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Sample records for spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate

  1. Transgenic cotton over-producing spinach sucrose phosphate synthase showed enhanced leaf sucrose synthesis and improved

    E-print Network

    Strauss, Richard E.

    Transgenic cotton over-producing spinach sucrose phosphate synthase showed enhanced leaf sucrose of transgenic cotton plants (Gos- sypium hirsutum cv. Coker 312 elite) was produced that over-expressed spinach in terms of foreign gene insertion, expression of spinach SPS, production of spinach SPS protein

  2. Multisite phosphorylation of spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L.; Huber, S.C. )

    1990-05-01

    Spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase is phosphorylated both in vivo and in vitro on serine residues. Phosphorylation of SPS in vivo yields twelve major phosphopeptides after a tryptic digest and two dimensional mapping. The in vivo labeling of three of these SPS P-peptides is reduced in illuminated leaves where the extracted enzyme is activated relative to that of dark leaves. Two of these inhibitory sites are phosphorylated as well when SPS is inactivated in vitro using ({sup 32}P)ATP. In vivo phosphorylation of two other sites is enhanced during mannose feeding of the leaves (in light or dark) which produces the highest activation state of SPS. Overall, the results confirm that light-dark regulation of SPS activity occurs as a result of regulatory seryl-phosphorylation and involves a balance between phosphorylation of sites which inhibit or stimulate activity. Regulation of the SPS protein kinase that inhibits activity is relatively unaffected by phosphate but inhibited by G1c 6-P (IC{sub 50}{approx}5 mM), which may explain the control of SPS activation state by light-dark signals.

  3. Inactivation of highly activated spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase by dephosphorylation. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L. ); Huber, S.C. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh ); Hite, D.R.C.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) can be phosphorylated and inactivated in vitro with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. Thus, it was surprising to find that SPS, extracted from leaves fed mannose in the light to highly activate the enzyme, could be inactivated in an ATP-independent manner when desalted crude extracts were preincubated at 25{degrees}C before assay. The spontaneous inactivation involved a loss in activity measured with limiting substrate concentrations in the presence of the inhibitor, Pi, without affecting maximum catalytic activity. The spontaneous inactivation was unaffected by exogenous carrier proteins and protease inhibitors, but was inhibited by inorganic phosphate, fluoride, and molybdate, suggesting that a phosphatase may be involved. Okadaic acid, a potent inhibitor of mammalian type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases, had no effect up to 5 micromolar. Inactivation was stimulated about twofold by exogenous Mg{sup 2+} and was relatively insensitive to Ca{sup 2+} and to pH over the range pH 6.5 to 8.5. Radioactive phosphate incorporated into SPS during labeling of excised leaves with ({sup 32}P)Pi (initially in the dark and then in the light with mannose) was lost with time when desalted crude extracts were incubated at 25 C, and the loss in radiolabel was substantially reduced by fluoride. These results provide direct evidence for action of an endogenous phosphatase(s) using SPS as substrate.

  4. Protein phosphorylation as a mechanism for regulation of spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L.A.; Huber, S.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation has been identified as a mechanism for the light-dark regulation of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) activity, previously shown to involve some type of covalent modification of the enzyme. The 120 kD subunit of SPS in extracts of light-treated leaves was labeled with {sup 32}P in the presence of ({gamma}-{sup 32}P) ATP. In this in vitro system, {sup 32}P incorporation into light-activated SPS was dependent upon ATP and magnesium concentrations as well as time, and was closely paralleled by inactivation of the enzyme. The soluble protein kinase involved in the interconversion of SPS between activated and deactivated forms may be specific for SPS as it co-purifies with SPS during partial purification of the enzyme. The kinase appears not to be calcium activated and no evidence has been obtained for metabolite control of SPS phosphorylation/inactivation.

  5. Site-directed mutagenesis of serine 158 demonstrates its role in spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; McMichael, R. Jr; Krause, K. P.; Kurreck, J.; Sonnewald, U.; Stitt, M.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) was performed to investigate the role of Ser158 in the modulation of spinach leaf SPS. Tobacco plants expressing the spinach wild-type (WT), S158A, S158T and S157F/S158E SPS transgenes were produced. Expression of transgenes appeared not to reduce expression of the tobacco host SPS. SPS activity in the WT and the S158T SPS transgenics showed light/dark modulation, whereas the S158A and S157F/S158E mutants were not similarly light/dark modulated: the S158A mutant enzyme was not inactivated in the dark, and the S157F/S158E was not activated in the light. The inability to modulate the activity of the S158A mutant enzyme by protein phosphorylation was demonstrated in vitro. The WT spinach enzyme immunopurified from dark transgenic tobacco leaves had a low initial activation state, and could be activated by PP2A and subsequently inactivated by SPS-kinase plus ATP. Rapid purification of the S158A mutant enzyme from dark leaves of transgenic plants using spinach-specific monoclonal antibodies yielded enzyme that had a high initial activation state, and pre-incubation with leaf PP2A or ATP plus SPS-kinase (the PKIII enzyme) caused little modulation of activity. The results demonstrate the regulatory significance of Ser158 as the major site responsible for dark inactivation of spinach SPS in vivo, and indicate that the significance of phosphorylation is the introduction of a negative charge at the Ser158 position.

  6. Site-specific regulatory interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase and 14-3-3 proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; Athwal, G. S.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We report an Mg2+-dependent interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) and endogenous 14-3-3 proteins, as evidenced by co-elution during gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation. The content of 14-3-3s associated with an SPS immunoprecipitate was inversely related to activity, and was specifically reduced when tissue was pretreated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside, suggesting metabolite control in vivo. A synthetic phosphopeptide based on Ser-229 was shown by surface plasmon resonance to bind a recombinant plant 14-3-3, and addition of the phosphorylated SPS-229 peptide was found to stimulate the SPS activity of an SPS:14-3-3 complex. Taken together, the results suggest a regulatory interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with Ser-229 of SPS.

  7. Expression of a maize sucrose phosphate synthase in tomato alters leaf carbohydrate partitioning.

    PubMed Central

    Worrell, A C; Bruneau, J M; Summerfelt, K; Boersig, M; Voelker, T A

    1991-01-01

    We isolated a complementary DNA sequence for the enzyme sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) from maize utilizing a limited amino acid sequence. The 3509-bp cDNA encodes a 1068-amino acid polypeptide. The identity of the cDNA was confirmed by the ability of the cloned sequence to direct sucrose phosphate synthesis in Escherichia coli. Because no plant-specific factors were necessary for enzymatic activity, we can conclude that SPS enzyme activity is conferred by a single gene product. Sequence comparisons showed that SPS is distantly related to the enzyme sucrose synthase. When expressed from a ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit promoter in transgenic tomatoes, total SPS activity was boosted up to sixfold in leaves and appeared to be physiologically uncoupled from the tomato regulation mechanism. The elevated SPS activity caused a reduction of starch and increase of sucrose in the tomato leaves. This result clearly demonstrates that SPS is involved in the regulation of carbon partitioning in the leaves. PMID:1840396

  8. Sucrose Phosphate Synthase Expression at the Cell and Tissue Level Is Coordinated with Sucrose Sink-to-Source Transitions in Maize Leaf.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, W. H.; Im, K. H.; Chourey, P. S.

    1996-01-01

    Immunohistological analyses for sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) show that the protein is localized in both bundle-sheath cells (BS) and mesophyll cells (M) in maize (Zea mays) leaves. In young leaves, SPS protein was predominantly in the BS, whereas mature leaves showed nearly equal levels of signal in both BS and M. A cell-type-specific response was also seen in light and dark treatments. Dark treatments led to reduced signal in M; however, little or no change was detected in BS. We suggest that SPS in BS is engaged in sucrose biosynthesis by both photoassimilatory and starch turnover reactions in maize leaves. In addition, we suggest that the enzyme in BS may play a major role in the early biosynthesis of sucrose in young leaves. These cell-specific changes in expression in situ were in agreement with the estimates of extractable enzyme activity from isolated BS and M of mature leaves (R. Ohsugi, S.C. Huber [1987] Plant Physiol 84: 1096-1101). In contrast, western blot analyses did not show any significant changes in the levels of SPS protein in either young or mature leaves subsequent to similar dark treatments. It is interesting that the northern blot analyses indicate that the steady-state levels of SPS transcripts were markedly reduced after dark treatments of > 12 h. Overall, our results indicate that Sps gene expression in maize leaf is modulated at multiple levels of controls by both developmental and environmental factors. PMID:12226344

  9. Interaction between Silver Nanoparticles and Spinach Leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Li, H.; Zhang, Y.; Riser, E.; He, S.; Zhang, W.

    2013-12-01

    Interactions of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) with plant surfaces are critical to assessing the bioavailability of ENPs to edible plants and to further evaluating impacts of ENPs on ecological health and food safety. Silver nanoparticles (i.e., nanoAg) could enter the agroecosystems either as an active ingredient in pesticides or from other industrial and consumer applications. Thus, in the events of pesticide application, rainfall, and irrigation, vegetable leaves could become in contact and then interact with nanoAg. The present study was to assess whether the interaction of nanoAg with spinach leaves can be described by classical sorption models and to what extent it depends on and varies with dispersion methods, environmental temperature, and ion release. We investigated the stability and ion release of nanoAg dispersed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, 1%) and humic acid (HA, 10 mg C/L) solutions, as well as sorption and desorption of nanoAg on and from the fresh spinach leaf. Results showed SDS-nanoAg released about 2%-8% more Ag ion than HA-nanoAg. The sorption of Ag ion, described by the Freundlich model in the initial concentration range of 0.6-50 mg/L, was 2-4 times higher than that of nanoAg. The sorption of nanoAg on spinach leaf can be fitted by the Langmuir model, and the maximum sorption amount of HA-nanoAg and SDS-nanoAg was 0.21 and 0.41 mg/g, respectively. The higher sorption of SDS-nanoAg relative to that of HA-nanoAg could be partially resulted from the higher release of Ag ion from the former. The maximum desorption amount of HA-nanoAg and SDS-nanoAg in 1% SDS solution was 0.08 and 0.10 mg/g, respectively. NanoAg attachment on and its penetration to the spinach leaf was visualized by the Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS). It is equally important that the less sorption of nanoAg under low environmental temperature could be partially due to the closure of stomata, as verified by SEM-EDS. CytoViva Hyperspectral Imaging System was also employed to map the distribution of nanoAg in the leaf profile. Significant sorption of nanoAg on spinach leaf should urge the precaution with potential widespread use of ENPs in agriculture.

  10. SCREENING FOR RESISTANCE TO STEMPHYLIUM LEAF SPOT OF SPINACH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf spot disease of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) caused by Stemphylium botryosum has continued to occur in California and six other states since 1997, posing another challenge for growers to produce high quality and defect-free products. No resistance to the pathogen has been reported in spinach....

  11. Characterization of interactions between Escherichia coli O157:H7 with epiphytic bacteria in vitro and on spinach leaf surfaces

    E-print Network

    Falkinham, Joseph

    and on spinach leaf surfaces Gabriela Lopez-Velasco a,1 , Heather A. Tydings a,1 , Renee R. Boyer a , Joseph O coli O157:H7 and spinach phylloepi- phytic bacteria and identified those that influence persistence for their ability to inhibit or to enhance the growth of E. coli O157:H7 in vitro and on spinach leaf surfaces

  12. Sucrose metabolism: Anabaena sucrose-phosphate synthase and sucrose-phosphate phosphatase define minimal functional domains shuffled during evolution.

    PubMed

    Cumino, Andrea; Curatti, Leonardo; Giarrocco, Laura; Salerno, Graciela L

    2002-04-24

    Based on the functional characterization of sucrose biosynthesis related protiens[SBP: sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), sucrose-phosphate phosphatase (SPP), and sucrose synthase (SuS)] in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and sequence analysis, we have shown that SBP are restricted to cyanobacterium species and plants, and that they are multidomain proteins with modular architecture. Anabaena SPS, a minimal catalytic SPS unit, defines a glucosyltransferase domain present in all SPSs and SuSs. Similarly, Anabaena SPP defines a phosphohydrolase domain characteristic of all SPPs and some SPSs. Phylogenetic analysis points towards the evolution of modern cyanobacterial and plant SBP from a bidomainal common ancestral SPS-like gene. PMID:12062401

  13. Abscisic acid accumulation in spinach leaf slices in the presence of penetrating and nonpenetrating solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Creelman, R.A.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1985-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) accumulated in detached, wilted leaves of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv Savoy Hybrid 612) and reached a maximum level within 3 to 4 hours. The increase in ABA over that found in detached turgid leaves was approximately 10-fold. The effects of water stress could be mimicked by the use of thin slices of spinach leaves incubated in the presence of 0.6 molar mannitol, a compound which causes plasmolysis (loss of turgor). When spinach leaf slices were incubated with ethylene glycol, a compound which rapidly penetrates the cell membrane causing a decrease in the osmotic potential of the tissue and only transient loss of turgor, no ABA accumulated. Spinach leaf slices incubated in both ethylene glycol and mannitol had ABA levels similar to those found when slices were incubated with mannitol alone. Increases similar to those found with mannitol also occurred when Aquacide III, a highly purified form of polyethylene glycol, was used. When spinach leaf slices were incubated with solutes which are supposed to disturb membrane integrity no increase in ABA was observed. These data indicate that, with respect to the accumulation of ABA, mannitol caused a physical stress rather than a chemical stress.

  14. EFFECT OF LIGHT INTENSITY, SOIL TYPE, AND LITHIUM ADDITION ON SPINACH AND MUSTARD GREENS LEAF CONSTITUENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26o 8' N, Long. 97o 57' W) between 14 Dec. 2005 and 17 Feb 2006 to evaluate the effect of soil type, light environment, and lithium addition on the leaf nutrients of spinach and mustard greens. Cultivars Samish (Spinacia oleracea) and...

  15. Loss of the two major leaf isoforms of sucrose-phosphate synthase in Arabidopsis thaliana limits sucrose synthesis and nocturnal starch degradation but does not alter carbon partitioning during photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Volkert, Kathrin; Debast, Stefan; Voll, Lars M.; Voll, Hildegard; Schießl, Ingrid; Hofmann, Jörg; Schneider, Sabine; Börnke, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc)-phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyses one of the rate-limiting steps in the synthesis of Suc in plants. The Arabidopsis genome contains four annotated SPS genes which can be grouped into three different families (SPSA1, SPSA2, SPSB, and SPSC). However, the functional significance of this multiplicity of SPS genes is as yet only poorly understood. All four SPS isoforms show enzymatic activity when expressed in yeast although there is variation in sensitivity towards allosteric effectors. Promoter–reporter gene analyses and quantitative real-time reverse transcription–PCR studies indicate that no two SPS genes have the same expression pattern and that AtSPSA1 and AtSPSC represent the major isoforms expressed in leaves. An spsa1 knock-out mutant showed a 44% decrease in leaf SPS activity and a slight increase in leaf starch content at the end of the light period as well as at the end of the dark period. The spsc null mutant displayed reduced Suc contents towards the end of the photoperiod and a concomitant 25% reduction in SPS activity. In contrast, an spsa1/spsc double mutant was strongly impaired in growth and accumulated high levels of starch. This increase in starch was probably not due to an increased partitioning of carbon into starch, but was rather caused by an impaired starch mobilization during the night. Suc export from excised petioles harvested from spsa1/spsc double mutant plants was significantly reduced under illumination as well as during the dark period. It is concluded that loss of the two major SPS isoforms in leaves limits Suc synthesis without grossly changing carbon partitioning in favour of starch during the light period but limits starch degradation during the dark period. PMID:24994761

  16. Sucrose phosphate synthase and sucrose phosphate phosphatase interact in planta and promote plant growth and biomass accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Victoria J.; Park, Ji-Young; Unda, Faride; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2015-01-01

    Bioinformatic analysis indicates that sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) contains a putative C-terminal sucrose phosphate phosphatase (SPP)-like domain that may facilitates the binding of SPP. If an SPS–SPP enzyme complex exists, it may provide sucrose biosynthesis with an additional level of regulation, forming a direct metabolic channel for sucrose-6-phosphate between these two enzymes. Herein, the formation of an enzyme complex between SPS and SPP was examined, and the results from yeast two-hybrid experiments suggest that there is indeed an association between these proteins. In addition, in planta bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) was observed in Arabidopsis seedlings, providing physical evidence for a protein interaction in live cells and in real time. Finally, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) was employed in an attempt to detect SPS–SPP interactions visually. The findings clearly demonstrated that SPS interacts with SPP and that this interaction impacts soluble carbohydrate pools and affects carbon partitioning to starch. Moreover, a fusion construct between the two genes promotes plant growth in both transgenic Arabidopsis and hybrid poplar. PMID:25873678

  17. Malate and Dihydroxyacetone Phosphate-dependent Nitrate Reduction in Spinach Leaf Protoplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Rathnam, C. K. M.

    1978-01-01

    Isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. var. Bloomsdale) leaf protoplasts reduced nitrate at rates of 9 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour in light with a 3- to 4-fold stimulation in the presence of HCO3?. A similar stimulation of nitrate reduction in the absence of CO2 fixation was obtained by the addition of malate, oxaloacetate (OAA), phospho-3-glyceric acid (PGA), or dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). Stimulation by malate and DHAP was light-independent, while the PGA and OAA effect was light-dependent. Nitrate reduction was found to be coupled to the cytoplasmic oxidation of DHAP or malate. The PGA/DHAP and OAA/malate shuttle across the chloroplast envelope has been demonstrated to support CO2 fixation and/or nitrate reduction. The leaf protoplasts readily assimilated nitrate into amino-N in a stoichiometric relationship. PMID:16660489

  18. Identification of Ser-543 as the major regulatory phosphorylation site in spinach leaf nitrate reductase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, M.; Shiraishi, N.; Campbell, W. H.; Yoo, B. C.; Harmon, A. C.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Spinach leaf NADH:nitrate reductase (NR) responds to light/dark signals and photosynthetic activity in part as a result of rapid regulation by reversible protein phosphorylation. We have identified the major regulatory phosphorylation site as Ser-543, which is located in the hinge 1 region connecting the cytochrome b domain with the molybdenum-pterin cofactor binding domain of NR, using recombinant NR fragments containing or lacking the phosphorylation site sequence. Studies with NR partial reactions indicated that the block in electron flow caused by phosphorylation also could be localized to the hinge 1 region. A synthetic peptide (NR6) based on the phosphorylation site sequence was phosphorylated readily by NR kinase (NRk) in vitro. NR6 kinase activity tracked the ATP-dependent inactivation of NR during several chromatographic steps and completely inhibited inactivation/phosphorylation of native NR in vitro. Two forms of NRk were resolved by using anion exchange chromatography. Studies with synthetic peptide analogs indicated that both forms of NRk had similar specificity determinants, requiring a basic residue at P-3 (i.e., three amino acids N-terminal to the phosphorylated serine) and a hydrophobic residue at P-5. Both forms are strictly calcium dependent but belong to distinct families of protein kinases because they are distinct immunochemically.

  19. Photosynthesis-related infrared light transmission changes in spinach leaf segments

    SciTech Connect

    Akimoto, T.

    1985-10-01

    The time courses of infrared light transmission changes and fluorescence induced by light in spinach leaf segments were measured. The illumination by red light exhibited a complex wave pattern. The transmission approached the baseline after repeating decreases and increases. Illumination by far-red light decreased the transmission. One of the differences between the two responses was the difference between the two amplitudes of the first increasing component. The component in the red light response was larger than the component in the far-red light response. The transmission decrease by far-red light is supposed to correspond to ''red drop.'' The transmission decrease by far-red light was suppressed by red light. This is due to an activation of a transmission-increasing component. This probably corresponds to ''enhancement.'' A proportional correlation existed between the intensity of far-red light and the minimum intensity of red light that suppressed the transmission decrease induced by far-red light. The component which made Peak D in the time course of fluorescence yield and the first increasing component in the transmission changes were suppressed by intense light.

  20. UPDATE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF TRANSGENIC COTTON OVER-EXPRESSING SUCROSE PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE

    E-print Network

    Strauss, Richard E.

    1416 UPDATE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF TRANSGENIC COTTON OVER-EXPRESSING SUCROSE PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE C. H Lubbock, TX John G. Gannaway Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Lubbock, TX Gay M. Jividen Cotton mature cotton fiberseven underadverse environmentalconditions such as cool nights. Background biochemical

  1. Antisense repression of sucrose phosphate synthase in transgenic muskmelon alters plant growth and fruit development

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hongmei; Ma, Leyuan; Zhao, Cong; Hao, Hui; Gong, Biao; Yu, Xiyan; Wang, Xiufeng

    2010-03-12

    To unravel the roles of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), we reduced its activity in transgenic muskmelon plants by an antisense approach. For this purpose, an 830 bp cDNA fragment of muskmelon sucrose phosphate synthase was expressed in antisense orientation behind the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus. The phenotype of the antisense plants clearly differed from that of control plants. The transgenic plant leaves were markedly smaller, and the plant height and stem diameter were obviously shorter and thinner. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the membrane degradation of chloroplast happened in transgenic leaves and the numbers of grana and grana lamella in the chloroplast were significantly less, suggesting that the slow growth and weaker phenotype of transgenic plants may be due to the damage of the chloroplast ultrastructure, which in turn results in the decrease of the net photosynthetic rate. The sucrose concentration and levels of sucrose phosphate synthase decreased in transgenic mature fruit, and the fruit size was smaller than the control fruit. Together, our results suggest that sucrose phosphate synthase may play an important role in regulating the muskmelon plant growth and fruit development.

  2. Physical and Kinetic Evidence for an Association between Sucrose-Phosphate Synthase and Sucrose-Phosphate Phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Echeverria, E.; Salvucci, M. E.; Gonzalez, P.; Paris, G.; Salerno, G.

    1997-01-01

    The possible formation of a multienzyme complex between sucrose (Suc)-phosphate synthase (SPS) and Suc-phosphate phosphatase (SPP) was examined by measuring the rates of Suc-6-phosphate (Suc-6-P) synthesis and hydrolysis in mixing experiments with partially purified enzymes from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and rice (Oryza sativa) leaves. The addition of SPP to SPS stimulated the rate of Suc-6-P synthesis. SPS inhibited the hydrolysis of exogenous Suc-6-P by SPP when added in the absence of its substrate (i.e. UDP-glucose) but stimulated SPP activity when the SPS substrates were present and used to generate Suc-6-P directly in the reaction. Results from isotope-dilution experiments suggest that Suc-6-P was channeled between SPS and SPP. A portion of the SPS activity comigrated with SPP during native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, providing physical evidence for an enzyme-enzyme interaction. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that SPS and SPP associate to form a multienzyme complex. PMID:12223802

  3. Spinach leaf chloroplast CO sub 2 and NO sub 2 sup minus photoassimilations do not compete for photogenerated reductant

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.M. )

    1988-12-01

    Potential competition between CO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} photoassimilation for photogenerated reductant (e.g. reduced ferredoxin and NADPH) was examined employing isolates of mesophyll cells and intact chloroplasts derived from mature source spinach leaves. Variations in the magnitude of incident light energy were used to manipulate the supply of reductant in situ within chloroplasts. Leaf cell and plastid isolates were fed with saturating CO{sub 2} and/or NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} to produce the highest demand for reductant by CO{sub 2} and/or NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} assimilatory processes (enzymes). Even in the presence of CO{sub 2} fixation, NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} reduction in intact leaf cell isolates as well as plastid isolates was maximal at light energies as low as 50 to 200 microeinsteins per second per square meter. Simultaneously, 500 to 800 microeinsteins per second per square meter were required to support maximal CO{sub 2} assimilation. Regardless of the magnitude of the incident light energy, CO{sub 2} assimilation did not repress NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} reduction, nor were these two processes mutually repressed. These observations have been interpreted to mean that reduced ferredoxin levels in situ in the plastids of mature source leaf mesophyll cells were adequate to supply the concurrent maximal demands exerted by enzymes associated with CO{sub 2} as well as with inorganic nitrogen photoassimilation.

  4. Modeling electroporation of the non-treated and vacuum impregnated heterogeneous tissue of spinach leaves

    E-print Network

    Ljubljana, University of

    Modeling electroporation of the non-treated and vacuum impregnated heterogeneous tissue of spinach August 2014 Available online 30 August 2014 Keywords: Spinach leaf Electroporation Numerical modeling Vacuum impregnation Uniform electroporation of the heterogeneous structure of spinach leaf cross section

  5. Summer (subarctic) versus winter (subtropic) production affects spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf bionutrients: vitamins (C, E, Folate, K1, provitamin A), lutein, phenolics, and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Lester, Gene E; Makus, Donald J; Hodges, D Mark; Jifon, John L

    2013-07-24

    Comparison of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) cultivars Lazio and Samish grown during the summer solstice in the subarctic versus the winter solstice in the subtropics provided insight into interactions between production environment (light intensity), cultivar, and leaf age/maturity/position affecting bionutrient concentrations of vitamins (C, E, folate, K1, provitamin A), lutein, phenolics, and antioxidants. Growing spinach during the winter solstice in the subtropics resulted in increased leaf dry matter %, oxidized (dehydro) ascorbic acid (AsA), ?- and ?-tocopherol, and total phenols but lower reduced (free) AsA, ?-carotene, folate, and antioxidant capacity compared to summer solstice-grown spinach in the subarctic. Both cultivars had similar bionutrients, except for higher dehydroAsA, and lower ?- and ?-tocopherol in 'Samish' compared to 'Lazio'. For most bionutrients measured, there was a linear, and sometimes quadratic, increase in concentrations from bottom to top canopy leaves. However, total phenolics and antioxidant capacity increased basipetally. The current study has thus demonstrated that dehydroAsA, ?-tocopherol, and ?-tocopherol were substantially lower in subarctic compared to subtropical-grown spinach, whereas the opposite relationship was found for antioxidant capacity, ?-carotene, and folates (vitamin B9). The observations are consistent with previously reported isolated effects of growth environment on bionutrient status of crops. The current results clearly highlight the effect of production environment (predominantly radiation capture), interacting with genetics and plant phenology to alter the bionutrient status of crops. While reflecting the effects of changing growing conditions, these results also indicate potential alterations in the nutritive value of foods with anticipated shifts in global climatic conditions. PMID:23834651

  6. Activation of SPS from darkened spinach leaves by an endogenous protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, S.C.; Huber, J.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Sucrose-phosphate synthase from darkened spinach leaves has a low activation state but can undergo a time-dependent activation in desalted leaf extracts that is inhibited by Pi, molybdate, okadaic acid and vanadate, but stimulated by fluoride. SPS labeled in vivo with ({sup 32}P)Pi in excised leaves in the dark loses incorporated {sup 32}P with time when extracts are incubated at 25{degree}C. This loss is largely prevented by vanadate, suggesting that an endogenous protein phosphatase can use SPS as substrate. Changes in phosphorylation state are closely paralleled by changes in SPS activation state. The spontaneous activation achieved in the extracts can be reversed by addition of 2 mM MgATP. Feeding okadaic acid to darkened leaves prevents light activation of SPS suggesting that the endogenous protein phosphatase is similar to the type-1 enzyme of animal tissues. Overall, the results are consistent with the notion that light activation of SPS involves dephosphorylation of inhibitory phosphorylation site(s). Regulation of the protein phosphatase by Pi may be of physiological significance.

  7. Deep two-photon microscopic imaging through brain tissue using the second singlet state from fluorescent agent chlorophyll ? in spinach leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; An Nguyen, Thien; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-06-01

    Two-photon (2P) excitation of the second singlet (S) state was studied to achieve deep optical microscopic imaging in brain tissue when both the excitation (800 nm) and emission (685 nm) wavelengths lie in the "tissue optical window" (650 to 950 nm). S2 state technique was used to investigate chlorophyll ? (Chl ?) fluorescence inside a spinach leaf under a thick layer of freshly sliced rat brain tissue in combination with 2P microscopic imaging. Strong emission at the peak wavelength of 685 nm under the 2P S state of Chl ? enabled the imaging depth up to 450 ?m through rat brain tissue.

  8. Chilling Delays Circadian Pattern of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase and Nitrate Reductase Activity in Tomato1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tamara L.; Tucker, Dawn E.; Ort, Donald R.

    1998-01-01

    Overnight low-temperature exposure inhibits photosynthesis in chilling-sensitive species such as tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and cucumber by as much as 60%. In an earlier study we showed that one intriguing effect of low temperature on chilling-sensitive plants is to stall the endogenous rhythm controlling transcription of certain nuclear-encoded genes, causing the synthesis of the corresponding transcripts and proteins to be mistimed when the plant is rewarmed. Here we show that the circadian rhythm controlling the activity of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and nitrate reductase (NR), key control points of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in plant cells, is delayed in tomato by chilling treatments. Using specific protein kinase and phosphatase inhibitors, we further demonstrate that the chilling-induced delay in the circadian control of SPS and NR activity is associated with the activity of critical protein phosphatases. The sensitivity of the pattern of SPS activity to specific inhibitors of transcription and translation indicates that there is a chilling-induced delay in SPS phosphorylation status that is caused by an effect of low temperature on the expression of a gene coding for a phosphoprotein phosphatase, perhaps the SPS phosphatase. In contrast, the chilling-induced delay in NR activity does not appear to arise from effects on NR phosphorylation status, but rather from direct effects on NR expression. It is likely that the mistiming in the regulation of SPS and NR, and perhaps other key metabolic enzymes under circadian regulation, underlies the chilling sensitivity of photosynthesis in these plant species. PMID:9733534

  9. Summer (sub-arctic) versus winter (sub-tropical) production affects on spinach leaf bio-nutrients: Vitamins (C, E, Folate, K1, provitamin A), lutein, phenolics, and antioxidants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparison of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) cultivars Lazio and Samish grown during the summer solstice in the sub-arctic versus the winter solstice in the sub-tropics provided insight into interactions between plant environment (day length, light intensity, ambient temperatures), cultivar and leaf...

  10. A high-performance liquid chromatography-based radiometric assay for sucrose-phosphate synthase and other UDP-glucose requiring enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Salvucci, M.E.; Crafts-Brandner, S.J. )

    1991-05-01

    A method for product analysis that eliminates a problematic step in the radiometric sucrose-phosphate synthase assay is described. The method uses chromatography on a boronate-derivatized high-performance liquid chromatography column to separate the labeled product, (14C)sucrose phosphate, from unreacted uridine 5{prime}-diphosphate-(14C)glucose (UDP-Glc). Direct separation of these compounds eliminates the need for treatment of the reaction mixtures with alkaline phosphatase, thereby avoiding the problem of high background caused by contaminating phosphodiesterase activity in alkaline phosphatase preparations. The method presented in this paper can be applied to many UDP-Glc requiring enzymes; here the authors show its use for determining the activities of sucrose-phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase, and uridine diphosphate-glucose pyrophosphorylase in plant extracts.

  11. Epidemiology and control of spinach downy mildew in coastal California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most serious threat to global fresh market spinach production is spinach downy mildew, caused by the obligate biotrophic pathogen, Peronospora effusa. Downy mildew causes yellow chlorotic lesions on spinach leaf tissue, often accompanied by abundant sporulation on the undersides of leaves. Very ...

  12. Inhibition of Bacterial Pathogens in Medium and on Spinach Leaf Surfaces using Plant-Derived Antimicrobials Loaded in Surfactant Micelles.

    PubMed

    Ruengvisesh, Songsirin; Loquercio, Andre; Castell-Perez, Elena; Taylor, T Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulation of hydrophobic plant essential oil components (EOC) into surfactant micelles can assist the decontamination of fresh produce surfaces from bacterial pathogens during postharvest washing. Loading of eugenol and carvacrol into surfactant micelles of polysorbate 20 (Tween 20), Surfynol® 485W, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and CytoGuard® LA 20 (CG20) was determined by identification of the EOC/surfactant-specific maximum additive concentration (MAC). Rheological behavior of dilute EOC-containing micelles was then tested to determine micelle tolerance to shearing. Antimicrobial efficacy of EOC micelles against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serotype Saintpaul was first evaluated by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). Pathogen-inoculated spinach was treated with eugenol-containing micelles applied via spraying or immersion methods. SDS micelles produced the highest MACs for EOCs, while Tween 20 loaded the lowest amount of EOCs. Micelles demonstrated Newtonian behavior in response to shearing. SDS and CG20-derived micelles containing EOCs produced the lowest MICs and MBCs for pathogens. E. coli O157:H7 and S. Saintpaul were reduced on spinach surfaces by application of eugenol micelles, though no differences in numbers of surviving pathogens were observed when methods of antimicrobial micelle application (spraying, immersion) was compared (P ? 0.05). Data suggest eugenol in SDS and CG20 micelles may be useful for produce surface decontamination from bacterial pathogens during postharvest washing. PMID:26444985

  13. Extraction and characterization of mixed phase KNO2-KNO3 nanocrystals derived from flat-leaf green spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, S.; Mohanta, D.

    2013-01-01

    Naturally available green spinach, which is a rich source of potassium, was used as the key ingredient to extract mixed-phase ferroelectric crystals of nitrite and nitrate derivatives (KNO2 + KNO3). The KNO3 phase was found to be dominant for higher pH values, as revealed by the x-ray diffraction patterns. The characteristic optical absorption spectra exhibited intra-band ?-?* electronic transitions, whereas Fourier transform infrared spectra exhibited characteristic N-O stretching vibrations. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed a broad endothermic peak at ˜121.8 °C, highlighting a transition from phase II to I via phase III of KNO3. Obtaining nanoscale ferroelectrics via the adoption of green synthesis is economically viable for large-scale production and possible application in ferroelectric elements/devices.

  14. Testing models of fatty acid transfer and lipid synthesis in spinach leaf using in vivo oxygen-18 labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, M.; Ohlrogge, J.

    1999-12-01

    Oxygen-18 labeling has been applied to the study of plant lipid biosynthesis for the first time. [{sup 13}C{sub 2}{sup 18}O{sub 2}]Acetate was incubated with spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves and the {sup 18}O content in fatty acid methyl esters isolated from different lipid classes measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fatty acids isolated from lipids synthesized within the plastid, such as monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, show an {sup 18}O content consistent with the exogenous acetate undergoing a single activation step and with the direct utilization of acyl-acyl carrier protein by the acyl transferases of the chloroplast. In contrast, fatty acids isolated from lipids assembled in the cytosol, such as phosphatidylcholine, show a 50% reduction in the {sup 18}O content. This is indicative of export of the fatty acyl groups from the plastid via a free carboxylate anion, and is consistent with the acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase:acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase mediated export mechanism. If this were not the case and the acyl group was transferred directly from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an acyl acceptor on the cytosolic side, there would be either complete retention of {sup 18}O or, less likely, complete loss of {sup 18}O, but not a 50% loss of {sup 18}O. Thus, existing models for fatty acid transfer from the plastid and for spatially separate synthesis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic lipids have both been confirmed.

  15. Mild Water Stress of Phaseolus vulgaris Plants Leads to Reduced Starch Synthesis and Extractable Sucrose Phosphate Synthase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Vassey, Terry L.; Sharkey, Thomas D.

    1989-01-01

    Mild water stress, on the order of ?1.0 megapascals xylem water potential, can reduce the rate of photosynthesis and eliminate the inhibition of photosynthesis caused by O2 in water-stress-sensitive plants such as Phaseolus vulgaris. To investigate the lack of O2 inhibition of photosynthesis, we measured stromal and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, sucrose phosphate synthase, and partitioning of newly fixed carbon between starch and sucrose before, during, and after mild water stress. The extractable activity of the fructose bisphosphatases was unaffected by mild water stress. The extractable activity of SPS was inhibited by more than 60% in plants stressed to water potentials of ?0.9 megapascals. Water stress caused a decline in the starch/sucrose partitioning ratio indicating that starch synthesis was inhibited more than sucrose synthesis. We conclude that the reduced rate of photosynthesis during water stress is caused by stomatal closure, and that the restriction of CO2 supply caused by stomatal closure leads to a reduction in the capacity for both starch and sucrose synthesis. This causes the reduced O2 inhibition and abrupt CO2 saturation of photosynthesis. PMID:16666665

  16. Mild water stress of Phaseolus vulgaris plants leads to reduced starch synthesis and extractable sucrose phosphate synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Vassey, T.L.; Sharkey, T.D. )

    1989-04-01

    Mild water stress, on the order of {minus}1.0 megapascals xylem water potential, can reduce the rate of photosynthesis and eliminate the inhibition of photosynthesis caused by O{sub 2} in water-stress-sensitive plants such as Phaseolus vulgaris. To investigate the lack of O{sub 2} inhibition of photosynthesis, we measured stromal and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, sucrose phosphate synthase, and partitioning of newly fixed carbon between starch and sucrose before, during, and after mild water stress. The extractable activity of the fructose bisphosphatases was unaffected by mild water stress. The extractable activity of SPS was inhibited by more than 60% in plants stressed to water potentials of {minus}0.9 megapascals. Water stress caused a decline in the starch/sucrose partitioning ratio indicating that starch synthesis was inhibited more than sucrose synthesis. We conclude that the reduced rate of photosynthesis during water stress is caused by stomatal closure, and that the restriction of CO{sub 2} supply caused by stomatal closure leads to a reduction in the capacity for both starch and sucrose synthesis. This causes the reduced O{sub 2} inhibition and abrupt CO{sub 2} saturation of photosynthesis.

  17. The Structure of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase from Halothermothrix orenii Reveals Its Mechanism of Action and Binding Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Chua,T.; Bujnicki, J.; Tan, T.; Huynh, F.; Patel, B.; Sivaraman, J.; Ogimoto, Y.; Miyano, K.; Sawa, H.

    2008-01-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyzes the transfer of a glycosyl group from an activated donor sugar, such as uridine diphosphate glucose (UDP-Glc), to a saccharide acceptor D-fructose 6-phosphate (F6P), resulting in the formation of UDP and D-sucrose-6'-phosphate (S6P). This is a central regulatory process in the production of sucrose in plants, cyanobacteria, and proteobacteria. Here, we report the crystal structure of SPS from the nonphotosynthetic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii and its complexes with the substrate F6P and the product S6P. SPS has two distinct Rossmann-fold domains with a large substrate binding cleft at the interdomain interface. Structures of two complexes show that both the substrate F6P and the product S6P bind to the A-domain of SPS. Based on comparative analysis of the SPS structure with other related enzymes, the donor substrate, nucleotide diphosphate glucose, binds to the B-domain of SPS. Furthermore, we propose a mechanism of catalysis by H. orenii SPS. Our findings indicate that SPS from H. orenii may represent a valid model for the catalytic domain of plant SPSs and thus may provide useful insight into the reaction mechanism of the plant enzyme.

