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Sample records for spin coulomb drag

  1. Nonlocal formulation of spin Coulomb drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, I.; Ullrich, C. A.

    2013-10-01

    The spin Coulomb drag (SCD) effect occurs in materials and devices where charged carriers with different spins exchange momentum via Coulomb scattering. This causes frictional forces between spin-dependent currents that lead to intrinsic dissipation, which may limit spintronics applications. A nonlocal formulation of SCD is developed which is valid for strongly inhomogeneous systems such as nanoscale spintronics devices. This nonlocal formulation of SCD is successfully applied to linewidths of intersubband spin plasmons in semiconductor quantum wells, where experiments have shown that the local approximation fails.

  2. Coulomb drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narozhny, B. N.; Levchenko, A.

    2016-04-01

    Coulomb drag is a transport phenomenon whereby long-range Coulomb interaction between charge carriers in two closely spaced but electrically isolated conductors induces a voltage (or, in a closed circuit, a current) in one of the conductors when an electrical current is passed through the other. The magnitude of the effect depends on the exact nature of the charge carriers and the microscopic, many-body structure of the electronic systems in the two conductors. Drag measurements have become part of the standard toolbox in condensed matter physics that can be used to study fundamental properties of diverse physical systems including semiconductor heterostructures, graphene, quantum wires, quantum dots, and optical cavities.

  3. Fermi surface versus Fermi sea contributions to intrinsic anomalous and spin Hall effects of multiorbital metals in the presence of Coulomb interaction and spin-Coulomb drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2016-06-01

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and spin Hall effect (SHE) are fundamental phenomena, and their potential for application is great. However, we understand the interaction effects unsatisfactorily, and should have clarified issues about the roles of the Fermi sea term and Fermi surface term of the conductivity of the intrinsic AHE or SHE of an interacting multiorbital metal and about the effects of spin-Coulomb drag on the intrinsic SHE. Here, we resolve the first issue and provide the first step about the second issue by developing a general formalism in the linear response theory with appropriate approximations and using analytic arguments. The most striking result is that even without impurities, the Fermi surface term, a non-Berry-curvature term, plays dominant roles at high or slightly low temperatures. In particular, this Fermi surface term causes the temperature dependence of the dc anomalous Hall or spin Hall conductivity due to the interaction-induced quasiparticle damping and the correction of the dc spin Hall conductivity due to the spin-Coulomb drag. Those results revise our understanding of the intrinsic AHE and SHE. We also find that the differences between the dc anomalous Hall and longitudinal conductivities arise from the difference in the dominant multiband excitations. This not only explains why the Fermi sea term such as the Berry-curvature term becomes important in clean and low-temperature case only for interband transports, but also provides the useful principles on treating the electron-electron interaction in an interacting multiorbital metal for general formalism of transport coefficients. Several correspondences between our results and experiments are finally discussed.

  4. Coulomb drag in topological insulator films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong; Liu, Weizhe Edward; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-05-01

    We study Coulomb drag between the top and bottom surfaces of topological insulator films. We derive a kinetic equation for the thin-film spin density matrix containing the full spin structure of the two-layer system, and analyze the electron-electron interaction in detail in order to recover all terms responsible for Coulomb drag. Focusing on typical topological insulator systems, with a film thicknesses d up to 6 nm, we obtain numerical and approximate analytical results for the drag resistivity ρD and find that ρD is proportional to T2d-4 na-3/2 np-3/2 at low temperature T and low electron density na,p, with a denoting the active layer and p the passive layer. In addition, we compare ρD with graphene, identifying qualitative and quantitative differences, and we discuss the multi-valley case, ultra thin films and electron-hole layers.

  5. Observation of Spin Coulomb Drag in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.P.

    2011-08-19

    An electron propagating through a solid carries spin angular momentum in addition to its mass and charge. Of late there has been considerable interest in developing electronic devices based on the transport of spin, which offer potential advantages in dissipation, size, and speed over charge-based devices. However, these advantages bring with them additional complexity. Because each electron carries a single, fixed value (-e) of charge, the electrical current carried by a gas of electrons is simply proportional to its total momentum. A fundamental consequence is that the charge current is not affected by interactions that conserve total momentum, notably collisions among the electrons themselves. In contrast, the electron's spin along a given spatial direction can take on two values, {+-} {h_bar}/2 (conventionally {up_arrow}, {down_arrow}), so that the spin current and momentum need not be proportional. Although the transport of spin polarization is not protected by momentum conservation, it has been widely assumed that, like the charge current, spin current is unaffected by electron-electron (e-e) interactions. Here we demonstrate experimentally not only that this assumption is invalid, but that over a broad range of temperature and electron density, the flow of spin polarization in a two-dimensional gas of electrons is controlled by the rate of e-e collisions.

  6. Negative Coulomb Drag in Double Bilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Li, J I A; Taniguchi, T; Watanabe, K; Hone, J; Levchenko, A; Dean, C R

    2016-07-22

    We report on an experimental measurement of Coulomb drag in a double quantum well structure consisting of bilayer-bilayer graphene, separated by few layer hexagonal boron nitride. At low temperatures and intermediate densities, a novel negative drag response with an inverse sign is observed, distinct from the momentum and energy drag mechanisms previously reported in double monolayer graphene. By varying the device aspect ratio, the negative drag component is suppressed and a response consistent with pure momentum drag is recovered. In the momentum drag dominated regime, excellent quantitative agreement with the density and temperature dependence predicted for double bilayer graphene is found. PMID:27494491

  7. Boltzmann-Langevin theory of Coulomb drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Andreev, A. V.; Levchenko, A.

    2015-06-01

    We develop a Boltzmann-Langevin description of the Coulomb drag effect in clean double-layer systems with large interlayer separation d as compared to the average interelectron distance λF. Coulomb drag arises from density fluctuations with spatial scales of order d . At low temperatures, their characteristic frequencies exceed the intralayer equilibration rate of the electron liquid, and Coulomb drag may be treated in the collisionless approximation. As temperature is raised, the electron mean free path becomes short due to electron-electron scattering. This leads to local equilibration of electron liquid, and consequently drag is determined by hydrodynamic density modes. Our theory applies to both the collisionless and the hydrodynamic regimes, and it enables us to describe the crossover between them. We find that drag resistivity exhibits a nonmonotonic temperature dependence with multiple crossovers at distinct energy scales. At the lowest temperatures, Coulomb drag is dominated by the particle-hole continuum, whereas at higher temperatures of the collision-dominated regime it is governed by the plasmon modes. We observe that fast intralayer equilibration mediated by electron-electron collisions ultimately renders a stronger drag effect.

  8. Cotunneling Drag Effect in Coulomb-Coupled Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, A. J.; Lim, J. S.; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Amasha, S.; Katine, J. A.; Shtrikman, Hadas; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2016-08-01

    In Coulomb drag, a current flowing in one conductor can induce a voltage across an adjacent conductor via the Coulomb interaction. The mechanisms yielding drag effects are not always understood, even though drag effects are sufficiently general to be seen in many low-dimensional systems. In this Letter, we observe Coulomb drag in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot and, through both experimental and theoretical arguments, identify cotunneling as essential to obtaining a correct qualitative understanding of the drag behavior.

  9. Supercurrent Drag via the Coulomb Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ji-Min; Yip, Sungkit

    1996-03-01

    We predict a supercurrent drag effect due to the Coulomb interaction between two parallel superconducting wires/layers. In contrast to previously explored frictional drag effect between two semiconducting quantum wells, our nondissipative drag mechanism ( J.-M. Duan and S. K. Yip, Phys. Rev. Lett.70), 3647 (1993). is based on considerations of the free energy of collective charge fluctuations. Our prediction has been confirmed experimentally ( X. Huang et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett.74, 4051 (1995). This mechanism generally exists in other nondissipative systems, such as double-layer quantum Hall syatems ( J.-M. Duan, Europhys. Lett.29), 489 (1995)., or between the two edge channels of a Hall bar, and between one-dimensional Luttinger Liquids.

  10. Cotunneling Drag Effect in Coulomb-Coupled Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Keller, A J; Lim, J S; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Amasha, S; Katine, J A; Shtrikman, Hadas; Goldhaber-Gordon, D

    2016-08-01

    In Coulomb drag, a current flowing in one conductor can induce a voltage across an adjacent conductor via the Coulomb interaction. The mechanisms yielding drag effects are not always understood, even though drag effects are sufficiently general to be seen in many low-dimensional systems. In this Letter, we observe Coulomb drag in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot and, through both experimental and theoretical arguments, identify cotunneling as essential to obtaining a correct qualitative understanding of the drag behavior. PMID:27541473

  11. Correlated Coulomb Drag in Capacitively Coupled Quantum-Dot Structures.

    PubMed

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2016-05-13

    We study theoretically Coulomb drag in capacitively coupled quantum dots (CQDs)-a bias-driven dot coupled to an unbiased dot where transport is due to Coulomb mediated energy transfer drag. To this end, we introduce a master-equation approach that accounts for higher-order tunneling (cotunneling) processes as well as energy-dependent lead couplings, and identify a mesoscopic Coulomb drag mechanism driven by nonlocal multielectron cotunneling processes. Our theory establishes the conditions for a nonzero drag as well as the direction of the drag current in terms of microscopic system parameters. Interestingly, the direction of the drag current is not determined by the drive current, but by an interplay between the energy-dependent lead couplings. Studying the drag mechanism in a graphene-based CQD heterostructure, we show that the predictions of our theory are consistent with recent experiments on Coulomb drag in CQD systems. PMID:27232031

  12. Correlated Coulomb Drag in Capacitively Coupled Quantum-Dot Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2016-05-01

    We study theoretically Coulomb drag in capacitively coupled quantum dots (CQDs)—a bias-driven dot coupled to an unbiased dot where transport is due to Coulomb mediated energy transfer drag. To this end, we introduce a master-equation approach that accounts for higher-order tunneling (cotunneling) processes as well as energy-dependent lead couplings, and identify a mesoscopic Coulomb drag mechanism driven by nonlocal multielectron cotunneling processes. Our theory establishes the conditions for a nonzero drag as well as the direction of the drag current in terms of microscopic system parameters. Interestingly, the direction of the drag current is not determined by the drive current, but by an interplay between the energy-dependent lead couplings. Studying the drag mechanism in a graphene-based CQD heterostructure, we show that the predictions of our theory are consistent with recent experiments on Coulomb drag in CQD systems.

  13. Hydrodynamic Coulomb drag of strongly correlated electron liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolov, S. S.; Levchenko, A.; Andreev, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    We develop a theory of Coulomb drag in ultraclean double layers with strongly correlated carriers. In the regime where the equilibration length of the electron liquid is shorter than the interlayer spacing the main contribution to the Coulomb drag arises from hydrodynamic density fluctuations. The latter consist of plasmons driven by fluctuating longitudinal stresses, and diffusive modes caused by temperature fluctuations and thermal expansion of the electron liquid. We express the drag resistivity in terms of the kinetic coefficients of the electron fluid. Our results are nonperturbative in interaction strength and do not assume Fermi-liquid behavior of the electron liquid.

  14. Coulomb drag between one-dimensional electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Mustafa

    We have measured Coulomb drag (CD) between two spatially separated and electrically isolated one-dimensional (1D) wires to study the Luttinger liquid (LL) state in 1D systems. We have fabricated dual-wire CD devices with long quantum wires (≥ 1 microm) and short quantum wires (≤ 500 nm) with respect to the thermal lengths. The devices are made from high-mobility (≅10 6cm2/Vs) two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures, using high-resolution e-beam lithography, combined with metal deposition by e-beam evaporation to form surface Schottky gates. Peak in drag voltage occurs when the subband bottoms of the lowest energy subbands of the drive and the drag wires line up with each other and the Fermi level. We have observed drag on 1 microm device at 22 mK temperature which is found to be reminiscent of the drag observed earlier on a 2 microm device. An extensive reanalysis of the drag results obtained on the 2 microm device indicates a power-law temperature dependence of drag for both identical and non-identical wires. Also drag is found to decay exponentially with the mismatch between the wires. These properties indicate the existence of Luttinger liquid (LL) state in the long wire device. We have observed positive and negative drags on short wire devices. The observed temperature dependence of drag resistance, for both positive and negative drags, shows first an increase, followed by a constant plateau and finally a decrease as the temperature is increased. This is in line with the predictions of the Fermi--Luttinger liquid (FLL) forward momentum transfer theory. This is the first experimental observation of 1D Coulomb drag due to forward momentum transfer between wires. A negative drag between same type of carriers (holes or electrons) may conceivably result from forward momentum transfer or forward scattering if the band curvature of the drag wire at or near the Fermi point is negative. Negative band curvature may result from asymmetry

  15. Coulomb drag between one-dimensional electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Mustafa

    We have measured Coulomb drag (CD) between two spatially separated and electrically isolated one-dimensional (1D) wires to study the Luttinger liquid (LL) state in 1D systems. We have fabricated dual-wire CD devices with long quantum wires (≥ 1 mum) and short quantum wires (≤ 500 nm) with respect to the thermal lengths. The devices are made from high-mobility (≅106cm2/Vs) two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures, using high-resolution e-beam lithography, combined with metal deposition by e-beam evaporation to form surface Schottky gates. Peak in drag voltage occurs when the subband bottoms of the lowest energy subbands of the drive and the drag wires line up with each other and the Fermi level. We have observed drag on 1 mum device at 22 mK temperature which is found to be reminiscent of the drag observed earlier on a 2 mum device. An extensive reanalysis of the drag results obtained on the 2 mum device indicates a power-law temperature dependence of drag for both identical and non-identical wires. Also drag is found to decay exponentially with the mismatch between the wires. These properties indicate the existence of Luttinger liquid (LL) state in the long wire device. We have observed positive and negative drags on short wire devices. The observed temperature dependence of drag resistance, for both positive and negative drags, shows first an increase, followed by a constant plateau and finally a decrease as the temperature is increased. This is in line with the predictions of the Fermi-Luttinger liquid (FLL) forward momentum transfer theory. This is the first experimental observation of 1D Coulomb drag due to forward momentum transfer between wires. A negative drag between same type of carriers (holes or electrons) may conceivably result from forward momentum transfer or forward scattering if the band curvature of the drag wire at or near the Fermi point is negative. Negative band curvature may result from asymmetry in the wire

  16. ``Perfect'' Coulomb Drag in a Bilayer Quantum Hall System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, D.; Finck, A. D. K.; Eisenstein, J. P.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2012-02-01

    We report Coulomb drag measurements in Corbino geometry which reveal that equal but oppositely directed electrical currents can freely propagate across the insulating bulk of the bilayer quantized Hall state at νT=1 even when the two 2D layers are electrically isolated and interlayer tunneling has been heavily suppressed by an in-plane magnetic field. This effect, which we dub ``perfect'' Coulomb drag, reflects the transport of charge neutral excitons across the bulk of the 2D system. The equal magnitude of the drive and drag currents is lost at high current and when either the temperature or effective separation between the two 2D layers is increased. In each of these cases, ordinary quasiparticle charge transport across the annulus has grown to dominate over exciton transport.

  17. Exciton Transport and Perfect Coulomb Drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Debaleena

    2013-03-01

    Exciton condensation is realized in closely-spaced bilayer quantum Hall systems at νT = 1 when the total density in the two 2D electron layers matches the Landau level degeneracy. In this state, electrons in one layer become tightly bound to holes in the other layer, forming a condensate similar to the Cooper pairs in a superconductor. Being charge neutral, these excitons ought to be free to move throughout the bulk of the quantum Hall fluid. One therefore expects that electron current driven in one layer would spontaneously generate a ``hole'' current in the other layer, even in the otherwise insulating bulk of the 2D system. We demonstrate precisely this effect, using a Corbino geometry to defeat edge state transport. Our sample contains two essentially identical two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) in GaAs quantum wells separated by a thin AlGaAs barrier. It is patterned into an annulus with arms protruding from each rim that provide contact to each 2DES separately. A current drag geometry is realized by applying a drive voltage between the outer and inner rim on one 2DES layer while the two rims on the opposite layer are connected together in a closed loop. There is no direct electrical connection between the two layers. At νT = 1 the bulk of the Corbino annulus becomes insulating owing to the quantum Hall gap and net charge transport across the bulk is suppressed. Nevertheless, we find that in the drag geometry appreciable currents do flow in each layer. These currents are almost exactly equal magnitude but, crucially, flow in opposite directions. This phenomenon reflects exciton transport within the νT = 1 condensate, rather than its quasiparticle excitations. We find that quasiparticle transport competes with exciton transport at elevated temperatures, drive levels, and layer separations. This work represents a collaboration with A.D.K. Finck, J.P. Eisenstein, L.N. Pfeiffer and K.W. West. This work is supported by the NSF under grant DMR-1003080.

  18. Ion wake effects on the Coulomb ion drag in complex dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Dae-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2010-09-06

    The ion wake effects on the Coulomb drag force are investigated in complex dusty plasmas. It is shown that the ion wake effects significantly enhance the Coulomb ion drag force. It is also found that the ion wake effects on the Coulomb drag force increase with an increase in the Debye length. In addition, the ion wake effects on the momentum transfer cross section and Coulomb drag force are found to be increased with increasing thermal Mach number, i.e., decreasing plasma temperature. It is also found that the Coulomb ion drag force would be stronger for smaller dust grains.

  19. CubeSat Measurement and Demonstration of Coulomb Drag Effect for Deorbiting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-08-01

    Deorbiting satellites by passive or active electrodynamic tether Lorentz force effect is well known. Probably less well known is that a charged conducting tether also interacts with the streaming ionospheric plasma by electrostatic Coulomb drag. Especially for the case of small satellites deorbited by thin tethers, the Coulomb drag effect can be larger than the Lorentz force effect. When a tether is optimised for Coulomb drag, the goal is only to keep it charged. The fact that the charged tether gathers current is then a side effect which can be minimised by using negative voltage and by making the tether very thin. Using negative voltage in most cases implies that one can use the satellite's conducting surface as the other electrode so that no electron or ion emitter is needed on the spacecraft for closing the circuit. Thinness of the tether is a large benefit not only from the mass saving and power consumption minimisation points of view, but also because a sufficiently thin tether (made e.g. four 25-50 micrometre thin aluminium wires) poses nearly no threat to other space assets in the even of an unwanted collision. ESTCube-1 is an Estonian 1U CubeSat which is scheduled for Vega launch in May 2013 to 680 km polar orbit. The payload of ESTCube-1 is a 10 m long Heytether made of 25-50 aluminium wires which can be charged to plus orminus 500 V by onboard voltage sources and electron gun. The mission of ESTCube-1 is to demonstrate deployment of very thin multiline (and thus micrometeoroid tolerant) tether and to measure the Coulomb drag effect on the charged tether by ionospheric plasma ram flow. The Coulomb drag has not been measured before and besides useful for deorbiting the effect can also be used to propel interplanetary spacecraft by the fast moving solar wind plasma stream. The measurement of the micronewton scale force is carried out by turning the voltage on and off in a synchronous way with the satellite's rotation and by measuring the cumulative change

  20. Spin Drag in Noncondensed Bose Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Duine, R. A.; Stoof, H. T. C.

    2009-10-23

    We show how time-dependent magnetic fields lead to spin motive forces and spin drag in a spinor Bose gas. We propose to observe these effects in a toroidal trap and analyze this particular proposal in some detail. In the linear-response regime we define a transport coefficient that is analogous to the usual drag resistivity in electron bilayer systems. Because of Bose enhancement of atom-atom scattering, this coefficient strongly increases as temperature is lowered. We also investigate the effects of heating.

  1. Coulomb drag and tunneling studies in quantum Hall bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Debaleena

    The bilayer quantum Hall state at total filling factor νT=1, where the total electron density matches the degeneracy of the lowest Landau level, is a prominent example of Bose-Einstein condensation of excitons. A macroscopically ordered state is realized where an electron in one layer is tightly bound to a "hole" in the other layer. If exciton transport were the only bulk transportmechanism, a current driven in one layer would spontaneously generate a current of equal magnitude and opposite sign in the other layer. The Corbino Coulomb drag measurements presented in this thesis demonstrate precisely this phenomenon. Excitonic superfluidity has been long sought in the νT=1 state. The tunneling between the two electron gas layers exihibit a dc Josephson-like effect. A simple model of an over-damped voltage biased Josephson junction is in reasonable agreement with the observed tunneling I -- V. At small tunneling biases, it exhibits a tunneling "supercurrent". The dissipation is carefully studied in this tunneling "supercurrent" and found to remain small but finite.

  2. Coulomb blockade of spin-dependent shuttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Kadigrobov, Anatoli M.; Shekhter, Robert I.; Jonson, M.

    2013-12-01

    We show that nanomechanical shuttling of single electrons may enable qualitatively new functionality if spin-polarized electrons are injected into a nanoelectromechanical single-electron tunneling (NEM-SET) device. This is due to the combined effects of spin-dependent electron tunneling and Coulomb blockade of tunneling, which are phenomena that occur in certain magnetic NEM-SET devices. Two effects are predicted to occur in such structures. The first is a reentrant shuttle instability, by which we mean the sequential appearance, disappearance and again the appearance of a shuttle instability as the driving voltage is increased (or the mechanical dissipation is diminished). The second effect is an enhanced spin polarization of the nanomechanically assisted current flow.

  3. 1D Coulomb drag between coupled nanowires formed at oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yuhe; Tomczyk, Michelle; Huang, Mengchen; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    ``Coulomb drag'' is a transport phenomenon where Coulomb interaction between two close but electrically isolated conductors induces voltage in one conductor when an electric current is injected in the other conductor. It is a powerful approach to probe electronic correlations. Here we examine 1D electronic correlations in a proximally coupled nanowire system where two parallel nanowires are created with conductive atomic force microscopy at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. Coulomb drag measurements are made by injecting current into one wire (drive wire) and measuring the induced voltage in the other wire (drag wire). This geometry offers experimental insights into the interplay of electron pairing and superconductivity in reduced dimensions. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from DOE DE-SC0014417 (JL).

  4. Ultranarrow resonance in Coulomb drag between quantum wires at coinciding densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. P.; Gornyi, I. V.; Polyakov, D. G.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of the chemical potential mismatch Δ (different electron densities) on Coulomb drag between two parallel ballistic quantum wires. For pair collisions, the drag resistivity ρD(Δ ) shows a peculiar anomaly at Δ =0 with ρD being finite at Δ =0 and vanishing at any nonzero Δ . The "bodyless" resonance in ρD(Δ ) at zero Δ is only broadened by processes of multiparticle scattering. We analyze Coulomb drag for finite Δ in the presence of both two- and three-particle scattering within the kinetic equation framework, focusing on a Fokker-Planck picture of the interaction-induced diffusion in momentum space of the double-wire system. We describe the dependence of ρD on Δ for both weak and strong intrawire equilibration due to three-particle scattering.

  5. Thickness effects on the Coulomb drag rate in double quantum layer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazifehshenas, T.; Eskourchi, A.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of quantum layer thickness on Coulomb drag phenomenon in a double quantum well (DQW) system, in which the electrons momentum can transfer from one layer to another. We have applied the full random phase approximation (RPA) in dynamical dielectric matrix of this coupled two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) system in order to obtain an improved result for temperature-dependent rate of momentum transfer. We have calculated the drag rate transresistivity for various well thicknesses at low and intermediate temperatures in Fermi-scale and for different electron gas densities. It has been obtained that the Coulomb drag rate increases with increasing the well width when the separation between the wells remains unchanged.

  6. Spin-Drag Hall Effect in a Rotating Bose Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Driel, H. J. van; Duine, R. A.; Stoof, H. T. C.

    2010-10-08

    We show that in a rotating two-component Bose mixture, the spin drag between the two different spin species shows a Hall effect. This spin-drag Hall effect can be observed experimentally by studying the out-of-phase dipole mode of the mixture. We determine the damping of this mode due to spin drag as a function of temperature. We find that due to Bose stimulation there is a strong enhancement of the damping for temperatures close to the critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation.

  7. Coulomb drag in anisotropic systems: a theoretical study on a double-layer phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saberi-Pouya, S.; Vazifehshenas, T.; Farmanbar, M.; Salavati-fard, T.

