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Sample records for sphaeroides ii extended

  1. The electronic structure of Fe2+ in reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. II. Extended x-ray fine structure studies.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberger, P; Okamura, M Y; Feher, G

    1982-01-01

    Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies were performed on reaction centers (RC) of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. RC containing two, one, and no quinones (2Q, 1Q, 0Q) samples were studied. The average ligand distance of the first coordination shell was determined to be 2.10 +/- 0.02 A with a more distant shell at 4.14 +/- 0.05 A. The Fe2+ site in RC was found to have a very large structural disorder parameter, from which a spread in ligand distance per iron site of approximately +/- 0.1 A was deduced. The most likely coordination number of the first shell is six, with a mixture of oxygens and nitrogens as ligands. The edge absorption results are consistent with the Fe2+ being in distorted octahedral environment. The EXAFS spectra of the 2Q and 1Q samples with and without O-phenanthroline were found to be the same. This indicates that either the secondary quinone and o-phenanthroline do not bind to Fe2+ or that they replace an equivalent ligand. The 0Q sample showed a 12% decrease in the EXAFS amplitude, which was restored upon addition of o-phenanthroline. These results can be explained by either a loss of a ligand or a severe conformational change when the primary quinone was removed. PMID:6977381

  2. AWIPS II Extended - Data Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R.; Schotz, S.; Calkins, J.; Gockel, B.; Ortiz, C.; Peter, R.

    2012-12-01

    AWIPS II Technology Infusion is a multiphase program. The first phase is the migration of the Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) and River Forecast Centers (RFCs) AWIPS I capabilities into a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), referred to as AWIPS II. AWIPS II is currently being deployed to Operational Test and Evaluation (OTE) and other select deployment sites. The subsequent phases of AWIPS Technology Infusion, known as AWIPS II Extended, include several projects that will improve technological capabilities of AWIPS II in order to enhance the NWS enterprise and improve services to partners. This paper summarizes AWIPS II Extended - Data Delivery project and reports on its status. Data Delivery enables AWIPS II users to discover, subscribe and access web-enabled data provider systems including the capability to subset datasets by space, time and parameter.

  3. Extending canonical Monte Carlo methods: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, L.; Curilef, S.

    2010-04-01

    We have previously presented a methodology for extending canonical Monte Carlo methods inspired by a suitable extension of the canonical fluctuation relation C = β2langδE2rang compatible with negative heat capacities, C < 0. Now, we improve this methodology by including the finite size effects that reduce the precision of a direct determination of the microcanonical caloric curve β(E) = ∂S(E)/∂E, as well as by carrying out a better implementation of the MC schemes. We show that, despite the modifications considered, the extended canonical MC methods lead to an impressive overcoming of the so-called supercritical slowing down observed close to the region of the temperature driven first-order phase transition. In this case, the size dependence of the decorrelation time τ is reduced from an exponential growth to a weak power-law behavior, \\tau (N)\\propto N^{\\alpha } , as is shown in the particular case of the 2D seven-state Potts model where the exponent α = 0.14-0.18.

  4. Thermodynamics. II - The extended thermodynamic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    The algebraic theory of thermodynamics developed in a previous paper is extended to include the algebraic structure that arises from the introduction of a physical body into the theory. The extension is based on very general definitions of both the thermodynamic states of a body and subsystems of that body. The algebraic analysis, which includes bodies in nonuniform states, shows that the set of all thermodynamic states of a body has the same algebraic structure as the set of thermodynamic states and that composite systems are induced by the algebraic structure of thermodynamic states. The analysis also justifies a variational treatment of thermodynamic bodies in uniform as well as nonuniform states. The variational calculation includes all conventional methods of calculation as special cases and helps to illuminate the origin and interpretation of the electrochemical potential.

  5. Osmoregulation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Abee, T; Palmen, R; Hellingwerf, K J; Konings, W N

    1990-01-01

    Betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) functioned most effectively as an osmoprotectant in osmotically stressed Rhodobacter sphaeroides cells during aerobic growth in the dark and during anaerobic growth in the light. The presence of the amino acids L-glutamate, L-alanine, or L-proline in the growth medium did not result in a significant increase in the growth rate at increased osmotic strengths. The addition of choline to the medium stimulated growth at increased osmolarities but only under aerobic conditions. Under these conditions choline was converted via an oxygen-dependent pathway to betaine, which was not further metabolized. The initial rates of choline uptake by cells grown in media with low and high osmolarities were measured over a wide range of concentrations (1.9 microM to 2.0 mM). Only one kinetically distinguishable choline transport system could be detected. Kt values of 2.4 and 3.0 microM and maximal rates of choline uptake (Vmax) of 5.4 and 4.2 nmol of choline/min.mg of protein were found in cells grown in the minimal medium without or with 0.3 M NaCl, respectively. Choline transport was not inhibited by a 25-fold excess of L-proline or betaine. Only one kinetically distinguishable betaine transport system was found in cells grown in the low-osmolarity minimal medium as well as in a high-osmolarity medium containing 0.3 M NaCl. In cells grown and assayed in the absence of NaCl, betaine transport occurred with a Kt of 15.1 microM and a Vmax of 3.2 nmol/min . mg of protein, whereas in cells that were grown and assayed in the presence of 0.3 M NaCl, the corresponding values were 18.2 microM and 9.2 nmol of betaine/min . mg of protein. This system was also able to transport L-proline, but with a lower affinity than that for betaine. The addition of choline of betaine to the growth medium did not result in the induction of additional transport systems. PMID:2294084

  6. Phosphoribulokinase mediates nitrogenase-induced carbon dioxide fixation gene repression in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Ryan M; Tabita, F Robert

    2015-11-01

    In many organisms there is a balance between carbon and nitrogen metabolism. These observations extend to the nitrogen-fixing, nonsulfur purple bacteria, which have the classic family of P(II) regulators that coordinate signals of carbon and nitrogen status to regulate nitrogen metabolism. Curiously, these organisms also possess a reverse mechanism to regulate carbon metabolism based on cellular nitrogen status. In this work, studies in Rhodobacter sphaeroides firmly established that the activity of the enzyme that catalyses nitrogen fixation, nitrogenase, induces a signal that leads to repression of genes encoding enzymes of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) CO2 fixation pathway. Additionally, genetic and metabolomic experiments revealed that NADH-activated phosphoribulokinase is an intermediate in the signalling pathway. Thus, nitrogenase activity appears to be linked to cbb gene repression through phosphoribulokinase. PMID:26306848

  7. Reliability and extended-life potential of EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    King, R W

    1985-01-01

    Although the longlife potential of liquid-metal-cooled reactors (LMRs) has been only partially demonstrated, many factors point to the potential for exceptionally long life. EBR-II has the opportunity to become the first LMR to achieve an operational lifetime of 30 years or more. In 1984 a study of the extended-life potential of EBR-II identified the factors that contribute to the continued successful operation of EBR-II as a power reactor and experimental facility. Also identified were factors that could cause disruptions in the useful life of the facility. Although no factors were found that would inherently limit the life of EBR-II, measures were identified that could help ensure continued plant availability. These measures include the implementation of more effective surveillance, diagnostic, and control systems to complement the inherent safety and reliability features of EBR-II. An operating lifetime of well beyond 30 years is certainly feasible.

  8. Heat transfer through an extended surface containing He II

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sciver, S.W.

    1999-02-01

    A semi-analytic solution for the heat transfer process between a He II pressurized bath and a saturated tube-type heat exchanger is presented. The problem is modeled with an extended surface heat transfer formulation analogous to that in conventional conduction. The process is governed by Kapitza conductance and counterflow within the bulk fluid in the tube. The resulting nonlinear differential equation may be integrated for the special case of constant properties, yielding a simple solution applicable to design and analysis of practical heat exchangers.

  9. Renovascular remodeling and renal injury after extended angiotensin II infusion.

    PubMed

    Casare, Fernando Augusto Malavazzi; Thieme, Karina; Costa-Pessoa, Juliana Martins; Rossoni, Luciana Venturini; Couto, Gisele Kruger; Fernandes, Fernanda Barrinha; Casarini, Dulce Elena; Oliveira-Souza, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Chronic angiotensin II (ANG II) infusion for 1 or 2 wk leads to progressive hypertension and induces inward hypertrophic remodeling in preglomerular vessels, which is associated with increased renal vascular resistance (RVR) and decreased glomerular perfusion. Considering the ability of preglomerular vessels to exhibit adaptive responses, the present study was performed to evaluate glomerular perfusion and renal function after 6 wk of ANG II infusion. To address this study, male Wistar rats were submitted to sham surgery (control) or osmotic minipump insertion (ANG II 200 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1), 42 days). A group of animals was treated or cotreated with losartan (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)), an AT1 receptor antagonist, between days 28 and 42 Chronic ANG II infusion increased systolic blood pressure to 185 ± 4 compared with 108 ± 2 mmHg in control rats. Concomitantly, ANG II-induced hypertension increased intrarenal ANG II level and consequently, preglomerular and glomerular injury. Under this condition, ANG II enhanced the total renal plasma flow (RPF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urine flow and induced pressure natriuresis. These changes were accompanied by lower RVR and enlargement of the lumen of interlobular arteries and afferent arterioles, consistent with impairment of renal autoregulatory capability and outward preglomerular remodeling. The glomerular injury culminated with podocyte effacement, albuminuria, tubulointerstitial macrophage infiltration and intrarenal extracellular matrix accumulation. Losartan attenuated most of the effects of ANG II. Our findings provide new information regarding the contribution of ANG II infusion over 2 wk to renal hemodynamics and function via the AT1 receptor. PMID:26962104

  10. GALACTIC CEPHEIDS WITH SPITZER. II. SEARCH FOR EXTENDED INFRARED EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Barmby, P.; Marengo, M.; Evans, N. R.; Huelsman, D.; Fazio, G. G.; Bono, G.; Su, K. Y. L.; Welch, D. L.

    2011-02-15

    A deep and detailed examination of 29 classical Cepheids with the Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed three stars with strong nearby extended emission detected in multiple bands which appears to be physically associated with the stars. RS Pup was already known to possess extended infrared emission, while the extended emission around the other two stars (S Mus and {delta} Cep) is newly discovered in our observations. Four other stars (GH Lup, l Car, T Mon, and X Cyg) show tentative evidence for extended infrared emission. An unusual elongated extended object next to SZ Tau appears to be a background or foreground object in a chance alignment with the Cepheid. The inferred mass-loss rate upper limits for S Mus and {delta} Cep are in the range from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, with the upper limit for RS Pup as high as 10{sup -6} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. Mass loss during post-main-sequence evolution has been proposed as a resolution to the discrepancy between pulsational and dynamical masses of Cepheid variable stars: dust in the lost material would make itself known by the presence of an infrared bright nebula or unresolved infrared excess. The observed frequency of infrared circumstellar emission (<24%) and the mass-loss rate we estimate for our sources show that dusty mass loss can only account for part of the Cepheid mass-loss discrepancy. Nevertheless, our direct evidence that mass loss is active during the Cepheid phase is an important confirmation that these processes need to be included in evolutionary and pulsation models of these stars and should be taken into account in the calibration of the Cepheid distance scale.

  11. An Extended Equation of State Modeling Method II. Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, G.; Marchi, P.; Stringari, P.; Richon, D.

    2006-09-01

    This work is the extension of previous work dedicated to pure fluids. The same method is extended to the representation of thermodynamic properties of a mixture through a fundamental equation of state in terms of the Helmholtz energy. The proposed technique exploits the extended corresponding-states concept of distorting the independent variables of a dedicated equation of state for a reference fluid using suitable scale factor functions to adapt the equation to experimental data of a target system. An existing equation of state for the target mixture is used instead of an equation for the reference fluid, completely avoiding the need for a reference fluid. In particular, a Soave-Redlich-Kwong cubic equation with van der Waals mixing rules is chosen. The scale factors, which are functions of temperature, density, and mole fraction of the target mixture, are expressed in the form of a multilayer feedforward neural network, whose coefficients are regressed by minimizing a suitable objective function involving different kinds of mixture thermodynamic data. As a preliminary test, the model is applied to five binary and two ternary haloalkane mixtures, using data generated from existing dedicated equations of state for the selected mixtures. The results show that the method is robust and straightforward for the effective development of a mixture- specific equation of state directly from experimental data.

  12. Evidence for Fluorescent Fe II Emission from Extended Low Ionization Outflows in Obscured Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tinggui; Ferland, Gary J.; Yang, Chenwei; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Shaohua

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that outflows in at least some broad absorption line (BAL) quasars are extended well beyond the putative dusty torus. Such outflows should be detectable in obscured quasars. We present four WISE selected infrared red quasars with very strong and peculiar ultraviolet Fe ii emission lines: strong UV Fe ii UV arising from transitions to ground/low excitation levels, and very weak Fe ii at wavelengths longer than 2800 Å. The spectra of these quasars display strong resonant emission lines, such as C iv, Al iii and Mg ii but sometimes, a lack of non-resonant lines such as C iii], S iii and He ii. We interpret the Fe ii lines as resonantly scattered light from the extended outflows that are viewed nearly edge-on, so that the accretion disk and broad line region are obscured by the dusty torus, while the extended outflows are not. We show that dust free gas exposed to strong radiation longward of 912 Å produces Fe ii emission very similar to that observed. The gas is too cool to collisionally excite Fe ii lines, accounting for the lack of optical emission. The spectral energy distribution from the UV to the mid-infrared can be modeled as emission from a clumpy dusty torus, with UV emission being reflected/scattered light either by the dusty torus or the outflow. Within this scenario, we estimate a minimum covering factor of the outflows from a few to 20% for the Fe ii scattering region, suggesting that Fe ii BAL quasars are at a special stage of quasar evolution.

  13. Ultraviolet-illuminated molecular cloud boundaries: Extended (C II) 158 micron emission toward L1630

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Zhou, S.; Howe, J. E.; Herrmann, F.; Madden, S. C.; Poglitsch, A.; Van Der Werf, P. P.; Stacey, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have made a large-scale map of the 158 micrometers C(+) line toward the L1630/Orion B molecular cloud. The map covers a approximately 35 min x 45 min area which includes the NGC 2024 H II region, zeta Ori, the reflection nebula NGC 2023, and the Horsehead nebula. Emission in the (C II) line is very widespread. The line was detected at levels in excess of a few 10(exp -4) ergs/sq cm/s/sr over almost the entire mapped region. Extended emission associated with the NGC 2024 H II region and its envelope accounts for more than half of the (C II) flux. Over this approximately 1.5 x 2.5 pc region, the amount of gas-phase carbon in the form of C(+) is comparable to the amount of carbon in CO. This result, together with the (C II) distribution, implies that (C II) emission arises on the surfaces of clumps throughout the cloud rather than in a single layer at the H II region boundary. Away from the H II region, most of the (C II) emission comes from the western edge of the L1630 cloud and probably results from excitation by external OB stars. The overall extent of the (C II) emission is comparable to that of millimeter molecular lines, but the distributions are different in detail. The difference in (C II) and molecular line distributions, in particular, the larger extent of the (C II) emission west of NGC 2024 implies large variations in the radio of the (C II) and CO J = 1 goes to 0 intensities. Models of photon-dominated regions can explain the relation between (C II) and CO intensities only if one considers the cloud edges and cloud interior separately. We propose a method for using (C II) and radio continuum emission to characterize the relationship between OB stars and photon-dominated regions.

  14. Ultraviolet illuminated molecular cloud boundaries: Extended (C II) 158 micrometer emission toward L1630

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Zhou, S.; Howe, J. E.; Herrmann, F.; Madden, S. C.; Poglitsch, A.; Vanderwerf, P. P.; Stacey, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    The construction of a large scale map of the 158 micrometer C+ line toward the L1630/Orion B molecular cloud, covering an approximately 35' by 45' area which includes the NGC 2024 H II region, zeta-Ori, the reflection nebula NGC 2023, and the Horsehead nebula, is reported. Emission in the C II line is very widespread. The line was detected at levels in excess of a few 0.0001 erg/sq cm/s/sr over almost the entire mapped region. Extended emission associated with the NGC 2024 H II region and its envelope accounts for more than half of the C II flux. Over this approximately 1.5 by 2.5 pc region, the amount of gas phase carbon in the form of C+ is comparable to the amount of carbon in CO. This result, together with the C II distribution implies that C II emission arises on the surface of clumps throughout the cloud rather than in a single layer at the H II region boundary. Away from the H II region, most of the C II emission comes from the western edge of the L1630 cloud and probably results from excitation by external OB stars. The overall extent of the C II emission is comparable to that of millimeter molecular lines but the distributions are different in detail. The difference in C II and molecular line distributions, in particular, the larger extent of the C II emission west of NGC 2024 implies large variations in the ratio of the C II and J = 1 towards 0 intensities. Models of photon dominated regions can explain the relation between C II and CO intensities only if the cloud edges and cloud interior are considered separately. A method for using C II and radio continuum emission to characterize the relationship between OB stars and photon dominated regions is proposed.

  15. Ammonium and methylammonium transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Cordts, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of two ammonium transport systems, including a novel NH{sub 4}{sup +}-specific system, were studied in the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. The organism's ability to transport NH{sub 4}{sup +} was characterized by: (1) filtration assays of the analog, {sup 14}CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}{sup +} and (2) comparison of extracellular and intracellular NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentrations determined chemically under various conditions. Both {sup 14}CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}{sup +} transport and maintenance of intracellular NH{sub 4}{sup +} pools were observed when glutamine synthetase was inhibited by methionine sulfoximine, suggesting ammonium transport and assimilation occurred independently.

  16. The Extended Star-Forming Environments of Galactic H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew S.

    2009-01-01

    H II regions are the bright beacons marking active sites of star formation throughout the Milky Way and other galaxies. The GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL Galactic plane surveys with the Spitzer Space Telescope have provided new views of the structure of H II regions and their relationship to extended star-forming environments in molecular cloud complexes. M17 is an excellent example of a well-studied H II region that is the most prominent part of a much larger star-formation event. We have found that the M17 H II region lies on the rim of a large shell structure, 0.5° in diameter ( 18 pc at 2.1 kpc), that is outlined both in diffuse IR emission from dust and in CO line emission near v=20 km/s. The molecular shell is best interpreted as an extended, expanding bubble outlining the photodissociation region of a faint, diffuse H II region several Myr old. We identify several candidate ionizing stars lying inside the bubble. We also find a concentration of candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) on the rim of the bubble. These location of these YSOs with respect to the diffuse IR and CO line emission indicates that star formation was triggered when the expanding bubble compressed one edge of an otherwise quiescent molecular cloud. The expansion of this precursor H II region may also have helped trigger the formation of the massive cluster ionizing the M17 H II region itself. The star formation history of the M17 extended molecular cloud environment has been punctuated by successive waves of massive star formation propagating through a giant molecular cloud complex.

  17. EXTENDED [C II] EMISSION IN LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Díaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Surace, J. A.; Charmandaris, V.; Stacey, G.; Murphy, E. J.; Haan, S.; Stierwalt, S.; Evans, A. S.; Malhotra, S.; Appleton, P.; Inami, H.; Magdis, G. E.; Elbaz, D.; Van der Werf, P. P.; Meijerink, R.; and others

    2014-06-10

    We present Herschel/PACS observations of extended [C II] 157.7 μm line emission detected on ∼1-10 kpc scales in 60 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey. We find that most of the extra-nuclear emission show [C II]/FIR ratios ≥4 × 10{sup –3}, larger than the mean ratio seen in the nuclei, and similar to those found in the extended disks of normal star-forming galaxies and the diffuse interstellar medium of our Galaxy. The [C II] ''deficits'' found in the most luminous local LIRGs are therefore restricted to their nuclei. There is a trend for LIRGs with warmer nuclei to show larger differences between their nuclear and extra-nuclear [C II]/FIR ratios. We find an anti-correlation between [C II]/FIR and the luminosity surface density, Σ{sub IR}, for the extended emission in the spatially resolved galaxies. However, there is an offset between this trend and that found for the LIRG nuclei. We use this offset to derive a beam filling-factor for the star-forming regions within the LIRG disks of ∼6% relative to their nuclei. We confront the observed trend to photo-dissociation region models and find that the slope of the correlation is much shallower than the model predictions. Finally, we compare the correlation found between [C II]/FIR and Σ{sub IR} with measurements of high-redshift starbursting IR-luminous galaxies.

  18. Bioremediation of lead contaminated soil with Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomin; Peng, Weihua; Jia, Yingying; Lu, Lin; Fan, Wenhong

    2016-08-01

    Bioremediation with microorganisms is a promising technique for heavy metal contaminated soil. Rhodobacter sphaeroides was previously isolated from oil field injection water and used for bioremediation of lead (Pb) contaminated soil in the present study. Based on the investigation of the optimum culturing conditions and the tolerance to Pb, we employed the microorganism for the remediation of Pb contaminated soil simulated at different contamination levels. It was found that the optimum temperature, pH, and inoculum size for R. sphaeroides is 30-35 °C, 7, and 2 × 10(8) mL(-1), respectively. Rhodobacter sphaeroides did not remove the Pb from soil but did change its speciation. During the bioremediation process, more available fractions were transformed to less accessible and inert fractions; in particular, the exchangeable phase was dramatically decreased while the residual phase was substantially increased. A wheat seedling growing experiment showed that Pb phytoavailability was reduced in amended soils. Results inferred that the main mechanism by which R. sphaeroides treats Pb contaminated soil is the precipitation formation of inert compounds, including lead sulfate and lead sulfide. Although the Pb bioremediation efficiency on wheat was not very high (14.78% root and 24.01% in leaf), R. sphaeroides remains a promising alternative for Pb remediation in contaminated soil. PMID:27179240

  19. Assembly of functional photosystem complexes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides incorporating carotenoids from the spirilloxanthin pathway.

    PubMed

    Chi, Shuang C; Mothersole, David J; Dilbeck, Preston; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Zhang, Hao; Qian, Pu; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Grayson, Katie J; Jackson, Philip J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Li, Ying; Holten, Dewey; Neil Hunter, C

    2015-02-01

    Carotenoids protect the photosynthetic apparatus against harmful radicals arising from the presence of both light and oxygen. They also act as accessory pigments for harvesting solar energy, and are required for stable assembly of many light-harvesting complexes. In the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides phytoene desaturase (CrtI) catalyses three sequential desaturations of the colourless carotenoid phytoene, extending the number of conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds, N, from three to nine and producing the yellow carotenoid neurosporene; subsequent modifications produce the yellow/red carotenoids spheroidene/spheroidenone (N=10/11). Genomic crtI replacements were used to swap the native three-step Rba. sphaeroides CrtI for the four-step Pantoea agglomerans enzyme, which re-routed carotenoid biosynthesis and culminated in the production of 2,2'-diketo-spirilloxanthin under semi-aerobic conditions. The new carotenoid pathway was elucidated using a combination of HPLC and mass spectrometry. Premature termination of this new pathway by inactivating crtC or crtD produced strains with lycopene or rhodopin as major carotenoids. All of the spirilloxanthin series carotenoids are accepted by the assembly pathways for LH2 and RC-LH1-PufX complexes. The efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer for 2,2'-diketo-spirilloxanthin (15 conjugated CC bonds; N=15) in LH2 complexes is low, at 35%. High energy transfer efficiencies were obtained for neurosporene (N=9; 94%), spheroidene (N=10; 96%) and spheroidenone (N=11; 95%), whereas intermediate values were measured for lycopene (N=11; 64%), rhodopin (N=11; 62%) and spirilloxanthin (N=13; 39%). The variety and stability of these novel Rba. sphaeroides antenna complexes make them useful experimental models for investigating the energy transfer dynamics of carotenoids in bacterial photosynthesis. PMID:25449968

  20. Embryonic, larval, and early juvenile development of the tropical sea urchin, Salmacis sphaeroides (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Aminur; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Arshad, A; Shamsudin, Mariana Nor; Amin, S M N

    2012-01-01

    Salmacis sphaeroides (Linnaeus, 1758) is one of the regular echinoids, occuring in the warm Indo-West Pacific, including Johor Straits, between Malaysia and Singapore. In order to investigate the developmental basis of morphological changes in embryos and larvae, we documented the ontogeny of S. sphaeroides in laboratory condition. Gametes were obtained from adult individuals by 0.5 M KCl injection into the coelomic cavity. Fertilization rate at limited sperm concentration (10(-5) dilution) was 96.6 ± 1.4% and the resulting embryos were reared at 24°C. First cleavage (2-cell), 4-cell, 8-cell, 16-cell, 32-cell, and multicell (Morulla) stages were achieved 01.12, 02.03, 02.28, 02.51, 03.12, and 03.32 h postfertilization. Ciliated blastulae with a mean length of 174.72 ± 4.43 μm hatched 08.45 h after sperm entry. The gastrulae formed 16.15 h postfertilization and the archenteron elongated constantly while ectodermal red-pigmented cells migrated synchronously to the apical plate. Pluteus larva started to feed unicellular algae in 2 d, grew continuously, and finally attained metamorphic competence in 35 d after fertilization. Metamorphosis took approximately 1 h 30 min from attachment to the complete resorption of larval tissues and the development of complete juvenile structure with adult spines, extended tubefeet and well-developed pedicellaria, the whole event of which usually took place within 1 d postsettlement. This study represents the first successful investigation on embryonic, larval, and early juvenile development of S. sphaeroides. The findings would greatly be helpful towards the understanding of ontogeny and life-history strategies, which will facilitate us to develop the breeding, seed production, and culture techniques of sea urchins in captive condition. PMID:23055824

  1. Embryonic, Larval, and Early Juvenile Development of the Tropical Sea Urchin, Salmacis sphaeroides (Echinodermata: Echinoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Aminur; Yusoff, Fatimah Md.; Arshad, A.; Shamsudin, Mariana Nor; Amin, S. M. N.

    2012-01-01

    Salmacis sphaeroides (Linnaeus, 1758) is one of the regular echinoids, occuring in the warm Indo-West Pacific, including Johor Straits, between Malaysia and Singapore. In order to investigate the developmental basis of morphological changes in embryos and larvae, we documented the ontogeny of S. sphaeroides in laboratory condition. Gametes were obtained from adult individuals by 0.5 M KCl injection into the coelomic cavity. Fertilization rate at limited sperm concentration (10−5 dilution) was 96.6 ± 1.4% and the resulting embryos were reared at 24°C. First cleavage (2-cell), 4-cell, 8-cell, 16-cell, 32-cell, and multicell (Morulla) stages were achieved 01.12, 02.03, 02.28, 02.51, 03.12, and 03.32 h postfertilization. Ciliated blastulae with a mean length of 174.72 ± 4.43 μm hatched 08.45 h after sperm entry. The gastrulae formed 16.15 h postfertilization and the archenteron elongated constantly while ectodermal red-pigmented cells migrated synchronously to the apical plate. Pluteus larva started to feed unicellular algae in 2 d, grew continuously, and finally attained metamorphic competence in 35 d after fertilization. Metamorphosis took approximately 1 h 30 min from attachment to the complete resorption of larval tissues and the development of complete juvenile structure with adult spines, extended tubefeet and well-developed pedicellaria, the whole event of which usually took place within 1 d postsettlement. This study represents the first successful investigation on embryonic, larval, and early juvenile development of S. sphaeroides. The findings would greatly be helpful towards the understanding of ontogeny and life-history strategies, which will facilitate us to develop the breeding, seed production, and culture techniques of sea urchins in captive condition. PMID:23055824

  2. Crystal structure of bacterioferritin from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Xu, Yongbin; Piao, Shunfu; Priyadarshi, Amit; Lee, Eun Hye; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Jeon, Young Ho; Ha, Nam-Chul; Hwang, Kwang Yeon

    2010-01-01

    Iron is essential for the survival of organisms, but either excess or deficient levels of iron induce oxidative stress, thereby causing cell damage. As a result, iron regulation is essential for proper cell growth and proliferation in most organisms. Bacterioferritin is a ferritin-like family protein that contains a heme molecule and a ferroxidase site at the di-iron center. This protein plays a primary role in intracellular iron storage for iron homeostasis, as well as in the maintenance of iron in a soluble and non-toxic form. Although several bacterioferritin structures have been determined, no structural studies have successfully elucidated the molecular function of the heme molecule and the ferroxidase center. Here, we report the crystal structure of bacterioferritin from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. This protein exists in a roughly spherical configuration via the assembly of 24 subunits. We describe the oligomeric arrangement, ferroxidase center and heme-binding site based on this structure. The protein contains a single iron-binding configuration in the ferroxidase center, which allows for the release of iron by His130 when the protein is in the intermediate state. The heme molecule in RsBfr is stabilized by shifting of the van der Waals interaction center between the porphyrin of the heme and Trp26. We anticipate that further structural analysis will provide a more complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of members of the ferritin-like family.

  3. Proteomic characterization of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 photosynthetic membrane: Identification of New Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiaohua; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Callister, Stephen J.; Tavano, Christine; Donohue, Timothy; Lipton, Mary S.; Kaplan, Samuel

    2007-10-01

    The intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) system develops, upon induction, as a structure dedicated to the major events of bacterial photosynthesis, including harvesting light energy, primary charge separation, and electron transport. In this study, multi-chromatographic methods coupled with fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer, combined with subcellular fractionation, was applied to an investigation of the supramolecular composition of the native photosynthetic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. A complete proteomic profile of the intracytoplasmic membranes was obtained and the results showed that the intracytoplasmic membranes are mainly composed of four photosynthetic membrane protein complexes, including light harvesting complexes I and II, the reaction center and cytochrome bc1, as well as two new membrane protein components, an unknown protein (RSP1760) and a possible alkane hydroxylase. Proteins necessary for various cellular functions, such as ATP synthesis, respiratory components, ABC transporters, protein translocation, and other proteins with unknown functions were also identified in association with the intracytoplasmic membranes. This study opens a new perspective on the characterization and understanding of the photosynthetic supramolecular complexes of R. sphaeroides, and their internal interactions as well as interactions with other proteins inside or outside the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  4. EXTENDED ANALYSIS OF THE SPECTRUM OF SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian

    2014-08-01

    We have made new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 2850-37900 Å with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 2 m Fourier transform spectrometer. These data extend our previously reported observations in the near-ultra-violet region. We present a comprehensive list of more than 5300 Cr II lines classified as transitions among 456 even and 457 odd levels, 179 of which are newly located in this work. Using highly excited levels of the 3d {sup 4}({sup 5} D)5g, 3d {sup 4}({sup 5} D)6g, and 3d {sup 4}({sup 5}D)6h configurations, we derive an improved ionization energy of 132971.02 ± 0.12 cm{sup –1} (16.486305 ± 0.000015 eV)

  5. Extended Analysis of the Spectrum of Singly Ionized Chromium (Cr II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian

    2014-08-01

    We have made new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 2850-37900 Å with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 2 m Fourier transform spectrometer. These data extend our previously reported observations in the near-ultra-violet region. We present a comprehensive list of more than 5300 Cr II lines classified as transitions among 456 even and 457 odd levels, 179 of which are newly located in this work. Using highly excited levels of the 3d 4(5 D)5g, 3d 4(5 D)6g, and 3d 4(5D)6h configurations, we derive an improved ionization energy of 132971.02 ± 0.12 cm-1 (16.486305 ± 0.000015 eV).

  6. Ammonium and methylammonium transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Cordts, M.L.; Gibson, J.

    1987-04-01

    Rhodobacter spheroides maintained intracellular ammonium pools of 1.1 to 2.6 mM during growth in several fixed nitrogen sources as well as during diazotrophic growth. Addition of 0.15 mM NH/sub 4//sup +/ to washed, nitrogen-free cell suspensions was followed by linear uptake of NH/sub 4//sup +/ from the medium and transient formation of intracellular pools of 0.9 to 1.5 mM NH/sub 4//sup +/. Transport of NH/sub 4//sup +/ was shown to be independent of assimilation by glutamine synthetase because intracellular pools of over 1 mM represented NH/sub 4//sup +/ concentration gradients of at least 100-fold across the cytoplasmic membrane. Ammonium pools of over 1 mM were also found in non-growing cell suspensions in nitrogen-free medium after glutamine synthetase was inhibited with methionine sulfoximine. In NH/sub 4//sup +/-free cell suspensions, methylammonium (/sup 14/CH/sub 3/NH/sub 3//sup +/) was taken up rapidly, and intracellular concentrations of 0.4 to 0.5 mM were maintained. The /sup 14/CN/sub 3/NH/sub 3//sup +/ pool was not affected by methionine sulfoximine. Unlike NH/sub 4//sup +/ uptake, /sup 14/CH/sub 3/NH/sub 3//sup +/ uptake in nitrogen-free cell suspensions was repressed by growth in NH/sub 4//sup +/. These results suggest that R. sphaeroides may produce an NH/sub 4//sup +/-specific transport system in addition to the NH/sub 4//sup +///sup 14/CH/sub 3/NH/sub 3//sup +/ transporter. This second transporter is able to produce normal-size NH/sub 4//sup +/ pools but has very little affinity for /sup 14/CH/sub 3/NH/sub 3//sup +/ and is not repressed by growth in high concentrations of NH/sub 4//sup +/.

  7. Assembly of functional photosystem complexes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides incorporating carotenoids from the spirilloxanthin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Shuang C.; Mothersole, David J.; Dilbeck, Preston; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Zhang, Hao; Qian, Pu; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Grayson, Katie J.; Jackson, Philip J.; Martin, Elizabeth C.; Li, Ying; Holten, Dewey; Neil Hunter, C.

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids protect the photosynthetic apparatus against harmful radicals arising from the presence of both light and oxygen. They also act as accessory pigments for harvesting solar energy, and are required for stable assembly of many light-harvesting complexes. In the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides phytoene desaturase (CrtI) catalyses three sequential desaturations of the colourless carotenoid phytoene, extending the number of conjugated carbon–carbon double bonds, N, from three to nine and producing the yellow carotenoid neurosporene; subsequent modifications produce the yellow/red carotenoids spheroidene/spheroidenone (N = 10/11). Genomic crtI replacements were used to swap the native three-step Rba. sphaeroides CrtI for the four-step Pantoea agglomerans enzyme, which re-routed carotenoid biosynthesis and culminated in the production of 2,2′-diketo-spirilloxanthin under semi-aerobic conditions. The new carotenoid pathway was elucidated using a combination of HPLC and mass spectrometry. Premature termination of this new pathway by inactivating crtC or crtD produced strains with lycopene or rhodopin as major carotenoids. All of the spirilloxanthin series carotenoids are accepted by the assembly pathways for LH2 and RC–LH1–PufX complexes. The efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer for 2,2′-diketo-spirilloxanthin (15 conjugated C 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 C bonds; N = 15) in LH2 complexes is low, at 35%. High energy transfer efficiencies were obtained for neurosporene (N = 9; 94%), spheroidene (N = 10; 96%) and spheroidenone (N = 11; 95%), whereas intermediate values were measured for lycopene (N = 11; 64%), rhodopin (N = 11; 62%) and spirilloxanthin (N = 13; 39%). The variety and stability of these novel Rba. sphaeroides antenna complexes make them useful experimental models for investigating the

  8. The mechanisms of protection of antioxidants on Nostoc sphaeroides against UV-B radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. H.

    UV radiation is one of space harmful factor for earth organisms in space exploration In the present work we studied on the role of antioxidant system in Nostoc sphaeroides K u tz Cyanobacteria and the effects of exogenous antioxidant molecules on its photosynthetic rate under UV-B radiation It was found that UV-B radiation decreased the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacterium but promoted the activity of antioxidant system to protect photosystem II PSII and exogenous antioxidant sodium nitroprusside SNP N-acetylcysteine NAC had an obvious protection on PSII activity under UV-B radiation The activity of SOD Superoxide Dismutase EC 1 15 1 1 CAT Catalase EC 1 11 1 6 POD Peroxidase EC 1 11 1 7 and content of MDA and ASC were improved by 0 5mM and 1mM SNP but 0 1mM SNP decreased the activity of antioxide system Exogenous NAC addition decreased the activity of SOD POD CAT and the content MDA and ASC but exogenous NAC addition increased the content of GSH The results suggested that exogenous SNP and NAC may protect algae by different mechanisms in which SNP maybe play double roles as sources of reactive free radicals or ROS scavengers in formation of algae s protection of PSII under UV-B radiation while NAC does function as antioxidant reagent or precursor of glutathione which could protect PSII directly from UV-B radiation Keyword antioxidant system exogenous or endogenous antioxidant Nostoc sphaeroides photosynthesis UV-B radiation

  9. Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup: IAEA Coordinated Research Project FUMEX-II

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.C.; Turnbull, J.A.; Sartori, E.

    2007-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency sponsored a Coordinated Research Project on Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup (FUMEX-II). Eighteen fuel modelling groups participated with the intention of improving their capabilities to understand and predict the behaviour of water reactor fuel at high burnups. The exercise was carried out in coordination with the OECD/NEA. The participants used a mixture of data derived from actual irradiation histories of high burnup experimental fuel and commercial irradiations where post-irradiation examination measurements are available, combined with idealised power histories intended to represent possible future extended dwell commercial irradiations and test code capabilities at high burnup. All participants have been asked to model nine priority cases out of some 27 cases made available to them for the exercise from the IAEA/OECD International Fuel Performance Experimental Database. Calculations carried out by the participants, particularly for the idealised cases, have shown how varying modelling assumptions affect the high burnup predictions, and have led to an understanding of the requirements of future high burnup experimental data to help discriminate between modelling assumptions. This understanding is important in trying to model transient and fault behaviour at high burnup. It is important to recognise that the code predictions presented here should not be taken to indicate that some codes do not perform well. The codes have been designed for different applications and have differing assumptions and validation ranges; for example codes intended to predict Candu fuel operation with thin wall collapsible cladding do not need the clad creep and gap conductivity modelling found in PWR codes. Therefore, when a case is based on Candu technology or PWR technology, it is to be expected that the codes may not agree. However, it is the very differences in such behaviour that is useful in helping to understand the effects of such

  10. Study of membrane-induced conformations of substance P: detection of extended polyproline II helix conformation.

    PubMed

    Foroutan, Arash; Lazarova, Tzvetana; Padrós, Esteve

    2011-04-01

    We study the conformation of substance P (SP), a ligand of neurokinin 1 receptor, and its analogue [Trp8]SP in membrane-mimetic media to provide further insights into membrane-ligand interactions and the factors determining and modulating the peptide structure. CD data revealed that the neuropeptide attains α-helical fold in negatively charged SDS micelles and DMPG liposomes but not in zwitterionic DMPC. The fluorescence experiments reported that the Trp side chain of [Trp8]SP inserts into the hydrophobic core of the SDS micelles and DMPG liposomes but faces the DMPC hydrophilic region, indicating that electrostatic interactions between membrane and SP are essential for the α-helical fold. Formation of extended polyproline II (PPII) helical structure in aqueous solutions and in submicellar concentrations of SDS and DMPC liposomes was confirmed by comparing CD spectra at increasing temperatures. Moreover, in all conditions where PPII conformation was detected, the Trp was totally exposed to the bulk. The PPII structure may be vital for recognition processes of SP by neurokinin receptors. PMID:21395305

  11. COMPASS II: extended coverage for polymer and drug-like molecule databases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huai; Jin, Zhao; Yang, Chunwei; Akkermans, Reinier L C; Robertson, Struan H; Spenley, Neil A; Miller, Simon; Todd, Stephen M

    2016-02-01

    The COMPASS II force field has been developed by extending the coverage of the COMPASS force field (J Phys Chem B 102(38):7338-7364, 1998) to polymer and drug-like molecules found in popular databases. Using a fragmentation method to systematically construct small molecules that exhibit key functional groups found in these databases, parameters applicable to database compounds were efficiently obtained. Based on the same parameterization paradigm as used in the development of the COMPASS force field, new parameters were derived by a combination of fits to quantum mechanical data for valence parameters and experimental liquid and crystal data for nonbond parameters. To preserve the quality of the original COMPASS parameters, a quality assurance suite was used and updated to ensure that additional atom-types and parameters do not interfere with the existing ones. Validation against molecular properties, liquid and crystal densities, and enthalpies, demonstrates that the quality of COMPASS is preserved and the same quality of prediction is achieved for the additional coverage. PMID:26815034

  12. DegS and RseP Homologous Proteases Are Involved in Singlet Oxygen Dependent Activation of RpoE in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Nuss, Aaron M.; Adnan, Fazal; Weber, Lennart; Berghoff, Bork A.; Glaeser, Jens; Klug, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is the main agent of photooxidative stress and is generated by photosensitizers as (bacterio)chlorophylls. It leads to the damage of cellular macromolecules and therefore photosynthetic organisms have to mount an adaptive response to 1O2 formation. A major player of the photooxidative stress response in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is the alternative sigma factor RpoE, which is inactivated under non-stress conditions by its cognate anti-sigma factor ChrR. By using random mutagenesis we identified RSP_1090 to be required for full activation of the RpoE response under 1O2 stress, but not under organic peroxide stress. In this study we show that both RSP_1090 and RSP_1091 are required for full resistance towards 1O2. Moreover, we revealed that the DegS and RseP homologs RSP_3242 and RSP_2710 contribute to 1O2 resistance and promote ChrR proteolysis. The RpoE signaling pathway in R. sphaeroides is therefore highly similar to that of Escherichia coli, although very different anti-sigma factors control RpoE activity. Based on the acquired results, the current model for RpoE activation in response to 1O2 exposure in R. sphaeroides was extended. PMID:24223961

  13. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.E.; Gilbert, C.W.; Guy, R.; Arntzen, C.J.