  18. Delineating the structural, functional and evolutionary relationships of sucrose phosphate synthase gene family II in wheat and related grasses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) is an important component of the plant sucrose biosynthesis pathway. In the monocotyledonous Poaceae, five SPS genes have been identified. Here we present a detailed analysis of the wheat SPSII family in wheat. A set of homoeologue-specific primers was developed in order to permit both the detection of sequence variation, and the dissection of the individual contribution of each homoeologue to the global expression of SPSII. Results The expression in bread wheat over the course of development of various sucrose biosynthesis genes monitored on an Affymetrix array showed that the SPS genes were regulated over time and space. SPSII homoeologue-specific assays were used to show that the three homoeologues contributed differentially to the global expression of SPSII. Genetic mapping placed the set of homoeoloci on the short arms of the homoeologous group 3 chromosomes. A resequencing of the A and B genome copies allowed the detection of four haplotypes at each locus. The 3B copy includes an unspliced intron. A comparison of the sequences of the wheat SPSII orthologues present in the diploid progenitors einkorn, goatgrass and Triticum speltoides, as well as in the more distantly related species barley, rice, sorghum and purple false brome demonstrated that intronic sequence was less well conserved than exonic. Comparative sequence and phylogenetic analysis of SPSII gene showed that false purple brome was more similar to Triticeae than to rice. Wheat - rice synteny was found to be perturbed at the SPS region. Conclusion The homoeologue-specific assays will be suitable to derive associations between SPS functionality and key phenotypic traits. The amplicon sequences derived from the homoeologue-specific primers are informative regarding the evolution of SPSII in a polyploid context. PMID:20591144

  19. Conversion of L-sorbosone to L-ascorbic acid by a NADP-dependent dehydrogenase in bean and spinach leaf. [Phaseolus vulgaris L. ; Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Loewus, M.W.; Bedgar, D.L.; Saito, Kazumi; Loewus, F.A. )

    1990-11-01

    An NADP-dependent dehydrogenase catalyzing the conversion of L-sorbosone to L-ascorbic acid has been isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Spinacia oleracea L. and partially purified. It is stable at {minus}20{degree}C for up to 8 months. Molecular masses, as determined by gel filtration, were 21 and 29 kilodaltons for bean and spinach enzymes, respectively. K{sub m} for sorbosone were 12 {plus minus} 2 and 18 {plus minus} 2 millimolar and for NADP{sup +}, 0.14 {plus minus} 0.05 and 1.2 {plus minus} 0.5 millimolar, for bean and spinach, respectively. Lycorine, a purported inhibitor of L-ascorbic acid biosynthesis, had no effect on the reaction.

  20. Norovirus surrogate survival on spinach during preharvest growth.

    PubMed

    Hirneisen, Kirsten A; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2013-04-01

    Produce can become contaminated with human viral pathogens in the field through soil, feces, or water used for irrigation; through application of manure, biosolids, pesticides, and fertilizers; and through dust, insects, and animals. The objective of this study was to assess the survival and stability of human noroviruses and norovirus surrogates (Murine norovirus [MNV] and Tulane virus [TV]) on foliar surfaces of spinach plants in preharvest growth conditions. Spinach plants were housed in a biocontrol chamber at optimal conditions for up to 7 days and infectivity was determined by plaque assay. Virus inoculation location had the largest impact on virus survival as viruses present on adaxial leaf surfaces had lower decimal reduction time (D values) than viruses present on abaxial leaf surfaces. Under certain conditions, spinach type impacted virus survival, with greater D values observed from survival on semi-savoy spinach leaves. Additional UVA and UVB exposure to mimic sunlight affected virus survival on adaxial surfaces for both semi-savoy and smooth spinach plants for both viruses. Human GII norovirus inoculated onto semi-savoy spinach had an average D value that was not statistically significant from MNV and TV, suggesting that these surrogates may have similar survival on spinach leaves compared with human noroviruses. An understanding of the behavior of enteric viruses on spinach leaves can be used to enhance growers' guidelines and for risk assessment with certain growing conditions. PMID:23506365

  1. Characterization of technetium species induced in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, A.V.; Krijger, G.C.; Elteren, J.T. van; Goeij, J.J.M. de

    1999-08-01

    Plants have the ability to accumulate the long-lived fission product {sup 99}Tc. In this work, an attempt was made to separate and characterize technetium species induced by spinach plants (Spinacia oleracea L.) grown on a TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} containing nutrient solution. Combination of data obtained with selective extraction and chromatography gave us insight into Tc speciation in spinach plants. The following classes of Tc species in spinach leaf homogenate were found after an incubation period of 11 d: TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} (ca. 7%), Tc{sup V}-cysteine (ca. 25%), Tc bound to insoluble cell-wall polysaccharides (ca. 17%), Tc bound to proteins (ca. 26%), and hydrophilic non-protein Tc species (ca. 25%). These results may yield a new insight into the metabolic pathways of Tc in plants.

  2. Leaf photosynthesis and carbohydrates of CO2-enriched maize and grain sorghum exposed to a short period of soil water deficit during vegetative development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought was imposed on 26-day old corn and grain sorghum grown in carbon dioxide (CO2) at 360 (ambient) or 720 (elevated) ppm. Midday leaf CO2 exchange rates (CER), and afternoon carbohydrate concentrations and activities of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) & adenosine 5’-diphosphoglucose pyrophosph...

  3. Effect of spinach cultivar and bacterial adherence factors on survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Macarisin, Dumitru; Patel, Jitendra; Bauchan, Gary; Giron, Jorge A; Ravishankar, Sadhana

    2013-11-01

    Similar to phytopathogens, human bacterial pathogens have been shown to colonize the plant phylloplane. In addition to environmental factors, such as temperature, UV, relative humidity, etc., the plant cultivar and, specifically, the leaf blade morphological characteristics may affect the persistence of enteropathogens on leafy greens. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of cultivar-dependent leaf topography and the role of strain phenotypic characteristics on Escherichia coli O157:H7 persistence on organic spinach. Spinach cultivars Emilia, Lazio, Space, and Waitiki were experimentally inoculated with the foodborne E. coli O157:H7 isolate EDL933 and its isogenic mutants deficient in cellulose, curli, or both curli and cellulose production. Leaves of 6-week-old plants were inoculated with 6.5 log CFU per leaf in a biosafety level 2 growth chamber. At 0, 1, 7, and 14 days, E. coli O157:H7 populations were determined by plating on selective medium and verified by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Leaf morphology (blade roughness and stoma density) was evaluated by low-temperature and variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy. E. coli O157:H7 persistence on spinach was significantly affected by cultivar and strain phenotypic characteristics, specifically, the expression of curli. Leaf blade roughness and stoma density influenced the persistence of E. coli O157:H7 on spinach. Cultivar Waitiki, which had the greatest leaf roughness, supported significantly higher E. coli O157:H7 populations than the other cultivars. These two morphological characteristics of spinach cultivars should be taken into consideration in developing intervention strategies to enhance the microbial safety of leafy greens. PMID:24215684

  4. Nitrogen Uptake in Spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, J.; VanBenthem, P.

    2013-12-01

    A plant's absorption of nitrogen can be encouraged by a variety of environmental factors, especially the application of fertilizers. As a common limiting factor in plant growth, not up taking enough nitrogen can be a result of an unhealthy plant. Moreover, as farmers seek out methods to increase growth of plants, fertilizers are used as a solution to the issue of nitrogen deficiency to incorporate additional nitrogen from chemical or organic sources, by not using the right fertilizer can greatly affect the plats. The point of this research project is to determine the effect of various fertilizers on the plant growth, and to correlate the measured nitrogen, water and chlorophyll content in spinach leaves. Spinach leaves were used because they are known to quickly uptake chemicals in the environment. The spinach plants were exposed to four different growing parameters, which are referred to as control, ammonium nitrate, MiracleGro , and organic. The spinach was originally placed in nitrogen deficient soil with only 2.2x10 4 weight percent (wt. %) nitrogen. The leaves in the control group were grown in this nitrogen deficient soil without any fertilizer added. Ammomium nitrate and MiracleGro were added to the spinach in the A and MG groups, respectively, and organic chicken stool was used for the O group. By using a spectral imaging system and flame combustion techniques, the chlorophyll content can be related to the nitrogen content in the spinach leaves. In these spinach leaves, nitrogen and chlorophyll content were measured, chlorophyll is a green pigment that plays a crucial role in producing nutrients for green plants. The lack of chlorophyll will allow the plant to become susceptible to diseases, so it is extremely important that the plants have a high content of chlorophyll. The role of nitrogen in chlorophyll is very important and helps in the creation of chlorophyll; therefore it is necessary that an appropriate amount of nitrogen is added for optimal growth and nutrient content. A common method of increasing nitrogen's availability is by adding fertilizer to plants. Fertilizers come in many varieties, ranging from organic to synthetic. Organic fertilizers differ from their synthetic counterparts in that they contain less artificial substances. Preliminary results of this study show that the organic fertilizer promoted growth of chlorophyll in the spinach leaves. The highest peaks in our results are due to the light absorbance of chlorophyll. The spectra also showed the organic fertilizer had the highest chlorophyll content, unlike the ammonium sulfate which had the last amount. Surprisingly, the control performed slightly better than the MiracleGro, which would not be expected, since MiracleGro is a widely used fertilizer, it was expected that this would lead to the highest chlorophyll content. It is unexpected the soil with trace nitrogen content was able to produce spinach with this relatively high content of chlorophyll. It is imperative to examine how different types of nitrogen additives affect spinach growth. The consequences of fertilizer overuse are destructive to both the plant and its environment, as well as to the humans that consume the resulting produce. The preliminary results of this experiment gave insight into the effectiveness of various kinds of fertilizers and may be able to encourage farmers to use organic fertilizers from natural sources for optimal nutrients and growth of their crops.

  5. Physical and mechanical properties of spinach for whole-surface online imaging inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiuying; Mo, Chang Y.; Chan, Diane E.; Peng, Yankun; Qin, Jianwei; Yang, Chun-Chieh; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kuanglin

    2011-06-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of baby spinach were investigated, including density, Young's modulus, fracture strength, and friction coefficient. The average apparent density of baby spinach leaves was 0.5666 g/mm3. The tensile tests were performed using parallel, perpendicular, and diagonal directions with respect to the midrib of each leaf. The test results showed that the mechanical properties of spinach are anisotropic. For the parallel, diagonal, and perpendicular test directions, the average values for the Young's modulus values were found to be 2.137MPa, 1.0841 MPa, and 0.3914 MPa, respectively, and the average fracture strength values were 0.2429 MPa, 0.1396 MPa, and 0.1113 MPa, respectively. The static and kinetic friction coefficient between the baby spinach and conveyor belt were researched, whose test results showed that the average coefficients of kinetic and maximum static friction between the adaxial (front side) spinach leaf surface and conveyor belt were 1.2737 and 1.3635, respectively, and between the abaxial (back side) spinach leaf surface and conveyor belt were 1.1780 and 1.2451 respectively. These works provide the basis for future development of a whole-surface online imaging inspection system that can be used by the commercial vegetable processing industry to reduce food safety risks.

  6. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  7. Ammonium reduces oxalate accumulation in different spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) genotypes by inhibiting root uptake of nitrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Lu, Lingli; Chen, Qiuhui; Ding, Wenya; Dai, Peibin; Hu, Yan; Yu, Yan; Jin, Chongwei; Lin, Xianyong

    2015-11-01

    Excessive accumulation of oxalate negatively affects nutritional value of many vegetables, such as spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Mixed solution of ammonium and nitrate could effectively reduce oxalate accumulation, while the mechanism involved remains unknown. High (Heizhenzhu) and low (Weilv) oxalate-accumulated spinach genotypes were used in this study to investigate the association of oxalate accumulation and root uptake of nitrogen. Exposure of increasing nitrate or mixed-nitrogen (nitrate:ammonium = 1:1) significantly increased leaf total and soluble oxalate contents. In contrast, increasing ammonium did not result in elevation of leaf oxalate. Correlation analysis confirmed that leaf oxalate accumulation was positively associated with root uptake of nitrate but not ammonium. Moreover, addition of ammonium significantly reduced nitrate uptake rate, and subsequently decreased leaf oxalate accumulation. The results suggest that oxalate synthesis in spinach leaves is associated with its root uptake of nitrate, and ammonium is able to reduce oxalate accumulation by inhibiting uptake of nitrate. PMID:25976827

  8. [Determination of uranium in spinach].

    PubMed

    Kishi, Eri; Yutani, Aiko; Ozaki, Asako; Shinya, Masanao; Katahira, Kenshi; Ooshima, Tomoko; Shimizu, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    After the severe accident at the Fukushima-1 Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011, radioactive contamination of food has become a matter of serious concern in Japan. There is considerable information about radioactive iodine and cesium, but little is known about uranium contamination. We determined uranium content in spinach by the Japanese official method (Manual on Radiation Measurement of Food in Emergency Situations). In the preliminary study, we confirmed that the use of a microwave digestion system for preparing the test solution of spinach could shorten the testing time and give acceptable results. The manual recommends the use of two elements (Tl and Bi) as internal standards for measurement of uranium by ICP-MS. We found that Tl was more suitable than Bi to quantify trace amounts of uranium in spinach. However, it was necessary to determine Tl or Bi concentrations in the sample before analysis, since some samples of spinach contained significant amounts of these elements. The uranium contents of 9 spinach samples bought in April and May 2011 were less than 10 ?g/kg, which are very low compared to the provisional regulatory limit in Japan. PMID:23676689

  9. Characterization of multiple SPS knockout mutants reveals redundant functions of the four Arabidopsis sucrose phosphate synthase isoforms in plant viability, and strongly indicates that enhanced respiration and accelerated starch turnover can alleviate the blockage of sucrose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bahaji, Abdellatif; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Ricarte-Bermejo, Adriana; Sánchez-López, Ángela María; Muñoz, Francisco José; Romero, Jose M; Ruiz, María Teresa; Baslam, Marouane; Almagro, Goizeder; Sesma, María Teresa; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2015-09-01

    We characterized multiple knock-out mutants of the four Arabidopsis sucrose phosphate synthase (SPSA1, SPSA2, SPSB and SPSC) isoforms. Despite their reduced SPS activity, spsa1/spsa2, spsa1/spsb, spsa2/spsb, spsa2/spsc, spsb/spsc, spsa1/spsa2/spsb and spsa2/spsb/spsc mutants displayed wild type (WT) vegetative and reproductive morphology, and showed WT photosynthetic capacity and respiration. In contrast, growth of rosettes, flowers and siliques of the spsa1/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsc mutants was reduced compared with WT plants. Furthermore, these plants displayed a high dark respiration phenotype. spsa1/spsb/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsb/spsc seeds poorly germinated and produced aberrant and sterile plants. Leaves of all viable sps mutants, except spsa1/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsc, accumulated WT levels of nonstructural carbohydrates. spsa1/spsc leaves possessed high levels of metabolic intermediates and activities of enzymes of the glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways, and accumulated high levels of metabolic intermediates of the nocturnal starch-to-sucrose conversion process, even under continuous light conditions. Results presented in this work show that SPS is essential for plant viability, reveal redundant functions of the four SPS isoforms in processes that are important for plant growth and nonstructural carbohydrate metabolism, and strongly indicate that accelerated starch turnover and enhanced respiration can alleviate the blockage of sucrose biosynthesis in spsa1/spsc leaves. PMID:26259182

  10. Spinach and mustard greens response to soil type, sulfur addition and lithium level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26o 8' N, Long. 97o 57' W) between Dec. 2006 and Feb 2007 to evaluate the effect of soil type, added sulfur and lithium level on the growth and leaf nutrients, particularly biofortified levels of Li and S, in spinach and mustard gree...

  11. Adenosine diphosphate sulphurylase activity in leaf tissue

    PubMed Central

    Burnell, Jim N.; Anderson, John W.

    1973-01-01

    1. A new method is described for the assay of ADP sulphurylase. The method involves sulphate-dependent [32P]Pi–ADP exchange; the method is simpler, more sensitive and more direct than the method involving adenosine 5?-sulphatophosphate-dependent uptake of Pi. 2. ADP sulphurylase activity was demonstrated in crude extracts of leaf tissue from a range of plants. Crude spinach extract catalysed the sulphate-dependent synthesis of [32P]ADP from [32P]Pi; spinach extracts did not catalyse sulphate-dependent AMP–Pi, ADP–PPi or ATP–Pi exchange under standard assay conditions. ADP sulphurylase activity in spinach leaf tissue was associated with chloroplasts and was liberated by sonication. 3. Some elementary kinetics of crude spinach leaf and purified yeast ADP sulphurylases in the standard assay are described; addition of Ba2+ was necessary to minimize endogenous Pi–ADP exchange of the yeast enzyme and crude extracts of winter-grown spinach. 4. Spinach leaf ADP sulphurylase was activated by Ba2+ and Ca2+; Mg2+ was ineffective. The yeast enzyme was also activated by Ba2+. The activity of both enzymes decreased with increasing ionic strength. 5. Purified yeast and spinach leaf ADP sulphurylases were sensitive to thiol-group reagents and fluoride. The pH optimum was 8. ATP inhibited sulphate-dependent Pi–ADP exchange. Neither selenate nor molybdate inhibited sulphate-dependent Pi–ADP exchange and crude spinach extracts did not catalyse selenate-dependent Pi–ADP exchange. 6. The presence of ADP sulphurylase activity jeopardizes the enzymic synthesis of adenosine 5?-sulphatophosphate from ATP and sulphate with purified ATP sulphurylase and pyrophosphatase. PMID:4582047

  12. Functional metagenomics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 interactions with spinach indigenous microorganisms during biofilm formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increase in foodborne outbreaks worldwide attributed to fresh fruit and vegetables suggests that produce may serve as an ecological niche for enteric pathogens. Here we examined the interaction of E. coli O157:H7 (EcO157) with spinach leaf microflora during co-colonization and establishment of a...

  13. Analysis of energy utilization in spinach processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chhinnan, M.S.; Singh, R.P.; Pedersen, L.D.; Carroad, P.A.; Rose, W.W.; Jacob, N.L.

    1980-03-01

    The equipment and methods used to monitor the electrical and thermal energy consumed in various unit operations in a spinach processing plant are described and the results of a processing plant energy audit are presented. It is concluded that it requires 6.5 MJ of natural gas and fuel oil and 0.072 MJ of electric power to process one kg of new spinach; the energy intensive operations in spinach processing are associated with exhaust boxes, blanchers, and retorts; uniform product flow through the canning line is essential to energy conservation; and design improvements are needed for the blancher, exhaust box, and retort. (LCL)

  14. Choline oxidation by intact chloroplasts isolated directly from spinach leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, P.; Hanson, A.D.

    1986-04-01

    Illuminated chloroplasts derived from spinach leaf protoplasts synthesize betaine from choline via the intermediate betaine aldehyde (BAL) (PNAS 82:3678). Photosynthetically active chloroplasts isolated directly from spinach leaves oxidized (/sup 14/C)choline in the light at rates 10 times higher (25-80 nmol/mg chl b) than protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Up to 20% of the (/sup 14/C)choline supplied during a 30 min incubation was oxidized in the light; the main product was (/sup 14/C)BAL. Rates of (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in darkness were only 5-30% of rates in light. Light-dependent (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation was abolished by DCMU and 5 mM DTT. Pre-illumination of the chloroplasts did not promote (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in darkness. The uncouplers nigericin and CCCP at concentrations which eliminated CO/sub 2/-dependent O/sub 2/ evolution did not affect (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in the light. They hypothesize that (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation is not dependent upon light activation of an enzymatic system or upon the electrochemical proton gradient but requires an oxidant generated in the light.

  15. Studies of a New Fusarium Wilt of Spinach in Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph)

    1926-01-01

    STATION B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 343 JULY, 1926 STUDIES OF A NEW FUSARIUM WILT OF SPINACH IN TEXAS AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President STATION STAFF... with the School of Agriculture. 1 SYNOPSIS , Spinach is an important truck crop in Texas, and is grown I mostly as a winter crop. A new spinach wilt has been under observation for several years. This trouble causes serious 1 losses, especially on spinach...

  16. THREE NEW RACES OF THE SPINACH DOWNY MILDEW PATHOGEN IDENTIFIED BY A MODIFIED SET OF SPINACH DIFFERENTIALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spinach downy mildew, caused by Peronospora farinosa f. sp. spinaciae, is the most economically important disease of spinach worldwide. In the past few years, field observations in both the United States and the European Union indicated that spinach cultivars resistant to the seven previously descr...

  17. Aphicide persistence on spinach and mustard greens.

    PubMed

    Sweeden, M B; McLeod, P J

    1997-02-01

    Laboratory bioassays with green peach aphids, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), were conducted on samples from field grown spinach and mustard greens to determine the persistence of triazamate, dimethoate, and mevinphos. Treatment with each insecticide resulted in similar mortality initially on both crops. Mortality on samples from mevinphos treated plants declined considerably by 1 d after treatment. Dimethoate persisted for > 4 d at a level that would kill at least some aphids during the allotted time. Persistence of triazamate and dimethoate activities were similar on spinach. Triazamate, however, resulted in greater aphid mortality through time on mustard greens than did dimethoate. PMID:9071890

  18. Relative Efficacy of Sodium Hypochlorite Wash Versus Irradiation to Inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 Internalized in Leaves of Romaine Lettuce and Baby Spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic bacteria which are internalized in leaf tissues are protected from the antimicrobial effects of surface treatments. Ionizing radiation is known to penetrate foods, but the efficacy of the process against internalized bacteria is unknown. Leaves of romaine lettuce and baby spinach were cut...

  19. Effects of plant maturity and bacterial inoculum level on the colonization and internalization of escherichia coli 0157:H7 in growing spinach leaves.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence of foodborne outbreaks linked to fresh produce has increased in the United States. Particularly noteworthy, was the 2006 Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreak associated with pre-packaged baby spinach. The study aimed to determine whether E. coli O157:H7 would be present in the aerial leaf...

  20. Inactivation of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 Internalized in Romaine Lettuce and Baby Spinach Leaves:Sodium Hypochlorite Wash vs. Irradiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic bacteria which are internalized in leaf tissues are protected from the antimicrobial effects of surface treatments. Ionizing radiation is known to penetrate foods, but the efficacy of the process against internalized bacteria is unknown. Leaves of romaine lettuce and baby spinach were cut...

  1. Rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves using phage-immobilized magnetoelastic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Shin; Li, Suiqiong; Chai, Yating; Park, Mi-Kyung; Shen, Wen; Barbaree, James M.; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the use of magnetoelastic biosensors for the rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves. The biosensors used in this investigation were comprised of a strip-shaped, goldcoated sensor platform (2 mm-long) diced from a ferromagnetic, amorphous alloy and a filamentous fd-tet phage which specifically binds with S. typhimurium. After surface blocking with bovine serum albumin, these biosensors were, without any preceding sample preparation, directly placed on wet spinach leaves inoculated with various concentrations of S. typhimurium. Upon contact with cells, the phage binds S. typhimurium to the sensor thereby increasing the total mass of the sensor. This change in mass causes a corresponding decrease in the sensor's resonant frequency. After 25 min, the sensors were collected from the leaf surface and measurements of the resonant frequency were performed immediately. The total assay time was less than 30 min. The frequency changes for measurement sensors (i.e., phageimmobilized) were found to be statistically different from those for control sensors (sensors without phage), down to 5 × 106 cells/ml. The detection limit may be improved by using smaller, micron-sized sensors that will have a higher probability of contacting Salmonella on the rough surfaces of spinach leaves.

  2. Spinach: A Liberty-based Simulator for Programmable Network Interface Architectures

    E-print Network

    Spinach: A Liberty-based Simulator for Programmable Network Interface Architectures Paul Willmann {willmann, brogioli, vijaypai}@rice.edu ABSTRACT This paper presents Spinach, a new simulator toolset specifically designed to target programmable network interface architectures. Spinach models both system

  3. Frequency of Verticillium Species in Commercial Spinach Fields and Transmission of V. dahliae from Spinach to Subsequent Lettuce Crops.

    PubMed

    Short, D P G; Gurung, S; Koike, S T; Klosterman, S J; Subbarao, K V

    2015-01-01

    Verticillium wilt caused by V. dahliae is a devastating disease of lettuce in California (CA). The disease is currently restricted to a small geographic area in central coastal CA, even though cropping patterns in other coastal lettuce production regions in the state are similar. Infested spinach seed has been implicated in the introduction of V. dahliae into lettuce fields but direct evidence linking this inoculum to wilt epidemics in lettuce is lacking. In this study, 100 commercial spinach fields in four coastal CA counties were surveyed to evaluate the frequency of Verticillium species recovered from spinach seedlings and the area under spinach production in each county was assessed. Regardless of the county, V. isaacii was the most frequently isolated species from spinach followed by V. dahliae and, less frequently, V. klebahnii. The frequency of recovery of Verticillium species was unrelated to the occurrence of Verticillium wilt on lettuce in the four counties but was related to the area under spinach production in individual counties. The transmission of V. dahliae from infested spinach seeds to lettuce was investigated in microplots. Verticillium wilt developed on lettuce following two or three plantings of Verticillium-infested spinach, in independent experiments. The pathogen recovered from the infected lettuce from microplots was confirmed as V. dahliae by polymerase chain reaction assays. In a greenhouse study, transmission of a green fluorescence protein-tagged mutant strain of V. dahliae from spinach to lettuce roots was demonstrated, after two cycles of incorporation of infected spinach residue into the soil. This study presents conclusive evidence that V. dahliae introduced via spinach seed can cause Verticillium wilt in lettuce. PMID:25098494

  4. LEAFMINER-RESISTANT SPINACH GERMPLASM 03-04-9.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture announces the release of a spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) breeding line 03-04-9. 03-04-9 is an oriental type of spinach with dark green, semi-erect leaves. The line may be suitable for commercial production, and is suitable f...

  5. Release of Spinach Germplasm With Resistance to Leafminers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture announces the release of a spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) breeding line 03-04-63. 03-04-63 is a semi-flat type of spinach with dark green, semi-erect leaves. The line may be suitable for commercial production, and is suitable...

  6. LEAFMINER-RESISTANT SPINACH GERMPLASM 03-04-63

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture announces the release of a spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) breeding line 03-04-63. 03-04-63 is a semi-flat type of spinach with dark green, semi-erect leaves. The line may be suitable for commercial production, and is suitable...

  7. Effect of route of introduction and host cultivar on the colonization, internalization, and movement of the human pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 in spinach.

    PubMed

    Mitra, R; Cuesta-Alonso, E; Wayadande, A; Talley, J; Gilliland, S; Fletcher, J

    2009-07-01

    Human pathogens can contaminate leafy produce in the field by various routes. We hypothesized that interactions between Escherichia coli O157:H7 and spinach are influenced by the route of introduction and the leaf microenvironment. E. coli O157:H7 labeled with green fluorescent protein was dropped onto spinach leaf surfaces, simulating bacteria-laden raindrops or sprinkler irrigation, and survived on the phylloplane for at least 14 days, with increasing titers and areas of colonization over time. The same strains placed into the rhizosphere by soil infiltration remained detectable on very few plants and in low numbers (10(2) to 10(6) CFU/g fresh tissue) that decreased over time. Stem puncture inoculations, simulating natural wounding, rarely resulted in colonization or multiplication. Bacteria forced into the leaf interior survived for at least 14 days in intercellular spaces but did not translocate or multiply. Three spinach cultivars with different leaf surface morphologies were compared for colonization by E. coli O157:H7 introduced by leaf drop or soil drench. After 2 weeks, cv. Bordeaux hosted very few bacteria. More bacteria were seen on cv. Space and were dispersed over an area of up to 0.3 mm2. The highest bacterial numbers were observed on cv. Tyee but were dispersed only up to 0.15 mm2, suggesting that cv. Tyee may provide protected niches or more nutrients or may promote stronger bacterial adherence. These findings suggest that the spinach phylloplane is a supportive niche for E. coli O157:H7, but no conclusive evidence was found for natural entry into the plant interior. The results are relevant for interventions aimed at minimizing produce contamination by human pathogens. PMID:19681281

  8. Impact of pigeon pea biochar on cadmium mobility in soil and transfer rate to leafy vegetable spinach.

    PubMed

    Coumar, M Vassanda; Parihar, R S; Dwivedi, A K; Saha, J K; Rajendiran, S; Dotaniya, M L; Kundu, S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction of heavy metals in the environment by various anthropogenic activities has become a potential treat to life. Among the heavy metals, cadmium (Cd) shows relatively high soil mobility and has high phyto-mammalian toxicity. Integration of soil remediation and ecosystem services, such as carbon sequestration in soils through organic amendments, may provide an attractive land management option for contaminated sites. The application of biochar in agriculture has recently received much attention globally due to its associated multiple benefits, particularly, long-term carbon storage in soil. However, the application of biochar from softwood crop residue for heavy metal immobilization, as an alternative to direct field application, has not received much attention. Hence, a pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of pigeon pea biochar on cadmium mobility in a soil-plant system in cadmium-spiked sandy loam soil. The biochar was prepared from pigeon pea stalk through a slow pyrolysis method at 300 °C. The experiment was designed with three levels of Cd (0, 5, and 10 mg Cd kg(-1) soil) and three levels of biochar (0, 2.5, and 5 g kg(-1) soil) using spinach as a test crop. The results indicate that with increasing levels of applied cadmium at 5 and 10 mg kg(-1) soil, the dry matter yield (DMY) of spinach leaf decreased by 9.84 and 18.29 %, respectively. However, application of biochar (at 2.5 and 5 g kg(-1) soil) significantly increased the dry matter yield of spinach leaf by 5.07 and 15.02 %, respectively, and root by 14.0 and 24.0 %, respectively, over the control. Organic carbon content in the post-harvest soil increased to 34.9 and 60.5 % due to the application of biochar 2.5 and 5 g kg(-1) soil, respectively. Further, there was a reduction in the diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable cadmium in the soil and in transfer coefficient values (soil to plant), as well as its concentrations in spinach leaf and root, indicating that cadmium mobility was decreased due to biochar application. This study shows that pigeon pea biochar has the potential to increase spinach yield and reduce cadmium mobility in contaminated sandy soil. PMID:26670040

  9. Biosynthesis of sucrose and mannitol as a function of leaf age in celery (Apium graveolens L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.M.; Fellman, J.K.; Loescher, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    In celery (Apium graveolens L.), the two major translocated carbohydrates are sucrose and the acyclic polyol mannitol. Their metabolism, however, is different and their specific functions are uncertain. To compare their roles in carbon partitioning and sink-source transitions, developmental changes in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ labeling, pool sizes, and key enzyme activities in leaf tissues were examined. The proportion of label in mannitol increased dramatically with leaf maturation whereas that in sucrose remained fairly constant. Mannitol content, however, was high in all leaves and sucrose content increased as leaves developed. Activities of mannose-6-P reductase, cytoplasmic and chloroplastic fructose-1,6-bis-phosphatases, sucrose phosphate synthase, and sucrose synthase increased with leaf maturation and decreased as leaves senesced. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and nonreversible glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase activities rose as leaves developed but did not decrease. Thus, sucrose is produced in all photosynthetically active leaves whereas mannitol is synthesized primarily in mature leaves and stored in all leaves. Onset of sucrose export in celery may result from sucrose accumulation in expanding leaves, but mannitol export is clearly unrelated to mannitol concentration. Mannitol export, however, appears to coincide with increased mannitol biosynthesis. Although mannitol and sucrose arise from a common precursor in celery, subsequent metabolism and transport must be regulated separately.

  10. Growth Conditions To Reduce Oxalic Acid Content of Spinach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Rutzke, Corinne

    2003-01-01

    A controlled-environment agricultural (CEA) technique to increase the nutritive value of spinach has been developed. This technique makes it possible to reduce the concentration of oxalic acid in spinach leaves. It is desirable to reduce the oxalic acid content because oxalic acid acts as an anti-nutritive calcium-binding component. More than 30 years ago, an enzyme (an oxidase) that breaks down oxalic acid into CO2 and H2O2 was discovered and found to be naturally present in spinach leaves. However, nitrate, which can also be present because of the use of common nitratebased fertilizers, inactivates the enzyme. In the CEA technique, one cuts off the supply of nitrate and keeps the spinach plants cool while providing sufficient oxygen. This technique provides the precise environment that enables the enzyme to naturally break down oxalate. The result of application of this technique is that the oxalate content is reduced by 2/3 in one week.

  11. Thermal inactivation kinetics of hepatitis A virus in spinach.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Hayriye; Ye, Xiaofei; Harte, Federico; D'Souza, Doris H; Davidson, P Michael

    2015-01-16

    Leafy vegetables have been recognized as important vehicles for the transmission of foodborne viral pathogens. To control hepatitis A viral foodborne illness outbreaks associated with mildly heated (e.g., blanched) leafy vegetables such as spinach, generation of adequate thermal processes is important both for consumers and the food industry. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the thermal inactivation behavior of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in spinach, and provide insights on HAV inactivation in spinach for future studies and industrial applications. The D-values calculated from the first-order model (50-72 °C) ranged from 34.40 ± 4.08 to 0.91 ± 0.12 min with a z-value of 13.92 ± 0.87 °C. The calculated activation energy value was 162 ± 11 kJ/mol. Using the information generated in the present study and the thermal parameters of industrial blanching conditions for spinach as a basis (100 °C for 120-180 s), the blanching of spinach in water at 100 °C for 120-180 s under atmospheric conditions will provide greater than 6 log reduction of HAV. The results of this study may be useful to the frozen food industry in designing blanching conditions for spinach to inactivate or control hepatitis A virus outbreaks. PMID:25462934

  12. Effect of Greens and Soil Type, Sulfur Addition and Lithium Level on Leaf Constituents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26o 8' N, Long. 97o 57' W) between Dec. 2006 and Feb 2007 to evaluate the effect of soil type, added sulfur and lithium level on the growth and leaf nutrients, particularly biofortified levels of Li and S, in spinach and mustard gree...

  13. Greenhouse spinach production in a NFT system.

    PubMed

    Both, A J; Leed, A R; Goto, E; Albright, L D; Langhans, R W

    1996-12-01

    Primed spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., cv. Nordic) seed was started in rockwool slabs in a growth room for eight days before the seedlings were transplanted into a controlled environment greenhouse equipped with five identical, but separate, NFT systems. The day and night temperatures in the greenhouse were maintained at 24 and 18 degrees C, respectively, with the daytime starting at 06:00 and ending at 22:00 hr. A photoperiod of 16 hrs was maintained, to prevent early bolting, and different target daily integrated light levels (PPF, in mol m-2 d-1) were studied to observe dry weight production. HPS lamps were used as the supplemental light source. Thirty-three days after seeding a final harvest was performed. Using the expolinear growth equation, dry weight production can be predicted based solely on target daily integrated light levels. Total chlorine residuals in the nutrient solution higher than 1 ppm were observed to be toxic. Root disease (rot) in the plant crown was found to be caused by Fusarium. Several remedies, including three biofungicides and potassium silicate, were tried but none proved to be consistently successful. PMID:11541569

  14. Investigation of an Escherichia coli 0157:H7 Outbreak Associated with Dole Pre-Packaged Spinach

    E-print Network

    Investigation of an Escherichia coli 0157:H7 Outbreak Associated with Dole Pre-Packaged Spinach Attachment 11 CDC Addendum Report, "Irrigation Water Issues Potentially Related to 2006 E. coli 0157:H7 in Spinach Outbreak" #12;Irrigation Water Issues Potentially Related to 2006 E. coli 0157:H7 in Spinach

  15. Colonization of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) by GFP-tagged verticillium dahliae.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soilborne fungus, Verticillium dahliae, causes wilt in a wide range of hosts, including spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). The interaction between a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged V. dahliae strain and spinach was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The roots of spinach seedlings...

  16. Phytologia (December 2011) 93(3) 283 SEVENTEEN YEARS STORAGE OF JUNIPER AND SPINACH

    E-print Network

    Adams, Robert P.

