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Sample records for spg13 compromises chaperonin

  1. Chaperonins.

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, N A; White, H E; Saibil, H R

    1998-01-01

    The molecular chaperones are a diverse set of protein families required for the correct folding, transport and degradation of other proteins in vivo. There has been great progress in understanding the structure and mechanism of action of the chaperonin family, exemplified by Escherichia coli GroEL. The chaperonins are large, double-ring oligomeric proteins that act as containers for the folding of other protein subunits. Together with its co-protein GroES, GroEL binds non-native polypeptides and facilitates their refolding in an ATP-dependent manner. The action of the ATPase cycle causes the substrate-binding surface of GroEL to alternate in character between hydrophobic (binding/unfolding) and hydrophilic (release/folding). ATP binding initiates a series of dramatic conformational changes that bury the substrate-binding sites, lowering the affinity for non-native polypeptide. In the presence of ATP, GroES binds to GroEL, forming a large chamber that encapsulates substrate proteins for folding. For proteins whose folding is absolutely dependent on the full GroE system, ATP binding (but not hydrolysis) in the encapsulating ring is needed to initiate protein folding. Similarly, ATP binding, but not hydrolysis, in the opposite GroEL ring is needed to release GroES, thus opening the chamber. If the released substrate protein is still not correctly folded, it will go through another round of interaction with GroEL. PMID:9657960

  2. How do chaperonins fold protein?

    PubMed Central

    Motojima, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    Protein folding is a biological process that is essential for the proper functioning of proteins in all living organisms. In cells, many proteins require the assistance of molecular chaperones for their folding. Chaperonins belong to a class of molecular chaperones that have been extensively studied. However, the mechanism by which a chaperonin mediates the folding of proteins is still controversial. Denatured proteins are folded in the closed chaperonin cage, leading to the assumption that denatured proteins are completely encapsulated inside the chaperonin cage. In contrast to the assumption, we recently found that denatured protein interacts with hydrophobic residues at the subunit interfaces of the chaperonin, and partially protrude out of the cage. In this review, we will explain our recent results and introduce our model for the mechanism by which chaperonins accelerate protein folding, in view of recent findings.

  3. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  4. The complexity of chloroplast chaperonins.

    PubMed

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Nisemblat, Shahar; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2013-12-01

    Type I chaperonins are large oligomeric protein ensembles that are involved in the folding and assembly of other proteins. Chloroplast chaperonins and co-chaperonins exist in multiple copies of two distinct isoforms that can combine to form a range of labile oligomeric structures. This complex system increases the potential number of chaperonin substrates and possibilities for regulation. The incorporation of unique subunits into the oligomer can modify substrate specificity. Some subunits are upregulated in response to heat shock and some show organ-specific expression, whereas others possess additional functions that are unrelated to their role in protein folding. Accumulating evidence suggests that specific subunits have distinct roles in biogenesis of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco). PMID:24035661

  5. Allosteric Mechanisms in Chaperonin Machines.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Ranit; Horovitz, Amnon

    2016-06-01

    Chaperonins are nanomachines that facilitate protein folding by undergoing energy (ATP)-dependent movements that are coordinated in time and space owing to complex allosteric regulation. They consist of two back-to-back stacked oligomeric rings with a cavity at each end where protein substrate folding can take place. Here, we focus on the GroEL/GroES chaperonin system from Escherichia coli and, to a lesser extent, on the more poorly characterized eukaryotic chaperonin CCT/TRiC. We describe their various functional (allosteric) states and how they are affected by substrates and allosteric effectors that include ATP, ADP, nonfolded protein substrates, potassium ions, and GroES (in the case of GroEL). We also discuss the pathways of intra- and inter-ring allosteric communication by which they interconvert and the coupling between allosteric transitions and protein folding reactions. PMID:26726755

  6. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  7. Ordered biological nanostructures formed from chaperonin polypeptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor); McMillan, R. Andrew (Inventor); Kagawa, Hiromi (Inventor); Paavola, Chad D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The following application relates to nanotemplates, nanostructures, nanoarrays and nanodevices formed from wild-type and mutated chaperonin polypeptides, methods of producing such compositions, methods of using such compositions and particular chaperonin polypeptides that can be utilized in producing such compositions.

  8. Ordered Nanostructures Made Using Chaperonin Polypeptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan; McMillan, Robert; Paavola, Chad; Mogul, Rakesh; Kagawa, Hiromi

    2004-01-01

    A recently invented method of fabricating periodic or otherwise ordered nanostructures involves the use of chaperonin polypeptides. The method is intended to serve as a potentially superior and less expensive alternative to conventional lithographic methods for use in the patterning steps of the fabrication of diverse objects characterized by features of the order of nanometers. Typical examples of such objects include arrays of quantum dots that would serve as the functional building blocks of future advanced electronic and photonic devices. A chaperonin is a double-ring protein structure having a molecular weight of about 60 plus or minus 5 kilodaltons. In nature, chaperonins are ubiquitous, essential, subcellular structures. Each natural chaperonin molecule comprises 14, 16, or 18 protein subunits, arranged as two stacked rings approximately 16 to 18 nm tall by approximately 15 to 17 nm wide, the exact dimensions depending on the biological species in which it originates. The natural role of chaperonins is unknown, but they are believed to aid in the correct folding of other proteins, by enclosing unfolded proteins and preventing nonspecific aggregation during assembly. What makes chaperonins useful for the purpose of the present method is that under the proper conditions, chaperonin rings assemble themselves into higher-order structures. This method exploits such higher-order structures to define nanoscale devices. The higher-order structures are tailored partly by choice of chemical and physical conditions for assembly and partly by using chaperonins that have been mutated. The mutations are made by established biochemical techniques. The assembly of chaperonin polypeptides into such structures as rings, tubes, filaments, and sheets (two-dimensional crystals) can be regulated chemically. Rings, tubes, and filaments of some chaperonin polypeptides can, for example, function as nano vessels if they are able to absorb, retain, protect, and release gases or

  9. Chaperonin-mediated Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Horwich, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    We have been studying chaperonins these past twenty years through an initial discovery of an action in protein folding, analysis of structure, and elucidation of mechanism. Some of the highlights of these studies were presented recently upon sharing the honor of the 2013 Herbert Tabor Award with my early collaborator, Ulrich Hartl, at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in Boston. Here, some of the major findings are recounted, particularly recognizing my collaborators, describing how I met them and how our great times together propelled our thinking and experiments. PMID:23803606

  10. Crystal structure of the human mitochondrial chaperonin symmetrical football complex.

    PubMed

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Yaniv, Oren; Parnas, Avital; Frolow, Felix; Azem, Abdussalam

    2015-05-12

    Human mitochondria harbor a single type I chaperonin system that is generally thought to function via a unique single-ring intermediate. To date, no crystal structure has been published for any mammalian type I chaperonin complex. In this study, we describe the crystal structure of a football-shaped, double-ring human mitochondrial chaperonin complex at 3.15 Å, which is a novel intermediate, likely representing the complex in an early stage of dissociation. Interestingly, the mitochondrial chaperonin was captured in a state that exhibits subunit asymmetry within the rings and nucleotide symmetry between the rings. Moreover, the chaperonin tetradecamers show a different interring subunit arrangement when compared to GroEL. Our findings suggest that the mitochondrial chaperonins use a mechanism that is distinct from the mechanism of the well-studied Escherichia coli system. PMID:25918392

  11. Crystal structure of the human mitochondrial chaperonin symmetrical football complex

    PubMed Central

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Yaniv, Oren; Parnas, Avital; Frolow, Felix; Azem, Abdussalam

    2015-01-01

    Human mitochondria harbor a single type I chaperonin system that is generally thought to function via a unique single-ring intermediate. To date, no crystal structure has been published for any mammalian type I chaperonin complex. In this study, we describe the crystal structure of a football-shaped, double-ring human mitochondrial chaperonin complex at 3.15 Å, which is a novel intermediate, likely representing the complex in an early stage of dissociation. Interestingly, the mitochondrial chaperonin was captured in a state that exhibits subunit asymmetry within the rings and nucleotide symmetry between the rings. Moreover, the chaperonin tetradecamers show a different interring subunit arrangement when compared to GroEL. Our findings suggest that the mitochondrial chaperonins use a mechanism that is distinct from the mechanism of the well-studied Escherichia coli system. PMID:25918392

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis expresses two chaperonin-60 homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, T H; Coates, A R; Butcher, P D; Hickman, C J; Shinnick, T M

    1993-01-01

    A 65-kDa protein and a 10-kDa protein are two of the more strongly immunoreactive components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. The 65-kDa antigen has homology with members of the GroEL or chaperonin-60 (Cpn60) family of heat shock proteins. The 10-kDa antigen has homology with the GroES or chaperonin-10 family of heat shock proteins. These two proteins are encoded by separate genes in M. tuberculosis. The studies reported here reveal that M. tuberculosis contains a second Cpn60 homolog located 98 bp downstream of the 10-kDa antigen gene. The second Cpn60 homolog (Cpn60-1) displays 61% amino acid sequence identity with the 65-kDa antigen (Cpn60-2) and 53% and 41% identity with the Escherichia coli GroEL protein and the human P60 protein, respectively. Primer-extension analysis revealed that transcription starts 29 bp upstream of the translation start of the Cpn60-1 homolog and protein purification studies indicate that the cpn60-1 gene is expressed as an approximately 60-kDa polypeptide. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7681982

  13. The Molecular Basis of Hyperthermophily: The Role of HSP60/Chaperonins In Vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kagawa, Hiromi

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we aim to understand how S. shibatae copes with high temperatures. In particular, we investigated the role of the 60 kDa heat shock protein (HSP60 or chaperonin) with the hypothesis that chaperonin stabilizes the cell membrane under stressful conditions. To prove the hypothesis, this year two questions were addressed: (1) Is the chaperonin localized in the cytoplasm or on the cell membrane? (2) Does the chaperonin show affinity to lipid in vivo? In addition to those, we intensively studied newly discovered chaperonin-related protein, gamma, to understand how it influenced the function of the other components of chaperonin and how their combined activities contributed to hyperthermophily.

  14. Ordered nanoparticle arrays formed on engineered chaperonin protein templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, R. Andrew; Paavola, Chad D.; Howard, Jeanie; Chan, Suzanne L.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional methods for fabricating nanoscale arrays are usually based on lithographic techniques. Alternative new approaches rely on the use of nanoscale templates made of synthetic or biological materials. Some proteins, for example, have been used to form ordered two-dimensional arrays. Here, we fabricated nanoscale ordered arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots by binding preformed nanoparticles onto crystalline protein templates made from genetically engineered hollow double-ring structures called chaperonins. Using structural information as a guide, a thermostable recombinant chaperonin subunit was modified to assemble into chaperonins with either 3 nm or 9 nm apical pores surrounded by chemically reactive thiols. These engineered chaperonins were crystallized into two-dimensional templates up to 20 microm in diameter. The periodic solvent-exposed thiols within these crystalline templates were used to size-selectively bind and organize either gold (1.4, 5 or 10nm) or CdSe-ZnS semiconductor (4.5 nm) quantum dots into arrays. The order within the arrays was defined by the lattice of the underlying protein crystal. By combining the self-assembling properties of chaperonins with mutations guided by structural modelling, we demonstrate that quantum dots can be manipulated using modified chaperonins and organized into arrays for use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices.

  15. Ordered nanoparticle arrays formed on engineered chaperonin protein templates.

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, R. A.; Paavola, C. D.; Howard, J.; Chan, S. L.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Trent, J. D.; Materials Science Division; NASA Ames Research Center; SETI Inst.

    2002-12-01

    Traditional methods for fabricating nanoscale arrays are usually based on lithographic techniques. Alternative new approaches rely on the use of nanoscale templates made of synthetic or biological materials. Some proteins, for example, have been used to form ordered two-dimensional arrays. Here, we fabricated nanoscale ordered arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots by binding preformed nanoparticles onto crystalline protein templates made from genetically engineered hollow double-ring structures called chaperonins. Using structural information as a guide, a thermostable recombinant chaperonin subunit was modified to assemble into chaperonins with either 3 nm or 9 nm apical pores surrounded by chemically reactive thiols. These engineered chaperonins were crystallized into two-dimensional templates up to 20 m in diameter. The periodic solvent-exposed thiols within these crystalline templates were used to size-selectively bind and organize either gold (1.4, 5 or 10nm) or CdSe-ZnS semiconductor (4.5 nm) quantum dots into arrays. The order within the arrays was defined by the lattice of the underlying protein crystal. By combining the self-assembling properties of chaperonins with mutations guided by structural modelling, we demonstrate that quantum dots can be manipulated using modified chaperonins and organized into arrays for use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices.

  16. Archaeal-like chaperonins in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Techtmann, Stephen M; Robb, Frank T

    2010-11-23

    Chaperonins (CPN) are ubiquitous oligomeric protein machines that mediate the ATP-dependent folding of polypeptide chains. These chaperones have not only been assigned stress response and normal housekeeping functions but also have a role in certain human disease states. A longstanding convention divides CPNs into two groups that share many conserved sequence motifs but differ in both structure and distribution. Group I complexes are the well known GroEL/ES heat-shock proteins in bacteria, that also occur in some species of mesophilic archaea and in the endosymbiotic organelles of eukaryotes. Group II CPNs are found only in the cytosol of archaea and eukaryotes. Here we report a third, divergent group of CPNs found in several species of bacteria. We propose to name these Group III CPNs because of their distant relatedness to both Group I and II CPNs as well as their unique genomic context, within the hsp70 operon. The prototype Group III CPN, Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans chaperonin (Ch-CPN), is able to refold denatured proteins in an ATP-dependent manner and is structurally similar to the Group II CPNs, forming a 16-mer with each subunit contributing to a flexible lid domain. The Group III CPN represent a divergent group of bacterial CPNs distinct from the GroEL/ES CPN found in all bacteria. The Group III lineage may represent an ancient horizontal gene transfer from an archaeon into an early Firmicute lineage. An analysis of their functional and structural characteristics may provide important insights into the early history of this ubiquitous family of proteins. PMID:21057109

  17. The Mechanism and Function of Group II Chaperonins.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Tom; Dalton, Kevin; Frydman, Judith

    2015-09-11

    Protein folding in the cell requires the assistance of enzymes collectively called chaperones. Among these, the chaperonins are 1-MDa ring-shaped oligomeric complexes that bind unfolded polypeptides and promote their folding within an isolated chamber in an ATP-dependent manner. Group II chaperonins, found in archaea and eukaryotes, contain a built-in lid that opens and closes over the central chamber. In eukaryotes, the chaperonin TRiC/CCT is hetero-oligomeric, consisting of two stacked rings of eight paralogous subunits each. TRiC facilitates folding of approximately 10% of the eukaryotic proteome, including many cytoskeletal components and cell cycle regulators. Folding of many cellular substrates of TRiC cannot be assisted by any other chaperone. A complete structural and mechanistic understanding of this highly conserved and essential chaperonin remains elusive. However, recent work is beginning to shed light on key aspects of chaperonin function and how their unique properties underlie their contribution to maintaining cellular proteostasis. PMID:25936650

  18. Chaperonin Polymers in Archaea: The Cytoskeleton of Prokaryotes?

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Trent, J. D.; Kagawa, H. K.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1997-07-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that play a critical role in folding nascent polypeptides under normal conditions and refolding damaged proteins under stress conditions. In all organisms these complexes are composed of evolutionarily conserved 60-kDa proteins arranged in double-ring structures with between 7 and 9 protein subunits per ring. These double ring structures are assumed to be the functional units in vivo, although they have never been observed inside cells. Here the authors show that the purified chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, which is closely related to chaperonins in eukaryotes, has a double ring structure at low concentrations (0.1 mg/ml), but at more physiological concentrations, the rings stack end to end to form polymers. The polymers are stable at physiological temperatures (75 C) and closely resemble structures observed inside unfixed S. shibatae cells. The authors suggest that in vivo chaperonin activity may be regulated by polymerization and that chaperonin polymers may act as a cytoskeleton-like structure in archaea and bacteria.

  19. Chaperonin polymers in archaea: The cytoskeleton of prokaryotes?

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-07-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that play a critical role in folding nascent polypeptides under normal conditions and refolding damaged proteins under stress conditions. In all organisms these complexes are composed of evolutionarily conserved 60-kDa proteins arranged in double-ring structures with between 7 and 9 protein subunits per ring. These double ring structures are assumed to be the functional units in vivo, although they have never been observed inside cells. Here the authors show that the purified chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, which is closely related to chaperonins in eukaryotes, has a double ring structure at low concentrations (0.1 mg/ml), but at more physiological concentrations, the rings stack end to end to form polymers. The polymers are stable at physiological temperatures (75 C) and closely resemble structures observed inside unfixed S. shibatae cells. The authors suggest that in vivo chaperonin activity may be regulated by polymerization and that chaperonin polymers may act as a cytoskeleton-like structure in archaea and bacteria.

  20. Cpn20: siamese twins of the chaperonin world.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Celeste; Bonshtien, Anat; Farchi-Pisanty, Odelia; Vitlin, Anna; Azem, Abdussalam

    2009-02-01

    The chloroplast cpn20 protein is a functional homolog of the cpn10 co-chaperonin, but its gene consists of two cpn10-like units joined head-to-tail by a short chain of amino acids. This double protein is unique to plastids and was shown to exist in plants as well plastid-containing parasites. In vitro assays showed that this cpn20 co-chaperonin is a functional homolog of cpn10. In terms of structure, existing data indicate that the oligomer is tetrameric, yet it interacts with a heptameric cpn60 partner. Thus, the functional oligomeric structure remains a mystery. In this review, we summarize what is known about this distinctive chaperonin and use a bioinformatics approach to examine the expression of cpn20 in Arabidopsis thaliana relative to other chaperonin genes in this species. In addition, we examine the primary structure of the two homologous domains for similarities and differences, in comparison with cpn10 from other species. Lastly, we hypothesize as to the oligomeric structure and raison d'être of this unusual co-chaperonin homolog. PMID:19031045

  1. CHAPERONIN 20 mediates iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD) activity independent of its co-chaperonin role in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Kuo, W Y; Huang, C H; Liu, A C; Cheng, C P; Li, S H; Chang, W C; Weiss, C; Azem, A; Jinn, T L

    2013-01-01

    Iron superoxide dismutases (FeSODs; FSDs) are primary antioxidant enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts. The stromal FSD1 conferred the only detectable FeSOD activity, whereas the thylakoid membrane- and nucleoid-co-localized FSD2 and FSD3 double mutant showed arrested chloroplast development. FeSOD requires cofactor Fe for its activity, but its mechanism of activation is unclear. We used reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gel filtration chromatography, LC-MS/MS, protoplast transient expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) analyses to identify and characterize a factor involved in FeSOD activation. We identified the chloroplast-localized co-chaperonin CHAPERONIN 20 (CPN20) as a mediator of FeSOD activation by direct interaction. The relationship between CPN20 and FeSOD was confirmed by in vitro experiments showing that CPN20 alone could enhance FSD1, FSD2 and FSD3 activity. The in vivo results showed that CPN20-overexpressing mutants and mutants with defective co-chaperonin activity increased FSD1 activity, without changing the chaperonin CPN60 protein level, and VIGS-induced downregulation of CPN20 also led to decreased FeSOD activity. Our findings reveal that CPN20 can mediate FeSOD activation in chloroplasts, a role independent of its known function in the chaperonin system. PMID:23057508

  2. Identification of elements that dictate the specificity of mitochondrial Hsp60 for its co-chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Parnas, Avital; Nisemblat, Shahar; Weiss, Celeste; Levy-Rimler, Galit; Pri-Or, Amir; Zor, Tsaffrir; Lund, Peter A; Bross, Peter; Azem, Abdussalam

    2012-01-01

    Type I chaperonins (cpn60/Hsp60) are essential proteins that mediate the folding of proteins in bacteria, chloroplast and mitochondria. Despite the high sequence homology among chaperonins, the mitochondrial chaperonin system has developed unique properties that distinguish it from the widely-studied bacterial system (GroEL and GroES). The most relevant difference to this study is that mitochondrial chaperonins are able to refold denatured proteins only with the assistance of the mitochondrial co-chaperonin. This is in contrast to the bacterial chaperonin, which is able to function with the help of co-chaperonin from any source. The goal of our work was to determine structural elements that govern the specificity between chaperonin and co-chaperonin pairs using mitochondrial Hsp60 as model system. We used a mutagenesis approach to obtain human mitochondrial Hsp60 mutants that are able to function with the bacterial co-chaperonin, GroES. We isolated two mutants, a single mutant (E321K) and a double mutant (R264K/E358K) that, together with GroES, were able to rescue an E. coli strain, in which the endogenous chaperonin system was silenced. Although the mutations are located in the apical domain of the chaperonin, where the interaction with co-chaperonin takes place, none of the residues are located in positions that are directly responsible for co-chaperonin binding. Moreover, while both mutants were able to function with GroES, they showed distinct functional and structural properties. Our results indicate that the phenotype of the E321K mutant is caused mainly by a profound increase in the binding affinity to all co-chaperonins, while the phenotype of R264K/E358K is caused by a slight increase in affinity toward co-chaperonins that is accompanied by an alteration in the allosteric signal transmitted upon nucleotide binding. The latter changes lead to a great increase in affinity for GroES, with only a minor increase in affinity toward the mammalian mitochondrial co-chaperonin

  3. Identification of Elements That Dictate the Specificity of Mitochondrial Hsp60 for Its Co-Chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Celeste; Levy-Rimler, Galit; Pri-Or, Amir; Zor, Tsaffrir; Lund, Peter A.; Bross, Peter; Azem, Abdussalam

    2012-01-01

    Type I chaperonins (cpn60/Hsp60) are essential proteins that mediate the folding of proteins in bacteria, chloroplast and mitochondria. Despite the high sequence homology among chaperonins, the mitochondrial chaperonin system has developed unique properties that distinguish it from the widely-studied bacterial system (GroEL and GroES). The most relevant difference to this study is that mitochondrial chaperonins are able to refold denatured proteins only with the assistance of the mitochondrial co-chaperonin. This is in contrast to the bacterial chaperonin, which is able to function with the help of co-chaperonin from any source. The goal of our work was to determine structural elements that govern the specificity between chaperonin and co-chaperonin pairs using mitochondrial Hsp60 as model system. We used a mutagenesis approach to obtain human mitochondrial Hsp60 mutants that are able to function with the bacterial co-chaperonin, GroES. We isolated two mutants, a single mutant (E321K) and a double mutant (R264K/E358K) that, together with GroES, were able to rescue an E. coli strain, in which the endogenous chaperonin system was silenced. Although the mutations are located in the apical domain of the chaperonin, where the interaction with co-chaperonin takes place, none of the residues are located in positions that are directly responsible for co-chaperonin binding. Moreover, while both mutants were able to function with GroES, they showed distinct functional and structural properties. Our results indicate that the phenotype of the E321K mutant is caused mainly by a profound increase in the binding affinity to all co-chaperonins, while the phenotype of R264K/E358K is caused by a slight increase in affinity toward co-chaperonins that is accompanied by an alteration in the allosteric signal transmitted upon nucleotide binding. The latter changes lead to a great increase in affinity for GroES, with only a minor increase in affinity toward the mammalian mitochondrial co-chaperonin

  4. Versatile platform for nanotechnology based on circular permutations of chaperonin protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paavola, Chad D. (Inventor); Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor); Chan, Suzanne L. (Inventor); Li, Yi-Fen (Inventor); McMillan, R. Andrew (Inventor); Kagawa, Hiromi (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides chaperonin polypeptides which are modified to include N-terminal and C-terminal ends that are relocated from the central pore region to various different positions in the polypeptide which are located on the exterior of the folded modified chaperonin polypeptide. In the modified chaperonin polypeptide, the naturally-occurring N-terminal and C-terminal ends are joined together directly or with an intervening linker peptide sequence. The relocated N-terminal or C-terminal ends can be covalently joined to, or bound with another molecule such as a nucleic acid molecule, a lipid, a carbohydrate, a second polypeptide, or a nanoparticle. The modified chaperonin polypeptides can assemble into double-ringed chaperonin structures. Further, the chaperonin structures can organize into higher order structures such as nanofilaments or nanoarrays which can be used to produce nanodevices and nanocoatings.

  5. Cellular Chaperonin CCTγ Contributes to Rabies Virus Replication during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinyang; Wu, Xiaopeng; Zan, Jie; Wu, Yongping; Ye, Chengjin; Ruan, Xizhen

    2013-01-01

    Rabies, as the oldest known infectious disease, remains a serious threat to public health worldwide. The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT complex facilitates the folding of proteins through ATP hydrolysis. Here, we investigated the expression, cellular localization, and function of neuronal CCTγ during neurotropic rabies virus (RABV) infection using mouse N2a cells as a model. Following RABV infection, 24 altered proteins were identified by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, including 20 upregulated proteins and 4 downregulated proteins. In mouse N2a cells infected with RABV or cotransfected with RABV genes encoding nucleoprotein (N) and phosphoprotein (P), confocal microscopy demonstrated that upregulated cellular CCTγ was colocalized with viral proteins N and P, which formed a hollow cricoid inclusion within the region around the nucleus. These inclusions, which correspond to Negri bodies (NBs), did not form in mouse N2a cells only expressing the viral protein N or P. Knockdown of CCTγ by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference led to significant inhibition of RABV replication. These results demonstrate that the complex consisting of viral proteins N and P recruits CCTγ to NBs and identify the chaperonin CCTγ as a host factor that facilitates intracellular RABV replication. This work illustrates how viruses can utilize cellular chaperonins and compartmentalization for their own benefit. PMID:23637400

  6. Cellular chaperonin CCTγ contributes to rabies virus replication during infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinyang; Wu, Xiaopeng; Zan, Jie; Wu, Yongping; Ye, Chengjin; Ruan, Xizhen; Zhou, Jiyong

    2013-07-01

    Rabies, as the oldest known infectious disease, remains a serious threat to public health worldwide. The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT complex facilitates the folding of proteins through ATP hydrolysis. Here, we investigated the expression, cellular localization, and function of neuronal CCTγ during neurotropic rabies virus (RABV) infection using mouse N2a cells as a model. Following RABV infection, 24 altered proteins were identified by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, including 20 upregulated proteins and 4 downregulated proteins. In mouse N2a cells infected with RABV or cotransfected with RABV genes encoding nucleoprotein (N) and phosphoprotein (P), confocal microscopy demonstrated that upregulated cellular CCTγ was colocalized with viral proteins N and P, which formed a hollow cricoid inclusion within the region around the nucleus. These inclusions, which correspond to Negri bodies (NBs), did not form in mouse N2a cells only expressing the viral protein N or P. Knockdown of CCTγ by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference led to significant inhibition of RABV replication. These results demonstrate that the complex consisting of viral proteins N and P recruits CCTγ to NBs and identify the chaperonin CCTγ as a host factor that facilitates intracellular RABV replication. This work illustrates how viruses can utilize cellular chaperonins and compartmentalization for their own benefit. PMID:23637400

  7. Functionality and Evolutionary History of the Chaperonins in Thermophilic Archaea. A Bioinformatical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlin, Samuel

    2004-01-01

    We used bioinformatics methods to study phylogenetic relations and differentiation patterns of the archaeal chaperonin 60 kDa heat-shock protein (HSP60) genes in support of the study of differential expression patterns of the three chaperonin genes encoded in Sulfolobus shibatae.

