responding germ-cell stages (spermatogonia). PMID:10946246

  3. Expression of c-kit receptor and its autophosphorylation in immature rat type A spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Dym, M; Jia, M C; Dirami, G; Price, J M; Rabin, S J; Mocchetti, I; Ravindranath, N

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activation of the c-kit receptor, a specific receptor for kit ligand (stem cell factor, steel factor), in rat type A spermatogonia. Testes were obtained from 9-day-old rats, decapsulated, and then subjected to sequential enzymatic digestion. The mixture of testicular cell types was then separated by sedimentation velocity at unit gravity. The isolated type A spermatogonia were characterized by light and electron microscopy. They exhibited spherical nuclei containing several nucleoli and associated chromatin clumps and organelles generally in a perinuclear location similar to that found in the in vivo 9-day-old testis. The synthesis of the c-kit receptor by the spermatogonia was established by hybridization of total RNA with a specific cDNA for mouse c-kit receptor. Two mRNA transcripts migrating at 4.8 kb and 12 kb were observed. Localization of the c-kit receptor in the isolated cells was determined by immunocytochemistry using an antibody to c-kit protein. Specific staining for c-kit receptor was observed in the cytoplasm of the isolated type A spermatogonia. Furthermore, the presence of the c-kit receptor protein in the spermatogonia was confirmed by Western blot analysis using the same antibody. The antibody recognized the c-kit receptor at approximately 160 kDa. In an attempt to determine whether this receptor has a functional significance, we examined the effect of kit ligand on the phosphorylation of the c-kit receptor. The c-kit receptor appeared to be constitutively autophosphorylated on tyrosine at low basal levels, and upon stimulation with kit ligand, the amount of phosphorylated protein increased significantly. These observations indicate that kit ligand induces autophosphorylation of the c-kit receptor, which may lead to the activation of other cellular target proteins responsible for spermatogonial proliferation and/or differentiation. PMID:7536046

  4. Successful cryopreservation of spermatogonia in critically endangered Manchurian trout (Brachymystax lenok).

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungki; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2016-04-01

    Because of the lack of cryopreservation techniques for fish eggs and embryos, cryopreservation of fish spermatogonia and subsequent generation of eggs and sperm would be an exit strategy for the long-term preservation of genetic resources. This study aimed to optimize cryoprotectants, cooling rates, and thawing temperatures for slow freezing of spermatogonia from endangered Manchurian trout (Brachymystax lenok). Whole testes were frozen with a cryomedium containing 1.3 M methanol, 0.2 M trehalose, and 10% egg yolk at a cooling rate of -1 °C/min and then stored in liquid nitrogen for 2 days. After thawing at 30 °C in a water bath, testicular cells from thawed testes were intraperitoneally transplanted into allogeneic triploid hatchlings. Transplanted spermatogonia migrated toward and were incorporated into recipient gonads, where they underwent gametogenesis. Transplantation efficiency did not significantly differ between frozen and fresh testes, demonstrating that Manchurian trout spermatogonia can be successfully cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. PMID:26827783

  5. Isolation, identification and enrichment of type a spermatogonia from the testis of chinese cross-bred buffaloes (swamp × river).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S; Xiao, Y; Han, L; Hua, H; Riaz, H; Liang, A; Yang, L-G

    2013-06-01

    The proportion of type A spermatogonia in the isolated testis cells is a prerequisite for conducting experiments and the manipulation of these germ cells. Thus, this study was designed to examine the wide range of strategies for the isolation, identification and enrichment of type A spermatogonia in pre-pubertal buffalo calves (3-6 months). Histological findings revealed the presence of maximum number of type A spermatogonia at 5 months, which was further confirmed by DBA immunohistochemistry. In a newly modified strategy for the isolation of testis tissues, mincing followed by trituration and two rounds of digestion with collagenase, hyaluronidase and DNase yielded more than 95% testis cell population. Differential plating with laminin, poly-l-lysine and gelatin significantly (p < 0.05) affected the purity of type A spermatogonia. Among these extracellular matrix (ECMs) molecules, laminin and gelatin performed well and reached at a purity of 39.38 ± 1.21% and 32.15 ± 1.60%, respectively. In addition, combination of laminin and gelatin followed by Percoll centrifugation performed the best and yielded >90% type A spermatogonial purity. Moreover, viability of the cells was not affected (p > 0.05) irrespective of different enrichment methods. In conclusion, type A spermatogonia isolation and enrichment system was developed using different ECM molecules in buffaloes, which will aid in solving wide range of problems especially fertility-related problems and transgenic animal production in buffaloes. PMID:22928737

  6. Adiponectin and the systemic inflammatory response in weight-losing patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Nigel B; Brown, Duncan J F; Michael Wallace, A; McMillan, Donald C

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between adiponectin and the systemic inflammatory response in weight-losing patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Measurement of anthropometry, acute phase proteins, interleukin-6, leptin (total and free) and adiponectin were carried out on healthy subjects (n = 13) and non-small cell lung cancer patients with weight loss (n = 20). The groups were age and sex matched. Compared with the controls the cancer group had a lower BMI (p < 0.01), mid-upper arm circumference (p < 0.001), triceps skinfold thickness (p < 0.05) and circulating concentrations of albumin (p < 0.001), haemoglobin (p < 0.05), free and total leptin (p < 0.05) and adiponectin (p < 0.01). In contrast, the cancer group had elevated circulating concentrations of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein concentrations (p < 0.001). In the cancer group circulating adiponectin concentrations were significantly inversely correlated with both free (rs = -0.675, p = 0.001) and total leptin concentrations (rs = -0.690, p = 0.001). However, neither weight loss, interleukin-6 or C-reactive protein concentrations were correlated with either adiponectin, free or total leptin concentrations in the cancer group. These results suggest that adipokine production is normal and is unlikely to play a major role in the abnormal fat metabolism in weight-losing cancer patients. PMID:15242698

  7. Production of donor-derived offspring by allogeneic transplantation of spermatogonia in the yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata).

    PubMed

    Morita, Tetsuro; Kumakura, Naoki; Morishima, Kagayaki; Mitsuboshi, Toru; Ishida, Masashi; Hara, Takashi; Kudo, Satomi; Miwa, Misako; Ihara, Shoko; Higuchi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Yutaka; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2012-06-01

    Although the yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata) is the fish most commonly farmed in Japan, breeding of this species has not yet started. This is primarily due to the lack of sufficiently sophisticated methods for manipulating gametogenesis, which makes it difficult to collect gametes from specific dams and sires. If it were possible to produce large numbers of surrogate fish by transplanting germ cells isolated from donor individuals harboring desirable genetic traits, then the probability of acquiring gametes carrying the donor-derived haplotype would increase, and breeding programs involving this species might increase as a result. As a first step, we established a method for the allogeneic transplantation of yellowtail spermatogonia and the production of donor-derived offspring. Donor cells were collected from immature (10-month-old) yellowtail males with testes containing abundant type A spermatogonia, labeled with PKH26 fluorescent dye, and transferred into the peritoneal cavities of 8-day-old larvae. Fluorescence observation at 28 days post-transplantation revealed that PKH26-labeled cells were incorporated into recipients' gonads. To assess whether donor-derived spermatogonia could differentiate into functional gametes in the allogeneic recipient gonads, gametes collected from nine male and four female adult recipients were fertilized with wild-type eggs and milt. Analysis of microsatellite DNA markers confirmed that some of the first filial (F(1)) offspring were derived from donor fish, with the average contribution of donor-derived F(1) offspring being 66% and the maximum reaching 99%. These findings confirmed that our method was effective for transplanting yellowtail spermatogonia into allogeneic larvae to produce donor-derived offspring. PMID:22460666

  8. Epithelia suspended in collagen gels can lose polarity and express characteristics of migrating mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Greenburg, G; Hay, E D

    1982-10-01

    This study of epithelial-mesenchymal transformation and epithelial cell polarity in vitro reveals that environmental conditions can have a profound effect on the epithelial phenotype, cell shape, and polarity as expressed by the presence of apical and basal surfaces. A number of different adult and embryonic epithelia were suspended within native collagen gels. Under these conditions, cells elongate, detach from the explants, and migrate as individual cells within the three-dimensional lattice, a previously unknown property of well-differentiated epithelia. Epithelial cells from adult and embryonic anterior lens were studied in detail. Elongated cells derived from the apical surface develop pseudopodia and filopodia characteristic of migratory cells and acquire a morphology and ultrastructure virtually indistinguishable from that of mesenchymal cells in vivo. It is concluded from these experiments that the three-dimensional collagen gel can promote dissociation, migration, and acquisition of secretory organelles by differentiated epithelial cells, and can abolish the apical-basal cell polarity characteristic of the original epithelium. PMID:7142291

  9. Depletion of the spermatogonia from the seminiferous epithelium of the rhesus monkey after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; de Rooij, D.G.

    1988-03-01

    In unirradiated testes large differences were found in the total number of spermatogonia among different monkeys, but the number of spermatogonia in the right and the left testes of the same monkey appeared to be rather similar. During the first 11 days after irradiation with 0.5 to 4.0 Gy of X rays the number of Apale spermatogonia (Ap) decreased to about 13% of the control level, while the number of Adark spermatogonia (Ad) did not change significantly. A significant decrease in the number of Ad spermatogonia was seen at Day 14 together with a significant increase in the number of Ap spermatogonia. It was concluded that the resting Ad spermatogonia are activated into proliferating Ap spermatogonia. After Day 16 the number of both Ap and Ad spermatogonia decreased to low levels. Apparently the new Ap spermatogonia were formed by lethally irradiated Ad spermatogonia and degenerated while attempting to divide. The activation of the Ad spermatogonia was found to take place throughout the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. Serum FSH, LH, and testosterone levels were measured before and after irradiation. Serum FSH levels already had increased during the first week after irradiation to 160% of the control level. Serum LH levels increased between 18 and 25 days after irradiation. Serum testosterone levels did not change at all. The results found in the rhesus monkey are in line with those found in humans, but due to the presence of Ad spermatogonia they differ from those obtained in non-primates.

  10. Aging Stem Cells Lose the Capability to Distribute Damaged Proteins Asymmetrically.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the interplay between reversible epigenetic changes and potentially more difficult to reverse accumulation of damaged macromolecules is a central challenge in developing treatments for aging-associated dysfunction. One hypothesis is that epigenetic drift leads to subtle losses of homeostatic maintenance mechanisms, that in turn, lead to the accumulation of damaged macromolecules, which then further degrade homeostasis. A key mechanism of maintaining optimal cell function is asymmetrical division, whereby cellular damage is segregated away from cells that need to undergo further proliferation, such as stem cells. Such asymmetrical distribution of damaged macromolecules has been observed during cell division in many organisms, from yeast to human embryonic stem cells, and depends on diffusion barriers (DBs) in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In a recent study, these results have been extended to neural stem cells (NSCs), in which the ability of the ER DB to promote asymmetrical distribution of damaged proteins deteriorates with age. NSC function declines with age as proliferative capacity is reduced. The loss of asymmetric protein distribution correlates with the loss of NSC proliferative capacity. Ectopic expression of progerin, an altered form of lamin A, is associated with the premature aging disorder, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Progerin's expression also increases with normal aging due to mis-splicing, weakening the ER DB. Recent work suggests that many cell signaling pathway changes associated with HGPS are replicated during normal aging in cultured cells. Moreover, the detrimental changes associated with progerin expression in HGPS are partially reversible experimentally after treatment with statins, a farnesyltransferase inhibitor, a isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase inhibitor, or sulforaphane. It will be of great interest if these compounds can also reverse the aging-associated permeability of the ER

  11. Wnt some lose some: transcriptional governance of stem cells by Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Wen-Hui; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, Wnt/β-catenin signaling features prominently in stem cells and cancers, but how and for what purposes have been matters of much debate. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and its downstream transcriptional regulators in normal and malignant stem cells. We centered this review largely on three types of stem cells—embryonic stem cells, hair follicle stem cells, and intestinal epithelial stem cells—in which the roles of Wnt/β-catenin have been extensively studied. Using these models, we unravel how many controversial issues surrounding Wnt signaling have been resolved by dissecting the diversity of its downstream circuitry and effectors, often leading to opposite outcomes of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated regulation and differences rooted in stage- and context-dependent effects. PMID:25030692

  12. Neural stem cells exposed to BrdU lose their global DNA methylation and undergo astrocytic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Leonid; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine, BrdU) is a halogenated nucleotide of low toxicity commonly used to monitor DNA replication. It is considered a valuable tool for in vitro and in vivo studies, including the detection of the small population of neural stem cells (NSC) in the mammalian brain. Here, we show that NSC grown in self-renewing conditions in vitro, when exposed to BrdU, lose the expression of stem cell markers like Nestin, Sox2 and Pax6 and undergo glial differentiation, strongly up-regulating the astrocytic marker GFAP. The onset of GFAP expression in BrdU exposed NSC was paralleled by a reduced expression of key DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) and a rapid loss of global DNA CpG methylation, as we determined by our specially developed analytic assay. Remarkably, a known DNA demethylating compound, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (Decitabine), had similar effect on demethylation and differentiation of NSC. Since our key findings apply also to NSC derived from murine forebrain, our observations strongly suggest more caution in BrdU uses in stem cells research. We also propose that BrdU and its related substances may also open new opportunities for differentiation therapy in oncology. PMID:22379135

  13. Neural stem cells exposed to BrdU lose their global DNA methylation and undergo astrocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Leonid; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2012-07-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, BrdU) is a halogenated nucleotide of low toxicity commonly used to monitor DNA replication. It is considered a valuable tool for in vitro and in vivo studies, including the detection of the small population of neural stem cells (NSC) in the mammalian brain. Here, we show that NSC grown in self-renewing conditions in vitro, when exposed to BrdU, lose the expression of stem cell markers like Nestin, Sox2 and Pax6 and undergo glial differentiation, strongly up-regulating the astrocytic marker GFAP. The onset of GFAP expression in BrdU exposed NSC was paralleled by a reduced expression of key DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) and a rapid loss of global DNA CpG methylation, as we determined by our specially developed analytic assay. Remarkably, a known DNA demethylating compound, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine), had similar effect on demethylation and differentiation of NSC. Since our key findings apply also to NSC derived from murine forebrain, our observations strongly suggest more caution in BrdU uses in stem cells research. We also propose that BrdU and its related substances may also open new opportunities for differentiation therapy in oncology. PMID:22379135

  14. Genes Involved in Post-Transcriptional Regulation Are Overrepresented in Stem/Progenitor Spermatogonia of Cryptorchid Mouse Testes

    PubMed Central

    Orwig, Kyle E.; Ryu, Buom-Yong; Master, Stephen R.; Phillips, Bart T.; Mack, Matthias; Avarbock, Mary R.; Chodosh, Lewis; Brinster, Ralph L.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression and consequent biological activity of adult tissue stem cells are regulated by signals emanating from the local microenvironment (niche). To gain insights into the molecular regulation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), gene expression was characterized from SSCs isolated from their cognate niches of cryptorchid (stem cell-enriched), wild-type, and busulfan-treated (stem cell-depleted) mouse testes. Quantitative assessment of stem cell activity in each testis model was determined using an in vivo functional assay and correlated with gene expression using Affymetrix MGU74Av2 microarrays and the ChipStat algorithm optimized to detect gene expression from rare cells in complex tissues. We identified 389 stem/progenitor spermatogonia candidate genes, which exhibited significant overlap with genes expressed by embryonic, hematopoietic, and neural stem cells; enriched spermatogonia; and cultured SSCs identified in previous studies. Candidate cell surface markers identified by the microarray may facilitate the isolation and enrichment of stem and/or progenitor spermatogonia. Flow cytometric analyses confirmed the expression of chemokine receptor 2 (Ccr2) and Cd14 on a subpopulation cryptorchid testis cells (α6-integrin+, side scatterlo) enriched for SSCs. These cell surface molecules may mark progenitor spermatogonia but not SSCs because Ccr2+ and Cd14+ fractions failed to produce spermatogenesis upon transplantation to recipient testes. Functional annotation of candidate genes and subsequent immunohistochemistry revealed that proteins involved in post-transcriptional regulation are overrepresented in cryptorchid testes that are enriched for SSCs. Comparative analyses indicated that this is a recurrent biological theme among stem cells. PMID:18203673

  15. Protein-losing enteropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  16. Paracrine Wnt/β-catenin signaling mediates proliferation of undifferentiated spermatogonia in the adult mouse testis

    PubMed Central

    Takase, Hinako M.; Nusse, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) fuel the production of male germ cells but the mechanisms behind SSC self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation are still poorly understood. Using the Wnt target gene Axin2 and genetic lineage-tracing experiments, we found that undifferentiated spermatogonia, comprising SSCs and transit amplifying progenitor cells, respond to Wnt/β-catenin signals. Genetic elimination of β-catenin indicates that Wnt/β-catenin signaling promotes the proliferation of these cells. Signaling is likely initiated by Wnt6, which is uniquely expressed by neighboring Sertoli cells, the only somatic cells in the seminiferous tubule that support germ cells and act as a niche for SSCs. Therefore, unlike other stem cell systems where Wnt/β-catenin signaling is implicated in self-renewal, the Wnt pathway in the testis specifically contributes to the proliferation of SSCs and progenitor cells. PMID:26929341

  17. The regulatory repertoire of PLZF and SALL4 in undifferentiated spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Dawn L; Gao, Zhen; Mutoji, Kazadi; Song, Yuntao Charlie; Ruan, Jianhua; Hermann, Brian P

    2016-06-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) maintain spermatogenesis throughout adulthood through balanced self-renewal and differentiation, yet the regulatory logic of these fate decisions is poorly understood. The transcription factors Sal-like 4 (SALL4) and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF; also known as ZBTB16) are known to be required for normal SSC function, but their targets are largely unknown. ChIP-seq in mouse THY1(+) spermatogonia identified 4176 PLZF-bound and 2696 SALL4-bound genes, including 1149 and 515 that were unique to each factor, respectively, and 1295 that were bound by both factors. PLZF and SALL4 preferentially bound gene promoters and introns, respectively. Motif analyses identified putative PLZF and SALL4 binding sequences, but rarely both at shared sites, indicating significant non-autonomous binding in any given cell. Indeed, the majority of PLZF/SALL4 shared sites contained only PLZF motifs. SALL4 also bound gene introns at sites containing motifs for the differentiation factor DMRT1. Moreover, mRNA levels for both unique and shared target genes involved in both SSC self-renewal and differentiation were suppressed following SALL4 or PLZF knockdown. Together, these data reveal the full profile of PLZF and SALL4 regulatory targets in undifferentiated spermatogonia, including SSCs, which will help elucidate mechanisms controlling the earliest cell fate decisions in spermatogenesis. PMID:27068105

  18. In vitro differentiation of rat spermatogonia into round spermatids in tissue culture

    PubMed Central

    Reda, A.; Hou, M.; Winton, T.R.; Chapin, R.E.; Söder, O.; Stukenborg, J.-B.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do the organ culture conditions, previously defined for in vitro murine male germ cell differentiation, also result in differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic germ cells exhibiting specific markers for haploid germ cells? SUMMARY ANSWER We demonstrated the differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic cells in vitro, with emphasis on exhibiting, protein markers described for round spermatids. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Full spermatogenesis in vitro from immature germ cells using an organ culture technique in mice was first reported 5 years ago. However, no studies reporting the differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic germ cells exhibiting the characteristic protein expression profile or into functional sperm have been reported. STUDY DESIGN, SAMPLES/MATERIALS, METHODS Organ culture of testicular fragments of 5 days postpartum (dpp) neonatal rats was performed for up to 52 days. Evaluation of microscopic morphology, testosterone levels, mRNA and protein expression as measured by RT-qPCR and immunostaining were conducted to monitor germ cell differentiation in vitro. Potential effects of melatonin, Glutamax® medium, retinoic acid and the presence of epidydimal fat tissue on the spermatogenic process were evaluated. A minimum of three biological replicates were performed for all experiments presented in this study. One-way ANOVA, ANOVA on ranks and student's t-test were applied to perform the statistical analysis. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Male germ cells, present in testicular tissue pieces grown from 5 dpp rats, exhibited positive protein expression for Acrosin and Crem (cAMP (cyclic adenosine mono phosphate) response element modulator) after 52 days of culture in vitro. Intra-testicular testosterone production could be observed after 3 days of culture, while when epididymal fat tissue was added, spontaneous contractility of cultured seminiferous tubules could be observed after 21 days. However, no

  19. A G-quadruplex DNA structure resolvase, RHAU, is essential for spermatogonia differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, X; Ma, W; Nie, J; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Yao, G; Han, J; Xu, J; Hu, B; Du, Y; Shi, Q; Yang, Z; Huang, X; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) DNA and G4 DNA resolvase are involved in a variety of biological processes. To understand the biological function of G4 DNA structures and their resolvases in spermatogenesis, we investigated the distribution of G4 structures in mouse testis and identified their alterations during spermatogenesis. Meanwhile, we studied the function of RNA helicase associated with AU-rich element (RHAU), a G4 DNA resolvase, in spermatogenesis with a germ-cell-specific knockout mouse model. The results showed that the ablation of RHAU in germ cells caused the increase of G4 structures and thus resulted in the decrease of spermatogonial differentiation. c-kit, a spermatogonia differentiation-related gene, contains two G4 DNA motifs on its promoter. We found its expression was significantly downregulated in RHAU conditional knockout testis. A further analysis demonstrated that RHAU directly bound to the G4 structures to activate c-kit expression. We concluded that RHAU regulates spermatogonia differentiation by promoting c-kit expression via directly binding to the G4 DNA motifs c-kit promoter. PMID:25611385

  20. [Protein-losing enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Amiot, A

    2015-07-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy is a rare syndrome of gastrointestinal protein loss. The primary causes can be classified into lymphatic leakage due to increased interstitial pressure and increased leakage of protein-rich fluids due to erosive or non-erosive gastrointestinal disorders. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy should be considered in patients with chronic diarrhea and peripheral oedema. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy is most commonly based on the determination of fecal alpha-1 antitrypsin clearance. Most protein-losing enteropathy cases are the result of either lymphatic obstruction or a variety of gastrointestinal disorders and cardiac diseases, while primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is less common. Treatment of protein-losing enteropathy targets the underlying disease but also includes dietary modification, such as high-protein and low-fat diet along with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. PMID:25618488

  1. NIH Loses a Friend

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. NIH Loses a Friend Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Donald ... changingthefaceofmedicine/ . Sincerely, Donald West King, M.D., Chairman Friends of the National Library of Medicine Let Us ...

  2. Losing weight after pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... below the minimum number of calories you need. Breastfeeding If you are breastfeeding, you will want to lose weight slowly. Weight ... not affect your milk supply or your health. Breastfeeding makes your body burn calories. It helps you ...

  3. Conservation of avian germplasm by xenogeneic transplantation of spermatogonia from sexually mature donors.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ricardo J G; Napolitano, Angelo; Garcia-Pereira, Fernando L; Baldo, Caroline F; Suhr, Steven T; King, Louis E; Cibelli, Jose B; Karcher, Darrin M; McNiel, Elizabeth A; Perez, Gloria I

    2013-03-01

    Approximately 12.5% of all 9,920 extant bird species in the world are threatened with extinction, and yet conservation efforts through natural breeding of captive species continue to encounter difficulties. However, sperm cryopreservation and artificial insemination offer potential benefits over natural breeding, but their applicability is still limited in nondomestic species. In this study, we aimed to exploit the potential of germ cell xenotransplantation as an alternative tool for preserving germplasm of endangered birds. The study was designed to investigate whether transfer of either spermatogonia-enriched cell fraction (SEF) or crude testicular cell fraction (CTF) from adult Japanese quails (as a model for wild species) would result in recolonization of gamma-irradiated gonads of adult recipient chickens. One month after transplantation, 75% of recipients injected with SEF and 25% of recipients injected with CTF resumed spermatogenesis. However, it took more than 3 months for 33% of the negative controls to resume marginal production of sperm. Some SEF recipients produced more spermatozoa bearing head morphology compared with donor controls. DNA analysis using quail-specific primers did not detect donor's DNA in these recipients' semen. However, 6 months after xenotransplantation, presence of quail germ cells was demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction and by immunohistochemistry in 1 rooster injected with SEF. These findings indicate that spermatogonia from adult quails were capable of colonizing immunocompetent testis of adult chickens but failed to produce sufficient sperm. Despite this limitation, the present approach represents a potential conservation tool that may be used to rescue germ cells of endangered adult male birds. PMID:23025754

  4. Losing Libraries, Saving Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This summer, as public libraries continued to get budget hit after budget hit across the country, several readers asked for a comprehensive picture of the ravages of the recession on library service. In partnership with 2010 Movers & Shakers Laura Solomon and Mandy Knapp, Ohio librarians who bought the Losing Libraries domain name, "LJ" launched…

  5. Inter-relationships between single carbon units' metabolism and resting energy expenditure in weight-losing patients with small cell lung cancer. Effects of methionine supply and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sengeløv, H; Hansen, O P; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J; Nielsen, O J; Ovesen, L

    1994-01-01

    The one-carbon unit metabolism was investigated in 8 weight-losing patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC). At diagnosis, 6 of the 8 patients had elevated formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) excretion after a histidine load, suggesting a lack of one-carbon units. In accordance, a significant decrease of FIGLU excretion was observed in the patients after oral administration of DL-methionine for 4 days. The elevated FIGLU excretion was positively correlated to weight loss prior to diagnosis and negatively correlated to serum albumin at time of diagnosis. After 3 months of combination chemotherapy, FIGLU excretion was reduced in all patients except 1, who had progressive disease. Despite the elevated FIGLU excretions, all patients had normal blood folate levels. The resting energy expenditure (REE) was recorded in 7 patients, and a significant, positive correlation was observed between pretreatment FIGLU excretion and REE, although the REE measured in this group of patients was within the normal range. These data demonstrate an increased demand of "active" one-carbon units in energy consumption in a group of weight-losing cancer patients. The one-carbon unit deficit was reconditioned by oral administration of the one-carbon unit donor DL-methionine. PMID:7833132

  6. The cancer stem cell phenotype: You can't win until you learn how to lose it

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Bertoni, Hernando; Laterra, John

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells and their relatively differentiated progenitors coexist in dynamic equilibrium and are subject to bidirectional conversion. We recently showed that reprogramming transcription factors induce glioblastoma cells to become stem-like and tumor propagating via a mechanism involving changes in global DNA methylation and downregulation of miRNAs.

  7. Enrichment of Undifferentiated Type A Spermatogonia from Goat Testis Using Discontinuous Percoll Density Gradient and Differential Plating

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Banafsheh; Gifani, Minoo; Shirazi, Abolfazl; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan; Baradaran, Behzad; Naderi, Mohammad Mehdi; Behzadi, Bahareh; Borjian-Boroujeni, Sara; Sarvari, Ali; Lakpour, Niknam; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background The well documented source for adult multipotent stem cells is Spermatogonial Stem Cells (SSCs). They are the foundation of spermatogenesis in the testis throughout adult life by balancing self-renewal and differentiation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of percoll density gradient and differential plating on enrichment of undifferentiated type A spermatogonia in dissociated cellular suspension of goat testes. Additionally, we evaluated the separated fractions of the gradients in percoll and samples in differential plating at different times for cell number, viability and purification rate of goat SSCs in culture. Methods Testicular cells were successfully isolated from one month old goat testis using two-step enzymatic digestion and followed by two purification protocols, differential plating with different times of culture (3, 4, 5, and 6 hr) and discontinuous percoll density with different gradients (20, 28, 30, and 32%). The difference of percentage of undifferentiated SSCs (PGP9.5 positive) in each method was compared using ANOVA and comparison between the highest percentage of corresponding value between two methods was carried out by t-test using Sigma Stat (ver. 3.5). Results The highest PGP9.5 (94.6±0.4) and the lowest c-Kit positive (25.1±0.7) in Percoll method was significantly (p ≤ 0.001) achieved in 32% percoll gradient. While the corresponding rates in differential plating method for the highest PGP9.5 positive cells (81.3±1.1) and lowest c-Kit (17.1±1.4) was achieved after 5 hr culturing (p < 0.001). The enrichment of undifferentiated type A spermatogonia using Percoll was more efficient than differential plating method (p < 0.001). Conclusion Percoll density gradient and differential plating were efficient and fast methods for enrichment of type A spermatogonial stem cells from goat testes. PMID:24834311

  8. Eating Well and Losing Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smoking - Eating Well and Losing Weight • Tools & Resources Sodium & High Blood Pressure Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) ...