    Phytologia (December 2011) 93(3) 283 SEVENTEEN YEARS STORAGE OF JUNIPER AND SPINACH LEAVES ABSTRACT Propanol appeared better than ethanol for the long-term storage of spinach leaves, followed by hexanol and pentanol. The lowest molecular weight and yields of DNA came from spinach stored in methanol

  17. Ion Channel Permeable for Divalent and Monovalent Cations in Native Spinach Thylakoid Membranes

    E-print Network

    Schönknecht, Gerald

    Ion Channel Permeable for Divalent and Monovalent Cations in Native Spinach Thylakoid Membranes I thylakoids of spinach (Spinacea oleracea). This channel was per- meable for K+ as well as for Mg2+ and Ca2 permeability of intact spinach thylakoids can be ex- plained on the single channel level by the data presented

  18. Hypothesis for the evolutionary origin of the chloroplast ribosomal protein L21 of spinach.

    PubMed

    Martin, W; Lagrange, T; Li, Y F; Bisanz-Seyer, C; Mache, R

    1990-12-01

    A full size cDNA clone encoding the chloroplast ribosomal protein L21 from spinach is presented. The identity of the clone and the location of the transit peptide processing site were determined by comparison with the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the spinach chloroplast protein CS-L7 previously identified. L21 r-protein sequences from spinach, Marchantia polymorpha and Escherichia coli are compared. Quite surprisingly, the data do not suggest that the rpl21 nuclear gene from spinach was derived through intracellular gene transfer from the chloroplast genome. The possibility of a mitochondrial origin for rpl21 gene of spinach is discussed. PMID:2076556

  19. Role of ascorbate in detoxifying ozone in the apoplast of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. ) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Luwe, M.W.F.; Takahama, Umeo; Heber, U. )

    1993-03-01

    Both reduced and oxidized ascorbate (AA and DHA) are present in the aqueous phase of the extracellular space, the apoplast, of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves. Fumigation with 0.3 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1] of ozone resulted in ozone uptake by the leaves close to 0.9 pmol cm[sup [minus]2] of leaf surface area s[sup [minus]1]. Apoplastic AA was slowly oxidized by ozone. The initial decrease of apoplastic AA was <0.1 pmol cm[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1]. The apoplastic ratio of AA to (AA + DHA) decreased within 6 h of fumigation from 0.9 to 0.1. Initially, the concentration of (AA + DHA) did not change in the apoplast, but when fumigation was continued, DHA increased and AA remained at a very low constant level. After fumigation was discontinued, DHA decreased very slowly in the apoplast, reaching control level after 70 h. Insufficient AA reached the apoplast from the cytosol to detoxify ozone in the apoplast when the ozone flux into the leaves was 0.9 pmol cm[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1]. The transport of DHA back into the cytosol was slower than AA transport into the apoplast. No dehydroascorbate reductase activity could be detected in the apoplast of spinach leaves. In contrast to its extracellular redox state, the intracellular redox state of AA did not change appreciably during a 24-h fumigation period. However, intracellular glutathione became slowly oxidized. At the beginning of fumigation, 90% of the total glutathione was reduced. Only 10% was reduced after 24-h exposure of the leaves to 0.3 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1] of ozone. Necrotic leaf damage started to become visible when fumigation was extended beyond a 24-h period. A close correlation between the extent of damage, on the one hand, and the AA content and the ascorbate redox state of whole leaves, on the other, was observed after 48 h of fumigation. Only the youngest leaves that contained high ascorbate concentrations did not exhibit necrotic leaf damage after 48 h. 30 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Survival of pathogenic Escherichia coli on basil, lettuce, and spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contamination of lettuce, spinach and basil with pathogenic E. coli has caused numerous illnesses over the past decade. E. coli O157:H7, E. coli O104:H4 and avian pathogenic E. coli (APECstx- and APECstx+) were inoculated on basil plants and in promix soiless substrate using drip and overhead ir...

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Phosphatidyl Choline from Spinach Leaves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devor, Kenneth A.

    1979-01-01

    This inexpensive but informative experiment for undergraduate biochemistry students involves isolating phosphatidyl choline from spinach leaves. Emphasis is on introducing students to techniques of lipid extraction, separation of lipids, identification using thin layer chromatography, and identification of fatty acids. Three periods of three hours…

  2. Effects of Photoperiod on Growth Rate and Endogenous Gibberellins in the Long-Day Rosette Plant Spinach

    PubMed Central

    Zeevaart, Jan A. D.

    1971-01-01

    The earliest visible responses of spinach plants (Spinacia oleracea L., cv. Savoy Hybrid 612) transferred from short to long days (8 hours of high intensity light supplemented with 16 hours of low intensity illumination from incandescent lamps) were upright leaf orientation and increased elongation of the petioles. The effect of long days on growth rate was direct; i.e., there was no after-effect if the plants were transferred to short days. Gibberellin A3 applied to plants under short days had an effect similar to that of long days, whereas application of the growth retardant AMO-1618 [2?-isopropyl-4?-(trimethylammonium chloride)-5?-methylphenyl piperidinel-carboxylate] under long days caused a growth habit typical of short-day conditions. Gibberellin A3 caused more stem growth in plants under long days in which the endogenous gibberellin content had been reduced by AMO-1618 than in plants under short days not treated with the growth retardant. Three gibberellin-like substances, called I, II, and III in order of increasing RF value, were present in acidic extracts of spinach under short days. After transfer to long days, II increased, whereas I and III decreased, the latter below the level of detection in the d5 corn assay. Following application of AMO-1618 the gibberellin content of plants under long days fell off more rapidly than in those under short days, indicating that gibberellin turnover was markedly higher under long days. This increased rate of gibberellin metabolism was established after 2 long days. When plants were returned to short days, the turnover of gibberellins declined. It is suggested that a higher rate of gibberellin biosynthesis combined with increased sensitivity to gibberellin is responsible for the observed growth responses in spinach under long days. PMID:16657712

  3. Improving spinach, radish, and lettuce growth under red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with blue light supplementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorio, N. C.; Goins, G. D.; Kagie, H. R.; Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherriette), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Waldmann's Green), and spinach (Spinacea oleracea L. cv. Nordic IV) plants were grown under 660-nm red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and were compared at equal photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) with either plants grown under cool-white fluorescent lamps (CWF) or red LEDs supplemented with 10% (30 micromoles m-2 s-1) blue light (400-500 nm) from blue fluorescent (BF) lamps. At 21 days after planting (DAP), leaf photosynthetic rates and stomatal conductance were greater for plants grown under CWF light than for those grown under red LEDs, with or without supplemental blue light. At harvest (21 DAP), total dry-weight accumulation was significantly lower for all species tested when grown under red LEDs alone than when grown under CWF light or red LEDs + 10% BF light. Moreover, total dry weight for radish and spinach was significantly lower under red LEDs + 10% BF than under CWF light, suggesting that addition of blue light to the red LEDs was still insufficient for achieving maximal growth for these crops.

  4. Leaf Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingie, Walter

    Leaf activities can provide a means of using basic concepts of outdoor education to learn in elementary level subject areas. Equipment needed includes leaves, a clipboard with paper, and a pencil. A bag of leaves may be brought into the classroom if weather conditions or time do not permit going outdoors. Each student should pick a leaf, examine…

  5. Expression and purification of spinach nitrite reductase in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Bellissimo, D.; Privalle, L. )

    1991-03-11

    The study of structure-function relationships in nitrite reductase (NiR) by site-directed mutagenesis requires an expression system from which suitable quantities of active enzyme can be purified. Spinach NiR cDNA was cloned into pUC18 and expressed in E.coli JM109 as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein. The IPTG-induced fusion protein contains five additional amino acids at the N-terminus. The expressed NiR in aerobic cultures was mostly insoluble and inactive indicating the presence of inclusion bodies. By altering growth conditions, active NiR could represent 0.5-1.0% of the total E.coli protein, Effects of the addition of delta-aminolevulinic acid, a heme precursor, and anaerobic growth were also examined. Spinach NiR was purified approximately 200 fold to homogeneity. When subjected to electrophoresis on SDS polyacrylamide gels, the NiR migrated as a single band with similar mobility to pure spinach enzyme. The expressed enzyme also reacted with rabbit anti-spinach NiR antibody as visualized by Western blot analysis. The absorption spectrum of the E.coli-expressed enzyme was identical to spinach enzyme with a Soret and alpha band a 386 and 573 nm, respectively, and an A{sub 278}/A{sub 386} = 1.9. The addition of nitrite produced the characteristic shifts in the spectrum. The E. coli-expressed NiR catalyzed the methylviologen-dependent reduction of nitrite. The specific activity was 100 U/mg. The K{sub m} determined for nitrite was 0.3 mM which is in agreement with values reported for the enzyme. These results indicate that the E.coli-expressed NiR is fully comparable to spinach NiR in purity, catalytic activity and physical state. Site-directed mutants have been made using PCR to examine structure-function relationships in this enzyme.

  6. Role of Cellulose and Colanic Acid in Attachment of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli to Lettuce and Spinach in Different Water Hardness Environments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Ching; Chen, Jinru; Frank, Joseph F

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the role of extracellular cellulose production by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) on attachment to lettuce and spinach in different water hardness environments. Two cellulose-producing wild-type STEC strains, 19 (O5:H-) and 49 (O103:H2), and their cellulose-deficient derivatives were used. Strain 49 also produced colanic acid as a constituent of its extracellular polymeric substances. Attached cells were determined by plate counts on the surface and cut edge of the leaves after an attachment period of 2 h at 4°C. Hydrophobicity and surface charge of the cells were determined. Strain 49 attached at levels 0.3 and 0.6 log greater to the surface and 0.9 and 0.4 log greater to the cut edges of spinach compared to strain 19 for both wild-type and cellulose-deficient cells (P > 0.05). Cellulose-producing cells attached more to the surface of lettuce but not of spinach than did cellulose-deficient cells. However, more cellulose-deficient cells attached (at levels 0.66 and 0.3 log greater) to the cut edge of lettuce (representing damaged tissue) than did cellulose-proficient cells (P > 0.05). Colanic acid production was associated with cell surfaces of low hydrophobicity. There was a decreasing level of attachment for the colanic acid-producing strain when water hardness increased from 200 to 1,000 pm on lettuce and spinach leaf surfaces, but no effects were seen for other cells. This decreased attachment was associated with a more negative surface charge. Cells that produced colanic acid were less hydrophobic and exhibited greater attachment to the surface and cut edge of spinach when compared to cells that did not produce colanic acid. Attachment of colanic acid-producing cells to leafy green surfaces was enhanced in higher water hardness environments. These data indicate that attachment of E. coli O157:H7 to leafy greens involves multiple mechanisms that are influenced by the type of leafy green, damage to the leaf, and the water hardness environment. PMID:26219358

  7. Photosynthate partitioning during flowering in relation to senescence of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Sklensky, D.; Davies, P.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Male spinach plants are frequently cited as a counter-example to the nutrient drain hypothesis. Photosynthate partitioning in both male and female plants was examined. Leaves just below the inflorescences in plants at various stages of flowering were labelled with {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and the photosynthate allowed to partition for three hours. The leaves, flowers and stems of the inflorescence, and the other above ground vegetative tissue were harvested. These parts were combusted in a sample oxidizer for the collection of the {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Allocation to the male and female flowers at very early stages are similar. As the flowers develop further, male flowers receive more photosynthate than do female flowers in early fruit production. Thus it is possible that nutrient drain to the flowers in male spinach plants is sufficient to account for senescence.

  8. Sizes of Mn-binding sites in spinach thylakoids

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, M.; Asada, K.

    1986-12-25

    The sizes of the Mn-binding sites in spinach thylakoids were estimated by target size analysis, assaying the membrane-bound Mn that was resistant to EDTA washing after radiation inactivation. The inactivation curve showed well the inactivation of two independent Mn-binding sites of different sizes: about two-thirds of the Mn coordinated to a binding site of 65 kDa, and the rest bound to a much smaller site of only about 3 kDa. In the large site, there was about 1 g atom of Mn/110 mol of chlorophyll in spinach thylakoids, which was constant in normally grown plants, although the Mn level in the small site depended on culture conditions. Thylakoids that had been incubated with hydroxylamine or in 0.8 M Tris lost Mn exclusively from the large binding site.

  9. Studies of GA sub 53 oxidase from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. )

    1990-05-01

    GA{sub 53} oxidase was purified 1,750-fold with 1% recovery of activity from spinach after exposure to 8 long days. This preparation was injected into balb/c mice and hybridomas from spleen cells were produced. Upon preliminary screening by immunoprecipitation of enzyme activity, three positive cell lines were selected. These are being cloned to select a true monoclonal antibody cell line. This antibody will be used to study the light/dark regulation of this enzyme.

  10. Comparative uptake of enteric viruses into spinach and green onions.

    PubMed

    Hirneisen, Kirsten A; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2013-03-01

    Root uptake of enteric pathogens and subsequent internalization has been a produce safety concern and is being investigated as a potential route of pre-harvest contamination. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and the human norovirus surrogate, murine norovirus (MNV), to internalize in spinach and green onions through root uptake in both soil and hydroponic systems. HAV or MNV was inoculated into soil matrices or into two hydroponic systems, floating and nutrient film technique systems. Viruses present within spinach and green onions were detected by RT-qPCR or infectivity assays after inactivating externally present viruses with Virkon(®). HAV and MNV were not detected in green onion plants grown up to 20 days and HAV was detected in only 1 of 64 spinach plants grown in contaminated soil substrate systems up to 20 days. Compared to soil systems, a drastic difference in virus internalization was observed in hydroponic systems; HAV or pressure-treated HAV and MNV were internalized up to 4 log RT-qPCR units and internalized MNV was shown to remain infectious. Understanding the interactions of human enteric viruses on produce can aid in the elucidation of the mechanisms of attachment and internalization, and aid in understanding risks associated with contamination events. PMID:23412715

  11. Localization, Purification, and Characterization of Shikimate Oxidoreductase-Dehydroquinate Hydrolyase from Stroma of Spinach Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Erich; Schultz, Gernot

    1985-01-01

    The stroma of chloroplasts is probably the sole site of the shikimate pathway enzymes shikimate oxidoreductase/dehydroquinate hydrolyase (SORase/DHQase) in spinach leaves. (a) The chromatographic behavior of the bifunctional protein SORase/DHQase on several separation materials with extracts from stroma compared with leaf extracts showed only one peak of enzymic activity originating from the stroma. (b) Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of these extracts followed by specific staining resulted in the same pattern without a band of extraplastidic enzyme. (c) In protoplast fractionation experiments it was shown that SORase/DHQase was present only in the soluble chloroplast protein fraction. An improved purification procedure for SORase/DHQase from stroma of chloroplasts, yield 40%, 1600 times as pure, gave essentially one protein band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. Our results demonstrate that both enzyme functions are carried out by a single polypeptide. Nondenaturing PAGE exhibited a pattern of four bands with SORase/DHQase showing that they differ in charge but not in their molecular weight. Molecular weight was determined to be 67 kilodaltons (gel filtration) and 59 kilodaltons (PAGE) for all four forms. It was proven they were not due to artifacts. The four forms show similar kinetic properties, their Km and pH optima differing only very slightly. Response to some metabolites is reported. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 7 PMID:16664373

  12. The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase of spinach leaves responds to blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Penel, Claude; Greppin, Hubert; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2002-01-01

    The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase (NOX) of spinach leaf disks is characterized by oscillations in activity with a regular period length of ca. 24 min. Within a single population of plants exposed to light at the same time, NOX activities of all plants function synchronously. Exposure of plants transferred from darkness to blue light (495 nm, 2 min, 50 micromoles m-2 s-1) resulted in a complex response pattern but with a new maximum in the rate of NOX activity 36 (24+12) min after illumination and then with maxima in the rate of NOX activity every 24 min thereafter. Transient maxima in NOX activity were observed as well after 9.3 + /- 1.4 and 20.7 +/- 2.1 min. The blue light response differed from the response to red (650 nm, 10 min, 50 micromoles m-2 s-1) or white light where activity maxima were initiated 12 min after the light exposure followed by maxima every 24 min thereafter. Green or yellow light was ineffective. The light response was independent of the time in the 24-min NOX cycle when the light was given. The net effects of blue and red light were ultimately the same with a new maximum in the rate of NOX activity at 12+24=36 min (and every 24 min thereafter), but the mechanisms appear to be distinct.

  13. Effect of Photoperiod on the Metabolism of Deuterium-Labeled Gibberellin A53 in Spinach 1

    PubMed Central

    Gianfagna, Thomas; Zeevaart, Jan A. D.; Lusk, William J.

    1983-01-01

    Application of gibberellin A53 (GA53) to short-day (SD)-grown spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) plants caused an increase in petiole length and leaf angle similar to that found in plants transferred to long days (LD). [2H] GA53 was fed to plants in SD, LD, and in a SD to LD transition experiment, and the metabolites were identified by gas chromatography with selected ion monitoring. After 2, 4, or 6 SD, [2H]GA53 was converted to [2H]GA19 and [2H]GA44. No other metabolites were detected. After 2 LD, only [2H] GA20 was identified. In the transition experiment in which plants were given 4 SD followed by 2 LD, all three metabolites were found. The results demonstrate unequivocally that GA19, GA20, and GA44 are metabolic products of GA53, and strongly suggest that photoperiod regulates GA metabolism, in part, by controlling the conversion of GA19 to GA20. PMID:16662988

  14. Characterization of the secondary structure and thermostability of the extrinsic 16 kilodalton protein of spinach photosystem II by

    E-print Network

    Carpentier, Robert

    protein of spinach photosystem II by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy H. Zhanga,1 , Y. Yamamotob of the extrinsic 16 kDa protein of the spinach photosystem II (OEC16) were characterized in solution between 25

  15. Leaf Carbohydrate Status and Enzymes of Translocate Synthesis in Fruiting and Vegetative Plants of Cucumis sativus L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Pharr, David M.; Huber, Steven C.; Sox, Harriet N.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon partitioning in the leaves of Cucumis sativus L., a stachyose translocating plant, was influenced by the presence or absence of a single growing fruit on the plant. Fruit growth was very rapid with rates of fresh weight gain as high as 3.3 grams per hour. Fruit growth was highly competitive with vegetative growth as indicated by lower fresh weights of leaf blades, petioles, stem internodes and root systems on plants bearing a single growing fruit compared to plants not bearing a fruit. Carbon exchange rates, starch accumulation rates and carbon export rates were higher in leaves of plants bearing a fruit. Dry weight loss from leaves was higher at night from fruiting plants, and morning starch levels were consistently lower in leaves of fruiting than in leaves of vegetative plants indicating rapid starch mobilization at night from the leaves of fruiting plants. Galactinol, the galactosyl donor for stachyose biosynthesis, was present in the leaves of fruit-bearing plants at consistently lower concentration than in leaves of vegetative plants. Galactinol synthase, and sucrose phosphate synthase activities were not different on a per gram fresh weight basis in leaves from the two plant types; however, stachyose synthase activity was twice as high in leaves from fruiting plants. Thus, the lower galactinol pools may be associated with an activation of the terminal step in stachyose biosynthesis in leaves in response to the high sink demand of a growing cucumber fruit. PMID:16663989

  16. Differences in biofilm formation of produce and poultry Salmonella enterica isolates and their persistence on spinach plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Repeat irrigation of spinach plants with water containing Salmonella was used to determine Salmonella persistence on spinach leaves. Spinach plants were irrigated four times (biweekly) with water containing ca. 2.1 log CFU Salmonella per 100 ml water (the maximum generic E. coli MPN recommended by...

  17. Spinach: A new natural host of Impatiens necrotic spot virus in California.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impatiens necrotic spot tospovirus (INSV; family Bunyaviridae) was detected in a spinach (Spinacia oleracea) experimental field in Monterey County, CA in October of 2008. Spinach plants exhibiting severe stunting and with leaves that showed interveinal yellowing, thickening, and deformation were obs...

  18. A real-time PCR assay for detection and quantification of verticillium dahliae in spinach seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium dahliae is a soilborne fungus that causes Verticillium wilt on multiple crops in central coastal California. Although spinach crops grown in this region for fresh and processing commercial production do not display Verticillium wilt symptoms, spinach seed produced in the U.S. or Europe ...

  19. Development of a qPCR assay for quantification of verticillium dahliae in spinach seed.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium wilt, caused by the soilborne fungus Verticillium dahliae, is an important disease of lettuce and other specialty crops in the Salinas Valley of California. Although spinach is not affected by Verticillium wilt in commercial production, spinach seed infected with V. dahliae from locatio...

  20. SCREENING AND BREEDING FOR RESISTANCE TO LEAFMINER (KIRIOMYZA LANGEI) IN LETTUCE AND SPINACH.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leafminer (Liriomyza langei Frick) is a major pest that causes considerable damage to a wide variety of vegetable crops including lettuce and spinach. Forty-eight lettuce cultivars and introduction lines and 338 spinach accessions were screened in an insect cage for leafminer resistance. Significant...

  1. A qPCR assay for detection and quantification of Verticillium dahliae in spinach seed.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Verticillium dahliae is the causal agent of Verticillium wilt of lettuce and other specialty crops in the Salinas Valley of California. Spinach, another major specialty crop in California, is not affected by Verticillium wilt in commercial production. However, spinach seed infected with ...

  2. Changes in quality, liking and purchase intent of irradiated fresh-cut spinach during storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of ionizing radiation to enhance microbial safety of fresh spinach at a maximum dose of 4 kGy has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. However, whether spinach can tolerate those high doses of radiation is unclear. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate effect...

  3. Biodegradable PLA (polylactic acid) hinged trays keep quality of fresh-cut and cooked spinach.

    PubMed

    Botondi, Rinaldo; Bartoloni, Serena; Baccelloni, Simone; Mencarelli, Fabio

    2015-09-01

    This work examines the effects of packaging using two different polymeric trays with hinged lids, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polylactic acid (PLA), on fresh-cut and cooked spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Samples were stored in a cold room for 16 days at 4 °C. Chemical (total pigments, total polyphenols, ascorbic acid, antioxidant activity), physical (water activity), technological (colour evaluation), sensorial (aroma, visual appearance and water accumulation) and microbial (total aerobic mesophilic and psychrotrophic counts) parameters were tested. Both polymeric trays maintained the overall quality of fresh spinach for 6 days but spinach stored in PLA trays maintained its flavour longer. A significant increase in total polyphenols, antiradical activity, total carotenoids as well as a decrease in ascorbic acid in fresh spinach was observed in the first 3 days of storage in both samples. Unfortunately, the PLA package accumulated condensed water. The total microbial load of fresh-cut spinach reached about 6.3-7.3 log CFU g(-1) within 8 days. Cooked spinach packed in PLA and PET polymeric hinged trays showed the same behaviour as fresh spinach in terms of quality and shelf life. In conclusion, PLA plastic hinged trays can be used for packaging fresh-cut and cooked cut spinach, but the problem of condensed water must be solved. PMID:26345011

  4. Pathway for the synthesis of triacylglycerols from monogalactosyldiacylglycerols in ozone-fumigated spinach leaves. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaki, Takeshi; Kondo, Noriaki; Yamada, Mitsuhiro Univ. of Tokyo )

    1990-10-01

    When the upper leaf surface of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) plants was treated with (1-{sup 14}C)acetate and grown for 2 days, {sup 14}C was effectively incorporated into acyl moieties of leaf lipids in ratios approximately their composition by mass. Fumigation of the plants with ozone (0.5 microliter per liter) caused a redistribution of {sup 14}C among lipid classes, i.e. a marked increase of {sup 14}C content in triacylglycerol (TG) and 1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DG) and a decrease of label in monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) without affecting {sup 14}C distribution in leaf fatty acids. Label in both TG and 1,2-DG was found predominantly in their polyene molecular species. Since MGDG consists of similar polyene molecular species, the results indicate the synthesis of TG from MGDG via 1,2-DG. Label was also accumulated in tri- and tetragalactosyldiacylglycerol, products of galactolipid:galactolipid galactosyltransferase (GGGT). Moreover, there was a close relation between increases in the amounts of TG and the oligogalactolipids in ozone-treated leaves. These results indicate that MGDG was converted to 1,2-DG by GGGT and then to TG. In intact chloroplasts isolated from ozone-treated leaves, there was an enhanced production of free fatty acid (FFA), which was diminished by the addition of coenzyme A (CoA) and ATP, indicating that ozone stimulated the hydrolysis of MGDG to liberate FFA, which was in turn converted to acyl-CoA. The final step of TG synthesis, acylation of 1,2-DG with acyl-CoA, was confirmed by feeding with (1-{sup 14}C)linolenic acid in leaf discs excised from ozone-fumigated leaves; {sup 14}C was effectively incorporated into TG but not into 1,2-DG.

  5. Correlating Arsenic-Induced Morphological Change in Spinach Leaves With Leaf Spectral Characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arsenic (As) is a widely spread soil contaminant which can be accumulated into plant parts. The presence of As in edible portions of plants allows for potentially dangerous ingestion by humans and animals. The ability to detect As in plants is an important tool to minimize such risks. Remote sens...

  6. Insect molting hormone and sterol biosynthesis in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Grebenok, R.J.; Adler, J.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Insect molting hormones, which are produced by plants and are effective molecules in the control of insect crop pests, are biosynthesized in developing spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea L.). The major sterols biosynthesized by spinach are avenasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholesta-7,24(28)-dien-3{beta}-ol), spinasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholesta-7,22-dien-3{beta}-ol), and 22-dihydrospinasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholest-7-en-3{beta}-ol). The major ecdysteroids biosynthesized are ecdysterone (2{beta},3{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-hexahydroxy-5{beta}-cholest-7-en-6-one) and polypodine B (2{beta},3{beta},5{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-heptahycroxycholest-7-en-6-one) and polypodine B (2{beta},3{beta},5{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-heptahydroxycholest-7-en-6-one). When labeled 2-{sup 14}C-mevalonic acid was incorporated into young leaves isolated squalene, sterols and ecdysteroids contained the label. During a short (16 h) incorporation period in intact young leaves of 100 day old plants, the avenasterol has the highest specific activity in counts per minute per {mu}g of sterol followed by 22-dihydrospinasterol which is more highly labeled than spinasterol. The ecdysteroids synthesized, on an entire plant basis, account for 20% of the total steroid (sterol and ecdysteroid) isolated from the plant.

  7. Effect of photoperiod on gibberellin biosynthetic enzymes in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, S.J.; Bleecker, A.B.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-04-01

    The photoperiodic control of stem elongation in spinach, a long day (LD) rosette plant, is mediated by gibberellins (GAs). The early 13-hydroxylated GA biosynthetic pathway from GA/sub 12/ to GA/sub 20/ operates in spinach: GA/sub 12/ ..-->.. GA/sub 53/ ..-->.. GA/sub 44/ ..-->.. GA/sub 19/ ..-->.. GA/sub 20/. Two enzymes of this pathway, those converting GA/sub 53/ to GA/sub 44/ (GA/sub 53/ oxidase) and GA/sub 19/ to GA/sub 20/ (GA/sub 19/ oxidase), are regulated by light. The enzyme converting GA/sub 44/ to GA/sub 19/ (GA/sub 44/ oxidase) is not light-regulated. In the light GA/sub 53/ and GA/sub 18/ oxidase activities are increased, therefore causing the GA biosynthetic pathway to be turned on. This leads to the production of an active GA in LD, which causes an increase in stem elongation. Two the enzymes, GA/sub 44/ and GA/sub 53/ oxidases, can be separated from one another by anion exchange HPLC. Estimates of the molecular weights of these two enzymes based on gel filtration HPLC will be reported.

  8. Choline oxidation by intact spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, P.; Lerma, C.; Hanson, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Plants synthesize betaine by a two-step oxidation of choline (choline ..-->.. betaine aldehyde ..-->.. betaine). Protoplast-derived chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) carry out both reactions, more rapidly in light than in darkness. We investigated the light-stimulated oxidation of choline, using spinach chloroplasts isolated directly from leaves. The rates of choline oxidation obtained (dark and light rates: 10-50 and 100-300 nanomoles per hour per milligram chlorophyll, respectively) were approximately 20-fold higher than for protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Betaine aldehyde was the main product. Choline oxidation in darkness and light was suppressed by hypoxia. Neither uncouplers not the Calvin cycle inhibitor glyceraldehyde greatly affected choline oxidation in the light, and maximal choline oxidation was attained far below light saturation of CO/sub 2/ fixation. The light stimulation of choline oxidation was abolished by the PSII inhibitors DCMU and dibromothymoquinone, and was partially restored by adding reduced diaminodurene, an electron donor to PSI. Both methyl viologen and phenazine methosulfate prevented choline oxidation. Adding dihydroxyacetone phosphate, which can generate NADPH in organello, doubled the dark rate of choline oxidation. These results indicate that choline oxidation in chloroplasts requires oxygen, and reducing power generated from PSI. Enzymic reactions consistent with these requirements are discussed.

  9. A superfolding Spinach2 reveals the dynamic nature of trinucleotide repeat RNA

    PubMed Central

    Strack, Rita L.; Disney, Matthew D.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent imaging of RNA in living cells is a technically challenging problem in cell biology. One strategy for genetically encoding fluorescent RNAs is to express them as fusions with ‘RNA mimics of GFP’. These are short aptamer tags that exhibit fluorescence upon binding otherwise nonfluorescent fluorophores that resemble those found in GFP. We find that the brightest of these aptamers, Spinach, often exhibits reduced fluorescence after it is fused to RNAs of interest. We show that a combination of thermal instability and a propensity for misfolding account for the low fluorescence of various Spinach-RNA fusions. Using systematic mutagenesis, we identified nucleotides that account for the poor folding of Spinach, and generated Spinach2, which exhibits markedly improved thermal stability and folding in cells. Furthermore, we show that Spinach2 largely retains its fluorescence when fused to various RNAs. Using Spinach2, we detail the cellular dynamics of the CGG trinucleotide-repeat containing “toxic RNA” associated with Fragile-X tremor/ataxia syndrome, and show that these RNAs form nuclear foci with unexpected morphological plasticity that is regulated by the cell cycle and by small molecules. Together, these data demonstrate that Spinach2 exhibits improved versatility for fluorescently labeling RNAs in living cells. PMID:24162923

  10. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome-specific EST sequences.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chuan-Liang; Zhang, Wei-Li; Cao, Ying; Wang, Shao-Jing; Li, Shu-Fen; Gao, Wu-Jun; Lu, Long-Dou

    2015-12-01

    The genome of spinach single chromosome complement is about 1000 Mbp, which is the model material to study the molecular mechanisms of plant sex differentiation. The cytological study showed that the biggest spinach chromosome (chromosome 1) was taken as spinach sex chromosome. It had three alleles of sex-related X,X(m) and Y. Many researchers have been trying to clone the sex-determining genes and investigated the molecular mechanism of spinach sex differentiation. However,there are no successful cloned reports about these genes. A new technology combining chromosome microdissection with hybridization-specific amplification (HSA) was adopted. The spinach Y chromosome degenerate oligonucleotide primed-PCR (DOP-PCR) products were hybridized with cDNA of the male spinach flowers in florescence. The female spinach genome was taken as blocker and cDNA library specifically expressed in Y chromosome was constructed. Moreover, expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences in cDNA library were cloned, sequenced and bioinformatics was analysed. There were 63 valid EST sequences obtained in this study. The fragment size was between 53 and 486 bp. BLASTn homologous alignment indicated that 12 EST sequences had homologous sequences of nucleic acids, the rest were new sequences. BLASTx homologous alignment indicated that 16 EST sequences had homologous protein-encoding nucleic acid sequence. The spinach Y chromosome-specific EST sequences laid the foundation for cloning the functional genes, specifically expressed in spinach Y chromosome. Meanwhile, the establishment of the technology system in the research provided a reference for rapid cloning of other biological sex chromosome-specific EST sequences. PMID:26690526

  11. Effect of ?-irradiation on the thermomechanical and morphological properties of chitosan obtained from prawn shell: Evaluation of potential for irradiated chitosan as plant growth stimulator for Malabar spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mohammed Mizanur; Kabir, Shahriar; Rashid, Taslim Ur; Nesa, Bodrun; Nasrin, Romana; Haque, Papia; Khan, Mubarak A.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we have synthesized chitosan from waste prawn shell via ?-irradiation of chitin and subsequent alkaline treatment. The detailed experimental studies demonstrated that nonirradiated chitin deacetylated by 40% NaOH solution showed 72% degree of deacetylation (DD), however 50 kGy irradiated chitin, deacetylated by 20% NaOH demonstrated 81.5% DD. Chitosan in solid state as obtained from ?-irradiation of chitin was further irradiated by different doses (2-100 kGy) of gamma irradiation and the effects of irradiation on the molecular weight, thermo-mechanical by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and antimicrobial properties were evaluated with respect to nonirradiated chitosan sample. Gamma irradiation of chitosan with a dose of 100 kGy caused a decrease in average molecular weight from 1.9×105 to 6.5×104 Da and thus increased its solubility in water. Nonirradiated and ?-irradiated chitosan at concentration 1% (w/w) in water were prepared and used to evaluate of its potentiality for growth stimulation of Malabar spinach. The chitosan solution was sprayed on the specimen plants and neighboring soil where germinations were taken place and various plant growth parameters such as plant height, number of leaves, leaf areas, dry and wet weight of the plants and roots were investigated. The details study revealed that application of 30 kGy irradiated chitosan yielded 60% higher growth of the Malabar spinach than that obtained from nonirradiated chitosan. The data are consistent with preliminary results from field experiments and unambiguously confirms that a minor amount of chitosan has a profound effect on the growth and development of Malabar spinach.

  12. Suppression Effects of Betaine-Enriched Spinach on Hyperhomocysteinemia Induced by Guanidinoacetic Acid and Choline Deficiency in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Qun; Jia, Zheng; Han, Feng; Inakuma, Takahiro; Miyashita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio; Sun, Li-Cui; Xiang, Xue-Song; Huang, Zhen-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Betaine is an important natural component of rich food sources, especially spinach. Rats were fed diets with betaine or spinach powder at the same level of betaine for 10 days to investigate the dose-dependent effects of spinach powder supplementation on hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) addition and choline deprivation. The GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats fed 25% casein diet (25C) was significantly suppressed by supplementation with betaine or spinach, and it was completely suppressed by taking 11.0% spinach supplementation. The choline deprivation-induced enhancement of plasma homocysteine concentration in rats fed 25% soybean protein diet (25S) was markedly suppressed by 3.82% spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach partially prevented the effects of GAA on hepatic concentrations of methionine metabolites. The decrease in activity of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) and cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS) in GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia was recovered by supplementation with betaine or spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach did not affect BHMT activity, whereas it partially restored CBS activity in choline-deprived 25S. The results indicated that betaine or spinach could completely suppress the hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline deficiency resulting from stimulating the homocysteine removal by both remethylation and cystathionine formation. PMID:25250392

  13. Suppression effects of betaine-enriched spinach on hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid and choline deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Qun; Jia, Zheng; Han, Feng; Inakuma, Takahiro; Miyashita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio; Sun, Li-Cui; Xiang, Xue-Song; Huang, Zhen-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Betaine is an important natural component of rich food sources, especially spinach. Rats were fed diets with betaine or spinach powder at the same level of betaine for 10 days to investigate the dose-dependent effects of spinach powder supplementation on hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) addition and choline deprivation. The GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats fed 25% casein diet (25 C) was significantly suppressed by supplementation with betaine or spinach, and it was completely suppressed by taking 11.0% spinach supplementation. The choline deprivation-induced enhancement of plasma homocysteine concentration in rats fed 25% soybean protein diet (25S) was markedly suppressed by 3.82% spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach partially prevented the effects of GAA on hepatic concentrations of methionine metabolites. The decrease in activity of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) and cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS) in GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia was recovered by supplementation with betaine or spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach did not affect BHMT activity, whereas it partially restored CBS activity in choline-deprived 25S. The results indicated that betaine or spinach could completely suppress the hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline deficiency resulting from stimulating the homocysteine removal by both remethylation and cystathionine formation. PMID:25250392

  14. Purification and characterization of ribulose-5-phosphate kinase from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, M.A.; Milanez, S.; Stringer, C.D.; Hartman, F.C.

    1986-02-15

    An efficient purification procedure utilizing affinity chromatography is described for spinach ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, a light-regulated chloroplastic enzyme. Gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified enzyme reveal a dimeric structure of 44,000 Mr subunits. Chemical crosslinking with dimethyl suberimidate confirms the presence of two subunits per molecule of native kinase, which are shown to be identical by partial NH2-terminal sequencing. Based on sulfhydryl titrations and on amino acid analyses, each subunit contains four to five cysteinyl residues. The observed slow loss of activity during spontaneous oxidation in air-saturated buffer correlates with the intramolecular oxidation of two sulfhydryl groups, presumably those involved in thioredoxin-mediated regulation.

  15. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment for Listeria Monocytogenes on Fresh Baby Spinach Leaves 

    E-print Network

    Omac, Basri

    2014-01-06

    that naturally contain microorganisms such as pathogens microorganisms. This quantitative microbial risk assessment describe the change of L. monocytogenes concentration in fresh baby spinach from farm to table. This model also consists of several scenarios...

  16. Imaging metabolite dynamics in living cells using a Spinach-based riboswitch.

    PubMed

    You, Mingxu; Litke, Jacob L; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2015-05-26

    Riboswitches are natural ligand-sensing RNAs typically that are found in the 5' UTRs of mRNA. Numerous classes of riboswitches have been discovered, enabling mRNA to be regulated by diverse and physiologically important cellular metabolites and small molecules. Here we describe Spinach riboswitches, a new class of genetically encoded metabolite sensor derived from naturally occurring riboswitches. Drawing upon the structural switching mechanism of natural riboswitches, we show that Spinach can be swapped for the expression platform of various riboswitches, allowing metabolite binding to induce Spinach fluorescence directly. In the case of the thiamine 5'-pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitch from the Escherichia coli thiM gene encoding hydroxyethylthiazole kinase, we show that insertion of Spinach results in an RNA sensor that exhibits fluorescence upon binding TPP. This TPP Spinach riboswitch binds TPP with affinity and selectivity similar to that of the endogenous riboswitch and enables the discovery of agonists and antagonists of the TPP riboswitch using simple fluorescence readouts. Furthermore, expression of the TPP Spinach riboswitch in Escherichia coli enables live imaging of dynamic changes in intracellular TPP concentrations in individual cells. Additionally, we show that other riboswitches that use a structural mechanism similar to that of the TPP riboswitch, including the guanine and adenine riboswitches from the Bacillus subtilis xpt gene encoding xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase, and the S-adenosyl-methionine-I riboswitch from the B. subtilis yitJ gene encoding methionine synthase, can be converted into Spinach riboswitches. Thus, Spinach riboswitches constitute a novel class of RNA-based fluorescent metabolite sensors that exploit the diversity of naturally occurring ligand-binding riboswitches. PMID:25964329

  17. Bioavailability of iron from spinach using an in vitro/human Caco-2 cell bioassay model.

    PubMed

    Rutzke, Corinne J; Glahn, Raymond P; Rutzke, Michael A; Welch, Ross M; Langhans, Robert W; Albright, Louis D; Combs, Gerald F; Wheeler, Raymond M

    2004-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) cv Whitney was tested for iron bioavailabilty using an in vitro human intestinal cell culture ferritin bioassay technique previously developed. Spinach was cultured in a growth chamber for 33 days, harvested, and freeze-dried. Total iron in the samples was an average of 71 micrograms/g dry weight. Spinach was digested in vitro (pepsin and 0.1 M HCl followed by pancreatin and 0.1 M NaHCO3) with and without the addition of supplemental ascorbic acid. Caco-2 cell cultures were used to determine iron bioavailability from the spinach mixtures. Production of the iron-binding protein ferritin in the Caco-2 cells showed the supplemental ascorbic acid doubled bioavailability of iron from spinach. The data show fresh spinach is a poor source of iron, and emphasize the importance of evaluation of whole meals rather than single food items. The data support the usefulness of the in vitro/Caco-2 cell ferritin bioassay model for prescreening of space flight diets for bioavailable iron. PMID:15880905

  18. Bioavailability of iron from spinach using an in vitro/human Caco-2 cell bioassay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutzke, Corinne J.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Rutzke, Michael A.; Welch, Ross M.; Langhans, Robert W.; Albright, Louis D.; Combs, Gerald F Jr; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) cv Whitney was tested for iron bioavailabilty using an in vitro human intestinal cell culture ferritin bioassay technique previously developed. Spinach was cultured in a growth chamber for 33 days, harvested, and freeze-dried. Total iron in the samples was an average of 71 micrograms/g dry weight. Spinach was digested in vitro (pepsin and 0.1 M HCl followed by pancreatin and 0.1 M NaHCO3) with and without the addition of supplemental ascorbic acid. Caco-2 cell cultures were used to determine iron bioavailability from the spinach mixtures. Production of the iron-binding protein ferritin in the Caco-2 cells showed the supplemental ascorbic acid doubled bioavailability of iron from spinach. The data show fresh spinach is a poor source of iron, and emphasize the importance of evaluation of whole meals rather than single food items. The data support the usefulness of the in vitro/Caco-2 cell ferritin bioassay model for prescreening of space flight diets for bioavailable iron.