    1984-10-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa Q/sub B/ protein of chloroplast membranes. 42 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  14. Succinate dehydrogenase in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: subunit composition and immunocross-reactivity with other related bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Barassi, C A; Kranz, R G; Gennis, R B

    1985-01-01

    Antibodies were raised against the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) present in the chromatophores of phototrophically grown Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis experiments indicated that the SDH present in the cytoplasmic membranes of heterotrophically grown R. sphaeroides is probably the same enzyme observed in the chromatophores. The enzyme was extracted by Triton X-100 in a form which consisted of only two subunits (molecular weight, 68,000 and 30,000) and was not associated with a cytochrome b. The antibodies directed against SDH from R. sphaeroides showed no immunocross-reactivity with SDH from phylogenetically related bacterial species, including Rhodopseudomonas capsulata, Paracoccus denitrificans, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Rhodospirillum rubrum, and Rhodospirillum fulvum. Images PMID:3874866

  15. Extended-soft-core baryon-baryon model. II. Hyperon-nucleon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rijken, Th.A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-04-15

    The YN results are presented from the extended soft-core (ESC) interactions. They consist of local and nonlocal potentials because of (i) one-boson exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of pseudoscalar, vector, scalar, and axial mesons; (ii) diffractive exchanges; (iii) two-pseudoscalar exchange; and (iv) meson-pair exchange (MPE). Both the OBE and pair vertices are regulated by Gaussian form factors producing potentials with a soft behavior near the origin. The assignment of the cutoff masses for the baryon-baryon-meson (BBM) vertices is dependent on the SU(3) classification of the exchanged mesons for OBE and a similar scheme for MPE. The particular version of the ESC model, called ESC04 [T. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 73, 044007 (2006)], describes nucleon-nucleon (NN) and hyperon-nucleon (YN) interactions in a unified way using broken SU(3) symmetry. Novel ingredients are the inclusion of (i) the axial-vector meson potentials and (ii) a zero in the scalar- and axial-vector meson form factors. These innovations made it possible for the first time to keep the parameters of the model close to the predictions of the {sup 3}P{sub 0} quark-antiquark creation model. This is also the case for the F/(F+D) ratios. Furthermore, the introduction of the zero helped to avoid the occurrence of unwanted bound states. Broken SU(3) symmetry serves to connect the NN and the YN channels, which leaves after fitting NN only a few free parameters for the determination of the YN interactions. In particular, the meson-baryon coupling constants are calculated via SU(3) using the coupling constants of the NN analysis as input. Here, as a novel feature, medium-strong flavor-symmetry breaking (FSB) of the coupling constants was allowed, using the {sup 3}P{sub 0} model with a Gell-Mann-Okubo hypercharge breaking for the BBM coupling. Very good fits for ESC model with and without FSB were obtained. The charge-symmetry breaking in the {lambda}p and {lambda}n channels, which is an SU(2

  16. Extended-soft-core baryon-baryon model. II. Hyperon-nucleon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Th. A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-04-01

    The YN results are presented from the extended soft-core (ESC) interactions. They consist of local and nonlocal potentials because of (i) one-boson exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of pseudoscalar, vector, scalar, and axial mesons; (ii) diffractive exchanges; (iii) two-pseudoscalar exchange; and (iv) meson-pair exchange (MPE). Both the OBE and pair vertices are regulated by Gaussian form factors producing potentials with a soft behavior near the origin. The assignment of the cutoff masses for the baryon-baryon-meson (BBM) vertices is dependent on the SU(3) classification of the exchanged mesons for OBE and a similar scheme for MPE. The particular version of the ESC model, called ESC04 [T. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 73, 044007 (2006)], describes nucleon-nucleon (NN) and hyperon-nucleon (YN) interactions in a unified way using broken SU(3) symmetry. Novel ingredients are the inclusion of (i) the axial-vector meson potentials and (ii) a zero in the scalar- and axial-vector meson form factors. These innovations made it possible for the first time to keep the parameters of the model close to the predictions of the 3P0 quark-antiquark creation model. This is also the case for the F/(F+D) ratios. Furthermore, the introduction of the zero helped to avoid the occurrence of unwanted bound states. Broken SU(3) symmetry serves to connect the NN and the YN channels, which leaves after fitting NN only a few free parameters for the determination of the YN interactions. In particular, the meson-baryon coupling constants are calculated via SU(3) using the coupling constants of the NN analysis as input. Here, as a novel feature, medium-strong flavor-symmetry breaking (FSB) of the coupling constants was allowed, using the 3P0 model with a Gell-Mann-Okubo hypercharge breaking for the BBM coupling. Very good fits for ESC model with and without FSB were obtained. The charge-symmetry breaking in the Λp and Λn channels, which is an SU(2) isospin breaking, is included in the

  17. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of living cells. 3. Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenxin; Liu, Biao; Mirkin, Michael V; Frank, Harry A; Rusling, James F

    2002-01-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) was used to probe the redox activity of individual purple bacteria (Rhodobacter sphaeroides). The approaches developed in our previous studies of mammalian cells were expanded to measure the rates and investigate the pathway of transmembrane charge transfer in bacteria. The two groups of redox mediators (i.e., hydrophilic and hydrophobic redox species) were used to shuttle the electrons between the SECM tip electrode in solution and the redox centers inside the cell. The analysis of the dependencies of the measured rate constant on formal potential and concentration of mediator species in solution yielded information about the permeability of the outer cell membrane to different ionic species and intracellular redox properties. The maps of redox reactivity of the cell surface were obtained with a micrometer or submicrometer spatial resolution. PMID:11795778

  18. Global insights into energetic and metabolic networks in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Improving our understanding of processes at the core of cellular lifestyles can be aided by combining information from genetic analyses, high-throughput experiments and computational predictions. Results We combined data and predictions derived from phenotypic, physiological, genetic and computational analyses to dissect the metabolic and energetic networks of the facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We focused our analysis on pathways crucial to the production and recycling of pyridine nucleotides during aerobic respiratory and anaerobic photosynthetic growth in the presence of an organic electron donor. In particular, we assessed the requirement for NADH/NADPH transhydrogenase enzyme, PntAB during respiratory and photosynthetic growth. Using high-throughput phenotype microarrays (PMs), we found that PntAB is essential for photosynthetic growth in the presence of many organic electron donors, particularly those predicted to require its activity to produce NADPH. Utilizing the genome-scale metabolic model iRsp1095, we predicted alternative routes of NADPH synthesis and used gene expression analyses to show that transcripts from a subset of the corresponding genes were conditionally increased in a ΔpntAB mutant. We then used a combination of metabolic flux predictions and mutational analysis to identify flux redistribution patterns utilized in the ΔpntAB mutant to compensate for the loss of this enzyme. Data generated from metabolic and phenotypic analyses of wild type and mutant cells were used to develop iRsp1140, an expanded genome-scale metabolic reconstruction for R. sphaeroides with improved ability to analyze and predict pathways associated with photosynthesis and other metabolic processes. Conclusions These analyses increased our understanding of key aspects of the photosynthetic lifestyle, highlighting the added importance of NADPH production under these conditions. It also led to a significant improvement in the

  19. Extending the life of a Bausch and Lomb Research II metallograph

    SciTech Connect

    Crouse, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Bausch and Lomb Research II metallograph has been out of production for several years and objective lenses are becoming impossible to get. As lenses become damaged and unavailable, the usefulness of an otherwise fine instrument drops to zero. A successful attempt to retrofit Nikon lenses to a research II has been made. Mechanical modifications to the metallograph were easily accomplished by an experienced service man using the machine shop facilities available. The resulting modifications have restored the usefulness of our metallograph beyond expectations, and provided us with a viable means of maintaining it in sevice for many years to come.

  20. Extended phenotypes in a boy and his mother with oto-palato-digital-syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Kraschl, Raimund; Kaulfersch, Wilhelm; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-09-01

    We describe additional phenotypic features in a boy and his mother. Both manifested the phenotypic/genotypic correlation of oto-palato-digital syndrome type II. The mother's radiographs showed wormian bones of the skull, and paranasal bossing, her feet showed bilateral fusion of the cuboid with the lateral cuneiform bone with subsequent development of metatarsus varus associated with dysplastic distal phalanges. PMID:26401283

  1. Water masers associated with compact molecular clouds and ultracompact H II regions - The extended sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, R.; Comoretto, G.; Felli, M.; Palla, F.; Brand, J.; Caselli, P.

    We present the results of a survey of water maser emission at 22.2 GHz towards a selected sample of IRAS-PSC sources which are believed to be associated with very young massive stars. The sample consists of 591 sources. The observations have been carried out using the Medicina 32-m radiotelescope, operated by the Istituto di Radioastronomia - C.N.R., Bologna. Whereas previous searches for maser emission have been directed towards known H II regions, the aim of the present survey is to identify new sources in an even earlier evolutionary phase, corresponding to the development of an ultracompact H II region. It is shown that our sample contains a significant number of sources that could be considered good candidates of massive protostellar cores still in the main accretion phase.

  2. Extended study of the Surface Heterogeneity of candidate dwarf-planets (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Emery, Joshua; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    2016-08-01

    We propose to continue with our investigation of the volatile activity and migration of volatiles on dwarf-planets (DP) and some candidates to dwarf-planets (CDP). We also extend this study to cover the list of targets for the Kuiper Extended Mission (KEM, second phase of New horizons mission submitted by the New Horizons Team to NASA for extension, and yet to be approved) and extend our continuous monitoring of Pluto's surface. Surface heterogeneity on these bodies can be indicative of the presence of an atmosphere, and active collisional history, or even cometary activity. In cycle 12 we were awarded with ~ 38hr to study three DPs and three CDPs. Five of these objects have been announced in 2016 as targets of the KEM. On cycle 13 we ask for 145.5 hours to study 11 CDP plus five targets of the KEM (one object belongs to both lists but will be observed only once) plus Pluto. By using the proven capability of Spitzer to detect and map the presence of volatile ices, complex organics and silicates on the surface of these distant bodies, we will 1) test the hypothesis that KBOs on the scale of >450 km in diameter could retain a higher content of volatiles than the smaller and more abundant KBOs; 2) characterize the distribution of silicates/organics/ices on the surface of these bodies. These points are key to understanding chemical and dynamical history of the outer Solar System, which acts as a model for the new systems discovered around other stars. Our study will be be of special interest in the eve of James Webb Telescope operation, in 2019 and will pave the road for a detailed characterization of the targets of the Kuiper Extended Mission (if approved).

  3. Extended phenotypes in a boy and his mother with oto-palato-digital-syndrome type II

    PubMed Central

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Kraschl, Raimund; Kaulfersch, Wilhelm; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We describe additional phenotypic features in a boy and his mother. Both manifested the phenotypic/genotypic correlation of oto-palato-digital syndrome type II. The mother′s radiographs showed wormian bones of the skull, and paranasal bossing, her feet showed bilateral fusion of the cuboid with the lateral cuneiform bone with subsequent development of metatarsus varus associated with dysplastic distal phalanges. PMID:26401283

  4. Colors of reflection nebulae. II - The excitation of extended red emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. N.; Schild, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    New BVI color-difference measurements are reported for the reflection nebulae NGC 7023, NGC 2068, and CED 201. The data are obtained through BVI imaging with a CCD detector and are analyzed together with previously published measurements for the reflection nebula NGC 2023. All four nebulae are substantially redder in the (V, I) range than expected on the basis of dust scattering alone, a result of the presence of extended emission in the I band. The relative strength of the I excess reaches a maximum in nebular regions where the color in the (B, V) range is bluest. These facts are interpreted in terms of a model which explains the extended I emission as a luminescence process excited by UV radiation from the illuminating star(s). Model fits identify the wavelength region between 1800 and 2500 A of the illuminating star's spectrum as the source of the energy of excitation. It appears possible that the 2200 A band in the dust-extinction curve is a gate for the excitation energy, and it is likely that the I excess emission and the extended near-IR emission recently discovered in reflection nebulae are similar in nature and origin.

  5. Theoretical study on magnetic coupling interaction for Cu(II) binuclear systems with extended bridging groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwei; Liu, Chengbu; Hu, Haiquan; Zhang, Changqiao

    2001-12-01

    The magnetic coupling interaction for Cu(II) binuclear systems with bridging groups C2O4 2- , C2O2( NH) 2 2- ( cis), C2O2( NH) 2 2- ( trans) and C2S2( NH) 2 2- ( trans) was studied by the broken symmetry (BS) approach within the framework of the density functional theory (DFT). The influence of different coordination atoms and geometry on magnetic coupling interaction was theoretically analyzed. Both of the calculated and experimental results were compared. The variation trends of coupling interaction calculated are in agreement with experimental ones.

  6. Comparing M31 and Milky Way satellites: The extended star formation histories of Andromeda II and Andromeda XVI

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Aparicio, Antonio; McConnachie, Alan; Stetson, Peter B.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Cassisi, Santi; Cole, Andrew A.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Irwin, Mike; Martin, Nicolas F.; Mayer, Lucio; Navarro, Julio F.

    2014-07-01

    We present the first comparison between the lifetime star formation histories (SFHs) of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites. Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we obtained deep optical imaging of Andromeda II (And II; M{sub V} = –12.0; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 6.7) and Andromeda XVI (And XVI; M{sub V} = –7.5; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 4.9) yielding color-magnitude diagrams that extend at least 1 mag below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, and are similar in quality to those available for the MW companions. And II and And XVI show strikingly similar SFHs: both formed 50%-70% of their total stellar mass between 12.5 and 5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 5-0.5) and both were abruptly quenched ∼5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 0.5). The predominance of intermediate age populations in And XVI makes it qualitatively different from faint companions of the MW and clearly not a pre-reionization fossil. Neither And II nor And XVI appears to have a clear analog among MW companions, and the degree of similarity in the SFHs of And II and And XVI is not seen among comparably faint-luminous pairs of MW satellites. These findings provide hints that satellite galaxy evolution may vary substantially among hosts of similar stellar mass. Although comparably deep observations of more M31 satellites are needed to further explore this hypothesis, our results underline the need for caution when interpreting satellite galaxies of an individual system in a broader cosmological context.

  7. Biohydrogen Production from Tofu Wastewater with Glutamine Auxotrophic Mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, G. H.; Kang, Z. H.; Qian, Y. F.; Wang, L.; Zhou, Q.; Zhu, H. G.

    2008-02-01

    Hydrogen production from organic wastewater by photo-bacteria has been attracted more attention, not only because hydrogen is a clean energy, but also because it can be a process for organic wastewater pre-treatment. However NH4+, which normally is the integrant in organic wastewater, is the inhibitor to hydrogen production with photo-bacteria. In this study, the NH4+ effect on biohydrogen generation and nitrogenase activity of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria-Rhodobacter sphaeroides was studied. Biohydrogen generation with wild-type R. sphaeroides was found to be more sensitive to NH4+ due to the obvious inhibition of NH4+ to its nitrogenase. For avoiding inhibition of NH4+ to biohydrogen generation of R. sphaeroides, a glutamine auxotrophic mutant R. sphaeroides AR-3 was obtained by EMS treatment. The mutant could generate biohydrogen efficiently in the medium with higher NH4+ concentration. Under suitable conditions, AR-3 produced biohydrogen from tofu wastewater with an average generation rate of 14.2 ml L-1h-1, it was increased by more than 100% compared with that from wild-type R. sphaeroides.

  8. Identification of Globular Cluster Stars in RAVE data II: Extended tidal debris around NGC 3201

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguiano, B.; De Silva, G. M.; Freeman, K.; Da Costa, G. S.; Zwitter, T.; Quillen, A. C.; Zucker, D. B.; Navarro, J. F.; Kunder, A.; Siebert, A.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Grebel, E. K.; Kordopatis, G.; Gibson, B. K.; Seabroke, G.; Sharma, S.; Wojno, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Steinmetz, M.; Boeche, C.; Gilmore, G.; Bienaymé, O.; Reid, W.; Watson, F.

    2016-04-01

    We report the identification of extended tidal debris potentially associated with the globular cluster NGC 3201, using the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) catalogue. We find the debris stars are located at a distance range of 1-7 kpc based on the forthcoming RAVE distance estimates. The derived space velocities and integrals of motion show interesting connections to NGC 3201, modulo uncertainties in the proper motions. Three stars, which are among the four most likely candidates for NGC 3201 tidal debris, are separated by 80° on the sky yet are well matched by the 12 Gyr, [Fe/H] = -1.5 isochrone appropriate for the cluster. This is the first time tidal debris around this cluster has been reported over such a large spatial extent, with implications for the cluster's origin and dynamical evolution.

  9. Structural Characterization of the Fla2 Flagellum of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    de la Mora, Javier; Uchida, Kaoru; del Campo, Ana Martínez; Camarena, Laura; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a free-living alphaproteobacterium that contains two clusters of functional flagellar genes in its genome: one acquired by horizontal gene transfer (fla1) and one that is endogenous (fla2). We have shown that the Fla2 system is normally quiescent and under certain conditions produces polar flagella, while the Fla1 system is always active and produces a single flagellum at a nonpolar position. In this work we purified and characterized the structure and analyzed the composition of the Fla2 flagellum. The number of polar filaments per cell is 4.6 on average. By comparison with the Fla1 flagellum, the prominent features of the ultra structure of the Fla2 HBB are the absence of an H ring, thick and long hooks, and a smoother zone at the hook-filament junction. The Fla2 helical filaments have a pitch of 2.64 μm and a diameter of 1.4 μm, which are smaller than those of the Fla1 filaments. Fla2 filaments undergo polymorphic transitions in vitro and showed two polymorphs: curly (right-handed) and coiled. However, in vivo in free-swimming cells, we observed only a bundle of filaments, which should probably be left-handed. Together, our results indicate that Fla2 cell produces multiple right-handed polar flagella, which are not conventional but exceptional. IMPORTANCE R. sphaeroides possesses two functional sets of flagellar genes. The fla1 genes are normally expressed in the laboratory and were acquired by horizontal transfer. The fla2 genes are endogenous and are expressed in a Fla1− mutant grown phototrophically and in the absence of organic acids. The Fla1 system produces a single lateral or subpolar flagellum, and the Fla2 system produces multiple polar flagella. The two kinds of flagella are never expressed simultaneously, and both are used for swimming in liquid media. The two sets of genes are certainly ready for responding to specific environmental conditions. The characterization of the Fla2 system will help us to understand

  10. Nucleotide sequence and functional analysis of cbbR, a positive regulator of the Calvin cycle operons of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, J L; Tabita, F R

    1993-01-01

    Structural genes encoding Calvin cycle enzymes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides are duplicated and organized within two physically distinct transcriptional units, the form I and form II cbb operons. Nucleotide sequence determination of the region upstream of the form I operon revealed a divergently transcribed open reading frame, cbbR, that showed significant similarity to the LysR family of transcriptional regulatory proteins. Mutants containing an insertionally inactivated cbbR gene were impaired in photoheterotrophic growth and completely unable to grow photolithoautotrophically with CO2 as the sole carbon source. In the cbbR strain, expression of genes within the form I operon was completely abolished and that of the form II operon was reduced to about 30% of the wild-type level. The cloned cbbR gene complemented the mutant for wild-type growth characteristics, and normal levels of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) were observed. However, rocket immunoelectrophoresis revealed that the wild-type level of RubisCO was due to overexpression of the form II enzyme, whereas expression of the form I RubisCO was 10% of that of the wild-type strain. The cbbR insertional inactivation did not appear to affect aerobic expression of either CO2 fixation operon, but preliminary evidence suggests that the constitutive expression of the form II operon observed in the cbbR strain may be subject to repression during aerobic growth. PMID:8376325

  11. Fine-structure constant constraints on dark energy. II. Extending the parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.; Pinho, A. M. M.; Carreira, P.; Gusart, A.; López, J.; Rocha, C. I. S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical tests of the stability of fundamental couplings, such as the fine-structure constant α , are a powerful probe of new physics. Recently these measurements, combined with local atomic clock tests and Type Ia supernova and Hubble parameter data, were used to constrain the simplest class of dynamical dark energy models where the same degree of freedom is assumed to provide both the dark energy and (through a dimensionless coupling, ζ , to the electromagnetic sector) the α variation. One caveat of these analyses was that it was based on fiducial models where the dark energy equation of state was described by a single parameter (effectively its present day value, w0). Here we relax this assumption and study broader dark energy model classes, including the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder and early dark energy parametrizations. Even in these extended cases we find that the current data constrains the coupling ζ at the 1 0-6 level and w0 to a few percent (marginalizing over other parameters), thus confirming the robustness of earlier analyses. On the other hand, the additional parameters are typically not well constrained. We also highlight the implications of our results for constraints on violations of the weak equivalence principle and improvements to be expected from forthcoming measurements with high-resolution ultrastable spectrographs.

  12. Engineered biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll b in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Canniffe, Daniel P.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll b has the most red-shifted absorbance maximum of all naturally occurring photopigments. It has a characteristic ethylidene group at the C8 position in place of the more common ethyl group, the product of a C8-vinyl reductase, which is carried by the majority of chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls used in photosynthesis. The subsequent and first step exclusive to bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis, the reduction of the C7 = C8 bond, is catalyzed by chlorophyllide oxidoreductase. It has been demonstrated that the enzyme from bacteriochlorophyll a-utilizing bacteria can catalyze the formation of compounds carrying an ethyl group at C8 from both ethyl- and vinyl-carrying substrates, indicating a surprising additional C8-vinyl reductase function, while the enzyme from organisms producing BChl b could only catalyze C7 = C8 reduction with a vinyl substrate, but this product carried an ethylidene group at the C8 position. We have replaced the native chlorophyllide oxidoreductase-encoding genes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with those from Blastochloris viridis, but the switch from bacteriochlorophyll a to b biosynthesis is only detected when the native conventional C8-vinyl reductase is absent. We propose a non-enzymatic mechanism for ethylidene group formation based on the absence of cellular C8-vinyl reductase activity. PMID:25058304

  13. Bacteriopheophytin triplet state in Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Białek, Rafał; Burdziński, Gotard; Jones, Michael R; Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof

    2016-08-01

    It is well established that photoexcitation of Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers (RC) with reduced quinone acceptors results in the formation of a triplet state localized on the primary electron donor P with a significant yield. The energy of this long-lived and therefore potentially damaging excited state is then efficiently quenched by energy transfer to the RC spheroidenone carotenoid, with its subsequent decay to the ground state by intersystem crossing. In this contribution, we present a detailed transient absorption study of triplet states in a set of mutated RCs characterized by different efficiencies of triplet formation that correlate with lifetimes of the initial charge-separated state P(+)H A (-) . On a microsecond time scale, two types of triplet state were detected: in addition to the well-known spheroidenone triplet state with a lifetime of ~4 μs, in some RCs we discovered a bacteriopheophytin triplet state with a lifetime of ~40 μs. As expected, the yield of the carotenoid triplet increased approximately linearly with the lifetime of P(+)H A (-) , reaching the value of 42 % for one of the mutants. However, surprisingly, the yield of the bacteriopheophytin triplet was the highest in RCs with the shortest P(+)H A (-) lifetime and the smallest yield of carotenoid triplet. For these the estimated yield of bacteriopheophytin triplet was comparable with the yield of the carotenoid triplet, reaching a value of ~7 %. Possible mechanisms of formation of the bacteriopheophytin triplet state are discussed. PMID:27368166

  14. Nuclear and extended spectra of NGC 1068 - II. Near-infrared stellar population synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Lucimara P.; Riffel, Rogério; Rodríguez-Ardila, Alberto; Gruenwald, Ruth; de Souza, Ronaldo

    2010-08-01

    We performed stellar population synthesis on the nuclear and extended regions of NGC 1068 by means of near-infrared spectroscopy to disentangle their spectral energy distribution components. This is the first time that such a technique is applied to the whole 0.8-2.4 μm wavelength interval in this galaxy. NGC 1068 is one of the nearest and probably the most studied Seyfert 2 galaxy, becoming an excellent laboratory to study the interaction between black holes, the jets that they can produce and the medium in which they propagate. Our main result is that traces of young stellar population are found at ~100 pc south of the nucleus. The contribution of a power-law continuum in the centre is about 25 per cent, which is expected if the light is scattered from a Seyfert 1 nucleus. We find peaks in the contribution of the featureless continuum about 100-150 pc from the nucleus on both sides. They might be associated with regions where the jet encounters dense clouds. Further support to this scenario is given by the peaks of hot dust distribution found around these same regions and the H2 emission-line profile, leading us to propose that the peaks might be associated to regions where stars are being formed. Hot dust also has an important contribution to the nuclear region, reinforcing the idea of the presence of a dense, circumnuclear torus in this galaxy. Cold dust appears mostly in the south direction, which supports the view that the south-west emission is behind the plane of the galaxy and is extinguished very likely by dust in the plane. Intermediate-age stellar population contributes significantly to the continuum, especially in the inner 200 pc.

  15. Young Starless Cores Embedded in the Magnetically Dominated Pipe Nebula. II. Extended Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Padovani, M.; Busquet, G.; Morata, O.; Masqué, J. M.; Alves, F. O.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Franco, G. A. P.; Estalella, R.

    2012-11-01

    The Pipe nebula is a massive, nearby, filamentary dark molecular cloud with a low star formation efficiency threaded by a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to its main axis. It harbors more than a hundred, mostly quiescent, very chemically young starless cores. The cloud is therefore a good laboratory to study the earliest stages of the star formation process. We aim to investigate the primordial conditions and the relation among physical, chemical, and magnetic properties in the evolution of low-mass starless cores. We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to map the 1.2 mm dust continuum emission of five new starless cores, which are in good agreement with previous visual extinction maps. For the sample of nine cores, which includes the four cores studied in a previous work, we derived an A V to N_H_2 factor of (1.27 ± 0.12) × 10-21 mag cm2 and a background visual extinction of ~6.7 mag possibly arising from the cloud material. We derived an average core diameter of ~0.08 pc, density of ~105 cm-3, and mass of ~1.7 M ⊙. Several trends seem to exist related to increasing core density: (1) the diameter seems to shrink, (2) the mass seems to increase, and (3) the chemistry tends to be richer. No correlation is found between the direction of the surrounding diffuse medium magnetic field and the projected orientation of the cores, suggesting that large-scale magnetic fields seem to play a secondary role in shaping the cores. We also used the IRAM 30 m telescope to extend the previous molecular survey at 1 and 3 mm of early- and late-time molecules toward the same five new Pipe nebula starless cores, and analyzed the normalized intensities of the detected molecular transitions. We confirmed the chemical differentiation toward the sample and increased the number of molecular transitions of the "diffuse" (e.g., the "ubiquitous" CO, C2H, and CS), "oxo-sulfurated" (e.g., SO and CH3OH), and "deuterated" (e.g., N2H+, CN, and HCN) starless core groups. The chemically defined

  16. YOUNG STARLESS CORES EMBEDDED IN THE MAGNETICALLY DOMINATED PIPE NEBULA. II. EXTENDED DATA SET

    SciTech Connect

    Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Padovani, M.; Beltran, M. T.; Sanchez-Monge, A.; Busquet, G.; Morata, O.; Masque, J. M.; Estalella, R.; Alves, F. O.; Franco, G. A. P.

    2012-11-01

    The Pipe nebula is a massive, nearby, filamentary dark molecular cloud with a low star formation efficiency threaded by a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to its main axis. It harbors more than a hundred, mostly quiescent, very chemically young starless cores. The cloud is therefore a good laboratory to study the earliest stages of the star formation process. We aim to investigate the primordial conditions and the relation among physical, chemical, and magnetic properties in the evolution of low-mass starless cores. We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to map the 1.2 mm dust continuum emission of five new starless cores, which are in good agreement with previous visual extinction maps. For the sample of nine cores, which includes the four cores studied in a previous work, we derived an A {sub V} to N{sub H{sub 2}} factor of (1.27 {+-} 0.12) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -21} mag cm{sup 2} and a background visual extinction of {approx}6.7 mag possibly arising from the cloud material. We derived an average core diameter of {approx}0.08 pc, density of {approx}10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, and mass of {approx}1.7 M {sub Sun }. Several trends seem to exist related to increasing core density: (1) the diameter seems to shrink, (2) the mass seems to increase, and (3) the chemistry tends to be richer. No correlation is found between the direction of the surrounding diffuse medium magnetic field and the projected orientation of the cores, suggesting that large-scale magnetic fields seem to play a secondary role in shaping the cores. We also used the IRAM 30 m telescope to extend the previous molecular survey at 1 and 3 mm of early- and late-time molecules toward the same five new Pipe nebula starless cores, and analyzed the normalized intensities of the detected molecular transitions. We confirmed the chemical differentiation toward the sample and increased the number of molecular transitions of the 'diffuse' (e.g., the 'ubiquitous' CO, C{sub 2}H, and CS), 'oxo-sulfurated' (e.g., SO and

  17. The Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey. II. Further results and analysis of the full sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Venturi, T.; Giacintucci, S.; Dallacasa, D.; Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Cuciti, V.; Macario, G.; Athreya, R.

    2015-07-01

    The intra-cluster medium contains cosmic rays and magnetic fields that are manifested through the large scale synchrotron sources, termed radio haloes, relics, and mini-haloes. The Extended Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS) is an extension of the GMRT Radio Halo Survey (GRHS) designed to search for radio haloes using GMRT 610/235 MHz observations. The GRHS and EGRHS consists of 64 clusters in the redshift range 0.2-0.4 that have an X-ray luminosity larger than 5 × 1044 erg s-1 in the 0.1-2.4 keV band and declination, δ > -31° in the REFLEX and eBCS X-ray cluster catalogues. In this second paper in the series, GMRT 610/235 MHz data on the last batch of 11 galaxy clusters and the statistical analysis of the full sample are presented. A new mini-halo in RX J2129.6+0005 and candidate diffuse sources in Z5247, A2552, and Z1953 have been discovered. A unique feature of this survey are the upper limits on the detections of 1 Mpc sized radio haloes; 4 new are presented here, making a total of 31 in the survey. Of the sample, 58 clusters with adequately sensitive radio information were used to obtain the most accurate occurrence fractions so far. The occurrence fractions of radio haloes, mini-haloes and relics in our sample are ~22%, ~16% and ~5%, respectively. The P1.4 GHz-LX diagrams for the radio haloes and mini-haloes are presented. The morphological estimators - centroid shift (w), concentration parameter (c), and power ratios (P3/P0) derived from the Chandra X-ray images - are used as proxies for the dynamical states of the GRHS and EGRHS clusters. The clusters with radio haloes and mini-haloes occupy distinct quadrants in the c-w, c-P3/P0 and w-P3/P0 planes, corresponding to the more and less morphological disturbance, respectively. The non-detections span both the quadrants. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Localization and mapping of CO/sub 2/ fixation genes within two gene clusters in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.L.; Tabita, F.R.

    1988-05-01

    Two fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase structural genes (fbpA and fbpB) have been identified within two unlinked gene clusters that were previously shown to contain the Rhodobacter sphaeroides sequences that code form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase and phosphoribulokinase. The fbpA and fbpB genes were localized to a region immediately upstream from the corresponding prkA and prkB sequences and were found to be transcribed in the same direction as the phosphoribulokinase and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase genes based on inducible expression of fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase activity directed by the lac promoter. A recombinant plasmid was constructed that contained the tandem fbpA and prkA genes inserted downstream from the lac promoter in plasmid pUC18. Both gene products were expressed in Escherichia coli upon induction of transcription with isopropyl ..beta..-D-thiogalactoside, demonstrating that the two genes can be cotranscribed. A Zymomonas mobilis glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate-dehydrogenase gene (gap) hybridized to a DNA sequence located approximately 1 kilobase upstream from the form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase gene. Although no corresponding gap sequence was found within the form I gene cluster, an additional region of homology was detected immediately upstream from the sequences that encode the form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenases.

  19. Recognition of Rhodobacter sphaeroides by microcontact-imprinted poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol).

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; Thomas, James L; Li, Ming-Huan; Shih, Ching-Ping; Jan, Jeng-Shiung; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2015-11-01

    The immobilization of cells or microorganisms is important for bioseparations, in bioreactors producing cellular metabolites, and as receptors for biosensing. Cell-imprinted polymers (CIPs) have been shown to have cavities with complementary shapes and also high affinities for the template cells or microorganisms. However, the effects of binding to CIPs on gene expression are only beginning to be studied. In this work, the purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides was employed as a model for the imprinting of microorganisms. R. sphaeroides was first adsorbed on a glass slide as the stamp and then microcontact-imprinted onto poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol), EVAL. The surfaces of the R. sphaeroides-imprinted (RsIPs) and non-imprinted (NIPs) EVAL thin films were examined by Raman spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The expression of the nitrogenase (nitrogen fixation, nifH) gene of R. sphaeroides adsorbed on both the RsIPs and NIPs EVAL thin films was also measured by the quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR); cells grown on imprinted polymer showed dramatic differences in gene expression compared to controls. PMID:26277714

  20. Modifying the endogenous electron fluxes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 for improved electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Man Tung; Cheng, Danhui; Wang, Ri; Hsing, I-Ming

    2016-05-01

    The purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides serve as a promising biocatalyst in the photo-microbial fuel cell system (photo-MFC). This gram-negative species performs highly efficient anoxygenic photosynthesis that ensures an anaerobic environment in the anode compartment. Previous studies incorporating R. sphaeroides into photo-MFC were conducted using platinum as the anode electrode. In this study, we detected a steady current generation of R. sphaeroides in a bioelectrochemical system where glassy carbon was the working electrode and a typical growth medium was the electrolyte. The bioelectricity generation synchronized with the supplementation of reduced carbon source and showed immediate response to illumination, which strongly indicated the correlation between the observed current and the cytoplasmic quinone activity. Modifications of the endogenous electron flows mediated by quinone pool are shown to have significantly enhanced the bioelectricity generation. We anticipate that the findings in this study would advance future optimization of R. sphaeroides as an anode strain, as well as facilitate the study of bioenergetics in photosynthetic bacteria. PMID:26992792

  1. Stable Carbon Isotope Discrimination by Form IC Rubisco Enzymes of the Extremely Metabolically Versatile Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ralstonia eutropha}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P. J.; Boller, A. J.; Zhao, Z.; Tabita, F. R.; Cavanaugh, C. M.; Scott, K. M.

    2006-12-01

    Variations in the relative amounts of 12C and 13C in microbial biomass can be used to infer the pathway(s) autotrophs use to fix and assimilate dissolved inorganic carbon. Discrimination against 13C by the enzymes catalyzing autotrophic carbon fixation is a major factor dictating biomass stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C = {[13C/12Csample/13C/12Cstandard] - 1} × 1000). Five different forms of RubisCO (IA, IB, IC, ID, and II) are utilized by algae and autotrophic bacteria reliant on the Calvin-Benson cycle for carbon fixation. To date, isotope discrimination has been measured for form IA, IB, and II RubisCOs, and their ɛ values (={[12k/13k] - 1} × 1000; 12k and 13k = rates of 12C and 13C fixation) range from 18 to 29‰, explaining the variation in biomass δ13C values of autotrophs utilizing these enzymes. Isotope discrimination by form IC RubisCO has not been measured, despite the presence of this enzyme in many proteobacteria of ecological interest, including marine manganese-oxidizing bacteria, some nitrifying and nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and extremely metabolically versatile organisms such as Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ralstonia eutropha. The purpose of this work was to determine the ɛ values for form IC RubisCO enzymes from R. sphaeroides and R. eutropha. Recombinant form IC RubisCOs were purified by conventional column chromatography procedures. Assay conditions (pH, dissolved inorganic carbon concentration) were tested to determine which parameters were conducive to the high rates of carbon fixation necessary for ɛ determination. Under standard conditions (pH 8.5 and 5 mM DIC), form IC RubisCO activities were sufficient for ɛ determination. Experiments are currently being conducted to measure the ɛ values of these enzymes. Sampling the full phylogenetic breadth of RubisCO enzymes for isotopic discrimination makes it possible to constrain the range of δ13C values of organisms fixing carbon via the Calvin-Benson cycle. These results are

  2. Equatorial π-stacking interactions in diruthenium (II,III) tetracarboxylate complexes containing extended π-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Natasha F.; Ronaldson, Michael; Stanley Cameron, T.; Wang, Ruiyao; Aquino, Manuel A. S.

    2013-11-01

    The synthesis of three new valent-averaged tetracarboxylatodiruthenium (II,III) complexes, [Ru2(1-naphthylacetate)4(H2O)2](PF6)ṡ4THF, 1ṡ4THF, [Ru2(2-naphthoate)4(THF)2](PF6)ṡ3THF, 2ṡ3THF, and [Ru2(coumarin-3-carboxylate)4(MeOH)2](PF6)ṡMeOHṡH2O, 3ṡMeOHṡH2O, was accomplished using a well documented carboxylate exchange reaction. All three complexes were thoroughly characterized using infrared and UV-Vis spectroscopies, elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction. Due to the extended π-systems present, two of the complexes, 2ṡ3THF and 3ṡMeOHṡH2O, display extensive π-stacking in two dimensions, with similar interactions notably absent in 1ṡ4THF due to the perpendicular orientation of the naphthyl rings. Modest H-bonding is seen in complexes 1ṡ4THF and 3ṡMeOHṡH2O. As these types of complexes are noted secondary building units (SBU's) in the construction of metal-organic frameworks (MOF's), the significance of these interactions in stabilizing even larger, supramolecular structures, are noted.