  8. Crystallization and structure determination of a symmetrical 'football' complex of the mammalian mitochondrial Hsp60-Hsp10 chaperonins.

    PubMed

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Parnas, Avital; Yaniv, Oren; Azem, Abdussalam; Frolow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial Hsp60-Hsp10 complex assists the folding of various proteins impelled by ATP hydrolysis, similar to the bacterial chaperonins GroEL and GroES. The near-atomic structural details of the mitochondrial chaperonins are not known, despite the fact that almost two decades have passed since the structures of the bacterial chaperonins became available. Here, the crystallization procedure, diffraction experiments and structure determination by molecular replacement of the mammalian mitochondrial chaperonin HSP60 (E321K mutant) and its co-chaperonin Hsp10 are reported. PMID:24419632

  9. Dataset concerning GroEL chaperonin interaction with proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marchenkov, V.V.; Marchenko, N.Yu.; Kaysheva, A.L.; Kotova, N.V.; Kashparov, I.A.; Semisotnov, G.V.

    2016-01-01

    GroEL chaperonin is well-known to interact with a wide variety of polypeptide chains. Here we show the data related to our previous work (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pep.2015.11.020[1]), and concerning the interaction of GroEL with native (lysozyme, α-lactalbumin) and denatured (lysozyme, α-lactalbumin and pepsin) proteins in solution. The use of affinity chromatography on the base of denatured pepsin for GroEL purification from fluorescent impurities is represented as well. PMID:26909376

  10. Characterization of group II chaperonins from an acidothermophilic archaeon Picrophilus torridus.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yohei Y; Tsuchida, Kanako; Noguchi, Keiichi; Ogawa, Naoki; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Yuji C; Yohda, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    Chaperonins are a type of molecular chaperone that assist in the folding of proteins. Group II chaperonins play an important role in the proteostasis in the cytosol of archaea and eukarya. In this study, we expressed, purified, and characterized group II chaperonins from an acidothermophilic archaeon Picrophilus torridus. Two genes exist for group II chaperonins, and both of the gene products assemble to form double-ring complexes similar to other archaeal group II chaperonins. One of the Picrophilus chaperonins, PtoCPNα, was able to refold denatured GFP at 50 °C. As expected, PtoCPNα exhibited an ATP-dependent conformational change that is observed by the change in fluorescence and diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT). In contrast, PtoCPNα lost its protein folding ability at moderate temperatures, becoming unable to interact with unfolded proteins. At lower temperatures, the release rate of the captured GFP from PtoCPNα was accelerated, and the affinity of denatured protein to PtoCPNα was weakened at the lower temperatures. Unexpectedly, in the DXT experiment, the fine motions were enhanced at the lower temperatures. Taken together, the results suggest that the fine tilting motions of the apical domain might correlate with the affinity of group II chaperonins for denatured proteins. PMID:27398315

  11. Engineering a nanopore with co-chaperonin function

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ching-Wen; Van Meervelt, Veerle; Tsai, Keng-Chang; De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Mast, Jan; Maglia, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of an enzymatic function can reveal functional insights and allows the engineering of biological systems with enhanced properties. We engineered an alpha hemolysin nanopore to function as GroES, a protein that, in complex with GroEL, forms a two-stroke protein-folding nanomachine. The transmembrane co-chaperonin was prepared by recombination of GroES functional elements with the nanopore, suggesting that emergent functions in molecular machines can be added bottom-up by incorporating modular elements into preexisting protein scaffolds. The binding of a single-ring version of GroEL to individual GroES nanopores prompted large changes to the unitary nanopore current, most likely reflecting the allosteric transitions of the chaperonin apical domains. One of the GroEL-induced current levels showed fast fluctuations (<1 ms), a characteristic that might be instrumental for efficient substrate encapsulation or folding. In the presence of unfolded proteins, the pattern of current transitions changed, suggesting a possible mechanism in which the free energy of adenosine triphosphate binding and hydrolysis is expended only when substrate proteins are occupied. PMID:26824063

  12. Eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin contains t-complex polypeptide 1 and seven related subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Rommelaere, H; Van Troys, M; Gao, Y; Melki, R; Cowan, N J; Vandekerckhove, J; Ampe, C

    1993-01-01

    We have characterized the cytosolic chaperonin from both rabbit reticulocyte lysate and bovine testis. The heteromeric complex contains eight subunits. Partial amino acid sequence data reveal that one of these is t-complex polypeptide 1 (TCP-1), while the other seven are TCP-1-related polypeptides, implicating the existence of a multigene family of TCP-1 homologues. We provide evidence that TCP-1 ring complex from bovine testis can facilitate the folding of both actin and tubulin, although, as in the case of chaperonin from reticulocyte lysate, two cofactors are required for the generation of properly folded tubulin. An additional molecule of TCP-1 may associate with the chaperonin depending on the purification procedure used. We propose that a highly conserved region in these polypeptides and in other chaperonins of the cpn60 chaperone family participates in ATP binding. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7903455

  13. Expression and Functional Characterization of the First Bacteriophage-Encoded Chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Semenyuk, Pavel I.; Orlov, Victor N.; Robben, Johan; Sykilinda, Nina N.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.

    2012-01-01

    Chaperonins promote protein folding in vivo and are ubiquitously found in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. The first viral chaperonin GroEL ortholog, gene product 146 (gp146), whose gene was earlier identified in the genome of bacteriophage EL, has been shown to be synthesized during phage propagation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells. The recombinant gp146 has been expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized by different physicochemical methods for the first time. Using serum against the recombinant protein, gp146's native substrate, the phage endolysin gp188, has been immunoprecipitated from the lysate of EL-infected bacteria and identified by mass spectrometry. In vitro experiments have shown that gp146 has a protective effect against endolysin thermal inactivation and aggregation, providing evidence of its chaperonin function. The phage chaperonin has been found to have the architecture and some properties similar to those of GroEL but not to require cochaperonin for its functional activity. PMID:22787217

  14. Computational modeling of protein folding assistance by the eukaryotic chaperonin CCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasinghe, Manori; Stan, George

    2009-03-01

    Chaperonins are biological nanomachines that promote protein folding using energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. Structurally, chaperonins are large oligomeric complexes that form double-ring construct, enclosing a central cavity that serves as folding chamber. Our focus is on the substrate binding mechanisms of the Eukaryotic chaperonin CCT and Archaeal chaperonin Thermosome. We contrast our results with the annealing action of the bacterial chaperonin GroEL of E. coli., currently the best studied for chaperonin machinery. CCT was suggested to be more selective towards the substrate recognition where as GroEL is more promiscuous due to the hydrophobic interactions. We study the interaction of CCT with Tubulin, one of its stringent substrates. Using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, we probe binding of a βtubulin peptide (205-274) to the CCTγ apical domain. We identify a versatile binding mechanism, involving mostly hydrophobic interactions with the helical region and electrostatic interactions with the helical protrusion region. This specific substrate-protein recognition mechanism is likely to be optimized for specific substrate protein-CCT subunit pairs.

  15. Chloroplast β chaperonins from A. thaliana function with endogenous cpn10 homologs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vitlin, Anna; Weiss, Celeste; Demishtein-Zohary, Keren; Rasouly, Aviram; Levin, Doron; Pisanty-Farchi, Odelia; Breiman, Adina; Azem, Abdussalam

    2011-09-01

    The involvement of type I chaperonins in bacterial and organellar protein folding has been well-documented. In E. coli and mitochondria, these ubiquitous and highly conserved proteins form chaperonin oligomers of identical 60 kDa subunits (cpn60), while in chloroplasts, two distinct cpn60 α and β subunit types co-exist together. The primary sequence of α and β subunits is ~50% identical, similar to their respective homologies to the bacterial GroEL. Moreover, the A. thaliana genome contains two α and four β genes. The functional significance of this variability in plant chaperonin proteins has not yet been elucidated. In order to gain insight into the functional variety of the chloroplast chaperonin family members, we reconstituted β homo-oligomers from A. thaliana following their expression in bacteria and subjected them to a structure-function analysis. Our results show for the first time, that A. thaliana β homo-oligomers can function in vitro with authentic chloroplast co-chaperonins (ch-cpn10 and ch-cpn20). We also show that oligomers made up of different β subunit types have unique properties and different preferences for co-chaperonin partners. We propose that chloroplasts may contain active β homo-oligomers in addition to hetero-oligomers, possibly reflecting a variety of cellular roles. PMID:21633907

  16. Trivalent Arsenic Inhibits the Functions of Chaperonin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuewen; Reissman, Stefanie; Douglas, Nick R.; Huang, Zhiwei; Yuan, Daniel S.; Wang, Xiaoling; McCaffery, J. Michael; Frydman, Judith; Boeke, Jef D.

    2010-01-01

    The exact molecular mechanisms by which the environmental pollutant arsenic works in biological systems are not completely understood. Using an unbiased chemogenomics approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that mutants of the chaperonin complex TRiC and the functionally related prefoldin complex are all hypersensitive to arsenic compared to a wild-type strain. In contrast, mutants with impaired ribosome functions were highly arsenic resistant. These observations led us to hypothesize that arsenic might inhibit TRiC function, required for folding of actin, tubulin, and other proteins postsynthesis. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that arsenic treatment distorted morphology of both actin and microtubule filaments. Moreover, arsenic impaired substrate folding by both bovine and archaeal TRiC complexes in vitro. These results together indicate that TRiC is a conserved target of arsenic inhibition in various biological systems. PMID:20660648

  17. Trivalent arsenic inhibits the functions of chaperonin complex.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xuewen; Reissman, Stefanie; Douglas, Nick R; Huang, Zhiwei; Yuan, Daniel S; Wang, Xiaoling; McCaffery, J Michael; Frydman, Judith; Boeke, Jef D

    2010-10-01

    The exact molecular mechanisms by which the environmental pollutant arsenic works in biological systems are not completely understood. Using an unbiased chemogenomics approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that mutants of the chaperonin complex TRiC and the functionally related prefoldin complex are all hypersensitive to arsenic compared to a wild-type strain. In contrast, mutants with impaired ribosome functions were highly arsenic resistant. These observations led us to hypothesize that arsenic might inhibit TRiC function, required for folding of actin, tubulin, and other proteins postsynthesis. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that arsenic treatment distorted morphology of both actin and microtubule filaments. Moreover, arsenic impaired substrate folding by both bovine and archaeal TRiC complexes in vitro. These results together indicate that TRiC is a conserved target of arsenic inhibition in various biological systems. PMID:20660648

  18. A compromise on abortion?

    PubMed

    Rhoden, N K

    1989-01-01

    Rhoden's article is one of three on "Abortion: searching for common ground" in this issue of the Hastings Center Report. Her article, together with those by M. Mahowald and M. Glendon, was prompted by the expectation that the impending U.S. Supreme Court decision in Webster v. Reproductive Health Services (3 July 1989) would overturn or restrict Roe v. Wade (1973). Rhoden, an advocate for the pro-choice position, asks whether a compromise leading to an acceptable regulatory policy is possible or desirable among those on opposite sides of the abortion issue. She identifies several reasons why the Roe decision is vulnerable to review, but argues that effective education about sexuality and comprehensive social support of women are better approaches to abortion than restrictive legislation. PMID:2663778

  19. The Legionella pneumophila Chaperonin - An Unusual Multifunctional Protein in Unusual Locations.

    PubMed

    Garduño, Rafael A; Chong, Audrey; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Allan, David S

    2011-01-01

    The Legionella pneumophila chaperonin, high temperature protein B (HtpB), was discovered as a highly immunogenic antigen, only a few years after the identification of L. pneumophila as the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. As its counterparts in other bacterial pathogens, HtpB did not initially receive further attention, particularly because research was focused on a few model chaperonins that were used to demonstrate that chaperonins are essential stress proteins, present in all cellular forms of life and involved in helping other proteins to fold. However, chaperonins have recently attracted increasing interest, particularly after several reports confirmed their multifunctional nature and the presence of multiple chaperonin genes in numerous bacterial species. It is now accepted that bacterial chaperonins are capable of playing a variety of protein folding-independent roles. HtpB is clearly a multifunctional chaperonin that according to its location in the bacterial cell, or in the L. pneumophila-infected cell, plays different roles. HtpB exposed on the bacterial cell surface can act as an invasion factor for non-phagocytic cells, whereas the HtpB released in the host cell can act as an effector capable of altering organelle trafficking, the organization of actin microfilaments and cell signaling pathways. The road to discover the multifunctional nature of HtpB has been exciting and here we provide a historical perspective of the key findings linked to such discovery, as well as a summary of the experimental work (old and new) performed in our laboratory. Our current understanding has led us to propose that HtpB is an ancient protein that L. pneumophila uses as a key molecular tool important to the intracellular establishment of this fascinating pathogen. PMID:21713066

  20. The medically compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Parnell, A G

    1986-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is found in up to 5 per cent of the population. There is an excess of blood sugar due to a deficiency or diminished effectiveness of insulin. It is a complex disease which, if not controlled, has many major complications including an increased incidence of heart attacks, strokes and vascular changes in many other organs. The management of young onset diabetic patients is directed towards: controlling the carbohydrate intake, testing the blood sugar by the patient and regular insulin injections. Great care must be taken in treating diabetics in the dental surgery. Except for children, any diabetic can be treated for simple dental procedures by ensuring freedom from pain, by eliminating stress and by ensuring that the patient does not miss a meal. Children, unstable diabetic patients and those with infections or requiring multiple extractions should be treated in hospital under the care of an endocrinologist. In hypertension it is only after a number of years that complications begin to appear. The main ones are those of stroke, retinal haemorrhages, renal failure and heart disease. Dentists should be encouraged to take the blood pressure of all adults who present for treatment. Patients with increased blood pressure yet controlled by drugs may be treated as normal patients. Those that are not well controlled should be referred to their physician. Dental appointments must be free of pain and stress should be avoided. A screening method is presented which assists in the evaluation of medically compromised patients. PMID:2941377

  1. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  2. [Tuberculosis in compromised hosts].

    PubMed

    2003-11-01

    Recent development of tuberculosis in Japan tends to converge on a specific high risk group. The proportion of tuberculosis developing particularly from the compromised hosts in the high risk group is especially high. At this symposium, therefore, we took up diabetes mellitus, gastrectomy, dialysis, AIDS and the elderly for discussion. Many new findings and useful reports for practical medical treatment are submitted; why these compromised hosts are predisposed to tuberculosis, tuberculosis diagnostic and remedial notes of those compromised hosts etc. It is an important question for the future to study how to prevent tuberculosis from these compromised hosts. 1. Tuberculosis in diabetes mellitus: aggravation and its immunological mechanism: Kazuyoshi KAWAKAMI (Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus). It has been well documented that diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major aggravating factor in tuberculosis. The onset of this disease is more frequent in DM patients than in individuals with any underlying diseases. However, the precise mechanism of this finding remains to be fully understood. Earlier studies reported that the migration, phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of neutrophils are all impaired in DM patients, which is related to their reduced host defense to infection with extracellular bacteria, such as S. aureus and E. colli. Host defense to mycobacterial infection is largely mediated by cellular immunity, and Th1-related cytokines, such as IFN-gamma and IL-12, play a central role in this response. It is reported that serum level of these cytokines and their production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are reduced in tuberculosis patients with DM, and this is supposed to be involved in the high incidence of tuberculosis in DM. Our study observed similar findings and furthermore indicated that IFN-gamma and IL-12 production by BCG-stimulated PBMC was lower

  3. Crystallization and structure determination of a symmetrical ‘football’ complex of the mammalian mitochondrial Hsp60–Hsp10 chaperonins

    PubMed Central

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Parnas, Avital; Yaniv, Oren; Azem, Abdussalam; Frolow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial Hsp60–Hsp10 complex assists the folding of various proteins impelled by ATP hydrolysis, similar to the bacterial chaperonins GroEL and GroES. The near-atomic structural details of the mitochondrial chaperonins are not known, despite the fact that almost two decades have passed since the structures of the bacterial chaperonins became available. Here, the crystallization procedure, diffraction experiments and structure determination by molecular replacement of the mammalian mitochondrial chaperonin HSP60 (E321K mutant) and its co-chaperonin Hsp10 are reported. PMID:24419632

  4. The GroEL-GroES Chaperonin Machine: A Nano-Cage for Protein Folding.

    PubMed

    Hayer-Hartl, Manajit; Bracher, Andreas; Hartl, F Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial chaperonin GroEL and its cofactor GroES constitute the paradigmatic molecular machine of protein folding. GroEL is a large double-ring cylinder with ATPase activity that binds non-native substrate protein (SP) via hydrophobic residues exposed towards the ring center. Binding of the lid-shaped GroES to GroEL displaces the bound protein into an enlarged chamber, allowing folding to occur unimpaired by aggregation. GroES and SP undergo cycles of binding and release, regulated allosterically by the GroEL ATPase. Recent structural and functional studies are providing insights into how the physical environment of the chaperonin cage actively promotes protein folding, in addition to preventing aggregation. Here, we review different models of chaperonin action and discuss issues of current debate. PMID:26422689

  5. Single-molecule spectroscopy of protein folding in a chaperonin cage

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Hagen; Hillger, Frank; Pfeil, Shawn H.; Hoffmann, Armin; Streich, Daniel; Haenni, Dominik; Nettels, Daniel; Lipman, Everett A.; Schuler, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are known to be essential for avoiding protein aggregation in vivo, but it is still unclear how they affect protein folding mechanisms. We use single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to follow the folding of a protein inside the GroEL/GroES chaperonin cavity over a time range from milliseconds to hours. Our results show that confinement in the chaperonin decelerates the folding of the C-terminal domain in the substrate protein rhodanese, but leaves the folding rate of the N-terminal domain unaffected. Microfluidic mixing experiments indicate that strong interactions of the substrate with the cavity walls impede the folding process, but the folding hierarchy is preserved. Our results imply that no universal chaperonin mechanism exists. Rather, a competition between intra- and intermolecular interactions determines the folding rates and mechanisms of a substrate inside the GroEL/GroES cage. PMID:20547872

  6. Differential effects of co-chaperonin homologs on cpn60 oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Bonshtien, Anat L.; Parnas, Avital; Sharkia, Rajach; Niv, Adina; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Weiss, Celeste

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the relationship between chaperonin/co-chaperonin binding, ATP hydrolysis, and protein refolding in heterologous chaperonin systems from bacteria, chloroplast, and mitochondria. We characterized two types of chloroplast cpn60 oligomers, ch-cpn60 composed of α and β subunits (α7β7 ch-cpn60) and one composed of all β subunits (β14 ch-cpn60). In terms of ATPase activity, the rate of ATP hydrolysis increased with protein concentration up to 60 μM, reflecting a concentration at which the oligomers are stable. At high concentrations of cpn60, all cpn10 homologs inhibited ATPase activity of α7β7 ch-cpn60. In contrast, ATPase of β14 ch-cpn60 was inhibited only by mitochondrial cpn10, supporting previous reports showing that β14 is functional only with mitochondrial cpn10 and not with other cpn10 homologs. Surprisingly, direct binding assays showed that both ch-cpn60 oligomer types bind to bacterial, mitochondrial, and chloroplast cpn10 homologs with an equal apparent affinity. Moreover, mitochondrial cpn60 binds chloroplast cpn20 with which it is not able to refold denatured proteins. Protein refolding experiments showed that in such instances, the bound protein is released in a conformation that is not able to refold. The presence of glycerol, or subsequent addition of mitochondrial cpn10, allows us to recover enzymatic activity of the substrate protein. Thus, in our systems, the formation of co-chaperonin/chaperonin complexes does not necessarily lead to protein folding. By using heterologous oligomer systems, we are able to separate the functions of binding and refolding in order to better understand the chaperonin mechanism. PMID:19224397

  7. Differential effects of co-chaperonin homologs on cpn60 oligomers.

    PubMed

    Bonshtien, Anat L; Parnas, Avital; Sharkia, Rajach; Niv, Adina; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the relationship between chaperonin/co-chaperonin binding, ATP hydrolysis, and protein refolding in heterologous chaperonin systems from bacteria, chloroplast, and mitochondria. We characterized two types of chloroplast cpn60 oligomers, ch-cpn60 composed of alpha and beta subunits (alpha(7)beta(7) ch-cpn60) and one composed of all beta subunits (beta(14) ch-cpn60). In terms of ATPase activity, the rate of ATP hydrolysis increased with protein concentration up to 60 microM, reflecting a concentration at which the oligomers are stable. At high concentrations of cpn60, all cpn10 homologs inhibited ATPase activity of alpha(7)beta(7) ch-cpn60. In contrast, ATPase of beta(14) ch-cpn60 was inhibited only by mitochondrial cpn10, supporting previous reports showing that beta(14) is functional only with mitochondrial cpn10 and not with other cpn10 homologs. Surprisingly, direct binding assays showed that both ch-cpn60 oligomer types bind to bacterial, mitochondrial, and chloroplast cpn10 homologs with an equal apparent affinity. Moreover, mitochondrial cpn60 binds chloroplast cpn20 with which it is not able to refold denatured proteins. Protein refolding experiments showed that in such instances, the bound protein is released in a conformation that is not able to refold. The presence of glycerol, or subsequent addition of mitochondrial cpn10, allows us to recover enzymatic activity of the substrate protein. Thus, in our systems, the formation of co-chaperonin/chaperonin complexes does not necessarily lead to protein folding. By using heterologous oligomer systems, we are able to separate the functions of binding and refolding in order to better understand the chaperonin mechanism. PMID:19224397

  8. Isolation and characterization of a Paracentrotus lividus cDNA encoding a stress-inducible chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Gianguzza, Fabrizio; Antonietta Ragusa, Maria; Roccheri, Maria Carmela; Liegro, Italia Di; Rinaldi, Anna Maria

    2000-01-01

    Chaperonins are ubiquitous proteins that facilitate protein folding in an adenosine triphosphate–dependent manner. Here we report the isolation of a sea urchin cDNA (Plhsp60) coding for mitochondrial chaperonin (Cpn60), whose basal expression is further enhanced by heat shock. The described cDNA corresponds to a full-length mRNA encoding a protein of 582 amino acids, the first 32 of which constitute a putative mitochondrial targeting leader sequence. Comparative analysis has demonstrated that this protein is highly conserved in evolution. PMID:11147969

  9. GroEL-Assisted Protein Folding: Does It Occur Within the Chaperonin Inner Cavity?

    PubMed Central

    Marchenkov, Victor V.; Semisotnov, Gennady V.

    2009-01-01

    The folding of protein molecules in the GroEL inner cavity under the co-chaperonin GroES lid is widely accepted as a crucial event of GroEL-assisted protein folding. This review is focused on the data showing that GroEL-assisted protein folding may proceed out of the complex with the chaperonin. The models of GroEL-assisted protein folding assuming ligand-controlled dissociation of nonnative proteins from the GroEL surface and their folding in the bulk solution are also discussed. PMID:19564940

  10. Protomer Roles in Chloroplast Chaperonin Assembly and Function.

    PubMed

    Bai, Cuicui; Guo, Peng; Zhao, Qian; Lv, Zongyang; Zhang, Shijia; Gao, Fei; Gao, Liyan; Wang, Yingchun; Tian, Zhixi; Wang, Jifeng; Yang, Fuquan; Liu, Cuimin

    2015-10-01

    The individual roles of three chloroplast CPN60 protomers (CPN60α, CPN60β1, and CPN60β2) and whether and how they are assembled into functional chaperonin complexes are investigated in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Protein complexes containing all three potential subunits were identified in Chlamydomonas, and their co-expression in Escherichia coli yielded a homogeneous population of oligomers containing all three subunits (CPN60αβ1β2), with a molecular weight consistent with a tetradecameric structure. While homo-oligomers of CPN60β could form, they were dramatically reduced when CPN60α was present and homo-oligomers of CPN60β2 were readily changed into hetero-oligomers in the presence of ATP and other protomers. ATP hydrolysis caused CPN60 oligomers to disassemble and drove the purified protomers to reconstitute oligomers in vitro, suggesting that the dynamic nature of CPN60 oligomers is dependent on ATP. Only hetero-oligomeric CPN60αβ1β2, containing CPN60α, CPN60β1, and CPN60β2 subunits in a 5:6:3 ratio, cooperated functionally with GroES. The combination of CPN60α and CPN60β subunits, but not the individual subunits alone, complemented GroEL function in E. coli with subunit recognition specificity. Down-regulation of the CPN60α subunit in Chlamydomonas resulted in a slow growth defect and an inability to grow autotrophically, indicating the essential role of CPN60α in vivo. PMID:26057234

  11. P. falciparum cpn20 is a bona fide co-chaperonin that can replace GroES in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Nisemblat, Shahar; Zizelski, Gal; Parnas, Avital; Dzikowski, Ron; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Human malaria is among the most ubiquitous and destructive tropical, parasitic diseases in the world today. The causative agent, Plasmodium falciparum, contains an unusual, essential organelle known as the apicoplast. Inhibition of this degenerate chloroplast results in second generation death of the parasite and is the mechanism by which antibiotics function in treating malaria. In order to better understand the biochemistry of this organelle, we have cloned a putative, 20 kDa, co-chaperonin protein, Pf-cpn20, which localizes to the apicoplast. Although this protein is homologous to the cpn20 that is found in plant chloroplasts, its ability to function as a co-chaperonin was questioned in the past. In the present study, we carried out a structural analysis of Pf-cpn20 using circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation and then used two different approaches to investigate the ability of this protein to function as a co-chaperonin. In the first approach, we purified recombinant Pf-cpn20 and tested its ability to act as a co-chaperonin for GroEL in vitro, while in the second, we examined the ability of Pf-cpn20 to complement an E. coli depletion of the essential bacterial co-chaperonin GroES. Our results demonstrate that Pf-cpn20 is fully functional as a co-chaperonin in vitro. Moreover, the parasitic co-chaperonin is able to replace GroES in E. coli at both normal and heat-shock temperatures. Thus, Pf-cpn20 functions as a co-chaperonin in chaperonin-mediated protein folding. The ability of the malarial protein to function in E. coli suggests that this simple system can be used as a tool for further analyses of Pf-cpn20 and perhaps other chaperone proteins from P. falciparum. PMID:23326533

  12. P. falciparum cpn20 Is a Bona Fide Co-Chaperonin That Can Replace GroES in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Nisemblat, Shahar; Zizelski, Gal; Parnas, Avital; Dzikowski, Ron; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Human malaria is among the most ubiquitous and destructive tropical, parasitic diseases in the world today. The causative agent, Plasmodium falciparum, contains an unusual, essential organelle known as the apicoplast. Inhibition of this degenerate chloroplast results in second generation death of the parasite and is the mechanism by which antibiotics function in treating malaria. In order to better understand the biochemistry of this organelle, we have cloned a putative, 20 kDa, co-chaperonin protein, Pf-cpn20, which localizes to the apicoplast. Although this protein is homologous to the cpn20 that is found in plant chloroplasts, its ability to function as a co-chaperonin was questioned in the past. In the present study, we carried out a structural analysis of Pf-cpn20 using circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation and then used two different approaches to investigate the ability of this protein to function as a co-chaperonin. In the first approach, we purified recombinant Pf-cpn20 and tested its ability to act as a co-chaperonin for GroEL in vitro, while in the second, we examined the ability of Pf-cpn20 to complement an E. coli depletion of the essential bacterial co-chaperonin GroES. Our results demonstrate that Pf-cpn20 is fully functional as a co-chaperonin in vitro. Moreover, the parasitic co-chaperonin is able to replace GroES in E. coli at both normal and heat-shock temperatures. Thus, Pf-cpn20 functions as a co-chaperonin in chaperonin-mediated protein folding. The ability of the malarial protein to function in E. coli suggests that this simple system can be used as a tool for further analyses of Pf-cpn20 and perhaps other chaperone proteins from P. falciparum. PMID:23326533

  13. Three conformations of an Archaeal chaperonin, TF55 from Sulfolobus shibatae.

    SciTech Connect

    Schoehn, G.; Quaite-Randall, E.; Joachimiak, A.; Saibil, H. R.; Biosciences Division; Birkbeck Coll.