  19. Effect of spinach cultivar and bacterial adherence factors on survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on spinach leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Similarly to phytopathogens and epiphytic microorganisms, human bacterial pathogens have been shown to colonize on plant phylloplane. Along with environmental variables such as temperate, UV light, relative humidity, etc., plant cultivar and specifically the leaf blade morphological characteristics ...

  20. Influence of variations in soil copper on the yield and nutrition of spinach grown in microplots on two organic soils

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, S.P.; Belanger, A.; Sanderson, R.B.; Valk, M.; Knibbe, E.N.

    1984-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. Symphony) was grown in spring 1982 in field microplots of an organic soil (site I-mucky peat) containing 81 to 1063 ..mu..g Cu.g/sup -1/ soil, and cv. America of the same crop taken in summer 1982 on a peaty organic soil (site II) varying in Cu content from 13 to 1659 ..mu..g.g/sup -1/. The variations in soil Cu were mainly due to three rates of Cu applications in 1978 at site II and in 1979 at site I. At site I, the diversity in soil-Cu had no effect on yield or foliar-Cu levels in the crop. At site II soil-Cu was positively correlated with yield and foliar Cu; and negatively with leaf Fe due to a dilution effect. Neither soil Cu nor foliar Cu had any significant effect on Mo in leaves at both sites, except that the increase in yield due to the highest level of Cu at site II was accompanied by an increased plant uptake of Mo. Also, foliar Cu was positively correlated with P, Mg and Mn levels in leaves at site I; and foliar Ca, Mg and Mn at site II. Residual soil Cu up to 1063 ..mu..g.g/sup -1/ in a mucky peat and 1659 ..mu..g./sup -1/ in a peat showed no signs of causing phytotoxocity or significant nutritional imbalance. 19 references, 4 tables.

  1. Changes in microbial populations on fresh cut spinach.

    PubMed

    Babic, I; Roy, S; Watada, A E; Wergin, W P

    1996-08-01

    The microbial populations found on fresh-cut spinach leaves that were stored in gas permeable bags at 10 degrees C for 12 days were examined and identified. The microorganisms consisted of mesophilic aerobic bacteria, psychrotrophic bacteria, Pseudomonadaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Micrococcaceae, lactic acid bacteria and yeasts. Populations of mesophiles, psychrotrophs, Pseudomonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae increased sharply during the storage period. The initial populations were 10(7), 10(6), 10(6) and 10(4) CFU.g-1 respectively. Populations reached 10(10) for the mesophiles, psychrotrophs and Pseudomonadaceae and 10(7) CFU.g-1 for Enterobacteriaceae after 12 days of storage. Micrococcaceae, lactic acid bacteria and yeasts remained constant (10(3)-10(4) CFU.g-1. The majority of the bacterial isolates were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens, Aeromonas caviae and Staphylococcus xylosus. The yeasts, which were most frequently isolated, were classified in the genus Cryptococcus. No pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella were detected. Observations with low temperature scanning electron microscopy (LTSEM) indicated that the microorganisms were not present on the surface of healthy unbroken leaves. Alternatively, they were found in areas where the cuticle was broken and could be seen infecting the internal palisade parenchyma. PMID:8880301

  2. Spinach pyruvate kinase isoforms: partial purification and regulatory properties

    SciTech Connect

    Baysdorfer, C.; Bassham, J.A.

    1984-02-01

    Pyruvate kinase from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves consists of two isoforms, separable by blue agarose chromatography. Both isoforms share similar pH profiles and substrate and alternate nucleotide K/sub m/ values. In addition, both isoforms are inhibited by oxalate and ATP and activated by AMP. The isoforms differ in their response to three key metabolites; citrate, aspartate, and glutamate. The first isoform is similar to previously reported plant pyruvate kinases in its sensitivity to citrate inhibition. The K/sub i/ for this inhibition is 1.2 millimolar citrate. The second isoform is not affected by citrate but is regulated by aspartate and glutamate. Aspartate is an activator with a K/sub a/ of 0.05 millimolar, and glutamate is an inhibitor with a K/sub i/ of 0.68 millimolar. A pyruvate kinase with these properties has not been previously reported. Based on these considerations, the authors suggest that the activity of the first isoform is regulated by respiratory metabolism. The second isoform, in contrast, may be regulated by the demand for carbon skeletons for use in ammonia assimilation.

  3. Phosphoglycolate phosphatase of spinach acts as a phosphoenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Z.B.; Seal, S.N.

    1987-05-01

    When /sup 32/P-glycolate and phosphoglycolate phosphatase from spinach are mixed, /sup 32/P is incorporated into acid precipitated protein. Properties that relate this phosphorylation to the enzyme are: The K/sub m/ value for P-glycolate is similar for protein phosphorylation and substrate hydrolysis; the /sup 32/P appearing in the phosphoenzyme is diluted by unlabeled P-glycolate or the alternative substrate, ethyl-P; the activator Cl/sup -/ enhances the effectiveness of ethyl-P as a substrate and as an inhibitor of the formation of /sup 32/P-enzyme; and /sup 32/P is lost from the enzyme when /sup 32/P-glycolate is consumed. The acid denatured phosphorylated protein is a molecule of 34,000 Da, which is half of the molecular weight of the native protein and is similar in size to the labeled band that is seen on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. The enzyme-bound phosphoryl group appears to be an acyl-phosphate from its pH stability, being quite stable at pH 1, less stable at pH 5, and very unstable above pH 5. The bond is readily hydrolyzed in acid molybdate and it is sensitive to cleavage by hydroxylamine at pH 6.8. The demonstration of enzyme phosphorylation by /sup 32/P-glycolate resolves the dilemma presented by initial rate studies in which alternative substrates appeared to have different mechanisms.

  4. Purification of gibberellin sub 53 -oxidase from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.M.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. )

    1989-04-01

    Spinach is a long-day rosette plants, in which stem growth is mediated by gibberellins. It has been shown that two enzymatic steps, GA{sub 53}-oxidase and GA{sub 19}-oxidase, are controlled by light. To develop an understanding into this light regulation, purification of GA{sub 53}-oxidase has been undertaken. The original assay relied on the HPLC separation of the product and substrate, but was considered too slow for the development of a purification scheme. A TLC system was developed which in conjunction with improvements to the assay conditions was sensitive and gave rapid results. The partial purification of the GA{sub 53}-oxidase is achieved by a high speed centrifugation, 40-55% ammonium sulfate precipitation, an hydroxyapatite column, Sephadex G-100 column and an anion exchange FPLC column, Mono Q HR10/10, yielding 1000-fold purification and 15% recovery. Monoclonal antibodies to the protein will be raised and used to further characterize the enzyme.

  5. Feedback inhibition of spinach L-galactose dehydrogenase by L-ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Mieda, Takahiro; Yabuta, Yukinori; Rapolu, Madhusudhan; Motoki, Takashi; Takeda, Toru; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2004-09-01

    We have studied the enzymological properties of L-galactose dehydrogenase (l-GalDH), a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of l-ascorbate (AsA) in plants. L-GalDH was purified approximately 560-fold from spinach leaves. The enzyme was a homodimer with a subunit mass of 36 kDa. We also cloned the full-length cDNA of spinach L-GalDH, which contained an open reading frame encoding 322 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 35,261 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA showed 82, 79 and 75% homology to L-GalDH from kiwifruit, apple and Arabidopsis, respectively. Recombinant enzyme expressed from the cDNA in Escherichia coli showed L-GalDH activity. Southern blot analysis revealed that the spinach L-GalDH gene occurs in a single copy. Northern blot analysis suggests that L-GalDH is expressed in different organs of spinach. The purified native L-GalDH showed high specificity for L-galactose with a Km of 116.2+/-3.2 microM. Interestingly, spinach L-GalDH exhibited reversible inhibition by AsA, the end-product of the biosynthetic pathway. The inhibition kinetics indicated a linear-competitive inhibition with a Ki of 133.2+/-7.2 microM, suggesting feedback regulation in AsA synthesis in the plant. PMID:15509850

  6. Spinach curly top virus: A Newly Described Curtovirus Species from Southwest Texas with Incongruent Gene Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Baliji, Surendranath; Black, Mark C; French, Roy; Stenger, Drake C; Sunter, Garry

    2004-07-01

    ABSTRACT A curtovirus associated with a disease of spinach was isolated in southwest Texas during 1996. Disease symptoms included severe stunting and chlorosis, with younger leaves curled, distorted, and dwarfed. Viral DNA was purified and an infectious clone obtained. Agroinoculation using a construct bearing full-length tandem repeats of the cloned viral genome resulted in systemic infection of species in six of seven plant families tested, indicating that the virus has a wide host range. Symptoms produced in spinach agroinoculated with cloned viral DNA were similar to those observed in the field. Viral single-stranded and double-stranded DNA forms typical of curtovirus infection were detected in host plants by Southern blot hybridization. The complete sequence of the infectious clone comprised 2,925 nucleotides, with seven open reading frames encoding proteins homologous to those of other curtoviruses. Complete genome comparisons revealed that the spinach curtovirus shared 64.2 to 83.9% nucleotide sequence identity relative to four previously characterized curtovirus species: Beet curly top virus, Beet severe curly top virus, Beet mild curly top virus, and Horseradish curly top virus. Phylogenetic analysis of individual open reading frames indicated that the evolutionary history of the three virion-sense genes was different from that of the four complementary-sense genes, suggesting that recombination among curtoviruses may have occurred. Collectively, these results indicate that the spinach curtovirus characterized here represents a newly described species of the genus Curtovirus, for which we propose the name Spinach curly top virus. PMID:18943911

  7. Distinct transcriptional profiles and phenotypes exhibited by Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates related to the 2006 spinach-associated outbreak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006, an outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was linked to the consumption of ready-to-eat bagged spinach. The likely sources of pre-harvest spinach contamination were soil and water that became contaminated via cattle or feral pigs in the proximity of the spinach fields. In this study, we compa...

  8. Essential oils reduce Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella on spinach leaves without affecting produce quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of cinnamaldehyde and Sporan alone, or in combination with acetic acid in reducing E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella on spinach leaves was investigated. Spinach leaves were inoculated with a cocktail of five-strain Salmonella or E. coli O157:H7, air-dried for 30 min, and then immersed in a...

  9. An Improved Method for the Extraction and Thin-Layer Chromatography of Chlorophyll A and B from Spinach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quach, Hao T.; Steeper, Robert L.; Griffin, William G.

    2004-01-01

    A simple and fast method, which resolves chlorophyll a and b from spinach leaves on analytical plates while minimizing the appearance of chlorophyll degradation products is shown. An improved mobile phase for the Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of spinach extract that allows for the complete resolution of the common plant pigments found in…

  10. Quality of fresh-cut iceberg lettuce and spinach irradiated at doses up to 4kGy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to investigate radiation tolerance of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce and spinach. Fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce packaged in modified atmosphere packages and spinach in perforated film bags were irradiated with gamma rays at doses of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 kGy. After irradiation, the sam...

  11. THE EFFECTS OF ELECTRON BEAM IRRADIATION AND SANITIZERS IN THE REDUCTION OF PATHOGENS AND ATTACHMENT PREVENTION ON SPINACH 

    E-print Network

    Neal, Jack A.

    2010-07-14

    The effects of electron beam (e-beam) irradiation and sanitizers in the reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella counts and attachment prevention on spinach was studied. Survival of these pathogens in spinach was observed at multiple...

  12. Systematic reconstruction of binding and stability landscapes of the fluorogenic aptamer spinach

    PubMed Central

    Ketterer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Weber, Wilfried; Meier, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Fluorogenic RNAs that are based on the complex formed by 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) derivatives and the RNA aptamer named Spinach were used to engineer a new generation of in vitro and in vivo sensors for bioanalytics. With the resolved crystal structure of the RNA/small molecule complex, the engineering map becomes available, but comprehensive information regarding the thermodynamic profile of the molecule is missing. Here, we reconstructed the full thermodynamic binding and stability landscapes between DFHBI and a truncated sequence of first-generation Spinach. For this purpose, we established a systematic screening procedure for single- and double-point mutations on a microfluidic large-scale integrated chip platform for 87-nt long RNAs. The thermodynamic profile with single base resolution was used to engineer an improved fluorogenic spinach generation via a directed rather than evolutional approach. PMID:26400180

  13. Systematic reconstruction of binding and stability landscapes of the fluorogenic aptamer spinach.

    PubMed

    Ketterer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Weber, Wilfried; Meier, Matthias

    2015-10-30

    Fluorogenic RNAs that are based on the complex formed by 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) derivatives and the RNA aptamer named Spinach were used to engineer a new generation of in vitro and in vivo sensors for bioanalytics. With the resolved crystal structure of the RNA/small molecule complex, the engineering map becomes available, but comprehensive information regarding the thermodynamic profile of the molecule is missing. Here, we reconstructed the full thermodynamic binding and stability landscapes between DFHBI and a truncated sequence of first-generation Spinach. For this purpose, we established a systematic screening procedure for single- and double-point mutations on a microfluidic large-scale integrated chip platform for 87-nt long RNAs. The thermodynamic profile with single base resolution was used to engineer an improved fluorogenic spinach generation via a directed rather than evolutional approach. PMID:26400180

  14. Nutritional Composition of Water Spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) Leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, K. J.; Hassan, L. G.; Dangoggo, S. M.; Ladan, M. J.

    Analyses of the nutritional composition of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) Forsk leaves were carried out using standard methods of food analysis. The proximate composition as well as mineral elements were determined. The leaves were found on dry weight basis to have high moisture (72.83±0.29%), ash (10.83±0.80%), crude lipid (11.00±0.50%), crude fibre (17.67±0.35%) and available carbohydrate (54.20±0.68%), but low in crude protein content (6.30±0.27%). The leaves also have energy value (300.94±5.31 kcal/100 g) that is within the range reported in some Nigerian leafy vegetables. The mineral element contents were high with remarkable concentration of K (5,458.33±954.70 mg/100 g) and Fe (210.30±2.47 mg/100 g). Also the leaves content moderate concentrations of Na (135.00±2.50 mg/100 g), calcium (416.70±5.77 mg/100 g), Magnesium (301.64±12.69 mg/100 g) and P (109.29±0.55 mg/100 g), with low Cu (0.36±0.01 mg/100 g), Mn (2.14±0.22 mg/100 g) and Zn (2.47±0.27 mg/100 g) contents. Comparing the mineral content with recommended dietary allowance, it was showed that the plant leaves is good sources of K, Mn and Fe for all categories of people, while Mg is adequate enough for adult female and children. From the result, Ipomoea aquatica Forsk leaves could be used for nutritional purposes, due to the amount and diversity of nutrients it contains.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Fixation in the Light and in the Dark by Isolated Spinach Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Avron, Mordhay; Gibbs, Martin

    1974-01-01

    Factors affecting CO2 fixation in the spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplast were investigated. Free magnesium ions are shown to be highly inhibitory for photosynthetic CO2 fixation in isolated intact spinach chloroplasts. The pH optimum for CO2 fixation is about 8.5 but is dependent upon the reaction medium. Conditions are defined under which chloroplasts illuminated in the absence of CO2 accumulate ribulose 1,5-diphosphate, and fix CO2 in a subsequent dark period when high magnesium ion concentrations are provided. The regulation of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation by these factors is discussed. PMID:16658664

  16. Elm Leaf Beetle 

    E-print Network

    Patrick, Carl D.

    2002-05-22

    Elm leaf beetles damage all varieties of elm trees. Learn how to identify this insect and understand its biology and life cycle. There are suggestions for controlling elm leaf beetles, as well as a table of insecticides effective against...

  17. Isolation of a cDNA clone for spinach lipid transfer protein and evidence that the protein is synthesized by the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard, W.R.; Thoma, S.; Botella, J.; Somerville, C.R. )

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a nonspecific lipid transfer protein from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was isolated by probing a library with synthetic oligonucleotides based on the amino acid sequence of the protein. Determination of the DNA sequence indicated a 354-nucleotide open reading frame which encodes a 118-amino acid residue polypeptide. The first 26 amino acids of the open reading frame, which are not present in the mature protein, have all the characteristics of a signal sequence which is normally associated with the synthesis of membrane proteins or secreted proteins. In vitro transcription of the cDNA and translation in the presence of canine pancreatic microsomes or microsomes from cultured maize endosperm cells indicated that proteolytic processing of the preprotein to the mature form was associated with cotranslational insertion into the microsomal membranes. Because there is no known mechanism by which the polypeptide could be transferred from the microsomal membranes to the cytoplasm, the proposed role of this protein in catalyzing lipid transfer between intracellular membranes is in doubt. Although the lipid transfer protein is one of the most abundant proteins in leaf cells, the results of genomic Southern analysis were consistent with the presence of only one gene. Analysis of the level of mRNA by Northern blotting indicated that the transcript was several-fold more abundant than an actin transcript in leaf and petiole tissue, but was present in roots at less than 1% of the level in petioles.

  18. Model based analysis of transient fluorescence yield induced by actinic laser flashes in spinach leaves and cells of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B; Renger, G

    2014-04-01

    Measurements of Single Flash Induced Transient Fluorescence Yield (SFITFY) on spinach leaves and whole cells of green thermophilic alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick were analyzed for electron transfer (ET) steps and coupled proton transfer (PT) on both the donor and the acceptor side of the reaction center (RC) of photosystem II (PS II). A specially developed PS II model (Belyaeva et al., 2008, 2011a) allowed the determination of ET steps that occur in a hierarchically ordered time scale from nanoseconds to several seconds. Our study demonstrates that our SFITFY data is consistent with the concept of the reduction of P680(+) by YZ in both leaves and algae (studied on spinach leaves and cells of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick). The multiphasic P680(+) reduction kinetics by YZ in PS II core complexes with high oxygen evolution capacity was seen in both algae and leaves. Model simulation to fit SFITFY curves for dark adapted species used here gives the rate constants to verify nanosecond kinetic stages of P680(+) reduction by YZ in the redox state S1 of the water oxidizing complex (WOC) shown in Kühn et al. (2004). Then a sequence of relaxation steps in the redox state S1, outlined by Renger (2012), occurs in both algae and leaves as a similar non-adiabatic ET reactions. Coupled PT is discussed briefly to understand a rearrangement of hydrogen bond protons in the protein matrix of the WOC (Umena et al., 2011). On the other hand, present studies showed a slower reoxidation of reduced QA by QB in algal cells as compared with that in a leaf that might be regarded as a consequence of differences of spatial domains at the QB-site in leaves compared to algae. Our comparative study helped to correlate theory with experimental data for molecular photosynthetic mechanisms in thylakoid membranes. PMID:24556534

  19. Differences in biofilm formation of produce and poultry Salmonella enterica isolates and their persistence on spinach plants.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jitendra; Singh, Manpreet; Macarisin, Dumitru; Sharma, Manan; Shelton, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Spinach plants were irrigated biweekly with water containing 2.1 log CFU Salmonella/100 ml water (the maximum Escherichia coli MPN recommended by the Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement; LGMA), or 4.1 CFU Salmonella/100 ml water to determine Salmonella persistence on spinach leaves. Green Fluorescent protein expressing Salmonella were undetectable by most-probable number (MPN) at 24 h and 7 days following each irrigation event. This study indicates that Salmonella are unlikely to persist on spinach leaves when irrigation water is contaminated at a level below the LGMA standards. In a parallel study, persistence of Salmonella isolated from poultry or produce was compared following biweekly irrigation of spinach plants with water containing 6 log CFU Salmonella/100 ml. Produce Salmonella isolates formed greater biofilms on polystyrene, polycarbonate and stainless steel surfaces and persisted at significantly higher numbers on spinach leaves than those Salmonella from poultry origin during 35 days study. Poultry Salmonella isolates were undetectable (<1 log CFU/g) on spinach plants 7 days following each irrigation event when assayed by direct plating. This study indicates that Salmonella persistence on spinach leaves is affected by the source of contamination and the biofilm forming ability of the strain. PMID:24010621

  20. Adherence of curli producing Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli to baby spinach leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellular appendages, such as curli fibers have been suggested to be involved in STEC persistence in fresh produce as these curli are critical in biofilm formation and adherence to animal cells. We determined the role of curli in attachment of STEC on spinach leaves. The curli expression by wild-ty...

  1. First report of Phytophthora root rot, caused by Phytophthora cryptogea, on spinach in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006 and 2007, commercially grown spinach (Spinacia oleracea) in California’s coastal Salinas Valley (Monterey County) was affected by an unreported root rot disease. Disease was limited to patches along the edges of fields. Affected plants were stunted with chlorotic older leaves. As disease pro...

  2. [Effect of cooking on content of nitrates, vitamin C, magnesium and iron in spinach].

    PubMed

    Astier-Dumas, M

    1975-01-01

    Cooking is known to lower the mineral and vitaminic content of foodstuffs. Recently, contaminant became to be a problem in foods, and it was proposed to use blanching or boiling to diminish contaminant residues in foods, specially vegetables. An example of this attitude is given by the use of blanching to lower nitrates levels in spinach specially prepared for baby foods. PMID:1211733

  3. Inorganic anions induce state changes in spinach thylakoid membranes Anjana JajooY

    E-print Network

    Govindjee

    to produce an opposite e¡ect to that of MgP or other diva- lent cations [11,12]. However, the role of anionsInorganic anions induce state changes in spinach thylakoid membranes Anjana JajooY *, Sudhakar, Urbana, IL 61801-3707, USA Received 22 July 1998 Abstract The role of cations in excitation energy

  4. Tandem Spinach Array for mRNA Imaging in Living Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jichuan; Fei, Jingyi; Leslie, Benjamin J.; Han, Kyu Young; Kuhlman, Thomas E.; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-01-01

    Live cell RNA imaging using genetically encoded fluorescent labels is an important tool for monitoring RNA activities. A recently reported RNA aptamer-fluorogen system, the Spinach, in which an RNA aptamer binds and induces the fluorescence of a GFP-like 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) ligand, can be readily tagged to the RNA of interest. Although the aptamer–fluorogen system is sufficient for imaging highly abundant non-coding RNAs (tRNAs, rRNAs, etc.), it performs poorly for mRNA imaging due to low brightness. In addition, whether the aptamer-fluorogen system may perturb the native RNA characteristics has not been systematically characterized at the levels of RNA transcription, translation and degradation. To increase the brightness of these aptamer-fluorogen systems, we constructed and tested tandem arrays containing multiple Spinach aptamers (8–64 aptamer repeats). Such arrays enhanced the brightness of the tagged mRNA molecules by up to ~17 fold in living cells. Strong laser excitation with pulsed illumination further increased the imaging sensitivity of Spinach array-tagged RNAs. Moreover, transcriptional fusion to the Spinach array did not affect mRNA transcription, translation or degradation, indicating that aptamer arrays might be a generalizable labeling method for high-performance and low-perturbation live cell RNA imaging. PMID:26612428

  5. Perchlorate uptake in spinach as related to perchlorate, nitrate and chloride concentrations in irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several studies have reported on the detection of perchlorate in edible leafy vegetables irrigated with Colorado River water. However, there is no information on spinach as related to perchlorate in irrigation water nor on the effect of other anions on perchlorate uptake. A greenhouse perchlorate up...

  6. Multispectral fluorescence imaging for detection of bovine feces on Romaine lettuce and baby spinach leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging with ultraviolet-A excitation was used to evaluate the feasibility of two-waveband fluorescence algorithms for the detection of bovine fecal contaminants on the abaxial and adaxial surfaces of Romaine lettuce and baby spinach leaves. Correlation analysis was used t...

  7. Internalization of E. coli O157:H7 in spinach cultivated in soil and hydroponic media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Internalization of E. coli O157:H7 into spinach plants through root uptake is a potential route of contamination. Previous studies that have investigated uptake of E. coli O157:H7 into leafy greens have expressed green fluorescent protein (gfp) from a plasmid, possibly limiting detecti...

  8. De novo and comparative transcriptome analysis of cultivated and wild spinach

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenxi; Jiao, Chen; Zheng, Yi; Sun, Honghe; Liu, Wenli; Cai, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoli; Liu, Shuang; Xu, Yimin; Mou, Beiquan; Dai, Shaojun; Fei, Zhangjun; Wang, Quanhua

    2015-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is an economically important green leafy vegetable crop. In this study, we performed deep transcriptome sequencing for nine spinach accessions: three from cultivated S. oleracea, three from wild S. turkestanica and three from wild S. tetrandra. A total of approximately 100 million high-quality reads were generated, which were de novo assembled into 72,151 unigenes with a total length of 46.5?Mb. By comparing sequences of these unigenes against different protein databases, nearly 60% of them were annotated and 50% could be assigned with Gene Ontology terms. A total of 387 metabolic pathways were predicted from the assembled spinach unigenes. From the transcriptome sequencing data, we were able to identify a total of ~320,000 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Phylogenetic analyses using SNPs as well as gene expression profiles indicated that S. turkestanica was more closely related to the cultivated S. oleracea than S. tetrandra. A large number of genes involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses were found to be differentially expressed between the cultivated and wild spinach. Finally, an interactive online database (http://www.spinachbase.org) was developed to allow the research community to efficiently retrieve, query, mine and analyze our transcriptome dataset. PMID:26635144

  9. Biofilm formation and bacteriophage inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on spinach harvester blades

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Outbreaks associated with leafy greens have focused attention on the transfer of human pathogens to leafy greens during harvest with commercial equipment. The role of this equipment should be investigated to develop mitigation strategies. Biofilm formation by Escherichia coli O157:H7 on a spinach ha...

  10. Persistence of enterohemorrhagic and non-pathogenic E. coli on spinach leaves and in rhizosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Outbreaks associated with leafy greens have focused attention on the persistence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on produce. Ecological interactions of E. coli O157:H7 and spinach require detailed characterization. Purpose: Survival of E. coli O157:H7 and non-pathogenic E. coli was evalua...

  11. ASSESSING GENETIC DIVERSITY OF SPINACH (SPINACIA OLERACEA L.) GERMPLASM USING TRAP MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Target region amplified polymorphism (TRAP) markers were used to evaluate genetic variability among 48 accessions of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), an economically important leafy vegetable crop in many countries. Thirty-eight accessions collected and preserved by the USDA National Plant Germplasm ...

  12. GROWTH RESPONSE IN SPINACH TO SEQUENTIAL AND SIMULTANEOUS EXPOSURE TO NO2 AND SO2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was exposed intermittently to NO2 and SO2 (2 hours/week; 0.8 or 1.5ppm) in a simultaneous or sequential fashion over the 42-day growth period. Nighttime simultaneous exposure to NO2 and SO2 reduced growth and altered assimilate partitioning to the root...

  13. De novo and comparative transcriptome analysis of cultivated and wild spinach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenxi; Jiao, Chen; Zheng, Yi; Sun, Honghe; Liu, Wenli; Cai, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoli; Liu, Shuang; Xu, Yimin; Mou, Beiquan; Dai, Shaojun; Fei, Zhangjun; Wang, Quanhua

    2015-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is an economically important green leafy vegetable crop. In this study, we performed deep transcriptome sequencing for nine spinach accessions: three from cultivated S. oleracea, three from wild S. turkestanica and three from wild S. tetrandra. A total of approximately 100 million high-quality reads were generated, which were de novo assembled into 72,151 unigenes with a total length of 46.5?Mb. By comparing sequences of these unigenes against different protein databases, nearly 60% of them were annotated and 50% could be assigned with Gene Ontology terms. A total of 387 metabolic pathways were predicted from the assembled spinach unigenes. From the transcriptome sequencing data, we were able to identify a total of ~320,000 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Phylogenetic analyses using SNPs as well as gene expression profiles indicated that S. turkestanica was more closely related to the cultivated S. oleracea than S. tetrandra. A large number of genes involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses were found to be differentially expressed between the cultivated and wild spinach. Finally, an interactive online database (http://www.spinachbase.org) was developed to allow the research community to efficiently retrieve, query, mine and analyze our transcriptome dataset. PMID:26635144

  14. Tandem Spinach Array for mRNA Imaging in Living Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jichuan; Fei, Jingyi; Leslie, Benjamin J; Han, Kyu Young; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-01-01

    Live cell RNA imaging using genetically encoded fluorescent labels is an important tool for monitoring RNA activities. A recently reported RNA aptamer-fluorogen system, the Spinach, in which an RNA aptamer binds and induces the fluorescence of a GFP-like 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) ligand, can be readily tagged to the RNA of interest. Although the aptamer-fluorogen system is sufficient for imaging highly abundant non-coding RNAs (tRNAs, rRNAs, etc.), it performs poorly for mRNA imaging due to low brightness. In addition, whether the aptamer-fluorogen system may perturb the native RNA characteristics has not been systematically characterized at the levels of RNA transcription, translation and degradation. To increase the brightness of these aptamer-fluorogen systems, we constructed and tested tandem arrays containing multiple Spinach aptamers (8-64 aptamer repeats). Such arrays enhanced the brightness of the tagged mRNA molecules by up to ~17 fold in living cells. Strong laser excitation with pulsed illumination further increased the imaging sensitivity of Spinach array-tagged RNAs. Moreover, transcriptional fusion to the Spinach array did not affect mRNA transcription, translation or degradation, indicating that aptamer arrays might be a generalizable labeling method for high-performance and low-perturbation live cell RNA imaging. PMID:26612428

  15. Evaluation of Oxalate Concentration in the U.S. Spinach Germplasm Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to its high nutrient content, spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is also known to have greater amount of oxalic acid than most crops. Oxalic acid may form crystals with minerals to reduce the bioavailability and absorption of calcium and iron in diets, and calcium oxalate may deposit in the...

  16. Using Spinach aptamer to correlate mRNA and protein levels in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pothoulakis, Georgios; Ellis, Tom

    2015-01-01

    In vivo gene expression measurements have traditionally relied on fluorescent proteins such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) with the help of high-sensitivity equipment such as flow cytometers. However, fluorescent proteins report only on the protein level inside the cell without giving direct information about messenger RNA (mRNA) production. In 2011, an aptamer termed Spinach was presented that acts as an RNA mimic of GFP when produced in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. It was later shown that coexpression of a red fluorescent protein (mRFP1) and the Spinach aptamer, when included into the same gene expression cassette, could be utilized for parallel in vivo measurements of mRNA and protein production. As accurate characterization of component biological parts is becoming increasingly important for fields such as synthetic biology, Spinach in combination with mRFP1 provide a great tool for the characterization of promoters and ribosome binding sites. In this chapter, we discuss how live-cell imaging and flow cytometry can be used to detect and measure fluorescence produced in E. coli cells by different constructs that contain the Spinach aptamer and the mRFP1 gene. PMID:25605386

  17. Generic Escherichia coli Contamination of Spinach at the Preharvest Stage: Effects of Farm Management and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Navratil, Sarah; Gregory, Ashley; Bauer, Arin; Srinath, Indumathi; Jun, Mikyoung; Szonyi, Barbara; Nightingale, Kendra; Anciso, Juan; Ivanek, Renata

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of farm management and environmental factors on preharvest spinach contamination with generic Escherichia coli as an indicator of fecal contamination. A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted by visiting spinach farms up to four times per growing season over a period of 2 years (2010 to 2011). Spinach samples (n = 955) were collected from 12 spinach farms in Colorado and Texas as representative states of the Western and Southwestern United States, respectively. During each farm visit, farmers were surveyed about farm-related management and environmental factors using a questionnaire. Associations between the prevalence of generic E. coli in spinach and farm-related factors were assessed by using a multivariable logistic regression model including random effects for farm and farm visit. Overall, 6.6% of spinach samples were positive for generic E. coli. Significant risk factors for spinach contamination with generic E. coli were the proximity (within 10 miles) of a poultry farm, the use of pond water for irrigation, a >66-day period since the planting of spinach, farming on fields previously used for grazing, the production of hay before spinach planting, and the farm location in the Southwestern United States. Contamination with generic E. coli was significantly reduced with an irrigation lapse time of >5 days as well as by several factors related to field workers, including the use of portable toilets, training to use portable toilets, and the use of hand-washing stations. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an association between field workers' personal hygiene and produce contamination with generic E. coli at the preharvest level. Collectively, our findings support that practice of good personal hygiene and other good farm management practices may reduce produce contamination with generic E. coli at the preharvest level. PMID:23666336

  18. Antioxidant Effects of Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) Supplementation in Hyperlipidemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sang-Heui; Park, Jae-Hee; Kim, So-Yun; Lee, Seon Woo; Chun, Soon-Sil; Park, Eunju

    2014-01-01

    Increased consumption of fresh vegetables that are high in polyphenols has been associated with a reduced risk of oxidative stress-induced disease. The present study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of spinach in vitro and in vivo in hyperlipidemic rats. For measurement of in vitro antioxidant activity, spinach was subjected to hot water extraction (WE) or ethanol extraction (EE) and examined for total polyphenol content (TPC), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), cellular antioxidant activity (CAA), and antigenotoxic activity. The in vivo antioxidant activity of spinach was assessed using blood and liver lipid profiles and antioxidant status in rats fed a high fat-cholesterol diet (HFCD) for 6 weeks. The TPC of WE and EE were shown as 1.5±0.0 and 0.5±0.0 mg GAE/g, respectively. Increasing the concentration of the extracts resulted in increased ORAC value, CAA, and antigenotoxic activity for all extracts tested. HFCD-fed rats displayed hyperlipidemia and increased oxidative stress, as indicated by a significant rise in blood and liver lipid profiles, an increase in plasma conjugated diene concentration, an increase in liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level, and a significant decrease in manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity compared with rats fed normal diet. However, administration of 5% spinach showed a beneficial effect in HFCD rats, as indicated by decreased liver TBARS level and DNA damage in leukocyte and increased plasma conjugated dienes and Mn-SOD activity. Thus, the antioxidant activity of spinach may be an effective way to ameliorate high fat and cholesterol diet-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24772405

  19. Spatial and Temporal Factors Associated with an Increased Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in Spinach Fields in New York State.

    PubMed

    Weller, Daniel; Wiedmann, Martin; Strawn, Laura K

    2015-09-01

    While rain and irrigation events have been associated with an increased prevalence of foodborne pathogens in produce production environments, quantitative data are needed to determine the effects of various spatial and temporal factors on the risk of produce contamination following these events. This study was performed to quantify these effects and to determine the impact of rain and irrigation events on the detection frequency and diversity of Listeria species (including L. monocytogenes) and L. monocytogenes in produce fields. Two spinach fields, with high and low predicted risks of L. monocytogenes isolation, were sampled 24, 48, 72, and 144 to 192 h following irrigation and rain events. Predicted risk was a function of the field's proximity to water and roads. Factors were evaluated for their association with Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolation by using generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs). In total, 1,492 (1,092 soil, 334 leaf, 14 fecal, and 52 water) samples were collected. According to the GLMM, the likelihood of Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolation from soil samples was highest during the 24 h immediately following an event (odds ratios [ORs] of 7.7 and 25, respectively). Additionally, Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolates associated with irrigation events showed significantly lower sigB allele type diversity than did isolates associated with precipitation events (P = <0.001), suggesting that irrigation water may be a point source of L. monocytogenes contamination. Small changes in management practices (e.g., not irrigating fields before harvest) may therefore reduce the risk of L. monocytogenes contamination of fresh produce. PMID:26116668

  20. 77 FR 29588 - Notice of Decision To Issue Permits for the Importation of Fresh Celery, Arugula, and Spinach...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ...designated phytosanitary measures will be sufficient to mitigate the risks of introducing or disseminating plant pests or noxious weeds via the importation of fresh celery, arugula, and spinach from Colombia. DATES: Effective Date: May 18, 2012. FOR...

  1. Flavonoid content and antioxidant capacity of spinach genotypes determined by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavonoids in different spinach genotypes were separated, identified, and quantified by a high-performance liquid chromatographic method with photodiode array and mass spectrometric detection. The antioxidant capacities of the genotypes were also measured using two antioxidant assays - oxygen radica...

  2. Characterization of photosystem I from spinach: effect of solution pH.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Xuefang; Wang, Meng; Liu, Jing; Cao, Meiwen; Lu, Jianren; Cui, Zhanfeng

    2012-04-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated the isolation of photosystem I (PSI) from spinach using ultrafiltration with a final purity of 84%. In order to get a higher purity of PSI and more importantly to develop a practical bioseparation process, key physiochemical properties of PSI and their dependence on operational parameters must be assessed. In this study, the effect of solution pH, one of the most important operating parameters for membrane process, on the property of PSI was examined. Following the isolation of crude PSI from spinach using n-dodecyl-beta-D: -maltoside as detergent, the isoelectric point, aggregation size, zeta potential, low-temperature fluorescence, atomic force microscopy imaging, secondary structure, and thermal stability were determined. Solution pH was found to have a significant effect on the activity, aggregation size and thermal stability of PSI. The results also suggested that the activity of PSI was related to its aggregation size. PMID:22477469

  3. Increasing total and biologically active chromium in wheat grain and spinach by spraying with chromium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, F.A.; Ellis, B.G.

