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Sample records for sphingolipids

  1. [Sphingolipid and apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Hu, Xiao-Song; Shi, Jie-Ping

    2003-07-01

    Over the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the study of sphingolipids with the development of biological techniques. Sphingolipids play important roles in diverse physiological process, including cytoskeleton migration, angiogenesis, embryonic development and signal transduction. Except for this, the lastest evidence has suggested that sphingolipids and their metabolite (ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine 1-phosphate) can induce apoptosis in a wide variety of tumor cell lines such as LoVo HT29, Bel7402, A549, CNE2 cells. This paper is attempted to review the recent advances of investigation into the relationship between sphingolipids and apoptosis. PMID:14628466

  2. Nuclear Sphingolipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lucki, Natasha C.; Sewer, Marion B.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear lipid metabolism is implicated in various processes, including transcription, splicing, and DNA repair. Sphingolipids play roles in numerous cellular functions, and an emerging body of literature has identified roles for these lipid mediators in distinct nuclear processes. Different sphingolipid species are localized in various subnuclear domains, including chromatin, the nuclear matrix, and the nuclear envelope, where sphingolipids exert specific regulatory and structural functions. Sphingomyelin, the most abundant nuclear sphingolipid, plays both structural and regulatory roles in chromatin assembly and dynamics in addition to being an integral component of the nuclear matrix. Sphingosine-1-phosphate modulates histone acetylation, sphingosine is a ligand for steroidogenic factor 1, and nuclear accumulation of ceramide has been implicated in apoptosis. Finally, nuclear membrane–associated ganglioside GM1 plays a pivotal role in Ca2+ homeostasis. This review highlights research on the factors that control nuclear sphingolipid metabolism and summarizes the roles of these lipids in various nuclear processes. PMID:21888508

  3. Sphingolipids in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    García-Barros, Mónica; Coant, Nicolas; Truman, Jean-Philip; Snider, Ashley J.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the major causes of death in the western world. Despite increasing knowledge of the molecular signaling pathways implicated in colon cancer, therapeutic outcomes are still only moderately successful. Sphingolipids, a family of N-acyl linked lipids, have not only structural functions but are also implicated in important biological functions. Ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate are the most important bioactive lipids, and they regulate several key cellular functions. Accumulating evidence suggests that many cancers present alterations in sphingolipids and their metabolizing enzymes. The aim of this review is to discuss the emerging roles of sphingolipids, both endogenous and dietary, in colon cancer and the interaction of sphingolipids with WNT/β-catenin pathway, one of the most important signaling cascades that regulate development and homeostasis in intestine PMID:24060581

  4. Sphingolipids in parasitic protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Bangs, James D.; Beverley, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The surface of most protozoan parasites relies heavily upon lipid-anchored molecules, to form protective barriers and play critical functions required for infectivity. Sphingolipids (SLs) play important roles through their abundance and involvement in membrane microdomain formation, as well as serving as the lipid anchor for many of these molecules, and in some but possibly not all species, as important signaling molecules. Interactions of parasite sphingolipid metabolism with that of the host may potentially contribute to parasite survival and/or host defense. In this chapter we summarize current knowledge of SL structure, synthesis and function in several of the major parasitic protozoan groups. PMID:20919659

  5. Sphingolipids from Conyza canadensis.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, Naveen; Iqbal, Kiran; Anis, Itrat; Malik, Abdul

    2002-12-01

    Sphingolipid 1 and its corresponding beta-D-glucopyranoside derivative 2 have been isolated from the ethylacetate fraction of Conyza canadensis along with beta-sitosterol 3, stigmasterol 4, beta-sitosterol 3-O-beta-D-glucoside 5 and harmine 6, reported for the first time from this species. The structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated through spectroscopy including two-dimensional NMR. PMID:12453535

  6. Sphingolipid metabolites in inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Maceyka, Michael; Spiegel, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are ubiquitous building blocks of eukaryotic cell membranes. Progress in our understanding of sphingolipid metabolism, state-of-the-art sphingolipidomic approaches and animal models have generated a large body of evidence demonstrating that sphingolipid metabolites, particularly ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate, are signalling molecules that regulate a diverse range of cellular processes that are important in immunity, inflammation and inflammatory disorders. Recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of action of sphingolipid metabolites and new perspectives on their roles in regulating chronic inflammation have been reported. The knowledge gained in this emerging field will aid in the development of new therapeutic options for inflammatory disorders. PMID:24899305

  7. The Yeast Sphingolipid Signaling Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Montefusco, David J.; Matmati, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are recognized as signaling mediators in a growing number of pathways, and represent potential targets to address many diseases. The study of sphingolipid signaling in yeast has created a number of breakthroughs in the field, and has the potential to lead future advances. The aim of this article is to provide an inclusive view of two major frontiers in yeast sphingolipid signaling. In the first section, several key studies in the field of sphingolipidomics are consolidated to create a yeast sphingolipidome that ranks nearly all known sphingolipid species by their level in a resting yeast cell. The second section presents an overview of most known phenotypes identified for sphingolipid gene mutants, presented with the intention of illuminating not yet discovered connections outside and inside of the field. PMID:24220500

  8. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  9. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  10. SEPARATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MAJOR PLANT SPHINGOLIPID CLASSES FROM LEAVES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sphingolipids are major components of the plasma membrane, tonoplast and other endomembranes of plant cells. Previous compositional analyses have focused only on individual sphingolipid classes because of the widely differing polarities of plant sphingolipids. Consequently, the total content of sphi...

  11. Ethylene Modulates Sphingolipid Synthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-xin; Wu, Jia-li; Yin, Jian; Zheng, Ping; Yao, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids have essential structural and bioactive functions in membranes and in signaling. However, how plants regulate sphingolipid biosynthesis in the response to stress remains unclear. Here, we reveal that the plant hormone ethylene can modulate sphingolipid synthesis. The fungal toxin Fumonisin B1 (FB1) inhibits the activity of ceramide synthases, perturbing sphingolipid homeostasis, and thus inducing cell death. We used FB1 to test the role of ethylene signaling in sphingolipid synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. The etr1-1 and ein2 mutants, which have disrupted ethylene signaling, exhibited hypersensitivity to FB1; by contrast, the eto1-1 and ctr1-1 mutants, which have enhanced ethylene signaling, exhibited increased tolerance to FB1. Gene expression analysis showed that during FB1 treatment, transcripts of genes involved in de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis were down-regulated in ctr1-1 mutants but up-regulated in ein2 mutants. Strikingly, under normal conditions, ctr1-1 mutants contained less ceramides and hydroxyceramides, compared with wild type. After FB1 treatment, ctr1-1 and ein2 mutants showed a significant improvement in sphingolipid contents, except the ctr1-1 mutants showed little change in hydroxyceramide levels. Treatment of wild-type seedlings with the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid down-regulated genes involved in the sphingolipid de novo biosynthesis pathway, thus reducing sphingolipid contents and partially rescuing FB1-induced cell death. Taking these results together, we propose that ethylene modulates sphingolipids by regulating the expression of genes related to the de novo biosynthesis of sphingolipids. PMID:26734030

  12. Sphingolipid metabolism and interorganellar transport: localization of sphingolipid enzymes and lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Toshiyuki; Hanada, Kentaro

    2015-02-01

    In recent decades, many sphingolipid enzymes, sphingolipid-metabolism regulators and sphingolipid transfer proteins have been isolated and characterized. This review will provide an overview of the intracellular localization and topology of sphingolipid enzymes in mammalian cells to highlight the locations where respective sphingolipid species are produced. Interestingly, three sphingolipids that reside or are synthesized in cytosolic leaflets of membranes (ceramide, glucosylceramide and ceramide-1-phosphate) all have cytosolic lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). These LTPs consist of ceramide transfer protein (CERT), four-phosphate adaptor protein 2 (FAPP2) and ceramide-1-phosphate transfer protein (CPTP), respectively. These LTPs execute functions that affect both the location and metabolism of the lipids they bind. Molecular details describing the mechanisms of regulation of LTPs continue to emerge and reveal a number of critical processes, including competing phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions and binding interactions with regulatory proteins and lipids that influence the transport, organelle distribution and metabolism of sphingolipids. PMID:25382749

  13. Novel sphingolipids from Conyza canadensis.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, Naveen; Iqbal, Kiran; Malik, Abdul

    2002-12-01

    New sphingolipids, 1,3,5-trihydroxy-2-hexadecanoylamino-(6E,9E)-heptacosdiene (1). 1,3,5-trihydroxy-2-hexadecanoylamino-(6E,9E)-heptacosdiene-1-O-glucopyranoside (2). 1,3-dihydroxy-2-hexanoylamino-(4E)-heptadecene (3). have been isolated from Conyza canadensis, along with five known compounds, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,5-dimethoxybenzoic acid, 3beta-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, and 3beta-erythrodiol, isolated for the first time from this species. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods ((1)H- and (13)C-NMR, IR and MS) and two dimensional (2D)-NMR experiments. PMID:12499589

  14. The role of sphingolipids in neuronal plasticity of the brain.

    PubMed

    Sonnino, Sandro; Prinetti, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Müller et al. in which the authors suggest a new sphingolipid-dependent mechanism for behavioral extinction. Their study should be considered in the broad perspective of sphingolipid metabolic pathways and traffic (depicted in the graphic). Read the highlighted article 'A sphingolipid mechanism for behavioral extinction' on page 589. PMID:26990419

  15. Human genetic disorders of sphingolipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Astudillo, Leonardo; Sabourdy, Frédérique; Therville, Nicole; Bode, Heiko; Ségui, Bruno; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Hornemann, Thorsten; Levade, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Monogenic defects of sphingolipid biosynthesis have been recently identified in human patients. These enzyme deficiencies affect the synthesis of sphingolipid precursors, ceramides or complex glycosphingolipids. They are transmitted as autosomal recessive or dominant traits, and their resulting phenotypes often replicate the abnormalities seen in murine models deficient for the corresponding enzymes. In quite good agreement with the known critical roles of sphingolipids in cells from the nervous system and the epidermis, these genetic defects clinically manifest as neurological disorders, including paraplegia, epilepsy or peripheral neuropathies, or present with ichthyosis. The present review summarizes the genetic alterations, biochemical changes and clinical symptoms of this new group of inherited metabolic disorders. Hypotheses regarding the molecular pathophysiology and potential treatments of these diseases are also discussed. PMID:25141825

  16. Sphingolipids in High Fat Diet and Obesity-Related Diseases.

    PubMed

    Choi, Songhwa; Snider, Ashley J

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient oversupply associated with a high fat diet (HFD) significantly alters cellular metabolism, and specifically including sphingolipid metabolism. Sphingolipids are emerging as bioactive lipids that play key roles in regulating functions, in addition to their traditional roles as membrane structure. HFD enhances de novo sphingolipid synthesis and turnover of sphingolipids via the salvage pathway, resulting in the generation of ceramide, and more specifically long chain ceramide species. Additionally, HFD elevates sphingomyelin and sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) levels in several tissues including liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and cardiovascular tissues. HFD-stimulated sphingolipid generation contributes to systemic insulin resistance, dysregulated lipid accumulation, and cytokine expression and secretion from skeletal muscle and adipose tissues, exacerbating obesity-related conditions. Furthermore, altered sphingolipid levels, particularly ceramide and sphingomyelin, are involved in obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. In this review, HFD-mediated sphingolipid metabolism and its impact on HFD-induced biology and pathobiology will be discussed. PMID:26648664

  17. Sphingolipids in neuroblastoma: their role in drug resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sietsma, Hannie; Dijkhuis, Anne Jan; Kamps, Willem; Kok, Jan Willem

    2002-08-01

    Disseminated neuroblastoma usually calls for chemotherapy as the primary approach for treatment. Treatment failure is often attributable to drug resistance. This involves a variety of cellular mechanisms, including increased drug efflux through expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters (e.g., P-glycoprotein) and the inability of tumor cells to activate or propagate the apoptotic response. In recent years it has become apparent that sphingolipid metabolism and the generation of sphingolipid species, such as ceramide, also play a role in drug resistance. This may involve an autonomous mechanism, related to direct effects of sphingolipids on the apoptotic response, but also a subtle interplay between sphingolipids and ATP-binding cassette transporters. Here, we present an overview of the current understanding of the multiple levels at which sphingolipids function in drug resistance, with an emphasis on sphingolipid function in neuroblastoma and how modulation of sphingolipid metabolism may be used as a novel treatment paradigm. PMID:12374201

  18. The involvement of sphingolipids in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Sietsma, H; Veldman, R J; Kok, J W

    2001-06-01

    Administration of most chemotherapeutic agents eventually results in the onset of apoptosis, despite the agents' variety in structure and molecular targets. Ceramide, the central molecule in cellular glycosphingolipid metabolism, has recently been identified as an important mediator of this process. Indeed, one of the events elicited by application of many cytotoxic drugs is an accumulation of this lipid. Treatment failure in cancer chemotherapy is largely attributable to multidrug resistance, in which tumor cells are typically cross-resistant to multiple chemotherapeutic agents. Different cellular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have been described. Of these the drug efflux pump activity of P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated proteins are the most extensively studied examples. Recently, an increased cellular capacity for ceramide glycosylation has been recognized as a novel multidrug resistance mechanism. Indeed, virtually all multidrug-resistant cells exhibit a deviating sphingolipid composition, most typically, increased levels of glucosylceramide. On the other hand, several direct molecular interactions between sphingolipids and drug efflux proteins have been described. Therefore, in addition to a role in the multidrug resistance phenotype by which ceramide accumulation and, thus, the onset of apoptosis are prevented, an indirect role for sphingolipids might be envisaged, by which the activity of these efflux proteins is modulated. In this review, we present an overview of the current understanding of the interesting relations that exist between sphingolipid metabolism and multidrug resistance. PMID:11420602

  19. Plant sphingolipids: decoding the enigma of the Sphinx

    PubMed Central

    Pata, Mickael O.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Ng, Carl K.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Sphingolipids are a ubiquitous class of lipids present in a variety of organisms including eukaryotes and bacteria. In the last two decades, research has focused on characterizing the individual species of this complex family of lipids, leading to a new field of research called sphingolipidomics. There are at least 500 (and perhaps thousands) different molecular species of sphingolipids in cells, and in Arabidopsis alone, it has been reported that there are at least 168 different sphingolipids. Plant sphingolipids can be divided into four classes: glycosyl inositol phosphoceramides (GIPCs), glycosylceramides, ceramides, and free long chain bases (LCBs). Numerous enzymes involved in plant sphingolipid metabolism have now been cloned and characterized, and, in general, there is broad conservation in the way sphingolipids are metabolized in animals, yeast and plants. Here, we review the diversity of sphingolipids reported in the literature, some of the recent advances in our understanding of sphingolipid metabolism in plants, and the physiological roles that sphingolipids and sphingolipid metabolites play in plant physiology. PMID:20028469

  20. Fostering Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Sphingolipid Strategies to Join Forces

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Hadi, Loubna; Di Vito, Clara; Riboni, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Complex sphingolipids are essential structural components of intestinal membranes, providing protection and integrity to the intestinal mucosa and regulating intestinal absorption processes. The role of sphingolipid signaling has been established in numerous cellular events, including intestinal cell survival, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. A significant body of knowledge demonstrates that intestinal sphingolipids play a crucial role, as such and through their signaling pathways, in immunity and inflammatory disorders. In this review, we report on and discuss the current knowledge on the metabolism, signaling, and functional implications of sphingolipids in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), focusing on the different aspects of sphingolipid actions on inflammatory responses and on the potential of sphingolipid-targeted molecules as anti-IBD therapeutic agents. PMID:26880864

  1. Taming the sphinx: Mechanisms of cellular sphingolipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Olson, D K; Fröhlich, F; Farese, R V; Walther, T C

    2016-08-01

    Sphingolipids are important structural membrane components of eukaryotic cells, and potent signaling molecules. As such, their levels must be maintained to optimize cellular functions in different cellular membranes. Here, we review the current knowledge of homeostatic sphingolipid regulation. We describe recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that have provided insights into how cells sense changes in sphingolipid levels in the plasma membrane and acutely regulate sphingolipid biosynthesis by altering signaling pathways. We also discuss how cellular trafficking has emerged as an important determinant of sphingolipid homeostasis. Finally, we highlight areas where work is still needed to elucidate the mechanisms of sphingolipid regulation and the physiological functions of such regulatory networks, especially in mammalian cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26747648

  2. A sphingolipid mechanism for behavioral extinction.

    PubMed

    Huston, Joseph P; Kornhuber, Johannes; Mühle, Christiane; Japtok, Lukasz; Komorowski, Mara; Mattern, Claudia; Reichel, Martin; Gulbins, Erich; Kleuser, Burkhard; Topic, Bianca; De Souza Silva, Maria A; Müller, Christian P

    2016-05-01

    Reward-dependent instrumental behavior must continuously be re-adjusted according to environmental conditions. Failure to adapt to changes in reward contingencies may incur psychiatric disorders like anxiety and depression. When an expected reward is omitted, behavior undergoes extinction. While extinction involves active re-learning, it is also accompanied by emotional behaviors indicative of frustration, anxiety, and despair (extinction-induced depression). Here, we report evidence for a sphingolipid mechanism in the extinction of behavior. Rapid extinction, indicating efficient re-learning, coincided with a decrease in the activity of the enzyme acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), which catalyzes turnover of sphingomyelin to ceramide, in the dorsal hippocampus of rats. The stronger the decline in ASM activity, the more rapid was the extinction. Sphingolipid-focused lipidomic analysis showed that this results in a decline of local ceramide species in the dorsal hippocampus. Ceramides shape the fluidity of lipid rafts in synaptic membranes and by that way can control neural plasticity. We also found that aging modifies activity of enzymes and ceramide levels in selective brain regions. Aging also changed how the chronic treatment with corticosterone (stress) or intranasal dopamine modified regional enzyme activity and ceramide levels, coinciding with rate of extinction. These data provide first evidence for a functional ASM-ceramide pathway in the brain involved in the extinction of learned behavior. This finding extends the known cellular mechanisms underlying behavioral plasticity to a new class of membrane-located molecules, the sphingolipids, and their regulatory enzymes, and may offer new treatment targets for extinction- and learning-related psychopathological conditions. Sphingolipids are common lipids in the brain which form lipid domains at pre- and postsynaptic membrane compartments. Here we show a decline in dorsal hippocampus ceramide species together with a

  3. Multiple sphingolipid abnormalities following cerebral microendothelial hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Testai, Fernando D.; Kilkus, John P.; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Gorshkova, Irina; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Dawson, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia has been previously shown to inhibit the dihydroceramide (DHC) desaturase, leading to the accumulation of DHC. In this study, we used metabolic labeling with [3H]-palmitate, HPLC/MS/MS analysis, and specific inhibitors to show numerous sphingolipid changes after oxygen deprivation in cerebral microendothelial cells. The increased DHC, particularly long-chain forms, was observed in both whole cells and detergent-resistant membranes. This was reversed by reoxygenation and blocked by the de novo sphingolipid synthesis inhibitor myriocin, but not by the neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor GW-4869. Furthermore, oxygen deprivation of microendothelial cells increased levels of dihydro-sphingosine (DH-Sph), DH-sphingosine1-phosphate (DH-S1P), DH-sphingomyelin (DH-SM), DH-glucosylceramide (DH-GlcCer), and S1P levels. In vitro assays revealed no changes in the activity of sphingomyelinases or sphingomyelin synthase, but resulted in reduced S1P lyase activity and 40% increase in glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) activity, which was reversed by reoxygenation. Inhibition of the de novo sphingolipid pathway (myriocin) or GCS (EtPoD4) induced endothelial barrier dysfunction and increased caspase 3-mediated cell death in response to hypoxia. Our findings suggest that hypoxia induces synthesis of S1P and multiple dihydrosphingolipids, including DHC, DH-SM, DH-GlcCer, DH-Sph and DH-S1P, which may be involved in ameliorating the effects of stroke. PMID:25060904

  4. Deregulation of sphingolipid metabolism in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Xingxuan; Huang, Yu; Li, Bin; Gong, Cheng-Xing; Schuchman, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal sphingolipid metabolism has been previously reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD). To extend these findings, several sphingolipids and sphingolipid hydrolases were analyzed in brain samples from AD patients and age-matched normal individuals. We found a pattern of elevated acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and acid ceramidase (AC) expression in AD, leading to a reduction in sphingomyelin and elevation of ceramide. More sphingosine also was found in the AD brains, although sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) levels were reduced. Notably, significant correlations were observed between the brain ASM and S1P levels and the levels of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and phosphorylated tau protein. Based on these findings, neuronal cell cultures were treated with Aβ oligomers, which were found to activate ASM, increase ceramide, and induce apoptosis. Pre-treatment of the neurons with purified, recombinant AC prevented the cells from undergoing Aβ-induced apoptosis. We propose that ASM activation is an important pathological event leading to AD, perhaps due to Aβ deposition. The downstream consequences of ASM activation are elevated ceramide, activation of ceramidases, and production of sphingosine. The reduced levels of S1P in the AD brain, together with elevated ceramide, likely contribute to the disease pathogenesis. PMID:18547682

  5. Sphingolipid mediators in cardiovascular cell biology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Levade, T; Augé, N; Veldman, R J; Cuvillier, O; Nègre-Salvayre, A; Salvayre, R

    2001-11-23

    Sphingolipids have emerged as a new class of lipid mediators. In response to various extracellular stimuli, sphingolipid turnover can be stimulated in vascular cells and cardiac myocytes. Subsequent generation of sphingolipid molecules such as ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate, is followed by regulation of ion fluxes and activation of various signaling pathways leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation, endothelial cell differentiation or apoptotic cell death, cell contraction, retraction, or migration. The importance of sphingolipids in cardiovascular signaling is illustrated by recent observations implicating them in physiological processes such as vasculogenesis as well as in frequent pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis and its complications. PMID:11717151

  6. Fatty Acid 2-Hydroxylation in Mammalian Sphingolipid Biology

    PubMed Central

    Hama, Hiroko

    2010-01-01

    2-Hydroxy fatty acids (hFA) are important components of a subset of mammalian sphingolipids. The presence of hFA in sphingolipids is best described in the nervous system, epidermis, and kidney. However, the literature also indicates that various hFA-sphingolipids are present in additional tissues and cell types, as well as in tumors. Biosynthesis of hFA-sphingolipids requires fatty acid 2-hydroyxlase, and degradation of hFA-sphingolipids depends, at least in part, on lysosomal acid ceramidase and the peroxisomal fatty acid α-oxidation pathway. Mutations in the fatty acid 2-hydroxylase gene, FA2H, have been associated with leukodystrophy and spastic paraparesis in humans, underscoring the importance of hFA-sphingolipids in the nervous system. In the epidermis, hFA-ceramides are essential for the permeability barrier function. Physiological function of hFA-sphingolipids in other organs remains largely unknown. Recent evidence indicates that hFA-sphingolipids have specific roles in cell signaling. PMID:20026285

  7. Sphingolipids and Membrane Biology as Determined from Genetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra Pralhada; Acharya, Jairaj K

    2008-01-01

    The importance of sphingolipids in membrane biology was appreciated early in the twentieth century when several human inborn errors of metabolism were linked to defects in sphingolipid degradation. The past two decades have seen an explosion of information linking sphingolipids with cellular processes. Studies have unraveled mechanistic details of the sphingolipid metabolic pathways, and these findings are being exploited in the development of novel therapies, some now in clinical trials. Pioneering work in yeast has laid the foundation for identifying genes encoding the enzymes of the pathways. The advent of the era of genomics and bioinformatics has led to the identification of homologous genes in other species and the subsequent creation of animal knock-out lines for these genes. Discoveries from these efforts have re-kindled interest in the role of sphingolipids in membrane biology. This review highlights some of the recent advances in understanding sphingolipids’ roles in membrane biology as determined from genetic models. PMID:18035569

  8. Age- and sex-dependent change in stratum corneum sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Denda, M; Koyama, J; Hori, J; Horii, I; Takahashi, M; Hara, M; Tagami, H

    1993-01-01

    We measured six stratum corneum sphingolipid species (ceramides 1-6) in 26 males and 27 females, and found a significant change in their percentage composition only among female subjects of different age groups. There was a significant increase in ceramide 1 and 2 with a corresponding decrease in ceramide 3 and 6 from prepubertal age to adulthood. Thereafter the ratio of ceramide 2 to total sphingolipids decreased with age in contrast to ceramide 3 which showed an increase. Such a pattern of change in the aging population is different from that observed in scaly skin experimentally induced by tape stripping. The present results suggest a significant influence of female hormones on the composition of stratum corneum sphingolipids. Moreover, the different patterns of change in sphingolipid composition of stratum corneum lipids between scales from inflammatory skin and those from aged skin also suggest that epidermal biosynthesis of sphingolipids is influenced by epidermal proliferative activity. PMID:8304781

  9. Cancer Treatment Strategies Targeting Sphingolipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Oskouian, Babak; Saba, Julie D.

    2011-01-01

    Ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate are related sphingolipid metabolites that can be generated through a de novo biosynthetic route or derived from the recycling of membrane sphingomyelin. Both these lipids regulate cellular responses to stress, with generally opposing effects. Sphingosine-1-phosphate functions as a growth and survival factor, acting as a ligand for a family of G protein-coupled receptors, whereas ceramide activates intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways through receptor-independent mechanisms. A growing body of evidence has implicated ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and the genes involved in their synthesis, catabolism and signaling in various aspects of oncogenesis, cancer progression and drug- and radiation resistance. This may be explained in part by the finding that both lipids impinge upon the PI3K/AKT pathway, which represses apoptosis and autophagy. In addition, sphingolipids influence cell cycle progression, telomerase function, cell migration and stem cell biology. Considering the central role of ceramide in mediating physiological as well as pharmacologically stimulated apoptosis, ceramide can be considered a tumor-suppressor lipid. In contrast, sphingosine-1-phosphate can be considered a tumor-promoting lipid, and the enzyme responsible for its synthesis functions as an oncogene. Not surprisingly, genetic mutations that result in reduced ceramide generation, increased sphingosine-1-phosphate synthesis or which reduce steady state ceramide levels and increase sphingosine-1-phosphate levels have been identified as mechanisms of tumor progression and drug resistance in cancer cells. Pharmacological tools for modulating sphingolipid pathways are being developed and represent novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer. PMID:20919655

  10. Novel sphingolipid derivatives promote keratinocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Paragh, György; Schling, Petra; Ugocsai, Peter; Kel, Alexander E; Liebisch, Gerhard; Heimerl, Susanne; Moehle, Christoph; Schiemann, Yvonne; Wegmann, Michael; Farwick, Mike; Wikonkál, Norbert M; Mandl, József; Langmann, Thomas; Schmitz, Gerd

    2008-12-01

    Sphingolipids are important components of the water permeability barrier of the skin. Moreover, ceramides were also shown to influence keratinocyte differentiation and regulate cellular signalling. A confluence-induced differentiation model of normal human keratinocytes was established to allow evaluation of pro- and anti-differentiation effects of exogenous compounds. The effects of phytosphingosine (PS), sphingosine (SO), sphinganine (SA) and their hexanoyl (-C6), stearoyl (-C18) and salicyl (-SLC) derivatives, C12-alkylamine-salicylate (C12-SLC), salicylate (SLC) along with vitamin D3 (VD3) and retinol as control substances were tested in this system. Cytotoxicity assays were carried out to optimize the incubation conditions of compounds and whole genome expression changes were monitored by DNA-microarray on days 0, 1 and 4. Geometric means of gene expression levels of a subset of known keratinocyte differentiation-related genes were calculated from the microarray data to compare effects of the sphingolipid derivatives. Compound treatment-induced transcriptional changes were analysed by the ExPlain software (BIOBASE GmbH). Five of the assayed substances (SA, SO-C6, PS-C6, SO-SLC, PS-SLC) were found to be potent promoters of keratinocyte differentiation compared with VD3, and C12-SLC revealed potential anti-differentiation properties. ExPlain analysis found a different regulatory profile in the computed transcriptional networks of the sphingoid bases versus their -C6 and especially -SLC derivatives suggesting that the change in their keratinocyte differentiation modifying potential is due to a unique effect of the covalent attachment of the salicylic acid. Taken together, these results demonstrate the gene regulatory potential of sphingolipid species that could be valuable for dermatological or cosmetic applications. PMID:18631249

  11. Sphingolipid metabolism and obesity-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Se-Chan; Kim, Bo-Rahm; Lee, Su-Yeon; Park, Tae-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a metabolic disorder developed by overnutrition and a major cause for insulin resistance and cardiovascular events. Since adipose tissue is one of the major sites for the synthesis and secretion of cytokines, enlarged adipose tissue in obese condition alters inflammatory state leading to pathophysiological conditions such as type 2 diabetes and increased cardiovascular risk. A plausible theory for development of metabolic dysregulation is that obesity increases secretion of inflammatory cytokines from adipose tissue and causes a chronic inflammation in the whole body. Additionally accumulation of lipids in non-adipose tissues elevates the cellular levels of bioactive lipids that inhibit the signaling pathways implicated in metabolic regulation together with activated inflammatory response. Recent findings suggest that obesity-induced inflammatory response leads to modulation of sphingolipid metabolism and these bioactive lipids may function as mediators for increased risk of metabolic dysfunction. Importantly, elucidation of mechanism regarding sphingolipid metabolism and inflammatory disease will provide crucial information to development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of obesity-induced pathological inflammation. PMID:23761785

  12. [Sphingolipid-mediated apoptotic signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Ségui, Bruno; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Tardy, Claudine; Bonhoure, Elisabeth; Levade, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    Various sphingolipids are being viewed as bioactive molecules and/or second messengers. Among them, ceramide (or N-acylsphingosine) and sphingosine generally behave as pro-apoptotic mediators. Indeed, ceramide mediates the death signal initiated by numerous stress agents which either stimulate its de novo synthesis or activate sphingomyelinases that release ceramide from sphingomyelin. For instance, the early generation of ceramide promoted by TNF is mediated by a neutral sphingomyelinase the activity of which is regulated by the FAN adaptor protein, thereby controlling caspase activation and the cell death programme. In addition, the activity of this neutral sphingomyelinase is negatively modulated by caveolin, a major constituent of some membrane microdomains. The enzyme sphingosine kinase also plays a crucial role in apoptosis signalling by regulating the intracellular levels of two sphingolipids having opposite effects, namely the pro-apoptotic sphingosine and the anti-apoptotic sphingosine 1-phosphate molecule. Ceramide and sphingosine metabolism therefore appears as a pivotal regulatory pathway in the determination of cell fate. PMID:14708343

  13. Principles of lysosomal membrane digestion: stimulation of sphingolipid degradation by sphingolipid activator proteins and anionic lysosomal lipids.

    PubMed

    Kolter, Thomas; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2005-01-01

    Sphingolipids and glycosphingolipids are membrane components of eukaryotic cell surfaces. Their constitutive degradation takes place on the surface of intra-endosomal and intra-lysosomal membrane structures. During endocytosis, these intra-lysosomal membranes are formed and prepared for digestion by a lipid-sorting process during which their cholesterol content decreases and the concentration of the negatively charged bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP)--erroneously also called lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA)--increases. Glycosphingolipid degradation requires the presence of water-soluble acid exohydrolases, sphingolipid activator proteins, and anionic phospholipids like BMP. The lysosomal degradation of sphingolipids with short hydrophilic head groups requires the presence of sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs). These are the saposins (Saps) and the GM2 activator protein. Sphingolipid activator proteins are membrane-perturbing and lipid-binding proteins with different specificities for the bound lipid and the activated enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Their inherited deficiency leads to sphingolipid- and membrane-storage diseases. Sphingolipid activator proteins not only facilitate glycolipid digestion but also act as glycolipid transfer proteins facilitating the association of lipid antigens with immunoreceptors of the CD1 family. PMID:16212488

  14. CFTR and sphingolipids mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Tabeling, Christoph; Yu, Hanpo; Wang, Liming; Ranke, Hannes; Goldenberg, Neil M; Zabini, Diana; Noe, Elena; Krauszman, Adrienn; Gutbier, Birgitt; Yin, Jun; Schaefer, Michael; Arenz, Christoph; Hocke, Andreas C; Suttorp, Norbert; Proia, Richard L; Witzenrath, Martin; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2015-03-31

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes pulmonary ventilation-perfusion matching in regional hypoxia, but promotes pulmonary hypertension in global hypoxia. Ventilation-perfusion mismatch is a major cause of hypoxemia in cystic fibrosis. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) may be critical in HPV, potentially by modulating the response to sphingolipids as mediators of HPV. HPV and ventilation-perfusion mismatch were analyzed in isolated mouse lungs or in vivo. Ca(2+) mobilization and transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) translocation were studied in human pulmonary (PASMCs) or coronary (CASMCs) artery smooth muscle cells. CFTR inhibition or deficiency diminished HPV and aggravated ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In PASMCs, hypoxia caused CFTR to interact with TRPC6, whereas CFTR inhibition attenuated hypoxia-induced TRPC6 translocation to caveolae and Ca(2+) mobilization. Ca(2+) mobilization by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was also attenuated by CFTR inhibition in PASMCs, but amplified in CASMCs. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) blocked HPV, whereas exogenous nSMase caused TRPC6 translocation and vasoconstriction that were blocked by CFTR inhibition. nSMase- and hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction, yet not TRPC6 translocation, were blocked by inhibition or deficiency of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) or antagonism of S1P receptors 2 and 4 (S1P2/4). S1P and nSMase had synergistic effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction that involved TRPC6, phospholipase C, and rho kinase. Our findings demonstrate a central role of CFTR and sphingolipids in HPV. Upon hypoxia, nSMase triggers TRPC6 translocation, which requires its interaction with CFTR. Concomitant SphK1-dependent formation of S1P and activation of S1P2/4 result in phospholipase C-mediated TRPC6 and rho kinase activation, which conjointly trigger vasoconstriction. PMID:25829545

  15. CFTR and sphingolipids mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Tabeling, Christoph; Yu, Hanpo; Wang, Liming; Ranke, Hannes; Goldenberg, Neil M.; Zabini, Diana; Noe, Elena; Krauszman, Adrienn; Gutbier, Birgitt; Yin, Jun; Schaefer, Michael; Arenz, Christoph; Hocke, Andreas C.; Suttorp, Norbert; Proia, Richard L.; Witzenrath, Martin; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes pulmonary ventilation-perfusion matching in regional hypoxia, but promotes pulmonary hypertension in global hypoxia. Ventilation-perfusion mismatch is a major cause of hypoxemia in cystic fibrosis. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) may be critical in HPV, potentially by modulating the response to sphingolipids as mediators of HPV. HPV and ventilation-perfusion mismatch were analyzed in isolated mouse lungs or in vivo. Ca2+ mobilization and transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) translocation were studied in human pulmonary (PASMCs) or coronary (CASMCs) artery smooth muscle cells. CFTR inhibition or deficiency diminished HPV and aggravated ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In PASMCs, hypoxia caused CFTR to interact with TRPC6, whereas CFTR inhibition attenuated hypoxia-induced TRPC6 translocation to caveolae and Ca2+ mobilization. Ca2+ mobilization by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was also attenuated by CFTR inhibition in PASMCs, but amplified in CASMCs. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) blocked HPV, whereas exogenous nSMase caused TRPC6 translocation and vasoconstriction that were blocked by CFTR inhibition. nSMase- and hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction, yet not TRPC6 translocation, were blocked by inhibition or deficiency of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) or antagonism of S1P receptors 2 and 4 (S1P2/4). S1P and nSMase had synergistic effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction that involved TRPC6, phospholipase C, and rho kinase. Our findings demonstrate a central role of CFTR and sphingolipids in HPV. Upon hypoxia, nSMase triggers TRPC6 translocation, which requires its interaction with CFTR. Concomitant SphK1-dependent formation of S1P and activation of S1P2/4 result in phospholipase C-mediated TRPC6 and rho kinase activation, which conjointly trigger vasoconstriction. PMID:25829545

  16. The role of epidermal sphingolipids in dermatologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Borodzicz, Sonia; Rudnicka, Lidia; Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara; Cudnoch-Jedrzejewska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids, a group of lipids containing the sphingoid base, have both structural and biological functions in human epidermis. Ceramides, as a part of extracellular lipids in the stratum corneum, are important elements of the skin barrier and are involved in the prevention of transepidermal water loss. In addition, ceramides regulate such processes as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of keratinocytes. Another important sphingolipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), inhibits proliferation and induces differentiation of keratinocytes. A recent clinical study of the efficacy and safety of ponesimod (a selective modulator of the S1P receptor 1) suggested that sphingolipid metabolism may become a new target for the pharmacological treatment of psoriasis. The role of sphingolipids in some dermatologic diseases, including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and ichthyoses was summarized in this article. PMID:26786937

  17. Tamoxifen regulation of sphingolipid metabolism—therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Morad, Samy A F; Cabot, Myles C

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen, a triphenylethylene antiestrogen and one of the first-line endocrine therapies used to treat estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, has a number of interesting, off-target effects, and among these is the inhibition of sphingolipid metabolism. More specifically, tamoxifen inhibits ceramide glycosylation, and enzymatic step that can adventitiously support the influential tumor-suppressor properties of ceramide, the aliphatic backbone of sphingolipids. Additionally, tamoxifen and metabolites N-desmethyltamoxifen and 4-hydroxytamoxifen, have been shown to inhibit ceramide hydrolysis by the enzyme acid ceramidase. This particular intervention slows ceramide destruction and thereby depresses formation of sphingosine 1-phosphate, a mitogenic sphingolipid with cancer growth-promoting properties. As ceramide-centric therapies are becoming appealing clinical interventions in the treatment of cancer, agents like tamoxifen that can retard the generation of mitogenic sphingolipids and buffer ceramide clearance via inhibition of glycosylation, take on new importance. In this review, we present an abridged, lay introduction to sphingolipid metabolism, briefly chronicle tamoxifen’s history in the clinic, examine studies that demonstrate the impact of triphenylethylenes on sphingolipid metabolism in cancer cells, and canvass works relevant to the use of tamoxifen as adjuvant to drive ceramide-centric therapies in cancer treatment. The objective is to inform the readership of what could be a novel, off-label indication of tamoxifen and structurally-related triphenylethylenes, an indication divorced from estrogen receptor status and one with application in drug resistance. PMID:25964209

  18. Sphingolipid synthesis deficiency in a mutant of Bacteroides levii

    SciTech Connect

    Brumleve, B.; Lev, M.

    1986-05-01

    Bacteroides levii, an anaerobic bacterium, synthesizes two sphingolipids; the sphingomyelin analogue, ceramide phosphorylethanolamine (CPE), and also ceramide phosphorylglycerol (CPG). The first enzyme in the sphingolipid pathway, 3-ketodihydro-sphingosine (3KDS) synthase, has been partially purified previously. To study subsequent steps in the pathways, mutants defective in sphingolipid synthesis were derived by ethyl methanesulfonate and nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Extracts of the mutant, 1075BB, show synthase activity although the cells do not synthesize CPE or CPG. The mutant differs from the wild type in that: (1) synthase activity was much diminished in the mutant, (2) sphingolipid synthesis does not occur in the mutant as evidenced by the absence of spots at sites where CPE and CPG migrate following two-dimensional thin layer chromatography, (3) incorporation of uniformly-labelled (/sup 14/C)serine carbon or (/sup 14/C)3KDS into sphingolipids was not observed in the mutant, (4) following incubation with (/sup 14/C)3KDS, radioactivity corresponding to dihydrosphingosine (DHS) and ceramide were observed in the mutant; no (/sup 14/C)DHS was detected in the wild type, and (5) enhanced incorporation of (/sup 14/C)serine carbon into two lipids not containing phosphorus was found in the mutant. The authors conclude, therefore, that this mutant, 1075BB, has a metabolic block at the terminal biosynthetic steps of sphingolipid synthesis.

  19. Sphingolipid signaling and hematopoietic malignancies: to the rheostat and beyond.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kenneth C; Baldwin, Dianna; Saba, Julie D

    2011-11-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid with diverse functions including the promotion of cell survival, proliferation and migration, as well as the regulation of angiogenesis, inflammation, immunity, vascular permeability and nuclear mechanisms that control gene transcription. S1P is derived from metabolism of ceramide, which itself has diverse and generally growth-inhibitory effects through its impact on downstream targets involved in regulation of apoptosis, senescence and cell cycle progression. Regulation of ceramide, S1P and the biochemical steps that modulate the balance and interconversion of these two lipids are major determinants of cell fate, a concept referred to as the "sphingolipid rheostat." There is abundant evidence that the sphingolipid rheostat plays a role in the origination, progression and drug resistance patterns of hematopoietic malignancies. The pathway has also been exploited to circumvent the problem of chemotherapy resistance in leukemia and lymphoma. Given the broad effects of sphingolipids, targeting multiple steps in the metabolic pathway may provide possible therapeutic avenues. However, new observations have revealed that sphingolipid signaling effects are more complex than previously recognized, requiring a revision of the sphingolipid rheostat model. Here, we summarize recent insights regarding the sphingolipid metabolic pathway and its role in hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:21707493

  20. Involvement of Sphingolipids in Ethanol Neurotoxicity in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mariko; Saito, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol-induced neuronal death during a sensitive period of brain development is considered one of the significant causes of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). In rodent models, ethanol triggers robust apoptotic neurodegeneration during a period of active synaptogenesis that occurs around the first two postnatal weeks, equivalent to the third trimester in human fetuses. The ethanol-induced apoptosis is mitochondria-dependent, involving Bax and caspase-3 activation. Such apoptotic pathways are often mediated by sphingolipids, a class of bioactive lipids ubiquitously present in eukaryotic cellular membranes. While the central role of lipids in ethanol liver toxicity is well recognized, the involvement of sphingolipids in ethanol neurotoxicity is less explored despite mounting evidence of their importance in neuronal apoptosis. Nevertheless, recent studies indicate that ethanol-induced neuronal apoptosis in animal models of FASD is mediated or regulated by cellular sphingolipids, including via the pro-apoptotic action of ceramide and through the neuroprotective action of GM1 ganglioside. Such sphingolipid involvement in ethanol neurotoxicity in the developing brain may provide unique targets for therapeutic applications against FASD. Here we summarize findings describing the involvement of sphingolipids in ethanol-induced apoptosis and discuss the possibility that the combined action of various sphingolipids in mitochondria may control neuronal cell fate. PMID:24961420

  1. Role of Sphingolipids in the Pathobiology of Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ghidoni, Riccardo; Caretti, Anna; Signorelli, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipid bioactivities in the respiratory airways and the roles of the proteins that handle them have been extensively investigated. Gas or inhaled particles or microorganisms come into contact with mucus components, epithelial cells, blood barrier, and immune surveillance within the airways. Lung structure and functionality rely on a complex interplay of polar and hydrophobic structures forming the surfactant layer and governing external-internal exchanges, such as glycerol-phospholipids sphingolipids and proteins. Sphingolipids act as important signaling mediators involved in the control of cell survival and stress response, as well as secreted molecules endowed with inflammation-regulatory activities. Most successful respiratory infection and injuries evolve in the alveolar compartment, the critical lung functional unit involved in gas exchange. Sphingolipid altered metabolism in this compartment is closely related to inflammatory reaction and ceramide increase, in particular, favors the switch to pathological hyperinflammation. This short review explores a few mechanisms underlying sphingolipid involvement in the healthy lung (surfactant production and endothelial barrier maintenance) and in a selection of lung pathologies in which the impact of sphingolipid synthesis and metabolism is most apparent, such as acute lung injury, or chronic pathologies such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:26770018

  2. SPHINGOLIPIDOMICS: METHODS FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF SPHINGOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Christopher A.; Allegood, Jeremy C.; Park, Hyejung; Sullards, M. Cameron

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipids comprise a highly diverse and complex class of molecules that serve as both structural components of cellular membranes and signaling molecules capable of eliciting apoptosis, differentiation, chemotaxis, and other responses in mammalian cells. Comprehensive or “sphingolipidomic” analyses (structure specific, quantitative analyses of all sphingolipids, or at least all members of a critical subset) are required in order to elucidate the role(s) of sphingolipids in a given biological context because so many of the sphingolipids in a biological system are inter-converted structurally and metabolically. Despite the experimental challenges posed by the diversity of sphingolipid-regulated cellular responses, the detection and quantitation of multiple sphingolipids in a single sample has been made possible by combining classical analytical separation techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with state-of-the-art tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. As part of the Lipid MAPS consortium an internal standard cocktail was developed that comprises the signaling metabolites (i.e. sphingoid bases, sphingoid base-1-phosphates, ceramides, and ceramide-1-phosphates) as well as more complex species such as mono- and di-hexosylceramides and sphingomyelin. Additionally, the number of species that can be analyzed is growing rapidly with the addition of fatty acyl Co-As, sulfatides, and other complex sphingolipids as more internal standards are becoming available. The resulting LC-MS/MS analyses are one of the most analytically rigorous technologies that can provide the necessary sensitivity, structural specificity, and quantitative precision with high-throughput for “sphingolipidomic” analyses in small sample quantities. This review summarizes historical and state-of-the-art analytical techniques used for the for the identification, structure determination, and quantitation of sphingolipids from free sphingoid bases through more

  3. Podocyte Pathology and Nephropathy – Sphingolipids in Glomerular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Merscher, Sandra; Fornoni, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are components of the lipid rafts in plasma membranes, which are important for proper function of podocytes, a key element of the glomerular filtration barrier. Research revealed an essential role of sphingolipids and sphingolipid metabolites in glomerular disorders of genetic and non-genetic origin. The discovery that glucocerebrosides accumulate in Gaucher disease in glomerular cells and are associated with clinical proteinuria initiated intensive research into the function of other sphingolipids in glomerular disorders. The accumulation of sphingolipids in other genetic diseases including Tay–Sachs, Sandhoff, Fabry, hereditary inclusion body myopathy 2, Niemann–Pick, and nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type and its implications with respect to glomerular pathology will be discussed. Similarly, sphingolipid accumulation occurs in glomerular diseases of non-genetic origin including diabetic kidney disease (DKD), HIV-associated nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and lupus nephritis. Sphingomyelin metabolites, such as ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate have also gained tremendous interest. We recently described that sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase acid-like 3b (SMPDL3b) is expressed in podocytes where it modulates acid sphingomyelinase activity and acts as a master modulator of danger signaling. Decreased SMPDL3b expression in post-reperfusion kidney biopsies from transplant recipients with idiopathic FSGS correlates with the recurrence of proteinuria in patients and in experimental models of xenotransplantation. Increased SMPDL3b expression is associated with DKD. The consequences of differential SMPDL3b expression in podocytes in these diseases with respect to their pathogenesis will be discussed. Finally, the role of sphingolipids in the formation of lipid rafts in podocytes and their contribution to the maintenance of a functional slit diaphragm in the glomerulus will be discussed. PMID:25126087

  4. Podocyte pathology and nephropathy - sphingolipids in glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Merscher, Sandra; Fornoni, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are components of the lipid rafts in plasma membranes, which are important for proper function of podocytes, a key element of the glomerular filtration barrier. Research revealed an essential role of sphingolipids and sphingolipid metabolites in glomerular disorders of genetic and non-genetic origin. The discovery that glucocerebrosides accumulate in Gaucher disease in glomerular cells and are associated with clinical proteinuria initiated intensive research into the function of other sphingolipids in glomerular disorders. The accumulation of sphingolipids in other genetic diseases including Tay-Sachs, Sandhoff, Fabry, hereditary inclusion body myopathy 2, Niemann-Pick, and nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type and its implications with respect to glomerular pathology will be discussed. Similarly, sphingolipid accumulation occurs in glomerular diseases of non-genetic origin including diabetic kidney disease (DKD), HIV-associated nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and lupus nephritis. Sphingomyelin metabolites, such as ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate have also gained tremendous interest. We recently described that sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase acid-like 3b (SMPDL3b) is expressed in podocytes where it modulates acid sphingomyelinase activity and acts as a master modulator of danger signaling. Decreased SMPDL3b expression in post-reperfusion kidney biopsies from transplant recipients with idiopathic FSGS correlates with the recurrence of proteinuria in patients and in experimental models of xenotransplantation. Increased SMPDL3b expression is associated with DKD. The consequences of differential SMPDL3b expression in podocytes in these diseases with respect to their pathogenesis will be discussed. Finally, the role of sphingolipids in the formation of lipid rafts in podocytes and their contribution to the maintenance of a functional slit diaphragm in the glomerulus will be discussed. PMID:25126087

  5. Vascular sphingolipids in physiological and pathological adaptation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jun-Xiang; Su, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Yao-Ping; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Xie, Xiao-Ping; Chang, Yao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are compounds containing a long-chain fatty alcohol amine called sphingosine which exists in cellular membranes, cytoplasm, nucleus, interstitial fluid, blood and lymphatic circulation. SLs act as essential constituents of membranes of eukaryotic cells, so the seesaw of SLs will lead to structural alteration of membranes instigating cellular functional change. SLs also act as crucial signaling molecules taking effect intracellularly or extracellularly which regulates activity of downstream molecules determining cellular adaptation to numerous stimulus. This review aims to highlight the contribution of SLs to physiological and pathophysiological remodeling of vasculature. We will first provide a short overview on metabolism, trafficking and compartmentalization of SLs. Then the regulation of SLs on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, vascular tone modulation, endothelial barrier integrity, apoptosis and autophagy are summarized. Finally, we will discuss how the SLs are modulated contributing to vascular development, angiogenesis and vascular remodeling in pathological situations as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and aging. The compellingly regulative actions of SLs bring about copious therapeutic targets for potential pharmacological intervention on the diseases involving vascular maladaptation. PMID:27100498

  6. Sphingolipids in Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Russo, S.B.; Ross, J.S.; Cowart, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disease, including obesity and type 2 diabetes, constitutes a major emerging health crisis in Western nations. Although the symptoms and clinical pathology and physiology of these conditions are well understood, the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease process have largely remained obscure. Sphingolipids, a lipid class with both signaling and structural properties, have recently emerged as key players in most major tissues affected by diabetes and are required components in the molecular etiology of this disease. Indeed, sphingolipids have been shown to mediate loss of insulin sensitivity, to promote the characteristic diabetic pro-inflammatory state, and to induce cell death and dysfunction in important organs such as the pancreas and heart. Furthermore, plasma sphingolipid levels are emerging as potential biomarkers for the decompensation of insulin resistance to frank type 2 diabetes. Despite these discoveries, the roles of specific sphingolipid species and sphingolipid metabolic pathways remain obscure, and newly developed experimental approaches must be employed to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms necessary for rational drug development and other clinical applications. PMID:23563667

  7. The GARP complex is required for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Florian; Petit, Constance; Kory, Nora; Christiano, Romain; Hannibal-Bach, Hans-Kristian; Graham, Morven; Liu, Xinran; Ejsing, Christer S; Farese, Robert V; Walther, Tobias C

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are abundant membrane components and important signaling molecules in eukaryotic cells. Their levels and localization are tightly regulated. However, the mechanisms underlying this regulation remain largely unknown. In this study, we identify the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex, which functions in endosome-to-Golgi retrograde vesicular transport, as a critical player in sphingolipid homeostasis. GARP deficiency leads to accumulation of sphingolipid synthesis intermediates, changes in sterol distribution, and lysosomal dysfunction. A GARP complex mutation analogous to a VPS53 allele causing progressive cerebello-cerebral atrophy type 2 (PCCA2) in humans exhibits similar, albeit weaker, phenotypes in yeast, providing mechanistic insights into disease pathogenesis. Inhibition of the first step of de novo sphingolipid synthesis is sufficient to mitigate many of the phenotypes of GARP-deficient yeast or mammalian cells. Together, these data show that GARP is essential for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis and suggest a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PCCA2. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08712.001 PMID:26357016

  8. Deciphering the link between salicylic acid signaling and sphingolipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rangel, Diana; Rivas-San Vicente, Mariana; de la Torre-Hernández, M. Eugenia; Nájera-Martínez, Manuela; Plasencia, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The field of plant sphingolipid biology has evolved in recent years. Sphingolipids are abundant in cell membranes, and genetic analyses revealed essential roles for these lipids in plant growth, development, and responses to abiotic and biotic stress. Salicylic acid (SA) is a key signaling molecule that is required for induction of defense-related genes and rapid and localized cell death at the site of pathogen infection (hypersensitive response) during incompatible host–pathogen interactions. Conceivably, while levels of SA rapidly increase upon pathogen infection for defense activation, they must be tightly regulated during plant growth and development in the absence of pathogens. Genetic and biochemical evidence suggest that the sphingolipid intermediates, long-chain sphingoid bases, and ceramides, play a role in regulating SA accumulation in plant cells. However, how signals generated from the perturbation of these key sphingolipid intermediates are transduced into the activation of the SA pathway has long remained to be an interesting open question. At least four types of molecules – MAP kinase 6, reactive oxygen species, free calcium, and nitric oxide – could constitute a mechanistic link between sphingolipid metabolism and SA accumulation and signaling. PMID:25806037

  9. Sphingolipid metabolism enzymes as targets for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kok, J W; Sietsma, H

    2004-05-01

    Treatment with anti-cancer agents in most cases ultimately results in apoptotic cell death of the target tumor cells. Unfortunately, tumor cells can develop multidrug resistance, e.g., by a reduced propensity to engage in apoptosis by which they become insensitive to multiple chemotherapeutics. Ceramide. the central molecule in cellular sphingolipid metabolism, has been recognized as an important mediator of apoptosis. Moreover, an increased cellular capacity for ceramide glycosylation has been identified as a novel multidrug resistance mechanism. Indeed, virtually all multidrug resistant cell types exhibit a deviating sphingolipid composition, most typically an increased level of glucosylceramide. Thus, the enzyme glucosylceramide synthase, which converts ceramide into glucosylceramide, has emerged as a potential target to increase apoptosis and decrease drug resistance of tumor cells. In addition, several other steps in the pathways of sphingolipid metabolism arc altered in multidrug resistant cells, opening a perspective on additional sphingolipid metabolism enzymes as targets for anti-cancer therapy. In this article, we present an overview of the current understanding concerning drug resistance-related changes in sphingolipid metabolism and how interference with this metabolism can be exploited to over come multidrug resistance. PMID:15134220

  10. Disruption of Sphingolipid Biosynthesis Blocks Phagocytosis of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Tafesse, Fikadu G; Rashidfarrokhi, Ali; Schmidt, Florian I; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Dougan, Stephanie; Dougan, Michael; Esteban, Alexandre; Maruyama, Takeshi; Strijbis, Karin; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2015-10-01

    The ability of phagocytes to clear pathogens is an essential attribute of the innate immune response. The role of signaling lipid molecules such as phosphoinositides is well established, but the role of membrane sphingolipids in phagocytosis is largely unknown. Using a genetic approach and small molecule inhibitors, we show that phagocytosis of Candida albicans requires an intact sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Blockade of serine-palmitoyltransferase (SPT) and ceramide synthase-enzymes involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis- by myriocin and fumonisin B1, respectively, impaired phagocytosis by phagocytes. We used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing to generate Sptlc2-deficient DC2.4 dendritic cells, which lack serine palmitoyl transferase activity. Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells exhibited a stark defect in phagocytosis, were unable to bind fungal particles and failed to form a normal phagocytic cup to engulf C. albicans. Supplementing the growth media with GM1, the major ganglioside present at the cell surface, restored phagocytic activity of Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells. While overall membrane trafficking and endocytic pathways remained functional, Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells express reduced levels of the pattern recognition receptors Dectin-1 and TLR2 at the cell surface. Consistent with the in vitro data, compromised sphingolipid biosynthesis in mice sensitizes the animal to C. albicans infection. Sphingolipid biosynthesis is therefore critical for phagocytosis and in vivo clearance of C. albicans. PMID:26431038

  11. Plant sphingolipids: Their importance in cellular organization and adaption.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, Louise V; Napier, Johnathan A; Molino, Diana; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2016-09-01

    Sphingolipids and their phosphorylated derivatives are ubiquitous bio-active components of cells. They are structural elements in the lipid bilayer and contribute to the dynamic nature of the membrane. They have been implicated in many cellular processes in yeast and animal cells, including aspects of signaling, apoptosis, and senescence. Although sphingolipids have a better defined role in animal systems, they have been shown to be central to many essential processes in plants including but not limited to, pollen development, signal transduction and in the response to biotic and abiotic stress. A fuller understanding of the roles of sphingolipids within plants has been facilitated by classical biochemical studies and the identification of mutants of model species. Recently the development of powerful mass spectrometry techniques hailed the advent of the emerging field of lipidomics enabling more accurate sphingolipid detection and quantitation. This review will consider plant sphingolipid biosynthesis and function in the context of these new developments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27086144

  12. Disruption of Sphingolipid Biosynthesis Blocks Phagocytosis of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Florian I.; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Dougan, Stephanie; Dougan, Michael; Esteban, Alexandre; Maruyama, Takeshi; Strijbis, Karin; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of phagocytes to clear pathogens is an essential attribute of the innate immune response. The role of signaling lipid molecules such as phosphoinositides is well established, but the role of membrane sphingolipids in phagocytosis is largely unknown. Using a genetic approach and small molecule inhibitors, we show that phagocytosis of Candida albicans requires an intact sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Blockade of serine-palmitoyltransferase (SPT) and ceramide synthase-enzymes involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis- by myriocin and fumonisin B1, respectively, impaired phagocytosis by phagocytes. We used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing to generate Sptlc2-deficient DC2.4 dendritic cells, which lack serine palmitoyl transferase activity. Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells exhibited a stark defect in phagocytosis, were unable to bind fungal particles and failed to form a normal phagocytic cup to engulf C. albicans. Supplementing the growth media with GM1, the major ganglioside present at the cell surface, restored phagocytic activity of Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells. While overall membrane trafficking and endocytic pathways remained functional, Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells express reduced levels of the pattern recognition receptors Dectin-1 and TLR2 at the cell surface. Consistent with the in vitro data, compromised sphingolipid biosynthesis in mice sensitizes the animal to C. albicans infection. Sphingolipid biosynthesis is therefore critical for phagocytosis and in vivo clearance of C. albicans. PMID:26431038

  13. Sphingolipid metabolism regulates development and lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Roy G; Thompson, Kenneth W; Camandola, Simonetta; Mack, Kendra T; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-12-15

    Sphingolipids are a highly conserved lipid component of cell membranes involved in the formation of lipid raft domains that house many of the receptors and cell-to-cell signaling factors involved in regulating cell division, maturation, and terminal differentiation. By measuring and manipulating sphingolipid metabolism using pharmacological and genetic tools in Caenorhabditis elegans, we provide evidence that the synthesis and remodeling of specific ceramides (e.g., dC18:1-C24:1), gangliosides (e.g., GM1-C24:1), and sphingomyelins (e.g., dC18:1-C18:1) influence development rate and lifespan. We found that the levels of fatty acid chain desaturation and elongation in many sphingolipid species increased during development and aging, with no such changes in developmentally-arrested dauer larvae or normal adults after food withdrawal (an anti-aging intervention). Pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs directed against serine palmitoyl transferase and glucosylceramide synthase acted to slow development rate, extend the reproductive period, and increase lifespan. In contrast, worms fed an egg yolk diet rich in sphingolipids exhibited accelerated development and reduced lifespan. Our findings demonstrate that sphingolipid accumulation and remodeling are critical events that determine development rate and lifespan in the nematode model, with both development rate and aging being accelerated by the synthesis of sphingomyelin, and its metabolism to ceramides and gangliosides. PMID:25437839

  14. Sphingolipid metabolism regulates development and lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Roy G.; Thompson, Kenneth W.; Camandola, Simonetta; Mack, Kendra T.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a highly conserved lipid component of cell membranes involved in the formation of lipid raft domains that house many of the receptors and cell-to-cell signaling factors involved in regulating cell division, maturation, and terminal differentiation. By measuring and manipulating sphingolipid metabolism using pharmacological and genetic tools in Caenorhabditis elegans, we provide evidence that the synthesis and remodeling of specific ceramides (e.g., dC18:1–C24:1), gangliosides (e.g., GM1–C24:1), and sphingomyelins (e.g., dC18:1–C18:1) influence development rate and lifespan. We found that the levels of fatty acid chain desaturation and elongation in many sphingolipid species increased during development and aging, with no such changes in developmentally-arrested dauer larvae or normal adults after food withdrawal (an anti-aging intervention). Pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs directed against serine palmitoyl transferase and glucosylceramide synthase acted to slow development rate, extend the reproductive period, and increase lifespan. In contrast, worms fed an egg yolk diet rich in sphingolipids exhibited accelerated development and reduced lifespan. Our findings demonstrate that sphingolipid accumulation and remodeling are critical events that determine development rate and lifespan in the nematode model, with both development rate and aging being accelerated by the synthesis of sphingomyelin, and its metabolism to ceramides and gangliosides. PMID:25437839

  15. Sphingolipids as Regulators of the Phagocytic Response to Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Arielle M.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Luberto, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections pose a significant risk for the increasing population of individuals who are immunocompromised. Phagocytes play an important role in immune defense against fungal pathogens, but the interactions between host and fungi are still not well understood. Sphingolipids have been shown to play an important role in many cell functions, including the function of phagocytes. In this review, we discuss major findings that relate to the importance of sphingolipids in macrophage and neutrophil function and the role of macrophages and neutrophils in the most common types of fungal infections, as well as studies that have linked these three concepts to show the importance of sphingolipid signaling in immune response to fungal infections. PMID:26688618

  16. Sphingolipids as targets for treatment of fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Rollin-Pinheiro, Rodrigo; Singh, Ashutosh; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2016-08-01

    Invasive fungal infections have significantly increased in the last few decades. Three classes of drugs are commonly used to treat these infections: polyenes, azoles and echinocandins. Unfortunately each of these drugs has drawbacks; polyenes are toxic, resistance against azoles is emerging and echinocandins have narrow spectrum of activity. Thus, the development of new antifungals is urgently needed. In this context, fungal sphingolipids have emerged as a potential target for new antifungals, because their biosynthesis in fungi is structurally different than in mammals. Besides, some fungal sphingolipids play an important role in the regulation of virulence in a variety of fungi. This review aims to highlight the diverse strategies that could be used to block the synthesis or/and function of fungal sphingolipids. PMID:27502288

  17. Genetic Determinants of Circulating Sphingolipid Concentrations in European Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rudan, Igor; Franklin, Christopher S.; Liebisch, Gerhard; Erdmann, Jeanette; Jonasson, Inger; Zorkoltseva, Irina V.; Pattaro, Cristian; Hayward, Caroline; Isaacs, Aaron; Hengstenberg, Christian; Campbell, Susan; Gnewuch, Carsten; Janssens, A. CecileJ.W.; Kirichenko, Anatoly V.; König, Inke R.; Marroni, Fabio; Polasek, Ozren; Demirkan, Ayse; Kolcic, Ivana; Schwienbacher, Christine; Igl, Wilmar; Biloglav, Zrinka; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Pichler, Irene; Zaboli, Ghazal; Axenovich, Tatiana I.; Peters, Annette; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Schunkert, Heribert; Hastie, Nick; Oostra, Ben A.; Wild, Sarah H.; Meitinger, Thomas; Gyllensten, Ulf; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan; Schmitz, Gerd; Campbell, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipids have essential roles as structural components of cell membranes and in cell signalling, and disruption of their metabolism causes several diseases, with diverse neurological, psychiatric, and metabolic consequences. Increasingly, variants within a few of the genes that encode enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism are being associated with complex disease phenotypes. Direct experimental evidence supports a role of specific sphingolipid species in several common complex chronic disease processes including atherosclerotic plaque formation, myocardial infarction (MI), cardiomyopathy, pancreatic β-cell failure, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, sphingolipids represent novel and important intermediate phenotypes for genetic analysis, yet little is known about the major genetic variants that influence their circulating levels in the general population. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) between 318,237 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and levels of circulating sphingomyelin (SM), dihydrosphingomyelin (Dih-SM), ceramide (Cer), and glucosylceramide (GluCer) single lipid species (33 traits); and 43 matched metabolite ratios measured in 4,400 subjects from five diverse European populations. Associated variants (32) in five genomic regions were identified with genome-wide significant corrected p-values ranging down to 9.08×10−66. The strongest associations were observed in or near 7 genes functionally involved in ceramide biosynthesis and trafficking: SPTLC3, LASS4, SGPP1, ATP10D, and FADS1–3. Variants in 3 loci (ATP10D, FADS3, and SPTLC3) associate with MI in a series of three German MI studies. An additional 70 variants across 23 candidate genes involved in sphingolipid-metabolizing pathways also demonstrate association (p = 10−4 or less). Circulating concentrations of several key components in sphingolipid metabolism are thus under strong genetic control, and variants in these loci can be

  18. Sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts are not enriched with cholesterol

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-04-22

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. As a result, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize themore » cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton.« less

  19. Sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts are not enriched with cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-04-22

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. As a result, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize the cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton.

  20. Sphingolipid Domains in the Plasma Membranes of Fibroblasts Are Not Enriched with Cholesterol*

    PubMed Central

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. Thus, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize the cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton. PMID:23609440

  1. Role of Sphingolipids and Metabolizing Enzymes in Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2015-06-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and sphingomyelin have been emerging as bioactive lipids since ceramide was reported to play a role in human leukemia HL-60 cell differentiation and death. Recently, it is well-known that ceramide acts as an inducer of cell death, that sphingomyelin works as a regulator for microdomain function of the cell membrane, and that sphingosine-1-phosphate plays a role in cell survival/proliferation. The lipids are metabolized by the specific enzymes, and each metabolite could be again returned to the original form by the reverse action of the different enzyme or after a long journey of many metabolizing/synthesizing pathways. In addition, the metabolites may serve as reciprocal bio-modulators like the rheostat between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Therefore, the change of lipid amount in the cells, the subcellular localization and the downstream signal in a specific subcellular organelle should be clarified to understand the pathobiological significance of sphingolipids when extracellular stimulation induces a diverse of cell functions such as cell death, proliferation and migration. In this review, we focus on how sphingolipids and their metabolizing enzymes cooperatively exert their function in proliferation, migration, autophagy and death of hematopoetic cells, and discuss the way developing a novel therapeutic device through the regulation of sphingolipids for effectively inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell death in hematological malignancies such as leukemia, malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. PMID:25997737

  2. Role of Sphingolipids and Metabolizing Enzymes in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and sphingomyelin have been emerging as bioactive lipids since ceramide was reported to play a role in human leukemia HL-60 cell differentiation and death. Recently, it is well-known that ceramide acts as an inducer of cell death, that sphingomyelin works as a regulator for microdomain function of the cell membrane, and that sphingosine-1-phosphate plays a role in cell survival/proliferation. The lipids are metabolized by the specific enzymes, and each metabolite could be again returned to the original form by the reverse action of the different enzyme or after a long journey of many metabolizing/synthesizing pathways. In addition, the metabolites may serve as reciprocal bio-modulators like the rheostat between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Therefore, the change of lipid amount in the cells, the subcellular localization and the downstream signal in a specific subcellular organelle should be clarified to understand the pathobiological significance of sphingolipids when extracellular stimulation induces a diverse of cell functions such as cell death, proliferation and migration. In this review, we focus on how sphingolipids and their metabolizing enzymes cooperatively exert their function in proliferation, migration, autophagy and death of hematopoetic cells, and discuss the way developing a novel therapeutic device through the regulation of sphingolipids for effectively inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell death in hematological malignancies such as leukemia, malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. PMID:25997737

  3. Sphingolipid Therapy in Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipids are known to play a significant physiological role in cell growth, cell differentiation, and critical signal transduction pathways. Recent studies have demonstrated a significant role of sphingolipids and their metabolites in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Our laboratory has investigated the cytoprotective effects of N,N,N-Trimethylsphingosine chloride (TMS), a stable N-methylated synthetic sphingolipid analogue on myocardial and hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury in clinically relevant in vivo murine models of ischemia-reperfusion injury. TMS administered intravenously at the onset of ischemia reduced myocardial infarct size in the wild-type and obese (ob/ob) mice. Following myocardial I/R, there was an improvement in cardiac function in the wild-type mice. Additionally, TMS also decreased serum liver enzymes following hepatic I/R in wild-type mice. The cytoprotective effects did not extend to the ob/ob mice following hepatic I/R or to the db/db mice following both myocardial and hepatic I/R. Our data suggests that although TMS is cytoprotective following I/R in normal animals, the cytoprotective actions of TMS are largely attenuated in obese and diabetic animals which may be due to altered signaling mechanisms in these animal models. Here we review the therapeutic role of TMS and other sphingolipids in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury and their possible mechanisms of cardioprotection. PMID:17928150

  4. Legionella pneumophila restrains autophagy by modulating the host's sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Monica; Escoll, Pedro; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    Sphingolipids are bioactive molecules playing a key role as membrane components, but they are also central regulators of many intracellular processes including macroautophagy/autophagy. In particular, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a critical mediator that controls the balance between sphingolipid-induced autophagy and cell death. S1P levels are adjusted via S1P synthesis, dephosphorylation or degradation, catalyzed by SGPL1 (sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase 1). Intracellular pathogens are able to modulate many different host cell pathways to allow their replication. We have found that infection of eukaryotic cells with the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila triggers a change in the host cell sphingolipid metabolism and specifically affects the levels of sphingosine. Indeed, L. pneumophila secretes a protein highly homologous to eukaryotic SGPL1 (named LpSPL). We solved the crystal structure of LpSPL and showed that it encodes lyase activity, targets the host's sphingolipid metabolism, and plays a role in starvation-induced autophagy during L. pneumophila infection to promote intracellular survival. PMID:27191778

  5. Sphingolipids are potential heat stress signals in Saccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Dickson, R C; Nagiec, E E; Skrzypek, M; Tillman, P; Wells, G B; Lester, R L

    1997-11-28

    The ability of organisms to quickly respond to stresses requires the activation of many intracellular signal transduction pathways. The sphingolipid intermediate ceramide is thought to be particularly important for activating and coordinating signaling pathways during mammalian stress responses. Here we present the first evidence that ceramide and other sphingolipid intermediates are signaling molecules in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae heat stress response. Our data show a 2-3-fold transient increase in the concentration of C18-dihydrosphingosine and C18-phytosphingosine, more than a 100-fold transient increase in C20-dihydrosphingosine and C20-phytosphingosine, and a more stable 2-fold increase in ceramide containing C18-phytosphingosine and a 5-fold increase in ceramide containing C20-phytosphingosine following heat stress. Treatment of cells with dihydrosphingosine activates transcription of the TPS2 gene encoding a subunit of trehalose synthase and causes trehalose, a known thermoprotectant, to accumulate. Dihydrosphingosine induces expression of a STRE-LacZ reporter gene, showing that the global stress response element, STRE, found in many yeast promoter sequences can be activated by sphingolipid signals. The TPS2 promoter contains four STREs that may mediate dihydrosphingosine responsiveness. Using genetic and other approaches it should be possible to identify sphingolipid signaling pathways in S. cerevisiae and quantify the importance of each during heat stress. PMID:9374502

  6. An overview of sphingolipid metabolism: from synthesis to breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Gault, CR; Obeid, LM; Hannun, YA

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids constitute a class of lipids defined by their eighteen carbon amino-alcohol backbones which are synthesized in the ER from nonsphingolipid precursors. Modification of this basic structure is what gives rise to the vast family of sphingolipids that play significant roles in membrane biology and provide many bioactive metabolites that regulate cell function. Despite the diversity of structure and function of sphingolipids, their creation and destruction are governed by common synthetic and catabolic pathways. In this regard, sphingolipid metabolism can be imagined as an array of interconnected networks that diverge from a single common entry point and converge into a single common breakdown pathway. In their simplest forms, sphingosine, phytosphingosine and dihydrosphingosine serve as the backbones upon which further complexity is achieved. For example, phosphorylation of the C1 hydroxyl group yields the final breakdown products and/or the important signaling molecules sphingosine-1-phosphate, phytosphingosine-1-phosphate and dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate, respectively. On the other hand, acylation of sphingosine, phytosphingosine, or dihydrosphingosine with one of several possible acyl CoA molecules through the action of distinct ceramide synthases produces the molecules defined as ceramide, phytoceramide, or dihydroceramide. Ceramide, due to the differing acyl CoAs that can be used to produce it, is technically a class of molecules rather than a single molecule and therefore may have different biological functions depending on the acyl chain it is composed of. At the apex of complexity is the group of lipids known as glycosphingolipids (GSL) which contain dozens of different sphingolipid species differing by both the order and type of sugar residues attached to their headgroups. Since these molecules are produced from ceramide precursors, they too may have differences in their acyl chain composition, revealing an additional layer of variation. The

  7. Probing sphingolipid function in plants by the analysis of Arabidopsis mutants with altered sphingolipid content and composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sphingolipids are major components of the plasma membrane and tonoplasts of plant cells. These lipids are enriched in detergent-resistant membrane fractions or lipid-rafts prepared from plasma membrane and have been linked to signaling pathways in plants. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), which c...