    2000-02-25

    Chaperonins are cylindrical, oligomeric complexes, essential for viability and required for the folding of other proteins. The GroE (group I) subfamily, found in eubacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts, have 7-fold symmetry and provide an enclosed chamber for protein subunit folding. The central cavity is transiently closed by interaction with the co-protein, GroES. The most prominent feature specific to the group II subfamily, found in archaea and in the eukaryotic cytosol, is a long insertion in the substrate-binding region. In the archaeal complex, this forms an extended structure acting as a built-in lid, obviating the need for a GroES-like co-factor. This extension occludes a site known to bind non-native polypeptides in GroEL. The site and nature of substrate interaction are not known for the group II subfamily. The atomic structure of the thermosome, an archaeal group II chaperonin, has been determined in a fully closed form, but the entry and exit of protein substrates requires transient opening. Although an open form has been investigated by electron microscopy, conformational changes in group II chaperonins are not well characterized. Using electron cryo-microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction, we describe three conformations of a group II chaperonin, including an asymmetric, bullet-shaped form, revealing the range of domain movements in this subfamily.

  14. Reversible denaturation of oligomeric human chaperonin 10: denatured state depends on chemical denaturant.

    PubMed Central

    Guidry, J. J.; Moczygemba, C. K.; Steede, N. K.; Landry, S. J.; Wittung-Stafshede, P.

    2000-01-01

    Chaperonins cpn60/cpn10 (GroEL/GroES in Escherichia coli) assist folding of nonnative polypeptides. Folding of the chaperonins themselves is distinct in that it entails assembly of a sevenfold symmetrical structure. We have characterized denaturation and renaturation of the recombinant human chaperonin 10 (cpn10), which forms a heptamer. Denaturation induced by chemical denaturants urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) as well as by heat was monitored by tyrosine fluorescence, far-ultraviolet circular dichroism, and cross-linking; all denaturation reactions were reversible. GuHCl-induced denaturation was found to be cpn10 concentration dependent, in accord with a native heptamer to denatured monomer transition. In contrast, urea-induced denaturation was not cpn10 concentration dependent, suggesting that under these conditions cpn10 heptamers denature without dissociation. There were no indications of equilibrium intermediates, such as folded monomers, in either denaturant. The different cpn10 denatured states observed in high [GuHCl] and high [urea] were supported by cross-linking experiments. Thermal denaturation revealed that monomer and heptamer reactions display the same enthalpy change (per monomer), whereas the entropy-increase is significantly larger for the heptamer. A thermodynamic cycle for oligomeric cpn10, combining chemical denaturation with the dissociation constant in absence of denaturant, shows that dissociated monomers are only marginally stable (3 kJ/mol). The thermodynamics for co-chaperonin stability appears conserved; therefore, instability of the monomer could be necessary to specify the native heptameric structure. PMID:11152122

  15. Ring Separation Highlights the Protein-Folding Mechanism Used by the Phage EL-Encoded Chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Molugu, Sudheer K; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Morgan, David Gene; Sherman, Michael B; He, Lilin; Georgopoulos, Costa; Sernova, Natalia V; Kurochkina, Lidia P; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Bernal, Ricardo A

    2016-04-01

    Chaperonins are ubiquitous, ATP-dependent protein-folding molecular machines that are essential for all forms of life. Bacteriophage φEL encodes its own chaperonin to presumably fold exceedingly large viral proteins via profoundly different nucleotide-binding conformations. Our structural investigations indicate that ATP likely binds to both rings simultaneously and that a misfolded substrate acts as the trigger for ATP hydrolysis. More importantly, the φEL complex dissociates into two single rings resulting from an evolutionarily altered residue in the highly conserved ATP-binding pocket. Conformational changes also more than double the volume of the single-ring internal chamber such that larger viral proteins are accommodated. This is illustrated by the fact that φEL is capable of folding β-galactosidase, a 116-kDa protein. Collectively, the architecture and protein-folding mechanism of the φEL chaperonin are significantly different from those observed in group I and II chaperonins. PMID:26996960

  16. Chaperonin-enhanced Escherichia coli cell-free expression of functional CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2016-08-10

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases and disorders. Obtaining milligram quantities of functional receptors through the development of robust production methods are highly demanded to probe GPCR structure and functions. In this study, we analyzed synergies of the bacterial chaperonin GroEL-GroES and cell-free expression for the production of functionally folded C-X-C chemokine GPCR type 4 (CXCR4). The yield of soluble CXCR4 in the presence of detergent Brij-35 reached ∼1.1mg/ml. The chaperonin complex added was found to significantly enhance the productive folding of newly synthesized CXCR4, by increasing both the rate (∼30-fold) and the yield (∼1.3-fold) of folding over its spontaneous behavior. Meanwhile, the structural stability of CXCR4 was also improved with supplied GroEL-GroES, as was the soluble expression of biologically active CXCR4 with a ∼1.4-fold increase. The improved stability together with the higher ligand binding affinity suggests more efficient folding. The essential chaperonin GroEL was shown to be partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both GroEL and its co-chaperonin GroES were necessary. The method reported here should prove generally useful for cell-free production of large amounts of natively folded GPCRs, and even other classes of membrane proteins. PMID:27316829

  17. Separation of E. coli chaperonin groEL from β-galactosidase without denaturation.

    PubMed

    Molugu, Sudheer K; Li, Jihui; Bernal, Ricardo A

    2015-12-15

    Chaperonins are a class of ubiquitous proteins that assist and accelerate protein folding in the cell. The Escherichia coli groEL is the best known and forms a complex with its co-chaperonin groES in the presence of ATP and assists in the folding of nascent and misfolded substrate proteins. The purification of recombinant groEL results in a nearly homogeneous sample that consistently co-purifies with the major contaminant E. coli β-galactosidase. Removal of β-galactosidase using column chromatography alone is exceedingly difficult. This is due to the fact that the overall size, surface charge, isoelectric point and hydrophobicity of groEL and β-galactosidase are very similar. Therefore purification of groEL chaperonin to homogeneity requires denaturation of the complex into monomers with urea for separating the groEL from contaminating β-galactosidase followed by reassembly of the chaperonin complex. Here, we present a simple procedure for separating β-galactosidase along with many other impurities from groEL preparations under non-denaturing conditions. The groEL is first salted out with 50% ammonium sulfate. This step also precipitates β-galactosidase but this is then salted out by the addition of magnesium chloride which leaves groEL in solution. All remaining contaminants are removed by column chromatography. PMID:26590880

  18. Streptococcus suis Serotypes Characterized by Analysis of Chaperonin 60 Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Brousseau, Ronald; Hill, Janet E.; Préfontaine, Gabrielle; Goh, Swee-Han; Harel, Josée; Hemmingsen, Sean M.

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important pathogen of swine which occasionally infects humans as well. There are 35 serotypes known for this organism, and it would be desirable to develop rapid methods methods to identify and differentiate the strains of this species. To that effect, partial chaperonin 60 gene sequences were determined for the 35 serotype reference strains of S. suis. Analysis of a pairwise distance matrix showed that the distances ranged from 0 to 0.275 when values were calculated by the maximum-likelihood method. For five of the strains the distances from serotype 1 were greater than 0.1, and for two of these strains the distances were were more than 0.25, suggesting that they belong to a different species. Most of the nucleotide differences were silent; alignment of protein sequences showed that there were only 11 distinct sequences for the 35 strains under study. The chaperonin 60 gene phylogenetic tree was similar to the previously published tree based on 16S rRNA sequences, and it was also observed that strains with identical chaperonin 60 gene sequences tended to have identical 16S rRNA sequences. The chaperonin 60 gene sequences provided a higher level of discrimination between serotypes than the 16S RNA sequences provided and could form the basis for a diagnostic protocol. PMID:11571190

  19. The Dynamic Conformational Cycle of the Group I Chaperonin C-Termini Revealed via Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Kevin M.; Frydman, Judith; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Chaperonins are large ring shaped oligomers that facilitate protein folding by encapsulation within a central cavity. All chaperonins possess flexible C-termini which protrude from the equatorial domain of each subunit into the central cavity. Biochemical evidence suggests that the termini play an important role in the allosteric regulation of the ATPase cycle, in substrate folding and in complex assembly and stability. Despite the tremendous wealth of structural data available for numerous orthologous chaperonins, little structural information is available regarding the residues within the C-terminus. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations are presented which localize the termini throughout the nucleotide cycle of the group I chaperonin, GroE, from Escherichia coli. The simulation results predict that the termini undergo a heretofore unappreciated conformational cycle which is coupled to the nucleotide state of the enzyme. As such, these results have profound implications for the mechanism by which GroE utilizes nucleotide and folds client proteins. PMID:25822285

  20. The dynamic conformational cycle of the group I chaperonin C-termini revealed via molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Kevin M; Frydman, Judith; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-01-01

    Chaperonins are large ring shaped oligomers that facilitate protein folding by encapsulation within a central cavity. All chaperonins possess flexible C-termini which protrude from the equatorial domain of each subunit into the central cavity. Biochemical evidence suggests that the termini play an important role in the allosteric regulation of the ATPase cycle, in substrate folding and in complex assembly and stability. Despite the tremendous wealth of structural data available for numerous orthologous chaperonins, little structural information is available regarding the residues within the C-terminus. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations are presented which localize the termini throughout the nucleotide cycle of the group I chaperonin, GroE, from Escherichia coli. The simulation results predict that the termini undergo a heretofore unappreciated conformational cycle which is coupled to the nucleotide state of the enzyme. As such, these results have profound implications for the mechanism by which GroE utilizes nucleotide and folds client proteins. PMID:25822285

  1. New GroEL-like chaperonin of bacteriophage OBP Pseudomonas fluorescens suppresses thermal protein aggregation in an ATP-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Semenyuk, Pavel I; Orlov, Victor N; Sokolova, Olga S; Kurochkina, Lidia P

    2016-08-01

    Recently, we discovered and studied the first virus-encoded chaperonin of bacteriophage EL Pseudomonas aeruginosa, gene product (gp) 146. In the present study, we performed bioinformatics analysis of currently predicted GroEL-like proteins encoded by phage genomes in comparison with cellular and mitochondrial chaperonins. Putative phage chaperonins share a low similarity and do not form a monophyletic group; nevertheless, they are closer to bacterial chaperonins in the phylogenetic tree. Experimental investigation of putative GroEL-like chaperonin proteins has been continued by physicochemical and functional characterization of gp246 encoded by the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteriophage OBP. Unlike the more usual double-ring architecture of chaperonins, including the EL gp146, the recombinant gp246 produced by Escherichia coli cells has been purified as a single heptameric ring. It possesses ATPase activity and does not require a co-chaperonin for its function. In vitro experiments demonstrated that gp246 is able to suppress the thermal protein inactivation and aggregation in an ATP-dependent manner, thus indicating chaperonin function. Single-particle electron microscopy analysis revealed the different conformational states of OBP chaperonin, depending on the bound nucleotide. PMID:27247423

  2. The molecular architecture of the eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC/CCT

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A.; Bracher, Andreas; Mönkemeyer, Leonie; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Chen, Bryan; Pechmann, Sebastian; Holmes, Susan; Cong, Yao; Ma, Boxue; Ludtke, Steve; Chiu, Wah; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Aebersold, Ruedi; Frydman, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Summary TRiC/CCT is a highly conserved and essential chaperonin that uses ATP cycling to facilitate folding of approximately 10% of the eukaryotic proteome. This 1 MDa hetero-oligomeric complex consists of two stacked rings of eight paralogous subunits each. Previously proposed TRiC models differ substantially in their subunit arrangements and ring register. Here, we integrate chemical crosslinking, mass spectrometry and combinatorial modeling to reveal the definitive subunit arrangement of TRiC. In vivo disulfide mapping provided additional validation for the crosslinking-derived arrangement as the definitive TRiC topology. This subunit arrangement allowed the refinement of a structural model using existing X-ray diffraction data. The new structure explains all available crosslink experiments, provides a rationale for previously unexplained structural features and reveals a surprising asymmetry of charges within the chaperonin folding chamber. PMID:22503819

  3. Circular Permutation of a Chaperonin Protein: Biophysics and Application to Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paavola, Chad; Chan, Suzanne; Li, Yi-Fen; McMillan, R. Andrew; Trent, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    We have designed five circular permutants of a chaperonin protein derived from the hyperthermophilic organism Sulfolobus shibatae. These permuted proteins were expressed in E. coli and are well-folded. Furthermore, all the permutants assemble into 18-mer double rings of the same form as the wild-type protein. We characterized the thermodynamics of folding for each permutant by both guanidine denaturation and differential scanning calorimetry. We also examined the assembly of chaperonin rings into higher order structures that may be used as nanoscale templates. The results show that circular permutation can be used to tune the thermodynamic properties of a protein template as well as facilitating the fusion of peptides, binding proteins or enzymes onto nanostructured templates.

  4. Significance of the N-terminal domain for the function of chloroplast cpn20 chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Bonshtien, Anat L; Weiss, Celeste; Vitlin, Anna; Niv, Adina; Lorimer, George H; Azem, Abdussalam

    2007-02-16

    Chaperonins cpn60 and cpn10 are essential proteins involved in cellular protein folding. Plant chloroplasts contain a unique version of the cpn10 co-chaperonin, cpn20, which consists of two homologous cpn10-like domains (N-cpn20 and C-cpn20) that are connected by a short linker region. Although cpn20 seems to function like other single domain cpn10 oligomers, the structure and specific functions of the domains are not understood. We mutated amino acids in the "mobile loop" regions of N-cpn20, C-cpn20 or both: a highly conserved glycine, which was shown to be important for flexibility of the mobile loop, and a leucine residue shown to be involved in binding of co-chaperonin to chaperonin. The mutant proteins were purified and their oligomeric structure validated by gel filtration, native gel electrophoresis, and circular dichroism. Functional assays of protein refolding and inhibition of GroEL ATPase both showed (i) mutation of the conserved glycine reduced the activity of cpn20, whether in N-cpn20 (G32A) or C-cpn20 (G130A). The same mutation in the bacterial cpn10 (GroES G24A) had no effect on activity. (ii) Mutations in the highly conserved leucine of N-cpn20 (L35A) and in the corresponding L27A of GroES resulted in inactive protein. (iii) In contrast, mutant L133A, in which the conserved leucine of C-cpn20 was altered, retained 55% activity. We conclude that the structure of cpn20 is much more sensitive to alterations in the mobile loop than is the structure of GroES. Moreover, only N-cpn20 is necessary for activity of cpn20. However, full and efficient functioning requires both domains. PMID:17178727

  5. An engineered chaperonin caging a guest protein: Structural insights and potential as a protein expression tool

    PubMed Central

    Furutani, Masahiro; Hata, Jun-Ichi; Shomura, Yasuhito; Itami, Keisuke; Yoshida, Takao; Izumoto, Yoshitaka; Togi, Akiko; Ideno, Akira; Yasunaga, Takuo; Miki, Kunio; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2005-01-01

    The structure of a chaperonin caging a substrate protein is not quite clear. We made engineered group II chaperonins fused with a guest protein and analyzed their structural and functional features. Thermococcus sp. KS-1 chaperonin α-subunit (TCP) which forms an eightfold symmetric double-ring structure was used. Expression plasmids were constructed which carried two or four TCP genes ligated head to tail in phase and a target protein gene at the 3′ end of the linked TCP genes. Electron microscopy showed that the expressed gene products with the molecular sizes of ~120 kDa (di-TCP) and ~230 kDa (tetra-TCP) formed double-ring complexes similar to those of wild-type TCP. The tetra-TCP retained ATPase activity and its thermostability was significantly higher than that of the wild type. A 260-kDa fusion protein of tetra-TCP and green fluorescent protein (GFP, 27 kDa) was able to form the double-ring complexes with green fluorescence. Image analyses indicated that the GFP moiety of tetra-TCP/GFP fusion protein was accommodated in the central cavity, and tetra-TCP/GFP formed the closed-form similar to that crystallographically resolved in group II chaperonins. Furthermore, it was suggested that caging GFP expanded the cavity around the bottom. Using this tetra-TCP fusion strategy, two virus structural proteins (21–25 kDa) toxic to host cells or two antibody fragments (25–36 kDa) prone to aggregate were well expressed in the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli. These fusion products also assembled to double-ring complexes, suggesting encapsulation of the guest proteins. The antibody fragments liberated by site-specific protease digestion exhibited ligand-binding activities. PMID:15659368

  6. Surviving cancer without compromising aspirations.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Sandra

    2011-07-01

    This short paper is a reflection of how one person coped, survived and grew following numerous metastatic incidences over a 20 year period. Surviving cancer is a complex process but coping with the threat of regular recurrence has required a coping strategy that embraced the disease, set it aside and refused to compromise hopes, dreams and future life. Central to this personal journey has been the need to redefine normality, live with and set aside the fear of future metastases and death and find an answer and meaning in a changing biology, increased morbidity and possible mortality. This paper contends that not compromising the direction of travel and being able to focus on a career has ensured that survival was valuable and valued. A working environment in which students' problems have been immediate has produced different stressors. These have ultimately forced personal worries to be set aside, while living with cancer has become normal and accepted. PMID:21514884

  7. The structural basis of substrate recognition by the eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC/CCT.

    PubMed

    Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Liu, Corey W; Aebersold, Ruedi; Frydman, Judith

    2014-11-20

    The eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC (also called CCT) is the obligate chaperone for many essential proteins. TRiC is hetero-oligomeric, comprising two stacked rings of eight different subunits each. Subunit diversification from simpler archaeal chaperonins appears linked to proteome expansion. Here, we integrate structural, biophysical, and modeling approaches to identify the hitherto unknown substrate-binding site in TRiC and uncover the basis of substrate recognition. NMR and modeling provided a structural model of a chaperonin-substrate complex. Mutagenesis and crosslinking-mass spectrometry validated the identified substrate-binding interface and demonstrate that TRiC contacts full-length substrates combinatorially in a subunit-specific manner. The binding site of each subunit has a distinct, evolutionarily conserved pattern of polar and hydrophobic residues specifying recognition of discrete substrate motifs. The combinatorial recognition of polypeptides broadens the specificity of TRiC and may direct the topology of bound polypeptides along a productive folding trajectory, contributing to TRiC's unique ability to fold obligate substrates. PMID:25416944

  8. The structural basis of substrate recognition by the eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC/CCT

    PubMed Central

    Joachimiak, Lukasz A.; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Liu, Corey; Aebersold, Ruedi; Frydman, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC (also called CCT) is the obligate chaperone for many essential proteins. TRiC is hetero-oligomeric, comprising two stacked rings of eight different subunits each. Subunit diversification from simpler archaeal chaperonins appears linked to proteome expansion. Here, we integrate structural, biophysical and modeling approaches to identify the hitherto unknown substrate-binding site in TRiC and uncover the basis of substrate recognition. NMR and modeling provided a structural model of a chaperonin-substrate complex. Mutagenesis and crosslinking-mass spectrometry validated the identified substrate binding interface and demonstrate that TRiC contacts full-length substrates combinatorially in a subunit-specific manner. The binding site of each subunit has a distinct, evolutionarily conserved, pattern of polar and hydrophobic residues specifying recognition of discrete substrate motifs. The combinatorial recognition of polypeptides broadens the specificity of TRiC and may direct the topology of bound polypeptides along a productive folding trajectory, contributing to its unique ability to fold obligate substrates. PMID:25416944

  9. In vitro interactions of the aphid endosymbiotic SymL chaperonin with barley yellow dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Filichkin, S A; Brumfield, S; Filichkin, T P; Young, M J

    1997-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV)-vector relationships suggest that there are specific interactions between BYDV virions and the aphid's cellular components. However, little is known about vector factors that mediate virion recognition, cellular trafficking, and accumulation within the aphid. Symbionins are molecular chaperonins produced by intracellular endosymbiotic bacteria and are the most abundant proteins found in aphids. To elucidate the potential role of symbionins in BYDV transmission, we have isolated and characterized two new symbionin symL genes encoded by the endosymbionts which are harbored by the BYDV aphid vectors Rhopalosiphum padi and Sitobion avenae. Endosymbiont symL-encoded proteins have extensive homology with the pea aphid SymL and Escherichia coli GroEL chaperonin. Recombinant and native SymL proteins can be assembled into oligomeric complexes which are similar to the GroEL oligomer. R. padi SymL protein demonstrates an in vitro binding affinity for BYDV and its recombinant readthrough polypeptide. In contrast to the R. padi SymL, the closely related GroEL does not exhibit a significant binding affinity either for BYDV or for its recombinant readthrough polypeptide. Comparative sequence analysis between SymL and GroEL was used to identify potential SymL-BYDV binding sites. Affinity binding of SymL to BYDV in vitro suggests a potential involvement of endosymbiotic chaperonins in interactions with virions during their trafficking through the aphid. PMID:8985385

  10. A Versatile Platform for Nanotechnology Based on Circular Permutation of a Chaperonin Protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paavola, Chad; McMillan, Andrew; Trent, Jonathan; Chan, Suzanne; Mazzarella, Kellen; Li, Yi-Fen

    2004-01-01

    A number of protein complexes have been developed as nanoscale templates. These templates can be functionalized using the peptide sequences that bind inorganic materials. However, it is difficult to integrate peptides into a specific position within a protein template. Integrating intact proteins with desirable binding or catalytic activities is an even greater challenge. We present a general method for modifying protein templates using circular permutation so that additional peptide sequence can be added in a wide variety of specific locations. Circular permutation is a reordering of the polypeptide chain such that the original termini are joined and new termini are created elsewhere in the protein. New sequence can be joined to the protein termini without perturbing the protein structure and with minimal limitation on the size and conformation of the added sequence. We have used this approach to modify a chaperonin protein template, placing termini at five different locations distributed across the surface of the protein complex. These permutants are competent to form the double-ring structures typical of chaperonin proteins. The permuted double-rings also form the same assemblies as the unmodified protein. We fused a fluorescent protein to two representative permutants and demonstrated that it assumes its active structure and does not interfere with assembly of chaperonin double-rings.

  11. On the assembly of dodecameric glutamine synthetase from stable chaperonin complexes.

    PubMed

    Fisher, M T

    1993-07-01

    For many in vitro protein-folding reactions, the fraction of correctly folded product declines as the initial protein concentration increases due primarily to misfolding and aggregation reactions. Under optimal conditions and in the presence of ATP, chaperonins (groEL and groES) enhanced the renaturation of dodecameric glutamine synthetase (GS) with yields of active enzyme between 75 and 85% of the original activity (Fisher, M.T. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 3955-3963). In spite of this enhancement, a concentration-dependent decline in recoverable activity was observed when increasing concentrations of unfolded GS were rapidly mixed with renaturation buffer containing a 2-fold molar excess (GS subunits:groEL oligomer) of chaperonins. When a stable groEL-GS complex, formed under optimal conditions, was concentrated 4-fold by centrifugal ultrafiltration prior to ATP addition, the amount of total active GS (percent of the original activity) recovered remained at optimal levels and no longer showed a concentration-dependent decline. The GS subunits that are initially bound and then released from groEL by ATP are assembly-competent. It is proposed that the subunits are no longer able to kinetically equilibrate with folding intermediates that misfold or aggregate. If a stable groEL-protein substrate complex can be amassed without loss of activity, this will facilitate studies on molecular aspects of chaperonin release mechanisms and oligomeric protein assembly. PMID:8100224

  12. Contribution of the C-Terminal Region of a Group II Chaperonin to its Interaction with Prefoldin and Substrate Transfer.

    PubMed

    Zako, Tamotsu; Sahlan, Muhamad; Fujii, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Yohei Y; Tai, Phan The; Sakai, Kotaro; Maeda, Mizuo; Yohda, Masafumi

    2016-06-01

    Prefoldin is a molecular chaperone that captures an unfolded protein substrate and transfers it to a group II chaperonin. Previous studies have shown that the interaction sites for prefoldin are located in the helical protrusions of group II chaperonins. However, it does not exclude the possibility of the existence of other interaction sites. In this study, we constructed C-terminal truncation mutants of a group II chaperonin and examined the effects of these mutations on the chaperone's function and interaction with prefoldin. Whereas the mutants with up to 6 aa truncation from the C-terminus retained more than 90% chaperone activities for protecting citrate synthase from thermal aggregation and refolding of green fluorescent protein and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, the truncation mutants showed decreased affinities for prefoldin. Consequently, the truncation mutants showed reduced transfer efficiency of the denatured substrate protein from prefoldin and subsequent chaperonin-dependent refolding. The results clearly show that the C-terminal region of group II chaperonins contributes to their interactions with prefoldin, the transfer of the substrate protein from prefoldin and its refolding. PMID:27079363

  13. Internal (His)6-tagging delivers a fully functional hetero-oligomeric class II chaperonin in high yield

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Danielle M.; Beuron, Fabienne; Sessions, Richard B.; Brancaccio, Andrea; Bigotti, Maria Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Group II chaperonins are ATP-ases indispensable for the folding of many proteins that play a crucial role in Archaea and Eukarya. They display a conserved two-ringed assembly enclosing an internal chamber where newly translated or misfolded polypeptides can fold to their native structure. They are mainly hexadecamers, with each eight-membered ring composed of one or two (in Archaea) or eight (in Eukarya) different subunits. A major recurring problem within group II chaperonin research, especially with the hetero-oligomeric forms, is to establish an efficient recombinant system for the expression of large amounts of wild-type as well as mutated variants. Herein we show how we can produce, in E. coli cells, unprecedented amounts of correctly assembled and active αβ-thermosome, the class II chaperonin from Thermoplasma acidophilum, by introducing a (His)6-tag within a loop in the α subunit of the complex. The specific location was identified via a rational approach and proved not to disturb the structure of the chaperonin, as demonstrated by size-exclusion chromatography, native gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. Likewise, the tagged protein showed an ATP-ase activity and an ability to refold substrates identical to the wild type. This tagging strategy might be employed for the overexpression of other recombinant chaperonins. PMID:26856373

  14. 48 CFR 432.616 - Compromise actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise actions. 432.616 Section 432.616 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 432.616 Compromise actions. Compromise of a...