    1981-06-01

    Recently, chromium has been shown to be necessary for glucose metabolism in man. But most plant species greatly restrict the uptake of Cr. This study was conducted to determine if both total and biologically active Cr could be increased in wheat grain or spinach by spraying the plants with either Cr/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ or Cr-EDTA. Concentrations of Cr in wheat grain were about doubled in a greenhouse experiment by spraying with either Cr source. Biologically active Cr (estimated by extraction with ethanol or NH/sub 4/OH) was increased from about 40 to greater than 50% of total Cr when wheat was sprayed with Cr salts. Total Cr in spinach leaves was increased by as much as 10-fold by spraying, with the sulfate source being more effective than the EDTA.

  4. Impact of coal mine dump contaminated soils on elemental uptake by Spinacia oleracea (spinach)

    SciTech Connect

    Chunilall, V.; Kindness, A.; Jonnalagadda, S.B.

    2006-07-01

    The elemental uptake and the growth response of Spinacia oleracea (spinach) to the soil contaminated with the South African bituminous coal mine dump soil, viz. 0%, 5%, 15%, and 25% w/w, was investigated. The contaminated soils were analyzed for pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), soil organic matter (SOM), and concentrations of selected heavy metals. The pH, SOM, and CEC decreased with an increase in contamination indicating the acidic nature of coal mine soil and the raise in the soil binding sites. The distribution of Fe, Mn, Ni, Cd, and Pb in the roots and leaves of the plants was determined in two stages of plant growth. Spinach showed high accumulation of Fe and increased levels of Ni and Cd with an increase in contamination. No plant growth was recorded with 25% contamination.

  5. Gamma irradiation dose: Effects on spinach baby-leaf ascorbic acid, carotenoids, folate, alpha-tocopherol, and phylloquinone concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ionizing radiation of fruits and vegetables, in the form of gamma rays or electron beams, is effective in overcoming quarantine barriers in trade, decontamination, disinfestation and prolonging shelf life, but a void of information persists on ionizing radiation effects of vitamin profiles in indivi...

  6. Retail display conditions of continuous light and dark on the disposition of vitamins in baby-leaf spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human-health benefits from the consumption of fruits and vegetables are due to the many bioactive compounds in these foods. Many of these compounds are heavily influenced by genetics (i.e. cultivar) and the environment, especially the many pigments and vitamins that can degrade during processing an...

  7. Interactions between food-borne pathogens and protozoa isolated from lettuce and spinach.

    PubMed

    Gourabathini, Poornima; Brandl, Maria T; Redding, Katherine S; Gunderson, John H; Berk, Sharon G

    2008-04-01

    The survival of Salmonella enterica was recently shown to increase when the bacteria were sequestered in expelled food vacuoles (vesicles) of Tetrahymena. Because fresh produce is increasingly linked to outbreaks of enteric illness, the present investigation aimed to determine the prevalence of protozoa on spinach and lettuce and to examine their interactions with S. enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes. Glaucoma sp., Colpoda steinii, and Acanthamoeba palestinensis were cultured from store-bought spinach and lettuce and used in our study. A strain of Tetrahymena pyriformis previously isolated from spinach and a soil-borne Tetrahymena sp. were also used. Washed protozoa were allowed to graze on green fluorescent protein- or red fluorescent protein-labeled enteric pathogens. Significant differences in interactions among the various protist-enteric pathogen combinations were observed. Vesicles were produced by Glaucoma with all of the bacterial strains, although L. monocytogenes resulted in the smallest number per ciliate. Vesicle production was observed also during grazing of Tetrahymena on E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica but not during grazing on L. monocytogenes, in vitro and on leaves. All vesicles contained intact fluorescing bacteria. In contrast, C. steinii and the amoeba did not produce vesicles from any of the enteric pathogens, nor were pathogens trapped within their cysts. Studies of the fate of E. coli O157:H7 in expelled vesicles revealed that by 4 h after addition of spinach extract, the bacteria multiplied and escaped the vesicles. The presence of protozoa on leafy vegetables and their sequestration of enteric bacteria in vesicles indicate that they may play an important role in the ecology of human pathogens on produce. PMID:18310421

  8. Spinach - A software library for simulation of spin dynamics in large spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogben, H. J.; Krzystyniak, M.; Charnock, G. T. P.; Hore, P. J.; Kuprov, Ilya

    2011-02-01

    We introduce a software library incorporating our recent research into efficient simulation algorithms for large spin systems. Liouville space simulations (including symmetry, relaxation and chemical kinetics) of most liquid-state NMR experiments on 40+ spin systems can now be performed without effort on a desktop workstation. Much progress has also been made with improving the efficiency of ESR, solid state NMR and Spin Chemistry simulations. Spinach is available for download at http://spindynamics.org.

  9. ASCOCHYTA LEAF SPOT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ascochyta leaf spot is a plant disease of wheat. It is often overlooked in association with other leaf spot diseases on wheat and is generally of minor economic importance in Europe, Japan, New Zealand, and North America. However, its distribution and frequency may be greater than realized, becaus...

  10. Yellow leaf blotch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow leaf blotch occurs worldwide in temperate climates. The disease is reported from countries in Asia, Australasia, Oceania, Europe, North America, Central America, the West Indies, and South America. In the northern Great Plains of North America, it is often the major leaf disease on alfalfa....

  11. (+)-Abscisic Acid Content of Spinach in Relation to Photoperiod and Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zeevaart, Jan A. D.

    1971-01-01

    Levels of (+)-abscisic acid present in the long-day plant spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., cv. Savoy Hybrid 612) grown under different photoperiodic regimes were measured in purified extracts by optical rotary dispersion. When plants were transferred from short to long days, the abscisic acid content increased 2- to 3-fold. This rise in the level of abscisic acid took place during the 1st long day. Abscisic acid levels of plants under short days as well as under long-day conditions were higher at the end of the 8-hour high intensity light period than at its beginning. The growth retardant AMO-1618 [2?-isopropyl-4?-(trimethyl-ammonium chloride)-5?-methylphenyl piperidine-1-carboxylate], which strongly reduces the gibberellin content of spinach under long days, did not affect the abscisic acid content. When water was withheld from plants until wilting symptoms appeared, the abscisic acid content increased more than 10-fold over that of turgid plants. There was no evidence that the sudden rise of abscisic acid level during wilting was due to release from a water-soluble bound form. Bioassays of crude acidic extracts in the wheat coleoptile section test did not indicate the presence of other specific growth inhibitors besides abscisic acid. It is concluded that abscisic acid does not function as an endogenous regulator of stem growth and flower formation in the long-day plant spinach. PMID:16657741

  12. Conversion of monogalactosyldiacylglycerols to triacylglycerols in ozone-fumigated spinach leaves. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaki, Takeshi; Saito, Kazuki; Kawaguchi, Akihiko; Kondo, Noriaki; Yamada, Mitsuhiro Keio Univ., Tokyo Univ. of Tokyo )

    1990-10-01

    Molecular species and fatty acid distribution of triacylglycerol (TG) accumulated in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves fumigated with ozone (0.5 microliter per liter) were compared with those of monogalactosyldiacylglyerol (MGDG). Analysis of positional distribution of the fatty acids in MGDG and the accumulated TG by the enzymatic digestion method showed that hexadecatrienoate (16:3) was restricted to sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone in both MGDG and TG, whereas {alpha}-linolenate (18:3) was preferentially located at sn-1 position in MGDG, and sn-1 and/or sn-3 positions in TG, suggesting that 1,2-diacylglycerol moieties of MGDG are the direct precursor of TG in ozone-fumigated leaves. Further analysis of TG molecular species by argentation chromatography and mass spectrometry showed that TG increased with ozone fumigation consisted of approximately an equal molar ratio of sn-1,3-18:3-2-16:3 and sn-1,2,3-18:3. Because the molecular species of MGDG in spinach leaves is composed of a similar molar ratio of sn-1-18:3-2-16:3 and sn-1,2-18:3, we conducted that MGDG was converted to 1,2-diacylglycerol and acylated with 18:3 to TG in ozone-fumigated spinach leaves.

  13. Uptake, translocation, and transformation of pentachlorophenol in soybean and spinach plants

    SciTech Connect

    Casterline, J.L. Jr.; Barnett, N.M.; Ku, Y.

    1985-06-01

    Soybean plants were grown for 90 days and spinach plants for 64 days in a mixture of sterilized greenhouse soil and sand containing 10 ppm pentachlorophenol. All plant parts and soil samples were extracted and separated into nonpolar and polar fractions. Major nonpolar and polar metabolites were identified by gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Nonpolar fractions from both soybean and spinach plants were found to contain pentachlorophenol and its metabolites, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, methoxytetrachlorophenol, 2,3,4,6-tetrachloroanisole, and pentachloroanisole. Cleavage of polar metabolites from the soybean plants by acid hydrolysis yielded organic solvent-extractable products. These products were identified as pentachlorophenol, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, and methoxytetrachlorophenol. Cleavage of polar materials from spinach plants yielded only pentachlorophenol. The polar metabolites from the soybean plants were also subjected to enzymatic cleavage by beta-glucosidase. The conjugates consisted mostly of O-glucosides of the same metabolites released by acid hydrolysis. Failure of hydrolysis by aryl sulfatase indicated that very little or no sulfates were present. The metabolites found in the plants were not detected in soil samples obtained from pots immediately after the plants were harvested.

  14. Leaf conductance and carbon gain under salt-stressed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, V.; Manzoni, S.; Marani, M.; Katul, G.

    2011-12-01

    Exposure of plants to salt stress is often accompanied by reductions in leaf photosynthesis and in stomatal and mesophyll conductances. To separate the effects of salt stress on these quantities, a model based on the hypothesis that carbon gain is maximized subject to a water loss cost is proposed. The optimization problem of adjusting stomatal aperture for maximizing carbon gain at a given water loss is solved for both a non-linear and a linear biochemical demand function. A key novel theoretical outcome of the optimality hypothesis is an explicit relationship between the stomatal and mesophyll conductances that can be evaluated against published measurements. The approaches here successfully describe gas-exchange measurements reported for olive trees (Olea europea L.) and spinach (Spinacia oleraceaL.) in fresh water and in salt-stressed conditions. Salt stress affected both stomatal and mesophyll conductances and photosynthetic efficiency of both species. The fresh water/salt water comparisons show that the photosynthetic capacity is directly reduced by 30%-40%, indicating that reductions in photosynthetic rates under increased salt stress are not due only to a limitation of CO2diffusion. An increase in salt stress causes an increase in the cost of water parameter (or marginal water use efficiency) exceeding 100%, analogous in magnitude to findings from extreme drought stress studies. The proposed leaf-level approach can be incorporated into physically based models of the soil-plant-atmosphere system to assess how saline conditions and elevated atmospheric CO2 jointly impact transpiration and photosynthesis.

  15. Global Leaf Trait Relationships: Mass, Area, and the Leaf

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    , we use "N" and "P" to refer to concentrations per unit leaf area or mass, and we use the wordsGlobal Leaf Trait Relationships: Mass, Area, and the Leaf Economics Spectrum Jeanne L. D. Osnas,1 if data are normalized by leaf mass. We show that these traits are approximately distributed proportional

  16. Effect of electrolyzed oxidizing water treatment on the reduction of nitrite levels in fresh spinach during storage.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jianxiong; Li, Huiying; Wan, Yangfang; Liu, Haijie

    2015-03-01

    Leafy vegetables are the major source of nitrite intake in the human diet, and technological processing to control nitrite levels in harvested vegetables is necessary. In the current work, the effect of electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) on the nitrite and nitrate levels in fresh spinach during storage was studied. EOW treatment, including slightly acidic electrolyzed water and acidic electrolyzed water, was found to effectively reduce nitrite levels in fresh spinach during storage; levels in the late period were 30 to 40% lower than that of the control. However, the nitrate levels in fresh spinach during storage were not influenced by EOW treatment. The reduction of nitrite levels in EOW-treated fresh spinach during storage can be attributed to the inactivation of nitrate reductase directly and to the reduction of bacterial populations. Our results suggest that treatment with slightly acidic electrolyzed water may be a better choice to control nitrite levels in fresh vegetables during storage. This study provided a useful method to reduce nitrite levels in fresh spinach. PMID:25719879

  17. Assessment of microbial risk factors and impact of meteorological conditions during production of baby spinach in the Southeast of Spain.

    PubMed

    Castro-Ibáñez, I; Gil, M I; Tudela, J A; Ivanek, R; Allende, A

    2015-08-01

    There is a timely need to evaluate the effect agricultural factors and meteorological conditions on fresh produce contamination. This study evaluated those risk factors and described, for the first time, the distribution of indicator microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, coliforms, and Enterobacteriaceae) and the prevalence of foodborne pathogens (Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella spp.) in baby spinach grown in the Southeast of Spain. A longitudinal study was conducted on three farms (2011-2013). Results obtained for E. coli highlighted soil and irrigation water as important factors affecting the microbial safety of baby spinach. Significant differences in the proportion of E. coli positive samples were found between treated (46.1%) and untreated (100%) irrigation water. However, the microbial quality of irrigation water didn't affect E. coli prevalence in produce. All E. coli positive spinach samples were detected at the highest observed temperature range suggesting that ambient temperature affects the probability and extent of spinach contamination. Salmonella spp. was detected by RT-PCR in manure, soil, irrigation water and baby spinach but only two of them (manure and irrigation water) were confirmed by isolation in culture media. Salmonella RT-PCR positive samples showed higher levels of E. coli than Salmonella negative samples. This preliminary finding supports recent identification of E. coli as a suitable parameter for the hygiene criterion at the primary production of leafy greens. PMID:25846928

  18. A SPINACH ISOLATE OF COLLETOTRICHUM DEMATIUM FROM THE UNITED STATES AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF C. GLOEOSPORIOIDES FROM RUSSIAN THISTLE IN HUNGARY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An isolate of C. gloeosporioides (Cg) from Hungary is under evaluation for biological control of Russian thistle (Salsola tragus), a major weed pest of the U.S. This pathogen has been found to infect spinach in containment greenhouse studies. To clarify risk to spinach, studies have been initiated...

  19. Changes in Chloroplast mRNA Stability during Leaf Development.

    PubMed Central

    Klaff, P; Gruissem, W

    1991-01-01

    During spinach leaf development, chloroplast-encoded mRNAs accumulate to different steady-state levels. Their relative transcription rates alone, however, cannot account for the changes in mRNA amount. In this study, we examined the importance of mRNA stability for the regulation of plastid mRNA accumulation using an in vivo system to measure mRNA decay in intact leaves by inhibiting transcription with actinomycin D. Decay of psbA and rbcL mRNAs was assayed in young and mature leaves. The psbA mRNA half-life was increased more than twofold in mature leaves compared with young leaves, whereas rbcL mRNA decayed with a similar relative half-life at both leaf developmental stages. The direct in vivo measurements demonstrated that differential mRNA stability in higher plant plastids can account for differences in mRNA accumulation during leaf development. The role of polysome association in mRNA decay was also investigated. Using organelle-specific translation inhibitors that force mRNAs into a polysome-bound state or deplete mRNAs of ribosomes, we measured mRNA decay in vivo in either state. The results showed that rbcL and psbA mRNAs are less stable when bound to polysomes relative to the polysome-depleted mRNAs and that their stabilities are differentially affected by binding to polysomes. The results suggested that ribosome binding and/or translation of the psbA and rbcL mRNAs may function to modulate the rate of their decay in chloroplasts. PMID:12324602

  20. Thermal inactivation of human norovirus surrogates in spinach and measurement of its uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Hayriye; D'souza, Doris H; Davidson, P Michael

    2014-02-01

    Leafy greens, including spinach, have potential for human norovirus transmission through improper handling and/or contact with contaminated water. Inactivation of norovirus prior to consumption is essential to protect public health. Because of the inability to propagate human noroviruses in vitro, murine norovirus (MNV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV-F9) have been used as surrogates to model human norovirus behavior under laboratory conditions. The objectives of this study were to determine thermal inactivation kinetics of MNV-1 and FCV-F9 in spinach, compare first-order and Weibull models, and measure the uncertainty associated with the process. D-values were determined for viruses at 50, 56, 60, 65, and 72 °C in 2-ml vials. The D-values calculated from the first-order model (50 to 72 °C) ranged from 0.16 to 14.57 min for MNV-1 and 0.15 to 17.39 min for FCV-9. Using the Weibull model, the tD for MNV-1 and FCV-F9 to destroy 1 log (D ? 1) at the same temperatures ranged from 0.22 to 15.26 and 0.27 to 20.71 min, respectively. The z-values determined for MNV-1 were 11.66 ± 0.42 °C using the Weibull model and 10.98 ± 0.58 °C for the first-order model and for FCV-F9 were 10.85 ± 0.67 °C and 9.89 ± 0.79 °C, respectively. There was no difference in D- or z-value using the two models (P > 0.05). Relative uncertainty for dilution factor, personal counting, and test volume were 0.005, 0.0004, and ca. 0.84%, respectively. The major contribution to total uncertainty was from the model selected. Total uncertainties for FCV-F9 for the Weibull and first-order models were 3.53 to 7.56% and 11.99 to 21.01%, respectively, and for MNV-1, 3.10 to 7.01% and 13.14 to 16.94%, respectively. Novel and precise information on thermal inactivation of human norovirus surrogates in spinach was generated, enabling more reliable thermal process calculations to control noroviruses. The results of this study may be useful to the frozen food industry in designing blanching processes for spinach to inactivate or control noroviruses. PMID:24490922

  1. Damped leaf flexure hinge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage. PMID:26026549

  2. Single Molecule Manipulation and Spectroscopy of Chlorophyll-a from Spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Jessica-Jones

    2005-03-01

    Chlorophyll-a, a molecule produced from `Spinach', adsorbed on a Au(111) surface has been investigated by using an ultra-high-vacuum low-temperature scanning-tunneling-microscope (UHV-LT-STM) at liquid helium temperatures. Studies are carried out both on isolated single molecules and on self-assembled molecular layers. The tunneling I-V and dI-dV spectroscopy of chlorophyll-a elucidate electronic properties of single molecule, such as the HOMO-LOMO gap and molecular orbital states. Mechanical stability of the chlorophyll-a is examined by using STM lateral manipulation (1,2). Here, the STM tip is placed just a few angstrom separation from the molecule to increase the tip-molecule interaction. Then the tip is laterally scanned across the surface resulting in pulling of the molecule. The detailed molecule movement is directly monitored through the corresponding STM-tip height signals. Our results reveal that the spinach molecule is a promising candidate for environmental friendly nano-device applications. (1). S.-W. Hla, K.-H. Rieder, Ann. Rev. Phys. Chem. 54 (2003) 307-330. (2). S.-W. Hla, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004), 208302. This work is financially supported by the US-DOE grant DE-FG02-02ER46012.

  3. Restrictions to Carbon Dioxide Conductance and Photosynthesis in Spinach Leaves Recovering from Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Delfine, Sebastiano; Alvino, Arturo; Villani, Maria Concetta; Loreto, Francesco

    1999-01-01

    Salt accumulation in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves first inhibits photosynthesis by decreasing stomatal and mesophyll conductances to CO2 diffusion and then impairs ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (S. Delfine, A. Alvino, M. Zacchini, F. Loreto [1998] Aust J Plant Physiol 25: 395–402). We measured gas exchange and fluorescence in spinach recovering from salt accumulation. When a 21-d salt accumulation was reversed by 2 weeks of salt-free irrigation (rewatering), stomatal and mesophyll conductances and photosynthesis partially recovered. For the first time, to our knowledge, it is shown that a reduction of mesophyll conductance can be reversed and that this may influence photosynthesis. Photosynthesis and conductances did not recover when salt drainage was restricted and Na content in the leaves was greater than 3% of the dry matter. Incomplete recovery of photosynthesis in rewatered and control leaves may be attributed to an age-related reduction of conductances. Biochemical properties were not affected by the 21-d salt accumulation. However, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity and content were reduced by a 36- to 50-d salt accumulation. Photochemical efficiency was reduced only in 50-d salt-stressed leaves because of a decrease in the fraction of open photosystem II centers. A reduction in chlorophyll content and an increase in the chlorophyll a/b ratio were observed in 43- and 50-d salt-stressed leaves. Low chlorophyll affects light absorptance but is unlikely to change light partitioning between photosystems. PMID:10069849

  4. Effects of Pb 2+ on energy distribution and photochemical activity of spinach chloroplast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao; Hong, Fashui; Liu, Chao; Su, Mingyu; Zheng, Lei; Gao, Fengqing; Yang, Fan

    2008-03-01

    Lead (Pb 2+) is a well-known highly toxic element. The mechanisms of the Pb 2+ toxicity are not well understood for photosynthesis. In this paper, we reported the effect of Pb 2+ on light absorption, distribution and conversion of spinach chloroplast by spectroscopy, and photochemical reaction activities. Several effects of Pb 2+ were observed: (1) the absorption peak intensity of chloroplast obviously decreased in red and blue region and produced optical flattering; (2) fluorescence quantum yield nearby 680 nm of chloroplast greatly declined; (3) the excitation band nearby 440 nm of chloroplast significantly descended; (4) Pb 2+ treatments reduced of the rate of whole chain electron transport, photochemical activities of PSII DCPIP photoreduction and oxygen evolution, but the photoreduction activities of PSI were little changed. Together, the studies of the experiments showed that Pb 2+ decreased absorption of light on spinach chloroplast and inhibited excitation energy to be absorbed by LHCII and transferred to PSII, then reduced the conversion from light energy to electron energy, and decelerated electron transport, water photolysis and oxygen evolution.

  5. Active site histidine in spinach ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase modified by diethyl pyrocarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Y.; McFadden, B.A.; el-Gul, T.

    1985-07-16

    (TH) Diethyl pyrocarbonate was synthesized from (TH) ethanol prepared by the reduction of acetaldehyde by NaB3H4. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) from spinach was inactivated with this reagent at pH 7.0 the presence of 20 mM MgS , and tryptic peptides that contained modified histidine residues were isolated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Labeling of the enzyme was conducted in the presence and absence of the competitive inhibitor sedoheptulose 1,7-bisphosphate. The amount of one peptide that was heavily labeled in the absence of this compound was reduced 10-fold in its presence. The labeled residue was histidine-298. This result, in combination with earlier experiments, suggests that His-298 in spinach RuBisCO is located in the active site domain and is essential to enzyme activity. This region of the primary structure is strongly conserved in seven other ribulosebisphosphate carboxylases from divergent sources.

  6. Effects of Mg 2+on spectral characteristics and photosynthetic functions of spinach photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chen; Xiao, Wu; Hao, Huang; Xiaoqing, Liu; Chao, Liu; Lei, Zheng; Fashui, Hong

    2009-03-01

    In the present paper we report the results obtained with the photosystem II (PSII) isolated from spinach treated by MgCl 2, and studied the effect of Mg 2+ on spectral characteristics and photosynthetic functions of PSII. The results showed that Mg 2+ treatment at a suitable concentration could significantly increase the absorption intensity of PSII and the intensity ratio of Soret band to Q band of chlorophyll-a. The treatment also elevated the excited peak intensity at 230, 278 and 343 nm, and the emitted peak intensity at 304 and 682 nm, and the ratio of F278/ F230, respectively. The results implied that Mg 2+ increased absorbance for visible light, improving energy transfer among amino acids within PSII protein complex and accelerating energy transport from tyrosine residue to chlorophyll-a. The photochemical activity and oxygen evolving rate of PSII were also enhanced by Mg 2+. This is viewed as evidence that Mg 2+ can promote energy transfer and oxygen evolution in PSII of spinach.

  7. Short communication Leaf optical properties and photosynthetic leaf absorptances

    E-print Network

    Durako, Michael J.

    characteristics indicates relatively low variability in light absorption across a wide range of leaf morphologies and environments consistent with previous suggestions of constraints on light absorption by aquatic plants. # 2007Short communication Leaf optical properties and photosynthetic leaf absorptances in several

  8. Effect of Nd3+ ion on carboxylation activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Hong, Fa-shui; Wu, Kang; Ma, Hong-bing; Zhang, Xue-guang; Hong, Cheng-jiao; Wu, Cheng; Gao, Feng-qing; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Xue-feng; Liu, Tao; Xie, Ya-ning; Xu, Jian-hua; Li, Zhong-rui

    2006-03-31

    Neodymium (Nd), as a member of rare earth elements, proved to enhance the photosynthesis rate and organic substance accumulation of spinach through the increase in carboxylation activity of Rubisco. Although the oxygenase activity of spinach Rubisco was slightly changed with the Nd(3+) treatment, the specific factor of Rubisco was greatly increased. It was partially due to the promotion of Rubisco activase (R-A) activity but mainly to the formation of Rubisco-Rubisco activase super-complex, a heavier molecular mass protein (about 1200kD) comprising both Rubisco and Rubisco activase. This super-complex was found during the extraction procedure of Rubisco by the gel electrophoresis and Western-blot studies. The formation of Rubisco-R-A super-complex suggested that the secondary structure of the protein purified from the Nd(3+)-treated spinach was different from that of the control. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of the 'Rubisco' purified from the Nd(3+)-treated spinach revealed that Nd was bound with four oxygen atoms and two sulfur atoms of amino acid residues at the Nd-O and Nd-S bond lengths of 2.46 and 2.89A, respectively. PMID:16469293

  9. Comparative survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Murine Norovirus on spinach plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Outbreaks resulting from the consumption of leafy greens contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and norovirus have occurred. It is unclear how the stress response factor rpoS in E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. affects their survival on spinach. Purpose: A comparison ...

  10. Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Feral Swine Near Spinach Fields and Cattle, Central California Coast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated involvement of feral swine in contamination of agriculture fields and surface waterways with Escherichia coli O157:H7 after a nationwide outbreak traced to bagged spinach from California. Isolates from feral swine, cattle, surface water, sediment, and soil at 1 ranch were matched to ...

  11. Use of Spinach, Radish, and Perennial Ryegrass to Assess the Availability of Metals in Waste Foundry Sands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant uptake is a major pathway by which potentially toxic metals can enter the food chain. In this laboratory study we grew spinach, radish, and perennial ryegrass in sand blends containing 50% waste foundry sand (WFS) to assess the availability of Al, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn,...

  12. Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Feral Swine near Spinach Fields and Cattle, Central California Coast1

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Michael; Carychao, Diana; Wiscomb, Gerald W.; Sweitzer, Richard A.; Crawford-Miksza, Leta; Farrar, Jeff A.; Lau, David K.; O’Connell, Janice; Millington, Anne; Asmundson, Roderick V.; Atwill, Edward R.; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated involvement of feral swine in contamination of agricultural fields and surface waterways with Escherichia coli O157:H7 after a nationwide outbreak traced to bagged spinach from California. Isolates from feral swine, cattle, surface water, sediment, and soil at 1 ranch were matched to the outbreak strain. PMID:18258044

  13. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in vitro and on the surface of spinach leaves by biobased surfactants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of biosurfactants on the populations of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in suspension and on spinach leaves. Eight surfactants including four soybean oil-based biosurfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80), sopho...

  14. Quality of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce and spinach irradiated at doses up to 4 kGy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xuetong; Guan, Wenqiang; Sokorai, Kimberly J. B.

    2012-08-01

    Fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce packaged in modified atmosphere packages and spinach in perforated film bags were irradiated with gamma rays at doses of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 kGy. After irradiation, the samples were stored for 14 days at 4 °C. O2 levels in the packages of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce decreased and CO2 levels increased with increasing radiation dose, suggesting that irradiation increased respiration rates of lettuce. Tissue browning of irradiated cut lettuce was less severe than that of non-irradiated, probably due to the lower O2 levels in the packages. However, samples irradiated at 3 and 4 kGy had lower maximum force and more severe sogginess than the non-irradiated control. In addition, ascorbic acid content of irradiated lettuce was 22-40% lower than the non-irradiated samples after 14 days of storage. The visual appearance of spinach was not affected by irradiation even at a dose of 4 kGy. Consumer acceptance suggested that more people would dislike and would not buy spinach that was treated at 3 and 4 kGy as compared to the non-irradiated sample. Overall, irradiation at doses of 1 and 2 kGy may be employed to enhance microbial safety of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce and spinach while maintaining quality.

  15. Survival and transfer of murine norovirus 1, a surrogate for human noroviruses, during the production process of deep-frozen onions and spinach.

    PubMed

    Baert, Leen; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Vermeersch, Mattias; Van Coillie, Els; Debevere, Johan

    2008-08-01

    The reduction of murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) on onions and spinach by washing was investigated as was the risk of contamination during the washing procedure. To decontaminate wash water, the industrial sanitizer peracetic acid (PAA) was added to the water, and the survival of MNV-1 was determined. In contrast to onions, spinach undergoes a heat treatment before freezing. Therefore, the resistance of MNV-1 to blanching of spinach was examined. MNV-1 genomic copies were detected with a real-time reverse transcription PCR assay in PAA-treated water and blanched spinach, and PFUs (representing infectious MNV-1 units) were determined with a plaque assay. A < or = 1-log reduction in MNV-1 PFUs was achieved by washing onion bulbs and spinach leaves. More than 3 log PFU of MNV-1 was transmitted to onion bulbs and spinach leaves when these vegetables were washed in water containing approximately 5 log PFU/ml. No decline of MNV-1 occurred in used industrial spinach wash water after 6 days at room temperature. A concentration of 20 ppm of PAA in demineralized water (pH 4.13) and in potable water (pH 7.70) resulted in reductions of 2.88 +/- 0.25 and 2.41 +/- 0.18 log PFU, respectively, after 5 min of exposure, but no decrease in number of genomic copies was observed. No reduction of MNV-1 PFUs was observed on frozen onions or spinach during storage for 6 months. Blanching spinach (80 degrees C for 1 min) resulted in at least 2.44-log reductions of infectious MNV-1, but many genomic copies were still present. PMID:18724752

  16. Distinct transcriptional profiles and phenotypes exhibited by Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates related to the 2006 spinach-associated outbreak.

    PubMed

    Parker, Craig T; Kyle, Jennifer L; Huynh, Steven; Carter, Michelle Q; Brandl, Maria T; Mandrell, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, a large outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was linked to the consumption of ready-to-eat bagged baby spinach in the United States. The likely sources of preharvest spinach contamination were soil and water that became contaminated via cattle or feral pigs in the proximity of the spinach fields. In this study, we compared the transcriptional profiles of 12 E. coli O157:H7 isolates that possess the same two-enzyme pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profile and are related temporally or geographically to the above outbreak. These E. coli O157:H7 isolates included three clinical isolates, five isolates from separate bags of spinach, and single isolates from pasture soil, river water, cow feces, and a feral pig. The three clinical isolates and two spinach bag isolates grown in cultures to stationary phase showed decreased expression of many ?(S)-regulated genes, including gadA, osmE, osmY, and katE, compared with the soil, water, cow, feral pig, and the other three spinach bag isolates. The decreased expression of these ?(S)-regulated genes was correlated with the decreased resistance of the isolates to acid stress, osmotic stress, and oxidative stress but increases in scavenging ability. We also observed that intraisolate variability was much more pronounced among the clinical and spinach isolates than among the environmental isolates. Together, the transcriptional and phenotypic differences of the spinach outbreak isolates of E. coli O157:H7 support the hypothesis that some variants within the spinach bag retained characteristics of the preharvest isolates, whereas other variants with altered gene expression and phenotypes infected the human host. PMID:22081562

  17. pinnate leaf venation (Cultivated) 

    E-print Network

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    compared to histones collected from pea leaf nuclei. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of 5% perchloric acid (PCA) extracts of isolated C. reinhardtii nuclei revealed two Hl proteins (Hia and Hlb) along with an H2B...

  18. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  19. Raspberry leaf curl virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry leaf curl virus (RLCV) is limited to hosts in the genus Rubus and is transmitted persistently by the small raspberry aphid, Aphis rubicola Oestlund. It is found only in North America, principally in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada and in the Rocky Mountain regions of...

  20. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  1. PLATYSPORA LEAF SPOT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platyspora leaf spot, caused by Comoclathris pentamera (P. Karst.) S. Ahmad (= Graphyllium pentamerum (P. Karst.) M.E. Barr; = Platyspora pentamera (P. Karst.) Wehm.) was first reported as a plant disease on wheat in 1971. The fungus previously was known only at high altitudes, where it persists on...

  2. Combination treatment of chlorine dioxide gas and aerosolized sanitizer for inactivating foodborne pathogens on spinach leaves and tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2015-08-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas and aerosolized sanitizer, when applied alone or in combination, on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto spinach leaves and tomato surfaces. Spinach leaves and tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of three strains each of the three foodborne pathogens. ClO2 gas (5 or 10 ppmv) and aerosolized peracetic acid (PAA) (80 ppm) were applied alone or in combination for 20 min. Exposure to 10 ppmv of ClO2 gas for 20 min resulted in 3.4, 3.3, and 3.4 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes on spinach leaves, respectively. Treatment with 80 ppm of aerosolized PAA for 20 min caused 2.3, 1.9, and 0.8 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas (10 ppmv) and aerosolized PAA (80 ppm) for 20 min caused 5.4, 5.1, and 4.1 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes on tomatoes experienced similar reduction patterns to those on spinach leaves. As treatment time increased, most combinations of ClO2 gas and aerosolized PAA showed additive effects in the inactivation of the three pathogens. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas and aerosolized PAA produced injured cells of three pathogens on spinach leaves while generally did not produce injured cells of these pathogens on tomatoes. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas (10 ppmv) and aerosolized PAA (80 ppm) did not significantly (p>0.05) affect the color and texture of samples during 7 days of storage. PMID:26001524

  3. E-Beam irradiation of bagged, ready-to-eat spinach leaves (Spinacea oleracea): an engineering approach.

    PubMed

    Gomes, C; Moreira, R G; Castell-Perez, M E; Kim, J; Da Silva, P; Castillo, A

    2008-03-01

    We experimentally assessed the efficacy of electron beam irradiation to ensure the safety and quality of ready-to-eat spinach leaves using a 2-MeV Van de Graff accelerator. Spinach leaves (approximately 8 g) inside petri dishes were irradiated up to 1 kGy and stored at 4 degrees C for 15 d. Nonirradiated samples served as controls. Color, texture, vitamin C, total carotenoids, and chlorophyll content were measured using standard methods. Sensory analysis was performed by 15 untrained panelists using a 9-point hedonic scale. Color of control and irradiated samples showed slight variation throughout storage. Firmness of all samples changed significantly (P < 0.05) by half the storage time; however, exposure to radiation did not cause significant differences by the end of shelf life. Irradiation did not affect the chlorophyll and total carotenoid content, though it produced samples with significantly lower (P < 0.05) vitamin C content. For all treatments, chlorophyll content decreased by day 15 while total carotenoids remained constant. Although, by the end of refrigerated storage, all the irradiated samples received slightly lower odor scores, sensory analysis revealed that irradiation had little or no effect on the overall quality of spinach leaves. We also simulated the dose distribution within a bag of spinach leaves irradiated using a 10-MeV linear accelerator (0.3 to 1 kGy) to quantify the problem of nonuniform dose absorbed at different parts of the bag and predict death of a pathogen such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. The simulation results confirmed that it is feasible to irradiate baby spinach leaves (up to 1 kGy) to eliminate E. coli 0157:H7 while maintaining the overall quality of the produce. PMID:18298731

  4. Gibberellin A[sub 1] is required for stem elongation in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Zeevaart, J.A.D.; Gage, D.A.; Talon, M. )

    1993-08-01

    The effects of the growth retardants 2'-isopropyl-4'-(trimethylammonium chloride)-5'-methylphenyl piperidine-1-carboxylate (AMO-1618) and calcium 3,5-dioxo-4-propionylcyclohexanecarboxylate (BX-112) on stem elongation were investigated in the rosette plant spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) under long-day (LD) conditions. Stem growth induced by a LD treatment was prevented by both retardants. The inhibition caused by AMO-1618 was reversed by gibberellin A[sub 1] (GA[sub 1]) and GA[sub 20], whereas the effects of BX-112 were reversed by GA[sub 1] only. Six GAs (GA[sub 53], GA[sub 44], GA[sub 19], GA[sub 20], GA[sub 1], and GA[sub 8]) were quantified by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring using internal standards. Plants treated with BX-112 had reduced levels of GA[sub 1], and GA[sub 8] and accumulated GA[sub 53], GA[sub 44], GA[sub 19], and GA[sub 20]. The relative levels of four additional GAs (3-epi-GA[sub 1], GA[sub 29], GA[sub 60], and GA[sub 81]) were compared by ion intensities only. Relative to GA[sub 81], the level of GA[sub 29] was decreased by BX-112, whereas the levels of GA[sub 6] and 3-epi-GA[sub 1] were increased. Transfer of spinach from short-day conditions to LD conditions caused an increase in all identified GAs of the early 13-hydroxylation pathway with GA[sub 20], GA[sub 1], and GA[sub 8] showing the largest increases. These findings support the position that, of the GA[sub s] belonging to the early 13-hydroxylation pathway, GA[sub 1] is the primary GA active per se for stem elongation in spinach. The increase in endogenous GA[sub 1] in plants in LD conditions is most likely the primary factor for stem elongation. 23 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Combining Spinach-tagged RNA and gene localization to image gene expression in live yeast

    PubMed Central

    Guet, David; Burns, Laura T.; Maji, Suman; Boulanger, Jérôme; Hersen, Pascal; Wente, Susan R.; Salamero, Jean; Dargemont, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Although many factors required for the formation of export-competent mRNPs have been described, an integrative view of the spatiotemporal coordinated cascade leading mRNPs from their site of transcription to their site of nuclear exit, at a single cell level, is still partially missing due to technological limitations. Here we report that the RNA Spinach aptamer is a powerful tool for mRNA imaging in live S. cerevisiae with high spatial-temporal resolution and no perturbation of the mRNA biogenesis properties. Dedicated image processing workflows are developed to allow detection of very low abundance of transcripts, accurate quantitative dynamic studies, as well as to provide a localization precision close to 100?nm at consistent time scales. Combining these approaches has provided a state-of-the-art analysis of the osmotic shock response in live yeast by localizing induced transcription factors, target gene loci and corresponding transcripts. PMID:26582123

  6. Characterization of elemental sulfur in isolated intact spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Joyard, J.; Douce, R. ); Forest, E. ); Blee, E. )

    1988-12-01

    Incubation of intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts in the presence of {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} resulted in the light-dependent formation of a chloroform-soluble sulfur-containing compound distinct from sulfolipid. The authors have identified this compound as the most stable form (S{sub 8}) of elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}, valence state for S = O) by mass spectrometry. It is possible that elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}) was formed by oxidation of bound sulfide, i.e. after the photoreduction of sulfate to sulfide by intact chloroplasts, and released as S{sub 8} under the experimental conditions used for analysis.