  3. Extended-criteria donors in liver transplantation Part II: reviewing the impact of extended-criteria donors on the complications and outcomes of liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Balázs; Gámán, György; Polak, Wojciech G; Gelley, Fanni; Hara, Takanobu; Ono, Shinichiro; Baimakhanov, Zhassulan; Piros, Laszlo; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    Extended-criteria donors (ECDs) have an impact on early allograft dysfunction (EAD), biliary complications, relapse of hepatitis C virus (HCV), and survivals. Early allograft dysfunction was frequently seen in grafts with moderate and severe steatosis. Donors after cardiac death (DCD) have been associated with higher rates of graft failure and biliary complications compared to donors after brain death. Extended warm ischemia, reperfusion injury and endothelial activation trigger a cascade, leading to microvascular thrombosis, resulting in biliary necrosis, cholangitis, and graft failure. The risk of HCV recurrence increased by donor age, and associated with using moderately and severely steatotic grafts. With the administration of protease inhibitors sustained virological response was achieved in majority of the patients. Donor risk index and EC donor scores (DS) are reported to be useful, to assess the outcome. The 1-year survival rates were 87% and 40% respectively, for donors with a DS of 0 and 3. Graft survival was excellent up to a DS of 2, however a DS >2 should be avoided in higher-risk recipients. The 1, 3 and 5-year survival of DCD recipients was comparable to optimal donors. However ECDs had minor survival means of 85%, 78.6%, and 72.3%. The graft survival of split liver transplantation (SLT) was comparable to that of whole liver orthotopic liver transplantation. SLT was not regarded as an ECD factor in the MELD era any more. Full-right-full-left split liver transplantation has a significant advantage to extend the high quality donor pool. Hypothermic oxygenated machine perfusion can be applied clinically in DCD liver grafts. Feasibility and safety were confirmed. Reperfusion injury was also rare in machine perfused DCD livers. PMID:26831547

  4. Achieving near-infrared emission in platinum(ii) complexes by using an extended donor-acceptor-type ligand.

    PubMed

    Zhang, You-Ming; Meng, Fanyuan; Tang, Jian-Hong; Wang, Yafei; You, Caifa; Tan, Hua; Liu, Yu; Zhong, Yu-Wu; Su, Shijian; Zhu, Weiguo

    2016-03-15

    A series of C^N ligands with donor-acceptor (D-A) frameworks, i.e. TPA-BTPy, TPA-BTPy-Fl and Fl(TPA-BTPy)2, as well as their mono- and di-nuclear platinum(ii) complexes of (TPA-BTPy)Pt(pic), (TPA-BTPy-Fl)Pt(pic) and [Fl(TPA-BTPy)2]Pt2(pic)2 are respectively designed and synthesized, in which triphenylamine (TPA) and fluorene (Fl) are used as the D units, 4-(pyrid-2-yl)benzothiadiazole (BTPy) as the A unit, and the picolinate anion (pic) as the auxiliary ligand. Their thermal, photophysical and electrochemical characteristics were investigated. Compared to mono-nuclear platinum complexes and their free ligands, this dinuclear one of [Fl(TPA-BTPy)2]Pt2(pic)2 shows an obvious interaction from the platinum atom to ligand and dual emission peaks at 828 and 601 nm in thin films. Upon oxidation with antimony pentachloride in dichloromethane, charge transfer transitions between the platinum and ligand are observed for the three complexes. The single-emissive-layer polymer light-emitting devices doped with [Fl(TPA-BTPy)2]Pt2(pic)2 display a strong electroluminescence with dual emission peaks at 780 and 600 nm at a dopant concentration over 4 wt%. A maximum external quantum efficiency of 0.02% with a radiance of 59 μW cm(-2) is obtained in the device at 30 wt% dopant concentration. This work indicates that the use of an extended D-A-type ligand is an effective strategy to achieve NIR emission for platinum complexes in PLEDs. PMID:26880278

  5. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes having analogous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Abhijeet; Shrivastava, B. D.; Srivastava, Krishna; Prasad, J.

    2013-02-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectra have been studied at the Cu K-edge in five mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes, viz., [Cu(L-glu)(bipy)] 1, [Cu(L-glu)(phen) (H2O)].3H2O 2, [Cu(L-tyro)(bipy)(ClO4)].2H2O 3, [Cu(L-phen)(bipy)(H2O)] (ClO4) 4, and [Cu(L-tyro)(phen)(H2O)] (ClO4).1.5H2O 5 (where L-glu = L-glutamate dianion, L-tyro = L-tyrosinate anion, bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine, and phen =1,10-phenanthroline), having essentially the same structure. The crystallographic data are available for all the complexes using which five theoretical models have been generated. Firstly, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data of each complex has been analyzed using its own theoretical model and the results obtained are found to be comparable with the crystallographic results. Then, the EXAFS data of each complex has been analyzed using the theoretical models of the remaining four of these complexes. For each complex, the structural parameters obtained by fitting EXAFS data with theoretical models of the four remaining complexes have been found to be comparable with those obtained by fitting its own theoretical model. Thus, it has been found that if the crystal structure is not available for a complex, then the crystal structure of similar or analogous complex can be used satisfactorily for generating the theoretical model for the EXAFS data analysis of that complex, even if different ligands are attached to the central metal atom. On the basis of EXAFS data analysis, the coordination geometries around the central metal ions in these complexes have been depicted.

  6. Pathways of energy flow through the light-harvesting antenna of the photosynthetic purple bacterium rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fu Geng; van Grondelle, Rienk; Sundström, Villy

    1992-01-01

    Using low intensity picosecond absorption spectroscopy with independently tunable excitation and probing infrared pulses, we have studied the pathways of energy transport through the light-harvesting antenna pigments of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. From the observed excited-state rise time of the red-most pigment B896 as a function of excitation wavelength it is concluded that the B850 pigment of LH2 is spectrally heterogeneous. For excitations originating in the B850 pigment this results in a fast channel (9 ps) that is mainly excited in the peak of the B850 absorption band, and a slow channel (35 ps) that is predominantly excited at ∼840 nm. Upon excitation of B800, more than 90% of the excitations follow the fast path. From the observed kinetics it is concluded that the majority of the LH2 → LH1 energy transfer takes place within at most a few picoseconds. The rate-limiting step in the whole energy transfer sequence appears to be the B896 → reaction center transfer. The origin of the B850 heterogeneity and the slow 35-ps component is at the moment unclear. Possibly it represents a highly extended form of LH2 in which transfer to LH1 takes a relatively long time, due to a large number of transfer steps. PMID:19431825

  7. Modification of the genome of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and construction of synthetic operons.

    PubMed

    Jaschke, Paul R; Saer, Rafael G; Noll, Stephan; Beatty, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The α-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is an exemplary model organism for the creation and study of novel protein expression systems, especially membrane protein complexes that harvest light energy to yield electrical energy. Advantages of this organism include a sequenced genome, tools for genetic engineering, a well-characterized metabolism, and a large membrane surface area when grown under hypoxic or anoxic conditions. This chapter provides a framework for the utilization of R. sphaeroides as a model organism for membrane protein expression, highlighting key advantages and shortcomings. Procedures covered in this chapter include the creation of chromosomal gene deletions, disruptions, and replacements, as well as the construction of a synthetic operon using a model promoter to induce expression of modified photosynthetic reaction center proteins for structural and functional analysis. PMID:21601102

  8. Ultrafast exciton relaxation in the B850 antenna complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, V.; Alden, R. G.; Williams, J. C.; Parson, W. W.

    1996-01-01

    Spectral changes were measured with femtosecond resolution following low-intensity, broad-band excitation of the peripheral antenna complex of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Absorption anisotropy decays also were measured. We identified a 35-fs relaxation of the absorption and emission spectra of the excited state, as well as a 20-fs anisotropy decay. We interpret these results as interlevel relaxation and dephasing, respectively, of extensively delocalized exciton states of the circular bacteriochlorophyll aggregate. PMID:8943011

  9. Nostoc sphaeroides Kützing, an excellent candidate producer for CELSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zongjie; Li, Dunhai; Li, Yanhui; Wang, Zhicong; Xiao, Yuan; Wang, Gaohong; Liu, Yongding; Hu, Chunxiang; Liu, Qifang

    2011-11-01

    Some phytoplankton can be regarded as possible candidates in the establishment of Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) for some intrinsic characteristics, the first characteristic is that they should grow rapidly, secondly, they should be able to endure some stress factors and develop some corresponding adaptive strategies; also it is very important that they could provide food rich in nutritious protein and vitamins for the crew; the last but not the least is they can also fulfill the other main functions of CELSS, including supplying oxygen, removing carbon dioxide and recycling the metabolic waste. According to these characteristics, Nostoc sphaeroides, a potential healthy food in China, was selected as the potential producer in CELSS. It was found that the oxygen average evolution rate of this algae is about 150 μmol O 2 mg -1 h -1, and the size of them are ranged from 2 to 20 mm. Also it can be cultured with high population density, which indicated that the potential productivity of Nostoc sphaeroides is higher than other algae in limited volume. We measured the nutrient contents of the cyanobacterium and concluded it was a good food for the crew. Based on above advantages, Nostoc sphaeroides was assumed to a suitable phytoplankton for the establishment of Controlled Ecological Life Support System. We plan to develop suitable bioreactor with the cyanobacterium for supplying oxygen and food in future space missions.

  10. Wheat straw degradation and production of alternative substrates for nitrogenase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Dziga, Dariusz; Jagiełło-Flasińska, Dominika

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is a major component of plant biomass and could be applied in the production of biofuels, especially bioethanol. An alternative approach is production of a clean fuel - hydrogen from cellulosic biomass. In this paper an innovatory model of cellulosic waste degradation has been proposed to verify the possibility of utilization of cellulose derivatives by purple non-sulfur bacteria. The concept is based on a two-step process of wheat straw conversion by bacteria in order to obtain an organic acid mixture. In the next stage such products are consumed by Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the known producer of hydrogen. It has been documented that Cellulomonas uda expresses cellulolytic activity in the presence of wheat straw as an only source of carbon. R. sphaeroides applied in this research can effectively consume organic acids released from straw by C. uda and Lactobacillus rhamnosus and is able to grow in the presence of these substrates. Additionally, an increased nitrogenase activity of R. sphaeroides has been indicated when bacteria were cultivated in the presence of cellulose derivatives which suggests that hydrogen production occurs. PMID:26192769

  11. Transient dynamic phenotypes as criteria for model discrimination: fold-change detection in Rhodobacter sphaeroides chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, Abdullah; Ingalls, Brian; Sontag, Eduardo

    2013-03-01

    The chemotaxis pathway of the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides shares many similarities with that of Escherichia coli. It exhibits robust adaptation and has several homologues of the latter's chemotaxis proteins. Recent theoretical results have correctly predicted that the E. coli output behaviour is unchanged under scaling of its ligand input signal; this property is known as fold-change detection (FCD). In the light of recent experimental results suggesting that R. sphaeroides may also show FCD, we present theoretical assumptions on the R. sphaeroides chemosensory dynamics that can be shown to yield FCD behaviour. Furthermore, it is shown that these assumptions make FCD a property of this system that is robust to structural and parametric variations in the chemotaxis pathway, in agreement with experimental results. We construct and examine models of the full chemotaxis pathway that satisfy these assumptions and reproduce experimental time-series data from earlier studies. We then propose experiments in which models satisfying our theoretical assumptions predict robust FCD behaviour where earlier models do not. In this way, we illustrate how transient dynamic phenotypes such as FCD can be used for the purposes of discriminating between models that reproduce the same experimental time-series data. PMID:23293140

  12. Dimerization of core complexes as an efficient strategy for energy trapping in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Chenchiliyan, Manoop; Timpmann, Kõu; Jalviste, Erko; Adams, Peter G; Hunter, C Neil; Freiberg, Arvi

    2016-06-01

    In the purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, light harvesting LH2 complexes transfer absorbed solar energy to RC-LH1-PufX core complexes, which are mainly found in the dimeric state. Many other purple phototrophs have monomeric core complexes and the basis for requiring dimeric cores is not fully established, so we analysed strains of Rba. sphaeroides that contain either native dimeric core complexes or altered monomeric cores harbouring a deletion of the first 12 residues from the N-terminus of PufX, which retains the PufX polypeptide but removes the major determinant of core complex dimerization. Membranes were purified from strains with dimeric or monomeric cores, and with either high or low levels of the LH2 complex. Samples were interrogated with absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence kinetic spectroscopies to reveal their light-harvesting and energy trapping properties. We find that under saturating excitation light intensity the photosynthetic membranes containing LH2 and monomeric core complexes have fluorescence lifetimes nearly twice that of membranes with LH2 plus dimeric core complexes. This trend of increased lifetime is maintained with RCs in the open state as well, and for two different levels of LH2 content. Thus, energy trapping is more efficient when photosynthetic membranes of Rba. sphaeroides consist of RC-LH1-PufX dimers and LH2 complexes. PMID:27013332

  13. Cu2+ site in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, and Rhodopseudomonas viridis.

    PubMed

    Utschig, L M; Poluektov, O; Schlesselman, S L; Thurnauer, M C; Tiede, D M

    2001-05-22

    The interaction of metal ions with isolated photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from the purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, and Rhodopseudomonas viridis has been investigated with transient optical and magnetic resonance techniques. In RCs from all species, the electrochromic response of the bacteriopheophytin cofactors associated with Q(A)(-)Q(B) --> Q(A)Q(B)(-) electron transfer is slowed in the presence of Cu(2+). This slowing is similar to the metal ion effect observed for RCs from Rb. sphaeroides where Zn(2+) was bound to a specific site on the surface of the RC [Utschig et al. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 8278]. The coordination environments of the Cu(2+) sites were probed with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, providing the first direct spectroscopic evidence for the existence of a second metal site in RCs from Rb. capsulatus and Rps. viridis. In the dark, RCs with Cu(2+) bound to the surface exhibit axially symmetric EPR spectra. Electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectral results indicate multiple weakly hyperfine coupled (14)N nuclei in close proximity to Cu(2+). These ESEEM spectra resemble those observed for Cu(2+) RCs from Rb. sphaeroides [Utschig et al. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 2961] and indicate that two or more histidines ligate the Cu(2+) at the surface site in each RC. Thus, RCs from Rb. sphaeroides, Rb. capsulatus, and Rps. viridis each have a structurally analogous Cu(2+) binding site that is involved in modulating the Q(A)(-)Q(B) --> Q(A)Q(B)(-) electron-transfer process. Inspection of the Rps. viridis crystal structure reveals four potential histidine ligands from three different subunits (M16, H178, H72, and L211) located beneath the Q(B) binding pocket. The location of these histidines is surprisingly similar to the grouping of four histidine residues (H68, H126, H128, and L211) observed in the Rb. sphaeroides RC crystal structure. Further elucidation of these Cu(2+) sites will provide

  14. Amino Acid Residues of RegA Important for Interactions with the CbbR-DNA Complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Dangel, Andrew W.; Luther, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    CbbR and RegA (PrrA) are transcriptional regulators of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) CO2 fixation pathway (cbbI and cbbII) operons of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The CbbR and RegA proteins interact, but CbbR must be bound to the promoter DNA in order for RegA-CbbR protein-protein interactions to occur. RegA greatly enhances the ability of CbbR to bind the cbbI promoter or greatly enhances the stability of the CbbR/promoter complex. The N-terminal receiver domain and the DNA binding domain of RegA were shown to interact with CbbR. Residues in α-helix 7 and α-helix 8 of the DNA binding domain (helix-turn-helix) of RegA directly interacted with CbbR, with α-helix 7 positioned immediately above the DNA and α-helix 8 located in the major groove of the DNA. A CbbR protein containing only the DNA binding motif and the linker helix was capable of binding to RegA. In contrast, a truncated CbbR containing only the linker helix and recognition domains I and II (required for effector binding) was not able to interact with RegA. The accumulated results strongly suggest that the DNA binding domains of both proteins interact to facilitate optimal transcriptional control over the cbb operons. In vivo analysis, using constitutively active mutant CbbR proteins, further indicated that CbbR must interact with phosphorylated RegA in order to accomplish transcriptional activation. PMID:24957624

  15. Comparison of reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and rhodopseudomonas viridis: Overall archistecture and protein-pigment interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Elkabbani, Ossama; Chang, Chonghwan; Tiede, D.; Norris, J.; Schiffer, M. )

    1991-06-04

    Photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from the photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis are protein complexes closely related in both structure and function. The structure of the Rps. viridis RC was used to determine the structure of the RC from Rb. sphaeroides. Small but meaningful differences between the positions of the helices and the cofactors in the two complexes were identified. The distances between helices A{sub L} adn A{sub M}, between B{sub L} and B{sub M}, and between bacteriopheophytins BP{sub L} and BP{sub M} are significantly shorter in Rps. viridis than they are in Rb. sphaeroides RCs. There are a number of differences in the amino acid residues that surround the cofactors; some of these residues form hydrogen bonds with the cofactors. Differences in chemical properties of the two RCs.

  16. Free Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) improved the biomass resource recovery and organic matter removal in Rhodobacter sphaeroides purification of sewage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rijia; Wu, Pan; Lang, Lang; Xu, Changru; Wang, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    The enhancement in biomass production and organic matter removal of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (R. sphaeroides) through iron ions in soybean protein wastewater treatment was investigated. Different dosages of ferric ions were introduced in the reactors under light-anaerobic conditions. Free ferric and ferrous ions in wastewater were formed and their concentrations were the optimal for the growth of R. sphaeroides when the total Fe dosage was 20 mg/L. At the optimal dosage, biomass production (4000 mg/L) and protease activity improved by 50% and 48% when compared to the controls, respectively. The organic matter and protein removal reached above 90% and hydraulic retention time was shortened from 96 to 72 h. A mechanism analysis indicated that iron ions can effectively improve the adenosine triphosphate production, which may furthermore encourage the synthesis of protease and the cellular material. PMID:26565434

  17. Mutations of the AMH type II receptor in two extended families with persistent Müllerian duct syndrome: lack of phenotype/genotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Mohammad; Taheini, Khalid; Picard, Jean-Yves; Cate, Richard L; Josso, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to compare phenotype and genotype in two extended Middle-Eastern families affected by persistent Müllerian duct syndrome due to mutations of the type II anti-Müllerian hormone receptor (AMHR-II). The first, consanguineous, family consisted of 6 boys and 2 girls, the second consisted of 4 girls and 2 boys. In family I, 4 boys and 1 girl were homozygous for a stop mutation in the 9th exon of AMHR-II, removing part of the intracellular domain of the protein. In family II, 1 girl and 1 boy were homozygous for a transversion changing conserved histidine 254 into a glutamine. Both homozygous girls were normal. In the homozygous males, the degree of development of Müllerian derivatives was variable. The uterus was well developed in 2 boys of family I and in the patient from family II; however, in 1 subject from family I, Müllerian derivatives were undetectable. Taken together, the diversity of clinical symptoms within the same sibship and the lack of correlation between the development of the Müllerian derivatives and the severity of the molecular defects suggest highly variable penetrance of the abnormal alleles and/or the existence of other genetic or epigenetic modifiers of gene expression. PMID:22584735

  18. Nearest-neighbor nitrogen and oxygen distances in the iron(II)-DNA complex studied by extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, Clelia R. A.; Meneghini, Rogerio; Tolentino, Helio

    2010-11-01

    In mammalian cells, DNA-bound Fe(II) reacts with H 2O 2 producing the highly reactive hydroxyl radical ( rad OH) in situ. Since rad OH attacks nearby DNA residue generating oxidative DNA damage, many questions have arisen regarding iron-DNA complex formations and their implication in pre-malignant mutations and aging. In this work, a solid sample of Fe(II)-DNA complex containing one Fe(II) per 10 nucleotides was analyzed from extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra collected in a synchrotron radiation light source. Best fitting parameters of the EXAFS signal for the first two shells provide evidence of five oxygen atoms at 1.99 ± 0.02 Å and one nitrogen atom at 2.20 ± 0.02 Å in the inner coordination sphere of the Fe(II)-DNA complex. Considering that both purine base moieties bearing nitrogen atoms are prone to chelate iron, these results are consistent with the previously observed lower levels of DNA damage in cytosine nucleotides relative to adenine and guanine sites in cells under more physiological conditions of Fe(II) Fenton reaction.

  19. A Cardiolipin-Deficient Mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Has an Altered Cell Shape and Is Impaired in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ti-Yu; Santos, Thiago M. A.; Kontur, Wayne S.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell shape has been suggested to play an important role in the regulation of bacterial attachment to surfaces and the formation of communities associated with surfaces. We found that a cardiolipin synthase (Δcls) mutant of the rod-shaped bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides—in which synthesis of the anionic, highly curved phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is reduced by 90%—produces ellipsoid-shaped cells that are impaired in biofilm formation. Reducing the concentration of CL did not cause significant defects in R. sphaeroides cell growth, swimming motility, lipopolysaccharide and exopolysaccharide production, surface adhesion protein expression, and membrane permeability. Complementation of the CL-deficient mutant by ectopically expressing CL synthase restored cells to their rod shape and increased biofilm formation. Treating R. sphaeroides cells with a low concentration (10 μg/ml) of the small-molecule MreB inhibitor S-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)isothiourea produced ellipsoid-shaped cells that had no obvious growth defect yet reduced R. sphaeroides biofilm formation. This study demonstrates that CL plays a role in R. sphaeroides cell shape determination, biofilm formation, and the ability of the bacterium to adapt to its environment. IMPORTANCE Membrane composition plays a fundamental role in the adaptation of many bacteria to environmental stress. In this study, we build a new connection between the anionic phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) and cellular adaptation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We demonstrate that CL plays a role in the regulation of R. sphaeroides morphology and is important for the ability of this bacterium to form biofilms. This study correlates CL concentration, cell shape, and biofilm formation and provides the first example of how membrane composition in bacteria alters cell morphology and influences adaptation. This study also provides insight into the potential of phospholipid biosynthesis as a target for new chemical strategies designed to

  20. Photophysical and Electrochemical Studies of Multinuclear Complexes of Iron(II) with Acetate and Extended Conjugated N-Donor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Said, Suhana; Roslan, Muhamad Faris; Azil, Afiq; Nordin, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    A dimeric iron(II) complex, trans-[Fe2(CH3COO)4(L1)2] (1), and a trinuclear iron(II) complex, [Fe3(CH3COO)4(H2O)4(L2)] (2), were studied as potential dye-sensitised solar cell materials. The structures of both complexes were deduced by a combination of instrumental analyses and molecular modelling. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility data suggested that 1 was made up of 56.8% high-spin (HS) and 43.2% low-spin (LS) Fe(II) atoms at 294 K and has a moderate antiferromagnetic interaction (J = −81.2 cm−1) between the two Fe(II) centres, while 2 was made up of 27.7% HS and 72.3% LS Fe(II) atoms at 300 K. The optical band gaps (Eo) for 1 were 1.9 eV (from absorption spectrum) and 2.2 eV (from fluorescence spectrum), electrochemical bandgap (Ee) was 0.83 eV, excited state lifetime (τ) was 0.67 ns, and formal redox potential (E′(FeIII/FeII)) was +0.63 V. The corresponding values for 2 were 3.5 eV (from absorption spectrum), 1.8 eV (from fluorescence spectrum), 0.69 eV, 2.8 ns, and +0.41 V. PMID:25879076

  1. 77 FR 30173 - Amendment of Americans With Disabilities Act Title II and Title III Regulations To Extend...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... commercial facilities) on September 15, 2010. See 75 FR 56164, 56236 (September 15, 2010). The revised ADA... September 30, 2004, 69 FR 58768, and two Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on June 17, 2008, 73 FR 34466 (title II) and 73 FR 34508 (title III). The Department also held a public hearing on the NPRMs...

  2. Extract from a mutant Rhodobacter sphaeroides as an enriched carotenoid source

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Chiang; Ding, Shangwu; Chiu, Kuo-Hsun; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Lin, Tai-Jung; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background The extract Lycogen™ from the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (WL-APD911) has attracted significant attention because of its promising potential as a bioactive mixture, attributed in part to its anti-inflammatory properties and anti-oxidative activity. Objective This study aims to investigate the components of Lycogen™ and its anti-inflammatory properties and anti-oxidative activity. Design and results The mutant strain R. sphaeroides (WL-APD911) whose carotenoid 1,2-hydratase gene has been altered by chemical mutagenesis was used for the production of a new carotenoid. The strain was grown at 30°C on Luria–Bertani (LB) agar plates. After a 4-day culture period, the mutant strain displayed a 3.5-fold increase in carotenoid content, relative to the wild type. In the DPPH test, Lycogen™ showed more potent anti-oxidative activity than lycopene from the wild-type strain. Primary skin irritation test with hamsters showed no irritation response in hamster skins after 30 days of treatment with 0.2% Lycogen™. Chemical investigations of Lycogen™ using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) 1H, 13C, and COSY/DQCOSY spectra have identified spheroidenone and methoxyneurosporene. Quantitative analysis of these identified compounds based on spectral intensities indicates that spheroidenone and methoxyneurosporene are major components (approximately 1:1); very small quantities of other derivatives are also present in the sample. Conclusions In this study, we identified the major carotenoid compounds contained in Lycogen™, including spheroidenone and methoxyneurosporene by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy analysis. The carotenoid content of this mutant strain of R. sphaeroides was 3.5-fold higher than that in normal strain. Furthermore, Lycogen™ from the mutant strain is more potent than lycopene from the wild-type strain and does not cause irritation in hamster skins. These findings suggest that this mutant strain has the potential to be used

  3. Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants which accumulate 5-aminolevulinic acid under aerobic and dark conditions.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, S; Watanabe, K; Tanaka, T; Miyachi, N; Hotta, Y; Murooka, Y

    1999-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides accumulates 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), which is a precursor in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, under light illumination and upon addition of levulinic acid as an inhibitor of ALA dehydratase. To generate an industrial strain which produces ALA in the absence of light, we sequentially mutated R. sphaeroides CR-286 using N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG). The mutant strains were screened by cultivating in the absence of light and assayed for ALA by the Ehrlich reaction in a 96-well microtiter plate. The mutant strain CR-386, derived from R. sphaeroides CR-286, was selected as a mutant that exhibited significant ALA accumulation. While CR-286 required light illumination for ALA production, CR-386 was able to accumulate 1.5 mM ALA in the presence of 50 mM glucose, 60 mM glycine, 15 mM levulinic acid and 1.0% (w/v) yeast extract under conditions of agitation in the absence of light. The mutant strain CR-450, derived from strain CR-386, was selected further as a mutant that exhibited significant ALA accumulation but no accumulation of aminoacetone, analogue of ALA. CR-450 accumulated 3.8 mM ALA under the same conditions. In the presence of 50 mM glucose, 60 mM glycine, 5 mM levulinic acid and 1.0% (w/v) yeast extract, the mutant strain CR-520, derived from strain CR-450, and strain CR-606, derived from strain CR-520, accumulated 8.1 mM and 11.2 mM ALA, respectively. In batch fermentation, the strain CR-606 accumulated 20 mM ALA over 18 h after the addition of glycine, levulinic acid, glucose and yeast extract. PMID:16232557

  4. The response of antioxidant systems in Nostoc sphaeroides against UV-B radiation and the protective effects of exogenous antioxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaohong; Hu, Chunxiang; Li, Dunhai; Zhang, Delu; Li, Xiaoyan; Chen, Kun; Liu, Yongding

    UV radiation is one of many harmful factors found in space that are detrimental to organisms on earth in space exploration. In the present work, we examined the role of antioxidant system in Nostoc sphaeroides Kütz (Cyanobacterium) and the effects of exogenously applied antioxidant molecules on its photosynthetic rate under UV-B radiation. It was found that UV-B radiation promoted the activity of antioxidant system to protect photosystem II (PSII) and exogenously applied antioxidant: sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) had an obvious protection on PSII activity under UV-B radiation. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6), peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7) and content of MDA (malondialdehyde) and ASC (ascorbate) were improved by 0.5 mM and 1 mM SNP, but 0.1 mM SNP decreased the activity of antioxidant system. Addition of exogenous NAC decreased the activity of SOD, POD, CAT and the content MDA and ASC. In contrast, exogenously applied NAC increased GSH content. The results suggest that exogenous SNP and NAC may protect algae by different mechanisms: SNP may play double roles as both sources of reactive free radicals as well as ROS scavengers in mediating the protective role of PSII on algae under UV-B radiation. On the other hand, NAC functions as an antioxidant or precursor of glutathione, which could protect PSII directly from UV-B radiation.

  5. Interaction of Product Analogs with the Active Site of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Dimethylsulfoxide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Nelson, Kimberly Johnson; Harris, Hugh H.; Doonan, Christian J.; Rajagopalan, K.V.

    2007-01-01

    We report a structural characterization using X-ray absorption spectroscopy of Rhodobacter sphaeroides dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase reduced with trimethylarsine, and show that this is structurally analogous to the physiologically relevant dimethylsulfide-reduced DMSO reductase. Our data unambiguously indicate that these species should be regarded as formal MoIV species, and indicate a classical coordination complex of trimethylarsine oxide, with no special structural distortions. The similarity of the trimethylarsine and dimethylsulfide complexes suggests in turn that the dimethylsulfide reduced enzyme possesses a classical coordination of DMSO with no special elongation of the S—O bond, as previously suggested. PMID:17361996

  6. Evidence for the purely electronic character of primary electron transfer in purple bacteria Rh. Sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, I. O.; Poddubnyy, V. V.; Eremin, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    A quantum-chemical calculation of the excited electronic states of a Rh. Sphaeroides reaction centre was performed. We discovered a new excited electronic state which can participate in electron transfer (ET). The energy gradient calculations showed that photoexcitation activates only high-frequency vibrational modes. This contradicts the widely accepted picture of ET resulting from vibrational wave packet motion. An alternative model is suggested where ET has a purely dissipative character and occurs only due to pigment--protein interaction. With this model, we demonstrate that oscillations in the femtosecond spectra can be caused by the new electronic state and non-Markovian character of dissipative dynamics.

  7. Interaction of Product Analogues With the Active Site of Rhodobacter Sphaeroides Dimethyl Sulfoxide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Nelson, K.J.; Harris, H.H.; Doonan, C.J.; Rajagopalan, K.V.; /Saskatchewan U. /Duke U. /Sydney U.

    2007-07-09

    We report a structural characterization using X-ray absorption spectroscopy of Rhodobacter sphaeroides dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase reduced with trimethylarsine, and show that this is structurally analogous to the physiologically relevant dimethylsulfide-reduced DMSO reductase. Our data unambiguously indicate that these species should be regarded as formal MoIV species, and indicate a classical coordination complex of trimethylarsine oxide, with no special structural distortions. The similarity of the trimethylarsine and dimethylsulfide complexes suggests in turn that the dimethylsulfide reduced enzyme possesses a classical coordination of DMSO with no special elongation of the S-O bond, as previously suggested.

  8. Polarized Range-Extended X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oriented Photosystem II Membranes in the S[subscript 1] State

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkar, Yulia; Yano, Junko; Glatzel, Pieter; Messinger, Johannes; Lewis, Azul; Sauer, Kenneth; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-11-13

    Detailed information about the orientation of particular Mn-Mn and Mn-Ca vectors in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of the Photosystem II in the S1 state provide a critical starting point for the analysis of the structural changes in the OEC along the catalytic S{sub i}-state cycle. The method of polarized range-extended EXAFS is an important technical development, that allows: (i) resolution of the 2.7 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} Mn-Mn interactions; (ii) resolution of 3.2 {angstrom} Mn-Mn and 3.4 {angstrom} Mn-Ca; (iii) determination of 2.7 {angstrom}, 2.8 {angstrom}, 3.2 {angstrom} Mn-Mn and 3.4 {angstrom} Mn-Ca vectors orientation relative to the membrane normal.

  9. Extended particle difference method for weak and strong discontinuity problems: part II. Formulations and applications for various interfacial singularity problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young-Cheol; Song, Jeong-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    The Extended Particle Difference Method is developed for interfacial singularity problems based on the Extended Particle Derivative Approximation scheme. Node-wise strong formulations are adopted for transient heat transfer problems, potential problems, and elasticity problems with various interfacial boundaries. The governing partial differential equations are directly discretized at interior and boundary nodes and the interface condition is immersed in the derivative approximation or is enforced at interfacial points. Assemblage of the discretized equations generates a linear algebraic system of equations, which accelerates computation speed due to the avoidance of numerical integration. Solving the system gives the nodal solution together with the jump solutions. We also demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the developed method with various numerical examples. Despite the existence of the singularity in the solution fields, the method overcomes the geometrical complexity inherent in interface modeling and thus achieves the second-order accuracy.

  10. The Non-Relativistic Limit of Relativistic Extended Thermodynamics with Many - Part II:. how it Includes the Mass, Momentum and Energy Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrisi, M. C.; Demontis, F.; Pennisi, S.

    2006-03-01

    In part I of this article, Borghero, Demontis and Pennisi have obtained the limits for light speed c going to infty, of the balance equations in Relativistic Extended Thermodynamics with many moments. In order to obtain independent equations, they have taken a suitable linear combination of the equations, before taking the limit. What happens with this procedure to the relativistic conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy? Obviously, they transform in their classical counterparts; but proof of this property is not easy and is treated in this part II of the article.

  11. Extended Cahill-Glauber formalism for finite-dimensional spaces. II. Applications in quantum tomography and quantum teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Marchiolli, Marcelo A.; Ruzzi, Maurizio; Galetti, Diogenes

    2005-10-15

    By means of a mod(N)-invariant operator basis, s-parametrized phase-space functions associated with bounded operators in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space are introduced in the context of the extended Cahill-Glauber formalism, and their properties are discussed in details. The discrete Glauber-Sudarshan, Wigner, and Husimi functions emerge from this formalism as specific cases of s-parametrized phase-space functions where, in particular, a hierarchical process among them is promptly established. In addition, a phase-space description of quantum tomography and quantum teleportation is presented and new results are obtained.

  12. Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants overexpressing chlorophyllide a oxidoreductase of Blastochloris viridis elucidate functions of enzymes in late bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Harada, Jiro; Nomata, Jiro; Yamamoto, Haruki; Fujita, Yuichi; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies we have demonstrated that chlorophyllide a oxidoreductases (CORs) from bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a-producing Rhodobacter species and BChl b-producing Blastochloris viridis show distinct substrate recognition and different catalytic hydrogenation reactions, and that these two types of CORs therefore cause committed steps for BChls a and b biosynthesis. In this study, COR genes from B. viridis were incorporated and overexpressed in a series of Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants. We found that the following two factors are essential in making R. sphaeroides produce BChl b: the loss of functions of both intrinsic COR and 8-vinyl reductase (BciA) in the host R. sphaeroides strain; and expression of the BchYZ catalytic components of COR from B. viridis, not the complete set of COR (BchXYZ), in the host strain. In addition, we incorporated bchYZ of B. viridis into the R. sphaeroides mutant lacking BchJ and BciA, resulting in the strain accumulating both BChl a and BChl b. This is the first example of an anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium producing BChls a and b together. The results suggest that BchJ enhances activity of the intrinsic COR. The physiological significance of BchJ in pigment biosynthetic pathways will be discussed. PMID:25978726

  13. [The mechanism of acetate assimilation in purple nonsulfur bacteria lacking the glyoxylate pathway: acetate assimilation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides cells].

    PubMed

    Filatova, L V; Berg, I A; Krasil'nikova, E N; Tsygankov, A A; Laurinavichene, T V; Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of acetate assimilation in the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, which lacks the glyoxylate pathway, is studied. It is found that the growth of this bacterium in batch and continuous cultures and the assimilation of acetate in cell suspensions are not stimulated by bicarbonate. The consumption of acetate is accompanied by the excretion of glyoxylate and pyruvate into the medium, stimulated by glyoxylate and pyruvate, and inhibited by citramalate. The respiration of cells in the presence of acetate is stimulated by glyoxylate, pyruvate, citramalate, and mesaconate. These data suggest that the citramalate cycle may function in Rba. sphaeroides in the form of an anaplerotic pathway instead of the glyoxylate pathway. At the same time, the low ratio of fixation rates for bicarbonate and acetate exhibited by the Rba. sphaeroides cells (approximately 0.1), as well as the absence of the stimulatory effect of acetate on the fixation of bicarbonate in the presence of the Calvin cycle inhibitor iodoacetate, suggests that pyruvate synthase is not involved in acetate assimilation in the bacterium Rba. sphaeroides. PMID:16119843

  14. Novel Methods for Analysing Bacterial Tracks Reveal Persistence in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Gabriel; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Wilkinson, David A.; de Beyer, Jennifer A.; Yates, Christian A.; Armitage, Judith P.; Maini, Philip K.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    Tracking bacteria using video microscopy is a powerful experimental approach to probe their motile behaviour. The trajectories obtained contain much information relating to the complex patterns of bacterial motility. However, methods for the quantitative analysis of such data are limited. Most swimming bacteria move in approximately straight lines, interspersed with random reorientation phases. It is therefore necessary to segment observed tracks into swimming and reorientation phases to extract useful statistics. We present novel robust analysis tools to discern these two phases in tracks. Our methods comprise a simple and effective protocol for removing spurious tracks from tracking datasets, followed by analysis based on a two-state hidden Markov model, taking advantage of the availability of mutant strains that exhibit swimming-only or reorientating-only motion to generate an empirical prior distribution. Using simulated tracks with varying levels of added noise, we validate our methods and compare them with an existing heuristic method. To our knowledge this is the first example of a systematic assessment of analysis methods in this field. The new methods are substantially more robust to noise and introduce less systematic bias than the heuristic method. We apply our methods to tracks obtained from the bacterial species Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrate that R. sphaeroides exhibits persistence over the course of a tumbling event, which is a novel result with important implications in the study of this and similar species. PMID:24204227

  15. Modelling and analysis of bacterial tracks suggest an active reorientation mechanism in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Gabriel; Baker, Ruth E.; Armitage, Judith P.; Fletcher, Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    Most free-swimming bacteria move in approximately straight lines, interspersed with random reorientation phases. A key open question concerns varying mechanisms by which reorientation occurs. We combine mathematical modelling with analysis of a large tracking dataset to study the poorly understood reorientation mechanism in the monoflagellate species Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The flagellum on this species rotates counterclockwise to propel the bacterium, periodically ceasing rotation to enable reorientation. When rotation restarts the cell body usually points in a new direction. It has been assumed that the new direction is simply the result of Brownian rotation. We consider three variants of a self-propelled particle model of bacterial motility. The first considers rotational diffusion only, corresponding to a non-chemotactic mutant strain. Two further models incorporate stochastic reorientations, describing ‘run-and-tumble’ motility. We derive expressions for key summary statistics and simulate each model using a stochastic computational algorithm. We also discuss the effect of cell geometry on rotational diffusion. Working with a previously published tracking dataset, we compare predictions of the models with data on individual stopping events in R. sphaeroides. This provides strong evidence that this species undergoes some form of active reorientation rather than simple reorientation by Brownian rotation. PMID:24872500

  16. Light-induced division and genomic synchrony in phototrophically growing cultures of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Lueking, D R; Campbell, T B; Burghardt, R C

    1981-05-01

    An experimental procedure for rapidly obtaining cell populations of phototrophically growing Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides which display division and genomic synchrony has been developed. The basis of the procedure resides with the normal physiological response displayed by cells of R. sphaeroides that have been subjected to an immediate decrease in incident light intensity. After an abrupt high- to low-light transition of an asynchronously dividing cell population, an immediate cessation of increases in culture turbidity, total cell number, and net accumulations of culture deoxyribonucleic acid and phospholipid occurs. Total cell number remains constant for 2.5 h after the transition to low light, after which time, it undergoes a sharp increase. Reinitiation of high-light conditions of growth 1 h subsequent to this increase in total cell number results in a cell population possessing a high degree of division and genomic synchrony. A characterization of this procedure, together with a demonstration of its utility for studies on intracytoplasmic membrane assembly, is presented. PMID:7012139

  17. Nostoc sphaeroides Kütz, a candidate producer par excellence for CELSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaohong; Hao, Zongjie; Liu, Yongding

    A lot of aquatic organisms could be regarded as suitable candidates par excellence in the establishment of CELSS, since they are relatively easy and fast to grow and resistant to changes in environmental condition as well as providing nutritious, protein-and vitamin-rich foods for the crew, which can fulfill the main functions of CELSS, including supplying oxygen, water and food, removing carbon dioxide and making daily life waste reusable. Our labotory has developed mass culture of Nostoc sphaeroides Kütz, which is one of traditional healthy food in China and. The oxygen evolution rate of the cyanobacterium is about 150 molO2.mg-1.h-1, and it usually grows into colony with size between 2-20mm, which is easy to be harvested. It also can be cultured with high density, which show that the productivity of the cyanobacterium in limited volume is higher than other microalgae. We had measured the nutrient content of the cyanobacterium and developed some Chinese Dishes and Soups with Nostoc sphaeroides Kütz, which showed that it was a good food for crew. Using remote sensing technique, we also investigated its growth in Closed System under microgravity by SHENZHOU-2 spacecraft in January 2001. We plan to develop suitable bioreactor with the cyanobacterium for supplying oxygen and food to crew in future.