  9. Human spermatogonial stem cells: a possible origin for spermatocytic seminoma

    PubMed Central

    Waheeb, Reham; Hofmann, Marie-Claude

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, spermatogenesis is maintained throughout life by a small subpopulation of type A spermatogonia called spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). In rodents, SSCs, or Asingle spermatogonia, form the self-renewing population. SSCs can also divide into Apaired (Apr) spermatogonia that are predestined to differentiate. Apaired spermatogonia produce chains of Aaligned (Aal) spermatogonia that divide to form A1 to A4, then type B spermatogonia. Type B spermatogonia will divide into primary spermatocytes that undergo meiosis. In human, there are only two different types of A spermatogonia, the Adark and Apale spermatogonia. The Adark spermatogonia are considered reserve stem cells, whereas the Apale spermatogonia are the self-renewing stem cells. There is only one generation of type B spermatogonia before differentiation into spermatocytes, which makes human spermatogenesis less efficient than in rodents. Although the biology of human SSCs is not well known, a panel of phenotypic markers has recently emerged that is remarkably similar to the list of markers expressed in mice. One such marker, the orphan receptor GPR125, is a plasma membrane protein that can be used to isolate human SSCs. Human SSCs proliferate in culture in response to growth factors such as GDNF, which is essential for SSC self-renewal in mice and triggers the same signaling pathways in both species. Therefore, despite differences in the spermatogonial differentiation scheme, both species use the same genes and proteins to maintain the pool of self-renewing SSCs within their niche. Spermatocytic seminomas are mainly found in the testes of older men, and they rarely metastasize. It is believed that these tumors originate from a postnatal germ cell. Because these lesions can express markers specific for meiotic prophase, they might originate form a primary spermatocyte. However, morphological appearance and overall immunohistochemical profile of these tumors indicate that the cell of origin could also

  10. Protein-losing nephropathy in small animals.

    PubMed

    Littman, Meryl P

    2011-01-01

    Genetic and acquired defects of glomerular permselectivity may lead to proteinuria and protein-losing nephropathy (PLN). Morbidity and mortality from complications of PLN may be severe even before progression to azotemia and renal failure. Leakage of plasma proteins into the glomerular filtrate can damage tubular cells and the function of the entire nephron. Detection, localization, and treatment of proteinuria are important to decrease the clinical signs and complications of PLN and the likelihood of progression to renal failure. Thorough diagnostic work-ups help to identify subsets of glomerular disease and their response to specific treatment protocols. PMID:21251510

  11. The Effect of Dose Rate on the Frequency of Specific-Locus Mutations Induced in Mouse Spermatogonia is Restricted to Larger Lesions; a Retrospective Analysis of Historical Data

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Liane B; Hunsicker, Patricia R

    2012-01-01

    A series of 19 large-scale germ-cell mutagenesis experiments conducted several decades ago led to the conclusion that low-LET radiation delivered to mouse spermatogonia at dose rates of 0.8 R/min and below induced only about one-third as many specific-locus mutations as did single, acute exposures at 24 R/min and above. A two-hit origin of the mutations was deemed unlikely in view of the then prevailing evidence for the small size of genetic lesions in spermatogonia. Instead, the dose-rate effect was hypothesized to be the result of a repair system that exists in spermatogonia, but not in more mature male reproductive cells. More recent genetic and molecular studies on the marker genes have identified the phenotypes associated with specific states of the mutant chromosomes, and it is now possible retrospectively to classify individual past mutations as "large lesions" or "other lesions". The mutation-frequency difference between high and low dose rates is restricted to the large lesion mutations, for which the dose-curve slopes differ by a factor exceeding 3.4. For other lesion mutations, there is essentially no difference between the slopes for protracted and acute irradiations; induced other lesions frequencies per unit dose remain similar for dose rates ranging over more than 7 orders of magnitude. For large lesions, these values rise sharply at dose rates >0.8 R/min, though they remain similar within the whole range of protracted doses, failing to provide evidence for a threshold dose rate. The downward bend at high doses that had been noted for X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations as a whole and ascribed to a positive correlation between spermatogonial death and mutation load is now found to be restricted to large lesion mutations. There is a marked difference between the mutation spectra (distributions among the seven loci) for large lesions and other lesions. Within each class, however, the spectra are similar for acute and protracted irradiation.

  12. Losing and Saving and Losing Physics in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marder, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Texas has the second-largest population of the states, and played even a larger role in education reform movements of the past 15 years than its size would indicate. In the Fall of 2011, physicists across the country were surprised to learn that six university physics programs in Texas were threatened with closure because of small graduation numbers. Five of them ultimately closed. Many of the faculty at the institutions losing programs came together and formed a consortium that eventually made it possible to continue offering physics,by unconventional means, to their undergraduates. In the Spring of 2013 came an even larger change. Physics had been part of the recommended high school graduation plan in Texas. As part of a bill making sweeping changes to high school graduation requirements and accountability, the physics requirement was removed. Physics may partly be falling victim to the national focus on STEM, which suggests that the various disciplines of science are interchangeable and not individually important. None of the changes in Texas are hard to imagine coming to other states as well.

  13. You Can Lose What You Never Had

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Cam

    2016-01-01

    An often-used idiom states: "you can't lose what you never had." Yet contrary to this expression, it "is" possible to lose what you never had--at least when special education support is concerned. In Ontario, as in other jurisdictions, special education exists as a codified system. An ever-changing nexus of discourses and…

  14. How Did Mars Lose Its Atmosphere?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Though it doesn't look like a nice place to live now, Mars may have had an atmosphere more like ours on Earth! But how did it lose it? One way a planet can lose its atmosphere is through a process ...

  15. Peripheral blood cells from weight-losing cancer patients control the hepatic acute phase response by a primarily interleukin-6 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    O'Riordain, M G; Falconer, J S; Maingay, J; Fearon, K C; Ross, J A

    1999-10-01

    Cancer cachexia is associated with an elevated hepatic acute phase protein response, poor outcome and elevated cytokine production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). This study investigates the mechanism by which PBMC can induce a hepatic acute phase response. Supernatants from the peripheral blood cells of cancer patients induced significantly higher C-reactive protein (CRP) from hepatocytes (198+/-21 ng ml-1) than did supernatants from healthy controls (64+/-20, p<0.005). CRP production in vitro correlated with IL-6 production by PBMC from patients with pancreatic cancer (r=0.76, p<0.0001). This C-reactive protein production was reduced by 84% using neutralising antibody to IL-6 (p<0.001). There was a significant negative correlation between PBMC-induced hepatocyte C-reactive protein production and survival (r=-0.45, p<0.01). PBMC from cancer patients induce the hepatic acute phase response via a primarily IL-6-dependent mechanism. PMID:10493968

  16. Will Titan lose its veil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, V.

    2007-08-01

    . If the real stock (CH4)real (CH4)crit=1.65.1020 kg, than Titan will lose its veil inevitably (scenario of the "mosaic history"), otherwise (CH4)real (CH4)crit the veil survives down to Titan's dying day ("continuous history"). References [1] H. B. Niemann and 17-co-authors, Nature, 438, 779, (2005). [2] V. Dimitrov, Prog. React. Kin. Mech. 30, N4, 227, (2006).

  17. NRG1 and KITL Signal Downstream of Retinoic Acid in the Germline to Support Soma-Free Syncytial Growth of Differentiating Spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Karen M.; Medrano, Gerardo A.; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Hamra, F. Kent

    2015-01-01

    Defined culture systems supporting spermatogonial differentiation will provide experimental platforms to study spermatogenesis. However, germline-intrinsic signaling mechanisms sufficient to support spermatogonial differentiation without somatic cells remain largely undefined. Here, we analyzed EGF superfamily receptor and ligand diversity in rat testis cells, and delineated germline-intrinsic signaling via an ERBB3 co-transducer, ERBB2, as essential for retinoic acid-induced syncytial growth by differentiating spermatogonia. Like the ERBB2/3 agonist NRG1, we found KIT Ligand (KITL) robustly supported spermatogonial differentiation without serum or somatic cells. ERBB2 inhibitors failed to disrupt KITL-dependent spermatogonial development, and, KITL prevented ERBB3-deficient spermatogonial degeneration upon differentiation. Thus, we report NRG1 and KITL activate alternative pathways downstream of retinoic acid signaling in the germline that are essential for stem cells to undergo pre-meiotic steps of spermatogenesis in culture. Robust serum/soma-free spermatogonial differentiation opens new doors to study mammalian germ cell biology in culture, which will facilitate the discovery of spermatogenic factors that can drive meiotic progression in vitro. PMID:26500786

  18. Order Lunch Early, Lose Weight Later?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160190.html Order Lunch Early, Lose Weight Later? Study found those ... a new study suggests. Researchers examined the lunch orders of 690 employees using a corporate cafeteria and ...

  19. Medical Mystery: Losing the sense of smell

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hearing Disorders Medical Mystery: Losing the sense of smell Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... a teenager that took away her sense of smell. Photo courtesy of Malone University Imagine, if you ...

  20. 'Doctor, how can I lose weight?'.

    PubMed

    Bright-See, E

    1983-11-01

    Millions of Canadians are trying to lose weight. According to the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company's recently released height and weight tables, some of them don't need to lose weight from a health standpoint. For those who would benefit from weight loss, a good program includes a balanced, low fat, high fiber diet; exercise; behavior modification and moral support. Few of the popular books and self-help groups offer all these essential components. PMID:21283478

  1. Bubble-fusion professor loses faculty post

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Purdue University in the US has announced that Rusi Taleyarkhan - who was found guilty of scientific misconduct by the university in July - will lose his title of Al Bement Jr Professor of Nuclear Engineering and will not be able to advise graduate students for at least three years. Purdue has also denied an appeal from the researcher about the misconduct verdict.

  2. Transcription and imprinting dynamics in developing postnatal male germline stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, Saher Sue; Low, Diana H.P.; Yi, Chongil; Lee, Chee Leng; Oatley, Jon M.; Payne, Christopher J.; Carrell, Douglas T.; Guccione, Ernesto; Cairns, Bradley R.

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) progress through proliferative and developmental stages to populate the testicular niche prior to productive spermatogenesis. To better understand, we conducted extensive genomic profiling at multiple postnatal stages on subpopulations enriched for particular markers (THY1, KIT, OCT4, ID4, or GFRa1). Overall, our profiles suggest three broad populations of spermatogonia in juveniles: (1) epithelial-like spermatogonia (THY1+; high OCT4, ID4, and GFRa1), (2) more abundant mesenchymal-like spermatogonia (THY1+; moderate OCT4 and ID4; high mesenchymal markers), and (3) (in older juveniles) abundant spermatogonia committing to gametogenesis (high KIT+). Epithelial-like spermatogonia displayed the expected imprinting patterns, but, surprisingly, mesenchymal-like spermatogonia lacked imprinting specifically at paternally imprinted loci but fully restored imprinting prior to puberty. Furthermore, mesenchymal-like spermatogonia also displayed developmentally linked DNA demethylation at meiotic genes and also at certain monoallelic neural genes (e.g., protocadherins and olfactory receptors). We also reveal novel candidate receptor–ligand networks involving SSCs and the developing niche. Taken together, neonates/juveniles contain heterogeneous epithelial-like or mesenchymal-like spermatogonial populations, with the latter displaying extensive DNA methylation/chromatin dynamics. We speculate that this plasticity helps SSCs proliferate and migrate within the developing seminiferous tubule, with proper niche interaction and membrane attachment reverting mesenchymal-like spermatogonial subtype cells back to an epithelial-like state with normal imprinting profiles. PMID:26545815

  3. Transcription and imprinting dynamics in developing postnatal male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Saher Sue; Low, Diana H P; Yi, Chongil; Lee, Chee Leng; Oatley, Jon M; Payne, Christopher J; Carrell, Douglas T; Guccione, Ernesto; Cairns, Bradley R

    2015-11-01

    Postnatal spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) progress through proliferative and developmental stages to populate the testicular niche prior to productive spermatogenesis. To better understand, we conducted extensive genomic profiling at multiple postnatal stages on subpopulations enriched for particular markers (THY1, KIT, OCT4, ID4, or GFRa1). Overall, our profiles suggest three broad populations of spermatogonia in juveniles: (1) epithelial-like spermatogonia (THY1(+); high OCT4, ID4, and GFRa1), (2) more abundant mesenchymal-like spermatogonia (THY1(+); moderate OCT4 and ID4; high mesenchymal markers), and (3) (in older juveniles) abundant spermatogonia committing to gametogenesis (high KIT(+)). Epithelial-like spermatogonia displayed the expected imprinting patterns, but, surprisingly, mesenchymal-like spermatogonia lacked imprinting specifically at paternally imprinted loci but fully restored imprinting prior to puberty. Furthermore, mesenchymal-like spermatogonia also displayed developmentally linked DNA demethylation at meiotic genes and also at certain monoallelic neural genes (e.g., protocadherins and olfactory receptors). We also reveal novel candidate receptor-ligand networks involving SSCs and the developing niche. Taken together, neonates/juveniles contain heterogeneous epithelial-like or mesenchymal-like spermatogonial populations, with the latter displaying extensive DNA methylation/chromatin dynamics. We speculate that this plasticity helps SSCs proliferate and migrate within the developing seminiferous tubule, with proper niche interaction and membrane attachment reverting mesenchymal-like spermatogonial subtype cells back to an epithelial-like state with normal imprinting profiles. PMID:26545815

  4. Sleep Loses Out for Many Hooked on Video Games

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159434.html Sleep Loses Out for Many Hooked on Video Games ... Bloodborne," "Fallout" and "Call of Duty" worth losing sleep over? For plenty of gamers, the answer is ...

  5. The "Biggest Loser" Expounds on the Benefits of Losing Pounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Biggest Loser" Expounds on the Benefits of Losing Pounds Past Issues / Winter 2008 ... 186 pounds, going from 361 to 175 pounds. The Twins on Losing Weight Bill: "The only way ...

  6. Sleep Loses Out for Many Hooked on Video Games

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159434.html Sleep Loses Out for Many Hooked on Video Games ... Bloodborne," "Fallout" and "Call of Duty" worth losing sleep over? For plenty of gamers, the answer is ...

  7. The Persistence of Gaining and Losing Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, J. P.; Frye, A.

    2012-12-01

    Streams are commonly classified as "gaining" or "losing", according to their relationships with groundwater. However, the gaining and losing nature of a stream can vary in space and time. Understanding the spatial and temporal persistence of gaining and losing reaches is essential for understanding controls on stream health. This is particularly important during low flow conditions. Hydrologic models are typically designed to simulate high flows, and are challenged by low flow. This problem will become more important as hydrologists are asked to forecast the increasing occurrence of low flows as a consequence of climate change. Low flow discharges have been a focus of research as they are occurring earlier in the summer and have longer durations throughout the fall. A concern is how low flow will affect water resources and its users in the region when demand is at its highest. As low flow discharges continue to persist, debate over these rights will continue as well. This study we used chloride as a chemical tracer to monitor gains and losses of stream discharge of small watershed in Southwestern, Idaho. Six conductivity probes were spaced evenly 200m apart along a control reach 1200m in total length. Tracers were performed at least once a month at this site throughout the winter and spring and even more often during the summer dry down to understand the temporal changes occurring. Spatial variations were observed by performing basin wide tracers over a stream length of ~9km during the spring and late summer. Results show that stream baseflow is dependent on the winter snowpack and spring rains in order to recharge the deep groundwater systems and to create a hydrologic connection between the stream and local hillslopes. As a result, when winter snowpack's and spring rains are mild, this connectivity is cut off much sooner producing low flow conditions much earlier in the summer.

  8. Male ironman triathletes lose skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Baumann, Barbara; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether male triathletes in an Ironman triathlon lose body mass in the form of fat mass or skeletal muscle mass in a field study at the Ironman Switzerland in 27 male Caucasian non-professional Ironman triathletes. Pre- and post-race body mass, fat mass and skeletal muscle mass were determined. In addition, total body water, hematological and urinary parameters were measured in order to quantify hydration status. Body mass decreased by 1.8 kg (p< 0.05), skeletal muscle decreased by 1.0 kg (p< 0.05) whereas fat mass showed no changes. Urinary specific gravity, plasma urea and plasma volume increased (p< 0.05). Pre- to post-race change (Delta) in body mass was not associated with ? skeletal muscle mass. Additionally, there was no association between Delta plasma urea and Delta skeletal muscle mass; Delta plasma volume was not associated with Delta total body water (p< 0.05). We concluded that male triathletes in an Ironman triathlon lose 1.8 kg of body mass and 1 kg of skeletal muscle mass, presumably due to a depletion of intramyocellular stored glycogen and lipids. PMID:20199992

  9. Comparison of sister chromatid exchange induction in murine germinal and somatic cells by gamma radiation exposure in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Morales-Ramirez, P.; Mendiola-Cruz, M.T.; Vallarino-Kelly, T.; Rodriguez-Reyes, R.

    1994-12-31

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction by gamma rays was determined in speratogonia irradiated before or after BrdU incorporation. Furthermore, the comparison of responses obtained in spermatogonia, bone marrow and salivary gland cells was carried out in the cells irradiated after BrdU incorporation, a condition which permits a higher SCE induction. Results indicate that gamma ray exposure of spermatogonia could induce a significant increase in SCE frequency with doses as low as 0.27 Gy, either before or after BrdU incorporation. However, the increase caused by radiation exposure after BrdU incorporation in spermatogonia was nearly three times lower than that obtained in both bone marrow and salivary gland cells. These data suggest that spermatogonia are either more efficient in repairing the gamma ray-induced lesions involved in SCE production or that these cells are less prone to the induction of such lesions. 53 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Maintenance of potential spermatogonial stem cells in vitro by GDNF treatment in a chondrichthyan model (Scyliorhinus canicula L.).

    PubMed

    Gautier, Aude; Bosseboeuf, Adrien; Auvray, Pierrick; Sourdaine, Pascal

    2014-10-01

    Previous work in dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula, has identified the testicular germinative area as the spermatogonial stem cell niche. In the present study, an in vitro co-culture system of spermatogonia and somatic cells from the germinative area was developed. Long-term maintenance of spermatogonia has been successful, and addition of GDNF has promoted the development of clones of spermatogonia expressing stem cell characteristics such as alkaline phosphatase activity and has allowed maintenance of self-renewal in spermatogonia for at least 5 mo under culture conditions, notably by decreasing cell apoptosis. Furthermore, clones of spermatogonia expressed the receptor of GDNF, GFRalpha1, which is consistent with the effect of GDNF on cells despite the lack of identification of a GDNF sequence in the dogfish's transcriptome. However, a sequence homologous to artemin has been identified, and in silico analysis supports the hypothesis that artemin could replace GDNF in the germinative area in dogfish. This study, as the first report on long-term in vitro maintenance of spermatogonia in a chondrichthyan species, suggests that the GFRalpha1 signaling function in self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells is probably conserved in gnathostomes. PMID:25143357

  11. Is the Fungus Magnaporthe Losing DNA Methylation?

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Ken-ichi; Van Vu, Ba; Kadotani, Naoki; Tanaka, Masaki; Murata, Toshiki; Shiina, Kohta; Chuma, Izumi; Tosa, Yukio; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The long terminal repeat retrotransposon, Magnaporthe gypsy-like element (MAGGY), has been shown to be targeted for cytosine methylation in a subset of Magnaporthe oryzae field isolates. Analysis of the F1 progeny from a genetic cross between methylation-proficient (Br48) and methylation-deficient (GFSI1-7-2) isolates revealed that methylation of the MAGGY element was governed by a single dominant gene. Positional cloning followed by gene disruption and complementation experiments revealed that the responsible gene was the DNA methyltransferase, MoDMT1, an ortholog of Neurospora crassa Dim-2. A survey of MAGGY methylation in 60 Magnaporthe field isolates revealed that 42 isolates from rice, common millet, wheat, finger millet, and buffelgrass were methylation proficient while 18 isolates from foxtail millet, green bristlegrass, Japanese panicgrass, torpedo grass, Guinea grass, and crabgrass were methylation deficient. Phenotypic analyses showed that MoDMT1 plays no major role in development and pathogenicity of the fungus. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the average copy number of genomic MAGGY elements was not significantly different between methylation-deficient and -proficient field isolates even though the levels of MAGGY transcript were generally higher in the former group. MoDMT1 gene sequences in the methylation-deficient isolates suggested that at least three independent mutations were responsible for the loss of MoDMT1 function. Overall, our data suggest that MoDMT1 is not essential for the natural life cycle of the fungus and raise the possibility that the genus Magnaporthe may be losing the mechanism of DNA methylation on the evolutionary time scale. PMID:23979580

  12. Antimutagenic properties of selected radioprotective drug mixtures with regard to X-ray-induced reciprocal translocations in mouse spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Benova, D K

    1986-01-01

    The radioprotective drugs AET, serotonin, and ATP were tested for antimutagenic activity against induction by 4.0 Gy X-rays of reciprocal translocations in mouse spermatogonia. Single drugs administered in doses of 8, 24 and 360 mg/kg b.wt., respectively, had no effect on translocation yields recorded in diakinesis-metaphase I spermatocytes. Two-drug mixtures afforded insignificant protection. Three-drug mixtures, however, were found to reduce radiation damage considerably, and the extent of protection was dependent in part on the amount of ATP. The best effect was obtained with formulations of serotonin-AET-ATP at the following doses, respectively: 8 + 24 + 360 mg/kg, 16 + 24 + 336 mg/kg, and 16 + 32 + 264 mg/kg. Less effective were the serotonin-AET-ATP formulations: 16 + 32 + 120 mg/kg, and 8 + 24 + 480 mg/kg. Treatment with drugs omitting radiation exposure was observed to raise, though insignificantly, the level of spontaneous translocation frequency. PMID:3941667

  13. 21 CFR 182.1745 - Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. 182.1745 Section... GRAS Food Substances § 182.1745 Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. (a) Product. Sodium carboxy-methylcellulose is the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose not less than 99.5 percent on a dry-weight...

  14. 21 CFR 182.1745 - Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. 182.1745 Section... (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1745 Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. (a) Product. Sodium carboxy-methylcellulose is the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose...

  15. 21 CFR 182.1745 - Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. 182.1745 Section... GRAS Food Substances § 182.1745 Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. (a) Product. Sodium carboxy-methylcellulose is the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose not less than 99.5 percent on a dry-weight...

  16. 21 CFR 182.1745 - Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. 182.1745 Section... GRAS Food Substances § 182.1745 Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. (a) Product. Sodium carboxy-methylcellulose is the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose not less than 99.5 percent on a dry-weight...

  17. Reduction of spermatogonia and testosterone in rat testes flown on Space Lab-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, Delbert E.; Stevenson, J.; Black, S.; Sapp, W.; Williams, C.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of space flight on rat testes were investigated. The weight, spermatogonial cell count, and testosterone levels in six rats flown on Space Lab-3 were measured. It is observed that compared to ground control rats the average weight loss was 7.1 percent and the spermatogonial cell count decreased by 7.5 percent. The data reveal that the testosterone level for large control rats was 9.13 ng/ml and 0.31 ng/ml for flight rats; and 2.54 ng/ml and 0.233 ng/ml for smaller control and flight rats, respectively. It is noted that spermatogenesis and testosterone production are reduced during spaceflight.

  18. Study of the potential spermatogonial stem cell compartment in dogfish testis, Scyliorhinus canicula L.

    PubMed

    Loppion, Geraldine; Crespel, Amélie; Martinez, Anne-Sophie; Auvray, Pierrïck; Sourdaine, Pascal

    2008-06-01

    In the lesser-spotted dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula), spermatogenesis takes place within spermatocysts made up of Sertoli cells associated with stage-synchronized germ cells. As shown in testicular cross sections, cysts radiate in maturational order from the germinative area, where they are formed, to the opposite margin of the testis, where spermiation occurs. In the germinative zone, which is located in a specific area between the tunica albuginea of the testis and the dorsal testicular vessel, individual large spermatogonia are surrounded by elongated somatic cells. The aim of this study has been to define whether these spermatogonia share characteristics with spermatogonial stem cells described in vertebrate and non-vertebrate species. We have studied their ultrastructure and their mitotic activity by 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunodetection. Additionally, immunodetection of c-Kit receptor, a marker of differentiating spermatogonia in rodents, and of alpha- and beta-spectrins, as constituents of the spectrosome and the fusome, has been performed. Ultrastructurally, nuclei of stage I spermatogonia present the same mottled aspect in dogfish as undifferentiated spermatogonia nuclei in rodents. Moreover, intercellular bridges are not observed in dogfish spermatogonia, although they are present in stage II spermatogonia. BrdU and PCNA immunodetection underlines their low mitotic activity. The presence of a spectrosome-like structure, a cytological marker of the germline stem cells in Drosophila, has been observed. Our results constitute the first step in the study of spermatogonial stem cells and their niche in the dogfish. PMID:18340468

  19. Antimutagenic properties of WR 2721 and of a radioprotective mixture, ATP-AET-serotonin, with regard to X ray induced reciprocal translocations in mouse spermatogonia

    SciTech Connect

    Benova, D.

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment by intraperitoneal administration of WR 2721 at 400 mg/kg body weight in mice receiving 4.0 Gy X rays was found to have an appreciable antimutagenic effect with regard to reciprocal translocation induction in spermatogonia. The effectiveness of the product tested proved superior to that of a radioprotective mixture of ATP-AET-serotonin given at optimal dose ratio--360, 24, and 8 mg/kg body weight, respectively. The RF (Reduction Factor) was 2.4 for WR 2721 and 1.8 for the mixture. The effect observed indicated WR 2721 to have potential capabilities for reducing the genetic risk of radiation in male individuals.

  20. Antimutagenic properties of WR 2721 and of a radioprotective mixture, ATP-AET-serotonin, with regard to X ray induced reciprocal translocations in mouse spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Benova, D

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment by intraperitoneal administration of WR 2721 at 400 mg/kg body weight in mice receiving 4.0 Gy X rays was found to have an appreciable antimutagenic effect with regard to reciprocal translocation induction in spermatogonia. The effectiveness of the product tested proved superior to that of a radioprotective mixture of ATP-AET-serotonin given at optimal dose ratio--360, 24, and 8 mg/kg body weight, respectively. The RF (Reduction Factor) was 2.4 for WR 2721 and 1.8 for the mixture. The effect observed indicated WR 2721 to have potential capabilities for reducing the genetic risk of radiation in male individuals. PMID:3027009

  1. Eliminating malignant contamination from therapeutic human spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Dovey, Serena L.; Valli, Hanna; Hermann, Brian P.; Sukhwani, Meena; Donohue, Julia; Castro, Carlos A.; Chu, Tianjiao; Sanfilippo, Joseph S.; Orwig, Kyle E.

    2013-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) transplantation has been shown to restore fertility in several species and may have application for treating some cases of male infertility (e.g., secondary to gonadotoxic therapy for cancer). To ensure safety of this fertility preservation strategy, methods are needed to isolate and enrich SSCs from human testis cell suspensions and also remove malignant contamination. We used flow cytometry to characterize cell surface antigen expression on human testicular cells and leukemic cells (MOLT-4 and TF-1a). We demonstrated via FACS that EpCAM is expressed by human spermatogonia but not MOLT-4 cells. In contrast, HLA-ABC and CD49e marked >95% of MOLT-4 cells but were not expressed on human spermatogonia. A multiparameter sort of MOLT-4–contaminated human testicular cell suspensions was performed to isolate EpCAM+/HLA-ABC–/CD49e– (putative spermatogonia) and EpCAM–/HLA-ABC+/CD49e+ (putative MOLT-4) cell fractions. The EpCAM+/HLA-ABC–/CD49e– fraction was enriched for spermatogonial colonizing activity and did not form tumors following human-to–nude mouse xenotransplantation. The EpCAM–/HLA-ABC+/CD49e+ fraction produced tumors following xenotransplantation. This approach could be generalized with slight modification to also remove contaminating TF-1a leukemia cells. Thus, FACS provides a method to isolate and enrich human spermatogonia and remove malignant contamination by exploiting differences in cell surface antigen expression. PMID:23549087

  2. 'I want to lose weight': Early risk for disordered eating?