  7. Combining Spinach-tagged RNA and gene localization to image gene expression in live yeast.

    PubMed

    Guet, David; Burns, Laura T; Maji, Suman; Boulanger, Jérôme; Hersen, Pascal; Wente, Susan R; Salamero, Jean; Dargemont, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Although many factors required for the formation of export-competent mRNPs have been described, an integrative view of the spatiotemporal coordinated cascade leading mRNPs from their site of transcription to their site of nuclear exit, at a single cell level, is still partially missing due to technological limitations. Here we report that the RNA Spinach aptamer is a powerful tool for mRNA imaging in live S. cerevisiae with high spatial-temporal resolution and no perturbation of the mRNA biogenesis properties. Dedicated image processing workflows are developed to allow detection of very low abundance of transcripts, accurate quantitative dynamic studies, as well as to provide a localization precision close to 100?nm at consistent time scales. Combining these approaches has provided a state-of-the-art analysis of the osmotic shock response in live yeast by localizing induced transcription factors, target gene loci and corresponding transcripts. PMID:26582123

  8. Electron spin resonance studies of urea-ferricyanide inactivated spinach photosystem I particles

    SciTech Connect

    Golbeck, J.H.; Warden, J.T.

    1981-09-01

    The photosystem I acceptor system of a subchloroplast particle from spinach was investigated by optical and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy following graduated inactivation of the bound iron-sulfur proteins by urea-ferricyanide. The chemical analysis of iron and sulfur and the ESR properties of centers A, B, and X are consistent with the participation of three iron-sulfur centers in photosystem I. A differential decrease in centers A, B, and X is observed under conditions which induce S= ..-->.. S/sup 0/ conversion in the bound iron-sulfur proteins. Center B is shown to be the most susceptible, while center X is the least susceptible component to oxidative denaturation. Stepwise inactivation experiments suggest that electron transport in photosystem I does not occur sequentially from X ..-->.. B ..-->.. A since there is quantitative photoreduction of center A in the absence of center B. We propose that center A is directly reduced by X.

  9. Visible light absorption and photo-sensitizing properties of spinach leaves and beetroot extracted natural dyes.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, D; Mondal, B; Mukherjee, K

    2015-09-01

    Herein, chlorophyll and betalain dyes are extracted from fresh spinach leaves and beetroots. Fourier transform infrared spectra are used to identify the characteristic peaks of the extracted dyes. UV-vis light absorption characteristics of the dyes and their mixed counterpart are investigated by varying their pH and temperature. These dyes are used as photo sensitizer for fabrication of zinc oxide photo-anode based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The photo-voltaic characteristics of the developed DSSCs are measured under simulated solar light (power of incident light 100 mW cm(-2) from Air Mass 1.5G). The solar to electric conversion efficiencies for the chlorophyll, betalain and mixed dye based solar cells are estimated as 0.148%, 0.197% and 0.294% respectively. The highest conversion efficiency for mixed dye based solar cell is attributed due to the absorption of wider range of solar spectrum. PMID:25875029

  10. Contribution of vitamin K1 to the electron spin polarization in spinach photosystem I

    SciTech Connect

    Rustandi, R.R.; Snyder, S.W.; Feezel, L.L.; Michalski, T.J.; Norris, J.R.; Thurnauer, M.C.; Biggins, J. )

    1990-09-04

    The electron spin polarized (ESP) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal observed in spinach photosystem I (PSI) particles was examined in preparations depleted of vitamin K1 by solvent extraction and following biological reconstitution by the quinone. The ESP EPR signal was not detected in the solvent-extracted PSI sample but was restored upon reconstitution with either protonated or deuterated vitamin K1 under conditions that also restored electron transfer to the terminal PSI acceptors. Reconstitution using deuterated vitamin K1 resulted in a line narrowing of the ESP EPR signal, supporting the conclusion that the ESP EPR signals in the reconstituted samples arise from a radical pair consisting of the oxidized PSI primary donor, P700+, and reduced vitamin K1.

  11. Investigation of detergent effects on the solution structure of spinach Light Harvesting Complex II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Mateus B.; Smolensky, Dmitriy; Heller, William T.; O'Neill, Hugh

    2010-11-01

    The properties of spinach light harvesting complex II (LHC II), stabilized in the detergents Triton X-100 (TX100) and n-Octyl-?-D-Glucoside (BOG), were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The LHC II-BOG scattering curve overlaid well with the theoretical scattering curve generated from the crystal structure of LHC II indicating that the protein preparation was in its native functional state. On the other hand, the simulated LHC II curve deviated significantly from the LHC II-TX100 experimental data. Analysis by circular dichroism spectroscopy supported the SANS analysis and showed that LHC II-TX100 is inactivated. This investigation has implications for extracting and stabilizing photosynthetic membrane proteins for the development of biohybrid photoconversion devices.

  12. Visible light absorption and photo-sensitizing properties of spinach leaves and beetroot extracted natural dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, D.; Mondal, B.; Mukherjee, K.

    2015-09-01

    Herein, chlorophyll and betalain dyes are extracted from fresh spinach leaves and beetroots. Fourier transform infrared spectra are used to identify the characteristic peaks of the extracted dyes. UV-vis light absorption characteristics of the dyes and their mixed counterpart are investigated by varying their pH and temperature. These dyes are used as photo sensitizer for fabrication of zinc oxide photo-anode based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The photo-voltaic characteristics of the developed DSSCs are measured under simulated solar light (power of incident light 100 mW cm-2 from Air Mass 1.5G). The solar to electric conversion efficiencies for the chlorophyll, betalain and mixed dye based solar cells are estimated as 0.148%, 0.197% and 0.294% respectively. The highest conversion efficiency for mixed dye based solar cell is attributed due to the absorption of wider range of solar spectrum.

  13. Temperature dependent steady state and picosecond kinetic fluorescence measurements of a photosystem I preparation from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerji, I.; Sauer, K.

    1988-08-01

    The fluorescence properties of a photosystem I (PSI) preparation from spinach containing approximately 200 chlorophyll (Chl) per reaction center were investigated. The preparation, characterized both spectroscopically and biochemically, contained the peripheral light harvesting antenna associated with PSI. In this study steady state fluorescence measurements were performed as a function of temperature. An emission maximum at 690 nm and a long wavelength shoulder from 710 to 740 nm were observed. The fluorescence yield at 690 nm is temperature independent, while the yield of the long wavelength shoulder increases dramatically with decreasing temperature. Additionally, kinetic measurements using the technique of single photon counting were done at room temperature and 77K. At 295K a four component fit was needed to describe the fluorescence decay; whereas at 77K, an additional 40-50 ps rise component indicative of fluorescence induction was necessary. 28 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Fabrication of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Photosynthetic Pigments Extracted from Spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Naoki; Kitagawa, Natsuko; Matsuda, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    We fabricated organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) containing chlorophylls in the active region, which were extracted from spinach using a chemical method. Photoluminescence (PL) cannot be observed in the thin film of the extracted chlorophylls owing to concentration quenching. To overcome the concentration quenching, a host material, poly[(m-phenylenevinylene)-alt-(2,5-dihexyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene)] (PPV) was added in the active region. This leads to the observaton of electroluminescence (EL) signals originating from chlorophyll a. We also evaluated the lifetime of the PL and EL. Consequently, the OLEDs containing carotenoids in the active region exhibit the light-emission much longer time than that without carotenoidos. This is assigned to the antioxidant activities of carotenoids. OLEDs containing a large amount of carotenoids are resistant to the oxidation damage.

  15. The spinach RNA aptamer as a characterization tool for synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Pothoulakis, Georgios; Ceroni, Francesca; Reeve, Benjamin; Ellis, Tom

    2014-03-21

    Characterization of genetic control elements is essential for the predictable engineering of synthetic biology systems. The current standard for in vivo characterization of control elements is through the use of fluorescent reporter proteins such as green fluorescent protein (GFP). Gene expression, however, involves not only protein production but also the production of mRNA. Here, we present the use of the Spinach aptamer sequence, an RNA mimic of GFP, as a tool to characterize mRNA expression in Escherichia coli. We show how the aptamer can be incorporated into gene expression cassettes and how co-expressing it with a red fluorescent protein (mRFP1) allows, for the first time, simultaneous measurement of mRNA and protein levels from engineered constructs. Using flow cytometry, we apply this tool here to evaluate ribosome binding site sequences and promoters and use it to highlight the differences in the temporal behavior of transcription and translation. PMID:23991760

  16. Investigation of Detergent Effects on the Solution Structure of Spinach Light Harvesting Complex II

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, Mateus B; Smolensky, Dmitriy; Heller, William T; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2010-01-01

    The properties of spinach light harvesting complex II (LHC II), stabilized in the detergents Triton X-100 (TX100) and n-Octyl-{beta}-D-Glucoside (BOG), were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The LHC II-BOG scattering curve overlaid well with the theoretical scattering curve generated from the crystal structure of LHC II indicating that the protein preparation was in its native functional state. On the other hand, the simulated LHC II curve deviated significantly from the LHC II-TX100 experimental data. Analysis by circular dichroism spectroscopy supported the SANS analysis and showed that LHC II-TX100 is inactivated. This investigation has implications for extracting and stabilizing photosynthetic membrane proteins for the development of biohybrid photoconversion devices.

  17. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  18. Probing the donor side of photosystem II in spinach chloroplasts and algae using electron paramagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Boska, M.D.

    1985-11-01

    this work concerns electron transfer reactions in photosystem II (PS II). Investigations carried out in this work examine the redox reaction rates in PS II using EPR. In Tris-washed PS II preparations from spinach, it is observed that the oxidation kinetics of S II/sub f/, the EPR signal formed by Z/sup +/ after deactivation of oxygen evolution, mirror the reduction kinetics of P680/sup +/ seen by EPR in samples poised at a variety of pH's. These data agree with previous data on the optically measured reduction kinetics of P680/sup +/. The oxidation kinetics of S II/sub vf/, the EPR transient seen from Z/sup +/ in samples active in O/sub 2/ evolving samples, were instrument limited (t/sub 1/2/ less than 4 ..mu..s) and thus could not be directly measured. These results taken together support a model where Z donates electrons directly to P680/sup +/. The examination of the oxidation and reduction kinetics of S II in monovalent and divalent salt-washed PS II preparations from spinach correlated most of the change of Z oxidation and re-reduction kinetics seen upon Tris-treatment with the loss of a 33 kDa polypeptide associated with the donor side of PS II. These data coupled with observations of stead-state light-induced amplitude changes in S II give evidence for the existance of an electron carrier between the water-splitting enzyme and Z. Observation of S II amplitude and kinetics in highly resolved PS II protein complexes from Synechoccus sp., consisting of either a 5 polypeptide PS II core complex (E-1) or a 4 polypeptide PS II core complex (CP2b), localize Z and P680 within the 4 polypeptide complex. 187 refs., 17 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. 7 CFR 29.3647 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Quality Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Mature, medium body, firm leaf structure...Quality Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Mature, medium body, close leaf structure...Quality Reddish-brown Heavy Leaf. Mature, heavy, firm leaf structure,...

  20. 7 CFR 29.3647 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Quality Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Mature, medium body, firm leaf structure...Quality Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Mature, medium body, close leaf structure...Quality Reddish-brown Heavy Leaf. Mature, heavy, firm leaf structure,...

  1. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Good Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, firm leaf structure, crepy...Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough...Good Quality Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, firm leaf structure,...

  2. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Good Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, firm leaf structure, crepy...Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough...Good Quality Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, firm leaf structure,...

  3. 7 CFR 29.3647 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Quality Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Mature, medium body, firm leaf structure...Quality Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Mature, medium body, close leaf structure...Quality Reddish-brown Heavy Leaf. Mature, heavy, firm leaf structure,...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Good Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, firm leaf structure, crepy...Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough...Good Quality Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, firm leaf structure,...

  5. 7 CFR 29.1028 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.1028 Section 29.1028 Agriculture Regulations... Type 92) § 29.1028 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  6. 7 CFR 29.3033 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3033 Section 29.3033 Agriculture Regulations... Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  7. 7 CFR 29.3525 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3525 Section 29.3525 Agriculture Regulations... Type 95) § 29.3525 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  8. 7 CFR 29.1028 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf. 29.1028 Section 29.1028 Agriculture Regulations... Type 92) § 29.1028 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  9. 7 CFR 29.3525 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3525 Section 29.3525 Agriculture Regulations... Type 95) § 29.3525 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  10. 7 CFR 29.2528 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.2528 Section 29.2528 Agriculture Regulations...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2528 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  11. 7 CFR 29.2528 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf. 29.2528 Section 29.2528 Agriculture Regulations...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2528 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  12. 7 CFR 29.3033 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3033 Section 29.3033 Agriculture Regulations... Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  13. Leaf development: a cellular perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kalve, Shweta; De Vos, Dirk; Beemster, Gerrit T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Through its photosynthetic capacity the leaf provides the basis for growth of the whole plant. In order to improve crops for higher productivity and resistance for future climate scenarios, it is important to obtain a mechanistic understanding of leaf growth and development and the effect of genetic and environmental factors on the process. Cells are both the basic building blocks of the leaf and the regulatory units that integrate genetic and environmental information into the developmental program. Therefore, to fundamentally understand leaf development, one needs to be able to reconstruct the developmental pathway of individual cells (and their progeny) from the stem cell niche to their final position in the mature leaf. To build the basis for such understanding, we review current knowledge on the spatial and temporal regulation mechanisms operating on cells, contributing to the formation of a leaf. We focus on the molecular networks that control exit from stem cell fate, leaf initiation, polarity, cytoplasmic growth, cell division, endoreduplication, transition between division and expansion, expansion and differentiation and their regulation by intercellular signaling molecules, including plant hormones, sugars, peptides, proteins, and microRNAs. We discuss to what extent the knowledge available in the literature is suitable to be applied in systems biology approaches to model the process of leaf growth, in order to better understand and predict leaf growth starting with the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:25132838

  14. The broad spectrum 2-oxoglutarate oxygenase inhibitor N-oxalylglycine is present in rhubarb and spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Al-Qahtani, Khalid; Jabeen, Bushra; Sekirnik, Rok; Riaz, Naheed; Claridge, Timothy D W; Schofield, Christopher J; McCullagh, James S O

    2015-09-01

    2-Oxoglutarate (2OG) and ferrous iron dependent oxygenases are involved in many biological processes in organisms ranging from humans (where some are therapeutic targets) to plants. These enzymes are of significant biomedicinal interest because of their roles in hypoxic signaling and epigenetic regulation. Synthetic N-oxalylglycine (NOG) has been identified as a broad-spectrum 2OG oxygenase inhibitor and is currently widely used in studies on the hypoxic response and chromatin modifications in animals. We report the identification of NOG as a natural product present in Rheum rhabarbarum (rhubarb) and Spinach oleracea (spinach) leaves; NOG was not observed in Escherchia coli or human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293T). The finding presents the possibility that NOG plays a natural role in regulating gene expression by inhibiting 2OG dependent oxygenases. This has significance because tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) intermediate inhibition of 2OG dependent oxygenases has attracted major interest in cancer research. PMID:26196940

  15. Bioconversion of spinach beta-carotene to vitamin A in Chinese children with normal or marginal vitamin A status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the vitamin A conversion value of spinach beta-carotene (beta -C) in healthy school children with normal or marginal vitamin A status, we recruited 32 school children aged 7-9 y (7.8 ± 0.6 y) with serum retinol '30 mug/dL or <30mug/dL. Subjects were given 5 gram cooked and pureed deut...

  16. Effect of lead stress on mineral content and growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Lamhamdi, Mostafa; El Galiou, Ouiam; Bakrim, Ahmed; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Aarab, Ahmed; Lafont, René

    2012-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is the most common heavy metal contaminant in the environment. Pb is not an essential element for plants, but they absorb it when it is present in their environment, especially in rural areas when the soil is polluted by automotive exhaust and in fields contaminated with fertilizers containing heavy metal impurities. To investigate lead effects on nutrient uptake and metabolism, two plant species, spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and wheat (Triticum aestivum), were grown under hydroponic conditions and stressed with lead nitrate, Pb(NO3)2, at three concentrations (1.5, 3, and 15 mM). Lead is accumulated in a dose-dependent manner in both plant species, which results in reduced growth and lower uptake of all mineral ions tested. Total amounts and concentrations of most mineral ions (Na, K, Ca, P, Mg, Fe, Cu and Zn) are reduced, although Mn concentrations are increased, as its uptake is reduced less relative to the whole plant’s growth. The deficiency of mineral nutrients correlates in a strong decrease in the contents of chlorophylls a and b and proline in both species, but these effects are less pronounced in spinach than in wheat. By contrast, the effects of lead on soluble proteins differ between species; they are reduced in wheat at all lead concentrations, whereas they are increased in spinach, where their value peaks at 3 mM Pb. The relative lead uptake by spinach and wheat, and the different susceptibility of these two species to lead treatment are discussed. PMID:23961216

  17. Interactions of plant zinc and plant species on the bioavailability of plant cadmium to Japanese quail fed lettuce and spinach

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, I.M.; Keach, R.M. Jr; Williams, F.M. ); Chaney, R.L. Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD ); Tao, Shyy-Hwa )

    1992-02-01

    Many cadmium-contaminated environments contain high levels of zinc. The effects of plant Zn and plant species on plant Cd bioavailability were tested in Japanese quail fed lettuce and spinach. Four groups of birds received 10% of their diets as lettuce or spinach leaves intrinsically labeled with {sup 109}Cd and containing low or high intrinsic Zn. Two other groups were fed control diets containing {sup 109}Cd as CdSO{sub 4} and low or high Zn as ZnCO{sub 3}. Cadmium concentrations in diets ranged from 0.857 to 1.05 {mu}g/g dry wt. Zinc concentrations in low-Zn diets ranged from 21.2 to 22.8, and in high-Zn diets from 56.0 to 63.3 {mu}g/g dry wt. Increased lettuce and spinach Zn decreased plant Cd retention in kidney, liver, and jejunum-ileum of Japanese quail. Spinach Cd was less absorbed than lettuce Cd at both Zn levels. Inorganic Zn produced a lesser decrease in Cd retention in kidney, liver, and jejunum-ileum than did plant Zn. The authors conclude that (1) crops that transport Zn and Cd readily into edible tissues show lower Cd bioavailability when grown in Zn-Cd contaminated environments than in Cd-only polluted sites, (2) plant species differ in Cd bioavailability for identical concentrations of Zn and Cd in edible tissues, and (3) toxicological studies with animals exposed to Cd salts and Zn supplements do not assess Cd bioavailability of Zn-Cd contaminated crops.

  18. Differences in responses of summer and winter spinach to elevated UV-B at varying soil NPK levels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suruchi; Agrawal, Madhoolika; Agrawal, S B

    2014-05-01

    Seasonal variations in response of spinach to elevated ultraviolet-B (UV-B) during summer and winter were assessed with respect to growth, biomass, yield, NPK uptake and NPK use efficiencies at varying NPK levels. The nutrient amendments were recommended NPK (RNPK) and 1.5 times recommended NPK (1.5 RNPK). Season significantly affected the measured parameters except the number of leaves. Under ambient UV-B, the growth performance of summer spinach was better in both the NPK levels, higher being at 1.5 RNPK leading to higher nutrient uptake. However, more reduction in biomass under elevated UV-B in 1.5 RNPK was recorded during summer, while during winter in RNPK. Reduction in biomass under elevated UV-B was accompanied by the modification in its partitioning with more biomass allocation to root during summer compared to winter at both the NPK levels. NPK uptake was higher in summer, while NPK use efficiencies were higher during winter. At higher than recommended NPK level, better NPK use efficiencies were displayed during both the seasons. Increased NPK supply during winter enabled spinach to capitalize light more efficiently and hence increased biomass accumulation. Strategies for surviving elevated UV-B in winter differ from those that provided protection from the same stress when it occurs in summer. PMID:24474564

  19. Level 2 validation of a flow cytometric method for detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in raw spinach.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anna J; Cooper, Willie M; Summage-West, Christine V; Sims, Lillie M; Woodruff, Robert; Christman, Jessica; Moskal, Ted J; Ramsaroop, Shawn; Sutherland, John B; Alusta, Pierre; Wilkes, Jon G; Buzatu, Dan A

    2015-12-23

    The Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) method currently used by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to detect Escherichia coli O157:H7 in spinach was systematically compared to a new flow cytometry based method. This Food and Drug Administration (FDA) level 2 external laboratory validation study was designed to determine the latter method's sensitivity and speed for analysis of this pathogen in raw spinach. Detection of target cell inoculations with a low cell count is critical, since enterohemorrhagic strains of E. coli require an infective dose of as few as 10 cells (Schmid-Hempel and Frank, 2007). Although, according to the FDA, the infectious dose is unknown (Food and Drug Administration, 1993). Therefore, the inoculation level into the spinach, a total of 2.0±2.6 viable E. coli O157 cells, was specified to yield between 25% and 75% detection by the new method, out of 20 samples (10 positives and 10 negatives). This criterion was met in that the new method detected 60% of the nominally positive samples; the corresponding sensitivity of the reference method was 50%. For both methods the most likely explanation for false negatives was that no viable cells were actually introduced into the sample. In this validation study, the flow cytometry method was equal to the BAM in sensitivity and far superior in speed. PMID:26318407

  20. 7 CFR 29.6022 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.6022 Section 29.6022 Agriculture...INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6022 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed...

  1. 7 CFR 29.2529 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2529 Section 29.2529 Agriculture...23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2529 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed...

  2. Exserohilum Leaf Spot on Tigergrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tigergrass (Thysanolaena maxima (Roxb.) Kuntze ) is a popular ornamental grass grown throughout landscapes in South Florida. In the summer of 2006, a leaf spot was observed on tigergrass in the landscape and a commercial nursery in Homestead, FL. The causal agent of the leaf spot was isolated, cha...

  3. Toxicity and Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals in Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) Grown in a Controlled Environment.

    PubMed

    Alia, Naz; Sardar, Khan; Said, Muhammad; Salma, Khalid; Sadia, Alam; Sadaf, Siddique; Toqeer, Ahmed; Miklas, Scholz

    2015-07-01

    The impact of heavy metal toxicity on the shoot and root lengths, total protein, fiber characteristics, moisture content and nutrient composition of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was evaluated. Plants were grown in pots containing soil and treated with different concentrations (mg/kg) of lead (Pb; 300, 400 and 500), cadmium (Cd; 0.5, 1 and 1.5) and zinc (Zn; 250, 500, and 700) as well as mixtures of Cd and Pb (0.5/300, 1/400, 1.5/500), Cd and Zn (0.5/250, 1/500, 1.5/700), and Pb and Zn (300/250, 400/500, 500/700). Soil contaminated by long-term irrigation with wastewater containing heavy metals was simulated. An increase in concentrations of heavy metals both individually and as mixtures significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the growth parameters and nutrient contents of S. oleracea. The uptake patterns of heavy metals in mixtures showed antagonistic impacts on each other. The toxicities of the mixtures Cd and Pb, Cd and Zn as well as Pb and Zn were higher than those observed in separate heavy metal applications but less than their additive sums. The toxicity caused by individual heavy metals was the highest for Cd followed by Pb and Zn. The highest toxicity was observed in plants grown in soil contaminated by Cd and Pb. PMID:26133131

  4. Efficient Photoelectrochemical Energy Conversion using Spinach Photosystem?II (PSII) in Lipid Multilayer Films

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Magdaong, Nikki M; Shen, Min; Frank, Harry A; Rusling, James F

    2015-01-01

    The need for clean, renewable energy has fostered research into photovoltaic alternatives to silicon solar cells. Pigment–protein complexes in green plants convert light energy into chemical potential using redox processes that produce molecular oxygen. Here, we report the first use of spinach protein photosystem?II (PSII) core complex in lipid films in photoelectrochemical devices. Photocurrents were generated from PSII in a ?2??m biomimetic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) film on a pyrolytic graphite (PG) anode with PSII embedded in multiple lipid bilayers. The photocurrent was ?20??A?cm?2 under light intensity 40?mW?cm?2. The PSII–DMPC anode was used in a photobiofuel cell with a platinum black mesh cathode in perchloric acid solution to give an output voltage of 0.6?V and a maximum output power of 14??W?cm?2. Part of this large output is related to a five-unit anode–cathode pH gradient. With catholytes at higher pH or no perchlorate, or using an MnO2 oxygen-reduction cathode, the power output was smaller. The results described raise the possibility of using PSII–DMPC films in small portable power conversion devices. PMID:25969807

  5. Toxicity and Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals in Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) Grown in a Controlled Environment

    PubMed Central

    Alia, Naz; Sardar, Khan; Said, Muhammad; Salma, Khalid; Sadia, Alam; Sadaf, Siddique; Toqeer, Ahmed; Miklas, Scholz

    2015-01-01

    The impact of heavy metal toxicity on the shoot and root lengths, total protein, fiber characteristics, moisture content and nutrient composition of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was evaluated. Plants were grown in pots containing soil and treated with different concentrations (mg/kg) of lead (Pb; 300, 400 and 500), cadmium (Cd; 0.5, 1 and 1.5) and zinc (Zn; 250, 500, and 700) as well as mixtures of Cd and Pb (0.5/300, 1/400, 1.5/500), Cd and Zn (0.5/250, 1/500, 1.5/700), and Pb and Zn (300/250, 400/500, 500/700). Soil contaminated by long-term irrigation with wastewater containing heavy metals was simulated. An increase in concentrations of heavy metals both individually and as mixtures significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the growth parameters and nutrient contents of S. oleracea. The uptake patterns of heavy metals in mixtures showed antagonistic impacts on each other. The toxicities of the mixtures Cd and Pb, Cd and Zn as well as Pb and Zn were higher than those observed in separate heavy metal applications but less than their additive sums. The toxicity caused by individual heavy metals was the highest for Cd followed by Pb and Zn. The highest toxicity was observed in plants grown in soil contaminated by Cd and Pb. PMID:26133131

  6. Crystallographic structure of the turbine C-ring from spinach chloroplast F-ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Asha Manikkoth; Seelert, Holger; Marx, Sven-Hendric; Dencher, Norbert A.; Grüber, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, F-ATP synthases provide energy through the synthesis of ATP. The chloroplast F-ATP synthase (CF1FO-ATP synthase) of plants is integrated into the thylakoid membrane via its FO-domain subunits a, b, b’ and c. Subunit c with a stoichiometry of 14 and subunit a form the gate for H+-pumping, enabling the coupling of electrochemical energy with ATP synthesis in the F1 sector. Here we report the crystallization and structure determination of the c14-ring of subunit c of the CF1FO-ATP synthase from spinach chloroplasts. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=144.420, b=99.295, c=123.51 Å, and ?=104.34° and diffracted to 4.5 Å resolution. Each c-ring contains 14 monomers in the asymmetric unit. The length of the c-ring is 60.32 Å, with an outer ring diameter 52.30 Å and an inner ring width of 40 Å. PMID:24521269

  7. Isolation and Quantitation of ?-d-Glucopyranosyl Abscisate from Leaves of Xanthium and Spinach 12

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Gregory L.; Zeevaart, Jan A. D.

    1982-01-01

    From previous work (Zeevaart 1980 Plant Physiol 66: 672-678) Xanthium leaves are known to contain a high level of alkali-hydrolyzable conjugated abscisic acid. This abscisic acid conjugate has been isolated and identified by mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and chemical and enzymic degradation techniques, as the glucosyl ester of abscisic acid, ?-d-glucopyranosyl abscisate. The glucosyl ester of abscisic acid was the only abscisic acid conjugate found in Xanthium leaves. It was also isolated from spinach leaves. An insignificant amount of the glucosyl ester of abscisic acid partitioned into diethyl ether, whereas 12% partitioned into ethyl acetate. Consequently, removal of abscisic acid by partitioning with ethyl acetate will result in considerable losses of the glucosyl ester of abscisic acid from the aqueous phase. Diethyl ether is, therefore, recommended for separation of abscisic acid and the glucosyl ester of abscisic acid by solvent partitioning. A method for quantitation of the glucosyl ester of abscisic acid as the tetraacetate derivative by gas-liquid chromatography with an electron capture detector was developed. The level of ?-d-glycopyranosyl abscisate in Xanthium leaves increased from 3.6 nanomoles per gram fresh weight in turgid leaves to 22.9 nanomoles in leaves from plants subjected to seven wilting-recovery cycles. ?-d-glycopyranosyl abscisate in Xanthium leaves may be a stable end product of abscisic acid metabolism. PMID:16662451

  8. Sugar-Nucleotide Precursors of Arabinopyranosyl, Arabinofuranosyl, and Xylopyranosyl Residues in Spinach Polysaccharides 1

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Stephen C.; Northcote, Don H.

    1983-01-01

    Cultured spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv Monstrous Viroflay) cells incorporated exogenous l-[3H]arabinose sequentially into ?-l-arabinopyranose-1-phosphate, uridine diphospho-?-l-arabinopyranose, uridine diphospho-?-d-xylopyranose and (in some experiments) ?-d-xylopyranose-1-phosphate. The amount of 3H in each of these compounds reached a plateau after a few minutes, and could be rapidly chased with nonradioactive l-arabinose, demonstrating rapid turnover. After a few minutes' lag, incorporation of 3H into the arabinofuranosyl, arabinopyranosyl, and xylopyranosyl residues of polysaccharides was linear with respect to time. The kinetics of labeling were compatible with UDP-?-l-arabinopyranose and UDP-?-d-xylopyranose being the immediate precursors of arabians (both the pyranose and the furanose residues) and xylans, respectively. No other radioactive nucleotides were formed; in particular, UDP-arabinofuranose was absent. There was no evidence for conversion of arabinopyranose to arabinofuranose within the polysaccharides, suggesting that this conversion occurs during polymer synthesis. The glycolipids detected showed too slow a turnover to be intermediates of pentosan synthesis. PMID:16663328

  9. Effects of ultrasonic treatments on the polyphenol and antioxidant content of spinach extracts.

    PubMed

    Altemimi, Ammar; Choudhary, Ruplal; Watson, Dennis G; Lightfoot, David A

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to test ultrasound treatments on spinach leaves during extraction, and conventional extraction was used as a control. The effects of different combinations of the ultrasonic water bath factors tested on phenolic compound yields included frequency (37 and 80 kHz), exposure time (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min), temperature (30, 40, and 50°C), and ultrasonic power (30%, 50%, and 70%). The best conditions for extraction yields were ultrasonic frequency of 37 kHz, extraction time of 30 min, reaction temperature of 40°C, and ultrasonic power of 50%. The mean yield (mg/100g), total phenol (mg gallic acid/g DW), flavonoids (mg/g DW), % DPPH free-radical scavenging activity, and % ferric reducing antioxidant power were all high (64.88 ± 21.84, 33.96 ± 11.30, 27.37 ± 11.85, 64.18 ± 16.69 and 70.25 ± 9.68). Treatments were significantly different. The interaction among the ultrasonic parameters was significant. Temperature and power had significant effects on all other dependent variables. PMID:25465093

  10. Crystallographic structure of the turbine c-ring from spinach chloroplast F-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, Asha Manikkoth; Seelert, Holger; Marx, Sven-Hendric; Dencher, Norbert A; Grüber, Gerhard

    2014-02-13

    In eukaryotic- and prokaryotic cells F-ATP synthases provide energy through the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The chloroplast F-ATP synthase (CF1FO-ATP synthase) of plants is integrated into the thylakoid membrane via its FO-domain subunits a, b, b' and c. Subunit c with a stoichiometry of 14 and subunit a form the gate for H+-pumping, enabling the coupling of electrochemical energy with ATP synthesis in the F1 sector. Here we report the crystallization and structure determination of the c14-ring of subunit c of the CF1FO-ATP synthase from spinach chloroplasts. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 144.420, b = 99.295, c = 123.51 Å, and ? = 104.34º and diffracted to 4.5 Å resolution. Each c-ring contains fourteen monomers in the asymmetric unit. The length of the c-ring is 60.32 Å, with an outer ring diameter 52.30 Å, and an inner ring width of 40 Å. PMID:24521269

  11. Nanodomains of cytochrome b6f and photosystem II complexes in spinach grana thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew P; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Olsen, John D; Hunter, C Neil

    2014-07-01

    The cytochrome b6f (cytb6f) complex plays a central role in photosynthesis, coupling electron transport between photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I to the generation of a transmembrane proton gradient used for the biosynthesis of ATP. Photosynthesis relies on rapid shuttling of electrons by plastoquinone (PQ) molecules between PSII and cytb6f complexes in the lipid phase of the thylakoid membrane. Thus, the relative membrane location of these complexes is crucial, yet remains unknown. Here, we exploit the selective binding of the electron transfer protein plastocyanin (Pc) to the lumenal membrane surface of the cytb6f complex using a Pc-functionalized atomic force microscope (AFM) probe to identify the position of cytb6f complexes in grana thylakoid membranes from spinach (Spinacia oleracea). This affinity-mapping AFM method directly correlates membrane surface topography with Pc-cytb6f interactions, allowing us to construct a map of the grana thylakoid membrane that reveals nanodomains of colocalized PSII and cytb6f complexes. We suggest that the close proximity between PSII and cytb6f complexes integrates solar energy conversion and electron transfer by fostering short-range diffusion of PQ in the protein-crowded thylakoid membrane, thereby optimizing photosynthetic efficiency. PMID:25035407

  12. CARBONIC ANHYDRASE ACTIVITY OF INTEGRAL-FUNCTIONAL COMPLEXES OF THYLAKOID MEMBRANES OF SPINACH CHLOROPLASTS.

    PubMed

    Semenihin, A V; Zolotareva, O K

    2015-01-01

    Isolated thylakoid membranes were disrupted by treatment with nonionic detergents digitonin or dodecyl maltoside. Solubilized polypeptide complexes were separated by native gel charge shift electrophoresis. The position of ATP-synthase complex and its isolated catalytic part (CF1) within gel was determined using the color reaction for ATPase activity. Due to the presence of cytochromes, the red band in unstained gels corresponded to the cytochrome b6f complex. Localization of the cytochrome b6f complex, ATP synthase and coupling CF1 in the native gel was confirmed by their subunit composition determined after SDS-electrophoretic analysis. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity in polypeptide zones of PS II, cytochrome b6f complex, and ATP-synthase CF1 was identified in native gels using indicator bromothymol blue. CA activity of isolated CF1 in solution was determined by infrared gas analysis as the rate of bicarbonate dehydration. The water-soluble acetazolamide, an inhibitor of CA, unlike lipophilic ethoxyzolamide inhibited CA activity of CF1 Thus, it was shown for the first time that ATP-synthase has a component which is capable of catalyzing the interconversion of forms of carbonic acid associated with proton exchange. The data obtained suggest the presence of multiple forms of carbonic anhydrase in the thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts and confirm their involvement in the proton transfer to the ATP synthase. PMID:26502699

  13. Effects of inorganic phosphate on the light dependent thylakoid energization of intact spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Heineke, D.; Heldt, H.W. ); Stitt, M. )

    1989-09-01

    The light dependent energization of the thylakoid membrane was analyzed in isolated intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts incubated with different concentrations of inorganic phosphate (Pi). Two independent methods were used: (a) the accumulation of ({sup 14}C)5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione and ({sup 14}C)methylamine; (b) the energy dependent chlorophyll fluorescence quenching. The inhibition of CO{sub 2} fixation by superoptimal medium Pi or by adding glyceraldehyde - an inhibitor of the Calvin cycle - leads to an increased energization of the thylakoid membrane; however, the membrane energization decreases when chloroplasts are inhibited by suboptimal Pi. This specific low phosphate effect could be partially reversed by adding oxaloacetate, which regenerates the electron acceptor NADP{sup +} and stimulates linear electron transport. The energization seen in low Pi is, however, always lower than in superoptimal Pi, even in the presence of oxaloacetate. Energization recovers in the presence of low amounts of N,N{prime}-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, which reacts with proton channels including the coupling factor 1 ATP synthase. N,N{prime}-Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide has no effect on energization of chloroplasts in superoptimal Pi. These results suggest there is a specific low phosphate proton leak in the thylakoids, and its origin is discussed.

  14. Spinach thylakoid polyphenol oxidase isolation, activation, and properties of the native chloroplast enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Golbeck, J.H.; Cammarata, K.V.

    1981-05-01

    Polyphenol oxidase activity (E.C. 1.14,18.1) has been found in two enzyme species isolated from thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts. The proteins were released from the membrane by sonication and purified >900-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and ion-exchange chromatography. The enzymes appear to be the tetramer and monomer of a subunit with a molecular weight of 42,500 as determined by lithium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Sonication releases polyphenol oxidase from the membrane largely in the latent state. In the absence of added fatty acids, the isolated enzyme spontaneously, but slowly, activates with time. Purified polyphenol oxidase utilizes o-diphenols as substrates and shows no detectable levels of monophenol or p-diphenol oxidase activities. Suitable substrates include chlorogenic acid, catechol, caffeic acid, pyrogallol, and dopamine; however, the enzyme is substrate-inhibited by the last four at concentrations near their K/sub m/. A large seasonal variation in polyphenol oxidase activity may result from a decrease in enzyme content rather than inhibition of the enzyme present.