  18. Reconstruction of a kinetic model of the chromatophore vesicles from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Tihamér; Helms, Volkhard

    2006-08-01

    We present a molecular model of a chromatophore vesicle from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. These vesicles are ideal benchmark systems for molecular and systemic simulations, because they have been well studied, they are small, and they are naturally separated from their cellular environment. To set up a photosynthetic chain working under steady-state conditions, we compiled from the experimental literature the specific activities and geometries that have been determined for their constituents. This data then allowed defining the stoichiometries for all membrane proteins. This article contains the kinetic part of the reconstructed model, while the spatial reconstruction is presented in a companion article. By considering the transport properties of the Cytochrome c(2) and ubiquinone pools, we show that their size and oxidation states allow for an efficient buffering of the statistical fluctuations that arise from the small size of the vesicles. Stoichiometric and kinetic considerations indicate that a typical chromatophore vesicle of Rb. sphaeroides with a diameter of 45 nm should contain approximately five bc(1) monomers. PMID:16714340

  19. Azadipyrromethene cyclometalation in neutral Ru(II) complexes: photosensitizers with extended near-infrared absorption for solar energy conversion applications.

    PubMed

    Bessette, André; Cibian, Mihaela; Ferreira, Janaina G; DiMarco, Brian N; Bélanger, Francis; Désilets, Denis; Meyer, Gerald J; Hanan, Garry S

    2016-06-28

    In the on-going quest to harvest near-infrared (NIR) photons for energy conversion applications, a novel family of neutral ruthenium(ii) sensitizers has been developed by cyclometalation of an azadipyrromethene chromophore. These rare examples of neutral ruthenium complexes based on polypyridine ligands exhibit an impressive panchromaticity achieved by the cyclometalation strategy, with strong light absorption in the 600-800 nm range that tails beyond 1100 nm in the terpyridine-based adducts. Evaluation of the potential for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC) and Organic Photovoltaic (OPV) applications is made through rationalization of the structure-property relationship by spectroscopic, electrochemical, X-ray structural and computational modelization investigations. Spectroscopic evidence for photo-induced charge injection into the conduction band of TiO2 is also provided. PMID:27264670

  20. Modeling Spitzer Observations of VV Ser. II. An Extended Quantum-heated Nebula and a Disk Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Evans, Neal J., II; Geers, Vincent C.; Harvey, Paul M.; Spiesman, William

    2007-02-01

    We present mid-infrared Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the UX Orionis star VV Ser and the surrounding cloud. The 5.6-70 μm images show bright, localized, and nebulous emission extended over 4' centered on VV Ser. This nebulosity is due to transiently heated grains excited by UV photons emitted by VV Ser. Imprinted on the nebulosity is a wedge-shaped dark band, centered on the star. We interpret this as the shadow cast by the inner regions of a near-edge-on disk, allowing the PAHs to be excited only outside of this shadow. We extend an axisymmetric radiative transfer model of the VV Ser disk described in a companion paper to include quantum-heated PAH molecules and very small grains (VSGs) in the thermal cooling approximation. The presence of a disk shadow strongly constrains the inclination as well as the position angle of the disk. The nebulosity at 5.6-8.0 μm and the 2175 Å absorption feature seen in an archival spectrum from the IUE can be fit using only PAHs, consistent with the main carrier of the 2175 Å feature being due to the graphite-like structure of the PAHs. The PAH component is found to be relatively smoothly distributed in the cloud, while the population of VSGs emitting at 20-70 μm is strongly concentrated ~50'' to the southeast of VV Ser. Depending on the adopted PAH opacity, the abundance of PAHs in the surrounding cloud is constrained to 5%+/-2% of the total dust mass. Although relatively rare, quantum-heated nebulosities surrounding single, well-defined stars are well-suited for gaining unique insights into the physics of very small particles in molecular clouds.

  1. Shape, shear and flexion - II. Quantifying the flexion formalism for extended sources with the ray-bundle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluke, C. J.; Lasky, P. D.

    2011-09-01

    Flexion-based weak gravitational lensing analysis is proving to be a useful adjunct to traditional shear-based techniques. As flexion arises from gradients across an image, analytic and numerical techniques are required to investigate flexion predictions for extended image/source pairs. Using the Schwarzschild lens model, we demonstrate that the ray-bundle method for gravitational lensing can be used to accurately recover second flexion, and is consistent with recovery of zero first flexion. Using lens plane to source plane bundle propagation, we find that second flexion can be recovered with an error no worse than 1 per cent for bundle radii smaller than Δθ= 0.01θE and lens plane impact pararameters greater than θE+Δθ, where θE is the angular Einstein radius. Using source plane to lens plane bundle propagation, we demonstrate the existence of a preferred flexion zone. For images at radii closer to the lens than the inner boundary of this zone, indicative of the true strong lensing regime, the flexion formalism should be used with caution (errors greater than 5 per cent for extended image/source pairs). We also define a shear-zone boundary, beyond which image shapes are essentially indistinguishable from ellipses (1 per cent error in ellipticity). While suggestive that a traditional weak lensing analysis is satisfactory beyond this boundary, a potentially detectable non-zero flexion signal remains. Research undertaken as part of the Commonwealth Cosmology Initiative (CCI, ), an international collaboration supported by the Australian Research Council.

  2. Construction and Validation of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 DNA Microarray: Transcriptome Flexibility at Diverse Growth Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Christopher T.; Sram, Jakub; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Ivanov, Pavel S.; Mackenzie, Christopher; Choudhary, Madhusudan; Land, Miriam L; Larimer, Frank W; Kaplan, Samuel; Gomelsky, Mark

    2004-07-01

    A high-density oligonucleotide DNA microarray, a genechip, representing the 4.6-Mb genome of the facultative phototrophic proteobacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1, was custom-designed and manufactured by Affymetrix, Santa Clara, Calif. The genechip contains probe sets for 4,292 open reading frames (ORFs), 47 rRNA and tRNA genes, and 394 intergenic regions. The probe set sequences were derived from the genome annotation generated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory after extensive revision, which was based primarily upon codon usage characteristic of this GC-rich bacterium. As a result of the revision, numerous missing ORFs were uncovered, nonexistent ORFs were deleted, and misidentified start codons were corrected. To evaluate R. sphaeroides transcriptome flexibility, expression profiles for three diverse growth modes-aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration in the dark, and anaerobic photosynthesis-were generated. Expression levels of one-fifth to one-third of the R. sphaeroides ORFs were significantly different in cells under any two growth modes. Pathways involved in energy generation and redox balance maintenance under three growth modes were reconstructed. Expression patterns of genes involved in these pathways mirrored known functional changes, suggesting that massive changes in gene expression are the major means used by R. sphaeroides in adaptation to diverse conditions. Differential expression was observed for genes encoding putative new participants in these pathways (additional photosystem genes, duplicate NADH dehydrogenase, ATP synthases), whose functionality has yet to be investigated. The DNA microarray data correlated well with data derived from quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, as well as with data from the literature, thus validating the R. sphaeroides genechip as a powerful and reliable tool for studying unprecedented metabolic versatility of this bacterium.

  3. Tyre-road grip coefficient assessment - Part II: online estimation using instrumented vehicle, extended Kalman filter, and neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, Pablo; Mántaras, Daniel A.; Fidalgo, Eloy; Álvarez, Javier; Riva, Paolo; Girón, Pablo; Compadre, Diego; Ferran, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of this work is to determine the limit of safe driving conditions by identifying the maximal friction coefficient in a real vehicle. The study will focus on finding a method to determine this limit before reaching the skid, which is valuable information in the context of traffic safety. Since it is not possible to measure the friction coefficient directly, it will be estimated using the appropriate tools in order to get the most accurate information. A real vehicle is instrumented to collect information of general kinematics and steering tie-rod forces. A real-time algorithm is developed to estimate forces and aligning torque in the tyres using an extended Kalman filter and neural networks techniques. The methodology is based on determining the aligning torque; this variable allows evaluation of the behaviour of the tyre. It transmits interesting information from the tyre-road contact and can be used to predict the maximal tyre grip and safety margin. The maximal grip coefficient is estimated according to a knowledge base, extracted from computer simulation of a high detailed three-dimensional model, using Adams® software. The proposed methodology is validated and applied to real driving conditions, in which maximal grip and safety margin are properly estimated.

  4. A phase II trial of extended induction epratuzumab and rituximab for previously untreated follicular lymphoma: CALGB 50701

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Barbara W.; Jung, Sin-Ho; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Kostakoglu, Lale; His, Eric; Byrd, John C.; Jones, Jeffrey; Leonard, John P.; Martin, S. Eric; Cheson, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Rituximab combined with chemotherapy has improved the survival of previously untreated patients with follicular lymphoma (FL). Nevertheless, many patients neither want nor can tolerate chemotherapy, leading to interest in biological approaches. Epratuzumab is a humanized anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody with efficacy in relapsed FL. Since both rituximab and epratuzumab have single agent activity in FL, we evaluated the antibody combination as initial treatment of patients with FL. Patients and Methods Fifty-nine untreated patients with FL received epratuzumab 360 mg/m2 with rituximab 375 mg/m2 weekly for four induction doses. This combination was continued as extended induction in weeks 12, 20, 28, and 36. Response assessed by CT was correlated with clinical risk factors, FDG-PET findings at week 3, Fcg polymorphisms, immunohistochemical markers, and statin use. Results Therapy was well-tolerated with toxicities similar to expected with rituximab monotherapy. Fifty-two (88.2%) evaluable patients responded, including 25 complete responses (CR)(42.4%), and 27 partial responses (45.8%). At 3 years follow-up, 60% of patients remain in remission. Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index (FLIPI) risk strongly predicted progression-free survival (p=0.022). Conclusions The high response rate and prolonged time to progression observed with this antibody combination are comparable to those observed after standard chemo-immunotherapies and further support the development of biologic, non-chemotherapeutic approaches for these patients. PMID:23922187

  5. Extended Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Analyses at the Shuttle Landing Facility: Phase II Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the AMU's Short-Range Statistical Forecasting task for peak winds at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The peak wind speeds are an important forecast element for the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle programs. The 45th Weather Squadron and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group indicate that peak winds are challenging to forecast. The Applied Meteorology Unit was tasked to develop tools that aid in short-range forecasts of peak winds at tower sites of operational interest. A seven year record of wind tower data was used in the analysis. Hourly and directional climatologies by tower and month were developed to determine the seasonal behavior of the average and peak winds. Probability density functions (PDF) of peak wind speed were calculated to determine the distribution of peak speed with average speed. These provide forecasters with a means of determining the probability of meeting or exceeding a certain peak wind given an observed or forecast average speed. A PC-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) tool was created to display the data quickly.

  6. Moko Disease-Causing Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum from Brazil Extend Known Diversity in Paraphyletic Phylotype II.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Greecy M R; Santos, Liliana A; Felix, Kátia C S; Rollemberg, Christtianno L; Silva, Adriano M F; Souza, Elineide B; Cellier, Gilles; Prior, Philippe; Mariano, Rosa L R

    2014-11-01

    The epidemic situation of Moko disease-causing strains in Latin America and Brazil is unclear. Thirty-seven Ralstonia solanacearum strains from Brazil that cause the Moko disease on banana and heliconia plants were sampled and phylogenetically typed using the endoglucanase (egl) and DNA repair (mutS) genes according to the phylotype and sequevar classification. All of the strains belonged to phylotype II and a portion of the strains was typed as the Moko disease-related sequevars IIA-6 and IIA-24. Nevertheless, two unsuspected sequevars also harbored the Moko disease-causing strains IIA-41 and IIB-25, and a new sequevar was described and named IIA-53. All of the strains were pathogenic to banana and some of the strains of sequevars IIA-6, IIA-24, and IIA-41 were also pathogenic to tomato. The Moko disease-causing strains from sequevar IIB-25 were pathogenic to potato but not to tomato. These results highlight the high diversity of strains of Moko in Brazil, reinforce the efficiency of the egl gene to reveal relationships among these strains, and contribute to a better understanding of the diversity of paraphyletic Moko disease-causing strains of the R. solanacearum species complex, where the following seven distinct genetic clusters have been described: IIA-6, IIA-24, IIA-41, IIA-53, IIB-3, IIB-4, and IIB-25. PMID:24848276

  7. Integrable scalar cosmologies. II. Can they fit into Gauged Extended Supergravity or be encoded in N=1 superpotentials?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fré, P.; Sorin, A. S.; Trigiante, M.

    2014-04-01

    The question whether the integrable one-field cosmologies classified in a previous paper by Fré, Sagnotti and Sorin can be embedded as consistent one-field truncations into Extended Gauged Supergravity or in N=1 supergravity gauged by a superpotential without the use of D-terms is addressed in this paper. The answer is that such an embedding is very difficult and rare but not impossible. Indeed, we were able to find two examples of integrable models embedded in supergravity in this way. Both examples are fitted into N=1 supergravity by means of a very specific and interesting choice of the superpotential W(z). The question whether there are examples of such an embedding in Extended Gauged Supergravity remains open. In the present paper, relying on the embedding tensor formalism we classified all gaugings of the N=2 STU model, confirming, in the absence on hypermultiplets, the uniqueness of the stable de Sitter vacuum found several years ago by Fré, Trigiante and Van Proeyen and excluding the embedding of any integrable cosmological model. A detailed analysis of the space of exact solutions of the first supergravity-embedded integrable cosmological model revealed several new features worth an in-depth consideration. When the scalar potential has an extremum at a negative value, the Universe necessarily collapses into a Big Crunch notwithstanding its spatial flatness. The causal structure of these Universes is quite different from that of the closed, positive curved, Universe: indeed, in this case the particle and event horizons do not coincide and develop complicated patterns. The cosmological consequences of this unexpected mechanism deserve careful consideration. The Cartan fieldshi associated with the Cartan generators of the Lie algebra G, whose number equals the rank r of G/H. For instance, in models associated with toroidal or orbifold compactifications, fields of this type are generically interpreted as radii of the underlying multi-tori. The axion fieldsb

  8. Planck's Dusty GEMS. II. Extended [CII] emission and absorption in the Garnet at z = 3.4 seen with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvadba, N.; Kneissl, R.; Cañameras, R.; Boone, F.; Falgarone, E.; Frye, B.; Gerin, M.; Koenig, S.; Lagache, G.; Le Floc'h, E.; Malhotra, S.; Scott, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present spatially resolved ALMA [CII] observations of the bright (flux density S350 = 400 mJy at 350 μm), gravitationally lensed, starburst galaxy PLCK G045.1+61.1 at z = 3.427, the "Garnet". This source is part of our set of "Planck's Dusty GEMS", discovered with the Planck's all-sky survey. Two emission-line clouds with a relative velocity offset of ~600 km s-1 extend towards north-east and south-west, respectively, of a small, intensely star-forming clump with a star-formation intensity of 220 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2, akin to maximal starbursts. [CII] is also seen in absorption, with a redshift of +350 km s-1 relative to the brightest CO component. [CII] absorption has previously only been found in the Milky Way along sightlines toward bright high-mass star-forming regions, and this is the first detection in another galaxy. Similar to Galactic environments, the [CII] absorption feature is associated with [CI] emission, implying that this is diffuse gas shielded from the UV radiation of the clump, and likely at large distances from the clump. Since absorption can only be seen in front of a continuum source, the gas in this structure can definitely be attributed to gas flowing towards the clump. The absorber could be part of a cosmic filament or merger debris being accreted onto the galaxy. We discuss our results also in light of the on-going debate of the origin of the [CII] deficit in dusty star-forming galaxies. Based on data obtained with ALMA in program 2013.1.01230.S, and with EMIR on the IRAM 30 m telescope in program 223-13.

  9. Probing the Extended Atmosphere and Wind of Betelgeuse with SOFIA-EXES: Exploiting the Forbidden Fe II Ladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Graham M.; Richter, Matthew; O'Gorman, Eamon; DeWitt, Curtis; Guinan, Edward F.; EXES Instrument Team

    2016-01-01

    Betelgeuse is a proving ground for theories of mass loss from cool massive stars: it has little circumstellar dust and low molecular abundances, but it is still able to drive a massive outflow just like its dusty cousins of later spectral-types. To constrain the physical processes causing mass loss we need to examine the conditions in the wind acceleration zone where most of the required energy is deposited. To study the dynamics and thermodynamics in this zone requires spectrally-resolved line profiles from diagnostics with different excitation energies.Forbidden mid-IR Fe II transitions from within the first three terms, with Texc=540 K, 3,400 K, and 11,700 K, provide just such diagnostics. NASA-DLR SOFIA with the Echelon-Cross-Echelle Spectrograph (EXES) provide the required low water vapor (42,000~ft) and spectral resolution (R=50,000) for two of the transitions, while the 17.94 μm line can be observed with TEXES on NASA's IRTF.We present key spectra from our Cycle 2 SOFIA program, which also enabled us to explore the mid-IR signature of the two cm-radio hot-spots that had recently been reported from eMERLIN interferometry. Our high S/N spectra place tight constraints on the amount of warm chromospheric plasma, and we have resolved the 25.99 μm ground-state line for the first time, showing blue-shifted emission from the outflow. Please note that the nature of the puzzling radio-hot spots are now understood.

  10. Oxygen Radical Scavenger Activity, EPR, NMR, Molecular Mechanics and Extended-Hückel Molecular Orbital Investigation of the Bis(Piroxicam)Copper(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Cini, R; Pogni, R; Basosi, R; Donati, A; Rossi, C; Sabadini, L; Rollo, L; Lorenzini, S; Gelli, R; Marcolongo, R

    1995-01-01

    stoichiometry was in fact prepared. (13)C spin-lattice relaxation rates of neutral, zwitterionic and anionic piroxicam, in DMSO solution are explained by the thermal equilibrium between the three most stable structures of the three forms, thus confirming the high quality of the force field. The EPR spectrum of [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] (DMSO/GLY, 2:1, v/v, 298 and 110 K) agrees with a N2O2+O2 pseudo-octahedral coordination geometry. The EPR spectrum of [Cu(II)(Pir)(2).0.5DMF agrees with a pseudo-tetrahedral coordination geometry. The parameters extracted from the room temperature spectra of the solution phases are in agreement with the data reported for powder and frozen solutions. The extended-Hückel calculations on minimum energy structures of [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] and [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)] (square planar) revealed that the HOMOs have a relevant character of d(x) (2)-y(2). On the other hand the HOMO of a computer generated structure for [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)] (pseudo-tetrahedral) has a relevant character of d(xy) atomic orbital. A d(xy) orbital is better suited to allow a dpi-ppi interaction to the O(2) (-) anion. Therefore this work shows that the anti-inflammatory activity of piroxicam could be due in part to the formation of [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)] chelates, which can exert a SOD-like activity. PMID:18472745

  11. An Extended Chain and Trinuclear Complexes Based on Pt(II)-M (M = Tl(I), Pb(II)) Bonds: Contrasting Photophysical Behavior.

    PubMed

    Forniés, Juan; Giménez, Nora; Ibáñez, Susana; Lalinde, Elena; Martín, Antonio; Moreno, M Teresa

    2015-05-01

    The syntheses and structural characterizations of a Pt-Tl chain [{Pt(bzq)(C6F5)2}Tl(Me2CO)]n 1 and two trinuclear Pt2M clusters (NBu4)[{Pt(bzq)(C6F5)2}2Tl] 2 and [{Pt(bzq)(C6F5)2}2Pb] 3 (bzq = 7,8-benzoquinolinyl), stabilized by donor-acceptor Pt → M bonds, are reported. The one-dimensional heterometallic chain 1 is formed by alternate "Pt(bzq)(C6F5)2" and "Tl(Me2CO)" fragments, with Pt-Tl bond separations in the range of 2.961(1)-3.067(1) Å. The isoelectronic trinuclear complexes 2 (which crystallizes in three forms, namely, 2a, 2b, and 2c) and 3 present a sandwich structure in which the Tl(I) or Pb(II) is located between two "Pt(bzq)(C6F5)2" subunits. NMR studies suggest equilibria in solution implying cleavage and reformation of Pt-M bonds. The lowest-lying absorption band in the UV-vis spectra in CH2Cl2 and tetrahydrofuran (THF) of 1, associated with (1)MLCT/(1)L'LCT (1)[5dπ(Pt) → π*(bzq)]/(1)[(C6F5) → bzq], displays a blue shift in relation to the precursor, suggesting the cleavage of the chain maintaining bimetallic Pt-Tl fragments in solution, also supported by NMR spectroscopy. In 2 and 3, it shows a blue shift in THF and a red shift in CH2Cl2, supporting a more extensive cleavage of the Pt-M bonds in THF solutions than in CH2Cl2, where the trinuclear entities are predominant. The Pt-Tl chain 1 displays in solid state a bright orange-red emission ascribed to (3)MM'CT (M' = Tl). It exhibits remarkable and fast reversible vapochromic and vapoluminescent response to donor vapors (THF and Et2O), related to the coordination/decoordination of the guest molecule to the Tl(I) ion, and mechanochromic behavior, associated with the shortening of the intermetallic Pt-Tl separations in the chain induced by grinding. In frozen solutions (THF, acetone, and CH2Cl2) 1 shows interesting luminescence thermochromism with emissions strongly dependent on the solvent, concentration, and excitation wavelengths. The Pt2Tl complex 2 shows an emission close to 1, ascribed to

  12. Formation of the regular satellites of giant planets in an extended gaseous nebula II: satellite migration and survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosqueira, Ignacio; Estrada, Paul R.

    2003-05-01

    For a satellite to survive in the disk the time scale of satellite migration must be longer than the time scale for gas dissipation. For large satellites (˜1000 km) migration is dominated by the gas tidal torque. We consider the possibility that the redistribution of gas in the disk due to the tidal torque of a satellite with mass larger than the inviscid critical mass causes the satellite to stall and open a gap (W.R. Ward, 1997, Icarus 26, 261-281). We adapt the inviscid critical mass criterion to include gas drag, and m-dependent nonlocal deposition of angular momentum. We find that such a model holds promise of explaining the survival of satellites in the subnebula, the mass versus distance relationship apparent in the saturnian and uranian satellite systems, the concentration of mass in Titan, and the observation that the satellites of Jupiter get rockier closer to the planet whereas those of Saturn become increasingly icy. It is also possible that either weak turbulence (close to the planet) or gap-opening satellite tidal torque removes gas on a similar time scale (10 4-10 5 years) as the orbital decay time of midsized (200-700 km) regular satellites forming in the inner disk (inside the centrifugal radius (I. Mosqueira and P.R. Estrada, 2003, Icarus, this issue)). We argue that Saturn's satellite system bridges the gap between those of Jupiter and Uranus by combining the formation of a Galilean-sized satellite in a gas optically thick subnebula with a strong temperature gradient, and the formation of smaller satellites, closer to the planet, in a disk with gas optical depth ≲1, and a weak temperature gradient. Using an optically thick inner disk (given gaseous opacity), and an extended, quiescent, optically thin outer disk, we show that there are regions of the disk of small net tidal torque (even zero) where satellites (Iapetus-sized or larger) may stall far from the planet. For our model these outer regions of small net tidal torque correspond roughly

  13. New dicyano cyclometalated compounds containing Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds as building blocks in 2D extended structures: synthesis, structure, and luminescence studies.

    PubMed

    Sicilia, Violeta; Forniés, Juan; Fuertes, Sara; Martín, Antonio

    2012-10-15

    New mixed metal complexes [PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = 7,8-benzoquinolinate (bzq, 3); 2-phenylpyridinate (ppy, 4)] have been synthesized by reaction of their corresponding precursors (NBu(4))[Pd(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = bzq (1), ppy (2)] with TlPF(6). Compounds 3 and 4 were studied by X-ray diffraction, showing the not-so-common Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds. Both crystal structures exhibit 2-D extended networks fashioned by organometallic "PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)" units, each one containing a donor-acceptor Pd(II)-Tl(I) bond, which are connected through additional Tl···N≡C contacts and weak Tl···π (bzq) contacts in the case of 3. Solid state emissions are red-shifted compared with those of the precursors and have been assigned to metal-metal'-to-ligand charge transfer (MM'LCT [d/s σ*(Pd,Tl) → π*(C^N)]) mixed with some intraligand ((3)IL[π(C^N) → π*(C^N)]) character. In diluted solution either at room temperature or 77 K, the Pd-Tl bond is no longer retained as confirmed by mass spectrometry, NMR, and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques. PMID:22998590

  14. Dynamics of ligand exchange mechanism at Cu(II) in water: An ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics study with extended quantum mechanical region

    SciTech Connect

    Moin, Syed Tarique; Hofer, Thomas S.; Weiss, Alexander K. H.; Rode, Bernd M.

    2013-07-07

    Ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF-MD) were successfully applied to Cu(II) embedded in water to elucidate structure and to understand dynamics of ligand exchange mechanism. From the simulation studies, it was found that using an extended large quantum mechanical region including two shells of hydration is required for a better description of the dynamics of exchanging water molecules. The structural features characterized by radial distribution function, angular distribution function and other analytical parameters were consistent with experimental data. The major outcome of this study was the dynamics of exchange mechanism and reactions in the first hydration shell that could not be studied so far. The dynamical data such as mean residence time of the first shell water molecules and other relevant data from the simulations are close to the results determined experimentally. Another major characteristic of hydrated Cu(II) is the Jahn-Teller distortion which was also successfully reproduced, leading to the final conclusion that the dominating aqua complex is a 6-coordinated species. The ab initio QMCF-MD formalism proved again its capabilities of unraveling even ambiguous properties of hydrated species that are far difficult to explore by any conventional quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach or experiment.

  15. HLA Class I and Class II Conserved Extended Haplotypes and Their Fragments or Blocks in Mexicans: Implications for the Study of Genetic Diversity in Admixed Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Marina; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Yunis, María; Granados-Montiel, Julio; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Granados, Julio; Yunis, Edmond J.

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are highly polymorphic and informative in disease association, transplantation, and population genetics studies with particular importance in the understanding of human population diversity and evolution. The aim of this study was to describe the HLA diversity in Mexican admixed individuals. We studied the polymorphism of MHC class I (HLA-A, -B, -C), and class II (HLA-DRB1, -DQB1) genes using high-resolution sequence based typing (SBT) method and we structured the blocks and conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs) in 234 non-related admixed Mexican individuals (468 haplotypes) by a maximum likelihood method. We found that HLA blocks and CEHs are primarily from Amerindian and Caucasian origin, with smaller participation of African and recent Asian ancestry, demonstrating a great diversity of HLA blocks and CEHs in Mexicans from the central area of Mexico. We also analyzed the degree of admixture in this group using short tandem repeats (STRs) and HLA-B that correlated with the frequency of most probable ancestral HLA-C/−B and -DRB1/−DQB1 blocks and CEHs. Our results contribute to the analysis of the diversity and ancestral contribution of HLA class I and HLA class II alleles and haplotypes of Mexican admixed individuals from Mexico City. This work will help as a reference to improve future studies in Mexicans regarding allotransplantation, immune responses and disease associations. PMID:24086347

  16. Time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godik, V. I.; Blankenship, R. E.; Causgrove, T. P.; Woodbury, N.

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence of reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, both stationary and time-resolved, was studied. Fluorescence kinetics were found to fit best a sum of four discrete exponential components. Half of the initial amplitude was due to a component with a lifetime of congruent to 60 ps, belonging to Trp residues, capable of efficient transfer of excitation energy to bacteriochlorophyll molecules of the reaction center. The three other components seem to be emitted by Trp ground-state conformers, unable to participate in such a transfer. Under the influence of intense actinic light, photooxidizing the reaction centers, the yield of stationary fluorescence diminished by congruent to 1.5 times, while the number of the kinetic components and their life times remained practically unchanged. Possible implications of the observed effects for the primary photosynthesis events are considered.

  17. Decoherence dynamics of coherent electronic excited states in the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xian-Ting; Zhang, Wei-Min; Zhuo, Yi-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical description to the quantum coherence and decoherence phenomena of energy transfer in photosynthesis observed in a recent experiment [Science 316, 1462 (2007)]. As a successive two-color laser pulses with selected frequencies cast on a sample of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rb. sphaeroides two resonant excitations of electrons in chromophores can be generated. However, this effective two-level subsystem will interact with its protein environment and decoherence is inevitable. We describe this subsystem coupled with its environment as a dynamical spin-boson model. The non-Markovian decoherence dynamics is described using a quasiadiabatic propagator path integral (QUAPI) approach. With the photon-induced effective time-dependent level splitting energy and level flip coupling coefficient between the two excited states and the environment-induced non-Markovian decoherence dynamics, our theoretical result is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Energy transfer properties of Rhodobacter sphaeroides chromatophores during adaptation to low light intensity.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, B; Lunceford, C; Lin, S; Woronowicz, K; Niederman, R A; Woodbury, N W

    2014-08-28

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to explore the pathway and kinetics of energy transfer in photosynthetic membrane vesicles (chromatophores) isolated from Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides cells harvested 2, 4, 6 or 24 hours after a transition from growth in high to low level illumination. As previously observed, this light intensity transition initiates the remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus and an increase in the number of light harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes relative to light harvesting 1 (LH1) and reaction center (RC) complexes. It has generally been thought that the increase in LH2 complexes served the purpose of increasing the overall energy transmission to the RC. However, fluorescence lifetime measurements and analysis in terms of energy transfer within LH2 and between LH2 and LH1 indicate that, during the remodeling time period measured, only a portion of the additional LH2 generated are well connected to LH1 and the reaction center. The majority of the additional LH2 fluorescence decays with a lifetime comparable to that of free, unconnected LH2 complexes. The presence of large LH2-only domains has been observed by atomic force microscopy in Rba. sphaeroides chromatophores (Bahatyrova et al., Nature, 2004, 430, 1058), providing structural support for the existence of pools of partially connected LH2 complexes. These LH2-only domains represent the light-responsive antenna complement formed after a switch in growth conditions from high to low illumination, while the remaining LH2 complexes occupy membrane regions containing mixtures of LH2 and LH1-RC core complexes. The current study utilized a multi-parameter approach to explore the fluorescence spectroscopic properties related to the remodeling process, shedding light on the structure-function relationship of the photosynthetic assembles. Possible reasons for the accumulation of these largely disconnected LH2-only pools are discussed. PMID:25008288

  19. Thioredoxin Is Involved in Oxygen-Regulated Formation of the Photosynthetic Apparatus of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Cecile; Haberzettl, Kerstin; Klug, Gabriele

    1999-01-01

    Thioredoxin, a redox active protein, has been previously demonstrated to be essential for growth of the anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. In the present study, the involvement of thioredoxin in the formation of the photosynthetic apparatus of R. sphaeroides WS8 was investigated by construction and analysis of a mutant strain disrupted for the chromosomal trxA copy and carrying a plasmid-borne copy of trxA under the control of the hybrid ptrc promoter inducible by IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside). This strain was viable in the absence of IPTG but was affected in pigmentation. When shifted from high to low oxygen tension conditions, the trxA mutant showed a reduced bacteriochlorophyll content in comparison to that of the wild type. Although thioredoxin is able to regulate aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthase (the first enzyme of the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway) activity by a dithiol-disulfide exchange, our mutant strain exhibited a level of ALA synthase activity identical to that of the wild type, suggesting that thioredoxin is involved in other steps to regulate the synthesis of the photosynthetic apparatus. Accordingly, we showed that the trxA mutation affects the oxygen-regulated expression of the puf operon encoding the pigment-binding proteins of the light-harvesting and reaction center complexes. Upon transition from aerobic to semiaerobic growth conditions, the maximal puf mRNA level was found to be 40 to 50% lower in the mutant strain than in the wild type. The stability of the puf transcripts was identical in both strains grown under low oxygen tension, indicating that the role of thioredoxin in regulating puf expression occurs at the transcriptional level. PMID:9864318

  20. Unusual Regulation of a Leaderless Operon Involved in the Catabolism of Dimethylsulfoniopropionate in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Matthew J.; Curson, Andrew R. J.; Shearer, Neil; Todd, Jonathan D.; Green, Robert T.; Johnston, Andrew W. B.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2.4.1 is a widely studied bacterium that has recently been shown to cleave the abundant marine anti-stress molecule dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) into acrylate plus gaseous dimethyl sulfide. It does so by using a lyase encoded by dddL, the promoter-distal gene of a three-gene operon, acuR-acuI-dddL. Transcription of the operon was enhanced when cells were pre-grown with the substrate DMSP, but this induction is indirect, and requires the conversion of DMSP to the product acrylate, the bona fide co-inducer. This regulation is mediated by the product of the promoter-proximal gene acuR, a transcriptional regulator in the TetR family. AcuR represses the operon in the absence of acrylate, but this is relieved by the presence of the co-inducer. Another unusual regulatory feature is that the acuR-acuI-dddL mRNA transcript is leaderless, such that acuR lacks a Shine-Dalgarno ribosomal binding site and 5′-UTR, and is translated at a lower level compared to the downstream genes. This regulatory unit may be quite widespread in bacteria, since several other taxonomically diverse lineages have adjacent acuR-like and acuI-like genes; these operons also have no 5′ leader sequences or ribosomal binding sites and their predicted cis-acting regulatory sequences resemble those of R. sphaeroides acuR-acuI-dddL. PMID:21249136

  1. 5-Aminolevulinate production by Escherichia coli containing the Rhodobacter sphaeroides hemA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Werf, M.J.; Zeikus, J.G. |

    1996-10-01

    The Rhodobacter sphaeroides hemA gene codes for 5-aminolevulinate (ALA) synthase. This enzyme catalyzes the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent condensation of succinyl coenzyme A and glycine-forming ALA. The R. sphaeroides hemA gene in the pUC18/19 vector system was transformed into Escherichia coli. The effects of both genetic and physiological factors on the expression of ALA synthase and the production of ALA were studied. ALA synthase activity levels were maximal when hemA had the same transcription direction as the lac promoter. The distance between the lac promoter and hemA affected the expression of ALA synthase on different growth substrates. The E. coli host strain used had an enormous effect on the ALA synthase activity level and on the production of ALA, with E. coli DH1 being best suited. The ALA synthase activity level was also dependent on the carbon source. Succinate, L-malate, fumarate, and L-aspartate gave the highest levels of ALA synthase activity, while the use of lactose as a carbon source resulted in a repression of ALA synthase. After growth on succinate, ALA synthase represented {approx}5% of total cellular protein. The ALA synthase activity level was also dependent on the pH of the medium, with maximal activity occurring at pH 6.5. ALA production by whole cells was limited by the availability of glycine, and the addition of 2 g of glycine per liter to the growth medium increased the production of ALA fivefold, to 2.25 mM. In recombinant E. coli extracts, up to 22 mM ALA was produced from succinate, glycine, and ATP. 58 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Connectivity of the intracytoplasmic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: a functional approach.

    PubMed

    Verméglio, André; Lavergne, Jérôme; Rappaport, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    The photosynthetic apparatus in the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is mostly present in intracytoplasmic membrane invaginations. It has long been debated whether these invaginations remain in topological continuity with the cytoplasmic membrane, or form isolated chromatophore vesicles. This issue is revisited here by functional approaches. The ionophore gramicidin was used as a probe of the relative size of the electro-osmotic units in isolated chromatophores, spheroplasts, or intact cells. The decay of the membrane potential was monitored from the electrochromic shift of carotenoids. The half-time of the decay induced by a single channel in intact cells was about 6 ms, thus three orders of magnitude slower than in isolated chromatophores. In spheroplasts obtained by lysis of the cell wall, the single channel decay was still slower (~23 ms) and the sensitivity toward the gramicidin concentration was enhanced 1,000-fold with respect to isolated chromatophores. These results indicate that the area of the functional membrane in cells or spheroplasts is about three orders of magnitude larger than that of isolated chromatophores. Intracytoplasmic vesicles, if present, could contribute to at most 10% of the photosynthetic apparatus in intact cells of Rba. sphaeroides. Similar conclusions were obtained from the effect of a ∆pH-induced diffusion potential in intact cells. This caused a large electrochromic response of carotenoids, of similar amplitude as the light-induced change, indicating that most of the system is sensitive to a pH change of the external medium. A single internal membrane and periplasmic space may offer significant advantages concerning renewal of the photosynthetic apparatus and reallocation of the components shared with other bioenergetic pathways. PMID:25512104

  3. Role of norEF in Denitrification, Elucidated by Physiological Experiments with Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Bergaust, Linda L.; Hartsock, Angela; Liu, Binbin; Bakken, Lars R.

    2014-01-01

    Many denitrifying organisms contain the norEF gene cluster, which codes for two proteins that are thought to be involved in denitrification because they are expressed during the reduction of nitrite and nitric oxide. The products of both genes are predicted to be membrane associated, and the norE product is a member of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit III family. However, the specific role of norEF is unknown. The denitrification phenotypes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides strains with and without norEF genes were studied, and it was found that loss of norEF lowered the rate of denitrification from nitrate and resulted in accumulation of micromolar concentrations of nitric oxide during denitrification from nitrite. norEF appears to have no direct role in the reduction of nitric oxide; however, since deletion of norEF in the wild-type 2.4.3 strain had essentially no influence on the kinetics of potential nitric oxide reduction (Vmax and Ks), as measured by monitoring the depletion of a bolus of nitric oxide injected into anoxic cultures without any other electron acceptors. However, norEF-deficient cells that had undergone a more chronic exposure to micromolar concentrations of nitric oxide showed an ∼50% reduction in Vmax but no change in apparent Ks. These results can explain the occurrence of norEF in the 2.4.3 strain of R. sphaeroides, which can reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, and their absence from strains such as 2.4.1, which likely use nitric oxide reductase to mitigate stress due to episodic exposure to nitric oxide from exogenous sources. PMID:24706737

  4. Biochemical Characterization of the Flagellar Rod Components of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: Properties and Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Osorio-Valeriano, Manuel; de la Mora, Javier; Camarena, Laura

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The flagellar basal body is a rotary motor that spans the cytoplasmic and outer membranes. The rod is a drive shaft that transmits torque generated by the motor through the hook to the filament that propels the bacterial cell. The assembly and structure of the rod are poorly understood. In a first attempt to characterize this structure in the alphaproteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we overexpressed and purified FliE and the four related rod proteins (FlgB, FlgC, FlgF, and FlgG), and we analyzed their ability to form homo-oligomers. We found that highly purified preparations of these proteins formed high-molecular-mass oligomers that tended to dissociate in the presence of NaCl. As predicted by in silico modeling, the four rod proteins share architectural features. Using affinity blotting, we detected the heteromeric interactions between these proteins. In addition, we observed that deletion of the N- and C-terminal regions of FlgF and FlgG severely affected heteromeric but not homomeric interactions. On the basis of our findings, we propose a model of rod assembly in this bacterium. IMPORTANCE Despite the considerable amount of research on the structure and assembly of other flagellar axial structures that has been conducted, the rod has been barely studied. An analysis of the biochemical characteristics of the flagellar rod components of the Fla1 system of R. sphaeroides is presented in this work. We also analyze the interactions of these proteins with each other and with their neighbors, and we propose a model for the order in which they are assembled. PMID:26574514

  5. Nitrite and Nitrous Oxide Reductase Regulation by Nitrogen Oxides in Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106

    PubMed Central

    Sabaty, Monique; Schwintner, Carole; Cahors, Sandrine; Richaud, Pierre; Verméglio, Andre

    1999-01-01

    We have cloned the nap locus encoding the periplasmic nitrate reductase in Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106. A mutant with this enzyme deleted is unable to grow under denitrifying conditions. Biochemical analysis of this mutant shows that in contrast to the wild-type strain, the level of synthesis of the nitrite and N2O reductases is not increased by the addition of nitrate. Growth under denitrifying conditions and induction of N oxide reductase synthesis are both restored by the presence of a plasmid containing the genes encoding the nitrate reductase. This demonstrates that R. sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106 does not possess an efficient membrane-bound nitrate reductase and that nitrate is not the direct inducer for the nitrite and N2O reductases in this species. In contrast, we show that nitrite induces the synthesis of the nitrate reductase. PMID:10498715

  6. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductase regulation by nitrogen oxides in Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106.