  8. Regulation of PP2A by Sphingolipid Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Joshua; Ogretmen, Besim

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine phosphatase that is a primary regulator of cellular proliferation through targeting of proliferative kinases, cell cycle regulators, and apoptosis inhibitors. It is through the regulation of these regulatory elements that gives PP2A tumor suppressor functions. In addition to mutations on the regulatory subunits, the phosphatase/tumor suppressing activity of PP2A is also inhibited in several cancer types due to overexpression or modification of the endogenous PP2A inhibitors such as SET/I2PP2A. This review focuses on the current literature regarding the interactions between the lipid signaling molecules, selectively sphingolipids, and the PP2A inhibitor SET for the regulation of PP2A, and the therapeutic potential of sphingolipids as PP2A activators for tumor suppression via targeting SET oncoprotein. PMID:25642418

  9. New norterpenoids and a sphingolipid from Carissa opaca.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Shehla; Saleem, Muhammad; Riaz, Naheed; Ashraf, Muhammad; Qurat-Ul-Ain; Nisar, Muhammad Farrukh; Jabbar, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Chemical investigations on the aerial parts of Carissa opaca resulted in the isolation and characterization of two new nor-triterpenoids (compounds 1 and 2) and a new sphingolipid (compound 3) together with six known compounds. The structures of all the isolates were established using spectral data. All the isolated compounds showed DPPH radical scavenging and enzyme inhibitory activities against enzymes acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, and lipoxygenase. PMID:27010529

  10. Sphingolipids contribute to acetic acid resistance in Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Lina; Genheden, Samuel; Eriksson, Leif A; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Lignocellulosic raw material plays a crucial role in the development of sustainable processes for the production of fuels and chemicals. Weak acids such as acetic acid and formic acid are troublesome inhibitors restricting efficient microbial conversion of the biomass to desired products. To improve our understanding of weak acid inhibition and to identify engineering strategies to reduce acetic acid toxicity, the highly acetic-acid-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii was studied. The impact of acetic acid membrane permeability on acetic acid tolerance in Z. bailii was investigated with particular focus on how the previously demonstrated high sphingolipid content in the plasma membrane influences acetic acid tolerance and membrane permeability. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we concluded that membranes with a high content of sphingolipids are thicker and more dense, increasing the free energy barrier for the permeation of acetic acid through the membrane. Z. bailii cultured with the drug myriocin, known to decrease cellular sphingo-lipid levels, exhibited significant growth inhibition in the presence of acetic acid, while growth in medium without acetic acid was unaffected by the myriocin addition. Furthermore, following an acetic acid pulse, the intracellular pH decreased more in myriocin-treated cells than in control cells. This indicates a higher inflow rate of acetic acid and confirms that the reduction in growth of cells cultured with myriocin in the medium with acetic acid was due to an increase in membrane permeability, thereby demonstrating the importance of a high fraction of sphingolipids in the membrane of Z. bailii to facilitate acetic acid resistance; a property potentially transferable to desired production organisms suffering from weak acid stress. PMID:26416641

  11. Interdiction of Sphingolipid Metabolism to Improve Standard Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Beckham, Thomas H.; Cheng, Joseph C.; Marrison, S. Tucker; Norris, James S.; Liu, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Non-surgical therapies for human malignancies must negotiate complex cell signaling pathways to impede cancer cell growth, ideally promoting death of cancer cells while sparing healthy tissue. For most of the past half century, medical approaches for treating cancer have relied primarily on cytotoxic chemotherapeutics that interfere with DNA replication and cell division, susceptibilities of rapidly dividing cancer cells. As a consequence, these therapies exert considerable cell stress, promoting the generation of ceramide through de novo synthesis and recycling of complex glycosphingolipids and sphingomyelin into apoptotic ceramide. Radiotherapy of cancer exerts similar geno- and cytotoxic cell stresses, and generation of ceramide following ionizing radiation therapy is a well-described feature of radiation-induced cell death. Emerging evidence now describes sphingolipids as mediators of death in response to newer targeted therapies, cementing ceramide generation as a common mechanism of cell death in response to cancer therapy. Many studies have now shown that dysregulation of ceramide accumulation—whether by reduced generation or accelerated metabolism—is a common mechanism of resistance to standard cancer therapies. The aims of this chapter will be to discuss described mechanisms of cancer resistance to therapy related to dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolism and to explore clinical and preclinical approaches to interdict sphingolipid metabolism to improve outcomes of standard cancer therapies. PMID:23290775

  12. Sphingolipids in Human Synovial Fluid - A Lipidomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Kosinska, Marta Krystyna; Liebisch, Gerhard; Lochnit, Guenter; Wilhelm, Jochen; Klein, Heiko; Kaesser, Ulrich; Lasczkowski, Gabriele; Rickert, Markus; Schmitz, Gerd; Steinmeyer, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Articular synovial fluid (SF) is a complex mixture of components that regulate nutrition, communication, shock absorption, and lubrication. Alterations in its composition can be pathogenic. This lipidomic investigation aims to quantify the composition of sphingolipids (sphingomyelins, ceramides, and hexosyl- and dihexosylceramides) and minor glycerophospholipid species, including (lyso)phosphatidic acid, (lyso)phosphatidylglycerol, and bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate species, in the SF of knee joints from unaffected controls and from patients with early (eOA) and late (lOA) stages of osteoarthritis (OA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). SF without cells and cellular debris from 9 postmortem donors (control), 18 RA, 17 eOA, and 13 lOA patients were extracted to measure lipid species using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry - directly or coupled with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. We provide a novel, detailed overview of sphingolipid and minor glycerophospholipid species in human SF. A total of 41, 48, and 50 lipid species were significantly increased in eOA, lOA, and RA SF, respectively when compared with normal SF. The level of 21 lipid species differed in eOA SF versus SF from lOA, an observation that can be used to develop biomarkers. Sphingolipids can alter synovial inflammation and the repair responses of damaged joints. Thus, our lipidomic study provides the foundation for studying the biosynthesis and function of lipid species in health and most prevalent joint diseases. PMID:24646942

  13. Beyond the Cherry-Red Spot: Ocular Manifestations of Sphingolipid-mediated Neurodegenerative and Inflammatory Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Donald U.; Mandal, Nawajes A.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a ubiquitous membrane lipid present in every cell and found most abundantly in neural tissues. Disorders such as Tay Sachs or Niemann Pick disease are the most familiar examples of dysfunction in sphingolipid metabolism and are typically associated with neurodegeneration and ocular findings such as blindness. More recently, the role of bioactive sphingolipids has been established in a multitude of cellular events, including cell survival, growth, senescence and apoptosis, inflammation, and neovascularization. We discuss our current knowledge and understanding of sphingolipid metabolism and signaling in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. PMID:24011710

  14. Beyond the cherry-red spot: Ocular manifestations of sphingolipid-mediated neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Chan, Annie Y; Stone, Donald U; Mandal, Nawajes A

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a ubiquitous membrane lipid present in every cell and found most abundantly in neural tissues. Disorders such as Tay-Sachs or Niemann-Pick disease are the most familiar examples of dysfunction in sphingolipid metabolism and are typically associated with neurodegeneration and ocular findings such as blindness. More recently, the role of bioactive sphingolipids has been established in a multitude of cellular events, including cell survival, growth, senescence and apoptosis, inflammation, and neovascularization. We discuss our current knowledge and understanding of sphingolipid metabolism and signaling in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. PMID:24011710

  15. Genes encoding Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase from various plants: identification, biochemical functions, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Fen; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Yuan, Jin-Hong; Deng, Chuan-Liang; Hu, Zan-Min; Gao, Wu-Jun

    2016-09-01

    ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase catalyzes the C8 desaturation of a long chain base, which is the characteristic structure of various complex sphingolipids. The genes of 20 ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases from 12 plants were identified and functionally detected by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae system to elucidate the relationship between the biochemical function and evolution of this enzyme. Results showed that the 20 genes all can encode a functional ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase, which catalyzes different ratios of two products, namely, 8(Z) and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine. The coded enzymes could be divided into two groups on the basis of biochemical functions: ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase with a preference for an E-isomer product and ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase with a preference for a Z-isomer product. The conversion rate of the latter was generally lower than that of the former. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the 20 desaturases could also be clustered into two groups, and this grouping is consistent with that of the biochemical functions. Thus, the biochemical function of ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase is correlated with its evolution. The two groups of ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases could arise from distinct ancestors in higher plants. However, they might have initially evolved from ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases in lower organisms, such as yeasts, which can produce E-isomer products only. Furthermore, almost all of the transgenic yeasts harboring ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase genes exhibit an improvement in aluminum tolerance. Our study provided new insights into the biochemical function and evolution of ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases in plants. PMID:27294968

  16. Characteristics of the rat cardiac sphingolipid pool in two mitochondrial subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Monette, Jeffrey S; Gómez, Luis A; Moreau, Régis F; Bemer, Brett A; Taylor, Alan W; Hagen, Tory M

    2010-07-23

    Mitochondrial sphingolipids play a diverse role in normal cardiac function and diseases, yet a precise quantification of cardiac mitochondrial sphingolipids has never been performed. Therefore, rat heart interfibrillary mitochondria (IFM) and subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) were isolated, lipids extracted, and sphingolipids quantified by LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that sphingomyelin (approximately 10,000 pmol/mg protein) was the predominant sphingolipid regardless of mitochondrial subpopulation, and measurable amounts of ceramide (approximately 70 pmol/mg protein) sphingosine, and sphinganine were also found in IFM and SSM. Both mitochondrial populations contained similar quantities of sphingolipids except for ceramide which was much higher in SSM. Analysis of sphingolipid isoforms revealed ten different sphingomyelins and six ceramides that differed from 16- to 24-carbon units in their acyl side chains. Sub-fractionation experiments further showed that sphingolipids are a constituent part of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, inner membrane ceramide levels were 32% lower versus whole mitochondria (45 pmol/mg protein). Three ceramide isotypes (C20-, C22-, and C24-ceramide) accounted for the lower amounts. The concentrations of the ceramides present in the inner membranes of SSM and IFM differed greatly. Overall, mitochondrial sphingolipid content reflected levels seen in cardiac tissue, but the specific ceramide distribution distinguished IFM and SSM from each other. PMID:20599536

  17. Characteristics of the Rat Cardiac Sphingolipid Pool in Two Mitochondrial Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Monette, Jeffrey S.; Gómez, Luis A.; Moreau, Régis F.; Bemer, Brett A.; Taylor, Alan W.; Hagen, Tory M.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial sphingolipids play a diverse role in normal cardiac function and diseases, yet a precise quantification of cardiac mitochondrial sphingolipids has never been performed. Therefore, rat heart interfibrillary (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria were isolated, lipids extracted, and sphingolipids quantified by LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that sphingomyelin (~10,000 pmols/mg protein) was the predominant sphingolipid regardless of mitochondrial subpopulation, and measurable amounts of ceramide (~70 pmols/mg protein) sphingosine, and sphinganine were also found in IFM and SSM. Both mitochondrial populations contained similar quantities of sphingolipids except for ceramide which was much higher in SSM. Analysis of sphingolipid isoforms revealed ten different sphingomyelins and six ceramides that differed from 16 to 24 carbon units in their acyl side-chains. Sub-fractionation experiments further showed that sphingolipids are a constituent part of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, inner membrane ceramide levels were 32% lower versus whole mitochondria (45 pmols/mg protein). Three ceramide isotypes (C20-, C22-, and C24-ceramide) accounted for the lower amounts. The concentrations of the ceramides present in the inner membranes of SSM and IFM differed greatly. Overall, mitochondrial sphingolipid content reflected levels seen in cardiac tissue, but the specific ceramide distribution distinguished IFM and SSM from each other. PMID:20599536

  18. A systematic simulation of the effect of salicylic acid on sphingolipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chao; Yin, Jian; Liu, Zhe; Wu, Jian-Xin; Zhao, Qi; Ren, Jian; Yao, Nan

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) affects plant development and defense responses. Recent studies revealed that SA also participates in the regulation of sphingolipid metabolism, but the details of this regulation remain to beexplored. Here, we use in silico Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) with published microarray data to construct a whole-cell simulation model, including 23 pathways, 259 reactions, and 172 metabolites, to predict the alterations in flux of major sphingolipid species after treatment with exogenous SA. This model predicts significant changes in fluxes of certain sphingolipid species after SA treatment, changes that likely trigger downstream physiological and phenotypic effects. To validate the simulation, we used 15N-labeled metabolic turnover analysis to measure sphingolipid contents and turnover rate in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with SA or the SA analog benzothiadiazole (BTH). The results show that both SA and BTH affect sphingolipid metabolism, altering the concentrations of certain species and also changing the optimal flux distribution and turnover rate of sphingolipids. Our strategy allows us to estimate sphingolipid fluxes on a short time scale and gives us a systemic view of the effect of SA on sphingolipid homeostasis. PMID:25859253

  19. Hemagglutinin clusters in the plasma membrane are not enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert L; Frisz, Jessica F; Klitzing, Haley A; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Weber, Peter K; Kraft, Mary L

    2015-04-01

    The clusters of the influenza envelope protein, hemagglutinin, within the plasma membrane are hypothesized to be enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. Here, we directly tested this hypothesis by using high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to image the distributions of antibody-labeled hemagglutinin and isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of fibroblast cells that stably express hemagglutinin. We found that the hemagglutinin clusters were neither enriched with cholesterol nor colocalized with sphingolipid domains. Thus, hemagglutinin clustering and localization in the plasma membrane is not controlled by cohesive interactions between hemagglutinin and liquid-ordered domains enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids, or from specific binding interactions between hemagglutinin, cholesterol, and/or the majority of sphingolipid species in the plasma membrane. PMID:25863057

  20. Hemagglutinin Clusters in the Plasma Membrane Are Not Enriched with Cholesterol and Sphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert L.; Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Weber, Peter K.; Kraft, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    The clusters of the influenza envelope protein, hemagglutinin, within the plasma membrane are hypothesized to be enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. Here, we directly tested this hypothesis by using high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to image the distributions of antibody-labeled hemagglutinin and isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of fibroblast cells that stably express hemagglutinin. We found that the hemagglutinin clusters were neither enriched with cholesterol nor colocalized with sphingolipid domains. Thus, hemagglutinin clustering and localization in the plasma membrane is not controlled by cohesive interactions between hemagglutinin and liquid-ordered domains enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids, or from specific binding interactions between hemagglutinin, cholesterol, and/or the majority of sphingolipid species in the plasma membrane. PMID:25863057

  1. The pleiotropic roles of sphingolipid signaling in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y; Li, S; Qin, X; Hou, W; Dong, H; Yao, L; Xiong, L

    2014-01-01

    The autophagic process involves encompassing damaged proteins and organelles within double- or multi-membraned structures and delivering these molecules to the lytic compartments of vacuoles. Sphingolipids (SLs), which are ubiquitous membrane lipids in eukaryotes, participate in the generation of various membrane structures, including rafts, caveolae, and cytosolic vesicles. SLs are a complex family of molecules that have a growing number of members, including ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and dihydroceramide, which have been associated with the essential cellular process of autophagy. This review highlights recent studies focusing on the regulation and function of SL-associated autophagy and its role in cell fate, diseases, and therapeutic interventions. PMID:24853423

  2. The sphingolipid salvage pathway in ceramide metabolism and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Idkowiak-Baldys, Jolanta; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2008-01-01

    Sphingolipids are important components of eukaryotic cells, many of which function as bioactive signaling molecules. Of these, ceramide is a central metabolite and plays key roles in a variety of cellular responses, including regulation of cell growth, viability, differentiation, and senescence. Ceramide is composed of the long-chain sphingoid base, sphingosine, in N-linkage to a variety of acyl groups. Sphingosine serves as the product of sphingolipid catabolism, and it is mostly salvaged through re-acylation, resulting in the generation of ceramide or its derivatives. This recycling of sphingosine is termed the “salvage pathway”, and recent evidence points to important roles for this pathway in ceramide metabolism and function. A number of enzymes are involved in the salvage pathway, and these include sphingomyelinases, cerebrosidases, ceramidases, and ceramide synthases. Recent studies suggest that the salvage pathway is not only subject to regulation, but it also modulates the formation of ceramide and subsequent ceramide-dependent cellular signals. This review focuses on the salvage pathway in ceramide metabolism, its regulation, its experimental analysis, and emerging biological functions. PMID:18191382

  3. Reducing sphingolipid synthesis orchestrates global changes to extend yeast lifespan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Huang, Xinhe; Withers, Bradley R; Blalock, Eric; Liu, Ke; Dickson, Robert C

    2013-10-01

    Studies of aging and longevity are revealing how diseases that shorten life can be controlled to improve the quality of life and lifespan itself. Two strategies under intense study to accomplish these goals are rapamycin treatment and calorie restriction. New strategies are being discovered including one that uses low-dose myriocin treatment. Myriocin inhibits the first enzyme in sphingolipid synthesis in all eukaryotes, and we showed recently that low-dose myriocin treatment increases yeast lifespan at least in part by down-regulating the sphingolipid-controlled Pkh1/2-Sch9 (ortholog of mammalian S6 kinase) signaling pathway. Here we show that myriocin treatment induces global effects and changes expression of approximately forty percent of the yeast genome with 1252 genes up-regulated and 1497 down-regulated (P < 0.05) compared with untreated cells. These changes are due to modulation of evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways including activation of the Snf1/AMPK pathway and down-regulation of the protein kinase A (PKA) and target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) pathways. Many processes that enhance lifespan are regulated by these pathways in response to myriocin treatment including respiration, carbon metabolism, stress resistance, protein synthesis, and autophagy. These extensive effects of myriocin match those of rapamycin and calorie restriction. Our studies in yeast together with other studies in mammals reveal the potential of myriocin or related compounds to lower the incidence of age-related diseases in humans and improve health span. PMID:23725375

  4. Quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia by using UHPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jia-Ning; Wang, Jing-Rong; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, 101 sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its five mycelia were quantitatively profiled by using a fully validated UHPLC-MS method. The results revealed that a general rank order for the abundance of different classes of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia is sphingoid bases/ceramides > phosphosphingolipids > glycosphingolipids. However, remarkable sphingolipid differences between wild Cordyceps and its mycelia were observed. One is that sphingoid base is the dominant sphingolipid in wild Cordyceps, whereas ceramide is the major sphingolipid in mycelia. Another difference is that the abundance of sphingomyelins in wild Cordyceps is almost 10-folds higher than those in most mycelia. The third one is that mycelia contain more inositol phosphorylceramides and glycosphingolipids than wild Cordyceps. Multivariate analysis was further employed to visualize the difference among wild Cordyceps and different mycelia, leading to the identification of respective sphingolipids as potential chemical markers for the differentiation of wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia. This study represents the first report on the quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia, which provided comprehensive chemical evidence for the quality control and rational utilization of wild Cordyceps and its mycelia. PMID:26868933

  5. Quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia by using UHPLC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Jia-Ning; Wang, Jing-Rong; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, 101 sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its five mycelia were quantitatively profiled by using a fully validated UHPLC-MS method. The results revealed that a general rank order for the abundance of different classes of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia is sphingoid bases/ceramides > phosphosphingolipids > glycosphingolipids. However, remarkable sphingolipid differences between wild Cordyceps and its mycelia were observed. One is that sphingoid base is the dominant sphingolipid in wild Cordyceps, whereas ceramide is the major sphingolipid in mycelia. Another difference is that the abundance of sphingomyelins in wild Cordyceps is almost 10-folds higher than those in most mycelia. The third one is that mycelia contain more inositol phosphorylceramides and glycosphingolipids than wild Cordyceps. Multivariate analysis was further employed to visualize the difference among wild Cordyceps and different mycelia, leading to the identification of respective sphingolipids as potential chemical markers for the differentiation of wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia. This study represents the first report on the quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia, which provided comprehensive chemical evidence for the quality control and rational utilization of wild Cordyceps and its mycelia. PMID:26868933

  6. Sphingolipids and Plant Defense/Disease: The “Death” Connection and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Berkey, Robert; Bendigeri, Dipti; Xiao, Shunyuan

    2012-01-01

    Sphingolipids comprise a major class of structural materials and lipid signaling molecules in all eukaryotic cells. Over the past two decades, there has been a phenomenal growth in the study of sphingolipids (i.e., sphingobiology) at an average rate of ∼1000 research articles per year. Sphingolipid studies in plants, though accounting for only a small fraction (∼6%) of the total number of publications, have also enjoyed proportionally rapid growth in the past decade. Concomitant with the growth of sphingobiology, there has also been tremendous progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant innate immunity. In this review, we (i) cross examine and analyze the major findings that establish and strengthen the intimate connections between sphingolipid metabolism and plant programmed cell death (PCD) associated with plant defense or disease; (ii) highlight and compare key bioactive sphingolipids involved in the regulation of plant PCD and possibly defense; (iii) discuss the potential role of sphingolipids in polarized membrane/protein trafficking and formation of lipid rafts as subdomains of cell membranes in relation to plant defense; and (iv) where possible, attempt to identify potential parallels for immunity-related mechanisms involving sphingolipids across kingdoms. PMID:22639658

  7. On-tissue localization of ceramides and other sphingolipids by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, E Ellen; Dworski, Shaalee; Canals, Daniel; Casas, Josefina; Fabrias, Gemma; Schoenling, Drew; Levade, Thierry; Denlinger, Chadrick; Hannun, Yusuf A; Medin, Jeffrey A; Drake, Richard R

    2014-08-19

    A novel MALDI-FTICR imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) workflow is described for on-tissue detection, spatial localization, and structural confirmation of low abundance bioactive ceramides and other sphingolipids. Increasingly, altered or elevated levels of sphingolipids, sphingolipid metabolites, and sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes have been associated with a variety of disorders such as diabetes, obesity, lysosomal storage disorders, and cancer. Ceramide, which serves as a metabolic hub in sphingolipid metabolism, has been linked to cancer signaling pathways and to metabolic regulation with involvement in autophagy, cell-cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. Using kidney tissues from a new Farber disease mouse model in which ceramides of all acyl chain lengths and other sphingolipid metabolites accumulate in tissues, specific ceramides and sphingomyelins were identified by on-tissue isolation and fragmentation, coupled with an on-tissue digestion by ceramidase or sphingomyelinase. Multiple glycosphingolipid species were also detected. The newly generated library of sphingolipid ions was then applied to MALDI-IMS of human lung cancer tissues. Multiple tumor specific ceramide and sphingomyelin species were detected and confirmed by on-tissue enzyme digests and structural confirmation. High-resolution MALDI-IMS in combination with novel on-tissue ceramidase and sphingomyelinase enzyme digestions makes it now possible to rapidly visualize the distribution of bioactive ceramides and sphingomyelin in tissues. PMID:25072097

  8. On-Tissue Localization of Ceramides and Other Sphingolipids by MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A novel MALDI-FTICR imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) workflow is described for on-tissue detection, spatial localization, and structural confirmation of low abundance bioactive ceramides and other sphingolipids. Increasingly, altered or elevated levels of sphingolipids, sphingolipid metabolites, and sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes have been associated with a variety of disorders such as diabetes, obesity, lysosomal storage disorders, and cancer. Ceramide, which serves as a metabolic hub in sphingolipid metabolism, has been linked to cancer signaling pathways and to metabolic regulation with involvement in autophagy, cell-cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. Using kidney tissues from a new Farber disease mouse model in which ceramides of all acyl chain lengths and other sphingolipid metabolites accumulate in tissues, specific ceramides and sphingomyelins were identified by on-tissue isolation and fragmentation, coupled with an on-tissue digestion by ceramidase or sphingomyelinase. Multiple glycosphingolipid species were also detected. The newly generated library of sphingolipid ions was then applied to MALDI-IMS of human lung cancer tissues. Multiple tumor specific ceramide and sphingomyelin species were detected and confirmed by on-tissue enzyme digests and structural confirmation. High-resolution MALDI-IMS in combination with novel on-tissue ceramidase and sphingomyelinase enzyme digestions makes it now possible to rapidly visualize the distribution of bioactive ceramides and sphingomyelin in tissues. PMID:25072097

  9. Separation of fluorescently labeled phosphoinositides and sphingolipids by capillary electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kelong; Jiang, Dechen; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) and sphingolipids regulate many aspects of cell behavior and are often involved in disease processes such as oncogenesis. Capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) is emerging as an important tool for enzymatic assays of the metabolism of these lipids, particularly in cell-based formats. Previous separations of phosphoinositide lipids by CE required a complex buffer with polymer additives which had the disadvantages of high cost and/or short shelf life. Further a simultaneous separation of these classes of lipids has not been demonstrated in a robust buffer system. In the current work, a simple separation buffer based on NaH2PO4 and 1-propanol was optimized to separate two sphingolipids and multiple phosphoinositides by CE. The NaH2PO4 concentration, pH, 1-propanol fraction, and a surfactant additive to the buffer were individually optimized to achieve simultaneous separation of the sphingolipids and phosphoinositides. Fluorescein-labeled sphingosine (SFL) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1PFL), fluorescein-labeled phosphatidyl-inositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and phosphatidyl-inositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3), and bodipy-fluorescein (BFL)-labeled PIP2 and PIP3 were separated pairwise and in combination to demonstrate the generalizability of the method. Theoretical plate numbers achieved were as high as 2×105 in separating fluorophore-labeled PIP2 and PIP3. Detection limits for the 6 analytes were in the range of 10−18 to 10−20 mol. The method also showed high reproducibility, as the relative standard deviation of the normalized migration time for each analyte in the simultaneous separation of all 6 compounds was less than 1%. The separation of a mixture composed of diacylglycerol (DAG) and multiple phosphoinositides was also demonstrated. As a final test, fluorescent lipid metabolites formed within cells loaded with BFLPIP2 were separated from a cell lysate as well as a single cell. This simple and

  10. Rapid quantitative analysis of sphingolipids in seafood using HPLC with evaporative light-scattering detection: its application in tissue distribution of sphingolipids in fish.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jingjing; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Hirata, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids are ubiquitous in all eukaryotic organisms and known to be essential constituents of cellular membranes. Recently, various physiological functions of dietary sphingolipids, such as preventing cancer, improving skin barrier and contributing to central nervous system myelination have been demonstrated. To characterize the sphingolipids from fish as food components, tissue distribution of sphingomyelin and glycosylceramide (ceramide monohexoside, CMH) in fish were determined in this study. We established a rapid, accurate and effective method for separation, purification and determination of sphingolipids by using high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detector (ELSD-HPLC). Sphingolipids were extracted and quantified from pacific saury (Cololabis saira). Sphingomyelin in different tissues of Cololabis saira ranged from 2.5 +/- 0.2 mg/g to 27.6 +/- 2.1 mg/g, the content in brain was the highest, followed by eyes, and CMH contents were less than 23.0 +/- 2.4 mg/g in all tissues. These results revealed that fish contained CMH and sphingomyelin as same levels as most of the terrestrial organisms and suggested marine organisms could be used as a potential source of precious and useful complex lipids. PMID:20720382

  11. The Impact of Cholesterol, DHA, and Sphingolipids on Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Marcus O. W.; Zimmer, Valerie C.; Lehmann, Johannes; Grimm, Heike S.; Hartmann, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder currently affecting over 35 million people worldwide. Pathological hallmarks of AD are massive amyloidosis, extracellular senile plaques, and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles accompanied by an excessive loss of synapses. Major constituents of senile plaques are 40–42 amino acid long peptides termed β-amyloid (Aβ). Aβ is produced by sequential proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). APP processing and Aβ production have been one of the central scopes in AD research in the past. In the last years, lipids and lipid-related issues are more frequently discussed to contribute to the AD pathogenesis. This review summarizes lipid alterations found in AD postmortem brains, AD transgenic mouse models, and the current understanding of how lipids influence the molecular mechanisms leading to AD and Aβ generation, focusing especially on cholesterol, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and sphingolipids/glycosphingolipids. PMID:24575399

  12. Network-based analysis of the sphingolipid metabolism in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fenger, Mogens; Linneberg, Allan; Jeppesen, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Common diseases like essential hypertension or diabetes mellitus are complex as they are polygenic in nature, such that each genetic variation only has a small influence on the disease. Genes operates in integrated networks providing the blue-print for all biological processes and conditional of the complex genotype determines the state and dynamics of any trait, which may be modified to various extent by non-genetic factors. Thus, diseases are heterogenous ensembles of conditions with a common endpoint. Numerous studies have been performed to define genes of importance for a trait or disease, but only a few genes with small effect have been identified. The major reasons for this modest progress is the unresolved heterogeneity of the regulation of blood pressure and the shortcomings of the prevailing monogenic approach to capture genetic effects in a polygenic condition. Here, a two-step procedure is presented in which physiological heterogeneity is disentangled and genetic effects are analyzed by variance decomposition of genetic interactions and by an information theoretical approach including 162 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 84 genes in the sphingolipid metabolism and related networks in blood pressure regulation. As expected, almost no genetic main effects were detected. In contrast, two-gene interactions established the entire sphingolipid metabolic and related genetic network to be highly involved in the regulation of blood pressure. The pattern of interaction clearly revealed that epistasis does not necessarily reflects the topology of the metabolic pathways i.e., the flow of metabolites. Rather, the enzymes and proteins are integrated in complex cellular substructures where communication flows between the components of the networks, which may be composite in structure. The heritabilities for diastolic and systolic blood pressure were estimated to be 0.63 and 0.01, which may in fact be the maximum heritabilities of these traits. This procedure

  13. Trafficking and Functions of Bioactive Sphingolipids: Lessons from Cells and Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kecheng; Blom, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide and sphingosine and their phosphorylated counterparts are recognized as “bioactive sphingolipids” and modulate membrane integrity, the activity of enzymes, or act as ligands of G protein-coupled receptors. The subcellular distribution of the bioactive sphingolipids is central to their function as the same lipid can mediate diametrically opposite effects depending on its location. To ensure that these lipids are present in the right amount and in the appropriate organelles, cells employ selective lipid transport and compartmentalize sphingolipid-metabolizing enzymes to characteristic subcellular sites. Our knowledge of key mechanisms involved in sphingolipid signaling and trafficking has increased substantially in the past decades—thanks to advances in biochemical and cell biological methods. In this review, we focus on the bioactive sphingolipids and discuss how the combination of studies in cells and in model membranes have contributed to our understanding of how they behave and function in living organisms. PMID:26715852

  14. The yeast model system as a tool towards the understanding of apoptosis regulation by sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Rego, António; Trindade, Dário; Chaves, Susana R; Manon, Stéphen; Costa, Vítor; Sousa, Maria João; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2014-02-01

    It has been established that sphingolipids are engaged in the regulation of apoptosis both as direct executors and as signalling molecules. However, the peculiarities of this class of bioactive lipids, namely the interconnectivity of their metabolic pathways, the specific subcellular localization where they are generated and the transport mechanisms involved, introduce a considerably high level of complexity in deciphering their role in the signalling and regulation of programmed cell death. Although yeast is undeniably a simple model, the conservation of the sphingolipid metabolism and of the core machinery engaged in regulated cell death has already provided valuable clues to the understanding of metabolic pathways involved in distinct cellular processes, including apoptosis. It can be anticipated that studies using this model system will further unravel mechanisms underlying the regulation of apoptosis by sphingolipids and contribute to novel therapeutic strategies against serious human diseases associated with dysfunction of sphingolipid-dependent cell death programmes. PMID:24103214

  15. Sphingolipid synthesis and scavenging in the intracellular apicomplexan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Steven; Wansadhipathi-Kannangara, Nilu K.; Bruce, Catherine R.; Mina, John G.; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Casas, Josefina; Hanada, Kentaro; Schwarz, Ralph T.; Sonda, Sabrina; Denny, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential components of eukaryotic cell membranes, particularly the plasma membrane, and are involved in a diverse array of signal transduction pathways. Mammals produce sphingomyelin (SM) as the primary complex sphingolipid via the well characterised SM synthase. In contrast yeast, plants and some protozoa utilise an evolutionarily related inositol phosphorylceramide (IPC) synthase to synthesise IPC. This activity has no mammalian equivalent and IPC synthase has been proposed as a target for anti-fungals and anti-protozoals. However, detailed knowledge of the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway of the apicomplexan protozoan parasites was lacking. In this study bioinformatic analyses indicated a single copy orthologue of the putative SM synthase from the apicomplexan Plasmodium falciparum (the causative agent of malaria) was a bona fide sphingolipid synthase in the related model parasite, Toxoplasma gondii (TgSLS). Subsequently, TgSLS was indicated, by complementation of a mutant cell line, to be a functional orthologue of the yeast IPC synthase (AUR1p), demonstrating resistance to the well characterised AUR1p inhibitor aureobasidin A. In vitro, recombinant TgSLS exhibited IPC synthase activity and, for the first time, the presence of IPC was demonstrated in T. gondii lipid extracts by mass spectrometry. Furthermore, host sphingolipid biosynthesis was indicated to influence, but be non-essential for, T. gondii proliferation, suggesting that whilst scavenging does take place de novo sphingolipid synthesis may be important for parasitism. PMID:23246819

  16. Simultaneous Quantification of Sphingolipids in Small Quantities of Liver by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Saigusa, Daisuke; Okudaira, Michiyo; Wang, Jiao; Kano, Kuniyuki; Kurano, Makoto; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Yatomi, Yutaka; Motohashi, Hozumi; Aoki, Junken

    2014-01-01

    Sph, S1P, and Cer, derived from the membrane sphingolipids, act as intracellular and intercellular mediators, involved in various (path) physiological functions. Accordingly, determining the distributions and concentrations of these sphingolipid mediators in body tissues is an important task. Consequently, a method for determination of sphingolipids in small quantities of tissue is required. Sphingolipids analysis has been dependent on improvements in mass spectrometry (MS) technology. Additionally, decomposition of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the tissue samples before preparation for MS has hindered analysis. In the present study, a method for stabilization of liver samples before MS preparation was developed using a heat stabilizer (Stabilizor™ T1). Then, a LC-MS/MS method using a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer with a C8 column was developed for simultaneous determination of sphingolipids in small quantities of liver specimens. This method showed good separation and validation results. Separation was performed with a gradient elution of solvent A (5 mmol L−1 ammonium formate in water, pH 4.0) and solvent B (5 mmol L−1 ammonium formate in 95% acetonitrile, pH 4.0) at 300 μL min−1. The lower limit of quantification was less than 132 pmol L−1, and this method was accurate (∼13.5%) and precise (∼7.13%) for S1P analysis. The method can be used to show the tissue distribution of sphingolipids. PMID:26819890

  17. Exploring the role of sphingolipid machinery during the epithelial to mesenchymal transition program using an integrative approach

    PubMed Central

    Meshcheryakova, Anastasia; Köfeler, Harald C.; Triebl, Alexander; Mungenast, Felicitas; Heinze, Georg; Gerner, Christopher; Zimmermann, Philip; Jaritz, Markus; Mechtcheriakova, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) program is activated in epithelial cancer cells and facilitates their ability to metastasize based on enhanced migratory, proliferative, anti-apoptotic, and pluripotent capacities. Given the fundamental impact of sphingolipid machinery to each individual process, the sphingolipid-related mechanisms might be considered among the most prominent drivers/players of EMT; yet, there is still limited knowledge. Given the complexity of the interconnected sphingolipid system, which includes distinct sphingolipid mediators, their synthesizing enzymes, receptors and transporters, we herein apply an integrative approach for assessment of the sphingolipid-associated mechanisms underlying EMT program. We created the sphingolipid-/EMT-relevant 41-gene/23-gene signatures which were applied to denote transcriptional events in a lung cancer cell-based EMT model. Based on defined 35-gene sphingolipid/EMT-attributed signature of regulated genes, we show close associations between EMT markers, genes comprising the sphingolipid network at multiple levels and encoding sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)-/ceramide-metabolizing enzymes, S1P and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors and S1P transporters, pluripotency genes and inflammation-related molecules, and demonstrate the underlying biological pathways and regulators. Mass spectrometry-based sphingolipid analysis revealed an EMT-attributed shift towards increased S1P and LPA accompanied by reduced ceramide levels. Notably, using transcriptomics data across various cell-based perturbations and neoplastic tissues (24193 arrays), we identified the sphingolipid/EMT signature primarily in lung adenocarcinoma tissues; besides, bladder, colorectal and prostate cancers were among the top-ranked. The findings also highlight novel regulatory associations between influenza virus and the sphingolipid/EMT-associated mechanisms. In sum, data propose the multidimensional contribution of sphingolipid machinery

  18. STEROIDOGENIC FACTOR-1 IS A SPHINGOLIPID BINDING PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Aarti N.; Dammer, Eric; Kelly, Samuel; Wang, Elaine; Merrill, Alfred H.; Sewer, Marion B.

    2007-01-01

    Steroidogenic factor (SF1, NR5A1, Ad4BP) is an orphan nuclear receptor that is essential for steroid hormone-biosynthesis and endocrine development. Studies have found that the ability of this receptor to increase target gene expression can be regulated by post-translational modification, subnuclear localization, and protein-protein interactions. Recent crystallographic studies and our mass spectrometric analyses of the endogenous receptor have demonstrated an integral role for ligand-binding in the control of SF1 transactivation activity. Herein, we discuss our findings that sphingosine is an endogenous ligand for SF1. These studies and the structural findings of others have demonstrated that the receptor can bind both sphingolipids and phospholipids. Thus, it is likely that multiple bioactive lipids are ligands for SF1 and that these lipids will differentially act to control SF1 activity in a context-dependent manner. Finally, these findings highlight a central role for bioactive lipids as mediators of trophic-hormone stimulated steroid hormone biosynthesis. PMID:17196738

  19. New lipoxygenase and cholinesterase inhibitory sphingolipids from Carthamus oxyacantha.

    PubMed

    Dilshad, Muhammad; Riaz, Naheed; Saleem, Muhammad; Shafiq, Nusrat; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ismail, Tayaba; Rafiq, Hafiza Mehwish; Jabbar, Abdul

    2016-08-01

    Two new sphingolipids: oxyacanthin A [(2S,3S,4R)-2-{[(2R,5E)-2-hydroxyoctadec-5-enoyl]amino}hexaeicosane-1,3,4-triol; 1] and B [(2S,3S,4R)-2-{[(2R,5E)-2-hydroxyoctadec-5-enoyl]amino}hexaeicosane-1,3,4-triol-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside; 2], together with 1-octacosanol, β-sitosterol, β-sitosterol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and luteolin 7-O-β-glucopyranoside were isolated from the methanolic extract of the whole plant of Carthamus oxyacantha. Their structures were elucidated using (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra and 2D NMR analyses (HMQC, HMBC and COSY) in combination with mass spectrometry (EI-MS, HR-EI-MS, FAB-MS and HR-FAB-MS) experiments and in comparison with the literature data of the related compounds. Both the compounds 1 and 2 showed inhibitory potential against lipoxygenase (LOX) in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values 83.3 ± 1.3 and 245.7 ± 1.1 µM, whereas compound 2 showed inhibition against enzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) with IC50 values 65.3 ± 0.1 and 93.6 ± 0.1 µM, respectively. PMID:26285908

  20. Peripheral sphingolipids are associated with variation in white matter microstructure in older adults.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Christopher E; Venkatraman, Vijay K; An, Yang; Landman, Bennett A; Davatzikos, Christos; Ratnam Bandaru, Veera Venkata; Haughey, Norman J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Mielke, Michelle M; Resnick, Susan M

    2016-07-01

    Sphingolipids serve important structural and functional roles in cellular membranes and myelin sheaths. Plasma sphingolipids have been shown to predict cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. However, the association between plasma sphingolipid levels and brain white matter (WM) microstructure has not been examined. We investigated whether plasma sphingolipids (ceramides and sphingomyelins) were associated with magnetic resonance imaging-based diffusion measures, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity, 10.5 years later in 17 WM regions of 150 cognitively normal adults (mean age 67.2). Elevated ceramide species (C20:0, C22:0, C22:1, and C24:1) were associated with lower FA in multiple WM regions, including total cerebral WM, anterior corona radiata, and the cingulum of the cingulate gyrus. Higher sphingomyelins (C18:1 and C20:1) were associated with lower FA in regions such as the anterior corona radiata and body of the corpus callosum. Furthermore, lower sphingomyelin to ceramide ratios (C22:0, C24:0, and C24:1) were associated with lower FA or higher mean diffusivity in regions including the superior and posterior corona radiata. However, although these associations were significant at the a priori p < 0.05, only associations with some regional diffusion measures for ceramide C22:0 and sphingomyelin C18:1 survived correction for multiple comparisons. These findings suggest plasma sphingolipids are associated with variation in WM microstructure in cognitively normal aging. PMID:27255825

  1. Use of Bodipy-labeled sphingolipid and cholesterol analogs to examine membrane microdomains in cells

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David L.; Bittman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Much evidence has accumulated to show that cellular membranes such as the plasma membrane, contain multiple “microdomains” of differing lipid and protein composition and function. These domains are sometimes enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids and are believed to be important structures for the regulation of many biological and pathological processes. This review focuses on the use of fluorescent (Bodipy) labeled analogs of sphingolipids and cholesterol to study such domains. We discuss the similarities between the behavior of Bodipy-cholesterol and natural cholesterol in artificial bilayers and in cultured cells, and the use of Bodipy-sphingolipid analogs to visualize membrane domains in living cells based on the concentration-dependent monomer-excimer fluorescence properties of the Bodipy-fluorophore. The use of Bodipy-d-erythro-lactosylceramide is highlighted for detection of domains on the plasma membrane and endosome membranes, and the importance of the sphingolipid stereochemistry in modulating domain formation is discussed. Finally, we suggest that Bodipy-sphingolipids may be useful in future studies to examine the relationship between membrane domains at the cell surface and domains enriched in other lipids and proteins on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. PMID:18820942

  2. Characterization of AnNce102 and its role in eisosome stability and sphingolipid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Athanasopoulos, Alexandros; Gournas, Christos; Amillis, Sotiris; Sophianopoulou, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    The plasma membrane is implicated in a variety of functions, whose coordination necessitates highly dynamic organization of its constituents into domains of distinct protein and lipid composition. Eisosomes, at least partially, mediate this lateral plasma membrane compartmentalization. In this work, we show that the Nce102 homologue of Aspergillus nidulans colocalizes with eisosomes and plays a crucial role in density/number of PilA/SurG foci in the head of germlings. In addition we demonstrate that AnNce102 and PilA negatively regulate sphingolipid biosynthesis, since their deletions partially suppress the thermosensitivity of basA mutant encoding sphingolipid C4-hydroxylase and the growth defects observed upon treatment with inhibitors of sphingolipid biosynthesis, myriocin and Aureobasidin A. Moreover, we show that YpkA repression mimics genetic or pharmacological depletion of sphingolipids, conditions that induce the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), and can be partially overcome by deletion of pilA and/or annce102 at high temperatures. Consistent with these findings, pilAΔ and annce102Δ also show differential sensitivity to various oxidative agents, while AnNce102 overexpression can bypass sphingolipid depletion regarding the PilA/SurG foci number and organization, also leading to the mislocalization of PilA to septa. PMID:26468899

  3. Newly identified essential amino acid residues affecting ^8-sphingolipid desaturase activity revealed by site-directed mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to identify amino acid residues crucial for the enzymatic activity of ^8-sphingolipid desaturases, a sequence comparison was performed among ^8-sphingolipid desaturases and ^6-fatty acid desaturase from various plants. In addition to the known conserved cytb5 (cytochrome b5) HPGG motif and...

  4. A genome-wide screen for genes affecting eisosomes reveals Nce102 function in sphingolipid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Florian; Moreira, Karen; Aguilar, Pablo S.; Hubner, Nina C.; Mann, Matthias; Walter, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The protein and lipid composition of eukaryotic plasma membranes is highly dynamic and regulated according to need. The sphingolipid-responsive Pkh kinases are candidates for mediating parts of this regulation, as they affect a diverse set of plasma membrane functions, such as cortical actin patch organization, efficient endocytosis, and eisosome assembly. Eisosomes are large protein complexes underlying the plasma membrane and help to sort a group of membrane proteins into distinct domains. In this study, we identify Nce102 in a genome-wide screen for genes involved in eisosome organization and Pkh kinase signaling. Nce102 accumulates in membrane domains at eisosomes where Pkh kinases also localize. The relative abundance of Nce102 in these domains compared with the rest of the plasma membrane is dynamically regulated by sphingolipids. Furthermore, Nce102 inhibits Pkh kinase signaling and is required for plasma membrane organization. Therefore, Nce102 might act as a sensor of sphingolipids that regulates plasma membrane function. PMID:19564405

  5. Maternal disturbance in activated sphingolipid metabolism causes pregnancy loss in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mizugishi, Kiyomi; Li, Cuiling; Olivera, Ana; Bielawski, Jacek; Bielawska, Alicja; Deng, Chu-Xia; Proia, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Uterine decidualization, a process that occurs in response to embryo implantation, is critical for embryonic survival and thus is a key event for successful pregnancy. Here we show that the sphingolipid metabolic pathway is highly activated in the deciduum during pregnancy and disturbance of the pathway by disruption of sphingosine kinase (Sphk) genes causes defective decidualization with severely compromised uterine blood vessels, leading to early pregnancy loss. Sphk-deficient female mice (Sphk1–/–Sphk2+/–) exhibited both an enormous accumulation of dihydrosphingosine and sphingosine and a reduction in phosphatidylethanolamine levels in pregnant uteri. These mice also revealed increased cell death in decidual cells, decreased cell proliferation in undifferentiated stromal cells, and massive breakage of decidual blood vessels, leading to uterine hemorrhage and early embryonic lethality. Thus, sphingolipid metabolism regulates proper uterine decidualization and blood vessel stability. Our findings also suggest that disturbance in sphingolipid metabolism may be considered as a cause of pregnancy loss in humans. PMID:17885683

  6. TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling maintains sphingolipid homeostasis by sensing and regulating ROS accumulation.

    PubMed

    Niles, Brad J; Joslin, Amelia C; Fresques, Tara; Powers, Ted

    2014-02-13

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during normal metabolism and can function as signaling molecules. However, ROS at elevated levels can damage cells. Here, we identify the conserved target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)/Ypk1 signaling module as an important regulator of ROS in the model eukaryotic organism, S. cerevisiae. We show that TORC2/Ypk1 suppresses ROS produced both by mitochondria as well as by nonmitochondrial sources, including changes in acidification of the vacuole. Furthermore, we link vacuole-related ROS to sphingolipids, essential components of cellular membranes, whose synthesis is also controlled by TORC2/Ypk1 signaling. In total, our data reveal that TORC2/Ypk1 act within a homeostatic feedback loop to maintain sphingolipid levels and that ROS are a critical regulatory signal within this system. Thus, ROS sensing and signaling by TORC2/Ypk1 play a central physiological role in sphingolipid biosynthesis and in the maintenance of cell growth and viability. PMID:24462291

  7. Δ10(E)-Sphingolipid Desaturase Involved in Fusaruside Mycosynthesis and Stress Adaptation in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Guo Y.; Fang, Wei; Xu, Qiang; Tan, Ren X.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are biologically important and structurally distinct cell membrane components. Fusaruside (1) is a 10,11-unsaturated immunosuppressive fungal sphingolipid with medical potentials for treating liver injury and colitis, but its poor natural abundance bottlenecks its druggability. Here, fusaruside is clarified biosynthetically, and its efficacy-related 10,11-double bond can be generated under the regioselective catalysis of an unprecedented Δ10(E)-sphingolipid desaturase (Δ10(E)-SD). Δ10(E)-SD shares 17.7% amino acid sequence similarity with a C9-unmethylated Δ10-sphingolipid desaturase derived from a marine diatom, and 55.7% with Δ8(E)-SD from Fusarium graminearum. Heterologous expression of Δ10(E)-SD in Pichia pastoris has been established to facilitate a reliable generation of 1 through the Δ10(E)-SD catalyzed desaturation of cerebroside B (2), an abundant fungal sphingolipid. Site directed mutageneses show that the conserved histidines of Δ10(E)-SD are essential for the 10,11-desaturation catalysis, which is also preconditioned by the C9-methylation of the substrate. Moreover, Δ10(E)-SD confers improved survival and faster growth to fungal strains at low temperature and high salinity, in parallel with to higher contents of 1 in the mycelia. Collectively, the investigation describes a new Δ10(E)-sphingolipid desaturase with its heterologous expression fundamentalizing a biotechnological supply of 1, and eases the follow-up clarification of the immunosuppression and stress-tolerance mechanism. PMID:25994332

  8. Isolation and functional characterisation of the genes encoding Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase from Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Fen; Song, Li-Ying; Yin, Wei-Bo; Chen, Yu-Hong; Chen, Liang; Li, Ji-Lin; Wang, Richard R-C; Hu, Zan-Min

    2012-01-01

    Δ(8)-Sphingolipid desaturase is the key enzyme that catalyses desaturation at the C8 position of the long-chain base of sphingolipids in higher plants. There have been no previous studies on the genes encoding Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturases in Brassica rapa. In this study, four genes encoding Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturases from B. rapa were isolated and characterised. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that these genes could be divided into two groups: BrD8A, BrD8C and BrD8D in group I, and BrD8B in group II. The two groups of genes diverged before the separation of Arabidopsis and Brassica. Though the four genes shared a high sequence similarity, and their coding desaturases all located in endoplasmic reticulum, they exhibited distinct expression patterns. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that BrD8A/B/C/D were functionally diverse Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturases that catalyse different ratios of the two products 8(Z)- and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine. The aluminium tolerance of transgenic yeasts expressing BrD8A/B/C/D was enhanced compared with that of control cells. Expression of BrD8A in Arabidopsis changed the ratio of 8(Z):8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine in transgenic plants. The information reported here provides new insights into the biochemical functional diversity and evolutionary relationship of Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase in plants and lays a foundation for further investigation of the mechanism of 8(Z)- and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine biosynthesis. PMID:22293117

  9. Sphingolipids in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia; Results from an International Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Snoek, Kitty G.; Reiss, Irwin K. M.; Tibboel, Jeroen; van Rosmalen, Joost; Capolupo, Irma; van Heijst, Arno; Schaible, Thomas; Post, Martin; Tibboel, Dick

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a severe congenital anomaly with significant mortality and morbidity, for instance chronic lung disease. Sphingolipids have shown to be involved in lung injury, but their role in the pathophysiology of chronic lung disease has not been explored. We hypothesized that sphingolipid profiles in tracheal aspirates could play a role in predicting the mortality/ development of chronic lung disease in congenital diaphragmatic hernia patients. Furthermore, we hypothesized that sphingolipid profiles differ between ventilation modes; conventional mechanical ventilation versus high-frequency oscillation. Methods Sphingolipid levels in tracheal aspirates were determined at days 1, 3, 7 and 14 in 72 neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia, born after > 34 weeks gestation at four high-volume congenital diaphragmatic hernia centers. Data were collected within a multicenter trial of initial ventilation strategy (NTR 1310). Results 36 patients (50.0%) died or developed chronic lung disease, 34 patients (47.2%) by stratification were initially ventilated by conventional mechanical ventilation and 38 patients (52.8%) by high-frequency oscillation. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with correction for side of the defect, liver position and observed-to-expected lung-to-head ratio, showed that none of the changes in sphingolipid levels were significantly associated with mortality /development of chronic lung disease. At day 14, long-chain ceramides 18:1 and 24:0 were significantly elevated in patients initially ventilated by conventional mechanical ventilation compared to high-frequency oscillation. Conclusions We could not detect significant differences in temporal sphingolipid levels in congenital diaphragmatic hernia infants with mortality/development of chronic lung disease versus survivors without development of CLD. Elevated levels of ceramides 18:1 and 24:0 in the conventional mechanical ventilation group when compared

  10. Changes in the Metabolism of Sphingolipids after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Testai, Fernando D; Xu, Hao-Liang; Kilkus, John; Suryadevara, Vidyani; Gorshkova, Irina; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Pelligrino, Dale A; Dawson, Dawson

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously described that ceramide (Cer), a mediator of cell death, increases in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. This study investigated the alterations of biochemical pathways involved in Cer homeostasis in SAH. Methods Cer, dihydroceramide (DHC), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and the activities of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), neutral sphingomyelinase (NSMase), sphingomyelinase synthase (SMS), S1P-lyase, and glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) were determined in the CSF of SAH subjects and in brain homogenate of SAH rats. Results Compared to controls (n=8), SAH patients (n=26) had higher ASMase activity (10.0±3.5 IF/µl.min vs. 15.0±4.6 IF/µl.min; p=0.009) and elevated levels of Cer (11.4±8.8 pmol/ml vs. 33.3±48.3 pmol/ml; p=0.001) and DHC (1.3±1.1 pmol/ml vs. 3.8±3.4 pmol/ml; p=0.001) in the CSF. The activities of GCS, NSMase, and SMS in the CSF were undetectable. Brain homogenates from SAH animals had increased ASMase activity (control: 9.7±1.2 IF/µg.min; SAH: 16.8±1.6 IF/µg.min; p<0.05) and Cer levels (control: 3422±26 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; SAH: 7073±2467 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; p<0.05) compared to controls. In addition, SAH was associated with a reduction of 60% in S1P levels, a 40% increase in S1P-lyase activity, and a 2-fold increase in the activity of GCS but similar NSMase and SMS activities than controls. Conclusions Our results show an activation of ASMase, S1P-lyase, and GCS resulting in a shift in the production of protective (S1P) in favor of deleterious (Cer) sphingolipids after SAH. Additional studies are needed to determine the effect of modulators of the pathways here described in the outcome of SAH. PMID:25597763

  11. Changes in the metabolism of sphingolipids after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Testai, Fernando D; Xu, Hao-Liang; Kilkus, John; Suryadevara, Vidyani; Gorshkova, Irina; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Pelligrino, Dale A; Dawson, Glyn

    2015-05-01

    We previously described how ceramide (Cer), a mediator of cell death, increases in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. This study investigates the alterations of biochemical pathways involved in Cer homeostasis in SAH. Cer, dihydroceramide (DHC), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and the activities of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), neutral sphingomyelinase (NSMase), sphingomyelinase synthase (SMS), S1P-lyase, and glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) were determined in the CSF of SAH subjects and in brain homogenate of SAH rats. Compared with controls (n = 8), SAH patients (n = 26) had higher ASMase activity (10.0 ± 3.5 IF/µl· min vs. 15.0 ± 4.6 IF/µl • min; P = 0.009) and elevated levels of Cer (11.4 ± 8.8 pmol/ml vs. 33.3 ± 48.3 pmol/ml; P = 0.001) and DHC (1.3 ± 1.1 pmol/ml vs. 3.8 ± 3.4 pmol/ml; P = 0.001) in the CSF. The activities of GCS, NSMase, and SMS in the CSF were undetectable. Brain homogenates from SAH animals had increased ASMase activity (control: 9.7 ± 1.2 IF/µg • min; SAH: 16.8 ± 1.6 IF/µg • min; P < 0.05) and Cer levels (control: 3,422 ± 26 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; SAH: 7,073 ± 2,467 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; P < 0.05) compared with controls. In addition, SAH was associated with a reduction of 60% in S1P levels, a 40% increase in S1P-lyase activity, and a twofold increase in the activity of GCS. In comparison, NSMase and SMS activities were similar to controls and SMS activities similar to controls. In conclusion, our results show an activation of ASMase, S1P-lyase, and GCS resulting in a shift in the production of protective (S1P) in favor of deleterious (Cer) sphingolipids after SAH. Additional studies are needed to determine the effect of modulators of the pathways described here in SAH. PMID:25597763

  12. Regulation of sphingolipid synthesis in renal cells from normal subjects and familial hypercholesterolemic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, S.; Clarke, K.S.; Kwiterovich, P.O. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of lipoproteins on sphingolipid metabolism in proximal renal tubular cells from normal subjects and low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-negative homozygous familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) subjects (TB,BA,DD,VH) employing (/sup 3/H)serine and (/sup 3/H)glucose. The results were: normal cells - 1) LDL (25 ..mu..g/ml) decreased the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)glucose and (/sup 3/H)serine into ceramide and LacCer about 2-3 fold; 2) the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)serine into sphingomyelin was also reduced 2 fold by LDL; 3) LDL modified by reductive methylation of lysine residues (which is not recognized by the LDL receptor) did not decrease the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)glucose and (/sup 3/H)serine into sphingolipids; FH cells - In contrast to normal cells, LDL (100 ..mu..g/ml) stimulated both the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)glucose into LacCer and of (/sup 3/H)serine into ceramide, LacCer and sphingomyelin 2-3 fold in cells lacking LDL receptors. The authors conclude that the endogenous synthesis of sphingolipids in normal renal cells may be regulated by the LDL receptor. Lack of LDL receptor, as in FH cells, results in increased sphingolipid synthesis and storage of LacCer.

  13. Sphingolipids mediate differential echinocandin susceptibility in Candida albicans and Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Healey, Kelley R; Challa, Krishna K; Edlind, Thomas D; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall synthesis-inhibiting echinocandins, including caspofungin and micafungin, play important roles in the treatment of candidiasis and aspergillosis. Previous studies revealed that, in the haploid yeast Candida glabrata, sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway mutations confer caspofungin reduced susceptibility (CRS) but micafungin increased susceptibility (MIS). Here, we describe one Candida albicans strain (of 10 tested) that similarly yields CRS-MIS mutants at relatively high frequency. Mutants demonstrated increased levels of long-chain bases (sphingolipid pathway intermediates) and, unique to this strain, loss of His104/Pro104 heterozygosity in the TSC13-encoded enoyl reductase. CRS-MIS was similarly observed in a C. albicans homozygous fen1Δ fen12Δ laboratory strain and in diverse wild-type strains following exogenous long-chain-base treatment. Analogous to these results, CRS-MIS was demonstrated in an Aspergillus nidulans basA mutant encoding defective sphingolipid C4-hydroxylase and in its wild-type parent exposed to long-chain bases. Sphingolipids likely modulate echinocandin interaction with their Fks membrane target in all susceptible fungi, with potential implications for optimizing therapy with existing antifungals and the development of novel agents. PMID:25824222

  14. Disruption of Sphingolipid Metabolism Elicits Apoptosis-Associated Reproductive Defects in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Van H.; Herr, Deron R.; Panton, Dionne; Fyrst, Henrik; Saba, Julie D.; Harris, Greg L.

    2007-01-01

    Sphingolipid signaling is thought to regulate apoptosis via mechanisms that are dependent on the concentration of ceramide relative to that of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). This study reports defects in reproductive structures and function that are associated with enhanced apoptosis in Drosophila Sply05091 mutants that lack functional S1P lyase and thereby accumulate sphingolipid long chain base metabolites. Analyses of reproductive structures in these adult mutants unmasked multiple abnormalities, including supernumerary spermathecae, degenerative ovaries, and severely reduced testes. TUNEL assessment revealed increased cell death in mutant egg chambers at most oogenic stages and in affected mutant testes. These reproductive abnormalities and elevated gonadal apoptosis were also observed, to varying degrees, in other mutants affecting sphingolipid metabolism. Importantly, the reproductive defects seen in the Sply05091 mutants were ameliorated both by a second site mutation in the lace gene that restores long chain base levels towards normal and by genetic disruption of the proapoptotic genes reaper, hid and grim. These data thus provide the first evidence in Drosophila that accumulated sphingolipids trigger elevated levels of apoptosis via the modulation of known signaling pathways. PMID:17706961

  15. Sphingolipid signalling: molecular basis and role in TNF-alpha-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Ségui, Bruno; Gouazé, Valérie; Tardy, Claudine; Cuvillier, Olivier; Levade, Thierry

    2002-12-01

    Various lipidic molecules serve as second messengers for transducing signals from the cell surface to the cell interior and trigger specific cellular responses. Sphingolipids represent a complex group of lipids that have recently emerged as new transducers in eukaryotic cells. Several sphingolipid molecules are able to modulate cell growth, differentiation and death. This review summarises current knowledge of the signalling functions of sphingolipids, especially in the regulation of tumour necrosis factor [alpha] (TNF-[alpha])-mediated cytotoxic effects. TNF-[alpha] is a multifaceted cytokine that controls a wide range of immune responses in mammals, including induction of programmed cell death (also called apoptosis). On the basis of recent observations, a working model is proposed for the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of sphingolipid generation following TNF-[alpha] receptor 1 activation. The implications of these findings for the development of future pharmacological strategies to prevent the cytotoxic TNF-[alpha] response and subsequent cellular dysfunctions (as seen in various human diseases) are discussed. PMID:14987386

  16. Biochemical methods for quantifying sphingolipids: ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine kinase-1 activity, and sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Brizuela, Leyre; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Sphingolipids (ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate) are bioactive lipids with important biological functions in proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inflammation. Herein, we describe easy and rapid biochemical methods with the use of radiolabeled molecules ((3)H, (32)P) for their mass determination. Quantitation of sphingosine kinase-1 activity, the most studied isoform, is also included. PMID:22528435

  17. Nogo-B regulates endothelial sphingolipid homeostasis to control vascular function and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Cantalupo, Anna; Zhang, Yi; Kothiya, Milankumar; Galvani, Sylvain; Obinata, Hideru; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Giordano, Frank J; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Hla, Timothy; Di Lorenzo, Annarita

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor in many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Although lipid signaling has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, specific molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we report that Nogo-B, a membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, regulates endothelial sphingolipid biosynthesis with direct effects on vascular function and blood pressure. Nogo-B inhibits serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, thereby controlling production of endothelial sphingosine 1-phosphate and autocrine, G protein-coupled receptor-dependent signaling by this metabolite. Mice lacking Nogo-B either systemically or specifically in endothelial cells are hypotensive, resistant to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and have preserved endothelial function and nitric oxide release. In mice that lack Nogo-B, pharmacological inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase with myriocin reinstates endothelial dysfunction and angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Our study identifies Nogo-B as a key inhibitor of local sphingolipid synthesis and shows that autocrine sphingolipid signaling within the endothelium is critical for vascular function and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:26301690

  18. Nogo-B regulates endothelial sphingolipid homeostasis to control vascular function and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kothiya, Milankumar; Galvani, Sylvain; Obinata, Hideru; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Giordano, Frank J; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Hla, Timothy; Di Lorenzo, Annarita

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor in many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Although lipid signaling has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, specific molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we report that Nogo-B, a membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, regulates endothelial sphingolipid biosynthesis with direct effects on vascular function and blood pressure. Nogo-B inhibits serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, thereby controlling production of endothelial sphingosine 1-phosphate and autocrine, G protein–coupled receptor–dependent signaling by this metabolite. Mice lacking Nogo-B either systemically or specifically in endothelial cells are hypotensive, resistant to angiotensin II–induced hypertension and have preserved endothelial function and nitric oxide release. In mice that lack Nogo-B, pharmacological inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase with myriocin reinstates endothelial dysfunction and angiotensin II–induced hypertension. Our study identifies Nogo-B as a key inhibitor of local sphingolipid synthesis and shows that autocrine sphingolipid signaling within the endothelium is critical for vascular function and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:26301690

  19. IKK NBD peptide inhibits LPS induced pulmonary inflammation and alters sphingolipid metabolism in a murine model.

    PubMed

    von Bismarck, Philipp; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Herzberg, Mona; Uhlig, Ulrike; Schütze, Stefan; Lucius, Ralph; Krause, Martin F

    2012-06-01

    Airway epithelial NF-κB is a key regulator of host defence in bacterial infections and has recently evolved as a target for therapeutical approaches. Evidence is accumulating that ceramide, generated by acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase), and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1-P) are important mediators in host defence as well as in pathologic processes of acute lung injury. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary sphingolipid metabolism in bacterial infections of the lung. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of NF-κB on sphingolipid metabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation. In a murine acute lung injury model with intranasal Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS we investigated TNF-α, KC (murine IL-8), IL-6, MCP-1 and neutrophilic infiltration next to aSMase activity and ceramide and S1-P lung tissue concentrations. Airway epithelial NF-κB was inhibited by topically applied IKK NBD, a cell penetrating NEMO binding peptide. This treatment resulted in significantly reduced inflammation and suppression of aSMase activity along with decreased ceramide and S1-P tissue concentrations down to levels observed in healthy animals. In conclusion our results confirm that changes in sphingolipid metabolim due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS inhalation are regulated by NF-κB translocation. This confirms the critical role of airway epithelial NF-κB pathway for the inflammatory response to bacterial pathogens and underlines the impact of sphingolipids in inflammatory host defence mechanisms. PMID:22469869

  20. Assessment of crosstalks between the Snf1 kinase complex and sphingolipid metabolism in S. cerevisiae via systems biology approaches.

    PubMed

    Borklu Yucel, Esra; Ulgen, Kutlu O

    2013-11-01

    Sphingolipids are essential building blocks of the plasma membranes and are highly bioactive in the regulation of diverse cellular functions and pathological processes, a fact which renders the sphingolipid metabolism an important research area. In this study, a computational framework was recruited for the reconstruction of a functional interaction network for sphingolipid metabolism in Baker's yeast, SSN. Gene Ontology (GO) annotations were integrated with functional interaction data of the BIOGRID database and the reconstructed protein interaction network was subjected to topological and descriptive analyses. SSN was of a scale-free nature, following a power law model with γ=1.41. Prominent processes of SSN revealed that the reconstructed network encapsulated the involvement of sphingolipid metabolism in vital cellular processes such as energy homeostasis, cell growth and/or death and synthesis of building blocks. To investigate the potential of SSN for predicting signal transduction pathways regulating and/or being regulated by sphingolipid biosynthesis in yeast, a case study involving the S. cerevisiae counterpart of AMP-activated protein kinase, the Snf1 kinase complex, was conducted. The mutant strain lacking the catalytic α subunit, snf1Δ/snf1Δ, had elevated inositol phosphorylceramide and mannosyl-inositol phosphorylceramide levels, and decreased mannosyl-diinositol phosphorylceramide levels compared to the wild type strain, revealing that Snf1p has a regulatory role in the sphingolipid metabolism. Transcriptome data belonging to that strain available in the literature were mapped onto SSN and the correlated SSN was further investigated to evaluate the possible crosstalk machineries where sphingolipids and Snf1p function in coordination, in other words the crosstalk points between sphingolipid-mediated and Snf1 kinase signalling. The subsequent investigation of the discovered candidate crosstalk processes by performing sensitivity experiments imply a

  1. Effects of flavonoids on sphingolipid turnover in the toxin-damaged liver and liver cells

    PubMed Central

    Babenko, Nataliya A; Shakhova, Elena G

    2008-01-01

    Background The ceramide generation is an early event in the apoptotic response to numerous stimuli including the oxidative stress and ceramide analogs mimic the stress effect and induce apoptosis. Flavonoids of German chamomile are reported to exhibit the hepatoprotective effect. Flavonoids affect sphingolipid metabolism and reduce the elevated ceramide level in the aged liver. In the present paper, the ceramide content and production in the CCl4- and ethanol-treated liver and hepatocytes as well as the correction of sphingolipid metabolism in the damaged liver using the mixture of German chamomile flavonoids (chamiloflan) or apigenin-7-glucoside (AP7Glu) have been investigated. Results The experiments were performed in either the rat liver or hepatocytes of normal, CCl4- and ethanol-treated or flavonoid- and toxin plus flavonoid-treated animals. [14C]palmitic acid and [methyl-14C-phosphorylcholine]sphingomyelin were used to investigate the sphingolipid turnover. Addition of the CCl4 or ethanol to isolated hepatocyte suspensions caused loss of cell viability and increased the lactate dehydrogenase release from the cells into supernatant and ceramide level in the cells. CCl4 administration to the rats enlarged ceramide mass as well as neutral sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity and reduced ceramide degradation by the neutral ceramidase. Pretreatment of isolated hepatocytes with flavonoids abrogated the CCl4 effects on the cell membrane integrity and normalized the ceramide content. Flavonoid administration to the rats normalized the elevated ceramide content in the damaged liver via neutral SMase inhibition and ceramidase activation. Conclusion The data obtained have demonstrated that flavonoids affect sphingolipid metabolism in the CCl4- and ethanol-damaged liver and liver cells. Flavonoids normalized activities of key enzymes of sphingolipid turnover (neutral SMase and ceramidase) and ceramide contents in the damaged liver and liver cells, and stabilized the

  2. Maternal Plasma and Amniotic Fluid Sphingolipids Profiling in Fetal Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Charkiewicz, Karol; Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Zbucka-Kretowska, Monika; Wolczynski, Slawomir; Laudanski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sphingolipids can be potentially involved in the formation of the central and peripheral nervous systems, which are particularly connected with the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of selected sphingolipids in the plasma and amniotic fluid of pregnant patients with fetal Down syndrome. Material and Methods Out of 190 amniocentesis we had 10 patients with confirmed Down syndrome. For the purpose of our control we chose 14 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the concentration of 11 sphingolipids in the blood plasma and amniotic fluid we used an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC/MS/MS). Results We showed a significant increase in the concentration of 2 ceramides, C22-Cer and C24:1-Cer, in the plasma of women with fetal Down syndrome. Furthermore we showed a decrease in the concentration of 7 ceramides—C16-Cer, C18-Cer, C18:1-Cer, C20-Cer, C22-Cer, C24:1-Cer, and C24-Cer—in the amniotic fluid of women with fetal Down syndrome. We created ROC curves for all significant sphingolipids in maternal plasma, which set the threshold values and allowed for predicting the likelihood of Down syndrome in the fetus with specific sensitivity and specificity. We demonstrated a significantly higher risk of Down syndrome when the plasma concentration of C22-Cer > 12.66 ng/100ul (sens. 0.9, sp. 0.79, P value = 0.0007) and C24:1-Cer > 33,19 ng/100ul (sens. 0.6, sp. 0.86, P value = 0.0194). Conclusion On the basis of our findings, it seems that the sphingolipids may play a role in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome requires further investigation on a larger group of patients. PMID:26000716

  3. Serum sphingolipids: relationships to insulin sensitivity and changes with exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Bryan C; Brozinick, Joseph T; Strauss, Allison; Bacon, Samantha; Kerege, Anna; Bui, Hai Hoang; Sanders, Phil; Siddall, Parker; Kuo, Ming Shang; Perreault, Leigh

    2015-08-15

    Ceramides and sphingolipids are a family of lipid molecules that circulate in serum and accumulate in skeletal muscle, promoting insulin resistance. Plasma ceramide and dihydroceramide are related to insulin resistance, yet less is known regarding other ceramide and sphingolipid species. Despite its association with insulin sensitivity, chronic endurance exercise training does not change plasma ceramide and sphingolipid content, with little known regarding a single bout of exercise. We measured basal relationships and the effect of acute exercise (1.5 h at 50% V̇o2 max) and recovery on serum ceramide and sphingolipid content in sedentary obese individuals, endurance-trained athletes, and individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Basal serum C18:0, C20:0, and C24:1 ceramide and C18:0 and total dihydroceramide were significantly higher in T2D and, along with C16:0 ceramide and C18:0 sphingomyelin, correlated positively with insulin resistance. Acute exercise significantly increased serum ceramide, glucosylceramide, and GM3 gangliosides, which largely decreased to basal values in recovery. Sphingosine 1-phosphate and sphingomyelin did not change during exercise but decreased below basal values in recovery. Serum C16:0 and C18:0 ceramide and C18:0 sphingomyelin, but not the total concentrations of either of them, were positively correlated with markers of muscle NF-κB activation, suggesting that specific species activate intracellular inflammation. Interestingly, a subset of sphingomyelin species, notably C14:0, C22:3, and C24:4 species, was positively associated with insulin secretion and glucose tolerance. Together, these data show that unique ceramide and sphingolipid species associate with either protective or deleterious features for diabetes and could provide novel therapeutic targets for the future. PMID:26126684

  4. Rice ORMDL controls sphingolipid homeostasis affecting fertility resulting from abnormal pollen development.

    PubMed

    Chueasiri, Chutharat; Chunthong, Ketsuwan; Pitnjam, Keasinee; Chakhonkaen, Sriprapai; Sangarwut, Numphet; Sangsawang, Kanidta; Suksangpanomrung, Malinee; Michaelson, Louise V; Napier, Johnathan A; Muangprom, Amorntip

    2014-01-01

    The orosomucoids (ORM) are ER-resisdent polypeptides encoded by ORM and ORMDL (ORM-like) genes. In humans, ORMDL3 was reported as genetic risk factor associated to asthma. In yeast, ORM proteins act as negative regulators of sphingolipid synthesis. Sphingolipids are important molecules regulating several processes including stress responses and apoptosis. However, the function of ORM/ORMDL genes in plants has not yet been reported. Previously, we found that temperature sensitive genetic male sterility (TGMS) rice lines controlled by tms2 contain a deletion of about 70 kb in chromosome 7. We identified four genes expressed in panicles, including an ORMDL ortholog, as candidates for tms2. In this report, we quantified expression of the only two candidate genes normally expressed in anthers of wild type plants grown in controlled growth rooms for fertile and sterile conditions. We found that only the ORMDL gene (LOC_Os07g26940) showed differential expression under these conditions. To better understand the function of rice ORMDL genes, we generated RNAi transgenic rice plants suppressing either LOC_Os07g26940, or all three ORMDL genes present in rice. We found that the RNAi transgenic plants with low expression of either LOC_Os07g26940 alone or all three ORMDL genes were sterile, having abnormal pollen morphology and staining. In addition, we found that both sphingolipid metabolism and expression of genes involved in sphingolipid synthesis were perturbed in the tms2 mutant, analogous to the role of ORMs in yeast. Our results indicated that plant ORMDL proteins influence sphingolipid homeostasis, and deletion of this gene affected fertility resulting from abnormal pollen development. PMID:25192280

  5. Lipopolysaccharide Disrupts Mitochondrial Physiology in Skeletal Muscle via Disparate Effects on Sphingolipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Melissa E.; Simmons, Kurtis J.; Tippetts, Trevor S.; Thatcher, Mikayla O.; Saito, Rex R.; Hubbard, Sheryl T.; Trumbull, Annie M.; Parker, Brian A.; Taylor, Oliver J.; Bikman, Benjamin T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are prevalent pathogenic molecules that are found within tissues and blood. Elevated circulating LPS is a feature of obesity and sepsis, both of which are associated with mitochondrial abnormalities that are key pathological features of LPS excess. However, the mechanism of LPS-induced mitochondrial alterations remains poorly understood. Herein we demonstrate the necessity of sphingolipid accrual in mediating altered mitochondrial physiology in skeletal muscle following LPS exposure. In particular, we found LPS elicited disparate effects on the sphingolipids dihydroceramides (DhCer) and ceramides (Cer) in both cultured myotubes and in muscle of LPS-injected mice. Although LPS-treated myotubes had reduced DhCer and increased Cer as well as increased mitochondrial respiration, muscle from LPS-injected mice manifested a reverse trend, namely elevated DhCer, but reduced Cer as well as reduced mitochondrial respiration. In addition, we found that LPS treatment caused mitochondrial fission, likely via dynamin-related protein 1, and increased oxidative stress. However, inhibition of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis via myriocin protected normal mitochondrial function in spite of LPS, but inhibition of DhCer desaturase 1, which increases DhCer, but not Cer, exacerbated mitochondrial respiration with LPS. In an attempt to reconcile the incongruent effects of LPS in isolated muscle cells and whole muscle tissue, we incubated myotubes with conditioned medium from treated macrophages. In contrast to direct myotube LPS treatment, conditioned medium from LPS-treated macrophages reduced myotube respiration, but this was again mitigated with sphingolipid inhibition. Thus, macrophage sphingolipid production appears to be necessary for LPS-induced mitochondrial alterations in skeletal muscle tissue. PMID:26529656

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Circulating Phospho- and Sphingolipid Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Kirichenko, Anatoly V.; Janssens, A. Cecile J. W.; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Gnewuch, Carsten; Domingues, Francisco S.; Pattaro, Cristian; Wild, Sarah H.; Jonasson, Inger; Polasek, Ozren; Zorkoltseva, Irina V.; Hofman, Albert; Karssen, Lennart C.; Struchalin, Maksim; Floyd, James; Igl, Wilmar; Biloglav, Zrinka; Broer, Linda; Pfeufer, Arne; Pichler, Irene; Campbell, Susan; Zaboli, Ghazal; Kolcic, Ivana; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Huffman, Jennifer; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Uitterlinden, Andre; Franke, Lude; Franklin, Christopher S.; Vitart, Veronique; Nelson, Christopher P.; Preuss, Michael; Bis, Joshua C.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Franceschini, Nora; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Axenovich, Tatiana; Oostra, Ben A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Schmitz, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Phospho- and sphingolipids are crucial cellular and intracellular compounds. These lipids are required for active transport, a number of enzymatic processes, membrane formation, and cell signalling. Disruption of their metabolism leads to several diseases, with diverse neurological, psychiatric, and metabolic consequences. A large number of phospholipid and sphingolipid species can be detected and measured in human plasma. We conducted a meta-analysis of five European family-based genome-wide association studies (N = 4034) on plasma levels of 24 sphingomyelins (SPM), 9 ceramides (CER), 57 phosphatidylcholines (PC), 20 lysophosphatidylcholines (LPC), 27 phosphatidylethanolamines (PE), and 16 PE-based plasmalogens (PLPE), as well as their proportions in each major class. This effort yielded 25 genome-wide significant loci for phospholipids (smallest P-value = 9.88×10−204) and 10 loci for sphingolipids (smallest P-value = 3.10×10−57). After a correction for multiple comparisons (P-value<2.2×10−9), we observed four novel loci significantly associated with phospholipids (PAQR9, AGPAT1, PKD2L1, PDXDC1) and two with sphingolipids (PLD2 and APOE) explaining up to 3.1% of the variance. Further analysis of the top findings with respect to within class molar proportions uncovered three additional loci for phospholipids (PNLIPRP2, PCDH20, and ABDH3) suggesting their involvement in either fatty acid elongation/saturation processes or fatty acid specific turnover mechanisms. Among those, 14 loci (KCNH7, AGPAT1, PNLIPRP2, SYT9, FADS1-2-3, DLG2, APOA1, ELOVL2, CDK17, LIPC, PDXDC1, PLD2, LASS4, and APOE) mapped into the glycerophospholipid and 12 loci (ILKAP, ITGA9, AGPAT1, FADS1-2-3, APOA1, PCDH20, LIPC, PDXDC1, SGPP1, APOE, LASS4, and PLD2) to the sphingolipid pathways. In large meta-analyses, associations between FADS1-2-3 and carotid intima media thickness, AGPAT1 and type 2 diabetes, and APOA1 and coronary artery disease were observed. In conclusion, our

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies novel loci associated with circulating phospho- and sphingolipid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Demirkan, Ayşe; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ugocsai, Peter; Isaacs, Aaron; Pramstaller, Peter P; Liebisch, Gerhard; Wilson, James F; Johansson, Åsa; Rudan, Igor; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Kirichenko, Anatoly V; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Jansen, Ritsert C; Gnewuch, Carsten; Domingues, Francisco S; Pattaro, Cristian; Wild, Sarah H; Jonasson, Inger; Polasek, Ozren; Zorkoltseva, Irina V; Hofman, Albert; Karssen, Lennart C; Struchalin, Maksim; Floyd, James; Igl, Wilmar; Biloglav, Zrinka; Broer, Linda; Pfeufer, Arne; Pichler, Irene; Campbell, Susan; Zaboli, Ghazal; Kolcic, Ivana; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Huffman, Jennifer; Hastie, Nicholas D; Uitterlinden, Andre; Franke, Lude; Franklin, Christopher S; Vitart, Veronique; Nelson, Christopher P; Preuss, Michael; Bis, Joshua C; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Franceschini, Nora; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Axenovich, Tatiana; Oostra, Ben A; Meitinger, Thomas; Hicks, Andrew A; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Schmitz, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Phospho- and sphingolipids are crucial cellular and intracellular compounds. These lipids are required for active transport, a number of enzymatic processes, membrane formation, and cell signalling. Disruption of their metabolism leads to several diseases, with diverse neurological, psychiatric, and metabolic consequences. A large number of phospholipid and sphingolipid species can be detected and measured in human plasma. We conducted a meta-analysis of five European family-based genome-wide association studies (N = 4034) on plasma levels of 24 sphingomyelins (SPM), 9 ceramides (CER), 57 phosphatidylcholines (PC), 20 lysophosphatidylcholines (LPC), 27 phosphatidylethanolamines (PE), and 16 PE-based plasmalogens (PLPE), as well as their proportions in each major class. This effort yielded 25 genome-wide significant loci for phospholipids (smallest P-value = 9.88×10(-204)) and 10 loci for sphingolipids (smallest P-value = 3.10×10(-57)). After a correction for multiple comparisons (P-value<2.2×10(-9)), we observed four novel loci significantly associated with phospholipids (PAQR9, AGPAT1, PKD2L1, PDXDC1) and two with sphingolipids (PLD2 and APOE) explaining up to 3.1% of the variance. Further analysis of the top findings with respect to within class molar proportions uncovered three additional loci for phospholipids (PNLIPRP2, PCDH20, and ABDH3) suggesting their involvement in either fatty acid elongation/saturation processes or fatty acid specific turnover mechanisms. Among those, 14 loci (KCNH7, AGPAT1, PNLIPRP2, SYT9, FADS1-2-3, DLG2, APOA1, ELOVL2, CDK17, LIPC, PDXDC1, PLD2, LASS4, and APOE) mapped into the glycerophospholipid and 12 loci (ILKAP, ITGA9, AGPAT1, FADS1-2-3, APOA1, PCDH20, LIPC, PDXDC1, SGPP1, APOE, LASS4, and PLD2) to the sphingolipid pathways. In large meta-analyses, associations between FADS1-2-3 and carotid intima media thickness, AGPAT1 and type 2 diabetes, and APOA1 and coronary artery disease were observed. In conclusion, our

  8. Sphingolipid profile alters in retinal dystrophic P23H-1 rats and systemic FTY720 can delay retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Megan; Qi, Hui; Sun, Eleanor; Tan, Jeremy; Porter, Hunter; Allegood, Jeremy; Chalfant, Charles E; Yasumura, Douglas; Matthes, Michael T; LaVail, Matthew M; Mandal, Nawajes A

    2016-05-01

    Retinal degeneration (RD) affects millions of people and is a major cause of ocular impairment and blindness. With a wide range of mutations and conditions leading to degeneration, targeting downstream processes is necessary for developing effective treatments. Ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate, a pair of bioactive sphingolipids, are involved in apoptosis and its prevention, respectively. Apoptotic cell death is a potential driver of RD, and in order to understand the mechanism of degeneration and potential treatments, we studied rhodopsin mutant RD model, P23H-1 rats. Investigating this genetic model of human RD allows us to investigate the association of sphingolipid metabolites with the degeneration of the retina in P23H-1 rats and the effects of a specific modulator of sphingolipid metabolism, FTY720. We found that P23H-1 rat retinas had altered sphingolipid profiles that, when treated with FTY720, were rebalanced closer to normal levels. FTY720-treated rats also showed protection from RD compared with their vehicle-treated littermates. Based on these data, we conclude that sphingolipid dysregulation plays a secondary role in retinal cell death, which may be common to many forms of RDs, and that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug FTY720 or related compounds that modulate sphingolipid metabolism could potentially delay the cell death. PMID:26947037

  9. Three-dimensional imaging of cholesterol and sphingolipids within a Madin-Darby canine kidney cell

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yeager, Ashley N.; Weber, Peter K.; Kraft, Mary L.

    2016-01-08

    Metabolic stable isotope incorporation and secondary ion mass spectrometry(SIMS) depth profiling performed on a Cameca NanoSIMS 50 were used to image the 18O-cholesterol and 15N-sphingolipid distributions within a portion of a Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell. Three-dimensional representations of the component-specific isotope distributions show clearly defined regions of 18O-cholesterol and 15N-sphingolipid enrichment that seem to be separate subcellular compartments. Furthermore, the low levels of nitrogen-containing secondary ions detected at the 18O-enriched regions suggest that these 18O-cholesterol-rich structures may be lipiddroplets, which have a core consisting of cholesterol esters and triacylglycerides.