  15. Survival of Salmonella enterica in Dried Turkey Manure and Persistence on Spinach Leaves.

    PubMed

    Oni, Ruth A; Sharma, Manan; Buchanan, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    Concerns about the microbiological safety of fresh produce have attracted attention in the past three decades due to multiple foodborne outbreaks. Animal manure contaminated with enteric pathogens has been identified as an important preharvest pathogen source. This study investigated the survival of Salmonella enterica in dust particles of dehydrated turkey manure and how association with manure dust may enhance the survival of salmonellae on leafy greens in the field. The survival of a cocktail of multiple Salmonella serotypes in the dried fecal material of various particle sizes (125 to 500 ?m) was examined at varying moisture contents (5, 10, and 15%). Survival times of the pathogen were inversely related to moisture content and particle size of manure dust, with viable Salmonella still detectable for up to 291 days in the smallest particle size (125 ?m) with 5% moisture. Association with manure dust particles increased the survival of Salmonella when subjected to UV light both under laboratory conditions and on the surface of spinach leaves in a greenhouse setting. The results of this study suggest that aerosolized manure particles could be a potential vehicle for Salmonella dispersal to leafy greens if the microorganism is present in the dry manure. PMID:26408127

  16. Partial purification of gibberellin oxidases from spinach leaves. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, S.J.; Bleecker, A.B.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1987-09-01

    Four enzyme activities catalyzing the following oxidative steps in the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway have been extracted from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves after exposure to 8 long days: GA/sub 12/ ..-->.. GA/sub 53/ ..-->.. GA/sub 44/ ..-->.. GA/sub 19/ ..-->.. GA/sub 20/. Two of these, GA/sub 53/ oxidase and GA/sup 19/ oxidase, were separable from the other two, GA/sub 44/ oxidase and GA/sub 12/ 13-hydroxylase, by anion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Apparent molecular weights of the four enzymes as determined by gel filtration HLPL are: GA/sub 12/ 13-hydroxylase, 28,400; GA/sub 43/ oxidase, 42,500; GA/sub 44/ oxidase, 38,100; GA/sub 19/ oxidase, 39,500. GA/sub 44/ oxidase was purified approximately 100-fold in 0.3% yield by a combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation, anion exchange HPLC, phenyl-Sepharose chromatography and gel filtration HLPC.

  17. Spectral characterization in a supersonic beam of neutral chlorophyll a evaporated from spinach leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafizadeh, N.; Ha-Thi, M. H.; Soep, B.; Gaveau, M. A.; Piuzzi, F.; Pothier, C.

    2011-09-01

    The observation of the light absorption of neutral biomolecules has been made possible by a method implemented for their preparation in the gas phase, in supersonically cooled molecular beams, based upon the work of Focsa et al. [C. Mihesan, M. Ziskind, B. Chazallon, E. Therssen, P. Desgroux, S. Gurlui, and C. Focsa, Appl. Surf. Sci. 253, 1090 (2006)], 10.1016/j.apsusc.2006.01.082. The biomolecules diluted in frozen water solutions are entrained in the gas plume of evaporated ice generated by an infrared optical parametric oscillators (OPO) laser tuned close to its maximum of absorption, at ˜3 ?m. The biomolecules are then picked up in the flux of a supersonic expansion of argon. The method was tested with indole dissolved in water. The excitation spectrum of indole was found cold and large clusters of indole with water were observed up to n = 75. Frozen spinach leaves were examined with the same method to observe the chlorophyll pigments. The Qy band of chlorophyll a has been observed in a pump probe experiment. The Qy bands of chlorophyll a is centred at 647 nm, shifted by 18 nm from its position in toluene solutions. The ionization threshold could also be determined as 6.1 ± 0.05 eV.

  18. beta. -carotene synthesis in spinach chloroplasts is tightly linked to photosynthetic carbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze-Siebert, D.; Schultz, G.

    1987-04-01

    When purified, highly intact spinach chloroplasts were illuminated in the presence of NaH/sup 14/CO/sub 3/, the largest portion of acetate derived compounds formed was ..beta..-carotene and not fatty acids (20 and 2.5 natoms C incorporated/mg chlorophyll x h when 5 mM NaH /sup 14/CO/sub 3/ was used). From isotopic dilution experiments applying glyceraldehyde 3-P, dihydroxyacetone-P, 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA), 2-PGA, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and pyruvate, respectively, evidence was obtained that acetyl-CoA to form isopentenyl-PP (IPP) originates from a low capacity but highly effective flow from photosynthetic CO/sub 2/-fixation via 3-PGA - 2-PGA - PEP - pyruvate. Phosphoglycerate mutase in chloroplasts, of which the presence hitherto was not unequivocally proven, was detected by (i) latency technique and (ii) feeding/1-/sup 14/C/glycerate and following 3-PGA, 2-PGA, PEP and pyruvate level in chloroplasts and suspension medium. From highly effective synthesis of ..beta..-carotene from CO/sub 2/ conclusion may be drawn that pathways for both, acetyl compounds and IPP, to form isoprenoids must exist in chloroplasts.

  19. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and EPR studies of oriented spinach thylakoid preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    In this study, oriented Photosystem II (PS II) particles from spinach chloroplasts are studied with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine more details of the structure of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). The nature of halide binding to Mn is also studied with Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) of Mn-Cl model compounds, and with Mn EXAFS of oriented PS II in which Br has replaced Cl. Attention is focused on the following: photosynthesis and the oxygen evolving complex; determination of mosaic spread in oriented photosystem II particles from signal II EPR measurement; oriented EXAFS--studies of PS II in the S{sub 2} state; structural changes in PS II as a result of treatment with ammonia: EPR and XAS studies; studies of halide binding to Mn: Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS of Mn-Cl model compounds and Mn EXAFS of oriented Br-treated photosystem II.

  20. Evidence for a reactive cysteine at the nucleotide binding site of spinach ribulose-5-phosphate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Omnaas, J.; Porter, M.A.; Hartman, F.C.

    1985-02-01

    Ribulose-5-phosphate kinase from spinach was rapidly inactivated by N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate in a bimolecular fashion with a k2 of 2.0 m s at 2C and pH 8.0. Ribulose 5-phosphate had little effect on the rate of inactivation, whereas complete protection was afforded by ADP or ATP. The extent of incorporation as determined with UC-labeled reagent was about 1 molar equivalent per subunit in the presence of ATP with full retention of enzymatic activity, and about 2 molar equivalents per subunit in the completely inactivated enzyme. Amino acid analyses of enzyme derivatized with UC-labeled reagent reveal that all of the covalently incorporated reagent was associated with cysteinyl residues. Hence, two sulfhydryls are reactive, but the inactivation correlates with alkylation of one cysteinyl residue at or near the enzyme's nucleotide binding site. The kinase was also extremely sensitive to the sulfhydryl reagents 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and N-ethylmaleimide. The reactive sulfhydryl groups are likely to be those generated by reduction of a disulfide during activation. 20 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Envelope Membranes from Spinach Chloroplasts Are a Site of Metabolism of Fatty Acid Hydroperoxides.

    PubMed Central

    Blee, E.; Joyard, J.

    1996-01-01

    Enzymes in envelope membranes from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts were found to catalyze the rapid breakdown of fatty acid hydroperoxides. In contrast, no such activities were detected in the stroma or in thylakoids. In preparations of envelope membranes, 9S-hydroperoxy-10(E),12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid, 13S-hydroperoxy-9(Z),11(E)-octadecadienoic acid, or 13S-hydroperoxy-9(Z),11(E),15(Z)-octadecatrienoic acid were transformed at almost the same rates (1-2 [mu]mol min-1 mg-1 protein). The products formed were separated by reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and further characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fatty acid hydroperoxides were cleaved (a) into aldehydes and oxoacid fragments, corresponding to the functioning of a hydroperoxide lyase, (b) into ketols that were spontaneously formed from allene oxide synthesized by a hydroperoxide dehydratase, (c) into hydroxy compounds synthesized enzymatically by a system that has not yet been characterized, and (d) into oxoenes resulting from the hydroperoxidase activity of a lipoxygenase. Chloroplast envelope membranes therefore contain a whole set of enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of a variety of fatty acid derivatives, some of which may act as regulatory molecules. The results presented demonstrate a new role for the plastid envelope within the plant cell. PMID:12226196

  2. Leaf hydraulics II: vascularized tissues.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Fulton E; Holbrook, N Michele; Stroock, Abraham D

    2014-01-01

    Current models of leaf hydration employ an Ohm's law analogy of the leaf as an ideal capacitor, neglecting the resistance to flow between cells, or treat the leaf as a plane sheet with a source of water at fixed potential filling the mid-plane, neglecting the discrete placement of veins as well as their resistance. We develop a model of leaf hydration that considers the average conductance of the vascular network to a representative areole (region bounded by the vascular network), and represent the volume of tissue within the areole as a poroelastic composite of cells and air spaces. Solutions to the 3D flow problem are found by numerical simulation, and these results are then compared to 1D models with exact solutions for a range of leaf geometries, based on a survey of temperate woody plants. We then show that the hydration times given by these solutions are well approximated by a sum of the ideal capacitor and plane sheet times, representing the time for transport through the vasculature and tissue respectively. We then develop scaling factors relating this approximate solution to the 3D model, and examine the dependence of these scaling factors on leaf geometry. Finally, we apply a similar strategy to reduce the dimensions of the steady state problem, in the context of peristomatal transpiration, and consider the relation of transpirational gradients to equilibrium leaf water potential measurements. PMID:24012489

  3. Heterologous C-terminal signals effectively target fluorescent fusion proteins to leaf peroxisomes in diverse plant species.

    PubMed

    Gnanasambandam, Annathurai; Anderson, David J; Mills, Edwina; Brumbley, Stevens M

    2012-05-15

    Peroxisomes are functionally diverse organelles that are wholly dependent on import of nuclear-encoded proteins. The signals that direct proteins into these organelles are either found at the C-terminus (type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal; PTS1) or N-terminus (type 2 peroxisomal targeting signal; PTS2) of the protein. Based on a limited number of tests in heterologous systems, PTS1 signals appear to be conserved across species. To further test the generality of this conclusion and to establish the extent to which the PTS1 signals can be relied on for biotechnological purposes across species, we tested two PTS1 signals for their ability to target fluorescent proteins in diverse plant species. Transient assays following microprojectile bombardment showed that the six amino acid PTS1 sequence (RAVARL) from spinach glycolate oxidase effectively targets green fluorescent fusion protein to the leaf peroxisomes in all 20 crops tested, including four monocots (sugarcane, wheat, corn and onion) and 16 dicots (carrot, cucumber, broccoli, tomato, lettuce, turnip, radish, cauliflower, cabbage, capsicum, celery, tobacco, petunia, beetroot, eggplant and coriander). Similarly, results indicated that the 10 amino acid PTS1 sequence (IHHPRELSRL) from pumpkin malate synthase effectively targets red fluorescent fusion protein to the leaf peroxisomes in all four crops tested including monocot (sugarcane) and dicot (cabbage, celery and pumpkin) species. These signal sequences should be useful metabolic engineering tools to direct recombinant proteins to the leaf peroxisomes in diverse plant species of biotechnological interest. PMID:22386008

  4. Instructions for Apple Leaf Sample Collection.doc September 2013 Instructions for Apple Leaf Sample Collection Vermont

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Instructions for Apple Leaf Sample Collection.doc September 2013 Instructions for Apple Leaf Sample;Instructions for Apple Leaf Sample Collection.doc September 2013 Washing Leaf Samples 1. Wash the leaf samples

  5. Retrieval of spinach crop parameters by microwave remote sensing with back propagation artificial neural networks: A comparison of different transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Pandey, A.; Singh, K. P.; Singh, V. P.; Mishra, R. K.; Singh, D.

    2012-08-01

    Back propagation artificial natural network (BPANN) is a well known and widely used machine learning methodology in the field of remote sensing. In this paper an attempt is made to retrieve the spinach crop parameters like biomass, leaf area index, average plant height and soil moisture content by using the X-band scattering coefficients with BPANN at different growth stages of this crop. The maturity age of this crop was found to be 45 days from the date of sowing. After 45 days from the date of sowing, this crop was cut at a certain height for production. Then, it is a point of interest to investigate the microwave response of variation in production. Significant variations in all the crop parameters were observed after cutting the crop and consequently made the problem more critical. Our work confirms the utility of BPANN in handling such a non-linear data set. The BPANN is essentially a network of simple processing nodes arranged into different layers as input, hidden and the output. The input layer propagates components of a particular input vector after weighting these with synaptic weights to each node in the hidden layer. At each node, these weighted input vector components are added. Each hidden layer computes output corresponding to these weighted sum through a non-linear/linear function (e.g. LOGSIG, TANSIG and PURLIN). These functions are known as transfer functions. Thus, each of the hidden layer nodes compute output values, which become inputs to the nodes of the output layer. At nodes of output layer also a weighted sum of outputs of previous layer (hidden layer) are obtained and processed through a transfer function. Thus, the output layer nodes compute the network output for the particular input vector. In this paper, output nodes use linear transfer function. Different transfer functions e.g. TANSIG, LOGSIG and PURELIN were used and the performance of the ANN was optimized by changing the number of neurons in the hidden layers. The present analysis suggests the need of critical analysis of the BPANN in terms of selection of the best transfer function and other network parameters for the better results.

  6. Modeling of the redox state dynamics in photosystem II of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick cells and leaves of spinach and Arabidopsis thaliana from single flash-induced fluorescence quantum yield changes on the 100 ns-10 s time scale.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B

    2015-08-01

    The time courses of the photosystem II (PSII) redox states were analyzed with a model scheme supposing a fraction of 11-25 % semiquinone (with reduced [Formula: see text]) RCs in the dark. Patterns of single flash-induced transient fluorescence yield (SFITFY) measured for leaves (spinach and Arabidopsis (A.) thaliana) and the thermophilic alga Chlorella (C.) pyrenoidosa Chick (Steffen et al. Biochemistry 44:3123-3132, 2005; Belyaeva et al. Photosynth Res 98:105-119, 2008, Plant Physiol Biochem 77:49-59, 2014) were fitted with the PSII model. The simulations show that at high-light conditions the flash generated triplet carotenoid (3)Car(t) population is the main NPQ regulator decaying in the time interval of 6-8 ?s. So the SFITFY increase up to the maximum level [Formula: see text]/F 0 (at ~50 ?s) depends mainly on the flash energy. Transient electron redistributions on the RC redox cofactors were displayed to explain the SFITFY measured by weak light pulses during the PSII relaxation by electron transfer (ET) steps and coupled proton transfer on both the donor and the acceptor side of the PSII. The contribution of non-radiative charge recombination was taken into account. Analytical expressions for the laser flash, the (3)Car(t) decay and the work of the water-oxidizing complex (WOC) were used to improve the modeled P680(+) reduction by YZ in the state S 1 of the WOC. All parameter values were compared between spinach, A. thaliana leaves and C. pyrenoidosa alga cells and at different laser flash energies. ET from [Formula: see text] slower in alga as compared to leaf samples was elucidated by the dynamics of [Formula: see text] fractions to fit SFITFY data. Low membrane energization after the 10 ns single turnover flash was modeled: the ??(t) amplitude (20 mV) is found to be about 5-fold smaller than under the continuous light induction; the time-independent lumen pHL, stroma pHS are fitted close to dark estimates. Depending on the flash energy used at 1.4, 4, 100 % the pHS in stroma is fitted to 7.3, 7.4, and 7.7, respectively. The biggest ?pH difference between stroma and lumen was found to be 1.2, thus pH- dependent NPQ was not considered. PMID:26049407

  7. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface...

  8. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface...

  9. 7 CFR 29.2528 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.2528 Section 29.2528 Agriculture...Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2528 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip...

  10. 7 CFR 29.1028 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.1028 Section 29.1028 Agriculture...12, 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1028 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip...

  11. 7 CFR 29.3033 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3033 Section 29.3033 Agriculture...s. Type 31 and Foreign Type 93) § 29.3033 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip...

  12. 7 CFR 29.3525 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3525 Section 29.3525 Agriculture...35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3525 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip...

  13. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Kevin A.; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M.; Dawson, Todd E.; Franks, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (??stem–leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO2 concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO2 on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ??stem–leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in ?leaf and maximize g s and CO2 assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  14. Experiments in Whole Leaf Photosynthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, J. C.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Described is a simple experimental system, which uses radioactive carbon dioxide to study whole leaf photosynthesis under a variety of conditions. Other experiments and simple apparatus for the experiments are also described. (Author/RH)

  15. Hormonal Regulation of Leaf Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, William P.

    1968-01-01

    A review is given of the progress made during the last 6 years in elucidating the nature, locus of action, and transport properties of the endogenous hormones that control leaf abscission. PMID:16657014

  16. Deriving leaf chlorophyll content of green-leafy vegetables from hyperspectral reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lihong; Yang, Linzhang

    Different nitrogen (N) treatments of four common green-leafy vegetable varieties with different leaf color: lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L. var. crispa L.) with yellow green leaves, pakchoi ( Brassica chinensis L.) var. aijiaohuang in Chinese (AJH) with middle green leaves, spinach ( Spinacia oleracea L.) with green leaves and pakchoi ( B. chinensis L.) var. shanghaiqing in Chinese (SHQ) with dark green leaves, were carried out to achieve a wide range of chlorophyll content. The relationship of vegetable leaf hyperspectral response to its chlorophyll content was examined in this study. Almost all reported successful leaf chlorophyll indices in the literature were evaluated for their ability to predict the chlorophyll content in vegetable leaves. Some new indices based on the first derivative curve were also developed, and compared with the chlorophyll indices published. The results showed that most of the indices showed a strong relation with leaf chlorophyll content. In general, modified indices with the blue or near red edge wavelength performed better than their simple counterpart without modification, ratio indices performed a little better than normalized indices when chlorophyll expressed on area basis and reversed when chlorophyll expressed on fresh weight basis. A normalized derivative difference ratio (BND: (D722-D700)/(D722+D700) calibrated by Maire et al. [Maire, G., Francois, C., Dufrene, E., 2004. Towards universal broad leaf chlorophyll indices using PROSPECT simulated database and hyperspectral reflectance measurements. Remote Sensing of Environment 89 (1), 1-28]) gave the best results among all published indices in this study (RMSE=22.1 mg m -2), then the mSR-like indices with the RMSE between 22.6 and 23.0 mg m -2. The new indices EBAR (ratio of the area of red and blue, ? dRE/? dB), EBFN (normalized difference of the amplitude of red and blue, (dRE-dB)/(dRE+dB)) and EBAN (normalized difference of the area of red and blue, (? dRE-? dB)/(? dRE+? dB)) calculated with the derivatives also showed a good performance with the RMSE of 23.3, 24.15 and 24.33 mg m -2, respectively. The study suggests that spectral reflectance measurements hold promise for the assessment of chlorophyll content at the leaf level for green-leafy vegetables. Further investigation is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of such techniques on other vegetable varieties or at the canopy level.

  17. What determines a leaf's shape?

    PubMed

    Dkhar, Jeremy; Pareek, Ashwani

    2014-01-01

    The independent origin and evolution of leaves as small, simple microphylls or larger, more complex megaphylls in plants has shaped and influenced the natural composition of the environment. Significant contributions have come from megaphyllous leaves, characterized usually as flat, thin lamina entrenched with photosynthetic organelles and stomata, which serve as the basis of primary productivity. During the course of evolution, the megaphylls have attained complexity not only in size or venation patterns but also in shape. This has fascinated scientists worldwide, and research has progressed tremendously in understanding the concept of leaf shape determination. Here, we review these studies and discuss the various factors that contributed towards shaping the leaf; initiated as a small bulge on the periphery of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) followed by asymmetric outgrowth, expansion and maturation until final shape is achieved. We found that the underlying factors governing these processes are inherently genetic: PIN1 and KNOX1 are indicators of leaf initiation, HD-ZIPIII, KANADI, and YABBY specify leaf outgrowth while ANGUSTIFOLIA3 and GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR5 control leaf expansion and maturation; besides, recent research has identified new players such as APUM23, known to specify leaf polarity. In addition to genetic control, environmental factors also play an important role during the final adjustment of leaf shape. This immense amount of information available will serve as the basis for studying and understanding innovative leaf morphologies viz. the pitchers of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes which have evolved to provide additional support to the plant survival in its nutrient-deficient habitat. In hindsight, formation of the pitcher tube in Nepenthes might involve the recruitment of similar genetic mechanisms that occur during sympetaly in Petunia. PMID:25584185

  18. Multifactorial Effects of Ambient Temperature, Precipitation, Farm Management, and Environmental Factors Determine the Level of Generic Escherichia coli Contamination on Preharvested Spinach

    PubMed Central

    Navratil, Sarah; Gregory, Ashley; Bauer, Arin; Srinath, Indumathi; Szonyi, Barbara; Nightingale, Kendra; Anciso, Juan; Jun, Mikyoung; Han, Daikwon; Ivanek, Renata

    2015-01-01

    A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted to identify farm management, environment, weather, and landscape factors that predict the count of generic Escherichia coli on spinach at the preharvest level. E. coli was enumerated for 955 spinach samples collected on 12 farms in Texas and Colorado between 2010 and 2012. Farm management and environmental characteristics were surveyed using a questionnaire. Weather and landscape data were obtained from National Resources Information databases. A two-part mixed-effect negative binomial hurdle model, consisting of a logistic and zero-truncated negative binomial part with farm and date as random effects, was used to identify factors affecting E. coli counts on spinach. Results indicated that the odds of a contamination event (non-zero versus zero counts) vary by state (odds ratio [OR] = 108.1). Odds of contamination decreased with implementation of hygiene practices (OR = 0.06) and increased with an increasing average precipitation amount (mm) in the past 29 days (OR = 3.5) and the application of manure (OR = 52.2). On contaminated spinach, E. coli counts increased with the average precipitation amount over the past 29 days. The relationship between E. coli count and the average maximum daily temperature over the 9 days prior to sampling followed a quadratic function with the highest bacterial count at around 24°C. These findings indicate that the odds of a contamination event in spinach are determined by farm management, environment, and weather factors. However, once the contamination event has occurred, the count of E. coli on spinach is determined by weather only. PMID:25636850

  19. Dark-adapted spinach thylakoid protein heterogeneity offers insights into the photosystem II repair cycle.

    PubMed

    Suorsa, Marjaana; Rantala, Marjaana; Danielsson, Ravi; Järvi, Sari; Paakkarinen, Virpi; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Styring, Stenbjörn; Mamedov, Fikret; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-09-01

    In higher plants, thylakoid membrane protein complexes show lateral heterogeneity in their distribution: photosystem (PS) II complexes are mostly located in grana stacks, whereas PSI and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase are mostly found in the stroma-exposed thylakoids. However, recent research has revealed strong dynamics in distribution of photosystems and their light harvesting antenna along the thylakoid membrane. Here, the dark-adapted spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) thylakoid network was mechanically fragmented and the composition of distinct PSII-related proteins in various thylakoid subdomains was analyzed in order to get more insights into the composition and localization of various PSII subcomplexes and auxiliary proteins during the PSII repair cycle. Most of the PSII subunits followed rather equal distribution with roughly 70% of the proteins located collectively in the grana thylakoids and grana margins; however, the low molecular mass subunits PsbW and PsbX as well as the PsbS proteins were found to be more exclusively located in grana thylakoids. The auxiliary proteins assisting in repair cycle of PSII were mostly located in stroma-exposed thylakoids, with the exception of THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN OF 18.3 (TLP18.3), which was more evenly distributed between the grana and stroma thylakoids. The TL29 protein was present exclusively in grana thylakoids. Intriguingly, PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION5 (PGR5) was found to be distributed quite evenly between grana and stroma thylakoids, whereas PGR5-LIKE PHOTOSYNTHETIC PHENOTYPE1 (PGRL1) was highly enriched in the stroma thylakoids and practically missing from the grana cores. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy. PMID:24296034

  20. Characterization of a photosynthesizing reconstituted spinach chloroplast preparation: regulation by primer, adenylates, ferredoxin, and pyridine nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Kow, Y.W.; Gibbs, M.

    1982-01-01

    A particulate preparation (MgP) capable of photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ assimilation without the addition of stromal protein was obtained by rupturing whole spinach (Spinacia oleracea var. America) chloroplasts in 15 millimolar MgCl/sub 2/ buffered with Tricine at pH 8.5. This CO/sub 2/ assimilation was dependent upon light, inorganic phosphate, ferredoxin, ADP, NAD or NADP, and primer. Excepting glycolate, the products of CO/sub 2/ fixation by MgP were similar to those found with whole chloroplasts. Glycerate-3-phosphate (PGA), fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), and ribose-5-phosphate (R5P) but not fructose-6-P (F6P) functioned as primers. Concentrations of PGA and FBP but not of R5P higher than 2 millimolar where inhibitory to CO/sub 2/ fixation. A lag of CO/sub 2/ fixation was observed with PGA and FBP but not with R5P. This lag as well as inhibition by NADP, ADP, and ATP in the FBP-primed preparation was eliminated by an equimolar mixture of FBP plus F6P indicating FBPase as the sensitive site. NADP, ADP, and ATP also blocked CO/sub 2/ fixation by the PGA-fortified preparation but inhibition was even more sensitive than that observed when FBP was added. Inhibition by AMP in the PGA and FBP-primed preparations was not affected by the addition of F6P. When R5P was the starting primer, inhibition of CO/sub 2/ fixation was relatively insensitive to the adenylates and NADP. In contrast to the parent whole chloroplast, CO/sub 2/ fixation by MgP was insensitive to high (5 millimolar) inorganic phosphate. Depending upon the ferredoxin concentration, NAD was as effective as NADP in supporting CO/sub 2/ fixation.

  1. Temperature and pH effects on chloroplastic respiration of glucose and fructose in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.K.; Gibbs, M. )

    1993-05-01

    Respiration was monitored principally as CO[sub 2] release in the darkened intact spinach chloroplast supplied with [sup 14]C-glucose and [sup 14]C-fructose. The rate of flucose respiration, optimum pH 7.5, increased from 15[degrees]C up to 40[degrees]C and then decreased in the presence of added ATP. In the absence of ATP, the optimum temperature for CO[sub 2] release was 25 [degrees]C and then decreased. At optimum pH 8.5, both in the absence and presence of ATP, the rate increased up to 25[degrees]C and then decreased. The negative effect of high temperature was not reversed when the chloroplast was returned to 25[degrees]C. Higher temperature (40[degrees]C vs 15[degrees]C) and higher pH (8.5 vs 7.5) increased radioactivity into starch and decreased radioactivity in CO[sub 2]. The rate of fructose respiration, optimum pH 7.5 but also at pH 8.5, increased CO[sub 2] release from 15[degrees]C to 40[degrees]C and then decreased both in the absence and presence of externally supplied ATP. Temperature and pH has no effect on radioactivity in starch and CO[sub 2] when fructose was substrate. The difference in results between glucose and fructose may reflect the localization of fructokinase in the stroma and glucokinase both in the stroma and cytosolic side of the outer chloroplastic membrane. It may be also reflect the equilibrium of phosphohexose isomerase favoring fructose-6-P.

  2. Formation of the Fe-S cluster of ferredoxin in lysed spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Akira; Matsubara, Hiroshi )

    1991-01-01

    In vitro formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster of ferredoxin (Fd) has been achieved by incubating apo-Fd and ({sup 35}S)cysteine with osmotically lysed chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Correct integration of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster into Fd was verified on the basis of the following: (a) Under nondenaturing conditions, {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd showed the same electrophoretic mobility as authentic holo-Fd; (b) {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd showed an ability to bind Fd-NADP{sup +} reductase; (c) the {sup 35}S-labeled moiety was removed from the Fd polypeptide by TCA treatment but not by 2-mercaptoethanol treatment; (d) externally added pea II apo-Fd was converted to {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd. This reconstitution was dependent on both ATP and light, and formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster was observed upon addition of ATP or when an ATP generation-system was constructed in the light. In contrast, ATP-consuming systems abolished the Fe-S cluster formation. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was unable to serve as an ATP substitute, indicating the requirement of ATP hydrolysis for cluster formation. GTP was able to substitute for ATP, but CTP and UTP were less effective. Fe-S cluster formation in lysed chloroplasts was stimulated by light even in the presence of added ATP. Light stimulation was inhibited by DCMU or methyl viologen but not by NH{sub 4}{sup +}. NADPH was able to substitute for light, indicating that light energy is required for the production of reducing compounds such as NADPH in addition to the generation of ATP.

  3. Differential sensitivity of spinach and amaranthus to enhanced UV-B at varying soil nutrient levels: association with gas exchange, UV-B-absorbing compounds and membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suruchi; Agrawal, Madhoolika; Agrawal, S B

    2013-07-01

    The metabolic reasons associated with differential sensitivity of C3 and C4 plant species to enhanced UV-B under varying soil nutrient levels are not well understood. In the present study, spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. var All Green), a C3 and amaranthus (Amaranthus tricolor L. var Pusa Badi Chaulai), a C4 plant were subjected to enhanced UV-B (280-315 nm; 7.2 kJ m(-2) day(-1)) over ambient under varying soil nutrient levels. The nutrient amendments were recommended Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P), Potassium (K), 1.5× recommended NPK, 1.5× recommended N and 1.5× recommended K. Enhanced UV-B negatively affected both the species at all nutrient levels, but the reductions varied with nutrient concentration and combinations. Reductions in photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and chlorophyll content were significantly more in spinach compared with amaranthus. The reduction in photosynthetic rate was maximum at 1.5× recommended K and minimum in 1.5× NPK amended plants. The oxidative damage to membranes measured in terms of malondialdehyde content was significantly higher in spinach compared with amaranthus. Enhanced UV-B reduced SOD activity in both the plants except in amaranthus at 1.5× recommended K. POX activity increased under enhanced UV-B at all nutrient levels in amaranthus, but only at 1.5× K in spinach. Amaranthus had significantly higher UV-B-absorbing compounds than spinach even under UV-B stress. Lowest reductions in yield and total biomass under enhanced UV-B compared with ambient were observed in amaranthus grown at 1.5× recommended NPK. Enhanced UV-B did not significantly change the nitrogen use efficiency in amaranthus at all NPK levels, but reduced in spinach except at 1.5× K. These findings suggest that the differential sensitivity of the test species under enhanced UV-B at varying nutrient levels is due to varying antioxidative and UV-B screening capacity, and their ability to utilize nutrients. Amaranthus tolerated enhanced UV-B stress more than spinach at all nutrient levels and 1.5× recommended NPK lowered the sensitivity maximally to enhanced UV-B with respect to photosynthesis, biomass and yield. PCA score has also confirmed the lower sensitivity of amaranthus compared with spinach with respect to the measured physiological and biochemical parameters. PMID:23686471

  4. Phenolic profile evolution of different ready-to-eat baby-leaf vegetables during storage.

    PubMed

    Santos, J; Oliveira, M B P P; Ibáñez, E; Herrero, M

    2014-01-31

    Ready-to-eat baby-leaf vegetables market has been growing and offering to consumers convenient, healthy and appealing products, which may contain interesting bioactive compounds. In this work, the composition and the evolution of the phenolic compounds from different baby-leaf vegetables during refrigerated storage was studied. The phenolic compounds were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and the phenolic profile of each sample was analyzed and quantified by using LC-MS and LC-DAD methods, respectively, at the beginning and at the end of a 10-day storage period. The baby-leaf vegetables studied included green lettuce, ruby red lettuce, swiss chard, spinach, pea shoots, watercress, garden cress, mizuna, red mustard, wild rocket and spearmint samples and a total of 203 phenolic compounds were tentatively identified and quantified. The main naturally phenolic compounds identified correspond to glycosylated flavonoids, with exception of green lettuce and spearmint leaves which had a higher content of hydroxycinnamic acids. Quantification of the main compounds showed a 10-fold higher content of total phenolic content of ruby red lettuce (483mgg(-1)) in relation to the other samples, being the lowest values found in the garden cress (12.8mgg(-1)) and wild rocket leaves (8.1mgg(-1)). The total phenolic content only showed a significant change (p<0.05) after storage in the green lettuce (+17.5%), mizuna (+7.8%), red mustard (-23.7%) and spearmint (-13.8%) leaves. Within the different classes of phenolic compounds monitored, the flavonols showed more stable contents than the hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acids, although the behavior of each compound varied strongly among samples. PMID:24438834

  5. NON-DESTRUCTIVE ASSESSMENT OF ARUNDO DONAX (POACEAE) LEAF QUALITY.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf quality information (i.e., leaf C content, leaf N content, leaf C:N ratio) is especially useful for understanding plant-herbivore interactions and may be important in developing control methods for the invasive riparian plant Arundo donax L. We measured leaf C content, leaf N content, leaf C:N ...

  6. Stomatal Closure during Leaf Dehydration, Correlation with Other Leaf Physiological Traits1

    E-print Network

    Holbrook, N. Michele

    Stomatal Closure during Leaf Dehydration, Correlation with Other Leaf Physiological Traits1 Tim J). This complexity is evi- denced by the variable effects of leaf water potential ( l) and vapor pressure deficit

  7. Functional relationships of leafing intensity to plant height, growth form and leaf habit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, En-Rong; Milla, Rubén; Aarssen, Lonnie W.; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2012-05-01

    Leafing intensity, i.e. the number of leaves per unit of stem volume or mass, is a common developmental correlate of leaf size. However, the ecological significance and the functional implications of variation in leafing intensity, other than its relation to leaf size, are unknown. Here, we explore its relationships with plant height, growth form, leaf size, and leaf habit to test a series of corollaries derived from the leafing intensity premium hypothesis. Volume-based leafing intensities and plant heights were recorded for 109 woody species from the subtropical evergreen broadleaf forests of eastern China. In addition, we compiled leafing intensity data from published literature, and combined it with our data to form a 398 species dataset, to test for differences of leafing intensity between plant growth forms (i.e. herbaceous and woody) and leaf habits (i.e. deciduous and evergreens). Leafing intensity was negatively correlated with plant height and individual leaf mass. Volume-based leafing intensities were significantly higher in herbaceous species than in woody species, and also higher in deciduous than in evergreen woody species. In conclusion, leafing intensity relates strongly to plant height, growth form, leaf size, and leaf habit in directions generally in accordance to the leafing intensity premium hypothesis. These results can be interpreted in terms of the evolution of adaptive strategies involving response to herbivory, competitive ability for light and reproductive economy.

  8. Relationship between fresh-packaged spinach leaves exposed to continuous light or dark and bioactive contents: Effects of cultivar, leaf size, and storage duration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human-health benefits derived from consumption of fruits and vegetables are due to the many bioactive compounds found in produce. The concentrations of these bioactive compounds are heavily influenced by genetics (i.e. cultivar) and environment, especially the many pigments and vitamins that can ch...

  9. Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm formation and internalization on lettuce and spinach leaf surfaces reduces efficacy of irradiation and sodium hypochlorite washes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination of leafy green vegetables is an ongoing concern for consumers. Biofilm-associated and internalized pathogens are relatively resistant to chemical treatments, but little is known about the response of these protected pathogens to irradiation. Leaves of Romaine l...

  10. Automatic detection of regions in spinach canopies responding to soil moisture deficit using combined visible and thermal imagery.

    PubMed

    Raza, Shan-e-Ahmed; Smith, Hazel K; Clarkson, Graham J J; Taylor, Gail; Thompson, Andrew J; Clarkson, John; Rajpoot, Nasir M

    2014-01-01

    Thermal imaging has been used in the past for remote detection of regions of canopy showing symptoms of stress, including water deficit stress. Stress indices derived from thermal images have been used as an indicator of canopy water status, but these depend on the choice of reference surfaces and environmental conditions and can be confounded by variations in complex canopy structure. Therefore, in this work, instead of using stress indices, information from thermal and visible light imagery was combined along with machine learning techniques to identify regions of canopy showing a response to soil water deficit. Thermal and visible light images of a spinach canopy with different levels of soil moisture were captured. Statistical measurements from these images were extracted and used to classify between canopies growing in well-watered soil or under soil moisture deficit using Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Gaussian Processes Classifier (GPC) and a combination of both the classifiers. The classification results show a high correlation with soil moisture. We demonstrate that regions of a spinach crop responding to soil water deficit can be identified by using machine learning techniques with a high accuracy of 97%. This method could, in principle, be applied to any crop at a range of scales. PMID:24892284

  11. Prevalence of multiple antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria on bagged, ready-to-eat baby spinach.