    PubMed

    Gusella, Joanne; Goodwin, Jacqueline; van Roosmalen, Erica

    2008-02-01

    The present study examined the risk of disordered eating and its relation to attempts to lose weight by surveying a Maritime Canadian sample of 247 girls and boys in grades 6, 7 and 8. Current attempts to lose weight were highest in grade 8 girls (41% of girls and 9% of boys) compared with grade 6 (14% of girls and 24% of boys) and grade 7 (21% of girls and 13% of boys) children. Of those trying to lose weight, 71.4% were in the average range for weight and height, 12.2% were overweight and 16.3% were obese. The Children's version of the Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT) was used to assess eating attitudes and behaviours, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale was used as a measure of self-esteem. The results showed that 8.5% of the children fell in the high-risk group for disordered eating (ChEAT score 20 or higher). Those in the high-risk group were significantly more likely to fear being overweight (90%), to have tried to lose weight in the past (81%), to be currently trying to lose weight (76%), and to have engaged in binge eating (38%) and self-induced vomiting (24%). The best predictor of membership in the high-risk group for girls was current attempts at weight loss and having lower self-esteem. Only two boys fell in the high-risk group. Body mass index and current weight category (underweight, average, overweight and obese) could not explain the differences between the low- and high-risk groups. Knowing that a child is trying to lose weight can aid in identifying youth at risk for disordered eating, and can provide an opportunity for preventive education. PMID:19183713

  3. Mass-losing red giants in open clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1987-01-01

    Mass-losing stars in open clusters with main-sequence turn-offs at intermediate mass have been searched for by using the IRAS data base. The absence of many strong 60 micron sources in open clusters implies that intermediate-mass stars lose much of their mass during an intense wind phase of rather short duration. For stars of about seven solar masses, this phase, if it exists at all, lasts for not much more than 100,000 yr. For stars of about four solar masses, the intense wind phase appears to last considerably less than 10 million yr; it may well last for less than a million yr.

  4. Meaning-Making through Narrative: On Not Losing the Plot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Terry

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the process of meaning-making from within the "narrative" mode and in particular considers the difficulty or even impossibility, in certain kinds of organisational and social situations, of constructing viable narratives. This experience is sometimes referred to as "losing the plot", hence the subtitle of the article. When…

  5. Learning to Lose: Weight Loss Classes and Personal Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Adult learning takes place not only in educational organisations, but through participation in leisure and special interest groups. Commercially operated weight management organisations recruit large numbers of adults to their classes to learn how to eat healthily and lose weight. They publish readers' "real life" success stories in their…

  6. Nothing to lose: why early career scientists make ideal entrepreneurs.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N

    2014-12-01

    An entrepreneurial movement within science strives to invert the classical trajectory of academic research careers by positioning trainees at the apex of burgeoning industries. Young scientists today have nothing to lose and everything to gain by pursuing this 'third road', and academic institutes and established companies only stand to benefit from supporting this emerging movement of discovery research with economic purpose. PMID:25458606

  7. Glycerol dynamics in weight-losing cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Edén, E; Edström, S; Bennegárd, K; Lindmark, L; Lundholm, K

    1985-02-01

    This study was designed to show whether weight-losing cancer patients have an elevated glycerol turnover. Four groups of patients were examined: weight-losing cancer patients, weight-losing patients without cancer, cancer patients without weight loss, and weight-stable and well-nourished hospitalized control patients. Glycerol was infused intravenously at three different rates (200, 400, and 800 mumol/hr/kg body weight) after an overnight fast. This allowed measurement of clearance and plasma glycerol turnover. Weight-losing cancer patients (group 1) had an almost threefold higher glycerol turnover per kilogram of body weight compared with malnourished and well-nourished noncancer patients. However, both malnourished cancer and noncancer patients had an elevated glycerol turnover compared with well-nourished patients when glycerol turnover was related to whole body lipids. The results how that progressive clinical cancer is associated with an elevated plasma glycerol turnover, probably indicating an increased whole body lipolysis. This may explain the loss of body fat during the development of cancer cachexia. PMID:4038560

  8. They Snooze, You Lose: The Educator's Guide to Successful Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmark, Lynell

    2011-01-01

    In today's increasingly visual world, the art of giving presentations is a much-needed talent. "They Snooze, You Lose", provides a comprehensive guide made especially for teachers and administrators who want to become presentation "stars" in their classrooms, at board meetings, or any time they are in front of an audience. This book describes how…

  9. We're Losing Our Minds: Rethinking American Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.; Hersh, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    America is being held back by the quality and quantity of learning in college. This is a true educational emergency! Many college graduates cannot think critically, write effectively, solve problems, understand complex issues, or meet employers' expectations. We are losing our minds--and endangering our social, economic, and scientific leadership.…

  10. 5 CFR 531.241 - Retaining and losing GM status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... retained rate under 5 CFR part 536. (A retained grade is not considered in determining whether a GM employee has been reduced in grade. See 5 CFR 536.205.) ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Retaining and losing GM status....

  11. The ambivalence of losing weight after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Warholm, Christine; Øien, Aud Marie; Råheim, Målfrid

    2014-01-01

    This study is grounded in a phenomenological lifeworld perspective. It aims at providing rich descriptions of lived experience of the process of losing weight after obesity surgery. Two women participated in in-depth interviews four times each during the first postoperative year. Based on the women’s experiences, a meaning structure—the ambivalence of losing weight after obesity surgery—was identified across the women’s processes of change. This consisted of five core themes: movement and activity—freedom but new demands and old restraints; eating habits and digestion—the complexity of change; appearance—smaller, but looser; social relations—stability and change; and being oneself—vulnerability and self-assurance. These core themes changed over time in terms of dominance. The experience of ambivalence is discussed according to a phenomenological perspective of the body as lived experience. PMID:24480033

  12. FACS and MACS sorting strategies to isolate and enrich human spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Valli, Hanna; Sukhwani, Meena; Dovey, Serena L.; Peters, Karen A.; Donohue, Julia; Castro, Carlos A.; Chu, Tianjiao; Marshall, Gary R.; Orwig, Kyle E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Determine the molecular characteristics of human spermatogonia and optimize methods to enrich spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). Design Laboratory study using human tissues Setting Research institute Patient(s)/Animal(s) Normal adult human testicular tissue. Interventions Human testicular tissue was fixed or digested with enzymes to produce a cell suspension. Human testis cells were fractionated by FACS and MACS. Main Outcome Measure(s) Immunostaining for selected markers, human-to-nude mouse xenotransplantation assay. Results Immunohistochemistry co-staining revealed the relative expression patterns of SALL4, UTF1, ZBTB16, UCHL1 and ENO2 in human undifferentiated spermatogonia as well as the extent of overlap with the differentiation marker, KIT. Whole mount analyses revealed that human undifferentiated spermatogonia (UCHL1+) were typically arranged in clones of 1–4 cells while differentiated spermatogonia (KIT+) were typically arranged in clones of 8 or more cells. The ratio of undifferentiated to differentiated spermatogonia is greater in humans than in rodents. SSC colonizing activity was enriched in the THY1dim and ITGA6+ fractions of human testes sorted by FACS. ITGA6 was effective for sorting human SSCs by MACS; THY1 and EPCAM were not. Conclusions Human spermatogonial differentiation correlates with increased clone size and onset of KIT expression, similar to rodents. The undifferentiated to differentiated developmental dynamics in human spermatogonia is different than rodents. THY1, ITGA6 and EPCAM can be used to enrich human SSC colonizing activity by FACS, but only ITGA6 is amenable to high throughput sorting by MACS. PMID:24890267

  13. Losing a valued member of the medical practice team.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Losing a valued member of your staff can be disruptive, painful, and costly to your medical practice. And despite your best intentions and impeccable employee management policies and skills, things will happen beyond your control, and people move on. Being prepared for that possibility will help you minimize and contain the damage and move your practice forward. This article suggests 15 strategies that you can use to mitigate the effects of losing a valued employee. These include strategies to protect your practice's interests and several that will smooth the transition for your remaining staff. This article also describes 10 ways that losing a valued employee can impact a practice. It offers 10 additional strategies to help you cope with the death of an employee, one of the most difficult challenges a practice manager may ever face. This article further suggests several easy-to-implement practice management techniques that will help you soften the blow of employee turnover. It offers a sample farewell letter to announce an employee's departure from your practice and suggests six knowledge transfer questions to ask before the employee leaves. Finally, this article provides a comprehensive list of more than 30 thoughtful, eye-opening, and revealing questions that you can ask in an employee exit interview or exit survey. PMID:25807601

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Pluripotent Human Spermatogonial Stem Cell-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kossack, Nina; Meneses, Juanito; Shefi, Shai; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Chavez, Shawn; Nicholas, Cory; Gromoll, Joerg; Turek, Paul J; Reijo-Pera, Renee A

    2009-01-01

    Several reports have documented the derivation of pluripotent cells (multipotent germline stem cells) from spermatogonial stem cells obtained from the adult mouse testis. These spermatogonia-derived stem cells express embryonic stem cell markers and differentiate to the three primary germ layers, as well as the germline. Data indicate that derivation may involve reprogramming of endogenous spermatogonia in culture. Here, we report the derivation of human multipotent germline stem cells (hMGSCs) from a testis biopsy. The cells express distinct markers of pluripotency, form embryoid bodies that contain derivatives of all three germ layers, maintain a normal XY karyotype, are hypomethylated at the H19 locus, and express high levels of telomerase. Teratoma assays indicate the presence of human cells 8 weeks post-transplantation but limited teratoma formation. Thus, these data suggest the potential to derive pluripotent cells from human testis biopsies but indicate a need for novel strategies to optimize hMGSC culture conditions and reprogramming. PMID:18927477

  15. Age at which the long-cycling spermatogonial stem-cell population is established in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Oakberg, E.F.

    1981-01-01

    The long-cycling A/sub 5/ spermatogonia are the cells of primary importance in estimating the reproductive and genetic hazards of radiation, chemicals, and pollutants in mammals. This addresses the following questions: (1) when do the long-cycling cells appear; (2) are they present at birth; and (3) from which cells do they arise. (ACR)

  16. Cool and luminous transients from mass-losing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Metzger, Brian D.; Tomida, Kengo

    2016-02-01

    We study transients produced by equatorial disc-like outflows from catastrophically mass-losing binary stars with an asymptotic velocity and energy deposition rate near the inner edge which are proportional to the binary escape velocity vesc. As a test case, we present the first smoothed-particle radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the mass loss from the outer Lagrange point with realistic equation of state and opacities. The resulting spiral stream becomes unbound for binary mass ratios 0.06 ≲ q ≲ 0.8. For synchronous binaries with non-degenerate components, the spiral-stream arms merge at a radius of ˜10a, where a is the binary semi-major axis, and the accompanying shock thermalizes about 10 per cent of the kinetic power of the outflow. The mass-losing binary outflows produce luminosities reaching up to ˜106 L⊙ and effective temperatures spanning 500 ≲ Teff ≲ 6000 K, which is compatible with many of the class of recently discovered red transients such as V838 Mon and V1309 Sco. Dust readily forms in the outflow, potentially in a catastrophic global cooling transition. The appearance of the transient is viewing angle-dependent due to vastly different optical depths parallel and perpendicular to the binary plane. We predict a correlation between the peak luminosity and the outflow velocity, which is roughly obeyed by the known red transients. Outflows from mass-losing binaries can produce luminous (105 L⊙) and cool (Teff ≲ 1500 K) transients lasting a year or longer, as has potentially been detected by Spitzer surveys of nearby galaxies.

  17. 42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. 136a.34 Section 136a.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....34 Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. (a) Individuals who lose their eligibility...

  18. 42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. 136a.34 Section 136a.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....34 Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. (a) Individuals who lose their eligibility...

  19. 42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. 136a.34 Section 136a.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....34 Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. (a) Individuals who lose their eligibility...

  20. 42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. 136a.34 Section 136a.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....34 Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. (a) Individuals who lose their eligibility...

  1. 42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. 136a.34 Section 136a.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....34 Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. (a) Individuals who lose their eligibility...

  2. Seven reasons you are losing patients to the competition.

    PubMed

    Chism, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Patients who choose elective procedures such as laser treatments, plastic surgery, Botox, fillers, bioidentical hormone therapy, or alternative medicine will leave your practice if their experience is anything less than favorable. This is true even if they get the results they were seeking. It is up to the office manager to create the right environment and engagement from the staff to ensure sustainability. This article offers seven reasons practices lose patients to the competition, and what to do to course-correct. PMID:26062331

  3. Losing the Dark: A Planetarium PSA about Light Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Carolyn Collins; Walker, Constance

    2015-03-01

    Losing the Dark is a six-minute PSA video created for fulldome theaters by Loch Ness Productions, the International Dark Sky Association Education Committee headed by Dr. Constance Walker of the National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Dome3, Adler Planetarium, and Babak Tafreshi (The World at Night). It explains light pollution, its effects, and ways to implement ``wise lighting`` practices to mitigate light pollution. The show is also made in flat-screen HD format for classical planetariums, non-dome theaters, and for presentatons by IDA speakers.

  4. Targeting the Gdnf Gene in peritubular myoid cells disrupts undifferentiated spermatogonial cell development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Willis, William D.; Eddy, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are a subpopulation of undifferentiated spermatogonia located in a niche at the base of the seminiferous epithelium delimited by Sertoli cells and peritubular myoid (PM) cells. SSCs self-renew or differentiate into spermatogonia that proliferate to give rise to spermatocytes and maintain spermatogenesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is essential for this process. Sertoli cells produce GDNF and other growth factors and are commonly thought to be responsible for regulating SSC development, but limited attention has been paid to the role of PM cells in this process. A conditional knockout (cKO) of the androgen receptor gene in PM cells resulted in male infertility. We found that testosterone (T) induces GDNF expression in mouse PM cells in vitro and neonatal spermatogonia (including SSCs) co-cultured with T-treated PM cells were able to colonize testes of germ cell-depleted mice after transplantation. This strongly suggested that T-regulated production of GDNF by PM cells is required for spermatogonial development, but PM cells might produce other factors in vitro that are responsible. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that production of GDNF by PM cells is essential for spermatogonial development by generating mice with a cKO of the Gdnf gene in PM cells. The cKO males sired up to two litters but became infertile due to collapse of spermatogenesis and loss of undifferentiated spermatogonia. These studies show for the first time, to our knowledge, that the production of GDNF by PM cells is essential for undifferentiated spermatogonial cell development in vivo. PMID:26831079

  5. Targeting the Gdnf Gene in peritubular myoid cells disrupts undifferentiated spermatogonial cell development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Willis, William D; Eddy, Edward M

    2016-02-16

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are a subpopulation of undifferentiated spermatogonia located in a niche at the base of the seminiferous epithelium delimited by Sertoli cells and peritubular myoid (PM) cells. SSCs self-renew or differentiate into spermatogonia that proliferate to give rise to spermatocytes and maintain spermatogenesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is essential for this process. Sertoli cells produce GDNF and other growth factors and are commonly thought to be responsible for regulating SSC development, but limited attention has been paid to the role of PM cells in this process. A conditional knockout (cKO) of the androgen receptor gene in PM cells resulted in male infertility. We found that testosterone (T) induces GDNF expression in mouse PM cells in vitro and neonatal spermatogonia (including SSCs) co-cultured with T-treated PM cells were able to colonize testes of germ cell-depleted mice after transplantation. This strongly suggested that T-regulated production of GDNF by PM cells is required for spermatogonial development, but PM cells might produce other factors in vitro that are responsible. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that production of GDNF by PM cells is essential for spermatogonial development by generating mice with a cKO of the Gdnf gene in PM cells. The cKO males sired up to two litters but became infertile due to collapse of spermatogenesis and loss of undifferentiated spermatogonia. These studies show for the first time, to our knowledge, that the production of GDNF by PM cells is essential for undifferentiated spermatogonial cell development in vivo. PMID:26831079

  6. Cool and Luminous Transients from Mass-Losing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondrej; Metzger, Brian D.; Tomida, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    We study transients produced by equatorial disk-like outflows from catastrophically mass-losing binary stars with an asymptotic velocity and energy deposition rate near the inner edge which are proportional to the binary escape velocity. As a test case, we present the first smoothed-particle radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the mass loss from the outer Lagrange point with realistic equation of state and opacities. The mass-losing binary outflows produce luminosities reaching up to 106 L⊙ and the effective temperatures are between 500 and 6000 K, which is compatible with those of many of the class of recently-discovered red transients such as V838 Mon and V1309 Sco. Dust readily forms in the outflow, potentially in a catastrophic global cooling transition. The appearance of the transient is viewing angle-dependent due to vastly different optical depths parallel and perpendicular to the binary plane. We predict a correlation between the peak luminosity and the outflow velocity, which is roughly obeyed by the known red transients.

  7. WHO in retreat: is it losing its influence?

    PubMed Central

    Godlee, F.

    1994-01-01

    WHO says it has three main functions: to set normative standards; to provide technical advice and assistance on medical matters; and to advocate changes in health policy. During its 46 year history the first two functions have been a constant and uncontroversial backbone through which WHO has earned its reputation for scientific excellence. The third function, advocacy, came to the fore with the launch of Health for All in 1977, after which WHO took a key role in influencing international health policy. WHO's friends and critics alike now say that the organisation is losing its influence and retreating into its technical and biomedical shell. This article maps the changes in WHO's approach over the past 46 years and considers whether fears about its loss of influence are justified. Images p1492-a p1492-b p1493-a p1494-a FIG 1 PMID:7804058

  8. Honeybee society destruction by losing control of self-reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peipei; Su, Beibei; He, Da-Ren

    2004-03-01

    Recently the mechanism of the damage caused by invasion of Apis mellifera capensis honeybee into the normal A. M. Scutellata colonies became interesting for scientists due to the fact that the mechanism may resemble those of cancer vicious hyperplasia, spreading of some epidemic, and turbulence of society induced by some bad society groups. For the mechanism, we suggest a new guess, which means that the losing control of self-reproduction disturbs and throws information structure of the society into confuse. We also simulate the damage process with a cellular automata based on the idea. The simulation shows that the process is equivalent to a non-equilibrium percolation phase transition. This discussion remind us that the management and monitor on the information network between society members may be a more effective way for avoiding the overflow of the destructor sub-colonies.

  9. ``Losing the Dark:'' A Planetarium PSA about Light Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Productions, L. N.; Walker, D. C.

    2013-04-01

    Losing the Dark is a PSA video being created for fulldome theaters by Loch Ness Productions under the direction of the International Dark Sky Association Education Committee headed by Dr. Constance Walker of the National Optical Astronomy Observatories. It explains the problems with light pollution, its effects on life, and three ways in which people can implement “wise lighting” practices to mitigate light pollution. The show is also being produced in a flat-screen HD format for use in classical planetarium and non-dome theaters, for presentations by IDA speakers when addressing planning boards, etc. and will be posted on the IDA and other web sites. The final length is six minutes for both versions. Funding has been provided by The International Planetarium Society and the International Dark-Sky Association.

  10. [CO-CULTURE OF BOAR SPERMATOGONIAL CELLS WITH SERTOLI CELLS].

    PubMed

    Savchenkova, I P; Vasil'eva, S A

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we developed in vitro culture conditions using co-culture of boar spermatogonial cells with Sertoli cells. Testes from 60-day-old crossbred boar were used. A spermatogonia-enriched culture was achieved by enzymatic digestion method and purification by density gradient centrifugation using a discontinuous Percoll gradient and differentiated adherence technique. Lipid drops were detected in isolated Sertoli cells by Oil Red O staining. We have found that the cultivation of boar spermatogonia in the presence of Sertoli cells (up to 35 days) leads to their differentiation as well as in vivo in testis. Association of cells in groups, formation of chains and suspension clusters of the spermatogenic cells were observed on the 10th day. Spermatogonial cellular colonies were noted at the same time. These cellular colonies were analyzed for the expression of genes: Nanog and Plzf in RT PCR. The expression of the Nanog gene in the experimental cellular clones obtained by short-term culture of spermatogonial cells in the presence of Sertoli cells was 200 times higher than the expression of this gene in the freshly isolated spermatogonial cells expression was found in freshly isolated germ cells and in cellular clones derived in vitro. We have found that, in the case of longer cultivation of these cells on Sertoli cells, in vitro process of differentiation of germ cells and formation of single mobile boar spermatozoa occurs at 30-33 days. Cellular population is heterogeneous at this stage. Spermatogenic differentiation in vitro without Sertoli cells stays on the 7th day of cultivation. The results show that co-culture of boar spermatogonia-enriched cells with Sertoli cells can induce their differentiation into spermatozoa in vitro and facilitate obtaining of porcine germ cell culture. PMID:27228660

  11. Testicular histology and germ cell cytology during spermatogenesis in the Mississippi map turtle, Graptemys pseudogeographica kohnii, from Northeast Arkansas

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Kelsey; Trauth, Stanley E; Gribbins, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The testicular histology and cytology of spermatogenesis in Graptemys pseudogeographica kohnii were examined using specimens collected between July 1996 and May 2004 from counties in northeastern Arkansas. A histological examination of the testes and germ cell cytology indicates a postnuptial testicular cycle of spermatogenesis and a major fall spermiation event. The majority of the germ cell populations in May and June specimens are represented by resting spermatogonia, type A spermatogonia, type B spermatogonia, pre-leptotene spermatocytes, and numerous Sertoli cell nuclei near the basement membrane. The start of proliferation is evident as spermatogonia in metaphase are present near the basal lamina and many of these germ cells have entered meiosis in June seminiferous tubules. Major spermatogenic events occur in the June and July specimens and result in an increased height of the seminiferous epithelium and increased diameter of the seminiferous tubules. The germ cell population during this time is represented by spermatogonia (type A, B, and resting), hypertrophic cells, large populations of early primary spermatocytes, and early round spermatids. By September, the major germ cell population has progressed past meiosis with abundant round and early elongating spermatids dominating the seminiferous epithelium. October seminiferous epithelia are marked by a decreas in height and mature spermatozoa fill the luminal space. Round and elongating spermatids constitute the largest portion of the germ cell population. Following the spermiation event, the testes enter a period of quiescence that lasts till the next spermatogenic cycle, which begins in the subsequent spring. Based on the cytological development of the seminiferous tubules revealed by our study, Graptemys pseudogeographica kohnii demonstrates a temporal germ cell development strategy similar to other temperate reptiles. A single major generation of germ cells progresses through spermatogenesis each year

  12. Mass-losing M supergiants in the solar neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; Kleinmann, S. G.

    1990-01-01

    A list of the 21 mass-losing red supergiants (20 M type, one G type; L greater than 100,000 solar luminosities) within 2.5 kpc of the sun is compiled. These supergiants are highly evolved descendants of main-sequence stars with initial masses larger than 20 solar masses. The surface density is between about 1 and 2/sq kpc. As found previously, these stars are much less concentrated toward the Galactic center than W-R stars, which are also highly evolved massive stars. Although with considerable uncertainty, it is estimated that the mass return by the M supergiants is somewhere between 0.00001 and 0.00003 solar mass/sq kpc yr. In the hemisphere facing the Galactic center there is much less mass loss from M supergiants than from W-R stars, but, in the anticenter direction, the M supergiants return more mass than do the W-R stars. The duration of the M supergiant phase appears to be between 200,000 and 400,000 yr. During this phase, a star of initially at least 20 solar masses returns perhaps 3-10 solar masses into the interstellar medium.

  13. Everolimus for Primary Intestinal Lymphangiectasia With Protein-Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Michio; Hori, Tomohiro; Kanda, Kaori; Kawamoto, Norio; Ibuka, Takashi; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL), also known as Waldmann's disease, is an exudative enteropathy resulting from morphologic abnormalities in the intestinal lymphatics. In this article, we describe a 12-year-old boy with PIL that led to protein-losing enteropathy characterized by diarrhea, hypoalbuminemia associated with edema (serum albumin level: 1.0 g/dL), and hypogammaglobulinemia (serum IgG level: 144 mg/dL). Severe hypoalbuminemia, electrolyte abnormalities, and tetany persisted despite a low-fat diet and propranolol. Everolimus (1.6 mg/m(2)/day) was added to his treatment as an antiangiogenic agent. With everolimus treatment, the patient's diarrhea resolved and replacement therapy for hypoproteinemia was less frequent. Hematologic and scintigraphy findings also improved (serum albumin level: 2.5 g/dL). There were no adverse reactions during the 12-month follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of everolimus use in a patient with PIL. PMID:26908672

  14. Losing track of time through delayed body representations.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Thomas H; Steixner, Agnes; Boettger, Joachim; Villringer, Arno

    2015-01-01

    The ability to keep track of time is perceived as crucial in most human societies. However, to lose track of time may also serve an important social role, associated with recreational purpose. To this end a number of social technologies are employed, some of which may relate to a manipulation of time perception through a modulation of body representation. Here, we investigated an influence of real-time or delayed videos of own-body representations on time perception in an experimental setup with virtual mirrors. Seventy participants were asked to either stay in the installation until they thought that a defined time (90 s) had passed, or they were encouraged to stay in the installation as long as they wanted and after exiting were asked to estimate the duration of their stay. Results show that a modulation of body representation by time-delayed representations of the mirror-video displays influenced time perception. Furthermore, these time-delayed conditions were associated with a greater sense of arousal and intoxication. We suggest that feeding in references to the immediate past into working memory could be the underlying mental mechanism mediating the observed modulation of time perception. We argue that such an influence on time perception would probably not only be achieved visually, but might also work with acoustic references to the immediate past (e.g., with music). PMID:25918507

  15. Losing track of time through delayed body representations

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Thomas H.; Steixner, Agnes; Boettger, Joachim; Villringer, Arno

    2015-01-01

    The ability to keep track of time is perceived as crucial in most human societies. However, to lose track of time may also serve an important social role, associated with recreational purpose. To this end a number of social technologies are employed, some of which may relate to a manipulation of time perception through a modulation of body representation. Here, we investigated an influence of real-time or delayed videos of own-body representations on time perception in an experimental setup with virtual mirrors. Seventy participants were asked to either stay in the installation until they thought that a defined time (90 s) had passed, or they were encouraged to stay in the installation as long as they wanted and after exiting were asked to estimate the duration of their stay. Results show that a modulation of body representation by time-delayed representations of the mirror-video displays influenced time perception. Furthermore, these time-delayed conditions were associated with a greater sense of arousal and intoxication. We suggest that feeding in references to the immediate past into working memory could be the underlying mental mechanism mediating the observed modulation of time perception. We argue that such an influence on time perception would probably not only be achieved visually, but might also work with acoustic references to the immediate past (e.g., with music). PMID:25918507

  16. Retinoblastoma Protein (RB1) Controls Fate Determination in Stem Cells and Progenitors of the Mouse Male Germline1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi-En; Gwost, Ivy; Oatley, Melissa J.; Oatley, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Continual spermatogenesis is the cornerstone of male fertility and relies on the actions of an undifferentiated spermatogonial population comprised of stem cells and progenitors. A foundational spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) pool is established during postnatal development that serves as a self-renewing reservoir from which progenitor spermatogonia arise that transiently amplify in number before committing to terminal differentiation. At present, the underlying molecular mechanisms governing these actions are undefined. Using conditional mutant mouse models, we investigated whether function of the undifferentiated spermatogonial population during postnatal life is influenced by the tumor suppressor protein RB1. Spermatogenesis initiates in mice with conditional inactivation of Rb1 in prospermatogonial precursors, but the germline is progressively lost upon aging due to impaired renewal of the undifferentiated spermatogonial population. In contrast, continual spermatogenesis is sustained following Rb1 inactivation in progenitor spermatogonia, but some cells transform into a carcinoma in situ-like state. Furthermore, knockdown of Rb1 abundance within primary cultures of wild-type undifferentiated spermatogonia impairs maintenance of the SSC pool, and some cells are invasive of the basement membrane after transplant into recipient testes, indicating acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Collectively, these findings indicate that RB1 plays an essential role in establishment of a self-renewing SSC pool and commitment to the spermatogenic lineage within progenitor spermatogonia. PMID:24089198

  17. Physically Active Rats Lose More Weight during Calorie Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Smyers, Mark E.; Bachir, Kailey Z.; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.; Novak, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Daily physical activity shows substantial inter-individual variation, and low physical activity is associated with obesity and weight gain. Elevated physical activity is also associated with high intrinsic aerobic capacity, which confers considerable metabolic health benefits. Rats artificially selected for high intrinsic aerobic capacity (high-capacity runners, HCR) are more physically active than their low-capacity counterparts (low-capacity runners, LCR). To test the hypothesis that physical activity counters metabolic thriftiness, we measured physical activity and weight loss during three weeks of 50% calorie restriction (CR) in the HCR and LCR rat lines. At baseline, HCR ate more and were more active than LCR; this was seen in male rats, where LCR are considerably heavier than HCR, as well as in a set of female rats where body weight did not differ between the lines, demonstrating that this effect is consistent across sex and not secondary to body weight. We show for the first time that HCR lose more weight than LCR relative to baseline. Physical activity levels declined throughout CR, and this was more pronounced in HCR than in LCR, yet some aspects of activity remained elevated in HCR relative to LCR even during CR. This is consistent with the idea that low physical activity contributes to metabolic thriftiness during food restriction, allowing LCR to defend body mass, particularly lean mass. This has implications for physical activity during diet-induced weight loss, the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in weight loss during a diet, and the potential evolutionary opposition between metabolic thriftiness and aerobic capacity. PMID:25449411

  18. Towards a no-lose theorem for naturalness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, David; Saraswat, Prashant

    2016-03-01

    We derive a phenomenological no-lose theorem for naturalness up to the TeV scale, which applies when quantum corrections to the Higgs mass from top quarks are canceled by perturbative beyond Standard Model (BSM) particles (top partners) of similar multiplicity due to to some symmetry. Null results from LHC searches already seem to disfavor such partners if they are colored. Any partners with SM charges and ˜TeV masses will be exhaustively probed by the LHC and a future 100 TeV collider. Therefore, we focus on neutral top partners. While these arise in twin Higgs theories, we analyze neutral top partners as model-independently as possible using effective field theory and simplified model methods. We classify all perturbative neutral top partner structures in order to compute their irreducible low-energy signatures at proposed future lepton and hadron colliders, as well as the irreducible tunings suffered in each scenario. Central to our theorem is the assumption that SM-charged BSM states appear in the UV completion of neutral naturalness, which is the case in all known examples. Direct production at the 100 TeV collider then allows this scale to be probed at the ˜10 TeV level. We find that proposed future colliders probe any such scenario of naturalness with tuning of 10% or better. This provides very strong model-independent motivation for both new lepton and hadron colliders, which in tandem act as discovery machines for general naturalness. We put our results in context by discussing other possibilities for naturalness, including "swarms" of top partners, inherently nonperturbative or exotic physics, or theories without SM-charged states in the UV completion. Realizing a concrete scenario which avoids our arguments while still lacking experimental signatures remains an open model-building challenge.