  10. Roles for Dysfunctional Sphingolipid Metabolism in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuropathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Haughey, Norman J.; Bandaru, Veera V.R.; Bai, Mihyun; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids in the membranes of neurons play important roles in signal transduction, either by modulating the localization and activation of membrane-associated receptors or by acting as precursors of bioactive lipid mediators. Activation of cytokine and neurotrophic factor receptors coupled to sphingomyelinases results in the generation of ceramides and gangliosides, which in turn, modify the structural and functional plasticity of neurons. In aging and neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is increased membrane-associated oxidative stress and excessive production and accumulation of ceramides. Studies of brain tissue samples from human subjects, and of experimental models of the diseases, suggest that perturbed sphingomyelin metabolism is a pivotal event in the dysfunction and degeneration of neurons that occurs in AD and HIV dementia. Dietary and pharmacological interventions that target sphingolipid metabolism should be pursued for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:20452460

  11. Three-dimensional imaging of cholesterol and sphingolipids within a Madin-Darby canine kidney cell.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Ashley N; Weber, Peter K; Kraft, Mary L

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic stable isotope incorporation and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiling performed on a Cameca NanoSIMS 50 were used to image the (18)O-cholesterol and (15)N-sphingolipid distributions within a portion of a Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell. Three-dimensional representations of the component-specific isotope distributions show clearly defined regions of (18)O-cholesterol and (15)N-sphingolipid enrichment that seem to be separate subcellular compartments. The low levels of nitrogen-containing secondary ions detected at the (18)O-enriched regions suggest that these (18)O-cholesterol-rich structures may be lipid droplets, which have a core consisting of cholesterol esters and triacylglycerides. PMID:26746168

  12. Free-radical Destruction of Sphingolipids Resulting in 2-hexadecenal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Shadyro, Oleg; Lisovskaya, Alexandra; Semenkova, Galina; Edimecheva, Irina; Amaegberi, Nadezda

    2015-01-01

    The action of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and γ-radiation on aqueous lysosphingolipid dispersions was found to produce 2-hexadecenal (Hex). This process includes the stages of formation of nitrogen-centered radicals from the starting molecules and the subsequent fragmentation of these radicals via the rupture of C–C and O–H bonds. These findings prove the existence of a nonenzymatic pathway of sphingolipid destruction leading to the formation of Hex, which possesses a wide spectrum of biological activity. Analysis of the effect of HOCl on transplantable rat glioma C6 cells and human embryonic kidney 293 cells points to the formation of Hex. This suggests that the described mechanism of free-radical destruction of sphingolipids may be replicated on cell culture under the stress of active chlorine forms. PMID:25861222

  13. Sphingolipids inhibit insulin and phorbol ester stimulated uptake of 2-deoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Murray, D.K.

    1986-07-16

    Studies are presented demonstrating inhibition of both insulin and phorbol myristate acetate stimulated uptake of 2-deoxyglucose uptake by 3T3-L1 fibroblasts. Greatest inhibition of uptake was seen with sphinganine while sphingosine was also potent in this regard. Ceramide inhibited phorbol myristate acetate but not insulin stimulation of uptake. It is suggested that sphingolipid inhibition of glucose transport relates to the previously demonstrated effect of corticosteroids to increase membrane sphingomyelin and inhibit glucose transport.

  14. Plasma Phospholipid and Sphingolipid Alterations in Presenilin1 Mutation Carriers: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Pratishtha; Lim, Wei L.F.; Shui, Guanghou; Gupta, Veer B.; James, Ian; Fagan, Anne M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Sohrabi, Hamid R.; Taddei, Kevin; Brown, Belinda M.; Benzinger, Tammie; Masters, Colin; Snowden, Stuart G.; Wenk, Marcus R.; Bateman, Randall J.; Morris, John C.; Martins, Ralph N.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Aberrant lipid metabolism has been implicated in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The current study investigated plasma phospholipid and sphingolipid profiles in individuals carrying PSEN1 mutations responsible for autosomal dominant AD (ADAD). Methods Study participants evaluated were from the Perth and Melbourne sites of the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) study. Plasma phospholipid and sphingolipid profiles were measured using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry in 20 PSEN1 mutation carriers (MC; eight of whom were symptomatic and twelve asymptomatic, based on Clinical Dementia Rating scores) and compared with six non carriers (NC) using linear mixed models. Further, AD gold standard biomarker data obtained from the DIAN database were correlated with lipid species significantly altered between MC and NC, using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Results One-hundred and thirty-nine plasma phospholipid and sphingolipid species were measured. Significantly altered species in MC compared to NC primarily belonged to choline and ethanolamine containing phospholipid classes and ceramides. Further phosphatidylcholine species (34:6, 36:5, 40:6) correlated with cerebrospinal fluid tau (p < 0.05), and plasmalogen ethanolamine species (34:2, 36:,4) correlated with both cerebrospinal fluid tau and brain amyloid load within the MC group (p < 0.05). Conclusion These findings indicate altered phospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism in ADAD and provide insight into the pathomolecular changes occurring with ADAD pathogenesis. Further, findings reported in this study allow comparison of lipid alterations in ADAD with those reported previously in sporadic AD. The findings observed in the current pilot study warrant validation in the larger DIAN cohort. PMID:26836186

  15. Inhibition of sphingolipid metabolism enhances resveratrol chemotherapy in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyong-Oh; Park, Nam-Young; Seo, Cho-Hee; Hong, Seon-Pyo; Oh, Ki-Wan; Hong, Jin-Tae; Han, Sang-Kil; Lee, Yong-Moon

    2012-09-01

    Resveratrol, a chemopreventive agent, is rapidly metabolized in the intestine and liver via glucuronidation. Thus, the pharmacokinetics of resveratrol limits its efficacy. To improve efficacy, the activity of resveratrol was investigated in the context of sphingolipid metabolism in human gastric cancer cells. Diverse sphingolipid metabolites, including dihydroceramides (DHCer), were tested for their ability to induce resveratrol cytotoxicity. Exposure to resveratrol (100 μM) for 24 hr induced cell death and cell cycle arrest in gastric cancer cells. Exposure to the combination of resveratrol and dimethylsphingosine (DMS) increased cytotoxicity, demonstrating that sphingolipid metabolites intensify resveratrol activity. Specifically, DHCer accumulated in a resveratrol concentration-dependent manner in SNU-1 and HT-29 cells, but not in SNU-668 cells. LC-MS/MS analysis showed that specific DHCer species containing C24:0, C16:0, C24:1, and C22:0 fatty acids chain were increased by up to 30-fold by resveratrol, indicating that resveratrol may partially inhibit DHCer desaturase. Indeed, resveratrol mildly inhibited DHCer desaturase activity compared to the specific inhibitor GT-11 or to retinamide (4-HPR); however, in SNU-1 cells resveratrol alone exhibited a typical cell cycle arrest pattern, which GT-11 did not alter, indicating that inhibition of DHCer desaturase is not essential to the cytotoxicity induced by the combination of resveratrol and sphingolipid metabolites. Resveratrol-induced p53 expression strongly correlated with the enhancement of cytotoxicity observed upon combination of resveratrol with DMS or 4-HPR. Taken together, these results show that DHCer accumulation is a novel lipid biomarker of resveratrol-induced cytotoxicity in human gastric cancer cells. PMID:24009836

  16. Sphingolipid Metabolism Correlates with Cerebrospinal Fluid Beta Amyloid Levels in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fonteh, Alfred N.; Ormseth, Cora; Chiang, Jiarong; Cipolla, Matthew; Arakaki, Xianghong; Harrington, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a) total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b) levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c) three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid β42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but not impaired

  17. Thematic Review Series: Sphingolipids. Biodiversity of sphingoid bases (“sphingosines”) and related amino alcohols*

    PubMed Central

    Pruett, Sarah T.; Bushnev, Anatoliy; Hagedorn, Kerri; Adiga, Madhura; Haynes, Christopher A.; Sullards, M. Cameron; Liotta, Dennis C.; Merrill, Alfred H.

    2008-01-01

    “Sphingosin” was first described by J. L. W. Thudichum in 1884 and structurally characterized as 2S,3R,4E-2-aminooctadec-4-ene-1,3-diol in 1947 by Herb Carter, who also proposed the designation of “lipides derived from sphingosine as sphingolipides.” This category of amino alcohols is now known to encompass hundreds of compounds that are referred to as sphingoid bases and sphingoid base-like compounds, which vary in chain length, number, position, and stereochemistry of double bonds, hydroxyl groups, and other functionalities. Some have especially intriguing features, such as the tail-to-tail combination of two sphingoid bases in the α,ω-sphingoids produced by sponges. Most of these compounds participate in cell structure and regulation, and some (such as the fumonisins) disrupt normal sphingolipid metabolism and cause plant and animal disease. Many of the naturally occurring and synthetic sphingoid bases are cytotoxic for cancer cells and pathogenic microorganisms or have other potentially useful bioactivities; hence, they offer promise as pharmaceutical leads. This thematic review gives an overview of the biodiversity of the backbones of sphingolipids and the broader field of naturally occurring and synthetic sphingoid base-like compounds. PMID:18499644

  18. The role of ORMDL proteins, guardians of cellular sphingolipids, in asthma.

    PubMed

    Paulenda, T; Draber, P

    2016-07-01

    A family of widely expressed ORM-like (ORMDL) proteins has been recently linked to asthma in genomewide association studies in humans and extensively explored in in vivo studies in mice. ORMDL proteins are key regulators of serine palmitoyltransferase, an enzyme catalyzing the initial step of sphingolipid biosynthesis. Sphingolipids play prominent roles in cell signaling and response to stress, and they affect the mechanistic properties of cellular membranes. Deregulation of sphingolipid biosynthesis and their recycling has been proven to support and even cause several diseases including allergy, inflammation, and asthma. ORMDL3, the most extensively studied member of the ORMDL family, has been shown to be important for endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis by regulating the unfolded protein response and calcium response. In immune cells, ORMDL3 is involved in migration and in the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, changes in the expression level of ORMDL3 are important in allergen-induced asthma pathologies. This review focuses on functional aspects of the ORMDL family proteins, which may serve as new therapeutic targets for the treatment of asthma and some other life-threatening diseases. PMID:26969910

  19. Serum Sphingolipid Variations Associate with Hepatic Decompensation and Survival in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Grammatikos, Georgios; Ferreiròs, Nerea; Waidmann, Oliver; Bon, Dimitra; Schroeter, Sirkka; Koch, Alexander; Herrmann, Eva; Zeuzem, Stefan; Kronenberger, Bernd; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Background Sphingolipids constitute bioactive molecules with functional implications in liver homeostasis. Particularly, ablation of very long chain ceramides in a knockout mouse model has been shown to cause a severe hepatopathy. Methods We aimed to evaluate the serum sphingolipid profile of 244 patients with cirrhosis prospectively followed for a median period of 228±217 days via mass spectrometry. Results We thereby observed a significant decrease of long and very long chain ceramides, particularly of C24ceramide, in patients with increasing severity of cirrhosis (p<0.001). Additionally, hydropic decompensation, defined by clinical presentation of ascites formation, was significantly correlated to low C24ceramide levels (p<0.001) while a significant association to hepatic decompensation and poor overall survival was observed for low serum concentrations of C24ceramide (p<0.001) as well. Multivariate analysis further identified low serum C24ceramide to be independently associated to overall survival (standard beta = -0.001, p = 0.022). Conclusions In our current analysis serum levels of very long chain ceramides show a significant reciprocal correlation to disease severity and hepatic decompensation and are independently associated with overall survival in patients with cirrhosis. Serum sphingolipid metabolites and particularly C24ceramide may constitute novel molecular targets of disease severity, hepatic decompensation and overall prognosis in cirrhosis and should be further evaluated in basic research studies. PMID:26382760

  20. Endothelial Nogo-B regulates sphingolipid biosynthesis to promote pathological cardiac hypertrophy during chronic pressure overload

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Huang, Yan; Cantalupo, Anna; Azevedo, Paula S.; Siragusa, Mauro; Bielawski, Jacek; Giordano, Frank J.; Di Lorenzo, Annarita

    2016-01-01

    We recently discovered that endothelial Nogo-B, a membrane protein of the ER, regulates vascular function by inhibiting the rate-limiting enzyme, serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), in de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis. Here, we show that endothelium-derived sphingolipids, particularly sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), protect the heart from inflammation, fibrosis, and dysfunction following pressure overload and that Nogo-B regulates this paracrine process. SPT activity is upregulated in banded hearts in vivo as well as in TNF-α–activated endothelium in vitro, and loss of Nogo removes the brake on SPT, increasing local S1P production. Hence, mice lacking Nogo-B, systemically or specifically in the endothelium, are resistant to the onset of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of SPT with myriocin restores permeability, inflammation, and heart dysfunction in Nogo-A/B–deficient mice to WT levels, whereas SEW2871, an S1P1 receptor agonist, prevents myocardial permeability, inflammation, and dysfunction in WT banded mice. Our study identifies a critical role of endothelial sphingolipid biosynthesis and its regulation by Nogo-B in the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and proposes a potential therapeutic target for the attenuation or reversal of this clinical condition. PMID:27158676

  1. CSF sphingolipids, β-amyloid, and tau in adults at risk for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, Michelle M.; Haughey, Norman J.; Bandaru, V.V.R.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Andreasson, Ulf; Johnson, Sterling C.; Gleason, Carey E.; Blazel, Hanna M.; Puglielli, Luigi; Sager, Mark A.; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular studies suggest sphingolipids may cause or accelerate amyloid-beta (Aβ) and tau pathology but in vivo human studies are lacking. We determined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of sphingolipids (ceramides, sphingomyelins), amyloid-beta (Aβ1–42, AβX-38, AβX-40, AβX-42) and tau (T-tau, p-tau181) in 91 cognitively normal individuals, aged 36–69 years, with a parental history of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The 18-carbon acyl chain length ceramide species was associated with AβX-38 (r = 0.312, p = 0.003), AβX-40 (r = 0.327, p = 0.002), and T-tau (r = 0.313, p = 0.003) but not with AβX-42 (r = 0.171, p = 0.106) or p-tau (r = 0.086, p = 0.418). All sphingomyelin species correlated (most p < 0.001) with all Aβ species and T-tau; many also correlated with p-tau. Results remained in regression models after controlling for age and APOE genotype. These results suggest in vivo relationships between CSF ceramides and sphingomyelins and Aβ and tau levels in cognitively normal individuals at increased risk for AD, indicating these sphingolipids may be associated with early pathogenesis. PMID:24952994

  2. Molecular profiling of LGL leukemia reveals role of sphingolipid signaling in survival of cytotoxic lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mithun Vinod; Zhang, Ranran; Irby, Rosalyn; Kothapalli, Ravi; Liu, Xin; Arrington, Ty; Frank, Bryan; Lee, Norman H.

    2008-01-01

    T-cell large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemia is characterized by clonal expansion of CD3+CD8+ cells. Leukemic LGLs correspond to terminally differentiated effector-memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that escape Fas-mediated activation-induced cell death (AICD) in vivo. The gene expression signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 30 LGL leukemia patients showed profound dysregulation of expression of apoptotic genes and suggested uncoupling of activation and apoptotic pathways as a mechanism for failure of AICD in leukemic LGLs. Pathway-based microarray analysis indicated that balance of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic sphingolipid-mediated signaling was deregulated in leukemic LGLs. We further investigated sphingolipid pathways and found that acid ceramidase was constitutively overexpressed in leukemic LGLs and that its inhibition induced apoptosis of leukemic LGLs. We also showed that S1P5 is the predominant S1P receptor in leukemic LGLs, whereas S1P1 is down-regulated. FTY720, a functional antagonist of S1P-mediated signaling, induced apoptosis in leukemic LGLs and also sensitized leukemic LGLs to Fas-mediated death. Collectively, these results show a role for sphingolipid-mediated signaling as a mechanism for long-term survival of CTLs. Therapeutic targeting of this pathway, such as use of FTY720, may have efficacy in LGL leukemia. PMID:18477771

  3. Roles of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction Induced by Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Véret, Julien; Bellini, Lara; Giussani, Paola; Ng, Carl; Magnan, Christophe; Le Stunff, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in order to maintain glucose homeostasis. However, various environmental stresses such as obesity have been shown to induce loss of secretory responsiveness in pancreatic β cells and pancreatic β cell apoptosis which can favor the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Indeed, elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) have been shown to induce β cell apoptosis. Importantly, the chronic adverse effects of FFAs on β cell function and viability are potentiated in the presence of hyperglycaemia, a phenomenon that has been termed gluco-lipotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of gluco-lipotoxicity in pancreatic β cells are not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that sphingolipid metabolism plays a key role in gluco-lipotoxicity induced apoptosis and loss of function of pancreatic β cells. The present review focuses on how the two main sphingolipid mediators, ceramides and sphingoid base-1-phosphates, regulate the deleterious effects of gluco-lipotoxicity on pancreatic β cells. The review highlights the role of a sphingolipid biostat on the dysregulation of β cell fate and function induced by gluco-lipotoxicity, offering the possibility of new therapeutic targets to prevent the onset of T2D. PMID:26237395

  4. Roles of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction Induced by Lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Véret, Julien; Bellini, Lara; Giussani, Paola; Ng, Carl; Magnan, Christophe; Le Stunff, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in order to maintain glucose homeostasis. However, various environmental stresses such as obesity have been shown to induce loss of secretory responsiveness in pancreatic β cells and pancreatic β cell apoptosis which can favor the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Indeed, elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) have been shown to induce β cell apoptosis. Importantly, the chronic adverse effects of FFAs on β cell function and viability are potentiated in the presence of hyperglycaemia, a phenomenon that has been termed gluco-lipotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of gluco-lipotoxicity in pancreatic β cells are not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that sphingolipid metabolism plays a key role in gluco-lipotoxicity induced apoptosis and loss of function of pancreatic β cells. The present review focuses on how the two main sphingolipid mediators, ceramides and sphingoid base-1-phosphates, regulate the deleterious effects of gluco-lipotoxicity on pancreatic β cells. The review highlights the role of a sphingolipid biostat on the dysregulation of β cell fate and function induced by gluco-lipotoxicity, offering the possibility of new therapeutic targets to prevent the onset of T2D. PMID:26237395

  5. A Sphingolipid Inhibitor Induces a Cytokinesis Arrest and Blocks Stage Differentiation in Giardia lamblia▿

    PubMed Central

    Sonda, Sabrina; Štefanić, Saša; Hehl, Adrian B.

    2008-01-01

    Sphingolipid biosynthesis pathways have recently emerged as a promising target for therapeutic intervention against pathogens, including parasites. A key step in the synthesis of complex sphingolipids is the glucosylation of ceramide, mediated by glucosylceramide (GlcCer) synthase, whose activity can be inhibited by PPMP (1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol). In this study, we investigated whether PPMP inhibits the proliferation and differentiation of the pathogenic parasite Giardia lamblia, the major cause of parasite-induced diarrhea worldwide. PPMP was found to block in vitro parasite replication in a dose-dependent manner, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 3.5 μM. The inhibition of parasite replication was irreversible at 10 μM PPMP, a concentration that did not affect mammalian cell metabolism. Importantly, PPMP inhibited the completion of cell division at a specific stage in late cytokinesis. Microscopic analysis of cells incubated with PPMP revealed the aberrant accumulation of cellular membranes belonging to the endoplasmic reticulum network in the caudal area of the parasites. Finally, PPMP induced a 90% reduction in G. lamblia differentiation into cysts, the parasite stage responsible for the transmission of the disease. These results show that PPMP is a powerful inhibitor of G. lamblia in vitro and that as-yet-uncharacterized sphingolipid biosynthetic pathways are potential targets for the development of anti-G. lamblia agents. PMID:18086854

  6. A sphingolipid inhibitor induces a cytokinesis arrest and blocks stage differentiation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Sonda, Sabrina; Stefanic, Sasa; Hehl, Adrian B

    2008-02-01

    Sphingolipid biosynthesis pathways have recently emerged as a promising target for therapeutic intervention against pathogens, including parasites. A key step in the synthesis of complex sphingolipids is the glucosylation of ceramide, mediated by glucosylceramide (GlcCer) synthase, whose activity can be inhibited by PPMP (1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol). In this study, we investigated whether PPMP inhibits the proliferation and differentiation of the pathogenic parasite Giardia lamblia, the major cause of parasite-induced diarrhea worldwide. PPMP was found to block in vitro parasite replication in a dose-dependent manner, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 3.5 muM. The inhibition of parasite replication was irreversible at 10 muM PPMP, a concentration that did not affect mammalian cell metabolism. Importantly, PPMP inhibited the completion of cell division at a specific stage in late cytokinesis. Microscopic analysis of cells incubated with PPMP revealed the aberrant accumulation of cellular membranes belonging to the endoplasmic reticulum network in the caudal area of the parasites. Finally, PPMP induced a 90% reduction in G. lamblia differentiation into cysts, the parasite stage responsible for the transmission of the disease. These results show that PPMP is a powerful inhibitor of G. lamblia in vitro and that as-yet-uncharacterized sphingolipid biosynthetic pathways are potential targets for the development of anti-G. lamblia agents. PMID:18086854

  7. TORC2-dependent protein kinase Ypk1 phosphorylates ceramide synthase to stimulate synthesis of complex sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Muir, Alexander; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Roelants, Françoise M; Timmons, Garrett; Thorner, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane lipid composition must be maintained during growth and under environmental insult. In yeast, signaling mediated by TOR Complex 2 (TORC2)-dependent protein kinase Ypk1 controls lipid abundance and distribution in response to membrane stress. Ypk1, among other actions, alleviates negative regulation of L-serine:palmitoyl-CoA acyltransferase, upregulating production of long-chain base precursors to sphingolipids. To explore other roles for TORC2-Ypk1 signaling in membrane homeostasis, we devised a three-tiered genome-wide screen to identify additional Ypk1 substrates, which pinpointed both catalytic subunits of the ceramide synthase complex. Ypk1-dependent phosphorylation of both proteins increased upon either sphingolipid depletion or heat shock and was important for cell survival. Sphingolipidomics, other biochemical measurements and genetic analysis demonstrated that these modifications of ceramide synthase increased its specific activity and stimulated channeling of long-chain base precursors into sphingolipid end-products. Control at this branch point also prevents accumulation of intermediates that could compromise cell growth by stimulating autophagy. PMID:25279700

  8. An LC/MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of individual sphingolipid species in B cells.

    PubMed

    Mi, Si; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Dielschneider, Rebecca F; Gibson, Spencer B; Curtis, Jonathan M

    2016-09-15

    Comprehensive profiling of sphingolipids is of great importance for clinical and pharmaceutical studies. An LC/MS/MS method was established for the simultaneous separation and quantification of individual sphingolipid species including ceramides, dihydroceramides, glucosylceramides, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, sphinganine and sphinganine-1-phosphate. All target individual sphingolipid species were separated and quantified in a single chromatographic run of <20min. Method validation results indicated that calibration curves were linear in the range of 2.5-10,000nM for ceramides and glucosylceramides, 10-10,000nM for dihydroceramides, 5-10,000nM for sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, sphinganine and sphinganine-1-phosphate, respectively. The limits of detection ranged from 0.5nM to 5nM. Accuracies of 92.5-113% with precisions of 0.3-8.0% RSD were obtained for all of the standards over a wide range of concentrations. The application of this method was demonstrated using B cells collected from Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia patients (n=5) and healthy donors (n=4). 17 sphingolipid species were successfully characterized and quantified in the lipid extract. This is a rapid method that could be readily adapted to lipidomic investigations of sphingolipids in other bio-fluids and tissues. PMID:27450899

  9. Quantitative analysis of sphingolipids for lipidomics using triple quadrupole and quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometers[S

    PubMed Central

    Shaner, Rebecca L.; Allegood, Jeremy C.; Park, Hyejung; Wang, Elaine; Kelly, Samuel; Haynes, Christopher A.; Sullards, M. Cameron; Merrill, Alfred H.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a highly diverse category of bioactive compounds. This article describes methods that have been validated for the extraction, liquid chromatographic (LC) separation, identification and quantitation of sphingolipids by electrospray ionization, tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) using triple quadrupole (QQQ, API 3000) and quadrupole-linear-ion trap (API 4000 QTrap, operating in QQQ mode) mass spectrometers. Advantages of the QTrap included: greater sensitivity, similar ionization efficiencies for sphingolipids with ceramide versus dihydroceramide backbones, and the ability to identify the ceramide backbone of sphingomyelins using a pseudo-MS3 protocol. Compounds that can be readily quantified using an internal standard cocktail developed by the LIPID MAPS Consortium are: sphingoid bases and sphingoid base 1-phosphates, more complex species such as ceramides, ceramide 1-phosphates, sphingomyelins, mono- and di-hexosylceramides, and these complex sphingolipids with dihydroceramide backbones. With minor modifications, glucosylceramides and galactosylceramides can be distinguished, and more complex species such as sulfatides can also be quantified, when the internal standards are available. JLR LC ESI-MS/MS can be utilized to quantify a large number of structural and signaling sphingolipids using commercially available internal standards. The application of these methods is illustrated with RAW264.7 cells, a mouse macrophage cell line. These methods should be useful for a wide range of focused (sphingo)lipidomic investigations. PMID:19036716

  10. Loss-of-function mutations and inducible RNA: suppression of Arabidopsis LCB2 genes reveal the critical role of sphingolipids in gametophytic and sporophytic cell viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) catalyzed the condensation of serine and palmitoyl-CoA and is the committed step in sphingolipid biosynthesis. Sphingolipids are essential components of all eukaryotic cells and have many diverse roles in plant development including structural roles as components o...

  11. Differential expression of sphingolipids in P-glycoprotein or multidrug resistance-related protein 1 expressing human neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Douwes, Jenny; Kamps, Willem; Sietsma, Hannie; Kok, Jan Willem

    2003-07-31

    The sphingolipid composition and multidrug resistance status of three human neuroblastoma cell lines were established. SK-N-FI cells displayed high expression and functional (efflux) activity of P-glycoprotein, while multidrug resistance-related protein 1 was relatively abundant and most active in SK-N-AS cells. These two cell lines exhibited higher sphingolipid levels, compared to SK-N-DZ, which had the lowest activity of either ATP-binding cassette transporter protein. SK-N-DZ cells also differed in ganglioside composition with predominant expression of b-series gangliosides. In conclusion, these three neuroblastoma cell lines offer a good model system to study sphingolipid metabolism in relation to ATP-binding cassette transporter protein function. PMID:12885402

  12. Evaluation of Sphingolipids in Wistar Rats Treated to Prolonged and Single Oral Doses of Fumonisin B1

    PubMed Central

    Direito, Glória M.; Almeida, Adriana P.; Aquino, Simone; dos Reis, Tatiana Alves; Pozzi, Claudia Rodrigues; Corrêa, Benedito

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate sphingolipid levels (sphingosine-So and sphinganine-Sa) and to compare the Sa/So ratio in liver, serum and urine of Wistar rats after prolonged administration (21 days) of fumonisin B1 (FB1). In parallel, the kinetics of sphingolipid elimination in urine was studied in animals receiving a single dose of FB1. Prolonged exposure to FB1 caused an increase in Sa levels in urine, serum and liver. The most marked effect on sphingolipid biosynthesis was observed in animals treated with the highest dose of FB1. Animals receiving a single dose of FB1 presented variations in Sa and So levels and in the Sa/So ratio. PMID:19333435

  13. Interaction of saposin D with membranes: effect of anionic phospholipids and sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Ciaffoni, Fiorella; Tatti, Massimo; Salvioli, Rosa; Vaccaro, Anna Maria

    2003-08-01

    Saposin (Sap) D is an endolysosomal protein that, together with three other similar proteins, Sap A, Sap B and Sap C, is involved in the degradation of sphingolipids and, possibly, in the solubilization and transport of gangliosides. We found that Sap D is able to destabilize and disrupt membranes containing each of the three anionic phospholipids most abundant in the acidic endolysosomal compartment, namely lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylserine (PS). The breakdown of the membranes, which occurs when the Sap D concentration on the lipid surface reaches a critical value, is a slow process that gives rise to small particles. The Sap D-particle complexes formed in an acidic milieu can be dissociated by an increase in pH, suggesting a dynamic association of Sap D with membranes. The presence of anionic phospholipids is required also for the Sap D-induced perturbation and solubilization of membranes containing a neutral sphingolipid such as ceramide or a ganglioside such as G(M1). At appropriate Sap D concentrations Cer and G(M1) are solubilized as constituents of small phospholipid particles. Our findings imply that most functions of Sap D are dependent on its interaction with anionic phospholipids, which mediate the Sap D effect on other components of the membrane such as sphingolipids. On consideration of the properties of Sap D we propose that Sap D might have a role in the definition of the structure and function of membranes, such as the intra-endolysosomal membranes, that are rich in anionic phospholipids. PMID:12733985

  14. Targeting the sphingolipid metabolism to defeat pancreatic cancer cell resistance to the chemotherapeutic gemcitabine drug.

    PubMed

    Guillermet-Guibert, Julie; Davenne, Lise; Pchejetski, Dimitri; Saint-Laurent, Nathalie; Brizuela, Leyre; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Cuvillier, Olivier; Susini, Christiane; Bousquet, Corinne

    2009-04-01

    Defeating pancreatic cancer resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine remains a challenge to treat this deadly cancer. Targeting the sphingolipid metabolism for improving tumor chemosensitivity has recently emerged as a promising strategy. The fine balance between intracellular levels of the prosurvival sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and the proapoptotic ceramide sphingolipids determines cell fate. Among enzymes that control this metabolism, sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1), a tumor-associated protein overexpressed in many cancers, favors survival through S1P production, and inhibitors of SphK1 are used in ongoing clinical trials to sensitize epithelial ovarian and prostate cancer cells to various chemotherapeutic drugs. We here report that the cellular ceramide/S1P ratio is a critical biosensor for predicting pancreatic cancer cell sensitivity to gemcitabine. A low level of the ceramide/S1P ratio, associated with a high SphK1 activity, correlates with a robust intrinsic pancreatic cancer cell chemoresistance toward gemcitabine. Strikingly, increasing the ceramide/S1P ratio, by using pharmacologic (SphK1 inhibitor or ceramide analogue) or small interfering RNA-based approaches to up-regulate intracellular ceramide levels or reduce SphK1 activity, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Conversely, decreasing the ceramide/S1P ratio, by up-regulating SphK1 activity, promoted gemcitabine resistance in these cells. Development of novel pharmacologic strategies targeting the sphingolipid metabolism might therefore represent an interesting promising approach, when combined with gemcitabine, to defeat pancreatic cancer chemoresistance to this drug. PMID:19372554

  15. Sphingolipids: Key Regulators of Apoptosis and Pivotal Players in Cancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Giussani, Paola; Tringali, Cristina; Riboni, Laura; Viani, Paola; Venerando, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance elicited by cancer cells still constitutes a huge problem that frequently impairs the efficacy of both conventional and novel molecular therapies. Chemotherapy usually acts to induce apoptosis in cancer cells; therefore, the investigation of apoptosis control and of the mechanisms used by cancer cells to evade apoptosis could be translated in an improvement of therapies. Among many tools acquired by cancer cells to this end, the de-regulated synthesis and metabolism of sphingolipids have been well documented. Sphingolipids are known to play many structural and signalling roles in cells, as they are involved in the control of growth, survival, adhesion, and motility. In particular, in order to increase survival, cancer cells: (a) counteract the accumulation of ceramide that is endowed with pro-apoptotic potential and is induced by many drugs; (b) increase the synthesis of sphingosine-1-phosphate and glucosylceramide that are pro-survivals signals; (c) modify the synthesis and the metabolism of complex glycosphingolipids, particularly increasing the levels of modified species of gangliosides such as 9-O acetylated GD3 (αNeu5Ac(2-8)αNeu5Ac(2-3)βGal(1-4)βGlc(1-1)Cer) or N-glycolyl GM3 (αNeu5Ac (2-3)βGal(1-4)βGlc(1-1)Cer) and de-N-acetyl GM3 (NeuNH(2)βGal(1-4)βGlc(1-1)Cer) endowed with anti-apoptotic roles and of globoside Gb3 related to a higher expression of the multidrug resistance gene MDR1. In light of this evidence, the employment of chemical or genetic approaches specifically targeting sphingolipid dysregulations appears a promising tool for the improvement of current chemotherapy efficacy. PMID:24625663

  16. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Ceramide Synthases Differentially Affects Growth, Sphingolipid Metabolism, Programmed Cell Death, and Mycotoxin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Luttgeharm, Kyle D; Chen, Ming; Mehra, Amit; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Markham, Jonathan E; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-10-01

    Ceramide synthases catalyze an N-acyltransferase reaction using fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and long-chain base (LCB) substrates to form the sphingolipid ceramide backbone and are targets for inhibition by the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1). Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains three genes encoding ceramide synthases with distinct substrate specificities: LONGEVITY ASSURANCE GENE ONE HOMOLOG1 (LOH1; At3g25540)- and LOH3 (At1g19260)-encoded ceramide synthases use very-long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and trihydroxy LCB substrates, and LOH2 (At3g19260)-encoded ceramide synthase uses palmitoyl-CoA and dihydroxy LCB substrates. In this study, complementary DNAs for each gene were overexpressed to determine the role of individual isoforms in physiology and sphingolipid metabolism. Differences were observed in growth resulting from LOH1 and LOH3 overexpression compared with LOH2 overexpression. LOH1- and LOH3-overexpressing plants had enhanced biomass relative to wild-type plants, due in part to increased cell division, suggesting that enhanced synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acid/trihydroxy LCB ceramides promotes cell division and growth. Conversely, LOH2 overexpression resulted in dwarfing. LOH2 overexpression also resulted in the accumulation of sphingolipids with C16 fatty acid/dihydroxy LCB ceramides, constitutive induction of programmed cell death, and accumulation of salicylic acid, closely mimicking phenotypes observed previously in LCB C-4 hydroxylase mutants defective in trihydroxy LCB synthesis. In addition, LOH2- and LOH3-overexpressing plants acquired increased resistance to FB1, whereas LOH1-overexpressing plants showed no increase in FB1 resistance, compared with wild-type plants, indicating that LOH1 ceramide synthase is most strongly inhibited by FB1. Overall, the findings described here demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis ceramide synthases results in strongly divergent physiological and metabolic phenotypes, some of which have significance

  17. Analysis of Mammalian Sphingolipids by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and Tissue Imaging Mass Spectrometry (TIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Sullards, M. Cameron; Liu, Ying; Chen, Yanfeng; Merrill, Alfred H.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a highly diverse category of molecules that serve not only as components of biological structures but also as regulators of numerous cell functions. Because so many of the structural features of sphingolipids give rise to their biological activity, there is a need for comprehensive or “sphingolipidomic” methods for identification and quantitation of as many individual subspecies as possible. This review defines sphingolipids as a class, briefly discusses classical methods for their analysis, and focuses primarily on liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and tissue imaging mass spectrometry (TIMS). Recently, a set of evolving and expanding methods have been developed and rigorously validated for the extraction, identification, separation, and quantitation of sphingolipids by LC-MS/MS. Quantitation of these biomolecules is made possible via the use of an internal standard cocktail. The compounds that can be readily analyzed are free long-chain (sphingoid) bases, sphingoid base 1-phosphates, and more complex species such as ceramides, ceramide 1-phosphates, sphingomyelins, mono- and di-hexosylceramides sulfatides, and novel compounds such as the 1-deoxy- and 1-(deoxymethyl)-sphingoid bases and their N-acyl-derivatives. These methods can be altered slightly to separate and quantitate isomeric species such as glucosyl/galactosylceramide. Because these techniques require the extraction of sphingolipids from their native environment, any information regarding their localization in histological slices is lost. Therefore, this review also describes methods for TIMS. This technique has been shown to be a powerful tool to determine the localization of individual molecular species of sphingolipids directly from tissue slices. PMID:21749933

  18. The Composition of West Nile Virus Lipid Envelope Unveils a Role of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Flavivirus Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Casas, Josefina; Escribano-Romero, Estela

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT West Nile virus (WNV) is an emerging zoonotic mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for outbreaks of febrile illness and meningoencephalitis. The replication of WNV takes place on virus-modified membranes from the endoplasmic reticulum of the host cell, and virions acquire their envelope by budding into this organelle. Consistent with this view, the cellular biology of this pathogen is intimately linked to modifications of the intracellular membranes, and the requirement for specific lipids, such as cholesterol and fatty acids, has been documented. In this study, we evaluated the impact of WNV infection on two important components of cellular membranes, glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids, by mass spectrometry of infected cells. A significant increase in the content of several glycerophospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, plasmalogens, and lysophospholipids) and sphingolipids (ceramide, dihydroceramide, and sphingomyelin) was noticed in WNV-infected cells, suggesting that these lipids have functional roles during WNV infection. Furthermore, the analysis of the lipid envelope of WNV virions and recombinant virus-like particles revealed that their envelopes had a unique composition. The envelopes were enriched in sphingolipids (sphingomyelin) and showed reduced levels of phosphatidylcholine, similar to sphingolipid-enriched lipid microdomains. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase (which catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin into ceramide) by either pharmacological approaches or small interfering RNA-mediated silencing reduced the release of flavivirus virions as well as virus-like particles, suggesting a role of sphingomyelin-to-ceramide conversion in flavivirus budding and confirming the importance of sphingolipids in the biogenesis of WNV. IMPORTANCE West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic flavivirus spread by mosquitoes that can infect multiple vertebrate hosts, including humans. There is no specific vaccine or therapy against this pathogen licensed

  19. Functional identification of a delta8-sphingolipid desaturase from Borago officinalis.

    PubMed

    Sperling, P; Libisch, B; Zähringer, U; Napier, J A; Heinz, E

    2001-04-15

    The similarities between delta12- and delta5-fatty acyl desaturase sequences were used to construct degenerate primers for PCR experiments with cDNA transcribed from mRNA of developing borage seeds. Screening of a borage seed cDNA library with an amplified DNA fragment resulted in the isolation of a full-length cDNA corresponding to a deduced open-reading frame of 446 amino acids. The protein showed high similarity to plant delta8-sphingolipid desaturases as well as to the delta6-fatty acyl desaturase from Borago officinalis. The sequence is characterized by the presence of a N-terminal cytochrome b5 domain. Expression of this open-reading frame in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in the formation of delta8-trans/cis-phytosphingenines not present in wild-type cells, as shown by HPLC analysis of sphingoid bases as their dinitrophenyl derivatives. GLC-MS analysis of the methylated di-O-trimethylsilyl ether derivatives confirmed the presence of delta8-stereoisomers of C18- and C20-phytosphingenine. Furthermore, Northern blotting showed that the gene encoding a stereo-unselective delta8-sphingolipid desaturase is primarily expressed in young borage leaves. PMID:11368168

  20. Synthesis and processing of sphingolipid activator protein-2 (SAP-2) in cultured human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Fujibayashi, S.; Wenger, D.A.

    1986-11-15

    Sphingolipid activator proteins (SAP) are relatively small molecular weight proteins that stimulate the enzymatic hydrolysis of sphingolipids in the presence of specific lysosomal hydrolases. SAP-2 has previously been demonstrated to activate the hydrolysis of glucosylceramide, galactosylceramide, and, possibly, sphingomyelin. Using monospecific rabbit antibodies against human spleen SAP-2, the synthesis and processing of SAP-2 were studied in cultured human fibroblasts. When (/sup 35/S)methionine was presented in the medium to control human cells for 4 h, five major areas of radiolabeling were found. These had apparent molecular weights of 73,000, 68,000, 50,000, 12,000, and 9000. Further studies indicated that the major extracellular product in normal cells given NH4Cl along with the (/sup 35/S)methionine and in medium from cultures from patients with I cell disease had an apparent molecular weight of 73,000. The Mr = 68,000 and 73,000 species can be converted to a species with an apparent molecular weight of 50,000 by the action of endoglycosidase F. After labeling cells for 1 h followed by a 1-h chase, the Mr = 12,000 and 9000 species appear. Treatment of the immunoprecipitated mixture with endoglycosidase F resulted in conversion of these species to one band with an apparent molecular weight of 7600. These studies indicate that this relatively low molecular weight protein is rapidly synthesized from a relatively large molecular weight highly glycosylated precursor.

  1. Novel mechanisms of action of classical chemotherapeutic agents on sphingolipid pathways.

    PubMed

    Hajj, Carla; Becker-Flegler, Katrin Anne; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana

    2015-06-01

    The prevailing mechanisms of action of traditional chemotherapeutic agents have been challenged by sphingolipid cancer research. Many studies have shown that ceramide generation in response to cytotoxic agents is central to tumor cell death. Ceramide can be generated either via hydrolysis of cell-membrane sphingomyelin by sphingomyelinases, hydrolysis of cerebrosides, or via de novo synthesis by ceramide synthases. Ceramide can act as a second messenger for apoptosis, senescence or autophagy. Inherent or acquired alterations in the sphingolipid pathway can account for resistance to the classic chemotherapeutic agents. In particular, it has been shown that activation of the acid ceramidase can lead to the formation of sphingosine 1-phosphate, which then antagonizes ceramide signaling by initiating a pro-survival signaling pathway. Furthermore, ceramide glycosylation catalyzed by glucosylceramide synthase converts ceramide to glucosylceramide, thus eliminating ceramide and consequently protecting cancer cells from apoptosis. In this review, we describe the effects of some of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents on ceramide generation, with a particular emphasis on strategies used to enhance the efficacy of these agents. PMID:25719313

  2. Fumonisin B₁ (FB₁) Induces Lamellar Separation and Alters Sphingolipid Metabolism of In Vitro Cultured Hoof Explants.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Nicole; Dohnal, Ilse; Nagl, Veronika; Schaumberger, Simone; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    One of the most important hoof diseases is laminitis. Yet, the pathology of laminitis is not fully understood. Different bacterial toxins, e.g. endotoxins or exotoxins, seem to play an important role. Additionally, ingestion of mycotoxins, toxic secondary metabolites of fungi, might contribute to the onset of laminitis. In this respect, fumonsins are of special interest since horses are regarded as species most susceptible to this group of mycotoxins. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of fumonisin B₁ (FB₁) on primary isolated epidermal and dermal hoof cells, as well as on the lamellar tissue integrity and sphingolipid metabolism of hoof explants in vitro. There was no effect of FB₁ at any concentration on dermal or epidermal cells. However, FB₁ significantly reduced the separation force of explants after 24 h of incubation. The Sa/So ratio was significantly increased in supernatants of explants incubated with FB₁ (2.5-10 µg/mL) after 24 h. Observed effects on Sa/So ratio were linked to significantly increased sphinganine concentrations. Our study showed that FB₁ impairs the sphingolipid metabolism of explants and reduces lamellar integrity at non-cytotoxic concentrations. FB₁ might, therefore, affect hoof health. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are necessary to elucidate the effects of FB₁ on the equine hoof in more detail. PMID:27023602

  3. Fumonisin- and AAL-Toxin-Induced Disruption of Sphingolipid Metabolism with Accumulation of Free Sphingoid Bases.

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, H. K.; Tanaka, T.; Duke, S. O.; Porter, J. K.; Wray, E. M.; Hodges, L.; Sessions, A. E.; Wang, E.; Merrill, A. H.; Riley, R. T.

    1994-01-01

    Fumonisins (FB) and AAL-toxin are sphingoid-like compounds produced by several species of fungi associated with plant diseases. In animal cells, both fumonisins produced by Fusarium moniliforme and AAL-toxin produced by Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici inhibit ceramide synthesis, an early biochemical event in the animal diseases associated with consumption of F. moniliforme-contaminated corn. In duckweed (Lemna pausicostata Heglem. 6746), tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill), and tobacco callus (Nicotiana tabacum cv Wisconsin), pure FB1 or AAL-toxin caused a marked elevation of phytosphingosine and sphinganine, sphingoid bases normally present in low concentrations. The relative increases were quite different in the three plant systems. Nonetheless, disruption of sphingolipid metabolism was clearly a common feature in plants exposed to FB1 or AAL-toxin. Resistant varieties of tomato (Asc/Asc) were much less sensitive to toxin-induced increases in free sphinganine. Because free sphingoid bases are precursors to plant "ceramides," their accumulation suggests that the primary biochemical lesion is inhibition of de novo ceramide synthesis and reacylation of free sphingoid bases. Thus, in plants the disease symptoms associated with A. alternata and F. moniliforme infection may be due to disruption of sphingolipid metabolism. PMID:12232389

  4. Hepatic fatty acid uptake is regulated by the sphingolipid acyl chain length.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo-Jae; Park, Joo-Won; Merrill, Alfred H; Storch, Judith; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Futerman, Anthony H

    2014-12-01

    Ceramide synthase 2 (CerS2) null mice cannot synthesize very-long acyl chain (C22-C24) ceramides resulting in significant alterations in the acyl chain composition of sphingolipids. We now demonstrate that hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) levels are reduced in the liver but not in the adipose tissue or skeletal muscle of the CerS2 null mouse, both before and after feeding with a high fat diet (HFD), where no weight gain was observed and large hepatic nodules appeared. Uptake of both BODIPY-palmitate and [VH]-palmitate was also abrogated in the hepa- tocytes and liver. The role of a number of key proteins involved in fatty acid uptake was examined, including FATP5, CD36/FAT, FABPpm and cytoplasmic FABP1. Levels of FATP5 and FABP1 were decreased in the CerS2 null mouse liver, whereas CD36/FAT levels were significantly elevated and CD36/FAT was also mislocalized upon insulin treatment. Moreover, treatment of hepatocytes with C22-C24-ceramides down-regulated CD36/FAT levels. Infection of CerS2 null mice with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-CerS2 restored normal TG levels and corrected the mislocalization of CD36/FAT, but had no effect on the intracellular localization or levels of FATP5 or FABP1. Together, these results demonstrate that hepatic fatty acid uptake via CD36/FAT can be regulated by altering the acyl chain composition of sphingolipids. PMID:25241943

  5. Muscle-specificity of age-related changes in markers of autophagy and sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Russ, David W; Boyd, Iva M; McCoy, Katherine M; McCorkle, Katherine W

    2015-12-01

    Our previous findings indicate that the gastrocnemius muscle of aging rats exhibits impairments of muscle quality (force/unit muscle tissue) and autophagy and increased sarcoplasmic reticulum stress. The purpose of this study was to examine age-related changes in soleus muscle contractility and in markers of autophagy in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. We assessed in situ muscle force and size in the soleus muscle of adult (7-8 months) and aged (24-26 months) male, F344/BN rats. We used immunoblotting to compare abundance of markers of autophagy, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stress and sphingolipid metabolism in the soleus and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles of these animals. Relative to adults, aged rats maintained soleus muscle quality and increased muscle size, resulting in increased tetanic force production. Immunoblotting revealed a general pattern of an age-related reduction of basal autophagy, despite increases in indicators of SR stress and upstream autophagic pathway activation in the MG. The MG also exhibited changes in markers of sphingolipid metabolism suggestive of increased muscle ceramide. Minimal age-related changes were observed in the soleus. The soleus maintains muscle mass and quality with age, and exhibits fewer age-related changes in markers of stress and autophagy than the MG. Based on these data, we suggest that maintenance of autophagy may preserve muscle quality by preventing excessive SR stress. PMID:26296420

  6. Involvement of complex sphingolipids and phosphatidylserine in endosomal trafficking in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2012-12-01

    Sphingolipids play critical roles in many physiologically important events in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we found that csg2Δ mutant cells defective in the synthesis of mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide exhibited abnormal intracellular accumulation of an exocytic v-SNARE, Snc1, under phosphatidylserine synthase gene (PSS1)-repressive conditions, although in wild-type cells, Snc1 was known to cycle between plasma membranes and the late Golgi via post-Golgi endosomes. The mislocalized Snc1 was co-localized with an endocytic marker dye, FM4-64, upon labelling for a short time. The abnormal distribution of Snc1 was suppressed by deletion of GYP2 encoding a GTPase-activating protein that negatively regulates endosomal vesicular trafficking, or expression of GTP-restricted form of Ypt32 GTPase. Furthermore, an endocytosis-deficient mutant of Snc1 was localized to plasma membranes in PSS1-repressed csg2Δ mutant cells as well as wild-type cells. Thus, the PSS1-repressed csg2Δ mutant cells were indicated to be defective in the trafficking of Snc1 from post-Golgi endosomes to the late Golgi. In contrast, the vesicular trafficking pathways via pre-vacuolar endosomes in the PSS1-repressed csg2Δ mutant cells seemed to be normal. These results suggested that specific complex sphingolipids and phosphatidylserine are co-ordinately involved in specific vesicular trafficking pathway. PMID:23062277

  7. A defect of sphingolipid metabolism modifies the properties of normal appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, David; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Calabresi, Peter A; Nath, Avindra; Haughey, Norman J

    2008-11-01

    Maintaining the appropriate complement and content of lipids in cellular membranes is critical for normal neural function. Accumulating evidence suggests that even subtle perturbations in the lipid content of neurons and myelin can disrupt their function and may contribute to myelin and axonal degradation. In this study, we determined the composition and quantified the content of lipids and sterols in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) and normal appearing grey matter (NAGM) from control and multiple sclerosis brain tissues by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Our results suggest that in active-multiple sclerosis, there is a shift in the lipid composition of NAWM and NAGM to a higher phospholipid and lower sphingolipid content. We found that this disturbance in lipid composition was reduced in NAGM but not in NAWM of inactive-multiple sclerosis. The pattern of disturbance in lipid composition suggests a metabolic defect that causes sphingolipids to be shuttled to phospholipid production. Modelling the biophysical consequence of this change in lipid composition of NAWM indicated an increase in the repulsive force between opposing bilayers that could explain decompaction and disruption of myelin structure. PMID:18772223

  8. Dictyostelium discoideum to human cells: pharmacogenetic studies demonstrate a role for sphingolipids in chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen; Min, Junxia; Alexander, Hannah

    2006-03-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle for the treatment of cancer and a subject of extensive research. Numerous mechanisms of drug resistance have been proposed, and they differ for different drugs. Nevertheless, it is clear that our understanding of this important problem is still incomplete, and that new targets for modulating therapy still await discovery. The attractive biology and the availability of powerful molecular techniques have made the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, a powerful non-mammalian model for drug target discovery, and the problem of drug resistance. To understand the molecular basis of chemoresistance to the widely used drug cisplatin, both genetic and pharmacological approaches have been applied to this versatile experimental system. These studies have resulted in the identification of novel molecular pathways which can be used to increase the efficacy of cisplatin, and brought attention to the role of sphingolipids in mediating the cellular response to chemotherapeutic drugs. In the following review, we will describe the history and utility of D. discoideum in pharmacogenetics, and discuss recent studies which focus attention on the role of sphingolipids in chemotherapy and chemoresistance. PMID:16403600

  9. Preparation of sphingolipid fatty acid methyl esters for determination by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    MacGee, J; Williams, M G

    1981-01-30

    Sphingolipid fatty acids are first converted to a mixture of free acids and their n-butyl esters by heating the specimen at 85 degree C in aqueous butanolic hydrogen chloride; the butyl esters are then saponified with methanolic potassium hydroxide. After acidification and extraction into hexane, the fatty acids are extracted into a very small volume of aqueous trimethyl(m-trifluorotolyl)ammonium hydroxide (TMTFTH), injection of an aliquot of the TMTFTH extract into the gas chromatograph yields the fatty acid methyl esters by pyrolytic methylation of the quaternary ammonium salts of the fatty acids. The preparation of a specimen ready for the gas--liquid chromatographic (GLC) analysis with quantitative recovery of the sphingolipid fatty acids can be accomplished in less than 2 h. By comparison, none of a number of well-accepted techniques for the release of sphingomyelin fatty acids by hydrolysis or methanolysis released the fatty acids quantitatively in less than 3 h, and all required additional manipulations before GLC analysis. PMID:7217267

  10. Legionella pneumophila S1P-lyase targets host sphingolipid metabolism and restrains autophagy.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Monica; Escoll, Pedro; Nora, Tamara; Botti, Joëlle; Boitez, Valérie; Bedia, Carmen; Daniels, Craig; Abraham, Gilu; Stogios, Peter J; Skarina, Tatiana; Christophe, Charlotte; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Cazalet, Christel; Hilbi, Hubert; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W T; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J; Ong, Sze Ying; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Codogno, Patrice; Levade, Thierry; Naderer, Thomas; Savchenko, Alexei; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-02-16

    Autophagy is an essential component of innate immunity, enabling the detection and elimination of intracellular pathogens. Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia in humans, is able to modulate autophagy through the action of effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell by the pathogen's Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Many of these effectors share structural and sequence similarity with eukaryotic proteins. Indeed, phylogenetic analyses have indicated their acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from a eukaryotic host. Here we report that L. pneumophila translocates the effector protein sphingosine-1 phosphate lyase (LpSpl) to target the host sphingosine biosynthesis and to curtail autophagy. Our structural characterization of LpSpl and its comparison with human SPL reveals high structural conservation, thus supporting prior phylogenetic analysis. We show that LpSpl possesses S1P lyase activity that was abrogated by mutation of the catalytic site residues. L. pneumophila triggers the reduction of several sphingolipids critical for macrophage function in an LpSpl-dependent and -independent manner. LpSpl activity alone was sufficient to prevent an increase in sphingosine levels in infected host cells and to inhibit autophagy during macrophage infection. LpSpl was required for efficient infection of A/J mice, highlighting an important virulence role for this effector. Thus, we have uncovered a previously unidentified mechanism used by intracellular pathogens to inhibit autophagy, namely the disruption of host sphingolipid biosynthesis. PMID:26831115

  11. Biological Effects of Naturally Occurring Sphingolipids, Uncommon Variants, and Their Analogs.

    PubMed

    Lai, Mitchell K P; Chew, Wee Siong; Torta, Federico; Rao, Angad; Harris, Greg L; Chun, Jerold; Herr, Deron R

    2016-09-01

    Sphingolipids (SPs) comprise a highly diverse class of lipids that serve biological roles both as structural components of cell membranes and as mediators of cell signaling. Pharmacologic and genetic manipulation of SPs and their signaling systems have underscored their importance in most biological processes, including central nervous system development and function. Likewise, perturbations of SP accumulation or signaling have been associated with a number of disease states, such as neural tube defects, neuroinflammation, stroke, and dementia. SPs can be endogenously synthesized de novo, and their metabolism is a well-regulated process, so their value as nutraceuticals has not been scrutinized. However, there is evidence that sphingolipid-rich diets can affect lipid homeostasis, and several mycotoxins are SP analogs that are known to cause profound derangement of SP metabolism or signaling. Furthermore, plants and invertebrates have SP species that are not present in mammals. Several of these have been shown to induce biological responses in mammalian cells. These findings suggest that dietary intake of SPs or SP analogs may have significant effects on human health or disease outcome. This manuscript provides an overview of SP metabolism and signaling, their perturbations in neurological diseases, as well as potential impacts of modulating this system in the brain. PMID:27393119

  12. Legionella pneumophila S1P-lyase targets host sphingolipid metabolism and restrains autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Rolando, Monica; Escoll, Pedro; Nora, Tamara; Botti, Joëlle; Boitez, Valérie; Daniels, Craig; Abraham, Gilu; Stogios, Peter J.; Skarina, Tatiana; Christophe, Charlotte; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Cazalet, Christel; Hilbi, Hubert; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W. T.; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J.; Ong, Sze Ying; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Codogno, Patrice; Levade, Thierry; Naderer, Thomas; Savchenko, Alexei; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential component of innate immunity, enabling the detection and elimination of intracellular pathogens. Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia in humans, is able to modulate autophagy through the action of effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell by the pathogen’s Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Many of these effectors share structural and sequence similarity with eukaryotic proteins. Indeed, phylogenetic analyses have indicated their acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from a eukaryotic host. Here we report that L. pneumophila translocates the effector protein sphingosine-1 phosphate lyase (LpSpl) to target the host sphingosine biosynthesis and to curtail autophagy. Our structural characterization of LpSpl and its comparison with human SPL reveals high structural conservation, thus supporting prior phylogenetic analysis. We show that LpSpl possesses S1P lyase activity that was abrogated by mutation of the catalytic site residues. L. pneumophila triggers the reduction of several sphingolipids critical for macrophage function in an LpSpl-dependent and -independent manner. LpSpl activity alone was sufficient to prevent an increase in sphingosine levels in infected host cells and to inhibit autophagy during macrophage infection. LpSpl was required for efficient infection of A/J mice, highlighting an important virulence role for this effector. Thus, we have uncovered a previously unidentified mechanism used by intracellular pathogens to inhibit autophagy, namely the disruption of host sphingolipid biosynthesis. PMID:26831115

  13. Following the flux of long-chain bases through the sphingolipid pathway in vivo using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Montañés, Fernando; Schneiter, Roger

    2016-05-01

    Sphingolipids are essential components of the plasma membrane. Their synthesis is tightly controlled by regulatory proteins, which impinge on the rate-limiting step of the pathway, the condensation of serine and palmitoyl-CoA to long-chain base (LCB). The subsequent conversion of LCB to ceramide by ceramide synthase (CerS) is also tightly regulated, because both the accumulation of LCB as well as an excess of ceramide is toxic. Here we describe an in vivo assay to monitor the flux of LCB through the sphingolipid pathway in yeast. Cells are provided with nonnatural odd-chain sphingosine analogs, C17-dihydrosphingosine or C17-phytosphingosine (PHS), and their incorporation into ceramide and more complex sphingolipids is monitored by mass spectrometry. Incorporation of C17-PHS is time and concentration dependent, is inhibited by fumonisin B1, an inhibitor of CerS, and greatly reduced in double mutant cells lacking components of the CerS, Lac1 and Lag1. The resulting C17-ceramides are further metabolized to more complex sphingolipids, inositol phosphorylceramide and mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide), indicating that the tracer can be used to decipher the regulation of later steps of the pathway. In support of this notion, we show that mutants lacking the Orm proteins, regulators of the rate-limiting step of the pathway, display increased steady-state levels of these intermediates without affecting their rate of synthesis. PMID:26977056

  14. Arabidopsis mutants in sphingolipid synthesis as tools to understand the structure and function of membrane microdomains in plasmodesmata

    PubMed Central

    González-Solís, Ariadna; Cano-Ramírez, Dora L.; Morales-Cedillo, Francisco; Tapia de Aquino, Cinthya; Gavilanes-Ruiz, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodesmata—intercellular channels that communicate adjacent cells—possess complex membranous structures. Recent evidences indicate that plasmodesmata contain membrane microdomains. In order to understand how these submembrane regions collaborate to plasmodesmata function, it is necessary to characterize their size, composition and dynamics. An approach that can shed light on these microdomain features is based on the use of Arabidopsis mutants in sphingolipid synthesis. Sphingolipids are canonical components of microdomains together with sterols and some glycerolipids. Moreover, sphingolipids are transducers in pathways that display programmed cell death as a defense mechanism against pathogens. The study of Arabidopsis mutants would allow determining which structural features of the sphingolipids are important for the formation and stability of microdomains, and if defense signaling networks using sphingoid bases as second messengers are associated to plasmodesmata operation. Such studies need to be complemented by analysis of the ultrastructure and the use of protein probes for plasmodesmata microdomains and may constitute a very valuable source of information to analyze these membrane structures. PMID:24478783

  15. Sphingolipids in the Root Play an Important Role in Regulating the Leaf Ionome in Arabidopsis thaliana[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Dai-Yin; Gable, Kenneth; Chen, Ming; Baxter, Ivan; Dietrich, Charles R.; Cahoon, Edgar B.; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Lahner, Brett; Lü, Shiyou; Markham, Jonathan E.; Morrissey, Joe; Han, Gongshe; Gupta, Sita D.; Harmon, Jeffrey M.; Jaworski, Jan G.; Dunn, Teresa M.; Salt, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipid synthesis is initiated by condensation of Ser with palmitoyl-CoA producing 3-ketodihydrosphinganine (3-KDS), which is reduced by a 3-KDS reductase to dihydrosphinganine. Ser palmitoyltransferase is essential for plant viability. Arabidopsis thaliana contains two genes (At3g06060/TSC10A and At5g19200/TSC10B) encoding proteins with significant similarity to the yeast 3-KDS reductase, Tsc10p. Heterologous expression in yeast of either Arabidopsis gene restored 3-KDS reductase activity to the yeast tsc10Δ mutant, confirming both as bona fide 3-KDS reductase genes. Consistent with sphingolipids having essential functions in plants, double mutant progeny lacking both genes were not recovered from crosses of single tsc10A and tsc10B mutants. Although the 3-KDS reductase genes are functionally redundant and ubiquitously expressed in Arabidopsis, 3-KDS reductase activity was reduced to 10% of wild-type levels in the loss-of-function tsc10a mutant, leading to an altered sphingolipid profile. This perturbation of sphingolipid biosynthesis in the Arabidopsis tsc10a mutant leads an altered leaf ionome, including increases in Na, K, and Rb and decreases in Mg, Ca, Fe, and Mo. Reciprocal grafting revealed that these changes in the leaf ionome are driven by the root and are associated with increases in root suberin and alterations in Fe homeostasis. PMID:21421810

  16. Enhanced apoptotic cancer cell killing after Foscan photodynamic therapy combined with fenretinide via de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Boppana, Nithin B; DeLor, Jeremy S; Van Buren, Eric; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Pierce, Jason S; Korbelik, Mladen; Separovic, Duska

    2016-06-01

    We and others have shown that stresses, including photodynamic therapy (PDT), can disrupt the de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway, leading to changes in the levels of sphingolipids, and subsequently, modulation of cell death. The de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway includes a ceramide synthase-dependent reaction, giving rise to dihydroceramide, which is then converted in a desaturase-dependent reaction to ceramide. In this study we tested the hypothesis that combining Foscan-mediated PDT with desaturase inhibitor fenretinide (HPR) enhances cancer cell killing. We discovered that by subjecting SCC19 cells, a human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line, to PDT+HPR resulted in enhanced accumulation of C16-dihydroceramide, not ceramide. Concomitantly, mitochondrial depolarization was enhanced by the combined treatment. Enhanced activation of caspase-3 after PDT+HPR was inhibited by FB. Enhanced clonogenic cell death after the combination was sensitive to FB, as well as Bcl2- and caspase inhibitors. Treatment of mouse SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma tumors with PDT+HPR resulted in improved long-term tumor cures. Overall, our data showed that combining PDT with HPR enhanced apoptotic cancer cell killing and antitumor efficacy of PDT. The data suggest the involvement of the de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway in enhanced apoptotic cell killing after PDT+HPR, and identify the combination as a novel more effective anticancer treatment than either treatment alone. PMID:27085050

  17. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Erika; Harmat, Veronika; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G.; Módos, Károly; Kardos, József; Liliom, Károly

    2010-01-01

    Lipid-protein interactions are rarely characterized at a structural molecular level due to technical difficulties; however, the biological significance of understanding the mechanism of these interactions is outstanding. In this report, we provide mechanistic insight into the inhibitory complex formation of the lipid mediator sphingosylphosphorylcholine with calmodulin, the most central and ubiquitous regulator protein in calcium signaling. We applied crystallographic, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic approaches using purified bovine calmodulin and bovine cerebral microsomal fraction to arrive at our conclusions. Here we present 1) a 1.6-Å resolution crystal structure of their complex, in which the sphingolipid occupies the conventional hydrophobic binding site on calmodulin; 2) a peculiar stoichiometry-dependent binding process: at low or high protein-to-lipid ratio calmodulin binds lipid micelles or a few lipid molecules in a compact globular conformation, respectively, and 3) evidence that the sphingolipid displaces calmodulin from its targets on cerebral microsomes. We have ascertained the specificity of the interaction using structurally related lipids as controls. Our observations reveal the structural basis of selective calmodulin inhibition by the sphingolipid. On the basis of the crystallographic and biophysical characterization of the calmodulin–sphingosylphosphorylcholine interaction, we propose a novel lipid-protein binding model, which might be applicable to other interactions as well.—Kovacs, E., Harmat, V., Tóth, J., Vértessy, B. G., Módos, K., Kardos, J., Liliom, K. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions. PMID:20522785

  18. Functional characterization of a higher plant sphingolipid Delta4-desaturase: defining the role of sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, Louise V; Zäuner, Simone; Markham, Jonathan E; Haslam, Richard P; Desikan, Radhika; Mugford, Sarah; Albrecht, Sandra; Warnecke, Dirk; Sperling, Petra; Heinz, E; Napier, Johnathan A

    2009-01-01

    The role of Delta4-unsaturated sphingolipid long-chain bases such as sphingosine was investigated in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Identification and functional characterization of the sole Arabidopsis ortholog of the sphingolipid Delta4-desaturase was achieved by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. A P. pastoris mutant disrupted in the endogenous sphingolipid Delta4-desaturase gene was unable to synthesize glucosylceramides. Synthesis of glucosylceramides was restored by the expression of Arabidopsis gene At4g04930, and these sphingolipids were shown to contain Delta4-unsaturated long-chain bases, confirming that this open reading frame encodes the sphingolipid Delta4-desaturase. At4g04930 has a very restricted expression pattern, transcripts only being detected in pollen and floral tissues. Arabidopsis insertion mutants disrupted in the sphingolipid Delta4-desaturase At4g04930 were isolated and found to be phenotypically normal. Sphingolipidomic profiling of a T-DNA insertion mutant indicated the absence of Delta4-unsaturated sphingolipids in floral tissue, also resulting in the reduced accumulation of glucosylceramides. No difference in the response to drought or water loss was observed between wild-type plants and insertion mutants disrupted in the sphingolipid Delta4-desaturase At4g04930, nor was any difference observed in stomatal closure after treatment with abscisic acid. No differences in pollen viability between wild-type plants and insertion mutants were detected. Based on these observations, it seems unlikely that Delta4-unsaturated sphingolipids and their metabolites such as sphingosine-1-phosphate play a significant role in Arabidopsis growth and development. However, Delta4-unsaturated ceramides may play a previously unrecognized role in the channeling of substrates for the synthesis of glucosylceramides. PMID:18978071

  19. Functional Characterization of a Higher Plant Sphingolipid Δ4-Desaturase: Defining the Role of Sphingosine and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, Louise V.; Zäuner, Simone; Markham, Jonathan E.; Haslam, Richard P.; Desikan, Radhika; Mugford, Sarah; Albrecht, Sandra; Warnecke, Dirk; Sperling, Petra; Heinz, E.; Napier, Johnathan A.

    2009-01-01

    The role of Δ4-unsaturated sphingolipid long-chain bases such as sphingosine was investigated in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Identification and functional characterization of the sole Arabidopsis ortholog of the sphingolipid Δ4-desaturase was achieved by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. A P. pastoris mutant disrupted in the endogenous sphingolipid Δ4-desaturase gene was unable to synthesize glucosylceramides. Synthesis of glucosylceramides was restored by the expression of Arabidopsis gene At4g04930, and these sphingolipids were shown to contain Δ4-unsaturated long-chain bases, confirming that this open reading frame encodes the sphingolipid Δ4-desaturase. At4g04930 has a very restricted expression pattern, transcripts only being detected in pollen and floral tissues. Arabidopsis insertion mutants disrupted in the sphingolipid Δ4-desaturase At4g04930 were isolated and found to be phenotypically normal. Sphingolipidomic profiling of a T-DNA insertion mutant indicated the absence of Δ4-unsaturated sphingolipids in floral tissue, also resulting in the reduced accumulation of glucosylceramides. No difference in the response to drought or water loss was observed between wild-type plants and insertion mutants disrupted in the sphingolipid Δ4-desaturase At4g04930, nor was any difference observed in stomatal closure after treatment with abscisic acid. No differences in pollen viability between wild-type plants and insertion mutants were detected. Based on these observations, it seems unlikely that Δ4-unsaturated sphingolipids and their metabolites such as sphingosine-1-phosphate play a significant role in Arabidopsis growth and development. However, Δ4-unsaturated ceramides may play a previously unrecognized role in the channeling of substrates for the synthesis of glucosylceramides. PMID:18978071

  20. Sphingolipids and cancer: ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate in the regulation of cell death and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ponnusamy, Suriyan; Meyers-Needham, Marisa; Senkal, Can E; Saddoughi, Sahar A; Sentelle, David; Selvam, Shanmugam Panneer; Salas, Arelis; Ogretmen, Besim

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids have emerged as bioeffector molecules, controlling various aspects of cell growth and proliferation in cancer, which is becoming the deadliest disease in the world. These lipid molecules have also been implicated in the mechanism of action of cancer chemotherapeutics. Ceramide, the central molecule of sphingolipid metabolism, generally mediates antiproliferative responses, such as cell growth inhibition, apoptosis induction, senescence modulation, endoplasmic reticulum stress responses and/or autophagy. Interestingly, recent studies suggest de novo-generated ceramides may have distinct and opposing roles in the promotion/suppression of tumors, and that these activities are based on their fatty acid chain lengths, subcellular localization and/or direct downstream targets. For example, in head and neck cancer cells, ceramide synthase 6/C16-ceramide addiction was revealed, and this was associated with increased tumor growth, whereas downregulation of its synthesis resulted in ER stress-induced apoptosis. By contrast, ceramide synthase 1-generated C18-ceramide has been shown to suppress tumor growth in various cancer models, both in situ and in vivo. In addition, ceramide metabolism to generate sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) by sphingosine kinases 1 and 2 mediates, with or without the involvement of G-protein-coupled S1P receptor signaling, prosurvival, angiogenesis, metastasis and/or resistance to drug-induced apoptosis. Importantly, recent findings regarding the mechanisms by which sphingolipid metabolism and signaling regulate tumor growth and progression, such as identifying direct intracellular protein targets of sphingolipids, have been key for the development of new chemotherapeutic strategies. Thus, in this article, we will present conclusions of recent studies that describe opposing roles of de novo-generated ceramides by ceramide synthases and/or S1P in the regulation of cancer pathogenesis, as well as the development of sphingolipid-based cancer

  1. Regulation of Sphingolipid Biosynthesis by the Morphogenesis Checkpoint Kinase Swe1*

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Neha; Han, Gongshe; Somashekarappa, Niranjanakumari; Gable, Kenneth; Dunn, Teresa; Kohlwein, Sepp D.

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipid (SL) biosynthesis is negatively regulated by the highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-localized Orm family proteins. Defective SL synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to increased phosphorylation and inhibition of Orm proteins by the kinase Ypk1. Here we present evidence that the yeast morphogenesis checkpoint kinase, Swe1, regulates SL biosynthesis independent of the Ypk1 pathway. Deletion of the Swe1 kinase renders mutant cells sensitive to serine palmitoyltransferase inhibition due to impaired sphingoid long-chain base synthesis. Based on these data and previous results, we suggest that Swe1 kinase perceives alterations in SL homeostasis, activates SL synthesis, and may thus represent the missing regulatory link that controls the SL rheostat during the cell cycle. PMID:26634277

  2. Altered levels of α-synuclein and sphingolipids in Batten disease lymphoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sunyang; Heo, Tae-Hwe; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2014-04-15

    Batten disease (juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by blindness, seizures, cognitive decline, and early death due to the inherited mutation of the CLN3 gene. Although α-synuclein and sphingolipids are relevant for the pathogenesis of some neuronal disorders, little attention has been paid to their role in Batten disease. To identify the molecular factors linked to autophagy and apoptotic cell death in Batten disease, the levels of α-synuclein, sphingomyelin, and gangliosides were examined. We observed enhanced levels of α-synuclein oligomers and gangliosides GM1, GM2, and GM3 and reduced levels of sphingomyelin and autophagy in Batten disease lymphoblast cells compared with normal lymphoblast cells, possibly resulting in a higher rate of apoptosis typically found in Batten disease lymphoblast cells. PMID:24534465

  3. Sphingolipids and Epoxidized Lipid Metabolites in the Control of Gut Immunosurveillance and Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Kunisawa, Jun; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal immune system ingeniously balances the distinct responses of elimination and tolerance of non-self-substances for the creation and maintenance of homeostatic environments. Accumulating evidence has recently shown that various lipids, including dietary one, are involved in the regulation of intestinal immunity and are associated with biophylaxis and immune disorders. Recent advances in the lipidomics allow the identification of novel pathways of lipid metabolism and lipid metabolites for the control of intestinal immunity. In this paper, we describe the effects and functions of lipids, especially sphingolipids and new lipid metabolites originated from dietary oil on the immunomodulation and on the development and pathogenesis of allergic diseases in the intestine. PMID:26858949

  4. Sphingolipids and Epoxidized Lipid Metabolites in the Control of Gut Immunosurveillance and Allergy.

    PubMed

    Kunisawa, Jun; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal immune system ingeniously balances the distinct responses of elimination and tolerance of non-self-substances for the creation and maintenance of homeostatic environments. Accumulating evidence has recently shown that various lipids, including dietary one, are involved in the regulation of intestinal immunity and are associated with biophylaxis and immune disorders. Recent advances in the lipidomics allow the identification of novel pathways of lipid metabolism and lipid metabolites for the control of intestinal immunity. In this paper, we describe the effects and functions of lipids, especially sphingolipids and new lipid metabolites originated from dietary oil on the immunomodulation and on the development and pathogenesis of allergic diseases in the intestine. PMID:26858949

  5. Nitric oxide-sphingolipid interplays in plant signalling: a new enigma from the Sphinx?

    PubMed

    Guillas, Isabelle; Puyaubert, Juliette; Baudouin, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) emerged as one of the major signaling molecules operating during plant development and plant responses to its environment. Beyond the identification of the direct molecular targets of NO, a series of studies considered its interplay with other actors of signal transduction and the integration of NO into complex signaling networks. Beside the close relationships between NO and calcium or phosphatidic acid signaling pathways that are now well-established, recent reports paved the way for interplays between NO and sphingolipids (SLs). This mini-review summarizes our current knowledge of the influence NO and SLs might exert on each other in plant physiology. Based on comparisons with examples from the animal field, it further indicates that, although SL-NO interplays are common features in signaling networks of eukaryotic cells, the underlying mechanisms and molecular targets significantly differ. PMID:24062754

  6. Regulation of Sphingolipid Biosynthesis by the Morphogenesis Checkpoint Kinase Swe1.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Neha; Han, Gongshe; Somashekarappa, Niranjanakumari; Gable, Kenneth; Dunn, Teresa; Kohlwein, Sepp D

    2016-01-29

    Sphingolipid (SL) biosynthesis is negatively regulated by the highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-localized Orm family proteins. Defective SL synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to increased phosphorylation and inhibition of Orm proteins by the kinase Ypk1. Here we present evidence that the yeast morphogenesis checkpoint kinase, Swe1, regulates SL biosynthesis independent of the Ypk1 pathway. Deletion of the Swe1 kinase renders mutant cells sensitive to serine palmitoyltransferase inhibition due to impaired sphingoid long-chain base synthesis. Based on these data and previous results, we suggest that Swe1 kinase perceives alterations in SL homeostasis, activates SL synthesis, and may thus represent the missing regulatory link that controls the SL rheostat during the cell cycle. PMID:26634277

  7. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase in development and disease: Sphingolipid metabolism takes flight

    PubMed Central

    Fyrst, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SPL) is a highly conserved enzyme that catalyses the final step of sphingolipid degradation, namely the irreversible cleavage of the carbon chain at position 2-3 of a long chain base phosphate (LCBP), thereby yielding a long-chain aldehyde and phosphoethanolamine. LCBPs are potent signaling molecules involved in cell proliferation, survival, migration, cell-cell interactions and cell stress responses. Therefore, tight regulation of LCBP signaling is required for proper cell function, and perturbations of this system can lead to alterations in biological processes including development, reproduction and physiology. SPL is a key enzyme in regulating the intracellular and circulating levels of LCBPs and is, therefore, gaining attention as a putative target for pharmacological intervention. This review provides an overview of our current understanding of SPL structure and function, mechanisms involved in SPL regulation and the role of SPL in development and disease. PMID:18558101

  8. Rapid evaluation of 25 key sphingolipids and phosphosphingolipids in human plasma by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Basit, Abdul; Piomelli, Daniele; Armirotti, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    We report on a new, sensitive, and fast LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of 25 key sphingolipid components in human plasma, including phosphorylated sphinganine and sphingosine, in a single 9-min run. This method enables an effective and high-throughput coverage of the metabolic changes involving the sphingolipidome during physiological or pathological states. The method is based on liquid-liquid extraction followed by reversed-phase LC-MS/MS. Exogenous odd-chain lipids are used as cost-effective but reliable internal standards. The method was fully validated in surrogate matrix and naive human plasma following FDA guidelines. Sample stability and dilution integrity were also tested and verified. PMID:25749796

  9. A Functionalized Sphingolipid Analogue for Studying Redistribution during Activation in Living T Cells.

    PubMed

    Collenburg, Lena; Walter, Tim; Burgert, Anne; Müller, Nora; Seibel, Jürgen; Japtok, Lukasz; Kleuser, Burkhard; Sauer, Markus; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle

    2016-05-01

    Sphingolipids are major components of the plasma membrane. In particular, ceramide serves as an essential building hub for complex sphingolipids, but also as an organizer of membrane domains segregating receptors and signalosomes. Sphingomyelin breakdown as a result of sphingomyelinase activation after ligation of a variety of receptors is the predominant source of ceramides released at the plasma membrane. This especially applies to T lymphocytes where formation of ceramide-enriched membrane microdomains modulates TCR signaling. Because ceramide release and redistribution occur very rapidly in response to receptor ligation, novel tools to further study these processes in living T cells are urgently needed. To meet this demand, we synthesized nontoxic, azido-functionalized ceramides allowing for bio-orthogonal click-reactions to fluorescently label incorporated ceramides, and thus investigate formation of ceramide-enriched domains. Azido-functionalized C6-ceramides were incorporated into and localized within plasma membrane microdomains and proximal vesicles in T cells. They segregated into clusters after TCR, and especially CD28 ligation, indicating efficient sorting into plasma membrane domains associated with T cell activation; this was abolished upon sphingomyelinase inhibition. Importantly, T cell activation was not abrogated upon incorporation of the compound, which was efficiently excluded from the immune synapse center as has previously been seen in Ab-based studies using fixed cells. Therefore, the functionalized ceramides are novel, highly potent tools to study the subcellular redistribution of ceramides in the course of T cell activation. Moreover, they will certainly also be generally applicable to studies addressing rapid stimulation-mediated ceramide release in living cells. PMID:27036914

  10. Neurochemical Metabolomics Reveals Disruption to Sphingolipid Metabolism Following Chronic Haloperidol Administration.