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the Coulomb drag resistivity in a double-layer electron system with highly anisotropic parabolic band structure using Boltzmann transport theory. As an example, we consider a double-layer phosphorene on which we apply our formalism. This approach, in principle, can be tuned for other double-layered systems with paraboloidal band structures. Our calculations show the rotation of one layer with respect to another layer can be considered a way of controlling the drag resistivity in such systems. As a result of rotation, the off-diagonal elements of the drag resistivity tensor have non-zero values at any temperature. In addition, we show that the anisotropic drag resistivity is very sensitive to the direction of momentum transfer between two layers due to highly anisotropic inter-layer electron–electron interaction and also the plasmon modes. In particular, the drag anisotropy ratio, {ρyy}/{ρxx} , can reach up to ∼ 3 by changing the temperature. Furthermore, our calculations suggest that including the local field correction in the dielectric function changes the results significantly. Finally, We examine the dependence of drag resistivity and its anisotropy ratio on various parameters like inter-layer separation, electron density, short-range interaction and insulating substrate/spacer.

  8. Coulomb drag in anisotropic systems: a theoretical study on a double-layer phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Saberi-Pouya, S; Vazifehshenas, T; Farmanbar, M; Salavati-Fard, T

    2016-07-20

    We theoretically study the Coulomb drag resistivity in a double-layer electron system with highly anisotropic parabolic band structure using Boltzmann transport theory. As an example, we consider a double-layer phosphorene on which we apply our formalism. This approach, in principle, can be tuned for other double-layered systems with paraboloidal band structures. Our calculations show the rotation of one layer with respect to another layer can be considered a way of controlling the drag resistivity in such systems. As a result of rotation, the off-diagonal elements of the drag resistivity tensor have non-zero values at any temperature. In addition, we show that the anisotropic drag resistivity is very sensitive to the direction of momentum transfer between two layers due to highly anisotropic inter-layer electron-electron interaction and also the plasmon modes. In particular, the drag anisotropy ratio, [Formula: see text], can reach up to [Formula: see text]3 by changing the temperature. Furthermore, our calculations suggest that including the local field correction in the dielectric function changes the results significantly. Finally, We examine the dependence of drag resistivity and its anisotropy ratio on various parameters like inter-layer separation, electron density, short-range interaction and insulating substrate/spacer. PMID:27221580

  9. Anomalous Coulomb Drag in Electron-Hole Bilayers due to the Formation of Excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimkin, Dmitry K.; Galitski, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Several recent experiments have reported an anomalous temperature dependence of the Coulomb drag effect in electron-hole bilayers. Motivated by these puzzling data, we study theoretically a low-density electron-hole bilayer, where electrons and holes avoid quantum degeneracy by forming excitons. We describe the ionization-recombination crossover between the electron-hole plasma and exciton gas and calculate both the intralayer and drag resistivity as a function of temperature. The latter exhibits a minimum followed by a sharp upturn at low temperatures, in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations [see, e.g., J. A. Seamons et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 026804 (2009)]. Importantly, the drag resistivity in the proposed scenario is found to be rather insensitive to a mismatch in electron and hole concentrations, in sharp contrast to the scenario of electron-hole Cooper pairing.

  10. Interplay of Coulomb interaction and spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünemann, Jörg; Linneweber, Thorben; Löw, Ute; Anders, Frithjof B.; Gebhard, Florian

    2016-07-01

    We employ the Gutzwiller variational approach to investigate the interplay of Coulomb interaction and spin-orbit coupling in a three-orbital Hubbard model. Already in the paramagnetic phase we find a substantial renormalization of the spin-orbit coupling that enters the effective single-particle Hamiltonian for the quasiparticles. Only close to half band-filling and for sizable Coulomb interaction do we observe clear signatures of Hund's atomic rules for spin, orbital, and total angular momentum. For a finite local Hund's rule exchange interaction we find a ferromagnetically ordered state. The spin-orbit coupling considerably reduces the size of the ordered moment, it generates a small ordered orbital moment, and it induces a magnetic anisotropy. To investigate the magnetic anisotropy energy, we use an external magnetic field that tilts the magnetic moment away from the easy axis (1 ,1 ,1 ) .

  11. 1D-1D Coulomb drag in a 6 Million Mobility Bi-layer Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilodeau, Simon; Laroche, Dominique; Xia, Jian-Sheng; Lilly, Mike; Reno, John; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Gervais, Guillaume

    We report Coulomb drag measurements in vertically-coupled quantum wires. The wires are fabricated in GaAs/AlGaAs bilayer heterostructures grown from two different MBE chambers: one at Sandia National Laboratories (1.2M mobility), and the other at Princeton University (6M mobility). The previously observed positive and negative drag signals are seen in both types of devices, demonstrating the robustness of the result. However, attempts to determine the temperature dependence of the drag signal in the 1D regime proved challenging in the higher mobility heterostructure (Princeton), in part because of difficulties in aligning the wires within the same transverse subband configuration. Nevertheless, this work, performed at the Microkelvin laboratory of the University of Florida, is an important proof-of-concept for future investigations of the temperature dependence of the 1D-1D drag signal down to a few mK. Such an experiment could confirm the Luttinger charge density wave interlocking predicted to occur in the wires. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  12. Coulomb drag upturn in an undoped electron-hole bilayer in perpendicular and parallel magnetic fields.

    SciTech Connect

    Seamons, John Andrew; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Morath, Christian Paul; Reno, John Louis

    2010-03-01

    A low-temperature upturn of the Coulomb drag resistivity {rho}{sub D} measured in undoped electron-hole bilayer devices, possibly manifesting from formation of a superfluid condensate or density modulated state, was recently observed. Here the effects of perpendicular and parallel magnetic fields on the drag upturn are examined. Measurements of {rho}{sub D} and drive layer resistivity {rho}{sub xx-e} as a function of temperature and magnetic field in two uEHBL devices are presented. In B{sub {perpendicular}}, the drag upturn was enhanced as the field increased up to roughly .2 T, beyond which oscillations in {rho}{sub D} and {rho}{sub xx-e}, reflecting Landau level formation, begin appearing. A small phase offset between those oscillations, which decreased at higher fields and temperatures, was also observed. In B{sub {parallel}}, the drag upturn magnitude diminished as the field increased. Above the upturn regime, both {rho}{sub D} and {rho}{sub xx-e} were enhanced by B{sub {parallel}}, the latter via decreased screening of the uniform background impurities.

  13. Low temperature transport and Coulomb drag studies of undoped electron-hole bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morath, Christian Paul

    This dissertation describes a series of three experiments focused on low electronic temperature transport and Coulomb drag in GaAs electron-hole bilayers. Electron-hole bilayers are of immense interest for exciton condensation studies since the exciton, predicted to form here, has a comparably light mass. This should lead to condensation at temperatures relatively easily obtained in a 3He-fridge, while the bilayer's device geometry allows for unambiguous detection of condensation effects via Coulomb drag measurements. General transport measurements of each layer are also of interest since an additional source of correlation, via the attractive Coulomb interaction from the nearby layer, is present. These interlayer effects are expected to become more visible as the layer separation is reduced and depend on the densities, relative and total, in each well, as well as the application of an external perpendicular or parallel magnetic field. Exploring these questions, measuring and discussing the results of experiments which probe them, was the main point of this dissertation. The first experiment examined the layer interdependence of transport in an undoped electron-hole bilayer (uEHBL) device with a relatively large 30 nm Al0.9Ga0.1As barrier between the two quantum wells. The results here were consistent with mobility of each layer being only indirectly dependent on the adjacent layer density and dominated by background impurity scattering. A decreasing interlayer separation, estimated via Coulomb drag measurements, was also observed with increased interlayer electric-field. The other two experiments were centered on the possibility of detecting electron-hole pairing and condensation in the bilayer using Coulomb drag measurements. Hints of condensation were observed in previous bilayer drag experiments and the follow-on experiments, described in this dissertation, sought to further elucidate the nature of these initial effects. The main result previously determined

  14. Anomalous low-temperature Coulomb drag in graphene-GaAs heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Gamucci, A; Spirito, D; Carrega, M; Karmakar, B; Lombardo, A; Bruna, M; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Ferrari, A C; Polini, M; Pellegrini, V

    2014-01-01

    Vertical heterostructures combining different layered materials offer novel opportunities for applications and fundamental studies. Here we report a new class of heterostructures comprising a single-layer (or bilayer) graphene in close proximity to a quantum well created in GaAs and supporting a high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas. In our devices, graphene is naturally hole-doped, thereby allowing for the investigation of electron-hole interactions. We focus on the Coulomb drag transport measurements, which are sensitive to many-body effects, and find that the Coulomb drag resistivity significantly increases for temperatures <5-10 K. The low-temperature data follow a logarithmic law, therefore displaying a notable departure from the ordinary quadratic temperature dependence expected in a weakly correlated Fermi-liquid. This anomalous behaviour is consistent with the onset of strong interlayer correlations. Our heterostructures represent a new platform for the creation of coherent circuits and topologically protected quantum bits. PMID:25524426

  15. Trapping - A control phenomenon of spinning drag-free satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.

    1971-01-01

    A drag-free satellite contains a proof mass in an internal cavity and is controlled in translation so that it never touches the proof mass. The satellite shields the proof mass from external forces thus allowing the proof mass to follow a drag-free orbit. Spinning the satellite is desirable because it attenuates the effect of proof mass disturbing forces and simplifies the attitude control. The design of a translation controller for a spinning drag-free satellite typically includes a deadspace to eliminate chatter. This design feature and the inability to locate precisely the mass center give rise to a phenomenon called trapping that potentially could waste significant amounts of propellant. A theory is developed and experimentally verified that explains the role of these factors and provides insight into the effect of other control parameters.

  16. Topological spin-transfer drag driven by skyrmion diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Héctor; Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-07-01

    We study the spin-transfer drag mediated by the Brownian motion of skyrmions. The essential idea is illustrated in a two-terminal geometry, in which a thin film of a magnetic insulator is placed in between two metallic reservoirs. An electric current in one of the terminals pumps topological charge into the magnet via a spin-transfer torque. The charge diffuses over the bulk of the system as stable skyrmion textures. By Onsager's reciprocity, the topological charge leaving the magnet produces an electromotive force in the second terminal. The voltage signal decays algebraically with the separation between contacts, in contrast to the exponential suppression of the spin drag driven by nonprotected excitations like magnons. We show how this topological effect can be used as a tool to characterize the phase diagram of chiral magnets and thin films with interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions.

  17. Gigantic enhancement of spin Seebeck effect by phonon drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Hiroto; Uchida, Ken-Ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Ohe, Jun-Ichiro; Takahashi, Saburo; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2011-03-01

    We investigate both theoretically and experimentally a gigantic enhancement of the spin Seebeck effect [K. Uchida et al., Nature 455, 778 (2008); C. M. Jaworski et al., Nature Mater. 9, 898 (2010); K. Uchida et al., Nature Mater. 9, 894 (2010)] in a prototypical magnet La Y2 Fe 5 O12 at low temperatures. Our theoretical analysis sheds light on the important role of phonons; the spin Seebeck effect is enormously enhanced by nonequilibrium phonons that drag the low-lying spin excitations. We further argue that this scenario gives a clue to understand the observation of the spin Seebeck effect that is unaccompanied by a global spin current, and predict that the substrate condition affects the observed signal.

  18. Spin Drag in an Ultracold Fermi Gas on the Verge of Ferromagnetic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Duine, R. A.; Stoof, H. T. C.; Polini, Marco; Vignale, G.

    2010-06-04

    Recent experiments [Jo et al., Science 325, 1521 (2009)] have presented evidence of ferromagnetic correlations in a two-component ultracold Fermi gas with strong repulsive interactions. Motivated by these experiments we consider spin drag, i.e., frictional drag due to scattering of particles with opposite spin, in such systems. We show that when the ferromagnetic state is approached from the normal side, the spin drag relaxation rate is strongly enhanced near the critical point. We also determine the temperature dependence of the spin diffusion constant. In a trapped gas the spin drag relaxation rate determines the damping of the spin dipole mode, which therefore provides a precursor signal of the ferromagnetic phase transition that may be used to experimentally determine the proximity to the ferromagnetic phase.

  19. Two dimensional graphene nanogenerator by coulomb dragging: Moving van der Waals heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Huikai; Li, Xiaoqiang; Wu, Zhiqian; Zhang, Shengjiao; Xu, Zhijuan; Chen, Hongsheng; Lin, Shisheng

    2015-06-15

    Harvesting energy from environment is the current focus of scientific community. Here, we demonstrate a graphene nanogenerator, which is based on moving van der Waals heterostructure formed between graphene and two dimensional (2D) graphene oxide (GO). This nanogenerator can convert mechanical energy into electricity with a voltage output of around 10 mV. Systematic experiments reveal the generated electricity originates from the coulomb interaction induced momentum transfer between 2D GO and holes in graphene. 2D boron nitride was also demonstrated to be effective in the framework of moving van der Waals heterostructure nanogenerator. This investigation of nanogenerator based on the interaction between 2D macromolecule materials will be important to understand the origin of the flow-induced potential in nanomaterials and may have great potential in practical applications.

  20. Spin blockade and exchange in Coulomb-confined silicon double quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Weber, Bent; Tan, Y H Matthias; Mahapatra, Suddhasatta; Watson, Thomas F; Ryu, Hoon; Rahman, Rajib; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y

    2014-06-01

    Electron spins confined to phosphorus donors in silicon are promising candidates as qubits because of their long coherence times, exceeding seconds in isotopically purified bulk silicon. With the recent demonstrations of initialization, readout and coherent manipulation of individual donor electron spins, the next challenge towards the realization of a Si:P donor-based quantum computer is the demonstration of exchange coupling in two tunnel-coupled phosphorus donors. Spin-to-charge conversion via Pauli spin blockade, an essential ingredient for reading out individual spin states, is challenging in donor-based systems due to the inherently large donor charging energies (∼45 meV), requiring large electric fields (>1 MV m(-1)) to transfer both electron spins onto the same donor. Here, in a carefully characterized double donor-dot device, we directly observe spin blockade of the first few electrons and measure the effective exchange interaction between electron spins in coupled Coulomb-confined systems. PMID:24727686

  1. Interdot Coulomb correlation effects and spin-orbit coupling in two carbon nanotube quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhen-Hua; Kuang, Xiao-Yu Zhong, Ming-Min; Shao, Peng; Li, Hui

    2014-01-28

    Transport properties of the two-level Kondo effect involving spin, orbital, and pseudospin degrees of freedom are examined in a parallel carbon nanotube double quantum dot with a sufficient interdot Coulomb interaction and small interdot tunneling. The interdot Coulomb correlation effects are taken into account, and it plays an important role in forming bonding and antibonding states. Attached to ferromagnetic leads, the Kondo effect is observed at the interdot Coulomb blockade region with degeneracy of spin, orbital, and pseudospin degrees of freedom. A crossover from a two-level Kondo state involving the fivefold degeneracy of the double quantum dots to an SU(4) spin-orbit Kondo state and to an SU(2) spin-Kondo effect is demonstrated. At finite magnetic field, the splitting of the spin, orbital, and pseudospin Kondo resonance can be restored. For finite intradot Coulomb interaction U, there is a competition between the single-dot Kondo effect and the antiferromagnetic exchange coupling J{sub AFM}, resulting in the suppression of the Kondo resonance. Moreover, both the J{sub AFM} and the Zeeman interactions compete, leading to need a much higher value of the magnetic field to compensate for the Kondo splitting.

  2. Coulomb energy averaged over the nl{sup N}-atomic states with a definite spin

    SciTech Connect

    Kibler, M.; Smirnov, Yu. F.

    1995-03-05

    A purely group-theoretical approach (for which the symmetric group plays a central role), based upon the use of properties of fractional-parentage coefficients and isoscalar factors, is developed for the derivation of the Coulomb energy averaged over the states, with a definite spin, arising from an atomic configuration nl{sup N}. 15 refs.

  3. Noncollinear drag force in Bose-Einstein condensates with Weyl spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Renyuan; Fialko, Oleksandr; Brand, Joachim; Zülicke, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    We consider the motion of a pointlike impurity through a three-dimensional two-component Bose-Einstein condensate subject to Weyl spin-orbit coupling. Using linear-response theory, we calculate the drag force felt by the impurity and the associated anisotropic critical velocity from the spectrum of elementary excitations. The drag force is shown to be generally not collinear with the velocity of the impurity. This unusual behavior is a consequence of condensation into a finite-momentum state due to the spin-orbit coupling.

  4. Yaw and spin effects on high intensity sound generation and on drag of training projectiles with ring cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    Projectiles containing axisymmetric ring cavities constitute aeroacoustic sources. These produce high intensity tones which are used for coding in the SAWE (Simulation of Area Weapons Effects) system. Experimental data obtained in a free jet facility are presented describing the effects of yaw, spin and geometric projectile parameters on sound pressure and drag. In general, the sound pressure decreases with increasing yaw angle whereas the drag increases. Spin tends to increase sound pressure levels because of a reduction in asymmetry of flow. Drag increases at zero yaw approximately as the 1.5 power of sound wavelength. A significant part of the drag increase appears to be due to energy loss by sound radiation.

  5. Coulomb Interaction Effects In Semiconductor Heterostructures With Spin-Orbit Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, Jeremy Patrick

    In this thesis we analyze two different situations where the interplay between the spin-orbit coupling (SOI) of the Rashba and Dresselhaus type, linear in the electron momentum, and the Coulomb interaction generates a specific macroscopic phenomenology that can be experimentally observed. In the first problem, we investigate the Friedel oscillations that can be sustained in the presence of the Coulomb repulsion in a two-dimensional lateral superlattice with SOI and analyze the dependence on several system parameters. Then, we are concerned with the properties of a single quantum well in the special regime where the coupling strengths of the Rashba and Dresselhaus interactions are equal. Starting from general total-energy considerations, we demonstrate that the SU(2) spin-rotation symmetry and the resulting persistent helical state (PHS) predicted to occur are not in fact realized; the actual spin order being that of an itinerant antiferromagnet (IAF). We obtain numerical results that describe the temperature evolution of the order parameter in the IAF state and determine the critical temperature of the transition to the paramagnetic order. Transport in this state is modeled by using the solutions of a Boltzmann equation obtained within the relaxation time approximation. Numerical estimates performed for realistic GaAs and InAs samples indicate that at low temperatures, the amplitude of the spin-Seebeck coefficient can be increased by scattering on magnetic impurities.

  6. Random Coulomb antiferromagnets: From diluted spin liquids to Euclidean random matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehn, J.; Sen, Arnab; Andreanov, A.; Damle, Kedar; Moessner, R.; Scardicchio, A.

    2015-08-01

    We study a disordered classical Heisenberg magnet with uniformly antiferromagnetic interactions which are frustrated on account of their long-range Coulomb form, i.e., J (r )˜-A lnr in d =2 and J (r )˜A /r in d =3 . This arises naturally as the T →0 limit of the emergent interactions between vacancy-induced degrees of freedom in a class of diluted Coulomb spin liquids (including the classical Heisenberg antiferromagnets in checkerboard, SCGO, and pyrochlore lattices) and presents a novel variant of a disordered long-range spin Hamiltonian. Using detailed analytical and numerical studies we establish that this model exhibits a very broad paramagnetic regime that extends to very large values of A in both d =2 and d =3 . In d =2 , using the lattice-Green-function-based finite-size regularization of the Coulomb potential (which corresponds naturally to the underlying low-temperature limit of the emergent interactions between orphans), we find evidence that freezing into a glassy state occurs only in the limit of strong coupling, A =∞ , while no such transition seems to exist in d =3 . We also demonstrate the presence and importance of screening for such a magnet. We analyze the spectrum of the Euclidean random matrices describing a Gaussian version of this problem and identify a corresponding quantum mechanical scattering problem.

  7. Experimental signature of the attractive Coulomb force between positive and negative magnetic monopoles in spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, C.; Giblin, S. R.; Lhotel, E.; Prabhakaran, D.; Balakrishnan, G.; Matsuhira, K.; Bramwell, S. T.

    2016-07-01

    A non-Ohmic current that grows exponentially with the square root of applied electric field is well known from thermionic field emission (the Schottky effect), electrolytes (the second Wien effect) and semiconductors (the Poole-Frenkel effect). It is a universal signature of the attractive Coulomb force between positive and negative electrical charges, which is revealed as the charges are driven in opposite directions by the force of an applied electric field. Here we apply thermal quenches to spin ice to prepare metastable populations of bound pairs of positive and negative emergent magnetic monopoles at millikelvin temperatures. We find that the application of a magnetic field results in a universal exponential-root field growth of magnetic current, thus confirming the microscopic Coulomb force between the magnetic monopole quasiparticles and establishing a magnetic analogue of the Poole-Frenkel effect. At temperatures above 300 mK, gradual restoration of kinetic monopole equilibria causes the non-Ohmic current to smoothly evolve into the high-field Wien effect for magnetic monopoles, as confirmed by comparison to a recent and rigorous theory of the Wien effect in spin ice. Our results extend the universality of the exponential-root field form into magnetism and illustrate the power of emergent particle kinetics to describe far-from-equilibrium response in complex systems.

  8. Fermi Surface of Sr_{2}RuO_{4}: Spin-Orbit and Anisotropic Coulomb Interaction Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoren; Gorelov, Evgeny; Sarvestani, Esmaeel; Pavarini, Eva

    2016-03-11

    The topology of the Fermi surface of Sr_{2}RuO_{4} is well described by local-density approximation calculations with spin-orbit interaction, but the relative size of its different sheets is not. By accounting for many-body effects via dynamical mean-field theory, we show that the standard isotropic Coulomb interaction alone worsens or does not correct this discrepancy. In order to reproduce experiments, it is essential to account for the Coulomb anisotropy. The latter is small but has strong effects; it competes with the Coulomb-enhanced spin-orbit coupling and the isotropic Coulomb term in determining the Fermi surface shape. Its effects are likely sizable in other correlated multiorbital systems. In addition, we find that the low-energy self-energy matrix-responsible for the reshaping of the Fermi surface-sizably differs from the static Hartree-Fock limit. Finally, we find a strong spin-orbital entanglement; this supports the view that the conventional description of Cooper pairs via factorized spin and orbital part might not apply to Sr_{2}RuO_{4}. PMID:27015496

  9. Charge and spin order in one dimensional systems with long range Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen Valenzuela, M.; Fratini, Simone; Baeriswyl, Dionys

    2004-03-01

    In this talk I present our results of studying a system of electrons on a one-dimensional lattice, interacting through long range Coulomb forces, by means of a variational technique which is the strong coupling analog of the Gutzwiller approach. For quarter filling we find that the effects of commensurability together with the strength of the interaction give rise to charge ordering as the ground state. When we add the spin degrees of freedom it is found that they are coupled by an antiferromagnetic kinetic exchange J, which turn out to be much smaller than the energy scale governing the charge degrees of freedom. Our results shed new light on the insulating phases of organic quasi-1D compounds where charge ordering sets in at high temperatures and coexists with spin ordering at low temperatures. We also present a phase diagram of interaction versus fillings where we identify three phases: weak charge density waves, Wigner crystal and Generalized Wigner crystal (solution of the Wigner crystal problem with the additional constraint for the electrons of living in the host lattice of the ions). Refs: B. Valenzuela et al. Phys. Rev. B, 68 (2003) 045112, S. Fratini et al. Contribution to the Michael J. Rice Special Issue of "Synthetic Metals" 2003, (cond-mat/0309450).

  10. Electronic structure of FeCr2S4 : Evidence of Coulomb enhanced spin-orbit splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Soumyajit; de Raychaudhury, Molly; Dasgupta, I.; Saha-Dasgupta, T.

    2009-11-01

    The electronic structure of the spinel compound, FeCr2S4 , is studied using density-functional-theory-based calculations. Our calculations provide a microscopic understanding of the origin of the insulating behavior of this compound, which turn out to be driven by Coulomb enhanced spin-orbit coupling operative within the Fe-d manifold. We also investigate the possible role of the structural distortions and compare the calculated optical property data with that of the experimental one.

  11. Spin-orbit interaction in bremsstrahlung and its effect on the electron motion in a strong Coulomb field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtun, Oleksiy; Tioukine, Valeri; Surzhykov, Andrey; Yerokhin, Vladimir A.; Cederwall, Bo; Tashenov, Stanislav

    2015-12-01

    Linear polarization of bremsstrahlung x rays produced in collisions of longitudinally polarized 2.1-MeV electrons with gold atoms was studied using the Compton scattering technique. We observed that the angle of x-ray polarization is strongly correlated with the incoming electron polarization. This correlation reveals the dominance of the spin-orbit interaction in bremsstrahlung and indicates a striking effect of the electron spin on the electron motion in a strong Coulomb field. The results confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions in a computationally challenging energy regime.