  15. Intracellular localization of a group II chaperonin indicates a membrane-related function

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Paavola, Chad D.; McMillan, R. Andrew; Howard, Jeanie; Jahnke, Linda; Lavin, Colleen; Embaye, Tsegereda; Henze, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that are believed to function as part of a protein folding system in the cytoplasm of the cell. We observed, however, that the group II chaperonins known as rosettasomes in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, are not cytoplasmic but membrane associated. This association was observed in cultures grown at 60°C and 76°C or heat-shocked at 85°C by using immunofluorescence microscopy and in thick sections of rapidly frozen cells grown at 76°C by using immunogold electron microscopy. We observed that increased abundance of rosettasomes after heat shock correlated with decreased membrane permeability at lethal temperature (92°C). This change in permeability was not seen in cells heat-shocked in the presence of the amino acid analogue azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, indicating functional protein synthesis influences permeability. Azetidine experiments also indicated that observed heat-induced changes in lipid composition in S. shibatae could not account for changes in membrane permeability. Rosettasomes purified from cultures grown at 60°C and 76°C or heat-shocked at 85°C bind to liposomes made from either the bipolar tetraether lipids of Sulfolobus or a variety of artificial lipid mixtures. The presence of rosettasomes did not significantly change the transition temperature of liposomes, as indicated by differential scanning calorimetry, or the proton permeability of liposomes, as indicated by pyranine fluorescence. We propose that these group II chaperonins function as a structural element in the natural membrane based on their intracellular location, the correlation between their functional abundance and membrane permeability, and their potential distribution on the membrane surface. PMID:14673104

  16. Intracellular localization of a group II chaperonin indicates a membrane-related function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Paavola, Chad D.; McMillan, R. Andrew; Howard, Jeanie; Jahnke, Linda; Lavin, Colleen; Embaye, Tsegereda; Henze, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that are believed to function as part of a protein folding system in the cytoplasm of the cell. We observed, however, that the group II chaperonins known as rosettasomes in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, are not cytoplasmic but membrane associated. This association was observed in cultures grown at 60 degrees C and 76 degrees C or heat-shocked at 85 degrees C by using immunofluorescence microscopy and in thick sections of rapidly frozen cells grown at 76 degrees C by using immunogold electron microscopy. We observed that increased abundance of rosettasomes after heat shock correlated with decreased membrane permeability at lethal temperature (92 degrees C). This change in permeability was not seen in cells heat-shocked in the presence of the amino acid analogue azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, indicating functional protein synthesis influences permeability. Azetidine experiments also indicated that observed heat-induced changes in lipid composition in S. shibatae could not account for changes in membrane permeability. Rosettasomes purified from cultures grown at 60 degrees C and 76 degrees C or heat-shocked at 85 degrees C bind to liposomes made from either the bipolar tetraether lipids of Sulfolobus or a variety of artificial lipid mixtures. The presence of rosettasomes did not significantly change the transition temperature of liposomes, as indicated by differential scanning calorimetry, or the proton permeability of liposomes, as indicated by pyranine fluorescence. We propose that these group II chaperonins function as a structural element in the natural membrane based on their intracellular location, the correlation between their functional abundance and membrane permeability, and their potential distribution on the membrane surface.

  17. Dissection of the ATP-dependent conformational change cycle of a group II chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Ayumi; Moriya, Kazuki; Arita, Mayuno; Yamamoto, Yohei; Kitamura, Kyotaro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kanzaki, Taro; Oka, Toshihiko; Makabe, Koki; Kuwajima, Kunihiro; Yohda, Masafumi

    2014-01-23

    Group II chaperonin captures an unfolded protein while in its open conformation and then mediates the folding of the protein during ATP-driven conformational change cycle. In this study, we performed kinetic analyses of the group II chaperonin from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus sp. KS-1 (TKS1-Cpn), by stopped-flow fluorometry and stopped-flow small-angle X-ray scattering to reveal the reaction cycle. Two TKS1-Cpn variants containing a Trp residue at position 265 or position 56 exhibit nearly the same fluorescence kinetics induced by rapid mixing with ATP. Fluorescence started to increase immediately after the start of mixing and reached a maximum at 1-2s after mixing. Only in the presence of K(+) that a gradual decrease in fluorescence was observed after the initial peak. Similar results were obtained by stopped-flow small-angle X-ray scattering. A rapid fluorescence increase, which reflects nucleotide binding, was observed for the mutant containing a Trp residue near the ATP binding site (K485W), irrespective of the presence or absence of K(+). Without K(+), a small, rapid fluorescence decrease followed the initial increase, and then a gradual decrease was observed. In contrast, with K(+), a large, rapid fluorescence decrease occurred just after the initial increase, and then the fluorescence gradually increased. Finally, we observed ATP binding signal and also subtle conformational change in an ATPase-deficient mutant with K485W mutation. Based on these results, we propose a reaction cycle model for group II chaperonins. PMID:24120682

  18. A chaperonin as protein nanoreactor for atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Renggli, Kasper; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Urbani, Raphael; Pfohl, Thomas; Bruns, Nico

    2014-01-27

    The group II chaperonin thermosome (THS) from the archaea Thermoplasma acidophilum is reported as nanoreactor for atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A copper catalyst was entrapped into the THS to confine the polymerization into this protein cage. THS possesses pores that are wide enough to release polymers into solution. The nanoreactor favorably influenced the polymerization of N-isopropyl acrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol)methylether acrylate. Narrowly dispersed polymers with polydispersity indices (PDIs) down to 1.06 were obtained in the protein nanoreactor, while control reactions with a globular protein-catalyst conjugate only yielded polymers with PDIs above 1.84. PMID:24459061

  19. Forensic Analysis of Compromised Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Directory Tree Analysis File Generator is a Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) script that simplifies and automates the collection of information for forensic analysis of compromised computer systems. During such an analysis, it is sometimes necessary to collect and analyze information about files on a specific directory tree. Directory Tree Analysis File Generator collects information of this type (except information about directories) and writes it to a text file. In particular, the script asks the user for the root of the directory tree to be processed, the name of the output file, and the number of subtree levels to process. The script then processes the directory tree and puts out the aforementioned text file. The format of the text file is designed to enable the submission of the file as input to a spreadsheet program, wherein the forensic analysis is performed. The analysis usually consists of sorting files and examination of such characteristics of files as ownership, time of creation, and time of most recent access, all of which characteristics are among the data included in the text file.

  20. Probing Water Density and Dynamics in the Chaperonin GroEL Cavity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ATP-dependent binding of the chaperonin GroEL to its cofactor GroES forms a cavity in which encapsulated substrate proteins can fold in isolation from bulk solution. It has been suggested that folding in the cavity may differ from that in bulk solution owing to steric confinement, interactions with the cavity walls, and differences between the properties of cavity-confined and bulk water. However, experimental data regarding the cavity-confined water are lacking. Here, we report measurements of water density and diffusion dynamics in the vicinity of a spin label attached to a cysteine in the Tyr71 → Cys GroES mutant obtained using two magnetic resonance techniques: electron-spin echo envelope modulation and Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization. Residue 71 in GroES is fully exposed to bulk water in free GroES and to confined water within the cavity of the GroEL–GroES complex. Our data show that water density and translational dynamics in the vicinity of the label do not change upon complex formation, thus indicating that bulk water-exposed and cavity-confined GroES surface water share similar properties. Interestingly, the diffusion dynamics of water near the GroES surface are found to be unusually fast relative to other protein surfaces studied. The implications of these findings for chaperonin-assisted folding mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24888581

  1. A Chaperonin Subunit with Unique Structures Is Essential for Folding of a Specific Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lianwei; Fukao, Yoichiro; Myouga, Fumiyoshi; Motohashi, Reiko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Type I chaperonins are large, double-ring complexes present in bacteria (GroEL), mitochondria (Hsp60), and chloroplasts (Cpn60), which are involved in mediating the folding of newly synthesized, translocated, or stress-denatured proteins. In Escherichia coli, GroEL comprises 14 identical subunits and has been exquisitely optimized to fold its broad range of substrates. However, multiple Cpn60 subunits with different expression profiles have evolved in chloroplasts. Here, we show that, in Arabidopsis thaliana, the minor subunit Cpn60β4 forms a heterooligomeric Cpn60 complex with Cpn60α1 and Cpn60β1–β3 and is specifically required for the folding of NdhH, a subunit of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH). Other Cpn60β subunits cannot complement the function of Cpn60β4. Furthermore, the unique C-terminus of Cpn60β4 is required for the full activity of the unique Cpn60 complex containing Cpn60β4 for folding of NdhH. Our findings suggest that this unusual kind of subunit enables the Cpn60 complex to assist the folding of some particular substrates, whereas other dominant Cpn60 subunits maintain a housekeeping chaperonin function by facilitating the folding of other obligate substrates. PMID:21483722

  2. Chaperonin GroEL-GroES Functions as both Alternating and Non-Alternating Engines.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Ando, Toshio

    2016-07-31

    A double ring-shaped GroEL consisting of 14 ATPase subunits assists protein folding, together with co-chaperonin GroES. The dynamic GroEL-GroES interaction is actively involved in the chaperonin reaction. Therefore, revealing this dynamic interaction is a key to understanding the operation principle of GroEL. Nevertheless, how this interaction proceeds in the reaction cycle has long been controversial. Here, we directly imaged GroEL-GroES interaction in the presence of disulfide-reduced α-lactalbumin as a substrate protein using high-speed atomic force microscopy. This real-time imaging revealed the occurrence of primary, symmetric GroEL:GroES2 and secondary, asymmetric GroEL:GroES1 complexes. Remarkably, the reaction was observed to often branch into main and side pathways. In the main pathway, alternate binding and release of GroES occurs at the two rings, indicating tight cooperation between the two rings. In the side pathway, however, this cooperation is disrupted, resulting in the interruption of alternating rhythm. From various properties observed for both pathways, we provide mechanistic insight into the alternate and non-alternate operations of the two-engine system. PMID:27393305

  3. Chaperonin GroEL/GroES Over-Expression Promotes Aminoglycoside Resistance and Reduces Drug Susceptibilities in Escherichia coli Following Exposure to Sublethal Aminoglycoside Doses

    PubMed Central

    Goltermann, Lise; Sarusie, Menachem V.; Bentin, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge to modern healthcare. Aminoglycoside antibiotics cause translation corruption and protein misfolding and aggregation in Escherichia coli. We previously showed that chaperonin GroEL/GroES depletion and over-expression sensitize and promote short-term tolerance, respectively, to this drug class. Here, we show that chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression accelerates acquisition of streptomycin resistance and reduces susceptibility to several other antibiotics following sub-lethal streptomycin antibiotic exposure. Chaperonin buffering could provide a novel mechanism for emergence of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26858694

  4. Chaperonin GroEL/GroES Over-Expression Promotes Aminoglycoside Resistance and Reduces Drug Susceptibilities in Escherichia coli Following Exposure to Sublethal Aminoglycoside Doses.

    PubMed

    Goltermann, Lise; Sarusie, Menachem V; Bentin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge to modern healthcare. Aminoglycoside antibiotics cause translation corruption and protein misfolding and aggregation in Escherichia coli. We previously showed that chaperonin GroEL/GroES depletion and over-expression sensitize and promote short-term tolerance, respectively, to this drug class. Here, we show that chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression accelerates acquisition of streptomycin resistance and reduces susceptibility to several other antibiotics following sub-lethal streptomycin antibiotic exposure. Chaperonin buffering could provide a novel mechanism for emergence of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26858694

  5. Integrity and compromise in nursing ethics.

    PubMed

    Winslow, B J; Winslow, G R

    1991-06-01

    Nurses are often caught in the middle of what appear to be intractable moral conflicts. For such times, the function and limits of moral compromise need to be explored. Compromise is compatible with moral integrity if a number of conditions are met. Among these are the sharing of a moral language, mutual respect on the part of those who differ, acknowledgement of factual and moral complexities, and recognition of limits to compromise. Nurses are in a position uniquely suited to leadership in fostering an environment that makes compromise with integrity possible. PMID:1880466

  6. 49 CFR 1503.425 - Compromise orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compromise orders. 1503.425 Section 1503.425... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.425 Compromise orders. (a) Issuance. At any time before the issuance of an Order Assessing Civil Penalty under this subpart, an agency attorney and a person subject...

  7. 49 CFR 1503.425 - Compromise orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compromise orders. 1503.425 Section 1503.425... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.425 Compromise orders. (a) Issuance. At any time before the issuance of an Order Assessing Civil Penalty under this subpart, an agency attorney and a person subject...

  8. 48 CFR 32.610 - Compromising debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 32.610 Compromising debts. For debts under $100,000, excluding interest, the designated agency official may compromise the debt pursuant to the Federal Claims Collection Standards (31 CFR part 902) and agency regulations. Unless specifically authorized by agency...

  9. 48 CFR 1432.610 - Compromising debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromising debts. 1432.610 Section 1432.610 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 1432.610 Compromising debts. The CO may...

  10. 26 CFR 301.7122-1 - Compromises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Secretary may, at the Secretary's discretion, compromise any civil or criminal liability arising under the internal revenue laws prior to reference of a case involving such a liability to the Department of Justice for prosecution or defense. (2) An agreement to compromise may relate to a civil or criminal...

  11. Contribution of the Type II Chaperonin, TRiC/CCT, to Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Soung-Hun; Kasembeli, Moses; Bakthavatsalam, Deenadayalan; Chiu, Wah; Tweardy, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The folding of newly synthesized proteins and the maintenance of pre-existing proteins are essential in sustaining a living cell. A network of molecular chaperones tightly guides the folding, intracellular localization, and proteolytic turnover of proteins. Many of the key regulators of cell growth and differentiation have been identified as clients of molecular chaperones, which implies that chaperones are potential mediators of oncogenesis. In this review, we briefly provide an overview of the role of chaperones, including HSP70 and HSP90, in cancer. We further summarize and highlight the emerging the role of chaperonin TRiC (T-complex protein-1 ring complex, also known as CCT) in the development and progression of cancer mediated through its critical interactions with oncogenic clients that modulate growth deregulation, apoptosis, and genome instability in cancer cells. Elucidation of how TRiC modulates the folding and function of oncogenic clients will provide strategies for developing novel cancer therapies. PMID:26561808

  12. Group II archaeal chaperonin recognition of partially folded human γD-crystallin mutants.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Oksana A; Yang, Jingkun; King, Jonathan A; Knee, Kelly M

    2014-06-01

    The features in partially folded intermediates that allow the group II chaperonins to distinguish partially folded from native states remain unclear. The archaeal group II chaperonin from Methanococcus Mauripaludis (Mm-Cpn) assists the in vitro refolding of the well-characterized β-sheet lens protein human γD-crystallin (HγD-Crys). The domain interface and buried cores of this Greek key conformation include side chains, which might be exposed in partially folded intermediates. We sought to assess whether particular features buried in the native state, but absent from the native protein surface, might serve as recognition signals. The features tested were (a) paired aromatic side chains, (b) side chains in the interface between the duplicated domains of HγD-Crys, and (c) side chains in the buried core which result in congenital cataract when substituted. We tested the Mm-Cpn suppression of aggregation of these HγD-Crys mutants upon dilution out of denaturant. Mm-Cpn was capable of suppressing the off-pathway aggregation of the three classes of mutants indicating that the buried residues were not recognition signals. In fact, Mm-Cpn recognized the HγD-Crys mutants better than (wild-type) WT and refolded most mutant HγD-Crys to levels twice that of WT HγD-Crys. This presumably represents the increased population or longer lifetimes of the partially folded intermediates of the mutant proteins. The results suggest that Mm-Cpn does not recognize the features of HγD-Crys tested-paired aromatics, exposed domain interface, or destabilized core-but rather recognizes other features of the partially folded β-sheet conformation that are absent or inaccessible in the native state of HγD-Crys. PMID:24615724

  13. The purified and recombinant Legionella pneumophila chaperonin alters mitochondrial trafficking and microfilament organization.

    PubMed

    Chong, Audrey; Lima, Celia A; Allan, David S; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Garduño, Rafael A

    2009-11-01

    A portion of the total cellular pool of the Legionella pneumophila chaperonin, HtpB, is found on the bacterial cell surface, where it can mediate invasion of nonphagocytic cells. HtpB continues to be abundantly produced and released by internalized L. pneumophila and may thus have postinvasion functions. We used here two functional models (protein-coated beads and expression of recombinant proteins in CHO cells) to investigate the competence of HtpB in mimicking early intracellular trafficking events of L. pneumophila, including the recruitment of mitochondria, cytoskeletal alterations, the inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, and association with the endoplasmic reticulum. Microscopy and flow cytometry studies indicated that HtpB-coated beads recruited mitochondria in CHO cells and U937-derived macrophages and induced transient changes in the organization of actin microfilaments in CHO cells. Ectopic expression of HtpB in the cytoplasm of transfected CHO cells also led to modifications in actin microfilaments similar to those produced by HtpB-coated beads but did not change the distribution of mitochondria. Association of phagosomes containing HtpB-coated beads with the endoplasmic reticulum was not consistently detected by either fluorescence or electron microscopy studies, and only a modest delay in the fusion of TrOv-labeled lysosomes with phagosomes containing HtpB-coated beads was observed. HtpB is the first Legionella protein and the first chaperonin shown to, by means of our functional models, induce mitochondrial recruitment and microfilament rearrangements, two postinternalization events that typify the early trafficking of virulent L. pneumophila. PMID:19687203

  14. Enhanced expression of soluble human papillomavirus L1 through coexpression of molecular chaperonin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dong; Zha, Xiao; Yu, Xianghui; Wu, Yuqing

    2016-04-01

    The major recombinant capsid protein L1 of human papillomavirus (HPV) is widely used to produce HPV prophylactic vaccines. However, the quality of soluble and active expression of L1 in Escherichia coli was below the required amount. Coexpression with the chaperonin GroEL/ES enhanced L1 expression. Overexpressing GroEL/ES increased the soluble expression level of glutathione S-transferase-fused L1 (GST-L1) by approximately ∼3 fold. The yield of HPV type 16 L1 pentamer (L1-p) was ∼2 fold higher than that in a single expression system after purification through size-exclusion chromatograph. The expression and purification conditions were then optimized. The yield of L1-p was enhanced by ∼5 fold, and those of HPV types 18 and 58 L1-p increased by ∼3 and ∼2 folds, respectively, compared with that in the single expression system. Coexpressing the mono-site mutant HPV16 L1 L469A with GroEL/ES increased L1-p yield by ∼7 fold compared with strains expressing the wild-type L1 gene. L1-p was then characterized using circular dichroism spectra, UV-vis cloud point, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope analyses. Results indicated that the conformation and biological characteristics of L1-p were identical to that of native L1. Hence, overexpressing chaperonin in E. coli can increase the expression level of GST-L1 and L1-p production after purification. This finding may contribute to the development of a platform for prophylactic HPV vaccines. PMID:26732286

  15. A Two-step Mechanism for the Folding of Actin by the Yeast Cytosolic Chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Sarah F.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Willison, Keith R.

    2011-01-01

    Actin requires the chaperonin containing TCP1 (CCT), a hexadecameric ATPase essential for cell viability in eukaryotes, to fold to its native state. Following binding of unfolded actin to CCT, the cavity of the chaperone closes and actin is folded and released in an ATP-dependent folding cycle. In yeast, CCT forms a ternary complex with the phosducin-like protein PLP2p to fold actin, and together they can return nascent or chemically denatured actin to its native state in a pure in vitro folding assay. The complexity of the CCT-actin system makes the study of the actin folding mechanism technically challenging. We have established a novel spectroscopic assay through selectively labeling the C terminus of yeast actin with acrylodan and observe significant changes in the acrylodan fluorescence emission spectrum as actin is chemically unfolded and then refolded by the chaperonin. The variation in the polarity of the environment surrounding the fluorescent probe during the unfolding/folding processes has allowed us to monitor actin as it folds on CCT. The rate of actin folding at a range of temperatures and ATP concentrations has been determined for both wild type CCT and a mutant CCT, CCT4anc2, defective in folding actin in vivo. Binding of the non-hydrolysable ATP analog adenosine 5′-(β,γ-imino)triphosphate to the ternary complex leads to 3-fold faster release of actin from CCT following addition of ATP, suggesting a two-step folding process with a conformational change occurring upon closure of the cavity and a subsequent final folding step involving packing of the C terminus to the native-like state. PMID:21056978

  16. Functional characterization of an archaeal GroEL/GroES chaperonin system: significance of substrate encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Luis; Klunker, Daniel; Ang, Debbie; Naylor, Dean J; Kerner, Michael J; Georgopoulos, Costa; Hartl, F Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2004-01-01

    In all three kingdoms of life chaperonins assist the folding of a range of newly synthesized proteins. As shown recently, Archaea of the genus Methanosarcina contain both group I (GroEL/GroES) and group II (thermosome) chaperonins in the cytosol. Here we report on a detailed functional analysis of the archaeal GroEL/GroES system of Methanosarcina mazei (Mm) in comparison to its bacterial counterpart from Escherichia coli (Ec). We find that the groESgroEL operon of M. mazei is unable to functionally replace groESgroEL in E. coli. However, the MmGroES protein can largely complement a mutant EcGroES protein in vivo. The ATPase rate of MmGroEL is very low and the dissociation of MmGroES from MmGroEL is 15 times slower than for the EcGroEL/GroES system. This slow ATPase cycle results in a prolonged enclosure time for model substrate proteins, such as rhodanese, in the MmGroEL:GroES folding cage before their release into the medium. Interestingly, optimal functionality of MmGroEL/GroES and its ability to encapsulate larger proteins, such as malate dehydrogenase, requires the presence of ammonium sulfate in vitro. In the absence of ammonium sulfate, malate dehydrogenase fails to be encapsulated by GroES and rather cycles on and off the GroEL trans ring in a non-productive reaction. These results indicate that the archaeal GroEL/GroES system has preserved the basic encapsulation mechanism of bacterial GroEL and suggest that it has adjusted the length of its reaction cycle to the slower growth rates of Archaea. Additionally, the release of only the folded protein from the GroEL/GroES cage may prevent adverse interactions of the GroEL substrates with the thermosome, which is not normally located within the same compartment. PMID:14576149

  17. Group II archaeal chaperonin recognition of partially folded human γD-crystallin mutants

    PubMed Central

    Sergeeva, Oksana A; Yang, Jingkun; King, Jonathan A; Knee, Kelly M

    2014-01-01

    The features in partially folded intermediates that allow the group II chaperonins to distinguish partially folded from native states remain unclear. The archaeal group II chaperonin from Methanococcus Mauripaludis (Mm-Cpn) assists the in vitro refolding of the well-characterized β-sheet lens protein human γD-crystallin (HγD-Crys). The domain interface and buried cores of this Greek key conformation include side chains, which might be exposed in partially folded intermediates. We sought to assess whether particular features buried in the native state, but absent from the native protein surface, might serve as recognition signals. The features tested were (a) paired aromatic side chains, (b) side chains in the interface between the duplicated domains of HγD-Crys, and (c) side chains in the buried core which result in congenital cataract when substituted. We tested the Mm-Cpn suppression of aggregation of these HγD-Crys mutants upon dilution out of denaturant. Mm-Cpn was capable of suppressing the off-pathway aggregation of the three classes of mutants indicating that the buried residues were not recognition signals. In fact, Mm-Cpn recognized the HγD-Crys mutants better than (wild-type) WT and refolded most mutant HγD-Crys to levels twice that of WT HγD-Crys. This presumably represents the increased population or longer lifetimes of the partially folded intermediates of the mutant proteins. The results suggest that Mm-Cpn does not recognize the features of HγD-Crys tested—paired aromatics, exposed domain interface, or destabilized core—but rather recognizes other features of the partially folded β-sheet conformation that are absent or inaccessible in the native state of HγD-Crys. PMID:24615724

  18. Simulation of the shape of chaperonins using the small-angle x-ray scattering curves and torus form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Amarantov, S. V.; Naletova, I. N.; Kurochkina, L. P.

    2011-08-15

    The inverse scattering problem has been solved for protein complexes whose surfaces can be described by a set of the simplest doubly connected surfaces in the uniform approximation (a scattering potential inside the molecule is a constant). Solutions of two proteins-well-known GroEL bacterial chaperonin and poor-studied bacteriophage chaperonin, which is a product of 146 gene (gp146)-were taken for the experiment. The shapes of protein complexes have been efficiently reconstructed from the experimental scattering curves. The shell method, the method of the rotation of amino acid sequences with the use of the form factor of an amino acid, and the method of seeking the model parameters of a protein complex with the preliminarily obtained form factor of the model have been used to reconstruct the shape of these particles.

  19. GroEL/ES Chaperonin Modulates the Mechanism and Accelerates the Rate of TIM-Barrel Domain Folding

    PubMed Central

    Bracher, Andreas; Engen, John R.; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit; Hartl, F. Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The GroEL/ES chaperonin system functions as a protein folding cage. Many obligate substrates of GroEL share the (βα)8 TIM-barrel fold, but how the chaperonin promotes folding of these proteins is not known. Here we analyzed the folding of DapA at peptide resolution using hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry. During spontaneous folding, all elements of the DapA TIM-barrel acquire structure simultaneously, in a process associated with a long search time. In contrast, GroEL/ES accelerates folding more than 30-fold by catalyzing segmental structure formation in the TIM-barrel. Segmental structure formation is also observed during the fast spontaneous folding of a structural homolog of DapA from a bacterium that lacks GroEL/ES. Thus, chaperonin-independence correlates with folding properties otherwise enforced by protein confinement in the GroEL/ES cage. We suggest that folding catalysis by GroEL/ES is required by a set of proteins to reach native state at a biologically relevant time-scale, avoiding aggregation or degradation. PMID:24813614

  20. [Effect of ADP and GroES on interaction of molecular chaperonin GroEL with non-native lysozyme].