    PubMed

    McClay, Joseph L; Vunck, Sarah A; Batman, Angela M; Crowley, James J; Vann, Robert E; Beardsley, Patrick M; van den Oord, Edwin J

    2015-09-01

    Haloperidol is an effective antipsychotic drug for treatment of schizophrenia, but prolonged use can lead to debilitating side effects. To better understand the effects of long-term administration, we measured global metabolic changes in mouse brain following 3 mg/kg/day haloperidol for 28 days. These conditions lead to movement-related side effects in mice akin to those observed in patients after prolonged use. Brain tissue was collected following microwave tissue fixation to arrest metabolism and extracted metabolites were assessed using both liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (MS). Over 300 unique compounds were identified across MS platforms. Haloperidol was found to be present in all test samples and not in controls, indicating experimental validity. Twenty-one compounds differed significantly between test and control groups at the p < 0.05 level. Top compounds were robust to analytical method, also being identified via partial least squares discriminant analysis. Four compounds (sphinganine, N-acetylornithine, leucine and adenosine diphosphate) survived correction for multiple testing in a non-parametric analysis using false discovery rate threshold < 0.1. Pathway analysis of nominally significant compounds (p < 0.05) revealed significant findings for sphingolipid metabolism (p = 0.015) and protein biosynthesis (p = 0.024). Altered sphingolipid metabolism is suggestive of disruptions to myelin. This interpretation is supported by our observation of elevated N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate in the haloperidol-treated mice (p = 0.004), a marker previously associated with demyelination. This study further demonstrates the utility of murine neurochemical metabolomics as a method to advance understanding of CNS drug effects. PMID:25850894

  11. A profile of sphingolipids and related compounds tentatively identified in yak milk.

    PubMed

    Qu, S; Barrett-Wilt, G; Fonseca, L M; Rankin, S A

    2016-07-01

    This work characterized a fraction of constituents in yak milk within the realm of approximately 1,000 to 3,000 Da using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Eleven samples of yak milk powder from the Sichuan province of China were received by the Department of Food Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and stored at room temperature until analysis. Sample preparation involved delipidation and deproteinization of yak milk samples and cold ethanol precipitation. Subsequently, MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry was performed in positive ion, reflector mode (AB Sciex TOF/TOF 4800 MALDI; AB Sciex, Foster City, CA). The instrument was first calibrated with the manufacturer's 6-peptide mixture, and each spectrum was internally calibrated using the accurate mass of ACTH Fragment 18-39 standard peptide (protonated mass at m/z 2464.199) present in each sample. Laser power was adjusted for the calibration standards and for each sample so that the signal obtained for the most-abundant ion in each spectrum could be maximized, or kept below ~2×10(4) to preserve spectral quality. Structure and name based on mass were matched using the Metlin metabolite database (https://metlin.scripps.edu/index.php). Results of the current work for yak milk powder showed a large variety of sphingolipid structures with clusters around 1,200, 1,600, and 2,000 Da. The profiling matched several glycosphingolipids, such as gangliosides GA1, GD1a, GD1b, GD3, GM1, GM2, GM3, and GT2 and several other unique moieties, including deaminated neuraminic acid (KDN) oligosaccharides, and fucose containing gangliosides. Matrix preparation and MALDI time-of-flight parameters were important factors established in this work to allow high resolution profiling of complex sphingolipids in yak powder milk. PMID:27085416

  12. Levels of Blood Organophosphorus Flame Retardants and Association with Changes in Human Sphingolipid Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fanrong; Wan, Yi; Zhao, Haoqi; Hu, Wenxin; Mu, Di; Webster, Thomas F; Hu, Jianying

    2016-08-16

    While a recent toxicological study has shown that organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) may disrupt sphingolipid homeostasis, epidemiologic evidence is currently lacking. In this study, a total of 257 participants were recruited from Shenzhen, China. Eleven OPFRs were for the first time simultaneously determined in the human blood samples by ultraperformance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Six OPFRs, tributyl phosphate (TNBP), 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP), tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP), triethyl phosphate (TEP), and TPHP, were detectable in at least 90% of participants, with median concentrations of 37.8, 1.22, 0.71, 0.54, 0.49, and 0.43 ng/mL, respectively. Sphingomyelin (SM) levels in the highest quartile of EHDPP, TPHP, TNBP, TBOEP, TEP, and TCIPP were 45.3% [95% confidence interval; 38.1%, 53.0%], 51.9% (45.5%, 58.6%), 153.6% (145.1%, 162.3%), 20.6% (14.5%, 27.0%), 59.0% (52.1%, 66.2%), and 62.8% (55.2%, 70.6%) higher than those in the lowest quartile, respectively, after adjusting for covariates. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) levels in the highest quartile of EHDPP, TPHP, and TNBP were 36% (-39%, -33%), 16% (-19%, -14%), and 36% (-38%, -33%) lower than those in the lowest quartile, respectively. A similar pattern emerged when exposures were modeled continuously. We for the first time found the associations between OPFRs and changes in human sphingolipid homeostasis. PMID:27434659

  13. Disruption of sphingolipid metabolism augments ceramide-induced autophagy in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Melland-Smith, Megan; Ermini, Leonardo; Chauvin, Sarah; Craig-Barnes, Hayley; Tagliaferro, Andrea; Todros, Tullia; Post, Martin; Caniggia, Isabella

    2015-04-01

    Bioactive sphingolipids including ceramides are involved in a variety of pathophysiological processes by regulating cell death and survival. The objective of the current study was to examine ceramide metabolism in preeclampsia, a serious disorder of pregnancy characterized by oxidative stress, and increased trophoblast cell death and autophagy. Maternal circulating and placental ceramide levels quantified by tandem mass spectrometry were elevated in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. Placental ceramides were elevated due to greater de novo synthesis via high serine palmitoyltransferase activity and reduced lysosomal breakdown via diminished ASAH1 expression caused by TGFB3-induced E2F4 transcriptional repression. SMPD1 activity was reduced; hence, sphingomyelin degradation by SMPD1 did not contribute to elevated ceramide levels in preeclampsia. Oxidative stress triggered similar changes in ceramide levels and acid hydrolase expression in villous explants and trophoblast cells. MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry localized the ceramide increases to the trophophoblast layers and syncytial knots of placentae from pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. ASAH1 inhibition or ceramide treatment induced autophagy in human trophoblast cells via a shift of the BOK-MCL1 rheostat toward prodeath BOK. Pharmacological inhibition of ASAH1 activity in pregnant mice resulted in increased placental ceramide content, abnormal placentation, reduced fetal growth, and increased autophagy via a similar shift in the BOK-MCL1 system. Our results reveal that oxidative stress-induced reduction of lysosomal hydrolase activities in combination with elevated de novo synthesis leads to ceramide overload, resulting in increased trophoblast cell autophagy, and typifies preeclampsia as a sphingolipid storage disorder. PMID:25853898

  14. Disruption of sphingolipid metabolism augments ceramide-induced autophagy in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Melland-Smith, Megan; Ermini, Leonardo; Chauvin, Sarah; Craig-Barnes, Hayley; Tagliaferro, Andrea; Todros, Tullia; Post, Martin; Caniggia, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive sphingolipids including ceramides are involved in a variety of pathophysiological processes by regulating cell death and survival. The objective of the current study was to examine ceramide metabolism in preeclampsia, a serious disorder of pregnancy characterized by oxidative stress, and increased trophoblast cell death and autophagy. Maternal circulating and placental ceramide levels quantified by tandem mass spectrometry were elevated in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. Placental ceramides were elevated due to greater de novo synthesis via high serine palmitoyltransferase activity and reduced lysosomal breakdown via diminished ASAH1 expression caused by TGFB3-induced E2F4 transcriptional repression. SMPD1 activity was reduced; hence, sphingomyelin degradation by SMPD1 did not contribute to elevated ceramide levels in preeclampsia. Oxidative stress triggered similar changes in ceramide levels and acid hydrolase expression in villous explants and trophoblast cells. MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry localized the ceramide increases to the trophophoblast layers and syncytial knots of placentae from pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. ASAH1 inhibition or ceramide treatment induced autophagy in human trophoblast cells via a shift of the BOK-MCL1 rheostat toward prodeath BOK. Pharmacological inhibition of ASAH1 activity in pregnant mice resulted in increased placental ceramide content, abnormal placentation, reduced fetal growth, and increased autophagy via a similar shift in the BOK-MCL1 system. Our results reveal that oxidative stress-induced reduction of lysosomal hydrolase activities in combination with elevated de novo synthesis leads to ceramide overload, resulting in increased trophoblast cell autophagy, and typifies preeclampsia as a sphingolipid storage disorder. PMID:25853898

  15. Initial steps of Shigella infection depend on the cholesterol/sphingolipid raft-mediated CD44-IpaB interaction.

    PubMed

    Lafont, Frank; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy; Hanada, Kentaro; Sansonetti, Philippe; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2002-09-01

    Shigellosis is an acute inflammatory bowel disease caused by the enteroinvasive bacterium SHIGELLA: Upon host cell-Shigella interaction, major host cell signalling responses are activated. Deciphering the initial molecular events is crucial to understanding the infectious process. We identified a molecular complex involving proteins of both the host, CD44 the hyaluronan receptor, and Shigella, the invasin IpaB, which partitions during infection within specialized membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, called rafts. We also document accumulation of cholesterol and raft-associated proteins at Shigella entry foci. Moreover, we report that Shigella entry is impaired after cholesterol depletion using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. Finally, we find that Shigella is less invasive in sphingosid-based lipid-deficient cell lines, demonstrating the involvement of sphingolipids. Our results show that rafts are implicated in Shigella binding and entry, suggesting that raft-associated molecular machineries are engaged in mediating the cell signalling response required for the invasion process. PMID:12198147

  16. Sng1 associates with Nce102 to regulate the yeast Pkh-Ypk signalling module in response to sphingolipid status.

    PubMed

    García-Marqués, Sara; Randez-Gil, Francisca; Dupont, Sebastien; Garre, Elena; Prieto, Jose A

    2016-06-01

    All cells are delimited by biological membranes, which are consequently a primary target of stress-induced damage. Cold alters membrane functionality by decreasing lipid fluidity and the activity of membrane proteins. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, evidence links sphingolipid homeostasis and membrane phospholipid asymmetry to the activity of the Ypk1/2 proteins, the yeast orthologous of the mammalian SGK1-3 kinases. Their regulation is mediated by different protein kinases, including the PDK1 orthologous Pkh1/2p, and requires the function of protein effectors, among them Nce102p, a component of the sphingolipid sensor machinery. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and the actors involved in Pkh/Ypk regulation remain poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that Sng1, a transmembrane protein, is an effector of the Pkh/Ypk module and identify the phospholipid asymmetry as key for yeast cold adaptation. Overexpression of SNG1 impairs phospholipid flipping, reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) and improves, in a Pkh-dependent manner, yeast growth in myriocin-treated cells, suggesting that excess Sng1p stimulates the Pkh/Ypk signalling. Furthermore, we link these effects to the association of Sng1p with Nce102p. Indeed, we found that Sng1p interacts with Nce102p both physically and genetically. Moreover, mutant nce102∆ sng1∆ cells show features of impaired Pkh/Ypk signalling, including increased ROS accumulation, reduced life span and defects in Pkh/Ypk-controlled regulatory pathways. Finally, myriocin-induced hyperphosphorylation of Ypk1p and Orm2p, which controls sphingolipid homeostasis, does not occur in nce102∆ sng1∆ cells. Hence, both Nce102p and Sng1p participate in a regulatory circuit that controls the activity of the Pkh/Ypk module and their function is required in response to sphingolipid status. PMID:27033517

  17. Substrate availability for long-chain base formation as a regulator of hepatic sphingolipid and cholesterol biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Messmer, T.O.; Merrill, A.H. Jr.

    1986-03-05

    The de novo biosynthesis of the sphinganine and sphingosine backbones of sphingolipids was studied with isolated rat hepatocytes and established liver cell lines. The rate of incorporation of radiolabel from (/sup 14/C)-serine by intact cells was half maximal at 0.3 mM, which is similar to the K/sub m/ of the initial enzyme of this pathway and in vivo concentrations of this substrate. Long-chain base biosynthesis was stimulated by another precursor, palmitic acid, but other fatty acids were inhibitory. Hepatocytes isolated from fed and fasted rats had different rates of sphingolipid formation, which may also reflect the relative levels of palmitoyl-CoA. These results established that the availability of the precursors of long-chain base formation, serine and palmitic acid, is a major factor in the regulation of this pathway. Since sphingomyelin biosynthesis could be modified, its relationship to cholesterol metabolism was also examined. Both hepatocytes and cultured liver cells in high serine (0.6mM) had increased incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-acetate into cholesterol (13%, P < 0.05 and 50%, P < 0.01, respectively). These results indicate that sphingolipid and cholesterol biosynthesis are coordinately regulated, perhaps because these lipids are located in similar membranes and lipoproteins.

  18. Alkaline Ceramidase 3 Deficiency Results in Purkinje Cell Degeneration and Cerebellar Ataxia Due to Dyshomeostasis of Sphingolipids in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Chet; Wang, Louis; Yi, Jae Kyo; Lin, Chih-Li; Sun, Wei; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.; Rhee, Soyoung; Li, Mingsong; Zhou, Jie; Ge, Shaoyu; Zhang, Guofeng; Snider, Ashley J.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.; Mao, Cungui

    2015-01-01

    Dyshomeostasis of both ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the brain has been implicated in aging-associated neurodegenerative disorders in humans. However, mechanisms that maintain the homeostasis of these bioactive sphingolipids in the brain remain unclear. Mouse alkaline ceramidase 3 (Acer3), which preferentially catalyzes the hydrolysis of C18:1-ceramide, a major unsaturated long-chain ceramide species in the brain, is upregulated with age in the mouse brain. Acer3 knockout causes an age-dependent accumulation of various ceramides and C18:1-monohexosylceramide and abolishes the age-related increase in the levels of sphingosine and S1P in the brain; thereby resulting in Purkinje cell degeneration in the cerebellum and deficits in motor coordination and balance. Our results indicate that Acer3 plays critically protective roles in controlling the homeostasis of various sphingolipids, including ceramides, sphingosine, S1P, and certain complex sphingolipids in the brain and protects Purkinje cells from premature degeneration. PMID:26474409

  19. Alkaline Ceramidase 3 Deficiency Results in Purkinje Cell Degeneration and Cerebellar Ataxia Due to Dyshomeostasis of Sphingolipids in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Xu, Ruijuan; Schrandt, Jennifer; Shah, Prithvi; Gong, Yong Z; Preston, Chet; Wang, Louis; Yi, Jae Kyo; Lin, Chih-Li; Sun, Wei; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; Rhee, Soyoung; Li, Mingsong; Zhou, Jie; Ge, Shaoyu; Zhang, Guofeng; Snider, Ashley J; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M; Mao, Cungui

    2015-10-01

    Dyshomeostasis of both ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the brain has been implicated in aging-associated neurodegenerative disorders in humans. However, mechanisms that maintain the homeostasis of these bioactive sphingolipids in the brain remain unclear. Mouse alkaline ceramidase 3 (Acer3), which preferentially catalyzes the hydrolysis of C18:1-ceramide, a major unsaturated long-chain ceramide species in the brain, is upregulated with age in the mouse brain. Acer3 knockout causes an age-dependent accumulation of various ceramides and C18:1-monohexosylceramide and abolishes the age-related increase in the levels of sphingosine and S1P in the brain; thereby resulting in Purkinje cell degeneration in the cerebellum and deficits in motor coordination and balance. Our results indicate that Acer3 plays critically protective roles in controlling the homeostasis of various sphingolipids, including ceramides, sphingosine, S1P, and certain complex sphingolipids in the brain and protects Purkinje cells from premature degeneration. PMID:26474409

  20. Loss of Frataxin induces iron toxicity, sphingolipid synthesis, and Pdk1/Mef2 activation, leading to neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuchuan; Lin, Guang; Haelterman, Nele A; Ho, Tammy Szu-Yu; Li, Tongchao; Li, Zhihong; Duraine, Lita; Graham, Brett H; Jaiswal, Manish; Yamamoto, Shinya; Rasband, Matthew N; Bellen, Hugo J

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Frataxin (FXN) cause Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA), a recessive neurodegenerative disorder. Previous studies have proposed that loss of FXN causes mitochondrial dysfunction, which triggers elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and leads to the demise of neurons. Here we describe a ROS independent mechanism that contributes to neurodegeneration in fly FXN mutants. We show that loss of frataxin homolog (fh) in Drosophila leads to iron toxicity, which in turn induces sphingolipid synthesis and ectopically activates 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase-1 (Pdk1) and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (Mef2). Dampening iron toxicity, inhibiting sphingolipid synthesis by Myriocin, or reducing Pdk1 or Mef2 levels, all effectively suppress neurodegeneration in fh mutants. Moreover, increasing dihydrosphingosine activates Mef2 activity through PDK1 in mammalian neuronal cell line suggesting that the mechanisms are evolutionarily conserved. Our results indicate that an iron/sphingolipid/Pdk1/Mef2 pathway may play a role in FRDA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16043.001 PMID:27343351

  1. Viral serine palmitoyltransferase induces metabolic switch in sphingolipid biosynthesis and is required for infection of a marine alga.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Carmit; Malitsky, Sergey; Othman, Alaa; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Wei, Yu; Zheng, Shuning; Aharoni, Asaph; Hornemann, Thorsten; Vardi, Assaf

    2016-03-29

    Marine viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the oceans shaping community structure and nutrient cycling. The interaction between the bloom-forming alga Emiliania huxleyi and its specific large dsDNA virus (EhV) is a major factor determining the fate of carbon in the ocean, thus serving as a key host-pathogen model system. The EhV genome encodes for a set of genes involved in the de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis, not reported in any viral genome to date. We combined detailed lipidomic and biochemical analyses to characterize the functional role of this virus-encoded pathway during lytic viral infection. We identified a major metabolic shift, mediated by differential substrate specificity of virus-encoded serine palmitoyltransferase, a key enzyme of sphingolipid biosynthesis. Consequently, unique viral glycosphingolipids, composed of unusual hydroxylated C17 sphingoid bases (t17:0) were highly enriched in the infected cells, and their synthesis was found to be essential for viral assembly. These findings uncover the biochemical bases of the virus-induced metabolic rewiring of the host sphingolipid biosynthesis during the chemical "arms race" in the ocean. PMID:26984500

  2. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Erika; Harmat, Veronika; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G; Módos, Károly; Kardos, József; Liliom, Károly

    2010-10-01

    Lipid-protein interactions are rarely characterized at a structural molecular level due to technical difficulties; however, the biological significance of understanding the mechanism of these interactions is outstanding. In this report, we provide mechanistic insight into the inhibitory complex formation of the lipid mediator sphingosylphosphorylcholine with calmodulin, the most central and ubiquitous regulator protein in calcium signaling. We applied crystallographic, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic approaches using purified bovine calmodulin and bovine cerebral microsomal fraction to arrive at our conclusions. Here we present 1) a 1.6-Å resolution crystal structure of their complex, in which the sphingolipid occupies the conventional hydrophobic binding site on calmodulin; 2) a peculiar stoichiometry-dependent binding process: at low or high protein-to-lipid ratio calmodulin binds lipid micelles or a few lipid molecules in a compact globular conformation, respectively, and 3) evidence that the sphingolipid displaces calmodulin from its targets on cerebral microsomes. We have ascertained the specificity of the interaction using structurally related lipids as controls. Our observations reveal the structural basis of selective calmodulin inhibition by the sphingolipid. On the basis of the crystallographic and biophysical characterization of the calmodulin-sphingosylphosphorylcholine interaction, we propose a novel lipid-protein binding model, which might be applicable to other interactions as well. PMID:20522785

  3. Chimeras of Delta6-fatty acid and Delta8-sphingolipid desaturases.

    PubMed

    Libisch, B; Michaelson, L V; Lewis, M J; Shewry, P R; Napier, J A

    2000-12-29

    The Borago officinalis Delta6 fatty acid desaturase (Boofd6) shares 58% identity in its amino acid sequence with Boofd8, a Delta8 sphingolipid desaturase from the same plant species. In order to localise the distinct catalytic properties of Boofd6 and Boofd8 to individual regions within them, a set of chimeras of these two enzymes were constructed and expressed in yeast. Chimera 2 is different from the other chimeras and Boofd6 in that it did not have any detectable desaturase activity on 18 carbon fatty acids. However, it desaturated C16 palmitoleic and C14 myristoleic acid, and the conversion rate for the later one was more than three times higher than that of Boofd6. These results suggest that the predicted membrane helices 1 and 2 of Boofd6 are involved in forming the substrate-binding site. This site appears to place constraints on the chain length of fatty acid substrates, which is similar to hydrophobic substrate binding pockets. PMID:11162428

  4. Lysosomotropic agents selectively target chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells due to altered sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dielschneider, R F; Eisenstat, H; Mi, S; Curtis, J M; Xiao, W; Johnston, J B; Gibson, S B

    2016-06-01

    Lysosome membrane permeabilization (LMP) mediates cell death in a variety of cancer cells. However, little is known about lysosomes and LMP in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Owing to drug resistance and toxicity in CLL patients, better treatment strategies are required. Our results show that CLL cells were sensitive to the lysosomotropic agent siramesine. Furthermore, this drug was more effective in CLL cells, regardless of prognostic factors, compared with normal B cells. Siramesine caused LMP, lipid peroxidation and transcription factor EB nuclear translocation followed by mitochondrial membrane potential loss and reactive oxygen species release. Siramesine-induced cell death was blocked by lipid antioxidants, but not by soluble antioxidants or protease inhibitors. To determine whether CLL cells had altered lysosomes, we investigated sphingolipid metabolism as the lysosome is a hub for lipid metabolism. We found that CLL cells had more lysosomes, increased sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase 1 (SPP1) expression, and increased levels of sphingosine compared with normal B cells. Raising sphingosine levels increased LMP and cell death in CLL cells, but not in normal B cells. Together, these results show that excess sphingosine in CLL cells could contribute to their sensitivity toward LMP. Thus, targeting the lysosome could be a novel therapeutic strategy in CLL. PMID:26859075

  5. Changes in membrane sphingolipid composition modulate dynamics and adhesion of integrin nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Eich, Christina; Manzo, Carlo; de Keijzer, Sandra; Bakker, Gert-Jan; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; García-Parajo, Maria F; Cambi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential constituents of the plasma membrane (PM) and play an important role in signal transduction by modulating clustering and dynamics of membrane receptors. Changes in lipid composition are therefore likely to influence receptor organisation and function, but how this precisely occurs is difficult to address given the intricacy of the PM lipid-network. Here, we combined biochemical assays and single molecule dynamic approaches to demonstrate that the local lipid environment regulates adhesion of integrin receptors by impacting on their lateral mobility. Induction of sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity reduced sphingomyelin (SM) levels by conversion to ceramide (Cer), resulting in impaired integrin adhesion and reduced integrin mobility. Dual-colour imaging of cortical actin in combination with single molecule tracking of integrins showed that this reduced mobility results from increased coupling to the actin cytoskeleton brought about by Cer formation. As such, our data emphasizes a critical role for the PM local lipid composition in regulating the lateral mobility of integrins and their ability to dynamically increase receptor density for efficient ligand binding in the process of cell adhesion. PMID:26869100

  6. Sphingolipids, Transcription Factors, and Conserved Toolkit Genes: Developmental Plasticity in the Ant Cardiocondyla obscurior

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Lukas; Simola, Daniel F.; Heinze, Jürgen; Oettler, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Developmental plasticity allows for the remarkable morphological specialization of individuals into castes in eusocial species of Hymenoptera. Developmental trajectories that lead to alternative caste fates are typically determined by specific environmental stimuli that induce larvae to express and maintain distinct gene expression patterns. Although most eusocial species express two castes, queens and workers, the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior expresses diphenic females and males; this provides a unique system with four discrete phenotypes to study the genomic basis of developmental plasticity in ants. We sequenced and analyzed the transcriptomes of 28 individual C. obscurior larvae of known developmental trajectory, providing the first in-depth analysis of gene expression in eusocial insect larvae. Clustering and transcription factor binding site analyses revealed that different transcription factors and functionally distinct sets of genes are recruited during larval development to induce the four alternative trajectories. In particular, we found complex patterns of gene regulation pertaining to sphingolipid metabolism, a conserved molecular pathway involved in development, obesity, and aging. PMID:25725431

  7. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase-2 perturbs brain sphingolipid balance and spatial memory in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tabatadze, Nino; Savonenko, Alena; Song, Hongjun; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Chu, Michael; Haughey, Norman J.

    2010-01-01

    The sphingolipid ceramide is a bioactive signaling lipid that is thought to play important roles in modulating synaptic activity, in part by regulating the function of excitatory postsynaptic receptors. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ceramide exerts its effects on synaptic activity remain largely unknown. We recently demonstrated that a rapid generation of ceramide by neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (nSMase2; also known as sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase-3) played a key role in modulating excitatory postsynaptic currents by controlling the insertion and clustering of NMDA receptors (Wheeler et al. 2009). We now demonstrate that nSMase2 plays a role in memory. Inhibition of nSMase2 impaired spatial and episodic-like memory in mice. At the molecular level, inhibition of nSMase2 decreased ceramide, increased PSD-95, increased the number of AMPA receptors and altered the subunit composition of NMDA receptors. Our study identifies nSMase2 as an important component for efficient memory formation and underscores the importance of ceramide in regulating synaptic events related to learning and memory. PMID:20629193

  8. Changes in membrane sphingolipid composition modulate dynamics and adhesion of integrin nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Eich, Christina; Manzo, Carlo; Keijzer, Sandra de; Bakker, Gert-Jan; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; García-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential constituents of the plasma membrane (PM) and play an important role in signal transduction by modulating clustering and dynamics of membrane receptors. Changes in lipid composition are therefore likely to influence receptor organisation and function, but how this precisely occurs is difficult to address given the intricacy of the PM lipid-network. Here, we combined biochemical assays and single molecule dynamic approaches to demonstrate that the local lipid environment regulates adhesion of integrin receptors by impacting on their lateral mobility. Induction of sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity reduced sphingomyelin (SM) levels by conversion to ceramide (Cer), resulting in impaired integrin adhesion and reduced integrin mobility. Dual-colour imaging of cortical actin in combination with single molecule tracking of integrins showed that this reduced mobility results from increased coupling to the actin cytoskeleton brought about by Cer formation. As such, our data emphasizes a critical role for the PM local lipid composition in regulating the lateral mobility of integrins and their ability to dynamically increase receptor density for efficient ligand binding in the process of cell adhesion. PMID:26869100

  9. Distribution of saposin proteins (sphingolipid activator proteins) in lysosomal storage and other diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, S; Yamamoto, Y; O'Brien, J S; Kishimoto, Y

    1990-01-01

    Saposins (A, B, C, and D) are small glycoproteins required for the hydrolysis of sphingolipids by specific lysosomal hydrolases. Concentrations of these saposins in brain, liver, and spleen from normal humans as well as patients with lysosomal storage disease were determined. A quantitative HPLC method was used for saposin A, C, and D and a stimulation assay was used for saposin B. In normal tissues, saposin D was the most abundant of the four saposins. Massive accumulations of saposins, especially saposin A (about 80-fold increase over normal), were found in brain of patients with Tay-Sachs disease or infantile Sandhoff disease. In spleen of adult patients with Gaucher disease, saposin A and D accumulations (60- and 17-fold, respectively, over normal) were higher than that of saposin C (about 16-fold over normal). Similar massive accumulations of saposins A and D were found in liver of patients with fucosidosis (about 70- and 20-fold, respectively, over normal). Saposin D was the primary saposin stored in the liver of a patient with Niemann-Pick disease (about 30-fold over normal). Moderate increases of saposins B and D were found in a patient with GM1 gangliosidosis. Normal or near normal levels of all saposins were found in patients with Krabbe disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, adrenoleukodystrophy, I-cell disease, mucopolysaccharidosis types 2 and 3B, or Jansky-Bielschowsky disease. The implications of the storage of saposins in these diseases are discussed. PMID:2110365

  10. A novel sphingolipid-TORC1 pathway critically promotes postembryonic development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huanhu; Shen, Huali; Sewell, Aileen K; Kniazeva, Marina; Han, Min

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of animal development in response to nutritional cues is an intensely studied problem related to disease and aging. While extensive studies indicated roles of the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) in sensing certain nutrients for controlling growth and metabolism, the roles of fatty acids and lipids in TOR-involved nutrient/food responses are obscure. Caenorhabditis elegans halts postembryonic growth and development shortly after hatching in response to monomethyl branched-chain fatty acid (mmBCFA) deficiency. Here, we report that an mmBCFA-derived sphingolipid, d17iso-glucosylceramide, is a critical metabolite in regulating growth and development. Further analysis indicated that this lipid function is mediated by TORC1 and antagonized by the NPRL-2/3 complex in the intestine. Strikingly, the essential lipid function is bypassed by activating TORC1 or inhibiting NPRL-2/3. Our findings uncover a novel lipid-TORC1 signaling pathway that coordinates nutrient and metabolic status with growth and development, advancing our understanding of the physiological roles of mmBCFAs, ceramides, and TOR. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00429.001 PMID:23705068

  11. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and denervation alter sphingolipids and up-regulate glucosylceramide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Alexandre; Croixmarie, Vincent; Priestman, David A.; Rosenbohm, Angela; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; D'Ambra, Eleonora; Huebecker, Mylene; Hussain, Ghulam; Boursier-Neyret, Claire; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Ludolph, Albert C.; Platt, Frances M.; Walther, Bernard; Spedding, Michael; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Gonzalez De Aguilar, Jose-Luis

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal adult-onset disease characterized by upper and lower motor neuron degeneration, muscle wasting and paralysis. Growing evidence suggests a link between changes in lipid metabolism and ALS. Here, we used UPLC/TOF-MS to survey the lipidome in SOD1(G86R) mice, a model of ALS. Significant changes in lipid expression were evident in spinal cord and skeletal muscle before overt neuropathology. In silico analysis also revealed appreciable changes in sphingolipids including ceramides and glucosylceramides (GlcCer). HPLC analysis showed increased amounts of GlcCer and downstream glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in SOD1(G86R) muscle compared with wild-type littermates. Glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), the enzyme responsible for GlcCer biosynthesis, was up-regulated in muscle of SOD1(G86R) mice and ALS patients, and in muscle of wild-type mice after surgically induced denervation. Conversely, inhibition of GCS in wild-type mice, following transient peripheral nerve injury, reversed the overexpression of genes in muscle involved in oxidative metabolism and delayed motor recovery. GCS inhibition in SOD1(G86R) mice also affected the expression of metabolic genes and induced a loss of muscle strength and morphological deterioration of the motor endplates. These findings suggest that GSLs may play a critical role in ALS muscle pathology and could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:26483191

  12. Identification of a New Class of Antifungals Targeting the Synthesis of Fungal Sphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Visesato; Rella, Antonella; Farnoud, Amir M.; Singh, Ashutosh; Munshi, Mansa; Bryan, Arielle; Naseem, Shamoon; Konopka, James B.; Ojima, Iwao; Bullesbach, Erika; Ashbaugh, Alan; Linke, Michael J.; Cushion, Melanie; Collins, Margaret; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Sallans, Larry; Desai, Pankaj B.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Kirkpatrick, William R.; Patterson, Thomas; Wong, Lai Hong; Sinha, Sunita; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Flaherty, Patrick; Pan, Xuewen; Cesar, Gabriele Vargas; de Melo Tavares, Patricia; Frases, Susana; Miranda, Kildare; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Luberto, Chiara; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent estimates suggest that >300 million people are afflicted by serious fungal infections worldwide. Current antifungal drugs are static and toxic and/or have a narrow spectrum of activity. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of new antifungal drugs. The fungal sphingolipid glucosylceramide (GlcCer) is critical in promoting virulence of a variety of human-pathogenic fungi. In this study, we screened a synthetic drug library for compounds that target the synthesis of fungal, but not mammalian, GlcCer and found two compounds [N′-(3-bromo-4-hydroxybenzylidene)-2-methylbenzohydrazide (BHBM) and its derivative, 3-bromo-N′-(3-bromo-4-hydroxybenzylidene) benzohydrazide (D0)] that were highly effective in vitro and in vivo against several pathogenic fungi. BHBM and D0 were well tolerated in animals and are highly synergistic or additive to current antifungals. BHBM and D0 significantly affected fungal cell morphology and resulted in the accumulation of intracellular vesicles. Deep-sequencing analysis of drug-resistant mutants revealed that four protein products, encoded by genes APL5, COS111, MKK1, and STE2, which are involved in vesicular transport and cell cycle progression, are targeted by BHBM. PMID:26106079

  13. Revisiting Plant Plasma Membrane Lipids in Tobacco: A Focus on Sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Cacas, Jean-Luc; Buré, Corinne; Grosjean, Kevin; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia; Lherminier, Jeannine; Rombouts, Yoann; Maes, Emmanuel; Bossard, Claire; Gronnier, Julien; Furt, Fabienne; Fouillen, Laetitia; Germain, Véronique; Bayer, Emmanuelle; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Robert, Franck; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Deleu, Magali; Lins, Laurence; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Mongrand, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The lipid composition of plasma membrane (PM) and the corresponding detergent-insoluble membrane (DIM) fraction were analyzed with a specific focus on highly polar sphingolipids, so-called glycosyl inositol phosphorylceramides (GIPCs). Using tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) 'Bright Yellow 2' cell suspension and leaves, evidence is provided that GIPCs represent up to 40 mol % of the PM lipids. Comparative analysis of DIMs with the PM showed an enrichment of 2-hydroxylated very-long-chain fatty acid-containing GIPCs and polyglycosylated GIPCs in the DIMs. Purified antibodies raised against these GIPCs were further used for immunogold-electron microscopy strategy, revealing the distribution of polyglycosylated GIPCs in domains of 35 ± 7 nm in the plane of the PM. Biophysical studies also showed strong interactions between GIPCs and sterols and suggested a role for very-long-chain fatty acids in the interdigitation between the two PM-composing monolayers. The ins and outs of lipid asymmetry, raft formation, and interdigitation in plant membrane biology are finally discussed. PMID:26518342

  14. 7-Ketocholesterol Incorporation into Sphingolipid/Cholesterol-enriched (Lipid Raft) Domains Is Impaired by Vitamin E

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Marie-Charlotte; Lemaire-Ewing, Stéphanie; Desrumaux, Catherine; Monier, Serge; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Athias, Anne; Néel, Dominique; Lagrost, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Cholesterol oxides, in particular 7-ketocholesterol, are proatherogenic compounds that induce cell death in the vascular wall when localized in lipid raft domains of the cell membrane. Deleterious effects of 7-ketocholesterol can be prevented by vitamin E, but the molecular mechanism involved is unclear. In this study, unlike γ-tocopherol, the α-tocopherol vitamin E form was found to prevent 7-ketocholesterol-mediated apoptosis of A7R5 smooth muscle cells. To be operative, α-tocopherol needed to be added to the cells before 7-ketocholesterol, and its anti-apoptotic effect was reduced and even suppressed when added together or after 7-ketocholesterol, respectively. Both pre- and co-treatment of the cells with α-tocopherol resulted in the redistribution of 7-ketocholesterol out of the sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched (lipid raft) domains. In turn, fewer amounts of α-tocopherol associated with lipid rafts on 7-ketocholesterol-pretreated cells compared with untreated cells, with no prevention of cell death in this case. In further support of the implication of lipid raft domains, the dephosphorylation/inactivation of Akt-PKB was involved in the 7-ketocholesterol-induced apoptosis. Akt-PKB dephosphorylation was prevented by α-tocopherol, but not γ-tocopherol pretreatment. PMID:19351882

  15. Imaging MALDI mass spectrometry of sphingolipids using an oscillating capillary nebulizer matrix application system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanfeng; Liu, Ying; Allegood, Jeremy; Wang, Elaine; Cachón-González, Begoña; Cox, Timothy M; Merrill, Alfred H; Sullards, M Cameron

    2010-01-01

    Matrix deposition is a critical step in tissue imaging by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). It greatly affects the quality of MALDI imaging, especially for the analytes (such as lipids) that may easily dissolve in the solvent used for the matrix application. This chapter describes the use of an oscillating capillary nebulizer (OCN) to spray small droplets of matrix aerosol onto the sample surface for improved matrix homogeneity, reduced crystal size, and controlled solvent effects. This protocol allows visualization of many different lipid species and, of particular interest, sphingolipids in tissue slices of Tay-Sachs/Sandhoff disease by imaging MALDI-MS. The structures of these lipids were identified by analysis of tissue extracts using electrospray ionization in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MS(3)). These results illustrate the usefulness of tissue imaging MALDI-MS with matrix deposition by OCN for the molecular analysis in normal physiology and pathology. In addition, the observation of numerous lipid subclasses with distinct localizations in the brain slices demonstrates that imaging MALDI-MS could be effectively used for "lipidomic" studies. PMID:20680588

  16. Amino acid determinants of substrate selectivity in the Trypanosoma brucei sphingolipid synthase family.

    PubMed

    Goren, Michael A; Fox, Brian G; Bangs, James D

    2011-10-18

    The substrate selectivity of four Trypanosoma brucei sphingolipid synthases was examined. TbSLS1, an inositol phosphorylceramide (IPC) synthase, and TbSLS4, a bifunctional sphingomyelin (SM)/ethanolamine phosphorylceramide (EPC) synthase, were inactivated by Ala substitutions of a conserved triad of residues His210, His253, and Asp257 thought to form part of the active site. TbSLS4 also catalyzed the reverse reaction, production of ceramide from sphingomyelin, but none of the Ala substitutions of the catalytic triad in TbSLS4 were able to do so. Site-directed mutagenesis identified residues proximal to the conserved triad that were responsible for the discrimination between charge and size of the different head groups. For discrimination between anionic (phosphoinositol) and zwitterionic (phosphocholine, phosphoethanolamine) head groups, doubly mutated V172D/S252F TbSLS1 and D172V/F252S TbSLS3 showed reciprocal conversion between IPC and bifunctional SM/EPC synthases. For differentiation of zwitterionic headgroup size, N170A TbSLS1 and A170N/N187D TbSLS4 showed reciprocal conversion between EPC and bifunctional SM/EPC synthases. These studies provide a mapping of the SLS active site and demonstrate that differences in catalytic specificity of the T. brucei enzyme family are controlled by natural variations in as few as three residue positions. PMID:21899277

  17. A minimalist approach to MALDI imaging of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids in rat brain sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hay-Yan J.; Post, Shelley N. Jackson Jeremy; Woods, Amina S.

    2008-12-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a powerful tool that has allowed researchers to directly probe tissue molecular structure and drug content with minimal manipulations, while maintaining anatomical integrity. In the present work glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids images were acquired from 16-[mu]m thick coronal rat brain sections using MALDI-MS. Images of phosphatidylinositol 38:4 (PI 38:4), sulfatide 24:1 (ST 24:1), and hydroxyl sulfatide 24:1 (ST 24:1 (OH)) were acquired in negative ion mode, while the images of phosphatidylcholine 34:1 (PC 34:1), potassiated phosphatidylcholines 32:0 (PC 32:0 + K+) and 36:1 (PC 36:1 + K+) were acquired in positive ion mode. The images of PI 38:4 and PC 36:1 + K+ show the preferential distribution of these two lipids in gray matter; and the images of two sulfatides and PC 32:0 + K+ show their preferential distribution in white matter. In addition, the gray cortical band and its adjacent anatomical structures were also identified by contrasting their lipid makeup. The resulting images were compared to lipid images acquired by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The suitability of TLC sprayers, Collison Nebulizer, and artistic airbrush were also evaluated as means for matrix deposition.

  18. The yeast PH domain proteins Slm1 and Slm2 are targets of sphingolipid signaling during the response to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Daquinag, Alexes; Fadri, Maria; Jung, Sung Yun; Qin, Jun; Kunz, Jeannette

    2007-01-01

    The PH domain-containing proteins Slm1 and Slm2 were previously identified as effectors of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI4,5P(2)) and TORC2 signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that Slm1 and Slm2 are also targets of sphingolipid signaling during the heat shock response. We show that upon depletion of cellular sphingolipid levels, Slm1 function becomes essential for survival under heat stress. We further demonstrate that Slm proteins are regulated by a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle involving the sphingolipid-activated protein kinases Pkh1 and Pkh2 and the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin. By using a combination of mass spectrometry and mutational analysis, we identified serine residue 659 in Slm1 as a site of phosphorylation. Characterization of Slm1 mutants that mimic dephosphorylated and phosphorylated states demonstrated that phosphorylation at serine 659 is vital for survival under heat stress and promotes the proper polarization of the actin cytoskeleton. Finally, we present evidence that Slm proteins are also required for the trafficking of the raft-associated arginine permease Can1 to the plasma membrane, a process that requires sphingolipid synthesis and actin polymerization. Together with previous work, our findings suggest that Slm proteins are subject to regulation by multiple signals, including PI4,5P(2), TORC2, and sphingolipids, and may thus integrate inputs from different signaling pathways to temporally and spatially control actin polarization. PMID:17101780

  19. Methods of staining and visualization of sphingolipid enriched and non-enriched plasma membrane regions of Arabidopsis thaliana with fluorescent dyes and lipid analogues

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sterols and Sphingolipids form lipid clusters in the plasma membranes of cell types throughout the animal and plant kingdoms. These lipid domains provide a medium for protein signaling complexes at the plasma membrane and are also observed to be principal regions of membrane contact at the inception of infection. We visualized different specific fluorescent lipophilic stains of the both sphingolipid enriched and non-sphingolipid enriched regions in the plasma membranes of live protoplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Lipid staining protocols for several fluorescent lipid analogues in plants are presented. The most emphasis was placed on successful protocols for the single and dual staining of sphingolipid enriched regions and exclusion of sphingolipid enriched regions on the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts. A secondary focus was placed to ensure that these staining protocols presented still maintain cell viability. Furthermore, the protocols were successfully tested with the spectrally sensitive dye Laurdan. Conclusion Almost all existing staining procedures of the plasma membrane with fluorescent lipid analogues are specified for animal cells and tissues. In order to develop lipid staining protocols for plants, procedures were established with critical steps for the plasma membrane staining of Arabidopsis leaf tissue and protoplasts. The success of the plasma membrane staining protocols was additionally verified by measurements of lipid dynamics by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique and by the observation of new phenomena such as time dependent lipid polarization events in living protoplasts, for which a putative physiological relevance is suggested. PMID:22867517

  20. Screening of fungal species for fumonisin production and fumonisin-like disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Norred, W P; Bacon, C W; Riley, R T; Voss, K A; Meredith, F I

    1999-01-01

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by several species of Fusaria. They are found on corn and in corn-based products, can cause fatal illnesses in some animals and are suspected human esophageal carcinogens. Fumonisins are believed to cause toxicity by blocking ceramide synthase, a key enzyme in sphingolipid biochemistry which converts sphinganine (or sphingosine) and fatty acyl CoA to ceramide. Relatively few fungal species have been evaluated for their ability to produce fumonisins. Fewer have been studied to determine if they produce ceramide synthase inhibitors, whether fumonisin-like structures or not, therefore potentially having toxicity similar to fumonisins. We analyzed corn cultures of 49 isolates representing 32 diverse species of fungi for their ability to produce fumonisins. We also evaluated the culture extracts for ceramide synthase activity. Only cultures prepared with species reported previously to produce fumonisins--Fusarium moniliforme and F. proliferatum--tested positive for fumonisins. Extracts of these cultures inhibited ceramide synthase, as expected. None of the other fungal isolates we examined produced fumonisins or other compounds capable of inhibiting ceramide synthase. Although the fungi we selected for these studies represent only a few of the thousands of species that exist, they share the commonality that they are frequently associated with cereal grasses, including corn, either as pathogens or as asymptomatic endophytes. Thus, these results should be encouraging to those attempting to find ways to genetically manipulate fumonisin-producing fungi, to make corn more resistant, or to develop biocontrol measures because it appears that only a relatively few fungal contaminants of corn can produce fumonisins. PMID:10822508

  1. Modifications of Sphingolipid Content Affect Tolerance to Hemibiotrophic and Necrotrophic Pathogens by Modulating Plant Defense Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Magnin-Robert, Maryline; Le Bourse, Doriane; Markham, Jonathan; Dorey, Stéphan; Clément, Christophe; Baillieul, Fabienne; Dhondt-Cordelier, Sandrine

    2015-11-01

    Sphingolipids are emerging as second messengers in programmed cell death and plant defense mechanisms. However, their role in plant defense is far from being understood, especially against necrotrophic pathogens. Sphingolipidomics and plant defense responses during pathogenic infection were evaluated in the mutant of long-chain base phosphate (LCB-P) lyase, encoded by the dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate lyase1 (AtDPL1) gene and regulating long-chain base/LCB-P homeostasis. Atdpl1 mutants exhibit tolerance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea but susceptibility to the hemibiotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst). Here, a direct comparison of sphingolipid profiles in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) during infection with pathogens differing in lifestyles is described. In contrast to long-chain bases (dihydrosphingosine [d18:0] and 4,8-sphingadienine [d18:2]), hydroxyceramide and LCB-P (phytosphingosine-1-phosphate [t18:0-P] and 4-hydroxy-8-sphingenine-1-phosphate [t18:1-P]) levels are higher in Atdpl1-1 than in wild-type plants in response to B. cinerea. Following Pst infection, t18:0-P accumulates more strongly in Atdpl1-1 than in wild-type plants. Moreover, d18:0 and t18:0-P appear as key players in Pst- and B. cinerea-induced cell death and reactive oxygen species accumulation. Salicylic acid levels are similar in both types of plants, independent of the pathogen. In addition, salicylic acid-dependent gene expression is similar in both types of B. cinerea-infected plants but is repressed in Atdpl1-1 after treatment with Pst. Infection with both pathogens triggers higher jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-isoleucine accumulation, and jasmonic acid-dependent gene expression in Atdpl1-1 mutants. Our results demonstrate that sphingolipids play an important role in plant defense, especially toward necrotrophic pathogens, and highlight a novel connection between the jasmonate signaling pathway, cell death, and sphingolipids. PMID:26378098

  2. Modifications of Sphingolipid Content Affect Tolerance to Hemibiotrophic and Necrotrophic Pathogens by Modulating Plant Defense Responses in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Magnin-Robert, Maryline; Le Bourse, Doriane; Markham, Jonathan; Dorey, Stéphan; Clément, Christophe; Baillieul, Fabienne; Dhondt-Cordelier, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are emerging as second messengers in programmed cell death and plant defense mechanisms. However, their role in plant defense is far from being understood, especially against necrotrophic pathogens. Sphingolipidomics and plant defense responses during pathogenic infection were evaluated in the mutant of long-chain base phosphate (LCB-P) lyase, encoded by the dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate lyase1 (AtDPL1) gene and regulating long-chain base/LCB-P homeostasis. Atdpl1 mutants exhibit tolerance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea but susceptibility to the hemibiotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst). Here, a direct comparison of sphingolipid profiles in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) during infection with pathogens differing in lifestyles is described. In contrast to long-chain bases (dihydrosphingosine [d18:0] and 4,8-sphingadienine [d18:2]), hydroxyceramide and LCB-P (phytosphingosine-1-phosphate [t18:0-P] and 4-hydroxy-8-sphingenine-1-phosphate [t18:1-P]) levels are higher in Atdpl1-1 than in wild-type plants in response to B. cinerea. Following Pst infection, t18:0-P accumulates more strongly in Atdpl1-1 than in wild-type plants. Moreover, d18:0 and t18:0-P appear as key players in Pst- and B. cinerea-induced cell death and reactive oxygen species accumulation. Salicylic acid levels are similar in both types of plants, independent of the pathogen. In addition, salicylic acid-dependent gene expression is similar in both types of B. cinerea-infected plants but is repressed in Atdpl1-1 after treatment with Pst. Infection with both pathogens triggers higher jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-isoleucine accumulation, and jasmonic acid-dependent gene expression in Atdpl1-1 mutants. Our results demonstrate that sphingolipids play an important role in plant defense, especially toward necrotrophic pathogens, and highlight a novel connection between the jasmonate signaling pathway, cell death, and sphingolipids. PMID:26378098

  3. Fumonisin B1 (FB1) Induces Lamellar Separation and Alters Sphingolipid Metabolism of In Vitro Cultured Hoof Explants

    PubMed Central

    Reisinger, Nicole; Dohnal, Ilse; Nagl, Veronika; Schaumberger, Simone; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important hoof diseases is laminitis. Yet, the pathology of laminitis is not fully understood. Different bacterial toxins, e.g. endotoxins or exotoxins, seem to play an important role. Additionally, ingestion of mycotoxins, toxic secondary metabolites of fungi, might contribute to the onset of laminitis. In this respect, fumonsins are of special interest since horses are regarded as species most susceptible to this group of mycotoxins. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of fumonisin B1 (FB1) on primary isolated epidermal and dermal hoof cells, as well as on the lamellar tissue integrity and sphingolipid metabolism of hoof explants in vitro. There was no effect of FB1 at any concentration on dermal or epidermal cells. However, FB1 significantly reduced the separation force of explants after 24 h of incubation. The Sa/So ratio was significantly increased in supernatants of explants incubated with FB1 (2.5–10 µg/mL) after 24 h. Observed effects on Sa/So ratio were linked to significantly increased sphinganine concentrations. Our study showed that FB1 impairs the sphingolipid metabolism of explants and reduces lamellar integrity at non-cytotoxic concentrations. FB1 might, therefore, affect hoof health. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are necessary to elucidate the effects of FB1 on the equine hoof in more detail. PMID:27023602

  4. HCV 3a Core Protein Increases Lipid Droplet Cholesteryl Ester Content via a Mechanism Dependent on Sphingolipid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Branche, Emilie; Conzelmann, Stéphanie; Parisot, Clotilde; Potma, Eric O.; Riezman, Howard; Negro, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients often develop steatosis and the HCV core protein alone can induce this phenomenon. To gain new insights into the pathways leading to steatosis, we performed lipidomic profiling of HCV core protein expressing-Huh-7 cells and also assessed the lipid profile of purified lipid droplets isolated from HCV 3a core expressing cells. Cholesteryl esters, ceramides and glycosylceramides, but not triglycerides, increased specifically in cells expressing the steatogenic HCV 3a core protein. Accordingly, inhibitors of cholesteryl ester biosynthesis such as statins and acyl-CoA cholesterol acyl transferase inhibitors prevented the increase of cholesteryl ester production and the formation of large lipid droplets in HCV core 3a-expressing cells. Furthermore, inhibition of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis by myriocin - but not of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis by miglustat - affected both lipid droplet size and cholesteryl ester level. The lipid profile of purified lipid droplets, isolated from HCV 3a core-expressing cells, confirmed the particular increase of cholesteryl ester. Thus, both sphingolipid and cholesteryl ester biosynthesis are affected by the steatogenic core protein of HCV genotype 3a. These results may explain the peculiar lipid profile of HCV-infected patients with steatosis. PMID:25522003

  5. Identification of Sphingolipid Metabolites That Induce Obesity via Misregulation of Appetite, Caloric Intake and Fat Storage in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Walls, Stanley M.; Attle, Steve J.; Brulte, Gregory B.; Walls, Marlena L.; Finley, Kim D.; Chatfield, Dale A.; Herr, Deron R.; Harris, Greg L.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is defined by excessive lipid accumulation. However, the active mechanistic roles that lipids play in its progression are not understood. Accumulation of ceramide, the metabolic hub of sphingolipid metabolism, has been associated with metabolic syndrome and obesity in humans and model systems. Here, we use Drosophila genetic manipulations to cause accumulation or depletion of ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) intermediates. Sphingolipidomic profiles were characterized across mutants for various sphingolipid metabolic genes using liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy. Biochemical assays and microscopy were used to assess classic hallmarks of obesity including elevated fat stores, increased body weight, resistance to starvation induced death, increased adiposity, and fat cell hypertrophy. Multiple behavioral assays were used to assess appetite, caloric intake, meal size and meal frequency. Additionally, we utilized DNA microarrays to profile differential gene expression between these flies, which mapped to changes in lipid metabolic pathways. Our results show that accumulation of ceramides is sufficient to induce obesity phenotypes by two distinct mechanisms: 1) Dihydroceramide (C14:0) and ceramide diene (C14:2) accumulation lowered fat store mobilization by reducing adipokinetic hormone- producing cell functionality and 2) Modulating the S1P: ceramide (C14:1) ratio suppressed postprandial satiety via the hindgut-specific neuropeptide like receptor dNepYr, resulting in caloric intake-dependent obesity. PMID:24339790

  6. The Sphingolipid Receptor S1PR2 Is a Receptor for Nogo-A Repressing Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Arzt, Michael E.; Weinmann, Oliver; Obermair, Franz J.; Pernet, Vincent; Zagrebelsky, Marta; Delekate, Andrea; Iobbi, Cristina; Zemmar, Ajmal; Ristic, Zorica; Gullo, Miriam; Spies, Peter; Dodd, Dana; Gygax, Daniel; Korte, Martin; Schwab, Martin E.

    2014-01-01

    Nogo-A is a membrane protein of the central nervous system (CNS) restricting neurite growth and synaptic plasticity via two extracellular domains: Nogo-66 and Nogo-A-Δ20. Receptors transducing Nogo-A-Δ20 signaling remained elusive so far. Here we identify the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) as a Nogo-A-Δ20-specific receptor. Nogo-A-Δ20 binds S1PR2 on sites distinct from the pocket of the sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and signals via the G protein G13, the Rho GEF LARG, and RhoA. Deleting or blocking S1PR2 counteracts Nogo-A-Δ20- and myelin-mediated inhibition of neurite outgrowth and cell spreading. Blockade of S1PR2 strongly enhances long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus of wild-type but not Nogo-A−/− mice, indicating a repressor function of the Nogo-A/S1PR2 axis in synaptic plasticity. A similar increase in LTP was also observed in the motor cortex after S1PR2 blockade. We propose a novel signaling model in which a GPCR functions as a receptor for two structurally unrelated ligands, a membrane protein and a sphingolipid. Elucidating Nogo-A/S1PR2 signaling platforms will provide new insights into regulation of synaptic plasticity. PMID:24453941

  7. Induction of cell wall thickening by the antifungal compound dihydromaltophilin disrupts fungal growth and is mediated by sphingolipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaojie; Calvo, Ana M; Yuen, Gary Y; Du, Liangcheng; Harris, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Dihydromaltophilin (heat-stable antifungal factor [HSAF]) is an antifungal metabolite produced in Lysobacter enzymogenes biocontrol strain C3. This compound induces cell wall thickening in Aspergillus nidulans. Here we show that the cell wall thickening is a general response to HSAF in diverse fungal species. In the A. nidulans model, the thickened cell wall negatively affects hyphal growth. Growth of HSAF-pre-treated hyphae failed to resume at hyphal tips with thick cell wall and the actin cable could not re-polarize at the thickened region of the cell wall, even after the treated hyphae were transferred to drug-free medium. Moreover, HSAF-induced cell wall thickening is mediated by sphingolipid synthesis: HSAF failed to induce cell wall thickening in the absence of ceramide synthase BarA and the sphingolipid synthesis inhibitor myriocin was able to suppress HSAF-induced cell wall thickening. The thickened cell wall could be digested by chitinase suggesting that chitin contributes to the HSAF-induced thickening. Furthermore, HSAF treatment activated the transcription of two chitin synthase encoding genes chsB and chsC. PMID:21462551

  8. Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 1 (TRPC1) Channels as Regulators of Sphingolipid and VEGF Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Muhammad Yasir; Magnusson, Melissa; Kemppainen, Kati; Sukumaran, Pramod; Löf, Christoffer; Pulli, Ilari; Kalhori, Veronica; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-01-01

    The identity of calcium channels in the thyroid is unclear. In human follicular thyroid ML-1 cancer cells, sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), through S1P receptors 1 and 3 (S1P1/S1P3), and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) stimulates migration. We show that human thyroid cells express several forms of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels, including TRPC1. In TRPC1 knockdown (TRPC1-KD) ML-1 cells, the basal and S1P-evoked invasion and migration was attenuated. Furthermore, the expression of S1P3 and VEGFR2 was significantly down-regulated. Transfecting wild-type ML-1 cells with a nonconducting TRPC1 mutant decreased S1P3 and VEGFR2 expression. In TRPC1-KD cells, receptor-operated calcium entry was decreased. To investigate whether the decreased receptor expression was due to attenuated calcium entry, cells were incubated with the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid). In these cells, and in cells where calmodulin and calmodulin-dependent kinase were blocked pharmacologically, S1P3 and VEGFR2 expression was decreased. In TRPC1-KD cells, both hypoxia-inducible factor 1α expression and the secretion and activity of MMP2 and MMP9 were attenuated, and proliferation was decreased in TRPC1-KD cells. This was due to a prolonged G1 phase of the cell cycle, a significant increase in the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27, and a decrease in the expression of cyclin D2, cyclin D3, and CDK6. Transfecting TRPC1 to TRPC1-KD cells rescued receptor expression, migration, and proliferation. Thus, the expression of S1P3 and VEGFR2 is mediated by a calcium-dependent mechanism. TRPC1 has a crucial role in this process. This regulation is important for the invasion, migration, and proliferation of thyroid cancer cells. PMID:25971967

  9. A single extraction method for the analysis by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry of fumonisins and biomarkers of disrupted sphingolipid metabolism in tissues of maize seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of many plants and produces fumonisins. In addition to their well-studied animal toxicoses these toxins contribute to the development of maize seedling disease in susceptible maize varieties. Fumonisin disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis occurs ...

  10. Liquid Chromatography with Dual Parallel Mass Spectrometry and 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Analysis of Sphingomyelin and Dihydrosphingomyelin. II. Bovine Milk Sphingolipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS), in parallel, was used for simultaneous detection of bovine milk sphingolipids (BMS). APCI-MS mass spectra exhibited mostly ceramide-like fragment ions, [Cer-H2O...

  11. A single extraction method for the analysis by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry of fumonisins and biomarkers of disrupted sphingolipid metabolism in tissues of maize seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of many plants and is known to produce fumonisins. These toxins have been shown to contribute to the development of maize seedling disease. Fumonisin disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis has been demonstrated to occur during such pathogenesis. A l...

  12. Age-dependent changes in the sphingolipid composition of CD4+ T cell membranes and immune synapses implicate glucosylceramides in age-related T cell dysfunction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sphingolipid (SL4) composition can influence the biophysical properties of cell membranes. Additionally, specific SL modulate signaling pathways involved in proliferation, senescence, and apoptosis. We investigated age-dependent changes in the SL composition of CD4+ T cells, and the impact of these ...

  13. Disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana activates salicylic acid-dependent responses and compromises resistance to Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici.

    PubMed

    Rivas-San Vicente, Mariana; Larios-Zarate, Guadalupe; Plasencia, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Sphingolipids play an important role in signal transduction pathways that regulate physiological functions and stress responses in eukaryotes. In plants, recent evidence suggests that their metabolic precursors, the long-chain bases (LCBs) act as bioactive molecules in the immune response. Interestingly, the virulence of two unrelated necrotrophic fungi, Fusarium verticillioides and Alternaria alternata, which are pathogens of maize and tomato plants, respectively, depends on the production of sphinganine-analog mycotoxins (SAMs). These metabolites inhibit de novo synthesis of sphingolipids in their hosts causing accumulation of LCBs, which are key regulators of programmed cell death. Therefore, to gain more insight into the role of sphingolipids in plant immunity against SAM-producing necrotrophic fungi, we disrupted sphingolipid metabolism in Nicotiana benthamiana through virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of the serine palmitoyltransfersase (SPT). This enzyme catalyzes the first reaction in LCB synthesis. VIGS of SPT profoundly affected N. benthamiana development as well as LCB composition of sphingolipids. While total levels of phytosphingosine decreased, sphinganine and sphingosine levels increased in SPT-silenced plants, compared with control plants. Plant immunity was also affected as silenced plants accumulated salicylic acid (SA), constitutively expressed the SA-inducible NbPR-1 gene and showed increased susceptibility to the necrotroph A. alternata f. sp. lycopersici. In contrast, expression of NbPR-2 and NbPR-3 genes was delayed in silenced plants upon fungal infection. Our results strongly suggest that LCBs modulate the SA-dependent responses and provide a working model of the potential role of SAMs from necrotrophic fungi to disrupt the plant host response to foster colonization. PMID:22990908

  14. Downregulation of the autophagy protein ATG-7 correlates with distinct sphingolipid profile in MCF-7 cells sensitized to photodamage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Separovic, Duska; Kelekar, Ameeta; Tarca, Adi L.; Bielawski, Jacek; Kessel, David

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the sphingolipid (SL) profile in autophagy-defective cells and overall cell death after PDT with Pc 4 (PDT). Human breast cancer MCF-7 cells with downregulated autophagy protein ATG-7 and their scrambled controls (Scr) were used. Exposure of ATG-7 knockdown cells to PDT led to defective processing of the autophagy marker LC3, and increased overall cell killing. In both cell types PDT evoked an early (2 h) increase in ceramides and dihydroceramides (DHceramides). When the two cell types were compared regarding time (2 and 24 h) and treatment conditions (with and without PDT), the levels of several ceramides and DHceramides were reduced, whereas the concentrations of C14-ceramide, C16-ceramide and C12-DHceramide were higher in ATG-7 knockdown cells. The data imply that the SL profile might be a marker of autophagy-deficiency in cells sensitized to PDT.

  15. A plasma-membrane E-MAP reveals links of the eisosome with sphingolipid metabolism and endosomal trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Pablo S; Fröhlich, Florian; Rehman, Michael; Shales, Mike; Ulitsky, Igor; Olivera-Couto, Agustina; Braberg, Hannes; Shamir, Ron; Walter, Peter; Mann, Matthias; Ejsing, Christer S; Krogan, Nevan J; Walther, Tobias C

    2011-01-01

    The plasma membrane delimits the cell and controls material and information exchange between itself and the environment. How different plasma-membrane processes are coordinated and how the relative abundance of plasma-membrane lipids and proteins is homeostatically maintained are not yet understood. Here, we used a quantitative genetic interaction map, or E-MAP, to functionally interrogate a set of ~400 genes involved in various aspects of plasma-membrane biology, including endocytosis, signaling, lipid metabolism and eisosome function. From this E-MAP, we derived a set of 57,799 individual interactions between genes functioning in these various processes. Using triplet genetic motif analysis, we identified a new component of the eisosome, Eis1, and linked the poorly characterized gene EMP70 to endocytic and eisosome function. Finally, we implicated Rom2, a GDP/GTP exchange factor for Rho1 and Rho2, in the regulation of sphingolipid metabolism. PMID:20526336

  16. Pharmacogenetics of resistance to cisplatin and other anti-cancer drugs and the role of sphingolipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen; Swatson, William S.; Alexander, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dictyostelium discoideum has proven to be a useful lead genetic system for identifying novel genes and pathways responsible for the regulation of sensitivity to the widely used anti-cancer drug cisplatin. Resistance to cisplatin is a major factor limiting the efficacy of the drug in treating many types of cancer. Studies using unbiased insertional mutagenesis in D. discoideum have identified the pathway of sphingolipid metabolism as a key regulator in controlling sensitivity to cisplatin. Using the genetic tools including directed homologous recombination and ectopic gene expression available with D. discoideum has shown how pharmacological modulation of this pathway can increase sensitivity to cisplatin, and these results have been extensively translated to, and validated in, human cells. Strategies, experimental conditions and methods are presented to enable further study of resistance to cisplatin as well as other important drugs. PMID:23494308

  17. Switching the Sphingolipid Rheostat in the Treatment of Diabetes and Cancer Comorbidity from a Problem to an Advantage

    PubMed Central

    Haass, Nikolas K.; Nassif, Najah; McGowan, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer and diabetes are among the most common diseases in western societies. Epidemiological studies have shown that diabetic patients have a significantly higher risk of developing a number of different types of cancers and that individuals with comorbidity (cancer and diabetes/prediabetes) have a poorer prognosis relative to nondiabetic cancer patients. The increasing frequency of comorbidity of cancer and diabetes mellitus, mainly type 2 diabetes, has driven the development of therapeutic interventions that target both disease states. There is strong evidence to suggest that balancing the sphingolipid rheostat, ceramide—sphingosine—sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is crucial in the prevention of diabetes and cancer and sphingosine kinase/S1P modulators are currently under development for the treatment of cancer and diabetes. This paper will highlight some of the complexities inherent in the use of the emerging sphingosine kinase/S1P modulators in the treatment of comorbidity of diabetes and cancer. PMID:25866760

  18. Defective ceramide synthases in mice cause reduced amplitudes in electroretinograms and altered sphingolipid composition in retina and cornea.

    PubMed

    Brüggen, Bianca; Kremser, Christiane; Bickert, Andreas; Ebel, Philipp; Vom Dorp, Katharina; Schultz, Konrad; Dörmann, Peter; Willecke, Klaus; Dedek, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Complex sphingolipids are strongly expressed in neuronal tissue and contain ceramides in their backbone. Ceramides are synthesized by six ceramide synthases (CerS1-6). Although it is known that each tissue has a unique profile of ceramide synthase expression and ceramide synthases are implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders, the expression of ceramide synthase isoforms has not been investigated in the retina. Here we demonstrate CerS1, CerS2 and CerS4 expression in mouse retina and cornea, with CerS4 ubiquitously expressed in all retinal neurons and Müller cells. To test whether ceramide synthase deficiency affects retinal function, we compared electroretinograms and retina morphology between wild-type and CerS1-, CerS2- and CerS4-deficient mice. Electroretinograms were strongly reduced in amplitude in ceramide synthase-deficient mice, suggesting that signalling in the outer retina is affected. However, the number of photoreceptors and cone outer segment length were unaltered and no changes in retinal layer thickness or synaptic structures were found. Mass spectrometric analyses of ceramides, hexosyl-ceramides and sphingomyelins showed that C20 to C24 acyl-containing species were decreased whereas C16-containing species were increased in the retina of ceramide synthase-deficient mice. Similar but smaller changes were also found in the cornea. Thus, we hypothesize that the replacement of very long-chain fatty acyl residues by shorter C16 residues may affect the electrical properties of retina and cornea, and alter receptor-mediated signal transduction, vesicle-mediated synaptic transmission or corneal light transmission. Future studies need to identify the molecular targets of ceramides or derived sphingolipids in light signal transduction and transmission in the eye. PMID:27086873

  19. A Novel Combined Approach of Short-Chain Sphingolipids and Thermosensitive Liposomes for Improved Drug Delivery to Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Azadeh; Pedrosa, Lilia R C; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Dadashzadeh, Simin; Koning, Gerben A

    2016-04-01

    Despite the advantages of liposomal drug delivery, the bioavailability of the chemotherapeutic drugs to tumor cells is limited by their slow release from nanocarriers and low drug permeability across cell membranes. Drug encapsulation into stealth thermosensitive liposomes can improve drug delivery to tumors by combining efficient accumulation at tumors and the active release of the payload following remote heat triggering. Short-chain sphingolipids are known to enhance cellular uptake of amphiphilic drugs. We hypothesized that short-chain sphingolipids could be utilized to further improve intracellular drug delivery from a thermoresponsive formulation by enhancing the cell membrane passage of released drug. The following two strategies were investigated: (1) co-delivery of C8-glucosylceramide and doxorubicin within the thermosensitive liposomes and (2) pretreatment with glucosylceramide-enriched drug-free liposomes and subsequent treatment with doxorubicin loaded thermosensitive liposomes. Liposomes were prepared and extensively characterized. Drug uptake, cell cytotoxicity and live cell imaging were performed under normothermic and hyperthermic conditions in melanoma cells. In these studies, hyperthermia improved drug delivery from doxorubicin loaded thermosensitive formulations. However, the results from cell experiments indicated that there was no additional benefit in the co-delivery strategy using doxorubicin loaded glucosylceramide-enriched thermosensitive liposomes. In contrast, cellular studies showed significantly higher doxorubicin internalization in the pretreatment strategy. One-hour exposure of the cells to C8-glucosylceramide before applying hyperthermia caused improved doxorubicin uptake and cytotoxicity as well as an almost instantaneous cellular entry of the doxorubicin released from thermosensitive liposomes. This novel, two-step drug delivery approach can be potentially beneficial for the intracellular delivery of cell impermeable

  20. Targeting blood-brain barrier sphingolipid signaling reduces basal P-glycoprotein activity and improves drug delivery to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Ronald E.; Peart, John C.; Hawkins, Brian T.; Campos, Christopher R.; Miller, David S.

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven drug efflux pump, is a major obstacle to the delivery of small-molecule drugs across the blood-brain barrier and into the CNS. Here we test a unique signaling-based strategy to overcome this obstacle. We used a confocal microscopy-based assay with isolated rat brain capillaries to map a signaling pathway that within minutes abolishes P-glycoprotein transport activity without altering transporter protein expression or tight junction permeability. This pathway encompasses elements of proinflammatory- (TNF-α) and sphingolipid-based signaling. Critical to this pathway was signaling through sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1). In brain capillaries, S1P acted through S1PR1 to rapidly and reversibly reduce P-glycoprotein transport activity. Sphingosine reduced transport by a sphingosine kinase-dependent mechanism. Importantly, fingolimod (FTY720), a S1P analog recently approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, also rapidly reduced P-glycoprotein activity; similar effects were found with the active, phosphorylated metabolite (FTY720P). We validated these findings in vivo using in situ brain perfusion in rats. Administration of S1P, FTY720, or FTY729P increased brain uptake of three radiolabeled P-glycoprotein substrates, 3H-verapamil (threefold increase), 3H-loperamide (fivefold increase), and 3H-paclitaxel (fivefold increase); blocking S1PR1 abolished this effect. Tight junctional permeability, measured as brain 14C-sucrose accumulation, was not altered. Therefore, targeting signaling through S1PR1 at the blood-brain barrier with the sphingolipid-based drugs, FTY720 or FTY720P, can rapidly and reversibly reduce basal P-glycoprotein activity and thus improve delivery of small-molecule therapeutics to the brain. PMID:22949658

  1. Effects of sphingolipid extracts on the morphological structure and lipid profile in an in vitro model of canine skin.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, Santiago; Ramió-Lluch, Laura; Brazís, Pilar; Fondevila, Dolors; Segarra, Sergi; Puigdemont, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Ceramides (CER) are essential sphingolipids of the stratum corneum (SC) that play an important role in maintaining cutaneous barrier function. Skin barrier defects occur in both human beings and dogs affected with atopic dermatitis, and have been associated with decreased CER concentrations and morphological alterations in the SC. The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes induced by three different sphingolipid extracts (SPE-1, SPE-2 and SPE-3) on the morphological structure and lipid composition of canine skin, using an in vitro model, whereby keratinocytes were seeded onto fibroblast-embedded collagen type I matrix at the air-liquid interface. Cell cultures were supplemented with SPE-1, SPE-2, SPE-3 or vehicle (control) for 14 days. The relative concentrations of lipids were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The ultrastructural morphology of samples was examined by transmission electron microscopy. SPE-1 induced significant elevation in total CERs, CER[NS], CER[NDS], CER[NP], CER[AS], CER[AP], CER[EOS] and CER[EOP] subclasses, whereas SPE-2 induced a significant elevation in total CER, CER[AP] and CER[EOS] compared with control conditions. Ultrastructural analysis revealed an increase in lamellar-lipid structures in the SC of SPE-1-treated samples. The findings demonstrated that SPE-1 stimulates production of CERs, as shown by changes in lipid composition and ultrastructural morphology. Thus, SPE-1 contributes to the formation of a well-organised SC and represents a potential therapeutic target for improving skin barrier function in atopic dermatitis. PMID:27256026

  2. Evaluation of the change in sphingolipids in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 treated with arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianhua; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Zhang, Guangji; Shen, Li; Zhou, Liting; Yu, Yu; Zhu, Fanfan; Chen, Zhe

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been found to display anticancer activity against many types of tumors and has been developed into an anticancer drug in clinical treatments. Sphingolipids are membrane lipids that participate in many signal transduction pathways. In this paper, the changes in sphingolipids of the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and the gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 treated with arsenic trioxide were investigated using an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method. Analytes were separated by an XBridge BEH C8 column used for Cer, HexCer, LacCer and SM chromatographic separation, and a Capcell PAK MG II C18 column was used for Sph, dhSph, S1P and dhS1P chromatographic separation and gradient elution with acetonitrile-water containing 0.1% formic acid as a mobile phase. A tandem mass spectrometer QTrap in SRM mode was employed in combination with RPLC as a detector for quantitative analysis. The ceramide/sphingolipid internal standard (IS) mixture was used to quantify the levels of sphingolipids. The distributions of sphingolipids were found to be different in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and the gastric cancer cell line MGC-803. Ceramide (Cer), hexosylceramide (HexCer) and dihexosylceramide (Hex2Cer) levels in U266 cell line are higher than those in MGC-803 cell line. Additionally, sphingomyelin (SM), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and sphinganine-1-phosphate (dhS1P) levels in the MGC-803 cell line are higher than those in the U266 cell line. When treated with arsenic trioxide (1-5μM iAs(III)(As(III) ions)), the levels of Hex2Cer in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 decreased, and the levels of S1P and dhS1P in the human gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 decreased. The decrease of Hex2Cer, S1P and dhS1P in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 were observed when the concentration of iAs(III) is 1.0μM. Therefore, arsenic trioxide exhibits anti-cancer activity by altering the sphingolipid pathway in the

  3. Psychosine-triggered endomitosis is modulated by membrane sphingolipids through regulation of phosphoinositide 4,5-bisphosphate production at the cleavage furrow.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Okahara, Kyohei; Naito-Matsui, Yuko; Abe, Mitsuhiro; Go, Shinji; Inokuchi, Jinichi; Okazaki, Toshiro; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Oka, Shogo; Takematsu, Hiromu

    2016-07-01

    Endomitosis is a special type of mitosis in which only cytokinesis-the final step of the cell division cycle-is defective, resulting in polyploid cells. Although endomitosis is biologically important, its regulatory aspects remain elusive. Psychosine, a lysogalactosylceramide, prevents proper cytokinesis when supplemented to proliferating cells. Cytokinetic inhibition by psychosine does not inhibit genome duplication. Consequently cells undergo multiple rounds of endomitotic cell cycles, resulting in the formation of giant multiploid cells. Here we successfully quantified psychosine-triggered multiploid cell formation, showing that membrane sphingolipids ratios modulate psychosine-triggered polyploidy in Namalwa cells. Among enzymes that experimentally remodel cellular sphingolipids, overexpression of glucosylceramide synthase to biosynthesize glycosylsphingolipids (GSLs) and neutral sphingomyelinase 2 to hydrolyze sphingomyelin (SM) additively enhanced psychosine-triggered multiploidy; almost all of the cells became polyploid. In the presence of psychosine, Namalwa cells showed attenuated cell surface SM clustering and suppression of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate production at the cleavage furrow, both important processes for cytokinesis. Depending on the sphingolipid balance between GSLs and SM, Namalwa cells could be effectively converted to viable multiploid cells with psychosine. PMID:27170180

  4. Altered sphingolipid metabolism in multidrug-resistant ovarian cancer cells is due to uncoupling of glycolipid biosynthesis in the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Veldman, Robert Jan; Klappe, Karin; Hinrichs, John; Hummel, Ina; van der Schaaf, Gieta; Sietsma, Hannie; Kok, Jan Willem

    2002-07-01

    Multidrug-resistant tumor cells display enhanced levels of glucosylceramide. In this study, we investigated how this relates to the overall sphingolipid composition of multidrug-resistant ovarian carcinoma cells and which mechanisms are responsible for adapted sphingolipid metabolism. We found in multidrug-resistant cells substantially lower levels of lactosylceramide and gangliosides in sharp contrast to glucosylceramide, galactosylceramide, and sphingomyelin levels. This indicates a block in the glycolipid biosynthetic pathway at the level of lactosylceramide formation, with concomitant accumulation of glucosylceramide. A series of observations exclude regulation at the enzyme level as the underlying mechanism. First, reduced lactosylceramide formation occurred only in intact resistant cells whereas cell-free activity of lactosylceramide synthase was higher compared with the parental cells. Second, the level of lactosylceramide synthase gene expression was equal in both phenotypes. Third, glucosylceramide synthase (mRNA and protein) expression and activity were equal or lower in resistant cells. Based on the kinetics of sphingolipid metabolism, the observation that brefeldin A does not restore lactosylceramide synthesis, and altered localization of lactosylceramide synthase fused to green fluorescent protein, we conclude that lactosylceramide biosynthesis is highly uncoupled from glucosylceramide biosynthesis in the Golgi apparatus of resistant cells. PMID:12039850

  5. A method for analysis and design of metabolism using metabolomics data and kinetic models: Application on lipidomics using a novel kinetic model of sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Savoglidis, Georgios; da Silveira Dos Santos, Aline Xavier; Riezman, Isabelle; Angelino, Paolo; Riezman, Howard; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2016-09-01

    We present a model-based method, designated Inverse Metabolic Control Analysis (IMCA), which can be used in conjunction with classical Metabolic Control Analysis for the analysis and design of cellular metabolism. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method by first developing a comprehensively curated kinetic model of sphingolipid biosynthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Next we apply IMCA using the model and integrating lipidomics data. The combinatorial complexity of the synthesis of sphingolipid molecules, along with the operational complexity of the participating enzymes of the pathway, presents an excellent case study for testing the capabilities of the IMCA. The exceptional agreement of the predictions of the method with genome-wide data highlights the importance and value of a comprehensive and consistent engineering approach for the development of such methods and models. Based on the analysis, we identified the class of enzymes regulating the distribution of sphingolipids among species and hydroxylation states, with the D-phospholipase SPO14 being one of the most prominent. The method and the applications presented here can be used for a broader, model-based inverse metabolic engineering approach. PMID:27113440

  6. Aβ1-25-Derived Sphingolipid-Domain Tracer Peptide SBD Interacts with Membrane Ganglioside Clusters via a Coil-Helix-Coil Motif

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaofeng; Kraut, Rachel; Mu, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    The Amyloid-β (Aβ)-derived, sphingolipid binding domain (SBD) peptide is a fluorescently tagged probe used to trace the diffusion behavior of sphingolipid-containing microdomains in cell membranes through binding to a constellation of glycosphingolipids, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol. However, the molecular details of the binding mechanism between SBD and plasma membrane domains remain unclear. Here, to investigate how the peptide recognizes the lipid surface at an atomically detailed level, SBD peptides in the environment of raft-like bilayers were examined in micro-seconds-long molecular dynamics simulations. We found that SBD adopted a coil-helix-coil structural motif, which binds to multiple GT1b gangliosides via salt bridges and CH–π interactions. Our simulation results demonstrate that the CH–π and electrostatic forces between SBD monomers and GT1b gangliosides clusters are the main driving forces in the binding process. The presence of the fluorescent dye and linker molecules do not change the binding mechanism of SBD probes with gangliosides, which involves the helix-turn-helix structural motif that was suggested to constitute a glycolipid binding domain common to some sphingolipid interacting proteins, including HIV gp120, prion, and Aβ. PMID:26540054

  7. Role of acid sphingomyelinase in the age-dependent dysregulation of sphingolipids turnover in the tissues of rats.

    PubMed

    Babenko, Nataliya A; Garkavenko, Vladimir V; Storozhenko, Galina V; Timofiychuk, Olga A

    2016-04-01

    Old age-associated pathologies usually coincide with altered sphingolipid metabolism. In the present article, the role of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) in the age-dependent changes of sphingomyelin (SM) and ceramide contents in the tissues has been investigated by means of ASMase inhibitors, imipramine and zoledronic acid. It has been determined that ceramide content and ceramide/SM ratio increased, while SM level decreased in the heart, liver, blood serum and skeletal muscles of 24-month old rats in contrast to 3-month old animals. Injections of imipramine or zoledronic acid to 24-month old rats resulted in significant downregulation of ASMase in the liver and skeletal and heart muscles. The both inhibitors decreased the ceramide content and ceramide/SM ratio and increased the SM content in all tissues studied, except the heart, of old rats to the levels close to those observed in the young animals. Long-term treatment of rats by inhibitors, which have different mechanisms of action on ASMase, exerts the similar, but not equal effects on enzyme activity and SM turnover. In summary, the data above strongly suggest that the age-dependent up-regulation of ASMase plays an important role in the modulation of ceramide and SM contents in rat tissues and that imipramine and zoledronic acid are useful tools for SM turnover manipulation at old age. PMID:26830134

  8. Long-chain bases of sphingolipids are transported into cells via the acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Narita, Tomomi; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Sase, Yurie; Kihara, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Transport of dietary lipids into small-intestinal epithelial cells is pathologically and nutritionally important. However, lipid uptake remains an almost unexplored research area. Although we know that long-chain bases (LCBs), constituents of sphingolipids, can enter into cells efficiently, the molecular mechanism of LCB uptake is completely unclear. Here, we found that the yeast acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) Faa1 and Faa4 are redundantly involved in LCB uptake. In addition to fatty acid-activating activity, transporter activity toward long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) has been suggested for ACSs. Both LCB and LCFA transports were largely impaired in faa1Δ faa4Δ cells. Furthermore, LCB and LCFA uptakes were mutually competitive. However, the energy dependency was different for their transports. Sodium azide/2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment inhibited import of LCFA but not that of LCB. Furthermore, the ATP-AMP motif mutation FAA1 S271A largely impaired the metabolic activity and LCFA uptake, while leaving LCB import unaffected. These results indicate that only LCFA transport requires ATP. Since ACSs do not metabolize LCBs as substrates, Faa1 and Faa4 are likely directly involved in LCB transport. Furthermore, we revealed that ACSs are also involved in LCB transport in mammalian cells. Thus, our findings provide strong support for the hypothesis that ACSs directly transport LCFAs. PMID:27136724

  9. A rapid LC-MS/MS method for quantitative profiling of fatty acids, sterols, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids in grapes.