  12. Triangular Spin-Orbit-Coupled Lattice with Strong Coulomb Correlations: Sn Atoms on a SiC(0001) Substrate.

    PubMed

    Glass, S; Li, G; Adler, F; Aulbach, J; Fleszar, A; Thomale, R; Hanke, W; Claessen, R; Schäfer, J

    2015-06-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) atom lattices provide model setups with Coulomb correlations that induce competing ground states. Here, SiC emerges as a wide-gap substrate with reduced screening. We report the first artificial high-Z atom lattice on SiC(0001) by Sn adatoms, based on experimental realization and theoretical modeling. Density-functional theory of our triangular structure model closely reproduces the scanning tunneling microscopy. Photoemission data show a deeply gapped state (∼2  eV gap), and, based on our calculations including dynamic mean-field theory, we argue that this reflects a pronounced Mott-insulating scenario. We also find indications that the system is susceptible to antiferromagnetic superstructures. Such artificial lattices on SiC(0001) thus offer a novel platform for coexisting Coulomb correlations and spin-orbit coupling, with bearing for unusual magnetic phases and proposed topological quantum states of matter. PMID:26197013

  13. Triangular Spin-Orbit-Coupled Lattice with Strong Coulomb Correlations: Sn Atoms on a SiC(0001) Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, S.; Li, G.; Adler, F.; Aulbach, J.; Fleszar, A.; Thomale, R.; Hanke, W.; Claessen, R.; Schäfer, J.

    2015-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atom lattices provide model setups with Coulomb correlations that induce competing ground states. Here, SiC emerges as a wide-gap substrate with reduced screening. We report the first artificial high-Z atom lattice on SiC(0001) by Sn adatoms, based on experimental realization and theoretical modeling. Density-functional theory of our triangular structure model closely reproduces the scanning tunneling microscopy. Photoemission data show a deeply gapped state (˜2 eV gap), and, based on our calculations including dynamic mean-field theory, we argue that this reflects a pronounced Mott-insulating scenario. We also find indications that the system is susceptible to antiferromagnetic superstructures. Such artificial lattices on SiC(0001) thus offer a novel platform for coexisting Coulomb correlations and spin-orbit coupling, with bearing for unusual magnetic phases and proposed topological quantum states of matter.

  14. Theoretical study of Coulomb correlations and spin-orbit coupling in SrIrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Vijeta Pulikkotil, J. J.

    2015-06-24

    Given that energy scales associated with crystal field splitting, spin orbit coupling and coulomb correlations in iridates are comparable, hence leading to exotic properties, we investigate the physical properties of orthorhombic SrIrO{sub 3} using density functional theory. Our calculations, however, show that SrIrO{sub 3} is a bad metal with no long range magnetic ordering, unlike its sister compounds Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} and Sr{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Moreover, despite having large band width, it appears conclusive that the larger resistivity in SrIrO{sub 3} is due to spin orbit interactions. Besides, the effects of electron-electron correlations on its electronic structure and magnetic properties are also discussed.

  15. Analytical evaluation of first-order electrical properties based on the spin-free Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2011-06-01

    We report an analytical scheme for the calculation of first-order electrical properties using the spin-free Dirac-Coulomb (SFDC) Hamiltonian, thereby exploiting the well-developed density-matrix formulations in nonrelativistic coupled-cluster (CC) derivative theory. Orbital relaxation effects are fully accounted for by including the relaxation of the correlated orbitals with respect to orbitals of all types, viz., frozen-core, occupied, virtual, and negative energy state orbitals. To demonstrate the applicability of the presented scheme, we report benchmark calculations for first-order electrical properties of the hydrogen halides, HX with X = F, Cl, Br, I, At, and a first application to the iodo(fluoro)methanes, CHnF3 - nI, n = 0-3. The results obtained from the SFDC calculations are compared to those from nonrelativistic calculations, those obtained via leading-order direct perturbation theory as well as those from full Dirac-Coulomb calculations. It is shown that the full inclusion of spin-free (SF) relativistic effects is necessary to obtain accurate first-order electrical properties in the presence of fifth-row elements. The SFDC scheme is also recommended for applications to systems containing lighter elements because it introduces no extra cost in the rate-determining steps of a CC calculation in comparison to the nonrelativistic case. On the other hand, spin-orbit contributions are generally small for first-order electrical properties of closed-shell molecules and may be handled efficiently by means of perturbation theory.

  16. Spin Hamiltonian, order out of a Coulomb phase, and pseudocriticality in the frustrated pyrochlore Heisenberg antiferromagnet FeF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Azam; Alaei, Mojtaba; Shahbazi, Farhad; Gingras, Michel J. P.

    2015-04-01

    FeF3, with its half-filled Fe3 +3 d orbital, hence zero orbital angular momentum and S =5 /2 , is often put forward as a prototypical highly frustrated classical Heisenberg pyrochlore antiferromagnet. By employing ab initio density functional theory, we obtain an effective spin Hamiltonian for this material. This Hamiltonian contains nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic Heisenberg, biquadratic, and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions as dominant terms and we use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the nonzero temperature properties of this minimal model. We find that upon decreasing temperature, the system passes through a Coulomb phase, composed of short-range correlated coplanar states, before transforming into an "all-in/all-out" (AIAO) state via a very weakly first-order transition at a critical temperature Tc≈22 K, in good agreement with the experimental value for a reasonable set of Coulomb interaction U and Hund's coupling JH describing the material. Despite the transition being first order, the AIAO order parameter evolves below Tc with a power-law behavior characterized by a pseudo "critical exponent" β ≈0.18 in accord with experiment. We comment on the origin of this unusual β value.

  17. Spin and pseudospin symmetric Dirac particles in the field of Tietz—Hua potential including Coulomb tensor interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameer, M. Ikhdair; Majid, Hamzavi

    2013-09-01

    Approximate analytical solutions of the Dirac equation for Tietz—Hua (TH) potential including Coulomb-like tensor (CLT) potential with arbitrary spin—orbit quantum number κ are obtained within the Pekeris approximation scheme to deal with the spin—orbit coupling terms κ(κ ± 1)r-2. Under the exact spin and pseudospin symmetric limitation, bound state energy eigenvalues and associated unnormalized two-component wave functions of the Dirac particle in the field of both attractive and repulsive TH potential with tensor potential are found using the parametric Nikiforov—Uvarov (NU) method. The cases of the Morse oscillator with tensor potential, the generalized Morse oscillator with tensor potential, and the non-relativistic limits have been investigated.

  18. An Exact Separation of the Spin-Free and Spin-Dependent Terms of the Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.

    1994-01-01

    The Dirac Hamiltonian is transformed by extracting the operator (sigma x p)/2mc from the small component of the wave function and applying it to the operators of the original Hamiltonian. The resultant operators contain products of Paull matrices that can be rearranged to give spin-free and spin-dependent operators. These operators are the ones encountered in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian, as well as some of higher order in alpha(sup 2). However, since the transformation of the original Dirac Hamiltonian is exact, the new Hamiltonian can be used in variational calculations, with or without the spin-dependent terms. The new small component functions have the same symmetry properties as the large component. Use of only the spin-free terms of the new Hamiltonian permits the same factorization over spin variables as in nonrelativistic theory, and therefore all the post-Self-Consistent Field (SCF) machinery of nonrelativistic calculations can be applied. However, the single-particle functions are two-component orbitals having a large and small component, and the SCF methods must be modified accordingly. Numerical examples are presented, and comparisons are made with the spin-free second-order Douglas-Kroll transformed Hamiltonian of Hess.

  19. Dispersive measurement of electron spin states in Coulomb-confined silicon double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Matthew; Kobayashi, Takashi; Weber, Bent; Hile, Sam; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle

    2015-03-01

    We use radio frequency reflectometry with a resonant circuit to investigate a double quantum dot device patterned by the placement of phosphorus donors in silicon with scanning tunnelling microscope lithography. The circuit responds to electron tunnelling to and from the quantum dots, the complex admittance of which provides information about the tunnel coupling between the dots and the leads. With four electrons on two dots, the Pauli Exclusion Principle makes tunnelling of one electron between the two dots spin dependent, which we exploit to measure the electronic spin state. We map the ground state transition between singlet and triplet states as a function of electric and magnetic fields, which shows that the exchange energy can be tuned over an order of magnitude (about 10 to 100 μeV) or more in this device. We apply high frequency pulses to induce an excited spin state and observe that the dispersive measurement can detect the excited spin state in addition to the ground state.

  20. Spin-free Dirac-Coulomb calculations augmented with a perturbative treatment of spin-orbit effects at the Hartree-Fock level

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lan; Stopkowicz, Stella; Gauss, Jürgen

    2013-12-07

    A perturbative approach to compute second-order spin-orbit (SO) corrections to a spin-free Dirac-Coulomb Hartree-Fock (SFDC-HF) calculation is suggested. The proposed scheme treats the difference between the DC and SFDC Hamiltonian as perturbation and exploits analytic second-derivative techniques. In addition, a cost-effective scheme for incorporating relativistic effects in high-accuracy calculations is suggested consisting of a SFDC coupled-cluster treatment augmented by perturbative SO corrections obtained at the HF level. Benchmark calculations for the hydrogen halides HX, X = F-At as well as the coinage-metal fluorides CuF, AgF, and AuF demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed perturbative treatment of SO effects on energies and electrical properties in comparison with the more rigorous full DC treatment. Furthermore, we present, as an application of our scheme, results for the electrical properties of AuF and XeAuF.

  1. Nonlocal Drag of Magnons in a Ferromagnetic Bilayer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianyu; Vignale, G; Flatté, Michael E

    2016-06-10

    Quantized spin waves, or magnons, in a magnetic insulator are assumed to interact weakly with the surroundings, and to flow with little dissipation or drag, producing exceptionally long diffusion lengths and relaxation times. In analogy to Coulomb drag in bilayer two-dimensional electron gases, in which the contribution of the Coulomb interaction to the electric resistivity is studied by measuring the interlayer resistivity (transresistivity), we predict a nonlocal drag of magnons in a ferromagnetic bilayer structure based on semiclassical Boltzmann equations. Nonlocal magnon drag depends on magnetic dipolar interactions between the layers and manifests in the magnon current transresistivity and the magnon thermal transresistivity, whereby a magnon current in one layer induces a chemical potential gradient and/or a temperature gradient in the other layer. The largest drag effect occurs when the magnon current flows parallel to the magnetization; however, for oblique magnon currents a large transverse current of magnons emerges. We examine the effect for practical parameters, and find that the predicted induced temperature gradient is readily observable. PMID:27341254

  2. Nonlocal Drag of Magnons in a Ferromagnetic Bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Vignale, G.; Flatté, Michael E.

    2016-06-01

    Quantized spin waves, or magnons, in a magnetic insulator are assumed to interact weakly with the surroundings, and to flow with little dissipation or drag, producing exceptionally long diffusion lengths and relaxation times. In analogy to Coulomb drag in bilayer two-dimensional electron gases, in which the contribution of the Coulomb interaction to the electric resistivity is studied by measuring the interlayer resistivity (transresistivity), we predict a nonlocal drag of magnons in a ferromagnetic bilayer structure based on semiclassical Boltzmann equations. Nonlocal magnon drag depends on magnetic dipolar interactions between the layers and manifests in the magnon current transresistivity and the magnon thermal transresistivity, whereby a magnon current in one layer induces a chemical potential gradient and/or a temperature gradient in the other layer. The largest drag effect occurs when the magnon current flows parallel to the magnetization; however, for oblique magnon currents a large transverse current of magnons emerges. We examine the effect for practical parameters, and find that the predicted induced temperature gradient is readily observable.

  3. Giant Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Wen, Z. C.; Wei, H. X.; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2010-01-01

    We show that the Coulomb blockade voltage can be made to depend strongly on the electron spin in a thin magnetic granular layer inserted in the middle of an insulating layer of a tunnel junction. This strong spin dependence is predicted from the spin-dependent inter-granular conductance through any of the following effects within the granular layer, giant magnetoresistance (GMR), tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), or GMR through a polymer spacer. The resulting Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance (CBMR) ratio can exceed the magnetoresistance ratio of the granular layer itself by orders of magnitude. Unlike other magenetoresistance effects, the CBMR effect does not require magnetic electrodes.

  4. Confinement of Coulomb balls

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, O.; Block, D.; Klindworth, M.; Piel, A.

    2005-12-15

    A model for the confinement of the recently discovered Coulomb balls is proposed. These spherical three-dimensional plasma crystals are trapped inside a rf discharge under gravity conditions and show an unusual structural order in complex plasmas. Measurements of the thermophoretic force acting on the trapped dust particles and simulations of the plasma properties of the discharge are presented. The proposed model of confinement considers thermophoretic, ion-drag, and electric field forces, and shows excellent agreement with the observations. The findings suggest that self-confinement does not significantly contribute to the structural properties of Coulomb balls.

  5. Time-of-flight spectroscopy via spin precession: The Larmor clock and anomalous spin dephasing in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biqin; Appelbaum, Ian

    2010-12-01

    Drift-diffusion theory—which fully describes charge transport in semiconductors—is also universally used to model transport of spin-polarized electrons in the presence of longitudinal electric fields. By transforming spin transit time into spin orientation with precession (a technique called the “Larmor clock”) in current-sensing vertical-transport intrinsic Si devices, we show that spin diffusion (and concomitant spin dephasing) can be greatly enhanced with respect to charge diffusion, in direct contrast to predictions of spin Coulomb-drag diffusion suppression.

  6. Effect of spin-orbit and on-site Coulomb interactions on the electronic structure and lattice dynamics of uranium monocarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowik, U. D.; Piekarz, P.; Legut, D.; Jagło, G.

    2016-08-01

    Uranium monocarbide, a potential fuel material for the generation IV reactors, is investigated within density functional theory. Its electronic, magnetic, elastic, and phonon properties are analyzed and discussed in terms of spin-orbit interaction and localized versus itinerant behavior of the 5 f electrons. The localization of the 5 f states is tuned by varying the local Coulomb repulsion interaction parameter. We demonstrate that the theoretical electronic structure, elastic constants, phonon dispersions, and their densities of states can reproduce accurately the results of x-ray photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat measurements as well as inelastic neutron scattering experiments only when the 5 f states experience the spin-orbit interaction and simultaneously remain partially localized. The partial localization of the 5 f electrons could be represented by a moderate value of the on-site Coulomb interaction parameter of about 2 eV. The results of the present studies indicate that both strong electron correlations and spin-orbit effects are crucial for realistic theoretical description of the ground-state properties of uranium carbide.

  7. Cost-Effective Treatment of Scalar Relativistic Effects for Multireference Systems: A CASSCF Implementation Based on the Spin-free Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian.

    PubMed

    Lipparini, Filippo; Gauss, Jürgen

    2016-09-13

    We present an implementation of the complete active space-self-consistent field (CASSCF) method specifically designed to be used in four-component scalar relativistic calculations based on the spin-free Dirac-Coulomb (SFDC) Hamiltonian. Our implementation takes full advantage of the properties of the SFDC Hamiltonian that allow us to use real algebra and to exploit point-group and spin symmetry to their full extent while including in a rigorous way scalar relativistic effects in the treatment. The SFDC-CASSCF treatment is more expensive than its non-relativistic counterpart only in the orbital optimization step, while exhibiting the same computational cost for the rate-determining full configuration interaction part. The numerical aspects are discussed, and the capabilities of the SFDC-CASSCF methodology are demonstrated through a pilot application. PMID:27464026

  8. Simulating Electrophoresis with Discrete Charge and Drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowitz, Aaron J.; Witten, Thomas A.

    A charged asymmetric rigid cluster of colloidal particles in saline solution can respond in exotic ways to an electric field: it may spin or move transversely. These distinctive motions arise from the drag force of the neutralizing countercharge surrounding the cluster. Because of this drag, calculating the motion of arbitrary asymmetric objects with nonuniform charge is impractical by conventional methods. Here we present a new method of simulating electrophoresis, in which we replace the continuous object and the surrounding countercharge with discrete point-draggers, called Stokeslets. The balance of forces imposes a linear, self-consistent relation among the drag and Coulomb forces on the Stokeslets, which allows us to easily determine the object's motion via matrix inversion. By explicitly enforcing charge+countercharge neutrality, the simulation recovers the distinctive features of electrophoretic motion to few-percent accuracy using as few as 1000 Stokeslets. In particular, for uniformly charged objects, we observe the characteristic Smoluchowski independence of mobility on object size and shape. We then discuss electrophoretic motion of asymmetric objects, where our simulation method is particularly advantageous. This work is supported by a Grant from the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation.

  9. Magnon drag thermopile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Sergio O.

    2013-03-01

    Thermoelectric effects in spintronics are gathering increasing attention as a means of controlling spin information by using heat flow. Thermal magnons (spin-wave quanta) are expected to play a major role, however, the coupling between electrons and magnons in ferromagnetic metals remains poorly understood. We demonstrate a conceptually new device that enables us to gather information on magnon-electron scattering and magnon-drag effects. The device resembles a thermopile formed by a large number of pairs of ferromagnetic wires placed between a hot and a cold source and connected thermally in parallel and electrically in series. By controlling the relative orientation of the magnetization in pairs of wires, the magnon drag can be studied independently of the electron and phonon drag thermoelectric effects. Measurements as a function of temperature reveal the effect on magnon drag following a variation of magnon and phonon populations. These results demonstrate the feasibility of directly converting magnon dynamics of nanomagnets into an electrical signal and could pave the way to novel thermoelectric devices for energy harvesting. This research was supported by the Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, MICINN (MAT2010-18065) and by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement NANOFUNCTION no 257375.

  10. Observation of Supercurrent Drag between Normal Metal and Superconducting Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaokang; Bazàn, Greg; Bernstein, Gary H.

    1995-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the Coulomb interaction between normal metal (Au /Ti) and superconducting (AlO x) 2D films separated by an insulating \\(Al2O3\\) layer. We report here the observation of supercurrent drag predicted by Duan and Yip [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3647 (1993)]. The drag was observed at temperatures close to Tc, with the ratio of the drag current to the drive current as high as about 1×10-3. Our results are discussed in terms of a model of Coulomb mutual scattering between the normal electrons in the drive wire and the superelectrons in the drag wire.

  11. Spin-orbit ZORA and four-component Dirac-Coulomb estimation of relativistic corrections to isotropic nuclear shieldings and chemical shifts of noble gas dimers.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Marzena; Kupka, Teobald; Stobiński, Leszek; Faber, Rasmus; Lacerda, Evanildo G; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2016-02-01

    Hartree-Fock and density functional theory with the hybrid B3LYP and general gradient KT2 exchange-correlation functionals were used for nonrelativistic and relativistic nuclear magnetic shielding calculations of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon dimers and free atoms. Relativistic corrections were calculated with the scalar and spin-orbit zeroth-order regular approximation Hamiltonian in combination with the large Slater-type basis set QZ4P as well as with the four-component Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian using Dyall's acv4z basis sets. The relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shieldings and chemical shifts are combined with nonrelativistic coupled cluster singles and doubles with noniterative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] calculations using the very large polarization-consistent basis sets aug-pcSseg-4 for He, Ne and Ar, aug-pcSseg-3 for Kr, and the AQZP basis set for Xe. For the dimers also, zero-point vibrational (ZPV) corrections are obtained at the CCSD(T) level with the same basis sets were added. Best estimates of the dimer chemical shifts are generated from these nuclear magnetic shieldings and the relative importance of electron correlation, ZPV, and relativistic corrections for the shieldings and chemical shifts is analyzed. PMID:26503739

  12. Coulomb Damping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2012-01-01

    Viscous damping is commonly discussed in beginning differential equations and physics texts but dry friction or Coulomb friction is not despite dry friction being encountered in many physical applications. One reason for avoiding this topic is that the equations involve a jump discontinuity in the damping term. In this article, we adopt an energy…

  13. Dragging of inertial frames.

    PubMed

    Ciufolini, Ignazio

    2007-09-01

    The origin of inertia has intrigued scientists and philosophers for centuries. Inertial frames of reference permeate our daily life. The inertial and centrifugal forces, such as the pull and push that we feel when our vehicle accelerates, brakes and turns, arise because of changes in velocity relative to uniformly moving inertial frames. A classical interpretation ascribed these forces to acceleration relative to some absolute frame independent of the cosmological matter, whereas an opposite view related them to acceleration relative to all the masses and 'fixed stars' in the Universe. An echo and partial realization of the latter idea can be found in Einstein's general theory of relativity, which predicts that a spinning mass will 'drag' inertial frames along with it. Here I review the recent measurements of frame dragging using satellites orbiting Earth. PMID:17805287

  14. Studies of Coulomb Gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Adam P. Szczepaniak; Eric S. Swanson

    2000-12-12

    Here we will discuss how the nonabelian Coulomb kernel exhibits confinement already at the mean field level. In the heavy quark limit residual interactions between heavy quarks and transverse gluons are spin dependent i.e., relativistic and can be calculated using the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. This makes the Coulomb gauge suitable for studying the nonrelativistic limit. Finally it is possible to use standard mean field techniques to define quasiparticle excitations, which, as we discuss below, have similar properties to what is usually assumed about constituent quarks in the light quark sector.

  15. Coulomb Glass: a Mean Field Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandra, Salvatore; Palassini, Matteo

    2012-02-01

    We study the Coulomb glass model of disordered localized electrons with long-range Coulomb interaction, which describes systems such as disordered insulators, granular metals, amorphous semiconductors, or doped crystalline semiconductors. Long ago Efros and Shklovskii showed that the long-range repulsion induces a soft Coulomb gap in the single particle density of states at low temperatures. Recent works suggested that this gap is associated to a transition to a glass phase, similar to the Almeida-Thouless transition in spin glasses. In this work, we use a mean field approach to characterize several physical properties of the Coulomb glass. In particular, following a seminal work of Bray and Moore, we show that the Edward-Anderson parameter qEA and the spin glass susceptibility χSG are directly related to spectrum distribution of the Hessian matrix around free energy minima. Using this result, we show that no glass transition is associated to the gap formation.

  16. Drift and diffusion of spin and charge density waves in a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Luyi; Koralek, J. D.; Orenstein, J.; Tibbetts, D. R.; Reno, J. L.; Lilly, M. P.

    2011-03-01

    We use transient grating spectroscopy (TGS) to study the persistent spin helix (PSH) state and electron-hole density wave (EHDW) in a 2D electron gas in the presence of an in-plane electric field parallel to the wavevector of the PSH or EHDW. By directly measuring the phase, we can measure the PSH and EHDW displacement with 10 nm spatial and sub-picosecond time resolution. We obtain both the spin diffusion and mobility and ambipolar diffusion and mobility from the TGS measurements of PSH and EHDW, respectively. The spin transresistivity extracted from the spin diffusion is in excellent agreement with the RPA theory of spin Coulomb drag (SCD). The spin mobility data indicate that SCD may also play a role in the spin wave drifting process. From the ambipolar diffusion and mobility, we obtain the transresistivity of electrons and holes in the same layer, which is much stronger than is typically seen in the conventional Coulomb drag experiments on coupled quantum wells.

  17. Backreaction of frame dragging

    SciTech Connect

    Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Rebelo, Carmen; Warnick, Claude M.

    2009-10-15

    The backreaction on black holes due to dragging heavy, rather than test, objects is discussed. As a case study, a five-dimensional regular black Saturn system where the central black hole has vanishing intrinsic angular momentum, J{sup BH}=0, is considered. It is shown that there is a correlation between the sign of two response functions. One is interpreted as a moment of inertia of the black ring in the black Saturn system. The other measures the variation of the black ring horizon angular velocity with the central black hole mass, for fixed ring mass and angular momentum. The two different phases defined by these response functions collapse, for small central black hole mass, to the thin and fat ring phases. In the fat phase, the zero area limit of the black Saturn ring has reduced spin j{sup 2}>1, which is related to the behavior of the ring angular velocity. Using the 'gravitomagnetic clock effect', for which a universality property is exhibited, it is shown that frame dragging measured by an asymptotic observer decreases, in both phases, when the central black hole mass increases, for fixed ring mass and angular momentum. A close parallelism between the results for the fat phase and those obtained recently for the double Kerr solution is drawn, considering also a regular black Saturn system with J{sup BH}{ne}0.

  18. Determination of balloon drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, George R.; Robbins, Edward J.

    1991-01-01

    The evolution of an empirical drag relationship that has stimulated rethinking regarding the physics of balloon drag phenomena is discussed. Combined parasitic drag from all sources in the balloon system are estimated to constitute less than 10 percent of the total system drag. It is shown that the difference between flight-determined drag coefficients and those based on the spherical assumption should be related to the square of the Froude number.