    PubMed

    Marchenko, N Iu; Marchenkov, V V; Kotova, N V; Semisotnov, G V; Bulankina, N I; Kaliman, P A

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of the molecular chaperonin GroEL with fluorescein-labeled lysozyme in the presence of high concentrations of thiol reagent--dithiothreitol (DTT) has been studied. In case of high concentrations of DTT lysozyme loses the native conformation due to the disruption of the intramolecular disulfide bonds stabilizing its structure and effectively aggregates. It has been shown that in the presence of high concentrations of DTT and two-fold molar excess of GroEL the lysozyme tightly interacts with GroEL that essentially decreases the efficiency of its aggregation. The addition of ADP to the complex of GroEL with nonnative lysozyme noticeably decreases the interaction of the chaperonin with nonnative protein target resulting in some increase of the efficiency of its aggregation. However, the addition of the co-chaperonin GroES together with ADP (i.e. the formation of the complex of GroEL with GroES) leads to drastic weakness of the interaction of GroEL with nonnative lysozyme and the efficiency of its aggregation becomes comparable with that in the absence of GroEL. PMID:14577157

  1. Chaperonin Cofactors, Cpn10 and Cpn20, of Green Algae and Plants Function as Hetero-oligomeric Ring Complexes*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Chin C.; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Saschenbrecker, Sandra; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2012-01-01

    The chloroplast chaperonin system of plants and green algae is a curiosity as both the chaperonin cage and its lid are encoded by multiple genes, in contrast to the single genes encoding the two components of the bacterial and mitochondrial systems. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr), three genes encode chaperonin cofactors, with cpn10 encoding a single ∼10-kDa domain and cpn20 and cpn23 encoding tandem cpn10 domains. Here, we characterized the functional interaction of these proteins with the Escherichia coli chaperonin, GroEL, which normally cooperates with GroES, a heptamer of ∼10-kDa subunits. The C. reinhardtii cofactor proteins alone were all unable to assist GroEL-mediated refolding of bacterial ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase but gained this ability when CrCpn20 and/or CrCpn23 was combined with CrCpn10. Native mass spectrometry indicated the formation of hetero-oligomeric species, consisting of seven ∼10-kDa domains. The cofactor “heptamers” interacted with GroEL and encapsulated substrate protein in a nucleotide-dependent manner. Different hetero-oligomer arrangements, generated by constructing cofactor concatamers, indicated a preferential heptamer configuration for the functional CrCpn10-CrCpn23 complex. Formation of heptamer Cpn10/Cpn20 hetero-oligomers was also observed with the Arabidopsis thaliana (At) cofactors, which functioned with the chloroplast chaperonin, AtCpn60α7β7. It appears that hetero-oligomer formation occurs more generally for chloroplast chaperonin cofactors, perhaps adapting the chaperonin system for the folding of specific client proteins. PMID:22518837

  2. 39 CFR 931.1 - Compromise of obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compromise of obligations. 931.1 Section 931.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PROCEDURE GOVERNING THE COMPROMISE OF OBLIGATIONS § 931.1 Compromise of obligations. Any proposition of compromise shall be submitted in writing, and the amount offered in compromise...

  3. Vascular Compromise from Soft Tissue Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Shannon; Carruthers, Jean D.A.; Carruthers, Alastair

    2014-01-01

    The popularity of soft tissue fillers is, in part, due to their favorable side-effect profile. However, serious complications can occur. The authors describe their extensive clinical experience with soft-tissue augmentation and the rare complication of vascular compromise, which can lead to necrosis and scarring. Over a 10-year period between January 2003 and January 2013, the authors observed a total of 12 cases of vascular compromise. Eight patients in their clinical practice showed evidence of vascular compromise out of a total of 14,355 filler injections (0.05%). In addition, four patients treated with an experimental particulate filler had vascular complications. All cases were examined for filler type, location of complication, risk factors, treatment, and outcomes. Although treatment plans differed for each patient in their series, all cases of vascular compromise resolved fully. The authors believe that an office-based protocol for both immediate and ongoing care—including a thorough individualized assessment and treatment plan for each patient—is critical to timely and effective resolution of side effects. They propose key recommendations for the prevention and management of vascular compromise to improve patient outcomes and reduce the risk of permanent complications. PMID:25276276

  4. The htpAB operon of Legionella pneumophila cannot be deleted in the presence of the groE chaperonin operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Gagnon, Elizabeth; Orton, Dennis J; Garduño, Rafael A

    2011-11-01

    HtpB, the chaperonin of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila , displays several virulence-related functions in vitro. To confirm HtpB's role in vivo, host infections with an htpB deletion mutant would be required. However, we previously reported that the htpAB operon (encoding co-chaperonin and chaperonin) is essential. We attempted here to delete htpAB in a L. pneumophila strain carrying the groE operon (encoding the Escherichia coli co-chaperonin and chaperonin). The groE operon was inserted into the chromosome of L. pneumophila Lp02, and then allelic replacement of htpAB with a gentamicin resistance cassette was attempted. Although numerous potential postallelic replacement transformants showed a correct selection phenotype, we still detected htpAB by PCR and full-size HtpB by immunoblot. Southern blot and PCR analysis indicated that the gentamicin resistance cassette had apparently integrated in a duplicated htpAB region. However, we showed by Southern blot that strain Lp02, and the Lp02 derivative carrying the groE operon, have only one copy of htpAB. These results confirmed that the htpAB operon cannot be deleted, not even in the presence of the groE operon, and suggested that attempts to delete htpAB under strong phenotypic selection result in aberrant genetic recombinations that could involve duplication of the htpAB locus. PMID:22029459

  5. Probing the Kinetic Stabilities of Friedreich’s Ataxia Clinical Variants Using a Solid Phase GroEL Chaperonin Capture Platform

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Ana R.; Naik, Subhashchandra; Fisher, Mark T.; Gomes, Cláudio M.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous human diseases are caused by protein folding defects where the protein may become more susceptible to degradation or aggregation. Aberrant protein folding can affect the kinetic stability of the proteins even if these proteins appear to be soluble in vivo. Experimental discrimination between functional properly folded and misfolded nonfunctional conformers is not always straightforward at near physiological conditions. The differences in the kinetic behavior of two initially folded frataxin clinical variants were examined using a high affinity chaperonin kinetic trap approach at 25 °C. The kinetically stable wild type frataxin (FXN) shows no visible partitioning onto the chaperonin. In contrast, the clinical variants FXN-p.Asp122Tyr and FXN-p.Ile154Phe kinetically populate partial folded forms that tightly bind the GroEL chaperonin platform. The initially soluble FXN-p.Ile154Phe variant partitions onto GroEL more rapidly and is more kinetically liable. These differences in kinetic stability were confirmed using differential scanning fluorimetry. The kinetic and aggregation stability differences of these variants may lead to the distinct functional impairments described in Friedreich’s ataxia, the neurodegenerative disease associated to frataxin functional deficiency. This chaperonin platform approach may be useful for identifying small molecule stabilizers since stabilizing ligands to frataxin variants should lead to a concomitant decrease in chaperonin binding. PMID:25333765

  6. Modeling the Dynamics of Compromised Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, B; Merl, D M

    2011-09-12

    Accurate predictive models of compromised networks would contribute greatly to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the detection and control of network attacks. Compartmental epidemiological models have been applied to modeling attack vectors such as viruses and worms. We extend the application of these models to capture a wider class of dynamics applicable to cyber security. By making basic assumptions regarding network topology we use multi-group epidemiological models and reaction rate kinetics to model the stochastic evolution of a compromised network. The Gillespie Algorithm is used to run simulations under a worst case scenario in which the intruder follows the basic connection rates of network traffic as a method of obfuscation.

  7. Modulation of STAT3 Folding and Function by TRiC/CCT Chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Kasembeli, Moses; Lau, Wilson Chun Yu; Roh, Soung-Hun; Eckols, T. Kris; Frydman, Judith; Chiu, Wah; Tweardy, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) transduces signals of many peptide hormones from the cell surface to the nucleus and functions as an oncoprotein in many types of cancers, yet little is known about how it achieves its native folded state within the cell. Here we show that Stat3 is a novel substrate of the ring-shaped hetero-oligomeric eukaryotic chaperonin, TRiC/CCT, which contributes to its biosynthesis and activity in vitro and in vivo. TRiC binding to Stat3 was mediated, at least in part, by TRiC subunit CCT3. Stat3 binding to TRiC mapped predominantly to the β-strand rich, DNA-binding domain of Stat3. Notably, enhancing Stat3 binding to TRiC by engineering an additional TRiC-binding domain from the von Hippel-Lindau protein (vTBD), at the N-terminus of Stat3, further increased its affinity for TRiC as well as its function, as determined by Stat3's ability to bind to its phosphotyrosyl-peptide ligand, an interaction critical for Stat3 activation. Thus, Stat3 levels and function are regulated by TRiC and can be modulated by manipulating its interaction with TRiC. PMID:24756126

  8. GroE chaperonins assisted functional expression of bacterial enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Liu, Jing-Jing; Kwak, Suryang; Tsai, Ching-Sung; Kong, In Iok; Sung, Bong Hyun; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Wang, Shu-Guang; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-10-01

    Rapid advances in the capabilities of reading and writing DNA along with increasing understanding of microbial metabolism at the systems-level have paved an incredible path for metabolic engineering. Despite these advances, post-translational tools facilitating functional expression of heterologous enzymes in model hosts have not been developed well. Some bacterial enzymes, such as Escherichia coli xylose isomerase (XI) and arabinose isomerase (AI) which are essential for utilizing cellulosic sugars, cannot be functionally expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We hypothesized and demonstrated that the mismatching of the HSP60 chaperone systems between bacterial and eukaryotic cells might be the reason these bacterial enzymes cannot be functionally expressed in yeast. The results showed that the co-expression of E. coli GroE can facilitate the functional expression of E. coli XI and AI, as well as the Agrobacterium tumefaciens D-psicose epimerase in S. cerevisiae. The co-expression of bacterial chaperonins in S. cerevisiae is a promising post-translational strategy for the functional expression of bacterial enzymes in yeast. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2149-2155. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27003667

  9. Ancient allelism at the cytosolic chaperonin-alpha-encoding gene of the zebrafish.

    PubMed Central

    Takami, K; Figueroa, F; Mayer, W E; Klein, J

    2000-01-01

    The T-complex protein 1, TCP1, gene codes for the CCT-alpha subunit of the group II chaperonins. The gene was first described in the house mouse, in which it is closely linked to the T locus at a distance of approximately 11 cM from the Mhc. In the zebrafish, Danio rerio, in which the T homolog is linked to the class I Mhc loci, the TCP1 locus segregates independently of both the T and the Mhc loci. Despite its conservation between species, the zebrafish TCP1 locus is highly polymorphic. In a sample of 15 individuals and the screening of a cDNA library, 12 different alleles were found, and some of the allelic pairs were found to differ by up to nine nucleotides in a 275-bp-long stretch of sequence. The substitutions occur in both translated and untranslated regions, but in the former they occur predominantly at synonymous codon sites. Phylogenetically, the alleles fall into two groups distinguished also by the presence or absence of a 10-bp insertion/deletion in the 3' untranslated region. The two groups may have diverged as long as 3.5 mya, and the polymorphic differences may have accumulated by genetic drift in geographically isolated populations. PMID:10628990

  10. Molecular characterization of the group II chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeum Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Mina; Matsuzaki, Hiroki; Nomura, Tomoko; Ishii, Noriyuki; Yohda, Masafumi

    2005-04-01

    The group II chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeum Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 (PhCPN) and its functional cooperation with the cognate prefoldin were investigated. PhCPN existed as a homo-oligomer in a double-ring structure, which protected the citrate synthase of a porcine heart from thermal aggregation at 45 degrees C, and did the same on the isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) of a thermophilic bacterium, Thermus thermophilus HB8, at 90 degrees C. PhCPN also enhanced the refolding of green fluorescent protein (GFP), which had been unfolded by low pH, in an ATP-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, functional cooperation between PhCPN and Pyrococcus prefoldin (PhPFD) in the refolding of GFP was not observed. Instead, cooperation between PhCPN and PhPFD was observed in the refolding of IPMDH unfolded with guanidine hydrochloride. Although PhCPN alone was not effective in the refolding of IPMDH, the refolding efficiency was enhanced by the cooperation of PhCPN with PhPFD. PMID:15538645

  11. 48 CFR 232.616 - Compromise actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise actions. 232.616 Section 232.616 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM... actions. Only the department/agency contract financing offices (see 232.070(c)) are authorized...

  12. An Unstructured Workshop as a Training Compromise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Because of its poor labor relations and consequent public image, New Zealand's meat industry asked the University of Otago to provide management training. Describes difficulties in developing effective training acceptable to the industry, the compromise workshop approach involving questionnaires and diaries, and the workshop's qualified success.…

  13. 49 CFR 1503.425 - Compromise orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compromise orders. 1503.425 Section 1503.425 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties...

  14. 49 CFR 1503.425 - Compromise orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise orders. 1503.425 Section 1503.425 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties...

  15. Political Compromise Makes the World Go 'Round

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Compromise in any context is often hard to accept. It feels like a person is giving up on his or her ideals. This is especially true in dealing with politics. Legislative and congressional bills can be written with the highest of ideals in mind. By the time the bill progresses through committees and the floor debate process, it can look like a…

  16. Disease-Associated Mutations in the HSPD1 Gene Encoding the Large Subunit of the Mitochondrial HSP60/HSP10 Chaperonin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bross, Peter; Fernandez-Guerra, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) forms together with heat shock protein 10 (HSP10) double-barrel chaperonin complexes that are essential for folding to the native state of proteins in the mitochondrial matrix space. Two extremely rare monogenic disorders have been described that are caused by missense mutations in the HSPD1 gene that encodes the HSP60 subunit of the HSP60/HSP10 chaperonin complex. Investigations of the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders have revealed that different degrees of reduced HSP60 function produce distinct neurological phenotypes. While mutations with deleterious or strong dominant negative effects are not compatible with life, HSPD1 gene variations found in the human population impair HSP60 function and depending on the mechanism and degree of HSP60 dys- and mal-function cause different phenotypes. We here summarize the knowledge on the effects of disturbances of the function of the HSP60/HSP10 chaperonin complex by disease-associated mutations.

  17. 38 CFR 1.931 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bases for compromise. 1.931 Section 1.931 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Standards for Compromise of Claims § 1.931 Bases for compromise. (a) VA may compromise a debt if it cannot collect the full amount because:...

  18. 49 CFR 1018.51 - Reasons for compromising a claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... compromise in accordance with the guidelines in 4 CFR 103.4. (b) The Board shall determine the debtor's... compromise in accordance with the Federal Claims Collection Standards, 4 CFR part 103. (c) Compromises... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reasons for compromising a claim. 1018.51...

  19. 40 CFR 13.25 - Standards for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for compromise. 13.25 Section 13.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS Compromise of Debts § 13.25 Standards for compromise. (a) EPA may compromise a claim pursuant to this...

  20. 31 CFR 902.5 - Further review of compromise offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Further review of compromise offers... COMPROMISE OF CLAIMS § 902.5 Further review of compromise offers. If an agency is uncertain whether to accept a firm, written, substantive compromise offer on a debt that is within the agency's...

  1. Gender Differences in the Readiness To Accept Career Compromise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gati, Itamar

    Most career decisions involve compromises. The need to compromise can be attributed to the fact that the characteristics of the options in the occupational world do not necessarily match the ideal career image of the career decision maker. This study examined the readiness to compromise and the content of compromise in 1,252 deliberating women and…

  2. Biochemical Characterization of Mutants in Chaperonin Proteins CCT4 and CCT5 Associated with Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy*

    PubMed Central

    Sergeeva, Oksana A.; Tran, Meme T.; Haase-Pettingell, Cameron; King, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies are a class of disorders marked by degeneration of the nerve fibers in the sensory periphery neurons. Recently, two mutations were identified in the subunits of the eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin TRiC, a protein machine responsible for folding actin and tubulin in the cell. C450Y CCT4 was identified in a stock of Sprague-Dawley rats, whereas H147R CCT5 was found in a human Moroccan family. As with many genetically identified mutations associated with neuropathies, the underlying molecular basis of the mutants was not defined. We investigated the biochemical properties of these mutants using an expression system in Escherichia coli that produces homo-oligomeric rings of CCT4 and CCT5. Full-length versions of both mutant protein chains were expressed in E. coli at levels approaching that of the WT chains. Sucrose gradient centrifugation revealed chaperonin-sized complexes of both WT and mutant chaperonins, but with reduced recovery of C450Y CCT4 soluble subunits. Electron microscopy of negatively stained samples of C450Y CCT4 revealed few ring-shaped species, whereas WT CCT4, H147R CCT5, and WT CCT5 revealed similar ring structures. CCT5 complexes were assayed for their ability to suppress aggregation of and refold the model substrate γd-crystallin, suppress aggregation of mutant huntingtin, and refold the physiological substrate β-actin in vitro. H147R CCT5 was not as efficient in chaperoning these substrates as WT CCT5. The subtle effects of these mutations are consistent with the homozygous disease phenotype, in which most functions are carried out during development and adulthood, but some selective function is lost or reduced. PMID:25124038

  3. Folding trajectories of human dihydrofolate reductase inside the GroEL GroES chaperonin cavity and free in solution.

    PubMed

    Horst, Reto; Fenton, Wayne A; Englander, S Walter; Wüthrich, Kurt; Horwich, Arthur L

    2007-12-26

    The chaperonin GroEL binds non-native polypeptides in an open ring via hydrophobic contacts and then, after ATP and GroES binding to the same ring as polypeptide, mediates productive folding in the now hydrophilic, encapsulated cis chamber. The nature of the folding reaction in the cis cavity remains poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear whether polypeptides take the same route to the native state in this cavity as they do when folding spontaneously free in solution. Here, we have addressed this question by using NMR measurements of the time course of acquisition of amide proton exchange protection of human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) during folding in the presence of methotrexate and ATP either free in solution or inside the stable cavity formed between a single ring variant of GroEL, SR1, and GroES. Recovery of DHFR refolded by the SR1/GroES-mediated reaction is 2-fold higher than in the spontaneous reaction. Nevertheless, DHFR folding was found to proceed by the same trajectories inside the cis folding chamber and free in solution. These observations are consistent with the description of the chaperonin chamber as an "Anfinsen cage" where polypeptide folding is determined solely by the amino acid sequence, as it is in solution. However, if misfolding occurs in the confinement of the chaperonin cavity, the polypeptide chain cannot undergo aggregation but rather finds its way back to a productive pathway in a manner that cannot be accomplished in solution, resulting in the observed high overall recovery. PMID:18093916

  4. The composition, structure and stability of a group II chaperonin are temperature regulated in a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Hiromi K; Yaoi, Takuro; Brocchieri, Luciano; McMillan, R Andrew; Alton, Thomas; Trent, Jonathan D

    2003-04-01

    The hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae contains group II chaperonins, known as rosettasomes, which are two nine-membered rings composed of three different 60 kDa subunits (TF55 alpha, beta and gamma). We sequenced the gene for the gamma subunit and studied the temperature-dependent changes in alpha, beta and gamma expression, their association into rosettasomes and their phylogenetic relationships. Alpha and beta gene expression was increased by heat shock (30 min, 86 degrees C) and decreased by cold shock (30 min, 60 degrees C). Gamma expression was undetectable at heat shock temperatures and low at normal temperatures (75-79 degrees C), but induced by cold shock. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that in vitro alpha and beta subunits form homo-oligomeric rosettasomes, and mixtures of alpha, beta and gamma form hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that beta homo-oligomeric rosettasomes and all hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes associate into filaments. In vivo rosettasomes were hetero-oligomeric with an average subunit ratio of 1alpha:1beta:0.1gamma in cultures grown at 75 degrees C, a ratio of 1alpha:3beta:1gamma in cultures grown at 60 degrees C and a ratio of 2alpha:3beta:0gamma after 86 degrees C heat shock. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we determined denaturation temperatures (Tm) for alpha, beta and gamma subunits of 95.7 degrees C, 96.7 degrees C and 80.5 degrees C, respectively, and observed that rosettasomes containing gamma were relatively less stable than those with alpha and/or beta only. We propose that, in vivo, the rosettasome structure is determined by the relative abundance of subunits and not by a fixed geometry. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicate that archaeal chaperonin subunits underwent multiple duplication events within species (paralogy). The independent evolution of these paralogues raises the possibility that chaperonins have functionally diversified between

  5. BBS10 encodes a vertebrate-specific chaperonin-like protein and is a major BBS locus.

    PubMed

    Stoetzel, Corinne; Laurier, Virginie; Davis, Erica E; Muller, Jean; Rix, Suzanne; Badano, José L; Leitch, Carmen C; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Corbani, Sandra; Jalk, Nadine; Vicaire, Serge; Sarda, Pierre; Hamel, Christian; Lacombe, Didier; Holder, Muriel; Odent, Sylvie; Holder, Susan; Brooks, Alice S; Elcioglu, Nursel H; Silva, Eduardo D; Da Silva, Eduardo; Rossillion, Béatrice; Sigaudy, Sabine; de Ravel, Thomy J L; Lewis, Richard Alan; Leheup, Bruno; Verloes, Alain; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Mégarbané, André; Poch, Olivier; Bonneau, Dominique; Beales, Philip L; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Katsanis, Nicholas; Dollfus, Hélène

    2006-05-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy. Although nine BBS genes have been cloned, they explain only 40-50% of the total mutational load. Here we report a major new BBS locus, BBS10, that encodes a previously unknown, rapidly evolving vertebrate-specific chaperonin-like protein. We found BBS10 to be mutated in about 20% of an unselected cohort of families of various ethnic origins, including some families with mutations in other BBS genes, consistent with oligogenic inheritance. In zebrafish, mild suppression of bbs10 exacerbated the phenotypes of other bbs morphants. PMID:16582908

  6. Identification, characterization, and expression of the BiP endoplasmic reticulum resident chaperonins in Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed Central

    Stedman, T T; Buck, G A

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated, characterized, and examined the expression of the genes encoding BiP endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident chaperonins responsible for transport, maturation, and proper folding of membrane and secreted proteins from two divergent strains of Pneumocystis carinii. The BiP genes, Pcbip and Prbip, from the P. c. carinii (prototype) strain and the P. c. rattus (variant) strain, respectively, are single-copy genes that reside on chromosomes of approximately 330 and approximately 350 kbp. Both genes encode approximately 72.5-kDa proteins that are most homologous to BiP genes from other organisms and exhibit the amino-terminal signal peptides and carboxyl-terminal ER retention sequences that are hallmarks of BiP proteins. We established short-term P. carinii cultures to examine expression and induction of Pcbip in response to heat shock, glucose starvation, inhibition of protein transport or N-linked glycosylation, and other conditions known to affect proper transport, glycosylation, and maturation of membrane and secreted proteins. These studies indicated that Pcbip mRNA is constitutively expressed but induced under conditions known to induce BiP expression in other organisms. In contrast to mammalian BiP genes but like other fungal BiP genes, P. carinii BiP mRNA levels are induced by heat shock. Finally, the Prbip and Pcbip coding sequences surprisingly exhibit only approximately 83% DNA and approximately 90% amino acid sequence identity and show only limited conservation in noncoding flanking and intron sequences. Analyses of the P. carinii BiP gene sequences support inclusion of P. carinii among the fungi but suggest a large divergence and possible speciation among P. carinii strains infecting a given host. PMID:8890193

  7. Symmetry-free cryo-EM structures of the chaperonin TRiC along its ATPase-driven conformational cycle

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yao; Schröder, Gunnar F; Meyer, Anne S; Jakana, Joanita; Ma, Boxue; Dougherty, Matthew T; Schmid, Michael F; Reissmann, Stefanie; Levitt, Michael; Ludtke, Steven L; Frydman, Judith; Chiu, Wah

    2012-01-01

    The eukaryotic group II chaperonin TRiC/CCT is a 16-subunit complex with eight distinct but similar subunits arranged in two stacked rings. Substrate folding inside the central chamber is triggered by ATP hydrolysis. We present five cryo-EM structures of TRiC in apo and nucleotide-induced states without imposing symmetry during the 3D reconstruction. These structures reveal the intra- and inter-ring subunit interaction pattern changes during the ATPase cycle. In the apo state, the subunit arrangement in each ring is highly asymmetric, whereas all nucleotide-containing states tend to be more symmetrical. We identify and structurally characterize an one-ring closed intermediate induced by ATP hydrolysis wherein the closed TRiC ring exhibits an observable chamber expansion. This likely represents the physiological substrate folding state. Our structural results suggest mechanisms for inter-ring-negative cooperativity, intra-ring-positive cooperativity, and protein-folding chamber closure of TRiC. Intriguingly, these mechanisms are different from other group I and II chaperonins despite their similar architecture. PMID:22045336

  8. A Gradient of ATP Affinities Generates an Asymmetric Power Stroke Driving the Chaperonin TRIC/CCT Folding Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Reissmann, Stefanie; Joachimiak, Lukasz A.; Chen, Bryan; Meyer, Anne S.; Nguyen, Anthony; Frydman, Judith

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC/CCT uses ATP cycling to fold many essential proteins that other chaperones cannot fold. This 1 MDa hetero-oligomer consists of two identical stacked rings assembled from eight paralogous subunits, each containing a conserved ATP-binding domain. Here, we report a dramatic asymmetry in the ATP utilization cycle of this ring-shaped chaperonin, despite its apparently symmetric architecture. Only four of the eight different subunits bind ATP at physiological concentrations. ATP binding and hydrolysis by the low-affinity subunits is fully dispensable for TRiC function in vivo. The conserved nucleotide-binding hierarchy among TRiC subunits is evolutionarily modulated through differential nucleoside contacts. Strikingly, high-and low-affinity subunits are spatially segregated within two contiguous hemispheres in the ring, generating an asymmetric power stroke that drives the folding cycle. This unusual mode of ATP utilization likely serves to orchestrate a directional mechanism underlying TRiC/CCT’s unique ability to fold complex eukaryotic proteins. PMID:23041314

  9. Structural Mechanisms of Mutant Huntingtin Aggregation Suppression by the Synthetic Chaperonin-like CCT5 Complex Explained by Cryoelectron Tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Darrow, Michele C.; Sergeeva, Oksana A.; Isas, Jose M.; Galaz-Montoya, Jesús G.; King, Jonathan A.; Langen, Ralf; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by functional deficits and loss of striatal neurons, is linked to an expanded and unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat in the huntingtin gene (HTT). This DNA sequence translates to a polyglutamine repeat in the protein product, leading to mutant huntingtin (mHTT) protein aggregation. The aggregation of mHTT is inhibited in vitro and in vivo by the TCP-1 ring complex (TRiC) chaperonin. Recently, a novel complex comprised of a single type of TRiC subunit has been reported to inhibit mHTT aggregation. Specifically, the purified CCT5 homo-oligomer complex, when compared with TRiC, has a similar structure, ATP use, and substrate refolding activity, and, importantly, it also inhibits mHTT aggregation. Using an aggregation suppression assay and cryoelectron tomography coupled with a novel computational classification method, we uncover the interactions between the synthetic CCT5 complex (∼1 MDa) and aggregates of mutant huntingtin exon 1 containing 46 glutamines (mHTTQ46-Ex1). We find that, in a similar fashion to TRiC, synthetic CCT5 complex caps mHTT fibrils at their tips and encapsulates mHTT oligomers, providing a structural description of the inhibition of mHTTQ46-Ex1 by CCT5 complex and a shared mechanism of mHTT inhibition between TRiC chaperonin and the CCT5 complex: cap and contain. PMID:25995452

  10. Structural Mechanisms of Mutant Huntingtin Aggregation Suppression by the Synthetic Chaperonin-like CCT5 Complex Explained by Cryoelectron Tomography.