    PubMed

    Della Corte, Anna; Chitarrini, Giulia; Di Gangi, Iole Maria; Masuero, Domenico; Soini, Evelyn; Mattivi, Fulvio; Vrhovsek, Urska

    2015-08-01

    The abundance of lipids in plants is influenced by genotype and phenotype. Despite being a very important class of plant metabolites, knowledge of grape lipids is still very limited to date, with the exception of those located in seeds. Few investigations of grape lipids have shown that their profile depends on grape maturity, the variety and their location in the berry. Recent advances in liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry have paved the way for faster analysis of lipids with minimal sample preparation. Here we describe a validation method for the extraction, identification and quantification of different classes of grape lipids: fatty acids, sterols, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids using liquid chromatographic electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The method was validated for 33 lipids, with linearity range (R(2)=0.95-1.00), LOQ (0.003-14.88 ng mL(-1)) and intraday and interday repeatability being evaluated for each lipid. The lipid profiling method developed was successfully applied to the analysis of 18 grape samples (10 red grape and 8 white grape varieties) from 4 different genetic groups: Vitis vinifera, Vitis non-vinifera, Muscat and hybrid; 33 lipids were identified and quantified. This method, which can be easily expanded to include further compounds and other plant tissues, is the starting point for analysis of the lipid profile in different grape tissues, an essential goal for better understanding the role of lipids in grape physiology. PMID:26048823

  10. Long-chain bases of sphingolipids are transported into cells via the acyl-CoA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Tomomi; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Sase, Yurie; Kihara, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Transport of dietary lipids into small-intestinal epithelial cells is pathologically and nutritionally important. However, lipid uptake remains an almost unexplored research area. Although we know that long-chain bases (LCBs), constituents of sphingolipids, can enter into cells efficiently, the molecular mechanism of LCB uptake is completely unclear. Here, we found that the yeast acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) Faa1 and Faa4 are redundantly involved in LCB uptake. In addition to fatty acid-activating activity, transporter activity toward long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) has been suggested for ACSs. Both LCB and LCFA transports were largely impaired in faa1Δ faa4Δ cells. Furthermore, LCB and LCFA uptakes were mutually competitive. However, the energy dependency was different for their transports. Sodium azide/2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment inhibited import of LCFA but not that of LCB. Furthermore, the ATP-AMP motif mutation FAA1 S271A largely impaired the metabolic activity and LCFA uptake, while leaving LCB import unaffected. These results indicate that only LCFA transport requires ATP. Since ACSs do not metabolize LCBs as substrates, Faa1 and Faa4 are likely directly involved in LCB transport. Furthermore, we revealed that ACSs are also involved in LCB transport in mammalian cells. Thus, our findings provide strong support for the hypothesis that ACSs directly transport LCFAs. PMID:27136724

  11. Altering the sphingolipid acyl chain composition prevents LPS/GLN-mediated hepatic failure in mice by disrupting TNFR1 internalization

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M; Fritsch, J; Zigdon, H; Pewzner-Jung, Y; Schütze, S; Futerman, A H

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of ceramide in death receptor-mediated apoptosis has been widely examined with most studies focusing on the role of ceramide generated from sphingomyelin hydrolysis. We now analyze the effect of the ceramide acyl chain length by studying tumor necrosis factor α receptor-1 (TNFR1)-mediated apoptosis in a ceramide synthase 2 (CerS2) null mouse, which cannot synthesize very-long acyl chain ceramides. CerS2 null mice were resistant to lipopolysaccharide/galactosamine-mediated fulminant hepatic failure even though TNFα secretion from macrophages was unaffected. Cultured hepatocytes were also insensitive to TNFα-mediated apoptosis. In addition, in both liver and in hepatocytes, caspase activities were not elevated, consistent with inhibition of TNFR1 pro-apoptotic signaling. In contrast, Fas receptor activation resulted in the death of CerS2 null mice. Caspase activation was blocked because of the inability of CerS2 null mice to internalize the TNFR1; whereas Fc-TNFα was internalized to a perinuclear region in hepatocytes from wild-type mice, no internalization was detected in CerS2 null mice. Our results indicate that altering the acyl chain composition of sphingolipids inhibits TNFR1 internalization and inhibits selective pro-apoptotic downstream signaling for apoptosis. PMID:24263103

  12. Expression of the Bacterial Type III Effector DspA/E in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Down-regulates the Sphingolipid Biosynthetic Pathway Leading to Growth Arrest*

    PubMed Central

    Siamer, Sabrina; Guillas, Isabelle; Shimobayashi, Mitsugu; Kunz, Caroline; Hall, Michael N.; Barny, Marie-Anne

    2014-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora, the bacterium responsible for fire blight, relies on a type III secretion system and a single injected effector, DspA/E, to induce disease in host plants. DspA/E belongs to the widespread AvrE family of type III effectors that suppress plant defense responses and promote bacterial growth following infection. Ectopic expression of DspA/E in plant or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is toxic, indicating that DspA/E likely targets a cellular process conserved between yeast and plant. To unravel the mode of action of DspA/E, we screened the Euroscarf S. cerevisiae library for mutants resistant to DspA/E-induced growth arrest. The most resistant mutants (Δsur4, Δfen1, Δipt1, Δskn1, Δcsg1, Δcsg2, Δorm1, and Δorm2) were impaired in the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Exogenously supplied sphingolipid precursors such as the long chain bases (LCBs) phytosphingosine and dihydrosphingosine also suppressed the DspA/E-induced yeast growth defect. Expression of DspA/E in yeast down-regulated LCB biosynthesis and induced a rapid decrease in LCB levels, indicating that serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, was repressed. SPT down-regulation was mediated by dephosphorylation and activation of Orm proteins that negatively regulate SPT. A Δcdc55 mutation affecting Cdc55-PP2A protein phosphatase activity prevented Orm dephosphorylation and suppressed DspA/E-induced growth arrest. PMID:24828506

  13. Expression of the bacterial type III effector DspA/E in Saccharomyces cerevisiae down-regulates the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway leading to growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Siamer, Sabrina; Guillas, Isabelle; Shimobayashi, Mitsugu; Kunz, Caroline; Hall, Michael N; Barny, Marie-Anne

    2014-06-27

    Erwinia amylovora, the bacterium responsible for fire blight, relies on a type III secretion system and a single injected effector, DspA/E, to induce disease in host plants. DspA/E belongs to the widespread AvrE family of type III effectors that suppress plant defense responses and promote bacterial growth following infection. Ectopic expression of DspA/E in plant or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is toxic, indicating that DspA/E likely targets a cellular process conserved between yeast and plant. To unravel the mode of action of DspA/E, we screened the Euroscarf S. cerevisiae library for mutants resistant to DspA/E-induced growth arrest. The most resistant mutants (Δsur4, Δfen1, Δipt1, Δskn1, Δcsg1, Δcsg2, Δorm1, and Δorm2) were impaired in the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Exogenously supplied sphingolipid precursors such as the long chain bases (LCBs) phytosphingosine and dihydrosphingosine also suppressed the DspA/E-induced yeast growth defect. Expression of DspA/E in yeast down-regulated LCB biosynthesis and induced a rapid decrease in LCB levels, indicating that serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, was repressed. SPT down-regulation was mediated by dephosphorylation and activation of Orm proteins that negatively regulate SPT. A Δcdc55 mutation affecting Cdc55-PP2A protein phosphatase activity prevented Orm dephosphorylation and suppressed DspA/E-induced growth arrest. PMID:24828506

  14. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Reveals Acyl-Chain- and Region-Specific Sphingolipid Metabolism in the Kidneys of Sphingomyelin Synthase 2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Masayuki; Wakabayashi, Masato; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Zhao, Songji; Sakai, Shota; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Obesity was reported to cause kidney injury by excessive accumulation of sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin and ceramide. Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) is an important enzyme for hepatic sphingolipid homeostasis and its dysfunction is considered to result in fatty liver disease. The expression of SMS2 is also high in the kidneys. However, the contribution of SMS2 on renal sphingolipid metabolism remains unclear. Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to visualize the distribution and provide quantitative data on lipids in tissue sections. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the effects of SMS2 deficiency on the distribution and concentration of sphingomyelins in the liver and kidneys of mice fed with a normal-diet or a high-fat-diet using imaging mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Our study revealed that high-fat-diet increased C18–C22 sphingomyelins, but decreased C24-sphingomyelins, in the liver and kidneys of wild-type mice. By contrast, SMS2 deficiency decreased C18–C24 sphingomyelins in the liver. Although a similar trend was observed in the whole-kidneys, the effects were minor. Interestingly, imaging mass spectrometry revealed that sphingomyelin localization was specific to each acyl-chain length in the kidneys. Further, SMS2 deficiency mainly decreased C22-sphingomyelin in the renal medulla and C24-sphingomyelins in the renal cortex. Thus, imaging mass spectrometry can provide visual assessment of the contribution of SMS2 on acyl-chain- and region-specific sphingomyelin metabolism in the kidneys. PMID:27010944

  15. Interference with distinct steps of sphingolipid synthesis and signaling attenuates proliferation of U87MG glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Bernhart, Eva; Damm, Sabine; Wintersperger, Andrea; Nusshold, Christoph; Brunner, Anna Martina; Plastira, Ioanna; Rechberger, Gerald; Reicher, Helga; Wadsack, Christian; Zimmer, Andreas; Malle, Ernst; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2015-07-15

    Glioblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor, which, despite combined radio- and chemotherapy, recurs and is invariably fatal for affected patients. Members of the sphingolipid (SL) family are potent effectors of glioma cell proliferation. In particular sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and the corresponding G protein-coupled S1P receptors transmit proliferative signals to glioma cells. To investigate the contribution to glioma cell proliferation we inhibited the first step of de novo SL synthesis in p53(wt) and p53(mut) glioma cells, and interfered with S1P signaling specifically in p53(wt) U87MG cells. Subunit silencing (RNAi) or pharmacological antagonism (using myriocin) of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT; catalyzing the first committed step of SL biosynthesis) reduced proliferation of p53(wt) but not p53(mut) GBM cells. In U87MG cells these observations were accompanied by decreased ceramide, sphingomyelin, and S1P content. Inhibition of SPT upregulated p53 and p21 expression and induced an increase in early and late apoptotic U87MG cells. Exogenously added S1P (complexed to physiological carriers) increased U87MG proliferation. In line, silencing of individual members of the S1P receptor family decreased U87MG proliferation. Silencing and pharmacological inhibition of the ATP-dependent cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) that facilitates S1P efflux in astrocytes attenuated U87MG growth. Glyburide-mediated inhibition of ABCA1 resulted in intracellular accumulation of S1P raising the possibility that ABCA1 promotes S1P efflux in U87MG glioma cells thereby contributing to inside-out signaling. Our findings indicate that de novo SL synthesis, S1P receptor-mediated signaling, and ABCA1-mediated S1P efflux could provide pharmacological targets to interfere with glioma cell proliferation. PMID:26002572

  16. Nfasc155H and MAG are specifically susceptible to detergent extraction in the absence of the myelin sphingolipid sulfatide

    PubMed Central

    Pomicter, AD; DeLoyht, JM; Hackett, AR; Purdie, N; Sato-Bigbee, C; Henderson, SC; Dupree, JL

    2015-01-01

    Mice incapable of synthesizing the myelin lipid sulfatide form paranodes that deteriorate with age. Similar instability also occurs in mice that lack contactin, contactin-associated protein or neurofascin155 (Nfasc155), the proteins that cluster in the paranode and form the junctional complex that mediates myelin-axon adhesion. In contrast to these proteins, sulfatide has not been shown to be enriched in the paranode nor has a sulfatide paranodal binding partner been identified; thus, it remains unclear how the absence of sulfatide results in compromised paranode integrity., Using an in situ extraction procedure, it has been reported that the absence of the myelin sphingolipids, galactocerebroside and sulfatide, increased the susceptibility of Nfasc155 to detergent extraction. Here, employing a similar approach, we demonstrate that in the presence of galactocerebroside but in the absence of sulfatide Nfasc155 is susceptible to detergent extraction. Furthermore, we use this in situ approach to show that stable association of myelin-associate glycoprotein (MAG) with the myelin membrane is sulfatide dependent while the membrane associations of myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, myelin basic protein and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase are sulfatide independent. These findings indicate that myelin proteins maintain their membrane associations by different mechanisms. Moreover, the myelin proteins that cluster in the paranode and require sulfatide mediate myelin-axon adhesion. Additionally, the apparent dependency on sulfatide for maintaining Nfasc155 and MAG associations is intriguing since the fatty acid composition of sulfatide is altered and paranodal ultrastructure is compromised in multiple sclerosis. Thus, our findings present a potential link between sulfatide perturbation and myelin deterioration in multiple sclerosis. PMID:24081651

  17. Membrane microdomain sphingolipids are required for anti-CD20-induced death of chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells

    PubMed Central

    Hammadi, Mariam; Youinou, Pierre; Tempescul, Adrian; Tobón, Gabriel; Berthou, Christian; Bordron, Anne; Pers, Jacques-Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia remains incurable, despite the addition of rituximab to chemotherapy as an available means of treatment. The resistance of certain patients to this monoclonal antibody prompted us to set up in vitro studies of another CD20-specific monoclonal antibody, B1 (later termed tositumomab). We hypothesized that the membrane lipid organization of leukemic B cells might be instrumental in the cells’ sensitivity to the B1 monoclonal antibody. Design and Methods B lymphocytes from 36 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and 13 patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma were investigated for B1-triggered cell death. Membrane components, such as sphingomyelin and ganglioside M1, were investigated by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation, together with the Csk-binding protein. Results Chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients segregated into two groups: B cells from one group were sensitive to B1, whereas those from the second group were not. Further results ascribed the resistance of these latter cases to a defective recruitment of Csk-binding protein, resulting in a lack of sphingomyelin and ganglioside M1 at the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of their malignant B cells. Sphingolipids were indeed retained in the cytoplasm, because of lowered activity of P-glycoprotein. Supporting this mechanism, rifampicin, an inducer of P-glycoprotein, improved the activity of this transmembrane efflux pump, normalized the quantity of sphingomyelin within the membrane, and thereby restored the efficacy of the B1 monoclonal antibody in the formerly B1-resistant cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Conclusions The lipid organization of membranes of B cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia differs from one patient to another. In practice, given the relevance of the membrane lipid distribution to the efficacy of biotherapies, this observation is of potential importance. PMID:22058197

  18. Role of sphingolipid mediator ceramide in obesity and renal injury in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Boini, Krishna M; Zhang, Chun; Xia, Min; Poklis, Justin L; Li, Pin-Lan

    2010-09-01

    The present study tested a hypothesis that excess accumulation of sphingolipid, ceramide, its metabolites, or a combination contributes to the development of obesity and associated kidney damage. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that C57BL/6J mice on the high-fat diet (HFD) had significantly increased plasma total ceramide levels compared with animals fed a low-fat diet (LFD). Treatment of mice with the acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) inhibitor amitriptyline significantly attenuated the HFD-induced plasma ceramide levels. Corresponding to increase in plasma ceramide, the HFD significantly increased the body weight gain, plasma leptin concentration, urinary total protein and albumin excretion, glomerular damage index, and adipose tissue ASMase activity compared with the LFD-fed mice. These HFD-induced changes were also significantly attenuated by treatment of mice with amitriptyline. In addition, the decline of plasma glucose concentration after an intraperitoneal injection of insulin (0.15 U/kg b.wt.) was more sustained in mice on the HFD with amitriptyline than on the HFD alone. Intraperitoneal injection of glucose (3 g/kg b.wt.) resulted in a slow increase followed by a rapid decrease in the plasma glucose concentration in LFD and HFD plus amitriptyline-treated mice, but such blood glucose response was not observed in HFD-fed mice. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated a decrease in the podocin and an increase in the desmin in the glomeruli of HFD-fed mice compared with the LFD and HFD plus amitriptyline-treated mice. In conclusion, our results reveal a pivotal role for ceramide biosynthesis in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and associated kidney damage. PMID:20543095

  19. Sphingolipid Long-Chain Base Synthesis in Plants (Characterization of Serine Palmitoyltransferase Activity in Squash Fruit Microsomes).

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, D. V.; Fairfield, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    The activity of serine palmitoyltransferase (palmitoyl-coenzyme A [CoA]:L-serine [Ser]-C-palmitoyltransferase [decarboxylating], EC 2.3.1.50), the enzyme catalyzing the first step in the synthesis of the long-chain base required for sphingolipid assembly, has been characterized in a plant system. Enzyme activity in a microsomal membrane fraction from summer squash fruit (Cucurbita pepo L. cv Early Prolific Straightneck) was assayed by monitoring the incorporation of L-[3H]Ser into the chloroform-soluble product, 3-ketosphinganine. Addition of NADPH to the assay system resulted in the conversion of 3-ketosphinganine to sphinganine. The apparent Km for Ser was approximately 1.8 mM. The enzyme exhibited a strong preference for palmitoyl-CoA, with optimal activity at a substrate concentration of 200 [mu]M. Pyridoxal 5[prime]-phosphate was required as a coenzyme. The pH optimum was 7.6, and the temperature optimum was 36 to 40[deg]C. Enzyme activity was greatest in the microsomal fraction obtained by differential centrifugation and was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum using marker enzymes. Two known mechanism-based inhibitors of the mammalian enzyme, L-cycloserine and [beta]-chloro-L-alanine, were effective inhibitors of enzyme activity in squash microsomes. Changes in enzyme activity with size (age) of squash fruit were observed. The results from this study suggest that the properties and catalytic mechanism of Ser palmitoyltransferase from squash are similar to those of the animal, fungal, and bacterial enzyme in most respects. The specific activity of the enzyme in squash microsomes ranged from 0.57 to 0.84 nmol min-1 mg-1 of protein, values 2- to 20-fold higher than those previously reported for preparations from animal tissues. PMID:12232036

  20. Cloning and molecular characterisation of a Delta8-sphingolipid-desaturase from Nicotiana tabacum closely related to Delta6-acyl-desaturases.

    PubMed

    García-Maroto, Federico; Garrido-Cárdenas, José A; Michaelson, Louise V; Napier, Johnathan A; Alonso, Diego López

    2007-06-01

    Investigation on the absence of Delta(6)-desaturase activity in Nicotiana tabacum has led to the cloning of a new desaturase gene from this organism (NTDXDES) that exhibited unexpected biochemical activity. Cladistic analysis shows clustering of NTDXDES together with functional Delta(6)-acyl-desaturases of near Solanales plants, such as Borago and Echium. This group lies apart from that of previously characterised Delta(8)-sphingolipid-desaturases, which also includes two putative tobacco members identified in this study. Moreover, strong expression of NTDXDES is found in leaves, flowers, fruits and developing seeds of tobacco plants that is highly dependent on the development phase, with transcriptional activity being higher at stages of active tissue growth. This pattern is similar to that showed by Delta(6)-acyl-desaturases characterised in Boraginaceae species. However, functional assays using a yeast expression system revealed that the protein encoded by NTDXDES lacks Delta(6)-desaturase activity, but instead it is able to desaturate sphingolipid substrates by introducing a double bond on the Delta(8)-position. These data indicate that NTDXDES represent a novel desaturase gene placed in a different evolutionary lineage to that of previously characterised Delta(8)-desaturases. PMID:17325828

  1. The effect of the bioactive sphingolipids S1P and C1P on multipotent stromal cells--new opportunities in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Jeleń, Marta; Chrząstek, Klaudia; Grzesiak, Jakub; Meissner, Justyna

    2015-09-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) belong to a family of bioactive sphingolipids that act as important extracellular signaling molecules and chemoattractants. This study investigated the influence of S1P and C1P on the morphology, proliferation activity and osteogenic properties of rat multipotent stromal cells derived from bone marrow (BMSCs) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASCs). We show that S1P and C1P can influence mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), each in a different manner. S1P stimulation promoted the formation of cellular aggregates of BMSCs and ASCs, while C1P had an effect on the regular growth pattern and expanded intercellular connections, thereby increasing the proliferative activity. Although osteogenic differentiation of MSCs was enhanced by the addition of S1P, the effectiveness of osteoblast differentiation was more evident in BMSCs, particularly when biochemical and molecular marker levels were considered. The results of the functional osteogenic differentiation assay, which includes an evaluation of the efficiency of extracellular matrix mineralization (SEM-EDX), revealed the formation of numerous mineral aggregates in BMSC cultures stimulated with S1P. Our data demonstrated that in an appropriate combination, the bioactive sphingolipids S1P and C1P may find wide application in regenerative medicine, particularly in bone regeneration with the use of MSCs. PMID:26110483

  2. Effects of stereochemistry, saturation, and hydrocarbon chain length on the ability of synthetic constrained azacyclic sphingolipids to trigger nutrient transporter down-regulation, vacuolation, and cell death.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Michael S; Tessier, Jérémie; Wiher, Timothy; O'Donoghue, Heather; McCracken, Alison N; Kim, Seong M; Nguyen, Dean G; Simitian, Grigor S; Viana, Matheus; Rafelski, Susanne; Edinger, Aimee L; Hanessian, Stephen

    2016-09-15

    Constrained analogs containing a 2-hydroxymethylpyrrolidine core of the natural sphingolipids sphingosine, sphinganine, N,N-dimethylsphingosine and N-acetyl variants of sphingosine and sphinganine (C2-ceramide and dihydro-C2-ceramide) were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to down-regulate nutrient transporter proteins and trigger cytoplasmic vacuolation in mammalian cells. In cancer cells, the disruptions in intracellular trafficking produced by these sphingolipids lead to cancer cell death by starvation. Structure activity studies were conducted by varying the length of the hydrocarbon chain, the degree of unsaturation and the presence or absence of an aryl moiety on the appended chains, and stereochemistry at two stereogenic centers. In general, cytotoxicity was positively correlated with nutrient transporter down-regulation and vacuolation. This study was intended to identify structural and functional features in lead compounds that best contribute to potency, and to develop chemical biology tools that could be used to isolate the different protein targets responsible for nutrient transporter loss and cytoplasmic vacuolation. A molecule that produces maximal vacuolation and transporter loss is expected to have the maximal anti-cancer activity and would be a lead compound. PMID:27475534

  3. Feeding a Modified Fish Diet to Bottlenose Dolphins Leads to an Increase in Serum Adiponectin and Sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Sobolesky, Philip M; Harrell, Tyler S; Parry, Celeste; Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Janech, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Feeding a modified fish diet has been suggested to improve insulin sensitivity in bottlenose dolphins; however, insulin sensitivity was not directly measured. Since demonstrating an improvement in insulin sensitivity is technically difficult in dolphins, we postulated that directional changes in the hormone axis: fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21)/Adiponectin/Ceramide (Cer), could provide further support to this hypothesis. We measured 2-h post-prandial serum FGF21, total adiponectin, percent unmodified adiponectin, ceramide, and sphingosine levels from dolphins fed a diet rich in heptadecanoic acid (C17:0) over 24 weeks. Serum FGF21 was quantified by ELISA with an observed range of 129-1599 pg/ml, but did not significantly change over the 24-week study period. Total adiponectin levels (mean ± SD) significantly increased from 776 ± 400 pmol/ml at week 0 to 1196 ± 467 pmol/ml at week 24. The percent unmodified adiponectin levels (mean ± SD) decreased from 23.8 ± 6.0% at week 0 to 15.2 ± 5.2% at week 24. Interestingly, although FGF21 levels did not change, there was a good correlation between FGF21 and total adiponectin (ρ = 0.788, P < 0.001). We quantified the abundances of serum ceramides and sphingosines (SPH) because adiponectin has a defined role in sphingolipid metabolism through adiponectin receptor-mediated activation of ceramidases. The most abundant ceramide in dolphin sera was Cer 24:1 comprising 49% of the ceramides measured. Significant reductions were observed in the unsaturated Cer 18:1, Cer 20:1, and Cer 24:1, whereas significant increases were observed in saturated Cer 22:0, Cer 24:0, and Cer 26:0. However, total serum ceramides did not change. Significant elevations were detected for total sphingosine, dihydrosphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate. Proteomic analysis of the serum proteins revealed few changes in serum proteins over the study period. In conclusion

  4. Long N-acyl fatty acids on sphingolipids are responsible for miscibility with phospholipids to form liquid-ordered phase.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Peter J

    2009-10-01

    :phospholipid at 25 degrees C with pure phospholipid in gel phase and 42:58 mole ratio at 65 degrees C when the phospholipid was in the fluid phase. The results are discussed with reference to the role of the length of the N-acyl substituent of the sphingolipids in formation of complexes with phospholipids. PMID:19576168

  5. Feeding a Modified Fish Diet to Bottlenose Dolphins Leads to an Increase in Serum Adiponectin and Sphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Sobolesky, Philip M.; Harrell, Tyler S.; Parry, Celeste; Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Janech, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Feeding a modified fish diet has been suggested to improve insulin sensitivity in bottlenose dolphins; however, insulin sensitivity was not directly measured. Since demonstrating an improvement in insulin sensitivity is technically difficult in dolphins, we postulated that directional changes in the hormone axis: fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21)/Adiponectin/Ceramide (Cer), could provide further support to this hypothesis. We measured 2-h post-prandial serum FGF21, total adiponectin, percent unmodified adiponectin, ceramide, and sphingosine levels from dolphins fed a diet rich in heptadecanoic acid (C17:0) over 24 weeks. Serum FGF21 was quantified by ELISA with an observed range of 129–1599 pg/ml, but did not significantly change over the 24-week study period. Total adiponectin levels (mean ± SD) significantly increased from 776 ± 400 pmol/ml at week 0 to 1196 ± 467 pmol/ml at week 24. The percent unmodified adiponectin levels (mean ± SD) decreased from 23.8 ± 6.0% at week 0 to 15.2 ± 5.2% at week 24. Interestingly, although FGF21 levels did not change, there was a good correlation between FGF21 and total adiponectin (ρ = 0.788, P < 0.001). We quantified the abundances of serum ceramides and sphingosines (SPH) because adiponectin has a defined role in sphingolipid metabolism through adiponectin receptor-mediated activation of ceramidases. The most abundant ceramide in dolphin sera was Cer 24:1 comprising 49% of the ceramides measured. Significant reductions were observed in the unsaturated Cer 18:1, Cer 20:1, and Cer 24:1, whereas significant increases were observed in saturated Cer 22:0, Cer 24:0, and Cer 26:0. However, total serum ceramides did not change. Significant elevations were detected for total sphingosine, dihydrosphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate. Proteomic analysis of the serum proteins revealed few changes in serum proteins over the study period. In conclusion

  6. Altering sphingolipid composition with aging induces contractile dysfunction of gastric smooth muscle via K(Ca) 1.1 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Shinkyu; Kim, Ji Aee; Kim, Tae Hun; Li, Hai-Yan; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Lee, Yong-Moon; Oh, Seikwan; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Futerman, Anthony H; Suh, Suk Hyo

    2015-12-01

    K(Ca) 1.1 regulates smooth muscle contractility by modulating membrane potential, and age-associated changes in K(Ca) 1.1 expression may contribute to the development of motility disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Sphingolipids (SLs) are important structural components of cellular membranes whose altered composition may affect K(Ca) 1.1 expression. Thus, in this study, we examined whether altered SL composition due to aging may affect the contractility of gastric smooth muscle (GSM). We studied changes in ceramide synthases (CerS) and SL levels in the GSM of mice of varying ages and compared them with those in young CerS2-null mice. The levels of C16- and C18-ceramides, sphinganine, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate were increased, and levels of C22, C24:1 and C24 ceramides were decreased in the GSM of both aged wild-type and young CerS2-null mice. The altered SL composition upregulated K(Ca) 1.1 and increased K(Ca) 1.1 currents, while no change was observed in K(Ca) 1.1 channel activity. The upregulation of KC a 1.1 impaired intracellular Ca²⁺mobilization and decreased phosphorylated myosin light chain levels, causing GSM contractile dysfunction. Additionally, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, protein kinase Cζ , c-Jun N-terminal kinases, and nuclear factor kappa-B were found to be involved in K(Ca) 1.1 upregulation. Our findings suggest that age-associated changes in SL composition or CerS2 ablation upregulate K(Ca) 1.1 via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase Cζ /c-Jun N-terminal kinases/nuclear factor kappa-B-mediated pathway and impair Ca²⁺ mobilization, which thereby induces the contractile dysfunction of GSM. CerS2-null mice exhibited similar effects to aged wild-type mice; therefore, CerS2-null mouse models may be utilized for investigating the pathogenesis of aging-associated motility disorders. PMID:26288989

  7. Reproductive and sphingolipid metabolic effects of fumonisin B1 and its alkaline hydrolysis product in LM/Bc mice: hydrolyzed fumonisin B1 did not cause neural tube defects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium verticillioides. They are toxic to animals and exert their effects through mechanisms involving disruption of sphingolipid metabolism. Fumonisins and their hydrolyzed analogues are found in alkaline-cooked, maize-based foods such as tortillas and the c...

  8. Modification of sphingolipid metabolism by tamoxifen and N-desmethyltamoxifen in acute myelogenous leukemia – Impact on enzyme activity and response to cytotoxics

    PubMed Central

    Morad, Samy A. F.; Tan, Su-Fern; Feith, David J.; Kester, Mark; Claxton, David F.; Loughran, Thomas P.; Barth, Brian M.; Fox, Todd E.; Cabot, Myles C.

    2015-01-01

    The triphenylethylene antiestrogen, tamoxifen, can be an effective inhibitor of sphingolipid metabolism. This off-target activity makes tamoxifen an interesting ancillary for boosting the apoptosis-inducing properties of ceramide, a sphingolipid with valuable tumor censoring activity. Here we show for the first time that tamoxifen and metabolite, N –desmethyltamoxifen (DMT) block ceramide glycosylation and inhibit ceramide hydrolysis (by acid ceramidase, AC) in human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cell lines and in AML cells derived from patients. Tamoxifen (1-10 μM) inhibition of AC in AML cells was accompanied by decreases in AC protein expression. Tamoxifen also depressed expression and activity of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), the enzyme catalyzing production of mitogenic sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1-P). Results from mass spectroscopy showed that tamoxifen and DMT, i ) increased the levels of endogenous C16:0- and C24:1 ceramide molecular species, ii) nearly totally halted production of respective glucosylceramide (GC) molecular species, iii ) drastically reduced levels of sphingosine ( to 9% of control), and iv ) reduced levels of S1-P by 85%, in vincristine-resistant HL-60/VCR cells. Co-administration of tamoxifen with either N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-HPR), a ceramide-generating retinoid, or a cell-deliverable form of ceramide, C6-ceramide, resulted in marked decreases in HL-60/VCR cell viability that far exceeded single agent potency. Combination treatments resulted in synergistic apoptotic cell death as gauged by increased Annexin V binding and DNA fragmentation and activation of caspase-3. These results show the versatility of adjuvant triphenylethylene with ceramide-centric therapies for magnifying therapeutic potential in AML. Such drug regimens could serve as effective strategies, even in the multidrug resistant setting. PMID:25769964

  9. Arabidopsis Sphingolipid Fatty Acid 2-Hydroxylases (AtFAH1 and AtFAH2) Are Functionally Differentiated in Fatty Acid 2-Hydroxylation and Stress Responses1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Minoru; Takahara, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Uchimiya, Hirofumi; Kawai-Yamada, Maki

    2012-01-01

    2-Hydroxy fatty acids (2-HFAs) are predominantly present in sphingolipids and have important physicochemical and physiological functions in eukaryotic cells. Recent studies from our group demonstrated that sphingolipid fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FAH) is required for the function of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Bax inhibitor-1 (AtBI-1), which is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane-localized cell death suppressor. However, little is known about the function of two Arabidopsis FAH homologs (AtFAH1 and AtFAH2), and it remains unclear whether 2-HFAs participate in cell death regulation. In this study, we found that both AtFAH1 and AtFAH2 had FAH activity, and the interaction with Arabidopsis cytochrome b5 was needed for the sufficient activity. 2-HFA analysis of AtFAH1 knockdown lines and atfah2 mutant showed that AtFAH1 mainly 2-hydroxylated very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA), whereas AtFAH2 selectively 2-hydroxylated palmitic acid in Arabidopsis. In addition, 2-HFAs were related to resistance to oxidative stress, and AtFAH1 or 2-hydroxy VLCFA showed particularly strong responses to oxidative stress. Furthermore, AtFAH1 interacted with AtBI-1 via cytochrome b5 more preferentially than AtFAH2. Our results suggest that AtFAH1 and AtFAH2 are functionally different FAHs, and that AtFAH1 or 2-hydroxy VLCFA is a key factor in AtBI-1-mediated cell death suppression. PMID:22635113

  10. Impact of insulin deprivation and treatment on sphingolipid distribution in different muscle subcellular compartments of streptozotocin-diabetic C57Bl/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Zabielski, Piotr; Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Lanza, Ian R.; Gopala, Srinivas; Manjunatha, S.; Jakaitis, Daniel R.; Persson, Xuan-Mai; Gransee, Jaime; Klaus, Katherine A.; Schimke, Jill M.; Jensen, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin deprivation in type 1 diabetes (T1D) individuals increases lipolysis and plasma free fatty acids (FFA) concentration, which can stimulate synthesis of intramyocellular bioactive lipids such as ceramides (Cer) and long-chain fatty acid-CoAs (LCFa-CoAs). Ceramide was shown to decrease muscle insulin sensitivity, and at mitochondrial levels it stimulates reactive oxygen species production. Here, we show that insulin deprivation in streptozotocin diabetic C57BL/6 mice increases quadriceps muscle Cer content, which was correlated with a concomitant decrease in the body fat and increased plasma FFA, glycosylated hemoglobin level (%Hb A1c), and muscular LCFa-CoA content. The alternations were accompanied by an increase in protein expression in LCFa-CoA and Cer synthesis (FATP1/ACSVL5, CerS1, CerS5), a decrease in the expression of genes implicated in muscle insulin sensitivity (GLUT4, GYS1), and inhibition of insulin signaling cascade by Aktα and GYS3β phosphorylation under acute insulin stimulation. Both the content and composition of sarcoplasmic fraction sphingolipids were most affected by insulin deprivation, whereas mitochondrial fraction sphingolipids remained stable. The observed effects of insulin deprivation were reversed, except for content and composition of LCFa-CoA, CerS protein expression, GYS1 gene expression, and phosphorylation status of Akt and GYS3β when exogenous insulin was provided by subcutaneous insulin implants. Principal component analysis and Pearson's correlation analysis revealed close relationships between the features of the diabetic phenotype, the content of LCFa-CoAs and Cers containing C18-fatty acids in sarcoplasm, but not in mitochondria. Insulin replacement did not completely rescue the phenotype, especially regarding the content of LCFa-CoA, or proteins implicated in Cer synthesis and muscle insulin sensitivity. These persistent changes might contribute to muscle insulin resistance observed in T1D individuals. PMID:24368672

  11. Vitamin E metabolite 13'-carboxychromanols inhibit pro-inflammatory enzymes, induce apoptosis and autophagy in human cancer cells by modulating sphingolipids and suppress colon tumor development in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yumi; Park, Na-Young; Rostgaard-Hansen, Agnetha Linn; Huang, Jianjie; Jiang, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin E forms are substantially metabolized to various carboxychromanols including 13'-carboxychromanols (13'-COOHs) that are found at high levels in feces. However, there is limited knowledge about functions of these metabolites. Here we studied δT-13'-COOH and δTE-13'-COOH, which are metabolites of δ-tocopherol and δ-tocotrienol, respectively. δTE-13'-COOH is also a natural constituent of a traditional medicine Garcinia Kola. Both 13'-COOHs are much stronger than tocopherols in inhibition of pro-inflammatory and cancer promoting cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), and in induction of apoptosis and autophagy in colon cancer cells. The anticancer effects by 13'-COOHs appeared to be partially independent of inhibition of COX-2/5-LOX. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we found that 13'-COOHs increased intracellular dihydrosphingosine and dihydroceramides after short-time incubation in HCT-116 cells, and enhanced ceramides while decreased sphingomyelins during prolonged treatment. Modulation of sphingolipids by 13'-COOHs was observed prior to or coinciding with biochemical manifestation of cell death. Pharmaceutically blocking the increase of these sphingolipids partially counteracted 13'-COOH-induced cell death. Further, 13'-COOH inhibited dihydroceramide desaturase without affecting the protein expression. In agreement with these mechanistic findings, δTE-13'-COOH significantly suppressed the growth and multiplicity of colon tumor in mice. Our study demonstrates that 13'-COOHs have anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities, may contribute to in vivo anticancer effect of vitamin E forms and are promising novel cancer prevention agents. PMID:27016075

  12. Palmitate induces COX-2 expression via the sphingolipid pathway-mediated activation of NF-κB, p38, and ERK in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eunhye; Yun, Mihee; Kim, Seong Keun; Seo, Gimoon; Bae, Joon Sung; Joo, Kwon; Chae, Gue Tae; Lee, Seong-Beom

    2014-05-01

    It has been suggested that free fatty acids (FFA) such as palmitate, which are secreted from enlarged adipocytes in the subcutaneous fat of obese subjects, serve as a link between obesity and altered skin functions. Cyclooxygenease-2 (COX-2) and prostanoids participate in the induction of impaired dermal function. In the current study, we investigated the issue of whether palmitate induces COX-2 expression via the sphingolipid pathway-mediated activation of NF-κB or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in human dermal fibroblasts. Palmitate treatment significantly induced COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release in human dermal fibroblasts. In addition, pre-treatment with triacsin C, an inhibitor of acyl-CoA synthetase in de novo ceramide synthesis, was found to reduce palmitate-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 release in human dermal fibroblast. The findings also show that palmitate-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 release are mediated by the NF-κB, p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK pathways. These findings point to a new mechanism for explaining the link between increased FFAs in obesity and impaired dermal function. PMID:24337700

  13. Effects of orally administered fumonisin B₁ (FB₁), partially hydrolysed FB₁, hydrolysed FB₁ and N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl) FB₁ on the sphingolipid metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Irene; Nagl, Veronika; Schwartz-Zimmermann, Heidi Elisabeth; Varga, Elisabeth; Schwarz, Christiane; Slavik, Veronika; Reisinger, Nicole; Malachová, Alexandra; Cirlini, Martina; Generotti, Silvia; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Krska, Rudolf; Moll, Wulf-Dieter; Berthiller, Franz

    2015-02-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a Fusarium mycotoxin frequently occurring in maize-based food and feed. Alkaline processing like nixtamalisation of maize generates partially and fully hydrolysed FB1 (pHFB1 and HFB1) and thermal treatment in the presence of reducing sugars leads to formation of N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl) fumonisin B1 (NDF). The toxicity of these metabolites, in particular their effect on the sphingolipid metabolism, is either unknown or discussed controversially. We produced high purity FB1, pHFB1a+b, HFB1 and NDF and fed them to male Sprague Dawley rats for three weeks. Once a week, urine and faeces samples were collected over 24 h and analysed for fumonisin metabolites as well as for the sphinganine (Sa) to sphingosine (So) ratio by validated LC-MS/MS based methods. While the latter was significantly increased in the FB1 positive control group, the Sa/So ratios of the partially and fully hydrolysed fumonisins were indifferent from the negative control group. Although NDF was partly cleaved during digestion, the liberated amounts of FB1 did not raise the Sa/So ratio. These results show that the investigated alkaline and thermal processing products of FB1 were, at the tested concentrations, non-toxic for rats, and suggest that according food processing can reduce fumonisin toxicity for humans. PMID:25475052

  14. 7-ketocholesterol incorporation into sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched (lipid raft) domains is impaired by vitamin E: a specific role for alpha-tocopherol with consequences on cell death.

    PubMed

    Royer, Marie-Charlotte; Lemaire-Ewing, Stéphanie; Desrumaux, Catherine; Monier, Serge; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Athias, Anne; Néel, Dominique; Lagrost, Laurent

    2009-06-01

    Cholesterol oxides, in particular 7-ketocholesterol, are proatherogenic compounds that induce cell death in the vascular wall when localized in lipid raft domains of the cell membrane. Deleterious effects of 7-ketocholesterol can be prevented by vitamin E, but the molecular mechanism involved is unclear. In this study, unlike gamma-tocopherol, the alpha-tocopherol vitamin E form was found to prevent 7-ketocholesterol-mediated apoptosis of A7R5 smooth muscle cells. To be operative, alpha-tocopherol needed to be added to the cells before 7-ketocholesterol, and its anti-apoptotic effect was reduced and even suppressed when added together or after 7-ketocholesterol, respectively. Both pre- and co-treatment of the cells with alpha-tocopherol resulted in the redistribution of 7-ketocholesterol out of the sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched (lipid raft) domains. In turn, fewer amounts of alpha-tocopherol associated with lipid rafts on 7-ketocholesterol-pretreated cells compared with untreated cells, with no prevention of cell death in this case. In further support of the implication of lipid raft domains, the dephosphorylation/inactivation of Akt-PKB was involved in the 7-ketocholesterol-induced apoptosis. Akt-PKB dephosphorylation was prevented by alpha-tocopherol, but not gamma-tocopherol pretreatment. PMID:19351882

  15. FTY720 Induces Apoptosis of M2 Subtype Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells by Targeting Sphingolipid Metabolism and Increasing Endogenous Ceramide Levels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lianchun; Liu, Yuan-Fang; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Hong; Song, Heng; Jiang, Hualiang; Chen, Sai-Juan; Luo, Cheng; Li, Keqin Kathy

    2014-01-01

    The M2 subtype Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML-M2) with t(8;21) represents an unmet challenge because of poor clinical outcomes in a sizable portion of patients. In this study,we report that FTY720 (Fingolimod), a sphingosine analogue and an FDA approved drug for treating of multiple sclerosis, shows antitumorigenic activity against the Kasumi-1 cell line, xenograft mouse models and leukemic blasts isolated from AML-M2 patients with t(8;21) translocation. Primary investigation indicated that FTY720 caused cell apoptosis through caspases and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activation. Transcriptomic profiling further revealed that FTY720 treatment could upregulate AML1 target genes and interfere with genes involved in ceramide synthesis. Treatment with FTY720 led to the elimination of AML1-ETO oncoprotein and caused cell cycle arrest. More importantly, FTY720 treatment resulted in rapid and significant increase of pro-apoptotic ceramide levels, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry based lipidomic approaches. Structural simulation model had also indicated that the direct binding of ceramide to inhibitor 2 of PP2A (I2PP2A) could reactivate PP2A and cause cell death. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that accumulation of ceramide plays a central role in FTY720 induced cell death of AML-M2 with t(8;21). Targeting sphingolipid metabolism by using FTY720 may provide novel insight for the drug development of treatment for AML-M2 leukemia. PMID:25050888

  16. Enhanced killing of SCC17B human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells after photodynamic therapy plus fenretinide via the de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Boppana, Nithin B; Stochaj, Ursula; Kodiha, Mohamed; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Pierce, Jason S; Korbelik, Mladen; Separovic, Duska

    2015-05-01

    Because photodynamic therapy (PDT) alone is not always effective as an anticancer treatment, PDT is combined with other anticancer agents for improved efficacy. The clinically-relevant fenretinide [N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide; 4HPR], was combined with the silicon phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc4-mediated PDT to test for their potential to enhance killing of SCC17B cells, a clinically-relevant model of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Because each of these treatments induces apoptosis and regulates the de novo sphingolipid (SL) biosynthesis pathway, the role of ceramide synthase, the pathway-associated enzyme, in PDT+4HPR-induced apoptotic cell death was determined using the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1 (FB). PDT+4HPR enhanced loss of clonogenicity. zVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, and FB, protected cells from death post-PDT+4HPR. In contrast, the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 inhibitor ABT199 enhanced cell killing after PDT+4HPR. Combining PDT with 4HPR led to FB-sensitive, enhanced Bax associated with mitochondria and cytochrome c redistribution. Mass spectrometry data showed that the accumulation of C16-dihydroceramide, a precursor of ceramide in the de novo SL biosynthesis pathway, was enhanced after PDT+4HPR. Using quantitative confocal microscopy, we found that PDT+4HPR enhanced dihydroceramide/ceramide accumulation in the ER, which was inhibited by FB. The results suggest that SCC17B cells are sensitized to PDT by 4HPR via the de novo SL biosynthesis pathway and apoptosis, and imply potential clinical relevance of the combination for cancer treatment. PMID:25739041

  17. Characterization of secretory sphingomyelinase activity, lipoprotein sphingolipid content and LDL aggregation in ldlr−/− mice fed on a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Deevska, Gergana M.; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J.; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana N.

    2012-01-01

    The propensity of LDLs (low-density lipoproteins) for aggregation and/or oxidation has been linked to their sphingolipid content, specifically the levels of SM (sphingomyelin) and ceramide. To investigate this association in vivo, ldlr (LDL receptor)-null mice (ldlr−/−) were fed on a modified (atherogenic) diet containing saturated fats and cholesterol. The diet led to significantly elevated SM content in all serum lipoproteins. In contrast, ceramide increased only in the LDL particles. MS-based analyses of the lipid acyl chain composition revealed a marked elevation in C16:0 fatty acid in SM and ceramide, consistent with the prevalence of palmitic acid in the modified diet. The diet also led to increased activity of the S-SMase [secretory SMase (sphingomyelinase)], a protein that is generated by ASMase (acid SMase) and acts on serum LDL. An increased macrophage secretion seemed to be responsible for the elevated S-SMase activity. ASMase-deficient mice (asm−/−/ldlr−/−) lacked S-SMase activity and were protected from diet-induced elevation in LDL ceramide. LDL from asm−/−/ldlr−/− mice fed on the modified diet were less aggregated and oxidized than LDL from asm+/+/ldlr−/− mice. When tested in vitro, the propensity for aggregation was dependent on the SM level: only LDL from animals on modified diet that have high SM content aggregated when treated with recombinant S-SMase. In conclusion, LDL-SM content and S-SMase activity are up-regulated in mice fed on an atherogenic diet. S-SMase mediates diet-induced changes in LDL ceramide content and aggregation. S-SMase effectiveness in inducing aggregation is dependent on diet-induced enrichment of LDL with SM, possibly through increased hepatic synthesis. PMID:22712892

  18. Sphingolipid Degradation by Leishmania major Is Required for Its Resistance to Acidic pH in the Mammalian Host▿†

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Xin, Lijun; Soong, Lynn; Zhang, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Leishmania parasites alternate between flagellated promastigotes in sand flies and nonflagellated amastigotes in mammals, causing a spectrum of serious diseases. To survive, they must resist the harsh conditions in phagocytes (including acidic pH, elevated temperature, and increased oxidative/nitrosative stress) and evade the immune response. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of sphingolipid (SL) metabolism in Leishmania virulence. In particular, we have generated a Leishmania major iscl− mutant which is deficient in SL degradation but grows normally as promastigotes in culture. Importantly, iscl− mutants cannot induce pathology in either immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice yet are able to persist at low levels. In this study, we investigated how the degradation of SLs might contribute to Leishmania infection. First, unlike wild-type (WT) L. major, iscl− mutants do not trigger polarized T cell responses in mice. Second, like WT parasites, iscl− mutants possess the ability to downregulate macrophage activation by suppressing the production of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and nitric oxide. Third, during the stationary phase, iscl− promastigotes were extremely vulnerable to acidic pH but not to other adverse conditions, such as elevated temperature and oxidative/nitrosative stress. In addition, inhibition of phagosomal acidification significantly improved iscl− survival in murine macrophages. Together, these findings indicate that SL degradation by Leishmania is essential for its adaption to the acidic environment in phagolysosomes but is not required for the suppression of host cell activation. Finally, our studies with iscl− mutant-infected mice suggest that having viable, persistent parasites is not sufficient to provide immunity against virulent Leishmania challenge. PMID:21576322

  19. Short-term Mg deficiency upregulates protein kinase C isoforms in cardiovascular tissues and cells; relation to NF-kB, cytokines, ceramide salvage sphingolipid pathway and PKC-zeta: hypothesis and review

    PubMed Central

    Altura, Burton M; Shah, Nilank C; Shah, Gatha J; Zhang, Aimin; Li, Wenyan; Zheng, Tao; Perez-Albela, Jose Luis; Altura, Bella T

    2014-01-01

    Numerous recent,epidemiological studies reveal that Western populations are growing more and more deficient in daily Mg intake which have been linked to etiology of cardiovascular (CV) diseases. A growing body of evidence suggests that a major missing link to this dilemma may reside within the sphingolipid-ceramide pathways. For the past 25 years , our labs have been focusing on these pathways in Mg-deficient mammals. The objective of this paper is two-fold: 1) to test various hypotheses and 2) to review the current status of the field and how protein kinase C isoforms may be pivotal to solving some of the CV attributes of Mg deficiency. Below, we test the hypotheses that: 1) short-term dietary deficiency of magnesium (MgD) would result in the upregulation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in left ventricular (LV) and aortic smooth muscle (ASM) and serum; 2) MgD would result in a release of select cytokines and an upregulation of NF-kB in LV and ASM, and in primary cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (PCASMC); 3) MgD would result in an activation of the sphingolipid salvage pathway in LV and ASM, and in PCASMC; 4) MgD would result in a synthesis of sphingosine, but not sphinganine, in PCASMC which could be inhibited by fumonisin B1 (FB) an inhibitor of ceramide synthase (CS), but not scyphostatin an inhibitor of neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase); 5) incubation of PCASMC (in low Mg2+) with the PKC-mimic PMA would result in release and synthesis of NF-kB, cytokines, and ceramide but not sphingosine. The new data indicate that short-term MgD (10% normal dietary intake) result in an upregulation of all three classes of PKC isoforms in LV, aortic muscle and in serum coupled to the upregulation of ceramide, NF-kB activation, and cytokines. High degrees of linear correlation were found to exist between upregulation of PKC isoforms, p65 and cytokine release, suggesting cross-talk between these molecules and molecular pathways. Our experiments with PCASMCs demonstrated

  20. Mutation for Nonsyndromic Mental Retardation in the trans-2-Enoyl-CoA Reductase TER Gene Involved in Fatty Acid Elongation Impairs the Enzyme Activity and Stability, Leading to Change in Sphingolipid Profile*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kensuke; Ohno, Yusuke; Sassa, Takayuki; Taguchi, Ryo; Çalışkan, Minal; Ober, Carole; Kihara, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs, chain length >C20) exist in tissues throughout the body and are synthesized by repetition of the fatty acid (FA) elongation cycle composed of four successive enzymatic reactions. In mammals, the TER gene is the only gene encoding trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductase, which catalyzes the fourth reaction in the FA elongation cycle. The TER P182L mutation is the pathogenic mutation for nonsyndromic mental retardation. This mutation substitutes a leucine for a proline residue at amino acid 182 in the TER enzyme. Currently, the mechanism by which the TER P182L mutation causes nonsyndromic mental retardation is unknown. To understand the effect of this mutation on the TER enzyme and VLCFA synthesis, we have biochemically characterized the TER P182L mutant enzyme using yeast and mammalian cells transfected with the TER P182L mutant gene and analyzed the FA elongation cycle in the B-lymphoblastoid cell line with the homozygous TER P182L mutation (TERP182L/P182L B-lymphoblastoid cell line). We have found that TER P182L mutant enzyme exhibits reduced trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductase activity and protein stability, thereby impairing VLCFA synthesis and, in turn, altering the sphingolipid profile (i.e. decreased level of C24 sphingomyelin and C24 ceramide) in the TERP182L/P182L B-lymphoblastoid cell line. We have also found that in addition to the TER enzyme-catalyzed fourth reaction, the third reaction in the FA elongation cycle is affected by the TER P182L mutation. These findings provide new insight into the biochemical defects associated with this genetic mutation. PMID:24220030

  1. Sphingolipid metabolism in organotypic mouse keratinocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, K.C.; Swartzendruber, D.C.; Wertz, P.W.; Downing, D.T. )

    1990-12-01

    Ceramides are the dominant component of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid lamellae, which constitute the epidermal permeability barrier. Only pig and human epidermal ceramides have been extensively characterized and the structures of the ceramides of cultured keratinocytes have not been previously investigated. In the present studies, we have characterized the ceramides synthesized by organotypic lifted mouse keratinocyte cultures for the first time and compared them to the ceramides of intact mouse epidermis. Both mouse epidermis and cultures contained five ceramides, ceramide 1 being the least polar and ceramide 5 the most polar. Ceramide 1 was a group of acylceramides, i.e., very-long-chain omega-hydroxyceramides with an ester-linked nonhydroxy fatty acid. Ceramide 2 contained medium-length saturated nonhydroxy fatty acids. (In culture, the ceramide 2 band was split into two parts with the slightly more polar ceramide 2' containing short-chain saturated nonhydroxy fatty acids.) Ceramide 5 contained short-chain alpha-hydroxy fatty acids. The structures of ceramides 1, 2, and 5 were analagous to those of pig and human epidermis. Mouse epidermal ceramide 3 was quite unusual, containing beta-hydroxy fatty acids, a structure not previously identified among mammalian ceramides. In contrast, culture ceramide 3 was composed of omega-hydroxy fatty acids with a chain-length distribution similar to that of ceramide 1. Mouse ceramide 4 was composed of fatty acids with chromatographic mobility similar to hydroxy fatty acids but with different chemical reactivity; it remains only partially characterized. Culture ceramide 4 was present in quantities too small for analysis. All ceramides in mouse epidermis and cultures contained only sphingosine bases, whereas pig and human ceramides also contain phytosphingosine.

  2. Role of Sphingolipids in Infant Gut Health and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Åke

    2016-06-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM), glycosphingolipids, and gangliosides are important polar lipids in the milk fat globule membrane but are not found in standard milk replacement formulas. Because digestion and absorption of SM and glycosphingolipids generate the bioactive metabolites ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and because intact gangliosides may have beneficial effects in the gut, this may be important for gut integrity and immune maturation in the neonate. The brush border enzymes that hydrolyze milk SM, alkaline sphingomyelinase (nucleotide phosphodiesterase pyrophosphatase 7), and neutral ceramidase are expressed at birth in both term and preterm infants. Released sphingosine is absorbed, phosphorylated to S1P, and converted to palmitic acid via S1P-lyase in the gut mucosa. Hypothetically, S1P also may be released from absorptive cells and exert important paracrine actions favoring epithelial integrity and renewal, as well as immune function, including secretory IgA production and migration of T lymphocyte subpopulations. Gluco-, galacto-, and lactosylceramide are hydrolyzed to ceramide by lactase-phlorizin hydrolase, which also hydrolyzes lactose. Gangliosides may adhere to the brush border and is internalized, modified, and possibly transported into blood, and may exert protective functions by their interactions with bacteria, bacterial toxins, and the brush border. PMID:27234412

  3. Sphingolipid transfer proteins defined by the GLTP-fold

    PubMed Central

    Malinina, Lucy; Simanshu, Dhirendra K.; Zhai, Xiuhong; Samygina, Valeria R.; Kamlekar, RaviKanth; Kenoth, Roopa; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja; Malakhova, Margarita L.; Molotkovsky, Julian G.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Brown, Rhoderick E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycolipid transfer proteins (GLTPs) originally were identified as small (~24 kDa), soluble, amphitropic proteins that specifically accelerate the intermembrane transfer of glycolipids. GLTPs and related homologs now are known to adopt a unique, helically dominated, two-layer ‘sandwich’ architecture defined as the GLTP-fold that provides the structural underpinning for the eukaryotic GLTP superfamily. Recent advances now provide exquisite insights into structural features responsible for lipid headgroup selectivity as well as the adaptability of the hydrophobic compartment for accommodating hydrocarbon chains of differing length and unsaturation. A new understanding of the structural versatility and evolutionary premium placed on the GLTP motif has emerged. Human GLTP-motifs have evolved to function not only as glucosylceramide binding/transferring domains for phosphoinositol 4-phosphate adaptor protein-2 during glycosphingolipid biosynthesis but also as selective binding/transfer proteins for ceramide-1-phosphate. The latter, known as ceramide-l-phosphate transfer protein, recently has been shown to form GLTP-fold while critically regulating Group-IV cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 activity and pro-inflammatory eicosanoid production. PMID:25797198

  4. Biochemical studies on sphingolipids of Artemia franciscana: complex neutral glycosphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hisao; Tohsato, Yukako; Kabayama, Kazuya; Itonori, Saki; Ito, Masahiro

    2013-04-01

    Brine shrimp are primitive crustacean arthropodal model organisms, second to daphnia, which can survive in high-salinity environments. Their oviposited cysts, cuticle-covered diapausing eggs, are highly resistant to dryness. To elucidate specialties of brine shrimp, this study characterized glycosphingolipids, which are signal transduction-associated material. A group of novel and complex fucosyl glycosphingolipids were separated and identified from cysts of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana by repeated lipid extraction, alkaline methanolysis, acid treatment, successive column chromatography, and post-source decay measurements by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Structures of the glycosphingolipids were elucidated by conventional structural characterization and mass spectrometry, and the compounds were identified as GlcNAcβ1-3GalNAcβ1-4(GlcNAcα1-2Fucα1-3)GlcNAcβ1-3Manβ1-4Glcβ1-Cer, GalNAcβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAcβ1-3GalNAcβ1-4(GlcNAcα1-2Fucα1-3)GlcNAcβ1-3Manβ1-4Glcβ1-Cer, and GalNAcβ1-4(GlcNAcα1-2Fucα1-3)GlcNAcβ1-3GalNAcβ1-4(GlcNAcα1-2Fucα1-3)GlcNAcβ1-3Manβ1-4Glcβ1-Cer. These compounds also contained a branching, non-arthro-series disaccharide with an α-GlcNAc terminus, similar to that found in a previously reported ceramide hexasaccharide (III(3)(GlcNAcα2Fucα)-At4Cer). The glycans within these complex GSLs are longer than reported glycans of the animal kingdom containing α-GlcNAc terminus. These complex GSLs as well as the longest GSL with ten sugar residues, ceramide decasaccharide (CDeS), contain the fucosylated LacdiNAc sequence reported to associate with parasitism/immunosuppression and the α-GlcNAc terminus reported to show a certain antibacterial effect in other reports. CDeS, the longest GSL of this species, was found in the highest amount, which indicates that CDeS may be functionally important. PMID:22890904

  5. Sphingolipids and Antimicrobial Peptides: Function and Roles in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungho; Lee, Sinhee; Lee, Yong-Moon

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD) and rosacea were complicated by barrier abrogation and deficiency in innate immunity. The first defender of epidermal innate immune response is the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that exhibit a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against multiple pathogens, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, viruses, and fungi. The deficiency of these AMPs in the skin of AD fails to protect our body against virulent pathogen infections. In contrast to AD where there is a suppression of AMPs, rosacea is characterized by overexpression of cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP), the products of which result in chronic epidermal inflammation. In this regard, AMP generation that is controlled by a key ceramide metabolite S1P-dependent mechanism could be considered as alternate therapeutic approaches to treat these skin disorders, i.e., Increased S1P levels strongly stimulated the CAMP expression which elevated the antimicrobial activity against multiple pathogens resulting the improved AD patient skin. PMID:24244808

  6. Gaucher’s Disease and Cancer: a Sphingolipid Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Brian M.; Shanmugavelandy, Sriram S.; Tacelosky, Diana M.; Kester, Mark; Morad, Samy A. F.; Cabot, Myles C.

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher’s disease is a sphingolipidosis characterized by a specific deficiency in an acidic glucocerebrosidase, which results in aberrant accumulation of glucosylceramide primarily within the lysosome. Gaucher’s disease has been correlated with cases of myeloma, leukemia, glioblastoma, lung cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma, although the reasons for the correlation are currently being debated. Some suggest that the effects of Gaucher’s disease may be linked to cancer, while others implicate the therapies used to treat Gaucher’s disease. This debate is not entirely surprising, as the speculations linking Gaucher’s disease with cancer fail to address the roles of ceramide and glucosylceramide in cancer biology. In this review, we will discuss, in the context of cancer biology, ceramide metabolism to glucosylceramide, the roles of glucosylceramide in multidrug-resistance, and the role of ceramide as an anticancer lipid. This review should reveal that it is most practical to associate elevated glucosylceramide, which accompanies Gaucher’s disease, with the progression of cancer. Furthermore, this review proposes that the therapies used to treat Gaucher’s disease, which augment ceramide accumulation, are likely not linked to correlations with cancer. PMID:23510065

  7. My journey into the world of sphingolipids and sphingolipidoses

    PubMed Central

    SANDHOFF, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of lipid storage in postmortem brains of patients with amaurotic idiocy led to the recognition of five lysosomal ganglioside storage diseases and identification of their inherited metabolic blocks. Purification of lysosomal acid sphingomyelinase and ceramidase and analysis of their gene structures were the prerequisites for the clarification of Niemann-Pick and Farber disease. For lipid catabolism, intraendosomal vesicles are formed during the endocytotic pathway. They are subjected to lipid sorting processes and were identified as luminal platforms for cellular lipid and membrane degradation. Lipid binding glycoproteins solubilize lipids from these cholesterol poor membranes and present them to water-soluble hydrolases for digestion. Biosynthesis and intracellular trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases (hexosaminidases, acid sphingomyelinase and ceramidase) and lipid binding and transfer proteins (GM2 activator, saposins) were analyzed to identify the molecular and metabolic basis of several sphingolipidoses. Studies on the biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids yielded the scheme of Combinatorial Ganglioside Biosynthesis involving promiscuous glycosyltransferases. Their defects in mutagenized mice impair brain development and function. PMID:23229750

  8. DNA damage response and sphingolipid signaling in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Nagahashi, Masayuki; Matsuda, Yasunobu; Moro, Kazuki; Tsuchida, Junko; Soma, Daiki; Hirose, Yuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-Ichi; Takabe, Kazuaki; Komatsu, Masaaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-09-01

    Patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cannot generally be cured by systemic chemotherapy or radiotherapy due to their poor response to conventional therapeutic agents. The development of novel and efficient targeted therapies to increase their treatment options depends on the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of HCC. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a network of cell-signaling events that are triggered by DNA damage. Its dysregulation is thought to be one of the key mechanisms underlying the generation of HCC. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a lipid mediator, has emerged as an important signaling molecule that has been found to be involved in many cellular functions. In the liver, the alteration of S1P signaling potentially affects the DDR pathways. In this review, we explore the role of the DDR in hepatocarcinogenesis of various etiologies, including hepatitis B and C infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Furthermore, we discuss the metabolism and functions of S1P that may affect the hepatic DDR. The elucidation of the pathogenic role of S1P may create new avenues of research into therapeutic strategies for patients with HCC. PMID:26514817

  9. Switching head group selectivity in mammalian sphingolipid biosynthesis by active-site engineering of sphingomyelin synthases.

    PubMed

    Kol, Matthijs; Panatala, Radhakrishnan; Nordmann, Mirjana; Swart, Leoni; van Suijlekom, Leonie; Cabukusta, Birol; Hilderink, Angelika; Grabietz, Tanja; Mina, John G M; Somerharju, Pentti; Korneev, Sergei; Tafesse, Fikadu G; Holthuis, Joost C M

    2016-07-01

    SM is a fundamental component of mammalian cell membranes that contributes to mechanical stability, signaling, and sorting. Its production involves the transfer of phosphocholine from phosphatidylcholine onto ceramide, a reaction catalyzed by SM synthase (SMS) 1 in the Golgi and SMS2 at the plasma membrane. Mammalian cells also synthesize trace amounts of the SM analog ceramide phosphoethanolamine (CPE), but the physiological relevance of CPE production is unclear. Previous work revealed that SMS2 is a bifunctional enzyme producing both SM and CPE, whereas a closely related enzyme, sphingomyelin synthase-related protein (SMSr)/SAMD8, acts as a monofunctional CPE synthase in the endoplasmatic reticulum. Using domain swapping and site-directed mutagenesis on enzymes expressed in defined lipid environments, we here identified structural determinants that mediate head group selectivity of SMS family members. Notably, a single residue adjacent to the catalytic histidine in the third exoplasmic loop profoundly influenced enzyme specificity, with glutamic acid permitting SMS-catalyzed CPE production and aspartic acid confining the enzyme to produce SM. An exchange of exoplasmic residues with SMSr proved sufficient to convert SMS1 into a bulk CPE synthase. This allowed us to establish mammalian cells that produce CPE rather than SM as the principal phosphosphingolipid and provide a model of the molecular interactions that impart catalytic specificity among SMS enzymes. PMID:27165857

  10. Differential Regulation of Specific Sphingolipids in Colon Cancer Cells during Staurosporine-Induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    del Solar, Virginia; Lizardo, Darleny Y; Li, Nasi; Hurst, Jerod J; Brais, Christopher J; Atilla-Gokcumen, G Ekin

    2015-12-17

    Apoptosis is accompanied by distinct morphological changes at the plasma and organelle membrane level. Involvement of certain lipids in apoptosis has been established; however, we have limited understanding of the specific lipid structures that participate in this process. We used untargeted comparative lipidomics to study the changes in lipid composition during staurosporine-induced apoptosis in HCT-116. Our results revealed that ceramides, dihydroceramides, and sphingomyelins, with defined acyl chains, constitute the majority of changes in the lipidome. Expression levels and activities of enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of lipids that change suggest that de novo synthesis causes these specific changes. Further analysis of the lipidome during apoptosis in other cancer and non-cancer cell lines suggested that accumulation of ceramides and dihydroceramides is specific to cancer cells. Taken together, our data propose that these molecules are regulated at the lipid-specific level during apoptosis and that this regulation differs between cancer and non-cancer cells. PMID:26687483

  11. Sphingolipid-mediated inhibition of apoptotic cell clearance by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Petrusca, Daniela N; Gu, Yuan; Adamowicz, Jeremy J; Rush, Natalia I; Hubbard, Walter C; Smith, Patricia A; Berdyshev, Evgeni V; Birukov, Konstantin G; Lee, Chao-Hung; Tuder, Rubin M; Twigg, Homer L; Vandivier, R William; Petrache, Irina

    2010-12-17

    A decreased clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) by alveolar macrophages (AM) may contribute to inflammation in emphysema. The up-regulation of ceramides in response to cigarette smoking (CS) has been linked to AM accumulation and increased detection of apoptotic alveolar epithelial and endothelial cells in lung parenchyma. We hypothesized that ceramides inhibit the AM phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Release of endogenous ceramides via sphingomyelinase or exogenous ceramide treatments dose-dependently impaired apoptotic Jurkat cell phagocytosis by primary rat or human AM, irrespective of the molecular species of ceramide. Similarly, in vivo augmentation of lung ceramides via intratracheal instillation in rats significantly decreased the engulfment of instilled target apoptotic thymocytes by resident AM. The mechanism of ceramide-induced efferocytosis impairment was dependent on generation of sphingosine via ceramidase. Sphingosine treatment recapitulated the effects of ceramide, dose-dependently inhibiting apoptotic cell clearance. The effect of ceramide on efferocytosis was associated with decreased membrane ruffle formation and attenuated Rac1 plasma membrane recruitment. Constitutively active Rac1 overexpression rescued AM efferocytosis against the effects of ceramide. CS exposure significantly increased AM ceramides and recapitulated the effect of ceramides on Rac1 membrane recruitment in a sphingosine-dependent manner. Importantly, CS profoundly inhibited AM efferocytosis via ceramide-dependent sphingosine production. These results suggest that excessive lung ceramides may amplify lung injury in emphysema by causing both apoptosis of structural cells and inhibition of their clearance by AM. PMID:20956540

  12. The Role of Skeletal Muscle Sphingolipids in the Development of Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Straczkowski, Marek; Kowalska, Irina

    2008-01-01

    Insulin resistance is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, polycystic ovary syndrome and other diseases. The most important stage in the development of insulin resistance is impairment of insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake. There is evidence that intramyocellular lipids might be responsible for this process through inhibition of insulin signaling. One of the important intracellular lipid pools is associated with the sphingomyelin signaling pathway. The second messenger in this pathway is ceramide. In vitro data indicate that ceramide inhibits insulin signaling, mainly through inactivation of protein kinase B. In vivo data suggest that ceramide accumulation within muscle cells might be associated with the development of insulin resistance. In this review, we discuss both in vitro and in vivo evidence for the role of muscle ceramide in the impairment of insulin action with particular focus on the question whether findings from animal studies are applicable to humans. We describe problems that are unresolved so far and topics of potential interest for future research. PMID:18548166

  13. Insights into Sphingolipid Miscibility: Separate Observation of Sphingomyelin and Ceramide N-Acyl Chain Melting

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Sherry S.W.; Busto, Jon V.; Keyvanloo, Amir; Goñi, Félix M.; Thewalt, Jenifer

    2012-01-01

    Ceramide produced from sphingomyelin in the plasma membrane is purported to affect signaling through changes in the membrane’s physical properties. Thermal behavior of N-palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM) and N-palmitoyl ceramide (PCer) mixtures in excess water has been monitored by 2H NMR spectroscopy and compared to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data. The alternate use of either perdeuterated or proton-based N-acyl chain PSM and PCer in our 2H NMR studies has allowed the separate observation of gel-fluid transitions in each lipid in the presence of the other one, and this in turn has provided direct information on the lipids’ miscibility over a wide temperature range. The results provide further evidence of the stabilization of the PSM gel state by PCer. Moreover, overlapping NMR and DSC data reveal that the DSC-signals parallel the melting of the major component (PSM) except at intermediate (20 and 30 mol %) fractions of PCer. In such cases, the DSC endotherm reports on the presumably highly cooperative melting of PCer. Up to at least 50 mol % PCer, PSM and PCer mix ideally in the liquid crystalline phase; in the gel phase, PCer becomes incorporated into PSM:PCer membranes with no evidence of pure solid PCer. PMID:23260048

  14. Lack of nitric oxide synthases increases lipoprotein immune complex deposition in the aorta and elevates plasma sphingolipid levels in lupus

    PubMed Central

    Al Gadban, Mohammed M.; German, Jashalynn; Truman, Jean-Philip; Soodavar, Farzan; Riemer, Ellen C; Twal, Waleed O; Smith, Kent J; Heller, Demarcus; Hofbauer, Ann F; Oates, Jim C.; Hammad, Samar M.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients display impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function required for normal vasodilatation. SLE patients express increased compensatory activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) generating excess nitric oxide that may result in inflammation. We examined the effects of genetic deletion of NOS2 and NOS3, encoding iNOS and eNOS respectively, on accelerated vascular disease in MRL/lpr lupus mouse model. NOS2 and NOS3 knockout (KO) MRL/lpr mice had higher plasma levels of triglycerides (23% and 35%, respectively), ceramide (45% and 21%, respectively), and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) (21%) compared to counterpart MRL/lpr controls. Plasma levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10) in NOS2 and NOS3 KO MRL/lpr mice were lower (53% and 80%, respectively) than counterpart controls. Nodule-like lesions in the adventitia were detected in aortas from both NOS2 and NOS3 KO MRL/lpr mice. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the lesions revealed activated endothelial cells and lipid-laden macrophages (foam cells), elevated sphingosine kinase 1 expression, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein immune complexes (oxLDL-IC). The findings suggest that advanced vascular disease in NOS2 and NOS3 KO MRL/lpr mice maybe mediated by increased plasma triglycerides, ceramide and S1P; decreased plasma IL-10; and accumulation of oxLDL-IC in the vessel wall. The results expose possible new targets to mitigate lupus-associated complications. PMID:22560558

  15. Visualization of sphingolipids and phospholipids in the fundic gland mucosa of human stomach using imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kurabe, Nobuya; Igarashi, Hisaki; Ohnishi, Ippei; Tajima, Shogo; Inoue, Yusuke; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the lipid distribution in gastric mucosae. METHODS: Imaging mass spectrometry (MS) is a useful tool to survey the distribution of biomolecules in surgical specimens. Here we used the imaging MS apparatus named iMScope to identify the dominant molecules present in the human gastric mucosa near the fundic glands. Five gastric specimens were subjected to iMScope analysis. These specimens were also analyzed by immunohistochemistry using MUC5AC, H(+)-K(+)-ATPaseβ Claudin18 antibodies. RESULTS: Three major molecules with m/z 725.5, 780.5, and 782.5 detected in the gastric mucosa were identified as sphingomyelin (SM) (d18:1/16:0), phosphatidylcholine (PC) (16:0/18:2), and PC (16:0/18:1), respectively, through MS/MS analyses. Using immunohistological staining, SM (d18:1/16:0) signals were mainly co-localized with the foveolar epithelium marker MUC5AC. In contrast, PC (16:0/18:2) signals were observed in the region testing positive for the fundic gland marker H(+)-K(+)-ATPaseβ. PC (16:0/18:1) signals were uniformly distributed throughout the mucosa. CONCLUSION: Our basic data will contribute to the studies of lipid species in physical and pathological conditions of the human stomach. PMID:27190696

  16. Cholesterol-Ceramide Interactions in Phospholipid and Sphingolipid Bilayers As Observed by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    García-Arribas, Aritz B; Axpe, Eneko; Mujika, Jon Iñaki; Mérida, David; Busto, Jon V; Sot, Jesús; Alonso, Alicia; Lopez, Xabier; García, Jose Ángel; Ugalde, Jesus M; Plazaola, Fernando; Goñi, Félix M

    2016-05-31

    Free volume voids in lipid bilayers can be measured by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). This technique has been applied, together with differential scanning calorimetry and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to study the effects of cholesterol (Chol) and ceramide (Cer) on free volume voids in sphingomyelin (SM) or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. Binary lipid samples with Chol were studied (DPPC:Chol 60:40, SM:Chol 60:40 mol ratio), and no phase transition was detected in the 20-60 °C range, in agreement with calorimetric data. Chol-driven liquid-ordered phase showed an intermediate free volume void size as compared to gel and fluid phases. For SM and SM:Cer (85:15 mol:mol) model membranes measured in the 20-60 °C range the gel-to-fluid phase transition could be observed with a related increase in free volume, which was more pronounced for the SM:Cer sample. MD simulations suggest a hitherto unsuspected lipid tilting in SM:Cer bilayers but not in pure SM. Ternary samples of DPPC:Cer:Chol (54:23:23) and SM:Cer:Chol (54:23:23) were measured, and a clear pattern of free volume increase was observed in the 20-60 °C because of the gel-to-fluid transition. Interestingly, MD simulations showed a tendency of Cer to change its distribution along the membrane to make room for Chol in ternary mixtures. The results suggest that the gel phase formed in these ternary mixtures is stabilized by Chol-Cer interactions. PMID:27158737

  17. Extrusion cooking with glucose supplementation of fumonsin- contaminated corn grits protects against nephrotoxicity and disrupted sphingolipid metabolism in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium verticillioides and F. proliferatum. They are found in corn and in corn-based foods. Fumonisin B1 (FB1), the most common fumonisin, causes animal diseases and, although its impact on human health is unclear, evidence suggests that it is a risk factor ...

  18. Krabbe disease: involvement of connexin43 in the apoptotic effects of sphingolipid psychosine on mouse oligodendrocyte precursors.