  19. Asteroid orbit evolution due to thermal drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    1995-01-01

    Thermal drag, a variant of the Yarkovsky effect, may act on small asteroids with sizes from a few meters to a few tens of meters. Yarkovsky thermal drag comes from an asteroid's absorbing sunlight in the visible and reradiating it in the infrared. Since the infrared photons have momentum, by action-reaction, they kick the asteroid when they leave its surface. The reradiation, which is asymmetric in latitude over the asteroid, gives a net force along the asteroid's pole. Due to the asteroid's thermal inertia, averaging this force over one orbital period produces a net drag if the spin axis has a component in the orbital plane. Thermal drag tends to circularize orbits. It can increase or decrease orbital inclinations. An object whose spin axis points in random directions over its lifetime displays little change in orbital inclination. Thermal drag appears to have little to do with the delivery of chondrites from the asteroid belt; the thermal drag timescale (10(exp 8) years for meter-sizzed objects) is long compared with their cosmic ray exposure ages, and aphelia in the asteroid belt are not expected for mature thermal drag orbits. However, Yarkovsky thermal drag may act on the recently discovered near-Earth asteroids, which have radii of 10-30 m. Asteroid 1992 DA, for instance, might have its orbit shrunk by 0.1 AU in 3 x 10(exp 7) years, removing it from an Earth-crossing orbit. The near-Earth asteroids also tend to have small to moderate orbital eccentricities, as expected for highly evolved thermal drag objects. However, the time needed to bring them in from the asteroid belt (about 10(exp 9) years) is long compared with the collisonal and dynamical lifetimes (both about 10(exp 8) years) for Earth-crossing objects, arguing against their emplacement by thermal drag.

  20. Energy-driven drag in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Justin; Levitov, Leonid

    2013-03-01

    When solid surfaces slide against each other they experience friction which can be enhanced by inserting molasses between them or reduced by using a lubricant. In the same way, two spatially isolated conducting layers that are placed in close proximity with each other feel friction because the long-ranged Coulomb interaction allows electrons in adjacent layers to ``rub shoulders at a distance.'' Recent measurements of Coulomb drag in Graphene by Gorbachev and co-workers from Manchester (doi:10.1038/nphys2441) have found that it is dramatically enhanced near the Dirac point, in stark contradiction with earlier theories predicting vanishing drag. We argue that a new kind of drag develops when heat transport in the two layers becomes strongly coupled due to efficient energy transfer between the layers. As a result, spatial charge inhomogeneity couples the motion of the electron liquid with heat transport through it, damping motion of electron flow in one layer by heat dissipation in the other. Interestingly, and somewhat paradoxically, this leads to strong drag without momentum transfer between layers. We predict distinct experimental signatures and discuss its magnetic field dependence.

  1. Spherical Calogero model with oscillator/Coulomb potential: Classical case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Francisco; Hakobyan, Tigran; Lechtenfeld, Olaf; Nersessian, Armen

    2016-06-01

    We construct the Hamiltonians and symmetry generators of Calogero-oscillator and Calogero-Coulomb models on the N -dimensional sphere within the matrix-model reduction approach. Our method also produces the integrable Calogero-Coulomb-Stark model on the sphere and proves the integrability of the spin extensions of all these systems.

  2. Drag reduction in nature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Moore, K. J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies on the drag-reducing shapes, structures, and behaviors of swimming and flying animals are reviewed, with an emphasis on potential analogs in vehicle design. Consideration is given to form drag reduction (turbulent flow, vortex generation, mass transfer, and adaptations for body-intersection regions), skin-friction drag reduction (polymers, surfactants, and bubbles as surface 'additives'), reduction of the drag due to lift, drag-reduction studies on porpoises, and drag-reducing animal behavior (e.g., leaping out of the water by porpoises). The need for further research is stressed.

  3. Drag reduction in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Moore, K. J.

    Recent studies on the drag-reducing shapes, structures, and behaviors of swimming and flying animals are reviewed, with an emphasis on potential analogs in vehicle design. Consideration is given to form drag reduction (turbulent flow, vortex generation, mass transfer, and adaptations for body-intersection regions), skin-friction drag reduction (polymers, surfactants, and bubbles as surface 'additives'), reduction of the drag due to lift, drag-reduction studies on porpoises, and drag-reducing animal behavior (e.g., leaping out of the water by porpoises). The need for further research is stressed.

  4. Drag bit construction

    DOEpatents

    Hood, Michael

    1986-01-01

    A mounting movable with respect to an adjacent hard face has a projecting drag bit adapted to engage the hard face. The drag bit is disposed for movement relative to the mounting by encounter of the drag bit with the hard face. That relative movement regulates a valve in a water passageway, preferably extending through the drag bit, to play a stream of water in the area of contact of the drag bit and the hard face and to prevent such water play when the drag bit is out of contact with the hard face.

  5. Drag bit construction

    DOEpatents

    Hood, M.

    1986-02-11

    A mounting movable with respect to an adjacent hard face has a projecting drag bit adapted to engage the hard face. The drag bit is disposed for movement relative to the mounting by encounter of the drag bit with the hard face. That relative movement regulates a valve in a water passageway, preferably extending through the drag bit, to play a stream of water in the area of contact of the drag bit and the hard face and to prevent such water play when the drag bit is out of contact with the hard face. 4 figs.

  6. Drag of ballistic electrons by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, V. L.; Muradov, M. I.

    2015-12-15

    Drag of electrons of a one-dimensional ballistic nanowire by a nearby one-dimensional beam of ions is considered. We assume that the ion beam is represented by an ensemble of heavy ions of the same velocity V. The ratio of the drag current to the primary current carried by the ion beam is calculated. The drag current turns out to be a nonmonotonic function of velocity V. It has a sharp maximum for V near v{sub nF}/2, where n is the number of the uppermost electron miniband (channel) taking part in conduction and v{sub nF} is the corresponding Fermi velocity. This means that the phenomenon of ion beam drag can be used for investigation of the electron spectra of ballistic nanostructures. We note that whereas observation of the Coulomb drag between two parallel quantum wires may in general be complicated by phenomena such as tunneling and phonon drag, the Coulomb drag of electrons of a one-dimensional ballistic nanowire by an ion beam is free of such spurious effects.

  7. Investigating Coulomb's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noll, Ellis; Koehlinger, Mervin; Kowalski, Ludwik; Swackhamer, Gregg

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of a computer-linked camera to demonstrate Coulomb's law. Suggests a way of reducing the difficulties in presenting Coulomb's law by teaching the inverse square law of gravity and the inverse square law of electricity in the same unit. (AIM)

  8. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous. PMID:21867316

  9. Solutions of D-dimensional Schrodinger equation for Woods-Saxon potential with spin-orbit, coulomb and centrifugal terms through a new hybrid numerical fitting Nikiforov-Uvarov method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknam, A.; Rajabi, A. A.; Solaimani, M.

    2016-03-01

    Solution of the radial Schrodinger equation for the Woods-Saxon potential together with spin-orbit interaction, coulomb and centrifugal terms by using usual Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU) method is not possible. Here, we have presented a new NU procedure with which we are able to solve this Schrodinger equation and any other one-dimensional ones with any shape of the potential profile. For this purpose, we have combined the NU method with numerical fitting schema. The energy eigenvalues and corresponding eigenfunctions for various values of n, l, and j quantum numbers have been obtained. Good agreement with experimental values is also achieved. We have calculated the 1/2+ state energy with more accuracy (our absolute error = 0.023 MeV and Hagen et al. absolute error = 0.0918 MeV), while Hagen et al. have calculated the 5/2+ state energy with higher accuracy (our absolute error = 0.71 MeV and Hagen et al. absolute error = 0.0337 MeV). Our wave functions are in agreement with Kim et al.'s work, too.

  10. Some comments on trim drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1975-01-01

    A discussion of data of and methods for predicting trim drag is presented. Specifically the following subjects are discussed: (1) economic impact of trim drag; (2) the trim drag problem in propeller driven airplanes and the effect of propeller and nacelle location; (3) theoretical procedures for predicting trim drag; and (4) research needs in the area of trim drag.

  11. ASTROPHYSICS: Neutron Stars Imply Relativity's a Drag.

    PubMed

    Schilling, G

    2000-09-01

    A new finding, based on x-rays from distant neutron stars, could be the first clear evidence of a weird relativistic effect called frame dragging, in which a heavy chunk of spinning matter wrenches the space-time around it like an eggbeater. Using data from NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, three astronomers in Amsterdam found circumstantial evidence for frame dragging in the flickering of three neutron stars in binary systems. They announced their results in the 1 September issue of The Astrophysical Journal. PMID:17839511

  12. Spacecraft drag modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaza Prieto, David; Graziano, Benjamin P.; Roberts, Peter C. E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews currently available methods to calculate drag coefficients of spacecraft traveling in low Earth orbits (LEO). Aerodynamic analysis of satellites is necessary to predict the drag force perturbation to their orbital trajectory, which for LEO orbits is the second in magnitude after the gravitational disturbance due to the Earth's oblateness. Historically, accurate determination of the spacecraft drag coefficient (CD) was rarely required. This fact was justified by the low fidelity of upper atmospheric models together with the lack of experimental validation of the theory. Therefore, the calculation effort was a priori not justified. However, advances on the field, such as new atmospheric models of improved precision, have allowed for a better characterization of the drag force. They have also addressed the importance of using physically consistent drag coefficients when performing aerodynamic calculations to improve analysis and validate theories. We review the most common approaches to predict these coefficients.

  13. Some comments on fuselage drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1975-01-01

    The following areas relating to fuselage drag are considered: (1) fuselage fineness - ratio and why and how this can be selected during preliminary design; (2) windshield drag; (3) skin roughness; and (4) research needs in the area of fuselage drag.

  14. The drag force on an American football

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Robert G.; Moore, Gary

    2003-08-01

    We have measured the drag coefficient on an American football oriented so that its major axis is pointed directly into the wind. The football was suspended from the top of a wind tunnel by bicycle spokes attached to small bearings. The results are similar to the drag coefficients reported by Rouse (1946) for the case of an ellipsoid with major diameter/minor diameter similar to the length/diameter for the football. The drag coefficient for a spinning football is slightly lower than that for a nonspinning football. Both are in the range of 0.05-0.06, about half the value assumed by Brancazio (1985), about one-third that reported by Rae and Streit (2002) and far smaller than that reported by Cunningham and Dowell (1976).

  15. Induced drag of multiplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prandtl, L

    1924-01-01

    The most important part of the resistance or drag of a wing system,the induced drag, can be calculated theoretically, when the distribution of lift on the individual wings is known. The calculation is based upon the assumption that the lift on the wings is distributed along the wing in proportion to the ordinates of a semi-ellipse. Formulas and numerical tables are given for calculating the drag. In this connection, the most favorable arrangements of biplanes and triplanes are discussed and the results are further elucidated by means of numerical examples.

  16. Drag Crisis of Gyro-Balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Yoshiyuki; Miyazaki, Takeshi; Himeno, Ryutaro

    2007-11-01

    Using a high-speed video camera, we measured the trajectory and the rotation of a hard baseball thrown by a pitching machine which can launch Gyro-Balls (rifle spinning balls). We determined the drag- and lift- coefficients by analyzing the video images. The measurements were performed in the range of 0.6x10^5spin parameter (SP : dimensionless spin rate)=0.12,0.23 and 0.35. Two seam patterns relative to the translational direction were investigated, i.e. 2-seam and 4-seam. The drag coefficient of a 4-seam gyro-ball with SP=0.12,0.23 and 0.35, decreases gradually with Re. However, the drag coefficient of a 2-seam gyro-ball with SP=0.12 decreases in two steps, i.e. in the ranges 0.8x10^5drag coefficients of a 2-seam Gyro-Ball with SP=0.23,0.35 are almost constant below Re=1.6x10^5 and Re=1.3x10^5, respectively. Their minima are attained at Re=1.8x10^5 and Re=1.6x10^5, respectively. These findings confirm the occurrence of the drag crisis for Gyro-Balls. The different Re-dependencies are due to the different seam patterns.

  17. Drag on Sessile Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Nobes, David; Sen, Debjyoti; Amirfazli, Alidad; University of Alberta Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present the first ever direct measurements of the coefficient of drag on sessile drops at Reynolds numbers from the creeping flow regime up to the point of incipient motion, made using a newly developed floating element differential drag sensor. Surfaces of different wettabilities (PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS)), wet by water, hexadecane, and various silicone oils, are used to study the effects of drop shape, and fluid properties on drag. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number (scaled by drop height) varies slightly with liquid-solid system and drop volume with results suggesting the drop experiences increased drag compared to similar shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillation influencing the otherwise laminar flow. Drops adopting more spherical shapes are seen to experience the greatest force at any given airspeed. This indicates that the relative exposed areas of drops is an important consideration in terms of force, with implications for the shedding of drops in applications such as airfoil icing and fuel cell flooding. The measurement technique used in this work can be adapted to measure drag force on other deformable, lightly adhered objects such as dust, sand, snow, vesicles, foams, and biofilms. The authours acknowledge NSERC, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and the Killam Trusts.

  18. Effect of the Pauli principle on photoelectron spin transport in p+ GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadiz, F.; Paget, D.; Rowe, A. C. H.; Amand, T.; Barate, P.; Arscott, S.

    2015-04-01

    In p+ GaAs thin films, the effect of photoelectron degeneracy on spin transport is investigated theoretically and experimentally by imaging the spin polarization profile as a function of distance from a tightly focused light excitation spot. Under degeneracy of the electron gas (high concentration, low temperature), a dip at the center of the polarization profile appears with a polarization maximum at a distance of about 2 μ m from the center. This counterintuitive result reveals that photoelectron diffusion depends on spin, as a direct consequence of the Pauli principle. This causes a concentration dependence of the spin stiffness while the spin dependence of the mobility is found to be weak in doped material. The various effects which can modify spin transport in a degenerate electron gas under local laser excitation are considered. A comparison of the data with a numerical solution of the coupled diffusion equations reveals that ambipolar coupling with holes increases the steady-state photoelectron density at the excitation spot and therefore the amplitude of the degeneracy-induced polarization dip. Thermoelectric currents are predicted to depend on spin under degeneracy (spin Soret currents), but these currents are negligible except at very high excitation power where they play a relatively small role. Coulomb spin drag and band-gap renormalization are negligible due to electrostatic screening by the hole gas.

  19. Coulomb Breakup Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.

    2008-12-05

    We formulate scattering theory in the framework of a surface-integral approach utilizing analytically known asymptotic forms of the three-body wave functions. This formulation is valid for both short-range and Coulombic potentials. The post and prior forms of the breakup amplitude are derived without any reference to renormalization procedures.

  20. Strong Coulomb effects in hole-doped Heisenberg chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnack, J.

    2005-06-01

    Substances such as the “telephone number compound” Sr14Cu24O41 are intrinsically hole-doped. The involved interplay of spin and charge dynamics is a challenge for theory. In this article we propose to describe hole-doped Heisenberg spin rings by means of complete numerical diagonalization of a Heisenberg Hamiltonian that depends parametrically on hole positions and includes the screened Coulomb interaction among the holes. It is demonstrated that key observables like magnetic susceptibility, specific heat, and inelastic neutron scattering cross section depend sensitively on the dielectric constant of the screened Coulomb potential.

  1. Coulomb problem for vector bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchiev, M.Yu.; Flambaum, V.V.

    2006-05-01

    The Coulomb problem for vector bosons W{sup {+-}} incorporates a well-known difficulty; the charge of the boson localized in a close vicinity of the attractive Coulomb center proves to be infinite. The paradox is shown to be resolved by the QED vacuum polarization, which brings in a strong effective repulsion that eradicates the infinite charge of the boson on the Coulomb center. This property allows one to define the Coulomb problem for vector bosons properly.

  2. Remote Spacecraft Attitude Control by Coulomb Charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Daan

    The possibility of inter-spacecraft collisions is a serious concern at Geosynchronous altitudes, where many high-value assets operate in proximity to countless debris objects whose orbits experience no natural means of decay. The ability to rendezvous with these derelict satellites would enable active debris removal by servicing or repositioning missions, but docking procedures are generally inhibited by the large rotational momenta of uncontrolled satellites. Therefore, a contactless means of reducing the rotation rate of objects in the space environment is desired. This dissertation investigates the viability of Coulomb charging to achieve such remote spacecraft attitude control. If a servicing craft imposes absolute electric potentials on a nearby nonspherical debris object, it will impart electrostatic torques that can be used to gradually arrest the object's rotation. In order to simulate the relative motion of charged spacecraft with complex geometries, accurate but rapid knowledge of the Coulomb interactions is required. To this end, a new electrostatic force model called the Multi-Sphere Method (MSM) is developed. All aspects of the Coulomb de-spin concept are extensively analyzed and simulated using a system with simplified geometries and one dimensional rotation. First, appropriate control algorithms are developed to ensure that the nonlinear Coulomb torques arrest the rotation with guaranteed stability. Moreover, the complex interaction of the spacecraft with the plasma environment and charge control beams is modeled to determine what hardware requirements are necessary to achieve the desired electric potential levels. Lastly, the attitude dynamics and feedback control development is validated experimentally using a scaled down terrestrial testbed. High voltage power supplies control the potential on two nearby conductors, a stationary sphere and a freely rotating cylinder. The nonlinear feedback control algorithms developed above are implemented to

  3. Transient induced drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weihs, D.; Katz, J.

    1986-01-01

    In the present treatment of the calculation of forces on a wing that is suddenly brought into motion at a constant speed, attention is given to the unsteady potential's contribution to the force balance. Total bound vorticity is produced at the initial impulse. The results obtained are independent of wing aspect ratio; as time increases, this effect on the drag force becomes smaller as the vortex emanating from the trailing edge is left behind. The second contributor to induced drag is the spanwise vorticity shedding that results from the spanwise load distribution of three-dimensional wings. This contribution grows with time as the length of the wake grows.

  4. Overview of external Nacelle drag and interference drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    A historical view of multi-jet engine installations is given that emphasizes integration of the powerplant and the airframe in aircraft design for improved reduction in external nacelle drag and interference drag characteristics.

  5. Frame dragging and superenergy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A.; Carot, J.

    2007-08-15

    We show that the vorticity appearing in stationary vacuum spacetimes is always related to the existence of a flow of superenergy on the plane orthogonal to the vorticity vector. This result, together with the previously established link between vorticity and superenergy in radiative (Bondi-Sachs) spacetimes, strengthens further the case for this latter quantity as the cause of frame dragging.

  6. Chiral drag force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Krishna; Sadofyev, Andrey V.

    2015-10-01

    We provide a holographic evaluation of novel contributions to the drag force acting on a heavy quark moving through strongly interacting plasma. The new contributions are chiral in the sense that they act in opposite directions in plasmas containing an excess of left- or right-handed quarks. The new contributions are proportional to the coefficient of the axial anomaly, and in this sense also are chiral. These new contributions to the drag force act either parallel to or antiparallel to an external magnetic field or to the vorticity of the fluid plasma. In all these respects, these contributions to the drag force felt by a heavy quark are analogous to the chiral magnetic effect (CME) on light quarks. However, the new contribution to the drag force is independent of the electric charge of the heavy quark and is the same for heavy quarks and antiquarks, meaning that these novel effects do not in fact contribute to the CME current. We show that although the chiral drag force can be non-vanishing for heavy quarks that are at rest in the local fluid rest frame, it does vanish for heavy quarks that are at rest in a suitably chosen frame. In this frame, the heavy quark at rest sees counterpropagating momentum and charge currents, both proportional to the axial anomaly coefficient, but feels no drag force. This provides strong concrete evidence for the absence of dissipation in chiral transport, something that has been predicted previously via consideration of symmetries. Along the way to our principal results, we provide a general calculation of the corrections to the drag force due to the presence of gradients in the flowing fluid in the presence of a nonzero chemical potential. We close with a consequence of our result that is at least in principle observable in heavy ion collisions, namely an anticorrelation between the direction of the CME current for light quarks in a given event and the direction of the kick given to the momentum of all the heavy quarks and

  7. Ion Coulomb crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewsen, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The following text will give a brief introduction to the physics of the spatially ordered structures, so-called Coulomb crystals, that appear when confined ions are cooled to sufficiently low temperatures. It will as well briefly comment on the very diverse scientific applications of such crystals, which have emerged the past two decades. While this document lacks figures, it includes a substantial number of references in which more detailed information can be found. It is the hope that the text will stimulate the reader to dig deeper into one or more of the discussed subjects and inspire her/him to think about new potential applications.

  8. Semiclassical Coulomb field

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, J.

    2008-06-15

    The contribution of different modes of the Coulomb field to decoherence and to the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance is calculated in the one-loop approximation for nonrelativistic electron gas. The dominant contribution was found to come from the usual collective modes in the plasma, namely, the zero-sound and the plasmon oscillations. The length scale of the quantum-classical transition is found to be close to the Thomas-Fermi screening length. It is argued that the extension of these modes to the whole Fock space yields optimal pointer states.

  9. Mass center estimation of a drag-free satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz Fernandez De Cordova, S.; Debra, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    The mass center location of a spinning drag-free satellite can be estimated because there is control required to accelerate the mass center along the axis of spin as long as there is some nutation in the spinning motion. Linear and nonlinear models are compared and observability discussed. Online estimation fails when nutation is damped so an offline mechanization is proposed. A new sensor has been designed to permit greater relative motion than was possible on the drag-free satellite flown in 1972 (JH-1). Experimental laboratory results using a spinning vehicle with the new sensor mounted 30 cm from a spherical air bearing support are presented which confirm earlier simulation results.

  10. Interaction and multiband effects in the intrinsic spin-Hall effect of an interacting multiorbital metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    The spin-Hall effect is a spin-current version of the usual-Hall effect, and its potential for application may be great. For the efficient application utilizing the spin-Hall effect, an understanding of interaction effects may be helpful because the interaction effects sometimes become remarkable in transport phenomena (e.g., fractional-quantum-Hall effect). However, a lot of theoretical studies neglected the interaction effects, and the interaction effects in the spin-Hall effect had been little understood. To improve this situation, I developed a general formalism for the intrinsic spin-Hall effect including the interaction effects and multiband effects by using the linear-response theory with approximations appropriate for an interacting multiorbital metal (see arXiv:1510.03988). In this talk, I explain how the electron-electron interaction modifies the spin-Hall conductivity and show several new and remarkable interactions effects, new mechanisms of the damping dependence and a crossover of the damping dependence in a clean system and a temperature-dependent correction due to the spin-Coulomb drag. I also show guidelines useful for general formulations of other transport phenomena including the interaction effects and multiband effects.

  11. Drag Coefficient of Hexadecane Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Yoshinobu; Hishida, Makoto; Kajimoto, Sadaaki; Tanaka, Gaku

    This paper deals with the drag coefficient of solidified hexadecane particles and their free rising velocity in liquid. The drag coefficient was experimentally investigated in Reynolds number range of about 40-300. The present experimental results are summarized in the following; (1) the drag coefficient of solidified hexadecane particles formed in liquid coolant by direct contact cooling is higher than that of a smooth surface sphere, this high drag coefficient seems to be attributed to the non-smooth surface of the solidified hexadecane particles, (2) experimental correlation for the drag coefficient of the solidified hexadecane particles was proposed, (3 ) the measured rising velocity of the solidified hexadecane particle agrees well with the calculated one, (4) the drag coefficients of hexadecane particles that were made by pouring hexadecane liquid into a solid hollow sphere agreed well with the drag coefficient of smooth surface sphere.

  12. Do spinors give rise to a frame-dragging effect?

    SciTech Connect

    Randono, Andrew

    2010-01-15

    We investigate the effect of the intrinsic spin of a fundamental spinor field on the surrounding spacetime geometry. We show that despite the lack of a rotating stress-energy source (and despite claims to the contrary) the intrinsic spin of a spin-half fermion gives rise to a frame-dragging effect analogous to that of orbital angular momentum, even in Einstein-Hilbert gravity where torsion is constrained to be zero. This resolves a paradox regarding the counter-force needed to restore Newton's third law in the well-known spin-orbit interaction. In addition, the frame-dragging effect gives rise to a long-range gravitationally mediated spin-spin dipole interaction coupling the internal spins of two sources. We argue that despite the weakness of the interaction, the spin-spin interaction will dominate over the ordinary inverse square Newtonian interaction in any process of sufficiently high energy for quantum field theoretical effects to be non-negligible.