    PubMed

    Sabaty, M; Schwintner, C; Cahors, S; Richaud, P; Verméglio, A

    1999-10-01

    We have cloned the nap locus encoding the periplasmic nitrate reductase in Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106. A mutant with this enzyme deleted is unable to grow under denitrifying conditions. Biochemical analysis of this mutant shows that in contrast to the wild-type strain, the level of synthesis of the nitrite and N(2)O reductases is not increased by the addition of nitrate. Growth under denitrifying conditions and induction of N oxide reductase synthesis are both restored by the presence of a plasmid containing the genes encoding the nitrate reductase. This demonstrates that R. sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106 does not possess an efficient membrane-bound nitrate reductase and that nitrate is not the direct inducer for the nitrite and N(2)O reductases in this species. In contrast, we show that nitrite induces the synthesis of the nitrate reductase. PMID:10498715

  7. Logo and Extended Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desilets, Brendan J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes use of the programing language "Logo" and the Apple II computer to teach high school students how to write extended definitions. By defining procedures in Logo for drawing simple geometric patterns, students learn that good definition requires precision, rewriting and, in complex tasks, recursion, an aspect of extended definition…

  8. Acrylyl-coenzyme A reductase, an enzyme involved in the assimilation of 3-hydroxypropionate by Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Asao, Marie; Alber, Birgit E

    2013-10-01

    The anoxygenic phototroph Rhodobacter sphaeroides uses 3-hydroxypropionate as a sole carbon source for growth. Previously, we showed that the gene (RSP_1434) known as acuI, which encodes a protein of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR) superfamily, was involved in 3-hydroxypropionate assimilation via the reductive conversion to propionyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Based on these results, we speculated that acuI encoded acrylyl-CoA reductase. In this work, we characterize the in vitro enzyme activity of purified, recombinant AcuI using a coupled spectrophotometric assay. AcuI from R. sphaeroides catalyzes the NADPH-dependent acrylyl-CoA reduction to produce propionyl-CoA. Two other members of the MDR012 family within the MDR superfamily, the products of SPO_1914 from Ruegeria pomeroyi and yhdH from Escherichia coli, were shown to also be part of this new class of NADPH-dependent acrylyl-CoA reductases. The activities of the three enzymes were characterized by an extremely low Km for acrylyl-CoA (<3 μM) and turnover numbers of 45 to 80 s(-1). These homodimeric enzymes were highly specific for NADPH (Km = 18 to 33 μM), with catalytic efficiencies of more than 10-fold higher for NADPH than for NADH. The introduction of codon-optimized SPO_1914 or yhdH into a ΔacuI::kan mutant of R. sphaeroides on a plasmid complemented 3-hydroxypropionate-dependent growth. However, in their native hosts, SPO_1914 and yhdH are believed to function in the metabolism of substrates other than 3-hydroxypropionate, where acrylyl-CoA is an intermediate. Complementation of the ΔacuI::kan mutant phenotype by crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase from R. sphaeroides was attributed to the fact that the enzyme also uses acrylyl-CoA as a substrate. PMID:23955006

  9. Quantifying the effects of light intensity on bioproduction and maintenance energy during photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Imam, Saheed; Fitzgerald, Colin M; Cook, Emily M; Donohue, Timothy J; Noguera, Daniel R

    2015-02-01

    Obtaining a better understanding of the physiology and bioenergetics of photosynthetic microbes is an important step toward optimizing these systems for light energy capture or production of valuable commodities. In this work, we analyzed the effect of light intensity on bioproduction, biomass formation, and maintenance energy during photoheterotrophic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Using data obtained from steady-state bioreactors operated at varying dilution rates and light intensities, we found that irradiance had a significant impact on biomass yield and composition, with significant changes in photopigment, phospholipid, and biopolymer storage contents. We also observed a linear relationship between incident light intensity and H2 production rate between 3 and 10 W m(-2), with saturation observed at 100 W m(-2). The light conversion efficiency to H2 was also higher at lower light intensities. Photosynthetic maintenance energy requirements were also significantly affected by light intensity, with links to differences in biomass composition and the need to maintain redox homeostasis. Inclusion of the measured condition-dependent biomass and maintenance energy parameters and the measured photon uptake rate into a genome-scale metabolic model for R. sphaeroides (iRsp1140) significantly improved its predictive performance. We discuss how our analyses provide new insights into the light-dependent changes in bioenergetic requirements and physiology during photosynthetic growth of R. sphaeroides and potentially other photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25428581

  10. Structural and genetic analysis of a mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides WS8 deficient in hook length control.

    PubMed Central

    González-Pedrajo, B; Ballado, T; Campos, A; Sockett, R E; Camarena, L; Dreyfus, G

    1997-01-01

    Motility in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is achieved by the unidirectional rotation of a single subpolar flagellum. In this study, transposon mutagenesis was used to obtain nonmotile flagellar mutants from this bacterium. We report here the isolation and characterization of a mutant that shows a polyhook phenotype. Morphological characterization of the mutant was done by electron microscopy. Polyhooks were obtained by shearing and were used to purify the hook protein monomer (FlgE). The apparent molecular mass of the hook protein was 50 kDa. N-terminal amino acid sequencing and comparisons with the hook proteins of other flagellated bacteria indicated that the Rhodobacter hook protein has consensus sequences common to axial flagellar components. A 25-kb fragment from an R. sphaeroides WS8 cosmid library restored wild-type flagellation and motility to the mutant. Using DNA adjacent to the inserted transposon as a probe, we identified a 4.6-kb SalI restriction fragment that contained the gene responsible for the polyhook phenotype. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this region revealed an open reading frame with a deduced amino acid sequence that was 23.4% identical to that of FliK of Salmonella typhimurium, the polypeptide responsible for hook length control in that enteric bacterium. The relevance of a gene homologous to fliK in the uniflagellated bacterium R. sphaeroides is discussed. PMID:9352903

  11. A Cu{sup 2+} site common to photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers from Rb. sphaeroides, Rb. capsulatus, and Rps. viridis.

    SciTech Connect

    Utschig, L. M.; Poluektov, O.; Schlesselman, S. L.; Thurnauer, M. C.; Tiede, D. M.; Chemistry

    2001-05-22

    The interaction of metal ions with isolated photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from the purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, and Rhodopseudomonas viridis has been investigated with transient optical and magnetic resonance techniques. In RCs from all species, the electrochromic response of the bacteriopheophytin cofactors associated with Q{sub A}{sup -}Q{sub B} {yields} Q{sub A}Q{sub B}{sup -} electron transfer is slowed in the presence of Cu{sup 2+}. This slowing is similar to the metal ion effect observed for RCs from Rb. sphaeroides where Zn{sup 2+} was bound to a specific site on the surface of the RC [Utschig et al. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 8278]. The coordination environments of the Cu{sup 2+} sites were probed with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, providing the first direct spectroscopic evidence for the existence of a second metal site in RCs from Rb. capsulatus and Rps. viridis. In the dark, RCs with Cu{sup 2+} bound to the surface exhibit axially symmetric EPR spectra. Electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectral results indicate multiple weakly hyperfine coupled {sup 14}N nuclei in close proximity to Cu{sup 2+}. These ESEEM spectra resemble those observed for Cu{sup 2+} RCs from Rb. sphaeroides [Utschig et al. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 2961] and indicate that two or more histidines ligate the Cu{sup 2+} at the surface site in each RC. Thus, RCs from Rb. sphaeroides, Rb. capsulatus, and Rps. viridis each have a structurally analogous Cu{sup 2+} binding site that is involved in modulating the Q{sub A}{sup -}Q{sub B} {yields} Q{sub A}Q{sub B}{sup -} electron-transfer process. Inspection of the Rps. viridis crystal structure reveals four potential histidine ligands from three different subunits (M16, H178, H72, and L211) located beneath the Q{sub B} binding pocket. The location of these histidines is surprisingly similar to the grouping of four histidine residues (H68, H126, H128, and L211) observed in

  12. Identification of unsaturated N-acylhomoserine lactones in bacterial isolates of Rhodobacter sphaeroides by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-hybrid linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Bianco, Giuliana; Abate, Salvatore; Losito, Ilario

    2011-07-15

    The identification of two unsaturated N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) produced by Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacteria, based on liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap (LTQ)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer upon electrospray ionization (ESI), is presented. Besides the confirmation of the signaling molecule already described in the literature, i.e. (Z)-N-tetradec-7-enoyl-homoserine lactone (C(14:1)-HSL), we have discovered the occurrence, at low, yet significant levels, of another monounsaturated compound, C(12:1) -HSL, which may extend the number of small diffusible chemical signals known for R. sphaeroides. Both unsaturated AHLs were identified by high-resolution FTICR mass spectrometry in extracts of bacterial culture media and the occurrence of a C=C bond was assessed upon their conversion into bromohydrins. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra were then collected on the LTQ mass analyzer. A careful comparison of tandem MS spectra of monounsaturated (i.e., C(12:1)-HSL and C(14:1)-HSL) and saturated AHLs (i.e. C(12)-HSL and C(14)-HSL) led to the emphasis of two series of product ions, exhibiting 14 Da spaced m/z ratios. Both series were referred to progressive fragmentations at the aliphatic end of the AHL acyl chains, followed by neutral losses of terminal alkenes (i.e. CH(2)=CH(CH(2))(n)H). In particular, the series located at the higher end of the explored m/z range (>200 Da), observed only for monounsaturated species, enabled the location of the C=C bond between carbons 7 and 8 of the acyl chain. PMID:21638357

  13. Multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization of PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, Udo; Meinhart, Anton; Winkler, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Crystal structures of two truncated variants of the transcription factor PpsR from R. sphaeroides are presented that enabled the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct. Together, these structures reveal the importance of α-helical PAS extensions for multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function. Per–ARNT–Sim (PAS) domains are essential modules of many multi-domain signalling proteins that mediate protein interaction and/or sense environmental stimuli. Frequently, multiple PAS domains are present within single polypeptide chains, where their interplay is required for protein function. Although many isolated PAS domain structures have been reported over the last decades, only a few structures of multi-PAS proteins are known. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function is poorly understood. The transcription factor PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is such a multi-PAS domain protein that, in addition to its three PAS domains, contains a glutamine-rich linker and a C-terminal helix–turn–helix DNA-binding motif. Here, crystal structures of two N-terminally and C-terminally truncated PpsR variants that comprise a single (PpsR{sub Q-PAS1}) and two (PpsR{sub N-Q-PAS1}) PAS domains, respectively, are presented and the multi-step strategy required for the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct (PpsR{sub ΔHTH}) is illustrated. While parts of the biologically relevant dimerization interface can already be observed in the two shorter constructs, the PpsR{sub ΔHTH} structure reveals how three PAS domains enable the formation of multiple oligomeric states (dimer, tetramer and octamer), highlighting that not only the PAS cores but also their α-helical extensions are essential for protein oligomerization. The results demonstrate that the long helical glutamine-rich linker of PpsR results from a direct fusion of the N-cap of the PAS1 domain with the C-terminal extension of the N-domain that

  14. Early Bacteriopheophytin Reduction in Charge Separation in Reaction Centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingyi; van Stokkum, Ivo H.M.; Paparelli, Laura; Jones, Michael R.; Groot, Marie Louise

    2013-01-01

    A question at the forefront of biophysical sciences is, to what extent do quantum effects and protein conformational changes play a role in processes such as biological sensing and energy conversion? At the heart of photosynthetic energy transduction lie processes involving ultrafast energy and electron transfers among a small number of tetrapyrrole pigments embedded in the interior of a protein. In the purple bacterial reaction center (RC), a highly efficient ultrafast charge separation takes place between a pair of bacteriochlorophylls: an accessory bacteriochlorophyll (B) and bacteriopheophytin (H). In this work, we applied ultrafast spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral region to Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs to accurately track the timing of the electron on BA and HA via the appearance of the BA and HA anion bands. We observed an unexpectedly early rise of the HA− band that challenges the accepted simple picture of stepwise electron transfer with 3 ps and 1 ps time constants. The implications for the mechanism of initial charge separation in bacterial RCs are discussed in terms of a possible adiabatic electron transfer step between BA and HA, and the effect of protein conformation on the electron transfer rate. PMID:23746522

  15. Amelioration of dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis in mice by Rhodobacter sphaeroides extract.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Man-Chin; Chiu, Kuo-Hsun; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Lee, Che-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria can produce some compounds in response to their environment. These compounds are widely used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications. Some probiotics have immunomodulatory activities and modulate the symptoms of several diseases. Autoimmune diseases represent a complex group of conditions that are thought to be mediated through the development of autoreactive immunoresponses. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is common autoimmune disease that affects many individuals worldwide. Previously, we found that the extracts of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Lycogen) inhibited nitric oxide production and inducible nitric-oxide synthase expression in activated macrophages. In this study, the effect of Lycogen, a potent anti-inflammatory agent, was evaluated in mice with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Oral administration of Lycogen reduced the expressions of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) in female BABL/c mice. In addition, the increased number of bacterial flora in the colon induced by DSS was amelirated by Lycogen. The histological score of intestinal inflammation in 5% DSS-treated mice after oral administration of Lycogen was lower than that of control mice. Meanwhile, Lycogen dramatically prolonged the survival of mice with severe colitis. These findings identified that Lycogen is an anti-inflammatory agent with the capacity to ameliorate DSS-induced colitis. PMID:23159923

  16. A Novel Component of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides Fla1 Flagellum Is Essential for Motor Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Cabrera, Victor; Poggio, Sebastian; Domenzain, Clelia; Osorio, Aurora; Dreyfus, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Here we describe a novel component essential for flagellar rotation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. This protein is encoded by motF (RSP_0067), the first gene of a predicted transcriptional unit which contains two hypothetical genes. Sequence analysis indicated that MotF is a bitopic membrane-spanning protein. Protease sensitivity assays and green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions confirmed this prediction and allowed us to conclude that the C terminus of MotF is located in the periplasmic space. Wild-type cells expressing a functional GFP-MotF fusion show a single fluorescent focus per cell. The localization of this protein in different genetic backgrounds allowed us to determine that normal localization of MotF depends on the presence of FliL and MotB. Characterization of a ΔmotF pseudorevertant strain revealed that a single nucleotide change in motB suppresses the Mot− phenotype of the motF mutant. Additionally, we show that MotF also becomes dispensable when other mutant alleles of motB previously isolated as second-site suppressors of ΔfliL were expressed in the motF mutant strain. These results show that MotF is a new component of the Fla1 flagellum, which together with FliL is required to promote flagellar rotation, possibly through MotB. PMID:22961858

  17. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil by Rhodobacter sphaeroides biofertilizer and plants.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Haihua; Luo, Jinxue; Zhang, Yiming; Xu, Shengjun; Bai, Zhihui; Huang, Zhanbin

    2015-09-01

    Bio-augmentation is a promising technique for remediation of polluted soils. This study aimed to evaluate the bio-augmentation effect of Rhodobacter sphaeroides biofertilizer (RBF) on the bioremediation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) contaminated soil. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted over a period of 120 days, three methods for enhancing bio-augmentation were tested on TPH contaminated soils, including single addition RBF, planting, and combining of RBF and three crop species, such as wheat (W), cabbage (C) and spinach (S), respectively. The results demonstrated that the best removal of TPH from contaminated soil in the RBF bio-augmentation rhizosphere soils was found to be 46.2%, 65.4%, 67.5% for W+RBF, C+RBF, S+RBF rhizosphere soils respectively. RBF supply impacted on the microbial community diversity (phospholipid fatty acids, PLFA) and the activity of soil enzymes, such as dehydrogenase (DH), alkaline phosphatase (AP) and urease (UR). There were significant difference among the soil only containing crude oil (CK), W, C and S rhizosphere soils and RBF bio-augmentation soils. Moreover, the changes were significantly distinct depended on crops species. It was concluded that the RBF is a valuable material for improving effect of remediation of TPH polluted soils. PMID:26525019

  18. Membrane-bound, pyridine nucleotide-independent L-lactate dehydrogenase of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Markwell, J P; Lascelles, J

    1978-01-01

    Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides has a pyridine nucleotide-independent L-lactate dehydrogenase associated with the membrane fraction of cells grown either aerobically or phototrophically. The dehydrogenase is present in cells grown on a variety of carbon sources, but at levels less than 20% of that found in cells grown with DL-lactate. The dehydrogenase has been purified 45-fold from membranes of strain L-57, a non-photosynthetic mutant, by steps involving solubilization with lauryl dimethylamine oxide and three anion-exchange chromatography steps. The purified enzyme was specific for the L-isomer of lactate. The Km of the purified enzyme for L-lactate is 1.4 mM, whereas that of the membrane-associated enzyme is 0.5 mM. The enzyme activity was inhibited competitively by D-lactate and non-competitively by oxalate and oxamate. Quinacrine, a flavin analog, also inhibited the activity. The inducible enzyme may serve as a marker of membrane protein in studies of membrane development. PMID:304854

  19. Spectral exhibition of electron-vibrational relaxation in P* state of Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Andrei G; Shuvalov, Vladimir A

    2015-08-01

    Electron-vibrational relaxation in the excited state of the primary electron donor, bacteriochlorophyll dimer P, in the reaction centers (RCs) of purple photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides is modeled. A multimode model of three states (i.e., the ground state Pg, initially excited P1*, and relaxed excited P2*) is used to calculate the incoherent dynamics of the difference (ΔA) spectra on a femtosecond timescale for the YM210 W mutant RCs. The relaxation processes are described by the step-ladder model. The model shows that the electron-vibrational relaxation in the excited state of P is visualized by the transient red shift of the stimulated emission from P*. The dynamics of this shift is observed as a change in the ΔA spectrum shape in its red-most part, within a few hundreds of femtoseconds after excitation. As a result, an initial rise in the red-side ΔA kinetics is delayed with respect to the blue-side kinetics. The time constant of the P1* → P2* electronic relaxation (54 fs) and the Pg, P1*, and P2* vibrational relaxations (120 fs), used in the model, provided the best fit of the experimental time-resolved ΔA spectra and kinetics at 90 and 293 K. The possible nature of the P1* → P2* electronic relaxation is discussed. PMID:25240681

  20. The Extract of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Inhibits Melanogenesis through the MEK/ERK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Sheng; Kuan, Yu-Diao; Chiu, Kuo-Hsun; Wang, Wei-Kuang; Chang, Fu-Hsin; Liu, Chen-Hsun; Lee, Che-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Reducing hyperpigmentation has been a big issue for years. Even though pigmentation is a normal mechanism protecting skin from UV-causing DNA damage and oxidative stress, it is still an aesthetic problem for many people. Bacteria can produce some compounds in response to their environment. These compounds are widely used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications. Some probiotics have immunomodulatory activities and modulate the symptoms of several diseases. Previously, we found that the extracts of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Lycogen™) inhibited nitric oxide production and inducible nitric-oxide synthase expression in activated macrophages. In this study, we sought to investigate an anti-melanogenic signaling pathway in α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-treated B16F10 melanoma cells and zebrafish. Treatment with Lycogen™ inhibited the cellular melanin contents and expression of melanogenesis-related protein, including microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase in B16F10 cells. Moreover, Lycogen™ reduced phosphorylation of MEK/ERK without affecting phosphorylation of p38. Meanwhile, Lycogen™ decreased zebrafish melanin expression in a dose-dependent manner. These findings establish Lycogen™ as a new target in melanogenesis and suggest a mechanism of action through the ERK signaling pathway. Our results suggested that Lycogen™ may have potential cosmetic usage in the future. PMID:23736765

  1. Native Mass Spectrometry Characterizes the Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex from the Purple Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Harrington, Lucas B.; Lu, Yue; Prado, Mindy; Saer, Rafael; Rempel, Don; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) is an emerging approach to study protein complexes in their near-native states and to elucidate their stoichiometry and topology. Here, we report a native MS study of the membrane-embedded reaction center (RC) protein complex from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The membrane-embedded RC protein complex is stabilized by detergent micelles in aqueous solution, directly introduced into a mass spectrometer by nano-electrospray (nESI), and freed of detergents and dissociated in the gas phase by collisional activation. As the collision energy is increased, the chlorophyll pigments are gradually released from the RC complex, suggesting that native MS introduces a near-native structure that continues to bind pigments. Two bacteriochlorophyll a pigments remain tightly bound to the RC protein at the highest collision energy. The order of pigment release and their resistance to release by gas-phase activation indicates the strength of pigment interaction in the RC complex. This investigation sets the stage for future native MS studies of membrane-embedded photosynthetic pigment-protein and related complexes.

  2. Molecular Cloning, Overexpression and Characterization of a Novel Water Channel Protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Erbakan, Mustafa; Shen, Yue-xiao; Grzelakowski, Mariusz; Butler, Peter J.; Kumar, Manish; Curtis, Wayne R.

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporins are highly selective water channel proteins integrated into plasma membranes of single cell organisms; plant roots and stromae; eye lenses, renal and red blood cells in vertebrates. To date, only a few microbial aquaporins have been characterized and their physiological importance is not well understood. Here we report on the cloning, expression and characterization of a novel aquaporin, RsAqpZ, from a purple photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides ATCC 17023. The protein was expressed homologously at a high yield (∼20 mg/L culture) under anaerobic photoheterotrophic growth conditions. Stopped-flow light scattering experiments demonstrated its high water permeability (0.17±0.05 cm/s) and low energy of activation for water transport (2.93±0.60 kcal/mol) in reconstituted proteoliposomes at a protein to lipid ratio (w/w) of 0.04. We developed a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy based technique and utilized a fluorescent protein fusion of RsAqpZ, to estimate the single channel water permeability of RsAqpZ as 1.24 (±0.41) x 10−12 cm3/s or 4.17 (±1.38)×1010 H2O molecules/s, which is among the highest single channel permeability reported for aquaporins. Towards application to water purification technologies, we also demonstrated functional incorporation of RsAqpZ in amphiphilic block copolymer membranes. PMID:24497982

  3. Isolation and characterization of the nifUSVW-rpoN gene cluster from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, W G; Tabita, F R

    1992-01-01

    The rpoN gene from Rhodobacter sphaeroides was isolated from a genomic library via complementation of a Rhodobacter capsulatus rpoN mutant. The rpoN gene was located on a 7.5-kb HindIII-EcoRI fragment. A Tn5 insertion analysis of this DNA fragment showed that a minimal DNA fragment of 5.3 kb was required for complementation. Nucleotide sequencing of the complementing region revealed the presence of nifUSVW genes upstream from rpoN. The rpoN gene was mutagenized via insertion of a gene encoding kanamycin resistance. The resulting rpoN mutant was not impaired in diazotrophic growth and was in all respects indistinguishable from the wild-type strain. Southern hybridizations using the cloned rpoN gene as a probe indicated the presence of a second rpoN gene. Deletion of the nifUS genes resulted in strongly reduced diazotrophic growth. Two conserved regions were identified in a NifV LeuA amino acid sequence alignment. Similar regions were found in pyruvate carboxylase and oxaloacetate decarboxylase. It is proposed that these conserved regions represent keto acid-binding sites. Images PMID:1317839

  4. Structure and physical map of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides bacteriophage RS1 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, T J; Chory, J; Goldsand, T E; Lynn, S P; Kaplan, S

    1985-01-01

    We analyzed, by restriction endonuclease mapping and electron microscopy, the genome of the lytic Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides-specific bacteriophage RS1 and characterized it as a linear molecule of approximately 60 to 65 kilobases. When the DNA from purified phage particles was examined by several independent methods, considerable size heterogeneity was apparent in the RS1 DNA. This size heterogeneity was concluded to be of biological origin, was independent of the specific host strain used to propagate virus, and was not due to the presence of host DNA within or nonspecifically associated with purified virions. In addition, treatment of RS1 DNA with either BAL 31 nuclease or DNA polymerase I Klenow fragment revealed that several distinct regions exist within the viral chromosome which contain free 3' hydroxyl groups. A restriction endonuclease map of the RS1 genome was constructed by using the restriction endonucleases EcoRI, ClaI, KpnI, BamHI, MluI, SmaI, and BclI; thereby allowing the positioning of some 40 restriction sites within the viral genome. The results are discussed in terms of the significance and the possible biological origin of the unique features discovered within the phage RS1 DNA. Images PMID:2989552

  5. Delipidation of cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides destabilizes its quaternary structure.

    PubMed

    Musatov, Andrej; Varhač, Rastislav; Hosler, Jonathan P; Sedlák, Erik

    2016-06-01

    Delipidation of detergent-solubilized cytochrome c oxidase isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Rbs-CcO) has no apparent structural and/or functional effect on the protein, however affects its resistance against thermal or chemical denaturation. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) hydrolysis of phospholipids that are co-purified with the enzyme removes all but two tightly bound phosphatidylethanolamines. Replacement of the removed phospholipids with nonionic detergent decreases both thermal stability of the enzyme and its resilience against the effect of chemical denaturants such as urea. In contrast to nondelipidated Rbs-CcO, the enzymatic activity of PLA2-treated Rbs-CcO is substantially diminished after exposure to high (>4 M) urea concentration at room temperature without an alteration of its secondary structure. Absorbance spectroscopy and sedimentation velocity experiments revealed a strong correlation between intact tertiary structure of heme regions and quaternary structure, respectively, and the enzymatic activity of the protein. We concluded that phospholipid environment of Rbs-CcO has the protective role for stability of its tertiary and quaternary structures. PMID:26923069

  6. Primary electron transfer reactions in modified reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Shuvalov, V. A.; Duysens, L. N. M.

    1986-01-01

    Absorption spectra were measured by means of an optical multichannel analyzer in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26 reaction centers (RCs) modified by treatment with NaBH4 at various times (≥1 ps) after the onset of a short excitation flash at 880 nm. Most of these RCs (75-95%) have only one “monomeric” bacteriochlorophyll-800 (B1) molecule and are as active as the original RCs. The duration of the excitation and measuring pulses was ≈33 ps. If the center of the excitation pulse preceded the center of the measuring pulse by 36-40 ps, the formation of a state PE (early state), which is converted to the state PF (P+ bacteriopheophytin-) in 4 ± 1 ps (1/e time), was observed. Also the kinetics and the spectrum of the stimulated emission (reflecting the kinetics and the emission spectrum of the excited state P*) were determined. The difference spectrum of the state PE approximately equals the sum of the spectra of the states P* (≈65%) and 1[P+B1-] (≈35%). This indicates that B1- is an intermediate in the electron transfer from P* to bacteriopheophytin, H1, transferring this electron with a rate constant of (4 × 0.35 ps)-1 = 7 × 1011 s-1. PMID:16593664

  7. Mechanism of nitrogenase switch-off by oxygen. [Klebsiella pneumoniae; Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans; Rhodopseudomonas capsulate

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, I.; Nadler, V.; Hochman, A.

    1987-02-01

    Oxygen caused a reversible inhibition (switch-off) of nitrogenase activity in whole cells of four strains of diazotrophs, the facultative anaerobe Klebsiella pneumoniae and three strains of photosynthetic bacteria (Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans and Rhodopseudomonas capsulata strians AD2 and BK5). In K. pneumoniae 50% inhibition of acetylene reduction was attained at an O/sub 2/ concentration of 0.37 ..mu..M. Cyanide (90 ..mu..M), which did not affect acetylene reduction but inhibited whole-cell respiration by 60 to 70%, shifted the O/sub 2/ concentration that caused 50% inhibition of nitrogenase activity to 2.9 ..mu..M. A mutant strain of K. pneumoniae, strain AH11, has a respiration rate that is 65 to 75% higher than that of the wild type, but is nitrogenase activity is similar to wild-type activity. Acetylene reduction by whole cells of this mutant was inhibited 50% by 0.20 ..mu..M O/sub 2/. Inhibition by CN/sup -/ of 40 to 50% of the O/sub 2/ uptake in the mutant shifted the O/sub 2/ concentration that caused 50% inhibition of nitrogenase to 1.58 ..mu..M. Thus, when the respiration rates were lower, higher oxygen concentrations were required to inhibit nitrogenase. Reversible inhibition of nitrogenase activity in vivo was caused under anaerobic conditions by other electron acceptors. Addition of 2 mM sulfite to cell suspensions of R. capsulata B10 and R. sphaeroides inhibited nitrogenase activity. Nitrite also inhibited acetylene reduction in whole cells of the photodenitrifier R. sphaeroides but not in R. capsulata B10, which is not capable of enzymatic reduction of NO/sub 2//sup -/. Lower concentrations of NO/sub 2//sup -/ were required to inhibit the activity in NO/sub 3//sup -/-grown cells, which have higher activities of nitrite reductase.

  8. Volume contraction on photoexcitation of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26: internal probe of dielectrics.

    PubMed Central

    Mauzerall, D C; Gunner, M R; Zhang, J W

    1995-01-01

    Reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides undergo a approximately 20 A3/mole volume contraction in < 50 ns after excitation. The rapid volume change is tentatively assigned to electrostriction. From its magnitude, we infer that the effective dielectric coefficient is 10-15 if the compressibility of the reaction center is similar to that of globular proteins. The volume contraction is not sensitive to replacement of the natural ubiquinone at the QA site by other quinones or to the occupancy of the QB site. The quenching caused by pressure on the reaction centers most likely occurs on a faster time scale than that of electron transfer. PMID:7711251

  9. Gene co-expression network analysis in Rhodobacter capsulatus and application to comparative expression analysis of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Pena-Castillo, Lourdes; Mercer, Ryan; Gurinovich, Anastasia; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.; Westbye, Alexander; Beatty, J. T.; Lang, Andrew S.

    2014-08-28

    The genus Rhodobacter contains purple nonsulfur bacteria found mostly in freshwater environments. Representative strains of two Rhodobacter species, R. capsulatus and R. sphaeroides, have had their genomes fully sequenced and both have been the subject of transcriptional profiling studies. Gene co-expression networks can be used to identify modules of genes with similar expression profiles. Functional analysis of gene modules can then associate co-expressed genes with biological pathways, and network statistics can determine the degree of module preservation in related networks. In this paper, we constructed an R. capsulatus gene co-expression network, performed functional analysis of identified gene modules, and investigated preservation of these modules in R. capsulatus proteomics data and in R. sphaeroides transcriptomics data. Results: The analysis identified 40 gene co-expression modules in R. capsulatus. Investigation of the module gene contents and expression profiles revealed patterns that were validated based on previous studies supporting the biological relevance of these modules. We identified two R. capsulatus gene modules preserved in the protein abundance data. We also identified several gene modules preserved between both Rhodobacter species, which indicate that these cellular processes are conserved between the species and are candidates for functional information transfer between species. Many gene modules were non-preserved, providing insight into processes that differentiate the two species. In addition, using Local Network Similarity (LNS), a recently proposed metric for expression divergence, we assessed the expression conservation of between-species pairs of orthologs, and within-species gene-protein expression profiles. Conclusions: Our analyses provide new sources of information for functional annotation in R. capsulatus because uncharacterized genes in modules are now connected with groups of genes that constitute a joint functional

  10. Characterization of Ornithine and Glutamine Lipids Extracted from Cell Membranes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh M.; Reid, Gavin E.

    2009-01-01

    The identification and structural characterization of a series of ornithine lipids extracted from the cell membranes of wild-type Rhodobacter sphaeroides, as well as from a glycerophosphocholine-deficient strain, has been achieved by multistage tandem mass spectrometry of their protonated and deprotonated precursor ions in a linear quadrupole ion trap. Systematic examination of the multistage gas-phase fragmentation reactions of these ions, combined with the use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange, has enabled the pathways responsible for sequential losses of the 3-hydroxy linked fatty acyl chain and the amide linked 3-OH fatty acid chain from these lipids, as well as for formation of the previously reported ornithine specific positively charged ‘fingerprint’ ion at m/z 115, to be determined. Additionally, the fragmentation pathways responsible for formation of a previously unreported ornithine lipid head group specific product ion at m/z 131 in negative ion mode have been examined. Based on these results, and by comparison with the fragmentation behavior of model lipoamino acid standard compounds, a series of novel glutamine containing lipids have also been identified, with analogous structures but with masses 14 Da higher than several of the ornithine lipids observed in this study. Characteristic ‘fingerprint’ ions indicative of these glutamine lipids were found at m/z 147, 130 and 129 in positive ion mode, and at m/z 145 and 127 in negative ion mode. The results from this study establish an experimental basis for future efforts aimed at the sensitive identification, characterization and quantitative analysis of ornithine and glutamine lipids in complex unfractionated cellular extracts. PMID:18835523

  11. In vitro assessment of gastrointestinal viability of two photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Rhodobacter sphaeroides *

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xu-xia; Pan, Yuan-jiang; Wang, Yan-bo; Li, Wei-fen

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the potential of two photosynthetic bacteria (PSB), Rhodopseudomonas palustris HZ0301 and Rhodobacter sphaeroides HZ0302, as probiotics in aquaculture. The viability of HZ0301 and HZ0302 in simulated gastric transit conditions (pH 2.0, pH 3.0 and pH 4.0 gastric juices) and in simulated small intestinal transit conditions (pH 8.0, with or without 0.3% bile salts) was tested. The effects of HZ0301 and HZ0302 on the viability and permeability of intestinal epithelial cell in primary culture of tilapias, Oreochromis nilotica, were also detected. All the treatments were determined with three replicates. The simulated gastric transit tolerance of HZ0301 and HZ0302 strains was pH-dependent and correspondingly showed lower viability at pH 2.0 after 180 min compared with pH 3.0 and pH 4.0. Both HZ0301 and HZ0302 were tolerant to simulated small intestine transit with or without bile salts in our research. Moreover, there was no significant difference (P>0.05) among three treatments including the control and the groups treated with HZ0301 or HZ0302 both in intestinal epithelial cell viability and membrane permeability, showing no cell damage. In summary, this study demonstrated that HZ0301 and HZ0302 had high capacity of upper gastrointestinal transit tolerance and were relatively safe for intestinal epithelial cells of tilapias. PMID:17726751

  12. Ultrafast Electron Transfer Kinetics in the LM Dimer of Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chang; Carey, Anne-Marie; Gao, Bing-Rong; Wraight, Colin A; Woodbury, Neal W; Lin, Su

    2016-06-23

    It has become increasingly clear that dynamics plays a major role in the function of many protein systems. One system that has proven particularly facile for studying the effects of dynamics on protein-mediated chemistry is the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Previous experimental and computational analysis have suggested that the dynamics of the protein matrix surrounding the primary quinone acceptor, QA, may be particularly important in electron transfer involving this cofactor. One can substantially increase the flexibility of this region by removing one of the reaction center subunits, the H-subunit. Even with this large change in structure, photoinduced electron transfer to the quinone still takes place. To evaluate the effect of H-subunit removal on electron transfer to QA, we have compared the kinetics of electron transfer and associated spectral evolution for the LM dimer with that of the intact reaction center complex on picosecond to millisecond time scales. The transient absorption spectra associated with all measured electron transfer reactions are similar, with the exception of a broadening in the QX transition and a blue-shift in the QY transition bands of the special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P) in the LM dimer. The kinetics of the electron transfer reactions not involving quinones are unaffected. There is, however, a 4-fold decrease in the electron transfer rate from the reduced bacteriopheophytin to QA in the LM dimer compared to the intact reaction center and a similar decrease in the recombination rate of the resulting charge-separated state (P(+)QA(-)). These results are consistent with the concept that the removal of the H-subunit results in increased flexibility in the region around the quinone and an associated shift in the reorganization energy associated with charge separation and recombination. PMID:27243380

  13. Study of an alternate glyoxylate cycle for acetate assimilation by Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Alber, Birgit E; Spanheimer, Regina; Ebenau-Jehle, Christa; Fuchs, Georg

    2006-07-01

    Organisms, which grow on organic substrates that are metabolized via acetyl-CoA, are faced with the problem to form all cell constituents from this C(2)-unit. The problem was solved by the seminal work of Kornberg and is known as the glyoxylate cycle. However, many bacteria are known to not contain isocitrate lyase, the key enzyme of this pathway. This problem was addressed in acetate-grown Rhodobacter sphaeroides. An acetate-minus mutant identified by transposon mutagenesis was affected in the gene for beta-ketothiolase forming acetoacetyl-CoA from two molecules of acetyl-CoA. This enzyme activity was missing in this mutant, which grew on acetoacetate and on acetate plus glyoxylate. A second acetate/acetoacetate-minus mutant was affected in the gene for a putative mesaconyl-CoA hydratase, an enzyme which catalyses the hydration of mesaconyl-CoA to beta-methylmalyl-CoA. Beta-methylmalyl-CoA is further cleaved into glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA. These results as well as identification of acetate-upregulated proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis lead to the proposal of a new pathway for acetate assimilation. In a first part, affected by the mutations, two molecules of acetyl-CoA and one molecule CO(2) are converted via acetoacetyl-CoA and mesaconyl-CoA to glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA. In a second part glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA are converted with another molecule of acetyl-CoA and CO(2) to l-malyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA. PMID:16856937

  14. Induction and anisotropy of fluorescence of reaction center from photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Sipka, Gábor; Maróti, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Submillisecond dark-light changes of the yield (induction) and anisotropy of fluorescence under laser diode excitation were measured in the photosynthetic reaction center of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Narrow band (1-2 nm) laser diodes emitting at 808 and 865 nm were used to selectively excite the accessory bacteriochlorophyll (B, 800 nm) or the upper excitonic state of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P-, 810 nm) and the lower excitonic state of the dimer (P+, 865 nm), respectively. The fluorescence spectrum of the wild type showed two bands centered at 850 nm (B) and 910 nm (P-). While the monotonous decay of the fluorescence yield at 910 nm tracked the light-induced oxidation of the dimer, the kinetics of the fluorescence yield at 850 nm showed an initial rise before a decrease. The anisotropy of the fluorescence excited at 865 nm (P-) was very close to the limiting value (0.4) across the whole spectral range. The excitation of both B and P- at 808 nm resulted in wavelength-dependent depolarization of the fluorescence from 0.35 to 0.24 in the wild type and from 0.30 to 0.24 in the reaction center of triple mutant (L131LH-M160LH-M197FH). The additivity law of the anisotropies of the fluorescence species accounts for the wavelength dependence of the anisotropy. The measured fluorescence yields and anisotropies are interpreted in terms of very fast energy transfer from (1)B* to (1)P- (either directly or indirectly by internal conversion from (1)P+) and to the oxidized dimer. PMID:25698106

  15. Modelling extended chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the concept that the warm, partially ionized plasma (presently called chromosphere) associated with such stars as Alpha Boo and Rho Per extends outwards at least several photospheric radii. Calculations are presented for the Mg II K line in light of two input model atmospheres. Specific predictions are deduced from the results obtained by each of the two models.

  16. ESR in zero field of the photoinduced triplet state in isolated reaction centers of rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26 detected by the singlet ground-state absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Blanken, H. J.; Van Der Zwet, G. P.; Hoff, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    We have measured zero-field resonance transitions of the triplet state of the primary donor monitoring the transmittance at 890 nm at 1.2 K in isolated reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. The transitions correspond to a decrease in transmittance, confirming the energy transfer model for the transitions detected via the antenna fluorescence in whole cells.

  17. Accumulation of a novel glycolipid and a betaine lipid in cells of Rhodobacter sphaeroides grown under phosphate limitation.