    PubMed

    Graziano, A C E; Parenti, R; Avola, R; Cardile, V

    2016-01-01

    Krabbe disease is a genetic demyelinating syndrome characterized by deficiency of the enzyme β-galactosylceramidase, lysosomal psychosine accumulation, and loss of myelin-forming cells. In this study, some apoptotic markers such as apoptotic index (AI), DNA fragmentation, caspase-3, PTEN, Bad, and PI3K were determined in oligodendrocyte precursors from wild type or twitcher mice untreated or treated with psychosine. Twitcher is a natural mouse model of Krabbe disease containing a premature stop codon (W339X) in the β-galactosylceramidase gene. Moreover, a possible involvement of connexin (Cx)43 in cell death of oligodendrocyte precursors induced by psychosine was investigated with the final aim to provide a contribution to the knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and pathophysiological events that occur in Krabbe disease. Connexins are a multigene family of structurally related trans-membrane proteins able to modulate essential cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation and migration. Among these, Cx43 is the predominant isoform in many cell types, including neural progenitor cells. Our results showed an increase of AI, DNA fragmentation, caspase-3, PTEN, Bad, and Cx43 associated to a decrease of PI3K, pAKT and pBad. Taken together, these findings suggest an involvement of Cx43 in the psychosine-mediated apoptosis of primary oligodendrocyte progenitors from wild type or twitcher mice, used for the first time as cell models in comparison. It could open unexplored perspective also for other demyelinating diseases. PMID:26459425

  19. A reflection of the lasting contributions from Dr. Robert Bittman to sterol trafficking, sphingolipid and phospholipid research.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Nigel J; Tigyi, Gabor J

    2016-01-01

    With the passing of Dr. Robert Bittman from pancreatic cancer on the 1st October 2014, the lipid research field lost one of the most influential and significant personalities. Robert Bittman's genius was in chemical design and his contribution to the lipid research field was truly immense. The reagents and chemicals he designed and synthesised allowed interrogation of the role of lipids in constituting complex biophysical membranes, sterol transfer and in cellular communication networks. Here we provide a review of these works which serve as a lasting memory to his life. PMID:26584871

  20. Structure of Sphingolipids From Sea Cucumber Cucumaria frondosa and Structure-Specific Cytotoxicity Against Human HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zicai; Song, Yu; Tao, Suyuan; Cong, Peixu; Wang, Xiaoxu; Xue, Changhu; Xu, Jie

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between structure and activity, three glucocerebroside series (CFC-1, CFC-2 and CFC-3), ceramides (CF-Cer) and long-chain bases (CF-LCB) of sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa (C. frondosa) were isolated and evaluated in HepG2 cells. The molecular species of CFC-1, CFC-2 and CFC-3 and CF-Cer were identified using reversed-phase liquid chromatography with heated electrospray ionization coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (RPLC-HESI-HRMS), and determined on the basis of chemical and spectroscopic evidence: For the three glucocerebroside series, fatty acids (FA) were mainly saturated (18:0 and 22:0), monounsaturated (22:1, 23:1 and 24:1) and 2-hydroxyl FA (2-HFA) (23:1 h and 24:1 h), the structure of long-chain bases (LCB) were dihydroxy (d17:1, d18:1 and d18:2) and trihydroxy (t16:0 and t17:0), and the glycosylation was glucose; For CF-Cer, FA were primarily saturated (17:0) and monounsaturated (16:1 and 19:1), the structure of LCB were dihydroxy (d17:1 and d18:1), and trihydroxy (t16:0). The results of cell experiment indicated that all of three glucocerebroside series, CF-Cer and CF-LCB exhibited an inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Moreover, CFC-3 was most effective in three glucocerebrosides to HepG-2 cell viability. The inhibition effect of CF-LCB was the strongest, and the inhibition effect of CF-Cer was much stronger than glucocerebrosides. PMID:26861868

  1. A Blood Spot Method for Detecting Fumonisin-Induced Changes in Putative Sphingolipid Biomarkers in LM/Bc Mice and Humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a toxic chemical produced by molds. The molds that produce fumonisin are common in corn. Consumption of contaminated corn by farm animals has been shown to be the cause of disease. Fumonisin has been hypothesized to be an environmental risk factor for diseases in humans in c...

  2. Gastrointestinal Degradation of Fumonisin B1 by Carboxylesterase FumD Prevents Fumonisin Induced Alteration of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Turkey and Swine

    PubMed Central

    Masching, Sabine; Naehrer, Karin; Schwartz-Zimmermann, Heidi-Elisabeth; Sărăndan, Mihai; Schaumberger, Simone; Dohnal, Ilse; Nagl, Veronika; Schatzmayr, Dian

    2016-01-01

    The mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a frequent contaminant of feed and causes various adverse health effects in domestic animals. Hence, effective strategies are needed to prevent the impact of fumonisins on livestock productivity. Here we evaluated the capability of the fumonisin carboxylesterase FumD to degrade FB1 to its less toxic metabolite hydrolyzed FB1 (HFB1) in the gastrointestinal tract of turkeys and pigs. First, an ex vivo pig model was used to examine the activity of FumD under digestive conditions. Within 2 h of incubation with FumD, FB1 was completely degraded to HFB1 in the duodenum and jejunum, respectively. To test the efficacy of the commercial application of FumD (FUMzyme) in vivo, female turkeys (n = 5) received either basal feed (CON), fumonisin-contaminated feed (15 mg/kg FB1+FB2; FB) or fumonisin-contaminated feed supplemented with FUMzyme (15 U/kg; FB+FUMzyme) for 14 days ad libitum. Addition of FUMzyme resulted in significantly decreased levels of FB1 in excreta, whereas HFB1 concentrations were significantly increased. Compared to the FB group (0.24 ± 0.02), the mean serum sphinganine-to-sphingosine (Sa/So) ratio was significantly reduced in the FB+FUMzyme group (0.19 ± 0.02), thus resembling values of the CON group (0.16 ± 0.02). Similarly, exposure of piglets (n = 10) to 2 mg/kg FB1+FB2 for 42 days caused significantly elevated serum Sa/So ratios (0.39 ± 0.15) compared to the CON group (0.14 ± 0.01). Supplementation with FUMzyme (60 U/kg) resulted in gastrointestinal degradation of FB1 and unaffected Sa/So ratios (0.16 ± 0.02). Thus, the carboxylesterase FumD represents an effective strategy to detoxify FB1 in the digestive tract of turkeys and pigs. PMID:27007395

  3. Gastrointestinal Degradation of Fumonisin B₁ by Carboxylesterase FumD Prevents Fumonisin Induced Alteration of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Turkey and Swine.

    PubMed

    Masching, Sabine; Naehrer, Karin; Schwartz-Zimmermann, Heidi-Elisabeth; Sărăndan, Mihai; Schaumberger, Simone; Dohnal, Ilse; Nagl, Veronika; Schatzmayr, Dian

    2016-03-01

    The mycotoxin fumonisin B₁ (FB₁) is a frequent contaminant of feed and causes various adverse health effects in domestic animals. Hence, effective strategies are needed to prevent the impact of fumonisins on livestock productivity. Here we evaluated the capability of the fumonisin carboxylesterase FumD to degrade FB₁ to its less toxic metabolite hydrolyzed FB₁ (HFB₁) in the gastrointestinal tract of turkeys and pigs. First, an ex vivo pig model was used to examine the activity of FumD under digestive conditions. Within 2 h of incubation with FumD, FB₁ was completely degraded to HFB₁ in the duodenum and jejunum, respectively. To test the efficacy of the commercial application of FumD (FUMzyme) in vivo, female turkeys (n = 5) received either basal feed (CON), fumonisin-contaminated feed (15 mg/kg FB₁+FB₂; FB) or fumonisin-contaminated feed supplemented with FUMzyme (15 U/kg; FB+FUMzyme) for 14 days ad libitum. Addition of FUMzyme resulted in significantly decreased levels of FB₁ in excreta, whereas HFB₁ concentrations were significantly increased. Compared to the FB group (0.24 ± 0.02), the mean serum sphinganine-to-sphingosine (Sa/So) ratio was significantly reduced in the FB+FUMzyme group (0.19 ± 0.02), thus resembling values of the CON group (0.16 ± 0.02). Similarly, exposure of piglets (n = 10) to 2 mg/kg FB₁+FB₂ for 42 days caused significantly elevated serum Sa/So ratios (0.39 ± 0.15) compared to the CON group (0.14 ± 0.01). Supplementation with FUMzyme (60 U/kg) resulted in gastrointestinal degradation of FB₁ and unaffected Sa/So ratios (0.16 ± 0.02). Thus, the carboxylesterase FumD represents an effective strategy to detoxify FB₁ in the digestive tract of turkeys and pigs. PMID:27007395

  4. BcR-induced apoptosis involves differential regulation of C16 and C24-ceramide formation and sphingolipid-dependent activation of the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Jacobs, Susan; Pettus, Benjamin J; Sietsma, Hannie; Kok, Jan Willem; Hannun, Yusuf A; de Leij, Lou F M H

    2003-04-25

    In this study, we describe an ordered formation of long- and very long-chain ceramide species in relation to the progression of B-cell receptor (BcR) triggering induced apoptosis. An early and caspase-independent increase in long-chain ceramide species, in which C(16)- ceramide predominated, was observed 6 h after BcR triggering. In contrast, very long-chain ceramide species were generated later, 12-24 h after BcR triggering. The formation of these very long-chain ceramide species, in which C(24)-ceramide predominated, required the activation of effector caspases. BcR-induced formation of long-chain ceramide species resulted in proteasomal activation and degradation of XIAP and subsequent activation of effector caspases, demonstrating an important cell-biological mechanism through which long-chain ceramides may be involved in the progression of BcR triggering induced apoptosis and subsequent formation of very long-chain ceramide species. BcR-induced activation of the proteasome was blocked with ISP-1/myriocin, a potent and selective inhibitor of serine palmitoyl transferase that catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the de novo formation of ceramide. Both ISP-1 and clasto-lactacystin beta-lactone, an irreversible inhibitor of the proteasome, prevented BcR cross-linking-induced XIAP degradation. Also, a mutant XIAP lacking the ubiquitin-ligating ring finger motif was completely resistant to proteasome-mediated degradation, and Ramos cells overexpressing XIAP became highly resistant to BcR cross-linking-induced activation of caspases. The formation of C(16)-ceramide in response to BcR cross-linking was found unaltered in XIAP overexpressing Ramos cells, whereas C(24)-ceramide formation was completely abolished. These results demonstrate how de novo generated long-chain ceramide species may be involved in the activation of downstream effector caspases and subsequent formation of very long-chain ceramide species. As such, these results provide novel and important insights into the significance of specific ceramide species in defined stages of apoptosis. PMID:12578840

  5. Binding of the sphingolipid S1P to hTERT stabilizes telomerase at the nuclear periphery by allosterically mimicking protein phosphorylation†

    PubMed Central

    Selvam, Shanmugam P.; De Palma, Ryan M.; Oaks, Joshua J.; Oleinik, Natalia; Peterson, Yuri K.; Stahelin, Robert V.; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Ponnusamy, Suriyan; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Smith, Charles D.; Ogretmen, Besim

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, the enzyme telomerase maintains the ends of chromosomes, called telomeres. Shortened telomeres trigger cell senescence, and cancer cells often have increased telomerase activity to promote their ability to proliferate indefinitely. The catalytic subunit, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), is stabilized by phosphorylation. Here, we found that the lysophospholipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), generated by sphingosine kinase 2 (SK2), bound hTERT at the nuclear periphery in human and mouse fibroblasts. Docking predictions and mutational analyses revealed that binding occurred between a hydroxyl group (C′3-OH) in S1P and Asp684 in hTERT. Inhibiting or depleting SK2 or mutating the S1P binding site decreased the stability of hTERT in cultured cells and promoted senescence and loss of telomere integrity. S1P binding inhibited the interaction of hTERT with MKRN1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that tags hTERT for degradation. Murine Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells formed smaller tumors in mice lacking SK2 than in wild-type mice, and knocking down SK2 in LLC cells before implantation into mice suppressed their growth. Pharmacologically inhibiting SK2 decreased the growth of subcutaneous A549 lung cancer cell-derived xenografts in mice, and expression of wild-type hTERT, but not an S1P-binding mutant, restored tumor growth. Thus, our data suggest that S1P binding to hTERT allosterically mimicks phosphorylation, promoting telomerase stability and hence telomere maintenance, cell proliferation, and tumor growth PMID:26082434

  6. Sphingolipid bases and their 1-phosphates, but not fumonisins, are translocated from roots to aerial tissues of maize seedlings watered with fumonisins.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an earlier study using maize seedlings grown from kernels inoculated with Fusarium verticillioides, fumonisin B1 (FB1) was preferentially accumulated in leaf tissue compared to FB2 and FB3. The present study tested whether maize seedlings preferentially translocate FB1 when plants are watered wit...

  7. Fumonisin production is necessary for development of the full spectrum of symptoms indicative of Fusarium verticillioides maize-seedling disease and evidence for disruption of sphingolipid metabolism as the proximate cause.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Fusarium verticillioides infects maize and produces fumonisins, inhibitors of ceramide synthase. To determine the role of fumonisins in maize seedling disease, seeds were inoculated with fumonisin producing or non-producing strains of F. verticillioides. Seedlings grown from seeds inocul...

  8. Cognitive status and vitamin K status in older men and women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin K has been implicated in the regulation of sphingolipid metabolism. In rats, vitamin K deficiency decreases sphingolipid concentrations, resulting in changes in behavior, but not short-term memory. The association between vitamin K intake and cognition in humans is not well studied. In 379 m...

  9. Lipid membrane domains in cell surface and vacuolar systems.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Hirabayashi, Y

    2000-01-01

    Detergent insoluble sphingolipid-cholesterol enriched 'raft'-like membrane microdomains have been implicated in a variety of biological processes including sorting, trafficking, and signaling. Mutant cells and knockout animals of sphingolipid biosynthesis are clearly useful to understand the biological roles of lipid components in raft-like domains. It is suggested that raft-like domains distribute in internal vacuolar membranes as well as plasma membranes. In addition to sphingolipid-cholesterol-rich membrane domains, recent studies suggest the existence of another lipid-membrane domain in the endocytic pathway. This domain is enriched with a unique phospholipid, lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) and localized in the internal membrane of multivesicular endosome. LBPA-rich membrane domains are involved in lipid and protein sorting within the endosomal system. Possible interaction between sphingolipids and LBPA in sphingolipid-storage disease is discussed. PMID:11201787

  10. Comparative plant sphingolipidomic reveals specific lipids in seeds and oil.

    PubMed

    Tellier, Frédérique; Maia-Grondard, Alessandra; Schmitz-Afonso, Isabelle; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2014-07-01

    Plant sphingolipids are a highly diverse family of structural and signal lipids. Owing to their chemical diversity and complexity, a powerful analytical method was required to identify and quantify a large number of individual molecules with a high degree of structural accuracy. By using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with a single elution system coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) in the positive multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, detailed sphingolipid composition was analyzed in various tissues of two Brassicaceae species Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa. A total of 300 molecular species were identified defining nine classes of sphingolipids, including Cers, hCers, Glcs and GIPCs. High-resolution mass spectrometry identified sphingolipids including amino- and N-acylated-GIPCs. The comparative analysis of seedling, seed and oil sphingolipids showed tissue specific distribution suggesting metabolic channeling and compartmentalization. PMID:24731258

  11. Sphingosine-1-phosphate metabolism: A structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Pulkoski-Gross, Michael J; Donaldson, Jane C; Obeid, Lina M

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids represent an important class of bioactive signaling lipids which have key roles in numerous cellular processes. Over the last few decades, the levels of bioactive sphingolipids and/or their metabolizing enzymes have been realized to be important factors involved in disease development and progression, most notably in cancer. Targeting sphingolipid-metabolizing enzymes in disease states has been the focus of many studies and has resulted in a number of pharmacological inhibitors, with some making it into the clinic as therapeutics. In order to better understand the regulation of sphingolipid-metabolizing enzymes as well as to develop much more potent and specific inhibitors, the field of sphingolipids has recently taken a turn toward structural biology. The last decade has seen the structural determination of a number of sphingolipid enzymes and effector proteins. In these terms, one of the most complete arms of the sphingolipid pathway is the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) arm. The structures of proteins involved in the function and regulation of S1P are being used to investigate further the regulation of said proteins as well as in the design and development of inhibitors as potential therapeutics. PMID:25923252

  12. Activation of 3-Phosphoinositide-dependent Kinase 1 (PDK1) and Serum- and Glucocorticoid-induced Protein Kinase 1 (SGK1) by Short-chain Sphingolipid C4-ceramide Rescues the Trafficking Defect of ΔF508-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (ΔF508-CFTR)*

    PubMed Central

    Caohuy, Hung; Yang, Qingfeng; Eudy, Yvonne; Ha, Thien-An; Xu, Andrew E.; Glover, Matthew; Frizzell, Raymond A.; Jozwik, Catherine; Pollard, Harvey B.

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is due to a folding defect in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The most common mutation, ΔF508, prevents CFTR from trafficking to the apical plasma membrane. Here we show that activation of the PDK1/SGK1 signaling pathway with C4-ceramide (C4-CER), a non-toxic small molecule, functionally corrects the trafficking defect in both cultured CF cells and primary epithelial cell explants from CF patients. The mechanism of C4-CER action involves a series of mutual autophosphorylation and phosphorylation events between PDK1 and SGK1. Detailed mechanistic studies indicate that C4-CER initially induces autophosphorylation of SGK1 at Ser422. SGK1[Ser(P)422] and C4-CER coincidently bind PDK1 and permit PDK1 to autophosphorylate at Ser241. Then PDK1[Ser(P)241] phosphorylates SGK1[Ser(P)422] at Thr256 to generate fully activated SGK1[Ser422, Thr(P)256]. SGK1[Ser(P)422,Thr(P)256] phosphorylates and inactivates the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2. ΔF508-CFTR is thus free to traffic to the plasma membrane. Importantly, C4-CER-mediated activation of both PDK1 and SGK1 is independent of the PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. Physiologically, C4-CER significantly increases maturation and stability of ΔF508-CFTR (t½ ∼10 h), enhances cAMP-activated chloride secretion, and suppresses hypersecretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8). We suggest that candidate drugs for CF directed against the PDK1/SGK1 signaling pathway, such as C4-CER, provide a novel therapeutic strategy for a life-limiting disorder that affects one child, on average, each day. PMID:25384981

  13. Fungal endophyte metabolism and allelopathic interactions with host plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The maize endophyte Fusarium verticillioides produces the fumonisin mycotoxins, which are of significant concern for their animal toxicity caused by inhibition of ceramide synthase and disruption of sphingolipid metabolism. Fumonisin-producing strains associated with maize cause leaf lesions, develo...

  14. Inducible nitric oxide has protective effect on fumonisin B1 hepatotoxicity in mice via modulation of sphingosine kinase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisin B1, a mycotoxin, is an inhibitor of ceramide synthase causing marked dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolism in cells. This mycotoxin causes accumulation of free sphingoid bases (sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine or sphinganine) and their metabolites, important messengers involved in si...

  15. Tree nut phytochemicals: composition, antioxidant capacity, bioactivity, impact factors. A systematic review of almonds, Brazils, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tree nuts contain an array of phytochemicals including carotenoids, phenolic acids, phytosterols and polyphenolic compounds such as flavonoids, proanthocyanidins (PAC) and stilbenes, all of which are included in nutrient databases, as well as phytates, sphingolipids, alkylphenols and lignans, which ...

  16. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Lyase Deficient Cells as a Tool to Study Protein Lipid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gerl, Mathias J.; Bittl, Verena; Kirchner, Susanne; Sachsenheimer, Timo; Brunner, Hanna L.; Lüchtenborg, Christian; Özbalci, Cagakan; Wiedemann, Hannah; Wegehingel, Sabine; Nickel, Walter; Haberkant, Per; Schultz, Carsten; Krüger, Marcus; Brügger, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Cell membranes contain hundreds to thousands of individual lipid species that are of structural importance but also specifically interact with proteins. Due to their highly controlled synthesis and role in signaling events sphingolipids are an intensely studied class of lipids. In order to investigate their metabolism and to study proteins interacting with sphingolipids, metabolic labeling based on photoactivatable sphingoid bases is the most straightforward approach. In order to monitor protein-lipid-crosslink products, sphingosine derivatives containing a reporter moiety, such as a radiolabel or a clickable group, are used. In normal cells, degradation of sphingoid bases via action of the checkpoint enzyme sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase occurs at position C2-C3 of the sphingoid base and channels the resulting hexadecenal into the glycerolipid biosynthesis pathway. In case the functionalized sphingosine looses the reporter moiety during its degradation, specificity towards sphingolipid labeling is maintained. In case degradation of a sphingosine derivative does not remove either the photoactivatable or reporter group from the resulting hexadecenal, specificity towards sphingolipid labeling can be achieved by blocking sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase activity and thus preventing sphingosine derivatives to be channeled into the sphingolipid-to-glycerolipid metabolic pathway. Here we report an approach using clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated nuclease Cas9 to create a sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1) HeLa knockout cell line to disrupt the sphingolipid-to-glycerolipid metabolic pathway. We found that the lipid and protein compositions as well as sphingolipid metabolism of SGPL1 knock-out HeLa cells only show little adaptations, which validates these cells as model systems to study transient protein-sphingolipid interactions. PMID:27100999

  17. Network Analysis of a Comprehensive Knowledge Repository Reveals a Dual Role for Ceramide in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Satoshi; Ogishima, Soichi; Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Masataka; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Nakaya, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of senile dementia. Many inflammatory factors such as amyloid-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines are known to contribute to the inflammatory response in the AD brain. Sphingolipids are widely known to have roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, where the precise roles for sphingolipids in inflammation-associated pathogenesis of AD are not well understood. Here we performed a network analysis to clarify the importance of sphingolipids and to model relationships among inflammatory factors and sphingolipids in AD. In this study, we have updated sphingolipid signaling and metabolic cascades in a map of AD signaling networks that we named "AlzPathway," a comprehensive knowledge repository of signaling pathways in AD. Our network analysis of the updated AlzPathway indicates that the pathways related to ceramide are one of the primary pathways and that ceramide is one of the important players in the pathogenesis of AD. The results of our analysis suggest the following two prospects about inflammation in AD: (1) ceramide could play important roles in both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways of AD, and (2) several factors such as Sphingomyelinase and Siglec-11 may be associated with ceramide related inflammation and anti-inflammation pathways in AD. In this study, network analysis of comprehensive knowledge repository reveals a dual role for ceramide in AD. This result provides a clue to clarify sphingolipids related inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways in AD. PMID:26849355

  18. Inhibitors of the sphingomyelin cycle: Sphingomyelin synthases and sphingomyelinases.

    PubMed

    Adada, Mohamad; Luberto, Chiara; Canals, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Sphingolipids are a class of bioactive lipids, which are key modulators of an increasing number of physiologic and pathophysiologic processes that include cell cycle, apoptosis, angiogenesis, stress and inflammatory responses. Sphingomyelin is an important structural component of biological membranes, and one of the end-points in the synthesis of sphingolipids. Mainly synthetized in the Golgi apparatus, sphingomyelin is transported to all other biological membranes. Upon stimulation, sphingomyelin can be hydrolyzed to ceramide by 5 different sphingomyelinases. The diversity and cellular topology of ceramide allow it to exert multiple biologies. Furthermore, ceramide can be metabolized to many other bioactive sphingolipids. Ceramide, coming from sphingomyelin or other complex sphingolipids, can be hydrolyzed to sphingosine, which can easily change cellular localization. In turn, sphingosine can be recycled to ceramide and to sphingomyelin in the endoplasmic reticulum, completing the sphingomyelin cycle. Our understanding of the roles of various sphingolipids in the regulation of different cellular processes has come from studying the enzymes that regulate these sphingolipids, and their manipulation. The use of pharmacologic inhibitors has been critical for their study, as well as being promising bullets for disease treatment. Some of these diseases involving the sphingomyelin cycle include cancer, inflammation, atherosclerosis, diabetes and some rare diseases such as Niemann-Pick disease. This review will focus on the enzymes involved in the sphingomyelin cycle, their history, and their involvement in pathophysiological processes. Finally, it will describe in details all the small molecules that are being used to inhibit these enzymes and their use in therapeutics. PMID:26200918

  19. Network Analysis of a Comprehensive Knowledge Repository Reveals a Dual Role for Ceramide in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Satoshi; Ogishima, Soichi; Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Masataka; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Nakaya, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of senile dementia. Many inflammatory factors such as amyloid-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines are known to contribute to the inflammatory response in the AD brain. Sphingolipids are widely known to have roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, where the precise roles for sphingolipids in inflammation-associated pathogenesis of AD are not well understood. Here we performed a network analysis to clarify the importance of sphingolipids and to model relationships among inflammatory factors and sphingolipids in AD. In this study, we have updated sphingolipid signaling and metabolic cascades in a map of AD signaling networks that we named “AlzPathway,” a comprehensive knowledge repository of signaling pathways in AD. Our network analysis of the updated AlzPathway indicates that the pathways related to ceramide are one of the primary pathways and that ceramide is one of the important players in the pathogenesis of AD. The results of our analysis suggest the following two prospects about inflammation in AD: (1) ceramide could play important roles in both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways of AD, and (2) several factors such as Sphingomyelinase and Siglec-11 may be associated with ceramide related inflammation and anti-inflammation pathways in AD. In this study, network analysis of comprehensive knowledge repository reveals a dual role for ceramide in AD. This result provides a clue to clarify sphingolipids related inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways in AD. PMID:26849355

  20. Variable Substrate Preference among Phospholipase D Toxins from Sicariid Spiders*

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Daniel M.; Roberts, Sue A.; Zobel-Thropp, Pamela A.; Delahaye, Jared L.; Bandarian, Vahe; Binford, Greta J.; Cordes, Matthew H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Venoms of the sicariid spiders contain phospholipase D enzyme toxins that can cause severe dermonecrosis and even death in humans. These enzymes convert sphingolipid and lysolipid substrates to cyclic phosphates by activating a hydroxyl nucleophile present in both classes of lipid. The most medically relevant substrates are thought to be sphingomyelin and/or lysophosphatidylcholine. To better understand the substrate preference of these toxins, we used 31P NMR to compare the activity of three related but phylogenetically diverse sicariid toxins against a diverse panel of sphingolipid and lysolipid substrates. Two of the three showed significantly faster turnover of sphingolipids over lysolipids, and all three showed a strong preference for positively charged (choline and/or ethanolamine) over neutral (glycerol and serine) headgroups. Strikingly, however, the enzymes vary widely in their preference for choline, the headgroup of both sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine, versus ethanolamine. An enzyme from Sicarius terrosus showed a strong preference for ethanolamine over choline, whereas two paralogous enzymes from Loxosceles arizonica either preferred choline or showed no significant preference. Intrigued by the novel substrate preference of the Sicarius enzyme, we solved its crystal structure at 2.1 Å resolution. The evolution of variable substrate specificity may help explain the reduced dermonecrotic potential of some natural toxin variants, because mammalian sphingolipids use primarily choline as a positively charged headgroup; it may also be relevant for sicariid predatory behavior, because ethanolamine-containing sphingolipids are common in insect prey. PMID:25752604

  1. Elevation of 20-carbon long chain bases due to a mutation in serine palmitoyltransferase small subunit b results in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lihong; Spassieva, Stefka; Gable, Kenneth; Gupta, Sita D.; Shi, Lan-Ying; Wang, Jieping; Bielawski, Jacek; Hicks, Wanda L.; Krebs, Mark P.; Naggert, Juergen; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Dunn, Teresa M.; Nishina, Patsy M.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids typically have an 18-carbon (C18) sphingoid long chain base (LCB) backbone. Although sphingolipids with LCBs of other chain lengths have been identified, the functional significance of these low-abundance sphingolipids is unknown. The LCB chain length is determined by serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) isoenzymes, which are trimeric proteins composed of two large subunits (SPTLC1 and SPTLC2 or SPTLC3) and a small subunit (SPTssa or SPTssb). Here we report the identification of an Sptssb mutation, Stellar (Stl), which increased the SPT affinity toward the C18 fatty acyl-CoA substrate by twofold and significantly elevated 20-carbon (C20) LCB production in the mutant mouse brain and eye, resulting in surprising neurodegenerative effects including aberrant membrane structures, accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins on membranes, and axon degeneration. Our work demonstrates that SPT small subunits play a major role in controlling SPT activity and substrate affinity, and in specifying sphingolipid LCB chain length in vivo. Moreover, our studies also suggest that excessive C20 LCBs or C20 LCB-containing sphingolipids impair protein homeostasis and neural functions. PMID:26438849

  2. Dihydroceramides: From Bit Players to Lead Actors.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Monowarul Mobin; Li, Ying; Chaurasia, Bhagirath; Kaddai, Vincent A; Summers, Scott A

    2015-06-19

    Sphingolipid synthesis involves a highly conserved biosynthetic pathway that produces fundamental precursors of complex sphingolipids. The final reaction involves the insertion of a double bond into dihydroceramides to generate the more abundant ceramides, which are converted to sphingomyelins and glucosylceramides/gangliosides by the addition of polar head groups. Although ceramides have long been known to mediate cellular stress responses, the dihydroceramides that are transiently produced during de novo sphingolipid synthesis were deemed inert. Evidence published in the last few years suggests that these dihydroceramides accumulate to a far greater extent in tissues than previously thought. Moreover, they have biological functions that are distinct and non-overlapping with those of the more prevalent ceramides. Roles are being uncovered in autophagy, hypoxia, and cellular proliferation, and the lipids are now implicated in the etiology, treatment, and/or diagnosis of diabetes, cancer, ischemia/reperfusion injury, and neurodegenerative diseases. This minireview summarizes recent findings on this emerging class of bioactive lipids. PMID:25947377

  3. Fumonisin B1 and the kidney: modes of action for renal tumor formation by fumonisin B1 in rodents.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stephanie; Dekant, Wolfgang; Mally, Angela

    2012-10-01

    The mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) is an important contaminant of maize and maize-based products. In rodent toxicity studies, FB1 was shown to be hepato- and nephrotoxic, and to induce renal tumors in rats when administered via the diet. Of particular note are the aggressive growth characteristics of FB1-induced tumors with a high potential to metastasize. While genotoxicity does not appear to contribute to FB1 carcinogenicity, it is well established that FB1-mediated disruption of sphingolipid metabolism plays a key role in FB1 toxicity. This review provides an overview on human dietary exposure to FB1, FB1 toxicity and carcinogenicity, and potential mechanisms involved in FB1-mediated tumor formation, with a particular focus on cellular functions of sphingolipids and biological consequences of FB1-mediated perturbation of sphingolipid metabolism. PMID:22771819

  4. Producing human ceramide-NS by metabolic engineering using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Suguru; Shimamoto, Toshi; Nagano, Hideaki; Tsuruno, Masahiro; Okuhara, Hiroaki; Hatanaka, Haruyo; Tojo, Hiromasa; Kodama, Yukiko; Funato, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide is one of the most important intercellular components responsible for the barrier and moisture retention functions of the skin. Because of the risks involved with using products of animal origin and the low productivity of plants, the availability of ceramides is currently limited. In this study, we successfully developed a system that produces sphingosine-containing human ceramide-NS in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by eliminating the genes for yeast sphingolipid hydroxylases (encoded by SUR2 and SCS7) and introducing the gene for a human sphingolipid desaturase (encoded by DES1). The inactivation of the ceramidase gene YDC1, overexpression of the inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C gene ISC1, and endoplasmic reticulum localization of the DES1 gene product resulted in enhanced production of ceramide-NS. The engineered yeast strains can serve as hosts not only for providing a sustainable source of ceramide-NS but also for developing further systems to produce sphingosine-containing sphingolipids. PMID:26573460

  5. Ceramide signaling in cancer and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bieberich, Erhard

    2008-01-01

    Most of the previous work on the sphingolipid ceramide has been devoted to its function as an apoptosis inducer. Recent studies, however, have shown that in stem cells, ceramide has additional nonapoptotic functions. In this article, ceramide signaling will be reviewed in light of ‘systems interface biology’: as an interconnection of sphingolipid metabolism, membrane biophysics and cell signaling. The focus will be on the metabolic interconversion of ceramide and sphingomyelin or sphingosine-1-phosphate. Lipid rafts and sphingolipid-induced protein scaffolds will be discussed as a membrane interface for lipid-controlled cell signaling. Ceramide/sphingomyelin and ceramide/sphingosine-1-phosphate-interdependent cell-signaling pathways are significant for the regulation of cell polarity, apoptosis and/or proliferation, and as novel pharmacologic targets in cancer and stem cells. PMID:19050750

  6. Sphingolipidomics: An Important Mechanistic Tool for Studying Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashutosh; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids form of a unique and complex group of bioactive lipids in fungi. Structurally, sphingolipids of fungi are quite diverse with unique differences in the sphingoid backbone, amide linked fatty acyl chain and the polar head group. Two of the most studied and conserved sphingolipid classes in fungi are the glucosyl- or galactosyl-ceramides and the phosphorylinositol containing phytoceramides. Comprehensive structural characterization and quantification of these lipids is largely based on advanced analytical mass spectrometry based lipidomic methods. While separation of complex lipid mixtures is achieved through high performance liquid chromatography, the soft – electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry allows a high sensitivity and selectivity of detection. Herein, we present an overview of lipid extraction, chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry employed in qualitative and quantitative sphingolipidomics in fungi. PMID:27148190

  7. Enzymes of sphingosine metabolism as potential pharmacological targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Levade, Thierry

    2003-05-01

    Whereas some sphingolipids such as sphingoid bases and ceramide can mediate and induce cell killing, other sphingolipids such as sphingosine 1-phosphate promote cell survival or proliferation. The tight equilibrium between the intracellular levels of each of these biomodulators is controlled by the various enzymes that either produce or degrade these lipid molecules. Herein, the effects of sphingoid bases and their derivatives on the regulation of (cancer) cell growth and death are reviewed. In addition, the consequences of pharmacological manipulation of the enzymes that govern sphingoid base metabolism on in vitro and in vivo tumor cell growth are presented. Further development of pharmacological tools aimed at interfering with the metabolism of sphingolipids is expected to provide new avenues in the treatment of cancers as well as other diseases. PMID:12676517

  8. Activation of sphingosine kinase-1 in cancer: implications for therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Ader, Isabelle; Bouquerel, Pierre; Brizuela, Leyre; Malavaud, Bernard; Mazerolles, Catherine; Rischmann, Pascal

    2010-06-01

    Sphingolipid metabolites are critical to the regulation of a number of fundamental biological processes including cancer. Whereas ceramide and sphingosine mediate and trigger apoptosis or cell growth arrest, sphingosine 1-phosphate promotes proliferation, cell survival and angiogenesis. The delicate equilibrium between the intracellular levels of each of these sphingolipids is controlled by the enzymes that either produce or degrade these metabolites. Sphingosine kinase-1 is a crucial regulator of this two-pan balance, because its produces the pro-survival and pro-angiogenic sphingosine 1-phosphate and decreases the amount of both ceramide and sphingosine, the pro-apoptotic sphingolipids. Moreover, its gene is oncogenic, its mRNA is overproduced in several solid tumors, its overexpression protects cells from apoptosis, and its activity is down-regulated by anti-cancer treatments. Therefore, the sphingosine kinase-1/sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling pathway appears to be a target of interest for therapeutic manipulation. PMID:20302564

  9. Producing human ceramide-NS by metabolic engineering using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Suguru; Shimamoto, Toshi; Nagano, Hideaki; Tsuruno, Masahiro; Okuhara, Hiroaki; Hatanaka, Haruyo; Tojo, Hiromasa; Kodama, Yukiko; Funato, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide is one of the most important intercellular components responsible for the barrier and moisture retention functions of the skin. Because of the risks involved with using products of animal origin and the low productivity of plants, the availability of ceramides is currently limited. In this study, we successfully developed a system that produces sphingosine-containing human ceramide-NS in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by eliminating the genes for yeast sphingolipid hydroxylases (encoded by SUR2 and SCS7) and introducing the gene for a human sphingolipid desaturase (encoded by DES1). The inactivation of the ceramidase gene YDC1, overexpression of the inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C gene ISC1, and endoplasmic reticulum localization of the DES1 gene product resulted in enhanced production of ceramide-NS. The engineered yeast strains can serve as hosts not only for providing a sustainable source of ceramide-NS but also for developing further systems to produce sphingosine-containing sphingolipids. PMID:26573460

  10. Mutagenesis of the borage Delta(6) fatty acid desaturase.

    PubMed

    Sayanova, O; Beaudoin, F; Libisch, B; Shewry, P; Napier, J

    2000-12-01

    The consensus sequence of the third histidine box of a range of Delta(5), Delta(6), Delta(8) and sphingolipid desaturases differs from that of the membrane-bound non-fusion Delta(12) and Delta(15) desaturases in the presence of glutamine instead of histidine. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to determine the importance of glutamine and other residues of the third histidine box and created a chimaeric enzyme to determine the ability of the Cyt b(5) fusion domain from the plant sphingolipid desaturase to substitute for the endogenous domain of the Delta(6) desaturase. PMID:11171152

  11. Synthetic lipids and their role in defining macromolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Parrill, Abby L

    2015-10-01

    Lipids have a variety of physiological roles, ranging from structural and biophysical contributions to membrane functions to signaling contributions in normal and abnormal physiology. This review highlights some of the contributions made by Robert Bittman to our understanding of lipid assemblies through the production of synthetic lipid analogs in the sterol, sphingolipid, and glycolipid classes. His contributions have included the development of a fluorescent cholesterol analog that shows strong functional analogies to cholesterol that has allowed live imaging of cholesterol distribution in living systems, to stereospecific synthetic approaches to both sphingolipid and glycolipid analogs crucial in defining the structure-activity relationships of lipid biological targets. PMID:26248325

  12. Bactericidal Activities of Milk Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Sprong, R. Corinne; Hulstein, Marco F. E.; Van der Meer, Roelof

    2001-01-01

    The bactericidal capacity of digestion products of bovine milk triglycerides and membrane lipids was tested in vitro using Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enteritidis, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, and Clostridium perfringens. C10:0 and C12:0 fatty acids and digestion products of sphingolipids appeared to be effective bactericidal agents, whereas digestion products of phosphoglycerides were moderately bactericidal. Thus, milk fat sphingolipids and triglycerides, particularly those containing C10:0 and C12:0 fatty acids, may protect against food-borne gastroenteritis. PMID:11257052

  13. An Arabidopsis neutral ceramidase mutant ncer1 accumulates hydroxyceramides and is sensitive to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Bi, Fang-Cheng; Yin, Jian; Wu, Jian-Xin; Rong, Chan; Wu, Jia-Li; Yao, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ceramidases hydrolyze ceramide into sphingosine and fatty acids and, although ceramidases function as key regulators of sphingolipid homeostasis in mammals, their roles in plants remain largely unknown. Here, we characterized the Arabidopsis thaliana ceramidase AtNCER1, a homolog of human neutral ceramidase. AtNCER1 localizes predominantly on the endoplasmic reticulum. The ncer1 T-DNA insertion mutants had no visible phenotype, but accumulated hydroxyceramides, and showed increased sensitivity to oxidative stress induced by methyl viologen. Plants over-expressing AtNCER1 showed increased tolerance to oxidative stress. These data indicate that the Arabidopsis neutral ceramidase affects sphingolipid homeostasis and oxidative stress responses. PMID:26150824

  14. Increased nuclear sphingoid base-1-phosphates and HDAC inhibition after fumonisin and FTY720-treatment: the link between epigenomic modifications and neural tube defects?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a mycotoxin produced by a common fungal contaminant of corn. Ingestion of FB1-contaminated food during early pregnancy is associated with increased risk for neural tube defects (NTDs). FB1 inhibits the enzyme ceramide synthase in de novo sphingolipid biosynthes...

  15. Spingolipids in the root play an important role in regulating the leaf ionome in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sphingolipid synthesis is initiated by condensation of serine with palmitoyl-CoA to produce 3-ketodihydrosphinganine (3-KDS), which is subsequently reduced by a 3-KDS reductase to dihydrosphinganine (DHS). Serine palmitoyltransferase was recently shown to be essential for plant viability, but the 3...

  16. Ceramide synthase inhibition causes accumulation of 1-deoxysphinganine: biosynthesis of a novel category of bioactive sphingoid bases in diverse mammalian cell linesa and mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins (FB) are mycotoxins that inhibit ceramide synthases (CerS) and cause animal and plant disease. Inhibition of CerS results in a rapid increases in sphinganine (Sa), an intermediate of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis, sphinganine 1-phosphate, and a previously unidentified metabolite tha...

  17. Comparative lipid analysis in the normal and cancerous organoids of MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Hisayoshi; Ogiso, Hideo; Okazaki, Toshiro; Kiyokawa, Etsuko

    2016-06-01

    Epithelial organs are made of a well-polarized monolayer of epithelial cells, and their morphology is maintained strictly for their proper functioning. The roles of lipids are not only to generate the membrane, but also to provide the specific domains for signal transduction, or to transmit signals as second messengers. By using a liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/MS method, we here analyzed sphingolipids in MDCK cysts under various conditions. Our result showed that, compared to the three-dimensional cyst, the two-dimensional MDCK sheet is relatively enriched in sphingolipids. During cystogenesis, the contents of sphingomyelin (SM) and lactocylceramide (LacCer)-but, none those of ceramide, hexocylceramide, or GM3-are altered depending on their acyl chains. While the total SM is decreased more efficiently by SMS-1 knockdown than by SMS-2 knockdown, depletion of SMS-2, but not SMS-1, inhibits cyst growth. Finally upon the switching on of activated K-Ras expression which induces luminal cell filling, ceramide and LacCer are increased. Our parallel examinations of the microarray data for mRNA of sphingolipid metabolic enzymes failed to fully explain the remodelling of the sphingolipids of MDCK cysts. However, these results should be useful to investigate the cell-type- and structure-specific lipid metabolism. PMID:26783265

  18. New oleyl glycoside as anti-cancer agent that targets on neutral sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo; García-Álvarez, Isabel; Casas, Josefina; Barreda-Manso, M Asunción; Yanguas-Casás, Natalia; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso

    2015-09-15

    We designed and synthesized two anomeric oleyl glucosaminides as anti-cancer agents where the presence of a trifluoroacetyl group close to the anomeric center makes them resistant to hydrolysis by hexosaminidases. The oleyl glycosides share key structural features with synthetic and natural oleyl derivatives that have been reported to exhibit anti-cancer properties. While both glycosides showed antiproliferative activity on cancer cell lines, only the α-anomer caused endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and cell death on C6 glioma cells. Analysis of sphingolipids and glycosphingolipds in cells treated with the glycosides showed that the α-anomer caused a drastic accumulation of ceramide and glucosylceramide and reduction of lactosylceramide and GM3 ganglioside at concentrations above a threshold of 20 μM. In order to understand how ceramide levels increase in response to α-glycoside treatment, further investigations were done using specific inhibitors of sphingolipid metabolic pathways. The pretreatment with 3-O-methylsphingomyelin (a neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor) restored sphingomyelin levels together with the lactosylceramide and GM3 ganglioside levels and prevented the ER stress and cell death caused by the α-glycoside. The results indicated that the activation of neutral sphingomyelinase is the main cause of the alterations in sphingolipids that eventually lead to cell death. The new oleyl glycoside targets a key enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism with potential applications in cancer therapy. PMID:26206186

  19. In vivo Metabolism of Hydrolyzed Fumonisin B1 and Fumonisin B1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is the most prevalent fumonisin mycotoxin found in corn and corn-based foods. It inhibits ceramide synthase, disrupts sphingolipid metabolism and function, is toxic to animals, causes cancer in rodents, and induces neural tube defects in some mouse strains. Its human health effect...

  20. Increased sphingoid base-1-phosphates and failure of neural tube closure after exposure to fumonisin or FTY720

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a mycotoxin produced by a common fungal contaminant of corn. Ingestion of FB1-contaminated food is associated with increased risk for neural tube defects (NTDs). FB1 induces NTDs in inbred LM/Bc mice. FB1 inhibits ceramide synthase in de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis, resultin...

  1. Lipid mediators link cells progression with placental and neural tube defects after maternal fumonisin exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a mycotoxin produced by a common fungal contaminant of maize. Increased risk for neural tube defects (NTDs) is observed in populations that rely on maize as a dietary staple. FB1 inhibits ceramide synthase, resulting in altered pools of biologically active sphingolipids. FB1...

  2. Reduction of Fumonisin Toxicity by Extrusion and Nixtamalization (Alkaline Cooking)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are found in corn. The most common, fumonisin FB1 (FB1) is toxic to animals, disrupts sphingolipid metabolism, and is a suspected risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs; serious birth defect) and cancer in humans that consume contaminated corn as a diet staple. FB1 levels in foods an...

  3. Ceramide Signaling and Metabolism in Pathophysiological States of the Lung.

    PubMed

    Petrache, Irina; Berdyshev, Evgeny V

    2016-01-01

    Following the discovery of ceramide as the central signaling and metabolic relay among sphingolipids, studies of its involvement in lung health and pathophysiology have exponentially increased. In this review, we highlight key studies in the context of recent progress in metabolomics and translational research methodologies. Evidence points toward an important role for the ceramide/sphingosine-1-phosphate rheostat in maintaining lung cell survival, vascular barrier function, and proper host response to airway microbial infections. Sphingosine kinase 1 has emerged as an important determinant of sphingosine-1-phosphate lung levels, which, when aberrantly high, contribute to lung fibrosis, maladaptive vascular remodeling, and allergic asthma. New sphingolipid metabolites have been discovered as potential biomarkers of several lung diseases. Although multiple acute and chronic lung pathological conditions involve perturbations in sphingolipid signaling and metabolism, there are specific patterns, unique sphingolipid species, enzymes, metabolites, and receptors, which have emerged that deepen our understanding of lung pathophysiology and inform the development of new therapies for lung diseases. PMID:26667073

  4. Fumonisins, Tortillas and Neural Tube Defects: Untangling a Complex Issue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisin mycotoxins are found in corn and corn-based foods. Fumonisin B1 (FB1), the most common, disrupts sphingolipid metabolism thereby causing species-specific diseases in animals that include cancer in rodents and (birth) neural tube defects (NTD) in LM/Bc mice. Fumonisins’ affect on human heal...

  5. Necessity of fumonisin production by Fusarium verticillioides for Foliar disease on corn seedlings and evaluation of absorption and translocation of the mycotoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium verticillioides, the causative agent of corn seedling blight and ear rot, produces the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1). The toxicity of FB1 is due to its inhibition of ceramide synthase, a key enzyme necessary for sphingolipid metabolism. Such inhibition occurs in both animals and plants. Fo...

  6. Finding pathway-modulating genes from a novel Ontology Fingerprint-derived gene network

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Tingting; Matmati, Nabil; Tsoi, Lam C.; Mohanty, Bidyut K.; Gao, Nan; Tang, Jijun; Lawson, Andrew B.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Zheng, W. Jim

    2014-01-01

    To enhance our knowledge regarding biological pathway regulation, we took an integrated approach, using the biomedical literature, ontologies, network analyses and experimental investigation to infer novel genes that could modulate biological pathways. We first constructed a novel gene network via a pairwise comparison of all yeast genes’ Ontology Fingerprints—a set of Gene Ontology terms overrepresented in the PubMed abstracts linked to a gene along with those terms’ corresponding enrichment P-values. The network was further refined using a Bayesian hierarchical model to identify novel genes that could potentially influence the pathway activities. We applied this method to the sphingolipid pathway in yeast and found that many top-ranked genes indeed displayed altered sphingolipid pathway functions, initially measured by their sensitivity to myriocin, an inhibitor of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis. Further experiments confirmed the modulation of the sphingolipid pathway by one of these genes, PFA4, encoding a palmitoyl transferase. Comparative analysis showed that few of these novel genes could be discovered by other existing methods. Our novel gene network provides a unique and comprehensive resource to study pathway modulations and systems biology in general. PMID:25063300

  7. Age‐related remodeling of small arteries is accompanied by increased sphingomyelinase activity and accumulation of long‐chain ceramides

    PubMed Central

    Ohanian, Jacqueline; Liao, Aiyin; Forman, Simon P.; Ohanian, Vasken

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The structure and function of large arteries alters with age leading to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Age‐related large artery remodeling and arteriosclerosis is associated with increased collagen deposition, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Bioactive sphingolipids are known to regulate these processes, and are also involved in aging and cellular senescence. However, less is known about age‐associated alterations in small artery morphology and function or whether changes in arterial sphingolipids occur in aging. We show that mesenteric small arteries from old sheep have increased lumen diameter and media thickness without a change in media to lumen ratio, indicative of outward hypertrophic remodeling. This remodeling occurred without overt changes in blood pressure or pulse pressure indicating it was a consequence of aging per se. There was no age‐associated change in mechanical properties of the arteries despite an increase in total collagen content and deposition of collagen in a thickened intima layer in arteries from old animals. Analysis of the sphingolipid profile showed an increase in long‐chain ceramide (C14–C20), but no change in the levels of sphingosine or sphingosine‐1‐phosphate in arteries from old compared to young animals. This was accompanied by a parallel increase in acid and neutral sphingomyelinase activity in old arteries compared to young. This study demonstrates remodeling of small arteries during aging that is accompanied by accumulation of long‐chain ceramides. This suggests that sphingolipids may be important mediators of vascular aging. PMID:24872355

  8. Serum sphingolipidomic analyses reveal an upregulation of C16- ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Grammatikos, Georgios; Schoell, Niklas; Ferreirós, Nerea; Bon, Dimitra; Herrmann, Eva; Farnik, Harald; Köberle, Verena; Piiper, Albrecht; Zeuzem, Stefan; Kronenberger, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that major alterations of serum sphingolipid metabolites in chronic liver disease associate significantly with the stage of liver fibrosis in corresponding patients. In the current study we assessed via mass spectrometry serum concentrations of sphingolipid metabolites in a series of 122 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to an age- and sex-matched series of 127 patients with cirrhosis. We observed a highly significant upregulation of long and very long chain ceramides (C16-C24) in the serum of patients with HCC as compared to patients with cirrhosis (P < 0.001). Accordingly, dihydro-ceramides, synthetic precursors of ceramides and notably sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and sphinganine-1-phosphate (SA1P) were upregulated in patients with HCC (P < 0.001). Especially the diagnostic accuracy of C16-ceramide and S1P, assessed by receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis, showed a higher area under the curve (AUC) value as compared to alpha fetoprotein (AFP) (0.999 and 0.985 versus 0.823, P < 0.001 respectively). In conclusion, serum levels of sphingolipid metabolites show a significant upregulation in patients with HCC as compared to patients with cirrhosis. Particularly C16-ceramide and S1P may serve as novel diagnostic markers for the identification of HCC in patients with liver diseases. Our data justify further investigations on the role of sphingolipids in HCC. PMID:26933996

  9. Stereospecificity of fatty acid 2-hydroxylase and differential functions of 2-hydroxy fatty acid enantiomers[S

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lin; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Dequan; Okunade, Adewole L.; Su, Xiong

    2012-01-01

    FA 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) is an NAD(P)H-dependent enzyme that initiates FA α oxidation and is also responsible for the biosynthesis of 2-hydroxy FA (2-OH FA)-containing sphingolipids in mammalian cells. The 2-OH FA is chiral due to the asymmetric carbon bearing the hydroxyl group. Our current study performed stereochemistry investigation and showed that FA2H is stereospecific for the production of (R)-enantiomers. FA2H knockdown in adipocytes increases diffusional mobility of raft-associated lipids, leading to reduced GLUT4 protein level, glucose uptake, and lipogenesis. The effects caused by FA2H knockdown were reversed by treatment with exogenous (R)-2-hydroxy palmitic acid, but not with the (S)-enantiomer. Further analysis of sphingolipids demonstrated that the (R)-enantiomer is enriched in hexosylceramide whereas the (S)-enantiomer is preferentially incorporated into ceramide, suggesting that the observed differential effects are in part due to synthesis of sphingolipids containing different 2-OH FA enantiomers. These results may help clarify the mechanisms underlying the recently identified diseases associated with FA2H mutations in humans and may lead to potential pharmaceutical and dietary treatments. This study also provides critical information to help study functions of 2-OH FA enantiomers in FA α oxidation and possibly other sphingolipid-independent pathways. PMID:22517924

  10. Ceramide in apoptosis: a revisited role.

    PubMed

    Levade, Thierry; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Gouazé, Valérie; Ségui, Bruno; Tardy, Claudine; Betito, Susan; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2002-08-01

    The sphingolipid ceramide has recently emerged as a new transducer or modulator of apoptotic cell death. This function, however, has recently been challenged. Here, in the light of recent observations, the role of ceramide in apoptosis signaling is discussed. PMID:12374195

  11. Still Benched on its Way to the Bedside: Sphingosine Kinase 1 as an Emerging Target in Cancer Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gault, Christopher R.; Obeid, Lina M.

    2011-01-01

    For several decades, lipid biologists have investigated how sphingolipids contribute to physiology, cell biology, and cell fate. Foremost among these discoveries is the finding that the bioactive sphingolipids ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) have diverse and often opposing effects on cell fate. Interestingly, these bioactive sphingolipids can be interconverted by just a few enzymatic reactions. Therefore, much attention has been paid to the enzymes which govern these reactions with a disproportionate amount of focus on the enzyme sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1). Several studies have found that tissue expression of SK1 correlates with cancer stage, chemotherapy response, and tumor aggressiveness. In addition, overexpression of SK1 in multiple cancer cell lines increases their resistance to chemotherapy, promotes proliferation, allows for anchorage independent growth, and increases local angiogenesis. Inhibition of SK1 using either pharmacological inhibitors or by crossing SK1 null mice has shown promise in many xenograft models of cancer as well as several genetic and chemically induced mouse models of carcinogenesis. Here we review the majority of the evidence that suggests SK1 is a promising target for the prevention and or treatment of various cancers. Also, we strongly advocate for further research into basic mechanisms of bioactive sphingolipid signaling and an increased focus on the efficacy of SK inhibitors in non-xenograft models of cancer progression. PMID:21787121

  12. Sphingosine kinase-1--a potential therapeutic target in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    Sphingolipid metabolites play critical functions in the regulation of a number of fundamental biological processes including cancer. Whereas ceramide and sphingosine mediate and trigger apoptosis or cell growth arrest, sphingosine 1-phosphate promotes proliferation and cell survival. The delicate equilibrium between the intracellular levels of each of these sphingolipids is controlled by the enzymes that either produce or degrade these metabolites. Sphingosine kinase-1 is a crucial regulator of this two-pan balance, because it produces the prosurvival sphingosine 1-phosphate, and reduces the content of both ceramide and sphingosine, the proapoptotic sphingolipids. Sphingosine kinase-1 controls the levels of sphingolipids having opposite effects on cell survival/death, its gene was found to be of oncogenic nature, its mRNA is overexpressed in many solid tumors, its overexpression protects cells from apoptosis and its activity is decreased during anticancer treatments. Therefore, sphingosine kinase-1 appears to be a target of interest for therapeutic manipulation via its pharmacological inhibition. Strategies to kill tumor cells by increasing their ceramide and/or sphingosine content while blocking sphingosine 1-phosphate generation should have a favorable therapeutic index. PMID:17159597

  13. Fumonisin as a possible contributing factor to neural tube defects in populations consuming large amounts of maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisin B1 (FB) is an inhibitor of sphingolipid (SL) biosynthesis and folate transport and can induce neural tube defects (NTD) in mice. NTD incidence is high in countries where maize is a dietary staple and FB exposure is likely. In Guatemala the incidence of FB in maize has been well documented ...

  14. Isolation and characterization of 1-Deoxysphinganine, a novel sphingoid base that accumulates in cells following fumonisin B1 inhibition of ceramide synthase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a fungal toxin found in maize worldwide. It is hepato- and nephrotoxic in many species, a liver and kidney carcinogen in rodents, and suspected to be involved in human disease. Its mechanism of action is disruption of sphingolipid metabolism consequent to inhibition of ceramide...

  15. Involvement of PDK1, PKC and TOR signaling pathways in basal fluconazole tolerance in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeseung; Lamichhane, Ami Khanal; Garraffo, H. Martin; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.; Chang, Yun C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This study shows the importance of PDK1, TOR and PKC signaling pathways to the basal tolerance of Cryptococcus neoformans toward fluconazole, the widely used drug for treatment of cryptococcosis. Mutations in genes integral to these pathway resulted in hypersensitivity to the drug. Upon fluconazole treatment, Mpk1, the downstream target of PKC was phosphorylated and its phosphorylation required Pdk1. We show genetically that the PDK1 and TOR phosphorylation sites in Ypk1 as well as the kinase activity of Ypk1 are required for the fluconazole basal tolerance. The involvement of these pathways in fluconazole basal tolerance was associated with sphingolipid homeostasis. Deletion of PDK1, SIN1, or YPK1 but not MPK1 affected cell viability in the presence of sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors. Concurrently, pdk1Δ, sinΔ1, ypk1Δ, and mpk1Δ exhibited altered sphingolipid content and elevated fluconazole accumulation compared with the wild-type. The fluconazole hypersensitivity phenotype of these mutants, therefore, appears to be the result of malfunction of the influx/efflux systems due to modifications of membrane sphingolipid content. Interestingly, the reduced virulence of these strains in mice suggests that the cryptococcal PDK1, PKC, and likely the TOR pathways play an important role in managing stress exerted either by fluconazole or by the host environment. PMID:22339665

  16. The Cryptococcal Enzyme Inositol Phosphosphingolipid-Phospholipase C Confers Resistance to the Antifungal Effects of Macrophages and Promotes Fungal Dissemination to the Central Nervous System†

    PubMed Central

    Shea, John M.; Kechichian, Talar B.; Luberto, Chiara; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, sphingolipids have emerged as critical molecules in the regulation of microbial pathogenesis. In fungi, the synthesis of complex sphingolipids is important for the regulation of pathogenicity, but the role of sphingolipid degradation in fungal virulence is not known. Here, we isolated and characterized the inositol phosphosphingolipid-phospholipase C1 (ISC1) gene from the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans and showed that it encodes an enzyme that metabolizes fungal inositol sphingolipids. Isc1 protects C. neoformans from acidic, oxidative, and nitrosative stresses, which are encountered by the fungus in the phagolysosomes of activated macrophages, through a Pma1-dependent mechanism(s). In an immunocompetent mouse model, the C. neoformans Δisc1 mutant strain is almost exclusively found extracellularly and in a hyperencapsulated form, and its dissemination to the brain is remarkably reduced compared to that of control strains. Interestingly, the dissemination of the C. neoformans Δisc1 strain to the brain is promptly restored in these mice when alveolar macrophages are pharmacologically depleted or when infecting an immunodeficient mouse in which macrophages are not efficiently activated. These studies suggest that Isc1 plays a key role in protecting C. neoformans from the intracellular environment of macrophages, whose activation is important for preventing fungal dissemination of the Δisc1 strain to the central nervous system and the development of meningoencephalitis. PMID:16988277

  17. Circulating levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate are elevated in severe, but not mild psoriasis and are unresponsive to anti-TNF-α treatment

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio; Xu, Ning; Sar, Daniel G.; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Ståhle, Mona; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are bioactive molecules with a putative role in inflammation. Alterations in sphingolipids, in particular ceramides, have been consistently observed in psoriatic skin. Herein, we quantified the circulating sphingolipid profile in individuals with mild or severe psoriasis as well as healthy controls. In addition, the effects of anti-TNF-α treatment were determined. Levels of sphingoid bases, including sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), increased in severe (P < 0.001; n = 32), but not in mild (n = 32), psoriasis relative to healthy controls (n = 32). These alterations were not reversed in severe patients (n = 16) after anti-TNF-α treatment despite significant improvement in psoriasis lesions. Circulating levels of sphingomyelins and ceramides shifted in a fatty acid chain length-dependent manner. These alterations were also observed in psoriasis skin lesions and were associated with changes in mRNA levels of ceramide synthases. The lack of S1P response to treatment may have pathobiological implications due to its close relation to the vascular and immune systems. In particular, increased levels of sphingolipids and especially S1P in severe psoriasis patients requiring biological treatment may potentially be associated with cardiovascular comorbidities. The fact that shifts in S1P levels were not ameliorated by anti-TNF-α treatment, despite improvements in the skin lesions, further supports targeting S1P receptors as therapy for severe psoriasis. PMID:26174087

  18. Serum sphingolipidomic analyses reveal an upregulation of C16-ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Grammatikos, Georgios; Schoell, Niklas; Ferreirós, Nerea; Bon, Dimitra; Herrmann, Eva; Farnik, Harald; Köberle, Verena; Piiper, Albrecht; Zeuzem, Stefan; Kronenberger, Bernd; Waidmann, Oliver; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-04-01

    We have recently shown that major alterations of serum sphingolipid metabolites in chronic liver disease associate significantly with the stage of liver fibrosis in corresponding patients. In the current study we assessed via mass spectrometry serum concentrations of sphingolipid metabolites in a series of 122 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to an age- and sex-matched series of 127 patients with cirrhosis. We observed a highly significant upregulation of long and very long chain ceramides (C16-C24) in the serum of patients with HCC as compared to patients with cirrhosis (P < 0.001). Accordingly, dihydro-ceramides, synthetic precursors of ceramides and notably sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and sphinganine-1-phosphate (SA1P) were upregulated in patients with HCC (P < 0.001). Especially the diagnostic accuracy of C16-ceramide and S1P, assessed by receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis, showed a higher area under the curve (AUC) value as compared to alpha fetoprotein (AFP) (0.999 and 0.985 versus 0.823, P < 0.001 respectively). In conclusion, serum levels of sphingolipid metabolites show a significant upregulation in patients with HCC as compared to patients with cirrhosis. Particularly C16-ceramide and S1P may serve as novel diagnostic markers for the identification of HCC in patients with liver diseases. Our data justify further investigations on the role of sphingolipids in HCC. PMID:26933996

  19. The Immunological Functions of Saposins

    PubMed Central

    Darmoise, Alexandre; Maschmeyer, Patrick; Winau, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Saposins or sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs) are small, nonenzymatic glycoproteins that are ubiquitously present in lysosomes. SAPs comprise the five molecules saposins A–D and the GM2 activator protein. Saposins are essential for sphingolipid degradation and membrane digestion. On the one hand, they bind the respective hydrolases required to catabolize sphingolipid molecules; on the other hand, saposins can interact with intralysosomal membrane structures to render lipids accessible to their degrading enzymes. Thus, saposins bridge the physicochemical gap between lipid substrate and hydrophilic hydrolases. Accordingly, defects in saposin function can lead to lysosomal lipid accumulation. In addition to their specific functions in sphingolipid metabolism, saposins have membrane-perturbing properties. At the low pH of lysosomes, saposins get protonated and exhibit a high binding affinity for anionic phospholipids. Based on their universal principle to interact with membrane bilayers, we present the immunological functions of saposins with regard to lipid antigen presentation to CD1-restricted T cells, processing of apoptotic bodies for antigen delivery and cross-priming, as well as their potential antimicrobial impact. PMID:20510729

  20. Quantitative Profiling of Long-Chain Bases by Mass Tagging and Parallel Reaction Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Ejsing, Christer S.; Bilgin, Mesut; Fabregat, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain bases (LCBs) are both intermediates in sphingolipid metabolism and potent signaling molecules that control cellular processes. To understand how regulation of sphingolipid metabolism and levels of individual LCB species impinge upon physiological and pathophysiological processes requires sensitive and specific assays for monitoring these molecules. Here we describe a shotgun lipidomics method for quantitative profiling of LCB molecules. The method employs a “mass-tag” strategy where LCBs are chemically derivatized with deuterated methyliodide (CD3I) to produce trimethylated derivatives having a positively charged quaternary amine group. This chemical derivatization minimizes unwanted in-source fragmentation of LCB analytes and prompts a characteristic trimethylaminium fragment ion that enables sensitive and quantitative profiling of LCB molecules by parallel reaction monitoring on a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the strategy provides, for the first time, a routine for monitoring endogenous 3-ketosphinganine molecules and distinguishing them from more abundant isomeric sphingosine molecules. To demonstrate the efficacy of the methodology we report an in-depth characterization of the LCB composition of yeast mutants with defective sphingolipid metabolism and the absolute levels of LCBs in mammalian cells. The strategy is generic, applicable to other types of mass spectrometers and can readily be applied as an additional routine in workflows for global lipidome quantification and for functional studies of sphingolipid metabolism. PMID:26660097

  1. Increased accumulation of fumonisin B1, sphingoid bases and sphingoid base 1-phosphates: explaining the differential sensitivity of rat kidney and liver to fumonisin toxicity.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins in maize and inhibitors of ceramide synthase a key enzyme in the de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway. In liver and kidney inhibition of ceramide synthase results in a marked increase in the ceramide precursor sphinganine. This study was conducted to investigate the di...

  2. Accumulation of sphingoid bases and sphingoid base 1-phosphates: A possible mechanism for Fusarium verticillioides corn-seedling disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sphingolipids are important structural components of membranes involved in signaling pathways that regulate cell growth and death. Fumonisins (FB) are water soluble mycotoxins produced by F. verticillioides, which is parasitic to corn. FBs are inhibitors of ceramide synthase (CS), a key enzyme in sp...

  3. Circulating levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate are elevated in severe, but not mild psoriasis and are unresponsive to anti-TNF-α treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checa, Antonio; Xu, Ning; Sar, Daniel G.; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Ståhle, Mona; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2015-07-01

    Sphingolipids are bioactive molecules with a putative role in inflammation. Alterations in sphingolipids, in particular ceramides, have been consistently observed in psoriatic skin. Herein, we quantified the circulating sphingolipid profile in individuals with mild or severe psoriasis as well as healthy controls. In addition, the effects of anti-TNF-α treatment were determined. Levels of sphingoid bases, including sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), increased in severe (P < 0.001 n = 32), but not in mild (n = 32), psoriasis relative to healthy controls (n = 32). These alterations were not reversed in severe patients (n = 16) after anti-TNF-α treatment despite significant improvement in psoriasis lesions. Circulating levels of sphingomyelins and ceramides shifted in a fatty acid chain length-dependent manner. These alterations were also observed in psoriasis skin lesions and were associated with changes in mRNA levels of ceramide synthases. The lack of S1P response to treatment may have pathobiological implications due to its close relation to the vascular and immune systems. In particular, increased levels of sphingolipids and especially S1P in severe psoriasis patients requiring biological treatment may potentially be associated with cardiovascular comorbidities. The fact that shifts in S1P levels were not ameliorated by anti-TNF-α treatment, despite improvements in the skin lesions, further supports targeting S1P receptors as therapy for severe psoriasis.

  4. Fumonisin B1 is necessary for corn seedling disease but is minimally translocated from roots to shoots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium verticillioides, the causative agent of corn seedling blight and ear rot, produces the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1). The toxicity of FB1 is due to its inhibition of ceramide synthase, a key enzyme necessary for sphingolipid metabolism. Such inhibition occurs in both animals and plants. Fo...

  5. Hydrolyzed fumonisins HFB1 and HFB2 are acylated in vitro and in vivo by ceramide synthase to form cytotoxic N-acyl-metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are produced by Fusarium verticillioides and other Fusarium species. They are found in corn and corn-based foods. Fumonisins B1 (FB1) and B2 (FB2), the most abundant fumonisins, are toxic to animals and disrupt sphingolipid metabolism by inhibiting the enzyme ceramide synthase. Their hy...

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF FLOTILLIN-1 ON EIMERIA TENELLA SPOROZOITES AND ITS ROLE IN HOST CELL INVASION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid rafts are detergent-resistant, liquid-ordered microdomains in plasma membranes that are enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids and involved in intracellular signal transduction, membrane trafficking, and molecular sorting. In this study, we investigated the possibility that lipid rafts on E...

  7. Fingolimod for the treatment of neurological diseases—state of play and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Brunkhorst, Robert; Vutukuri, Rajkumar; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a fascinating class of signaling molecules derived from the membrane lipid sphingomyelin. They show abundant expression in the brain. Complex sphingolipids such as glycosphingolipids (gangliosides and cerebrosides) regulate vesicular transport and lysosomal degradation and their dysregulation can lead to storage diseases with a neurological phenotype. More recently, simple sphingolipids such ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) were discovered to signal in response to many extracellular stimuli. Forming an intricate signaling network, the balance of these readily interchangeable mediators is decisive for cell fate under stressful conditions. The immunomodulator fingolimod is the prodrug of an S1P receptor agonist. Following receptor activation, the drug leads to downregulation of the S1P1 receptor inducing functional antagonism. As the first drug to modulate the sphingolipid signaling pathway, it was marketed in 2010 for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). At that time, immunomodulation was widely accepted as the key mechanism of fingolimod’s efficacy in MS. But given the excellent passage of this lipophilic compound into the brain and its massive brain accumulation as well as the abundant expression of S1P receptors on brain cells, it is conceivable that fingolimod also affects brain cells directly. Indeed, a seminal study showed that the protective effect of fingolimod in experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), a murine MS model, is lost in mice lacking the S1P1 receptor on astrocytes, arguing for a specific role of astrocytic S1P signaling in MS. In this review, we discuss the role of sphingolipid mediators and their metabolizing enzymes in neurologic diseases and putative therapeutic strategies arising thereof. PMID:25309325

  8. Sphingosine inhibits the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity.

    PubMed

    Benaim, Gustavo; Pimentel, Adriana A; Felibertt, Pimali; Mayora, Adriana; Colman, Laura; Sojo, Felipe; Rojas, Héctor; De Sanctis, Juan B

    2016-04-29

    The increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) is the key variable for many different processes, ranging from regulation of cell proliferation to apoptosis. In this work we demonstrated that the sphingolipid sphingosine (Sph) increases the [Ca(2+)]i by inhibiting the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), in a similar manner to thapsigargin (Tg), a specific inhibitor of this Ca(2+) pump. The results showed that addition of sphingosine produced a release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum followed by a Ca(2+) entrance from the outside mileu. The results presented in this work support that this sphingolipid could control the activity of the SERCA, and hence sphingosine may participate in the regulation of [Ca(2+)]I in mammalian cells. PMID:27033604

  9. Very long chain fatty acid and lipid signaling in the response of plants to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Leger, Amandine

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that lipid signaling is essential for plant resistance to pathogens. Besides oxylipins and unsaturated fatty acids known to play important signaling functions during plant-pathogen interactions, the very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) biosynthesis pathway has been recently associated to plant defense through different aspects. VLCFAs are indeed required for the biosynthesis of the plant cuticle and the generation of sphingolipids. Elucidation of the roles of these lipids in biotic stress responses is the result of the use of genetic approaches together with the identification of the genes/proteins involved in their biosynthesis. This review focuses on recent observations which revealed the complex function of the cuticle and cuticle-derived signals, and the key role of sphingolipids as bioactive molecules involved in signal transduction and cell death regulation during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:19649180

  10. Match-making for posaconazole through systems thinking.

    PubMed

    Fügi, Matthias A; Kaiser, Marcel; Tanner, Marcel; Schneiter, Roger; Mäser, Pascal; Guan, Xue Li

    2015-02-01

    Currently available drugs for Chagas' disease are limited by toxicity and low efficacy in the chronic stage. Posaconazole, the most advanced new anti-chagasic drug candidate, did not fully confirm its initial potential in a Phase II clinical trial for chronic Chagas' disease. Given that posaconazole is highly active against Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro, and was very well tolerated in clinical trials, it should not be abandoned. Rather, a combination therapy may provide a highly promising outlook. Systems-scale approaches facilitate the hunt for a combination partner for posaconazole, which acts by blocking sterol biosynthesis. Mounting evidence suggests the functional interactions between sterols and sphingolipids in vivo. Here, we propose combining sterol and sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors to advance drug development in Chagas' disease. PMID:25486978

  11. STAT3 and sphingosine-1-phosphate in inflammation-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Andrew V; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Lin, Elaine Y

    2014-01-01

    Accumulated evidences have demonstrated that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a critical link between inflammation and cancer. Multiple studies have indicated that persistent activation of STAT3 in epithelial/tumor cells in inflammation-associated colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor signaling. In inflammatory response whereby interleukin (IL)-6 production is abundant, STAT3-mediated pathways were found to promote the activation of sphingosine kinases (SphK1 and SphK2) leading to the production of S1P. Reciprocally, S1P encourages the activation of STAT3 through a positive autocrine-loop signaling. The crosstalk between IL-6, STAT3 and sphingolipid regulated pathways may play an essential role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression in inflamed intestines. Therapeutics targeting both STAT3 and sphingolipid are therefore likely to contribute novel and more effective therapeutic strategies against inflammation-associated CRC. PMID:25132744

  12. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine in cancer progress

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Hong-Wei; Jing, Qing-Chuan; Liu, Ping-Ping; Liu, Jing; Li, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) is a naturally occurring bioactive sphingolipid in blood plasma, metabolizing from the hydrolysis of the membrane sphingolipid. It has been shown to exert multifunctional role in cell physiological regulation either as an intracellular second messenger or as an extracellular agent through G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Because of elevated levels of SPC in malicious ascites of patients with cancer, the role of SPC in tumor progression has prompted wide interest. The factor was reported to affect the proliferation and/or migration of many cancer cells, including pancreatic cancer cells, epithelial ovarian carcinoma cells, rat C6 glioma cells, neuroblastoma cells, melanoma cells, and human leukemia cells. This review covers current knowledge of the role of SPC in tumor. PMID:26550104

  13. Dynamics of the Heat Stress Response of Ceramides with Different Fatty-Acyl Chain Lengths in Baker's Yeast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Wei; Fonseca, Luis L; Hannun, Yusuf A; Voit, Eberhard O

    2015-08-01

    The article demonstrates that computational modeling has the capacity to convert metabolic snapshots, taken sequentially over time, into a description of cellular, dynamic strategies. The specific application is a detailed analysis of a set of actions with which Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to heat stress. Using time dependent metabolic concentration data, we use a combination of mathematical modeling, reverse engineering, and optimization to infer dynamic changes in enzyme activities within the sphingolipid pathway. The details of the sphingolipid responses to heat stress are important, because they guide some of the longer-term alterations in gene expression, with which the cells adapt to the increased temperature. The analysis indicates that all enzyme activities in the system are affected and that the shapes of the time trends in activities depend on the fatty-acyl CoA chain lengths of the different ceramide species in the system. PMID:26241868

  14. Analysis of the Involvement of Different Ceramide Variants in the Response to Hydroxyurea Stress in Baker's Yeast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Wei; Fonseca, Luis L; Hannun, Yusuf A; Voit, Eberhard O

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids have been identified as important signaling compounds in stress responses. However, it is not always clear how different sphingolipid profiles are achieved in a particular stress situation. Here we propose a detailed mass action model, containing 42 dependent variables and 137 reactions, that offers explanations of the roles of variant ceramides species, which differ in the lengths of their fatty acyl chains and their saturation state, in the response to hydroxyurea stress. The simulations demonstrate that the cells manage to achieve hydroxyurea tolerance through a well-coordinated, differential usage of the variant ceramide species. Moreover, the results suggest that key enzymes have different affinities toward saturated and unsaturated fatty acyl chains, which implies that the saturation state affords the cells with an additional mode of regulation that had not been recognized so far. These conclusions from our computational analysis are yet to be validated experimentally. PMID:26784947

  15. Reflections on my career in analytical chemistry and biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    SWEELEY, Charles C.

    2010-01-01

    My career has been focused in two major areas, analytical chemistry and biochemistry of complex lipids and glycoconjugates. Included here are the pioneering work on the gas chromatography of long-chain sphingolipid bases, carbohydrates, steroids and urinary organic acids. Mass spectrometry was utilized extensively in structural studies of sphingolipids, fatty acids, carbohydrates, steroids, urinary organic acids, polyisoprenoid alcohols, and juvenile hormone. Computer systems were developed for the acquisition and analysis of mass spectra, and were used for development of automated metabolic profiling of complex mixtures of metabolites. Fabry’s disease was discovered to be a glycosphingolipidosis. Enzymes of lysosomal metabolism of glycosphingolipids were purified, characterized, and used in one of the first demonstrations of the feasibility of enzyme replacement therapy in a lysosomal storage disorder (Fabry’s disease). Extracellular sialidases were studied to evaluate the hypothesis that they might be involved in the regulation of membrane growth factor receptors. The enzyme for hematoside synthesis was purified and characterized. PMID:20948176

  16. Regulation of ceramide channel formation and disassembly: Insights on the initiation of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Ghali, Majdouline; Stiban, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipid research has surged in the past two decades and has produced a wide variety of evidence supporting the role of this class of molecules in mediating cellular growth, differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis. Ceramides are a subgroup of sphingolipids (SLs) that are directly involved in the process of initiation of apoptosis. We, and others, have recently shown that ceramides are capable of the formation of protein-permeable channels in mitochondrial outer membranes under physiological conditions. These pores are indeed good candidates for the pathway of release of pro-apoptotic proteins from the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) into the cytosol to initiate intrinsic apoptosis. Here, we review recent findings on the regulation of ceramide channel formation and disassembly, highlighting possible implications on the initiation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:26587005

  17. Lipids in plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Siebers, Meike; Brands, Mathias; Wewer, Vera; Duan, Yanjiao; Hölzl, Georg; Dörmann, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria and fungi can undergo symbiotic or pathogenic interactions with plants. Membrane lipids and lipid-derived molecules from the plant or the microbial organism play important roles during the infection process. For example, lipids (phospholipids, glycolipids, sphingolipids, sterol lipids) are involved in establishing the membrane interface between the two organisms. Furthermore, lipid-derived molecules are crucial for intracellular signaling in the plant cell, and lipids serve as signals during plant-microbial communication. These signal lipids include phosphatidic acid, diacylglycerol, lysophospholipids, and free fatty acids derived from phospholipase activity, apocarotenoids, and sphingolipid breakdown products such as ceramide, ceramide-phosphate, long chain base, and long chain base-phosphate. Fatty acids are the precursors for oxylipins, including jasmonic acid, and for azelaic acid, which together with glycerol-3-phosphate are crucial for the regulation of systemic acquired resistance. This article is part of a Special Issue titled "Plant Lipid Biology," guest editors Kent Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:26928590

  18. Intratracheal myriocin enhances allergen‐induced Th2 inflammation and airway hyper‐responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Edukulla, Ramakrishna; Rehn, Kira Lee; Liu, Bo; McAlees, Jaclyn W.; Hershey, Gurjit K.; Wang, Yui Hsi; Lewkowich, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ceramide is the central substrate of sphingolipid metabolism and plays a key role in cellular signal transduction pathways, regulating apoptosis, differentiation, and chemotaxis. Alterations in airway ceramide levels are observed in multiple pulmonary diseases and recent human genetic association studies have linked dysregulation of sphingolipid regulatory genes with asthma pathogenesis. Methods Utilizing myriocin, a potent inhibitor of sphingolipid synthesis, we evaluated the immune regulatory role of de novo ceramide generation in vitro and in vivo. Intratracheal myriocin was administered alone or during house dust mite sensitization (HDM) of BALB/C mice and airway hyper‐responsiveness (AHR) was evaluated by invasive plethysmography followed by bronchial lavage (BAL) cytology and cytokine quantification. Results Myriocin inhibits and HDM exposure activates de novo ceramide synthesis in bone marrow‐derived dendritic cells. Mice receiving intratracheal myriocin developed a mild airway neutrophilic infiltrate without inducing a significant increase in AHR. CXCL1 was elevated in the BAL fluid of myriocin‐treated mice while the neutrophilic chemotactic factors anaphylatoxin C5a, leukotriene B4, and IL‐17 were unaffected. HDM treatment combined with myriocin led to a dramatic enhancement of AHR (63% increase over HDM alone, p < 0.001) and increased granulocyte pulmonary infiltrates versus HDM or myriocin alone. Elevated Th2 T cell counts and Th2 cytokines/chemokines (IL5, IL13, CCL17) were observed in mice treated with combined HDM/myriocin compared to HDM alone. Myriocin‐treated pulmonary CD11c+ cells stimulated with HDM secreted significantly more CXCL1 than cells stimulated with HDM alone while HDM stimulated airway epithelial cells showed no change in CXCL1 secretion following myriocin treatment. Conclusions Intratracheal myriocin, likely acting via ceramide synthesis inhibition, enhances allergen‐induced airway inflammation

  19. A new twist to the emerging functions of ceramides in cancer: novel role for platelet acid sphingomyelinase in cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hannun, Yusuf A; Newcomb, Benjamin

    2015-06-01

    It is now appreciated that sphingolipids constitute a rich class of bioactive molecules that include ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1‐phosphate whose formation is controlled by a network of highly regulated enzymes (Hannun & Obeid, 2008). Notably, several stress stimuli induce the production of ceramide, which, as a single entity, has been traditionally associated with apoptotic and growth suppressive functions. However, recent data clearly suggest that this simplistic formulation is no longer tenable. PMID:25859016

  20. Method for inhibiting oxidation of metal sulfide-containing material

    DOEpatents

    Elsetinow, Alicia; Borda, Michael J.; Schoonen, Martin A.; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2006-12-26

    The present invention provides means for inhibiting the oxidation of a metal sulfide-containing material, such as ore mine waste rock or metal sulfide taiulings, by coating the metal sulfide-containing material with an oxidation-inhibiting two-tail lipid coating (12) thereon, thereby inhibiting oxidation of the metal sulfide-containing material in acid mine drainage conditions. The lipids may be selected from phospholipids, sphingolipids, glycolipids and combinations thereof.