    PubMed

    Darrow, Michele C; Sergeeva, Oksana A; Isas, Jose M; Galaz-Montoya, Jesús G; King, Jonathan A; Langen, Ralf; Schmid, Michael F; Chiu, Wah

    2015-07-10

    Huntington disease, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by functional deficits and loss of striatal neurons, is linked to an expanded and unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat in the huntingtin gene (HTT). This DNA sequence translates to a polyglutamine repeat in the protein product, leading to mutant huntingtin (mHTT) protein aggregation. The aggregation of mHTT is inhibited in vitro and in vivo by the TCP-1 ring complex (TRiC) chaperonin. Recently, a novel complex comprised of a single type of TRiC subunit has been reported to inhibit mHTT aggregation. Specifically, the purified CCT5 homo-oligomer complex, when compared with TRiC, has a similar structure, ATP use, and substrate refolding activity, and, importantly, it also inhibits mHTT aggregation. Using an aggregation suppression assay and cryoelectron tomography coupled with a novel computational classification method, we uncover the interactions between the synthetic CCT5 complex (∼ 1 MDa) and aggregates of mutant huntingtin exon 1 containing 46 glutamines (mHTTQ46-Ex1). We find that, in a similar fashion to TRiC, synthetic CCT5 complex caps mHTT fibrils at their tips and encapsulates mHTT oligomers, providing a structural description of the inhibition of mHTTQ46-Ex1 by CCT5 complex and a shared mechanism of mHTT inhibition between TRiC chaperonin and the CCT5 complex: cap and contain. PMID:25995452

  11. Regulation and sequence of the Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 groESL operon, encoding a cyanobacterial chaperonin.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, R; Reddy, K J; Sherman, L A

    1990-01-01

    The molecular chaperonins such as GroEL are now widely regarded as essential components for the stabilization of integral membrane or secretory proteins before membrane insertion or translocation, as well as for the assembly of macromolecular complexes such as ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase. The groESL operon of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was cloned as two independent lacZ-groEL translational fusions by immunoscreening a lambda ZAP genomic expression library and then sequenced. The derived amino acid sequences of the GroES and GroEL proteins demonstrated very high levels of amino acid identity with cognate chaperonins from bacteria and chloroplasts. The bicistronic 2.4-kilobase transcript from this operon, barely detectable in RNA preparations from cells grown at 30 degrees C, accumulated approximately 120-fold in preparations from cells grown for 20 min at 45 degrees C. Under these conditions, GroEL protein accumulated to 10-fold-higher levels. Primer extension analysis was used to identify a cyanobacterial heat shock promoter located at -81 base pairs from the groES initiation codon. The transcriptional -10 and -35 sequences differ slightly from Escherichia coli consensus heat shock promoter sequences. Images PMID:1975581

  12. Chaperonin 20 might be an iron chaperone for superoxide dismutase in activating iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD)

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Wen-Yu; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Jinn, Tsung-Luo

    2013-01-01

    Activation of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (CuZnSODs) is aided by Cu incorporation and disulfide isomerization by Cu chaperone of SOD (CCS). As well, an Fe-S cluster scaffold protein, ISU, might alter the incorporation of Fe or Mn into yeast MnSOD (ySOD2), thus leading to active or inactive ySOD2. However, metallochaperones involved in the activation of FeSODs are unknown. Recently, we found that a chloroplastic chaperonin cofactor, CPN20, could mediate FeSOD activity. To investigate whether Fe incorporation in FeSOD is affected by CPN20, we used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to analyze the ability of CPN20 to bind Fe. CPN20 could bind Fe, and the Fe binding to FeSOD was increased with CPN20 incubation. Thus, CPN20 might be an Fe chaperone for FeSOD activation, a role independent of its well-known co-chaperonin activity. PMID:23299425

  13. In vitro stabilization and in vivo solubilization of foreign proteins by the beta subunit of a chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. strain KOD1.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Z; Fujiwara, S; Kohda, K; Takagi, M; Imanaka, T

    1997-01-01

    The gene encoding the beta subunit of a molecular chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. strain KOD1 (cpkB) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The cpkB gene is composed of 1,641 nucleotides, encoding a protein (546 amino acids) with a molecular mass of 59,140 Da. The enhancing effect of CpkB on enzyme stability was examined by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Purified recombinant CpkB prevents thermal denaturation and enhances thermostability of ADH. CpkB requires ATP for its chaperonin function at a low CpkB concentration; however, CpkB functions without ATP when present in excess. In vivo chaperonin function for the solubilization of insoluble proteins was also studied by coexpressing CpkB and CobQ (cobryic acid synthase), indicating that CpkB is useful for solubilizing the insoluble proteins in vivo. These results suggest that the beta subunit plays a major role in chaperonin activity and is functional without the alpha subunit. PMID:9023959

  14. The Cpn10(1) Co-Chaperonin of A. thaliana Functions Only as a Hetero-Oligomer with Cpn20

    PubMed Central

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Zizelski, Gal; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2014-01-01

    The A. thaliana genome encodes five co-chaperonin homologs, three of which are destined to the chloroplast. Two of the proteins, Cpn10(2) and Cpn20, form functional homo-oligomers in vitro. In the current work, we present data on the structure and function of the third A. thaliana co-chaperonin, which exhibits unique properties. We found that purified recombinant Cpn10(1) forms inactive dimers in solution, in contrast to the active heptamers that are formed by canonical Cpn10s. Additionally, our data demonstrate that Cpn10(1) is capable of assembling into active hetero-oligomers together with Cpn20. This finding was reinforced by the formation of active co-chaperonin species upon mixing an inactive Cpn20 mutant with the inactive Cpn10(1). The present study constitutes the first report of a higher plant Cpn10 subunit that is able to function only upon formation of hetero-oligomers with other co-chaperonins. PMID:25419702

  15. The Cpn10(1) co-chaperonin of A. thaliana functions only as a hetero-oligomer with Cpn20.

    PubMed

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Zizelski, Gal; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2014-01-01

    The A. thaliana genome encodes five co-chaperonin homologs, three of which are destined to the chloroplast. Two of the proteins, Cpn10(2) and Cpn20, form functional homo-oligomers in vitro. In the current work, we present data on the structure and function of the third A. thaliana co-chaperonin, which exhibits unique properties. We found that purified recombinant Cpn10(1) forms inactive dimers in solution, in contrast to the active heptamers that are formed by canonical Cpn10s. Additionally, our data demonstrate that Cpn10(1) is capable of assembling into active hetero-oligomers together with Cpn20. This finding was reinforced by the formation of active co-chaperonin species upon mixing an inactive Cpn20 mutant with the inactive Cpn10(1). The present study constitutes the first report of a higher plant Cpn10 subunit that is able to function only upon formation of hetero-oligomers with other co-chaperonins. PMID:25419702

  16. Differential conformational modulations of MreB folding upon interactions with GroEL/ES and TRiC chaperonin components

    PubMed Central

    Moparthi, Satish Babu; Carlsson, Uno; Vincentelli, Renaud; Jonsson, Bengt-Harald; Hammarström, Per; Wenger, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Here, we study and compare the mechanisms of action of the GroEL/GroES and the TRiC chaperonin systems on MreB client protein variants extracted from E. coli. MreB is a homologue to actin in prokaryotes. Single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and time-resolved fluorescence polarization anisotropy report the binding interaction of folding MreB with GroEL, GroES and TRiC. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements on MreB variants quantified molecular distance changes occurring during conformational rearrangements within folding MreB bound to chaperonins. We observed that the MreB structure is rearranged by a binding-induced expansion mechanism in TRiC, GroEL and GroES. These results are quantitatively comparable to the structural rearrangements found during the interaction of β-actin with GroEL and TRiC, indicating that the mechanism of chaperonins is conserved during evolution. The chaperonin-bound MreB is also significantly compacted after addition of AMP-PNP for both the GroEL/ES and TRiC systems. Most importantly, our results showed that GroES may act as an unfoldase by inducing a dramatic initial expansion of MreB (even more than for GroEL) implicating a role for MreB folding, allowing us to suggest a delivery mechanism for GroES to GroEL in prokaryotes. PMID:27328749

  17. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Erica Y.; Scalzitti, Nicholas J.; Dion, Gregory R.; Bowe, Sarah N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  18. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kao, Erica Y; Scalzitti, Nicholas J; Dion, Gregory R; Bowe, Sarah N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  19. Identifying genetic relatives without compromising privacy

    PubMed Central

    He, Dan; Furlotte, Nicholas A.; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Joo, Jong Wha J.; Wadia, Akshay; Ostrovsky, Rafail; Sahai, Amit; Eskin, Eleazar

    2014-01-01

    The development of high-throughput genomic technologies has impacted many areas of genetic research. While many applications of these technologies focus on the discovery of genes involved in disease from population samples, applications of genomic technologies to an individual’s genome or personal genomics have recently gained much interest. One such application is the identification of relatives from genetic data. In this application, genetic information from a set of individuals is collected in a database, and each pair of individuals is compared in order to identify genetic relatives. An inherent issue that arises in the identification of relatives is privacy. In this article, we propose a method for identifying genetic relatives without compromising privacy by taking advantage of novel cryptographic techniques customized for secure and private comparison of genetic information. We demonstrate the utility of these techniques by allowing a pair of individuals to discover whether or not they are related without compromising their genetic information or revealing it to a third party. The idea is that individuals only share enough special-purpose cryptographically protected information with each other to identify whether or not they are relatives, but not enough to expose any information about their genomes. We show in HapMap and 1000 Genomes data that our method can recover first- and second-order genetic relationships and, through simulations, show that our method can identify relationships as distant as third cousins while preserving privacy. PMID:24614977

  20. Chaperonins induce an amyloid-like transformation of ovine prion protein: the fundamental difference in action between eukaryotic TRiC and bacterial GroEL.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Georgy G; Naletova, Irina N; Sheval, Evgeny V; Stroylova, Yulia Y; Schmalhausen, Elena V; Haertlé, Thomas; Muronetz, Vladimir I

    2011-12-01

    Molecular chaperones have been shown to be involved in the processes taking place during the pathogenesis of various amyloid neurodegenerative diseases. However, contradictory literature reports suggest that different molecular chaperones can either stimulate or prevent the formation of amyloid structures from distinct amyloidogenic proteins. In the present work, we concentrated on the effects caused by two molecular chaperonins, ovine TRiC and bacterial GroEL, on the aggregation and conformational state of ovine PrP. Both chaperonins were shown to bind native PrP and to produce amyloid-like forms of ovine PrP enriched with beta-structures but, while GroEL acted in an ATP-dependent manner, TRiC was shown to cause the same effect only in the absence of Mg-ATP (i.e. in the inactive form). In the presence of chaperonin GroEL, ovine PrP was shown to form micellar particles, approximately 100-200nm in diameter, which were observed both by dynamic light scattering assay and by electron microscopy. The content of these particles was significantly higher in the presence of Mg-ATP and, only under these conditions, GroEL produced amyloid-like species enriched with beta-structures. TRiC was shown to induce the formation of amyloid fibrils observed by electron microscopy, but only in the absence of Mg-ATP. This study suggests the important role of the cytosolic chaperonin TRiC in the propagation of amyloid structures in vivo during the development of amyloid diseases and the possible role of the bacterial chaperonin GroEL, located in the intestinal microflora, in the induction of these diseases. PMID:21856455

  1. Overexpression of chaperonin containing TCP1, subunit 3 predicts poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiao; Hu, Zhi-Ping; Li, Zhao; Gao, Peng-Ji; Zhu, Ji-Ye

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the value of chaperonin containing TCP1, subunit 3 (CCT3) to predict the prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and determine its function in HCC progression. METHODS: CCT3 expression levels were examined in human non-cancerous liver tissues and a variety of HCC cell lines by quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblotting. CCT3 expression was suppressed by small interfering RNA. The effects of reducing CCT3 expression in HCC cells were tested. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cell counting experiment, cell cycle assay, apoptosis assay and invasion assay were employed to evaluate cell functions in vitro. Immunohistochemistry was performed on HCC specimens. In addition, CCT3 expression in HCC specimens was also assessed at the protein and mRNA level. Associations between clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis were analyzed, along with the possible mechanisms involved in CCT3’s function in HCC progression. RESULTS: The expression levels of CCT3 mRNA and protein were upregulated in HCC cell lines in contrast to adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Reducing CCT3 expression not only suppressed cell proliferation in cell counts, MTT assay, cell cycle assay and induced cell apoptosis (P < 0.05 vs negative control), but also inhibited the tumor cell invasion capacity in vitro (P < 0.01 vs negative control). Overexpression of CCT3 in the nuclei of cancer cells in HCC specimens (58 of 104 patients, 55.8%) was associated with poor prognosis in HCC patients (3-year survival rate, 55.5% vs 84.2%, P = 0.020) after hepatectomy. Mechanistic analyses showed that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation was decreased even when stimulated by interleukin-6 after knocking down CCT3 in the HepG2 cell line. CONCLUSION: Overexpression of CCT3 in the nuclei of cancerous cells is associated with HCC progression. CCT3 may be a target that affects the activation of STAT3 in

  2. Chaperonin-Based Biolayer Interferometry To Assess the Kinetic Stability of Metastable, Aggregation-Prone Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lea, Wendy A; O'Neil, Pierce T; Machen, Alexandra J; Naik, Subhashchandra; Chaudhri, Tapan; McGinn-Straub, Wesley; Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew T; Burns, Joshua R; Baldwin, Michael R; Khar, Karen R; Karanicolas, John; Fisher, Mark T

    2016-09-01

    Stabilizing the folded state of metastable and/or aggregation-prone proteins through exogenous ligand binding is an appealing strategy for decreasing disease pathologies caused by protein folding defects or deleterious kinetic transitions. Current methods of examining binding of a ligand to these marginally stable native states are limited because protein aggregation typically interferes with analysis. Here, we describe a rapid method for assessing the kinetic stability of folded proteins and monitoring the effects of ligand stabilization for both intrinsically stable proteins (monomers, oligomers, and multidomain proteins) and metastable proteins (e.g., low Tm) that uses a new GroEL chaperonin-based biolayer interferometry (BLI) denaturant pulse platform. A kinetically controlled denaturation isotherm is generated by exposing a target protein, immobilized on a BLI biosensor, to increasing denaturant concentrations (urea or GuHCl) in a pulsatile manner to induce partial or complete unfolding of the attached protein population. Following the rapid removal of the denaturant, the extent of hydrophobic unfolded/partially folded species that remains is detected by an increased level of GroEL binding. Because this kinetic denaturant pulse is brief, the amplitude of binding of GroEL to the immobilized protein depends on the duration of the exposure to the denaturant, the concentration of the denaturant, wash times, and the underlying protein unfolding-refolding kinetics; fixing all other parameters and plotting the GroEL binding amplitude versus denaturant pulse concentration result in a kinetically controlled denaturation isotherm. When folding osmolytes or stabilizing ligands are added to the immobilized target proteins before and during the denaturant pulse, the diminished population of unfolded/partially folded protein manifests as a decreased level of GroEL binding and/or a marked shift in these kinetically controlled denaturation profiles to higher denaturant

  3. Mitochondrial Hsp60 Chaperonopathy Causes an Autosomal-Recessive Neurodegenerative Disorder Linked to Brain Hypomyelination and Leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Daniella; Georgopoulos, Costa; Bross, Peter; Ang, Debbie; Segev, Yardena; Goldsher, Dorit; Nemirovski, Alexandra; Shahar, Eli; Ravid, Sarit; Luder, Anthony; Heno, Bayan; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Skorecki, Karl; Mandel, Hanna

    2008-01-01

    Hypomyelinating leukodystrophies (HMLs) are disorders involving aberrant myelin formation. The prototype of primary HMLs is the X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) caused by mutations in PLP1. Recently, homozygous mutations in GJA12 encoding connexin 47 were found in patients with autosomal-recessive Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease (PMLD). However, many patients of both genders with PMLD carry neither PLP1 nor GJA12 mutations. We report a consanguineous Israeli Bedouin kindred with clinical and radiological findings compatible with PMLD, in which linkage to PLP1 and GJA12 was excluded. Using homozygosity mapping and mutation analysis, we have identified a homozygous missense mutation (D29G) not previously described in HSPD1, encoding the mitochondrial heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60) in all affected individuals. The D29G mutation completely segregates with the disease-associated phenotype. The pathogenic effect of D29G on Hsp60-chaperonin activity was verified by an in vivo E. coli complementation assay, which demonstrated compromised ability of the D29G-Hsp60 mutant protein to support E. coli survival, especially at high temperatures. The disorder, which we have termed MitCHAP-60 disease, can be distinguished from spastic paraplegia 13 (SPG13), another Hsp60-associated autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, by its autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern, as well as by its early-onset, profound cerebral involvement and lethality. Our findings suggest that Hsp60 defects can cause neurodegenerative pathologies of varying severity, not previously suspected on the basis of the SPG13 phenotype. These findings should help to clarify the important role of Hsp60 in myelinogenesis and neurodegeneration. PMID:18571143

  4. 31 CFR 902.2 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bases for compromise. 902.2 Section 902.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS (DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY-DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE) STANDARDS FOR THE COMPROMISE OF CLAIMS § 902.2 Bases for compromise....

  5. 49 CFR 89.13 - Documentary evidence of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Documentary evidence of compromise. 89.13 Section 89.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.13 Documentary evidence of compromise. A compromise of any claim is not final...

  6. 49 CFR 89.13 - Documentary evidence of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Documentary evidence of compromise. 89.13 Section 89.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.13 Documentary evidence of compromise. A compromise of any claim is not final...

  7. 26 CFR 300.3 - Offer to compromise fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Offer to compromise fee. 300.3 Section 300.3... ADMINISTRATION USER FEES § 300.3 Offer to compromise fee. (a) Applicability. This section applies to the... provided in this section, this fee applies to all offers to compromise accepted for processing. (b) Fee....

  8. 20 CFR 340.13 - Compromise of amounts recoverable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INSURANCE ACT RECOVERY OF BENEFITS § 340.13 Compromise of amounts recoverable. The Board or its designee may compromise an amount recoverable, provided such amount does not exceed $100,000, excluding interest, or such... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compromise of amounts recoverable....

  9. 5 CFR 185.146 - Compromise or settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compromise or settlement. 185.146 Section 185.146 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.146 Compromise or settlement. (a) Parties may make offers of compromise...

  10. 49 CFR 1018.71 - Referral of a compromise offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Referral of a compromise offer. 1018.71 Section... § 1018.71 Referral of a compromise offer. The Board may refer a debtor's firm written offer of compromise which is substantial in amount to GAO or to DOJ if the Board is uncertain whether the offer should...

  11. 27 CFR 70.436 - Offers in compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Offers in compromise. 70.436 Section 70.436 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Cigarette Papers and Tubes § 70.436 Offers in compromise. Procedure in the case of offers in compromise...

  12. 27 CFR 70.415 - Offers in compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Offers in compromise. 70.415 Section 70.415 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Beer § 70.415 Offers in compromise. Procedure in the case of offers in compromise of liabilities...

  13. 49 CFR 89.13 - Documentary evidence of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Documentary evidence of compromise. 89.13 Section 89.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.13 Documentary evidence of compromise. A compromise of any claim is not final...

  14. 49 CFR 89.13 - Documentary evidence of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Documentary evidence of compromise. 89.13 Section 89.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.13 Documentary evidence of compromise. A compromise of any claim is not final...

  15. 49 CFR 89.13 - Documentary evidence of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Documentary evidence of compromise. 89.13 Section 89.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.13 Documentary evidence of compromise. A compromise of any claim is not final...

  16. Institutional Commitments, Individual Compromises: Identity-Related Responses to Compromise in an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchman, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    This study explores compromises by individual academic staff, which reflect their multiple understandings of academic work. I offer a brief overview of the changing Australian tertiary sector environment and the ways in which this has had an impact on the academic role. The discussion centres around the need for investigations of academia to be…

  17. Morgellons: contested illness, diagnostic compromise and medicalisation.

    PubMed

    Fair, Brian

    2010-05-01

    The case of Morgellons illustrates how the emergence of a new medically contested illness intersected with and impacted on the diagnostic processes of an existing uncontested psychiatric condition, Delusional Parasitosis (DP). More specifically, the sociopolitical processes at play in the contested illness, Morgellons, dubiously reflect patient empowerment, as well the resilience and power of medical jurisdiction. This research offers insights into the contested illness and medicalisation literatures, and aims to bridge these two approaches towards the relationship between patient empowerment and medical authority, which I do through the notion of doctor-patient compromise. The data for this research come from a comprehensive qualitative analysis of Morgellons discourse through four key sources: the pro-Morgellons website Morgellons.org; the anti-Morgellons website Morgellonswatch.com; the popular media's portrayal of Morgellons; and the DP and Morgellons articles published in peer-reviewed medical journals, as made available on PubMed. PMID:20149149

  18. Purification and characterization of chaperonin 60 and heat-shock protein 70 from chromoplasts of Narcissus pseudonarcissus.

    PubMed Central

    Bonk, M; Tadros, M; Vandekerckhove, J; Al-Babili, S; Beyer, P

    1996-01-01

    In chromoplast differentiation during flower formation in Narcissus pseudonarcissus, the molecular chaperones chaperonin 60 (Cpn60; alpha and beta) and heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) greatly increase in abundance. Both were purified and shown to be present in a functional form in chromoplasts, indicating their requirement in the extensive structural rearrangements during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition. The purified proteins, sequenced N terminally and from internal peptides, showed strong homology to plastid Cpn60 and Hsp 70 representatives from other plant species. During chromoplast differentiation, the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is strongly induced. The corresponding enzymes are all nuclear encoded and form a large, soluble, hetero-oligomeric protein complex after import but prior to their membrane attachment. By immunoprecipitations we have shown that the plastid Hsp70 is a structural constituent of a soluble entity also containing phytoene desaturase. PMID:8754688

  19. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-01

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins.

  20. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins. PMID:26585937

  1. Functional characterization of the α- and β-subunits of a group II chaperonin from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Woo; Kim, Se Won; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Jeon, Sung-Jong; Kwon, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Byung-Woo; Nam, Soo-Wan

    2013-06-28

    We isolated and functionally characterized the α- and β- subunits (ApCpnA and ApCpnB) of a chaperonin from Aeropyrum pernix K1. The constructed vectors pET3d- ApCpnA and pET21a-ApCpnB were transformed into E. coli Rosetta (DE3), BL21 (DE3), or CodonPlus (DE3) cells. The expression of ApCpnA (60.7 kDa) and ApCpnB (61.2 kDa) was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. Recombinant ApCpnA and ApCpnB were purified by heat-shock treatment and anion-exchange chromatography. ApCpnA and ApCpnB were able to hydrolyze not only ATP, but also CTP, GTP, and UTP, albeit with different efficacies. Purified ApCpnA and ApCpnB showed the highest ATPase, CTPase, UTPase, and GTPase activities at 80°C. Furthermore, the addition of ApCpnA and ApCpnB effectively protected citrate synthase (CS) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from thermal aggregation and inactivation at 43°C and 50°C, respectively. In particular, the addition of ATP or CTP to ApCpnA and ApCpnB resulted in the most effective prevention of thermal aggregation and inactivation of CS and ADH. The ATPase activity of the two chaperonin subunits was dependent on the salt concentration. Among the ions we examined, potassium ions were the most effective at enhancing the ATP hydrolysis activity of ApCpnA and ApCpnB. PMID:23676910

  2. Female genital alteration: a compromise solution.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kavita Shah; Jacobs, Allan J

    2016-03-01

    Despite 30 years of advocacy, the prevalence of non-therapeutic female genital alteration (FGA) in minors is stable in many countries. Educational efforts have minimally changed the prevalence of this procedure in regions where it has been widely practiced. In order to better protect female children from the serious and long-term harms of some types of non-therapeutic FGA, we must adopt a more nuanced position that acknowledges a wide spectrum of procedures that alter female genitalia. We offer a revised categorisation for non-therapeutic FGA that groups procedures by effect and not by process. Acceptance of de minimis procedures that generally do not carry long-term medical risks is culturally sensitive, does not discriminate on the basis of gender, and does not violate human rights. More morbid procedures should not be performed. However, accepting de minimis non-therapeutic f FGA procedures enhances the effort of compassionate practitioners searching for a compromise position that respects cultural differences but protects the health of their patients. PMID:26902479

  3. Location and Flexibility of the Unique C-Terminal Tail of Aquifex aeolicus Co-Chaperonin Protein 10 as Derived by Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Biophysical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong-Hua; Luke, Kathryn; Zhang, Junjie; Chiu, Wah; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2008-01-01

    Co-chaperonin protein 10 (cpn10, GroES in Escherichia coli) is a ring-shaped heptameric protein that facilitates substrate folding when in complex with cpn60 (GroEL in E. coli). The cpn10 from the hyperthermophilic, ancient bacterium Aquifex aeolicus (Aacpn10) has a 25-residue C-terminal extension in each monomer not found in any other cpn10 protein. Earlier in vitro work has shown that this tail is not needed for heptamer assembly or protein function. Without the tail, however, the heptamers (Aacpn10del-25) readily aggregate into fibrillar stacked rings. To explain this phenomenon, we performed binding experiments with a peptide construct of the tail to establish its specificity for Aacpn10del-25 and used cryo-electron microscopy to determine the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the GroEL–Aacpn10–ADP complex at an 8-Å resolution. We found that the GroEL–Aacpn10 structure is similar to the GroEL–GroES structure at this resolution, suggesting that Aacpn10 has molecular interactions with cpn60 similar to other cpn10s. The cryo-electron microscopy density map does not directly reveal the density of the Aacpn10 25-residue tail. However, the 3D statistical variance coefficient map computed from multiple 3D reconstructions with randomly selected particle images suggests that the tail is located at the Aacpn10 monomer–monomer interface and extends toward the cis-ring apical domain of GroEL. The tail at this location does not block the formation of a functional co-chaperonin/chaperonin complex but limits self-aggregation into linear fibrils at high temperatures. In addition, the 3D variance coefficient map identifies several regions inside the GroEL–Aacpn10 complex that have flexible conformations. This observation is in full agreement with the structural properties of an effective chaperonin. PMID:18588898

  4. Isolation and Characterization of a Second Subunit of Molecular Chaperonin from Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD1: Analysis of an ATPase-Deficient Mutant Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Michi; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Takagi, Masahiro; Kanaya, Shigenori; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    1999-01-01

    The cpkA gene encoding a second (α) subunit of archaeal chaperonin from Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant CpkA was studied for chaperonin functions in comparison with CpkB (β subunit). The effect on decreasing the insoluble form of proteins was examined by coexpressing CpkA or CpkB with CobQ (cobyric acid synthase from P. kodakaraensis) in E. coli. The results indicate that both CpkA and CpkB effectively decrease the amount of the insoluble form of CobQ. Both CpkA and CpkB possessed the same ATPase activity as other bacterial and eukaryal chaperonins. The ATPase-deficient mutant proteins CpkA-D95K and CpkB-D95K were constructed by changing conserved Asp95 to Lys. Effect of the mutation on the ATPase activity and CobQ solubilization was examined. Neither mutant exhibited ATPase activity in vitro. Nevertheless, they decreased the amount of the insoluble form of CobQ by coexpression as did wild-type CpkA and CpkB. These results implied that both CpkA and CpkB could assist protein folding for nascent protein in E. coli without requiring energy from ATP hydrolysis. PMID:10103287

  5. Contribution of the C-terminal region to the thermostability of the archaeal group II chaperonin from Thermococcus sp. strain KS-1.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takao; Kanzaki, Taro; Iizuka, Ryo; Komada, Toshihiro; Zako, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Rintaro; Maruyama, Tadashi; Yohda, Masafumi

    2006-10-01

    Chaperonin is a double ring-shaped oligomeric protein complex, which captures a protein in the folding intermediate state and assists its folding in an ATP-dependent manner. The chaperonin from a hyperthermophilic archaeum, Thermococcus sp. strain KS-1, is a group II chaperonin and is composed of two distinct subunits, alpha and beta. Although these subunits are highly homologous in sequence, the homo-oligomer of the beta-subunit is more thermostable than that of the alpha-subunit. To identify the region responsible for this difference in thermostability, we constructed domain-exchange mutants. The mutants containing the equatorial domain of the beta-subunit were more resistant to thermal dissociation than the mutants with that of the alpha-subunit. Thermostability of a beta-subunit mutant whose C-terminal 22 residues were replaced with those of the alpha-subunit decreased to the comparable level of that of the alpha-subunit homo-oligomer. These results indicate that the difference in thermostability between alpha- and beta-subunits mainly originates in the C-terminal residues in the equatorial domain, only where they exhibit substantial sequence difference. PMID:16685467

  6. 49 CFR 209.109 - Payment of penalty; compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment of penalty; compromise. 209.109 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Penalties Civil Penalties § 209.109 Payment of penalty; compromise. (a) Payment of a civil penalty may be made...