  19. Physically active rats lose more weight during calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Smyers, Mark E; Bachir, Kailey Z; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Novak, Colleen M

    2015-02-01

    Daily physical activity shows substantial inter-individual variation, and low physical activity is associated with obesity and weight gain. Elevated physical activity is also associated with high intrinsic aerobic capacity, which confers considerable metabolic health benefits. Rats artificially selected for high intrinsic aerobic capacity (high-capacity runners, HCR) are more physically active than their low-capacity counterparts (low-capacity runners, LCR). To test the hypothesis that physical activity counters metabolic thriftiness, we measured physical activity and weight loss during three weeks of 50% calorie restriction (CR) in the HCR and LCR rat lines. At baseline, HCR ate more and were more active than LCR; this was seen in male rats, where LCR are considerably heavier than HCR, as well as in a set of female rats where body weight did not differ between the lines, demonstrating that this effect is consistent across sex and not secondary to body weight. We show for the first time that HCR lose more weight than LCR relative to baseline. Physical activity levels declined throughout CR, and this was more pronounced in HCR than in LCR, yet some aspects of activity remained elevated in HCR relative to LCR even during CR. This is consistent with the idea that low physical activity contributes to metabolic thriftiness during food restriction, allowing LCR to defend body mass, particularly lean mass. This has implications for physical activity during diet-induced weight loss, the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in weight loss during a diet, and the potential evolutionary opposition between metabolic thriftiness and aerobic capacity. PMID:25449411

  20. 25 CFR 115.808 - Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? 115.808 Section 115.808 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES... § 115.808 Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? The value of trust fund investments...

  1. 20 CFR 408.232 - When do you lose your foreign resident status?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When do you lose your foreign resident status... CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS SVB Qualification and Entitlement Residence Outside the United States § 408.232 When do you lose your foreign resident status? (a) General rule. We consider you to have lost...

  2. 25 CFR 115.808 - Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? 115.808 Section 115.808 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES... § 115.808 Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? The value of trust fund investments...

  3. 25 CFR 115.808 - Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? 115.808 Section 115.808 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES... § 115.808 Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? The value of trust fund investments...

  4. 25 CFR 115.808 - Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? 115.808 Section 115.808 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES... § 115.808 Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? The value of trust fund investments...

  5. 25 CFR 115.808 - Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? 115.808 Section 115.808 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES... § 115.808 Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? The value of trust fund investments...

  6. Pluripotent cell derivation from male germline cells by suppression of Dmrt1 and Trp53.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takashi; Kanatsu-Shinohara, Mito; Hirose, Michiko; Ogura, Atsuo; Shinohara, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Diploid germ cells are thought to have pluripotency potential. We recently described a method to derive pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) from cultured spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) by depleting Trp53 and Dmrt1, both of which are known suppressors of teratomas. In this study, we used this technique to analyze the effect of this protocol in deriving PSCs from the male germline at different developmental stages. We collected primordial germ cells (PGCs), gonocytes and spermatogonia, and the cells were transduced with lentiviruses expressing short hairpin RNA against Dmrt1 and/or Trp53. We found that PGCs are highly susceptible to reprogramming induction and that only Trp53 depletion was sufficient to induce pluripotency. In contrast, gonocytes and spermatogonia were resistant to reprogramming by double knockdown of Dmrt1 and Trp53. PSCs derived from PGCs contributed to chimeras produced by blastocyst injection, but some of the embryos showed placenta-only phenotypes suggestive of epigenetic abnormalities of PGC-derived PSCs. These results show that PGCs and gonocytes/spermatogonia have distinct reprogramming potential and also suggest that fresh and cultured SSCs do not necessarily have the same properties. PMID:26227109

  7. Immunological changes following protein losing enteropathy after surgery total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) by cytomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, József; Lenz, Dominik; Mittag, Anja; Sauer, Ursula; Wild, Lena; Hess, John; Schranz, Dietmar; Hambsch, Jörg; Schneider, Peter; Tárnok, Attila

    2008-02-01

    Complex immunophenotyping single-cell analysis are essential for systems biology and cytomics. The application of cytomics in immunology and cardiac research and diagnostics is very broad, ranging from the better understanding of the cardiovascular cell biology to the identification of heart function and immune consequences after surgery. TCPC or Fontan-type circulation is an accepted palliative surgery for patients with a functionally univentricular heart. Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), the enteric loss of proteins, is a potential late complication after TCPC surgery. PLE etiology is poorly understood, but immunological factors seem to play a role. This study was aimed to gain insight into immune phenotype alterations following post-TCPC PLE. Patients were studied during routine follow-up up to 5yrs after surgery, blood samples of TCPC patients without (n=21, age 6.8+/-2.6 years at surgery; mean+/-SD) and with manifest PLE (n=12, age 12.8+/- 4.5 years at sampling) and age matched healthy children (control, n=22, age 8.6+/-2.5 years) were collected. Routine laboratory, immune phenotype and serological parameters were determined. Following PLE the immune phenotype dramatically changed with signs of acute inflammation (increased neutrophil and monocyte count, CRP, IL-8). In contrast, lymphocyte count (NK-cells, αβTCR +CD4 +, αβTCR +CD8 + cells) decreased (p<0.001). The residual T-cells had elevated CD25 and CD69 expression. In PLE-patients unique cell populations with CD3 +αβ/γδTCR - and αβTCR +CD4 -8 - phenotype were present in increased frequencies. Our studies show dramatically altered leukocyte phenotype after PLE in TCPC patients. These alterations resemble to changes in autoimmune diseases. We conclude that autoimmune processes may play a role in etiology and pathophysiology of PLE.

  8. Sexually dimorphic expression of Dmrt1 and γH2AX in germ stem cells during gonadal development in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Kazuko; Otomo, Asako; Wada, Mikako; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Ito, Michihiko

    2016-04-01

    In many animals, primordial germ cells (PGCs) migrate into developing gonads. There, they proliferate and differentiate into female and male germ stem cells (GSCs), oogonia and spermatogonia, respectively. Few studies have focused on the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of GSC sex determination. Here, we investigated the expression of the transcription factor Dmrt1 and a phosphorylated form of the histone variant H2AX (γH2AX) during gonadal development in Xenopus laevis. During early sexual differentiation, Dmrt1 was expressed in the GSCs of the ZW (female) and ZZ (male) gonads as well as somatic cells of the ZZ gonads. Notably, the PGCs and primary GSCs contained large, unstructured nuclei, whereas condensed, rounder nuclei appeared only in primary oogonia during tadpole development. After metamorphosis, Dmrt1 showed its expression in secondary spermatogonia, but not in secondary oogonia. Like Dmrt1, γH2AX was expressed in the nuclei of primary GSCs in early developing gonads. However, after metamorphosis, γH2AX expression continued in primary and secondary spermatogonia, but was barely detected in the condensed nuclei of primary oogonia. Taken together, these observations indicate that spermatogonia tend to retain PGC characteristics, compared to oogonia, which undergo substantial changes during gonadal differentiation in X. laevis. Our findings suggest that Dmrt1 and γH2AX may contribute to the maintenance of stem cell identity by controlling gene expression and epigenetic changes, respectively. PMID:27239441

  9. Stress reticulocytes lose transferrin receptors by an extrinsic process involving spleen and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Melissa M; Koury, Stephen T; Kopsombut, Prapaporn; Alford, Catherine E; Price, James O; Koury, Mark J

    2016-09-01

    As they mature into erythrocytes during normal erythropoiesis, reticulocytes lose surface transferrin receptors before or concurrently with reticulin. Exosome release accounts for most of the loss of transferrin receptors from reticulocytes. During erythropoietic stress, reticulocytes are released early from hematopoietic tissues and have increased reticulin staining and transferrin receptors. Flow cytometry of dually stained erythrocytes of mice recovering from phlebotomy demonstrated delayed loss of reticulin and transferrin receptors during in vitro maturation compared to in vivo maturation, indicating that an in vivo process extrinsic to the reticulocytes facilitates their maturation. Splenectomy or macrophage depletion by liposomal clodronate inhibited in vivo maturation of reticulocytes and increased the numbers of reticulin-negative, transferrin receptor-positive cells during and after recovery from phlebotomy. This reticulin-negative, transferrin receptor-positive population was rarely found in normal mice. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the reticulin-negative, transferrin receptor-positive cells were elongated and discoid erythrocytes, but they had intracellular and surface structures that appeared to be partially degraded organelles. The results indicate that maturation of circulating stress reticulocytes is enhanced by an extrinsic process that occurs in the spleen and involves macrophage activity. Complete loss of reticulin with incomplete loss of surface transferrin receptors in this process produces a reticulin-negative, transferrin receptor-positive erythrocyte population that has potential utility for detecting prior erythropoietic stresses including bleeding, hemolysis and erythropoietin administration, even after recovery has been completed. Am. J. Hematol. 91:875-882, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27194638

  10. Microarray-Based Analysis of Cell-Cycle Gene Expression During Spermatogenesis in the Mouse1

    PubMed Central

    Roy Choudhury, Dipanwita; Small, Chris; Wang, Yufeng; Mueller, Paul R.; Rebel, Vivienne I.; Griswold, Michael D.; McCarrey, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a continuum of cellular differentiation in a lineage that features three principal stages: 1) a mitotically active stage in spermatogonia, 2) a meiotic stage in spermatocytes, and 3) a postreplicative stage in spermatids. We used a microarray-based approach to identify changes in expression of cell-cycle genes that distinguish 1) mitotic type A spermatogonia from meiotic pachytene spermatocytes and 2) pachytene spermatocytes from postreplicative round spermatids. We detected expression of 550 genes related to cell-cycle function in one or more of these cell types. Although a majority of these genes were expressed during all three stages of spermatogenesis, we observed dramatic changes in levels of individual transcripts between mitotic spermatogonia and meiotic spermatocytes and between meiotic spermatocytes and postreplicative spermatids. Our results suggest that distinct cell-cycle gene regulatory networks or subnetworks are associated with each phase of the cell cycle in each spermatogenic cell type. In addition, we observed expression of different members of certain cell-cycle gene families in each of the three spermatogenic cell types investigated. Finally, we report expression of 221 cell-cycle genes that have not previously been annotated as part of the cell cycle network expressed during spermatogenesis, including eight novel genes that appear to be testis-specific. PMID:20631398

  11. Testicular structure and germ cells morphology in salamanders

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Mari Carmen; Mejía-Roa, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    Testes of salamanders or urodeles are paired elongated organs that are attached to the dorsal wall of the body by a mesorchium. The testes are composed of one or several lobes. Each lobe is morphologically and functionally a similar testicular unit. The lobes of the testis are joined by cords covered by a single peritoneal epithelium and subjacent connective tissue. The cords contain spermatogonia. Spermatogonia associate with Sertoli cells to form spermatocysts or cysts. The spermatogenic cells in a cyst undergo their development through spermatogenesis synchronously. The distribution of cysts displays the cephalo-caudal gradient in respect to the stage of spermatogenesis. The formation of cysts at cephalic end of the testis causes their migration along the lobules to the caudal end. Consequently, the disposition in cephalo-caudal regions of spermatogenesis can be observed in longitudinal sections of the testis. The germ cells are spermatogonia, diploid cells with mitotic activity; primary and second spermatocytes characterized by meiotic divisions that develop haploid spermatids; during spermiogenesis the spermatids differentiate to spermatozoa. During spermiation the cysts open and spermatozoa leave the testicular lobules. After spermiation occurs the development of Leydig cells into glandular tissue. This glandular tissue regressed at the end of the reproductive cycle. PMID:26413406

  12. INTERDISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Aggregation Behaviors of a Two-Species System with Lose-Lose Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-Xia; Lin, Zhen-Quan; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ke, Jian-Hong

    2010-06-01

    We propose an aggregation evolution model of two-species (A- and B-species) aggregates to study the prevalent aggregation phenomena in social and economic systems. In this model, A- and B-species aggregates perform self-exchange-driven growths with the exchange rate kernels K (k,l) = Kkl and L(k,l) = Lkl, respectively, and the two species aggregates perform self-birth processes with the rate kernels J1(k) = J1k and J2(k) = J2k, and meanwhile the interaction between the aggregates of different species A and B causes a lose-lose scheme with the rate kernel H(k,l) = Hkl. Based on the mean-field theory, we investigated the evolution behaviors of the two species aggregates to study the competitions among above three aggregate evolution schemes on the distinct initial monomer concentrations A0 and B0 of the two species. The results show that the evolution behaviors of A- and B-species are crucially dominated by the competition between the two self-birth processes, and the initial monomer concentrations A0 and B0 play important roles, while the lose-lose scheme play important roles in some special cases.

  13. Protein-losing enteropathy in a dog with lymphangiectasia, lymphoplasmacytic enteritis and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Alarcón, C A; Beristaín-Ruiz, D M; Pérez-Casio, F; Rivera, R; Ochoa, G; Martín-Orozco, U

    2012-01-01

    This is a report of seven-year-old male Akita mixed dog, with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE). He had a history of chronic vomiting and diarrhea with anorexia/hyporexia. Previously he suffered acute abdomen about eight months prior to this visit. Our dog showed uncommon combination of diseases that could cause PLE since it was affected by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL), and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). The dog had most of the abnormalities found in IL, as well as hypoalbuminemia, hyperglobulinemia, lymphopenia, hypocalcemia, and hypercholesterolemia. During endoscopy exam, we found changes characteristic of IL such as irregular small white spots. We took biopsies from stomach, duodenum, and cecum. These biopsies showed infiltration by lymphocytes and plasmatic cells in the lamina propria also, the duodenal biopsies showed moderate dilation of the lymphatic vessels. The patient had 2.1 µg/mL of TLI, this result was compatible with EPI. We assume that the first pathology in this animal was IBD, which caused chronic pancreatitis (CP) that in turn progressed to EPI. It is also possible that IL was secondary to IBD. We have reported for the first time the correlation of IBD and EPI in dogs. This should change our approach to treating chronic diarrhea in dogs. Therefore, we propose that dogs diagnosed with EPI should also be subjected to endoscopy and intestinal biopsy. Similarly, to rule out secondary EPI, TLI should be measured routinely in dogs with IBD. PMID:23106499

  14. EDITORIAL: Advanced fractions? or use it or lose it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    1997-09-01

    kind of mixture of skill, knowledge and understanding required for successful mathematical operations is use it or lose it. We went `decimal' a long time ago, and the ideas of pence as 12ths of a shilling and shillings as 20ths of a pound are positively mediaeval for everyone under 40 or so. Remember farthings? In those days fractions were everywhere. Nowadays they are somewhat esoteric for the average citizen - and physicist. Yet fractions are vital in advanced mathematics, e.g. involving the differentiation and integration of polynomial fractions, as Peter Gill pointed out. This is why he was teaching simple fractions to his students, and possibly why their competence at these was such a good indicator of success in their end-of-year mathematics exam. What can we conclude from all this? I suggest two things. First, that fractions as illustrated above might well be considered as advanced mathematics, a fit and intriguing topic for an A-level course. Ordinary citizens should be taught - very thoroughly - to understand and use that useful kind of fraction based on dividing things into 100 parts, called percentages. Secondly, and more fundamentally, we should learn from this example to take a hard look at what we teach and what we need to teach, removing or adapting those things that exist in syllabuses and the National Curriculum for reasons of purely historical inertia. I hope that the IoP Working Party on Mathematics and Physics, due to report in the autumn, has looked hard at issues like this. And, of course, anyone interested in this topic is cordially invited to the Education Group's 16 - 19 Day Conference, which this year is about this vexed question of what mathematics physics learners need - and how they get it. At IoP Headquarters on Saturday, 15 November 1997. Details from Catherine Wilson.

  15. Spermatogonial stem cells in the testis of an endangered bovid: Indian black buck (Antilope cervicapra L.).

    PubMed

    Goel, Sandeep; Reddy, Niranjan; Mahla, Ranjeet Singh; Suman, Sanjay Kumar; Pawar, Rahul Mohanchandra

    2011-07-01

    Numerous wild bovids are facing threat of extinction owing to the loss of habitat and various other reasons. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) represent the only germline stem cells in adult body that are capable of self-renewal and that can undergo differentiation to produce haploid germ cells. SSCs can, therefore, serve as a useful resource for preservation of germplasm of threatened and endangered mammals. The Indian black buck (Antilope cervicapra L.) is a small Indian antelope that is listed as endangered by the Indian Wildlife Protection Act, 1972. Immunohistochemical analysis of testes tissues of black buck revealed the presence of spermatogonia that were specifically stained by lectin-Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA). The expression of pluripotent cell-specific markers, NANOG and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1), was detected in spermatogonia. Interestingly, the expression of POU5F1 (OCT3/4) was absent from spermatogonia, however, it was detected in differentiating cells such as spermatocytes and round spermatids but not in elongated spermatids. The expression of NANOG protein was also present in spermatocytes but absent in round and elongated spermatids. Using the testis transplantation assay, stem cell potential of black buck spermatogonia was confirmed as indicated by the presence of colonized DBA-stained cells in the basal membrane of seminiferous tubules of xenotransplanted mice testis. The findings from this study suggest the presence of SSCs in the testis of an endangered bovid for the first time and open new possibility to explore the use of SSCs in conservation. PMID:21719218

  16. Altered protein prenylation in Sertoli cells is associated with adult infertility resulting from childhood mumps infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Xing; Ying, Pu; Diao, Fan; Wang, Qiang; Ye, Dan; Jiang, Chen; Shen, Ning; Xu, Na; Chen, Wei-Bo; Lai, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Shan; Miao, Xiao-Li; Feng, Jin; Tao, Wei-Wei; Zhao, Ning-Wei; Yao, Bing; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Hai-Xiang; Li, Jian-Min; Sha, Jia-Hao; Huang, Xing-Xu; Shi, Qing-Hua; Tang, Hong; Gao, Xiang; Li, Chao-Jun

    2013-07-29

    Mumps commonly affects children 5-9 yr of age, and can lead to permanent adult sterility in certain cases. However, the etiology of this long-term effect remains unclear. Mumps infection results in progressive degeneration of the seminiferous epithelium and, occasionally, Sertoli cell-only syndrome. Thus, the remaining Sertoli cells may be critical to spermatogenesis recovery after orchitis healing. Here, we report that the protein farnesylation/geranylgeranylation balance is critical for patients' fertility. The expression of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase 1 (GGPPS) was decreased due to elevated promoter methylation in the testes of infertile patients with mumps infection history. When we deleted GGPPS in mouse Sertoli cells, these cells remained intact, whereas the adjacent spermatogonia significantly decreased after the fifth postnatal day. The proinflammatory MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways were constitutively activated in GGPPS(-/-) Sertoli cells due to the enhanced farnesylation of H-Ras. GGPPS(-/-) Sertoli cells secreted an array of cytokines to stimulate spermatogonia apoptosis, and chemokines to induce macrophage invasion into the seminiferous tubules. Invaded macrophages further blocked spermatogonia development, resulting in a long-term effect through to adulthood. Notably, this defect could be rescued by GGPP administration in EMCV-challenged mice. Our results suggest a novel mechanism by which mumps infection during childhood results in adult sterility. PMID:23825187

  17. Surviving the tornado of mental illness: psychiatric survivors' experiences of getting, losing, and keeping housing.

    PubMed

    Forchuk, Cheryl; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Csiernik, Rick; Turner, Katherine

    2006-04-01

    This qualitative study explored experiences of psychiatric consumer-survivors related to housing. Nine focus groups involving 90 people were conducted in urban and rural areas in South-Western Ontario. A set of open-ended questions was used. Many participants described a devastating experience of losing much of what was important to them and going through a long arduous process to rebuild their lives. Group discussions were audiotaped and transcribed. Individual and team analyses of the transcripts revealed that psychiatric survivors experienced three levels of upheaval, loss, and destruction, similar to the effects of a tornado: losing ground, struggling to survive, and gaining stability. Within each of these levels, five major themes were identified: living in fear, losing control of basic human rights, attempting to hold onto and create relationships, identifying supports and seeking services, and obtaining personal space and place. A caring community response, including adequate housing, income support, and community care, can help people rebuild their lives. PMID:16603754

  18. Relaxin affects cell organization and early and late stages of spermatogenesis in a coculture of rat testicular cells.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, M T; Francisco, R A R; Silva, R P; Porto, C S; Lazari, M F M

    2015-07-01

    Relaxin and its receptor RXFP1 are co-expressed in Sertoli cells, and relaxin can stimulate proliferation of Sertoli cells. In this study, we investigated a role of relaxin in spermatogenesis, using a short-term culture of testicular cells of the rat that allowed differentiation of spermatogonia to spermatids. Sertoli, germ, and peritubular myoid cells were the predominant cell types in the culture. Sertoli and germ cells expressed RXFP1. Cultures were incubated without (control) or with 0.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or 100 ng/mL H2 relaxin (RLN) for 2 days. Cell organization, number, and differentiation were analyzed after 2 (D2), 5 (D5) or 8 (D8) days of culturing. Although the proportion of germ cells decayed from D2 to D5, the relative contribution of HC, 1C, 2C, and 4C germ cell populations remained constant in the control group during the whole culture. RLN did not affect the proportion of germ cell populations compared with control, but increased gene and/or protein expression of the undifferentiated and differentiated spermatogonia markers PLZF and c-KIT, and of the post-meiotic marker Odf2 in D5. RLN favored organization of cells in tubule-like structures, the arrangement of myoid cells around the tubules, arrangement of c-KIT-positive spermatogonia at the basal region of the tubules, and expression of the cell junction protein β-catenin close to the plasma membrane region. Knockdown of relaxin with small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced expression of β-catenin at the cell junctions, and shifted its expression to the nucleus. We propose that relaxin may affect spermatogenesis by modulating spermatogonial self renewal and favoring cell contact. PMID:26041439

  19. Your money or your self-esteem: threatened egotism promotes costly entrapment in losing endeavors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqing; Baumeister, Roy F

    2006-07-01

    The present research explored egotism-maintaining favorable views of the self-as a motivation underlying entrapment in losing endeavors. Four studies suggested that threatened selfesteem would cause decision makers to invest and lose more money in a previously chosen course of action. Ego-threatened participants consistently lost more money than nonthreatened participants across diverse entrapping situations regardless of whether the outcome was ostensibly determined by luck (Experiments 1 and 4), ability (Experiment 2), or interpersonal competition (Experiment 3). Thus, pursuing favorable views of the self could be costly to decision makers' financial well-being and may produce self-defeating behaviors. PMID:16738022

  20. Cell proliferation in the seminiferous and epididymal epithelia of Sus domesticus.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Mañas, C M; Beltrán-Frutos, E; Ferrer, C; Seco-Rovira, V; Pinart, E; Briz, M D; Bonet, S; Canteras, M; Pastor, L M

    2014-03-15

    It is important to understand the proliferative activity of the different structures of the male reproductive apparatus in livestock species, such as Sus domesticus, to ensure reproductive efficiency. The main aims of this study were (a) to evaluate the proliferative activity of the spermatogonia in the different stages of the seminiferous cycle and (b) to study the cell proliferation in the epididymal epithelium in each region, identifying the different cells involved. For this, the testes and epididymis of three healthy, sexually mature Sus domesticus boars were used. The organs were processed for light microscopy, and immunohistochemical techniques were used to detect proliferating cell nuclear antigen. The cells immunostaining positively and negatively for proliferating cell nuclear antigen were counted and several parameters and indexes were calculated to evaluate the proliferation in both epithelia, taking into account the stage of the seminiferous epithelium cycle, and, in the case of the epididymal epithelium, the different regions and cells are the same. Finally, a contrast analysis of equality between pairs of means was carried out followed by a least significant differences test, in which differences were considered significant at P < 0.05. In the seminiferous epithelium, the greatest total number of spermatogonia and proliferating spermatogonia was observed in the postmeiotic stages (mainly VII and VIII). The proliferation index of the spermatogonia increased from the meiotic to postmeiotic stages. As regards the epididymal epithelium, the total proliferation index was higher in the caput. In each region, the clear and principal cells showed the highest proliferation index with respect to the total number of cells counted, whereas the proliferation index of each cell with respect to the same type was higher in the clear cells, followed by the narrow and principal cells. In conclusion, the proliferative activity of spermatogonia in the seminiferous

  1. Dose-response studies on the spermatogonial stem cells of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; Davids, J.A.; Warmer, C.J.; Bootsma, A.L.; de Rooij, D.G. )

    1989-09-01

    Studies of the dose response of the spermatogonial stem cells in the rhesus monkey were performed at intervals of 130 and 160 days after graded doses of X irradiation. The D0 of the spermatogonial stem cells was established using the total numbers of the type A spermatogonia that were present at 130 and 160 days after irradiation and was found to be 1.07 Gy; the 95% confidence interval was 0.90-1.34 Gy.

  2. Propagation of bovine spermatogonial stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Pedro M; Soda, Takeshi; Teerds, Katja J; Mizrak, S Canan; van de Kant, Henk J G; de Rooij, Dirk G

    2008-11-01

    The access to sufficient numbers of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is a prerequisite for the study of their regulation and further biomanipulation. A specialized medium and several growth factors were tested to study the in vitro behavior of bovine type A spermatogonia, a cell population that includes the SSCs and can be specifically stained for the lectin Dolichos biflorus agglutinin. During short-term culture (2 weeks), colonies appeared, the morphology of which varied with the specific growth factor(s) added. Whenever the stem cell medium was used, round structures reminiscent of sectioned seminiferous tubules appeared in the core of the colonies. Remarkably, these round structures always contained type A spermatogonia. When leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), or fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) were added, specific effects on the numbers and arrangement of somatic cells were observed. However, the number of type A spermatogonia was significantly higher in cultures to which glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was added and highest when GDNF, LIF, EGF, and FGF2 were all present. The latter suggests that a proper stimulation of the somatic cells is necessary for optimal stimulation of the germ cells in culture. Somatic cells present in the colonies included Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cells, and a few Leydig cells. A transplantation experiment, using nude mice, showed the presence of SSCs among the cultured cells and in addition strongly suggested a more than 10 000-fold increase in the number of SSCs after 30 days of culture. These results demonstrate that bovine SSC self-renew in our specialized bovine culture system and that this system can be used for the propagation of these cells. PMID:18663014

  3. Who Gains, Who Loses?: The Fiscal Impact of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costrell, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Do school vouchers save the taxpayer money, or do they add to taxpayer burdens? Which groups of taxpayers are most affected, and do they gain or lose? What is the financial impact on public school districts? Usually, these questions are debated in the abstract. Now it is possible to get more concrete answers from the nation's longest-running…

  4. Why Some Hope Scholarship Recipients Retain the Scholarship and Others Lose It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trant, Eleanore C.; Crabtree, Katelyn E.; Ciancio, Dennis J.; Hart, Leslie A.; Watson, Tiffany B.; Williams, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The study we report here examined parental, pre-course, and in-course predictors of students' probability of retaining (n = 136) or losing the HOPE scholarship (n = 41). The study was conducted in a multi-section, entry-level course (n = 203) for the Teacher-Education Program at a large state university in the southeastern U.S. Logistic regression…

  5. Evaluation of the "Lose Your Excuse" Public Service Advertising Campaign for Tweens to Save Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Jane T.; Goldman, Patty; Zhivan, Natalia; Agyeman, Yaw; Barber, Erin

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the 2008-2009 "Lose your Excuse" public service advertising (PSA) campaign on energy efficiency targeting 8- to 12-year-olds, intended to increase knowledge, foster proactive attitudes, and change energy usage behaviors. Baseline and two follow-up surveys were conducted with online samples representative of the national…

  6. Children Who Lose Their Parents to HIV/AIDS: Agency Guidelines for Adoptive and Kinship Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkel-Holguin, Lisa

    Across the United States and world, children who lose their parents to HIV/AIDS are one of the fasted emerging groups affected by this epidemic. Increasingly, child welfare and family service agencies are helping infected parents to secure legal and permanent care arrangements for their children. These guidelines address the issues of placing…

  7. 20 CFR 663.565 - May an eligible training provider lose its eligibility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of title I of WIA or the WIA regulations, including 29 CFR part 37, may be removed from the list in... training to appeal a denial of eligibility under this subpart according to the requirements of 20 CFR 667... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May an eligible training provider lose...