  1. Metabolic profiles of male meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans from the EPIC-Oxford cohort12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Julie A; Rinaldi, Sabina; Ferrari, Pietro; Carayol, Marion; Achaintre, David; Scalbert, Augustin; Cross, Amanda J; Gunter, Marc J; Fensom, Georgina K; Appleby, Paul N; Key, Timothy J; Travis, Ruth C

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human metabolism is influenced by dietary factors and lifestyle, environmental, and genetic factors; thus, men who exclude some or all animal products from their diet might have different metabolic profiles than meat eaters. Objective: We aimed to investigate differences in concentrations of 118 circulating metabolites, including acylcarnitines, amino acids, biogenic amines, glycerophospholipids, hexose, and sphingolipids related to lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism between male meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans from the Oxford arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Design: In this cross-sectional study, concentrations of metabolites were measured by mass spectrometry in plasma from 379 men categorized according to their diet group. Differences in mean metabolite concentrations across diet groups were tested by using ANOVA, and a false discovery rate–controlling procedure was used to account for multiple testing. Principal component analysis was used to investigate patterns in metabolic profiles. Results: Concentrations of 79% of metabolites differed significantly by diet group. In the vast majority of these cases, vegans had the lowest concentration, whereas meat eaters most often had the highest concentrations of the acylcarnitines, glycerophospholipids, and sphingolipids, and fish eaters or vegetarians most often had the highest concentrations of the amino acids and a biogenic amine. A clear separation between patterns in the metabolic profiles of the 4 diet groups was seen, with vegans being noticeably different from the other groups because of lower concentrations of some glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids. Conclusions: Metabolic profiles in plasma could effectively differentiate between men from different habitual diet groups, especially vegan men compared with men who consume animal products. The difference in metabolic profiles was mainly explained by the lower concentrations of

  2. Lipidomic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii reveals critical changes in lipid composition in response to acetic acid stress.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Lina; Santos, Aline Xs; Riezman, Howard; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555) cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L(-1), while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L(-1) acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS) showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP)2C 2.2×) and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP)2C 2.7×), when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to generate large

  3. Exogenous ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) and phospho-ceramide analogue-1 (PCERA-1) regulate key macrophage activities via distinct receptors

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Sebastián; Ernst, Orna; Avni, Dorit; Athamna, Muhammad; Philosoph, Amir; Arana, Lide; Ouro, Alberto; Hoeferlin, L. Alexis; Meijler, Michael M.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio; Zor, Tsaffrir

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an ensemble of tightly regulated steps, in which macrophages play an essential role. Previous reports showed that the natural sphingolipid ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) stimulates macrophages migration, while the synthetic C1P mimic, phospho-ceramide analogue-1 (PCERA-1), suppresses production of the key pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and amplifies production of the key anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in LPS-stimulated macrophages, via one or more unidentified G-protein coupled receptors. We show that C1P stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages migration via the NFκB pathway and MCP-1 induction, while PCERA-1 neither mimicked nor antagonized these activities. Conversely, PCERA-1 synergistically elevated LPS-dependent IL-10 expression in RAW264.7 macrophages via the cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway, while C1P neither mimicked nor antagonized these activities. Interestingly, both compounds have the capacity to additively inhibit TNFα secretion; PCERA-1, but not C1P, suppressed LPS-induced TNFα expression in macrophages in a CREB-dependent manner, while C1P, but not PCERA-1, directly inhibited recombinant TNFα converting enzyme (TACE). Finally, PCERA-1 failed to interfere with binding of C1P to either the cell surface receptor or to TACE. These results thus indicate that the natural sphingolipid C1P and its synthetic analog PCERA-1 bind and activate distinct receptors expressed in RAW264.7 macrophages. Identification of these receptors will be instrumental for elucidation of novel activities of extra-cellular sphingolipids, and may pave the way for the design of new sphingolipid mimics for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, and pathologies which depend on cell migration, as in metastatic tumors. PMID:26656944

  4. L-Serine Deficiency Elicits Intracellular Accumulation of Cytotoxic Deoxysphingolipids and Lipid Body Formation.

    PubMed

    Esaki, Kayoko; Sayano, Tomoko; Sonoda, Chiaki; Akagi, Takumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2015-06-01

    L-serine is required to synthesize membrane lipids such as phosphatidylserine and sphingolipids. Nevertheless, it remains largely unknown how a diminished capacity to synthesize L-serine affects lipid homeostasis in cells and tissues. Here, we show that deprivation of external L-serine leads to the generation of 1-deoxysphingolipids (doxSLs), including 1-deoxysphinganine, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (KO-MEFs) lacking D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh), which catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of L-serine. A novel mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach demonstrated that 1-deoxydihydroceramide was the most abundant species of doxSLs accumulated in L-serine-deprived KO-MEFs. Among normal sphingolipid species in KO-MEFs, levels of sphinganine, dihydroceramide, ceramide, and hexosylceramide were significantly reduced after deprivation of external L-serine, whereas those of sphingomyelin, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate were retained. The synthesis of doxSLs was suppressed by supplementing the culture medium with L-serine but was potentiated by increasing the ratio of L-alanine to L-serine in the medium. Unlike with L-serine, depriving cells of external L-leucine did not promote the occurrence of doxSLs. Consistent with results obtained from KO-MEFs, brain-specific deletion of Phgdh in mice also resulted in accumulation of doxSLs in the brain. Furthermore, L-serine-deprived KO-MEFs exhibited increased formation of cytosolic lipid bodies containing doxSLs and other sphingolipids. These in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that doxSLs are generated in the presence of a high ratio of L-alanine to L-serine in cells and tissues lacking Phgdh, and de novo synthesis of L-serine is necessary to maintain normal sphingolipid homeostasis when the external supply of this amino acid is limited. PMID:25903138

  5. A novel mechanism of dasatinib-induced apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia; ceramide synthase and ceramide clearance genes.

    PubMed

    Gencer, Emel B; Ural, Ali U; Avcu, Ferit; Baran, Yusuf

    2011-11-01

    Sphingolipids are bioeffector molecules that control various aspects of cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and drug resistance. Ceramides, the central molecule of sphingolipid metabolism, are inducer of apoptosis and inhibitors of proliferation. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and glucosyleceramide, converted from ceramides by sphingosine kinase-1 (SK-1) and glucosyleceramide synthase (GCS) enzymes, respectively, inhibit apoptosis and develop resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, we examined the therapeutic potentials of bioactive sphingolipids in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) alone and in combination with dasatinib in addition to investigate the roles of ceramide-metabolizing genes in dasatinib-induced apoptosis. Cytotoxic effects of dasatinib, C8:ceramide, PDMP, and SK-1 inhibitor were determined by XTT cell proliferation assay. Changes in caspase-3 enzyme activity and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were measured using caspase-3 colorimetric assay and JC-1 MMP detection kit. Expression levels of ceramide-metabolizing genes were examined by qRT-PCR. Application of ceramide analogs and inhibitors of ceramide clearance genes decreased cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. Targeting bioactive sphingolipids towards generation/accumulation of ceramides increased apoptotic effects of dasatinib, synergistically. It was shown for the first time that dasatinib induces apoptosis through downregulating expression levels of antiapoptotic SK-1 but not GCS, and upregulating expression levels of ceramide synthase (CerS) genes, especially CerS1, in K562 cells. On the other hand, dasatinib downregulates expression levels of both GCS and SK-1 and upregulate apoptotic CerS2, -5 and -6 genes in Meg-01 cells. Increasing endogenous ceramide levels and decreasing prosurvival lipids, S1P, and GC, can open the way of more effective treatment of CML. PMID:21455605

  6. Formation and Properties of Membrane-Ordered Domains by Phytoceramide: Role of Sphingoid Base Hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Marquês, Joaquim T; Cordeiro, André M; Viana, Ana S; Herrmann, Andreas; Marinho, H Susana; de Almeida, Rodrigo F M

    2015-09-01

    Phytoceramide is the backbone of major sphingolipids in fungi and plants and is essential in several tissues of animal organisms, such as human skin. Its sphingoid base, phytosphingosine, differs from that usually found in mammals by the addition of a hydroxyl group to the 4-ene, which may be a crucial factor for the different properties of membrane microdomains among those organisms and tissues. Recently, sphingolipid hydroxylation in animal cells emerged as a key feature in several physiopathological processes. Hence, the study of the biophysical properties of phytosphingolipids is also relevant in that context since it helps us to understand the effects of sphingolipid hydroxylation. In this work, binary mixtures of N-stearoyl-phytoceramide (PhyCer) with palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) were studied. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence of membrane probes, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and confocal microscopy were employed. As for other saturated ceramides, highly rigid gel domains start to form with just ∼5 mol % PhyCer at 24 °C. However, PhyCer gel-enriched domains in coexistence with POPC-enriched fluid present additional complexity since their properties (maximal order, shape, and thickness) change at specific POPC/PhyCer molar ratios, suggesting the formation of highly stable stoichiometric complexes with their own properties, distinct from both POPC and PhyCer. A POPC/PhyCer binary phase diagram, supported by the different experimental approaches employed, is proposed with complexes of 3:1 and 1:2 stoichiometries which are stable at least from ∼15 to ∼55 °C. Thus, it provides mechanisms for the in vivo formation of sphingolipid-enriched gel domains that may account for stable membrane compartments and diffusion barriers in eukaryotic cell membranes. PMID:26262576

  7. Elucidating the chemical structure of native 1-deoxysphingosine.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Regula; Saied, Essa M; Othman, Alaa; Arenz, Christoph; Maccarone, Alan T; Poad, Berwyck L J; Blanksby, Stephen J; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Hornemann, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    The 1-deoxysphingolipids (1-deoxySLs) are formed by an alternate substrate usage of the enzyme, serine-palmitoyltransferase, and are devoid of the C1-OH-group present in canonical sphingolipids. Pathologically elevated 1-deoxySL levels are associated with the rare inherited neuropathy, HSAN1, and diabetes type 2 and might contribute to β cell failure and the diabetic sensory neuropathy. In analogy to canonical sphingolipids, it was assumed that 1-deoxySLs also bear a (4E) double bond, which is normally introduced by sphingolipid delta(4)-desaturase 1. This, however, was never confirmed. We therefore supplemented HEK293 cells with isotope-labeled D3-1-deoxysphinganine and compared the downstream formed D3-1-deoxysphingosine (1-deoxySO) to a commercial synthetic SPH m18:1(4E)(3OH) standard. Both compounds showed the same m/z, but differed in their RPLC retention time and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in-source fragmentation, suggesting that the two compounds are structural isomers. Using dimethyl disulfide derivatization followed by MS(2) as well as differential-mobility spectrometry combined with ozone-induced dissociation MS, we identified the carbon-carbon double bond in native 1-deoxySO to be located at the (Δ14) position. Comparing the chromatographic behavior of native 1-deoxySO to chemically synthesized SPH m18:1(14Z) and (14E) stereoisomers assigned the native compound to be SPH m18:1(14Z). This indicates that 1-deoxySLs are metabolized differently than canonical sphingolipids. PMID:27165858

  8. Loss of Ypk1, the yeast homolog to the human serum- and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase, accelerates phospholipase B1-mediated phosphatidylcholine deacylation.

    PubMed

    Surlow, Beth A; Cooley, Benjamin M; Needham, Patrick G; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Patton-Vogt, Jana

    2014-11-01

    Ypk1, the yeast homolog of the human serum- and glucocorticoid-induced kinase (Sgk1), affects diverse cellular activities, including sphingolipid homeostasis. We now report that Ypk1 also impacts the turnover of the major phospholipid, phosphatidylcholine (PC). Pulse-chase radiolabeling reveals that a ypk1Δ mutant exhibits increased PC deacylation and glycerophosphocholine production compared with wild type yeast. Deletion of PLB1, a gene encoding a B-type phospholipase that hydrolyzes PC, in a ypk1Δ mutant curtails the increased PC deacylation. In contrast to previous data, we find that Plb1 resides in the ER and in the medium. Consistent with a link between Ypk1 and Plb1, the levels of both Plb1 protein and PLB1 message are elevated in a ypk1Δ strain compared with wild type yeast. Furthermore, deletion of PLB1 in a ypk1Δ mutant exacerbates phenotypes associated with loss of YPK1, including slowed growth and sensitivity to cell wall perturbation, suggesting that increased Plb1 activity buffers against the loss of Ypk1. Because Plb1 lacks a consensus phosphorylation site for Ypk1, we probed other processes under the control of Ypk1 that might be linked to PC turnover. Inhibition of sphingolipid biosynthesis by the drug myriocin or through utilization of a lcb1-100 mutant results in increased PLB1 expression. Furthermore, we discovered that the increase in PLB1 expression observed upon inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis or loss of Ypk1 is under the control of the Crz1 transcription factor. Taken together, these results suggest a functional interaction between Ypk1 and Plb1 in which altered sphingolipid metabolism up-regulates PLB1 expression via Crz1. PMID:25258318

  9. Sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling pathway in inner ear biology. New therapeutic strategies for hearing loss?

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Guevara, Ricardo; Cencetti, Francesca; Donati, Chiara; Bruni, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent conditions around the world, in particular among people over 60 years old. Thus, an increase of this affection is predicted as result of the aging process in our population. In this context, it is important to further explore the function of molecular targets involved in the biology of inner ear sensory cells to better individuate new candidates for therapeutic application. One of the main causes of deafness resides into the premature death of hair cells and auditory neurons. In this regard, neurotrophins and growth factors such as insulin like growth factor are known to be beneficial by favoring the survival of these cells. An elevated number of published data in the last 20 years have individuated sphingolipids not only as structural components of biological membranes but also as critical regulators of key biological processes, including cell survival. Ceramide, formed by catabolism of sphingomyelin (SM) and other complex sphingolipids, is a strong inducer of apoptotic pathway, whereas sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), generated by cleavage of ceramide to sphingosine and phosphorylation catalyzed by two distinct sphingosine kinase (SK) enzymes, stimulates cell survival. Interestingly S1P, by acting as intracellular mediator or as ligand of a family of five distinct S1P receptors (S1P1–S1P5), is a very powerful bioactive sphingolipid, capable of triggering also other diverse cellular responses such as cell migration, proliferation and differentiation, and is critically involved in the development and homeostasis of several organs and tissues. Although new interesting data have become available, the information on S1P pathway and other sphingolipids in the biology of the inner ear is limited. Nonetheless, there are several lines of evidence implicating these signaling molecules during neurogenesis in other cell populations. In this review, we discuss the role of S1P during inner ear development, also as guidance for future

  10. Functions of Ceramide Synthase Paralogs YPR114w and YJR116w of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Shamroop K.; Almeida, Reinaldo; Ejsing, Christer S.; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide is synthesized in yeast by two redundant acyl-CoA dependent synthases, Lag1 and Lac1. In lag1∆ lac1∆ cells, free fatty acids and sphingoid bases are elevated, and ceramides are produced through the redundant alkaline ceramidases Ypc1 and Ydc1, working backwards. Even with all four of these genes deleted, cells are surviving and continue to contain small amounts of complex sphingolipids. Here we show that these residual sphingolipids are not synthesized by YPR114w or YJR116w, proteins of unknown function showing a high degree of homology to Lag1 and Lac1. Indeed, the hextuple lag1∆ lac1∆ ypc1∆ ydc1∆ ypr114w∆ yjr116w∆ mutant still contains ceramides and complex sphingolipids. Yjr116w∆ exhibit an oxygen-dependent hypersensitivity to Cu2+ due to an increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a mitochondrially orchestrated programmed cell death in presence of copper, but also a general copper hypersensitivity that cannot be counteracted by the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). Myriocin efficiently represses the synthesis of sphingoid bases of ypr114w∆, but not its growth. Both yjr116w∆ and ypr114w∆ have fragmented vacuoles and produce less ROS than wild type, before and after diauxic shift. Ypr114w∆/ypr114w∆ have an increased chronological life span. Thus, Yjr116w and Ypr114w are related, but not functionally redundant. PMID:26752183

  11. Persistence of HCV in Acutely-Infected Patients Depletes C24-Ceramide and Upregulates Sphingosine and Sphinganine Serum Levels

    PubMed Central

    Grammatikos, Georgios; Dietz, Julia; Ferreiros, Nerea; Koch, Alexander; Dultz, Georg; Bon, Dimitra; Karakasiliotis, Ioannis; Lutz, Thomas; Knecht, Gaby; Gute, Peter; Herrmann, Eva; Zeuzem, Stefan; Mavromara, Penelope; Sarrazin, Christoph; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) substantially affects lipid metabolism, and remodeling of sphingolipids appears to be essential for HCV persistence in vitro. The aim of the current study is the evaluation of serum sphingolipid variations during acute HCV infection. We enrolled prospectively 60 consecutive patients with acute HCV infection, most of them already infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and serum was collected at the time of diagnosis and longitudinally over a six-month period until initiation of antiviral therapy or confirmed spontaneous clearance. Quantification of serum sphingolipids was performed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Spontaneous clearance was observed in 11 out of 60 patients (18.3%), a sustained viral response (SVR) in 43 out of 45 patients (95.5%) receiving an antiviral treatment after follow-up, whereas persistence of HCV occurred in six out of 60 patients (10%). C24-ceramide (C24-Cer)-levels increased at follow-up in patients with spontaneous HCV eradication (p < 0.01), as compared to baseline. Sphingosine and sphinganine values were significantly upregulated in patients unable to clear HCV over time compared to patients with spontaneous clearance of HCV infection on follow-up (p = 0.013 and 0.006, respectively). In summary, the persistence of HCV after acute infection induces a downregulation of C24Cer and a simultaneous elevation of serum sphingosine and sphinganine concentrations. PMID:27304952

  12. LAPTM4B facilitates late endosomal ceramide export to control cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Blom, Tomas; Li, Shiqian; Dichlberger, Andrea; Bäck, Nils; Kim, Young Ah; Loizides-Mangold, Ursula; Riezman, Howard; Bittman, Robert; Ikonen, Elina

    2015-10-01

    Lysosome-associated protein transmembrane-4b (LAPTM4B) associates with poor prognosis in several cancers, but its physiological function is not well understood. Here we use novel ceramide probes to provide evidence that LAPTM4B interacts with ceramide and facilitates its removal from late endosomal organelles (LEs). This lowers LE ceramide in parallel with and independent of acid ceramidase-dependent catabolism. In LAPTM4B-silenced cells, LE sphingolipid accumulation is accompanied by lysosomal membrane destabilization. However, these cells resist ceramide-driven caspase-3 activation and apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents or gene silencing. Conversely, LAPTM4B overexpression reduces LE ceramide and stabilizes lysosomes but sensitizes to drug-induced caspase-3 activation. Together, these data uncover a cellular ceramide export route from LEs and identify LAPTM4B as its regulator. By compartmentalizing ceramide, LAPTM4B controls key sphingolipid-mediated cell death mechanisms and emerges as a candidate for sphingolipid-targeting cancer therapies. PMID:26280656

  13. Role of Inositol Phosphosphingolipid Phospholipase C1, the Yeast Homolog of Neutral Sphingomyelinases in DNA Damage Response and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Kaushlendra

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids play a very crucial role in many diseases and are well-known as signaling mediators in many pathways. Sphingolipids are produced during the de novo process in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) from the nonsphingolipid precursor and comprise both structural and bioactive lipids. Ceramide is the central core of the sphingolipid pathway, and its production has been observed following various treatments that can induce several different cellular effects including growth arrest, DNA damage, apoptosis, differentiation, and senescence. Ceramides are generally produced through the sphingomyelin hydrolysis and catalyzed by the enzyme sphingomyelinase (SMase) in mammals. Presently, there are many known SMases and they are categorized into three groups acid SMases (aSMases), alkaline SMases (alk-SMASES), and neutral SMases (nSMases). The yeast homolog of mammalians neutral SMases is inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C. Yeasts generally have inositol phosphosphingolipids instead of sphingomyelin, which may act as a homolog of mammalian sphingomyelin. In this review, we shall explain the structure and function of inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C1, its localization inside the cells, mechanisms, and its roles in various cell responses during replication stresses and diseases. This review will also give a new basis for our understanding for the mechanisms and nature of the inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C1/nSMase. PMID:26346287

  14. Cholesterol reduction impairs exocytosis of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Linetti, Anna; Fratangeli, Alessandra; Taverna, Elena; Valnegri, Pamela; Francolini, Maura; Cappello, Valentina; Matteoli, Michela; Passafaro, Maria; Rosa, Patrizia

    2010-02-15

    Cholesterol and sphingolipids are abundant in neuronal membranes, where they help the organisation of the membrane microdomains involved in major roles such as axonal and dendritic growth, and synapse and spine stability. The aim of this study was to analyse their roles in presynaptic physiology. We first confirmed the presence of proteins of the exocytic machinery (SNARES and Ca(v)2.1 channels) in the lipid microdomains of cultured neurons, and then incubated the neurons with fumonisin B (an inhibitor of sphingolipid synthesis), or with mevastatin or zaragozic acid (two compounds that affect the synthesis of cholesterol by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase or squalene synthase). The results demonstrate that fumonisin B and zaragozic acid efficiently decrease sphingolipid and cholesterol levels without greatly affecting the viability of neurons or the expression of synaptic proteins. Electron microscopy showed that the morphology and number of synaptic vesicles in the presynaptic boutons of cholesterol-depleted neurons were similar to those observed in control neurons. Zaragozic acid (but not fumonisin B) treatment impaired synaptic vesicle uptake of the lipophilic dye FM1-43 and an antibody directed against the luminal epitope of synaptotagmin-1, effects that depended on the reduction in cholesterol because they were reversed by cholesterol reloading. The time-lapse confocal imaging of neurons transfected with ecliptic SynaptopHluorin showed that cholesterol depletion affects the post-depolarisation increase in fluorescence intensity. Taken together, these findings show that reduced cholesterol levels impair synaptic vesicle exocytosis in cultured neurons. PMID:20103534

  15. A selective ATP-competitive sphingosine kinase inhibitor demonstrates anti-cancer properties

    PubMed Central

    Pitman, Melissa R.; Powell, Jason A.; Coolen, Carl; Moretti, Paul A.B.; Zebol, Julia R.; Pham, Duyen H.; Finnie, John W.; Don, Anthony S.; Ebert, Lisa M.; Bonder, Claudine S.; Gliddon, Briony L.; Pitson, Stuart M.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic balance of cellular sphingolipids, the sphingolipid rheostat, is an important determinant of cell fate, and is commonly deregulated in cancer. Sphingosine 1-phosphate is a signaling molecule with anti-apoptotic, pro-proliferative and pro-angiogenic effects, while conversely, ceramide and sphingosine are pro-apoptotic. The sphingosine kinases (SKs) are key regulators of this sphingolipid rheostat, and are attractive targets for anti-cancer therapy. Here we report a first-in-class ATP-binding site-directed small molecule SK inhibitor, MP-A08, discovered using an approach of structural homology modelling of the ATP-binding site of SK1 and in silico docking with small molecule libraries. MP-A08 is a highly selective ATP competitive SK inhibitor that targets both SK1 and SK2. MP-A08 blocks pro-proliferative signalling pathways, induces mitochondrial-associated apoptosis in a SK-dependent manner, and reduces the growth of human lung adenocarcinoma tumours in a mouse xenograft model by both inducing tumour cell apoptosis and inhibiting tumour angiogenesis. Thus, this selective ATP competitive SK inhibitor provides a promising candidate for potential development as an anti-cancer therapy, and also, due to its different mode of inhibition to other known SK inhibitors, both validates the SKs as targets for anti-cancer therapy, and represents an important experimental tool to study these enzymes. PMID:25788259

  16. Glycosphingolipid degradation and animal models of GM2-gangliosidoses.

    PubMed

    Kolter, T; Sandhoff, K

    1998-08-01

    Glycosphingolipids form cell type-specific patterns on the surface of eukaryotic cells. Degradation of glycosphingolipids requires endocytic membrane flow of plasma membrane-derived glycosphingolipids into the lysosomes as the digesting organelles. The inherited deficiencies of lysosomal hydrolases and of sphingolipid activator proteins both give rise to sphingolipid storage diseases. Recent research has focused on the mechanisms leading to selective membrane degradation in the lysosomes and on the mechanism and physiological function of sphingolipid activator proteins. The GM2-degrading system is a paradigm for activator protein-dependent lysosomal degradation. Three polypeptide chains contribute to the in vivo degradation of ganglioside GM2: the alpha- and beta-chains of the beta-hexosaminidases and the GM2 activator. Mouse models of Tay-Sachs disease (alpha-chain deficiency), Sandhoff disease (beta-chain deficiency) and GM2 activator deficiency have been described. While the phenotypes of these variants of GM2-gangliosidoses are only slightly different in humans, the animal models show drastic differences in severity and course of the diseases. The reason for this is the specificity of sialidase, which is different between mouse and human. A double-knockout mouse lacking beta-hexosaminidases A, B and S shows a phenotype of mucopolysaccharidosis and gangliosidosis. A substrate deprivation approach to therapy is discussed with respect to animal models of the GM2-gangliosidoses. PMID:9728335

  17. Activation of the melastatin-related cation channel TRPM3 by D-erythro-sphingosine [corrected].

    PubMed

    Grimm, Christian; Kraft, Robert; Schultz, Günter; Harteneck, Christian

    2005-03-01

    TRPM3, a member of the melastatin-like transient receptor potential channel subfamily (TRPM), is predominantly expressed in human kidney and brain. TRPM3 mediates spontaneous Ca2+ entry and nonselective cation currents in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Using measurements with the Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye fura-2 and the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we found that D-erythro-sphingosine, a metabolite arising during the de novo synthesis of cellular sphingolipids, activated TRPM3. Other transient receptor potential (TRP) channels tested [classic or canonical TRP (TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5), vanilloid-like TRP (TRPV4, TRPV5, TRPV6), and melastatin-like TRP (TRPM2)] did not significantly respond to application of sphingosine. Sphingosine-induced TRPM3 activation was not mediated by inhibition of protein kinase C, depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores, and intracellular conversion of sphingosine to sphingosine-1-phosphate. Although sphingosine-1-phosphate and ceramides had no effect, two structural analogs of sphingosine, dihydro-D-erythro-sphingosine and N,N-dimethyl-D-erythro-sphingosine, also activated TRPM3. Sphingolipids, including sphingosine, are known to have inhibitory effects on a variety of ion channels. Thus, TRPM3 is the first ion channel activated by sphingolipids. PMID:15550678

  18. Signaling network of lipids as a comprehensive scaffold for omics data integration in sputum of COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Azimzadeh Jamalkandi, Sadegh; Mirzaie, Mehdi; Jafari, Mohieddin; Mehrani, Hossein; Shariati, Parvin; Khodabandeh, Mahvash

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous and progressive inflammatory condition that has been linked to the dysregulation of many metabolic pathways including lipid biosynthesis. How lipid metabolism could affect disease progression in smokers with COPD remains unclear. We cross-examined the transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and phenomics data available on the public domain to elucidate the mechanisms by which lipid metabolism is perturbed in COPD. We reconstructed a sputum lipid COPD (SpLiCO) signaling network utilizing active/inactive, and functional/dysfunctional lipid-mediated signaling pathways to explore how lipid-metabolism could promote COPD pathogenesis in smokers. SpLiCO was further utilized to investigate signal amplifiers, distributers, propagators, feed-forward and/or -back loops that link COPD disease severity and hypoxia to disruption in the metabolism of sphingolipids, fatty acids and energy. Also, hypergraph analysis and calculations for dependency of molecules identified several important nodes in the network with modular regulatory and signal distribution activities. Our systems-based analyses indicate that arachidonic acid is a critical and early signal distributer that is upregulated by the sphingolipid signaling pathway in COPD, while hypoxia plays a critical role in the elevated dependency to glucose as a major energy source. Integration of SpLiCo and clinical data shows a strong association between hypoxia and the upregulation of sphingolipids in smokers with emphysema, vascular disease, hypertension and those with increased risk of lung cancer. PMID:26215076

  19. The Impact of Sphingosine Kinase-1 in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tamashiro, Paulette M.; Furuya, Hideki; Shimizu, Yoshiko; Iino, Kayoko; Kawamori, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has a high reoccurrence rate and an extremely low survival rate. There is limited availability of effective therapies to reduce the rate of recurrence, resulting in high morbidity and mortality of advanced cases. Late presentation, delay in detection of lesions, and a high rate of metastasis make HNSCC a devastating disease. This review offers insight into the role of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1), a key enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism, in HNSCC. Sphingolipids not only play a structural role in cellular membranes, but also modulate cell signal transduction pathways to influence biological outcomes such as senescence, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis. SphK1 is a critical regulator of the delicate balance between proliferation and apoptosis. The highest expression of SphK1 is found in the advanced stage of disease, and there is a positive correlation between SphK1 expression and recurrent tumors. On the other hand, silencing SphK1 reduces HNSCC tumor growth and sensitizes tumors to radiation-induced death. Thus, SphK1 plays an important and influential role in determining HNSCC proliferation and metastasis. We discuss roles of SphK1 and other sphingolipids in HNSCC development and therapeutic strategies against HNSCC. PMID:24970177

  20. Exercise and Weight Loss Improve Muscle Mitochondrial Respiration, Lipid Partitioning, and Insulin Sensitivity After Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    PubMed

    Coen, Paul M; Menshikova, Elizabeth V; Distefano, Giovanna; Zheng, Donghai; Tanner, Charles J; Standley, Robert A; Helbling, Nicole L; Dubis, Gabriel S; Ritov, Vladimir B; Xie, Hui; Desimone, Marisa E; Smith, Steven R; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Toledo, Frederico G S; Houmard, Joseph A; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2015-11-01

    Both Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and exercise can improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with severe obesity. However, the impact of RYGB with or without exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondria, intramyocellular lipids, and insulin sensitivity index (SI) is unknown. We conducted a randomized exercise trial in patients (n = 101) who underwent RYGB surgery and completed either a 6-month moderate exercise (EX) or a health education control (CON) intervention. SI was determined by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Mitochondrial respiration and intramyocellular triglyceride, sphingolipid, and diacylglycerol content were measured in vastus lateralis biopsy specimens. We found that EX provided additional improvements in SI and that only EX improved cardiorespiratory fitness, mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities, and cardiolipin profile with no change in mitochondrial content. Muscle triglycerides were reduced in type I fibers in CON, and sphingolipids decreased in both groups, with EX showing a further reduction in a number of ceramide species. In conclusion, exercise superimposed on bariatric surgery-induced weight loss enhances mitochondrial respiration, induces cardiolipin remodeling, reduces specific sphingolipids, and provides additional improvements in insulin sensitivity. PMID:26293505

  1. Regulation and functions of sphingosine kinases in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Lauren; Kordula, Tomasz; Spiegel, Sarah; Milstien, Sheldon

    2009-01-01

    It has long been known that sphingolipids, especially sphingomyelin, a principal component of myelin, are highly enriched in the central nervous system and are structural components of all eukaryotic cell membranes. In the last few years, substantial evidence has accumulated from studies of many types of cells demonstrating that in addition to their structural roles, their breakdown products form a new class of signaling molecules with potent and myriad regulatory effects on essentially every cell in the body. While the sphingolipid metabolites sphingosine and its precursor ceramide have been associated with cell growth arrest and apoptosis, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) enhances proliferation, differentiation, and cell survival as well as regulates many physiological and pathological processes. The relative levels of these three interconvertible sphingolipid metabolites, and thus cell fate, are strongly influenced by the activity of sphingosine kinases, of which there are two isoforms, designated SphK1 and SphK2, the enzymes that phosphorylate sphingosine to produce S1P. Not much is yet known of the importance of S1P in the central nervous system. Therefore, this review is focused on current knowledge of regulation of SphK1 and SphK2 on both transcriptional and post-translational levels and the functions of these isozymes and their product S1P and its receptors in the central nervous system. PMID:18485923

  2. Hydroxyurea treatment inhibits proliferation of Cryptococcus neoformans in mice.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Mor, Visesato; Bairwa, Narendra K; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Mohanty, Bidyut K

    2012-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a serious threat to immunocompromised individuals, especially for HIV patients who develop meningoencephalitis. For effective cryptococcal treatment, novel antifungal drugs or innovative combination therapies are needed. Recently, sphingolipids have emerged as important bioactive molecules in the regulation of microbial pathogenesis. Previously we reported that the sphingolipid pathway gene, ISC1, which is responsible for ceramide production, is a major virulence factor in Cn infection. Here we report our studies of the role of ISC1 during genotoxic stress induced by the antineoplastic hydroxyurea (HU) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), which affect DNA replication and genome integrity. We observed that Cn cells lacking ISC1 are highly sensitive to HU and MMS in a rich culture medium. HU affected cell division of Cn cells lacking the ISC1 gene, resulting in cell clusters. Cn ISC1, when expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) strain lacking its own ISC1 gene, restored HU resistance. In macrophage-like cells, although HU affected the proliferation of wild type (WT) Cn cells by 50% at the concentration tested, HU completely inhibited Cn isc1Δ cell proliferation. Interestingly, our preliminary data show that mice infected with WT or Cn isc1Δ cells and subsequently treated with HU had longer lifespans than untreated, infected control mice. Our work suggests that the sphingolipid pathway gene, ISC1, is a likely target for combination therapy with traditional drugs such as HU. PMID:22783238

  3. Lipid profiles of detergent resistant fractions of the plasma membrane in oat and rye in association with cold acclimation and freezing tolerance.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Imai, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2016-04-01

    Cold acclimation (CA) results in alteration of the plasma membrane (PM) lipid composition in plants, which plays a crucial role in the acquisition of freezing tolerance via membrane stabilization. Recent studies have indicated that PM structure is consistent with the fluid mosaic model but is laterally non-homogenous and contains microdomains enriched in sterols, sphingolipids and specific proteins. In plant cells, the function of these microdomains in relation to CA and freezing tolerance is not yet fully understood. The present study aimed to investigate the lipid compositions of detergent resistant fractions of the PM (DRM) which are considered to represent microdomains. They were prepared from leaves of low-freezing tolerant oat and high-freezing tolerant rye. The DRMs contained higher proportions of sterols, sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids than the PM. In particular, one of the sterol lipid classes, acylated sterylglycoside, was the predominant sterol in oat DRM while rye DRM contained free sterol as the major sterol. Oat and rye showed different patterns (or changes) of sterols and 2-hydroxy fatty acids of sphingolipids of DRM lipids during CA. Taken together, these results suggest that CA-induced changes of lipid classes and molecular species in DRMs are associated with changes in the thermodynamic properties and physiological functions of microdomains during CA and hence, influence plant freezing tolerance. PMID:26904981

  4. Fpk1/2 kinases regulate cellular sphingoid long-chain base abundance and alter cellular resistance to LCB elevation or depletion

    PubMed Central

    Yamane-Sando, Yukari; Shimobayashi, Etsuko; Shimobayashi, Mitsugu; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Oka, Shogo; Takematsu, Hiromu

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a family of eukaryotic lipids biosynthesized from sphingoid long-chain bases (LCBs). Sphingolipids are an essential class of lipids, as their depletion results in cell death. However, acute LCB supplementation is also toxic; thus, proper cellular LCB levels should be maintained. To characterize the “sphingolipid-signaling intercross,” we performed a kinome screening assay in which budding yeast protein kinase-knockout strains were screened for resistance to ISP-1, a potent inhibitor of LCB biosynthesis. Here, one pair of such DIR (deletion-mediated ISP-1 resistance) genes, FPK1 and FPK2, was further characterized. Cellular LCB levels increased in the fpk1/2Δ strain, which was hypersensitive to phytosphingosine (PHS), a major LCB species of yeast cells. Concomitantly, this strain acquired resistance to ISP-1. Fpk1 and Fpk2 were involved in two downstream events; that is, ISP-1 uptake due to aminophospholipid flippase and LCB degradation due to LCB4 expression. RSK3, which belongs to the p90-S6K subfamily, was identified as a functional counterpart of Fpk1/2 in mammalian cells as the RSK3 gene functionally complemented the ISP-1-resistant phenotype of fpk1/2Δ cells. PMID:24510621

  5. [Involvement of nonstructural protein 5A and lipids on production of hepatitis C virus particles].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tetsuro; Masaki, Takahiro; Aizaki, Hideki

    2008-12-01

    A robust system for production of recombinant infectious hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been established in 2005 and classical virological techniques are now able to be applied to the HCV research, especially regarding molecular mechanisms on virion assembly and maturation. We recently demonstrated that the C-terminal serine cluster of NS5A is a determinant of NS5A interaction with Core and the subcellular localization of NSSA. Mutation of this cluster blocks the NS5A-Core interaction, resulting in perturbation of association between Core and HCV RNA. It is thus tempting to consider that NS5A plays a key role in transporting the viral genome RNA synthesized by the replication complex to the surface of lipid droplets (LDs) or LD-associated membranes, where Core localizes, leading to facilitation of nucleocapsid formation. We also demonstrated an important role of cholesterol and sphingolipid in HCV infection and virion maturation. Specifically, mature HCV particles are rich in cholesterol. Depletion of cholesterol from HCV or hydrolysis of virion-associated sphingomyelin results in a loss of infectivity, and the addition of exogenous cholesterol restores infectivity. In addition, cholesterol and sphingolipid on the HCV membrane play a key role in virus internalization. Finally, inhibitors of the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway efficiently block virion production. PMID:19374198

  6. Free-cholesterol-mediated autophagy of ORMDL1 stimulates sphingomyelin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhui; Robinet, Peggy; Smith, Jonathan D; Gulshan, Kailash

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol confers unique biophysical properties to the plasma membrane bilayer that are essential for maintaining optimal membrane fluidity, which in turn regulate multiple physiological functions required to promote cellular integrity and viability. Conversely, excessive cholesterol causes pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis that can lead to heart attacks. Human atheroma macrophages carry a large burden of free cholesterol (FC) in addition to cholesterol esters. It is recognized that sterols can modulate the levels of other lipids to attain lipid homeostasis; thus, excess FC may play a role in modulating compensatory sphingolipid pathways. Recent studies have shown that excess lipids can cause ER stress and apoptosis. In contrast, autophagy may play a protective role by clearing excess lipids from macrophage foam cell lipid droplets. Interestingly, a macrophage study using a TLR4-specifc agonist showed that de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis is essential for autophagy induction, suggesting links between sphingolipid biosynthesis and autophagy. While the role of autophagy in removing excess lipids has been the focus of many studies, its role in fine-tuning cellular lipid homeostasis remains largely unexplored. PMID:26042659

  7. Sphingosine-1-phosphate Phosphatase 2 Regulates Pancreatic Islet β-Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yoshimitsu; Allende, Maria L; Mizukami, Hiroki; Cook, Emily K; Gavrilova, Oksana; Tuymetova, Galina; Clarke, Benjamin A; Chen, Weiping; Olivera, Ana; Proia, Richard L

    2016-06-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a sphingolipid metabolite that regulates basic cell functions through metabolic and signaling pathways. Intracellular metabolism of S1P is controlled, in part, by two homologous S1P phosphatases (SPPases), 1 and 2, which are encoded by the Sgpp1 and Sgpp2 genes, respectively. SPPase activity is needed for efficient recycling of sphingosine into the sphingolipid synthesis pathway. SPPase 1 is important for skin homeostasis, but little is known about the functional role of SPPase 2. To identify the functions of SPPase 2 in vivo, we studied mice with the Sgpp2 gene deleted. In contrast to Sgpp1(-/-) mice, Sgpp2(-/-) mice had normal skin and were viable into adulthood. Unexpectedly, WT mice expressed Sgpp2 mRNA at high levels in pancreatic islets when compared with other tissues. Sgpp2(-/-) mice had normal pancreatic islet size; however, they exhibited defective adaptive β-cell proliferation that was demonstrated after treatment with either a high-fat diet or the β-cell-specific toxin, streptozotocin. Importantly, β-cells from untreated Sgpp2(-/-) mice showed significantly increased expression of proteins characteristic of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response compared with β-cells from WT mice, indicating a basal islet defect. Our results show that Sgpp2 deletion causes β-cell endoplasmic reticulum stress, which is a known cause of β-cell dysfunction, and reveal a juncture in the sphingolipid recycling pathway that could impact the development of diabetes. PMID:27059959

  8. Cholesterol-Dependent Nanomechanical Stability of Phase-Segregated Multicomponent Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Li, James K.; Hao, Changchun; Walker, Gilbert C.; Zou, Shan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cholesterol is involved in endocytosis, exocytosis, and the assembly of sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched domains, as has been demonstrated in both model membranes and living cells. In this work, we explored the influence of different cholesterol levels (5–40 mol %) on the morphology and nanomechanical stability of phase-segregated lipid bilayers consisting of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin/cholesterol (DOPC/SM/Chol) by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force mapping. Breakthrough forces were consistently higher in the SM/Chol-enriched liquid-ordered domains (Lo) than in the DOPC-enriched fluid-disordered phase (Ld) at a series of loading rates. We also report the activation energies (ΔEa) for the formation of an AFM-tip-induced fracture, calculated by a model for the rupture of molecular thin films. The obtained ΔEa values agree remarkably well with reported values for fusion-related processes using other techniques. Furthermore, we observed that within the Chol range studied, the lateral organization of bilayers can be categorized into three distinct groups. The results are rationalized by fracture nanomechanics of a ternary phospholipid/sphingolipid/cholesterol mixture using correlated AFM-based imaging and force mapping, which demonstrates the influence of a wide range of cholesterol content on the morphology and nanomechanical stability of model bilayers. This provides fundamental insights into the role of cholesterol in the formation and stability of sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched domains, as well as in membrane fusion. PMID:20643069

  9. TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling regulates actin polarization via reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Niles, Brad J; Powers, Ted

    2014-12-01

    The evolutionarily conserved mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) signaling pathway is an important regulator of actin cytoskeletal architecture and, as such, is a candidate target for preventing cancer cell motility and invasion. Remarkably, the precise mechanism(s) by which mTORC2 regulates the actin cytoskeleton have remained elusive. Here we show that in budding yeast, TORC2 and its downstream kinase Ypk1 regulate actin polarization by controlling reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Specifically, we find that TORC2-Ypk1 regulates actin polarization both by vacuole-related ROS, controlled by the phospholipid flippase kinase Fpk1 and sphingolipids, and by mitochondria-mediated ROS, controlled by the PKA subunit Tpk3. In addition, we find that the protein kinase C (Pkc1)/MAPK cascade, a well-established regulator of actin, acts downstream of Ypk1 to regulate ROS, in part by promoting degradation of the oxidative stress responsive repressor, cyclin C. Furthermore, we show that Ypk1 regulates Pkc1 activity through proper localization of Rom2 at the plasma membrane, which is also dependent on Fpk1 and sphingolipids. Together these findings demonstrate important links between TORC2/Ypk1 signaling, Fpk1, sphingolipids, Pkc1, and ROS as regulators of actin and suggest that ROS may play an important role in mTORC2-dependent dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton in cancer cells. PMID:25253719

  10. Ceramides And Stress Signalling Intersect With Autophagic Defects In Neurodegenerative Drosophila blue cheese (bchs) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Hebbar, Sarita; Sahoo, Ishtapran; Matysik, Artur; Argudo Garcia, Irene; Osborne, Kathleen Amy; Papan, Cyrus; Torta, Federico; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Fun, Xiu Hui; Wenk, Markus R; Shevchenko, Andrej; Schwudke, Dominik; Kraut, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipid metabolites are involved in the regulation of autophagy, a degradative recycling process that is required to prevent neuronal degeneration. Drosophila blue cheese mutants neurodegenerate due to perturbations in autophagic flux, and consequent accumulation of ubiquitinated aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that blue cheese mutant brains exhibit an elevation in total ceramide levels; surprisingly, however, degeneration is ameliorated when the pool of available ceramides is further increased, and exacerbated when ceramide levels are decreased by altering sphingolipid catabolism or blocking de novo synthesis. Exogenous ceramide is seen to accumulate in autophagosomes, which are fewer in number and show less efficient clearance in blue cheese mutant neurons. Sphingolipid metabolism is also shifted away from salvage toward de novo pathways, while pro-growth Akt and MAP pathways are down-regulated, and ER stress is increased. All these defects are reversed under genetic rescue conditions that increase ceramide generation from salvage pathways. This constellation of effects suggests a possible mechanism whereby the observed deficit in a potentially ceramide-releasing autophagic pathway impedes survival signaling and exacerbates neuronal death. PMID:26639035

  11. Functions of Ceramide Synthase Paralogs YPR114w and YJR116w of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mallela, Shamroop K; Almeida, Reinaldo; Ejsing, Christer S; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide is synthesized in yeast by two redundant acyl-CoA dependent synthases, Lag1 and Lac1. In lag1∆ lac1∆ cells, free fatty acids and sphingoid bases are elevated, and ceramides are produced through the redundant alkaline ceramidases Ypc1 and Ydc1, working backwards. Even with all four of these genes deleted, cells are surviving and continue to contain small amounts of complex sphingolipids. Here we show that these residual sphingolipids are not synthesized by YPR114w or YJR116w, proteins of unknown function showing a high degree of homology to Lag1 and Lac1. Indeed, the hextuple lag1∆ lac1∆ ypc1∆ ydc1∆ ypr114w∆ yjr116w∆ mutant still contains ceramides and complex sphingolipids. Yjr116w∆ exhibit an oxygen-dependent hypersensitivity to Cu2+ due to an increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a mitochondrially orchestrated programmed cell death in presence of copper, but also a general copper hypersensitivity that cannot be counteracted by the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). Myriocin efficiently represses the synthesis of sphingoid bases of ypr114w∆, but not its growth. Both yjr116w∆ and ypr114w∆ have fragmented vacuoles and produce less ROS than wild type, before and after diauxic shift. Ypr114w∆/ypr114w∆ have an increased chronological life span. Thus, Yjr116w and Ypr114w are related, but not functionally redundant. PMID:26752183

  12. Sphingosine Kinase Regulates Microtubule Dynamics and Organelle Positioning Necessary for Proper G1/S Cell Cycle Transition in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Pasternack, Deborah A.; Sharma, Aabha I.; Olson, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sphingolipids are important constituents of cell membranes and also serve as mediators of cell signaling and cell recognition. Sphingolipid metabolites such as sphingosine-1-phosphate and ceramide regulate signaling cascades involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, autophagy, inflammation, and apoptosis. Little is known about how sphingolipids and their metabolites function in single-celled eukaryotes. In the present study, we investigated the role of sphingosine kinase (SPHK) in the biology of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the agent of African sleeping sickness. T. brucei SPHK (TbSPHK) is constitutively but differentially expressed during the life cycle of T. brucei. Depletion of TbSPHK in procyclic-form T. brucei causes impaired growth and attenuation in the G1/S phase of the cell cycle. TbSPHK-depleted cells also develop organelle positioning defects and an accumulation of tyrosinated α-tubulin at the elongated posterior end of the cell, known as the “nozzle” phenotype, caused by other molecular perturbations in this organism. Our studies indicate that TbSPHK is involved in G1-to-S cell cycle progression, organelle positioning, and maintenance of cell morphology. Cytotoxicity assays using TbSPHK inhibitors revealed a favorable therapeutic index between T. brucei and human cells, suggesting TbSPHK to be a novel drug target. PMID:26443455

  13. Child Stunting is Associated with Low Circulating Essential Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Richard D.; Shardell, Michelle; Sakr Ashour, Fayrouz A.; Moaddel, Ruin; Trehan, Indi; Maleta, Kenneth M.; Ordiz, M. Isabel; Kraemer, Klaus; Khadeer, Mohammed A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Manary, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Stunting affects about one-quarter of children under five worldwide. The pathogenesis of stunting is poorly understood. Nutritional interventions have had only modest effects in reducing stunting. We hypothesized that insufficiency in essential amino acids may be limiting the linear growth of children. Methods We used a targeted metabolomics approach to measure serum amino acids, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and other metabolites using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 313 children, aged 12–59 months, from rural Malawi. Children underwent anthropometry. Findings Sixty-two percent of the children were stunted. Children with stunting had lower serum concentrations of all nine essential amino acids (tryptophan, isoleucine, leucine, valine, methionine, threonine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine) compared with nonstunted children (p < 0.01). In addition, stunted children had significantly lower serum concentrations of conditionally essential amino acids (arginine, glycine, glutamine), non-essential amino acids (asparagine, glutamate, serine), and six different sphingolipids compared with nonstunted children. Stunting was also associated with alterations in serum glycerophospholipid concentrations. Interpretation Our findings support the idea that children with a high risk of stunting may not be receiving an adequate dietary intake of essential amino acids and choline, an essential nutrient for the synthesis of sphingolipids and glycerophospholipids. PMID:27211567

  14. Persistence of HCV in Acutely-Infected Patients Depletes C24-Ceramide and Upregulates Sphingosine and Sphinganine Serum Levels.

    PubMed

    Grammatikos, Georgios; Dietz, Julia; Ferreiros, Nerea; Koch, Alexander; Dultz, Georg; Bon, Dimitra; Karakasiliotis, Ioannis; Lutz, Thomas; Knecht, Gaby; Gute, Peter; Herrmann, Eva; Zeuzem, Stefan; Mavromara, Penelope; Sarrazin, Christoph; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) substantially affects lipid metabolism, and remodeling of sphingolipids appears to be essential for HCV persistence in vitro. The aim of the current study is the evaluation of serum sphingolipid variations during acute HCV infection. We enrolled prospectively 60 consecutive patients with acute HCV infection, most of them already infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and serum was collected at the time of diagnosis and longitudinally over a six-month period until initiation of antiviral therapy or confirmed spontaneous clearance. Quantification of serum sphingolipids was performed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Spontaneous clearance was observed in 11 out of 60 patients (18.3%), a sustained viral response (SVR) in 43 out of 45 patients (95.5%) receiving an antiviral treatment after follow-up, whereas persistence of HCV occurred in six out of 60 patients (10%). C24-ceramide (C24-Cer)-levels increased at follow-up in patients with spontaneous HCV eradication (p < 0.01), as compared to baseline. Sphingosine and sphinganine values were significantly upregulated in patients unable to clear HCV over time compared to patients with spontaneous clearance of HCV infection on follow-up (p = 0.013 and 0.006, respectively). In summary, the persistence of HCV after acute infection induces a downregulation of C24Cer and a simultaneous elevation of serum sphingosine and sphinganine concentrations. PMID:27304952

  15. Acid Ceramidase in Melanoma: EXPRESSION, LOCALIZATION, AND EFFECTS OF PHARMACOLOGICAL INHIBITION.

    PubMed

    Realini, Natalia; Palese, Francesca; Pizzirani, Daniela; Pontis, Silvia; Basit, Abdul; Bach, Anders; Ganesan, Anand; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-01-29

    Acid ceramidase (AC) is a lysosomal cysteine amidase that controls sphingolipid signaling by lowering the levels of ceramides and concomitantly increasing those of sphingosine and its bioactive metabolite, sphingosine 1-phosphate. In the present study, we evaluated the role of AC-regulated sphingolipid signaling in melanoma. We found that AC expression is markedly elevated in normal human melanocytes and proliferative melanoma cell lines, compared with other skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts) and non-melanoma cancer cells. High AC expression was also observed in biopsies from human subjects with Stage II melanoma. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that the subcellular localization of AC differs between melanocytes (where it is found in both cytosol and nucleus) and melanoma cells (where it is primarily localized to cytosol). In addition to having high AC levels, melanoma cells generate lower amounts of ceramides than normal melanocytes do. This down-regulation in ceramide production appears to result from suppression of the de novo biosynthesis pathway. To test whether AC might contribute to melanoma cell proliferation, we blocked AC activity using a new potent (IC50 = 12 nM) and stable inhibitor. AC inhibition increased cellular ceramide levels, decreased sphingosine 1-phosphate levels, and acted synergistically with several, albeit not all, antitumoral agents. The results suggest that AC-controlled sphingolipid metabolism may play an important role in the control of melanoma proliferation. PMID:26553872

  16. Ceramide signalling: regulatory role in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Geilen, C C; Wieder, T; Orfanos, C E

    1997-09-01

    The stratum corneum of vertebrates is a major structural compartment that provides mechanical protection and prevents skin desiccation. The water barrier function of the stratum corneum was first reported in 1944, and this was shown later to be associated with multilayered lipid lamellae localized in the extracellular spaces. The major lipid components isolated from the cornified epidermal layers are ceramides, which belong to the class of sphingolipids, cholesterol and free fatty acids; their biosynthesis is in tight relationship with the cutaneous barrier function. In studies in which the barrier is artificially disturbed, lipid biosynthesis is found to be directly regulated by barrier permeability. As mentioned above, the ceramides involved in this process are located in the extracellular spaces of the upper epidermal layers, whereas sphingomyelin, the most common sphingolipid, is an integral part of the bilayer plasma membrane of the keratinocytes. During the last few years, however, increasing evidence has shown that sphingolipids may also take part in cell signalling, and the term 'sphingomyelin cycle' has been coined to describe this novel path-way of signal transduction. Intracellular messengers of the sphingomyelin cycle are ceramides as the products of an agonist-stimulated sphingomyelin hydrolysis. Increased levels of intracellular ceramides induce cell differentiation and/or apoptosis and reduce cell proliferation. In contrast to the extracellular barrier-forming ceramides which are complex partly O-acylated species containing long-chain fatty acids, intracellular signal-transducing ceramides are not O-acylated and have acyl chain lengths of 16 and 18 carbon atoms. We present here a review of our present knowledge on the sphingomyelin cycle as a possible signal transduction pathway in the human epidermis. We discuss the common origin of extracellular ceramides constituting the lipid barrier and of intracellular ceramides generated by agonist

  17. Differential metabolic responses of Beauveria bassiana cultured in pupae extracts, root exudates and its interactions with insect and plant.

    PubMed

    Luo, Feifei; Wang, Qian; Yin, Chunlin; Ge, Yinglu; Hu, Fenglin; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Hong; Bao, Guanhu; Wang, Bin; Lu, Ruili; Li, Zengzhi

    2015-09-01

    Beauveria bassiana is a kind of world-wide entomopathogenic fungus and can also colonize plant rhizosphere. Previous researches showed differential expression of genes when entomopathogenic fungi are cultured in insect or plant materials. However, so far there is no report on metabolic alterations of B. bassiana in the environments of insect or plant. The purpose of this paper is to address this problem. Herein, we first provide the metabolomic analysis of B. bassiana cultured in insect pupae extracts (derived from Euproctis pseudoconspersa and Bombyx mori, EPP and BMP), plant root exudates (derived from asparagus and carrot, ARE and CRE), distilled water and minimal media (MM), respectively. Principal components analysis (PCA) shows that mycelia cultured in pupae extracts and root exudates are evidently separated and individually separated from MM, which indicates that fungus accommodates to insect and plant environments by different metabolic regulation mechanisms. Subsequently, orthogonal projection on latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) identifies differential metabolites in fungus under three environments relative to MM. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) is performed to cluster compounds based on biochemical relationships, showing that sphingolipids are increased in BMP but are decreased in EPP. This observation further implies that sphingolipid metabolism may be involved in the adaptation of fungus to different hosts. In the meantime, sphingolipids are significantly decreased in root exudates but they are not decreased in distilled water, suggesting that some components of the root exudates can suppress sphingolipid to down-regulate sphingolipid metabolism. Pathway analysis finds that fatty acid metabolism is maintained at high level but non-ribosomal peptides (NRP) synthesis is unaffected in mycelia cultured in pupae extracts. In contrast, fatty acid metabolism is not changed but NRP synthesis is high in mycelia cultured in root exudates

  18. Dose-Dependent Effects on Sphingoid Bases and Cytokines in Chickens Fed Diets Prepared with Fusarium Verticillioides Culture Material Containing Fumonisins

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Bertrand; Schwartz-Zimmermann, Heidi E.; Caha, Sylvia; Moll, Wulf Dieter; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Applegate, Todd J.

    2015-01-01

    In chickens, the effect of mycotoxins, especially fumonisins (FB), in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is not well documented. Thus, this study in broiler chicks determined the effects of consuming diets prepared with Fusarium verticillioides culture material containing FB on intestinal gene expression and on the sphinganine (Sa)/sphingosine (So) ratio (Sa/So; a biomarker of FB effect due to disruption of sphingolipid metabolism). Male broilers were assigned to 6 diets (6 cages/diet; 6 birds/cage) from hatch to 20 days containing 0.4, 5.6, 11.3, 17.5, 47.8, or 104.8 mg FB/kg diet. Exposure to FB altered the Sa/So ratio in all tissues analyzed, albeit to varying extents. Linear dose-responses were observed in the kidney, jejunum and cecum. The liver and the ileum were very sensitive and data fit a cubic and quadratic polynomial model, respectively. Gene expression in the small intestine revealed low but significant upregulations of cytokines involved in the pro-inflammatory, Th1/Th17 and Treg responses, especially at 10 days of age. Interestingly, the cecal tonsils exhibited a biphasic response. Unlike the sphingolipid analysis, the effects seen on gene expression were not dose dependent, even showing more effects when birds were exposed to 11.3 mg FB/kg. In conclusion, this is the first report on the disruption of the sphingolipid metabolism by FB in the GIT of poultry. Further studies are needed to reach conclusions on the biological meaning of the immunomodulation observed in the GIT, but the susceptibility of chickens to intestinal pathogens when exposed to FB, at doses lower than those that would cause overt clinical symptoms, should be addressed. PMID:25871822

  19. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase downregulation promotes colon carcinogenesis through STAT3-activated microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Degagné, Emilie; Pandurangan, Ashok; Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Kumar, Ashok; Eltanawy, Abeer; Zhang, Meng; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Nefedov, Mikhail; de Jong, Pieter J.; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.; Bittman, Robert; Ahmedi, Yasmin; Saba, Julie D.

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence supports a link between inflammation and cancer; however, mediators of the transition between inflammation and carcinogenesis remain incompletely understood. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) lyase (SPL) irreversibly degrades the bioactive sphingolipid S1P and is highly expressed in enterocytes but downregulated in colon cancer. Here, we investigated the role of SPL in colitis-associated cancer (CAC). We generated mice with intestinal epithelium-specific Sgpl1 deletion and chemically induced colitis and tumor formation in these animals. Compared with control animals, mice lacking intestinal SPL exhibited greater disease activity, colon shortening, cytokine levels, S1P accumulation, tumors, STAT3 activation, STAT3-activated microRNAs (miRNAs), and suppression of miR-targeted anti-oncogene products. This phenotype was attenuated by STAT3 inhibition. In fibroblasts, silencing SPL promoted tumorigenic transformation through a pathway involving extracellular transport of S1P through S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2), S1P receptor activation, JAK2/STAT3-dependent miR-181b-1 induction, and silencing of miR-181b-1 target cylindromatosis (CYLD). Colon biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease revealed enhanced S1P and STAT3 signaling. In mice with chemical-induced CAC, oral administration of plant-type sphingolipids called sphingadienes increased colonic SPL levels and reduced S1P levels, STAT3 signaling, cytokine levels, and tumorigenesis, indicating that SPL prevents transformation and carcinogenesis. Together, our results suggest that dietary sphingolipids can augment or prevent colon cancer, depending upon whether they are metabolized to S1P or promote S1P metabolism through the actions of SPL. PMID:25347472

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate in inflammatory bowel disease and colitis-associated colon cancer: the fat’s in the fire

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jung H.; Saba, Julie D.

    2015-01-01

    Colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) is a pathological condition defined by the development of colon cancer in patients afflicted by Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC), two idiopathic diseases of the gut which together comprise the disease group called inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). When IBD involves the colon, affected patients face an increased risk of developing colon cancer compared to the general population. The phenomenon of CAC represents one of the most convincing forms of evidence linking the processes of inflammation, oxidative stress and carcinogenesis. A greater understanding of the molecular events driving CAC could reveal new strategies to treat IBD and reduce the incidence of CAC. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid produced through degradation of endogenous and dietary mammalian sphingolipids containing the long chain base sphingosine. S1P signals through a family of five G protein-coupled receptors. In addition, it activates nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), two transcriptional regulators that serve as master switches in inflammation and carcinogenesis. Through these and other mechanisms, a causal role for S1P in inflammatory conditions including colitis and CAC has been implicated. In contrast to S1P, dietary sphingolipids called sphingadienes derived from plant food sources cannot be converted to S1P and exhibit anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive activities, reducing colitis and CAC in mouse models. In this review, we summarize recent findings implicating S1P signaling and metabolism in the pathogenesis of IBD and CAC. The potential role of oxidative stress in modulating S1P is also discussed. Further, we propose the hypothesis that dietary sphingolipids may promote or prevent CAC depending on their ability to be converted to S1P. PMID:27011900

  1. Reduced GM1 ganglioside in CFTR-deficient human airway cells results in decreased β1-integrin signaling and delayed wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Itokazu, Yutaka; Pagano, Richard E.; Schroeder, Andreas S.; O'Grady, Scott M.; Limper, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function reduces chloride secretion and increases sodium uptake, but it is not clear why CFTR mutation also results in progressive lung inflammation and infection. We previously demonstrated that CFTR-silenced airway cells migrate more slowly during wound repair than CFTR-expressing controls. In addition, CFTR-deficient cells and mouse models have been reported to have altered sphingolipid levels. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that reduced migration in CFTR-deficient airway epithelial cells results from altered sphingolipid composition. We used cell lines derived from a human airway epithelial cell line (Calu-3) stably transfected with CFTR short hairpin RNA (CFTR-silenced) or nontargeting short hairpin RNA (controls). Cell migration was measured by electric cell substrate impedance sensing (ECIS). Lipid analyses, addition of exogenous glycosphingolipids, and immunoblotting were performed. We found that levels of the glycosphingolipid, GM1 ganglioside, were ∼60% lower in CFTR-silenced cells than in controls. CFTR-silenced cells exhibited reduced levels of activated β1-integrin, phosphorylated tyrosine 576 of focal adhesion kinase (pFAK), and phosphorylation of Crk-associated substrate (pCAS). Addition of GM1 (but not GM3) ganglioside to CFTR-silenced cells restored activated β1-integrin, pFAK, and pCAS to near control levels and partially restored (∼40%) cell migration. Our results suggest that decreased GM1 in CFTR-silenced cells depresses β1-integrin signaling, which contributes to the delayed wound repair observed in these cells. These findings have implications for the pathology of cystic fibrosis, where altered sphingolipid levels in airway epithelial cells could result in a diminished capacity for wound repair after injury. PMID:24500283

  2. Palmitate Diet-induced Loss of Cardiac Caveolin-3: A Novel Mechanism for Lipid-induced Contractile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Catherine J.; Cebova, Martina; Pinz, Ilka M.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of cardiomyopathy, and mechanisms linking the underlying risk and dietary factors are not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that dietary intake of saturated fat increases the levels of sphingolipids, namely ceramide and sphingomyelin in cardiac cell membranes that disrupt caveolae, specialized membrane micro-domains and important for cellular signaling. C57BL/6 mice were fed two high-fat diets: palmitate diet (21% total fat, 47% is palmitate), and MCT diet (21% medium-chain triglycerides, no palmitate). We established that high-palmitate feeding for 12 weeks leads to 40% and 50% increases in ceramide and sphingomyelin, respectively, in cellular membranes. Concomitant with sphingolipid accumulation, we observed a 40% reduction in systolic contractile performance. To explore the relationship of increased sphingolipids with caveolins, we analyzed caveolin protein levels and intracellular localization in isolated cardiomyocytes. In normal cardiomyocytes, caveolin-1 and caveolin-3 co-localize at the plasma membrane and the T-tubule system. However, mice maintained on palmitate lost 80% of caveolin-3, mainly from the T-tubule system. Mice maintained on MCT diet had a 90% reduction in caveolin-1. These data show that caveolin isoforms are sensitive to the lipid environment. These data are further supported by similar findings in human cardiac tissue samples from non-obese, obese, non-obese cardiomyopathic, and obese cardiomyopathic patients. To further elucidate the contractile dysfunction associated with the loss of caveolin-3, we determined the localization of the ryanodine receptor and found lower expression and loss of the striated appearance of this protein. We suggest that palmitate-induced loss of caveolin-3 results in cardiac contractile dysfunction via a defect in calcium-induced calcium release. PMID:23585895

  3. Dose-dependent effects on sphingoid bases and cytokines in chickens fed diets prepared with fusarium verticillioides culture material containing fumonisins.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Bertrand; Schwartz-Zimmermann, Heidi E; Caha, Sylvia; Moll, Wulf Dieter; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Applegate, Todd J

    2015-04-01

    In chickens, the effect of mycotoxins, especially fumonisins (FB), in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is not well documented. Thus, this study in broiler chicks determined the effects of consuming diets prepared with Fusarium verticillioides culture material containing FB on intestinal gene expression and on the sphinganine (Sa)/sphingosine (So) ratio (Sa/So; a biomarker of FB effect due to disruption of sphingolipid metabolism). Male broilers were assigned to 6 diets (6 cages/diet; 6 birds/cage) from hatch to 20 days containing 0.4, 5.6, 11.3, 17.5, 47.8, or 104.8 mg FB/kg diet. Exposure to FB altered the Sa/So ratio in all tissues analyzed, albeit to varying extents. Linear dose-responses were observed in the kidney, jejunum and cecum. The liver and the ileum were very sensitive and data fit a cubic and quadratic polynomial model, respectively. Gene expression in the small intestine revealed low but significant upregulations of cytokines involved in the pro-inflammatory, Th1/Th17 and Treg responses, especially at 10 days of age. Interestingly, the cecal tonsils exhibited a biphasic response. Unlike the sphingolipid analysis, the effects seen on gene expression were not dose dependent, even showing more effects when birds were exposed to 11.3 mg FB/kg. In conclusion, this is the first report on the disruption of the sphingolipid metabolism by FB in the GIT of poultry. Further studies are needed to reach conclusions on the biological meaning of the immunomodulation observed in the GIT, but the susceptibility of chickens to intestinal pathogens when exposed to FB, at doses lower than those that would cause overt clinical symptoms, should be addressed. PMID:25871822

  4. Neutral sphingomyelinase-3 mediates TNF-stimulated oxidant activity in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Jennifer S.; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; McLean, Julie B.; Deevska, Gergana M.; Bonnell, Mark R.; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana N.; Reid, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Sphingolipid and oxidant signaling affect glucose uptake, atrophy, and force production of skeletal muscle similarly and both are stimulated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF), suggesting a connection between systems. Sphingolipid signaling is initiated by neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase), a family of agonist-activated effector enzymes. Northern blot analyses suggest that nSMase3 may be a striated muscle-specific nSMase. The present study tested the hypothesis that nSMase3 protein is expressed in skeletal muscle and functions to regulate TNF-stimulated oxidant production. Results We demonstrate constitutive nSMase activity in skeletal muscles of healthy mice and humans and in differentiated C2C12 myotubes. nSMase3 (Smpd4 gene) mRNA is highly expressed in muscle. An nSMase3 protein doublet (88 and 85 kD) is derived from alternative mRNA splicing of exon 11. The proteins partition differently. The full-length 88 kD isoform (nSMase3a) fractionates with membrane proteins that are resistant to detergent extraction; the 85 kD isoform lacking exon 11 (nSMase3b) is more readily extracted and fractionates with detergent soluble membrane proteins; neither variant is detected in the cytosol. By immunofluorescence microscopy, nSMase3 resides in both internal and sarcolemmal membranes. Finally, myotube nSMase activity and cytosolic oxidant activity are stimulated by TNF. Both if these responses are inhibited by nSMase3 knockdown. Innovation These findings identify nSMase3 as an intermediate that links TNF receptor activation, sphingolipid signaling, and skeletal muscle oxidant production. Conclusion Our data show that nSMase3 acts as a signaling nSMase in skeletal muscle that is essential for TNF-stimulated oxidant activity. PMID:25180167

  5. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase downregulation promotes colon carcinogenesis through STAT3-activated microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Degagné, Emilie; Pandurangan, Ashok; Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Kumar, Ashok; Eltanawy, Abeer; Zhang, Meng; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Nefedov, Mikhail; de Jong, Pieter J; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G; Bittman, Robert; Ahmedi, Yasmin; Saba, Julie D

    2014-12-01

    Growing evidence supports a link between inflammation and cancer; however, mediators of the transition between inflammation and carcinogenesis remain incompletely understood. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) lyase (SPL) irreversibly degrades the bioactive sphingolipid S1P and is highly expressed in enterocytes but downregulated in colon cancer. Here, we investigated the role of SPL in colitis-associated cancer (CAC). We generated mice with intestinal epithelium-specific Sgpl1 deletion and chemically induced colitis and tumor formation in these animals. Compared with control animals, mice lacking intestinal SPL exhibited greater disease activity, colon shortening, cytokine levels, S1P accumulation, tumors, STAT3 activation, STAT3-activated microRNAs (miRNAs), and suppression of miR-targeted anti-oncogene products. This phenotype was attenuated by STAT3 inhibition. In fibroblasts, silencing SPL promoted tumorigenic transformation through a pathway involving extracellular transport of S1P through S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2), S1P receptor activation, JAK2/STAT3-dependent miR-181b-1 induction, and silencing of miR-181b-1 target cylindromatosis (CYLD). Colon biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease revealed enhanced S1P and STAT3 signaling. In mice with chemical-induced CAC, oral administration of plant-type sphingolipids called sphingadienes increased colonic SPL levels and reduced S1P levels, STAT3 signaling, cytokine levels, and tumorigenesis, indicating that SPL prevents transformation and carcinogenesis. Together, our results suggest that dietary sphingolipids can augment or prevent colon cancer, depending upon whether they are metabolized to S1P or promote S1P metabolism through the actions of SPL. PMID:25347472

  6. Lack of Acid Sphingomyelinase Induces Age-Related Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bill X.; Fan, Jie; Boyer, Nicholas P.; Jenkins, Russell W.; Koutalos, Yiannis; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) cause Niemann–Pick diseases type A and B, which are fatal inherited lipid lysosomal storage diseases, characterized with visceral organ abnormalities and neurodegeneration. However, the effects of suppressing retinal ASMase expression are not understood. The goal of this study was to determine if the disruption of ASMase expression impacts the retinal structure and function in the mouse, and begin to investigate the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities. Methods Acid sphingomyelinase knockout (ASMase KO) mice were utilized to study the roles of this sphingolipid metabolizing enzyme in the retina. Electroretinogram and morphometric analysis were used to assess the retinal function and structure at various ages. Sphingolipid profile was determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Western blots evaluated the level of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Results When compared to control animals, ASMase KO mice exhibited significant age-dependent reduction in ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes. Associated with these functional deficits, morphometric analysis revealed progressive thinning of retinal layers; however, the most prominent degeneration was observed in the photoreceptor and outer nuclear layer. Additional analyses of ASMase KO mice revealed early reduction in ERG c-wave amplitudes and increased lipofuscin accumulation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Sphingolipid analyses showed abnormal accumulation of sphingomyelin and sphingosine in ASMase KO retinas. Western blot analyses showed a higher level of the autophagosome marker LC3-II. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that ASMase is necessary for the maintenance of normal retinal structure and function. The early outer retinal dysfunction, outer segment degeneration, accumulation of lipofuscin and autophagosome markers provide evidence that disruption of lysosomal function contributes to the age-dependent retinal degeneration exhibited by

  7. ABCA2 transporter deficiency reduces incidence of TRAMP prostate tumor metastasis and cellular chemotactic migration

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Jody T.; Helke, Kristi L.; Normand, Gabrielle; Green, CoDanielle; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Tew, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    In order to study the effects of ATP-binding cassette transporter 2 (ABCA2) deficiency on the progression of prostate cancer, congenic Abca2 knockout (KO) mice were crossed to the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. ABCA2 expression was elevated in wild-type/TRAMP (WT/Tg) dorsal prostate, a region comprising the most aggressive tumors in this model, compared to non-transgenic WT mice. Primary prostate tumor progression was similar in KO/Tg and WT/Tg mice with respect to pathological score, prostate tumor growth, as calculated using MRI volumetry, and proliferative index, as determined by PCNA immunostaining. Vimentin, a marker of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, was expressed at similar levels in prostate, but elevated in histologically normal seminal vesicles (SV) in KO/Tg mice (P < 0.02), concomitant with an increased SV volume (P < 0.01). These changes in the SV did not exacerbate the metastatic phenotype of this disease model; rather, KO/Tg mice aged 20-25 weeks had no detectable metastases while 38% of WT/Tg developed metastases to lung and/or lymph nodes. The absence of a metastatic phenotype in KO/Tg mice was reprised in stable ABCA2 knockdown (KD) cells where chemotactic, but not random, migration was impaired (P = 0.0004). Expression levels of sphingolipid biosynthetic enzymes were examined due to the established link of the transporter with sphingolipid homeostasis. Galactosylceramide synthase (GalCerS) mRNA levels were over 8-fold higher in KD cells (P = 0.001), while lactosylceramide synthase (LacCerS) and CTP:choline cytidylyltransferase (CCT) were significantly reduced (P < 0.0001 and 0.03, respectively). Overall, we demonstrate that ABCA2 deficiency inhibits prostate tumor metastasis in vivo and decreases chemotactic potential of cells, conceivably due to altered sphingolipid metabolism. PMID:21041019

  8. Fumonisin toxicosis in swine: an overview of porcine pulmonary edema and current perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Haschek, W M; Gumprecht, L A; Smith, G; Tumbleson, M E; Constable, P D

    2001-01-01

    Fumonisin toxicosis in swine was named porcine pulmonary edema (PPE) after outbreaks of a fatal disease in pigs fed Fusarium verticillioides (F. moniliforme)-contaminated corn screenings from the 1989 corn crop in Iowa, Illinois, and Georgia. Pigs that died had severe pulmonary edema, which has not been identified in other species after exposure to fumonisins. The disease has been reproduced experimentally by feeding of naturally contaminated corn, F. verticillioides culture material, and by intravenous administration of fumonisin B1 (FB1). Hepatic lesions consisting of apoptosis, necrosis, and hepatocyte proliferation also are observed. As in other species, alterations in clinical pathology reflect hepatic injury as well as elevated serum cholesterol concentration. In chronic studies, esophageal plaques, hyperplastic hepatic nodules, and right ventricular hypertrophy were found. In pigs, as in other species, fumonisin alters sphingolipid biosynthesis, with the greatest alterations in sphingosine and sphinganine concentrations in kidney, liver, lung, and heart. Our recent studies on fumonisin toxicosis in pigs have focused on immune effects and the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema. The specific immune system was not affected; however, FB1 inhibited phagocytosis and sphingolipid biosynthesis in pulmonary macrophages. Fumonisin induced an accumulation of membranous material in pulmonary capillary endothelial cells; this change appears specific to this cell type and to swine. In short-term cardiovascular studies, fumonisin decreased left ventricular dP/dt(max) (an index of cardiac contractility), mean systemic arterial pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output, and increased mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure. These changes are compatible with the inhibition of L-type calcium channels by increased sphingosine and/or sphinganine concentration. Therefore, fumonisin-induced pulmonary edema in swine appears to result from acute left

  9. Weak Glycolipid Binding of a Microdomain-Tracer Peptide Correlates with Aggregation and Slow Diffusion on Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lauterbach, Tim; Manna, Manoj; Ruhnow, Maria; Wisantoso, Yudi; Wang, Yaofeng; Matysik, Artur; Oglęcka, Kamila; Mu, Yuguang; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Wohland, Thorsten; Kraut, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Organized assembly or aggregation of sphingolipid-binding ligands, such as certain toxins and pathogens, has been suggested to increase binding affinity of the ligand to the cell membrane and cause membrane reorganization or distortion. Here we show that the diffusion behavior of the fluorescently tagged sphingolipid-interacting peptide probe SBD (Sphingolipid Binding Domain) is altered by modifications in the construction of the peptide sequence that both result in a reduction in binding to ganglioside-containing supported lipid membranes, and at the same time increase aggregation on the cell plasma membrane, but that do not change relative amounts of secondary structural features. We tested the effects of modifying the overall charge and construction of the SBD probe on its binding and diffusion behavior, by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR; Biacore) analysis on lipid surfaces, and by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) on live cells, respectively. SBD binds preferentially to membranes containing the highly sialylated gangliosides GT1b and GD1a. However, simple charge interactions of the peptide with the negative ganglioside do not appear to be a critical determinant of binding. Rather, an aggregation-suppressing amino acid composition and linker between the fluorophore and the peptide are required for optimum binding of the SBD to ganglioside-containing supported lipid bilayer surfaces, as well as for interaction with the membrane. Interestingly, the strength of interactions with ganglioside-containing artificial membranes is mirrored in the diffusion behavior by FCS on cell membranes, with stronger binders displaying similar characteristic diffusion profiles. Our findings indicate that for aggregation-prone peptides, aggregation occurs upon contact with the cell membrane, and rather than giving a stronger interaction with the membrane, aggregation is accompanied by weaker binding and complex diffusion profiles indicative of heterogeneous diffusion

  10. Adaptive Control Model Reveals Systematic Feedback and Key Molecules in Metabolic Pathway Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Richard A.; Merrill, Alfred H.; Wang, May D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Robust behavior in metabolic pathways resembles stabilized performance in systems under autonomous control. This suggests we can apply control theory to study existing regulation in these cellular networks. Here, we use model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) to investigate the dynamics of de novo sphingolipid synthesis regulation in a combined theoretical and experimental case study. The effects of serine palmitoyltransferase over-expression on this pathway are studied in vitro using human embryonic kidney cells. We report two key results from comparing numerical simulations with observed data. First, MRAC simulations of pathway dynamics are comparable to simulations from a standard model using mass action kinetics. The root-sum-square (RSS) between data and simulations in both cases differ by less than 5%. Second, MRAC simulations suggest systematic pathway regulation in terms of adaptive feedback from individual molecules. In response to increased metabolite levels available for de novo sphingolipid synthesis, feedback from molecules along the main artery of the pathway is regulated more frequently and with greater amplitude than from other molecules along the branches. These biological insights are consistent with current knowledge while being new that they may guide future research in sphingolipid biology. In summary, we report a novel approach to study regulation in cellular networks by applying control theory in the context of robust metabolic pathways. We do this to uncover potential insight into the dynamics of regulation and the reverse engineering of cellular networks for systems biology. This new modeling approach and the implementation routines designed for this case study may be extended to other systems. Supplementary Material is available at www.liebertonline.com/cmb. PMID:21314456

  11. Association between CLN3 (Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis, CLN3 Type) Gene Expression and Clinical Characteristics of Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Makoukji, Joelle; Raad, Mohamad; Genadry, Katia; El-Sitt, Sally; Makhoul, Nadine J.; Saad Aldin, Ehab; Nohra, Eden; Jabbour, Mark; Sangaralingam, Ajanthah; Chelala, Claude; Habib, Robert H.; Boulos, Fouad; Tfayli, Arafat; Boustany, Rose-Mary

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Elucidation of underlying biology and molecular pathways is necessary for improving therapeutic options and clinical outcomes. CLN3 protein (CLN3p), deficient in neurodegenerative CLN3 disease is anti-apoptotic, and defects in the CLN3 gene cause accelerated apoptosis of neurons in CLN3 disease and up-regulation of ceramide. Dysregulated apoptotic pathways are often implicated in the development of the oncogenic phenotype. Predictably, CLN3 mRNA expression and CLN3 protein were up-regulated in a number of human and murine breast cancer-cell lines. Here, we determine CLN3 expression in non-tumor vs. tumor samples from fresh and formalin-fixed/paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast tissue and analyze the association between CLN3 overexpression and different clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer patients. Additionally, gene expression of 28 enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism was determined. CLN3 mRNA is overexpressed in tumor vs. non-tumor breast tissue from FFPE and fresh samples, as well as in mouse MCF7 breast cancer compared to MCF10A normal cells. Of the clinicopathological characteristics of tumor grade, age, menopause status, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), only absence of HER2 expression correlated with CLN3 overexpression. Sphingolipid genes for ceramide synthases 2 and 6 (CerS2; CerS6), delta(4)-desaturase sphingolipid 2 (DEGS2), and acidic sphingomyelinase (SMPD1) displayed higher expression levels in breast cancer vs. control tissue, whereas ceramide galactosyltransferase (UGT8) was underexpressed in breast cancer samples. CLN3 may be a novel molecular target for cancer drug discovery with the goal of modulation of ceramide pathways. PMID:26528430

  12. Trichothecenes induce accumulation of glucosylceramide in neural cells by interfering with lactosylceramide synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kralj, Ana; Gurgui, Mihaela; Koenig, Gabriele M.; Echten-Deckert, Gerhild van

    2007-11-15

    Trichothecenes are sesquiterpenoid metabolites produced by several fungal strains that impair human and animal health. Since sphingolipids were connected with fungal toxicity the aim of the present study was to test the influence of fungal metabolites on sphingolipid metabolism in neural cells. The crude extract of fungal strain Spicellum roseum induced accumulation of glucosylceramide (GlcCer), and simultaneous reduction of the formation of lactosylceramide (LacCer) and complex gangliosides in primary cultured neurons. Following a bioassay-guided fractionation of the respective fungal extract we could demonstrate that the two isolated trichothecene derivatives, 8-deoxy-trichothecin (8-dT) and trichodermol (Td-ol) were responsible for this effect. Thus, incubation of primary cultured neurons as well as of neuroblastoma B104 cells for 24 h with 30 {mu}M of either of the two fungal metabolites resulted in uncoupling of sphingolipid biosynthesis at the level of LacCer. For the observed reduction of LacCer synthase activity by about 90% cell integrity was crucial in both cell types. In neuroblastoma cells the amount of LacCer synthase mRNA was reduced in the presence of trichothecenes, whereas in primary cultured neurons this was not the case, suggesting a post-transcriptional mechanism of action in the latter cell type. The data also show that the compounds did not interfere with the translocation of GlcCer in neuroblastoma cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that trichodermol and 8-deoxy-trichothecin inhibit LacCer synthase activity in a cell-type-specific manner.