    PubMed

    Benning, C; Huang, Z H; Gage, D A

    1995-02-20

    Cells of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides grown under phosphate-limiting conditions accumulated nonphosphorous glycolipids and lipids carrying head groups derived from amino acids. Concomitantly, the relative amount of phosphoglycerolipids decreased from 90 to 22 mol% of total polar lipids in the membranes. Two lipids, not detectable in cells grown under standard conditions, were synthesized during phosphate-limited growth. Fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy, exact mass measurements, 1H NMR spectroscopy, sugar composition analysis, and methylation analysis of the predominant glycolipid led to the identification of the novel compound 1,2-di-O-acyl-3-O-[alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-beta-D-galactopyr anosyl]glycerol. The second lipid was identified as the betaine lipid 1,2-di-O-acyl-[4'-(N,N,N-trimethyl)-homoserine]glycerol by cochromatography employing an authentic standard from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy, exact mass measurements, and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Prior to this observation, the occurrence of this lipid was thought to be restricted to lower plants and algae. Apparently, these newly synthesized nonphosphorous lipids, in addition to the sulfo- and the ornithine lipid also found in R. sphaeroides grown under optimal conditions, take over the role of phosphoglycerolipids in phosphate-deprived cells. PMID:7872771

  18. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of 2H-labelled spheroidenes in petroleum ether and in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Kok, P; Köhler, J; Groenen, E J; Gebhard, R; van der Hoef, I; Lugtenburg, J; Farhoosh, R; Frank, H A

    1997-03-01

    As a step towards the structural analysis of the carotenoid spheroidene in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre, we present the resonance Raman spectra of 14-2H, 15-2H, 15'-2H, 14'-2H, 14,15'-2H2 and 15-15'-2H2 spheroidenes in petroleum ether and, except for 14,15'-2H2 spheroidene, in the Rb. sphaeroides R26 reaction center (RC). Analysis of the spectral changes upon isotopic substitution allows a qualitative assignment of most of the vibrational bands to be made. For the all-trans spheroidenes in solution the resonance enhancement of the Raman bands is determined by the participation of carbon carbon stretching modes in the centre of the conjugated chain, the C9 to C15' region. For the RC-bound 15,15'-cis spheroidenes, enhancement is determined by the participation of carbon-carbon stretching modes in the centre of the molecule, the C13 to C13' region. Comparison of the spectra in solution and in the RC reveals evidence for an out-of-plane distortion of the RC-bound spheroidene in the central C14 to C14' region of the carotenoid. The characteristic 1240 cm-1 band in the spectrum of the RC-bound spheroidene has been assigned to a normal mode that contains the coupled C12-C13 and C13'-C12' stretch vibrations. PMID:9177038

  19. The sRNA SorY confers resistance during photooxidative stress by affecting a metabolite transporter in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Fazal; Weber, Lennart; Klug, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to oxygen and light generates photooxidative stress by the bacteriochlorophyll a mediated formation of singlet oxygen (1O2) in the facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We have identified SorY as an sRNA, which is induced under several stress conditions and confers increased resistance against 1O2. SorY by direct interaction affects the takP mRNA, encoding a TRAP-T transporter. We present a model in which SorY reduces the metabolite flux into the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) by reducing malate import through TakP. It was previously shown that oxidative stress in bacteria leads to switch from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway and to reduced activity of the TCA cycle. As a consequence the production of the prooxidant NADH is reduced and production of the protective NADPH is enhanced. In R. sphaeroides enzymes for glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, Entner–Doudoroff pathway and gluconeogenesis are induced in response to 1O2 by the alternative sigma factor RpoHII. The same is true for the sRNA SorY. By limiting malate import SorY thus contributes to the balance of the metabolic fluxes under photooxidative stress conditions. This assigns a so far unknown function to an sRNA in oxidative stress response. PMID:25833751

  20. The sulfolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol is not required for photosynthetic electron transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides but enhances growth under phosphate limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, C.; Somerville, C.R. ); Beatty, J.T. ); Prince, R.C. )

    1993-02-15

    All photosynthetic organisms, with the exception of several species of photosynthetic bacteria, are thought to contain the sulfolipid 6-sulfo-[alpha]-D-quinovosyldiacylglycerol. The association of this lipid with photosynthetic membranes has led to the assumption that it plays some role in photosynthesis. Stable null mutants of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides completely lacking sulfolipid were obtained by disruption of the sqdB gene. The ratios of the various components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, as well as the electron transfer rates during cyclic electron transport, were not altered in the mutants, when grown under optimal conditions. Growth rates of wild type and mutants were identical under a variety of growth conditions, with the exception of phosphate limitation, which resulted in reduced growth of the mutants. Phosphate limitation of the wild type a used a significant reduction in the amount of all phospholipids and an increased amount of sulfolipid. By contrast, the sulfolipid-deficient mutant had reduced levels of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine but maintained a normal level of phosphatidylglycerol. In addition, two unidentified lipids lacking phosphorus accumulated in the membranes of both wild-type and mutant strains under phosphate limitation. We conclude that sulfolipid plays no significant unique role in photoheterotrophic growth or photosynthetic electron transport in R. sphaeroides but may function as a surrogate for phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylglycerol, under phosphate-limiting conditions. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Electronic structure of Q-A in reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. I. Electron paramagnetic resonance in single crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, R A; Lendzian, F; Abresch, E C; Lubitz, W; Feher, G

    1995-01-01

    The magnitude and orientation of the electronic g-tensor of the primary electron acceptor quinone radical anion, Q-A, has been determined in single crystals of zinc-substituted reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 at 275 K and at 80 K. To obtain high spectral resolution, EPR experiments were performed at 35 GHz and the native ubiquinone-10 (UQ10) in the reaction center was replaced by fully deuterated UQ10. The principal values and the direction cosines of the g-tensor axes with respect to the crystal axes a, b, c were determined. Freezing of the single crystals resulted in only minor changes in magnitude and orientation of the g-tensor. The orientation of Q-A as determined by the g-tensor axes deviates only by a few degrees (< or = 8 degrees) from the orientation of the neutral QA obtained from an average of four different x-ray structures of Rb. sphaeroides reaction centers. This deviation lies within the accuracy of the x-ray structure determinations. The g-tensor values measured in single crystals agree well with those in frozen solutions. Variations in g-values between Q-A, Q-B, and UQ10 radical ion in frozen solutions were observed and attributed to different environments. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 9 PMID:8527644

  2. Photobiological transformation of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) using Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Millerick, Kayleigh A; Johnston, Juliet T; Finneran, Kevin T

    2016-09-01

    Pump-and-treat strategies for groundwater containing explosives may be necessary when the contaminated water approaches sensitive receptors. This project investigated bacterial photosynthesis as a strategy for ex situ treatment, using light as the primary energy source to facilitate RDX transformation. The objective was to characterize the ability of photosynthetic Rhodobacter sphaeroides (strain ATCC(®) 17023 ™) to transform the high-energy explosive RDX. R. sphaeroides transformed 30 μM RDX within 40 h under light conditions; RDX was not fully transformed in the dark (non-photosynthetic conditions), suggesting that photosynthetic electron transfer was the primary mechanism. Experiments with RDX demonstrated that succinate and malate were the most effective electron donors for photosynthesis, but glycerol was also utilized as a photosynthetic electron donor. RDX was transformed irrespective of the presence of carbon dioxide. The electron shuttling compound anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) increased transformation kinetics in the absence of CO2, when the cells had excess NADPH that needed to be re-oxidized because there was limited CO2 for carbon fixation. When CO2 was added, the cells generated more biomass, and AQDS had no stimulatory effect. End products indicated that RDX carbon became CO2, biomass, and a soluble, uncharacterized aqueous metabolite, determined using (14)C-labeled RDX. These data are the first to suggest that photobiological explosives transformation is possible and will provide a framework for which phototrophy can be used in environmental restoration of explosives contaminated water. PMID:27285383

  3. Biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate co-production by Enterobacter aerogenes and Rhodobacter sphaeroides from Calophyllum inophyllum oil cake.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, A; Sandhya, M; Ponnusami, V

    2014-07-01

    The feasibility of coupled biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate production by Enterobacter aerogenes and Rhodobacter sphaeroides using Calophyllum inophyllum oil cake was studied under dark and photo fermentation conditions. The utilization of a non-edible acidic oil cake (C. inophyllum), and exploitation of a modified minimal salt media led to reduction in the cost of media. Cost of fermentation is reduced by implementation of alternate dark-photo fermentative periods and through the use of a co-culture consisting of a dark fermentative (E. aerogenes) and a photo fermentative (R. sphaeroides) bacterium. The biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate produced were 7.95 L H2/L media and 10.73 g/L media, respectively, under alternate dark and photo fermentation and were 3.23 L H2/L media and 5.6g/L media, respectively under complete dark fermentation. The characteristics of the oil cake and alternate dark (16 h) and photo (8h) fermentative conditions were found to be supportive in producing high biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) yield. PMID:24859207

  4. Band Structure of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides Photosynthetic Reaction Center from Low-Temperature Absorption and Hole-Burned Spectra.

    PubMed

    Rancova, Olga; Jankowiak, Ryszard; Kell, Adam; Jassas, Mahboobe; Abramavicius, Darius

    2016-06-30

    Persistent/transient spectral hole burning (HB) and computer simulations are used to provide new insight into the excitonic structure and excitation energy transfer of the widely studied bacterial reaction center (bRC) of Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides. We focus on site energies of its cofactors and electrochromic shifts induced in the chemically oxidized (P(+)) and charge-separated (P(+)QM(-)) states. Theoretical models lead to two alternative interpretations of the H-band. On the basis of our experimental and simulation data, we suggest that the bleach near 813-825 nm in transient HB spectra in the P(+)QM(-) state, often assigned to the upper exciton component of the special pair, is mostly due to different electrochromic shifts of the BL/M cofactors. From the exciton compositions in the charge-neutral (CN) bRC, the weak fourth excitonic band near 780 nm can be denoted PY+, that is, the upper excitonic band of the special pair, which in the CN bRC behaves as a delocalized state over PM and PL pigments that weakly mixes with accessory BChls. Thus, the shoulder in the absorption of Rb. sphaeroides near 813-815 nm does not contain the PY+ exciton band. PMID:27266271

  5. Plasmid content and localization of the genes encoding the denitrification enzymes in two strains of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Schwintner, C; Sabaty, M; Berna, B; Cahors, S; Richaud, P

    1998-08-15

    Plasmid content and localization of the genes encoding the reductases of the denitrification pathway were determined in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides forma sp. denitrificans by transverse alternating-field electrophoresis (TAFE) and hybridization with digoxigenin-labeled homologous probes. Two large plasmids of 102 and 115 kb were found. The genes encoding the various reductases are not clustered on a single genetic unit. The nap locus (localized with a napA probe), the nirK gene and the norCB genes encoding the nitrate, nitrite and nitric oxide reductases, respectively, were found on different AseI and SnaBI digested chromosomal DNA fragments, whereas the nos locus (localized with a nosZ probe), encoding the nitrous oxide reductase, was identified on the 115-kb plasmid. Furthermore, the genes encoding two proteins of unknown function, one periplasmic and the other cytoplasmic, but whose synthesis is highly induced by nitrate, were found on a different chromosomal fragment. For comparison, the same experiments were carried out on the well-characterized strain Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. PMID:9742704

  6. Understanding Medicines: Conceptual Analysis of Nurses' Needs for Knowledge and Understanding of Pharmacology (Part I). Understanding Medicines: Extending Pharmacology Education for Dependent and Independent Prescribing (Part II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathard, Helen L.

    2001-01-01

    Part I reviews what nurses need to know about the administration and prescription of medicines. Part II addresses drug classifications, actions and effects, and interactions. Also discussed are the challenges pharmacological issues pose for nursing education. (SK)

  7. Syntheses, structural variations and fluorescence studies of two dinuclear zinc(II) complexes of a Schiff base ligand with an extended carboxylate side arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, Shyamapada; Sasmal, Ashok; Dhal, Piu; Rizzoli, Corrado; Mitra, Samiran

    2016-03-01

    A potentially tetradentate Schiff base ligand containing carboxylic acid group, HL, (E)-2-((pyridin-2-yl)methyleneamino)-5-chlorobenzoic acid is synthesized and characterized. Reaction of HL with hydrated zinc(II) trichloroacetate and zinc(II) trifluoroacetate under similar reaction condition yields two discrete dinuclear complexes, [Zn(L)(Cl)]2 (1) and [Zn(L)(CF3COO)]2 (2) and characterized by different physicochemical methods. Single crystal X-ray structural characterization reveals different ligating properties of the coordinated anionic ligand (L-) in its zinc(II) complexes. The side arm carboxylate of L- shows μ1,3-carboxylato-bridging mode in 1 and connects zinc(II) atoms in syn-anti fashion while it exhibits a μ1,1-carboxylato-bridging mode in 2. The metal ions display distorted square pyramidal geometries in both the structures and associated with different degrees of distortions. The fluorescence spectra of HL and its zinc(II) complexes recorded in methanol at room temperature which reveal the enhancement of emission intensity for the complexes compared to that of the free ligand. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) reveal high thermal stabilities of the complexes.

  8. Identification of key residues that confer Rhodobacter sphaeroides LPS activity at horse TLR4/MD-2.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Katherine L; Gangloff, Monique; Walsh, Catherine M; Spring, David R; Gay, Nicholas J; Bryant, Clare E

    2014-01-01

    The molecular determinants underpinning how hexaacylated lipid A and tetraacylated precursor lipid IVa activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are well understood, but how activation is induced by other lipid A species is less clear. Species specificity studies have clarified how TLR4/MD-2 recognises different lipid A structures, for example tetraacylated lipid IVa requires direct electrostatic interactions for agonism. In this study, we examine how pentaacylated lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RSLPS) antagonises human TLR4/MD-2 and activates the horse receptor complex using a computational approach and cross-species mutagenesis. At a functional level, we show that RSLPS is a partial agonist at horse TLR4/MD-2 with greater efficacy than lipid IVa. These data suggest the importance of the additional acyl chain in RSLPS signalling. Based on docking analysis, we propose a model for positioning of the RSLPS lipid A moiety (RSLA) within the MD-2 cavity at the TLR4 dimer interface, which allows activity at the horse receptor complex. As for lipid IVa, RSLPS agonism requires species-specific contacts with MD-2 and TLR4, but the R2 chain of RSLA protrudes from the MD-2 pocket to contact the TLR4 dimer in the vicinity of proline 442. Our model explains why RSLPS is only partially dependent on horse TLR4 residue R385, unlike lipid IVa. Mutagenesis of proline 442 into a serine residue, as found in human TLR4, uncovers the importance of this site in RSLPS signalling; horse TLR4 R385G/P442S double mutation completely abolishes RSLPS activity without its counterpart, human TLR4 G384R/S441P, being able to restore it. Our data highlight the importance of subtle changes in ligand positioning, and suggest that TLR4 and MD-2 residues that may not participate directly in ligand binding can determine the signalling outcome of a given ligand. This indicates a cooperative binding mechanism within the receptor complex, which is becoming increasingly important in TLR

  9. Identification of Key Residues That Confer Rhodobacter sphaeroides LPS Activity at Horse TLR4/MD-2

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Catherine M.; Spring, David R.; Gay, Nicholas J.; Bryant, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular determinants underpinning how hexaacylated lipid A and tetraacylated precursor lipid IVa activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are well understood, but how activation is induced by other lipid A species is less clear. Species specificity studies have clarified how TLR4/MD-2 recognises different lipid A structures, for example tetraacylated lipid IVa requires direct electrostatic interactions for agonism. In this study, we examine how pentaacylated lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RSLPS) antagonises human TLR4/MD-2 and activates the horse receptor complex using a computational approach and cross-species mutagenesis. At a functional level, we show that RSLPS is a partial agonist at horse TLR4/MD-2 with greater efficacy than lipid IVa. These data suggest the importance of the additional acyl chain in RSLPS signalling. Based on docking analysis, we propose a model for positioning of the RSLPS lipid A moiety (RSLA) within the MD-2 cavity at the TLR4 dimer interface, which allows activity at the horse receptor complex. As for lipid IVa, RSLPS agonism requires species-specific contacts with MD-2 and TLR4, but the R2 chain of RSLA protrudes from the MD-2 pocket to contact the TLR4 dimer in the vicinity of proline 442. Our model explains why RSLPS is only partially dependent on horse TLR4 residue R385, unlike lipid IVa. Mutagenesis of proline 442 into a serine residue, as found in human TLR4, uncovers the importance of this site in RSLPS signalling; horse TLR4 R385G/P442S double mutation completely abolishes RSLPS activity without its counterpart, human TLR4 G384R/S441P, being able to restore it. Our data highlight the importance of subtle changes in ligand positioning, and suggest that TLR4 and MD-2 residues that may not participate directly in ligand binding can determine the signalling outcome of a given ligand. This indicates a cooperative binding mechanism within the receptor complex, which is becoming increasingly important in TLR

  10. The Q gene of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: its role in puf operon expression and spectral complex assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, L; Lee, J K; Kaplan, S

    1994-01-01

    The Q gene of the facultative photoheterotroph Rhodobacter sphaeroides, localized immediately upstream of the oxygen- and light-regulated puf operon, encodes a 77-amino-acid polypeptide. The 5' and 3' ends of the 561-bp Q transcript were determined. To gain insight into the role of the Q gene product, a number of Q mutations were constructed by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis and subsequent substitution of the mutated form of the gene in single copy for the chromosomal copy via homologous recombination. The resulting mutants can grow photosynthetically, with the exception of QSTART, in which the initiation codon for the Q protein was altered. Spectral analysis of the intracytoplasmic membranes showed that one of the missense mutants (QdA) was deficient in the formation of detectable B875 light-harvesting complex (LHC), whereas deletion of the stem-loop structure (Qloop) failed to form B800-850 LHC when grown anaerobically either in the dark or under light intensity of 100 W/m2. Other missense mutants (QuA and QuB) contained either more B800-850 LHC or more B875 LHC, respectively, than the wild type. Although the levels of puf and puc transcripts isolated from QSTART grown anaerobically on succinate-dimethyl sulfoxide in the dark were comparable to wild-type levels, no B875 spectral complex was detected and there was a greater than 90% reduction in the level of the B800-850 pigment-protein complex. It has also been confirmed that the ultimate cellular levels of either the B875 or B800-850 spectral complexes can vary over wide limits without any change in the level(s) of complex specific transcripts. When the wild-type Q gene was reintroduced in trans into the Q mutations, QSTART was able to grow photosynthetically and both B800-850 and B875 spectral complexes were formed in either QdA or Qloop. Finally, we demonstrated that the level of each puf-specific mRNA behaves independently of one another as well as independently of the level(s) of Q gene-specific m

  11. Weak temperature dependence of P (+) H A (-) recombination in mutant Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof; Białek, Rafał; Pajzderska, Maria; Karolczak, Jerzy; Burdziński, Gotard; Jones, Michael R; Brettel, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    In contrast with findings on the wild-type Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center, biexponential P (+) H A (-)  → PH A charge recombination is shown to be weakly dependent on temperature between 78 and 298 K in three variants with single amino acids exchanged in the vicinity of primary electron acceptors. These mutated reaction centers have diverse overall kinetics of charge recombination, spanning an average lifetime from ~2 to ~20 ns. Despite these differences a protein relaxation model applied previously to wild-type reaction centers was successfully used to relate the observed kinetics to the temporal evolution of the free energy level of the state P (+) H A (-) relative to P (+) B A (-) . We conclude that the observed variety in the kinetics of charge recombination, together with their weak temperature dependence, is caused by a combination of factors that are each affected to a different extent by the point mutations in a particular mutant complex. These are as follows: (1) the initial free energy gap between the states P (+) B A (-) and P (+) H A (-) , (2) the intrinsic rate of P (+) B A (-)  → PB A charge recombination, and (3) the rate of protein relaxation in response to the appearance of the charge separated states. In the case of a mutant which displays rapid P (+) H A (-) recombination (ELL), most of this recombination occurs in an unrelaxed protein in which P (+) B A (-) and P (+) H A (-) are almost isoenergetic. In contrast, in a mutant in which P (+) H A (-) recombination is relatively slow (GML), most of the recombination occurs in a relaxed protein in which P (+) H A (-) is much lower in energy than P (+) H A (-) . The weak temperature dependence in the ELL reaction center and a YLH mutant was modeled in two ways: (1) by assuming that the initial P (+) B A (-) and P (+) H A (-) states in an unrelaxed protein are isoenergetic, whereas the final free energy gap between these states following the protein relaxation is large (~250 meV or

  12. Integration of energy and electron transfer processes in the photosynthetic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Cartron, Michaël L.; Olsen, John D.; Sener, Melih; Jackson, Philip J.; Brindley, Amanda A.; Qian, Pu; Dickman, Mark J.; Leggett, Graham J.; Schulten, Klaus; Hunter, C. Neil

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis converts absorbed solar energy to a protonmotive force, which drives ATP synthesis. The membrane network of chlorophyll–protein complexes responsible for light absorption, photochemistry and quinol (QH2) production has been mapped in the purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides using atomic force microscopy (AFM), but the membrane location of the cytochrome bc1 (cytbc1) complexes that oxidise QH2 to quinone (Q) to generate a protonmotive force is unknown. We labelled cytbc1 complexes with gold nanobeads, each attached by a Histidine10 (His10)-tag to the C-terminus of cytc1. Electron microscopy (EM) of negatively stained chromatophore vesicles showed that the majority of the cytbc1 complexes occur as dimers in the membrane. The cytbc1 complexes appeared to be adjacent to reaction centre light-harvesting 1-PufX (RC-LH1-PufX) complexes, consistent with AFM topographs of a gold-labelled membrane. His-tagged cytbc1 complexes were retrieved from chromatophores partially solubilised by detergent; RC-LH1-PufX complexes tended to co-purify with cytbc1, whereas LH2 complexes became detached, consistent with clusters of cytbc1 complexes close to RC-LH1-PufX arrays, but not with a fixed, stoichiometric cytbc1-RC-LH1-PufX supercomplex. This information was combined with a quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of the RC, cytbc1, ATP synthase, cytaa3 and cytcbb3 membrane protein complexes, to construct an atomic-level model of a chromatophore vesicle comprising 67 LH2 complexes, 11 LH1-RC-PufX dimers & 2 RC-LH1-PufX monomers, 4 cytbc1 dimers and 2 ATP synthases. Simulation of the interconnected energy, electron and proton transfer processes showed a half-maximal ATP turnover rate for a light intensity equivalent to only 1% of bright sunlight. Thus, the photosystem architecture of the chromatophore is optimised for growth at low light intensities. PMID:24530865

  13. Mutations to R. sphaeroides Reaction Center Perturb Energy Levels and Vibronic Coupling but Not Observed Energy Transfer Rates.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Moira L; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Rolczynski, Brian S; Massey, Sara C; Engel, Gregory S

    2016-03-10

    The bacterial reaction center is capable of both efficiently collecting and quickly transferring energy within the complex; therefore, the reaction center serves as a convenient model for both energy transfer and charge separation. To spectroscopically probe the interactions between the electronic excited states on the chromophores and their intricate relationship with vibrational motions in their environment, we examine coherences between the excited states. Here, we investigate this question by introducing a series of point mutations within 12 Å of the special pair of bacteriochlorophylls in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center. Using two-dimensional spectroscopy, we find that the time scales of energy transfer dynamics remain unperturbed by these mutations. However, within these spectra, we detect changes in the mixed vibrational-electronic coherences in these reaction centers. Our results indicate that resonance between bacteriochlorophyll vibrational modes and excitonic energy gaps promote electronic coherences and support current vibronic models of photosynthetic energy transfer. PMID:26630123

  14. Two Stereoisomers of Spheroidene in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 Reaction Center: A DFT Analysis of Resonance Raman Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, A. C.; van Hemert, M. C.; Lugtenburg, J.; Frank, H. A.; Groenen, E. J. J.

    2007-01-01

    From a theoretical analysis of the resonance Raman spectra of 19 isotopomers of spheroidene reconstituted into the reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26, we conclude that the carotenoid in the RC occurs in two configurations. The normal mode underlying the resonance Raman transition at 1239 cm−1, characteristic for spheroidene in the RC, has been identified and found to uniquely refer to the cis nature of the 15,15′ carbon-carbon double bond. Detailed analysis of the isotope-induced shifts of transitions in the 1500–1550 cm−1 region proves that, besides the 15,15′-cis configuration, spheroidene in the RC adopts another cis-configuration, most likely the 13,14-cis configuration. PMID:17617552

  15. Kinetics of cytochrome c oxidase from R. sphaeroides initiated by direct electron transfer followed by tr-SEIRAS.

    PubMed

    Steininger, Christoph; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Knoll, Wolfgang; Naumann, Renate L C

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved surface-enhanced IR-absorption spectroscopy (tr-SEIRAS) has been performed on cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The enzyme was converted electrochemically into the fully reduced state. Thereafter, in the presence of oxygen, the potential was switched to open circuit potential (OCP). Under these conditions, the enzyme is free to undergo enzymatic oxidation in the absence of an external electric field. Tr-SEIRAS was performed using the step-scan technique, triggered by periodic potential pulses switching between - 800mV and OCP. Single bands were resolved in a broad band in the amide I region using phase sensitive detection. Amplitudes of these bands were analyzed as a function of time. Time constants in the ms time scale were considered in terms of conformational changes of the protein secondary structures associated with the enzymatic turnover of the protein. PMID:27398977

  16. Features of structural organization and expression regulation of malate dehydrogenase isoforms from Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2R.

    PubMed

    Eprintsev, A T; Klimova, M A; Shikhalieva, K D; Fedorin, D N; Dzhaber, M T; Kompantseva, E I

    2009-07-01

    Two isoforms of malate dehydrogenase (MDH), dimeric and tetrameric, have been found in the purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2R, devoid of the glyoxylate shunt, which assimilate acetate via the citramalate cycle. Inhibitory analysis showed that the 74-kDa protein is involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle, while the 148-kDa MDH takes part in the citramalate pathway. A single gene encoding synthesis of the isologous subunits of the MDH isoforms was found during molecular-biological investigations. The appearance in the studied bacterium of the tetrameric MDH isoform during growth in the presence of acetate is probably due to the increased level of mdh gene expression, revealed by the real-time PCR, the product of which in cooperation with the citramalate cycle enzymes plays an important role in acetate assimilation. PMID:19747101

  17. Seasat over-land scatterometer data. II - Selection of extended area land-target sites for the calibration of spaceborne scatterometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennett, Rosemary G.; Li, Fuk K.

    1989-01-01

    The post-launch performance verification for future scatterometers can use extended area land targets to calibrate antenna gain patterns and to verify and monitor deployment configurations. For the Ku-band Seasat scatterometer, a region of tropical rain forest in the Amazon basin was used as a homogeneous extended-area land target. As this region is continuously being deforested, other regions are investigated for calibrating scatterometers. The global backscatter coefficients (sigma0) are compared to classifications of natural vegetation and cultivation intensity and the variability with time during the three-month mission is studied. The statistical variability of sigma0 is compared with prior estimates resulting from the known variability of the instrument parameters and communication noise. Data from selected forested regions with relatively homogeneous sigma0 and little time-dependence are presented.

  18. The Semiquinone at the Qi Site of the bc1 Complex Explored Using HYSCORE Spectroscopy and Specific Isotopic Labeling of Ubiquinone in Rhodobacter sphaeroides via 13C Methionine and Construction of a Methionine Auxotroph

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Specific isotopic labeling at the residue or substituent level extends the scope of different spectroscopic approaches to the atomistic level. Here we describe 13C isotopic labeling of the methyl and methoxy ring substituents of ubiquinone, achieved through construction of a methionine auxotroph in Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain BC17 supplemented with l-methionine with the side chain methyl group 13C-labeled. Two-dimensional electron spin echo envelope modulation (HYSCORE) was applied to study the 13C methyl and methoxy hyperfine couplings in the semiquinone generated in situ at the Qi site of the bc1 complex in its membrane environment. The data were used to characterize the distribution of unpaired spin density and the conformations of the methoxy substituents based on density functional theory calculations of 13C hyperfine tensors in the semiquinone of the geometry-optimized X-ray structure of the bc1 complex (Protein Data Bank entry 1PP9) with the highest available resolution. Comparison with other proteins indicates individual orientations of the methoxy groups in each particular case are always different from the methoxy conformations in the anion radical prepared in a frozen alcohol solution. The protocol used in the generation of the methionine auxotroph is more generally applicable and, because it introduces a gene deletion using a suicide plasmid, can be applied repeatedly. PMID:25184535

  19. Regulation of nap Gene Expression and Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase Activity in the Phototrophic Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM158

    PubMed Central

    Gavira, Mónica; Roldán, M. Dolores; Castillo, Francisco; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial periplasmic nitrate reductases (Nap) can play different physiological roles and are expressed under different conditions depending on the organism. Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM158 has a Nap system, encoded by the napKEFDABC gene cluster, but nitrite formed is not further reduced because this strain lacks nitrite reductase. Nap activity increases in the presence of nitrate and oxygen but is unaffected by ammonium. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blots demonstrated that the napKEFDABC genes constitute an operon transcribed as a single 5.5-kb product. Northern blots and nap-lacZ fusions revealed that nap expression is threefold higher under aerobic conditions but is regulated by neither nitrate nor ammonium, although it is weakly induced by nitrite. On the other hand, nitrate but not nitrite causes a rapid enzyme activation, explaining the higher Nap activity found in nitrate-grown cells. Translational nap′-′lacZ fusions reveal that the napK and napD genes are not efficiently translated, probably due to mRNA secondary structures occluding the translation initiation sites of these genes. Neither butyrate nor caproate increases nap expression, although cells growing phototrophically on these reduced substrates show a very high Nap activity in vivo (nitrite accumulation is sevenfold higher than in medium with malate). Phototrophic growth on butyrate or caproate medium is severely reduced in the NapA− mutants. Taken together, these results indicate that nitrate reduction in R. sphaeroides is mainly regulated at the level of enzyme activity by both nitrate and electron supply and confirm that the Nap system is involved in redox balancing using nitrate as an ancillary oxidant to dissipate excess reductant. PMID:11872721

  20. Top-Down Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Membrane-Bound Light-Harvesting Complex 2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong; Saer, Rafael; Liu, Haijun; Gross, Michael L; Blankenship, Robert E

    2015-12-15

    We report a top-down proteomic analysis of the membrane-bound peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 isolated from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The LH2 complex is coded for by the puc operon. The Rb. sphaeroides genome contains two puc operons, designated puc1BAC and puc2BA. Although previous work has shown consistently that the LH2 β polypeptide coded by the puc2B gene was assembled into LH2 complexes, there are contradictory reports as to whether the Puc2A polypeptides are incorporated into LH2 complexes. Furthermore, post-translational modifications of this protein offer the prospect that it could coordinate bacteriochlorophyll a (Bchl a) by a modified N-terminal residue. Here, we describe the components of the LH2 complex on the basis of electron-capture dissociation fragmentation to confirm the identity and sequence of the protein's subunits. We found that both gene products of the β polypeptides are expressed and assembled in the mature LH2 complex, but only the Puc1A-encoded polypeptide α is observed here. The methionine of the Puc2B-encoded polypeptide is missing, and a carboxyl group is attached to the threonine at the N-terminus. Surprisingly, one amino acid encoded as an isoleucine in both the puc2B gene and the mRNA is found as valine in the mature LH2 complex, suggesting an unexpected and unusual post-translational modification or a specific tRNA recoding of this one amino acid. PMID:26574182

  1. Biohydrogen production by purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides: Effect of low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gabrielyan, Lilit; Sargsyan, Harutyun; Trchounian, Armen

    2016-09-01

    The present work was focused on the effects of low-intensity (the flux capacity was of 0.06mWcm(-2)) electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of extremely high frequencies or millimeter waves on the growth and hydrogen (H2) photoproduction by purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides MDC6521 (from Armenian mineral springs). After exposure of R. sphaeroides, grown under anaerobic conditions upon illumination, to EMI (51.8GHz and 53.0GHz) for 15min an increase of specific growth rate by ~1.2-fold, in comparison with control (non-irradiated cells), was obtained. However, the effect of EMI depends on the duration of irradiation: the exposure elongation up to 60min caused the delay of the growth lag phase and the decrease specific growth rate by ~1.3-fold, indicating the bactericidal effect of EMI. H2 yield of the culture, irradiated by EMI for 15min, determined during 72h growth, was ~1.2-fold higher than H2 yield of control cells, whereas H2 production by cultures, irradiated by EMI for 60min was not observed during 72h growth. This difference in the effects of extremely high frequency EMI indicates a direct effect of radiation on the membrane transfer and the enzymes of these bacteria. Moreover, EMI increased DCCD-inhibited H(+) fluxes across the bacterial membrane and DCCD-sensitive ATPase activity of membrane vesicles, indicating that the proton FoF1-ATPase is presumably a basic target for extremely high frequency EMI related to H2 production by cultures. PMID:27479839

  2. Whole-genome shotgun optical mapping of Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2.4. 1 and its use for whole-genome shotgun sequence assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Shou, S.; Kvikstad, E.; Kile, A.; Severin, J.; Forrest, D.; Runnheim, R.; Churas, C.; Hickman, J. W.; Mackenzie, C.; Choudhary, M.; Donohue, T.; Kaplan, S.; Schwartz, D. C.

    2003-09-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 is a facultative photoheterotrophic bacterium with tremendous metabolic diversity, which has significantly contributed to our understanding of the molecular genetics of photosynthesis, photoheterotrophy, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism, carbon dioxide fixation, taxis, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. To further understand this remarkable bacterium, and to accelerate an ongoing sequencing project, two whole-genome restriction maps (EcoRI and HindIII) of R. sphaeroides strain 2.4.1 were constructed using shotgun optical mapping. The approach directly mapped genomic DNA by the random mapping of single molecules. The two maps were used to facilitate sequence assembly by providing an optical scaffold for high-resolution alignment and verification of sequence contigs. Our results show that such maps facilitated the closure of sequence gaps by the early detection of nascent sequence contigs during the course of the whole-genome shotgun sequencing process.

  3. Beyond Susceptible and Resistant, Part II: Treatment of Infections Due to Gram-Negative Organisms Producing Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases

    PubMed Central

    Curello, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The production of β-lactamase is the most common mechanism of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics among gram-negative bacteria. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) are capable of hydrolyzing most penicillins, extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and aztreonam, but their activity is suppressed in the presence of a β-lactamase inhibitor. Serious infections with ESBL-producing isolates are associated with high rates of mortality, making early detection and adequate medical management essential to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Much controversy has centered on the recommendations for testing and reporting of antibiotic susceptibility of potential ESBL-producing organisms. The latest version of the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) susceptibility reporting guidelines, published in 2010, no longer advocates for phenotypic testing of ESBL-producing isolates. From newer studies demonstrating a correlation between organism minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and clinical outcome, along with pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling demonstrating the importance of the MIC to achieving therapeutic targets, the CLSI has assigned lower susceptibility breakpoints for aztreonam and most cephalosporins. The new guidelines recommend using the lower MIC breakpoints to direct antibiotic selection. This article reviews the microbiology and epidemiology of ESBLs, the recent change in CLSI susceptibility reporting guidelines for ESBLs, and the clinical and PK/PD data supporting the relationship between in vitro susceptibility and clinical outcome. Finally, considerations for antimicrobial selection when treating patients with infections caused by ESBL-producing organisms from various sources are discussed. PMID:25309145

  4. Conservation of Pathogenic TCR Homology Across Class II Restrictions in Anti-RNP Autoimmunity: Extended Efficacy of T Cell Vaccine Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Zang, YunJuan; Martinez, Laisel; Fernandez, Irina; Pignac-Kobinger, Judith; Greidinger, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    T cells have been shown to mediate aspects of anti-RNP autoimmunity, and are a potential target of therapy in lupus and related diseases. In this study, we assessed the relevance of a conserved class of anti-RNP T cells to autoimmune disease expression and therapy. Our data show that anti-RNP T cell selection induced a limited set of homologous CDR3 motifs at high frequency. Homologous CDR3 motifs have been reported in other autoimmune diseases. Vaccination with irradiated anti-RNP (but not anti-Tetanus Toxoid) CD4+ cells induced remission of anti-RNP-associated nephritis in at least 80% of treated mice, even with donor/recipient MHC Class II mismatch, and in both induced and spontaneous autoimmunity. Vaccine responder sera inhibited anti-70k T cell proliferation and bound hybridomas expressing the conserved CDR3 motifs. Our data indicate that a limited set of TCR CDR3 motifs may be important for the pathogenesis of anti-RNP lupus and other autoimmune diseases. The ability to target a consistent set of pathogenic T cells between individuals and across Class II restrictions may allow for the more practical development of a standardized anti-RNP T cell vaccine preparation useful for multiple patients. PMID:24670800

  5. Spin Crossover Properties of Iron(ii) Complexes with a N4O2 Donor Set by Extended Π-CONJUGATED Schiff-Base Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takayoshi

    2013-09-01

    The preparation and magnetic properties of three Fe(II) Schiff-base complexes, [Fe(qnal-21)2]•CH2Cl2 (1), [Fe(qnal-12)2]•2C6H6 (2) and [Fe(Hqsalc)2] (3), (Hqnal-21 = N-(8'-quinolyl)-2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldimine, Hqnal-12 = N-(8'-quinolyl)-1-hydroxy-2-naphthaldimine, H2qsalc = 4-hydroxy-3-[(8-quinolinylimino)methyl]benzoic acid) are reported. X-ray single crystal structure analyses of 1 and 2 reveal that an Fe(II) ion in each complex is coordinated by two Schiff-base ligands, qnal-21 or qnal-12, in a meridional fashion. Molecular packing of 2 shows that a qnal-12 interacts with neighboring two qnal-12's through π-π interactions, which results in the formation of one-dimensional chain. Although the magnetic property of 2 shows a high-spin state at all the temperature range measured, the χT-T plot of 3 shows abrupt spin crossover behavior with a wide hysteresis of 21 K, probably due to the hydrogen-bond network originated by carboxyl groups.

  6. IscR of Rhodobacter sphaeroides functions as repressor of genes for iron-sulfur metabolism and represents a new type of iron-sulfur-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Remes, Bernhard; Eisenhardt, Benjamin D; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Klug, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    IscR proteins are known as transcriptional regulators for Fe–S biogenesis. In the facultatively phototrophic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides IscR is the product of the first gene in the isc-suf operon. A major role of IscR in R. sphaeroides iron-dependent regulation was suggested in a bioinformatic study (Rodionov et al., PLoS Comput Biol 2:e163, 2006), which predicted a binding site in the upstream regions of several iron uptake genes, named Iron-Rhodo-box. Most known IscR proteins have Fe–S clusters featuring (Cys)3(His)1 ligation. However, IscR proteins from Rhodobacteraceae harbor only a single-Cys residue and it was considered unlikely that they can ligate an Fe–S cluster. In this study, the role of R. sphaeroides IscR as transcriptional regulator and sensor of the Fe–S cluster status of the cell was analyzed. A mutant lacking IscR is more impaired in growth under iron limitation than the wild-type and exhibits significantly increased ROS levels in iron-replete and iron-deplete conditions. Expression studies reveal that R. sphaeroides IscR in its cluster-bound form functions as transcriptional repressor of genes involved in iron metabolism by direct binding to the promoter region of genes preceded by the motif. A total of 110 genes are directly or indirectly affected by IscR. Furthermore, IscR possesses a unique Fe–S cluster ligation scheme with only a single cysteine involved. PMID:26235649

  7. IscR of Rhodobacter sphaeroides functions as repressor of genes for iron-sulfur metabolism and represents a new type of iron-sulfur-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Remes, Bernhard; Eisenhardt, Benjamin D; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Klug, Gabriele

    2015-10-01

    IscR proteins are known as transcriptional regulators for Fe-S biogenesis. In the facultatively phototrophic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides IscR is the product of the first gene in the isc-suf operon. A major role of IscR in R. sphaeroides iron-dependent regulation was suggested in a bioinformatic study (Rodionov et al., PLoS Comput Biol 2:e163, 2006), which predicted a binding site in the upstream regions of several iron uptake genes, named Iron-Rhodo-box. Most known IscR proteins have Fe-S clusters featuring (Cys)3 (His)1 ligation. However, IscR proteins from Rhodobacteraceae harbor only a single-Cys residue and it was considered unlikely that they can ligate an Fe-S cluster. In this study, the role of R. sphaeroides IscR as transcriptional regulator and sensor of the Fe-S cluster status of the cell was analyzed. A mutant lacking IscR is more impaired in growth under iron limitation than the wild-type and exhibits significantly increased ROS levels in iron-replete and iron-deplete conditions. Expression studies reveal that R. sphaeroides IscR in its cluster-bound form functions as transcriptional repressor of genes involved in iron metabolism by direct binding to the promoter region of genes preceded by the motif. A total of 110 genes are directly or indirectly affected by IscR. Furthermore, IscR possesses a unique Fe-S cluster ligation scheme with only a single cysteine involved. PMID:26235649

  8. Cardiolipin Deficiency in Rhodobacter sphaeroides Alters the Lipid Profile of Membranes and of Crystallized Cytochrome Oxidase, but Structure and Function Are Maintained

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xi; Tamot, Banita; Hiser, Carrie; Reid, Gavin E.; Benning, Christoph; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2012-05-08

    Many recent studies highlight the importance of lipids in membrane proteins, including in the formation of well-ordered crystals. To examine the effect of changes in one lipid, cardiolipin, on the lipid profile and the production, function, and crystallization of an intrinsic membrane protein, cytochrome c oxidase, we mutated the cardiolipin synthase (cls) gene of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, causing a >90% reduction in cardiolipin content in vivo and selective changes in the abundances of other lipids. Under these conditions, a fully native cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was produced, as indicated by its activity, spectral properties, and crystal characteristics. Analysis by MALDI tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) revealed that the cardiolipin level in CcO crystals, as in the membranes, was greatly decreased. Lipid species present in the crystals were directly analyzed for the first time using MS/MS, documenting their identities and fatty acid chain composition. The fatty acid content of cardiolipin in R. sphaeroides CcO (predominantly 18:1) differs from that in mammalian CcO (18:2). In contrast to the cardiolipin dependence of mammalian CcO activity, major depletion of cardiolipin in R. sphaeroides did not impact any aspect of CcO structure or behavior, suggesting a greater tolerance of interchange of cardiolipin with other lipids in this bacterial system.