  8. Factors associated with BMI, weight perceptions and trying to lose weight in African-American smokers.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rebecca E.; Harris, Kari Jo; Catley, Delwyn; Shostrom, Valerie; Choi, Simon; Mayo, Matthew S.; Okuyemi, Kola; Kaur, Harsohena; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined sociodemographic, behavioral and psychosocial factors associated with BMI, weight perceptions and trying to lose weight among African-American smokers (N=600, M=44.2 years, 70% female). Sixty-eight percent of the sample were overweight or obese (sample BMI M=28.0, SD=6.7). Three separate, simultaneous multivariable regression models were used to determine which factors were associated with BMI, weight perceptions and trying to lose weight. Poorer health, female gender and high-school education or higher were significantly associated with higher BMIs (p<0.05). Being female (OR=5.8, 95% CI=3.6-9.3) and having a higher BMI (OR=0.6, 95% CI=0.5-0.6) was associated with perception of overweight and smoking more cigarettes per day (OR=1.0, 95% CI=1.0-1.1), and perceiving oneself as overweight (OR=14.1, 95% CI=8.2-24.2) was associated with trying to lose weight. Participants somewhat underestimated their BMI in their weight perceptions. Those who perceived themselves as overweight were more likely to be trying to lose weight; therefore, increasing participant awareness of actual BMI status may lead to improved weight-control efforts in African-American smokers. Several expected associations with outcomes were not found, suggesting that BMI and weight constructs are not well-understood in this population. PMID:15719872

  9. A Professor's Controversial Analysis of Why Black Students Are "Losing the Race."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisberg, Leo

    2000-01-01

    Reports on the controversial stands taken by John H. McWhorter, a black University of Berkeley associate professor, in his book "Losing the Race: Self-Sabotage in Black America." The book opposes affirmative action and suggests that black academic achievement lags because of a mindset endemic to black culture that discourages learning, while…

  10. Assets and Depreciation: Or, Only an Accountant Would Claim Books Lose Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Herbert

    1998-01-01

    Examines the purpose for using historical costs in library financial records. Discusses the difference between spending money and losing resources. Describes how financial record systems operate and the ways in which accounting treats classes of expenditures. Uses the example of a bookmobile. (AEF)

  11. 2007 Presidential Address: Fear of Losing Control--Power, Perfectionism, and the Psychology of Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrisler, Joan C.

    2008-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence and popular culture suggest that fear of losing control of oneself is common among North American women, yet there is little in the way of data or theory to show why so many women fear loss of control or how to help them to leave that fear behind. In this article a commonly accepted definition of self-regulation is examined…

  12. Losing Perspective: The Recent Debate Over Welfare and Poverty. Working Paper 2081-02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Frank S.; Michel, Richard C.

    Charles Murray's book, "Losing Ground: American Social Policy, 1950-1980," proposes the abolition of benefit programs for all working-aged persons for the following reasons: (1) it is logically impossible for the government to aid the poor by creating incentives for people to become poor; (2) since the mid-1960s the United States has so…

  13. Influence of breast feeding on the clinical features of salt-losing congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Joseph A; Bailey, John D

    1983-01-01

    Feeding habits before diagnosis were reviewed in 32 infants with salt-losing congenital adrenal hyperplasia who were admitted to hospital in adrenal crisis. Most breast-fed babies failed to thrive, seldom vomited, and despite severe salt wasting, presented at a later age than their formula-fed counterparts. PMID:6830279

  14. Living with clipped wings—Patients’ experience of losing a leg

    PubMed Central

    Norlyk, Annelise; Martinsen, Bente; Kjaer-Petersen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the lived experience of losing a leg as described by the patients themselves post-discharge. Studies have documented that regardless of aetiology patients are faced with severe physical as well as psychosocial challenges post-amputation. However, only few studies explore in-depth the patients’ perspective on the various challenges following the loss of a leg. The study uses the phenomenological approach of Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR). Data were collected from 24 in-depth interviews with 12 Danish patients. Data analysis was performed according to the guidelines given in RLR. The essential meaning of losing a leg is a radical and existential upheaval, which restricts patients’ lifestyle and irretrievably alters their lifeworld. Life after the operation is associated with despair, and a painful sense of loss, but also with the hope of regaining personal independence. The consequences of losing a leg gradually materialize as the patients realize how the loss of mobility limits their freedom. Patients experience the professional help as primarily directed towards physical care and rehabilitation. The findings show that the loss of a leg and, subsequently, the restricted mobility carry with them an existential dimension which refers to limitation of action space and loss of freedom experienced as an exclusion from life. Our findings demonstrate a need for complementary care and stress the importance of an increased awareness of the psychosocial and existential consequences of losing a limb. PMID:24128661

  15. Winning or Losing against an Opposite-Sex Peer on a Gender-Based Competitive Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Stefanie; Thompson, J. Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Explored the effects on college students' mood and body image of a negative versus positive outcome in an opposite-sex, competitive peer interaction. Used one gender-neutral and one gender stereotypical task. There were no gender differences in reactions to winning or losing gender-neutral competitions, except marginally for depression. The…

  16. Communicative Acts in Coach-Athlete Interactions: When Losing Competitions and when Making Mistakes in Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagar, Sam S.; Jowett, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Athletes' perceptions of coaches' communicative acts of interaction in two key interpersonal situations were examined, and their impact on the athletes: (a) when athletes lose competitions; and, (b) when athletes make mistakes in training. Athletes (N = 324, M age = 20.11) completed an open-ended survey. Data were deductively and inductively…

  17. Lose to Win: A Goal-Oriented Group for Overweight Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Roselyn

    1985-01-01

    Describes the Lose to Win Program, a weight loss program for third, fourth and fifth grade students. The program included nutrition education, exercise, and improving the self concept, and involved the use of rewards, and support of parents and school staff. (JAC)

  18. A Longitudinal Study of Body Image and Strategies to Lose Weight and Increase Muscles among Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, M. P.; Ricciardelli, L. A.

    2005-01-01

    A longitudinal study was used to examine age differences in the role of body mass index (BMI) and sociocultural pressures in predicting changes in body image and strategies to both lose weight and increase muscles among 443 children aged between 8 and 12 years (207 boys, 236 girls) over a 16-month period. The strongest predictors of body image and…

  19. 20 CFR 663.565 - May an eligible training provider lose its eligibility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... subsequently violated any provision of title I of WIA or the WIA regulations, including 29 CFR part 37, may be... according to the requirements of 20 CFR 667.640(b). ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false May an eligible training provider lose...

  20. 20 CFR 663.565 - May an eligible training provider lose its eligibility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... subsequently violated any provision of title I of WIA or the WIA regulations, including 29 CFR part 37, may be... according to the requirements of 20 CFR 667.640(b). ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false May an eligible training provider lose...

  1. Losing Ground: A Critique. Institute for Research on Poverty Special Report Series #38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLanahan, Sara; And Others

    Five papers which criticize Charles Murray's book, "Losing Ground: American Social Policy 1950-1980" are presented in this report. In general, the papers dispute Murray's thesis that the poor did not benefit from social policies but were, instead, substantially harmed by these programs. The papers (and their authors) are: (1) "Charles Murray and…

  2. Osteoclasts Lose Innate Inflammatory Reactivity to Metal and Polymer Implant Debris Compared to Monocytes/Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Jessica; Samelko, Lauryn; Gilvar, Phil; McAllister, Kyron; Hallab, Nadim James

    2013-01-01

    Long-term aseptic failures of joint replacements are generally attributed to implant debris-induced inflammation and osteolysis. This response is largely mediated by immune and bone cells (monocytes/macrophages and osteoclasts, respectively), that in the presence of implant debris (e.g. metal particles and ions), release pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6. The relative degree to which implant debris can illicit inflammatory response(s) from osteoclasts vs monocytes/macrophages is unknown, i.e. are osteoclasts a viable target for anti-inflammatory therapy for implant debris? We investigated relative monocyte versus osteoclast inflammatory responses in a side-by-side comparison using implant debris from the perspective of both danger signaling (IL-1β) and pathogenic recognition (TNF-α) reactivity (Challenge Agents: Cobalt-alloy, Titanium-alloy, and PMMA particles, 0.9-1.8um-dia ECD and Cobalt, and Nickel-ions 0.01-0.1mM, all with and without LPS priming). Human monocytes/macrophages reacted to implant debris with >100 fold greater production of cytokines compared to osteoclast-like cells. Particulate Co-alloy challenge induced >1000 pg/ml of IL-1β and TNF-α, in monocytes and <50pg/mL IL-1β and TNF-α in osteoclasts. Cobalt ions induced >3000pg/mL IL-1β and TNF-α in monocytes/macrophages and <50pg/mL IL-1β and TNF-α in osteoclasts. The paracrine effect of supernatants from debris-treated monocytes/macrophages was capable of inducing greater osteoclastogenesis (TRAP+, p<0.06) and inflammation than direct debris challenge on osteoclasts. Our results indicate that as monocytes/macrophages differentiate into osteoclasts, they largely lose their innate immune reactivity to implant debris and thus may not be as relevant a therapeutic target as monocytes/macrophages for mitigating debris-induced inflammation. PMID:24198853

  3. Losing it.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Diane L

    2004-04-01

    "It's worse than I thought.... She's completely lost her mind," says Harry Beecham, the CEO of blue chip management consultancy Pierce and Company. The perplexed executive was in a hotel suite with his wife in Amsterdam, the latest stop on his regular trek to dozens of Pierce offices worldwide. In his hand was a sheaf of paper--the same message sent over and over again by his star employee and protégée Katharina Waldburg. The end of the world is coming, she warned. "Someone is going to die." Harry wouldn't have expected this sort of behavior from Katharina. After graduating with distinction from Oxford, she made a name for herself by single-handedly building Pierce's organizational behavior practice. At 27, she's poised to become the youngest partner ever elected at the firm. But Harry can't ignore the faxes in his hand. Or the stream-of-consciousness e-mails Katharina's been sending to one of the directors in Pierce's Berlin office--mostly gibberish but potentially disastrous to Katharina's reputation if they ever got out. Harry also can't dismiss reports from Roland Fuoroli, manager of the Berlin office, of a vicious verbal exchange Katharina had with him, or of an "over the top" lunch date Katharina had with one of Pierce's clients in which she was explaining the alphabet's role in the creation of the universe. Harry is planning to talk to Katharina when he gets to Berlin. What should he say? And will it be too late? Four commentators offer their advice in this fictional case study. They are Kay Redfield Jamison, a professor of psychiatry and a coauthor of Manic-Depressive Illness; David E. Meen, a former director at McKinsey & Company; Norman Pearlstine, the editor in chief at Time Incorporated; and Richard Primus, an assistant law professor at the University of Michigan. PMID:15077365

  4. Losing ground.

    PubMed

    Carter, D

    1993-01-01

    A recent research effort by the Nepalese Topological Survey Branch and the Department of Soil Science and the University of British Columbia, Canada, found with the use of the geographic information system (GIS) that forest cover has expanded, but soil fertility is decreasing at a rapid rate in Nepal. These findings conflict with media allegations which allege forest destruction from farmers' wood-cutting practices and responsibility for flooding in Bangladesh. The research was conducted in the Jhikhu Khola watershed in the Middle Mountains, which is Nepal's most populous region that is intensively used in subsistence farming and grazing. Migration adds to the existing problems of soil erosion, sedimentation, deforestation, and loss in soil fertility. The soil is prone to erosion. Data were collected through the GIS system by aerial photos, field surveys, and soil analysis. Hydrometric stations to measure the sedimentation process were established in 7 places and farmers monitored the climate, water loss and gain, and sediment movement. Interviews were also conducted among the farm population on demographics, livestock, fodder and fuel consumption, crop yields and practices, and fertilizer use. Researchers aimed both to identify the causes of soil degradation and to estimate the productivity, profitability, and sustainability of different land uses and farming systems. Another finding was that, in Jhikhu Khola, the deforestation of the 1960s has been abated by reforestation efforts in the 1980s. This has contributed to a 10% expansion of forest cover, and increase of sloping terrace by 9%, and a decline in grazing land by 9% and shrub land by 6%. Calculations for the year 2000 showed that the fuelwood surplus would drop to 6% from 73% and food surplus of 25% would become a 27% deficit. The 40% deficiency in animal feed would increase to 54%. Although reforestation has added to forest cover, pine tree cultivation occurred on moderate elevations where grazing and food production are possible, while higher altitudes on steep slopes were untouched. Workshops are conducted in the villages and efforts are being made to promote the exchange of information between departments. The ultimate solution is to increase agricultural production for profit. PMID:12318008

  5. Losing Ground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckholm, Erik

    1976-01-01

    Past unsound agricultural practices coupled with drought and high winds eroded away topsoil in the Great Plains. Because of technology and food surpluses productivity returned to the deteriorated lands. Ecosystem overstress could become devastating especially in poor countries as food surpluses and energy decline and populations soar. (MR)

  6. Impact of streambed heterogeneity on hyporheic exchange fluxes under losing and gaining stream flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Aryeh; Laube, Gerrit; Schmidt, Christian; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Arnon, Shai

    2015-04-01

    Biogeochemical processes in streams are affected by water exchange between the surface and subsurface environments (e.g. hyporheic exchange). It has previously been shown that hyporheic exchange is strongly affected by the local morphology of the streambed and the flow conditions, including overlying water velocity and losing or gaining fluxes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate how the streambed heterogeneity is affecting hyporheic exchange. In addition, we tested how losing or gaining flow conditions are affecting the hyporheic exchange fluxes and the spatial distribution of the flow paths within the streambed. Experiments measuring the combined effect of streambed heterogeneity and losing and gaining flow conditions on hyporheic exchange were conducted in a laboratory flume system (640 cm long and 30 cm wide). The flow in the flume is fully controlled including gaining or losing fluxes, and it was packed with heterogeneous sediments. An estimate of the solute exchange between the stream and the sediment was obtained from the analysis of a salt tracer (NaCl) injection into the overlying water, which then was monitored by an electrical conductivity meter. In addition, dye injections into the overlying water were used to visualize the effect of sediment heterogeneity on the flow paths in the streambed. Experimental results showed that increasing losing and gaining fluxes resulted in a similar decline in the hyporheic exchange flux as previously observed for a homogenous streambed. However the location in which the hyporheic exchange takes place is different and is strongly influenced by the sediment heterogeneity. The spatial distribution of hyporheic exchange within the streambed will be discussed in light of the distribution of the local, horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities.

  7. Expression of FGFR3 during human testis development and in germ cell-derived tumours of young adults.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Katherine A; Olesen, Inge A; Winge, Sofia B; Nielsen, Ana R; Nielsen, John E; Graem, Niels; Juul, Anders; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Observations in patients with an activating mutation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) suggest a role for FGFR3 signalling in promoting proliferation or survival of germ cells. In this study, we aimed to identify the FGFR3 subtype and the ontogeny of expression during human testis development and to ascertain whether FGFR3 signalling is linked to germ cell proliferation and the pathogenesis of testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) of young adult men. Using RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, we examined 58 specimens of human testes throughout development for FGFR3 expression, and then compared expression of FGFR3 with proliferation markers (PCNA or Ki67). We also analysed for FGFR3 expression 30 TGCTs and 28 testes containing the tumour precursor cell, carcinoma in situ (CIS). Fetal and adult testes expressed exclusively the FGFR3IIIc isoform. FGFR3 protein expression was restricted to the cytoplasm/plasma membrane of spermatogonia and was most prevalent at mid-gestation, infancy and from puberty onwards. Phosphorylated (p)FGFR was detected in pre-spermatogonia at mid-gestation and in spermatogonia during puberty and in the adult testis. Throughout normal human testis development, expression of FGFR3 did not directly correlate with proliferation markers. In preinvasive CIS cells and in TGCTs, including classical seminoma and embryonal carcinoma, FGFR3IIIc was detected only in a small number of cells, with a heterogeneous expression pattern. FGFR3 is an excellent marker for human pre-/spermatogonia throughout development. Signalling through this receptor is likely associated with spermatogonial survival rather than proliferation. FGFR3 is not expressed in gonocytes and may not be essential to the aetiology of TGCTs stemming from CIS. PMID:23784824

  8. Beta-Catenin Haplo Insufficient Male Mice Do Not Lose Bone in Response to Hindlimb Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Joshua; Cheng, An-Lin; Johnson, Mark L.; Bonewald, Lynda F.

    2016-01-01

    As the β-catenin pathway has been shown to be involved in mechanotransduction, we sought to determine if haploinsufficiency would affect skeletal response to unloading. It has previously been shown that deletion of both alleles of β-catenin in bone cells results in a fragile skeleton highly susceptible to fracture, but deletion of one allele using Dmp1-Cre (Ctnnb1+/loxP; Dmp1-Cre, cKO HET) has little effect on the 2 mo old skeleton. We found that under normal housing conditions, trabecular bone volume was significantly less in 5 mo old male cKO HET mice compared to controls (Ctrl/HET:Tb. BV/TV = 13.96±2.71/8.92±0.95%, Tb.N. = 4.88±0.51/3.95±0.44/mm, Tb. Sp. = 0.20±0.02/0.26±0.03mm, a 36%, 19% and 30% change respectively) but not in females suggesting an age and gender related effect. Before performing suspension experiments and to control for the environmental effects, animals with the same tail attachment and housing conditions, but not suspended (NS), were compared to normally housed (NH) animals. Attachment and housing resulted in weight loss in both genders and phenotypes. Cortical bone loss was observed in the cKO HET males (NH/NS, Ct BV/TV: 90.45±0.72/89.12±0.56%) and both diaphyseal (0.19±0.01/0.17±0.01mm) and metaphyseal (0.10±0.01/0.08±0.01mm) thickness, but not in female cKO HET mice suggesting that male cKO HET mice are susceptible to attachment and housing conditions. These results with transgenic mice emphasizes the importance of proper controls when attributing skeletal responses to unloading. With suspension, cKO HET male mice did not lose bone unlike female cKO HET mice that had greater trabecular bone loss than controls (Ctrl 9%:cKO HET 21% decrease Tb. N; Ctrl 12%:cKO HET 27% increase Tb. Sp.). Suspended and non-suspended mice lost weight compared to normally housed animals. Taken together, the data suggest a protective effect of β-catenin against the effects of stress in males and partial protection against unloading in females

  9. Losing the Dark: Public Outreach about Light Pollution and Its Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins Petersen, Carolyn; Petersen, Mark C.; Walker, Constance E.; Kardel, W. Scott; International Dark Sky Association Education Committee

    2015-01-01

    Losing the Dark is a PSA video available for public outreach through fulldome theaters as well as conventional venues (classroom, lecture hall, YouTube, Vimeo). It was created by Loch Ness Productions for the International Dark Sky Association. It explains problems caused by light pollution, which targets astronomy, health, and the environment. Losing the Dark also suggests ways people can implement "wise lighting" practices to help mitigate light pollution. The video is available free of charge for outreach professionals in planetarium facilities (both fulldome and classical), science centers, classroom, and other outreach venues, and has been translated into 13 languages. It is available via download, USB key (at cost), and through online venues. This paper summarizes the program's outreach to more than a thousand fulldome theaters, nearly 100,000 views via four sites on Youtube and Vimeo,a number of presentations at other museum and classroom facilities, and shares some preliminary metrics and commentary from users.

  10. I feel good whether my friends win or my foes lose: Brain mechanisms underlying feeling similarity

    PubMed Central

    Aue, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    People say they enjoy both seeing a preferred social group succeed and seeing an adversary social group fail. At the same time, they state they dislike seeing a preferred social group fail and seeing an adversary social group succeed. The current magnetic resonance imaging study investigated whether—and if so, how—such similarities in reported feeling states are reflected in neural activities. American football fans anticipated success and failure situations for their favorite or their adversary teams. The data support the idea that feeling similarities and divergences expressed in verbal reports carry with them significant neural similarities and differences, respectively. Desired (favorite team likely to win and adversary team likely to lose) rather than undesired (favorite team likely to lose and adversary team likely to win) outcomes were associated with heightened activity in the supramarginal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, insula, and cerebellum. Precuneus activity additionally distinguished anticipated desirable outcomes for favorite versus adversary teams. PMID:24912072

  11. Oxygen consumption along bed forms under losing and gaining streamflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Falco, Natalie; Arnon, Shai; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that bed forms are the most significant geomorphological structure that drives hyporheic exchange and biogeochemical processes in stream networks. Other studies also demonstrated that due to the hyporheic flow patterns within bed form, biogeochemical processes do not occur uniformly along and within the bed forms. The objective of this work was to systematically evaluate how losing or gaining flow conditions affect oxygen consumption by biofilm along sandy bed forms. We measured the effects of losing and gaining flow conditions on oxygen consumption by combining modeling and experiments in a novel laboratory flume system that enable the control of losing and gaining fluxes. Oxygen consumption was measured after growing a benthic biofilm fed with Sodium Benzoate (as a carbon source) and measuring the distribution of oxygen in the streambed with microelectrodes. The experimental results were analyzed using a novel code that calculates vertical profiles of reaction rates in the presence of hyporheic water fluxes. These experimental observations and modeling revealed that oxygen distribution varied along the bed forms. The zone of oxygen consumption (i.e. depth of penetration) was the largest at the upstream side of the bed form and the smallest in the lee side (at the lowest part of the bed form), regardless of the flow conditions. Also, the zone of oxygen consumption was the largest under losing conditions, the smallest under gaining conditions, and in-between under neutral conditions. The distribution of oxygen consumption rates determined with our new model will be also discussed. Our preliminary results enable us to show the importance of the coupling between flow conditions and oxygen consumption along bed forms and are expected to improve our understanding of nutrient cycling in streams.

  12. Thoracic Duct Decompression for Protein-Losing Enteropathy in Failing Fontan Circulation.

    PubMed

    António, Marta; Gordo, Andreia; Pereira, Conceição; Pinto, Fátima; Fragata, Isabel; Fragata, José

    2016-06-01

    An infrequent but devastating late complication of Fontan circulation is protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), which results from unbalanced lymphatic homeostasis. Surgical decompression of the thoracic duct by redirecting its drainage to the pulmonary venous atrium has been introduced recently as a possible treatment. This report describes a single-institution experience with this innovative procedure in 2 patients with failing Fontan circulation with PLE refractory to optimized medical therapy. PMID:27211948

  13. Seizures Associated With Hypocalcemia in a Yorkshire Terrier With Protein-Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Jim; Quimby, Jessica; Bayliss, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    A 7 yr old, male, castrated, Yorkshire terrier was presented on emergency for an acute onset of seizure activity. The owner also reported that the dog had previously exhibited other symptoms, including intermittent vomiting, diarrhea, and anorexia for several yr. The initial workup revealed a marked decrease in ionized calcium and total protein. Further diagnostics revealed decreases in magnesium, 25 hydroxyvitamin D, albumin, and globulins, and an increased parathyroid hormone level. Intestinal biopsies revealed inflammatory bowel disease and lymphangiectasia. The dog received intravenous calcium gluconate for treatment of hypocalcemia followed by oral calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Seizure activity ceased once calcium levels approached the normal range. Medical and dietary therapy for lymphangiectasia and inflammatory bowel disease consisted of prednisone, rutin, and a low-fat diet. Decreased serum total ionized calcium levels have been reported previously in dogs with protein-losing enteropathies. Typically, the hypocalcemia is not associated with clinical signs. Severe clinical signs of hypocalcemia are rarely reported in dogs with protein-losing enteropathy, but seizures, facial twitching, and tremors can occur. When presented with a dog with a history of seizure activity, panhypoproteinemia, and hypocalcemia, protein-losing enteropathy should be included on the list of differential diagnoses. PMID:26535456

  14. Winning and Losing Tree Species of Reassembly in Minnesota’s Mixed and Broadleaf Forests

    PubMed Central

    Hanberry, Brice B.; Palik, Brian J.; He, Hong S.

    2013-01-01

    We examined reassembly of winning and losing tree species, species traits including shade and fire tolerance, and associated disturbance filters and forest ecosystem types due to rapid forest change in the Great Lakes region since 1850. We identified winning and losing species by changes in composition, distribution, and site factors between historical and current surveys in Minnesota’s mixed and broadleaf forests. In the Laurentian Mixed Forest, shade-intolerant aspen replaced shade-intolerant tamarack as the most dominant tree species. Fire-tolerant white pine and jack pine decreased, whereas shade-tolerant ashes, maples, and white cedar increased. In the Eastern Broadleaf Forest, fire-tolerant white oaks and red oaks decreased, while shade-tolerant ashes, American basswood, and maples increased. Tamarack, pines, and oaks have become restricted to sites with either wetter or sandier and drier soils due to increases in aspen and shade-tolerant, fire-sensitive species on mesic sites. The proportion of shade-tolerant species increased in both regions, but selective harvest reduced the applicability of functional groups alone to specify winners and losers. Harvest and existing forestry practices supported aspen dominance in mixed forests, although without aspen forestry and with fire suppression, mixed forests will transition to a greater composition of shade-tolerant species, converging to forests similar to broadleaf forests. A functional group framework provided a perspective of winning and losing species and traits, selective filters, and forest ecosystems that can be generalized to other regions, regardless of species identity. PMID:23613911

  15. Trying to lose weight among non-overweight university students from 22 low, middle and emerging economy countries.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of trying to lose weight among non-overweight in university students and its sociodemographic and behavioural factors from 22 low and middle income and emerging economy countries. In a cross-sectional survey we took anthropometric measurements and used a self-administered questionnaire among 15997 undergraduate university students (mean age 20.8, Standard deviation=2.8, age range of 16-30 years) from 22 universities in 22 countries. Body mass index (BMI) was used for weight status. Results indicate that 27.1% non-overweight students were trying to lose weight, 34.6% among women and 16.5% among men. Among underweight or normal weight students, 19.0% perceived themselves to be overweight, 11.3% were dieting to lose weight, and 53.5% considered to lose weight of high importance. Multivariate logistic regression found that being female, coming from a low income country, the perception of being overweight, high importance of losing weight, dieting to lose weight, trying to eat fibre, and avoiding foods with fat and cholesterol were associated with trying to lose weight in non-overweight university students. The study found a high prevalence of weight control practices and several specific risk factors were identified that can be utilized in interventions to target unhealthy weight control measures. PMID:25740756

  16. Photo-generated carriers lose energy during extraction from polymer-fullerene solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Melianas, Armantas; Etzold, Fabian; Savenije, Tom J.; Laquai, Frédéric; Inganäs, Olle; Kemerink, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    In photovoltaic devices, the photo-generated charge carriers are typically assumed to be in thermal equilibrium with the lattice. In conventional materials, this assumption is experimentally justified as carrier thermalization completes before any significant carrier transport has occurred. Here, we demonstrate by unifying time-resolved optical and electrical experiments and Monte Carlo simulations over an exceptionally wide dynamic range that in the case of organic photovoltaic devices, this assumption is invalid. As the photo-generated carriers are transported to the electrodes, a substantial amount of their energy is lost by continuous thermalization in the disorder broadened density of states. Since thermalization occurs downward in energy, carrier motion is boosted by this process, leading to a time-dependent carrier mobility as confirmed by direct experiments. We identify the time and distance scales relevant for carrier extraction and show that the photo-generated carriers are extracted from the operating device before reaching thermal equilibrium. PMID:26537357

  17. Photo-generated carriers lose energy during extraction from polymer-fullerene solar cells.

    PubMed

    Melianas, Armantas; Etzold, Fabian; Savenije, Tom J; Laquai, Frédéric; Inganäs, Olle; Kemerink, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    In photovoltaic devices, the photo-generated charge carriers are typically assumed to be in thermal equilibrium with the lattice. In conventional materials, this assumption is experimentally justified as carrier thermalization completes before any significant carrier transport has occurred. Here, we demonstrate by unifying time-resolved optical and electrical experiments and Monte Carlo simulations over an exceptionally wide dynamic range that in the case of organic photovoltaic devices, this assumption is invalid. As the photo-generated carriers are transported to the electrodes, a substantial amount of their energy is lost by continuous thermalization in the disorder broadened density of states. Since thermalization occurs downward in energy, carrier motion is boosted by this process, leading to a time-dependent carrier mobility as confirmed by direct experiments. We identify the time and distance scales relevant for carrier extraction and show that the photo-generated carriers are extracted from the operating device before reaching thermal equilibrium. PMID:26537357

  18. Protein-losing enteropathy associated with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus with a good response to rituximab.