  13. Quantum Hall Exciton Condensation at Full Spin Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finck, A. D. K.; Eisenstein, J. P.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2010-03-01

    Using Coulomb drag as a probe, we explore the excitonic phase transition in quantum Hall bilayers at νT=1 as a function of Zeeman energy, EZ. The critical layer separation (d/l)c for exciton condensation initially increases rapidly with EZ, but then reaches a maximum and begins a gentle decline. At high EZ, where both the excitonic phase at small d/l and the compressible phase at large d/l are fully spin polarized, we find that the width of the transition, as a function of d/l, is much larger than at small EZ and persists in the limit of zero temperature. We discuss these results in the context of two models in which the system contains a mixture of the two fluids.

  14. Quantum Hall Exciton Condensation at Full Spin Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finck, A. D. K.; Eisenstein, J. P.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2010-01-01

    Using Coulomb drag as a probe, we explore the excitonic phase transition in quantum Hall bilayers at νT=1 as a function of Zeeman energy EZ. The critical layer separation (d/ℓ)c for exciton condensation initially increases rapidly with EZ, but then reaches a maximum and begins a gentle decline. At high EZ, where both the excitonic phase at small d/ℓ and the compressible phase at large d/ℓ are fully spin polarized, we find that the width of the transition, as a function of d/ℓ, is much larger than at small EZ and persists in the limit of zero temperature. We discuss these results in the context of two models in which the system contains a mixture of the two fluids.

  15. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-07-01

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body.

  16. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body. PMID:26189698

  17. Rotating flexible drag mill

    DOEpatents

    Pepper, W.B.

    1984-05-09

    A rotating parachute for decelerating objects travelling through atmosphere at subsonic or supersonic deployment speeds includes a circular canopy having a plurality of circumferentially arranged flexible panels projecting radially from a solid central disk. A slot extends radially between adjacent panels to the outer periphery of the canopy. Upon deployment, the solid disk diverts air radially to rapidly inflate the panels into a position of maximum diameter. Air impinging on the panels adjacent the panel slots rotates the parachute during its descent. Centrifugal force flattens the canopy into a constant maximum diameter during terminal descent for maximum drag and deceleration.

  18. Detection of gravitational frame dragging using orbiting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Salgado, Marcelo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we propose information theoretic and interferometric techniques to detect the effect of gravitational frame dragging on orbiting qubits. In particular, we consider the Kerr spacetime geometry and spin-\\tfrac{1}{2} qubits moving in equatorial circular orbits. We ignore the { O }({\\hslash }) order effects due to spin-curvature coupling, which allows us to consider the motion of the spin-\\tfrac{1}{2} particles as Kerr geometry geodesics. We derive analytical expressions for the infinitesimal Wigner rotation and numerical results for their integration across the length of the particle’s trajectory. To this end, we consider the bounds on the finite Wigner rotation imposed by Penrose’s cosmic censorship hypothesis. Finally we propose how the Wigner rotation strictly due to frame dragging could be observed using interferometry and other quantum metrology techniques.

  19. Coulomb interactions and fermion condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Capstick, S.; Cutkosky, R.E.; Joensen, M.A. ); Wang, K.C. )

    1990-08-15

    The influence of the Coulomb interaction in states containing massless and flavorless fermion-antifermion pairs is studied, using a continuum formulation within the finite volume {ital S}{sup 3}. Several different forms for the Coulomb interaction are examined, including confining potentials as well as nonconfining potentials. The calculations show that if the interaction is strong enough, the Coulomb interaction leads to condensation of pairs, and that this condensation has a chiral character. The condensation does not depend on whether the interaction is confining. It is found that simplified variational approximations are not accurate enough for an adequate description of the states.

  20. Parachute drag and radial force

    SciTech Connect

    Purvis, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a combination of old and new wind tunnel data in a format which illustrates the effects of inflated diameter, geometric porosity, reefing line length, suspension line length, number of gores, and number of ribbons on parachute drag. A new definition of radial force coefficient is presented, as well as a universal drag curve for flat circular and conical parachutes.

  1. Miniature drag force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilevered beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like that of a second order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  2. Drag reduction strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. Christopher

    1994-01-01

    previously a description was given of an active control scheme using wall transpiration that leads to a 15% reduction in surface skin friction beneath a turbulent boundary layer, according to direct numerical simulation. In this research brief further details of that scheme and its variants are given together with some suggestions as to how sensor/actuator arrays could be configured to reduce surface drag. The research which is summarized here was performed during the first half of 1994. This research is motivated by the need to understand better how the dynamics of near-wall turbulent flow can be modified so that skin friction is reduced. The reduction of turbulent skin friction is highly desirable in many engineering applications. Experiments and direct numerical simulations have led to an increased understanding of the cycle of turbulence production and transport in the boundary layer and raised awareness of the possibility of disrupting the process with a subsequent reduction in turbulent skin friction. The implementation of active feedback control in a computational setting is a viable approach for the investigation of the modifications to the flow physics that can be achieved. Bewley et al. and Hill describe how ideas from optimal control theory are employed to give 'sub-optimal' drag reduction schemes. The objectives of the work reported here is to investigate in greater detail the assumptions implicit within such schemes and their limitations. It is also our objective to describe how an array of sensors and actuators could be arranged and interconnected to form a 'smart' surface which has low skin friction.

  3. Observation of magnon-mediated electric current drag at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Wan, C. H.; Zhang, X.; Yuan, Z. H.; Zhang, Q. T.; Qin, J. Y.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F.; Zhang, S.

    2016-02-01

    Spin-based electronic devices such as magnetic memory and spin logic rely on spin information transport. Conduction electrons, due to their intrinsic spin angular momentum, become an obvious choice for spin information carriers. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that magnons, quasiparticles representing low-energy excitations of ferromagnetic materials, can serve as effective spin information carriers as well. Specifically, we consider two nonmagnetic heavy metals (HMs) that are separated by an electric leak-free ferrimagnetic insulator. When an electric current is applied in one of the HM layers, magnons in the ferrimagnetic insulator are excited and become an effective medium to couple the spin currents in two HMs. As a result, the charge/spin current in one HM layer can drag a charge/spin current in the other HM layer. This work provides a route for spin-based electronic devices where the spin transport is carried by quasiparticles other than electrons.

  4. Measuring the Effects of Lift and Drag on Projectile Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2012-02-01

    The trajectory of a projectile through the air is affected both by gravity and by aerodynamic forces. The latter forces can conveniently be ignored in many situations, even when they are comparatively large. For example, if a 145-g, 74-mm diameter baseball is pitched at 40 ms-1 (89.5 mph), it experiences a drag force of about 1.5 N. The gravitational force on the ball 1.42 N. Nevertheless, the trajectory of a baseball pitched without spin is not strongly affected by the drag force. Because the ball is relatively heavy and the flight distance is relatively small (about 60 ft), the drag force reduces the ball speed by only about 10% by the time it reaches the batter. As a result, the time taken for the ball to reach the batter is only about 5% longer than in a vacuum, and the actual trajectory is also very similar.2

  5. Self-burrowing seeds: drag reduction in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Wonjong; Choi, Sung Mok; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of drag reduction of self-burrowing seeds in granular media. In response to environmental changes in humidity, the awn (a tail-like appendage of seed) of Pelargonium carnosum exhibits coiling-uncoiling deformation which induces the thrust and rotary motions of the head of the seed against the surface of the soil. Using various sizes of glass beads that mimic the granular soil, we measure the thrust forces required for the seed of Pelargonium carnosum to penetrate into granular media with and without rotation. Our quantitative measurements show that the rotation of the seed remarkably reduces the granular drag as compared to the drag against the non-spinning seed. This leads us to conclude that the hygroscopically active awns of Pelargonium carnosum enables its seed to dig into the relatively coarse granular soils.

  6. Modelling LARES temperature distribution and thermal drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Phuc H.; Matzner, Richard

    2015-10-01

    The LARES satellite, a laser-ranged space experiment to contribute to geophysics observation, and to measure the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect, has been observed to undergo an anomalous along-track orbital acceleration of -0.4 pm/s2 (pm : = picometer). This thermal "drag" is not surprising; along-track thermal drag has previously been observed with the related LAGEOS satellites (-3.4 pm/s2). It is hypothesized that the thermal drag is principally due to anisotropic thermal radiation from the satellite's exterior. We report the results of numerical computations of the along-track orbital decay of the LARES satellite during the first 126 days after launch. The results depend to a significant degree on the visual and IR absorbance α and emissivity ɛ of the fused silica Cube Corner Reflectors. We present results for two values of α IR = ɛ IR : 0.82, a standard number for "clean" fused silica; and 0.60, a possible value for silica with slight surface contamination subjected to the space environment. The heating and the resultant along-track acceleration depend on the plane of the orbit, the sun position, and, in particular, on the occurrence of eclipses, all of which are functions of time. Thus we compute the thermal drag for specific days. We compare our model to observational data, available for a 120 day period starting with the 7th day after launch, which shows the average acceleration of -0.4 pm/s2. With our model the average along-track thermal drag over this 120 day period for CCR α IR = ɛ IR = 0.82 was computed to be -0.59 pm/s2. For CCR α IR = ɛ IR = 0.60 we compute -0.36 pm/s2. LARES consists of a solid spherical tungsten sphere, into which the CCRs are set in colatitude circles. Our calculation models the satellite as 93 isothermal elements: the tungsten part, and each of the 92 Cube Corner Reflectors. The satellite is heated from two sources: sunlight and Earth's infrared (IR) radiation. We work in the fast-spin regime, where CCRs with

  7. DRAG REDUCTION WITH SUPERHYDROPHOBIC RIBLETS

    SciTech Connect

    Barbier, Charlotte N; D'Urso, Brian R; Jenner, Elliot

    2012-01-01

    Samples combining riblets and superhydrophobic surfaces are fabricated at University of Pittsburgh and their drag reduction properties are studied at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a commercial cone-and-plate rheometer. In parallel to the experiments, numerical simulations are performed in order to estimate the slip length at high rotational speed. For each sample, a drag reduction of at least 5% is observed in both laminar and turbulent regime. At low rotational speed, drag reduction up to 30% is observed with a 1 mm deep grooved sample. As the rotational speed increases, a secondary flow develops causing a slight decrease in drag reductions. However, drag reduction above 15% is still observed for the large grooved samples. In the turbulent regime, the 100 microns grooved sample becomes more efficient than the other samples in drag reduction and manages to sustain a drag reduction above 15%. Using the simulations, the slip length of the 100 micron grooved sample is estimated to be slightly above 100 micron in the turbulent regime.

  8. Aerodynamic drag on intermodal railcars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Philip; Maynes, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic drag associated with transport of commodities by rail is becoming increasingly important as the cost of diesel fuel increases. This study aims to increase the efficiency of intermodal cargo trains by reducing the aerodynamic drag on the load carrying cars. For intermodal railcars a significant amount of aerodynamic drag is a result of the large distance between loads that often occurs and the resulting pressure drag resulting from the separated flow. In the present study aerodynamic drag data have been obtained through wind tunnel testing on 1/29 scale models to understand the savings that may be realized by judicious modification to the size of the intermodal containers. The experiments were performed in the BYU low speed wind tunnel and the test track utilizes two leading locomotives followed by a set of five articulated well cars with double stacked containers. The drag on a representative mid-train car is measured using an isolated load cell balance and the wind tunnel speed is varied from 20 to 100 mph. We characterize the effect that the gap distance between the containers and the container size has on the aerodynamic drag of this representative rail car and investigate methods to reduce the gap distance.

  9. Aerodynamic Drag and Drag Reduction: Energy and Energy Savings (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    An assessment of the role of fluid dynamic resistance and/or aerodynamic drag and the relationship to energy use in the United States is presented. Existing data indicates that up to 25% of the total energy consumed in the United States is used to overcome aerodynamic drag, 27% of the total energy used in the United States is consumed by transportation systems, and 60% of the transportation energy or 16% of the total energy consumed in the United States is used to overcome aerodynamic drag in transportation systems. Drag reduction goals of 50% are proposed and discussed which if realized would produce a 7.85% total energy savings. This energy savings correlates to a yearly cost savings in the $30Billion dollar range.

  10. When superfluids are a drag

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, David C

    2008-01-01

    The article considers the dramatic phenomenon of seemingly frictionless flow of slow-moving superfluids. Specifically the question of whether an object in a superfluid flow experiences any drag force is addressed. A brief account is given of the history of this problem and it is argued that recent advances in ultracold atomic physics can shed much new light on this problem. The article presents the commonly held notion that sufficiently slow-moving superfluids can flow without drag and also discusses research suggesting that scattering quantum fluctuations might cause drag in a superfluid moving at any speed.

  11. "Coulombic Viscosity" In Granular Materials: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-09-01

    very brief (30-60 sec) damping period, motion of the grains was observed to be retarded by the electrostatic interactions. The fact that the grains almost instantly formed aggregates was evidence that their ballistic motions had been constrained and redirected by the dipole-dipole interactions that led to filamentary aggregate development. Undoubtedly, the "Coulombic viscosity" of the cloud assisted in damping grain motion so rapidly. The electrostatically-induced grain-cloud viscosity or drag exerted on grain motion, is a complex function of three major parameters: charge magnitude, charge sign, and mean intergranular distance. The above experiments illustrate one particular type of granular behavior. The discussion here will therefore be restricted to drag relationships: (a) between grains that are naturally charged triboelectrically and thus exhibit dipole-dipole attractions between one another even if there are slight net charges present (which can be overwhelmed by dipole coupling at short distances), and (b) between grains that are densely spaced where the intergranular distance varies between zero and some value (usually tens or hundreds of grain diameters) that permits each grain to detect the dipole moment of another grain -- the distance is not so great that other grains appears as neutral electrical "singularities. I. Aeolian transport: During motion of grains in a saltation cloud (on Earth, Mars, or Venus), triboelectric charging must occur as a result of multiple grain contacts, and by friction with the entraining air. A situation might develop that is similar to the one described above in the attrition device: grain motion becoming significantly retarded (reduced flux) as grains find it increasingly difficult to either separate from the surface, or to pass one another without Coulombic retarding forces. A "Coulombic drag" will exist at flux initiation and increase with time to work in direct opposition to the aerodynamic drag that drives the grain motion

  12. "Coulombic Viscosity" In Granular Materials: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    very brief (30-60 sec) damping period, motion of the grains was observed to be retarded by the electrostatic interactions. The fact that the grains almost instantly formed aggregates was evidence that their ballistic motions had been constrained and redirected by the dipole-dipole interactions that led to filamentary aggregate development. Undoubtedly, the "Coulombic viscosity" of the cloud assisted in damping grain motion so rapidly. The electrostatically-induced grain-cloud viscosity or drag exerted on grain motion, is a complex function of three major parameters: charge magnitude, charge sign, and mean intergranular distance. The above experiments illustrate one particular type of granular behavior. The discussion here will therefore be restricted to drag relationships: (a) between grains that are naturally charged triboelectrically and thus exhibit dipole-dipole attractions between one another even if there are slight net charges present (which can be overwhelmed by dipole coupling at short distances), and (b) between grains that are densely spaced where the intergranular distance varies between zero and some value (usually tens or hundreds of grain diameters) that permits each grain to detect the dipole moment of another grain -- the distance is not so great that other grains appears as neutral electrical "singularities. I. Aeolian transport: During motion of grains in a saltation cloud (on Earth, Mars, or Venus), triboelectric charging must occur as a result of multiple grain contacts, and by friction with the entraining air. A situation might develop that is similar to the one described above in the attrition device: grain motion becoming significantly retarded (reduced flux) as grains find it increasingly difficult to either separate from the surface, or to pass one another without Coulombic retarding forces. A "Coulombic drag" will exist at flux initiation and increase with time to work in direct opposition to the aerodynamic drag that drives the grain motion

  13. "Coulombic Viscosity" In Granular Materials: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    very brief (30-60 sec) damping period, motion of the grains was observed to be retarded by the electrostatic interactions. The fact that the grains almost instantly formed aggregates was evidence that their ballistic motions had been constrained and redirected by the dipole-dipole interactions that led to filamentary aggregate development. Undoubtedly, the "Coulombic viscosity" of the cloud assisted in damping grain motion so rapidly. The electrostatically-induced grain-cloud viscosity or drag exerted on grain motion, is a complex function of three major parameters: charge magnitude, charge sign, and mean intergranular distance. The above experiments illustrate one particular type of granular behavior. The discussion here will therefore be restricted to drag relationships: (a) between grains that are naturally charged triboelectrically and thus exhibit dipole-dipole attractions between one another even if there are slight net charges present (which can be overwhelmed by dipole coupling at short distances), and (b) between grains that are densely spaced where the intergranular distance varies between zero and some value (usually tens or hundreds of grain diameters) that permits each grain to detect the dipole moment of another grain -- the distance is not so great that other grains appears as neutral electrical "singularities. I. Aeolian transport: During motion of grains in a saltation cloud (on Earth, Mars, or Venus), triboelectric charging must occur as a result of multiple grain contacts, and by friction with the entraining air. A situation might develop that is similar to the one described above in the attrition device: grain motion becoming significantly retarded (reduced flux) as grains find it increasingly difficult to either separate from the surface, or to pass one another without Coulombic retarding forces. A "Coulombic drag" will exist at flux initiation and increase with time to work in direct opposition to the aerodynamic drag that drives the grain motion

  14. Renormalization in Coulomb gauge QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andraši, A.; Taylor, John C.

    2011-04-01

    In the Coulomb gauge of QCD, the Hamiltonian contains a non-linear Christ-Lee term, which may alternatively be derived from a careful treatment of ambiguous Feynman integrals at 2-loop order. We investigate how and if UV divergences from higher order graphs can be consistently absorbed by renormalization of the Christ-Lee term. We find that they cannot.

  15. Entropic Corrections to Coulomb's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Sheykhi, A.

    2012-04-01

    Two well-known quantum corrections to the area law have been introduced in the literatures, namely, logarithmic and power-law corrections. Logarithmic corrections, arises from loop quantum gravity due to thermal equilibrium fluctuations and quantum fluctuations, while, power-law correction appears in dealing with the entanglement of quantum fields in and out the horizon. Inspired by Verlinde's argument on the entropic force, and assuming the quantum corrected relation for the entropy, we propose the entropic origin for the Coulomb's law in this note. Also we investigate the Uehling potential as a radiative correction to Coulomb potential in 1-loop order and show that for some value of distance the entropic corrections of the Coulomb's law is compatible with the vacuum-polarization correction in QED. So, we derive modified Coulomb's law as well as the entropy corrected Poisson's equation which governing the evolution of the scalar potential ϕ. Our study further supports the unification of gravity and electromagnetic interactions based on the holographic principle.

  16. Coulomb problem for vector particles : Energy spectrum.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchiev, M. Yu.; Flambaum, V. V.; Physics; Univ. of South Wales

    2006-05-31

    The Coulomb problem for vector bosons W{+-} incorporates a well-known difficulty; the charge of the boson localized in a close vicinity of the attractive Coulomb center proves to be infinite. The paradox is shown to be resolved by the QED vacuum polarization, which brings in a strong effective repulsion that eradicates the infinite charge of the boson on the Coulomb center. This property allows one to define the Coulomb problem for vector bosons properly.

  17. Coulomb crystallization in classical and quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Coulomb crystallization occurs in one-component plasmas when the average interaction energy exceeds the kinetic energy by about two orders of magnitude. A simple road to reach such strong coupling consists in using external confinement potentials the strength of which controls the density. This has been succsessfully realized with ions in traps and storage rings and also in dusty plasma. Recently a three-dimensional spherical confinement could be created [1] which allows to produce spherical dust crystals containing concentric shells. I will give an overview on our recent results for these ``Yukawa balls'' and compare them to experiments. The shell structure of these systems can be very well explained by using an isotropic statically screened pair interaction. Further, the thermodynamic properties of these systems, such as the radial density distribution are discussed based on an analytical theory [3]. I then will discuss Coulomb crystallization in trapped quantum systems, such as mesoscopic electron and electron hole plasmas in coupled layers [4,5]. These systems show a very rich correlation behavior, including liquid and solid like states and bound states (excitons, biexcitons) and their crystals. On the other hand, also collective quantum and spin effects are observed, including Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity of bound electron-hole pairs [4]. Finally, I consider Coulomb crystallization in two-component neutral plasmas in three dimensions. I discuss the necessary conditions for crystals of heavy charges to exist in the presence of a light component which typically is in the Fermi gas or liquid state. It can be shown that their exists a critical ratio of the masses of the species of the order of 80 [5] which is confirmed by Quantum Monte Carlo simulations [6]. Familiar examples are crystals of nuclei in the core of White dwarf stars, but the results also suggest the existence of other crystals, including proton or α-particle crystals in dense matter

  18. Hamiltonian approach to frame dragging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Kenneth J.

    2008-07-01

    A Hamiltonian approach makes the phenomenon of frame dragging apparent “up front” from the appearance of the drag velocity in the Hamiltonian of a test particle in an arbitrary metric. Hamiltonian (1) uses the inhomogeneous force equation (4), which applies to non-geodesic motion as well as to geodesics. The Hamiltonian is not in manifestly covariant form, but is covariant because it is derived from Hamilton’s manifestly covariant scalar action principle. A distinction is made between manifest frame dragging such as that in the Kerr metric, and hidden frame dragging that can be made manifest by a coordinate transformation such as that applied to the Robertson-Walker metric in Sect. 2. In Sect. 3 a zone of repulsive gravity is found in the extreme Kerr metric. Section 4 treats frame dragging in special relativity as a manifestation of the equivalence principle in accelerated frames. It answers a question posed by Bell about how the Lorentz contraction can break a thread connecting two uniformly accelerated rocket ships. In Sect. 5 the form of the Hamiltonian facilitates the definition of gravitomagnetic and gravitoelectric potentials.

  19. Dragging a floating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duck-Gyu; Kim, Ho-Young

    2010-11-01

    A cylinder immersed in a fluid stream experiences a drag, and it is well known that the drag coefficient is a function of the Reynolds number only. Here we study the force exerted on a long horizontal cylinder that is dragged perpendicular to its axis while floating on an air-water interface with a high Reynolds number. In addition to the flow-induced drag, the floating body is subjected to capillary forces along the contact line where the three phases of liquid/solid/gas meet. We first theoretically predict the meniscus profile around the horizontally moving cylinder assuming the potential flow, and show that the profile is in good agreement with that obtained experimentally. Then we compare our theoretical predictions and experimental measurement results for the drag coefficient of a floating horizontal cylinder that is given by a function of the Weber number and the Bond number. This study can help us to understand the horizontal motion of partially submerged objects at air-liquid interface, such as semi-aquatic insects and marine plants.

  20. Alignment of dust particles by ion drag forces in subsonic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Piel, Alexander

    2011-07-15

    The role of ion drag forces for the alignment of dust particles is studied for subsonic flows. While alignment by wake-field attraction is a well known mechanism for supersonic flows, it is argued here that ion-scattering forces become more important in subsonic ion flows. A model of non-overlapping collisions is introduced and numerical results are discussed. For typical conditions of dusty plasma experiments, alignment by drag forces is found strong enough to overcome the destabilizing force from Coulomb repulsion between dust particles. It turns out that the major contribution to the horizontal restoring force originates from the transverse momentum transfer, which is usually neglected in ion drag force calculations because of an assumed rotational symmetry of the flow.

  1. Conductance of a proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, B.; Lutchyn, R. M.; Glazman, L. I.

    2016-06-01

    We identify the leading processes of electron transport across finite-length segments of proximitized nanowires and build a quantitative theory of their two-terminal conductance. In the presence of spin-orbit interaction, a nanowire can be tuned across the topological transition point by an applied magnetic field. Due to a finite segment length, electron transport is controlled by the Coulomb blockade. Upon increasing of the field, the shape and magnitude of the Coulomb blockade peaks in the linear conductance are defined, respectively, by Andreev reflection, single-electron tunneling, and resonant tunneling through the Majorana modes emerging after the topological transition. Our theory provides the framework for the analysis of experiments with proximitized nanowires [such as reported in S. M. Albrecht et al., Nature (London) 531, 206 (2016), 10.1038/nature17162] and identifies the signatures of the topological transition in the two-terminal conductance.

  2. Cooling of cryogenic electron bilayers via the Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, John King; Friesen, Mark; Joynt, Robert; Coppersmith, S. N.