  7. 49 CFR 209.109 - Payment of penalty; compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment of penalty; compromise. 209.109 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Penalties Civil Penalties § 209.109 Payment of penalty; compromise. (a) Payment of a civil penalty may be made...

  8. 49 CFR 107.327 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compromise and settlement. 107.327 Section 107.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PROGRAM PROCEDURES Enforcement Compliance Orders and Civil Penalties § 107.327 Compromise and...

  9. 49 CFR 107.327 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise and settlement. 107.327 Section 107.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PROGRAM PROCEDURES Enforcement Compliance Orders and Civil Penalties § 107.327 Compromise and...

  10. 5 CFR 1215.32 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compromise, suspension and termination. 1215.32 Section 1215.32 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.32 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a)...

  11. 10 CFR 429.132 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Compromise and settlement. 429.132 Section 429.132 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Enforcement § 429.132 Compromise and settlement. (a) DOE may...

  12. 10 CFR 429.132 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Compromise and settlement. 429.132 Section 429.132 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Enforcement § 429.132 Compromise and settlement. (a) DOE may...

  13. 10 CFR 429.132 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compromise and settlement. 429.132 Section 429.132 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Enforcement § 429.132 Compromise and settlement. (a) DOE may...

  14. 38 CFR 1.970 - Standards for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for compromise. 1.970 Section 1.970 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Referrals to Gao, Department of Justice, Or Irs § 1.970 Standards for compromise. Decisions of...

  15. 38 CFR 1.970 - Standards for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for compromise. 1.970 Section 1.970 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Referrals to Gao, Department of Justice, Or Irs § 1.970 Standards for compromise. Decisions of...

  16. 48 CFR 252.239-7000 - Protection against compromising emanations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection against... CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.239-7000 Protection against compromising emanations. As prescribed in 239.7103(a), use the following clause: Protection Against Compromising Emanations (JUN 2004)...

  17. 20 CFR 355.46 - Compromise or settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compromise or settlement. 355.46 Section 355.46 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDIES FOR FRAUDULENT CLAIMS OR STATEMENTS REGULATIONS UNDER THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 355.46 Compromise or settlement. (a) Parties may make offers of...

  18. 5 CFR 1312.30 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of Classified Information § 1312.30 Loss or possible compromise. Any person who has knowledge of the loss or possible compromise of classified information shall immediately secure the material and then report...

  19. 27 CFR 70.449 - Offers in compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Offers in compromise. 70.449 Section 70.449 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Cartridges, and Explosives § 70.449 Offers in compromise. The procedures in the case of offers in...

  20. 19 CFR 161.5 - Compromise of Government claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Compromise of Government claims. 161.5 Section 161... Government claims. (a) Offer. An offer made pursuant to section 617, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1617), in compromise of a Government claim arising under the Customs laws and the terms upon which...

  1. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskar,; Kumari, Neeti; Goyal, Neena

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study presents cloning and characterization of TCP1{gamma} gene from L. donovani. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCP1{gamma} is a subunit of T-complex protein-1 (TCP1), a chaperonin class of protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} co-localized with actin, a cytoskeleton protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The data suggests that this gene may have a role in differentiation/biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report on this chapronin in Leishmania. -- Abstract: T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1{gamma}), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1{gamma} of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1{gamma}), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1{gamma} revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1{gamma}. However, leishmanial TCP1{gamma} represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1{gamma} as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1{gamma} was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1{gamma} with actin suggests

  2. A direct regulatory interaction between chaperonin TRiC and stress-responsive transcription factor HSF1.

    PubMed

    Neef, Daniel W; Jaeger, Alex M; Gomez-Pastor, Rocio; Willmund, Felix; Frydman, Judith; Thiele, Dennis J

    2014-11-01

    Heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor that protects cells from protein-misfolding-induced stress and apoptosis. The mechanisms by which cytosolic protein misfolding leads to HSF1 activation have not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that HSF1 is directly regulated by TRiC/CCT, a central ATP-dependent chaperonin complex that folds cytosolic proteins. A small-molecule activator of HSF1, HSF1A, protects cells from stress-induced apoptosis, binds TRiC subunits in vivo and in vitro, and inhibits TRiC activity without perturbation of ATP hydrolysis. Genetic inactivation or depletion of the TRiC complex results in human HSF1 activation, and HSF1A inhibits the direct interaction between purified TRiC and HSF1 in vitro. These results demonstrate a direct regulatory interaction between the cytosolic chaperone machine and a critical transcription factor that protects cells from proteotoxicity, providing a mechanistic basis for signaling perturbations in protein folding to a stress-protective transcription factor. PMID:25437552

  3. The Chaperonin Containing TCP1 Complex (CCT/TRiC) Is Involved in Mediating Sperm-Oocyte Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Matthew D.; Smith, Nathan D.; Baker, Mark A.; Lin, Minjie; Aitken, R. John; Nixon, Brett

    2011-01-01

    Sperm-oocyte interactions are among the most remarkable processes in cell biology. These cellular recognition events are initiated by an exquisitely specific adhesion of free-swimming spermatozoa to the zona pellucida, an acellular matrix that surrounds the ovulated oocyte. Decades of research focusing on this interaction have led to the establishment of a widely held paradigm that the zona pellucida receptor is a single molecular entity that is constitutively expressed on the sperm cell surface. In contrast, we have employed the techniques of blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, far Western blotting, and proximity ligation to secure the first direct evidence in support of a novel hypothesis that zona binding is mediated by multimeric sperm receptor complex(es). Furthermore, we show that one such multimeric association, comprising the chaperonin-containing TCP1 complex (CCT/TRiC) and a zona-binding protein, zona pellucida-binding protein 2, is present on the surface of capacitated spermatozoa and could account for the zona binding activity of these cells. Collectively, these data provide an important biochemical insight into the molecular basis of sperm-zona pellucida interaction and a plausible explanation for how spermatozoa gain their ability to fertilize. PMID:21880732

  4. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar; Kumari, Neeti; Goyal, Neena

    2012-12-01

    T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1γ), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1γ of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1γ), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1γ revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1γ. However, leishmanial TCP1γ represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1γ exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1γ as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1γ was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1γ with actin suggests that, this gene may have a role in maintaining the structural dynamics of cytoskeleton of parasite. PMID:23137535

  5. Probing the Sequence of Conformationally-Induced Polarity Changes in the Molecular Chaperonin GroEL with Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Yeon; Semyonov, Alexander N.; Twieg, Robert J.; Horwich, Arthur L.; Frydman, Judith; Moerner, W. E.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrophobic interactions play a major role in binding non-native substrate proteins in the central cavity of the bacterial chaperonin GroEL. The sequence of local conformational changes by which GroEL and its cofactor GroES assist protein folding can be explored using the polarity-sensitive fluorescence probe Nile Red. A specific single-cysteine mutant of GroEL (Cys261), whose cysteine is located inside the central cavity at the apical region of the protein, was covalently labeled with synthetically prepared Nile Red maleimide (NR). Bulk fluorescence spectra of Cys261-NR were measured to examine the effects of binding of the stringent substrate, malate dehydrogenase (MDH), GroES, and nucleotide on the local environment of the probe. After binding denatured substrate, the fluorescence intensity increased by 32±7%, suggesting enhanced hydrophobicity at the position of the label. On the other hand, in the presence of ATP, the fluorescence intensity decreased by 13±3%, implying increased local polarity. In order to explore the sequence of local polarity changes, substrate, GroES, and various nucleotides were added in different orders; the resulting changes in emission intensity provide insight into the sequence of conformational changes occurring during GroEL-mediated protein folding. PMID:16375456

  6. Intrinsic unfoldase/foldase activity of the chaperonin GroEL directly demonstrated using multinuclear relaxation-based NMR

    PubMed Central

    Libich, David S.; Tugarinov, Vitali; Clore, G. Marius

    2015-01-01

    The prototypical chaperonin GroEL assists protein folding through an ATP-dependent encapsulation mechanism. The details of how GroEL folds proteins remain elusive, particularly because encapsulation is not an absolute requirement for successful re/folding. Here we make use of a metastable model protein substrate, comprising a triple mutant of Fyn SH3, to directly demonstrate, by simultaneous analysis of three complementary NMR-based relaxation experiments (lifetime line broadening, dark state exchange saturation transfer, and Carr–Purcell–Meinboom–Gill relaxation dispersion), that apo GroEL accelerates the overall interconversion rate between the native state and a well-defined folding intermediate by about 20-fold, under conditions where the “invisible” GroEL-bound states have occupancies below 1%. This is largely achieved through a 500-fold acceleration in the folded-to-intermediate transition of the protein substrate. Catalysis is modulated by a kinetic deuterium isotope effect that reduces the overall interconversion rate between the GroEL-bound species by about 3-fold, indicative of a significant hydrophobic contribution. The location of the GroEL binding site on the folding intermediate, mapped from 15N, 1HN, and 13Cmethyl relaxation dispersion experiments, is composed of a prominent, surface-exposed hydrophobic patch. PMID:26124125

  7. Interactions between a luteovirus and the GroEL chaperonin protein of the symbiotic bacterium Buchnera aphidicola of aphids.

    PubMed

    Bouvaine, Sophie; Boonham, Neil; Douglas, Angela E

    2011-06-01

    Luteoviruses and poleroviruses are important plant viruses transmitted exclusively by aphids in a circulative manner via the aphid haemolymph. A chaperonin protein, GroEL, synthesized in aphids by a symbiotic bacterium, Buchnera aphidicola, is hypothesized to bind to virus particles in the haemolymph, thereby promoting transmission. To investigate this hypothesis, the GroEL-binding site for barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) was determined in vitro, and the abundance of GroEL protein in different aphid tissues was investigated. Virus binding to a peptide library representing the full GroEL molecule revealed a single binding site that coincides with the site that anchors two GroEL rings to form the native GroEL tetradecamer. In the functional form of the GroEL protein, virus binding would compete with the formation of the two GroEL rings. Using a mAb raised against a Buchnera-specific GroEL epitope, GroEL was detected in Buchnera cells by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry, but not in the aphid haemolymph, fat body or gut. From the prediction here that GroEL-virus interactions are probably severely limited by competition with other GroEL molecules, and the evidence that GroEL is not available to interact with virus particles in vivo, it is concluded that GroEL-virus interactions are unlikely to contribute to virus transmission by aphids. PMID:21346031

  8. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  9. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  10. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  11. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  12. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  13. Construction and characterization of the hetero-oligomer of the group II chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus sp. strain KS-1.

    PubMed

    Sahlan, Muhamad; Kanzaki, Taro; Yohda, Masafumi

    2009-05-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus sp. strain KS-1 (T. KS-1) expresses two different chaperonin subunits, alpha and beta, for the folding of its proteins. The composition of the subunits in the hexadecameric double ring changes with temperature. The content of the beta subunit significantly increases according to the increase in temperature. The homo-oligomer of the beta subunit, Cpn beta, is more thermostable than that of the alpha subunit, Cpn alpha. Since Cpn alpha and Cpn beta also have different protein folding activities and interactions with prefoldin, the hetero-oligomer is thought to exhibit different characteristics according to the content of subunits. The hetero-oligomer of the T. KS-1 chaperonin has not been studied, however, because the alpha and beta subunits form hetero-oligomers of varying compositions when they are expressed simultaneously. In this study, we characterized the T. KS-1 chaperonin hetero-oligomer, Cpn alphabeta, containing both alpha and beta in the alternate order, which was constructed by the expression of alpha and beta subunits in a coordinated fashion and protease digestion. Cpn alphabeta protected citrate synthase from thermal aggregation, promoted the folding of acid-denatured GFP in an ATP-dependent manner, and exhibited an ATP-dependent conformational change. The yield of refolded GFP generated by Cpn alphabeta was almost equivalent to that generated by Cpn beta but lower than that generated by Cpn alpha. In contrast, Cpn alphabeta exhibited almost the same level of thermal stability as Cpn alpha, which was lower than that of Cpn beta. The affinity of Cpn alphabeta to prefoldin was found to be between those of Cpn alpha and Cpn beta, as expected. PMID:19229501

  14. Assisted protein folding at low temperature: evolutionary adaptation of the Antarctic fish chaperonin CCT and its client proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cuellar, Jorge; Yébenes, Hugo; Parker, Sandra K.; Carranza, Gerardo; Serna, Marina; Valpuesta, José María; Zabala, Juan Carlos; Detrich, H. William

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eukaryotic ectotherms of the Southern Ocean face energetic challenges to protein folding assisted by the cytosolic chaperonin CCT. We hypothesize that CCT and its client proteins (CPs) have co-evolved molecular adaptations that facilitate CCT–CP interaction and the ATP-driven folding cycle at low temperature. To test this hypothesis, we compared the functional and structural properties of CCT–CP systems from testis tissues of an Antarctic fish, Gobionotothen gibberifrons (Lönnberg) (habitat/body T = −1.9 to +2°C), and of the cow (body T = 37°C). We examined the temperature dependence of the binding of denatured CPs (β-actin, β-tubulin) by fish and bovine CCTs, both in homologous and heterologous combinations and at temperatures between −4°C and 20°C, in a buffer conducive to binding of the denatured CP to the open conformation of CCT. In homologous combination, the percentage of G. gibberifrons CCT bound to CP declined linearly with increasing temperature, whereas the converse was true for bovine CCT. Binding of CCT to heterologous CPs was low, irrespective of temperature. When reactions were supplemented with ATP, G. gibberifrons CCT catalyzed the folding and release of actin at 2°C. The ATPase activity of apo-CCT from G. gibberifrons at 4°C was ∼2.5-fold greater than that of apo-bovine CCT, whereas equivalent activities were observed at 20°C. Based on these results, we conclude that the catalytic folding cycle of CCT from Antarctic fishes is partially compensated at their habitat temperature, probably by means of enhanced CP-binding affinity and increased flexibility of the CCT subunits. PMID:24659247

  15. Fitness Trade-Offs Determine the Role of the Molecular Chaperonin GroEL in Buffering Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Prats-Escriche, Maria; Montagud-Martínez, Roser; López-Cerdán, Adolfo; Toft, Christina; Aguilar-Rodríguez, José; Wagner, Andreas; Fares, Mario A.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones fold many proteins and their mutated versions in a cell and can sometimes buffer the phenotypic effect of mutations that affect protein folding. Unanswered questions about this buffering include the nature of its mechanism, its influence on the genetic variation of a population, the fitness trade-offs constraining this mechanism, and its role in expediting evolution. Answering these questions is fundamental to understand the contribution of buffering to increase genetic variation and ecological diversification. Here, we performed experimental evolution, genome resequencing, and computational analyses to determine the trade-offs and evolutionary trajectories of Escherichia coli expressing high levels of the essential chaperonin GroEL. GroEL is abundantly present in bacteria, particularly in bacteria with large loads of deleterious mutations, suggesting its role in mutational buffering. We show that groEL overexpression is costly to large populations evolving in the laboratory, leading to groE expression decline within 66 generations. In contrast, populations evolving under the strong genetic drift characteristic of endosymbiotic bacteria avoid extinction or can be rescued in the presence of abundant GroEL. Genomes resequenced from cells evolved under strong genetic drift exhibited significantly higher tolerance to deleterious mutations at high GroEL levels than at native levels, revealing that GroEL is buffering mutations in these cells. GroEL buffered mutations in a highly diverse set of proteins that interact with the environment, including substrate and ion membrane transporters, hinting at its role in ecological diversification. Our results reveal the fitness trade-offs of mutational buffering and how genetic variation is maintained in populations. PMID:26116858

  16. Molecular Diagnostic Tools for Detection and Differentiation of Phytoplasmas Based on Chaperonin-60 Reveal Differences in Host Plant Infection Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Dumonceaux, Tim J.; Green, Margaret; Hammond, Christine; Perez, Edel; Olivier, Chrystel

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplasmas (‘Candidatus Phytoplasma’ spp.) are insect-vectored bacteria that infect a wide variety of plants, including many agriculturally important species. The infections can cause devastating yield losses by inducing morphological changes that dramatically alter inflorescence development. Detection of phytoplasma infection typically utilizes sequences located within the 16S–23S rRNA-encoding locus, and these sequences are necessary for strain identification by currently accepted standards for phytoplasma classification. However, these methods can generate PCR products >1400 bp that are less divergent in sequence than protein-encoding genes, limiting strain resolution in certain cases. We describe a method for accessing the chaperonin-60 (cpn60) gene sequence from a diverse array of ‘Ca.Phytoplasma’ spp. Two degenerate primer sets were designed based on the known sequence diversity of cpn60 from ‘Ca.Phytoplasma’ spp. and used to amplify cpn60 gene fragments from various reference samples and infected plant tissues. Forty three cpn60 sequences were thereby determined. The cpn60 PCR-gel electrophoresis method was highly sensitive compared to 16S-23S-targeted PCR-gel electrophoresis. The topology of a phylogenetic tree generated using cpn60 sequences was congruent with that reported for 16S rRNA-encoding genes. The cpn60 sequences were used to design a hybridization array using oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microspheres, providing rapid diagnosis and typing of phytoplasma infections. The oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microsphere assay revealed samples that were infected simultaneously with two subtypes of phytoplasma. These tools were applied to show that two host plants, Brassica napus and Camelina sativa, displayed different phytoplasma infection patterns. PMID:25551224

  17. Topographic Studies of the GroEL-GroES Chaperonin Complex by Chemical Cross-linking Using Diformyl Ethynylbenzene

    PubMed Central

    Trnka, Michael J.; Burlingame, A. L.

    2010-01-01

    -linking analysis of the 21-protein, ADP-bound GroEL-GroES chaperonin complex. Twenty-five unique sites of cross-linking were determined. PMID:20813910

  18. Specific cross-reactivity of antibodies raised against two major stress proteins, stress 70 and chaperonin 60, in diverse species

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, B.M.; Martin, L.S.; Nakagawa, P.A. ); Hunter, D.A. . Biologisk Inst.); Miller, S. ); Ullrich, S.J. . National Cancer Inst.)

    1994-08-01

    Immunoblot analysis using several antibodies raised against two major families of stress proteins, stress 70 and chaperonin 60 (cpn60), which are highly conserved in mammals, was carried out in diverse species often used in environmental research, including molluscs, annelids, crustaceans, echinoderms, and fish. The study revealed surprisingly different patterns of antibody cross-reactivity among species. The monoclonal anti-stress 70 antibody (mAb) C92 was the least cross-reactive for all species tested. The mAbs anti-stress 70 N27, BRM-22, and 3a3 were more broadly cross-reactive, but their binding specifities to stress 70 isoforms in the diverse species tested did not correlate with one another or follow taxonomic lines. The polyclonal anti-stress 70 antibody reacted to proteins in the 70 to 74 kDa range in all fish examined and in most invertebrates. When a polyclonal antibody (pAb) raised against cpn60 from a moth was used as a probe, specific binding was observed with proteins in the 60 to 64 kDa range in all fish examined and in most invertebrates. However, the size and number of isoforms that reacted with the pAb were species specific. These data suggest that these two major stress protein families are less highly conserved in invertebrates and fish than in mammals. Therefore, to minimize misinterpretation when using antibodies in heterologous assays with species in which the stress response has not been well characterized, it is important to determine which isoforms of stress 70 react with a particular antibody and to take into account the differential regulation of each member of this multigene family.

  19. Molecular diagnostic tools for detection and differentiation of phytoplasmas based on chaperonin-60 reveal differences in host plant infection patterns.

    PubMed

    Dumonceaux, Tim J; Green, Margaret; Hammond, Christine; Perez, Edel; Olivier, Chrystel

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplasmas ('Candidatus Phytoplasma' spp.) are insect-vectored bacteria that infect a wide variety of plants, including many agriculturally important species. The infections can cause devastating yield losses by inducing morphological changes that dramatically alter inflorescence development. Detection of phytoplasma infection typically utilizes sequences located within the 16S-23S rRNA-encoding locus, and these sequences are necessary for strain identification by currently accepted standards for phytoplasma classification. However, these methods can generate PCR products >1400 bp that are less divergent in sequence than protein-encoding genes, limiting strain resolution in certain cases. We describe a method for accessing the chaperonin-60 (cpn60) gene sequence from a diverse array of 'Ca.Phytoplasma' spp. Two degenerate primer sets were designed based on the known sequence diversity of cpn60 from 'Ca.Phytoplasma' spp. and used to amplify cpn60 gene fragments from various reference samples and infected plant tissues. Forty three cpn60 sequences were thereby determined. The cpn60 PCR-gel electrophoresis method was highly sensitive compared to 16S-23S-targeted PCR-gel electrophoresis. The topology of a phylogenetic tree generated using cpn60 sequences was congruent with that reported for 16S rRNA-encoding genes. The cpn60 sequences were used to design a hybridization array using oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microspheres, providing rapid diagnosis and typing of phytoplasma infections. The oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microsphere assay revealed samples that were infected simultaneously with two subtypes of phytoplasma. These tools were applied to show that two host plants, Brassica napus and Camelina sativa, displayed different phytoplasma infection patterns. PMID:25551224

  20. Identification of Staphylococcus species and subspecies by the chaperonin 60 gene identification method and reverse checkerboard hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, S H; Santucci, Z; Kloos, W E; Faltyn, M; George, C G; Driedger, D; Hemmingsen, S M

    1997-01-01

    A previous study (S. H. Goh et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 34:818-823, 1996) demonstrated that a 600-bp region of the chaperonin 60 (Cpn60) genes from various bacterial isolates could be amplified by PCR with a pair of degenerate primers and that the products could be used as species-specific probes for Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. lugdunensis, S. saprophyticus, and S. schleiferi. To further validate the utility of bacterial Cpn60 genes as universal targets for bacterial identification (ID), reverse checkerboard chemiluminescent hybridization experiments were performed with DNA probes from 34 different Staphylococcus species and subspecies. With the exception of probes from the Cpn60 genes of S. intermedius and S. delphini, which cross hybridized, all were species specific. Two subspecies of both S. capitis and S. cohnii were differentiated from one another, while DNAs from the two S. schleiferi subspecies cross hybridized. When 40 known Staphylococcus isolates were tested in a blind experiment by the Cpn60 gene method, 36 strains, representing six species and one subspecies (S. sciuri, S. caseolyticus, S. hominis, S. warneri, S. hyicus, S. haemolyticus, and S. capitis subsp. ureolyticus), were correctly identified. DNA from the four remaining isolates, known to be S. hyicus bovine strains, failed to hybridize to DNA from the S. hyicus target strain or any other Staphylococcus species. However, DNAs from these S. hyicus isolates did cross hybridize with each other. New DNA sequence data and evidence from previous studies suggest some genetic divergence between the two groups of S. hyicus isolates. Our results demonstrate that this Cpn60 gene-based ID method has the potential to be a basic method for bacterial ID. Studies are in progress to further validate the utility of this Cpn60 gene system for ID of Staphylococcus and other genera, including those of slow-growing microorganisms. PMID:9399505

  1. Alchemy or Science? Compromising Archaeology in the Deep Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jonathan

    2007-06-01

    In the torrid debate between archaeology and treasure hunting, compromise is often suggested as the pragmatic solution, especially for archaeology carried out either in deep water or beyond the constraints that commonly regulate such activities in territorial seas. Both the wisdom and the need for such compromise have even been advocated by some archaeologists, particularly in forums such as the internet and conferences. This paper argues that such a compromise is impossible, not in order to fuel confrontation but simply because of the nature of any academic discipline. We can define what archaeology is in terms of its aims, theories, methods and ethics, so combining it with an activity founded on opposing principles must transform it into something else. The way forward for archaeology in the deep sea does not lie in a contradictory realignment of archaeology’s goals but in collaborative research designed to mesh with emerging national and regional research and management plans.

  2. The role of the Chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1, subunit 8 (CCT8) in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yin, Haibing; Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Wei, Yingze; Zong, Guijuan; Yang, Shuyun; Chen, Xudong; Zheng, Guihua; Zhu, Xinghua; Guo, Yan; Li, Chunsun; Chen, Yali; Wang, Yuchan; He, Song

    2016-06-01

    The chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT) is known to mediate folding of proteins. CCT, subunit 8 (CCT8), is the θ subunit of CCT complex chaperonin. CCT8 has been reported to be dysregulated in several tumor tissues. In this study, we investigated the role of CCT8 in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Clinically, the expression levels of CCT8 in reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH) and B-cell NHL specimens were investigated using immunohistochemical analysis. We found that CCT8 was highly expressed in proliferating germinal center cells compared with the quiescent cells of the follicular mantle zone. Furthermore, CCT8 was highly expressed in progressive lymphomas than in indolent lymphomas. Kaplan-Meier curve showed that high expression of CCT8 was significantly associated with shorter overall survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Moreover, we demonstrated that CCT8 could promote the proliferation of B-cell NHL cells. In addition, we found that CCT8 could accelerate the G1/S transition in B-cell NHL. Finally, we demonstrated that overexpression of CCT8 could reverse cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) phenotype. Our study may shed new insights into the important role of CCT8 in cancer development. PMID:27101149

  3. Vaccinia-Related Kinase 2 Controls the Stability of the Eukaryotic Chaperonin TRiC/CCT by Inhibiting the Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP25

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangjune; Lee, Dohyun; Lee, Juhyun; Song, Haengjin; Kim, Hyo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones monitor the proper folding of misfolded proteins and function as the first line of defense against mutant protein aggregation in neurodegenerative diseases. The eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC is a potent suppressor of mutant protein aggregation and toxicity in early stages of disease progression. Elucidation of TRiC functional regulation will enable us to better understand the pathological mechanisms of neurodegeneration. We have previously shown that vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) downregulates TRiC protein levels through the ubiquitin-proteasome system by recruiting the E3 ligase COP1. However, although VRK2 activity was necessary in TRiC downregulation, the phosphorylated substrate was not determined. Here, we report that USP25 is a novel TRiC interacting protein that is also phosphorylated by VRK2. USP25 catalyzed deubiquitination of the TRiC protein and stabilized the chaperonin, thereby reducing accumulation of misfolded polyglutamine protein aggregates. Notably, USP25 deubiquitinating activity was suppressed when VRK2 phosphorylated the Thr680, Thr727, and Ser745 residues. Impaired USP25 deubiquitinating activity after VRK2-mediated phosphorylation may be a critical pathway in TRiC protein destabilization. PMID:25755282

  4. OsCpn60α1, Encoding the Plastid Chaperonin 60α Subunit, Is Essential for Folding of rbcL

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Ryul; Yang, Jung-Il; An, Gynheung

    2013-01-01

    Chaperonins are involved in protein-folding. The rice genome encodes six plastid chaperonin subunits (Cpn60) - three α and three β. Our study showed that they were differentially expressed during normal plant development. Moreover, five were induced by heat stress (42°C) but not by cold (10°C). The oscpn60α1 mutant had a pale-green phenotype at the seedling stage and development ceased after the fourth leaf appeared. Transiently expressed OsCpn60α1:GFP fusion protein was localized to the chloroplast stroma. Immuno-blot analysis indicated that the level of Rubisco large subunit (rbcL) was severely reduced in the mutant while levels were unchanged for some imported proteins, e.g., stromal heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and chlorophyll a/b binding protein 1 (Lhcb1). This demonstrated that OsCpn60α1 is required for the folding of rbcL and that failure of that process is seedling-lethal. PMID:23620301

  5. 26 CFR 601.203 - Offers in compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STATEMENT OF PROCEDURAL RULES Rulings and Other Specific Matters § 601.203 Offers in compromise. (a) General... Department of Justice for prosecution or defense. Certain functions of the Commissioner with respect to... prosecution are pending in the Office of the Chief Counsel, the Department of Justice, or in an office of...