    PubMed

    Sansinanea, Pierina; Carrica, Sebastián Augusto; Marcos, Josefina; García, Mercedes Argentina

    2016-01-01

    A case is presented of a protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) as the initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a 17 year-old female patient, who presented with ascites, edema and hypoalbuminemia. The diagnosis of SLE was based on the presence of: malar rash, oral ulcers, thrombocytopenia, antinuclear antibodies, IgM anticardiolipin antibody, and lupus anticoagulant. Renal and liver diseases were ruled out. The PLE diagnosis was confirmed with fecal alpha 1-antitrypsin clearance. The PLE was refractory to different lines of immunosuppressive agents like glucocorticoids, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and cyclosporine, showing a satisfactory and sustained response with rituximab, allowing steroid sparing and long term remission. PMID:25818375

  19. Mass-losing peculiar red giants - The comparison between theory and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1989-01-01

    The mass loss from evolved red giants is considered. It seems that red giants on the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) are losing between 0.0003 and 0.0006 solar mass/sq kpc yr in the solar neighborhood. If all the main sequence stars between 1 and 5 solar masses ultimately evolve into white dwarfs with masses of 0.7 solar mass, the predicted mass loss rate in the solar neighborhood from these stars is 0.0008 solar mass/sq kpc yr. Although there are still uncertainties, it appears that there is no strong disagreement between theory and observation.

  20. Late post liver transplant protein losing enteropathy: Rare complication of incisional hernia

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jonathan D; Perera, M Thamara PR; Pal, CY; Neuberger, James; Mirza, Darius F

    2013-01-01

    Development of oedema and hypoproteinaemia in a liver transplant recipient may be the first signs of graft dysfunction and should prompt a full assessment. We report the novel case of a patient who, years after liver transplantation developed a functional blind loop in an incisional hernia, which manifested as oedema and hypoproteinaemia secondary to protein losing enteropathy. After numerous investigations, the diagnosis was made by flurodeoxyglucose positron emmision tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Surgical repair of the incisional hernia was followed several months later by resolution of the protein loss, and confirmed at a post operative FDG-PET scan at one year. PMID:23885154

  1. Carbon dust particle size distributions around mass-losing AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jura, M.

    1997-03-01

    Solids of presolar SiC and interstellar carbon have qualitatively similar relative size distribution for particles with radii, a, in the range 0.35 μm0.35 μm are produced by interacting binary systems rather than single mass-losing stars.

  2. Protein-losing nephropathy associated with Borrelia burgdorferi seropositivity in a soft-coated wheaten terrier: Response to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Horney, Barbara S.; Stojanovic, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    A soft-coated wheaten terrier was examined for lameness with subsequent identification of protein-losing nephropathy, hypoalbuminemia, hyperglobulinemia, and seroconversion to Borrelia burgdorferi. Following doxycycline therapy, the urine protein loss decreased significantly and serum albumin concentration remained close to or within the reference interval for over 3 years, contrary to the reported poor prognosis for renal disease associated with B. burgdorferi or protein-losing nephropathy of soft-coated wheaten terriers. PMID:24082169

  3. How Do Massive Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars Lose All Their Mass?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, B. L.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Waelkens, C.; Min, M.; Lombaert, R.; Van Winckel, H.

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have made it increasingly clear that oxygen-rich and massive (≥5 M⊙) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars go through only one, short, superwind. Although the superwind was originally introduced for the star to lose enough mass to reach that of a white dwarf, evidence is now building that the superwind lasts too short a time for it to be sufficiently efficient. The integrated mass lost during the whole superwind is not enough to remove the remaining H-rich envelope and terminate the AGB. Studies presented at the conference have shown, from methods based on both gas and dust, that the superwind lasts only ≲1200 years. The analysis of solid-state spectral bands of crystalline olivine (Mg2-2xFe2xSiO4) in the spectra of massive OH/IR stars is a powerful way to determine the extent of the superwind. De Vries, Blommaert, Waters et al. (2014) show that the temperature indicated by the observed 69μm band of crystalline olivine can only be reproduced by models with a geometrically compact superwind (RSW ≲ 2500 AU = 1400 R*). The way by which a star loses its remaining mass after the superwind is unknown. During the conference this problem was discussed and the most likely hypothesis would be a short but very strong phase after the superwind. This hyperwind would have a mass-loss rate of ≳10-3 M⊙/yr.

  4. Application of integral pumping tests to investigate the influence of a losing stream on groundwater quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leschik, S.; Musolff, A.; Krieg, R.; Martienssen, M.; Bayer-Raich, M.; Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2009-06-01

    Losing streams that are influenced by wastewater treatment plant effluents and combined sewer overflows (CSO's) can be a source of groundwater contamination. Released micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, endocrine disrupters and other ecotoxicologically relevant substances as well as inorganic wastewater constituents can reach the groundwater, where they may deteriorate groundwater quality. This paper presents a method to quantify exfiltration mass flow rates Mex of wastewater constituents from losing streams by the operation of integral pumping tests (IPT's) up- and downstream of a target section. Due to the large sampled water volume during IPT's the results are more reliable than those from conventional point sampling. We applied the method at a test site in Leipzig (Germany). Wastewater constituents K+ and NO3- showed Mex values of 1241 to 4315 and 749 to 924 mg m-1stream d-1, respectively, while Cl- (16.8 to 47.3 g m-1stream d-1) and SO42- (20.3 to 32.2 g m-1stream d-1) revealed the highest observed Mex values at the test site. The micropollutants caffeine and technical-nonylphenol were dominated by elimination processes in the groundwater between upstream and downstream wells. Additional concentration measurements in the stream and a connected sewer at the test site were performed to identify relevant processes that influence the concentrations at the IPT wells.

  5. Application of integral pumping tests to investigate the influence of a losing stream on groundwater quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leschik, S.; Musolff, A.; Krieg, R.; Martienssen, M.; Bayer-Raich, M.; Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2009-10-01

    Losing streams that are influenced by wastewater treatment plant effluents and combined sewer overflows (CSOs) can be a source of groundwater contamination. Released micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, endocrine disrupters and other ecotoxicologically relevant substances as well as inorganic wastewater constituents can reach the groundwater, where they may deteriorate groundwater quality. This paper presents a method to quantify exfiltration mass flow rates per stream length unit Mex of wastewater constituents from losing streams by the operation of integral pumping tests (IPTs) up- and downstream of a target section. Due to the large sampled water volume during IPTs the results are more reliable than those from conventional point sampling. We applied the method at a test site in Leipzig (Germany). Wastewater constituents K+ and NO3- showed Mex values of 1241 to 4315 and 749 to 924 mg mstream-1 d-1, respectively, while Cl- (16.8 to 47.3 g mstream-1 d-1) and SO42- (20.3 to 32.2 g mstream-1 d-1) revealed the highest observed Mex values at the test site. The micropollutants caffeine and technical-nonylphenol were dominated by elimination processes in the groundwater between upstream and downstream wells. Additional concentration measurements in the stream and a connected sewer at the test site were performed to identify relevant processes that influence the concentrations at the IPT wells.

  6. Changes in the morphology and protein expression of germ cells and Sertoli cells in plateau pikas testes during non-breeding season.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Cao, Guangming; Zhang, Yanming; Qu, Jiapeng; Li, Wei; Wan, Xinrong; Li, Yu-Xia; Zhang, Zhibin; Wang, Yan-Ling; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Plateau pikas are seasonally breeding small herbivores that inhabit the meadow ecosystem of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Testis regression in plateau pikas begins in early June, and the male pikas are completely infertile, with a dramatically reduced testis size, in late July. In this study, a decreased germ cell number in the testes was first noted in early June. By late June, only Sertoli cells and a small number of spermatogonia remained. Interestingly, large gonocyte-like germ cells were observed in early July. In late July, the number of gonocyte-like cells per tubule increased significantly, and most of the Sertoli cell nuclei moved to and clustered in the center of the seminiferous tubules. The gonocyte-like germ cells and Sertoli cells began to express AP-2γ and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) proteins, which were detected in the germ cells and Sertoli cells of juvenile pikas but not in adult testes. Simultaneously, LC3 puncta dramatically increased in the seminiferous tubules of the pikas' testes during the non-breeding season. Our study found that spermatogonia and Sertoli cells in non-breeding adult pikas morphologically resembled those in juvenile pikas and expressed specific markers, indicating that de-differentiation-like transitions may occur during this process. PMID:26939551

  7. Changes in the morphology and protein expression of germ cells and Sertoli cells in plateau pikas testes during non-breeding season

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Cao, Guangming; Zhang, Yanming; Qu, Jiapeng; Li, Wei; Wan, Xinrong; Li, Yu-xia; Zhang, Zhibin; Wang, Yan-ling; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Plateau pikas are seasonally breeding small herbivores that inhabit the meadow ecosystem of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Testis regression in plateau pikas begins in early June, and the male pikas are completely infertile, with a dramatically reduced testis size, in late July. In this study, a decreased germ cell number in the testes was first noted in early June. By late June, only Sertoli cells and a small number of spermatogonia remained. Interestingly, large gonocyte-like germ cells were observed in early July. In late July, the number of gonocyte-like cells per tubule increased significantly, and most of the Sertoli cell nuclei moved to and clustered in the center of the seminiferous tubules. The gonocyte-like germ cells and Sertoli cells began to express AP-2γ and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) proteins, which were detected in the germ cells and Sertoli cells of juvenile pikas but not in adult testes. Simultaneously, LC3 puncta dramatically increased in the seminiferous tubules of the pikas’ testes during the non-breeding season. Our study found that spermatogonia and Sertoli cells in non-breeding adult pikas morphologically resembled those in juvenile pikas and expressed specific markers, indicating that de-differentiation-like transitions may occur during this process. PMID:26939551

  8. Application of Integral Pumping Tests to estimate the influence of losing streams on groundwater quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leschik, S.; Musolff, A.; Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2009-05-01

    Urban streams receive effluents of wastewater treatment plants and untreated wastewater during combined sewer overflow events. In the case of losing streams substances, which originate from wastewater, can reach the groundwater and deteriorate its quality. The estimation of mass flow rates Mex from losing streams to the groundwater is important to support groundwater management strategies, but is a challenging task. Variable inflow of wastewater with time-dependent concentrations of wastewater constituents causes a variable water composition in urban streams. Heterogeneities in the structure of the streambed and the connected aquifer lead, in combination with this variable water composition, to heterogeneous concentration patterns of wastewater constituents in the vicinity of urban streams. Groundwater investigation methods based on conventional point sampling may yield unreliable results under these conditions. Integral Pumping Tests (IPT) can overcome the problem of heterogeneous concentrations in an aquifer by increasing the sampled volume. Long-time pumping (several days) and simultaneous sampling yields reliable average concentrations Cav and mass flow rates Mcp for virtual control planes perpendicular to the natural flow direction. We applied the IPT method in order to estimate Mex of a stream section in Leipzig (Germany). The investigated stream is strongly influenced by combined sewer overflow events. Four pumping wells were installed up- and downstream of the stream section and operated for a period of five days. The study was focused on four inorganic (potassium, chloride, nitrate and sulfate) and two organic (caffeine and technical-nonylphenol) wastewater constituents with different transport properties. The obtained concentration-time series were used in combination with a numerical flow model to estimate Mcp of the respective wells. The difference of the Mcp's between up- and downstream wells yields Mex of wastewater constituents that increase

  9. Comparison of game-related statistics in men's international championships between winning and losing teams according to margin of victory.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Jose M; Escalantel, Yolanda; Madera, Joaquin; Mansilla, Mirella; García-Hermoso, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to compare water polo game-related statistics by game outcome (winning and losing teams) and margins of victory (close games, unbalanced games, and very unbalanced games), and (ii) to identify characteristics that mark the differences in performances for each group of margin of victory. The game-related statistics of the 308 men's matches played in seven International Championships (Olympic Games, World and European Championships) were analysed. A cluster analysis established three groups (close games, unbalanced games, and very unbalanced games) according to the margin of victory. Differences between game outcomes (winning or losing teams) and margins of victory (close, unbalanced, and very unbalanced games) were determined using the chi-squared statistic, also calculating the effect sizes of the differences. A discriminant analysis was then performed applying the sample-splitting method according to game outcome (winning and losing teams) by margin of victory. It was found that the game-related statistics differentiate the winning from the losing teams in each final score group, with 7 (offensive and defensive) variables differentiating winners from losers in close games, 16 in unbalanced games, and 11 in very unbalanced games. In all three types of game, the game-related statistics were shown to discriminate performance (85% or more), with two variables being discriminatory by game outcome (winning or losing teams) in all three cases: shots and goalkeeper-blocked shots. PMID:25420372

  10. Comparison of game-related statistics in men's international championships between winning and losing teams according to margin of victory.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Jose M; Escalantel, Yolanda; Madera, Joaquin; Mansilla, Mirella; García-Hermoso, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to compare water polo game-related statistics by game outcome (winning and losing teams) and margins of victory (close games, unbalanced games, and very unbalanced games), and (ii) to identify characteristics that mark the differences in performances for each group of margin of victory. The game-related statistics of the 308 men's matches played in seven International Championships (Olympic Games, World and European Championships) were analysed. A cluster analysis established three groups (close games, unbalanced games, and very unbalanced games) according to the margin of victory. Differences between game outcomes (winning or losing teams) and margins of victory (close, unbalanced, and very unbalanced games) were determined using the chi-squared statistic, also calculating the effect sizes of the differences. A discriminant analysis was then performed applying the sample-splitting method according to game outcome (winning and losing teams) by margin of victory. It was found that the game-related statistics differentiate the winning from the losing teams in each final score group, with 7 (offensive and defensive) variables differentiating winners from losers in close games, 16 in unbalanced games, and 11 in very unbalanced games. In all three types of game, the game-related statistics were shown to discriminate performance (85% or more), with two variables being discriminatory by game outcome (winning or losing teams) in all three cases: shots and goalkeeper-blocked shots. PMID:25507356

  11. Do stars that lose mass expand or contract? A semianalytical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisler, J.; Alcock, C.

    1986-01-01

    Semianalytic methods are used to determine whether a star of polytropic index n expands or contracts following an insentropic loss of mass. It is found that most stars shrink, including radiative stars which can be approximated by polytropes of index roughly three. However, stars that have a ratio of specific heats gamma only slightly larger than 1 + 1/n do expand if the perturbation of the core density is sufficiently large. For stars that shrink, the fractional change in the radius is not a linear function of the fractional change in mass. Using Lane's theorem, it is shown that a star with gamma = 4/3 cannot lose mass isentropically, although the radius increases if the core density is reduced.

  12. Evaluation of the "Lose Your Excuse" public service advertising campaign for tweens to save energy.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Jane T; Goldman, Patty; Zhivan, Natalia; Agyeman, Yaw; Barber, Erin

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluates the 2008-2009 "Lose your Excuse" public service advertising (PSA) campaign on energy efficiency targeting 8- to 12-year-olds, intended to increase knowledge, foster proactive attitudes, and change energy usage behaviors. Baseline and two follow-up surveys were conducted with online samples representative of the national population of households with kids with online access. Almost half (47%) of the tweens recognized at least one ad from the campaign. Ad recognition was positively associated with knowledge, proactive attitudes, and energy-saving behavior. Propensity score analysis confirmed a small but measurable and statistically significant effect on energy-saving behavior. The discussion section compares these results to public health campaigns in terms of ghost awareness, reach, and effect size. PMID:22167204

  13. The risk of losing 10 years of life put in perspective: views of college student smokers.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shu-Hui; Huang, Song-Lih

    2015-03-01

    Health messages have limited effects on young smokers. The health effects typically have long latent periods, and the appreciation of risk depends on the meaning given to longevity. This study aims to understand how college student smokers interpreted the risks of losing 10 years of life because of smoking. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with 23 male smokers from a relatively low-achieving college in southern Taiwan. The participants had vague ideas about the future; were not expecting a successful life, thought life was stressful and boring; and expressed that there was no need to live too long. Many believed that removing the stress and having a composed lifestyle was the way to becoming healthy, which could be achieved only by people with economic success. They would quit had they been rich. Empowerment to help young smokers gain control over their life events may be the key to tobacco control. PMID:23695539

  14. Disseminated mycobacterium avium complex as protein-losing enteropathy in a non-HIV patient.

    PubMed

    Konjeti, Venkata Rajesh; Paluri, Sravanthi

    2014-01-01

    Disseminated mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) causing protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) due to intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) in a non-HIV immunocompromised state is extremely rare. We present a case of 56-year-old male who was evaluated for worsening dyspnea and found to have right-sided chylous pleural effusion as well as worsening abdominal and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy. He had a history of psoriasis for which hewas on etanercept and alefacept which were stopped two years prior to the presentation. The evaluation revealed a MAC infection in his lymph nodes--a low CD4 count but negative for HIV. He was started on MAC therapy. He subsequently developed noninfectious diarrhea, Hypoalbuminemia, recurrentpleural effusions, ascites, and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP). Despite appropriate antibiotics and management--including total parental nutrition (TPN) with a medium-chain triglyceride enriched low fat diet--the patient's clinical condition deteriorated rapidly resulting in death. PMID:25672059

  15. Sociocultural influences on strategies to lose weight, gain weight, and increase muscles among ten cultural groups.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Marita P; Busija, Lucy; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Ricciardelli, Lina; Mellor, David; Mussap, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This study determined how sociocultural messages to change one's body are perceived by adolescents from different cultural groups. In total, 4904 adolescents, including Australian, Chilean, Chinese, Indo-Fijian, Indigenous Fijian, Greek, Malaysian, Chinese Malaysian, Tongans in New Zealand, and Tongans in Tonga, were surveyed about messages from family, peers, and the media to lose weight, gain weight, and increase muscles. Groups were best differentiated by family pressure to gain weight. Girls were more likely to receive the messages from multiple sociocultural sources whereas boys were more likely to receive the messages from the family. Some participants in a cultural group indicated higher, and others lower, levels of these sociocultural messages. These findings highlight the differences in sociocultural messages across cultural groups, but also that adolescents receive contrasting messages within a cultural group. These results demonstrate the difficulty in representing a particular message as being characteristic of each cultural group. PMID:25497878

  16. Cortical topography of event-related potentials to winning and losing in a video tennis game.

    PubMed

    Ivanitsky, A M; Kurnitskaya, I V; Sobotka, S

    1986-07-01

    The event-related potentials (ERP) in frontal and posterior associative cortex in right and left hemispheres were studied in two different outcomes of a television tennis game. These outcomes were 'win' and 'loss' of the ball, the first serving as a model of positive, the second as a model of negative emotional reactions. The ERPs consisted of 4 waves: P300, N600, P800, N1000. The most characteristic interhemispheric difference for 'win' was an increase of N600 in the left posterior associative cortex, and for 'loss', a decrease of P800 in the right frontal area. Thus, the positive and negative emotional reactions have specific spatio-temporal cortical organizations. The topography of ERP related to positive and negative emotions was disturbed in depressive patients. The patients revealed a larger negativity of the right posterior associative cortex and the left frontal cortex waves both at winning and losing the ball. PMID:3733492

  17. Coal slurry lobby loses again: but believes time is on its side

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, C.

    1980-10-11

    Time favors the Slurry Transport Association's attempts to overcome railroad and railroad-union opposition and gain legislative support for coal-slurry pipelines. The long-standing support for railroads in Congress has so far successfully blocked the efforts of a coalition of slurry lobbyists to develop an alternative method of coal transport. Pipeline sponsors seek eminent domainright to cross railroad rights-of-way, but the railroads feel they cannot afford to lose even 20 percent of their profitable coal freight. At issue is whether coal should guarantee a monopoly to the railroads at the expense of national energy needs, policies which mandate coal substitution for oil and gas, and coal exports. Union lobbyists impress legislators with the impact of pipelines on employees even though Congress recently deregulated the railroads. (DCK)

  18. Integrated Hydrogeological Investigation on the Vulnerability of a Pumping Station at a Losing Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngueleu Kamangou, Stephane; Vogt, Tobias; Cirpka, Olaf

    2010-05-01

    River restoration usually includes alteration of the river channel morphology. Thereby the interaction between river and groundwater can be modified. For the design of a river restoration project - especially in the vicinity of a groundwater pumping well for drinking water production - this impact must be predicted. But a good prediction requires a proper understanding of the existing situation. Numerical models help to improve the strategy of a successful river restoration project. The main objective of this study was to investigate the vulnerability of a pumping station located at losing river in northeast Switzerland. Besides the effect that river restoration could create, a particular attention was placed on the effect of a beaver dam in a side channel close to the pumping station. Analysis of field measurements coupled with numerical modeling of the pumping station area improved the understanding of the interactions in the river corridor between the river, side channels and the alluvial aquifer.

  19. Differential gauging and tracer tests resolve seepage fluxes in a strongly-losing stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehl, C.; Fisher, A. T.; Hatch, C.; Huertos, M. Los; Stemler, G.; Shennan, C.

    2006-10-01

    SummaryThe Pajaro River, central coastal California, consistently loses 0.2-0.4 m 3/s of discharge along an 11.42-km experimental reach late in the water year, when discharge is ⩽4.5 m 3/s. Channel loss occurs throughout this reach, but is greatest in magnitude near the bottom of the reach. Water isotopic data and other observations suggest that channel loss results mainly from streambed seepage, as opposed to evapotranspiration. If it occurs throughout the year, the channel loss along this short stream reach could contribute 6-13 × 10 6 m 3 of annual aquifer recharge, or ˜20-40% of current sustainable basin yield. We performed a series of tracer injections along this reach to determine if hydrologic exchange occurs within this strongly-losing stream. We found that during periods of high channel loss, there were also comparable storage exchange fluxes and lateral inflow of tracer-free water. Within upper and lower parts of the experimental reach, storage exchange fluxes are about 10 times greater than lateral inflow. The former are associated with the movement of water between the main channel and surface or subsurface storage zones. In this system, it is likely that the latter are primarily associated with spatially- or temporally-long subsurface flow paths within the shallow streambed, as opposed to inflow of ground water from deeper in the basin. Along both upper and lower parts of the experimental reach, lateral inflow tends to increase as channel discharge decreases. In contrast, storage exchange fluxes increase with decreasing discharge along the upper parts of the reach, but decrease with decreasing discharge along the lower parts. Gauging and tracer test results suggest that subsurface storage exchange and loss may occur simultaneously, and that the lateral inflow of tracer-free water can be caused by long-scale subsurface flow as well as ground water making its first appearance in the channel.

  20. Thermal regime of dune-covered sediments under gaining and losing water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. Bayani; Wilson, John L.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the effects of current-bed form induced flow and heat transport through permeable-bottom sediments overlain by a marine or terrestrial water column that is gaining or losing deep groundwater. Heat transport is forced by the diel variation of temperature in the water column. The investigation utilizes sequentially coupled simulations of turbulent flow in the water column, and Darcy flow and heat transport in the sediments. The simulations address the question when, where, and by how much are diel water column temperature variations transmitted into sediments subjected to ambient-groundwater discharge? This is crucial information for detecting, observing, and predicting temperature-sensitive biogeochemical and ecological processes in the bottom sediments. When the groundwater gain or loss is small, it has no appreciable effect on temperatures in the sediments, which are controlled by heat conduction and current-bed form induced heat advection. As losing discharge increases, the temperature signal from the water column penetrates deeper into the sediments, with the largest temperature variations found under a downwelling zone along the stoss side of the bed form and damped temperature variations found near a narrow upwelling zone below the crest. Similar patterns are observed under gaining conditions, but with temperature variations penetrating to shallower depths; the interfacial exchange zone is diminished by upward movement of deep groundwater. Large gains or losses of deep groundwater prevent the formation of an interfacial exchange zone making heat transport almost vertically one-dimensional. The sensitivity of the sediment-thermal regime to hydrodynamic conditions increases with increasing water column current (Reynolds number) and with sediment permeability.

  1. Isolation and Identification of Prepubertal Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Spermatogonial Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wanyou; Chen, Shibei; Do, Dagiang; Liu, Qinyou; Deng, Yanfei; Lei, Xiaocan; Luo, Chan; Huang, Ben; Shi, Deshun

    2016-10-01

    Isolation and culture of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are attractive for production of genetic modified offspring. In the present study, buffalo spermatogonial stem-like cells were isolated, cultured and expression pattern of different germ cell marker genes were determined. To recover spermatogonia, testes from age 3 to 7 months of buffalo were decapsulated, and seminiferous tubules were enzymatically dissociated. Two types of cells, immature sertoli cell and type A spermatogonia were observed in buffalo testes in this stage. Germ cell marker genes, OCT3/4 (Pou5f1), THY-1, c-kit, PGP9.5 (UCHL-1) and Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, were determined to be expressed both in mRNA and protein level by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining in buffalo testes and buffalo spermatogonial stem-like cells, respectively. In the following, when the isolated buffalo buffalo spermatogonial stem-like cells were cultured in the medium supplemented 2.5% fetal bovine serum and 40 ng/mL glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor medium, SSCs proliferation efficiency and colony number were significantly improved than those of other groups (p<0.05). These findings may help in isolation and establishing long term in vitro culture system for buffalo spermatogonial stem-like cells, and accelerating the generation of genetic modified buffaloes. PMID:26954139

  2. Gaining, losing, and dry stream reaches at Bear Creek Valley, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, March and September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.A.; Mitchell, R.L. III

    1996-12-31

    A study was conducted, to delineate stream reaches that were gaining flow, losing flow, or that were dry in the upper reaches of Bear Creek Valley near the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The study included a review of maps and discharge data from a seepage investigation conducted at Bear Creek Valley; preparation of tables showing site identification and discharge and stream reaches that were gaining flow, losing flow, or that were dry; and preparation of maps showing measurement site locations and discharge measurements, and gaining, losing, and dry stream reaches. This report will aid in developing a better understanding of ground-water and surface-water interactions in the upper reaches of Bear Creek.

  3. A point-by-point analysis of performance in a fencing match: psychological processes associated with winning and losing streaks.