    2011-09-01

    Heat dissipation in current-carrying cryogenic nanostructures is problematic because the phonon density of states decreases strongly as energy decreases. We show that the Coulomb interaction can prove a valuable resource for carrier cooling via coupling to a nearby cold electron reservoir. Specifically, we consider the geometry of an electron bilayer in a silicon-based heterostructure and analyze the power transfer. We show that, across a range of temperatures, separations, and sheet densities, the electron-electron interaction dominates the phonon heat-dissipation modes as the main cooling mechanism. Coulomb cooling is most effective at low densities, when phonon cooling is least effective in silicon, making it especially relevant for experiments attempting to perform coherent manipulations of single spins.

  3. Vertical variations of coral reef drag forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Shai; Niewerth, Stephan; Koll, Katinka; Shavit, Uri

    2016-05-01

    Modeling flow in a coral reef requires a closure model that links the local drag force to the local mean velocity. However, the spatial flow variations make it difficult to predict the distribution of the local drag. Here we report on vertical profiles of measured drag and velocity in a laboratory reef that was made of 81 Pocillopora Meandrina colony skeletons, densely arranged along a tilted flume. Two corals were CT-scanned, sliced horizontally, and printed using a 3-D printer. Drag was measured as a function of height above the bottom by connecting the slices to drag sensors. Profiles of velocity were measured in-between the coral branches and above the reef. Measured drag of whole colonies shows an excellent agreement with previous field and laboratory studies; however, these studies never showed how drag varies vertically. The vertical distribution of drag is reported as a function of flow rate and water level. When the water level is the same as the reef height, Reynolds stresses are negligible and the drag force per unit fluid mass is nearly constant. However, when the water depth is larger, Reynolds stress gradients become significant and drag increases with height. An excellent agreement was found between the drag calculated by a momentum budget and the measured drag of the individual printed slices. Finally, we propose a modified formulation of the drag coefficient that includes the normal dispersive stress term and results in reduced variations of the drag coefficient at the cost of introducing an additional coefficient.

  4. Drag of buoyant vortex rings.

    PubMed

    Vasel-Be-Hagh, Ahmadreza; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S-K; Turner, John Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Extending from the model proposed by Vasel-Be-Hagh et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 769, 522 (2015)], a perturbation analysis is performed to modify Turner's radius by taking into account the viscous effect. The modified radius includes two terms; the zeroth-order solution representing the effect of buoyancy, and the first-order perturbation correction describing the influence of viscosity. The zeroth-order solution is explicit Turner's radius; the first-order perturbation modification, however, includes the drag coefficient, which is unknown and of interest. Fitting the photographically measured radius into the modified equation yields the time history of the drag coefficient of the corresponding buoyant vortex ring. To give further clarification, the proposed model is applied to calculate the drag coefficient of a buoyant vortex ring at a Bond number of approximately 85; a similar procedure can be applied at other Bond numbers. PMID:26565349

  5. Drag of buoyant vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasel-Be-Hagh, Ahmadreza; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S.-K.; Turner, John Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Extending from the model proposed by Vasel-Be-Hagh et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 769, 522 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.126], a perturbation analysis is performed to modify Turner's radius by taking into account the viscous effect. The modified radius includes two terms; the zeroth-order solution representing the effect of buoyancy, and the first-order perturbation correction describing the influence of viscosity. The zeroth-order solution is explicit Turner's radius; the first-order perturbation modification, however, includes the drag coefficient, which is unknown and of interest. Fitting the photographically measured radius into the modified equation yields the time history of the drag coefficient of the corresponding buoyant vortex ring. To give further clarification, the proposed model is applied to calculate the drag coefficient of a buoyant vortex ring at a Bond number of approximately 85; a similar procedure can be applied at other Bond numbers.

  6. Coulomb dissociation of N,2120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röder, Marko; Adachi, Tatsuya; Aksyutina, Yulia; Alcantara, Juan; Altstadt, Sebastian; Alvarez-Pol, Hector; Ashwood, Nicholas; Atar, Leyla; Aumann, Thomas; Avdeichikov, Vladimir; Barr, M.; Beceiro, Saul; Bemmerer, Daniel; Benlliure, Jose; Bertulani, Carlos; Boretzky, Konstanze; Borge, Maria J. G.; Burgunder, G.; Caamaño, Manuel; Caesar, Christoph; Casarejos, Enrique; Catford, Wilton; Cederkäll, Joakim; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, Marielle; Chulkov, Leonid; Cortina-Gil, Dolores; Crespo, Raquel; Datta Pramanik, Ushasi; Diaz-Fernandez, Paloma; Dillmann, Iris; Elekes, Zoltan; Enders, Joachim; Ershova, Olga; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Fraile, Luis M.; Freer, Martin; Freudenberger, M.; Fynbo, Hans; Galaviz, Daniel; Geissel, Hans; Gernhäuser, Roman; Göbel, Kathrin; Golubev, Pavel; Gonzalez Diaz, D.; Hagdahl, Julius; Heftrich, Tanja; Heil, Michael; Heine, Marcel; Heinz, Andreas; Henriques, Ana; Holl, Matthias; Ickert, G.; Ignatov, Alexander; Jakobsson, Bo; Johansson, Hâkan; Jonson, Björn; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, Nasser; Kanungo, Rituparna; Kelic-Heil, Aleksandra; Knöbel, Ronja; Kröll, Thorsten; Krücken, Reiner; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, Nikolaus; Labiche, Marc; Langer, Christoph; Le Bleis, Tudi; Lemmon, Roy; Lepyoshkina, Olga; Lindberg, Simon; Machado, Jorge; Marganiec, Justyna; Mostazo Caro, Magdalena; Movsesyan, Alina; Najafi, Mohammad Ali; Nilsson, Thomas; Nociforo, Chiara; Panin, Valerii; Paschalis, Stefanos; Perea, Angel; Petri, Marina; Pietri, S.; Plag, Ralf; Prochazka, A.; Rahaman, Md. Anisur; Rastrepina, Ganna; Reifarth, Rene; Ribeiro, Guillermo; Ricciardi, M. Valentina; Rigollet, Catherine; Riisager, Karsten; Rossi, Dominic; Sanchez del Rio Saez, Jose; Savran, Deniz; Scheit, Heiko; Simon, Haik; Sorlin, Olivier; Stoica, V.; Streicher, Branislav; Taylor, Jon; Tengblad, Olof; Terashima, Satoru; Thies, Ronja; Togano, Yasuhiro; Uberseder, Ethan; Van de Walle, J.; Velho, Paulo; Volkov, Vasily; Wagner, Andreas; Wamers, Felix; Weick, Helmut; Weigand, Mario; Wheldon, Carl; Wilson, G.; Wimmer, Christine; Winfield, J. S.; Woods, Philip; Yakorev, Dmitry; Zhukov, Mikhail; Zilges, Andreas; Zuber, Kai; R3B Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Neutron-rich light nuclei and their reactions play an important role in the creation of chemical elements. Here, data from a Coulomb dissociation experiment on N,2120 are reported. Relativistic N,2120 ions impinged on a lead target and the Coulomb dissociation cross section was determined in a kinematically complete experiment. Using the detailed balance theorem, the 19N (n ,γ )20N and 20N (n ,γ ) 21N excitation functions and thermonuclear reaction rates have been determined. The 19 (n ,γ )20N rate is up to a factor of 5 higher at T <1 GK with respect to previous theoretical calculations, leading to a 10% decrease in the predicted fluorine abundance.

  7. Coulomb Energies in ^18Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherr, R.; Fortune, H. T.

    1998-10-01

    Coulomb energies of the ^18Ne mirrors of the levels of ^18O vary considerably from state to state, an effect understood as arising from their different configurations. All the low-lying positive-parity states in these nuclei can be described in terms of two nucleons coupled to an ^16O core plus a collective component (most probably four-particle two-hole (4p-2h)). We have computed Coulomb energies using one such formulation(Lawson, Serduke and Fortune, Phys. Rev. C 14), 1245 (1976).. Two-particle energies arise from coupling a neutron to single-particle states of ^17O, and a proton to the mirror states of ^17F. For the 4p-2h component, we use the ^14O-^14C mass difference, plus a ph Coulomb term(Sherr and Bertsch, Phys. Rev. C 12), 1671 (1975).. Agreement is perhaps slightly better than another such attempt(Nero, Adelberger and Dietrich, Phys. Rev. C 24), 1864 (1981). using wave functions from Benson and Flowers.

  8. Homopolar artificial gravity generator based on frame-dragging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajmar, M.

    2010-05-01

    Space exploration is linked in many ways to the generation and challenges of artificial gravity. Space stations and drag-free satellite platforms are used to provide microgravity environments for scientific experiments. On the other hand, microgravity or reduced gravity environments such as on Moon and Mars are known to put limits for long-term human presence. Large centrifuges in space may provide Earth-like gravity environments during long-term travels, however, such technology certainly has its limits to provide similar environments for human outposts on other moons and planets. One can imagine a different technology using a prediction out of Einstein's general relativity theory which is called frame-dragging. In principle, frame-dragging might be used to generate artificial gravitational fields similar to electric fields generated by time-varying or moving magnetic fields. We will show that it is also possible to generate constant artificial gravitational fields that could provide microgravity or artificial gravity environments. Although such technology is possible in principle, the field strengths calculated from Einstein's theory are too small to be useful so far. However, recently detected anomalies around low-temperature spinning matter as well as fly-by anomalies point to possible enhancement mechanisms that might make an artificial gravity generator based on frame-dragging a reality in the future.

  9. Drag-free satellite control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debra, Daniel B.

    1989-01-01

    A drag-free satellite cancels the effect of external disturbances. Although the forces may be small, a satellite is disturbed by residual air drag, radiation pressure, micrometeorite impact, and other small forces that act on its surface disturbing its orbit, which is principally determined by the gravity field. In some missions, these small perturbations that make the satellite deviate from its purely gravitational orbit are limiting. An internal unsupported proof mass is shielded by the satellite from the external disturbances. The position of the shield (or the main part of the satellite) is measured with respect to the internal proof mass, and this information is used to actuate a propulsion system which moves the satellite to follow the proof mass. A drag-free control system is illustrated. Since the proof mass is shielded it follows a purely gravitational orbit - as does the satellite following it - hence the name drag-free satellite. The idea was conceived by Lange (1964) and has been applied to many mission studies since. In some cases, it is not necessary to cancel the disturbances, only to measure them so they may be taken into account. In such cases, an accelerometer may be a more suitable solution (for example, using the ONERA Cactus or the Bell Aerosystems MESA).

  10. The maximum drag reduction asymptote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, George H.; Hof, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    Addition of long chain polymers is one of the most efficient ways to reduce the drag of turbulent flows. Already very low concentration of polymers can lead to a substantial drag and upon further increase of the concentration the drag reduces until it reaches an empirically found limit, the so called maximum drag reduction (MDR) asymptote, which is independent of the type of polymer used. We here carry out a detailed experimental study of the approach to this asymptote for pipe flow. Particular attention is paid to the recently observed state of elasto-inertial turbulence (EIT) which has been reported to occur in polymer solutions at sufficiently high shear. Our results show that upon the approach to MDR Newtonian turbulence becomes marginalized (hibernation) and eventually completely disappears and is replaced by EIT. In particular, spectra of high Reynolds number MDR flows are compared to flows at high shear rates in small diameter tubes where EIT is found at Re < 100. The research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA grant agreement n° [291734].

  11. OBSTACLE DRAG IN STRATIFIED FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes an experimental study of the drag of two- and three-dimensional bluff obstacles of various cross-stream shapes when towed through a fluid having a stable, linear density gradient with Brunt-Vaisala frequency, N. rag measurements were made directly using a for...

  12. Symmetry breaking for drag minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Marcus; Squires, Todd M.; Brenner, Michael P.

    2005-11-01

    For locomotion at high Reynolds numbers drag minimization favors fore-aft asymmetric slender shapes with blunt noses and sharp trailing edges. On the other hand, in an inertialess fluid the drag experienced by a body is independent of whether it travels forward or backward through the fluid, so there is no advantage to having a single preferred swimming direction. In fact numerically determined minimum drag shapes are known to exhibit almost no fore-aft asymmetry even at moderate Re. We show that asymmetry persists, albeit extremely weakly, down to vanishingly small Re, scaling asymptotically as Re^3. The need to minimize drag to maximize speed for a given propulsive capacity gives one possible mechanism for the increasing asymmetry in the body plans seen in nature, as organisms increase in size and swimming speed from bacteria like E-Coli up to pursuit predator fish such as tuna. If it is the dominant mechanism, then this signature scaling will be observed in the shapes of motile micro-organisms.

  13. Drag and propulsive forces in electric sails with negative polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Torres, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    An electric solar sail (E-sail) is a recent propellantless propulsion concept for a direct exploration of the Solar System. An E-sail consists of a set of bare, conductive tethers at high positive/negative bias, prone to extract solar wind momentum by Coulomb deflection of protons. Additionally, a negatively biased E-sail has been proposed as a concept for de-orbiting space debris with drag forces produced in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The present work focuses on the negative-bias case with a sheath that must be correctly modeled for a flowing plasma ambient. Ion scattering within the sheath and the resulting force are determined for several plasma conditions. Since the plasma flow does reduce the effective range for the ion scattering within the sheath, the resulting force is then reduced. Tethers at very high negative bias should be required for extremely high plasma flow.

  14. Numerical investigation of the effect of sphere dimples on the drag crisis and the Magnus effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Tsubokura, Makoto; Tsunoda, Masaya

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigates the flow over a golf ball and a smooth sphere around the critical Reynolds numbers under both stationary and self-spinning conditions by conducting Large-eddy simulations (LES) based on high resolution unstructured grids. For the stationary cases, the present calculation results validate the promotion of the drag crisis at a relatively lower Reynolds number due to the golf ball dimples. It also shows that the golf ball dimples have a limited effect on the time-dependent lateral force development in the subcritical regime, whereas the dimples are beneficial in suppressing the lateral force oscillations in the supercritical regimes. With spin parameter Γ = 0.1, the drag coefficients for the spinning smooth sphere increase slightly in all Reynolds number regimes when compared to the stationary cases, whereas for the spinning golf ball, the drag force decreases in the critical regime and increases in the supercritical regime. For both spinning models, the inverse Magnus effect was reproduced in the critical regime, whereas in the supercritical regime the ordinary Magnus force was generated. Relatively weaker lift forces were also observed in the cases of the spinning golf balls when compared to the spinning smooth spheres.

  15. Device measures fluid drag on test vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, R.; Judd, J. H.; Leiss, A.

    1965-01-01

    Electromechanical drag balance device measures the aerodynamic drag force acting on a vehicle as it moves through the atmosphere and telemeters the data to a remote receiving station. This device is also used for testing the hydrodynamic drag characteristics of underwater vehicles.

  16. 14 CFR 31.53 - Drag rope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Drag rope. 31.53 Section 31.53 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.53 Drag rope. If a drag rope is used, the end...

  17. 14 CFR 31.53 - Drag rope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Drag rope. 31.53 Section 31.53 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.53 Drag rope. If a drag rope is used, the end...

  18. 14 CFR 31.53 - Drag rope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Drag rope. 31.53 Section 31.53 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.53 Drag rope. If a drag rope is used, the end...

  19. 14 CFR 31.53 - Drag rope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Drag rope. 31.53 Section 31.53 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.53 Drag rope. If a drag rope is used, the end...

  20. 14 CFR 31.53 - Drag rope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Drag rope. 31.53 Section 31.53 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.53 Drag rope. If a drag rope is used, the end...

  1. Rotary photon drag enhanced by a slow-light medium.

    PubMed

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Gibson, Graham; Boyd, Robert W; Padgett, Miles J

    2011-07-01

    Transmission through a spinning window slightly rotates the polarization of the light, typically by a microradian. It has been predicted that the same mechanism should also rotate an image. Because this rotary photon drag has a contribution that is inversely proportional to the group velocity, the image rotation is expected to increase in a slow-light medium. Using a ruby window under conditions for coherent population oscillations, we induced an effective group index of about 1 million. The resulting rotation angle was large enough to be observed by the eye. This result shows that rotary photon drag applies to images as well as polarization. The possibility of switching between different rotation states may offer new opportunities for controlled image coding. PMID:21719672

  2. Studies of friction drag and pressure drag of airfoils using the Eppler program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, William H.

    1988-01-01

    Most previous studies of the drag and two-dimensional airfoils consider only the total drag. The present report gives results of a study of three airfoils, using the Eppler program, to determine the distribution of friction drag along the chord and to obtain relative values of friction drag and pressure drag over a wide range of angle of attack and Reynolds number. The effects of boundary-layer suction in the turbulent region of the boundary layer of two of the airfoils are also investigated. The pressure drag is found to be an important component of the total drag, reaching values of 60 to 80 percent of the total drag near the stall. The use of suction producing a uniform inflow in the turbulent region of the boundary layer results in large increases in maximum lift, and increases the skin-friction drag but reduces or even changes the sign of the pressure drag.

  3. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, David; Senatore, Gaetano

    2009-05-01

    This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS), held from 29 July-2 August 2008 at the University of Camerino. Camerino is an ancient hill-top town located in the Apennine mountains of Italy, 200 kilometres northeast of Rome, with a university dating back to 1336. The Camerino conference was the 11th in a series which started in 1977: 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (hosted by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (hosted by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, New York, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) 2005: Moscow, Russia (hosted by Vladimir E Fortov and Vladimir Vorob'ev). The name of the series was changed in 1996 from Strongly Coupled Plasmas to Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems to reflect a wider range of topics. 'Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems' encompasses diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. The purpose of the conferences is to provide a regular international forum for the presentation and discussion of research achievements and ideas relating to a variety of plasma, liquid and condensed matter systems that are dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphases that have followed new discoveries and new techniques. The field has continued to see new experimental tools and access to new strongly coupled conditions, most recently in the areas of warm matter, dusty plasmas

  4. An entropic understanding of Coulomb force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jin-Ho; Kim, Hyosung

    2012-02-01

    Exploiting Verlinde's proposal on the entropic understanding of Newton's law, we show that Coulomb force could also be understood as an entropically emergent force (rather than as a fundamental force). We apply Kaluza-Klein idea to Verlinde's formalism to obtain Coulomb interaction in the lower dimensions. The kinematics concerning the Kaluza-Klein momenta separates the interaction due to the momentum flow from the gravitational interaction. The momentum-charge conversion relation results in the precise form of Coulomb interaction.

  5. Coulomb Dissociation of 27P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beceiro Novo, S.; Sümmerer, K.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Wimmer, C.; Plag, R.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Aumann, T.; Behr, K.; Boretzky, K.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Datta-Pramanik, U.; Elekes, Z.; Fulop, Z.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Giron, S.; Greife, U.; Hammache, F.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Johansson, H.; Karagiannis, C.; Kiselev, O.; Kurz, N.; Larsson, K.; Le Bleis, T.; Litvinov, Y.; Mahata, K.; Muentz, C.; Nociforo, C.; Ott, W.; Paschalis, S.; Prokopowicz, W.; Rodriguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D.; Simon, H.; Stanoiu, M.; Stroth, J.; Typel, S.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.

    2012-09-01

    In this work the astrophysical 26Si(p,γ)27P reaction is studied using the Coulomb dissociation technique. We performed a 27P Coulomb Dissociation experiment at GSI, Darmstadt (28 May-5 June 2007) using the ALADIN-LAND setup which allows complete-kinematic studies. A secondary 27P beam at 498 AMeV impinging a 515mg/cm2 Pb target was used. The relative energy of the outgoing system (26Si+p) is measured obtaining the resonant states of the 27P. Preliminary results show four resonant states measured at 0.36±0.07, 0.88±0.09, 1.5±0.2, 2.3±0.3 MeV and evidence of a higher state at around 3.1 MeV. The preliminary total cross section obtained for relative energies between 0 and 3 MeV has been measured and yields 55±7 mb.

  6. Doppler Velocimetry of Current Driven Spin Helices in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Luyi

    by electron-electron interactions, leading to remarkable resistance to diffusive spreading of the drifting pulse of spin polarization. Finally, we show that spin helices continue propagate at the same speed as the Fermi sea even when the electron drift velocity exceeds the Fermi velocity of 107 cm s-1. We also use this phase-resolved Doppler velocimetry technique to perform the first simultaneous measurements of drift and diffusion of electron-hole packets in the same two-dimensional electron gas. The results that we obtain strongly violate the picture of electron-hole transport that is presented in the classic textbook treatments of ambipolar dynamics. We find that the rates of transport are controlled almost entirely by the intrinsic frictional force exerted between electrons and holes, rather than the interaction of carriers with phonons or impurities. From the experimental data we obtain the first measurement of the "Coulomb drag" friction between electrons and holes coexisting in the same two-dimensional layer. Moreover, we show that the frictional force thus obtained is in quantitative agreement with theoretically predicted values, which follow entirely from electron density, temperature and fundamental constants, i.e. no adjustable parameters. The understanding of ambipolar transport that we have achieved is an essential prerequisite to the design of those spintronic devices in which spin current is carried by the drift of polarized electrons and holes.

  7. Relativistic symmetries with the trigonometric Pöschl—Teller potential plus Coulomb-like tensor interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babatunde, J. Falaye; Sameer, M. Ikhdair

    2013-06-01

    The Dirac equation is solved to obtain its approximate bound states for a spin-1/2 particle in the presence of trigonometric Pöschl—Teller (tPT) potential including a Coulomb-like tensor interaction with arbitrary spin—orbit quantum number κ using an approximation scheme to substitute the centrifugal terms κ(κ ± 1)r-2. In view of spin and pseudo-spin (p-spin) symmetries, the relativistic energy eigenvalues and the corresponding two-component wave functions of a particle moving in the field of attractive and repulsive tPT potentials are obtained using the asymptotic iteration method (AIM). We present numerical results in the absence and presence of tensor coupling A and for various values of spin and p-spin constants and quantum numbers n and κ. The non-relativistic limit is also obtained.

  8. Unsafe coulomb excitation of {sup 240-244}Pu.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenhoever, I.

    1998-12-01

    The high spin states of {sup 240}Pu and {sup 244}Pu have been investigated with GAMMASPHERE at ATLAS, using Coulomb excitation with a {sup 208}Pb beam at energies above the Coulomb barrier. Data on a transfer channel leading to {sup 242}Pu were obtained as well. In the case of {sup 244}Pu, the yrast band was extended to 34{h_bar}, revealing the completed {pi}i{sub 13/2} alignment, a ''first'' for actinide nuclei. The yrast sequence of {sup 242}Pu was also extended to higher spin and a similar backbend was delineated. In contrast, while the ground state band of {sup 240}Pu was measured up to the highest rotational frequencies ever reported in the actinide region ({approximately} 300 keV), no sign of particle alignment was observed. In this case, several observables such as the large B(E1)/B(E2) branching ratios in the negative parity band, and the vanishing energy staggering between the negative and positive parity bands suggest that the strength of octupole correlations increases with rotational frequency. These stronger correlations may well be responsible for delaying or suppressing the {pi}i{sub 13/2} particle alignment.

  9. Spin-Orbit Coupling and the Conservation of Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hnizdo, V.

    2012-01-01

    In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, the total (i.e. orbital plus spin) angular momentum of a charged particle with spin that moves in a Coulomb plus spin-orbit-coupling potential is conserved. In a classical nonrelativistic treatment of this problem, in which the Lagrange equations determine the orbital motion and the Thomas equation yields the…

  10. Coulombic contribution and fat center vortex model

    SciTech Connect

    Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh; Deldar, Sedigheh

    2007-02-27

    The fat (thick) center vortex model is one of the phenomenological models which is fairly successful to interpret the linear potential between static sources. However, the Coulombic part of the potential has not been investigated by the model yet. In an attempt to get the Coulombic contribution and to remove the concavity of the potentials, we are studying different vortex profiles and vortex sizes.

  11. Stereoscopic Investigations of 3D Coulomb Balls

    SciTech Connect

    Kaeding, Sebastian; Melzer, Andre; Arp, Oliver; Block, Dietmar; Piel, Alexander

    2005-10-31

    In dusty plasmas particles are arranged due to the influence of external forces and the Coulomb interaction. Recently Arp et al. were able to generate 3D spherical dust clouds, so-called Coulomb balls. Here, we present measurements that reveal the full 3D particle trajectories from stereoscopic imaging.

  12. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir E.; Golden, Kenneth I.; Norman, Genri E.