  9. Quenching Capabilities of Long-Chain Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting-2 Complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with an Engineered Carotenoid Synthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Six light-harvesting-2 complexes (LH2) from genetically modified strains of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These strains were engineered to incorporate carotenoids for which the number of conjugated groups (N = NC=C + NC=O) varies from 9 to 15. The Rb. sphaeroides strains incorporate their native carotenoids spheroidene (N = 10) and spheroidenone (N = 11), as well as longer-chain analogues including spirilloxanthin (N = 13) and diketospirilloxantion (N = 15) normally found in Rhodospirillum rubrum. Measurements of the properties of the carotenoid first singlet excited state (S1) in antennas from the Rb. sphaeroides set show that carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) interactions are similar to those in LH2 complexes from various other bacterial species and thus are not significantly impacted by differences in polypeptide composition. Instead, variations in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer are primarily regulated by the N-determined energy of the carotenoid S1 excited state, which for long-chain (N ≥ 13) carotenoids is not involved in energy transfer. Furthermore, the role of the long-chain carotenoids switches from a light-harvesting supporter (via energy transfer to BChl a) to a quencher of the BChl a S1 excited state B850*. This quenching is manifested as a substantial (∼2-fold) reduction of the B850* lifetime and the B850* fluorescence quantum yield for LH2 housing the longest carotenoids. PMID:27285777

  10. [The mechanism of acetate assimilation in purple nonsulfur bacteria lacking the glyoxylate pathway: enzymes of the citramalate cycle in Rhodobacter sphaeroides].

    PubMed

    Filatova, L V; Berg, I A; Krasil'nikova, E N; Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of acetate assimilation by the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, which lacks the glyoxylate shortcut, has been studied. In a previous work, proceeding from data on acetate assimilation by Rba. sphaeroides cell suspensions, a suggestion was made regarding the operation, in this bacterium, of the citramalate cycle. This cycle was earlier found in Rhodospirillum rubrum in the form of an anaplerotic reaction sequence that operates during growth on acetate instead of the glyoxylate shortcut, which is not present in the latter bacterium. The present work considers the enzymes responsible for acetate assimilation in Rba. sphaeroides. It is shown that this bacterium possesses the key enzymes of the citramalate cycle: citramalate synthase, which catalyzes condensation of acetyl-CoA and pyruvate and, as a result, forms citramalate, and 3-methylmalyl-CoA lyase, which catalyzes the cleavage of 3-methylmalyl-CoA to glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA. The regeneration of pyruvate, which is the acetyl-CoA acceptor in the citramalate cycle, involves propionyl-CoA and occurs via the following reaction sequence: propionyl-CoA (+ CO2) --> methylmalonyl-CoA --> succinyl-CoA --> succinate --> fumarate --> malate --> oxalacetate (- CO2) --> phosphoenolpyruvate --> pyruvate. The independence of the cell growth and the acetate assimilation of CO2 is due to the accumulation of CO2/HCO3- (released during acetate assimilation) in cells to a level sufficient for the effective operation of propionyl-CoA carboxylase. PMID:16119844

  11. Quenching Capabilities of Long-Chain Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting-2 Complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with an Engineered Carotenoid Synthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dilbeck, Preston L; Tang, Qun; Mothersole, David J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Hunter, C Neil; Bocian, David F; Holten, Dewey; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M

    2016-06-23

    Six light-harvesting-2 complexes (LH2) from genetically modified strains of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These strains were engineered to incorporate carotenoids for which the number of conjugated groups (N = NC═C + NC═O) varies from 9 to 15. The Rb. sphaeroides strains incorporate their native carotenoids spheroidene (N = 10) and spheroidenone (N = 11), as well as longer-chain analogues including spirilloxanthin (N = 13) and diketospirilloxantion (N = 15) normally found in Rhodospirillum rubrum. Measurements of the properties of the carotenoid first singlet excited state (S1) in antennas from the Rb. sphaeroides set show that carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) interactions are similar to those in LH2 complexes from various other bacterial species and thus are not significantly impacted by differences in polypeptide composition. Instead, variations in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer are primarily regulated by the N-determined energy of the carotenoid S1 excited state, which for long-chain (N ≥ 13) carotenoids is not involved in energy transfer. Furthermore, the role of the long-chain carotenoids switches from a light-harvesting supporter (via energy transfer to BChl a) to a quencher of the BChl a S1 excited state B850*. This quenching is manifested as a substantial (∼2-fold) reduction of the B850* lifetime and the B850* fluorescence quantum yield for LH2 housing the longest carotenoids. PMID:27285777

  12. Syntheses and spectroscopic and quadratic nonlinear optical properties of extended dipolar complexes with ruthenium(II) ammine electron donor and N-methylpyridinium acceptor groups.

    PubMed

    Coe, Benjamin J; Jones, Lathe A; Harris, James A; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Asselberghs, Inge; Clays, Koen; Persoons, André; Garín, Javier; Orduna, Jesús

    2004-03-31

    In this paper, we describe the extremely unusual optical properties of Ru(II)-based electron donor-acceptor (D-A) polyene and some closely related chromophores. For three different polyene series, the intense, visible d-->pi* metal-to-ligand charge-transfer bands unexpectedly blue-shift as the number of E-ethylene units (n) increases from 1 to 3, and the static first hyperpolarizabilities beta(0) determined via hyper-Rayleigh scattering and Stark spectroscopy maximize at n = 2, in marked contrast to other known D-A polyenes in which beta(0) increases steadily with n. Time-dependent density-functional theory and finite field calculations verify these empirical trends, which arise from the orbital structures of the complexes. This study illustrates that transition metal-based nonlinear optical chromophores can show very different behavior when compared with their more thoroughly studied purely organic counterparts. PMID:15038742

  13. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  14. Intergalactic medium emission observations with the cosmic web imager. II. Discovery of extended, kinematically linked emission around SSA22 Lyα BLOB 2

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Martin, D.; Chang, Daphne; Matuszewski, Matt; Morrissey, Patrick; Rahman, Shahin; Moore, Anna; Steidel, Charles C.; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2014-05-10

    The intergalactic medium (IGM) is the dominant reservoir of baryons, delineates the large-scale structure of the universe at low to moderate overdensities, and provides gas from which galaxies form and evolve. Simulations of a cold-dark-matter- (CDM-) dominated universe predict that the IGM is distributed in a cosmic web of filaments and that galaxies should form along and at the intersections of these filaments. While observations of QSO absorption lines and the large-scale distribution of galaxies have confirmed the CDM paradigm, the cosmic web of IGM has never been confirmed by direct imaging. Here we report our observation of the Lyα blob 2 (LAB2) in SSA22 with the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI). This is an integral field spectrograph optimized for low surface brightness, extended emission. With 22 hr of total on- and off-source exposure, CWI has revealed that LAB2 has extended Lyα emission that is organized into azimuthal zones consistent with filaments. We perform numerous tests with simulations and the data to secure the robustness of this result, which relies on data with modest signal-to-noise ratios. We have developed a smoothing algorithm that permits visualization of data cube slices along image or spectral image planes. With both raw and smoothed data cubes we demonstrate that the filaments are kinematically associated with LAB2 and display double-peaked profiles characteristic of optically thick Lyα emission. The flux is 10-20 times brighter than expected for the average emission from the IGM but is consistent with boosted fluorescence from a buried QSO or gravitation cooling radiation. Using simple emission models, we infer a baryon mass in the filaments of at least 1-4 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}, and the dark halo mass is at least 2 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}. The spatial-kinematic morphology is more consistent with inflow from the cosmic web than outflow from LAB2, although an outflow feature maybe present at one azimuth. LAB2 and the surrounding gas

  15. Intergalactic Medium Emission Observations with the Cosmic Web Imager. II. Discovery of Extended, Kinematically Linked Emission around SSA22 Lyα Blob 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D. Christopher; Chang, Daphne; Matuszewski, Matt; Morrissey, Patrick; Rahman, Shahin; Moore, Anna; Steidel, Charles C.; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2014-05-01

    The intergalactic medium (IGM) is the dominant reservoir of baryons, delineates the large-scale structure of the universe at low to moderate overdensities, and provides gas from which galaxies form and evolve. Simulations of a cold-dark-matter- (CDM-) dominated universe predict that the IGM is distributed in a cosmic web of filaments and that galaxies should form along and at the intersections of these filaments. While observations of QSO absorption lines and the large-scale distribution of galaxies have confirmed the CDM paradigm, the cosmic web of IGM has never been confirmed by direct imaging. Here we report our observation of the Lyα blob 2 (LAB2) in SSA22 with the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI). This is an integral field spectrograph optimized for low surface brightness, extended emission. With 22 hr of total on- and off-source exposure, CWI has revealed that LAB2 has extended Lyα emission that is organized into azimuthal zones consistent with filaments. We perform numerous tests with simulations and the data to secure the robustness of this result, which relies on data with modest signal-to-noise ratios. We have developed a smoothing algorithm that permits visualization of data cube slices along image or spectral image planes. With both raw and smoothed data cubes we demonstrate that the filaments are kinematically associated with LAB2 and display double-peaked profiles characteristic of optically thick Lyα emission. The flux is 10-20 times brighter than expected for the average emission from the IGM but is consistent with boosted fluorescence from a buried QSO or gravitation cooling radiation. Using simple emission models, we infer a baryon mass in the filaments of at least 1-4 × 1011 M ⊙, and the dark halo mass is at least 2 × 1012 M ⊙. The spatial-kinematic morphology is more consistent with inflow from the cosmic web than outflow from LAB2, although an outflow feature maybe present at one azimuth. LAB2 and the surrounding gas have significant and

  16. Profiling of ornithine lipids in bacterial extracts of Rhodobacter sphaeroides by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization and multistage mass spectrometry (RPLC-ESI-MS(n)).

    PubMed

    Granafei, Sara; Losito, Ilario; Trotta, Massimo; Italiano, Francesca; de Leo, Vincenzo; Agostiano, Angela; Palmisano, Francesco; Cataldi, Tommaso R I

    2016-01-15

    Ornithine lipids (OLs), a sub-group of the large (and of emerging interest) family of lipoamino acids of bacterial origin, contain a 3-hydroxy fatty acyl chain linked via an amide bond to the α-amino group of ornithine and via an ester bond to a second fatty acyl chain. OLs in extracts of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (R. sphaeroides) were investigated by high-performance reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in negative ion mode using a linear ion trap (LIT). The presence of OLs bearing both saturated (i.e, 16:0, 17:0, 18:0, 19:0 and 20:0) and unsaturated chains (i.e., 18:1, 19:1, 19:2 and 20:1) was ascertained and their identification, even for isomeric, low abundance and partially co-eluting species, was achieved by low-energy collision induced dissociation (CID) multistage mass spectrometry (MS(n), n = 2-4). OLs signatures found in two R. sphaeroides strains, i.e., wild type 2.4.1 and mutant R26, were examined and up to 16 and 17 different OL species were successfully identified, respectively. OLs in both bacterial strains were characterized by several combinations of fatty chains on ester-linked and amide-linked 3-OH fatty acids. Multistage MS spectra of monoenoic amide-linked 3-OH acyl chains, allowed the identification of positional isomer of OL containing 18:1 (i.e. 9-octadecenoic) and 20:1 (i.e. 11-eicosenoic) fatty acids. The most abundant OL ([M-H](-) at m/z 717.5) in R. sphaeroides R26 was identified as OL 3-OH 20:1/19:1 (i.e., 3-OH-eicosenoic acid amide-linked to ornithine and esterified to a nonadecenoic chain containing a cyclopropane ring). An unusual OL (m/z 689.5 for the [M-H](-) ion), most likely containing a cyclopropene ester-linked acyl chain (i.e., OL 3-OH 18:0/19:2), was retrieved only in the carotenoidless mutant strain R26. Based on the biosynthetic pathways already known for cyclopropa(e)ne ring-including acyl chains, a plausible explanation was invoked for the enzymatic

  17. The Effects of Extending of Co-planarity in a Series of Structurally Relative Polypyridyl Palladium(II) Complexes on DNA-binding and Cytotoxicity Properties

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Somaye; Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Sori Nezami, Ziba; Ghahghaei, Arezou; Yaghoubi, Fatemeh; Divsalar, Adeleh; Saboury, Ali-Akbar; H. Shirazi, Farshad

    2014-01-01

    In depth interaction studies between calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (CT-DNA) and a series of four structurally relative palladium(II) complexes [Pd(en)(HB)](NO3)2 (a-d), where en is ethylenediamine and heterocyclic base (HB) is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, a); 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, b); dipyridoquinoxaline (dpq, c) and dipyridophenazine (dppz, d) (Figure 1), were performed. These studies have been investigated by utilizing the electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectra and ethidium bromide (EBr) displacement and gel filtration techniques. a-d complexes cooperatively bind and denature the DNA at low concentrations. Their concentration at midpoint of transition, L1/2, follows the order a >> b > c > d. Also the g, the number of binding sites per 1000 nucleotides, follows the order a >> b ~ c > d. EBr and Scatchard experiments for a-d complexes suggest efficient intercalative binding affinity to CT-DNA giving the order: d > c > b > a. Several binding and thermodynamic parameters are also described. The biological activity of these cationic and water soluble palladium complexes were tested against chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, K562. b, c and d complexes show cytotoxic concentration (Cc50) values much lower than cisplatin. PMID:25587317

  18. Selective removal of aberrant extender units by a type II thioesterase for efficient FR-008/candicidin biosynthesis in Streptomyces sp. strain FR-008.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongjun; Meng, Qingqing; You, Delin; Li, Jialiang; Chen, Shi; Ding, Dazhong; Zhou, Xiufen; Zhou, Huchen; Bai, Linquan; Deng, Zixin

    2008-12-01

    Gene fscTE, encoding a putative type II thioesterase (TEII), was associated with the FR-008/candicidin gene cluster. Deletion of fscTE reduced approximately 90% of the FR-008/candicidin production, while the production level was well restored when fscTE was added back to the mutant in trans. FscTE was unable to compensate for the release of the maturely elongated polyketide as site-directed inactivation of the type I thioesterase (TEI) totally abolished FR-008/candicidin production. Direct biochemical analysis of FscTE in parallel with its homologue TylO from the tylosin biosynthetic pathway demonstrated their remarkable preferences for acyl-thioesters (i.e., propionyl-S-N-acetylcysteamine [SNAC] over methylmalonyl-SNAC and acetyl-SNAC over malonyl-SNAC) and thus concluded that TEII could maintain effective polyketide biosynthesis by selectively removing the nonelongatable residues bound to acyl carrier proteins. Overexpression of FscTE under the strong constitutive ermE*p promoter in the wild-type strain did not suppress FR-008/candicidin formation, which confirmed its substrate specificity in vivo. Furthermore, successful complementation of the fscTE mutant was obtained with fscTE and tylO, whereas no complementation was detected with nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) TEII tycF and srfAD, reflecting substrate specificities of TEIIs distinctive from those of either polyketide synthases or NRPSs. PMID:18836004

  19. Functional assembly of the foreign carotenoid lycopene into the photosynthetic apparatus of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, achieved by replacement of the native 3-step phytoene desaturase with its 4-step counterpart from Erwinia herbicola.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Asua, Guillermo; Cogdell, Richard J; Hunter, C Neil

    2002-04-01

    Photosynthetic organisms synthesize a diverse range of carotenoids. These pigments are important for the assembly, function and stability of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, and they are used to quench harmful radicals. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was used as a model system to explore the origin of carotenoid diversity. Replacing the native 3-step phytoene desaturase (CrtI) with the 4-step enzyme from Erwinia herbicola results in significant flux down the spirilloxanthin pathway for the first time in Rb. sphaeroides. In Rb. sphaeroides, the completion of four desaturations to lycopene by the Erwinia CrtI appears to require the absence of CrtC and, in a crtC background, even the native 3-step enzyme can synthesize a significant amount (13%) of lycopene, in addition to the expected neurosporene. We suggest that the CrtC hydroxylase can intervene in the sequence of reactions catalyzed by phytoene desaturase. We investigated the properties of the lycopene-synthesizing strain of Rb. sphaeroides. In the LH2 light-harvesting complex, lycopene transfers absorbed light energy to the bacteriochlorophylls with an efficiency of 54%, which compares favourably with other LH2 complexes that contain carotenoids with 11 conjugated double bonds. Thus, lycopene can join the assembly pathway for photosynthetic complexes in Rb. sphaeroides, and can perform its role as an energy donor to bacteriochlorophylls. PMID:11967082

  20. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of APF530 (extended-release granisetron) in patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy: results of two Phase II trials

    PubMed Central

    Gabrail, Nashat; Yanagihara, Ronald; Spaczyński, Marek; Cooper, William; O’Boyle, Erin; Smith, Carrie; Boccia, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite advances with new therapies, a significant proportion of patients (>30%) suffer delayed-onset chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) despite use of antiemetics. APF530 is a sustained-release subcutaneous (SC) formulation of granisetron for preventing CINV. APF530 pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy were studied in two open-label, single-dose Phase II trials (C2005-01 and C2007-01, respectively) in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Methods In C2005-01, 45 patients received APF530 250, 500, or 750 mg SC (granisetron 5, 10, or 15 mg, respectively). In C2007-01, 35 patients were randomized to APF530 250 or 500 mg SC. Injections were given 30 to 60 minutes before single-day moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Plasma granisetron was measured from predose to 168 hours after study drug administration. Safety and efficacy were also evaluated. Results APF530 pharmacokinetics were dose proportional, with slow absorption and elimination of granisetron after a single SC dose. Median time to maximum plasma concentration and half-life were similar for APF530 250 and 500 mg in both trials, with no differences between the groups receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Exposure to granisetron was maintained at a therapeutic level over the delayed-onset phase, at least 168 hours. Adverse events in both trials were as expected for granisetron; injection site reactions (eg, erythema and induration) were predominantly mild and seen in ≤20% of patients. Complete responses (no emesis, with no rescue medication) were obtained in the acute, delayed, and overall phases in ≥80% and ≥75% of patients in both trials with the 250 and 500 mg doses, respectively. Conclusion After a single injection of APF530, there were dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and sustained concentrations of granisetron over 168 hours. The 250 and 500 mg doses were well tolerated

  1. Surface complexation and precipitate geometry for aqueous Zn(II) sorption on ferrihydrite I: X-ray absorption extended fine structure spectroscopy analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    "Two-line" ferrihydrite samples precipitated and then exposed to a range of aqueous Zn solutions (10-5 to 10-3 M), and also coprecipitated in similar Zn solutions (pH 6.5), have been examined by Zn and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Typical Zn complexes on the surface have Zn-O distances of 1.97(0.2) A?? and coordination numbers of about 4.0(0.5), consistent with tetrahedral oxygen coordination. This contrasts with Zn-O distances of 2.11(.02) A?? and coordination numbers of 6 to 7 in the aqueous Zn solutions used in sample preparation. X-ray absorption extended fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) fits to the second shell of cation neighbors indicate as many as 4 Zn-Fe neighbors at 3.44(.04) A?? in coprecipitated samples, and about two Zn-Fe neighbors at the same distance in adsorption samples. In both sets of samples, the fitted coordination number of second shell cations decreases as sorption density increases, indicating changes in the number and type of available complexing sites or the onset of competitive precipitation processes. Comparison of our results with the possible geometries for surface complexes and precipitates suggests that the Zn sorption complexes are inner sphere and at lowest adsorption densities are bidentate, sharing apical oxygens with adjacent edge-sharing Fe(O,OH)6 octahedra. Coprecipitation samples have complexes with similar geometry, but these are polydentate, sharing apices with more than two adjacent edge-sharing Fe(O,OH)6 polyhedra. The results are inconsistent with Zn entering the ferrihydrite structure (i.e., solid solution formation) or formation of other Zn-Fe precipitates. The fitted Zn-Fe coordination numbers drop with increasing Zn density with a minimum of about 0.8(.2) at Zn/(Zn + Fe) of 0.08 or more. This change appears to be attributable to the onset of precipitation of zinc hydroxide polymers with mainly tetrahedral Zn coordination. At the highest loadings studied, the nature of the complexes changes further

  2. X-ray observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 253 --- II. Extended emission from hot gas in the nuclear area, disk, and halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, W.; Vogler, A.; Klein, U.; Zinnecker, H.

    2000-08-01

    Spatial and spectral analysis of deep ROSAT HRI and PSPC observations of the near edge-on starburst galaxy NGC 253 reveal diffuse soft X-ray emission, which contributes 80% to its total X-ray luminosity (LX = 5 1039 erg s-1, corrected for foreground absorption). The nuclear area, disk, and halo contribution to the luminosity is about equal. The starburst nucleus itself is highly absorbed and not visible in the ROSAT band. The emission from the nuclear area stems from a heavily absorbed source with an extent of 250 pc (FWHM) about 100 pc above the nucleus along the SE minor axis ("nuclear source", X34), and the "X-ray plume". The nuclear source is best described as having a thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum with a temperature of T = 1.2 keV (NH = 3 1021 cm-2) and LXexgal = 3 1038 erg s-1 (corrected for Galactic foreground absorption). The spectrum of the hollow-cone shaped plume (opening angle of 32̂ and extent of ~ 700 pc along the SE minor axis) is best modeled by a composite of a thermal bremsstrahlung (NH = 3 1020 cm-2, T = 1.2 keV, LXexgal = 4.6 1038 erg s-1) and a thin thermal plasma (Galactic foreground absorption, T = 0.33 keV, LXexgal = 4 1038 erg s-1). The diffuse nuclear emission components trace interactions between the galactic super-wind emitted by the starburst nucleus, and the dense interstellar medium of the disk. Diffuse emission from the disk is heavily absorbed and follows the spiral structure. It can be described by a thin thermal plasma spectrum (T = 0.7 keV, intrinsic luminosity LXintr = 1.2 1039 erg s-1), and most likely reflects a mixture of sources (X-ray binaries, supernova remnants, and emission from H II regions) and the hot interstellar medium. The surface brightness profile reveals a bright inner and a fainter outer component along the major axis with extents of ∓3.4 kpc and ∓7.5 kpc. We analysed the total halo emission separated into two geometrical areas; the "corona" (scale height ~ 1 kpc) and the "outer halo". The coronal

  3. Insights into the species-specific TLR4 signaling mechanism in response to Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A detection

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Panneerselvam, Suresh; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    TLR4 in complex with MD2 senses the presence of lipid A (LA) and initiates a signaling cascade that curb the infection. This complex is evolutionarily conserved and can initiate the immune system in response to a variety of LAs. In this study, molecular dynamics simulation (25 ns) was performed to elucidate the differential behavior of TLR4/MD2 complex in response to Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A (RsLA). Penta-acyl chain-containing RsLA is at the verge of agonist (6 acyl-chains) and antagonist (4 acyl-chains) structure, and activates the TLR4 pathway in horses and hamsters, while inhibiting in humans and murine. In the time-evolved coordinates, the promising factors that dictated the differential response included the local and global mobility pattern of complexes, solvent-accessible surface area of ligand, and surface charge distributions of TLR4 and MD2. We showed that the GlcN1-GlcN2 backbone acquires agonist (3FXI)-like configurations in horses and hamsters, while acquiring antagonist (2E59)-like configurations in humans and murine systems. Moreover, analysis of F126 behavior in the MD2 F126 loop (amino acids 123–129) and loop EF (81–89) suggested that certain sequence variations also contribute to species-specific response. This study underlines the TLR4 signaling mechanism and provides new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25563849

  4. Physiological Roles for Two Periplasmic Nitrate Reductases in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.3 (ATCC 17025)▿

    PubMed Central

    Hartsock, Angela; Shapleigh, James P.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolically versatile purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.3 is a denitrifier whose genome contains two periplasmic nitrate reductase-encoding gene clusters. This work demonstrates nonredundant physiological roles for these two enzymes. One cluster is expressed aerobically and repressed under low oxygen while the second is maximally expressed under low oxygen. Insertional inactivation of the aerobically expressed nitrate reductase eliminated aerobic nitrate reduction, but cells of this strain could still respire nitrate anaerobically. In contrast, when the anaerobic nitrate reductase was absent, aerobic nitrate reduction was detectable, but anaerobic nitrate reduction was impaired. The aerobic nitrate reductase was expressed but not utilized in liquid culture but was utilized during growth on solid medium. Growth on a variety of carbon sources, with the exception of malate, the most oxidized substrate used, resulted in nitrite production on solid medium. This is consistent with a role for the aerobic nitrate reductase in redox homeostasis. These results show that one of the nitrate reductases is specific for respiration and denitrification while the other likely plays a role in redox homeostasis during aerobic growth. PMID:21949073

  5. Dissociation of the light-harvesting membrane protein complex I from Rhodobacter sphaeroides under high hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puusepp, Marit; Kangur, Liina; Freiberg, Arvi

    2015-04-01

    The light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is an excellent model system for investigating the stability of oligomeric membrane proteins under high hydrostatic pressure. The currently investigated LH1 forms a 16-meric ring structure of B825 subunits. B825 is a heterodimer of transmembrane α- and β-polypeptide chains, which non-covalently binds two bacteriochlorophyll a molecules. These pigment molecules were used as intrinsic spectroscopic sensors to follow the dissociation reaction. Our results demonstrate that the LH1 dissociates into B825 subunits through an intermediary tetrameric unit B845. The dissociation mechanism depends on pressure. At ∼200-500 MPa the dissociation corresponds to a pseudo-first-order reaction, characterised by the apparent reaction rate at atmospheric pressure k0 = 3.10-5 s-1, activation volume ΔV‡ = -4 mL/mol, and free energy of activation ΔG‡ = 26 kJ/mol. Below 200 MPa and above 500 MPa, the reaction is more complex, including further dissociation of B825 into monomers B777. This paper was presented at the LIIth European High Pressure Research Group (EHPRG 52) Meeting in Lyon (France), 7-12 September 2014.

  6. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  7. Characterization of the flgG operon of Rhodobacter sphaeroides WS8 and its role in flagellum biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    González-Pedrajo, Bertha; de la Mora, Javier; Ballado, Teresa; Camarena, Laura; Dreyfus, Georges

    2002-11-13

    In this work, we show evidence regarding the functionality of a large cluster of flagellar genes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The genes of this cluster, flgGHIJKL and orf-1, are mainly involved in the formation of the basal body, and flgK and flgL encode the hook-associated proteins HAP1 and HAP3. In general, these genes showed a good similarity as compared with those reported for Salmonella enterica. However, flgJ and flgK showed particular features that make them unique among the flagellar sequences already reported. flgJ is only a third of the size reported for flgJ from Salmonella; whereas flgK is about three times larger than any other flgK sequence previously known. Our results indicate that both genes are functional, and their products are essential for flagellar assembly. In contrast, the interruption of orf-1, did not affect motility suggesting that this sequence, if functional, is not indispensable for flagellar assembly. Finally, we present genetic evidence suggesting that the flgGHIJKL genes are expressed as a single transcriptional unit depending on the sigma-54 factor. PMID:12401220

  8. Concomitant biohydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production from dark fermentation effluents by adapted Rhodobacter sphaeroides and mixed photofermentative cultures.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Anish; Valentino, Serena; Frunzo, Luigi; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    This work aimed at investigating concomitant production of biohydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) by photofermentation (PF) using dark fermentation effluents (DFE). An adapted culture of Rhodobacter sphaeroides AV1b (pH 6.5, 24±2°C) achieved H2 and PHB yields of 256 (±2) NmLH2/g Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and 273.8mgPHB/gCOD (32.5±3% of the dry cells weight (DCW)), respectively. When a diluted (1:2) DFE medium was applied to the adapted pure and mixed photofermentative culture, the respective H2 yields were 164.0 (±12) and 71.3 (±6) NmLH2/gCOD and the PHB yields were 212.1 (±105.2) and 50.7 (±2.7) mgPHB/gCOD added, corresponding to 24 (±0.7) and 6.3 (±0) % DCW, respectively. The concomitant H2 and PHB production from the PF process gave a good DFE post treatment achieving up to 80% COD removal from the initial DFE. PMID:27005789

  9. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex. PMID:24160544

  10. Optimization of Biomass and 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides ATCC17023 via Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuli; Zhang, Guangming; Li, Jianzheng; Li, Xiangkun; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Microbial 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) produced from wastewater is considered as potential renewable energy. However, many hurdles are needed to be overcome such as the regulation of key influencing factors on ALA yield. Biomass and ALA production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides was optimized using response surface methodology. The culturing medium was artificial volatile fatty acids wastewater. Three additives were optimized, namely succinate and glycine that are precursors of ALA biosynthesis, and D-glucose that is an inhibitor of ALA dehydratase. The optimal conditions were achieved by analyzing the response surface plots. Statistical analysis showed that succinate at 8.56 mmol/L, glycine at 5.06 mmol/L, and D-glucose at 7.82 mmol/L were the best conditions. Under these optimal conditions, the highest biomass production and ALA yield of 3.55 g/L and 5.49 mg/g-biomass were achieved. Subsequent verification experiments at optimal values had the maximum biomass production of 3.41 ± 0.002 g/L and ALA yield of 5.78 ± 0.08 mg/g-biomass. PMID:26875086

  11. Electronic Structure and Dynamics of Higher-Lying Excited States in Light Harvesting Complex 1 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Peter D; Ting, Po-Chieh; Massey, Sara C; Martin, Elizabeth C; Hunter, C Neil; Engel, Gregory S

    2016-06-23

    Light harvesting in photosynthetic organisms involves efficient transfer of energy from peripheral antenna complexes to core antenna complexes, and ultimately to the reaction center where charge separation drives downstream photosynthetic processes. Antenna complexes contain many strongly coupled chromophores, which complicates analysis of their electronic structure. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) provides information on energetic coupling and ultrafast energy transfer dynamics, making the technique well suited for the study of photosynthetic antennae. Here, we present 2DES results on excited state properties and dynamics of a core antenna complex, light harvesting complex 1 (LH1), embedded in the photosynthetic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The experiment reveals weakly allowed higher-lying excited states in LH1 at 770 nm, which transfer energy to the strongly allowed states at 875 nm with a lifetime of 40 fs. The presence of higher-lying excited states is in agreement with effective Hamiltonians constructed using parameters from crystal structures and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies. The energy transfer dynamics between the higher- and lower-lying excited states agree with Redfield theory calculations. PMID:27232937

  12. Inhibitor-complexed Structures of the Cytochrome bc[subscript 1] from the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, Lothar; Elberry, Maria; Zhou, Fei; Yu, Chang-An; Yu, Linda; Xia, Di

    2008-06-30

    The cytochrome bc{sub 1} complex (bc{sub 1}) is a major contributor to the proton motive force across the membrane by coupling electron transfer to proton translocation. The crystal structures of wild type and mutant bc{sub 1} complexes from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Rsbc{sub 1}), stabilized with the quinol oxidation (Q{sub P}) site inhibitor stigmatellin alone or in combination with the quinone reduction (Q{sub N}) site inhibitor antimycin, were determined. The high quality electron density permitted assignments of a new metal-binding site to the cytochrome c1 subunit and a number of lipid and detergent molecules. Structural differences between Rsbc{sub 1} and its mitochondrial counterparts are mostly extra membranous and provide a basis for understanding the function of the predominantly longer sequences in the bacterial subunits. Functional implications for the bc{sub 1} complex are derived from analyses of 10 independent molecules in various crystal forms and from comparisons with mitochondrial complexes.

  13. Enhanced production of coenzyme Q10 by self-regulating the engineered MEP pathway in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenqiang; Ye, Lidan; Xu, Haoming; Xie, Wenping; Gu, Jiali; Yu, Hongwei

    2014-04-01

    Fine-tuning the expression level of an engineered pathway is crucial for the metabolic engineering of a host toward a desired phenotype. However, most engineered hosts suffer from nonfunctional protein expression, metabolic imbalance, cellular burden or toxicity from intermediates when an engineered pathway is first introduced, which can decrease production of the desired product. To circumvent these obstacles, we developed a self-regulation system utilizing the trc/tac promoter, LacI(q) protein and ribosomal binding sites (RBS). With the purpose of improving coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 ) production by increasing the decaprenyl diphosphate supplement, enzymes DXS, DXR, IDI, and IspD were constitutively overexpressed under the control of the trc promoter in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Then, a self-regulation system combining a set of RBSs for adjusting the expression of the LacI(q) protein was applied to tune the expression of the four genes, resulting in improved CoQ10 production. Finally, another copy of the tac promoter with the UbiG gene (involved in the ubiquinone pathway of CoQ10 biosynthesis) was introduced into the engineered pathway. By optimizing the expression level of both the upstream and downstream pathway, CoQ10 production in the mutants was improved up to 93.34 mg/L (7.16 mg/g DCW), about twofold of the wild-type (48.25 mg/L, 3.24 mg/g DCW). PMID:24122603

  14. Identification and elimination of metabolic bottlenecks in the quinone modification pathway for enhanced coenzyme Q10 production in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenqiang; Ye, Lidan; Lv, Xiaomei; Xie, Wenping; Gu, Jiali; Chen, Zhaofeng; Zhu, Yongqiang; Li, Aipeng; Yu, Hongwei

    2015-05-01

    In this report, UbiE and UbiH in the quinone modification pathway (QMP) were identified in addition to UbiG as bottleneck enzymes in the CoQ10 biosynthesis by Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The CoQ10 content was enhanced after co-overexpression of UbiE and UbiG, however, accompanied by the accumulation of the intermediate 10P-MMBQ. UbiH was then co-overexpressed to pull the metabolic flux towards downstream, resulting in an elevated CoQ10 productivity and decreased biomass. On the other hand, the expression levels of UbiE and UbiG were tuned to eliminate the intermediate accumulation, however at the sacrifice of productivity. To alleviate the detrimental effect on either productivity or cell growth, we tried to fuse UbiG with UbiE and localize them onto the membrane to elevate intermediate conversion. By fusing UbiE and UbiG to pufX, CoQ10 was accumulated to 108.51±2.76mg/L with a biomass of 12.2±0.9g/L. At last, we combined the optimized QMP and the previously engineered 2-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway (MEP) to further boost CoQ10 biosynthesis, resulting in a strain with 138±2.64mg/L CoQ10 production. PMID:25817210

  15. Insights into the species-specific TLR4 signaling mechanism in response to Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Panneerselvam, Suresh; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    TLR4 in complex with MD2 senses the presence of lipid A (LA) and initiates a signaling cascade that curb the infection. This complex is evolutionarily conserved and can initiate the immune system in response to a variety of LAs. In this study, molecular dynamics simulation (25 ns) was performed to elucidate the differential behavior of TLR4/MD2 complex in response to Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A (RsLA). Penta-acyl chain-containing RsLA is at the verge of agonist (6 acyl-chains) and antagonist (4 acyl-chains) structure, and activates the TLR4 pathway in horses and hamsters, while inhibiting in humans and murine. In the time-evolved coordinates, the promising factors that dictated the differential response included the local and global mobility pattern of complexes, solvent-accessible surface area of ligand, and surface charge distributions of TLR4 and MD2. We showed that the GlcN1-GlcN2 backbone acquires agonist (3FXI)-like configurations in horses and hamsters, while acquiring antagonist (2E59)-like configurations in humans and murine systems. Moreover, analysis of F126 behavior in the MD2 F126 loop (amino acids 123-129) and loop EF (81-89) suggested that certain sequence variations also contribute to species-specific response. This study underlines the TLR4 signaling mechanism and provides new therapeutic opportunities.

  16. The L(M196)H mutation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center results in new electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Fufina, Tatiana Y; Vasilieva, Lyudmila G; Gabdulkhakov, Azat G; Shuvalov, Vladimir A

    2015-08-01

    New histidine residue was introduced in M196 position in the reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides in order to alter polarity of the BChl dimer's protein environment and to study how it affects properties and structure of the primary electron donor P. It was shown that in the absorption spectrum of the mutant RC the 6 nm red shift of the Q Y P band was observed together with considerable decrease of its amplitude. The mid-point potential of P/P (+) in the mutant RC was increased by +65 (±15) mV as compared to the E m P/P (+) value in the wild-type RC suggesting that the mutation resulted in new pigment-protein interactions. Crystal structure of RC L(M196)H determined at 2.4 Å resolution implies that BChl Р В and introduced histidine-M196 organize new electrostatic contact that may be specified either as π-π staking or as hydrogen-π interaction. Besides, the structure of the mutants RC shows that His-M196 apparently became involved in hydrogen bond network existing in BChl Р В vicinity that may favor stability of the mutant RC. PMID:25480338

  17. Structure of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26: protein-cofactor (quinones and Fe2+) interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J P; Feher, G; Yeates, T O; Komiya, H; Rees, D C

    1988-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been determined by x-ray diffraction to a resolution of 2.8 A with an R value of 24%. The interactions of the protein with the primary quinone, QA, secondary quinone, QB, and the nonheme iron are described and compared to those of RCs from Rhodopseudomonas viridis. Structural differences between the QA and QB environments that contribute to the function of the quinones (the electron transfer from QA- to QB and the charge recombination of QA-, QB- with the primary donor) are delineated. The protein residues that may be involved in the protonation of QB are identified. A pathway for the doubly reduced QB to dissociate from the RC is proposed. The interactions between QB and the residues that have been changed in herbicide-resistant mutants are described. The environment of the nonheme iron is compared to the environments of metal ions in other proteins. Images PMID:3054889

  18. Triplet energy transfer between bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoids in B850 light-harvesting complexes ofRhodobacter sphaeroides R-26.1.

    PubMed

    Farhoosh, R; Chynwat, V; Gebhard, R; Lugtenburg, J; Frank, H A

    1994-11-01

    The build-up and decay of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) and carotenoid triplet states were studied by flash absorption spectroscopy in (a) the B800-850 antenna complex ofRhodobacter (Rb.)sphaeroides wild type strain 2.4.1, (b) theRb. sphaeroides R-26.1 B850 light-harvesting complex incorporated with spheroidene, (c) the B850 complex incorporated with 3,4-dihydrospheroidene, (d) the B850 complex incorporated with 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene and (e) theRb. sphaeroides R-26.1 B850 complex lacking carotenoids. Steady state absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy were used to evaluate the structural integrity of the complexes. The transient data were fit according to either single or double exponential rate expressions. The triplet lifetimes of the carotenoids were observed to be 7.0±0.1 μs for the B800-850 complex, 14±2 μs for the B850 complex incorporated with spheroidene, and 19±2 μs for the B850 complex incorporated with 3,4-dihydrospheroidene. The BChl triplet lifetime in the B850 complex was 80±5 μs. No quenching of BChl triplet states was seen in the B850 complex incorporated with 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene. For the B850 complex incorporated with spheroidene and with 3,4-dihydrospheroidene, the percentage of BChl quenched by carotenoids was found to be related to the percentage of carotenoid incorporation. The triplet energy transfer efficiencies are compared to the values for singlet energy transfer measured previously (Frank et al. (1993) Photochem. Photobiol. 57: 49-55) on the same samples. These studies provide a systematic approach to exploring the effects of state energies and lifetimes on energy transfer between BChls and carotenoids in vivo. PMID:24306503

  19. Homogeneous Universes in Extended Inflation II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Enrique

    1997-04-01

    It is shown that the scalar field π of the Brans-Dicke theory in the Bianchi TypeVIo-VIh-VIIh-VIII and IX models has the same form that in the isotropic Robertson-Walker case. It is shown that the Universe will be isotropized very fast, permitting so that the approximation of an Universe Robertson-Walker isotropic to be a good approach in the early Universe.