    PubMed

    Doron, Julie; Gaudreau, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to revisit the complex nature of serial dependency of performance during a match, examining the prospective associations between psychological processes and subsequent performance at the within-person level of analysis, and explore whether psychological processes are associated with the likelihood of winning series of points. A process-oriented sequential approach was used with 16 elite fencers during a simulated competition. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that serial dependency of performance fluctuates within a match. Results of a Bayesian multilevel structural equation model showed that prior performance subsequently influenced psychological processes. Although psychological processes did not predict performance in the subsequent point, successive winnings were associated with higher perceived control and task-oriented coping and lower negative affectivity compared with both losing streaks and nonstreaks. Overall, serial dependencies of performance are nonstationary during a match whereas psychological processes significantly differ in episodes of winning after winning versus losing after losing. PMID:24501140

  4. NANOG promoter methylation and expression correlation during normal and malignant human germ cell development

    PubMed Central

    Nettersheim, Daniel; Bierman, Katharina; Gillis, Ad JM; Steger, Klaus; Looijenga, Leendert HJ

    2011-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors are the most frequent malignant tumors in young Caucasian males, with increasing incidence. The actual model of tumorigenesis is based on the theory that a block in maturation of fetal germ cells lead to formation of the intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified. Early fetal germ cells and undifferentiated germ cell tumors express pluripotency markers such as the transcription factor NANOG. It has been demonstrated that epigenetic modifications, such as promoter DNA methylation, are able to silence gene expression in normal and cancer cells. Here we show that OCT3/4-SOX2 mediated expression of NANOG can be silenced by methylation of promoter CpG-sites. We found that global methylation of DNA decreased from fetal spermatogonia to mature sperm. In contrast, CpGs in the NANOG promoter were found hypomethylated in spermatogonia and hypermethylated in sperm. This selective repression might reflect the cells need to suppress pluripotency in order to prevent malignant transformation. Finally, methylation of CpGs in the NANOG promoter in germ cell tumors and derived cell lines correlated to differentiation state. PMID:20930529

  5. The actin-binding protein profilin is required for germline stem cell maintenance and germ cell enclosure by somatic cyst cells

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Alicia R.; Spence, Allyson C.; Yamashita, Yukiko M.; Davies, Erin L.; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2014-01-01

    Specialized microenvironments, or niches, provide signaling cues that regulate stem cell behavior. In the Drosophila testis, the JAK-STAT signaling pathway regulates germline stem cell (GSC) attachment to the apical hub and somatic cyst stem cell (CySC) identity. Here, we demonstrate that chickadee, the Drosophila gene that encodes profilin, is required cell autonomously to maintain GSCs, possibly facilitating localization or maintenance of E-cadherin to the GSC-hub cell interface. Germline specific overexpression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli 2 (APC2) rescued GSC loss in chic hypomorphs, suggesting an additive role of APC2 and F-actin in maintaining the adherens junctions that anchor GSCs to the niche. In addition, loss of chic function in the soma resulted in failure of somatic cyst cells to maintain germ cell enclosure and overproliferation of transit-amplifying spermatogonia. PMID:24346697

  6. A case of protein supplement effect in protein-losing enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jeong; Rha, Mi Yong; Cho, Young Yun; Kim, Eun Ran; Chang, Dong Kyung

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this article is to report improvement of nutritional status by protein supplements in the patient with protein-losing enteropathy. The patient was a female whose age was 25 and underwent medical treatment of Crohn's disease, an inflammatory bowl disease, after diagnosis of cryptogenic multifocal ulcerous enteritis. The weight was 33.3 kg (68% of IBW) in the severe underweight and suffered from ascites and subcutaneous edema with hypoalbuminemia (1.3 g/dL) at the time of hospitalization. The patient consumed food restrictively due to abdominal discomfort. Despite various attempts of oral feeding, the levels of calorie and protein intake fell into 40-50% of the required amount, which was 800-900 kcal/d (24-27 kcal/kg/d) for calorie and 34 g/d (1 g/kg/d) for protein. It was planned to supplement the patient with caloric supplementation (40-50 kcal/kg) and protein supplementation (2.5 g/kg) to increase body weight and improve hypoproteinemia. It was also planned to increase the level of protein intake slowly to target 55 g/d in about 2 weeks starting from 10 g/d and monitored kidney load with high protein supplementation. The weight loss was 1.0 kg when the patient was discharged from the hospital (hospitalization periods of 4 weeks), however, serum albumin was improved from 1.3 g/dL to 2.5 g/dL and there was no abdominal discomfort. She kept supplement of protein at 55 g/d for 5 months after the discharge from the hospital and kept it at 35 g/d for about 2 months and then 25 g/d. The body weight increased gradually from 32.3 kg (65% of IBW) to 44.0 kg (89% of IBW) by 36% for the period of F/u and serum albumin was kept above 2.8 g/dL without intravenous injection of albumin. The performance status was improved from 4 points of 'very tired' to 2 points of 'a little tired' out of 5-point scale measurement and the use of diuretic stopped from the time of 4th month after the discharge from the hospital owing to improvement in edema and ascites. During

  7. Adaptive reduction in thermogenesis and resistance to lose fat in obese men.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Angelo; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2009-08-01

    Adaptive thermogenesis is defined as a greater than predicted change in energy expenditure in response to changes in energy balance. This issue is particularly relevant in the context of a weight-reducing programme in which diminished thermogenesis can be sufficient to compensate for a prescribed decrease in daily energy intake. In the present pilot study, we investigated the adaptive reduction in thermogenesis in resting state that appears to favour resistance to further weight loss. Eight obese men (mean BMI: 33.4 kg/m2, mean age: 38 years) participated in this repeated-measures, within-subject, clinical intervention. They were subjected to a weight-loss programme that consisted of a supervised diet (-2930 kJ/d) and exercise clinical intervention. The phases investigated were as follows: (i) baseline, (ii) after 5 (SE 1) kg loss of body weight (phase 1), (iii) after 10 (SE 1) kg weight loss (phase 2) and (iv) at resistance to further weight loss (plateau). At each phase of the weight-reducing programme, body weight and composition as well as RMR were measured. A regression equation was established in a control population of the same age to predict RMR in obese men at each phase of the weight-loss programme. We observed that body weight and fat mass (FM) were significantly reduced (P < 0.05), while fat-free mass remained unchanged throughout the programme. In phase 1, measured RMR had fallen by 418 kJ/d, more than predicted (P < 0.05), and this difference reached 706 kJ/d at plateau (P < 0.05 v. phase 1). A positive association (r 0.64, P < 0.05) was observed between the reduction in thermogenesis and the degree of FM depletion at plateau. The adaptive reduction in thermogenesis at plateau was substantial and represented 30.9% of the compensation in energy balance that led to resistance to further lose body weight. In conclusion, these results show that adaptive reduction in thermogenesis may contribute to the occurrence of resistance to lose fat in obese men

  8. Associations of Trying to Lose Weight, Weight Control Behaviors, and Current Cigarette Use among US High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jonetta L.; Eaton, Danice K.; Pederson, Linda L.; Lowry, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Background: Approximately one-quarter of high school students currently use cigarettes. Previous research has suggested some youth use smoking as a method for losing weight. The purpose of this study was to describe the association of current cigarette use with specific healthy and unhealthy weight control practices among 9th-12th grade students…

  9. 25 CFR 115.430 - Will your account lose its supervised status when you reach the age of 18?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reach the age of 18? 115.430 Section 115.430 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Will your account lose its supervised status when you reach the age of 18? Your account will no longer be supervised when you reach the age of 18 unless statutory language or a tribal resolution...

  10. 25 CFR 115.430 - Will your account lose its supervised status when you reach the age of 18?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reach the age of 18? 115.430 Section 115.430 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Will your account lose its supervised status when you reach the age of 18? Your account will no longer be supervised when you reach the age of 18 unless statutory language or a tribal resolution...

  11. The Experience of Receiving and Then Losing a Scholarship: A Tracer Study of Secondary School Scholarship Recipients in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Cathy; Chapman, David W.; Okurut, Charles Opolot

    2014-01-01

    This study reports findings of a tracer that investigated differences in the profile and subsequent experiences of scholarship recipients in Uganda who were able to complete the lower secondary school cycle (O level) without interruption (N = 174) and those that dropped out before completing their O-level cycle (N = 51), thereby losing their…

  12. Losing Chlordimeform Use in Cotton Production. Its Effects on the Economy and Pest Resistance. Agricultural Economic Report Number 587.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osteen, Craig; Suguiyama, Luis

    This report examines the economic implications of losing chlordimeform use on cotton and considers chlordimeform's role in managing the resistance of bollworms and tobacco budworms to synthetic pyrethroids. It estimates changes in prices, production, acreage, consumer expenditures, aggregate producer returns, regional crop effects, and returns to…

  13. 40 CFR 266.355 - How could you lose the transportation and disposal conditional exemption for your waste and what...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How could you lose the transportation and disposal conditional exemption for your waste and what actions must you take? 266.355 Section 266.355 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF...

  14. 40 CFR 266.355 - How could you lose the transportation and disposal conditional exemption for your waste and what...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How could you lose the transportation....355 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... may endanger human health or the environment, you must also immediately notify us orally within...

  15. Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity and structural integrity during the aging process in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jian-Ching; Rebrin, Igor; Klichko, Vladimir; Orr, William C.; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity during the aging process. {yields} Abundance of seven nuclear-encoded subunits of cytochrome c oxidase decreased with age in Drosophila. {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase is specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration. -- Abstract: The hypothesis, that structural deterioration of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity and an increase in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation, was tested in Drosophila melanogaster. CcO activity and the levels of seven different nuclear DNA-encoded CcO subunits were determined at three different stages of adult life, namely, young-, middle-, and old-age. CcO activity declined progressively with age by 33%. Western blot analysis, using antibodies specific to Drosophila CcO subunits IV, Va, Vb, VIb, VIc, VIIc, and VIII, indicated that the abundance these polypeptides decreased, ranging from 11% to 40%, during aging. These and previous results suggest that CcO is a specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration, which may have a broad impact on mitochondrial physiology.

  16. Protein-losing enteropathy in a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis and advanced colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshihiko; Muguruma, Naoki; Kimura, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Koichi; Sogabe, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Kohno, Seiya; Nakasono, Masahiko; Hayashi, Hiroshige; Bando, Yoshimi; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-06-01

    A 29-year-old female visited a hospital because of increasingly severe lower leg edema. She was diagnosed as having multiple polyps in the stomach and colon by gastroscopy and sigmoidoscopy as well as multiple liver tumors by abdominal CT. She was referred to our hospital for further examination. Total colonoscopy revealed a type 2 tumor in the transverse colon and more than 200 polyps distributed throughout the colorectum. Biopsies of the tumor and polyps showed histological characteristics of adenocarcinoma and tubulovillous adenoma, respectively. Thus, she was diagnosed as having metastatic colon cancer derived from familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Laboratory tests showed a marked hypoalbuminemia of 1.1 g/dl. The fecal alpha-1 anti-trypsin test showed abnormal clearance (62.1 ml/day), and scintigraphy using 99mTc-human serum albumin revealed protein loss in the whole colon. Multiple ligation probe amplification analysis of the APC gene identified a germline duplication of exons 11-13. Direct sequencing of the reverse transcription PCR products of APC mRNA revealed a deletion of 25 base pairs and a tandem duplication of exons 11-13. This case was considered to be protein-losing enteropathy resulting from numerous colonic tubulovillous adenomas and advanced colon cancer in a FAP patient with unusual mutational events in APC. PMID:27170298

  17. Successful therapy for protein-losing enteropathy caused by chronic neuronopathic Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Mhanni, A.A.; Kozenko, M.; Hartley, J.N.; Deneau, M.; El-Matary, W.; Rockman-Greenberg, C.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (OMIM #230800) is caused by β-glucosidase deficiency and primarily involves the mononuclear phagocyte system (also called Reticuloendothelial System or Macrophage System). The disease is classified into three main phenotypes based on the presence or absence of neurological manifestations: non-neuronopathic (type 1), acute neuronopathic (type 2) and chronic neuronopathic (type 3). Typical manifestations include hepatosplenomegaly, skeletal deformities, hematological abnormalities, interstitial lung fibrosis and neurodegeneration in neuronopathic cases. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy with resultant protein losing enteropathy (PLE) has only been rarely described. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy may lead to intestinal lymphatic obstruction and secondary lymphangiectasia resulting in chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain and weight loss. Fecal protein loss with secondary hypoalbuminemia can be significant. We report a male with Chronic Neuronopathic Gaucher disease (GD) (homozygous for c.1448T > C (NM_000157.3) GBA mutation) who at 16 years of age developed intractable abdominal pain, diarrhea and weight loss. This was caused by PLE secondary to intestinal lymphangiectasia caused by calcified mesenteric lymphadenopathy despite prior long term enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and/or substrate reduction therapy (SRT). His older similarly affected sister who had been receiving treatment with ERT and/or SRT remains stable on these treatments with no evidence of mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Medical management with total parenteral nutrition, daily medium chain triglyceride-oil (MCT) supplementation, low dose oral budesonide, continued oral SRT and an increased dose of parenteral ERT has stabilized his condition with resolution of the gastrointestinal symptoms and appropriate weight gain. PMID:27014572

  18. Gaining pounds by losing pounds: preferences for lifestyle interventions to reduce obesity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Mandy; Yi, Deokhee; Avenell, Alison; Douglas, Flora; Aucott, Lorna; van Teijlingen, Edwin; Vale, Luke

    2015-04-01

    While there is evidence that weight-loss interventions reduce morbidity, indications of their acceptability are limited. Understanding preferences for lifestyle interventions will help policymakers design interventions. We used a discrete choice experiment to investigate preferences for lifestyle interventions to reduce adult obesity. Attributes focused on: the components of the programme; weight change; short-term and longer-term health gains; time spent on the intervention and financial costs incurred. Data were collected through a web-based questionnaire, with 504 UK adults responding. Despite evidence that dietary interventions are the most effective way to lose weight, respondents preferred lifestyle interventions involving physical activity. While the evidence suggests that behaviour change support improves effectiveness of interventions, its value to participants was limited. A general preference to maintain current lifestyles, together with the sensitivity of take up to financial costs, suggests financial incentives could be used to help maximise uptake of healthy lifestyle interventions. An important target group for change, men, required more compensation to take up healthier lifestyles. Those of normal weight, who will increase in weight over time if they do not change their lifestyle, required the highest compensation. Policymakers face challenges in inducing people to change their behaviour and adopt healthy lifestyles. PMID:25348049

  19. Protein-losing enteropathy cured by resection of adenomatous goiter: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Takada, Jun; Araki, Hiroshi; Kubota, Masaya; Ibuka, Takashi; Shiraki, Makoto; Shimizu, Masahito; Moriwaki, Hisataka

    2015-06-01

    A 51-year-old Japanese woman presented to our hospital with systemic edema and general fatigue. Her serum albumin level was very low (1.5 g/dL). Technetium-99 m-human serum albumin ((99m)Tc-HSA) scintigraphy showed albumin leakage from the upper small bowel. Magnetic resonance lymphangiography showed dilated lymphatic vessels in the chest, whereas double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) showed white villi and chyle leakage in the deeper part of the duodenal mucosa. A duodenal mucosa biopsy specimen revealed lymphangiectasia. She was diagnosed with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE). Treatment with a fat-restricted diet and tranexamic acid--previously reported to be effective against PLE--was attempted, but was ineffective. A thyroid tumor was simultaneously detected in her left neck, and was found to extend to the mediastinum on computed tomography. The tumor (size, >5 cm) was resected, and a pathological diagnosis of adenomatous goiter was made. The patient's serum albumin level increased to normal levels within 1 month postoperatively. After 6 months, (99m)Tc-HSA scintigraphy showed no albumin leakage from the gastrointestinal tract, and disappearance of white villi and chyle leakage on DBE. No lymphangiectasia was noted in the biopsy specimen. Adenomatous goiter was thus considered the cause of the PLE, possibly through lymph flow obstruction in the mediastinum. PMID:25845937

  20. Tactical metrics that discriminate winning, drawing and losing teams in UEFA Euro 2012®.

    PubMed

    Winter, Christian; Pfeiffer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this article are twofold: first, an innovative approach to notational analysis in football is outlined. By considering the important theoretical requirements for the analysis of sports games (like the interaction between two parties, the procedural sequence of action or the significance of tactical behaviour) the meaning of the introduced parameters, called tactical metrics, is illustrated. In a second step, the validity of this approach is tested using matches of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) Euro 2012® to investigate a connection between these metrics and success. The results show that 11 tactical metrics model tactical behaviour in 4 different dimensions (game speed, transition play after ball recovery, transition play after ball loss and offence efficiency (OE)). Discriminant analysis based on the factor values leads to a correct classification of 64.8% identifying winners, losers and drawers. This successful discrimination reveals a connection between match success and the presented metrics. Especially, the transition play after losing the ball and the OE seem to be factors connected directly with the result of a match, since those were important values for a successful discrimination. Furthermore, the procedural description of tactical behaviour provides the opportunity to conduct meaningful recommendations for the training and coaching process. PMID:26508419

  1. Congenital protein losing enteropathy: an inborn error of lipid metabolism due to DGAT1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Joshi; Vilboux, Thierry; Haberman, Yael; Pri-Chen, Hadass; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Mazaheri, Sina; Marek-Yagel, Dina; Barel, Ortal; Di Segni, Ayelet; Eyal, Eran; Hout-Siloni, Goni; Lahad, Avishay; Shalem, Tzippora; Rechavi, Gideon; Malicdan, May Christine V; Weiss, Batia; Gahl, William A; Anikster, Yair

    2016-08-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is a clinical disorder of protein loss from the gastrointestinal system that results in hypoproteinemia and malnutrition. This condition is associated with a wide range of gastrointestinal disorders. Recently, a unique syndrome of congenital PLE associated with biallelic mutations in the DGAT1 gene has been reported in a single family. We hypothesize that mutations in this gene are responsible for undiagnosed cases of PLE in infancy. Here we investigated three children in two families presenting with severe diarrhea, hypoalbuminemia and PLE, using clinical studies, homozygosity mapping, and exome sequencing. In one family, homozygosity mapping using SNP arrays revealed the DGAT1 gene as the best candidate gene for the proband. Sequencing of all the exons including flanking regions and promoter regions of the gene identified a novel homozygous missense variant, p.(Leu295Pro), in the highly conserved membrane-bound O-acyl transferase (MBOAT) domain of the DGAT1 protein. Expression studies verified reduced amounts of DGAT1 in patient fibroblasts. In a second family, exome sequencing identified a previously reported splice site mutation in intron 8. These cases of DGAT1 deficiency extend the molecular and phenotypic spectrum of PLE, suggesting a re-evaluation of the use of DGAT1 inhibitors for metabolic disorders including obesity and diabetes. PMID:26883093

  2. Prefrontal neurons represent winning and losing during competitive video shooting games between monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Takayuki; Watanabe, Masataka

    2012-05-30

    Humans and animals must work to support their survival and reproductive needs. Because resources are limited in the natural environment, competition is inevitable, and competing successfully is vitally important. However, the neuronal mechanisms of competitive behavior are poorly studied. We examined whether neurons in the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) showed response sensitivity related to a competitive game. In this study, monkeys played a video shooting game, either competing with another monkey or the computer, or playing alone without a rival. Monkeys performed more quickly and more accurately in the competitive than in the noncompetitive games, indicating that they were more motivated in the competitive than in the noncompetitive games. LPFC neurons showed differential activity between the competitive and noncompetitive games showing winning- and losing-related activity. Furthermore, activities of prefrontal neurons differed depending on whether the competition was between monkeys or between the monkey and the computer. These results indicate that LPFC neurons may play an important role in monitoring the outcome of competition and enabling animals to adapt their behavior to increase their chances of obtaining a reward in a socially interactive environment. PMID:22649245

  3. Losing an only child: the one-child policy and elderly care in China.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu

    2014-05-01

    China has had the one-child policy for more than 30 years. It reduced China's population growth within a short period of time and promoted economic development. However, it has also led to difficulties, and this paper focuses on those which pertain to ageing and losing one's only child. Approximately one million families have lost their only child in China. They suffer mentally and physically, and sometimes face social stigma and economic loss. What worries them most, however, is elderly care, which has become a severe crisis for the families who have lost their only children. This article draws upon several qualitative studies and 12 cases reported by the Chinese media in 2012 and 2013, and existing laws and policies for supporting those who have lost only children. It also analyses the current elderly care situation facing these families. The Chinese government has recognized the predicament and provides some help, which is increasing but is still not always adequate. To both sustain China's economic development and limit population growth, it is essential for the government to reform the one-child policy and provide a comprehensive support system for the families who have lost their only children, including financial relief and elderly care, and work to reduce stigma against these families. PMID:24908462

  4. Cholestasis and protein-losing enteropathy secondary to hyperthyroidism in a 6-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Lamia; Charfi, Manel; Maalej, Bayen; Majdoub, Imen; Safi, Faiza; Fourati, Hela; Hentati, Yosr; Daoud, Emna; Mnif, Zeineb; Abid, Mohamed; Mahfoudh, Abdelmajid

    2014-09-01

    Hepatic dysfunctions are not infrequent in patients with hyperthyroidism. These disorders may be related to the effects of the excess thyroid hormone secretion, to the uses of antithyroid drugs, or to the presence of concomitant hepatic diseases. Our aim is to describe the clinical and biochemical features of liver dysfunction related to thyrotoxicosis. We report here a case of a 6-year-old girl who was admitted for jaundice and pruritus as a result of the development of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease. On physical examination at admission, she was found to have jaundice and hepatomegaly. Laboratory data show cholestasis and protein-losing enteropathy. Investigations exclude other causes of hepatic disorder. One month after the initiation of antithyroid drug, the patient became euthyroid with improvement in jaundice and pruritus and normalization of hepatic tests and alpha antitrypsine clearance. In conclusion, the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism may be delayed in patients in whom the primary manifestations were pruritus and jaundice. The physician should suspect thyrotoxicosis prior to hepatitis or skin manifestations. PMID:24825088

  5. Use of vertical electrical resistivity profiles to characterize the riverbed of losing-disconnected rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Sebastien; Davis, Aaron; Crosbie, Russell; Taylor, Andrew; Munday, Tim

    2014-05-01

    There are few field techniques available to estimate infiltration rates from losing-disconnected rivers, where infiltration rates are often constrained by the presence of clay layers with a low hydraulic conductivity. It is hypothesized that, in this environment, the bulk of the infiltration would occur in 'hotspots' where the clay layer is thin or absent. Infiltration was estimated over a 2 km section of Billabong Creek (Murray-Darling Basin, Australia) using vertical electrical sounding (VES) resistivity to characterize the continuity and thickness of the riverbed clay layer. Both a towed in-river survey over the whole study reach and three fixed array measurements at the shoreline at selected areas were used. Using locations with measured high and low resistivity, the resistivity profiles were constrained by coring the riverbed to measure vertical variations in riverbed texture, porewater content and porewater salinity. The VES showed that the clay layer was continuous along the study reach and varied in thickness between 1 m and >4 m. Using a simple steady-state model, infiltration rates along the study reach were estimated to vary between 1700 and 7800 m3 km-1 year-1, with an average of 3400 m3 km-1 year-1. This methodology can provide independent estimates of infiltration rates at a scale suitable for the calibration of regional groundwater models.

  6. Successful therapy for protein-losing enteropathy caused by chronic neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Mhanni, A A; Kozenko, M; Hartley, J N; Deneau, M; El-Matary, W; Rockman-Greenberg, C

    2016-03-01

    Gaucher disease (OMIM #230800) is caused by β-glucosidase deficiency and primarily involves the mononuclear phagocyte system (also called Reticuloendothelial System or Macrophage System). The disease is classified into three main phenotypes based on the presence or absence of neurological manifestations: non-neuronopathic (type 1), acute neuronopathic (type 2) and chronic neuronopathic (type 3). Typical manifestations include hepatosplenomegaly, skeletal deformities, hematological abnormalities, interstitial lung fibrosis and neurodegeneration in neuronopathic cases. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy with resultant protein losing enteropathy (PLE) has only been rarely described. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy may lead to intestinal lymphatic obstruction and secondary lymphangiectasia resulting in chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain and weight loss. Fecal protein loss with secondary hypoalbuminemia can be significant. We report a male with Chronic Neuronopathic Gaucher disease (GD) (homozygous for c.1448T > C (NM_000157.3) GBA mutation) who at 16 years of age developed intractable abdominal pain, diarrhea and weight loss. This was caused by PLE secondary to intestinal lymphangiectasia caused by calcified mesenteric lymphadenopathy despite prior long term enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and/or substrate reduction therapy (SRT). His older similarly affected sister who had been receiving treatment with ERT and/or SRT remains stable on these treatments with no evidence of mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Medical management with total parenteral nutrition, daily medium chain triglyceride-oil (MCT) supplementation, low dose oral budesonide, continued oral SRT and an increased dose of parenteral ERT has stabilized his condition with resolution of the gastrointestinal symptoms and appropriate weight gain. PMID:27014572

  7. Stream-aquifer interactions and hyporheic exchange in gaining and losing sinuous streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. Bayani

    2009-06-01

    The irregular planform morphology of rivers leads to formation of hyporheic zones along its banks. This study investigates how hyporheic exchange in stream banks, whose planform is idealized as sinusoidal, is affected by net gains from and net losses of water to the adjacent aquifer. These effects are studied via numerical modeling of groundwater flow adjacent to sinuous channels across a broad range of sinuosity and gain/loss magnitude. Hyporheic zone areas and fluxes both decrease exponentially with increasing magnitude of net gain or loss relative to the case where the stream has no net flux of water (neutral). Residence time through the hyporheic zone also decreases with gain/loss magnitude. The hyporheic zones become constrained near the apex of bends, indicating that these areas could be hot spots for mixing and biogeochemical processing. Hyporheic zones in channels with smaller sinuosity are more prone to hyporheic flux and area reduction while very sinuous channels are able to maintain a hyporheic zone even under largely losing or gaining conditions. Equations fitted to the suite of simulation results allow for prediction of hyporheic flux, area, and residence time on the basis of aquifer hydraulic conductivity, channel sinuosity, and the ratio of along-valley and across-valley mean head gradients.

  8. Losing jobs and lighting up: Employment experiences and smoking in the Great Recession

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Shelley D.; Perreira, Krista M.