    2006-04-01

    This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS) which was held during the week of 20 24 June 2005 in Moscow, Russia. The Moscow conference was the tenth in a series of conferences. The previous conferences were organized as follows. 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (organized by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (organized by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, NY, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) After 1995 the name of the series was changed from `Strongly Coupled Plasmas' to the present name in order to extend the topics of the conferences. The planned frequency for the future is once every three years. The purpose of these conferences is to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of research accomplishments and ideas relating to a variety of plasma liquid and condensed matter systems, dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Strongly coupled Coulomb systems encompass diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphasis as new discoveries and new methods appear. This year, sessions were organized for invited presentations and posters on dense plasmas and warm matter, astrophysics and dense hydrogen, non-neutral and ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, condensed matter 2D and layered charged-particle systems, Coulomb liquids, and statistical theory of SCCS. Within

  13. Coulomb blockade with neutral modes.

    PubMed

    Kamenev, Alex; Gefen, Yuval

    2015-04-17

    We study transport through a quantum dot in the fractional quantum Hall regime with filling factors ν=2/3 and ν=5/2, weakly coupled to the leads. We account for both injection of electrons to or from the leads, and quasiparticle rearrangement processes between the edge and the bulk of the quantum dot. The presence of neutral modes introduces topological constraints that modify qualitatively the features of the Coulomb blockade (CB). The periodicity of CB peak spacings doubles and the ratio of spacing between adjacent peaks approaches (in the low temperature and large dot limit) a universal value: 2∶1 for ν=2/3 and 3∶1 for ν=5/2. The corresponding CB diamonds alternate their width in the direction of the bias voltage and allow for the determination of the neutral mode velocity, and of the topological numbers associated with it. PMID:25933323

  14. Plane Wave and Coulomb Asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, P. G.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2004-01-01

    A simple plane wave solution of the Schrödinger Helmholtz equation is a quantum eigenfunction obeying both energy and linear momentum correspondence principles. Inclusion of the outgoing wave with scattering amplitude f obeys unitarity and the optical theorem. By closely considering the standard asymptotic development of the plane wave, we show that there is a problem with angular momentum when we consider forward scattering at the point of closest approach and at large impact parameter given semiclassically by (l + 1/2)/k where l is the azimuthal quantum number and may be large (J Leech et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 257901 (2002)). The problem is resolved via non-uniform, non-standard analysis involving the Heaviside step function, unifying classical, semiclassical and quantum mechanics, and the treatment is extended to the case of pure Coulomb scattering.

  15. The Coulombic Lattice Potential of Ionic Compounds: The Cubic Perovskites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francisco, E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents coulombic models representing the particles of a system by point charges interacting through Coulomb's law to explain coulombic lattice potential. Uses rubidium manganese trifluoride as an example of cubic perovskite structure. Discusses the effects on cluster properties. (CW)

  16. Whose drag is it anyway? Drag kings and monarchy in the UK.

    PubMed

    Willox, Annabelle

    2002-01-01

    This chapter will show that the term "drag" in drag queen has a different meaning, history and value to the term "drag" in drag king. By exposing this basic, yet fundamental, difference this paper will expose the problems inherent in the assumption of parity between the two forms of drag. An exposition of how camp has been used to comprehend and theorise drag queens will facilitating an understanding of the parasitic interrelationship between camp and drag queen performances, while a critique of "Towards a Butch-Femme Aesthetic," by Sue Ellen Case, will point out the problematic assumptions made about camp when attributed to a cultural location different to the drag queen. By interrogating the historical, cultural and theoretical similarities and differences between drag kings, butches, drag queens and femmes this paper will expose the flawed assumption that camp can be attributed to all of the above without proviso, and hence expose why drag has a fundamentally different contextual meaning for kings and queens. This chapter will conclude by examining the work of both Judith Halberstam and Biddy Martin and the practical examples of drag king and queen performances provided at the UK drag contest held at The Fridge in Brixton, London on 23 June 1999. PMID:12769284

  17. Drag and drop display & builder

    SciTech Connect

    Bolshakov, Timofei B.; Petrov, Andrey D.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Drag and Drop (DnD) Display & Builder is a component-oriented system that allows users to create visual representations of data received from data acquisition systems. It is an upgrade of a Synoptic Display mechanism used at Fermilab since 2002. Components can be graphically arranged and logically interconnected in the web-startable Project Builder. Projects can be either lightweight AJAX- and SVG-based web pages, or they can be started as Java applications. The new version was initiated as a response to discussions between the LHC Controls Group and Fermilab.

  18. Miniature drag-force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A miniature drag-force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring unsteady as well as steady-state velocity head and flow direction. It consists of a cantilevered beam with strain gages located at the base of the beam as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like those of a lightly damped second-order system with a natural frequency as high as 40 kilohertz depending on beam geometry and material. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Anemometer characteristics and several designs are presented along with discussions of several applications.

  19. Drag-type drill bit

    SciTech Connect

    Short, L.W. Jr.; Barr, J.D.

    1987-04-28

    A drag-type drill bit is described comprising: a bit body having an operating end face; and a multiplicity of superhard cutting elements interlocked to the body. The cutting elements define a multiplicity of cutting areas dispersed over the operating end face of the bit body in a pattern adapted to cause the cutting areas to cut an earth formation to a desired three-dimensional profile as the bit body is rotated, the cutting areas having back rake angles which become more negative with distance from the profile.

  20. Miniature drag-force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A miniature drag force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring unsteady as well as steady state velocity head and flow direction. It consists of a cantilevered beam with strain gages located at the base of the beam as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like those of lightly damped second order system with a natural frequency as high as 40 kilohertz depending on beam geometry and material. The anemometer is used in both forward and reversed flow. Anemometer characteristics and several designs are presented along with discussions of several applications.

  1. Fresnel drag effect in fiber optic gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vali, V.; Berg, M. F.; Shorthill, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development of a low-noise fiber-optic ring interferometer gyroscope. A technique for measuring the Fresnel drag coefficient of optical fibers is described, and the accuracy of the technique is considered. An experiment is performed which allows verification of the Einstein velocity addition theorem to the first nonlinear term. An experimental setup for measuring Fresnel drag is described: it consists of a Sagnac interferometer and a Fresnel drag measurement configuration.

  2. Drag reduction of a hairy disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jun; Hu, David L.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate experimentally the hydrodynamics of a hairy disk immersed in a two-dimensional flowing soap film. Drag force is measured as a function of hair length, density, and coating area. An optimum combination of these parameters yields a drag reduction of 17%, which confirms previous numerical predictions (15%). Flow visualization indicates the primary mechanism for drag reduction is the bending, adhesion, and reinforcement of hairs trailing the disk, which reduces wake width and traps "dead water." Thus, the use of hairy coatings can substantially reduce an object's drag while negligibly increasing its weight.

  3. Transformance: reading the gospel in drag.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeffrey Q

    2004-01-01

    Despite the large body of scholarship on drag and its performance of misogyny, mimicry, and masculinity, little attention has been paid to the role of musical genres in Black drag performance and its reception. This essay explores drag performances of gospel music and its relationship with the spectator at the Biology Bar, a Black gay drag site in Chicago. By examining the shift from the club "space" to the church "place," this research locates several possibilities for queer gospel performances. Through the introduction of a theory of transformance, this essay highlights the contradictions, complications, and complexities of the relationship between the Black church and the Black gay community. PMID:15132488

  4. Nonequilibrium forces between dragged ultrasoft colloids.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sunil P; Winkler, Roland G; Gompper, Gerhard

    2011-10-01

    The dynamical deformation of ultrasoft colloids as well as their dynamic frictional forces are numerically investigated, when one colloid is dragged past another at constant velocity. Hydrodynamic interactions are captured by a particle-based mesoscopic simulation method. At vanishing relative velocity, the equilibrium repulsive force-distance curve is obtained. At large drag velocities, in contrast, we find an apparent attractive force for departing colloids along the dragging direction. The deformation, in the close encounter of colloids, and the energy dissipation are examined as a function of the drag velocity and their separation. PMID:22107322

  5. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag coefficient of

  6. Coexistence and competition of on-site and intersite Coulomb interactions in Mott-molecular-dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliano, R. C.; de Arruda, A. S.; Craco, L.

    2016-02-01

    We reveal the interplay between on-site (U) and intersite (V) Coulomb interactions in the extended two-site Hubbard model. Due to its atomic-like form quantum correlations intrinsic to Mott-molecular-dimers are exactly computed. Our results for physical quantities such as double occupancy and specific heat are consistent with those obtained for the one-band Hubbard model, suggesting that a two-site dimer model is able to capture the essential thermodynamic properties of strongly interacting electron systems. It is noted that intersite Coulomb interactions promote the formation of doublons, which compete with the spin-singlet state induced by the on-site Coulomb repulsion. Our results are expected to be relevant for understanding electronic and thermodynamical properties of interacting electrons in systems with strongly coupled magnetic atoms.

  7. Numerical approach to Coulomb gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.; Bowman, Patrick O.

    2008-07-01

    We calculate the ghost two-point function in Coulomb gauge QCD with a simple model vacuum gluon wave function using Monte Carlo integration. This approach extends the previous analytic studies of the ghost propagator with this ansatz, where a ladder-rainbow expansion was unavoidable for calculating the path integral over gluon field configurations. The new approach allows us to study the possible critical behavior of the coupling constant, as well as the Coulomb potential derived from the ghost dressing function. We demonstrate that IR enhancement of the ghost correlator or Coulomb form factor fails to quantitatively reproduce confinement using Gaussian vacuum wave functional.

  8. Crystallization in two-component Coulomb systems.

    PubMed

    Bonitz, M; Filinov, V S; Fortov, V E; Levashov, P R; Fehske, H

    2005-12-01

    The analysis of Coulomb crystallization is extended from one-component to two-component plasmas. Critical parameters for the existence of Coulomb crystals are derived for both classical and quantum crystals. In the latter case, a critical mass ratio of the two charged components is found, which is of the order of 80. Thus, holes in semiconductors with sufficiently flat valence bands are predicted to spontaneously order into a regular lattice. Such hole crystals are intimately related to ion Coulomb crystals in white dwarf and neutron stars as well as to ion crystals produced in the laboratory. A unified phase diagram of two-component Coulomb crystals is presented and is verified by first-principles computer simulations. PMID:16384315

  9. Miniature drag-force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag-force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilever beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain-gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like those of a second-order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  10. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  11. MAGNETIC DRAG ON HOT JUPITER ATMOSPHERIC WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, Rosalba; Menou, Kristen; Rauscher, Emily

    2010-08-20

    Hot Jupiters, with atmospheric temperatures T {approx}> 1000 K, have residual thermal ionization levels sufficient for the interaction of ions with the planetary magnetic field to result in a sizable magnetic drag on the (neutral) atmospheric winds. We evaluate the magnitude of magnetic drag in a representative three-dimensional atmospheric model of the hot Jupiter HD 209458b and find that it is a plausible mechanism to limit wind speeds in this class of atmospheres. Magnetic drag has a strong geometrical dependence, both meridionally and from the dayside to the nightside (in the upper atmosphere), which could have interesting consequences for the atmospheric flow pattern. By extension, close-in eccentric planets with transiently heated atmospheres will experience time-variable levels of magnetic drag. A robust treatment of magnetic drag in circulation models for hot atmospheres may require iterated solutions to the magnetic induction and Saha equations as the hydrodynamic flow is evolved.

  12. Coulomb Distortion in the Inelastic Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Solvignon, Dave Gaskell, John Arrington

    2009-09-01

    The Coulomb distortion effects have been for a long time neglected in deep inelastic scattering for the good reason that the incident energies were very high. But for energies in the range of earlier data from SLAC or at JLab, the Coulomb distortion could have the potential consequence of affecting the A-dependence of the EMC effect and of the longitudinal to transverse virtual photon absorption cross section ratio $R(x,Q^2)$.

  13. On the modelling of Coulomb friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, S. J.; Tucker, R. W.

    1999-03-01

    This paper analyses two different representations of Coulomb friction in the context of a dynamic simulation of the torsional vibrations of a driven drill-string. A simple model is used to compare the relative merits of a piecewise analytic approach using a discontinuous friction profile to a numerical integration using a smooth nonlinear representation of the Coulomb friction. In both cases the effects of viscous damping on the excitation of torsional relaxation oscillations are exhibited.

  14. Modelling Coulomb Collisions in Anisotropic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Collisional transport in anisotropic plasmas is investigated comparing the theoretical transport coefficients (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2009) for anisotropic particles with the results of the corresponding Langevin equation, obtained as a generalization of Manheimer et al. (1997). References: Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2009), On Coulomb collisions in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 16, 054501. Manheimer, W. M., M. Lampe and G. Joyce (1997), Langevin representation of Coulomb collisions in PIC simulations, J. Comput. Phys., 138, 563-584.

  15. Off-shell Jost solutions for Coulomb and Coulomb-like interactions in all partial waves

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, U.; Bhoi, J.

    2013-01-15

    By exploiting the theory of ordinary differential equations, with judicious use of boundary conditions, interacting Green's functions and their integral transforms together with certain properties of higher transcendental functions, useful analytical expressions for the off-shell Jost solutions for motion in Coulomb and Coulomb-nuclear potentials are derived in maximal reduced form through different approaches to the problem in the representation space. The exact analytical expressions for the off-shell Jost solutions for Coulomb and Coulomb-like potentials are believed to be useful for the description of the charged particle scattering/reaction processes.

  16. Coulomb and nuclear excitations of narrow resonances in 17Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marganiec, J.; Wamers, F.; Aksouh, F.; Aksyutina, Yu.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Aumann, T.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bertulani, C. A.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Chartier, M.; Chatillon, A.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Emling, H.; Ershova, O.; Fraile, L. M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Heil, M.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Hoffmann, J.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Karagiannis, C.; Kiselev, O. A.; Kratz, J. V.; Kulessa, R.; Kurz, N.; Langer, C.; Lantz, M.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Mahata, K.; Müntz, C.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Nyman, G.; Ott, W.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Perea, A.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Richter, A.; Rodriguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D.; Riisager, K.; Savran, D.; Schrieder, G.; Simon, H.; Stroth, J.; Sümmerer, K.; Tengblad, O.; Typel, S.; Weick, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wimmer, C.

    2016-08-01

    New experimental data for dissociation of relativistic 17Ne projectiles incident on targets of lead, carbon, and polyethylene targets at GSI are presented. Special attention is paid to the excitation and decay of narrow resonant states in 17Ne. Distributions of internal energy in the 15O + p + p three-body system have been determined together with angular and partial-energy correlations between the decay products in different energy regions. The analysis was done using existing experimental data on 17Ne and its mirror nucleus 17N. The isobaric multiplet mass equation is used for assignment of observed resonances and their spins and parities. A combination of data from the heavy and light targets yielded cross sections and transition probabilities for the Coulomb excitations of the narrow resonant states. The resulting transition probabilities provide information relevant for a better understanding of the 17Ne structure.

  17. Giant Frictional Drag in Double Bilayer Graphene Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kayoung; Xue, Jiamin; Dillen, David C.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2016-07-01

    We study the frictional drag between carriers in two bilayer graphene flakes separated by a 2-5 nm thick hexagonal boron nitride dielectric. At temperatures (T ) lower than ˜10 K , we observe a large anomalous negative drag emerging predominantly near the drag layer charge neutrality. The anomalous drag resistivity increases dramatically with reducing T , and becomes comparable to the layer resistivity at the lowest T =1.5 K . At low T the drag resistivity exhibits a breakdown of layer reciprocity. A comparison of the drag resistivity and the drag layer Peltier coefficient suggests a thermoelectric origin of this anomalous drag.

  18. Giant Frictional Drag in Double Bilayer Graphene Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kayoung; Xue, Jiamin; Dillen, David C; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2016-07-22

    We study the frictional drag between carriers in two bilayer graphene flakes separated by a 2-5 nm thick hexagonal boron nitride dielectric. At temperatures (T) lower than ∼10  K, we observe a large anomalous negative drag emerging predominantly near the drag layer charge neutrality. The anomalous drag resistivity increases dramatically with reducing T, and becomes comparable to the layer resistivity at the lowest T=1.5  K. At low T the drag resistivity exhibits a breakdown of layer reciprocity. A comparison of the drag resistivity and the drag layer Peltier coefficient suggests a thermoelectric origin of this anomalous drag. PMID:27494492

  19. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2010-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb

  20. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2011-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb.

  1. Helicopter hub fairing and pylon interference drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, D. R.; Sung, D. Y.; Young, L. A.; Louie, A. W.; Stroub, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted to study the aerodynamics of helicopter hub and pylon fairings. The test was conducted in the 7-by 10 Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel (Number 2) at Ames Research Center using a 1/5-scale XH-59A fuselage model. The primary focus of the test was on the rotor hub fairing and pylon mutual interference drag. Parametric studies of pylon and hub fairing geometry were also conducted. This report presents the major findings of the test as well as tabulated force and moment data, flow visualization photographs, and graphical presentations of the drag data. The test results indicate that substantial drag reduction can be attained through the use of a cambered hub fairing with circular arc upper surface and flat lower surface. Furthermore, a considerable portion of the overall drag reduction is attributed to the reduction in the hub-on-pylon interference drag. It is also observed that the lower surface curvature of the fairing has a strong influence on the hub fairing and on pylon interference drag. However, the drag reduction benefit that was obtained by using the cambered hub fairing with a flat lower surface was adversely affected by the clearance between the hub fairing and the pylon.

  2. Turbulent drag reduction in nonionic surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamano, Shinji; Itoh, Motoyuki; Kato, Katsuo; Yokota, Kazuhiko

    2010-05-01

    There are only a few studies on the drag-reducing effect of nonionic surfactant solutions which are nontoxic and biodegradable, while many investigations of cationic surfactant solutions have been performed so far. First, the drag-reducing effects of a nonionic surfactant (AROMOX), which mainly consisted of oleyldimethylamineoxide, was investigated by measuring the pressure drop in the pipe flow at solvent Reynolds numbers Re between 1000 and 60 000. Second, we investigated the drag-reducing effect of a nonionic surfactant on the turbulent boundary layer at momentum-thickness Reynolds numbers Reθ from 443 to 814 using two-component laser-Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry systems. At the temperature of nonionic surfactant solutions, T =25 °C, the maximum drag reduction ratio for AROMOX 500 ppm was about 50%, in the boundary layer flow, although the drag reduction ratio was larger than 60% in pipe flow. Turbulence statistics and structures for AROMOX 500 ppm showed the behavior of typical drag-reducing flow such as suppression of turbulence and modification of near-wall vortices, but they were different from those of drag-reducing cationic surfactant solutions, in which bilayered structures of the fluctuating velocity vectors were observed in high activity.

  3. Magnetic monopoles in quantum spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Olga; Moessner, Roderich; Sondhi, Shivaji

    Typical spin ice materials can be modeled using classical Ising spins. The geometric frustration of the pyrochlore lattice causes the spins to satisfy ice rules, whereas a violation of the ice constraint constitutes an excitation. Flipping adjacent spins fractionalizes the excitation into two monopoles. Long range dipolar spin couplings result in Coulombic interactions between charges, while the leading effect of quantum fluctuations is to provide the monopoles with kinetic energy. We study the effect of adding quantum dynamics to spin ice, a well-known classical spin liquid, with a particular view of how to best detect its presence in experiment. For the weakly diluted quantum spin ice, we find a particularly crisp phenomenon, namely, the emergence of hydrogenic excited states in which a magnetic monopole is bound to a vacancy at various distances.

  4. Drag evaluation of the Bellanca Skyrocket II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregorek, G. M.; Hoffmann, M. J.; Payne, H. E.; Harris, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The Bellanca Skyrocket II, possessor of five world speed records, is a single engine aircraft with high performance that has been attributed to a laminar flow airfoil and an all composite structure. Utilization of composite materials in the Skyrocket II is unique since this selection was made to increase the aerodynamic efficiency of the aircraft. Flight tests are in progress to measure the overall aircraft drag and the wing section drag for comparison with the predicted performance of the Skyrocket. Initial results show the zero lift drag is indeed low, equalling 0.016.

  5. Drag reduction method for gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Lowther, F.E.

    1990-09-25

    This patent describes a method of reducing drag for a gas flowing in a pipeline between a first point and a second point. It comprises: inputting gas at a constant pressure into the pipeline at the first point to establish gas flow in the pipeline between the first and second points; injecting a drag reducer into the gas flow at the first point; monitoring the flowrate of the gas at the second point; and adjusting the injection rate of the drag reducer at the first point until a maximum flowrate of the gas is reached at the second point.

  6. Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb method for the fast evaluation of Coulomb integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashige, Yuki; Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2007-04-01

    The authors propose a new linear-scaling method for the fast evaluation of Coulomb integrals with Gaussian basis functions called the Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb (GFC) method. In this method, the Coulomb potential is expanded in a basis of mixed Gaussian and finite-element auxiliary functions that express the core and smooth Coulomb potentials, respectively. Coulomb integrals can be evaluated by three-center one-electron overlap integrals among two Gaussian basis functions and one mixed auxiliary function. Thus, the computational cost and scaling for large molecules are drastically reduced. Several applications to molecular systems show that the GFC method is more efficient than the analytical integration approach that requires four-center two-electron repulsion integrals. The GFC method realizes a near linear scaling for both one-dimensional alanine α-helix chains and three-dimensional diamond pieces.

  7. Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb method for the fast evaluation of Coulomb integrals.

    PubMed

    Kurashige, Yuki; Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2007-04-14

    The authors propose a new linear-scaling method for the fast evaluation of Coulomb integrals with Gaussian basis functions called the Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb (GFC) method. In this method, the Coulomb potential is expanded in a basis of mixed Gaussian and finite-element auxiliary functions that express the core and smooth Coulomb potentials, respectively. Coulomb integrals can be evaluated by three-center one-electron overlap integrals among two Gaussian basis functions and one mixed auxiliary function. Thus, the computational cost and scaling for large molecules are drastically reduced. Several applications to molecular systems show that the GFC method is more efficient than the analytical integration approach that requires four-center two-electron repulsion integrals. The GFC method realizes a near linear scaling for both one-dimensional alanine alpha-helix chains and three-dimensional diamond pieces. PMID:17444700

  8. Penetration drag in loosely packed granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bless, Stephan; Omidvar, Mehdi; Iskander, Magued; New York University Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The drag coefficient for penetration of granular materials by conical-nosed penetrators was computed by assuming the particles are non-interacting and rebound elastically off of the advancing penetrator. The solution was C =4 [sin(theta)]**2, where theta is the half angle of the cone. Experiments were conducted in which the drag coefficient was measured over the range 30 to 80 m/s for four types of sand: Ottawa silica sand, crushed quartz glass, coral sand, and aragonite sand. The sands were tested at relative densities of 40 and 80%. The drag coefficients for the low density materials were in excellent agreement with this simple model. The high density material had a drag considerably larger than predicted, presumably because of particle-to-particle interactions.

  9. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the minimum induced drag of wings. The topics include: 1) The History of Spanload Development of the optimum spanload Winglets and their implications; 2) Horten Sailplanes; and 3) Flight Mechanics & Adverse yaw.

  10. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    SciTech Connect

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  11. Drag Reduction Tests on Supersonic Transport Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Langley researchers recently completed supersonic tests in the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel on a nonlinear design for a supersonic transport. Although the drag reduction measured during the tests was not as great as that predicted using computational methods, significant drag reductions were achieved. Future tests will be conducted at a higher Reynolds number, which will be more representative of flight conditions. These tests will be used to identify a supersonic transport configuration that provides maximum drag reduction. Reducing drag decreases operating cost by improving fuel consumption and lowering aircraft weight. As a result, this research has the potential to help make a future high-speed civil transport (HSCT) an affordable means of travel for the flying public.

  12. Thermal Casimir drag in fluctuating classical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démery, Vincent; Dean, David S.

    2011-07-01

    A uniformly moving inclusion which locally suppresses the fluctuations of a classical thermally excited field is shown to experience a drag force that depends on the dynamics of the field. It is shown that in a number of cases the linear friction coefficient is dominated by short distance fluctuations and takes a very simple form. Examples where this drag can occur are for stiff objects, such as proteins, nonspecifically bound to more flexible ones such as polymers and membranes.

  13. The Minimum Induced Drag of Aerofoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, M. M.

    1979-01-01

    Equations are derived to demonstrate which distribution of lifting elements result in a minimum amount of aerodynamic drag. The lifting elements were arranged (1) in one line, (2) parallel lying in a transverse plane, and (3) in any direction in a transverse plane. It was shown that the distribution of lift which causes the least drag is reduced to the solution of the problem for systems of airfoils which are situated in a plane perpendicular to the direction of flight.

  14. Integrated lift/drag controller for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olcott, J. W.; Seckel, E.; Ellis, D. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A system for altering the lift/drag characteristics of powered aircraft to provide a safe means of glide path control includes a control device integrated for coordination action with the aircraft throttle. Such lift/drag alteration devices as spoilers, dive brakes, and the like are actuated by manual operation of a single lever coupled with the throttle for integrating, blending or coordinating power control. Improper operation of the controller is inhibited by safety mechanisms.