  20. prrA, a putative response regulator involved in oxygen regulation of photosynthesis gene expression in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Eraso, J M; Kaplan, S

    1994-01-01

    A new locus, prrA, involved in the regulation of photosynthesis gene expression in response to oxygen, has been identified in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Inactivation of prrA results in the absence of photosynthetic spectral complexes. The prrA gene product has strong homology to response regulators associated with signal transduction in other prokaryotes. When prrA is present in multiple copies, cells produce light-harvesting complexes under aerobic growth conditions, suggesting that prrA affects photosynthesis gene expression positively in response to oxygen deprivation. Analysis of the expression of puc::lacZ fusions in wild-type and PrrA- cells revealed a substantial decrease in LacZ expression in the absence of prrA under all conditions of growth, especially when cells were grown anaerobically in the dark in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Northern (RNA) and slot blot hybridizations confirmed the beta-galactoside results for puc and revealed additional positive regulation of puf, puhA, and cycA by PrrA. The effect of truncated PrrA on photosynthesis gene expression in the presence of low oxygen levels can be explained by assuming that PrrA may be effective as a multimer. PrrA was found to act on the downstream regulatory sequences (J. K. Lee and S. Kaplan, J. Bacteriol. 174:1146-1157, 1992) of the puc operon regulatory region. Finally, two spontaneous prrA mutations that abolish prrA function by changing amino acids in the amino-terminal domain of the protein were isolated. Images PMID:8282708

  1. Expression of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides hemA and hemT genes, encoding two 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase isozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Neidle, E L; Kaplan, S

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides hemA and hemT genes, encoding 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthase isozymes, were determined. ALA synthase catalyzes the condensation of glycine and succinyl coenzyme A, the first and rate-limiting step in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. The hemA and hemT structural gene sequences were 65% identical to each other, and the deduced HemA and HemT polypeptide sequences were 53% identical, with an additional 16% of aligned amino acids being similar. HemA and HemT were homologous to all characterized ALA synthases, including two human ALA synthase isozymes. In addition, they were evolutionarily related to 7-keto-8-aminopelargonic acid synthetase (BioF) and 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase (Kbl), enzymes which catalyze similar reactions. Two hemA transcripts were identified, both expressed under photosynthetic conditions at levels approximately three times higher than those found under aerobic conditions. A single transcriptional start point was identified for both transcripts, and a consensus sequence at this location indicated that an Fnr-like protein may be involved in the transcriptional regulation of hemA. Transcription of hemT was not detected in wild-type cells under the physiological growth conditions tested. In a mutant strain in which the hemA gene had been inactivated, however, hemT was expressed. In this mutant, hemT transcripts were characterized by Northern (RNA) hybridization, primer extension, and ribonuclease protection techniques. A small open reading frame of unknown function was identified upstream of, and transcribed in the same direction as, hemA. Images PMID:8468290

  2. B850 pigment-protein complex of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: Extinction coefficients, circular dichroism, and the reversible binding of bacteriochlorophyll

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Roderick K.; Clayton, Betty J.

    1981-01-01

    Chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides yield the antenna complex B850 in either of two states, depending on the method of isolation. Methods using dodecyl (= lauryl) dimethylamine oxide yield B850 with an absorption spectrum like that in vivo: the bands at 800 and 850 nm, due to the bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) components Bchl-800 and Bchl-850, are in ratio A800/A850 = 0.65 ± 0.05. When B850 is isolated by methods using dodecyl sulfate, the Bchl-800 is attenuated or absent. Bchl assays of these materials and of the isolated antenna complex B875 yielded the following extinction coefficients, ±SD, on the basis of the molarity of Bchl: For B875, ε875 = 126 ± 8 mM-1 cm-1. For B850 in the normal (high-Bchl-800) state, ε850 = 132 ± 10 mM-1 cm-1. For the individual components of Bchl in B850, ε850 of Bchl-850 = 184 ± 13 mM-1 cm-1 and ε800 of Bchl-800 = 213 ± 28 mM-1 cm-1. With these coefficients the molecular ratio of Bchl-850 to Bchl-800 equals 1.8 ± 0.4 for B850 in the high-Bchl-800 state. Starting with B850 depleted of Bchl-800, the addition of dodecyldimethylamine oxide restored the 800-nm absorption band. The 850-nm band became shifted toward the blue, narrowed, and slightly attenuated, and its associated circular dichroism became 20% more intense. Free Bchl added with dodecyldimethylamine oxide accelerated the restoration of Bchl-800 and retarded the attenuation of Bchl-850. We conclude that free Bchl can interact reversibly with a binding site for Bchl-800 in the B850 complex, with dodecyl sulfate favoring dissociation and dodecyldimethylamine oxide promoting association. Thus the reversible dissociation of a native chlorophyll-protein complex has now been demonstrated. PMID:16593090

  3. Resolved difference spectra of redox centers involved in photosynthetic electron flow in Rhodopseudomonas capsulata and Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, J R; Meinhardt, S W; Tierney, G V; Crofts, A R

    1981-03-12

    1. In Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides the Qx absorption band of the reaction center bacteriochlorophyll dimer which bleaches on photo-oxidation is both blue-shifted and has an increased extinction coefficient on solubilisation of the chromatophore membrane with lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide. These effects may be attributable in part to the particle flattening effect. 2. The difference spectrum of photo-oxidisable c type cytochrome in the chromatophore was found to have a slightly variable peak position in the alpha-band (lambda max at 551--551.25 nm); this position was always red-shifted in comparison to that of isolated cytochrome c2 (lambda max at 549.5 +/- 0.5 nm). The shift in wavelength maximum was not due to association with the reaction center protein. A possible heterogeneity in the c-type cytochromes of chromatophores is discussed. 3. Flash-induced difference spectra attributed to cytochrome b were resolved at several different redox potentials and in the presence and absence of antimycin. Under most conditions, one major component, cytochrome b50 appeared to be involved. However, in some circumstances, reduction of a component with the spectral characteristics of cytochrome b-90 was observed. 4. Difference spectra attributed to (BChl)2, (Formula: see text), c type cytochrome and cytochrome b50 were resolved in the Soret region for Rhodopseudomonas capsulata. 5. A computer-linked kinetic spectrophotometer for obtaining automatically the difference spectra of components functioning in photosynthetic electron transfer chains is described. The system incorporates a novel method for automatically adjusting and holding the photomultiplier supply voltage. PMID:6260162

  4. Different effects of identical symmetry-related mutations near the bacteriochlorophyll dimer in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, L G; Fufina, T Y; Gabdulkhakov, A G; Shuvalov, V A

    2015-06-01

    In the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (RC), asymmetric protein environment of the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) dimer largely determines the photophysical and photochemical properties of the primary electron donor. Previously, we noticed significant differences in properties of Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs with identical mutations in symmetry-related positions - I(M206)H and I(L177)H. The substitution I(L177)H resulted in covalent binding of BChl PA with the L-subunit, as well as in 6-coordination of BChl BB, whereas in RC I(M206)H no such changes of pigment-protein interactions were found. In addition, the yield of RC I(M206)H after its isolation from membranes was significantly lower than the yield of RC I(L177)H. This study shows that replacement of amino acid residues in the M203-M206 positions near BChls PB and BA by symmetry-related residues from the L-subunit near BChls PA and BB leads to further decrease in RC amount in the membranes associated obviously with poor assembly of the complex. Introduction of a new hydrogen bond between BChl PB and its protein environment by means of the F(M197)H mutation stabilized the mutant RC but did not affect its low yield. We suggest that the mutation I(M206)H and substitution of amino acid residues in M203-M205 positions could disturb glycolipid binding on the RC surface near BChl BA that is important for stable assembly of the complex in the membrane. PMID:26531011

  5. Charge separation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutant reaction centers with increased midpoint potential of the primary electron donor.

    PubMed

    Khmelnitskiy, A Yu; Khatypov, R A; Khristin, A M; Leonova, M M; Vasilieva, L G; Shuvalov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Primary charge separation dynamics in four mutant reaction centers (RCs) of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides with increased midpoint potential of the primary electron donor P (M160LH, L131LH, M197FH, and M160LH + L131LH + M197FH) have been studied by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy at room temperature. The decay of the excited singlet state in the wild-type and mutant RCs is complex and has two main exponential components, which indicates heterogeneity of electron transfer rates or the presence of reverse electron transfer reactions. The radical anion band of monomeric bacteriochlorophyll B(A) at 1020 nm was first observed in transient absorbance difference spectra of single mutants. This band remains visible, although with somewhat reduced amplitude, even at delays up to tens of picoseconds when stimulated emission is absent and the reaction centers are in the P(+)H(A)(-) state. The presence of this band in this time period indicates the existence of thermodynamic equilibrium between the P(+)B(A)(-)H(A) and P(+)B(A)H(A)(-) states. The data give grounds for assuming that the value of the energy difference between the states P*, P(+)B(A)(-)H(A), and P(+)B(A)H(A)(-) at early times is of the same order of magnitude as the energy kT at room temperature. Besides, monomeric bacteriochlorophyll B(A) is found to be an immediate electron acceptor in the single mutant RCs, where electron transfer is hampered due to increased energy of the P(+)B(A)(-) state with respect to P*. PMID:23379560

  6. Interdependent expression of the ccoNOQP-rdxBHIS loci in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jung Hyeob; Kaplan, Samuel

    2002-10-01

    The rdxBHIS gene cluster of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1, located downstream of the ccoNOQP operon encoding the cbb(3) cytochrome c oxidase, is required for the posttranscriptional modification of the cbb(3) cytochrome c oxidase. The cbb(3) cytochrome c oxidase is the main terminal oxidase under microaerobic conditions, as well as a component of the signal transduction pathway controlling photosynthesis gene expression. Because of the intimate functional and positional relationships of the ccoNOQP operon and the rdxBHIS gene cluster, we have examined the transcriptional activities of this DNA region in order to understand their expression and regulation. Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription-PCR, together with earlier complementation analysis, suggested that the ccoNOQP-rdxBHIS cluster is transcribed as ccoNOQP-, ccoNOQP-rdxBH-, rdxBH-, and rdxIS-specific transcripts. Multiple transcriptional start sites have been identified by primer extension analyses: five for ccoN, four for rdxB, and one for rdxI. Transcription from P1(N) of ccoN and P1(B) of rdxB is dependent on the presence of FnrL. LacZ fusion analysis support the above-described studies, especially the importance of FnrL. Expression of the cco-rdx cluster is closely related to photosynthesis gene expression, suggesting that transcript stoichiometry and presumably the stoichiometry of the gene products are critical factors in controlling photosynthesis gene expression. PMID:12218019

  7. PucC and LhaA direct efficient assembly of the light‐harvesting complexes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Mothersole, David J.; Jackson, Philip J.; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Tucker, Jaimey D.; Brindley, Amanda A.; Dickman, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mature architecture of the photosynthetic membrane of the purple phototroph R hodobacter sphaeroides has been characterised to a level where an atomic‐level membrane model is available, but the roles of the putative assembly proteins LhaA and PucC in establishing this architecture are unknown. Here we investigate the assembly of light‐harvesting LH2 and reaction centre‐light‐harvesting1‐PufX (RC‐LH1‐PufX) photosystem complexes using spectroscopy, pull‐downs, native gel electrophoresis, quantitative mass spectrometry and fluorescence lifetime microscopy to characterise a series of lha A and puc C mutants. LhaA and PucC are important for specific assembly of LH1 or LH2 complexes, respectively, but they are not essential; the few LH1 subunits found in Δlha A mutants assemble to form normal RC‐LH1‐PufX core complexes showing that, once initiated, LH1 assembly round the RC is cooperative and proceeds to completion. LhaA and PucC form oligomers at sites of initiation of membrane invagination; LhaA associates with RCs, bacteriochlorophyll synthase (BchG), the protein translocase subunit YajC and the YidC membrane protein insertase. These associations within membrane nanodomains likely maximise interactions between pigments newly arriving from BchG and nascent proteins within the SecYEG‐SecDF‐YajC‐YidC assembly machinery, thereby co‐ordinating pigment delivery, the co‐translational insertion of LH polypeptides and their folding and assembly to form photosynthetic complexes. PMID:26419219

  8. Molecular genetic analysis of a dimethylsulfoniopropionate lyase that liberates the climate-changing gas dimethylsulfide in several marine alpha-proteobacteria and Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Curson, A R J; Rogers, R; Todd, J D; Brearley, C A; Johnston, A W B

    2008-03-01

    The alpha-proteobacterium Sulfitobacter EE-36 makes the gas dimethylsulfide (DMS) from dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), an abundant antistress molecule made by many marine phytoplankton. We screened a cosmid library of Sulfitobacter for clones that conferred to other bacteria the ability to make DMS. One gene, termed dddL, was sufficient for this phenotype when cloned in pET21a and introduced into Escherichia coli. Close DddL homologues exist in the marine alpha-proteobacteria Fulvimarina, Loktanella Oceanicola and Stappia, all of which made DMS when grown on DMSP. There was also a dddL homologue in Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2.4.1, but not in strain ATCC 17025; significantly, the former, but not the latter, emits DMS when grown with DMSP. Escherichia coli containing the cloned, overexpressed dddL genes of R. sphaeroides 2.4.1 and Sulfitobacter could convert DMSP to acrylate plus DMS. This is the first identification of such a 'DMSP lyase'. Thus, DMS can be made either by this DddL lyase or by a DMSP acyl CoA transferase, specified by dddD, a gene that we had identified in several other marine bacteria. PMID:18237308

  9. Heterologous expression of glutamyl-tRNA reductase gene in Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U.001 to enhance 5-aminolevulinic acid production

    PubMed Central

    Kars, Gökhan; Alparslan, Ümmühan

    2014-01-01

    The pathways for synthesis of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) use either succinyl-CoA and glycine (C-4 pathway), or glutamate (C-5 pathway). Although Rhodobacter sphaeroides synthesizes 5-ALA through the C-4 pathway, it also has the genes coding for the enzymes of the C-5 pathway, except for glutamyl-tRNA reductase. The glutamyl-tRNA reductase gene was cloned from Rhodospirillum rubrum and expressed in R. sphaeroides; thus, the C-5 pathway was enabled to function upon assembling all the required genes. Consequently, a new and unique bacterial strain producing more 5-ALA was developed. Biohydrogen was also produced in the same bioprocess within a biorefinery approach using sugar beet molasses as substrate. The amount of 5-ALA produced by the modified strain was 25.9 mg/g dry cell weight (DCW), whereas the wild-type strain produced 12.4 mg/g DCW. In addition, the amount of H2 generated by the modified and wild-type cells, respectively, was 0.92 L/L culture and 1.05 L/L culture. PMID:26740781

  10. Enhanced photo-fermentative H2 production using Rhodobacter sphaeroides by ethanol addition and analysis of soluble microbial products

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological fermentation routes can provide an environmentally friendly way of producing H2 since they use renewable biomass as feedstock and proceed under ambient temperature and pressure. In particular, photo-fermentation has superior properties in terms of achieving high H2 yield through complete degradation of substrates. However, long-term H2 production data with stable performance is limited, and this data is essential for practical applications. In the present work, continuous photo-fermentative H2 production from lactate was attempted using the purple non-sulfur bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131. As a gradual drop in H2 production was observed, we attempted to add ethanol (0.2% v/v) to the medium. Results As continuous operation went on, H2 production was not sustained and showed a negligible H2 yield (< 0.5 mol H2/mol lactateadded) within two weeks. Electron balance analysis showed that the reason for the gradual drop in H2 production was ascribed to the increase in production of soluble microbial products (SMPs). To see the possible effect of ethanol addition, a batch test was first conducted. The presence of ethanol significantly increased the H2 yield from 1.15 to 2.20 mol H2/mol lactateadded, by suppressing the production of SMPs. The analysis of SMPs by size exclusion chromatography showed that, in the later period of fermentation, more than half of the low molecular weight SMPs (< 1 kDa) were consumed and used for H2 production when ethanol had been added, while the concentration of SMPs continuously increased in the absence of ethanol. It was found that the addition of ethanol facilitated the utilization of reducing power, resulting in an increase in the cellular levels of NAD+ and NADP+. In continuous operation, ethanol addition was effective, such that stable H2 production was attained with an H2 yield of 2.5 mol H2/mol lactateadded. Less than 15% of substrate electrons were used for SMP production, whereas 35% were used in

  11. Isolation and characterization of photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas capsulata and Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Worland, S.T.

    1984-09-01

    Reaction centers were isolated by affinity chromatography on equine cytochrome C. Peripheral proteins were removed with 0.05% LDAO. Absorption and EPR spectra and bleaching assays indicate that the reaction centers retained their electron donors and acceptors in the native environment. Three reaction center polypeptides were isolated and submitted for amino-terminal sequence determination. By comparing these sequences to those deduced from DNA, it was established that the M and L subunits are post-translationally modified to remove the aminoterminal Met, whereas the H subunit is not. Inhibition of O/sub 2/ evolution in photosystem II particles from spinach by naphthoquinone derivatives show O/sub 2/ inhibition by bromomethyl and acetoxymethyl derivatives but not with hydroxymethyl derivatives. Inhibition by acetoxymethyl derivatives in irreversible and dependent on illumination suggesting that reduction of the quinone is necessary. Therefore acetoxymethyl derivatives may be useful as suicide reagents for labelling quinone binding sites. Procedures were developed to extract one or both of the quinones present in reaction centers and preserve the integrity of the co-factor binding sites. The H and M subunits were cleaned using furmic acid. Both fragments were isolated from the H subunit, while the larger fragment was isolated from the M subunit. Electrophoretic mobilities of the isolated fragments agrees well with the expected molecular weights. The L subunit was digested with Staphylococcus areus vs protease. The pattern obtained was consistant with the potential sites of cleavage, but it was not possible to assign cleavage sites unambiguously. 112 references, 37 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Cloning and characterization of two groESL operons of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: transcriptional regulation of the heat-induced groESL operon.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W T; Terlesky, K C; Tabita, F R

    1997-01-01

    The nonsulfur purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was found to contain two groESL operons. The groESL1 heat shock operon was cloned from a genomic library, and a 2.8-kb DNA fragment was sequenced and found to contain the groES and groEL genes. The deduced amino acid sequences of GroEL1 (cpn60) and GroES1 (cpn10) were in agreement with N-terminal sequences previously obtained for the isolated proteins (K. C. Terlesky and F. R. Tabita, Biochemistry 30:8181-8186, 1991). These sequences show a high degree of similarity to groESL genes isolated from other bacteria. Northern analysis indicated that the groESL1 genes were expressed as part of a 2.2-kb polycistronic transcript that is induced 13-fold after heat shock. Transcript size was not affected by heat shock; however, the amount of transcript was induced to its greatest extent 15 to 30 min after a 40 degrees C heat shock, from an initial temperature of 28 degrees C, and remained elevated up to 120 min. The R. sphaeroides groESL1 operon contains a putative hairpin loop at the start of the transcript that is present in other bacterial heat shock genes. Primer extension of the message showed that the transcription start site is at the start of this conserved hairpin loop. In this region were also found putative -35 and -10 sequences that are conserved upstream from other bacterial heat shock genes. Transcription of the groESL1 genes was unexpectedly low under photoautotrophic growth conditions. Thus far, it has not been possible to construct a groESL1 deletion strain, perhaps indicating that these genes are essential for growth. A second operon (groESL2) was also cloned from R. sphaeroides, using a groEL1 gene fragment as a probe; however, no transcript was observed for this operon under several different growth conditions. A groESL2 deletion strain was constructed, but there was no detectable change in the phenotype of this strain compared to the parental strain. PMID:8990302

  13. Towards a vibrational analysis of spheroidene. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of 13C-labelled spheroidenes in petroleum ether and in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Kok, P; Köhler, J; Groenen, E J; Gebhard, R; van der Hoef, I; Lugtenburg, J; Hoff, A F; Farhoosh, R; Frank, H A

    1994-04-28

    We report resonance Raman spectra of the carotenoid spheroidene and its 14'-13C and 15'-13C substituted analogues in petroleum ether and bound to the reaction centre of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. The spectra in petroleum ether correspond to planar all-trans spheroidene while those of the reaction centres are consistent with a nonplanar 15,15'-cis spheroidene. The effect of 13C labelling is largest in the carbon-carbon double-bond stretching region. The 15'-13C substitution of the reaction centre bound spheroidene, however, hardly changes the C=C band as compared to that for the natural abundance spheroidene apart from a new weak band at 1508 cm(-1). This observation has been interpreted as a decoupling of the C15=C15' stretch from the other double-bond stretches in combination with a small intrinsic Raman intensity of this local mode for 15,15'-cis spheroidene. PMID:8167135

  14. Structural and preliminary molecular dynamics studies of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center and its mutant form L(M196)H + H(M202)L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyashtorny, V. G.; Fufina, T. Yu.; Vasilieva, L. G.; Shuvalov, V. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.

    2014-07-01

    Pigment-protein interactions are responsible for the high efficiency of the light-energy transfer and conversion in photosynthesis. The reaction center (RC) from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is the most convenient model for studying the mechanisms of primary processes of photosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis can be used to study the effect of the protein environment of electron-transfer cofactors on the optical properties, stability, pigment composition, and functional activity of RC. The preliminary analysis of RC was performed by computer simulation of the amino acid substitutions L(M196)H + H(M202)L at the pigment-protein interface and by estimating the stability of the threedimensional structure of the mutant RC by the molecular dynamics method. The doubly mutated reaction center was overexpressed, purified, and crystallized. The three-dimensional structure of this mutant was determined by X-ray crystallography and compared with the molecular dynamics model.

  15. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  16. Sub-picosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopy of all- trans-neurosporene in solution and bound to the LH2 complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides G1C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Ping; Inaba, Toru; Watanabe, Yasutaka; Koyama, Yasushi

    2000-12-01

    Sub-picosecond, time-resolved absorption spectra of all- trans-neurosporene, both free in n-hexane solution and bound to the LH2 complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides G1C, were recorded and analyzed by singular-value decomposition followed by global fitting using a sequential model. The former experiment identified the 1B u+→1B u-→2A g- internal conversion, whereas the latter experiment identified a transformation of 1B u+→2A g-→T 1(1 3B u+). Excitation to the 1B u+(0) or 1B u+(1) vibronic level resulted in enhancement of stimulated emission from the particular level, showing that vibrational relaxation in the 1B u+ state has a time constant comparable to, or larger than, that of electronic relaxation.

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray structure analysis of wild-type and L(M196)H-mutant Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centres

    PubMed Central

    Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Fufina, T. Y.; Vasilieva, L. G.; Mueller, U.; Shuvalov, V. A.

    2013-01-01

    The electron and proton transport mediated by protein-bound cofactors in photosynthesis have been investigated by various methods in order to determine the energetics, the dynamics and the pathway of this process. In purple bacteria, primary photosynthetic charge separation and the build-up of a proton gradient across the periplasmic membrane are catalyzed by the photosynthetic reaction centre (RC). Here, the purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of wild-type and L(M196)H-mutant RCs of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are presented, enabling study of the influence of the protein environment of the primary electron donor on the spectral properties and photochemical activity of the RC. PMID:23695564

  18. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray structure analysis of wild-type and L(M196)H-mutant Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centres.

    PubMed

    Gabdulkhakov, A G; Fufina, T Y; Vasilieva, L G; Mueller, U; Shuvalov, V A

    2013-05-01

    The electron and proton transport mediated by protein-bound cofactors in photosynthesis have been investigated by various methods in order to determine the energetics, the dynamics and the pathway of this process. In purple bacteria, primary photosynthetic charge separation and the build-up of a proton gradient across the periplasmic membrane are catalyzed by the photosynthetic reaction centre (RC). Here, the purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of wild-type and L(M196)H-mutant RCs of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are presented, enabling study of the influence of the protein environment of the primary electron donor on the spectral properties and photochemical activity of the RC. PMID:23695564

  19. Differences in the binding of the primary quinone receptor in Photosystem I and reaction centres of Rhodobacter sphaeroides-R26 studied with transient EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Est, A.; Sieckmann, I.; Lubitz, W.; Stehlik, D.

    1995-05-01

    The binding of the primary quinone acceptor, Q, in Photosystem I (PS I) and reaction centres (RC's) of Rhodobacter Sphaeroide-R26 in which, the non-heme iron has been replaced by zinc (Zn-bRC's) is studied using transient EPR spectroscopy. In PS I, Q is phylloquinone (vitamin K 1, VK 1) and is referred to as A 1. In Zn-bRC's, it is ubiquinone-10 (UQ 10) and called Q A. Native samples of the two RC's as well as those in which A 1 and Q A have been replaced by perdeuterated napthoquinone (NQ- d6) and duroquinone (DQ- d12) are compared. The spin polarized K-band (24 GHz) spectra of the charge separated state P +.Q -. (P = primary chlorophyll donor) in Zn-bRC's show that substitution of Q A, with NQ- d6 and DQ- d12 does not have a measurable effect on the quinone orientation in the Q A site. In contrast, large differences in the orientation of VK 1, NQ- d6 and DQ- d12 in the A 1 site in PS I are found. In addition, all three quinones in PS I are oriented differently than Q A in Zn-bRC's. Further, the x and y principal values of the g-tensors of VK 1-., NQ -. and DQ -. in PS I are shown to be significantly larger than in frozen alcohol and Zn-bRC's. It is suggested that the differences in the orientation and a g-values of the quinones in the two RC's arise from a weaker binding to the protein in PS I.

  20. A distant homologue of the FlgT protein interacts with MotB and FliL and is essential for flagellar rotation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Fabela, Salvador; Domenzain, Clelia; De la Mora, Javier; Osorio, Aurora; Ramirez-Cabrera, Victor; Poggio, Sebastian; Dreyfus, Georges; Camarena, Laura

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we describe a periplasmic protein that is essential for flagellar rotation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. This protein is encoded upstream of flgA, and its expression is dependent on the flagellar master regulator FleQ and on the class III flagellar activator FleT. Sequence comparisons suggest that this protein is a distant homologue of FlgT. We show evidence that in R. sphaeroides, FlgT interacts with the periplasmic regions of MotB and FliL and with the flagellar protein MotF, which was recently characterized as a membrane component of the flagellum in this bacterium. In addition, the localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-MotF is completely dependent on FlgT. The Mot(-) phenotype of flgT cells was weakly suppressed by point mutants of MotB that presumably keep the proton channel open and efficiently suppress the Mot(-) phenotype of motF and fliL cells, indicating that FlgT could play an additional role beyond the opening of the proton channel. The presence of FlgT in purified filament-hook-basal bodies of the wild-type strain was confirmed by Western blotting, and the observation of these structures under an electron microscope showed that the basal bodies from flgT cells had lost the ring that covers the LP ring in the wild-type structure. Moreover, MotF was detected by immunoblotting in the basal bodies obtained from the wild-type strain but not from flgT cells. From these results, we suggest that FlgT forms a ring around the LP ring, which anchors MotF and stabilizes the stator complex of the flagellar motor. PMID:24056105

  1. Absence of the cbb3 Terminal Oxidase Reveals an Active Oxygen-Dependent Cyclase Involved in Bacteriochlorophyll Biosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangyu E.; Martin, Elizabeth C.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The characteristic green color associated with chlorophyll pigments results from the formation of an isocyclic fifth ring on the tetrapyrrole macrocycle during the biosynthesis of these important molecules. This reaction is catalyzed by two unrelated cyclase enzymes employing different chemistries. Oxygenic phototrophs such as plants and cyanobacteria utilize an oxygen-dependent enzyme, the major component of which is a diiron protein named AcsF, while BchE, an oxygen-sensitive [4Fe-4S] cluster protein, dominates in phototrophs inhabiting anoxic environments, such as the purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We identify a potential acsF in this organism and assay for activity of the encoded protein in a strain lacking bchE under various aeration regimes. Initially, cells lacking bchE did not demonstrate AcsF activity under any condition tested. However, on removal of a gene encoding a subunit of the cbb3-type respiratory terminal oxidase, cells cultured under regimes ranging from oxic to micro-oxic exhibited cyclase activity, confirming the activity of the oxygen-dependent enzyme in this model organism. Potential reasons for the utilization of an oxygen-dependent enzyme in anoxygenic phototrophs are discussed. IMPORTANCE The formation of the E ring of bacteriochlorophyll pigments is the least well characterized step in their biosynthesis, remaining enigmatic for over 60 years. Two unrelated enzymes catalyze this cyclization step; O2-dependent and O2-independent forms dominate in oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, respectively. We uncover the activity of an O2-dependent enzyme in the anoxygenic purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, initially by inactivation of the high-affinity terminal respiratory oxidase, cytochrome cbb3. We propose that the O2-dependent form allows for the biosynthesis of a low level of bacteriochlorophyll under oxic conditions, so that a rapid initiation of photosynthetic processes is possible for

  2. Coherent phenomena of charge separation in reaction centers of LL131H and LL131H/LM160H/FM197H mutants of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, A G; Vasilieva, L G; Shkuropatov, A Y; Shuvalov, V A

    2011-10-01

    Primary stage of charge separation and transfer of charges was studied in reaction centers (RCs) of point mutants LL131H and LL131H/LM160H/FM197H of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides by differential absorption spectroscopy with temporal resolution of 18 fsec at 90 K. Difference absorption spectra measured at 0-4 psec delays after excitation of dimer P at 870 nm with 30 fsec step were obtained in the spectral range of 935-1060 nm. It was found that a decay of P* due to charge separation is considerably slower in the mutant RCs in comparison with native RCs of Rba. sphaeroides. Coherent oscillations were found in the kinetics of stimulated emission of the P* state at 940 nm. Fourier analysis of the oscillations revealed a set of characteristic bands in the frequency range of 20-500 cm(-1). The most intense band has the frequency of ~130 cm(-1) in RCs of mutant LL131H and in native RCs and the frequency of ~100 cm(-1) in RCs of the triple mutant. It was found that an absorption band of bacteriochlorophyll anion B(A)(-) which is registered in the difference absorption spectra of native RCs at 1020 nm is absent in the analogous spectra of the mutants. The results are analyzed in terms of the participation of the B(A) molecule in the primary electron transfer in the presence of a nuclear wave packet moving along the inharmonic surface of P* potential energy. PMID:22098236

  3. Magnesium chelatase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides: initial characterization of the enzyme using purified subunits and evidence for a BchI-BchD complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, L C; Jensen, P E; Hunter, C N

    1999-01-01

    The enzyme magnesium-protoporphyrin IX chelatase (Mg chelatase) catalyses the insertion of Mg into protoporphyrin IX, the first committed step in (bacterio)chlorophyll biosynthesis. In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, this reaction is catalysed by the products of the bchI, bchD and bchH genes. These genes have been expressed in Escherichia coli so that the BchI, BchD and BchH proteins are produced with N-terminal His6 affinity tags, which has led to the production of large amounts of highly purified, highly active Mg chelatase subunits from a single chromatography step. Furthermore, BchD has been purifed free of contamination with the chaperone GroEL, which had proven to be a problem in the past. BchD, present largely as an insoluble protein in E. coli, was purified in 6 M urea and refolded by addition of BchI, MgCl2 and ATP, yielding highly active protein. BchI/BchD mixtures prepared in this way were used in conjunction with BchH to determine the kinetic parameters of R. sphaeroides Mg chelatase for its natural substrates. We have been able to demonstrate for the first time that BchI and BchD form a complex, and that Mg2+ and ATP are required to establish and maintain this complex. Gel filtration data suggest that BchI and BchD form a complex of molecular mass 200 kDa in the presence of Mg2+ and ATP. Our data suggest that, in vivo, BchD is only folded correctly and maintained in its correct conformation in the presence of BchI, Mg2+ and ATP. PMID:9882621

  4. Triplet energy transfer between the primary donor and carotenoids in Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers incorporated with spheroidene analogs having different extents of pi-electron conjugation.

    PubMed

    Farhoosh, R; Chynwat, V; Gebhard, R; Lugtenburg, J; Frank, H A

    1997-07-01

    Three carotenoids, spheroidene, 3,4-dihydrospheroidene and 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene, having 8, 9 and 10 conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds, respectively, were incorporated into Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers. The extents of binding were found to be 95 +/- 5% for spheroidene, 65 +/- 5% for 3,4-dihydrospheroidene and 60 +/- 10% for 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene. The dynamics of the triplet states of the primary donor and carotenoid were measured at room temperature by flash absorption spectroscopy. The carotenoid, spheroidene, was observed to quench the primary donor triplet state. The triplet state of spheroidene that was formed subsequently decayed to the ground state with a lifetime of 7.0 +/- 0.5 microseconds. The primary donor triplet lifetime in the Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers lacking carotenoids was 60 +/- 5 microseconds. Quenching of the primary donor triplet state by the carotenoid was not observed in the Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers containing 3,4-dihydrospheroidene nor in the R-26.1 reaction centers containing 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene. Triplet-state electron paramagnetic resonance was also carried out on the samples. The experiments revealed carotenoid triple-state signals in the Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers incorporated with spheroidene, indicating that the primary donor triplet is quenched by the carotenoid. No carotenoid signals were observed from Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers incorporating 3,4-dihydrospheroidene nor in reaction centers incorporating 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene. Circular dichroism, steady-state absorbance band shifts accompanying the primary photochemistry in the reaction center and singlet energy transfer from the carotenoid to the primary donor confirm that the carotenoids are bound in the reaction centers and interacting with the primary donor. These studies provide a systematic approach to exploring the effects of carotenoid structure and excited

  5. A Cluster of Four Homologous Small RNAs Modulates C1 Metabolism and the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in Rhodobacter sphaeroides under Various Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Billenkamp, Fabian; Peng, Tao; Berghoff, Bork A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In bacteria, regulatory RNAs play an important role in the regulation and balancing of many cellular processes and stress responses. Among these regulatory RNAs, trans-encoded small RNAs (sRNAs) are of particular interest since one sRNA can lead to the regulation of multiple target mRNAs. In the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, several sRNAs are induced by oxidative stress. In this study, we focused on the functional characterization of four homologous sRNAs that are cotranscribed with the gene for the conserved hypothetical protein RSP_6037, a genetic arrangement described for only a few sRNAs until now. Each of the four sRNAs is characterized by two stem-loops that carry CCUCCUCCC motifs in their loops. They are induced under oxidative stress, as well as by various other stress conditions, and were therefore renamed here sRNAs CcsR1 to CcsR4 (CcsR1–4) for conserved CCUCCUCCC motif stress-induced RNAs 1 to 4. Increased CcsR1–4 expression decreases the expression of genes involved in C1 metabolism or encoding components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex either directly by binding to their target mRNAs or indirectly. One of the CcsR1–4 target mRNAs encodes the transcriptional regulator FlhR, an activator of glutathione-dependent methanol/formaldehyde metabolism. Downregulation of this glutathione-dependent pathway increases the pool of glutathione, which helps to counteract oxidative stress. The FlhR-dependent downregulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex reduces a primary target of reactive oxygen species and reduces aerobic electron transport, a main source of reactive oxygen species. Our findings reveal a previously unknown strategy used by bacteria to counteract oxidative stress. IMPORTANCE Phototrophic organisms have to cope with photo-oxidative stress due to the function of chlorophylls as photosensitizers for the formation of singlet oxygen. Our study assigns an important role in photo-oxidative stress resistance to a

  6. Primary electron transfer in reaction centers of YM210L and YM210L/HL168L mutants of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, A G; Vasilieva, L G; Khmelnitskaya, T I; Shkuropatova, V A; Shkuropatov, A Ya; Shuvalov, V A

    2010-07-01

    The role of tyrosine M210 in charge separation and stabilization of separated charges was studied by analyzing of the femtosecond oscillations in the kinetics of decay of stimulated emission from P* and of a population of the primary charge separated state P(+)B(A)(-) in YM210L and YM210L/HL168L mutant reaction centers (RCs) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides in comparison with those in native Rba. sphaeroides RCs. In the mutant RCs, TyrM210 was replaced by Leu. The HL168L mutation placed the redox potential of the P(+)/P pair 123 mV below that of native RCs, thus creating a theoretical possibility of P(+)B(A)(-) stabilization. Kinetics of P* decay at 940 nm of both mutants show a significant slowing of the primary charge separation reaction in comparison with native RCs. Distinct damped oscillations in these kinetics with main frequency bands in the range of 90-150 cm(-1) reflect mostly nuclear motions inside the dimer P. Formation of a very small absorption band of B(A)(-) at 1020 nm is registered in RCs of both mutants. The formation of the B(A)(-) band is accompanied by damped oscillations with main frequencies from ~10 to ~150 cm(-1). Only a partial stabilization of the P(+)B(A)(-) state is seen in the YM210L/HL168L mutant in the form of a small non-oscillating background of the 1020-nm kinetics. A similar charge stabilization is absent in the YM210L mutant. A model of oscillatory reorientation of the OH-group of TyrM210 in the electric fields of P(+) and B(A)(-) is proposed to explain rapid stabilization of the P(+)B(A)(-) state in native RCs. Small oscillatory components at ~330-380 cm(-1) in the 1020-nm kinetics of native RCs are assumed to reflect this reorientation. We conclude that the absence of TyrM210 probably cannot be compensated by lowering of the P(+)B(A)(-) free energy that is expected for the double YM210L/HL168L mutant. An oscillatory motion of the HOH55 water molecule under the influence of P(+) and B(A)(-) is assumed to be another potential

  7. Quantum extended supersymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, D. R.; Scharf, G.

    2004-09-01

    We analyse some quantum multiplets associated with extended supersymmetries. We study in detail the general form of the causal (anti)commutation relations. The condition of positivity of the scalar product imposes severe restrictions on the (quantum) model. It is problematic if one can find out quantum extensions of the standard model with extended supersymmetries.

  8. Extended or Restricted Childhood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Colin

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the Government's proposals for "extended" primary schools, an important element in the recently-published five-year plan for education. The author expresses concern that extended primary schools will not provide a variety of experiences, including "play" experiences for young children.

  9. Extended conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Anne

    1990-08-01

    Some extended conformal field theories are briefly reviewed. They illustrate how non minimal models of the Virasoro algebra (c≥1) can become minimal with respect to a larger algebra. The accent is put on N-extended superconformal algebras, which are relevant in superstring compactification.

  10. Characterization and Modeling of the Oligomeric State and Ligand Binding Behavior of Purified Translocator Protein 18 kDa from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein that has been identified as a key player in cholesterol and porphyrin transport, apoptotic signaling, and cancer development, as well as neurological inflammation and disease. Despite a number of TSPO ligands whose effects have been studied with respect to these varied biological activities, the nature of their interactions with TSPO and the molecular mechanism of their effects remain controversial, in part because of the lack of an atomic-resolution structure. We expressed and purified the homologue of mammalian TSPO from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RsTSPO), as well as a mutant form in a proposed drug binding loop, RsTSPOW38C. We characterized their binding behaviors with endogenous ligands and a series of compounds that affect apoptosis by using a sensitive tryptophan fluorescence quenching assay. Our results show that RsTSPO behaves as a dimer in the purified state and binds with low micromolar affinity to many of these ligands, including retinoic acid, curcumin, and a known Bcl-2 inhibitor, gossypol, suggesting a possible direct role for TSPO in their regulation of apoptosis. A computational model of the RsTSPO dimer is constructed using EM-Fold, Rosetta, and a cryo-electron microscopy density map. Binding behaviors of known ligands are discussed in the context of the model with respect to regions that may be involved in binding. PMID:23952237