  6. 49 CFR 209.109 - Payment of penalty; compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment of penalty; compromise. 209.109 Section 209.109 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Penalties Civil Penalties § 209.109 Payment...

  7. Implant surgery in healthy compromised patients-review of literature.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiu, I M; Stoian, I M

    2014-01-01

    Systemic diseases are of major importance in terms of prosthetic restorations supported by dental implants in healthy compromised patients. Each treatment stage from conception of the treatment plan to the long-term monitoring is under the necessity of the interdisciplinary approach to the underlying disease. PMID:25870664

  8. 47 CFR 1.1915 - Exploration of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Federal Claims Collection Standards (31 CFR part 902). The Commission will also consider a request... justification of the offer and addressing the bases for compromise at 31 CFR 902.2. Debtors will provide full... evaluate an offer, using the factors set forth in 31 CFR 902.2 and, as appropriate, refer the offer...

  9. Evil Searching: Compromise and Recompromise of Internet Hosts for Phishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Tyler; Clayton, Richard

    Attackers compromise web servers in order to host fraudulent content, such as malware and phishing websites. While the techniques used to compromise websites are widely discussed and categorized, analysis of the methods used by attackers to identify targets has remained anecdotal. In this paper, we study the use of search engines to locate potentially vulnerable hosts. We present empirical evidence from the logs of websites used for phishing to demonstrate attackers’ widespread use of search terms which seek out susceptible web servers. We establish that at least 18% of website compromises are triggered by these searches. Many websites are repeatedly compromised whenever the root cause of the vulnerability is not addressed. We find that 19% of phishing websites are recompromised within six months, and the rate of recompromise is much higher if they have been identified through web search. By contrast, other public sources of information about phishing websites are not currently raising recompromise rates; we find that phishing websites placed onto a public blacklist are recompromised no more frequently than websites only known within closed communities.

  10. Time-to-Compromise Model for Cyber Risk Reduction Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Miles A. McQueen; Wayne F. Boyer; Mark A. Flynn; George A. Beitel

    2005-09-01

    We propose a new model for estimating the time to compromise a system component that is visible to an attacker. The model provides an estimate of the expected value of the time-to-compromise as a function of known and visible vulnerabilities, and attacker skill level. The time-to-compromise random process model is a composite of three subprocesses associated with attacker actions aimed at the exploitation of vulnerabilities. In a case study, the model was used to aid in a risk reduction estimate between a baseline Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system and the baseline system enhanced through a specific set of control system security remedial actions. For our case study, the total number of system vulnerabilities was reduced by 86% but the dominant attack path was through a component where the number of vulnerabilities was reduced by only 42% and the time-to-compromise of that component was increased by only 13% to 30% depending on attacker skill level.

  11. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS. WP Watkinson1, LB Wichers2, JP Nolan1, DW Winsett1, UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, LC Walsh1, ER Lappi1, D Terrell1, R Slade1, AD Ledbetter1, and DL Costa1. 1USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD/PTB, RTP, NC, US...

  12. 40 CFR 27.46 - Compromise or settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compromise or settlement. 27.46 Section 27.46 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES... at any time after the date on which the reviewing official is permitted to issue a complaint...

  13. 14 CFR 1261.414 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the Claims Collection Litigation Report. See § 1261.417(e) or 4 CFR 105.2(b). Claims for which the... Department of Justice for litigation. The Comptroller General may exercise such compromise authority with... other debtors that resistance to payment is not likely to succeed. (f) Enforcement policy....

  14. 14 CFR 1261.414 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the Claims Collection Litigation Report. See § 1261.417(e) or 4 CFR 105.2(b). Claims for which the... Department of Justice for litigation. The Comptroller General may exercise such compromise authority with... other debtors that resistance to payment is not likely to succeed. (f) Enforcement policy....

  15. 14 CFR 1261.414 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the Claims Collection Litigation Report. See § 1261.417(e) or 4 CFR 105.2(b). Claims for which the... Department of Justice for litigation. The Comptroller General may exercise such compromise authority with... other debtors that resistance to payment is not likely to succeed. (f) Enforcement policy....

  16. 14 CFR § 1261.414 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the Claims Collection Litigation Report. See § 1261.417(e) or 4 CFR 105.2(b). Claims for which the... Department of Justice for litigation. The Comptroller General may exercise such compromise authority with... other debtors that resistance to payment is not likely to succeed. (f) Enforcement policy....

  17. 14 CFR 1261.414 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the Claims Collection Litigation Report. See § 1261.417(e) or 4 CFR 105.2(b). Claims for which the... Department of Justice for litigation. The Comptroller General may exercise such compromise authority with... other debtors that resistance to payment is not likely to succeed. (f) Enforcement policy....

  18. Whatever It Takes: Health Compromising Behaviors in Female Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Jennifer J.; Krane, Vikki

    2005-01-01

    The power and performance model of sport stresses a sport ethic of doing "whatever it takes" to win (Coakley, 2004). Uncritical acceptance of this model may lead to various health-compromising behaviors. Employing achievement goal theory, we examine why female athletes may adopt the power and performance approach. An ego motivational climate and a…

  19. An Item Response Model for Characterizing Test Compromise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Daniel O.

    2002-01-01

    Developed an item response model for characterizing test-compromise that enables the estimation of item preview and score-gain distributions. In the approach, models parameters and posterior distributions are estimated by Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedures. Simulation study results suggest that when at least some test items are known to be…

  20. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 2400.33 Section 2400.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY...

  1. 7 CFR 1956.124 - Compromise and adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Compromise and adjustment. 1956.124 Section 1956.124 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS...

  2. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may...

  3. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may...

  4. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may...

  5. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may...

  6. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may...

  7. Vehicle influence on permeation through intact and compromised skin.

    PubMed

    Gujjar, Meera; Banga, Ajay K

    2014-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to compare the transdermal permeation of a model compound, diclofenac diethylamine, from a hydrophilic and lipophilic vehicle across in vitro models simulating compromised skin. Mineral oil served as a lipophilic vehicle while 10mM phosphate buffered saline served as a hydrophilic vehicle. Compromised skin was simulated by tape stripping, delipidization, or microneedle application and compared with intact skin as a control. Transepidermal water loss was measured to assess barrier function. Skin compromised with tape stripping and delipidization significantly (p<0.05) increased permeation of diclofenac diethylamine compared to intact and microneedle treated skin with phosphate buffered saline vehicle. A similar trend in permeation was observed with mineral oil as the vehicle. For both vehicles, permeation across skin increased in the same order and correlated with degree of barrier impairment as indicated by transepidermal water loss values: intactcompromised skin. PMID:24979534

  8. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2400.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION... measures taken to negate or minimize any adverse effect of the compromise. (b) The Security Officer...

  9. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2400.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION... measures taken to negate or minimize any adverse effect of the compromise. (b) The Security Officer...

  10. Chaperonin CCT-Mediated AIB1 Folding Promotes the Growth of ERα-Positive Breast Cancer Cells on Hard Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Ze; Qiu, Juhui; Zhang, Lingling; Luo, Xiangdong; Jang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Clinical observations have revealed a strong association between estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive tumors and the development of bone metastases, however, the mechanism underlying this association remains unknown. We cultured MCF-7 (ERα-positive) on different rigidity substrates. Compared with cells grown on more rigid substrates (100 kPa), cells grown on soft substrates (10 kPa) exhibited reduced spreading ability, a lower ratio of cells in the S and G2/M cell cycle phases, and a decreased proliferation rate. Using stable isotope labeling by amino acids (SILAC), we further compared the whole proteome of MCF-7 cells grown on substrates of different rigidity (10 and 100 kPa), and found that the expression of eight members of chaperonin CCT increased by at least 2-fold in the harder substrate. CCT folding activity was increased in the hard substrate compared with the soft substrates. Amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1), was identified in CCT immunoprecipitates. CCT folding ability of AIB1 increased on 100-kPa substrate compared with 10- and 30-kPa substrates. Moreover, using mammalian two-hybrid protein-protein interaction assays, we found that the polyglutamine repeat sequence of the AIB1 protein was essential for interaction between CCTζ and AIB1. CCTζ-mediated AIB1 folding affects the cell area spreading, growth rate, and cell cycle. The expressions of the c-myc, cyclin D1, and PgR genes were higher on hard substrates than on soft substrate in both MCF-7 and T47D cells. ERα and AIB1 could up-regulate the mRNA and protein expression levels of the c-myc, cyclin D1, and PgR genes, and that 17 β-estradiol could enhance this effects. Conversely, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, could inhibit these effects. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that some ERα-positive breast cancer cells preferentially grow on more rigid substrates. CCT-mediated AIB1 folding appears to be involved in the rigidity response of breast cancer cells, which provides novel insight into the

  11. Chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide subunit eta (CCT-eta) is a specific regulator of fibroblast motility and contractility.

    PubMed

    Satish, Latha; Johnson, Sandra; Wang, James H-C; Post, J Christopher; Ehrlich, Garth D; Kathju, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Integumentary wounds in mammalian fetuses heal without scar; this scarless wound healing is intrinsic to fetal tissues and is notable for absence of the contraction seen in postnatal (adult) wounds. The precise molecular signals determining the scarless phenotype remain unclear. We have previously reported that the eta subunit of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide (CCT-eta) is specifically reduced in healing fetal wounds in a rabbit model. In this study, we examine the role of CCT-eta in fibroblast motility and contractility, properties essential to wound healing and scar formation. We demonstrate that CCT-eta (but not CCT-beta) is underexpressed in fetal fibroblasts compared to adult fibroblasts. An in vitro wound healing assay demonstrated that adult fibroblasts showed increased cell migration in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation, whereas fetal fibroblasts were unresponsive. Downregulation of CCT-eta in adult fibroblasts with short inhibitory RNA (siRNA) reduced cellular motility, both basal and growth factor-induced; in contrast, siRNA against CCT-beta had no such effect. Adult fibroblasts were more inherently contractile than fetal fibroblasts by cellular traction force microscopy; this contractility was increased by treatment with EGF and PDGF. CCT-eta siRNA inhibited the PDGF-induction of adult fibroblast contractility, whereas CCT-beta siRNA had no such effect. In each of these instances, the effect of downregulating CCT-eta was to modulate the behavior of adult fibroblasts so as to more closely approximate the characteristics of fetal fibroblasts. We next examined the effect of CCT-eta modulation on alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) expression, a gene product well known to play a critical role in adult wound healing. Fetal fibroblasts were found to constitutively express less alpha-SMA than adult cells. Reduction of CCT-eta with siRNA had minimal effect on cellular beta-actin but

  12. Creating clones, kids & chimera: liberal democratic compromise at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nathan A

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this article is to find middle ground between the supporters and opponents of biotechnology by perpetuating the existing legal compromise pertaining to the complete range of health and welfare doctrines relevant to the biotechnological industry. The author aspires neither to add to nor detract from this liberal democratic consensus, but to preserve its constitutive balance between positivism and natural law and over-regulation and under-regulation in the hopes of stabilizing new political fault lines developing around the few biotechnological innovations already grabbing headlines. The most feasible solution is to extend the existing liberal democratic compromise with respect to equal protection, reproductive rights, the First Amendment, human subject experimentation, patent law, and parental rights. This includes banning or monopolizing certain biotechnologies and extending substantive special respect to the ex vivo living human embryo. Biotechnology must not be left to regulate itself. PMID:15382747

  13. A technique to salvage endodontically compromised maxillary anterior tooth.

    PubMed

    Comut, Alper; Foran, Denise; Cunningham, Ralph P

    2014-01-01

    A complication of endodontic treatment is over-preparation of the tooth structure in an attempt to access calcified pulp chambers and root canals. This could result in thin root walls that might compromise the long-term prognosis of the tooth. There are various treatment options when such a complication occurs, among them, extraction of the compromised tooth and its replacement with a dental implant. This clinical report describes a nonsurgical, multidisciplinary treatment alternative where a maxillary anterior tooth with a thinned root wall was successfully saved by repairing the damaged root to its original thickness using a composite resin material and subsequently restoring with a cast post and core and a crown. PMID:24654367

  14. Securing Single Points of Compromise (SPoC)

    SciTech Connect

    Belangia, David Warren

    2015-06-25

    Securing the Single Points of Compromise that provide central services to the institution’s environment is paramount to success when trying to protect the business. (Fisk, 2014) Time Based Security mandates protection (erecting and ensuring effective controls) that last longer than the time to detect and react to a compromise. When enterprise protections fail, providing additional layered controls for these central services provides more time to detect and react. While guidance is readily available for securing the individual critical asset, protecting these assets as a group is not often discussed. Using best business practices to protect these resources as individual assets while leveraging holistic defenses for the group increases the opportunity to maximize protection time, allowing detection and reaction time for the SPoCs that is commensurate with the inherent risk of these centralized services.

  15. Potential Soviet compromise on ballistic missile defense. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.P.

    1989-11-01

    The body of this research memorandum was written before the Baker-Shevardnadze meeting in Wyoming. It presented evidence suggesting that the Soviet Union might agree to a compromise at the Wyoming meeting that defers the issue of ballistic missile defense (BMD) negotiations to a later stage in arms reductions, thus facilitating a first-stage cut in offensive arms without an explicit Soviet endorsement of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). Through this compromise, offensive arms reductions should first be delinked from an agreement on BMD, and then be relinked during the second stage of deeper cuts. Therefore, negotiations on limiting BMD systems, though deterred, are deemed inevitable if the U.S. persists in deploying a strategic defense system (SDS). Moreover, some Soviet arms controllers already look beyond the first stage to the prospect of negotiated transition into a strategic defense environment (i.e., a reliance on defensive deterrence). In this approach, Wyoming, then, was expected to be only a first move in the Soviet negotiating strategy for a grand compromise on strategic defense. As explained in the afterword added to the paper, the actual events at Wyoming seem consistent with that interpretation.

  16. Misfolded forms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase interact with GroEL and inhibit chaperonin-assisted folding of the wild-type enzyme.

    PubMed

    Polyakova, Oxana V; Roitel, Olivier; Asryants, Regina A; Poliakov, Alexei A; Branlant, Guy; Muronetz, Vladimir I

    2005-04-01

    We studied the interaction of chaperonin GroEL with different misfolded forms of tetrameric phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH): (1) GAPDH from rabbit muscles with all SH-groups modified by 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate); (2) O-R-type dimers of mutant GAPDH from Bacillus stearothermophilus with amino acid substitutions Y283V, D282G, and Y283V/W84F, and (3) O-P-type dimers of mutant GAPDH from B. stearothermophilus with amino acid substitutions Y46G/S48G and Y46G/R52G. It was shown that chemically modified GAPDH and the O-R-type mutant dimers bound to GroEL with 1:1 stoichiometry and dissociation constants K(d) of 0.4 and 0.9 muM, respectively. A striking feature of the resulting complexes with GroEL was their stability in the presence of Mg-ATP. Chemically modified GAPDH and the O-R-type mutant dimers inhibited GroEL-assisted refolding of urea-denatured wild-type GAPDH from B. stearothermophilus but did not affect its spontaneous reactivation. In contrast to the O-R-dimers, the O-P-type mutant dimers neither bound nor affected GroEL-assisted refolding of the wild-type GAPDH. Thus, we suggest that interaction of GroEL with certain types of misfolded proteins can result in the formation of stable complexes and the impairment of chaperonin activity. PMID:15741339

  17. Misfolded forms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase interact with GroEL and inhibit chaperonin-assisted folding of the wild-type enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Polyakova, Oxana V.; Roitel, Olivier; Asryants, Regina A.; Poliakov, Alexei A.; Branlant, Guy; Muronetz, Vladimir I.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the interaction of chaperonin GroEL with different misfolded forms of tetrameric phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH): (1) GAPDH from rabbit muscles with all SH-groups modified by 5,5′-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate); (2) O-R-type dimers of mutant GAPDH from Bacillus stearothermophilus with amino acid substitutions Y283V, D282G, and Y283V/W84F, and (3) O-P-type dimers of mutant GAPDH from B. stearothermophilus with amino acid substitutions Y46G/S48G and Y46G/R52G. It was shown that chemically modified GAPDH and the O-R-type mutant dimers bound to GroEL with 1:1 stoichiometry and dissociation constants Kd of 0.4 and 0.9 μM, respectively. A striking feature of the resulting complexes with GroEL was their stability in the presence of Mg-ATP. Chemically modified GAPDH and the O-R-type mutant dimers inhibited GroEL-assisted refolding of urea-denatured wild-type GAPDH from B. stearothermophilus but did not affect its spontaneous reactivation. In contrast to the O-R-dimers, the O-P-type mutant dimers neither bound nor affected GroEL-assisted refolding of the wild-type GAPDH. Thus, we suggest that interaction of GroEL with certain types of misfolded proteins can result in the formation of stable complexes and the impairment of chaperonin activity. PMID:15741339

  18. Identification of a novel BBS gene (BBS12) highlights the major role of a vertebrate-specific branch of chaperonin-related proteins in Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoetzel, Corinne; Muller, Jean; Laurier, Virginie; Davis, Erica E; Zaghloul, Norann A; Vicaire, Serge; Jacquelin, Cecile; Plewniak, Frederic; Leitch, Carmen C; Sarda, Pierre; Hamel, Christian; de Ravel, Thomy J L; Lewis, Richard Alan; Friederich, Evelyne; Thibault, Christelle; Danse, Jean-Marc; Verloes, Alain; Bonneau, Dominique; Katsanis, Nicholas; Poch, Olivier; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Helene

    2007-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is primarily an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by progressive retinal degeneration, obesity, cognitive impairment, polydactyly, and kidney anomalies. The disorder is genetically heterogeneous, with 11 BBS genes identified to date, which account for ~70% of affected families. We have combined single-nucleotide-polymorphism array homozygosity mapping with in silico analysis to identify a new BBS gene, BBS12. Patients from two Gypsy families were homozygous and haploidentical in a 6-Mb region of chromosome 4q27. FLJ35630 was selected as a candidate gene, because it was predicted to encode a protein with similarity to members of the type II chaperonin superfamily, which includes BBS6 and BBS10. We found pathogenic mutations in both Gypsy families, as well as in 14 other families of various ethnic backgrounds, indicating that BBS12 accounts for approximately 5% of all BBS cases. BBS12 is vertebrate specific and, together with BBS6 and BBS10, defines a novel branch of the type II chaperonin superfamily. These three genes are characterized by unusually rapid evolution and are likely to perform ciliary functions specific to vertebrates that are important in the pathophysiology of the syndrome, and together they account for about one-third of the total BBS mutational load. Consistent with this notion, suppression of each family member in zebrafish yielded gastrulation-movement defects characteristic of other BBS morphants, whereas simultaneous suppression of all three members resulted in severely affected embryos, possibly hinting at partial functional redundancy within this protein family. PMID:17160889

  19. Video-assisted thoracoscopy in compromised pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Gamba, Piergiorgio; Midrio, Paola; Betalli, Pietro; Snijders, Deborah; Leon, Francesco Fascetti

    2010-02-01

    The use of video-assisted techniques (VATs) in the paediatric field has become increasingly more frequent, based on reports of prompter recovery following VATs in respect to standard techniques. Specific advantages have been documented, in particular for pediatric patients undergoing chemioradiotherapic treatment. We retrospectively reviewed data of severely compromised patients who underwent VAT for lung wedge resections and biopsies carried out in our center over a 7-year period. As far as the area of therapeutic tumor resection is concerned, the present data are consistent with the view that thoracoscopy is both an effective and safe tool in diagnostic procedures. PMID:19811063

  20. From function to esthetics: anterior or occlusal compromises to esthetics.

    PubMed

    Guichet, D L; Guichet, N F

    1993-01-01

    Increased patient expectations together with improved diagnostic, material, and surgical advances have expanded the boundaries of esthetic dentistry. To optimize functional and esthetic success, existing techniques are being enhanced through careful patient selection and management of the occlusion. During the period from 1991 to 1992, several areas relating anterior or occlusal compromises to esthetics have been identified. These include: dental and skeletal malocclusion, periodontal esthetic defects, restorative materials and laboratory techniques, tooth arrangement and maxillomandibular relations, and implant dentistry. This paper reviews some of the literature on these areas during this period. PMID:8401825

  1. Expert review--identification of intra-partum fetal compromise.

    PubMed

    Prior, Tomas; Kumar, Sailesh

    2015-07-01

    Whilst most cases of cerebral palsy occur as a consequence of an ante-natal insult, a significant proportion, particularly in the term fetus, are attributable to intra-partum hypoxia. Intra-partum monitoring using continuous fetal heart rate assessment has led to an increased incidence of operative delivery without a concurrent reduction in the incidence of cerebral palsy. Despite this, birth asphyxia remains the strongest and most consistent risk factor for cerebral palsy in term infants. This review evaluates current intra-partum monitoring techniques as well as alternative approaches aimed at better identification of the fetus at risk of compromise in labour. PMID:25917435

  2. [Frostbite injuries causing compromised airway after inhalation of propane].

    PubMed

    Straarup, Therese Simonsen; Fink, Anders Olsen; Larsen, Jens Kjærgaard Rolighed

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case report of a 23-year-old man with acute pharyngeal injuries due to frostbite subsequent to inhalation of propane. He was fiber-optically intubated on admission to hospital since his airways were considered acutely compromised. He was subsequently kept intubated for 11 days due to persistent pharyngeal oedema and frostbite injuries. The latter is caused by low temperature of propane upon release from a pressurized container. Injuries caused by frostbite often gradually progress and thus caution should be exerted in regards to airway management. PMID:25557449

  3. Anthropogenic noise compromises antipredator behaviour in European eels.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stephen D; Purser, Julia; Radford, Andrew N

    2015-02-01

    Increases in noise-generating human activities since the Industrial Revolution have changed the acoustic landscape of many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Anthropogenic noise is now recognized as a major pollutant of international concern, and recent studies have demonstrated impacts on, for instance, hearing thresholds, communication, movement and foraging in a range of species. However, consequences for survival and reproductive success are difficult to ascertain. Using a series of laboratory-based experiments and an open-water test with the same methodology, we show that acoustic disturbance can compromise antipredator behaviour--which directly affects survival likelihood--and explore potential underlying mechanisms. Juvenile European eels (Anguilla anguilla) exposed to additional noise (playback of recordings of ships passing through harbours), rather than control conditions (playback of recordings from the same harbours without ships), performed less well in two simulated predation paradigms. Eels were 50% less likely and 25% slower to startle to an 'ambush predator' and were caught more than twice as quickly by a 'pursuit predator'. Furthermore, eels experiencing additional noise had diminished spatial performance and elevated ventilation and metabolic rates (indicators of stress) compared with control individuals. Our results suggest that acoustic disturbance could have important physiological and behavioural impacts on animals, compromising life-or-death responses. PMID:25098970

  4. Progress in Pain Assessment: The Cognitively Compromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, C. Richard

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Pain assessment is essential for patient care in many settings, but it proves difficult when the patient is cognitively compromised or otherwise unable to produce a conventional pain report. This review describes progress in pain assessment technology that involves the coding of human facial expression. Recent findings It is possible to quantify facial expression by coding patterns of facial muscle contraction and relaxation. These patterns are action units, and they can gauge the intensity of pain as well as signal its occurrence. The experience of pain seems to generate a unique facial expression comprising several action units. Concerns have existed about whether demented patients produce diagnostically meaningful facial expressions of pain because they tend to generate more non-specific facial expressions and perhaps code pain intensity less well than normals. Recent work shows that facial expression reflects pain as well or better in demented patients compared to normals. Summary Although still nascent, coded facial expression appears to work reliably as a pain assessment tool with cognitively compromised patients. Clinical application awaits the development of technology that can automate facial coding and scoring. PMID:18784487

  5. 40 CFR 1620.6 - Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., compromise, and settle. 1620.6 Section 1620.6 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD..., determine, compromise, and settle. The General Counsel of CSB, or his or her designee, is delegated authority to consider, ascertain, adjust, determine, compromise and settle claims under the provision of...

  6. 40 CFR 1620.6 - Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., compromise, and settle. 1620.6 Section 1620.6 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD..., determine, compromise, and settle. The General Counsel of CSB, or his or her designee, is delegated authority to consider, ascertain, adjust, determine, compromise and settle claims under the provision of...

  7. 7 CFR 3550.253 - Settlement of a debt by compromise or adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Settlement of a debt by compromise or adjustment. 3550.253 Section 3550.253 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL... Actions § 3550.253 Settlement of a debt by compromise or adjustment. Compromise or adjustment offers...

  8. 7 CFR 3550.253 - Settlement of a debt by compromise or adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Settlement of a debt by compromise or adjustment. 3550.253 Section 3550.253 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL... Actions § 3550.253 Settlement of a debt by compromise or adjustment. Compromise or adjustment offers...

  9. Perceived Career Compromise, Affect and Work-Related Satisfaction in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaousides, Theodore; Jome, LaRae

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of career compromise on positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), and work-related satisfaction (WRS). Career compromise refers to the modification of occupational preferences under pressing external circumstances [Gottfredson, L. S. (1981). Circumscription and compromise: A…

  10. Compromises along the Way: Balancing Speed To Market with Sustainability while Delivering Knowledge Management Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Martha K.

    This paper will discuss some of the compromises, and the path to those compromises, that must be made while implementing a successful knowledge management program within a for-profit enterprise. Specifically the following compromises are addressed: (1) manage knowledge where it is created, but do that within a global system; (2) no single scope…