  13. Overexpression of BAX INHIBITOR-1 Links Plasma Membrane Microdomain Proteins to Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toshiki; Aki, Toshihiko; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Uchimiya, Hirofumi; Kawai-Yamada, Maki

    2015-01-01

    BAX INHIBITOR-1 (BI-1) is a cell death suppressor widely conserved in plants and animals. Overexpression of BI-1 enhances tolerance to stress-induced cell death in plant cells, although the molecular mechanism behind this enhancement is unclear. We recently found that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BI-1 is involved in the metabolism of sphingolipids, such as the synthesis of 2-hydroxy fatty acids, suggesting the involvement of sphingolipids in the cell death regulatory mechanism downstream of BI-1. Here, we show that BI-1 affects cell death-associated components localized in sphingolipid-enriched microdomains of the plasma membrane in rice (Oryza sativa) cells. The amount of 2-hydroxy fatty acid-containing glucosylceramide increased in the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM; a biochemical counterpart of plasma membrane microdomains) fraction obtained from BI-1-overexpressing rice cells. Comparative proteomics analysis showed quantitative changes of DRM proteins in BI-1-overexpressing cells. In particular, the protein abundance of FLOTILLIN HOMOLOG (FLOT) and HYPERSENSITIVE-INDUCED REACTION PROTEIN3 (HIR3) markedly decreased in DRM of BI-1-overexpressing cells. Loss-of-function analysis demonstrated that FLOT and HIR3 are required for cell death by oxidative stress and salicylic acid, suggesting that the decreased levels of these proteins directly contribute to the stress-tolerant phenotypes in BI-1-overexpressing rice cells. These findings provide a novel biological implication of plant membrane microdomains in stress-induced cell death, which is negatively modulated by BI-1 overexpression via decreasing the abundance of a set of key proteins involved in cell death. PMID:26297139

  14. Preparative isolation of cerebrosides (galactosyl and glucosyl ceramide).

    PubMed

    Radin, N S

    1976-05-01

    An improved method for isolating cerebrosides from natural sources is described. The method is particularly suited to large scale work and can be adapted to the isolation of sphingolipids that are less polar than the gangliosides. It is based on the use of sodium sulfate to absorb the water from chloroform-methanol tissue extracts, the use of triiodide to cleave the ether linkage of plasmalogens, and the use of alkaline methanolysis to cleave the ester linkages of the glycerolipids. The final separation of the lipids is done with a silica gel column. PMID:932562

  15. Inhibition of Ceramide De Novo Synthesis with Myriocin Affects Lipid Metabolism in the Liver of Rats with Streptozotocin-Induced Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wiesiołek-Kurek, Patrycja; Piotrowska, Dominika M.; Łukaszuk, Bartłomiej; Chabowski, Adrian; Żendzian-Piotrowska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays diabetes is one of the most common metabolic diseases. Sphingolipids, which are vitally important constituents of intracellular signal transduction pathways, may be among the most pathogenic lipid moieties intermingled in the origin and development of diabetes. It is now well established that inhibition of de novo ceramide synthesis with myriocin exerts positive effects on lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus animal models. However, its influence on type I diabetes still remains unknown. Therefore, the scope of this paper is to fulfill that particular gap in our knowledge. PMID:24701589

  16. Plasma ceramides are elevated in overweight Holstein dairy cows experiencing greater lipolysis and insulin resistance during the transition from late pregnancy to early lactation.

    PubMed

    Rico, J E; Bandaru, V V R; Dorskind, J M; Haughey, N J; McFadden, J W

    2015-11-01

    Insulin resistance is a homeorhetic adaptation to parturition in dairy cows transitioning from late pregnancy to early lactation. An increase in prepartum adiposity can predispose periparturient cows to greater lipolysis and insulin resistance, thus increasing the risk for metabolic disease. Mechanisms mediating the development of insulin resistance in overweight peripartal dairy cows may depend on ceramide metabolism. The sphingolipid ceramide accumulates in plasma and tissues of overweight monogastric animals, and facilitates saturated fatty acid-induced insulin resistance. Considering this evidence, we hypothesized that plasma ceramides would be elevated in periparturient dairy cattle and that these sphingolipids would correlate with the magnitude of lipolysis and insulin resistance. To test our central hypothesis, multiparous Holstein cows were allocated into 2 groups according to their body condition score (BCS) at d -30 prepartum: lean (BCS <3.0; n=10) or overweight (BCS >4.0; n=11). Blood samples were collected at d -45, -30, -15, and -7, relative to expected parturition, and at d 4 postpartum. Plasma glucose, insulin, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentrations were measured, and insulin sensitivity was estimated. The concentrations of individual plasma ceramide and glycosylated ceramide were determined using liquid chromatography-based mass spectrometry. Results demonstrated that greater adiposity was associated with a greater loss in body condition during late pregnancy. Overweight cows had greater circulating concentrations of glucose, insulin, and NEFA, and lower insulin sensitivity relative to lean cows. We detected 30 different sphingolipids across 6 lipid classes with acyl chains ranging from 16 to 26 carbons. The most abundant plasma sphingolipids detected were C24:0-ceramide, C24:0-monohexosylceramide, and C16:0-lactosylceramide. Plasma concentrations of total ceramide and monohexosylceramide increased as

  17. Lipid antigens in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dowds, C. Marie; Kornell, Sabin-Christin

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are not only a central part of human metabolism but also play diverse and critical roles in the immune system. As such, they can act as ligands of lipid-activated nuclear receptors, control inflammatory signaling through bioactive lipids such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins, and modulate immunity as intracellular phospholipid- or sphingolipid-derived signaling mediators. In addition, lipids can serve as antigens and regulate immunity through the activation of lipid-reactive T cells, which is the topic of this review. We will provide an overview of the mechanisms of lipid antigen presentation, the biology of lipid-reactive T cells, and their contribution to immunity. PMID:23999493

  18. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein activity and chemosensitization of multidrug-resistant ovarian carcinoma 2780AD cells by hexanoylglucosylceramide.

    PubMed

    Veldman, R J; Sietsma, H; Klappe, K; Hoekstra, D; Kok, J W

    1999-12-20

    In the present study we show that neutral hexanoyl-(glyco)sphingolipids inhibit P-glycoprotein (Pgp) activity in human ovarian 2780AD cells. By contrast, hexanoylceramide and the gangliosides GM(3) and GM(2) had no effect on Pgp activity, whereas sphingosine had a stimulating effect. In the case of hexanoylglucosylceramide, inhibition of Pgp activity by was reflected by a regained doxorubicin sensitivity of cells, which were grown in medium supplemented with the lipid. Our results lead to the conclusion that a direct transmodulation of Pgp activity by glycolipids occurs, depending on lipid headgroup structure, which can result in reduced resistance to the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin. PMID:10600530

  19. Assessment of the retention properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) stationary phase for lipid class profiling in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, F S; Chaminade, P; Ferrier, D; Baillet, A

    2001-09-14

    Potentialities of polymerized vinyl alcohol on silica gel were assessed for class separation of simple lipids, sphingolipids, glyceroglycolipids and phospholipids by high-performance liquid chromatography. A screening of pure solvents in binary gradient elution and a chemometric approach was used to define a rugged two segment linear gradient formed from four solvents for total lipid class separation. Triethylamine and formic acid were added in all mobile phase components for acidic phospholipid separation and evaporative light scattering response enhancement. Simple analytical procedures are described for the analysis of complex lipid materials. PMID:11587330

  20. Sphingosine in apoptosis signaling.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier

    2002-12-30

    The sphingolipid metabolites ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate contribute to controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis. Ceramide and its catabolite sphingosine act as negative regulators of cell proliferation and promote apoptosis. Conversely, sphingosine 1-phosphate, formed by phosphorylation of sphingosine by a sphingosine kinase, has been involved in stimulating cell growth and inhibiting apoptosis. As the phosphorylation of sphingosine diminishes apoptosis, while dephosphorylation of sphingosine 1-phosphate potentiates it, the role of sphingosine as a messenger of apoptosis is of importance. Herein, the effects of sphingosine on diverse signaling pathways implicated in the apoptotic process are reviewed. PMID:12531549

  1. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors: Biology and therapeutic potential in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jo, S-K; Bajwa, A; Awad, AS; Lynch, KR; Okusa, MD

    2008-01-01

    The major sphingolipid metabolite, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), has important biological functions. S1P is the ligand for a family of five G-protein-coupled receptors with distinct signaling pathways that regulate angiogenesis, vascular maturation, immunity, chemotaxis, and other important biological pathways. Recently, clinical trials have targeted S1P receptors (S1PRs) for autoimmune diseases and transplantation and have generated considerable interest in developing additional, more selective compounds. This review summarizes current knowledge on the biology of S1P and S1PRs that forms the basis for future drug development and the treatment of kidney disease. PMID:18322542

  2. Review of nut phytochemicals, fat-soluble bioactives, antioxidant components and health effects.

    PubMed

    Alasalvar, Cesarettin; Bolling, Bradley W

    2015-04-01

    The levels of phytochemicals (total phenols, proanthocyanidins, gallic acid + gallotannins, ellagic acid + ellagitannins, flavonoids, phenolic acids, stilbenes and phytates), fat-soluble bioactives (lipid, tocols, phytosterols, sphingolipids, carotenoids, chlorophylls and alkyl phenols) as well as natural antioxidants (nutrient and non-nutrient) present in commonly consumed twelve nuts (almond, Brazil nut, cashew, chestnut, hazelnut, heartnut, macadamia, peanut, pecan, pine nut, pistachio and walnut) are compared and reported. Recent studies adding new evidence for the health benefits of nuts are also discussed. Research findings from over 112 references, many of which have been published within last 10 years, have been compiled and reported. PMID:26148924

  3. Potential of caveolae in the therapy of cardiovascular and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Fuxe, Kjell; Franco, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Caveolae are membrane micro-domains enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and caveolins, which are transmembrane proteins with a hairpin-like structure. Caveolae participate in receptor-mediated trafficking of cell surface receptors and receptor-mediated signaling. Furthermore, caveolae participate in clathrin-independent endocytosis of membrane receptors. On the one hand, caveolins are involved in vascular and cardiac dysfunction. Also, neurological abnormalities in caveolin-1 knockout mice and a link between caveolin-1 gene haplotypes and neurodegenerative diseases have been reported. The aim of this article is to present the rationale for considering caveolae as potential targets in cardiovascular and neurological diseases. PMID:25324780

  4. Lipid Raft in Cardiac Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Manika; Das, Dipak K

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts are sphingolipid and cholesterol rich micro-domains of the plasma membrane that coordinate and regulate varieties of signaling processes. Lipid rafts are also present in cardiac myocytes and are enriched in signaling molecules and ion channel regulatory proteins. Lipid rafts are receiving increasing attention as cellular organelles contributing to the pathogenesis of several structural and functional processes including cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. At present, very little is known about the role of lipid rafts in cardiac function and dysfunction. This review will discuss the possible role of lipid rafts in cardiac health and disease. PMID:20436850

  5. 'Cherry red spot' in a patient with Tay-Sachs disease: case report.

    PubMed

    Aragão, Ricardo Evangelista Marrocos de; Ramos, Régia Maria Gondim; Pereira, Felipe Bezerra Alves; Bezerra, Andreya Ferreira Rodrigues; Fernandes, Daniel Nogueira

    2009-01-01

    Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of sphingolipid metabolism, caused by enzyme hexosaminidase A deficiency that leads to an accumulation of GM2 in neurocytes which results in progressive loss of neurological function. The accumulation of lipid in retinal ganglion cells that leads to a chalk-white appearance of the fundus called 'cherry red spot' is the hallmark of Tay-Sachs disease. It is also seen in others neurometabolic diseases as well as in central retinal artery occlusion. This case reports a child with Tay-Sachs disease in a family with four previous similar deaths without diagnostic. PMID:19820796

  6. The Arabidopsis ceramidase AtACER functions in disease resistance and salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Xin; Li, Jian; Liu, Zhe; Yin, Jian; Chang, Zhen-Yi; Rong, Chan; Wu, Jia-Li; Bi, Fang-Cheng; Yao, Nan

    2015-03-01

    Ceramidases hydrolyze ceramide into sphingosine and fatty acids. In mammals, ceramidases function as key regulators of sphingolipid homeostasis, but little is known about their roles in plants. Here we characterize the Arabidopsis ceramidase AtACER, a homolog of human alkaline ceramidases. The acer-1 T-DNA insertion mutant has pleiotropic phenotypes, including reduction of leaf size, dwarfing and an irregular wax layer, compared with wild-type plants. Quantitative sphingolipid profiling showed that acer-1 mutants and the artificial microRNA-mediated silenced line amiR-ACER-1 have high ceramide levels and decreased long chain bases. AtACER localizes predominantly to the endoplasmic reticulum, and partially to the Golgi complex. Furthermore, we found that acer-1 mutants and AtACER RNAi lines showed increased sensitivity to salt stress, and lines overexpressing AtACER showed increased tolerance to salt stress. Reduction of AtACER also increased plant susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae. Our data highlight the key biological functions of ceramidases in biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. PMID:25619405

  7. Sphingosine Kinase 2 and Ceramide Transport as Key Targets of the Natural Flavonoid Luteolin to Induce Apoptosis in Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel Hadi, Loubna; Di Vito, Clara; Marfia, Giovanni; Ferraretto, Anita; Tringali, Cristina; Viani, Paola; Riboni, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The plant flavonoid luteolin exhibits different biological effects, including anticancer properties. Little is known on the molecular mechanisms underlying its actions in colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we investigated the effects of luteolin on colon cancer cells, focusing on the balance between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), two sphingoid mediators with opposite roles on cell fate. Using cultured cells, we found that physiological concentrations of luteolin induce the elevation of ceramide, followed by apoptotic death of colon cancer cells, but not of differentiated enterocytes. Pulse studies revealed that luteolin inhibits ceramide anabolism to complex sphingolipids. Further experiments led us to demonstrate that luteolin induces an alteration of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi flow of ceramide, pivotal to its metabolic processing to complex sphingolipids. We report that luteolin exerts its action by inhibiting both Akt activation, and sphingosine kinase (SphK) 2, with the consequent reduction of S1P, an Akt stimulator. S1P administration protected colon cancer cells from luteolin-induced apoptosis, most likely by an intracellular, receptor-independent mechanism. Overall this study reveals for the first time that the dietary flavonoid luteolin exerts toxic effects on colon cancer cells by inhibiting both S1P biosynthesis and ceramide traffic, suggesting its dietary introduction/supplementation as a potential strategy to improve existing treatments in CRC. PMID:26580959

  8. Intracisternal Cyclodextrin Prevents Cerebellar Dysfunction and Purkinje Cell Death in Feline Niemann-Pick type C1 disease

    PubMed Central

    Vite, C. H.; Bagel, J. H.; Swain, G. P.; Prociuk, M.; Sikora, T. U.; Stein, V. M.; O’Donnell, P.; Ruane, T.; Ward, S.; Crooks, A.; Li, S.; Mauldin, E.; Stellar, S.; De Meulder, M.; Kao, M. L.; Ory, D. S.; Davidson, C.; Vanier, M. T.; Walkley, S. U.

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the NPC1 gene, leading to an increase in unesterified cholesterol and several sphingolipids, and resulting in hepatic disease and progressive neurological disease. Whereas subcutaneous administration of the pharmaceutical excipient 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) ameliorated hepatic disease, doses sufficient to reduce neurological disease resulted in pulmonary toxicity. In contrast, direct administration of HPβCD into the cisterna magna of presymptomatic cats with NPC disease prevented the onset of cerebellar dysfunction for greater than a year and resulted in a reduction in Purkinje cell loss and near normal concentrations of cholesterol and sphingolipids. Moreover, administration of intracisternal HPβCD to NPC cats with ongoing cerebellar dysfunction slowed disease progression, increased survival time, and decreased the accumulation of brain gangliosides. An increase in hearing threshold was identified as a potential adverse effect. Together, these studies in the feline animal model have provided critical data on efficacy and safety of drug administration directly into the CNS that will be important for advancing HPβCD into clinical trials. PMID:25717099

  9. Sphingomyelin regulates the transbilayer movement of diacylglycerol in the plasma membrane of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yoshibumi; Makino, Asami; Murase-Tamada, Kotono; Sakai, Shota; Inaba, Takehiko; Hullin-Matsuda, Françoise; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2013-08-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) is a key component in lipid metabolism and signaling. Previous model membrane studies using DAG analogs suggest their rapid membrane transbilayer movement. However, little is known about the DAG distribution and dynamics in cell membranes. Using live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we monitored the transbilayer movement of DAG with the yellow fluorescent protein-tagged C1AB domain from protein kinase C-γ (EYFP-C1AB), which selectively binds DAG. When HeLa cells were treated with Bacillus cereus phospholipase C (Bc-PLC) to produce DAG on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, intracellularly expressed EYFP-C1AB probe accumulated at the plasma membrane, indicating the transbilayer movement of the outer leaflet DAG to the inner leaflet. This Bc-PLC-induced translocation of EYFP-C1AB probe to the plasma membrane was not observed in the sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, but was recovered after cell treatment with sphingomyelinase or preincubation with an inhibitor of sphingolipid biosynthesis. The inhibitory effect of sphingomyelin (SM) on the transbilayer movement of DAG was reproduced in model membranes using a fluorescent short-chain DAG analog. These results demonstrate that the SM content on the outer leaflet regulates the transbilayer movement of DAG in the plasma membrane, thus providing new insights into the dynamics of DAG in cell pathophysiology. PMID:23682124

  10. Approaches in the study of ganglioside metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Tettamanti, G.; Ghidoni, R.; Sonnino, S.; Chigorno, V.; Venerando, B.; Giuliani, A.; Fiorilli, A.

    1984-01-01

    Ganglioside GM1, /sup 3/H-labeled in the sphingosine or terminal galactose moiety was injected into mice and its metabolic fate in the liver was followed. After administration of sphingosine-labeled GM1 all major liver gangliosides (GM3, GM2, GM1, GD1a-NeuAc, NeuG1) became radioactive, the radioactivity residing in all cases on the sphingosine moiety. The specific radioactivity was highest on GM1, followed by GM2, GM3 and GD1a-NeuAc, NeuG1. Several neutral glycosphingolipids and sphingomyelin were also formed. After administration of galactose-labelled GM1 the only radioactive gangliosides present in the liver were GM1 and GD1a-NeuAc, NeuG1, both carrying the radioactivity on the terminal galactose residue, with no formation of labelled neutral glycosphingolipids. Subcellular studies gave clear evidence that GM1, after being taken up by the liver, was mainly degraded to GM2, GM3 and neutral glycosphingolipids at the level of lysosomes. A part of it was sialylated to more complex gangliosides and some of its metabolic by-products were used for the biosynthesis of other sphingolipid species, likely at the level of the Golgi apparatus. All this suggests that exogenous GM1 is introduced in the metabolic routes of endogenous gangliosides and of other sphingolipids, which are operating in the liver.

  11. Influence of lipids with hydroxyl-containing head groups on Fe2+ (Cu2+)/H2O2-mediated transformation of phospholipids in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Olshyk, Viktoriya N; Melsitova, Inna V; Yurkova, Irina L

    2014-01-01

    Under condition of ROS formation in lipid membranes, free radical reactions can proceed in both hydrophobic (peroxidation of lipids, POL) and polar (free radical fragmentation) parts of the bilayer. Free-radical fragmentation is typical for the lipids containing a hydroxyl group in β-position with respect to an ester or amide bond. The present study has been undertaken to investigate free-radical transformations of phospholipids in model membranes containing lipids able to undergo fragmentation in their polar part. Liposomes from egg yolk lecithin containing saturated or monounsaturated glycero- and sphingolipids were subjected to the action of an HO* - generating system - Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc, and the POL products were investigated. In parallel with this, the effects of monoacylglycerols and scavengers of reactive species on Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc - mediated free-radical fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerols were studied. Hydroxyl-containing sphingolipids and glycerolipids, which undergo free-radical fragmentation under such conditions, manifested antioxidant properties in the model membranes. In the absence of HO groups in the lipid structure, the effect was either pro-oxidant or neutral. Monoacylglycerols slowed down the rate of both peroxidation in the hydrophobic part and free-radical fragmentation in the hydrophilic part of phospholipid membrane. Scavengers of reactive species inhibited the fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerol substantially. Thus, the ability of hydroxyl-containing lipids to undergo free-radical fragmentation in polar part apparently makes a substantial contribution to the mechanism of their protector action. PMID:24189590

  12. Sphingopeptides: dihydrosphingosine-based fusion inhibitors against wild-type and enfuvirtide-resistant HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Avraham; Viard, Mathias; Unger, Linor; Blumenthal, Robert; Shai, Yechiel

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the structural organization of lipids in the cell and viral membranes is essential for elucidating mechanisms of viral fusion that lead to entry of enveloped viruses into their host cells. The HIV lipidome shows a remarkable enrichment in dihydrosphingomyelin, an unusual sphingolipid formed by a dihydrosphingosine backbone. Here we investigated the ability of dihydrosphingosine to incorporate into the site of membrane fusion mediated by the HIV envelope (Env) protein. Dihydrosphingosine as well as cholesterol, fatty acid, and tocopherol was conjugated to highly conserved, short HIV-1 Env-derived peptides with no antiviral activity otherwise. We showed that dihydrosphingosine exclusively endowed nanomolar antiviral activity to the peptides (IC(50) as low as 120 nM) in HIV-1 infection on TZM-bl cells and on Jurkat T cells, as well as in the cell-cell fusion assay. These sphingopeptides were active against enfuvirtide-resistant and wild-type CXCR4 and CCR5 tropic HIV strains. The anti-HIV activity was determined by both the peptides and their dihydrosphingosine conjugate. Moreover, their mode of action involved accumulation in the cells and viruses and binding to membranes enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The data suggest that sphingopeptides are recruited to the HIV membrane fusion site and provide a general concept in developing inhibitors of sphingolipid-mediated biological systems. PMID:22872679

  13. Enzyme replacement improves nervous system pathology and function in a mouse model for metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Ulrich; Herbst, Eva; Hedayati, Kerstin Khalaj; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Wessig, Carsten; Schröder, Stephan; Eistrup, Carl; Möller, Christer; Fogh, Jens; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2005-05-01

    A deficiency of arylsulfatase A (ASA) causes the lysosomal storage disease metachromatic leukodystrophy, which is characterized by accumulation of the sphingolipid 3-O-sulfogalactosylceramide (sulfatide). Sphingolipid storage results in progressive demyelination and severe neurologic symptoms. The disease is lethal, and curative therapy is not available. To assess the therapeutic potential of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), ASA knockout mice were treated by intravenous injection of recombinant human ASA. Plasma levels of ASA declined with a half-time of approximately 40 min, and enzyme was detectable in tissues within minutes after injection. The uptake of injected enzyme was high into liver, moderate into peripheral nervous system (PNS) and kidney and very low into brain. The apparent half-life of endocytosed enzyme was approximately 4 days. A single injection led to a time- and dose-dependent decline of the excess sulfatide in PNS and kidney by up to 70%, but no reduction was seen in brain. Four weekly injections with 20 mg/kg body weight not only reduced storage in peripheral tissues progressively, but also were surprisingly effective in reducing sulfatide storage in brain and spinal cord. The histopathology of kidney and central nervous system was ameliorated. Improved neuromotor coordination capabilities and normalized peripheral compound motor action potential demonstrate the benefits of ERT on the nervous system function. Enzyme replacement may therefore be a promising therapeutic option in this devastating disease. PMID:15772092

  14. Open Field Study of Some Zea mays Hybrids, Lipid Compounds and Fumonisins Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Giorni, Paola; Dall’Asta, Chiara; Reverberi, Massimo; Scala, Valeria; Ludovici, Matteo; Cirlini, Martina; Galaverna, Gianni; Fanelli, Corrado; Battilani, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Lipid molecules are increasingly recognized as signals exchanged by organisms interacting in pathogenic and/or symbiotic ways. Some classes of lipids actively determine the fate of the interactions. Host cuticle/cell wall/membrane components such as sphingolipids and oxylipins may contribute to determining the fate of host–pathogen interactions. In the present field study, we considered the relationship between specific sphingolipids and oxylipins of different hybrids of Zea mays and fumonisin by F. verticillioides, sampling ears at different growth stages from early dough to fully ripe. The amount of total and free fumonisin differed significantly between hybrids and increased significantly with maize ripening. Oxylipins and phytoceramides changed significantly within the hybrids and decreased with kernel maturation, starting from physiological maturity. Although the correlation between fumonisin accumulation and plant lipid profile is certain, the data collected so far cannot define a cause-effect relationship but open up new perspectives. Therefore, the question—“Does fumonisin alter plant lipidome or does plant lipidome modulate fumonisin accumulation?”—is still open. PMID:26378580

  15. Fluorescence detection by intensity changes for high-performance thin-layer chromatography separation of lipids using automated multiple development.

    PubMed

    Cebolla, Vicente L; Jarne, Carmen; Domingo, Pilar; Domínguez, Andrés; Delgado-Camón, Aránzazu; Garriga, Rosa; Galbán, Javier; Membrado, Luis; Gálvez, Eva M; Cossío, Fernando P

    2011-05-13

    Changes in emission of berberine cation, induced by non-covalent interactions with lipids on silica gel plates, can be used for detecting and quantifying lipids using fluorescence scanning densitometry in HPTLC analysis. This procedure, referred to as fluorescence detection by intensity changes (FDIC) has been used here in combination with automated multiple development (HPTLC/AMD), a gradient-based separation HPTLC technique, for separating, detecting and quantifying lipids from different families. Three different HPTLC/AMD gradient schemes have been developed for separating: neutral lipid families and steryl glycosides; different sphingolipids; and sphingosine-sphinganine mixtures. Fluorescent molar responses of studied lipids, and differences in response among different lipid families have been rationalized in the light of a previously proposed model of FDIC response, which is based on ion-induced dipole interactions between the fluorophore and the analyte. Likewise, computational calculations using molecular mechanics have also been a complementary useful tool to explain high FDIC responses of cholesteryl and steryl-derivatives, and moderate responses of sphingolipids. An explanation for the high FDIC response of cholesterol, whose limit of detection (LOD) is 5 ng, has been proposed. Advantages and limitations of FDIC application have also been discussed. PMID:21145556

  16. Loss of Ceramide Kinase in Arabidopsis Impairs Defenses and Promotes Ceramide Accumulation and Mitochondrial H2O2 Bursts[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Fang-Cheng; Liu, Zhe; Wu, Jian-Xin; Liang, Hua; Xi, Xue-Li; Fang, Ce; Sun, Tie-Jun; Yin, Jian; Dai, Guang-Yi; Rong, Chan; Greenberg, Jean T.; Su, Wei-Wei; Yao, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants that lack ceramide kinase, encoded by ACCELERATED CELL DEATH5 (ACD5), display spontaneous programmed cell death late in development and accumulate substrates of ACD5. Here, we compared ceramide accumulation kinetics, defense responses, ultrastructural features, and sites of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in wild-type and acd5 plants during development and/or Botrytis cinerea infection. Quantitative sphingolipid profiling indicated that ceramide accumulation in acd5 paralleled the appearance of spontaneous cell death, and it was accompanied by autophagy and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Plants lacking ACD5 differed significantly from the wild type in their responses to B. cinerea, showing earlier and higher increases in ceramides, greater disease, smaller cell wall appositions (papillae), reduced callose deposition and apoplastic ROS, and increased mitochondrial ROS. Together, these data show that ceramide kinase greatly affects sphingolipid metabolism and the site of ROS accumulation during development and infection, which likely explains the developmental and infection-related cell death phenotypes. The acd5 plants also showed an early defect in restricting B. cinerea germination and growth, which occurred prior to the onset of cell death. This early defect in B. cinerea restriction in acd5 points to a role for ceramide phosphate and/or the balance of ceramides in mediating early antifungal responses that are independent of cell death. PMID:25149397

  17. Metabolome-Wide Association Study of Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, L. Goodwin; Uppal, Karan; Walker, Douglas I.; Roberson, Rachel M.; Tran, ViLinh; Parks, Megan B.; Wade, Emily A.; May, Alexandra T.; Umfress, Allison C.; Jarrell, Kelli L.; Stanley, Brooklyn O. C.; Kuchtey, John; Kuchtey, Rachel W.; Jones, Dean P.; Brantley, Milam A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) patients can be differentiated from controls based on metabolic characteristics. Methods We used ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry with C18 liquid chromatography for metabolomic analysis on frozen plasma samples from 72 POAG patients and 72 controls. Metabolome-wide Spearman correlation was performed to select differentially expressed metabolites (DEM) correlated with POAG. We corrected P values for multiple testing using Benjamini and Hochberg false discovery rate (FDR). Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to depict the relationship between participants and DEM. Differentially expressed metabolites were matched to the METLIN metabolomics database; both DEM and metabolites significantly correlating with DEM were analyzed using MetaboAnalyst to identify metabolic pathways altered in POAG. Results Of the 2440 m/z (mass/charge) features recovered after filtering, 41 differed between POAG cases and controls at FDR = 0.05. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed these DEM to associate into eight clusters; three of these clusters contained the majority of the DEM and included palmitoylcarnitine, hydroxyergocalciferol, and high-resolution METLIN matches to sphingolipids, other vitamin D-related metabolites, and terpenes. MetaboAnalyst also indicated likely alteration in steroid biosynthesis pathways. Conclusions Global ultrahigh resolution metabolomics emphasized the importance of altered lipid metabolism in POAG. The results suggest specific metabolic processes, such as those involving palmitoylcarnitine, sphingolipids, vitamin D-related compounds, and steroid precursors, may contribute to POAG status and merit more detailed study with targeted methods. PMID:26230767

  18. Inhibition of Ceramide De Novo Synthesis Ameliorates Diet Induced Skeletal Muscles Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kurek, Krzysztof; Mikłosz, Agnieszka; Łukaszuk, Bartłomiej; Chabowski, Adrian; Górski, Jan; Żendzian-Piotrowska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays wrong nutritional habits and lack of physical activity give a rich soil for the development of insulin resistance and obesity. Many researches indicate lipids, especially the one from the sphingolipids class, as the group of molecules heavily implicated in the progress of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Recently, scientists have focused their scrutiny on myriocin, a potent chemical compound that inhibits ceramide (i.e., central hub of sphingolipids signaling pathway) de novo synthesis. In the present research we evaluated the effects of myriocin application on type 2 diabetes mellitus in three different types of skeletal muscles: (1) slow-oxidative (red gastrocnemius), (2) oxidative-glycolytic (soleus), and (3) glycolytic (white gastrocnemius). For these reasons the animals were randomly divided into four groups: “control” (C), “myriocin” (M), “high fat diet” (HFD), “high fat diet” (HFD), and “high fat diet + myriocin” (HFD + M). Our in vivo study demonstrated that ceramide synthesis inhibition reduces intramuscular ceramide, its precursor sphinganine, and its derivatives sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate concentrations. Moreover, FFA and TG contents were also decreased after myriocin treatment. Thus, myriocin presents potential therapeutic perspectives with respect to the treatment of insulin resistance and its serious consequences in obese patients. PMID:26380311

  19. Adipose tissue and ceramide biosynthesis in the pathogenesis of obesity.

    PubMed

    Samad, Fahumiya; Badeanlou, Leylla; Shah, Charmi; Yang, Guang

    2011-01-01

    Although obesity is a complex metabolic disorder often associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia and Type 2 diabetes, as well as with accelerated atherosclerosis, the molecular changes in obesity that promote these disorders are not completely understood. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain how increased adipose tissue mass affects whole body insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk. One theory is that increased adipose derived inflammatory cytokines induces a chronic inflammatory state that not only increases cardiovascular risk, but also antagonizes insulin signaling and mitochondrial function and thereby impair glucose hemostasis. Another suggests that lipid accumulation in nonadipose tissues not suited for fat storage leads to the buildup of bioactive lipids that inhibit insulin signaling and metabolism. Recent evidence demonstrates that sphingolipid metabolism is dysregulated in obesity and specific sphingolipids may provide a common pathway that link excess nutrients and inflammation to increased metabolic and cardiovascular risk. This chapter will focus primarily on the expression and regulation of adipose and plasma ceramide biosynthesis in obesity and, its potential contribution to the pathogenesis of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:21910083

  20. Up-regulation of Plasma Hexosylceramide (d18: 1/18: 1) Contributes to Genotype 2 Virus Replication in Chronic Hepatitis C: A 20-Year Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Yan; Qu, Feng; Li, Jun-Feng; Liu, Mei; Ren, Feng; Zhang, Jing-Yun; Bian, Dan-Dan; Chen, Yu; Duan, Zhong-Ping; Zhang, Jin-Lan; Zheng, Su-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between plasma sphingolipids and hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients.A cohort of 120 treatment-naïve CHC patients was included. Liver biopsies and the Scheuer scoring system were used to assess hepatic inflammatory activity. Blood biochemical indicators, HCV-RNA load, and immunological markers were also measured. Forty-four plasma sphingolipids were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.The hexosylceramide (HexCer) (d18:1/18:1) level was significantly different between patients with a low HCV load (<10 IU/mL) and a high HCV load (≥10 IU/mL), and it was positively correlated with the HCV-RNA load (r = 0.337, P = 0.001) in CHC patients. Additionally, the plasma HexCer (d18:1/18:1) level (odds ratio 1.302, 95% confidence interval 1.129-1.502) was an independent factor for a high HCV-RNA load. For patients with hepatic inflammation grade ≤2 or HCV genotype 2, HexCer (d18:1/18:1) was independently related to a high HCV-RNA load.Plasma HexCer (d18:1/18:1) might be involved in the high viral replication level in chronic HCV infection, especially for CHC patients with genotype 2. PMID:27281078

  1. Truth and consequences of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Ana; Saba, Julie D.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine phosphate lyase (SPL) is an intracellular enzyme responsible for the irreversible catabolism of the lipid signaling molecule sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). SPL catalyzes the cleavage of S1P resulting in the formation of hexadecenal and ethanolamine phosphate. S1P functions as a ligand for a family of ubiquitously expressed G protein-coupled receptors that mediate autocrine and paracrine signals controlling cell migration, proliferation and programmed cell death pathways. S1P has also been implicated in developmental and pathological angiogenesis, cancer, inflammation, allergy, diabetes, lymphocyte trafficking and morphogenesis of the heart, kidney and brain as well as their response to ischemic injury. As the final enzyme in the sphingolipid degradative pathway, SPL commands the only exit point for sphingolipid intermediates and their flow into phospholipid metabolism. So, in addition to regulating S1P levels, SPL is the gatekeeper of a critical node of lipid metabolic flow. The recent crystallization of a prokaryotic SPL has provided insight into the function and potential regulation and drug targeting of this enzyme. Considering the many physiological and pathological functions of S1P signaling, it seems likely that targeting SPL to modulate S1P signaling could be useful in a variety of clinical contexts. In this review we discuss the recent highlights related to SPL-mediated biology, the structure of the SPL protein, the function of its products, new insights regarding the usefulness of SPL targeting in treating human diseases and the consequences of permanent SPL disruption in mice. PMID:21946005

  2. In vivo HMRS and lipidomic profiling reveals comprehensive changes of hippocampal metabolism during aging in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lejun; Cao, Bofeng; Xu, Zhiying; Sui, Yanbin; Chen, Jiao; Luan, Qiang; Yang, Ruifang; Li, Shanchun; Li, Ke Feng

    2016-01-29

    Aging is characterized by various cellular changes in the brain. Hippocampus is important for systemic aging and lifespan control. There is still a lack of comprehensive overview of metabolic changes in hippocampus during aging. In this study, we first created an accelerated brain aging mice model through the chronic administration of d-galactose. We then performed a multiplatform metabolomic profiling of mice hippocampus using the combination of in vivo 9.4 T HMRS and in vitro LC-MS/MS based lipidomics. We found N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA), gama-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate/glutamine, taurine, choline, sphingolipids (SMs), phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs), phosphatidylinositols (PIs), phosphatidylglycerols (PGs) and phosphatidylserines (PSs), all of them decreasing with the aging process in mice hippocampus. The changes of sphingolipids and phospholipids were not limited to one single class or molecular species. In contrast, we found the significant accumulation of lactate, myoinositol and phosphatidylcholines (PCs) along with aging in hippocampus. SM (d18:1/20:2), PE (36:2), PG (34:1), PI (36:4), PS (18:0/20:4) and PC (36:0) have the most significant changes along with aging. Network analysis revealed the striking loss of biochemical connectivity and interactions between hippocampal metabolites with aging. The correlation pattern between metabolites in hippocampus could function as biomarkers for aging or diagnosis of aging-related diseases. PMID:26707637

  3. Arabidopsis ribosomal proteins control vacuole trafficking and developmental programs through the regulation of lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruixi; Sun, Ruobai; Hicks, Glenn R.; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2015-01-01

    The vacuole is the most prominent compartment in plant cells and is important for ion and protein storage. In our effort to search for key regulators in the plant vacuole sorting pathway, ribosomal large subunit 4 (rpl4d) was identified as a translational mutant defective in both vacuole trafficking and normal development. Polysome profiling of the rpl4d mutant showed reduction in polysome-bound mRNA compared with wild-type, but no significant change in the general mRNA distribution pattern. Ribsomal profiling data indicated that genes in the lipid metabolism pathways were translationally down-regulated in the rpl4d mutant. Live imaging studies by Nile red staining suggested that both polar and nonpolar lipid accumulation was reduced in meristem tissues of rpl4d mutants. Pharmacological evidence showed that sterol and sphingolipid biosynthetic inhibitors can phenocopy the defects of the rpl4d mutant, including an altered vacuole trafficking pattern. Genetic evidence from lipid biosynthetic mutants indicates that alteration in the metabolism of either sterol or sphingolipid biosynthesis resulted in vacuole trafficking defects, similar to the rpl4d mutant. Tissue-specific complementation with key enzymes from lipid biosynthesis pathways can partially rescue both vacuole trafficking and auxin-related developmental defects in the rpl4d mutant. These results indicate that lipid metabolism modulates auxin-mediated tissue differentiation and endomembrane trafficking pathways downstream of ribosomal protein function. PMID:25535344

  4. MRP1 and glucosylceramide are coordinately over expressed and enriched in rafts during multidrug resistance acquisition in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Klappe, Karin; Hinrichs, John W J; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Sietsma, Hannie; Kok, Jan Willem

    2004-07-01

    Previously we have described a novel multidrug-resistant cell line, HT29(col), which displayed over expression of the multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and an altered sphingolipid composition, including enhanced levels of glucosylceramide (GlcCer; Kok JW, Veldman RJ, Klappe K, Koning H, Filipeanu C, Muller M. Int J Cancer 2000;87:172-8). In our study, long-term screening revealed that, during colchicine-induced acquisition of multidrug resistance in a new HT29(col) cell line, increases in GlcCer occurred concomitantly with upregulation of MRP1 expression. Both MRP1 and GlcCer were found enriched in Lubrol-insoluble membrane domains. The expression of MRP1 and GlcCer were tightly correlated, as indicated also by a reversal of both at the later stage of colchicine consolidation. Resistance to colchicine was determined by MRP1, while glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) did not contribute: 1). Resistance was fully inhibited by MK571. 2). GCS expression and activity were not upregulated in HT29(col) cells. 3). Inhibition of GCS did not affect MRP1-mediated efflux function or sensitivity to colchicine. Instead, overall sphingolipid metabolism was upregulated through an increased rate of ceramide biosynthesis. In conclusion, upregulation of MRP1 occurs in concert with upregulation of GlcCer during multidrug-resistance acquisition, and both are enriched in rafts. The increased GlcCer pool does not directly modulate MRP1 function and cell survival. PMID:15122583

  5. PDMP sensitizes neuroblastoma to paclitaxel by inducing aberrant cell cycle progression leading to hyperploidy.

    PubMed

    Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Klappe, Karin; Jacobs, Susan; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Kamps, Willem; Sietsma, Hannie; Kok, Jan Willem

    2006-03-01

    The sphingolipid ceramide has been recognized as an important mediator in the apoptotic machinery, and its efficient conversion to glucosylceramide has been associated with multidrug resistance. Therefore, inhibitors of glucosylceramide synthase are explored as tools for treatment of cancer. In this study, we used D,L-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol to sensitize Neuro-2a murine neuroblastoma cells to the microtubule-stabilizing agent paclitaxel. This treatment resulted in a synergistic inhibition of viable cell number increase, which was based on a novel mechanism: (a) After a transient mitotic arrest, cells proceeded through an aberrant cell cycle resulting in hyperploidy. Apoptosis also occurred but to a very limited extent. (b) Hyperploidy was not abrogated by blocking de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis using ISP-1, ruling out involvement of ceramide as a mediator. (c) Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and 2 activities were synergistically decreased on treatment. In conclusion, instead of inducing apoptosis through ceramide accumulation, D,L-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol by itself affects cell cycle-related proteins in paclitaxel-arrested Neuro-2a cells resulting in aberrant cell cycle progression leading to hyperploidy. PMID:16546973

  6. Rewiring Host Lipid Metabolism by Large Viruses Determines the Fate of Emiliania huxleyi, a Bloom-Forming Alga in the Ocean[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rosenwasser, Shilo; Mausz, Michaela A.; Schatz, Daniella; Sheyn, Uri; Malitsky, Sergey; Aharoni, Asaph; Weinstock, Eyal; Tzfadia, Oren; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Feldmesser, Ester; Pohnert, Georg; Vardi, Assaf

    2014-01-01

    Marine viruses are major ecological and evolutionary drivers of microbial food webs regulating the fate of carbon in the ocean. We combined transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to explore the cellular pathways mediating the interaction between the bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi and its specific coccolithoviruses (E. huxleyi virus [EhV]). We show that EhV induces profound transcriptome remodeling targeted toward fatty acid synthesis to support viral assembly. A metabolic shift toward production of viral-derived sphingolipids was detected during infection and coincided with downregulation of host de novo sphingolipid genes and induction of the viral-encoded homologous pathway. The depletion of host-specific sterols during lytic infection and their detection in purified virions revealed their novel role in viral life cycle. We identify an essential function of the mevalonate-isoprenoid branch of sterol biosynthesis during infection and propose its downregulation as an antiviral mechanism. We demonstrate how viral replication depends on the hijacking of host lipid metabolism during the chemical “arms race” in the ocean. PMID:24920329

  7. Implication of Ceramide, Ceramide 1-Phosphate and Sphingosine 1-Phosphate in Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gangoiti, Patricia; Granado, Maria H.; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M.; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    In the last two decades there has been considerable progress in our understanding of the role of sphingolipids in controlling signal transduction processes, particularly in the mechanisms leading to regulation of cell growth and death. Ceramide is a well-characterized sphingolipid metabolite and second messenger that can be produced by cancer cells in response to a variety of stimuli, including therapeutic drugs, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Although this is a promising aspect when thinking of treating cancer, it should be borne in mind that ceramide production may not always be a growth inhibitory or pro-apoptotic signal. In fact, ceramide can be readily converted to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) by the concerted actions of ceramidases and sphingosine kinases, or to ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) by the action of ceramide kinase. In general, S1P and C1P have opposing effects to ceramide, acting as pro-survival or mitogenic signals in most cell types. This review will address our current understanding of the many roles of ceramide, S1P and C1P in the regulation of cell growth and survival with special emphasis to the emerging role of these molecules and their metabolizing enzymes in controlling tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:21566746

  8. A lipid storage–like disorder contributes to cognitive decline in HIV-infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Mielke, Michelle M.; Sacktor, Ned; McArthur, Justin C.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott; Chang, Linda; Wojna, Valerie; Pardo, Carlos; Calabresi, Peter; Munsaka, Sody

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In this multicenter cohort study, we sought to identify prognostic and associative metabolic indicators for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Methods: A quantitative lipidomic analysis was conducted on 524 longitudinal CSF samples collected from 7 different performance sites across the mainland United States, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Subjects included HIV-infected individuals with longitudinal clinical and cognitive testing data and cognitively normal HIV-negative healthy controls. Results: At baseline, HIV+ subjects could be differentiated from HIV− controls by reductions in a single ceramide species and increases in multiple forms of cholesterol. Perturbations in cholesterol metabolism and ceramide were influenced by combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) use. There were no cross-sectional baseline differences in any lipid metabolite when HIV+ subjects were grouped according to cognitive status. However, a single sphingolipid metabolite and reduced levels of esterified cholesterols were prognostic indicators of incident cognitive decline. Longitudinal patterns of these disturbances in sphingolipid and sterol metabolism suggest that a progressive disorder of lipid metabolism that is similar to disorders of lipid storage may contribute to the pathogenesis of HAND. Conclusions: These findings suggest that HIV infection and cART are independently associated with a CNS metabolic disturbance, identify surrogate markers that are prognostic for cognitive decline, and implicate a lipid storage–like disorder in the progression of HAND. PMID:24027056

  9. Targeting ceramide synthase 6-dependent metastasis-prone phenotype in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Cao, Ke; Kato, Seiichi; Komizu, Yuji; Mizutani, Naoki; Tanaka, Kouji; Arima, Chinatsu; Tai, Mei Chee; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Togawa, Norie; Shiraishi, Takahiro; Usami, Noriyasu; Taniguchi, Tetsuo; Fukui, Takayuki; Yokoi, Kohei; Wakahara, Keiko; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Mizutani, Yukiko; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Inokuchi, Jin-ichi; Iwaki, Soichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Satou, Akira; Matsumoto, Yoko; Ueoka, Ryuichi; Tamiya-Koizumi, Keiko; Murate, Takashi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Kyogashima, Mamoru; Takahashi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids make up a family of molecules associated with an array of biological functions, including cell death and migration. Sphingolipids are often altered in cancer, though how these alterations lead to tumor formation and progression is largely unknown. Here, we analyzed non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens and cell lines and determined that ceramide synthase 6 (CERS6) is markedly overexpressed compared with controls. Elevated CERS6 expression was due in part to reduction of microRNA-101 (miR-101) and was associated with increased invasion and poor prognosis. CERS6 knockdown in NSCLC cells altered the ceramide profile, resulting in decreased cell migration and invasion in vitro, and decreased the frequency of RAC1-positive lamellipodia formation while CERS6 overexpression promoted it. In murine models, CERS6 knockdown in transplanted NSCLC cells attenuated lung metastasis. Furthermore, combined treatment with l-α-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine liposome and the glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor D-PDMP induced cell death in association with ceramide accumulation and promoted cancer cell apoptosis and tumor regression in murine models. Together, these results indicate that CERS6-dependent ceramide synthesis and maintenance of ceramide in the cellular membrane are essential for lamellipodia formation and metastasis. Moreover, these results suggest that targeting this homeostasis has potential as a therapeutic strategy for CERS6-overexpressing NSCLC. PMID:26650179

  10. A Conserved Circular Network of Coregulated Lipids Modulates Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Köberlin, Marielle S.; Snijder, Berend; Heinz, Leonhard X.; Baumann, Christoph L.; Fauster, Astrid; Vladimer, Gregory I.; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid composition affects the biophysical properties of membranes that provide a platform for receptor-mediated cellular signaling. To study the regulatory role of membrane lipid composition, we combined genetic perturbations of sphingolipid metabolism with the quantification of diverse steps in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and mass spectrometry-based lipidomics. Membrane lipid composition was broadly affected by these perturbations, revealing a circular network of coregulated sphingolipids and glycerophospholipids. This evolutionarily conserved network architecture simultaneously reflected membrane lipid metabolism, subcellular localization, and adaptation mechanisms. Integration of the diverse TLR-induced inflammatory phenotypes with changes in lipid abundance assigned distinct functional roles to individual lipid species organized across the network. This functional annotation accurately predicted the inflammatory response of cells derived from patients suffering from lipid storage disorders, based solely on their altered membrane lipid composition. The analytical strategy described here empowers the understanding of higher-level organization of membrane lipid function in diverse biological systems. PMID:26095250

  11. Vitamin K and the Nervous System: An Overview of its Actions12

    PubMed Central

    Ferland, Guylaine

    2012-01-01

    The role of vitamin K in the nervous system has been somewhat neglected compared with other physiological systems despite the fact that this nutrient was identified some 40 y ago as essential for the synthesis of sphingolipids. Present in high concentrations in brain cell membranes, sphingolipids are now known to possess important cell signaling functions in addition to their structural role. In the past 20 y, additional support for vitamin K functions in the nervous system has come from the discovery and characterization of vitamin K–dependent proteins that are now known to play key roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Notably, protein Gas6 has been shown to be actively involved in cell survival, chemotaxis, mitogenesis, and cell growth of neurons and glial cells. Although limited in number, studies focusing on the relationship between vitamin K nutritional status and behavior and cognition have also become available, pointing to diet and certain drug treatments (i.e., warfarin derivatives) as potential modulators of the action of vitamin K in the nervous system. This review presents an overview of the research that first identified vitamin K as an important nutrient for the nervous system and summarizes recent findings that support this notion. PMID:22516728

  12. Targeting ceramide synthase 6–dependent metastasis-prone phenotype in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Cao, Ke; Kato, Seiichi; Komizu, Yuji; Mizutani, Naoki; Tanaka, Kouji; Arima, Chinatsu; Tai, Mei Chee; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Togawa, Norie; Shiraishi, Takahiro; Usami, Noriyasu; Taniguchi, Tetsuo; Fukui, Takayuki; Yokoi, Kohei; Wakahara, Keiko; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Mizutani, Yukiko; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Inokuchi, Jin-ichi; Iwaki, Soichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Satou, Akira; Matsumoto, Yoko; Ueoka, Ryuichi; Tamiya-Koizumi, Keiko; Murate, Takashi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Kyogashima, Mamoru; Takahashi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids make up a family of molecules associated with an array of biological functions, including cell death and migration. Sphingolipids are often altered in cancer, though how these alterations lead to tumor formation and progression is largely unknown. Here, we analyzed non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens and cell lines and determined that ceramide synthase 6 (CERS6) is markedly overexpressed compared with controls. Elevated CERS6 expression was due in part to reduction of microRNA-101 (miR-101) and was associated with increased invasion and poor prognosis. CERS6 knockdown in NSCLC cells altered the ceramide profile, resulting in decreased cell migration and invasion in vitro, and decreased the frequency of RAC1-positive lamellipodia formation while CERS6 overexpression promoted it. In murine models, CERS6 knockdown in transplanted NSCLC cells attenuated lung metastasis. Furthermore, combined treatment with l-α-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine liposome and the glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor D-PDMP induced cell death in association with ceramide accumulation and promoted cancer cell apoptosis and tumor regression in murine models. Together, these results indicate that CERS6-dependent ceramide synthesis and maintenance of ceramide in the cellular membrane are essential for lamellipodia formation and metastasis. Moreover, these results suggest that targeting this homeostasis has potential as a therapeutic strategy for CERS6-overexpressing NSCLC. PMID:26650179

  13. Differential Effect of Plant Lipids on Membrane Organization

    PubMed Central

    Grosjean, Kevin; Mongrand, Sébastien; Beney, Laurent; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The high diversity of the plant lipid mixture raises the question of their respective involvement in the definition of membrane organization. This is particularly the case for plant plasma membrane, which is enriched in specific lipids, such as free and conjugated forms of phytosterols and typical phytosphingolipids, such as glycosylinositolphosphoceramides. This question was here addressed extensively by characterizing the order level of membrane from vesicles prepared using various plant lipid mixtures and labeled with an environment-sensitive probe. Fluorescence spectroscopy experiments showed that among major phytosterols, campesterol exhibits a stronger ability than β-sitosterol and stigmasterol to order model membranes. Multispectral confocal microscopy, allowing spatial analysis of membrane organization, demonstrated accordingly the strong ability of campesterol to promote ordered domain formation and to organize their spatial distribution at the membrane surface. Conjugated sterol forms, alone and in synergy with free sterols, exhibit a striking ability to order membrane. Plant sphingolipids, particularly glycosylinositolphosphoceramides, enhanced the sterol-induced ordering effect, emphasizing the formation and increasing the size of sterol-dependent ordered domains. Altogether, our results support a differential involvement of free and conjugated phytosterols in the formation of ordered domains and suggest that the diversity of plant lipids, allowing various local combinations of lipid species, could be a major contributor to membrane organization in particular through the formation of sphingolipid-sterol interacting domains. PMID:25575593

  14. Glucosylceramidase mass and subcellular localization are modulated by cholesterol in Niemann-Pick disease type C.

    PubMed

    Salvioli, Rosa; Scarpa, Susanna; Ciaffoni, Fiorella; Tatti, Massimo; Ramoni, Carlo; Vanier, Marie T; Vaccaro, Anna Maria

    2004-04-23

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is characterized by the accumulation of cholesterol and sphingolipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment. The mechanism by which the concentration of sphingolipids such as glucosylceramide is increased in this disease is poorly understood. We have found that, in NPC fibroblasts, the cholesterol storage affects the stability of glucosylceramidase (GCase), decreasing its mass and activity; a reduction of cholesterol raises the level of GCase to nearly normal values. GCase is activated and stabilized by saposin C (Sap C) and anionic phospholipids. Here we show by immunofluorescence microscopy that in normal fibroblasts, GCase, Sap C, and lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), the most abundant anionic phospholipid in the endolysosomal system, reside in the same intracellular vesicular structures. In contrast, the colocalization of GCase, Sap C, and LBPA is markedly impaired in NPC fibroblasts but can be re-established by cholesterol depletion. These data show for the first time that the level of cholesterol modulates the interaction of GCase with its protein and lipid activators, namely Sap C and LBPA, regulating the GCase activity and stability. PMID:14757764

  15. Ceramides promote apoptosis for virus-infected lymphoma cells through induction of ceramide synthases and viral lytic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lu; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Bai, Aiping; Chen, Yihan; Bielawski, Jacek; Del Valle, Luis; Smith, Charles D.; Ochoa, Augusto C.; Qin, Zhiqiang; Parsons, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent for several human cancers including primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), a rapidly progressive malignancy arising preferentially in immunocompromised patients. With conventional chemotherapy, PEL continues to portend high mortality, dictating the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Sphingosine kinase 2 (SphK2) represents a key gatekeeper for sphingolipid metabolism, responsible for conversion of ceramides to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). We have previously demonstrated that targeting SphK2 using a novel selective inhibitor, ABC294640, leads to intracellular accumulation of ceramides and induces apoptosis for KSHV-infected PEL cells, while suppressing tumor progression in vivo. In the current study, we sought to determine whether specific ceramide/dh-ceramide species and related ceramide synthases (CerS) impact viability for KSHV-infected PEL cells during targeting of SphK2. We found that several specific ceramide and dihydro(dh)-ceramide species and their associated CerS reduce PEL survival and tumor expansion in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that dhC16-Cer induces PEL apoptosis in part through activation of KSHV lytic gene expression. These data further implicate bioactive sphingolipids in regulation of PEL survival, and provide justification for future studies evaluating clinically relevant ceramide analogs or mimetics for their potential as therapeutic agents for PEL. PMID:26327294

  16. CERAMIDE AND SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE ACT AS PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY-ELICITED DAMAGE-ASSOCIATED MOLECULAR PATTERNS: CELL SURFACE EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judit; Sun, Jinghai; Canals, Daniel; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Separovic, Duska

    2014-01-01

    Molecules that appear on the surface of tumor cells after their therapy treatment may have important roles either as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or signals for phagocytes influencing the disposal of these cells. Treatment of SCCVII and CAL27 cells, models of mouse and human squamous cell carcinoma respectively, by photodynamic therapy (PDT) resulted in the presentation of ceramide and sphingosine-1-phposphate (S1P) on the cell surface. This was documented by anti-ceramide and anti-S1P antibody staining followed by flow cytometry. The exposure of these key sphingolipid molecules on PDT-treated tumor cells was PDT dose-dependent and it varied in intensity with different photosensitizers used for PDT. The above results, together with the finding that both ceramide and S1P can activate NFκB signaling in macrophages co-incubated with PDT-treated tumor cells, establish that these two sphingolipids can act as DAMPs stimulating inflammatory/immune reactions critical for tumor therapy response. PMID:24713544

  17. Differential effect of plant lipids on membrane organization: specificities of phytosphingolipids and phytosterols.

    PubMed

    Grosjean, Kevin; Mongrand, Sébastien; Beney, Laurent; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia

    2015-02-27

    The high diversity of the plant lipid mixture raises the question of their respective involvement in the definition of membrane organization. This is particularly the case for plant plasma membrane, which is enriched in specific lipids, such as free and conjugated forms of phytosterols and typical phytosphingolipids, such as glycosylinositolphosphoceramides. This question was here addressed extensively by characterizing the order level of membrane from vesicles prepared using various plant lipid mixtures and labeled with an environment-sensitive probe. Fluorescence spectroscopy experiments showed that among major phytosterols, campesterol exhibits a stronger ability than β-sitosterol and stigmasterol to order model membranes. Multispectral confocal microscopy, allowing spatial analysis of membrane organization, demonstrated accordingly the strong ability of campesterol to promote ordered domain formation and to organize their spatial distribution at the membrane surface. Conjugated sterol forms, alone and in synergy with free sterols, exhibit a striking ability to order membrane. Plant sphingolipids, particularly glycosylinositolphosphoceramides, enhanced the sterol-induced ordering effect, emphasizing the formation and increasing the size of sterol-dependent ordered domains. Altogether, our results support a differential involvement of free and conjugated phytosterols in the formation of ordered domains and suggest that the diversity of plant lipids, allowing various local combinations of lipid species, could be a major contributor to membrane organization in particular through the formation of sphingolipid-sterol interacting domains. PMID:25575593

  18. Open Field Study of Some Zea mays Hybrids, Lipid Compounds and Fumonisins Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Giorni, Paola; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Reverberi, Massimo; Scala, Valeria; Ludovici, Matteo; Cirlini, Martina; Galaverna, Gianni; Fanelli, Corrado; Battilani, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Lipid molecules are increasingly recognized as signals exchanged by organisms interacting in pathogenic and/or symbiotic ways. Some classes of lipids actively determine the fate of the interactions. Host cuticle/cell wall/membrane components such as sphingolipids and oxylipins may contribute to determining the fate of host-pathogen interactions. In the present field study, we considered the relationship between specific sphingolipids and oxylipins of different hybrids of Zea mays and fumonisin by F. verticillioides, sampling ears at different growth stages from early dough to fully ripe. The amount of total and free fumonisin differed significantly between hybrids and increased significantly with maize ripening. Oxylipins and phytoceramides changed significantly within the hybrids and decreased with kernel maturation, starting from physiological maturity. Although the correlation between fumonisin accumulation and plant lipid profile is certain, the data collected so far cannot define a cause-effect relationship but open up new perspectives. Therefore, the question-"Does fumonisin alter plant lipidome or does plant lipidome modulate fumonisin accumulation?"-is still open. PMID:26378580

  19. Morphogenesis checkpoint kinase Swe1 is the executor of lipolysis-dependent cell-cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Neha; Visram, Myriam; Cristobal-Sarramian, Alvaro; Sarkleti, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Cell growth and division requires the precise duplication of cellular DNA content but also of membranes and organelles. Knowledge about the cell-cycle–dependent regulation of membrane and storage lipid homeostasis is only rudimentary. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that the breakdown of triacylglycerols (TGs) is regulated in a cell-cycle–dependent manner, by activation of the Tgl4 lipase by the major cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28. The lipases Tgl3 and Tgl4 are required for efficient cell-cycle progression during the G1/S (Gap1/replication phase) transition, at the onset of bud formation, and their absence leads to a cell-cycle delay. We now show that defective lipolysis activates the Swe1 morphogenesis checkpoint kinase that halts cell-cycle progression by phosphorylation of Cdc28 at tyrosine residue 19. Saturated long-chain fatty acids and phytosphingosine supplementation rescue the cell-cycle delay in the Tgl3/Tgl4 lipase-deficient strain, suggesting that Swe1 activity responds to imbalanced sphingolipid metabolism, in the absence of TG degradation. We propose a model by which TG-derived sphingolipids are required to activate the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2ACdc55) to attenuate Swe1 phosphorylation and its inhibitory effect on Cdc28 at the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. PMID:25713391

  20. Morphogenesis checkpoint kinase Swe1 is the executor of lipolysis-dependent cell-cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Neha; Visram, Myriam; Cristobal-Sarramian, Alvaro; Sarkleti, Florian; Kohlwein, Sepp D

    2015-03-10

    Cell growth and division requires the precise duplication of cellular DNA content but also of membranes and organelles. Knowledge about the cell-cycle-dependent regulation of membrane and storage lipid homeostasis is only rudimentary. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that the breakdown of triacylglycerols (TGs) is regulated in a cell-cycle-dependent manner, by activation of the Tgl4 lipase by the major cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28. The lipases Tgl3 and Tgl4 are required for efficient cell-cycle progression during the G1/S (Gap1/replication phase) transition, at the onset of bud formation, and their absence leads to a cell-cycle delay. We now show that defective lipolysis activates the Swe1 morphogenesis checkpoint kinase that halts cell-cycle progression by phosphorylation of Cdc28 at tyrosine residue 19. Saturated long-chain fatty acids and phytosphingosine supplementation rescue the cell-cycle delay in the Tgl3/Tgl4 lipase-deficient strain, suggesting that Swe1 activity responds to imbalanced sphingolipid metabolism, in the absence of TG degradation. We propose a model by which TG-derived sphingolipids are required to activate the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A(Cdc55)) to attenuate Swe1 phosphorylation and its inhibitory effect on Cdc28 at the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. PMID:25713391

  1. Phospholipids in Milk Fat: Composition, Biological and Technological Significance, and Analytical Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Contarini, Giovanna; Povolo, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids are quantitatively the most important phospholipids (PLs) in milk. They are located on the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) and in other membranous material of the skim milk phase. They include principally phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine, while sphingomyelin is the dominant species of sphingolipids There is considerable evidence that PLs have beneficial health effects, such as regulation of the inflammatory reactions, chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activity on some types of cancer, and inhibition of the cholesterol absorption. PLs show good emulsifying properties and can be used as a delivery system for liposoluble constituents. Due to the amphiphilic characteristics of these molecules, their extraction, separation and detection are critical points in the analytical approach. The extraction by using chloroform and methanol, followed by the determination by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), coupled with evaporative light scattering (ELSD) or mass detector (MS), are the most applied procedures for the PL evaluation. More recently, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR) was also used, but despite it demonstrating high sensitivity, it requires more studies to obtain accurate results. This review is focused on milk fat phospholipids; their composition, biological activity, technological properties, and significance in the structure of milk fat. Different analytical methodologies are also discussed. PMID:23434649

  2. Clathrin and AP-1 regulate apical polarity and lumen formation during C. elegans tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongjie; Kim, Ahlee; Abraham, Nessy; Khan, Liakot A.; Hall, David H.; Fleming, John T.; Gobel, Verena

    2012-01-01

    Clathrin coats vesicles in all eukaryotic cells and has a well-defined role in endocytosis, moving molecules away from the plasma membrane. Its function on routes towards the plasma membrane was only recently appreciated and is thought to be limited to basolateral transport. Here, an unbiased RNAi-based tubulogenesis screen identifies a role of clathrin (CHC-1) and its AP-1 adaptor in apical polarity during de novo lumenal membrane biogenesis in the C. elegans intestine. We show that CHC-1/AP-1-mediated polarized transport intersects with a sphingolipid-dependent apical sorting process. Depleting each presumed trafficking component mislocalizes the same set of apical membrane molecules basolaterally, including the polarity regulator PAR-6, and generates ectopic lateral lumens. GFP::CHC-1 and BODIPY-ceramide vesicles associate perinuclearly and assemble asymmetrically at polarized plasma membrane domains in a co-dependent and AP-1-dependent manner. Based on these findings, we propose a trafficking pathway for apical membrane polarity and lumen morphogenesis that implies: (1) a clathrin/AP-1 function on an apically directed transport route; and (2) the convergence of this route with a sphingolipid-dependent apical trafficking path. PMID:22535410

  3. Roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate in cell growth, differentiation, and death.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, S; Cuvillier, O; Edsall, L; Kohama, T; Menzeleev, R; Olivera, A; Thomas, D; Tu, Z; Van Brocklyn, J; Wang, F

    1998-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that branching pathways of sphingolipid metabolism may mediate either apoptotic or mitogenic responses depending on the cell type and the nature of the stimulus. While ceramide has been shown to be an important regulatory component of apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha and the Fas ligand, sphingosine-1-phosphate (SPP), a further metabolite of ceramide, has been implicated as a second messenger in cellular proliferation and survival induced by platelet-derived growth factor, neuronal growth factor, and serum. SPP protects cells from apoptosis resulting from elevations of ceramide. Inflammatory cytokines stimulate sphingomyelinase, but not ceramidase, leading to accumulation of ceramide, whereas growth signals also stimulate ceramidase and sphingosine kinase leading to increased SPP levels. We propose that the dynamic balance between levels of sphingolipid metabolites, ceramide, and SPP and consequent regulation of different members of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (JNK versus ERK) family is an important factor that determines whether a cell survives or dies. PMID:9526097

  4. Sphingosine-1-phosphate synthesis and functions in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Price, Megan M; Oskeritzian, Carole A; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipids are not only major lipid components of all eukaryotic cell membranes, but they also comprise an important family of bioactive signaling molecules that regulate a diverse array of biological responses. The sphingolipid metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), is a key regulator of immune responses. Cellular levels of S1P are determined by the balance between its synthesis, involving two sphingosine kinases (SphK1 and SphK2), and its degradation, involving S1P lyase and S1P phosphatases. S1P mainly signals through its cell-surface receptors and may also have intracellular functions. S1P has important functions in mast cells – the major effectors of allergic responses. Antigen triggering of IgE receptors on mast cells activates both SphKs resulting in the production of S1P that is released and regulates and amplifies mast cell functions, including degranulation as well as cytokine and chemokine release. PMID:19802381

  5. Global transcriptional responses to cisplatin in Dictyostelium discoideum identify potential drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Van Driessche, Nancy; Alexander, Hannah; Min, Junxia; Kuspa, Adam; Alexander, Stephen; Shaulsky, Gad

    2007-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum is a useful model for studying mechanisms of cisplatin drug sensitivity. Our previous findings, that mutations in sphingolipid metabolism genes confer cisplatin resistance in D. discoideum and in human cells, raised interest in the resistance mechanisms and their implications for cisplatin chemotherapy. Here we used expression microarrays to monitor physiological changes and to identify pathways that are affected by cisplatin treatment of D. discoideum. We found >400 genes whose regulation was altered by cisplatin treatment of wild-type cells, including groups of genes that participate in cell proliferation and in nucleotide and protein metabolism, showing that the cisplatin response is orderly and multifaceted. Transcriptional profiling of two isogenic cisplatin-resistant mutants, impaired in different sphingolipid metabolism steps, showed that the effect of cisplatin treatment was greater than the effect of the mutations, indicating that cisplatin resistance in the mutants is due to specific abilities to overcome the drug effects rather than to general drug insensitivity. Nevertheless, the mutants exhibited significantly different responses to cisplatin compared with the parent, and >200 genes accounted for that difference. Mutations in five cisplatin response genes (sgkB, csbA, acbA, smlA, and atg8) resulted in altered drug sensitivity, implicating novel pathways in cisplatin response. Our data illustrate how modeling complex cellular responses to drugs in genetically stable and tractable systems can uncover new targets with the potential for improving chemotherapy. PMID:17878305

  6. Sphingosine-1-phosphate in cell growth and cell death.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, S; Cuvillier, O; Edsall, L C; Kohama, T; Menzeleev, R; Olah, Z; Olivera, A; Pirianov, G; Thomas, D M; Tu, Z; Van Brocklyn, J R; Wang, F

    1998-06-19

    Recent evidence suggests that branching pathways of sphingolipid metabolism may mediate either apoptotic or mitogenic responses depending on the cell type and the nature of the stimulus. While ceramide has been shown to be an important regulatory component of apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha and Fas ligand, sphingosine-1-phosphate (SPP), a further metabolite of ceramide, has been implicated as a second messenger in cellular proliferation and survival induced by platelet-derived growth factor, nerve growth factor, and serum. SPP protects cells from apoptosis resulting from elevations of ceramide. Inflammatory cytokines stimulate sphingomyelinase, but not ceramidase, leading to accumulation of ceramide, whereas growth signals also leading to accumulation of ceramide, whereas growth signals also stimulate ceramidase and sphingosine kinase leading to increased SPP levels. We propose that the dynamic balance between levels of sphingolipid metabolites, ceramide, and SPP, and consequent regulation of different family members of mitogen-activated protein kinases (JNK versus ERK), is an important factor that determines whether a cell survives or dies. PMID:9668339

  7. Sphingosine Kinase 2 and Ceramide Transport as Key Targets of the Natural Flavonoid Luteolin to Induce Apoptosis in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Hadi, Loubna; Di Vito, Clara; Marfia, Giovanni; Ferraretto, Anita; Tringali, Cristina; Viani, Paola; Riboni, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The plant flavonoid luteolin exhibits different biological effects, including anticancer properties. Little is known on the molecular mechanisms underlying its actions in colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we investigated the effects of luteolin on colon cancer cells, focusing on the balance between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), two sphingoid mediators with opposite roles on cell fate. Using cultured cells, we found that physiological concentrations of luteolin induce the elevation of ceramide, followed by apoptotic death of colon cancer cells, but not of differentiated enterocytes. Pulse studies revealed that luteolin inhibits ceramide anabolism to complex sphingolipids. Further experiments led us to demonstrate that luteolin induces an alteration of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi flow of ceramide, pivotal to its metabolic processing to complex sphingolipids. We report that luteolin exerts its action by inhibiting both Akt activation, and sphingosine kinase (SphK) 2, with the consequent reduction of S1P, an Akt stimulator. S1P administration protected colon cancer cells from luteolin-induced apoptosis, most likely by an intracellular, receptor-independent mechanism. Overall this study reveals for the first time that the dietary flavonoid luteolin exerts toxic effects on colon cancer cells by inhibiting both S1P biosynthesis and ceramide traffic, suggesting its dietary introduction/supplementation as a potential strategy to improve existing treatments in CRC. PMID:26580959

  8. Mesotrypsin and caspase-14 participate in prosaposin processing: potential relevance to epidermal permeability barrier formation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Tanaka, Mami; Motoyama, Akira; Miyai, Masashi; Matsunaga, Yukiko; Matsuda, Junko; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Hibino, Toshihiko

    2014-07-18

    A proteomics-based search for molecules interacting with caspase-14 identified prosaposin and epidermal mesotrypsin as candidates. Prosaposin is a precursor of four sphingolipid activator proteins (saposins A-D) that are essential for lysosomal hydrolysis of sphingolipids. Thus, we hypothesized that caspase-14 and mesotrypsin participate in processing of prosaposin. Because we identified a saposin A sequence as an interactor with these proteases, we prepared a specific antibody to saposin A and focused on saposin A-related physiological reactions. We found that mesotrypsin generated saposins A-D from prosaposin, and mature caspase-14 contributed to this process by activating mesotrypsinogen to mesotrypsin. Knockdown of these proteases markedly down-regulated saposin A synthesis in skin equivalent models. Saposin A was localized in granular cells, whereas prosaposin was present in the upper layer of human epidermis. The proximity ligation assay confirmed interaction between prosaposin, caspase-14, and mesotrypsin in the granular layer. Oil Red staining showed that the lipid envelope was significantly reduced in the cornified layer of skin from saposin A-deficient mice. Ultrastructural studies revealed severely disorganized cornified layer structure in both prosaposin- and saposin A-deficient mice. Overall, our results indicate that epidermal mesotrypsin and caspase-14 work cooperatively in prosaposin processing. We propose that they thereby contribute to permeability barrier formation in vivo. PMID:24872419

  9. Changes in ganglioside content affect the binding of Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin to detergent-resistant membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Seiko; Tamai, Eiji; Matsushita, Osamu; Minami, Junzaburo; Okabe, Akinobu; Miyata, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    Epsilon-toxin (ET) of Clostridium perfringens, which causes fatal enterotoxemia in ungulates, was previously shown to bind to and form a heptameric pore within the detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) of MDCK cells. Depletion of