  15. Atomistically informed solute drag in Al Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Curtin, W. A.

    2008-07-01

    Solute drag in solute-strengthened alloys, caused by diffusion of solute atoms around moving dislocations, controls the stress at deformation rates and temperatures useful for plastic forming processes. In the technologically important Al-Mg alloys, the solute drag stresses predicted by classical theories are much larger than experiments, which is resolved in general by eliminating the singularity of the dislocation core via Peierls-Nabarro-type models. Here, the drag stress versus dislocation velocity is computed numerically using a realistic dislocation core structure obtained from an atomistic model to investigate the role of the core and obtain quantitative stresses for comparison with experiment. The model solves a discrete diffusion equation in a reference frame moving with the dislocation, with input solute enthalpies and diffusion activation barriers in the core computed by or estimated from atomistic studies. At low dislocation velocities, the solute drag stress is controlled by bulk solute diffusion because the core diffusion occurs too quickly. In this regime, the drag stress can be obtained using a Peierls-Nabarro model with a core spreading parameter tuned to best match the atomistic models. At intermediate velocities, both bulk and core diffusion can contribute to the drag, leading to a complex stress-velocity relationship showing two peaks in stress. At high velocities, the drag stress is controlled solely by diffusion within and across the core. Like the continuum models, the drag stress is nearly linear in solute concentration. The Orowan relationship is used to connect dislocation velocity to deformation strain rate. Accounting for the dependence of mobile dislocation density on stress, the simulations are in good agreement with experiments on Al-Mg alloys over a range of concentrations and temperatures.

  16. Photon drag effect in carbon nanotube yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obraztsov, Alexander N.; Lyashenko, Dmitry A.; Fang, Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H.; Obraztsov, Petr A.; Garnov, Sergei V.; Svirko, Yuri P.

    2009-06-01

    We demonstrate that in graphitic nanocarbon materials, combination of ballistic conductivity and strong electron photon coupling opens a unique opportunity to observe transfer of momentum of the electromagnetic radiation to free carriers. The resulting drag of quasiballistically propagating electrons can be employed, in particular, to visualize the temporal profile, polarization, and propagation direction of the laser pulse. In this letter, we report the giant photon drag effect in yarns made of multiwall carbon nanotubes.

  17. 1/f Noise in a Coulomb Glass.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Clare C.; Shtengel, Kirill

    2002-03-01

    Low frequency 1/f noise is found in Coulomb glasses, among other systems with slow relaxation. It has been recently studied in detail in Si:B in the experimental work of Massey and Lee [1]. They concluded that their findings were inconsistent with the single-particle mechanisms proposed earlier. We show that the observed noise can be produced by charge fluctuations due to electrons hopping between isolated sites and a percolating network at low temperatures [2]. Coulomb interactions are included through the Coulomb gap in the density of states. The low frequency noise spectrum goes as ω^-α with α slightly larger than 1. This result, together with the temperature dependence of α and the noise amplitude are in good agreement with the experiments of Massey and Lee. [1] J. G. Massey and Mark Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3986 (1997). [2] Kirill Shtengel and Clare C. Yu (2001), cond-mat/0111302.

  18. Spin vibronics in interacting nonmagnetic molecular nanojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, S.; Brüggemann, J.; Thorwart, M.

    2015-07-01

    We show that in the presence of ferromagnetic electronic reservoirs and spin-dependent tunnel couplings, molecular vibrations in nonmagnetic single molecular transistors induce an effective intramolecular exchange magnetic field. It generates a finite spin accumulation and precession for the electrons confined on the molecular bridge and occurs under (non)equilibrium conditions. The effective exchange magnetic field is calculated here to lowest order in the tunnel coupling for a nonequilibrium transport setup. Coulomb interaction between electrons is taken into account as well as a finite electron-phonon coupling. We show that for realistic physical parameters, an effective spin-phonon coupling emerges. It is induced by quantum many-body interactions, which are either of electron-phonon or Coulomb type. We investigate the precession and accumulation of the confined spins as function of bias and gate voltages as well as their dependence on the angle enclosed by the magnetizations between the left and right reservoir.

  19. Flow drag and heat transfer characteristics of drag-reducing nanofluids with CuO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping-Yang; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Zhen-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A new kind of aqueous CuO nanofluid with drag-reducing performance was developed. The new working fluid was an aqueous CTAC (cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) solution with CuO nanoparticles added and has both special effects of drag-reducing and heat transfer enhancement. An experiment was carried out to investigate the forced convective flow and heat transfer characteristics of conventional drag reducing fluid (aqueous CTAC solution) and the new drag-reducing nanofluid in a test tube with an inner diameter of 25.6 mm. Results indicated that there were no obvious differences of the drag-reducing characteristics between conventional drag reducing fluid and new drag-reducing nanofluid. However, their heat transfer characteristics were obvious different. The heat transfer characteristics of the new drag-reducing nanofluid significantly depend on the liquid temperature, the nanoparticle concentration and the CTAC concentration. The heat transfer enhancement technology of nanofluid could be applied to solve the problem of heat transfer deterioration for conventional drag-reducing fluids.

  20. A preliminary design of a drag-free satellite and its application to geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, B. O.; Debra, D. B.; Kaula, W. M.

    1969-01-01

    The design of a drag-free satellite and its application to measuring tidal interaction of the earth and tesseral harmonics are discussed. Principle areas of discussion are: (1) the feasibility of making geophysical measurements which are not possible with conventional satellites, and (2) design of attitude and translation control systems for spinning vehicle and possible coupling of attitude and translation control for gravity stabilized vehicles.

  1. Experimental drag histories of shocked spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestridge, Katherine; Orlicz, Greg; Martinez, Adam

    2015-11-01

    The horizontal shock tube (HST) facility at Los Alamos is used to investigate the drag forces on micrometer-sized particles dispersed in air when they are accelerated by a shock. Eight-frame, high-speed particle tracking velocimetry/accelerometry (PTVA) diagnostics are implemented to measure the trajectory of individual particles with high spatial and temporal resolution, and a shadowgraphy system is used to measure the shock position on each image. We present experiments over a range of Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers, particle sizes, and particle densities that explore the drag forces on solid, spherical, non-deforming particles. Experimental drag coefficients are calculated from eight dynamic measurements of particle position versus time, for Mach 1.3 and Mach 1.2 experiments. Experimental results show drag coefficients significantly larger than those predicted by the standard drag model for solid, spherical particles. These results are consistent with measurements made by Rudinger (1970) and Sommerfeld (1985). We will present experimental results and analysis of unsteady drag as a function of particle Reynolds number, Mach number and Stokes number.

  2. Measurement of drag and its cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBra, D. B.; Conklin, J. W.

    2011-05-01

    The design of drag cancellation missions of the future will take advantage of the technology experience of the past. The importance of data for modeling of the atmosphere led to at least six types of measurement: (a) balloon flights, (b) missile-launched falling spheres, (c) the 'cannonball' satellites of Ken Champion with accelerometers for low-altitude drag measurement (late 1960s and early 1970s), (d) the Agena flight of LOGACS (1967), a Bell MESA accelerometer mounted on a rotating platform to spectrally shift low-frequency errors in the accelerometer, (e) a series of French low-level accelerometers (e.g. CACTUS, 1975), and (f) correction of differential accelerations for drag errors in measuring gravity gradient on a pair of satellites (GRACE, 2002). The independent invention of the drag-free satellite concept by Pugh and Lange (1964) to cancel external disturbance added implementation opportunities. Its first flight application was for ephemeris prediction improvement with the DISCOS flight (1972)—still the only extended free test mass flight. Then successful flights for reduced disturbance environment for science measurement with gyros on GP-B (2004) and for improved accuracy in geodesy and ocean studies (GOCE, 2009) each using accelerometer measurements to control the drag-canceling thrust. LISA, DECIGO, BBO and other gravity wave-measuring satellite systems will push the cancellation of drag to new levels.

  3. Bioinspired surfaces for turbulent drag reduction.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Kevin B; Gose, James W; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we discuss how superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) can provide friction drag reduction in turbulent flow. Whereas biomimetic SHSs are known to reduce drag in laminar flow, turbulence adds many new challenges. We first provide an overview on designing SHSs, and how these surfaces can cause slip in the laminar regime. We then discuss recent studies evaluating drag on SHSs in turbulent flow, both computationally and experimentally. The effects of streamwise and spanwise slip for canonical, structured surfaces are well characterized by direct numerical simulations, and several experimental studies have validated these results. However, the complex and hierarchical textures of scalable SHSs that can be applied over large areas generate additional complications. Many studies on such surfaces have measured no drag reduction, or even a drag increase in turbulent flow. We discuss how surface wettability, roughness effects and some newly found scaling laws can help explain these varied results. Overall, we discuss how, to effectively reduce drag in turbulent flow, an SHS should have: preferentially streamwise-aligned features to enhance favourable slip, a capillary resistance of the order of megapascals, and a roughness no larger than 0.5, when non-dimensionalized by the viscous length scale.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. PMID:27354731

  4. 14 CFR 25.937 - Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. 25...-drag limiting systems. Turbopropeller power airplane propeller-drag limiting systems must be designed... results in propeller drag in excess of that for which the airplane was designed under § 25.367. Failure...

  5. 14 CFR 23.937 - Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. 23... General § 23.937 Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. (a) Turbopropeller-powered airplane propeller-drag... normal or emergency operation results in propeller drag in excess of that for which the airplane...

  6. 14 CFR 25.937 - Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. 25...-drag limiting systems. Turbopropeller power airplane propeller-drag limiting systems must be designed... results in propeller drag in excess of that for which the airplane was designed under § 25.367. Failure...

  7. 14 CFR 25.937 - Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. 25...-drag limiting systems. Turbopropeller power airplane propeller-drag limiting systems must be designed... results in propeller drag in excess of that for which the airplane was designed under § 25.367. Failure...

  8. 14 CFR 25.937 - Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. 25...-drag limiting systems. Turbopropeller power airplane propeller-drag limiting systems must be designed... results in propeller drag in excess of that for which the airplane was designed under § 25.367. Failure...

  9. 14 CFR 23.937 - Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. 23... General § 23.937 Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. (a) Turbopropeller-powered airplane propeller-drag... normal or emergency operation results in propeller drag in excess of that for which the airplane...

  10. 14 CFR 23.937 - Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. 23... General § 23.937 Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. (a) Turbopropeller-powered airplane propeller-drag... normal or emergency operation results in propeller drag in excess of that for which the airplane...

  11. 14 CFR 23.937 - Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. 23... General § 23.937 Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. (a) Turbopropeller-powered airplane propeller-drag... normal or emergency operation results in propeller drag in excess of that for which the airplane...

  12. 14 CFR 23.937 - Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. 23... General § 23.937 Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. (a) Turbopropeller-powered airplane propeller-drag... normal or emergency operation results in propeller drag in excess of that for which the airplane...

  13. 14 CFR 25.937 - Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. 25...-drag limiting systems. Turbopropeller power airplane propeller-drag limiting systems must be designed... results in propeller drag in excess of that for which the airplane was designed under § 25.367. Failure...

  14. Coulomb force as an entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Tower

    2010-05-15

    Motivated by Verlinde's theory of entropic gravity, we give a tentative explanation to the Coulomb's law with an entropic force. When trying to do this, we find the equipartition rule should be extended to charges and the concept of temperature should be reinterpreted. If one accepts the holographic principle as well as our generalizations and reinterpretations, then Coulomb's law, the Poisson equation, and the Maxwell equations can be derived smoothly. Our attempt can be regarded as a new way to unify the electromagnetic force with gravity, from the entropic origin. Possibly some of our postulates are related to the D-brane picture of black hole thermodynamics.

  15. Coulomb balls in Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Block, D.; Arp, O.; Piel, A.; Melzer, A.

    2005-10-31

    Recently, it was shown that it is possible to confine spherical dust clouds in a plasma. It was found that these dust clouds have a crystalline structure which differs notably from the well known fcc, bcc and hcp order in extended crystalline systems. The experiments show that the particles arrange in nested shells with hexagonal order on individual shells. The high transparency and the rather slow time scales of Coulomb balls allow to observe individual particles with video microscopy techniques and therefore to determine the structural properties of Coulomb balls with high accuracy. This contribution presents a comparison of experimental results and MD-Simulations.

  16. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Emergent behaviour from electron-transport properties is routinely observed in systems with dimensions approaching the nanoscale. However, analogous mesoscopic behaviour resulting from ionic transport has so far not been observed, most probably because of bottlenecks in the controlled fabrication of subnanometre nanopores for use in nanofluidics. Here, we report measurements of ionic transport through a single subnanometre pore junction, and the observation of ionic Coulomb blockade: the ionic counterpart of the electronic Coulomb blockade observed for quantum dots. Our findings demonstrate that nanoscopic, atomically thin pores allow for the exploration of phenomena in ionic transport, and suggest that nanopores may also further our understanding of transport through biological ion channels.

  17. Efficient evaluation of the Coulomb force in the Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashige, Yuki; Nakajima, Takahito; Sato, Takeshi; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2010-06-01

    We propose an efficient method for evaluating the Coulomb force in the Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb (GFC) method, which is a linear-scaling approach for evaluating the Coulomb matrix and energy in large molecular systems. The efficient evaluation of the analytical gradient in the GFC is not straightforward as well as the evaluation of the energy because the SCF procedure with the Coulomb matrix does not give a variational solution for the Coulomb energy. Thus, an efficient approximate method is alternatively proposed, in which the Coulomb potential is expanded in the Gaussian and finite-element auxiliary functions as done in the GFC. To minimize the error in the gradient not just in the energy, the derived functions of the original auxiliary functions of the GFC are used additionally for the evaluation of the Coulomb gradient. In fact, the use of the derived functions significantly improves the accuracy of this approach. Although these additional auxiliary functions enlarge the size of the discretized Poisson equation and thereby increase the computational cost, it maintains the near linear scaling as the GFC and does not affects the overall efficiency of the GFC approach.

  18. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    SciTech Connect

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  19. A Study of Ion Drag for Ground and Microgravity Dusty Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Taylor; Thomas, Edward

    2015-11-01

    This presentation presents the results of a recent study of the interaction between charged dust particles and plasma ions through the ion drag force in a dc glow discharge plasma. Measurements of the dust particles motion are carried out using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). When an electrostatic perturbation is applied to the dust cloud, the particle motion, in response to the perturbation, is shown to reverse direction as the gas pressure is increased. An analysis of the dust particle motion and background plasma parameters suggests that there is a competition between the ion drag and electric forces on the particles. These forces are calculated for a range of pressures using detailed measurements of the plasma parameters carried out by a single Langmuir probe. The analysis of these measurements suggests that a change in the relative magnitude of the Coulomb collision ion drag compared to the electric force is a probable explanation for the observed reversal of direction of motion as the neutral gas pressure is increased. The application of these results to microgravity studies of dusty plasmas will be discussed. Support provided by NASA-JPL (JPL-RSA 1471384).

  20. Superfluid spin transport through easy-plane ferromagnetic insulators.

    PubMed

    Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2014-06-01

    Superfluid spin transport-dissipationless transport of spin-is theoretically studied in a ferromagnetic insulator with easy-plane anisotropy. We consider an open geometry where the spin current is injected into the ferromagnet from one side by a metallic reservoir with a nonequilibrium spin accumulation and ejected into another metallic reservoir located downstream. Spin transport is studied using a combination of magnetoelectric circuit theory, Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert phenomenology, and microscopic linear-response theory. We discuss how spin superfluidity can be probed in a magnetically mediated negative electron-drag experiment. PMID:24949786

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Coulomb Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M

    2002-05-17

    A swift ion creates a track of electronic excitations in the target material. A net repulsion inside the track can cause a ''Coulomb Explosion'', which can lead to damage and sputtering of the material. Here we report results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of Coulomb explosion for a cylindrical track as a function of charge density and neutralization/quenching time, {tau}. Screening by the free electrons is accounted for using a screened Coulomb potential for the interaction among charges. The yield exhibits a prompt component from the track core and a component, which dominates at higher excitation density, from the heated region produced. For the cases studied, the number of atoms ejected per incident ion, i.e. the sputtering yield Y, is quadratic with charge density along the track as suggested by simple models. Y({tau} = 0.2 Debye periods) is nearly 20% of the yield when there is no neutralization ({tau} {yields} {infinity}). The connections between ''Coulomb explosions'', thermal spikes and measurements of electronic sputtering are discussed.

  2. BRST invariance in Coulomb gauge QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andraši, A.; Taylor, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In the Coulomb gauge, the Hamiltonian of QCD contains terms of order ħ2, identified by Christ and Lee, which are non-local but instantaneous. The question is addressed how do these terms fit in with BRST invariance. Our discussion is confined to the simplest, O(g4) , example.

  3. Coulombic Effects in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Clowers, Brian H.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been increasingly employed in a number of applications. When coupled to mass spectrometry (MS), IMS becomes a powerful analytical tool for separating complex samples and investigating molecular structure. Therefore, improvements in IMS-MS instrumentation, e.g. IMS resolving power and sensitivity, are highly desirable. Implementation of an ion trap for accumulation and pulsed ion injection to IMS based on the ion funnel has provided considerably increased ion currents, and thus a basis for improved sensitivity and measurement throughput. However, large ion populations may manifest Coulombic effects contributing to the spatial dispersion of ions traveling in the IMS drift tube, and reduction in the IMS resolving power. In this study, we present an analysis of Coulombic effects on IMS resolution. Basic relationships have been obtained for the spatial evolution of ion packets due to Coulombic repulsion. The analytical relationships were compared with results of a computer model that simulates IMS operation based on a first principles approach. Initial experimental results reported here are consistent with the computer modeling. A noticeable decrease in the IMS resolving power was observed for ion populations of >10,000 elementary charges. The optimum IMS operation conditions which would minimize the Coulombic effects are discussed. PMID:19438247

  4. The Pioneer Anomaly as a Coulomb Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Steven

    2016-06-01

    The anomalous acceleration of the Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 spacecraft can be explained as a Coulomb attraction between the positively-charged Solar System (due to cosmic rays) and the negatively-charged spacecraft (due to alpha-particle emission from the radioisotope thermoelectric generators).

  5. Thermodynamic Theory of Spherically Trapped Coulomb Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrighton, Jeffrey; Dufty, James; Bonitz, Michael; K"{A}Hlert, Hanno

    2009-11-01

    The radial density profile of a finite number of identical charged particles confined in a harmonic trap is computed over a wide ranges of temperatures (Coulomb coupling) and particle numbers. At low temperatures these systems form a Coulomb crystal with spherical shell structure which has been observed in ultracold trapped ions and in dusty plasmas. The shell structure is readily reproduced in simulations. However, analytical theories which used a mean field approachfootnotetext[1]C. Henning et al., Phys. Rev. E 74, 056403 (2006) or a local density approximationfootnotetext[2]C. Henning et al., Phys. Rev. E 76, 036404 (2007) have, so far, only been able to reproduce the average density profile. Here we present an approach to Coulomb correlations based on the hypernetted chain approximation with additional bridge diagrams. It is demonstrated that this model reproduces the correct shell structure within a few percent and provides the basis for a thermodynamic theory of Coulomb clusters in the strongly coupled fluid state.footnotetext[3]J. Wrighton, J.W. Dufty, H. K"ahlert and M. Bonitz, J. Phys. A 42, 214052 (2009) and Phys. Rev. E (2009) (to be submitted)

  6. Frictional drag reduction by bubble injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    The injection of gas bubbles into a turbulent boundary layer of a liquid phase has multiple different impacts on the original flow structure. Frictional drag reduction is a phenomenon resulting from their combined effects. This explains why a number of different void-drag reduction relationships have been reported to date, while early works pursued a simple universal mechanism. In the last 15 years, a series of precisely designed experimentations has led to the conclusion that the frictional drag reduction by bubble injection has multiple manifestations dependent on bubble size and flow speed. The phenomena are classified into several regimes of two-phase interaction mechanisms. Each regime has inherent physics of bubbly liquid, highlighted by keywords such as bubbly mixture rheology, the spectral response of bubbles in turbulence, buoyancy-dominated bubble behavior, and gas cavity breakup. Among the regimes, bubbles in some selected situations lose the drag reduction effect owing to extra momentum transfer promoted by their active motions. This separates engineers into two communities: those studying small bubbles for high-speed flow applications and those studying large bubbles for low-speed flow applications. This article reviews the roles of bubbles in drag reduction, which have been revealed from fundamental studies of simplified flow geometries and from development of measurement techniques that resolve the inner layer structure of bubble-mixed turbulent boundary layers.

  7. Theoretical and experimental investigation of additive drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibulkin, Merwin

    1954-01-01

    The significance of additive drag is discussed and equations for determining its approximate value are derived for annular and open-nose inlets. Charts are presented giving values of additive drag coefficient over a range of free-stream Mach numbers for open and for annular-nose inlets with conical flow at the inlet. The effects on additive drag of variable inlet-total-pressure recovery and static pressures on the centerbody are investigated and an analytical method of predicting the variation of pressure on the centerbody with mass-flow ratio is given. Experimental additive-drag values are presented for a series of 20 degree and 25 degree cone half-angle inlets and one open-nose inlet operating at free-stream Mach numbers of 1.8 and 1.6. A comparison with the theoretical values of additive drag shows excellent agreement for the open-nose inlet and moderately good agreement for the annular inlets. (author)

  8. Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, R. B.; Cai, W.

    2016-04-01

    The drag force exerted on a moving dislocation by a field of mobile solutes is studied in the steady state. The drag force is numerically calculated as a function of the dislocation velocity for both perfect and extended dislocations. The sensitivity of the non-dimensionalized force-velocity curve to the various controlling parameters is assessed, and an approximate analytical force-velocity expression is given. A non-dimensional parameter S characterizing the strength of the solute-dislocation interaction, the background solute fraction ?, and the dislocation character angle ?, are found to have the strongest influence on the force-velocity curve. Within the model considered here, a perfect screw dislocation experiences no solute drag, but an extended screw dislocation experiences a non-zero drag force that is about 10 to 30% of the drag on an extended edge dislocation. The solutes can change the spacing between the Shockley partials in both stationary and moving extended dislocations, even when the stacking fault energy remains unaltered. Under certain conditions, the solutes destabilize an extended dislocation by either collapsing it into a perfect dislocation or causing the partials to separate unboundedly. It is proposed that the latter instability may lead to the formation of large faulted areas and deformation twins in low stacking fault energy materials containing solutes, consistent with experimental observations of copper and stainless steel containing hydrogen.

  9. [Drag-out in metal finishing industries].

    PubMed

    Laforest, V; Piatyszek, E; Mojaat, W; Bourgois, J

    2005-10-01

    Currently, environmental regulations induce industrialists to implement source reduction techniques in order to comply with the prevention principle toward sustainable development. The project PIPSI (PIlotage Propre des Systèmes Industriels/industrial system dean piloting) financing by Rhone-Alps Region is carried out with the aim to contribute to this objective. The study presented in this article concerns the pollution transfer in a metal finishing treatment line in order to minimise the environmental impact obtained notably with the pollution balance. Drag-out and draining phenomena have been particularly studied. Results obtained showed that a 10 seconds of draining reduced drag-out from 65 to 85% in terms of pieces design. Moreover, during the experiments, 5 drag-out levels were identified by medium values from 26 to 1700 ml m(-2). So that, either a piece can be associated to a level or knowing the piece drag-out level, it is possible to evaluate its medium drag-out value. Then the pollution balance will be obtained more easily. PMID:16342539

  10. Analysis of a fully packed loop model arising in a magnetic Coulomb phase.

    PubMed

    Jaubert, L D C; Haque, M; Moessner, R

    2011-10-21

    The Coulomb phase of spin ice, and indeed the I(c) phase of water ice, naturally realize a fully packed two-color loop model in 3D. We present a detailed analysis of the statistics of these loops: we find loops spanning the system multiple times hosting a finite fraction of all sites while the average loop length remains finite. We contrast the behavior with an analogous 2D model. We connect this body of results to properties of polymers, percolation and insights from Schramm-Loewner evolution processes. We also study another extended degree of freedom, called worms, which appear as "Dirac strings" in spin ice. We discuss implications of these results for the efficiency of numerical cluster algorithms, and address implications for the ordering properties of a broader class of magnetic systems, e.g., with Heisenberg spins, such as CsNiCrF(6) or ZnCr(2)O(4). PMID:22107573