    2015-01-01

    The Great Recession produced the highest rates of unemployment observed in decades, in part due to particularly high rates of people losing work involuntarily. The impact of these job losses on health is unknown, due to the length of time required for most disease development, concerns about reverse causation, and limited data that covers this time period. We examine associations between job loss, employment status and smoking, the leading preventable cause of death, among 13,571 individuals participating in the 2001-2011 waves of the U.S.-based Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Results indicate that recent involuntary job loss is associated with an average 1.1 percentage point increase in smoking probability. This risk is strongest when people have returned to work, and appears reversed when they leave the labor market altogether. Although some job loss is associated with changes in household income and psychological distress levels, we find no evidence that these changes explain smoking behavior modifications. Smoking prevention programs and policies targeted at displaced workers or the newly employed may alleviate some negative health effects produced by joblessness during the Great Recession. PMID:26079992

  9. Losing jobs and lighting up: Employment experiences and smoking in the Great Recession.

    PubMed

    Golden, Shelley D; Perreira, Krista M

    2015-08-01

    The Great Recession produced the highest rates of unemployment observed in decades, in part due to particularly high rates of people losing work involuntarily. The impact of these job losses on health is unknown, due to the length of time required for most disease development, concerns about reverse causation, and limited data that covers this time period. We examine associations between job loss, employment status and smoking, the leading preventable cause of death, among 13,571 individuals participating in the 2001-2011 waves of the U.S.-based Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Results indicate that recent involuntary job loss is associated with an average 1.1 percentage point increase in smoking probability. This risk is strongest when people have returned to work, and appears reversed when they leave the labor market altogether. Although some job loss is associated with changes in household income and psychological distress levels, we find no evidence that these changes explain smoking behavior modifications. Smoking prevention programs and policies targeted at displaced workers or the newly employed may alleviate some negative health effects produced by joblessness during the Great Recession. PMID:26079992

  10. No Time To Lose - High Throughput Screening To Assess Nanomaterial Safety

    PubMed Central

    Damoiseaux, R; George, S; Li, M; Pokhrel, S; Ji, Z; France, B; Xia, T; Suarez, E; Rallo, R; Mädler, L; Cohen, Y; Hoek, EMV; Nel, A

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials hold great promise for medical, technological and economical benefits. Knowledge concerning the toxicological properties of these novel materials is typically lacking. At the same time, it is becoming evident that some nanomaterials could have a toxic potential in humans and the environment. Animal based systems lack the needed capacity to cope with the abundance of novel nanomaterials being produced, and thus we have to employ in vitro methods with high throughput to manage the rush logistically and use high content readouts wherever needed in order to gain more depth of information. Towards this end, high throughput screening (HTS) and high content screening (HCS) approaches can be used to speed up the safety analysis on a scale that commensurate with the rate of expansion of new materials and new properties. The insights gained from HTS/HCS should aid in our understanding of the tenets of nanomaterial hazard at biological level as well as asset the development of safe-by-design approaches. This review aims to provide a comprehensive introduction to the HTS/HCS methodology employed for safety assessment of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), including data analysis and prediction of potentially hazardous material properties. Given the current pace of nanomaterial development, HTS/HCS is a potentially effective means of keeping up with the rapid progress in this field – we have literally no time to lose. PMID:21301704

  11. Who Is Counseled to Lose Weight? Survey Results and Anthropometric Data from 3149 Lower Socioeconomic Women

    PubMed Central

    Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Egginton, Jason S.; Naessens, James M.; Montori, Victor M.; Jatoi, Aminah

    2013-01-01

    Objective Because obesity is a grave public health concern, this study examined the percentage of disadvantaged women who recalled ever receiving weight loss advice from a healthcare provider and factors associated with such advice. Design This study was part of 5-clinic, cervical cancer prevention trial. Patients not immediately post-partum completed a Spanish/English survey; height and weight were also obtained. Results Of the 3149 respondents (response rate 83%), 2138 (68%) were overweight or obese (body mass index (BMI) >/= 25); 94% reported a household income of <$35,000/year; 69% were Hispanic; 10% non-Hispanic black; and 40% completed the survey in Spanish. Only one-third reported ever having been told to lose weight. Based on BMI, these rates were 15% in the 25–29.9 range (overweight); 34% within 30–34.9; 57% within 35–39.9; and 73% >/= 40. In univariate analyses, among overweight women, diabetes or English-speaking was associated with weight loss advice. In multivariate analyses, being older, more educated, and diabetic were associated with such advice. 48% of non-Hispanic whites, 31% of non-Hispanic blacks, and 29% of Hispanic had a home scale. Conclusions Among disadvantaged women, obesity alone does not determine who recalls weight loss advice. Language barriers and lack of a home scale merit further study to address obesity. PMID:21744160

  12. A prospect theory explanation of the disposition to trade losing investments for less than market price.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, D J

    2002-06-01

    Investors have a proven general reluctance to realize losses. The theory of "mental accounting" suggests that losses are easier to accept when mentally integrated with either preceding losses or with compensatory gains. Mental integration is made easier when a failed asset is exchanged against a new, apparently profitable, acquisition. The alternative is to sell the existing asset on the open market before re-investing the proceeds as desired. This is emotionally less appealing than "rolling over" a losing investment into a new venture by way of an asset trade. The psychological benefits of exchanging rather than selling a failed asset come at a cost. It is typical of trade-in arrangements, e.g., where one trades an old car against a new one, that the effective sale price of the existing asset is less than current market value. Acceptance of this low price adds to the investor's total monetary loss on the existing asset but is essential to an overall package deal apart from which that asset would often remain belatedly unsold. PMID:12090518

  13. Can't wait to lose weight? Characterizing temporal discounting parameters for weight-loss.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seung-Lark; Bruce, Amanda S

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is often related to steeper temporal discounting, that is, higher decision impulsivity for immediate rewards over delayed rewards. However, previous studies have measured temporal discounting parameters through monetary rewards. The aim of this study was to develop a temporal discounting measure based on weight-loss rewards, which may help to understand decision-making mechanisms more closely related to body weight regulation. After having their heights and weights measured, healthy young adults completed the Monetary Choice Questionnaire (MCQ), and an adapted version of the MCQ, with weight-loss as a reward. Participants also completed self-reports that measure obesity-related cognitive variables. For 42 participants who expressed a desire to lose weight, weight-loss rewards were discounted over time and had a positive correlation with temporal discounting for monetary rewards. Higher temporal discounting for weight loss rewards (i.e., preference for immediate weight loss) showed correlations with beliefs that obesity is under obese persons' control and largely due to lack of willpower, while temporal discounting parameters for monetary rewards did not. Taken together, our weight loss temporal discounting measure demonstrated both convergent and divergent validity, which can be utilized for future obesity research and interventions. PMID:25450897

  14. Assessment of testicular function after acute and chronic irradiation: Further evidence for an influence of late spermatids on Sertoli cell function in the adult rat

    SciTech Connect

    Pineau, C.; Velez de la Calle, J.F.; Pinon-Lataillade, G.; Jegou, B.

    1989-06-01

    To study cell to cell communications within the testis of adult Sprague-Dawley rats, we used acute whole body neutron plus gamma-irradiation over 7-121 days postirradiation and chronic whole body gamma-irradiation over 14-84 days of irradiation and 7-86 days postirradiation. Neither irradiation protocol had an effect on the body weight of the animals. Neutron plus gamma-rays induced dramatic damages to spermatogonia, preleptotene spermatocytes, spermatozoa, and, to a lesser extent, pachytene spermatocytes. In contrast, gamma-rays induced a selective destruction of spermatogonia. Subsequently, in both experiments a maturation-depletion process led to a marked decrease in all germ cell types. A complete or near complete recovery of the different germ cell types and spermatozoa took place during the two postirradiation periods. Under both irradiation protocols Sertoli cells number was unchanged. Androgen-binding protein and FSH levels were normal in spite of the disappearance of most germ cells from spermatogonia to early spermatids. However, the decline of androgen-binding protein as well as the rise of FSH and their subsequent recovery were highly correlated to the number of late spermatids and spermatozoa. Moreover, it appeared that spermatocytes may also interfere with the production of inhibin (Exp B). With neither irradiation was Leydig cell function altered, except in Exp B in which elevated LH levels were temporarily observed. Correlation analysis suggested a relationship between preleptotene spermatocytes and Leydig cell function. In conclusion, this study establishes that chronic gamma-irradiation is particularly useful in the study of intratesticular paracrine regulation in vivo and provides further support to the concept that late spermatids play a major role in controlling some aspects of Sertoli cell function in the adult rat.

  15. Loss of Gata4 in Sertoli cells impairs the spermatogonial stem cell niche and causes germ cell exhaustion by attenuating chemokine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, Ji-Xin; Cheng, Jin-Mei; Li, Jian; Jin, Cheng; Li, Xiao-Yu; Deng, Shou-Long; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2015-01-01

    Sertoli cells, the primary somatic cell in the seminiferous epithelium, provide the spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) microenvironment (niche) through physical support and the expression of paracrine factors. However, the regulatory mechanisms within the SSC niche, which is primarily controlled by Sertoli cells, remain largely unknown. GATA4 is a Sertoli cell marker, involved in genital ridge initiation, sex determination and differentiation during the embryonic stage. Here, we showed that neonatal mice with a targeted disruption of Gata4 in Sertoli cells (Gata4flox/flox; Amh-Cre; hereafter termed Gata4 cKO) displayed a loss of the establishment and maintenance of the SSC pool and apoptosis of both gonocyte-derived differentiating spermatogonia and meiotic spermatocytes. Thus, progressive germ cell depletion and a Sertoli-cell-only syndrome were observed as early as the first wave of murine spermatogenesis. Transplantation of germ cells from postnatal day 5 (P5) Gata4 cKO mice into KitW/W-v recipient seminiferous tubules restored spermatogenesis. In addition, microarray analyses of P5 Gata4 cKO mouse testes showed alterations in chemokine signaling factors, including Cxcl12, Ccl3, Cxcr4 (CXCL12 receptor), Ccr1 (CCL3 receptor), Ccl9, Xcl1 and Ccrl2. Deletion of Gata4 in Sertoli cells markedly attenuated Sertoli cell chemotaxis, which guides SSCs or prospermatogonia to the stem cell niche. Finally, we showed that GATA4 transcriptionally regulated Cxcl12 and Ccl9, and the addition of CXCL12 and CCL9 to an in vitro testis tissue culture system increased the number of PLZF+ undifferentiated spermatogonia within Gata4 cKO testes. Together, these results reveal a novel role for GATA4 in controlling the SSC niche via the transcriptional regulation of chemokine signaling shortly after birth. PMID:26473289

  16. Nitrate dynamics within the Pajaro River, a nutrient-rich, losing stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruehl, C.R.; Fisher, A.T.; Los, Huertos M.; Wankel, Scott D.; Wheat, C.G.; Kendall, C.; Hatch, C.E.; Shennan, C.

    2007-01-01

    The major ion chemistry of water from an 11.42-km reach of the Pajaro River, a losing stream in central coastal California, shows a consistent pattern of higher concentrations during the 2nd (dry) half of the water year. Most solutes are conserved during flow along the reach, but [NO 3-] decreases by ???30% and is accompanied by net loss of channel discharge and extensive surface-subsurface exchange. The corresponding net NO3- uptake length is 37 ?? 13 km (42 ?? 12 km when normalized to the conservative solute Cl-), and the areal NO3- uptake rate is 0.5 ??mol m -2 s-1. The observed reduction in [NO3-] along the reach results from one or more internal sinks, not dilution by ground water, hill-slope water, or other water inputs. Observed reductions in [NO3-] and channel discharge along the experimental reach result in a net loss of 200-400 kg/d of NO3--N, ???50% of the input load. High-resolution (temporal and spatial) sampling indicates that most of the NO3- loss occurs along the lower part of the reach, where there is the greatest seepage loss and surface-subsurface exchange of water. Stable isotopes of NO 3-, total dissolved P concentrations, and streambed chemical profiles suggest that denitrification is the most significant NO 3- sink along the reach. Denitrification efficiency, as expressed through downstream enrichment in 15N-NO3-, varies considerably during the water year. When discharge is greater (typically earlier in the water year), denitrification is least efficient and downstream enrichment in 15N-NO3- is greatest. When discharge is lower, denitrification in the streambed appears to occur with greater efficiency, resulting in lower downstream enrichment in 15N-NO3-. ?? 2007 by The North American Benthological Society.

  17. Crowding in the City: Losing and Winning Competitors of an Invasive Bird

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Brito, Dailos; Carrete, Martina; Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G.; Ibáñez, Carlos; Tella, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species can take advantage of resources unexploited by natives (opportunism hypothesis) or they can exploit the same resources but more aggressively or efficiently (competition hypothesis), thus impacting native species. However, invasive species tend to exploit anthropogenic habitats that are inefficiently used by natives such as urban environments. Focusing on the ring-necked parakeet (Psittacula krameri), one of the most invasive birds worldwide, we combined observations of interspecific aggressions, species-specific cavity-nest preferences and the spatial distribution of the native cavity-nesting vertebrate community to determine the invasion process as well as its potential impacts on native species in a Mediterranean city. Our results support the competition hypothesis, suggesting that ring-necked parakeets are outcompeting native species sharing nest-site preferences. Parakeets initiated and won most interspecific aggressions, which were directed towards competitors but also towards predators. This behaviour could explain the spatial arrangement of natives, with most bird species breeding close to parakeets possibly to take advantage of their effective antipredatory behaviour. However, temporal and spatial patterns of segregation suggest that a threatened bat species is negatively affected by parakeets. This demonstrates that common species gain benefits and threatened ones (in this study, a bat and possibly a falcon) lose nest sites due to invaders. Therefore, the conservation status of the native species that pay the costs of competition with invaders should be considered. This scenario of winners and losers may, however, shift towards more losers if the ring-necked parakeet population continues to grow, thus requiring close monitoring and control/eradication programs to avoid further impacts. PMID:24945439

  18. Crowding in the city: losing and winning competitors of an invasive bird.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Brito, Dailos; Carrete, Martina; Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G; Ibáñez, Carlos; Tella, José L

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species can take advantage of resources unexploited by natives (opportunism hypothesis) or they can exploit the same resources but more aggressively or efficiently (competition hypothesis), thus impacting native species. However, invasive species tend to exploit anthropogenic habitats that are inefficiently used by natives such as urban environments. Focusing on the ring-necked parakeet (Psittacula krameri), one of the most invasive birds worldwide, we combined observations of interspecific aggressions, species-specific cavity-nest preferences and the spatial distribution of the native cavity-nesting vertebrate community to determine the invasion process as well as its potential impacts on native species in a Mediterranean city. Our results support the competition hypothesis, suggesting that ring-necked parakeets are outcompeting native species sharing nest-site preferences. Parakeets initiated and won most interspecific aggressions, which were directed towards competitors but also towards predators. This behaviour could explain the spatial arrangement of natives, with most bird species breeding close to parakeets possibly to take advantage of their effective antipredatory behaviour. However, temporal and spatial patterns of segregation suggest that a threatened bat species is negatively affected by parakeets. This demonstrates that common species gain benefits and threatened ones (in this study, a bat and possibly a falcon) lose nest sites due to invaders. Therefore, the conservation status of the native species that pay the costs of competition with invaders should be considered. This scenario of winners and losers may, however, shift towards more losers if the ring-necked parakeet population continues to grow, thus requiring close monitoring and control/eradication programs to avoid further impacts. PMID:24945439

  19. Altered insulin response to glucose in weight-losing cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rofe, A M; Bourgeois, C S; Coyle, P; Taylor, A; Abdi, E A

    1994-01-01

    Cancer cachexia and the underlying metabolic disturbances are due in part to either altered insulin release and action. Glucose intolerance in cancer patients is frequently observed but the nature of the insulin response is not usually described. The aim of this study was to investigate the insulin response in fasted, weigh-losing cancer patients following an oral glucose load (75 g). All cancer patients (n = 35) showed glucose intolerance. Three types of response were identified; those with an increased insulin: glucose ratio (I:G) at 60 min, (average 12.3, n = 13), those with a normal I:G (average 7.2 n = 7) and those with a decrease I:G (average 4.2, n = 15). Fasting plasma glucose concentrations were normal in all groups prior to the glucose tolerance test. However, patients with the lowest I:G also had the lowest fasting plasma insulin concentrations, the lowest plasma albumin concentrations and the highest plasma triglyceride concentrations. Those patients with an abnormal insulin response (either high or low I:G) had significantly greater weight loss (16% for low I:G group, 13% for the high I:G) compared to the normal responders (8%). Plasma fatty acid concentrations were increased in all cancer patients and decreased appropriately after glucose administration, indicating that lipolysis remained sensitive to the action of insulin. It is concluded that weight loss in cancer is associated with glucose intolerance and an abnormal insulin response, and that this response is indicative of either insulin resistance (high I:G) or decreased pancreatic function (low I:G). These findings suggest a role for insulin replacement therapy in the latter group of patients. PMID:8010722

  20. The impact of losing a child on the clinical presentation of complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Zetumer, Samuel; Young, Ilanit; Shear, M. Katherine; Skritskaya, Natalia; Lebowitz, Barry; Simon, Naomi; Reynolds, Charles; Mauro, Christine; Zisook, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether bereaved parents with Complicated Grief (CG) struggle with their grief differently than others with CG. This study addressed this question by comparing CG severity, CG-related symptoms, thoughts and behaviors, and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses of bereaved parents with CG to the diagnoses and symptoms of others with CG. Methods Baseline data from 345 participants enrolled in the Healing Emotions After Loss (HEAL) study, a multi-site CG treatment study, were used to compare parents with CG (n = 75) to others with CG (n = 275). Data from the parent group was then used to compare parents with CG who had lost a younger child (n = 24) to parents with CG who had lost an older child (n = 34). Demographic and loss-related data were also gathered and used to control for confounders between groups. Results Parents with CG demonstrated slightly higher levels of CG (p = .025), caregiver self-blame (p = .007), and suicidality (p = .025) than non-parents with CG. Parents who had lost younger children were more likely to have had a wish to be dead since the loss than parents who had lost older children (p = .041). Limitations All data were gathered from a treatment research study, limiting the of these results. No corrections were made for multiple comparisons. The comparison of parents who lost younger children to parents who lost older children was limited by a small sample size. Conclusions Even in the context of CG, the relationship to the deceased may have a bearing on the degree and severity of grief symptoms and associated features. Bereaved parents with CG reported more intense CG, self-blame, and suicidality than other bereaved groups with CG, though this finding requires confirmation. The heightened levels of suicidal ideation experienced by parents with CG, especially after losing a younger child, suggest the value of routinely screening for suicidal thoughts and behaviors in this group. PMID:25217759

  1. Tropical nature reserves are losing their buffer zones, but leakage is not to blame.

    PubMed

    Lui, Gillian V; Coomes, David A

    2016-05-01

    Tropical forests provide important ecosystem services to humanity, yet are threatened by habitat loss resulting from deforestation and land-use change. Although reserves are considered the cornerstones of conservation efforts in the tropics, their efficacy remains equivocal. One question that remains unresolved is whether leakage - the unanticipated displacement of deforestation from inside reserves into the unrestricted zones just beyond a reserve's administrative boundary - is common around tropical forest reserves, or whether the zones are acting as buffers between the protected area and the outside world. To resolve this question, we used the Landsat-derived Global Forest Change dataset to estimate deforestation rates between 2000 and 2012 inside and outside of 60 nature reserves spread across the tropics. Deforestation rates inside reserves (within 5km of the administrative boundary) were generally lower than those immediately outside the reserves (i.e. in buffer zones 0-10km from the boundary), suggesting that reserves are effective at protecting forests. We hypothesised that leakage would result in greater deforestation rates in reserve buffer zones than in the broader reserve landscapes, but such a pattern was observed in only five African sites, suggesting that leakage does not often occur on the edge of established reserves. However, roughly 80% of reserves experienced deforestation rates that increased gradually from their interiors to the outer periphery of their buffer zones. Thus, while leakage may not be a pervasive phenomenon around tropical reserves worldwide, tropical reserves are often losing their buffer zones, resulting in increased isolation that could have ramifications for ecosystem services provisioning and tropical conservation strategies. PMID:26632993

  2. Oral disodium cromoglycate and ketotifen for a patient with eosinophilic gastroenteritis, food allergy and protein-losing enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Junzo; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Nozawa, Ruriko; Isome, Masato; Suzuki, Shigeo; Takahashi, Ai; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2003-09-01

    We present a case report of a 10 years old boy with protein-losing enteropathy and eosinophilic gastroenteritis who had positive histamine release tests, increased allergen-specific IgE antibodies to some food items, and low levels of total serum protein and albumin. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a number of polyps and diffuse gastritis. Biopsy specimens of the stomach and duodenum showed widespread eosinophilia and neutrophilia. Although a restricted diet was recommended, a diet which excluded foods with positive results to both histamine release test and allergen-specific IgE antibodies was poorly tolerated, and the patient rejected systemic administration of corticosteroids. Thus, we initiated an oral disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and ketotifen therapy. After oral DSCG and ketotifen administration, the patient's condition improved gradually. Therefore, oral DSCG and ketotifen therapy might be considered as treatment option in patients with eosinophilic gastroenteritis and protein-losing enteropathy caused by food allergy. PMID:15032404

  3. From fan to fat? Vicarious losing increases unhealthy eating, but self-affirmation is an effective remedy.

    PubMed

    Cornil, Yann; Chandon, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Using archival and experimental data, we showed that vicarious defeats experienced by fans when their favorite football team loses lead them to consume less healthy food. On the Mondays following a Sunday National Football League (NFL) game, saturated-fat and food-calorie intake increase significantly in cities with losing teams, decrease in cities with winning teams, and remain at their usual levels in comparable cities without an NFL team or with an NFL team that did not play. These effects are greater in cities with the most committed fans, when the opponents are more evenly matched, and when the defeats are narrow. We found similar results when measuring the actual or intended food consumption of French soccer fans who had previously been asked to write about or watch highlights from victories or defeats of soccer teams. However, these unhealthy consequences of vicarious defeats disappear when supporters spontaneously self-affirm or are given the opportunity to do so. PMID:23925307

  4. Germ cell toxicity: significance in genetic and fertility effects of radiation and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Oakberg, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the male and female to radiation and chemicals is different. Any loss of oocytes in the female cannot be replaced, and if severe enough, will result in a shortening of the reproductive span. In the male, a temporary sterile period may be induced owing to destruction of the differentiating spermatogonia, but the stem cells are the most resistant spermatogonial type, are capable of repopulating the seminiferous epithelium, and fertility usually returns. The response of both the male and female changes with development of the embryonic to the adult gonad, and with differentiation and maturation in the adult. The primordial germ cells, early oocytes, and differentiating spermatogonia of the adult male are unusually sensitive to the cytotoxic action of noxious agents, but each agent elicits a specific response owing to the intricate biochemical and physiological changes associated with development and maturation of the gametes. The relationship of germ cell killing to fertility is direct, and long-term fertility effects can be predicted from histological analysis of the gonads. The relationship to genetic effects, on the other hand, is indirect, and acts primarily by limiting the cell stages available for testing, by affecting the distribution of mitotically active stem cells among the different stages of the mitotic cycle, and thereby, changing both the type and frequency of genetic effects observed. 100 references, 38 figures, 7 tables.

  5. Are urban safety-net hospitals losing low-risk Medicaid maternity patients?

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, D J; Hadley, J; Freeman, V G

    2001-01-01

    patient volumes to subsidize care for uninsured and underinsured patients. If safety-net hospitals continue to lose their low-risk Medicaid patients, their ability to finance care for the medically indigent will be impaired. Increased hospital competition may improve access to hospital care for low-risk Medicaid patients, but policymakers should be cognizant of the potential reduction in access to hospital care for uninsured and underinsured patients. Public policymakers should ensure that safety-net hospitals have sufficient financial resources to care for these patients by subsidizing their care directly. PMID:11324742

  6. Aggression and Related Behavioral Traits: The Impact of Winning and Losing and the Role of Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching; Li, Cheng-Yu; Earley, Ryan L.; Hsu, Yuying

    2012-01-01

    A suite of correlated behaviors reflecting between-individual consistency in behavior across multiple situations is termed a “behavioral syndrome.” Researchers have suggested that a cause for the correlation between different behaviors might lie in the neuroendocrine system. In this study, we examined the relationships between aggressiveness (a fish's readiness to perform gill display to its mirror image) and each of boldness (the readiness to emerge from a shelter), exploratory tendency (the readiness to approach a novel shelter), and learning performance (the probability of entering the correct reservoir in a T-maze test) in a mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus. We explored the possibility that the relationships between them arise because these behaviors are all modulated by cortisol and testosterone. We also tested the stability of the relationships between these behaviors shortly after using a winning or losing experience to alter individuals’ aggressiveness. The results were that aggressiveness correlated positively with boldness and the tendency to explore, and that these three behavioral traits were all positively correlated with pre-experience testosterone levels. Aggressiveness and boldness also positively correlated with pre-experience cortisol levels; exploratory tendency did not. The relationship between aggressiveness and boldness appeared to be stronger than that between either of them and exploratory tendency. These results suggest that testosterone and cortisol play important roles in mediating the correlations between these behavioral traits. Learning performance was not significantly correlated with the other behavioral traits or with levels of testosterone or cortisol. Recent experience in contests influenced individuals’ aggressiveness, tendency to explore, and learning performance but not their boldness; individuals that received a winning experience were quicker to display to their mirror image and performed better in the

  7. Losing Neutrality: The Neural Basis of Impaired Emotional Control without Sleep.

    PubMed

    Simon, Eti Ben; Oren, Noga; Sharon, Haggai; Kirschner, Adi; Goldway, Noam; Okon-Singer, Hadas; Tauman, Rivi; Deweese, Menton M; Keil, Andreas; Hendler, Talma

    2015-09-23

    Sleep deprivation has been shown recently to alter emotional processing possibly associated with reduced frontal regulation. Such impairments can ultimately fail adaptive attempts to regulate emotional processing (also known as cognitive control of emotion), although this hypothesis has not been examined directly. Therefore, we explored the influence of sleep deprivation on the human brain using two different cognitive-emotional tasks, recorded using fMRI and EEG. Both tasks involved irrelevant emotional and neutral distractors presented during a competing cognitive challenge, thus creating a continuous demand for regulating emotional processing. Results reveal that, although participants showed enhanced limbic and electrophysiological reactions to emotional distractors regardless of their sleep state, they were specifically unable to ignore neutral distracting information after sleep deprivation. As a consequence, sleep deprivation resulted in similar processing of neutral and negative distractors, thus disabling accurate emotional discrimination. As expected, these findings were further associated with a decrease in prefrontal connectivity patterns in both EEG and fMRI signals, reflecting a profound decline in cognitive control of emotion. Notably, such a decline was associated with lower REM sleep amounts, supporting a role for REM sleep in overnight emotional processing. Altogether, our findings suggest that losing sleep alters emotional reactivity by lowering the threshold for emotional activation, leading to a maladaptive loss of emotional neutrality. Significance statement: Sleep loss is known as a robust modulator of emotional reactivity, leading to increased anxiety and stress elicited by seemingly minor triggers. In this work, we aimed to portray the neural basis of these emotional impairments and their possible association with frontal regulation of emotional processing, also known as cognitive control of emotion. Using specifically suited EEG and f

  8. Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) increases milk yield without losing body weight in lactating sows.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Joo, Young-Kuk; Lee, Jin-Woo; Ha, Young-Joo; Yeo, Joon-Mo; Kim, Wan-Young

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on the performance of lactating sows and piglets as well as the immunity of piglets suckling from sows fed CLA. Eighteen multiparous Duroc sows with an average body weight (BW) of 232.0 ± 6.38 kg were randomly selected and assigned to two dietary treatments (n = 9 for each treatment), control (no CLA addition) and 1% CLA supplementation. For the control diet, CLA was replaced with soybean oil. Experimental diets were fed to sows during a 28-day lactation period. Litter size for each sow was standardized to nine piglets by cross-fostering within 24 hours after birth. Sow milk and blood samples were taken from sows and piglets after 21 and 27 days of lactation, respectively. Loss of BW was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in sows fed control diet compared to sows fed CLA diet. Piglet weights at weaning and weight gain during suckling were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in sows fed CLA compared to sows fed control diet. Serum non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) and urea nitrogen concentrations were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in sows fed CLA than in sows fed soybean oil. IgG concentrations of the groups supplemented with CLA increased by 49% in sow serum (p < 0.0001), 23% in milk (p < 0.05), and 35% in piglet serum (p < 0.05) compared with the control group. Sows fed CLA showed an increase of 10% in milk yield compared with sows fed soybean oil (p < 0.05), even though there was no difference in daily feed intake between the treatments. Milk fat content was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in sows fed CLA than in sows fed soybean oil. Solid-not-fat yield was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in sows supplemented with CLA than in sows fed control diet and also protein-to-fat ratio in milk was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in sows fed CLA compared with the control group. The results show that CLA supplementation to sows increased milk yield without losing BW during

  9. A Novel Transcriptional Factor Nkapl Is a Germ Cell-Specific Suppressor of Notch Signaling and Is Indispensable for Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Hidenobu; Kiuchi, Hiroshi; Takao, Tetsuya; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Akira; Nonomura, Norio; Miyata, Haruhiko; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito; Kawakami, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Naoki; Wada, Morimasa; Tanaka, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is an elaborately regulated system dedicated to the continuous production of spermatozoa via the genesis of spermatogonia. In this process, a variety of genes are expressed that are relevant to the differentiation of germ cells at each stage. Although Notch signaling plays a critical role in germ cell development in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans, its function and importance for spermatogenesis in mammals is controversial. We report that Nkapl is a novel germ cell-specific transcriptional suppressor in Notch signaling. It is also associated with several molecules of the Notch corepressor complex such as CIR, HDAC3, and CSL. It was expressed robustly in spermatogonia and early spermatocytes after the age of 3 weeks. Nkapl-deleted mice showed complete arrest at the level of pachytene spermatocytes. In addition, apoptosis was observed in this cell type. Overexpression of NKAPL in germline stem cells demonstrated that Nkapl induced changes in spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) markers and the reduction of differentiation factors through the Notch signaling pathway, whereas testes with Nkapl deleted showed inverse changes in those markers and factors. Therefore, Nkapl is indispensable because aberrantly elevated Notch signaling has negative effects on spermatogenesis, affecting SSC maintenance and differentiation factors. Notch signaling should be properly regulated through the transcriptional factor Nkapl. PMID:25875095

  10. D-Aspartate Induces Proliferative Pathways in Spermatogonial GC-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Santillo, Alessandra; Falvo, Sara; Chieffi, Paolo; Di Fiore, Maria Maddalena; Senese, Rosalba; Chieffi Baccari, Gabriella

    2016-02-01

    D-aspartate (D-Asp) is an endogenous amino acid present in vertebrate tissues, with particularly high levels in the testis. In vivo studies indicate that D-Asp indirectly stimulates spermatogenesis through the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Moreover, in vitro studies have demonstrated that D-Asp up-regulates testosterone production in Leydig cells by enhancing expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. In this study, a cell line derived from immortalized type-B mouse spermatogonia retaining markers of mitotic germ cells (GC-1) was employed to explore more direct involvement of D-Asp in spermatogenesis. Activity and protein expression of markers of cell proliferation were determined at intervals during incubation in D-Asp-containing medium. D-Asp induced phosphorylation of ERK and Akt proteins, stimulated expression of PCNA and Aurora B, and enhanced mRNA synthesis and protein expression of P450 aromatase and protein expression of Estrogen Receptor β (ERβ). These results are the first demonstration of a direct effect of D-Asp on spermatogonial mitotic activity. Considering that spermatogonia express the NR1 subunit of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartic Acid receptor (NMDAR), we suggest that their response to D-Asp depends on NMDAR-mediated activation of the ERK and Akt pathways and is further enhanced by activation of the P450 aromatase/ERβ pathway. PMID:26189884