    PubMed

    Walia, Sandeep; Rana, Sonia W; Maue, Daniel; Rana, Jatin; Kumar, Ashok; Walia, Satish K

    2013-01-01

    In this study, multiple antibiotic-resistant (MAR) Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) were isolated from triple-washed, bagged, ready-to-eat (RTE) baby spinach. Biochemical identification of randomly selected bacterial colonies showed the predominance of cytochrome oxidase-positive Pseudomonas species. Among the GNB, a higher prevalence of resistance was observed against cefoxitin (93.1%) followed by ampicillin (79.4%), chloramphenicol (72.6%), ceftizoxime (65.7%), aztreonam (64.9%), cefotaxime (53.6%), imipenem (38.3%), ceftazidime (33.5%), gentamicin (32.6%), tetracycline (22.2%), and ciprofloxacin (19.8%). Multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) linked to two or more antibiotics was found in 95.3% of isolates, and resistance was transferable in the strains tested. These findings confirm the presence of MAR bacteria on RTE baby spinach and suggest that human consumption of this produce would amplify the MAR gene pool via conjugal transfer of MAR genes to commensal gut microflora and bacterial pathogens. PMID:22838727

  12. Automatic Detection of Regions in Spinach Canopies Responding to Soil Moisture Deficit Using Combined Visible and Thermal Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Shan-e-Ahmed; Smith, Hazel K.; Clarkson, Graham J. J.; Taylor, Gail; Thompson, Andrew J.; Clarkson, John; Rajpoot, Nasir M.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal imaging has been used in the past for remote detection of regions of canopy showing symptoms of stress, including water deficit stress. Stress indices derived from thermal images have been used as an indicator of canopy water status, but these depend on the choice of reference surfaces and environmental conditions and can be confounded by variations in complex canopy structure. Therefore, in this work, instead of using stress indices, information from thermal and visible light imagery was combined along with machine learning techniques to identify regions of canopy showing a response to soil water deficit. Thermal and visible light images of a spinach canopy with different levels of soil moisture were captured. Statistical measurements from these images were extracted and used to classify between canopies growing in well-watered soil or under soil moisture deficit using Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Gaussian Processes Classifier (GPC) and a combination of both the classifiers. The classification results show a high correlation with soil moisture. We demonstrate that regions of a spinach crop responding to soil water deficit can be identified by using machine learning techniques with a high accuracy of 97%. This method could, in principle, be applied to any crop at a range of scales. PMID:24892284

  13. Photoregulation of fructose and glucose respiration in the intact chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 and spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.K.; Changguo Chen; Gibbs, M. )

    1993-04-01

    The photoregulation of chloroplastic respiration was studied by monitoring in darkness and in light the release of [sup 14]CO[sub 2] from whole chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) supplied externally with [[sup 14]C]glucose and [[sup 14]C]fructose, respectively. CO[sub 2] release was inhibited more than 90% in both chloroplasts by a light intensity of 4 W m[sup [minus]2]. Oxidants, oxaloacetate in Chlamydomonas, nitrite in spinach, and phenazine methosulfate in both chloroplasts, reversed the inhibition. The onset of the photoinhibitory effect on CO[sub 2] release was relatively rapid compared to the restoration of CO[sub 2] release following illumination. In both darkened chloroplasts, dithiothreitol inhibited release. Of the four enzymes (fructokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, glucose-6-P dehydrogenase, and gluconate-6-P dehydrogenase) in the pathway catalyzing the release of CO[sub 2] from fructose, only glucose-6-P dehydrogenase was deactivated by light and by dithiothreitol. 33 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Research of the relationship between delayed fluorescence and net photosynthesis rate in spinach under NaCl stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingrui; Xing, Da

    2006-09-01

    Under NaCl stress conditions, the relationship between delayed fluorescence (DF) and net photosynthesis rate (Pn) in detached leaves of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) was surveyed. Results showed that the changes in DF intensity of the spinach leaves directly exposed to different NaCl concentrations demonstrated considerably high consistency with that in Pn. Incubation of the leaves in 200mmol/L NaCl induced a gradual increase and subsequent decline of the DF intensity and Pu, whereas incubation of the leaves in 300mmol/L NaCl induced a continuous decline of the DF intensity and Pn, suggesting that DF bad the same response to duration of treatment of different NaC1 concentrations with Pn. Both DF and Pn showed maximal Ca 2+ antagonism effects on stress of high concentration NaC1 when the concentration of CaC1 II reached l5mmolfL. All the results demonstrated that DF has an excellent correlation with Pn and can be used as a sensitive test for the state of photosynthetic apparatus under salt stress physiology.

  15. Isolation and characterization of spinach photosystem II membrane-associated catalase and polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Sheptovitsky, Y G; Brudvig, G W

    1996-12-17

    Photosystem II (PSII) membranes exhibit catalase and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities. Mild heat treatment of PSII membranes for 90 min at 30 degrees C releases most of these enzyme activities into the supernatant, accompanied by a 7-fold activation of PPO. In contrast, mild heat treatment of thylakoid membranes does not release significant amounts of either activity, indicating that both enzymes are bound to the luminal surface of the thylakoid membrane. The heat-released PSII membrane-associated catalase and PPO have been purified and characterized. Catalase activity was correlated with a 63 kDa polypeptide which was purified by batch adsorption to anion-exchange beads followed by gel filtration. The PSII membrane-associated catalase is unstable in solution, probably due to irreversible aggregation. The enzyme was characterized in terms of molecular and subunit size, amino-acid composition, UV-visible absorption, heme content, pH optimum, inhibitor sensitivity, and K(m) value for H2O2. Its properties indicate that the PSII membrane-associated catalase is a luminal thylakoid membrane-bound heme enzyme that has not been identified previously. The residual catalase activity of PSII membranes after mild heat treatment is irreversibly inhibited with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, a specific inhibitor of heme catalases, without inhibition of O2-evolution activity. This result indicates that little, if any, of the catalase activity from PSII membranes in the dark is catalyzed by the O2-evolving center of PSII. PPO activity was correlated with a 48 kDa polypeptide. However, the 48 kDa polypeptide and another heat-released polypeptide of 72 kDa have the same N-terminal sequence, which is also identical to that of a known 64 kDa protein [Hind, G., Marshak, D. R., & Coughlan, S. J. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 8157-8164]. During heat treatment of PSII membranes and further manipulations it was found that the 72 kDa polypeptide was largely converted into the 48 kDa polypeptide. Thus, the 72 kDa polypeptide appears to be a latent precursor of the active 48 kDa PPO. The PSII membrane-associated PPO was purified by anion-exchange chromatography and was characterized in terms of substrate specificity, pH optimum, inhibitor sensitivity and native molecular weight. The heat-released PPO appears to be identical to the enzyme previously isolated from spinach thylakoid membranes [Golbeck, J. H., & Cammarata, K. V. (1981) Plant Physiol. 67, 977-984]. PMID:8973199

  16. A novel approach to investigate the uptake and internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in spinach cultivated in soil and hydroponic media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Internalization of E. coli O157:H7 into spinach plants through root uptake is a potential route of contamination. A Tn7-based plasmid vector was used to insert the green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene into the attTn7 site in the E. coli chromosome. Three gfp-labeled E. coli inocula, O157:H7 strains ...

  17. The effect of repeated irrigation with varying total organic carbon content on the persistence of E. coli O157:H7 on baby spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In response to U.S. foodborne illnesses caused by contaminated spinach, growers have adopted regulations stated in the California Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement (LGMA). The LGMA permits a maximum population mean of 126 Most Probable Number (MPN) generic E. coli per 100 ml irrigation water. These...

  18. Use of zero-valent iron biosand filters to reduce E. coli O157:H12 in irrigation water applied to spinach plants in a field setting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Zero-valent iron (ZVI) filters may provide an efficient method to mitigate the contamination of produce crops through irrigation water. Purpose: To evaluate the use of ZVI-filtration in decontaminating E. coli O157:H12 in irrigation water and on spinach plants in a small, field-scale...

  19. The Effect of Repeated Irrigation with Water Containing Varying Levels of Total Organic Carbon on the Persistence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on Baby Spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The California lettuce and leafy greens industry has adopted the Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement (LGMA), which allows for 126 Most Probable Number (MPN) generic E. coli/100ml in irrigation water. Repeat irrigation of baby spinach plants with water containing E. coli O157:H7 and different levels of...

  20. Mathematical modeling and numerical analysis of the growth of Non-O157 shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in spinach leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to investigate the growth of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in spinach leaves and to develop kinetic models to describe the bacterial growth. Six serogroups of non-O157 STEC, including O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145, were used in the growth stu...

  1. D-ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase: Cloning and heterologous expression of the spinach gene, and purification and characterization of the recombinant enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.R.; Hartman, F.C.; Lu, T.Y.S.; Larimer, F.W.

    1998-09-01

    The authors have achieved, to their knowledge, the first high-level heterologous expression of the gene encoding D-ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase from any source, thereby permitting isolation and characterization of the epimerase as found in photosynthetic organisms. The extremely labile recombinant spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) enzyme was stabilized by DL-{alpha}-glycerophosphate or ethanol and destabilized by D-ribulose-5-phosphate or 2-mercaptoethanol. Despite this lability, the unprecedentedly high specific activity of the purified material indicates that the structural integrity of the enzyme is maintained throughout isolation. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate and divalent metal cations did not affect epimerase activity, thereby excluding a requirement for the latter in catalysis. As deduced from the sequence of the cloned spinach gene and the electrophoretic mobility under denaturing conditions of the purified recombinant enzyme, its 25-kD subunit size was about the same as that of the corresponding epimerases of yeast and mammals. However, in contrast to these other species, the recombinant spinach enzyme was octameric rather than dimeric, as assessed by gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions. Western-blot analyses with antibodies to the purified recombinant enzyme confirmed that the epimerase extracted from spinach leaves is also octameric.

  2. Effect of Nd{sup 3+} ion on carboxylation activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chao; Hong Fashui . E-mail: Hongfsh_cn@sina.com; Wu Kang; Ma, Hong-bing; Zhang Xueguang; Hong Chengjiao; Wu Cheng; Gao Fengqing; Yang Fan; Zheng Lei; Wang Xuefeng; Liu Tao; Xie Yaning; Xu Jianhua; Li Zhongrui

    2006-03-31

    Neodymium (Nd), as a member of rare earth elements, proved to enhance the photosynthesis rate and organic substance accumulation of spinach through the increase in carboxylation activity of Rubisco. Although the oxygenase activity of spinach Rubisco was slightly changed with the Nd{sup 3+} treatment, the specific factor of Rubisco was greatly increased. It was partially due to the promotion of Rubisco activase (R-A) activity but mainly to the formation of Rubisco-Rubisco activase super-complex, a heavier molecular mass protein (about 1200 kD) comprising both Rubisco and Rubisco activase. This super-complex was found during the extraction procedure of Rubisco by the gel electrophoresis and Western-blot studies. The formation of Rubisco-R-A super-complex suggested that the secondary structure of the protein purified from the Nd{sup 3+}-treated spinach was different from that of the control. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of the 'Rubisco' purified from the Nd{sup 3+}-treated spinach revealed that Nd was bound with four oxygen atoms and two sulfur atoms of amino acid residues at the Nd-O and Nd-S bond lengths of 2.46 and 2.89 A, respectively.

  3. Inhibition of E. coli O157:H7 on the surface of Fresh Spinach by bacteriophage ECP-100 and Modified Atmosphere Packaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The last multistate Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) outbreak linked to bagged spinach in 2006 has raised concerns about the safety of ready-to-eat vegetables. Since washing alone or in combination with chemicals has been ineffective in completely killing EHEC, there is an urgent need for more effect...

  4. Influence of the interaction between light intensity and CO2 concentration on productivity and quality of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) grown in fully controlled environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proietti, Simona; Moscatello, Stefano; Giacomelli, Gene A.; Battistelli, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    The effects of the factorial combination of two light intensities (200 and 800 ?mol m-2 s-1) and two CO2 concentrations (360 and 800 ppm) were studied on the productivity and nutritional quality of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) grown under controlled environment. After 6 weeks within a growth chamber, spinach plants were sampled and analyzed for productivity and quality. There were no statistically significant interactions between the effects of light and CO2 for all of the variables studied, except for the nitrate and oxalic acid content of the leaves. High light and high CO2 independently one from the other, promoted spinach productivity, and the accumulation of ascorbic acid, while their interactive effect limited the accumulation of nitrate and oxalic acid in the spinach leaves. The results highlight the importance of considering the effects of the interaction among environmental variables on maximizing production and the nutritional quality of the food when cultivating and modeling the plant response in controlled environment systems such as for bioregenerative life support.

  5. The effect of total organic carbon content and repeated irrigation on the persistence of E. coli O157:H7 on baby spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Contaminated fresh-cut spinach and other leafy greens have caused foodborne illness in the United States. In response, growers are adopting recommendations stated in the California Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement (LGMA). The LGMA permits a maximum population of 126 Most Probable Nu...

  6. Biophysical control of leaf temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, N.; Prentice, I. C.; Wright, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    In principle sunlit leaves can maintain their temperatures within a narrower range than ambient temperatures. This is an important and long-known (but now overlooked) prediction of energy balance theory. Net radiation at leaf surface in steady state (which is reached rapidly) must be equal to the combination of sensible and latent heat exchanges with surrounding air, the former being proportional to leaf-to-air temperature difference (?T), the latter to the transpiration rate. We present field measurements of ?T which confirm the existence of a 'crossover temperature' in the 25-30?C range for species in a tropical savanna and a tropical rainforest environment. This finding is consistent with a simple representation of transpiration as a function of net radiation and temperature (Priestley-Taylor relationship) assuming an entrainment factor (?) somewhat greater than the canonical value of 0.26. The fact that leaves in tropical forests are typically cooler than surrounding air, often already by solar noon, is consistent with a recently published comparison of MODIS day-time land-surface temperatures with air temperatures. Theory further predicts a strong dependence of leaf size (which is inversely related to leaf boundary-layer conductance, and therefore to absolute magnitude of ?T) on moisture availability. Theoretically, leaf size should be determined by either night-time constraints (risk of frost damage to active leaves) or day-time constraints (risk of heat stress damage),with the former likely to predominate - thereby restricting the occurrence of large leaves - at high latitudes. In low latitudes, daytime maximum leaf size is predicted to increase with temperature, provided that water is plentiful. If water is restricted, however, transpiration cannot proceed at the Priestley-Taylor rate, and it quickly becomes advantageous for plants to have small leaves, which do not heat up much above the temperature of their surroundings. The difference between leaf and air temperature is generally neglected in terrestrial ecosystem and carbon cycle models. This is a significant omission that could lead to an over-estimation of the heat-stress vulnerability of carbon uptake in the wet tropics. Leaf energy balance theory is well established, and should be included in the next generation of models.

  7. Behavior of Leaf Meristems and Their Modification

    PubMed Central

    Ichihashi, Yasunori; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    A major source of diversity in flowering plant form is the extensive variability of leaf shape and size. Leaf formation is initiated by recruitment of a handful of cells flanking the shoot apical meristem (SAM) to develop into a complex three-dimensional structure. Leaf organogenesis depends on activities of several distinct meristems that are established and spatiotemporally differentiated after the initiation of leaf primordia. Here, we review recent findings in the gene regulatory networks that orchestrate leaf meristem activities in a model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We then discuss recent key studies investigating the natural variation in leaf morphology to understand how the gene regulatory networks modulate leaf meristems to yield a substantial diversity of leaf forms during the course of evolution. PMID:26648955

  8. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. The degrees range from close (slick and...

  9. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. The degrees range from close (slick and...

  10. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. The degrees range from close (slick and...

  11. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. The degrees range from close (slick and...

  12. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. The degrees range from close (slick and...

  13. An Innovative Way to Monitor Leaf Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnello, A.; Paredes, K.; Trinh, U.; Saleska, S. R.; Wu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Anthony John Garnello, Karina Paredes, Uyen Khanh Ho Trinh, Jin Wu, Scott Saleska Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Abstract: Leaf age is an important characteristic for controlling plant functional performance and is associated with the changes of leaf physical, chemical, and physiological properties. Understanding how plant physiology changes over time will allow more accurate predictions of growth patterns, and a more comprehensive understanding of vegetative life histories. There still lacks an efficient technique in monitoring leaf age, tagging leaves is still the only way to accurately monitor leaf age. The goal of this study is to develop a multi-metric, accurate technique for better monitoring of leaf age. In order to acquire true leaf age records, 10 individual plant species were selected at the University of Arizona campus, and newly flushing leaves were tagged and monitored during the Monsoon season (from early June, 2013, to mid October, 2013). Every 2 weeks, 10 to 15 leaves in relative age order were harvested from each 1-meter branch to measure multiple key leaf metrics, including leaf thickness (via micrometer), fresh and dry weight, fresh and dry area (via ImageJ software), and leaf hyperspectral reflectance (via a handheld ASD Field Pro). Other leaf traits were also derived from our measurements, such as specific leaf area (SLA), leaf density (fresh weight/leaf volume), water percentage, and shrinkage ratio (1-dry area/fresh area). The hyperspectral version of vegetation index (a ratio derived from two spectral channels) was generated for each branch sample, by randomly selecting two channels from within the spectral domain of 350 nm to 2500 nm. The preliminary result documents three types of hyperspectral vegetation index (VI) which are highly related with leaf relative age order (R2>0.9). These include the sensitive spectral domains correlated with (a) leaf pigments (~550nm) and leaf physical structure (750nm-1000nm), (b) leaf pigments (~550nm) and leaf water concentration (1400nm-2300nm), and (c) leaf physical structure (750nm-1000nm) and leaf water concentration (1400nm-2300nm). Preliminary results showed that (1) among the key leaf traits, leaf shrinkage is the only trait that showed a consistent correlation with relative age order across the samples; (2) a power function best modeled the interspecies relationship between leaf shrinkage and leaf age (R2 = 0.81, p-value < 0.01, 22 data points for 7 species); (3) a strong correlation was found between the predicted leaf age using the species specific power functions of leaf shrinkage and true leaf age (R2= 0.96, p-value < 0.01), suggesting that leaf shrinkage could be a useful trait for prediction of absolute leaf age in the future. In the next step, we will integrate leaf shrinkage based leaf age prediction with hyperspectral VI framework, aiming to derive some reliable VIs which can be universal for leaf aging prediction among all the species.

  14. Prediction of protein targets of kinetin using in silico and in vitro methods: a case study on spinach seed germination mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sivakumar Prasanth; Parmar, Vilas R; Jasrai, Yogesh T; Pandya, Himanshu A

    2015-07-01

    Kinetin, a cytokinin which promotes seed germination by inhibiting the action of abscisic acid, is an important molecule known to trigger various molecular mechanisms by interacting with an array of proteins shown from experimental observations in various model organisms. We report here the prediction of most probable protein targets of kinetin from spinach proteome using in silico approaches. Inverse docking and ligand-based similarity search was performed using kinetin as molecule. The former method prioritized six spinach proteins, whereas the latter method provided a list of protein targets retrieved from several model organisms. The most probable protein targets were selected by comparing the rank list of docking and ligand similarity methods. Both of these methods prioritized chitinase as the most probable protein target (?G pred?=?5.064 kcal/mol) supported by the experimental structure of yeast chitinase 1 complex with kinetin (PDB: 2UY5) and Gliocladium roseum chitinase complex with 3,7-dihydro-1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-dione (caffeine; 3G6M) which bears a 3D similarity of 0.43 with kinetin. An in vitro study to evaluate the effect of kinetin on spinach seed germination indicated that a very low concentration of kinetin (0.5 mg/l) did not show a significant effect compared to control in inducing seed germination process. Further, higher levels of kinetin (>0.5 mg/l) constituted an antagonist effect on spinach seed germination. It is anticipated that kinetin may have a molecular interaction with prioritized protein targets synthesized during the seed germination process and reduces growth. Thus, it appears that kinetin may not be a suitable hormone for enhancing spinach seed germination in vitro. PMID:26101551

  15. Respiration of sugars in spinach (Spinacia oleraces), maize (Zea mays), and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 chloroplasts with emphasis on the hexose kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.K.; Chen, C.; Epstein, D.K.; Gibbs, M. )

    1993-06-01

    The role of hexokinase in carbohydrate degradation in isolated, intact chloroplasts was evaluated. This was accomplished by monitoring the evolution of [sup 14]CO[sub 2] from darkened spinach (Spinacia oleracea), maize (Zea mays) mesophyll, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts externally supplied with [sup 14]C-labeled fructose, glucose, mannose, galactose, maltose, and ribose. Glucose and ribose were the preferred substrates with the Chlamydomonas and maize chloroplasts, respectively. The rate of CO[sub 2] release from fructose was about twice that from glucose in the spinach chloroplast. externally supplied ATP stimulated the rate of CO[sub 2] release. The pH optimum for CO[sub 2] release was 7.5 with ribose and fructose and 8.5 with glucose as substrates. Probing the outer membrane polypeptides of the intact spinach chloroplast with two proteases, trypsin and thermolysin, decreased [sup 14]CO[sub 2] release from glucose about 50% but had little effect when fructose was the substrate. Tryptic digestion decreased CO[sub 2] release from glucose in the Chlamydomonas chloroplast about 70%. [sup 14]CO[sub 2] evolution from [1-[sup 14]C]-glucose-6-phosphate in both chloroplasts was unaffected by treatment with trypsin. Enzymic analysis of the supernatant (stroma) of the lysed spinach chloroplast indicated a hexokinase active primarily with fructose but with some affinity for glucose. The pellet (membranal fraction) contained a hexokinase utilizing both glucose and fructose but with considerably less total activity than the stormal enzyme. Treatment with trypsin and thermolysin eliminated more than 50% of the glucokinase activity but had little effect on fructokinase activity in the spinach chloroplast. Tryptic digestion of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast resulted in a loss of about 90% of glucokinase activity. 34 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. LEAF: A Microcomputer Program for Constructing the Tukey Stem and Leaf Graph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascale, Pietro J.; Smith, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a BASIC microcomputer program that constructs the Tukey (1977) stem and leaf graph. Options within the LEAF program include a modified stem and leaf where the stem is split and a parallel stem and leaf graph where two separate sets of data are displayed from a common stem. (Author)

  17. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity....

  18. 7 CFR 29.3526 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3526 Section 29.3526 Agriculture... Type 95) § 29.3526 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or broken leaves....

  19. 7 CFR 29.2530 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.2530 Section 29.2530 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2530 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See chart, § 29.2601.)...

  20. 7 CFR 29.2278 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.2278 Section 29.2278 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2278 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See chart, § 29.2351.)...

  1. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity....

  2. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See...

  3. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity....

  4. 7 CFR 29.2530 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.2530 Section 29.2530 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2530 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See chart, § 29.2601.)...

  5. 7 CFR 29.2529 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2529 Section 29.2529 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2529 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole...

  6. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See...

  7. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by...

  8. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity....

  9. 7 CFR 29.2277 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2277 Section 29.2277 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2277 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and...

  10. 7 CFR 29.2278 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.2278 Section 29.2278 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2278 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See chart, § 29.2351.)...

  11. 7 CFR 29.3034 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3034 Section 29.3034 Agriculture... Leaf scrap. A by-product of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or broken leaves....

  12. 7 CFR 29.6022 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.6022 Section 29.6022 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6022 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or broken leaves....

  13. CORN LEAF CHLOROPHYLL STATUS FROM HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf chlorophyll concentration is an indicator of plant N status. Subtle differences in canopy reflectance due to changes in leaf chlorophyll concentration are often overwhelmed by the large changes in reflectance associated with soil brightness and leaf area index (LAI). Our objective was to devel...

  14. 7 CFR 29.3034 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3034 Section 29.3034 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf scrap. A by-product of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco...

  15. 7 CFR 29.6022 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.6022 Section 29.6022 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6022 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap...

  16. 7 CFR 29.2529 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2529 Section 29.2529 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2529 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole...

  17. 7 CFR 29.3526 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3526 Section 29.3526 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3526 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3528 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign...3528 Leaf surface. The roughness or smoothness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is affected to...

  19. 7 CFR 29.3528 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign...3528 Leaf surface. The roughness or smoothness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is affected to...

  20. 7 CFR 29.3528 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign...3528 Leaf surface. The roughness or smoothness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is affected to...

  1. 7 CFR 29.3528 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign...3528 Leaf surface. The roughness or smoothness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is affected to...

  2. 7 CFR 29.3528 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign...3528 Leaf surface. The roughness or smoothness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is affected to...

  3. 7 CFR 29.3526 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3526 Section 29.3526 Agriculture...36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3526 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed...

  4. 7 CFR 29.2277 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2277 Section 29.2277 Agriculture...Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2277 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed...

  5. 7 CFR 29.2278 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.2278 Section 29.2278...Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2278 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See...

  6. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf tobacco. 30.2 Section 30.2 Agriculture...STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.2 Leaf tobacco. Tobacco in the...

  7. 7 CFR 29.3034 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3034 Section 29.3034 Agriculture...Type 31 and Foreign Type 93) § 29.3034 Leaf scrap. A by-product of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed...

  8. ZONATE LEAF SPOT (CAUSED BY CRISTULARIELLA MORICOLA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zonate leaf spot derives it name from the occurrence of large, circular leaf lesions with distinct concentric rings. Initially the leaf lesions are light tan in color and the concentric rings are symmetrical appearing as a ‘bulls eye’. Initial lesions are 5-10 mm in diameter and continue to expand...

  9. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by...

  10. Light reflectance of leaf constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown how various leaf constituents differ in reflecting light over the 370- to 1100-nm wavelength interval. The premise tested is that refractive index discontinuities in leaves, other than air-cell interfaces, contribute to the reflectance of near-infrared light.-

  11. XANTHOMONAS LEAF BLIGHT OF ONION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xanthomonas leaf blight, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. allii, is a common foliar disease of onion. This extension bulletin presents a review of disease symptomology, etiology, epidemiology, and management. The association of environment, host, and cultural and disease severity ...

  12. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, strong color intensity... Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, moderate color... may be waste. H5F—Low Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean...

  13. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, strong color intensity... Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, moderate color... may be waste. H5F—Low Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean...

  14. Leafing patterns and leaf traits of four evergreen shrubs in the Patagonian Monte, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanella, María Victoria; Bertiller, Mónica B.

    2009-11-01

    We assessed leafing patterns (rate, timing, and duration of leafing) and leaf traits (leaf longevity, leaf mass per area and leaf-chemistry) in four co-occurring evergreen shrubs of the genus Larrea and Chuquiraga (each having two species) in the arid Patagonian Monte of Argentina. We asked whether species with leaves well-defended against water shortage (high LMA, leaf longevity, and lignin concentration, and low N concentration) have lower leaf production, duration of the leafing period, and inter-annual variation of leafing than species with the opposite traits. We observed two distinctive leafing patterns each related to one genus. Chuquiraga species produced new leaves concentrated in a massive short leafing event (5-48 days) while new leaves of Larrea species emerged gradually (128-258 days). Observed leafing patterns were consistent with simultaneous and successive leafing types previously described for woody plants. The peak of leaf production occurred earlier in Chuquiraga species (mid September) than in Larrea species (mid October-late November). Moreover, Chuquiraga species displayed leaves with the longest leaf lifespan, while leaves of Larrea species had the lowest LMA and the highest N and soluble phenolics concentrations. We also observed that only the leaf production of Larrea species increased in humid years. We concluded that co-occurring evergreen species in the Patagonian Monte displayed different leafing patterns, which were associated with some relevant leaf traits acting as plant defenses against water stress and herbivores. Differences in leafing patterns could provide evidence of ecological differentiation among coexisting species of the same life form.

  15. Leaf area dynamics of conifer forests

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, H.; Oren, R.; Whitehead, D.; Kaufmann, M.R.

    1995-07-01

    Estimating the surface area of foliage supported by a coniferous forest canopy is critical for modeling its biological properties. Leaf area represents the surface area available for the interception of energy, the absorption of carbon dioxide, and the diffusion of water from the leaf to the atmosphere. The concept of leaf area is pertinent to the physiological and ecological dynamics of conifers at a wide range of spatial scales, from individual leaves to entire biomes. In fact, the leaf area of vegetation at a global level can be thought of as a carbon-absorbing, water-emitting membrane of variable thickness, which can have an important influence on the dynamics and chemistry of the Earth`s atmosphere over both the short and the long term. Unless otherwise specified, references to leaf area herein refer to projected leaf area, i.e., the vertical projection of needles placed on a flat plane. Total leaf surface area is generally from 2.0 to 3.14 times that of projected leaf area for conifers. It has recently been suggested that hemisurface leaf area, i.e., one-half of the total surface area of a leaf, a more useful basis for expressing leaf area than is projected area. This chapter is concerned with the dynamics of coniferous forest leaf area at different spatial and temporal scales. In the first part, we consider various hypotheses related to the control of leaf area development, ranging from simple allometric relations with tree size to more complex mechanistic models that consider the movement of water and nutrients to tree canopies. In the second part, we consider various aspects of leaf area dynamics at varying spatial and temporal scales, including responses to perturbation, seasonal dynamics, genetic variation in crown architecture, the responses to silvicultural treatments, the causes and consequences of senescence, and the direct measurement of coniferous leaf area at large spatial scales using remote sensing.

  16. SPAD-based leaf nitrogen estimation is impacted by environmental factors and crop leaf characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Dongliang; Chen, Jia; Yu, Tingting; Gao, Wanlin; Ling, Xiaoxia; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll meters are widely used to guide nitrogen (N) management by monitoring leaf N status in agricultural systems, but the effects of environmental factors and leaf characteristics on leaf N estimations are still unclear. In the present study, we estimated the relationships among SPAD readings, chlorophyll content and leaf N content per leaf area for seven species grown in multiple environments. There were similar relationships between SPAD readings and chlorophyll content per leaf area for the species groups, but the relationship between chlorophyll content and leaf N content per leaf area, and the relationship between SPAD readings and leaf N content per leaf area varied widely among the species groups. A significant impact of light-dependent chloroplast movement on SPAD readings was observed under low leaf N supplementation in both rice and soybean but not under high N supplementation. Furthermore, the allocation of leaf N to chlorophyll was strongly influenced by short-term changes in growth light. We demonstrate that the relationship between SPAD readings and leaf N content per leaf area is profoundly affected by environmental factors and leaf features of crop species, which should be accounted for when using a chlorophyll meter to guide N management in agricultural systems. PMID:26303807

  17. Isolation of Mesophyll Cells and Bundle Sheath Cells from Digitaria sanguinalis (L.) Scop. Leaves and a Scanning Microscopy Study of the Internal Leaf Cell Morphology 1

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Gerald E.; Black, Clanton C.

    1971-01-01

    A technique is described for the separation of mesophyll and bundle sheath cells from Digitaria sanguinalis leaves and evidence for separation is given with light and scanning electron micrographs. Gentle grinding of fully differentiated leaves in a mortar releases mesophyll cells which are isolated on nylon nets by filtration. More extensive grinding of the remaining tissue yields bundle sheath strands which are isolated by filtration with stainless steel sieves and nylon nets. Further grinding of bundle sheath strands in a tissue homogenizer releases bundle sheath cells which are collected on nylon nets. Percentage of purity derived from cell counts and yield data on a chlorophyll basis are given. The internal leaf cell morphology is presented in scanning electron micrographs and compared with light micrographs of fully-differentiated D. sanguinalis leaves. In leaves of plants which possess the C4-dicarboxylic acid cycle of photosynthesis, the relationship of leaf morphology to photosynthesis in mesophyll and bundle sheath cells is considered, and the hypothesis is presented that as atmospheric CO2 enters a leaf about 85% is fixed by the C4-dicarboxylic acid cycle in the mesophyll cells and 10 to 15% is fixed by the reductive pentose phosphate cycle in the bundle sheath cells. A technique also is given for the isolation of mesophyll cells from spinach leaves. Images PMID:16657571

  18. Use of graphitic carbon black and primary secondary amine for determination of 17 organophosphorus pesticide residues in spinach.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Li, Wei; Ge, Jing; Wu, Yijun; Jiang, Shuren; Liu, Fengmao

    2008-10-01

    Graphitized carbon black (GCB) and primary secondary amine (PSA) as dispersive-SPE sorbents were applied to optimize the method for the determination of 17 organophosphorus pesticides in spinach which contained so many pigments using GC with flame photometric detector (FPD). The sample was extracted with ACN, and an aliquot of the extract was concentrated to near dryness. Ethyl acetate or acetone was chosen as the dissolving solvent. Subsequently, dispersive-SPE was used for cleanup, and the type and quantity of sorbents (GCB, PSA and activated carbon) were tested in the experiments. The best results were when acetone was used to dissolve and 30 mg each of GCB and PSA for cleanup. In this condition, recoveries of pesticides analyzed were between 52-117% with RSD below 10%, and LOQ ranged from 10 to 20 microg/kg. This method was simple, effective and efficient, and can protect the GC system to some extent. PMID:18972520

  19. Photosystem II Core Phosphorylation Heterogeneity, Differential Herbicide Binding, and Regulation of Electron Transfer in Photosystem II Preparations from Spinach 1

    PubMed Central

    Giardi, Maria T.; Rigoni, Fernanda; Barbato, Roberto

    1992-01-01

    The effect of photosystem II core phosphorylation on the secondary quinone acceptor of photosystem II (QB) domain environment was analyzed by comparative herbicide-binding studies with photosystem II preparations from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). It was found that phosphorylation reduces the binding affinity for most photosynthetic herbicides. The binding of synthetic quinones and of the electron acceptor 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol is also reduced by photosystem II phosphorylation. Four photosystem II core populations isolated from membranes showed different extents of phosphorylation as well as different degrees of affinity for photosynthetic herbicides. These findings support the idea that heterogeneity of photosystem II observed in vivo could be, in part, due to phosphorylation. Images Figure 1 PMID:16653222

  20. Biochemical and proton NMR characterization of the isolated functional beta-subunit of coupling factor one from spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Roux-Fromy, M.; Neumann, J.M.; Andre, F.; Berger, G.; Girault, G.; Galmiche, J.M.; Remy, R.

    1987-04-29

    Beta subunits have been dissociated from CF1 of spinach chloroplasts, purified by HPLC and characterized by two-dimensional electrophoresis and fluorescence emission. The solutions of isolated beta subunits are able to hydrolyze MgATP; this ATPase activity is an intrinsic property of the beta molecule. From proton NMR at 300 and 500 MHz, it is shown that the preparations are fully reproducible and that beta subunits remain monomeric with 75% aliphatic protons associated with rigid parts of the molecule. The other 25% give rise to separate resonances and belong to mobile side-chains and/or to flexible regions. The measurement of the transverse relaxation times T2 has permitted a detailed characterization of the molecular dynamics of the isolated beta subunits.

  1. Hormonal regulation of leaf senescence in Lilium.

    PubMed

    Arrom, Laia; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2012-10-15

    In addition to floral senescence and longevity, the control of leaf senescence is a major factor determining the quality of several cut flowers, including Lilium, in the commercial market. To better understand the physiological process underlying leaf senescence in this species, we evaluated: (i) endogenous variation in the levels of phytohormones during leaf senescence, (ii) the effects of leaf darkening in senescence and associated changes in phytohormones, and (iii) the effects of spray applications of abscisic acid (ABA) and pyrabactin on leaf senescence. Results showed that while gibberellin 4 (GA(4)) and salicylic acid (SA) contents decreased, that of ABA increased during the progression of leaf senescence. However, dark-induced senescence increased ABA levels, but did not affect GA(4) and SA levels, which appeared to correlate more with changes in air temperature and/or photoperiod than with the induction of leaf senescence. Furthermore, spray applications of pyrabactin delayed the progression of leaf senescence in cut flowers. Thus, we conclude that (i) ABA plays a major role in the regulation of leaf senescence in Lilium, (ii) darkness promotes leaf senescence and increases ABA levels, and (iii) exogenous applications of pyrabactin inhibit leaf senescence in Lilium, therefore suggesting that it acts as an antagonist of ABA in senescing leaves of cut lily flowers. PMID:22854182

  2. Application of Metagenomic Sequencing to Food Safety: Detection of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli on Fresh Bagged Spinach.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Susan R; Mammel, Mark K; Lacher, David W; Elkins, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Culture-independent diagnostics reduce the reliance on traditional (and slower) culture-based methodologies. Here we capitalize on advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) to apply this approach to food pathogen detection utilizing NGS as an analytical tool. In this study, spiking spinach with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) following an established FDA culture-based protocol was used in conjunction with shotgun metagenomic sequencing to determine the limits of detection, sensitivity, and specificity levels and to obtain information on the microbiology of the protocol. We show that an expected level of contamination (?10 CFU/100 g) could be adequately detected (including key virulence determinants and strain-level specificity) within 8 h of enrichment at a sequencing depth of 10,000,000 reads. We also rationalize the relative benefit of static versus shaking culture conditions and the addition of selected antimicrobial agents, thereby validating the long-standing culture-based parameters behind such protocols. Moreover, the shotgun metagenomic approach was informative regarding the dynamics of microbial communities during the enrichment process, including initial surveys of the microbial loads associated with bagged spinach; the microbes found included key genera such as Pseudomonas, Pantoea, and Exiguobacterium. Collectively, our metagenomic study highlights and considers various parameters required for transitioning to such sequencing-based diagnostics for food safety and the potential to develop better enrichment processes in a high-throughput manner not previously possible. Future studies will investigate new species-specific DNA signature target regimens, rational design of medium components in concert with judicious use of additives, such as antibiotics, and alterations in the sample processing protocol to enhance detection. PMID:26386062

  3. Knockout of major leaf ferredoxin reveals new redox-regulatory adaptations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Voss, Ingo; Koelmann, Meike; Wojtera, Joanna; Holtgrefe, Simone; Kitzmann, Camillo; Backhausen, Jan E; Scheibe, Renate

    2008-07-01

    Ferredoxins are the major distributors for electrons to the various acceptor systems in plastids. In green tissues, ferredoxins are reduced by photosynthetic electron flow in the light, while in heterotrophic tissues, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced) (NADPH) generated in the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway (OPP) is the reductant. We have used a Ds-T-DNA insertion line of Arabidopsis thaliana for the gene encoding the major leaf ferredoxin (Fd2, At1g60950) to create a situation of high electron pressure in the thylakoids. Although these plants (Fd2-KO) possess only the minor fraction of leaf Fd1 (At1g10960), they grow photoautotrophically on soil, but with a lower growth rate and less chlorophyll. The more oxidized conditions in the stroma due to the formation of reactive oxygen species are causing a re-adjustment of the redox state in these plants that helps them to survive even under high light. Redox homeostasis is achieved by regulation at both, the post-translational and the transcriptional level. Over-reduction of the electron transport chain leads to increased transcription of the malate-valve enzyme NADP-malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and the oxidized stroma leads to an increased transcription of the OPP enzyme glucose-6-P dehydrogenase. In isolated spinach chloroplasts, oxidized conditions give rise to a decreased activation state of NADP-MDH and an activation of glucose-6-P dehydrogenase even in the light. In Fd2-KO plants, NADPH-requiring antioxidant systems are upregulated. These adjustments must be caused by plastid signals, and they prevent oxidative damage under rather severe conditions. PMID:18494733

  4. The relationship of leaf photosynthetic traits – Vcmax and Jmax – to leaf nitrogen, leaf phosphorus, and specific leaf area: a meta-analysis and modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Anthony P; Beckerman, Andrew P; Gu, Lianhong; Kattge, Jens; Cernusak, Lucas A; Domingues, Tomas F; Scales, Joanna C; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Wullschleger, Stan D; Woodward, F Ian

    2014-01-01

    Great uncertainty exists in the global exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. An important source of this uncertainty lies in the dependency of photosynthesis on the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax) and the maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax). Understanding and making accurate prediction of C fluxes thus requires accurate characterization of these rates and their relationship with plant nutrient status over large geographic scales. Plant nutrient status is indicated by the traits: leaf nitrogen (N), leaf phosphorus (P), and specific leaf area (SLA). Correlations between Vcmax and Jmax and leaf nitrogen (N) are typically derived from local to global scales, while correlations with leaf phosphorus (P) and specific leaf area (SLA) have typically been derived at a local scale. Thus, there is no global-scale relationship between Vcmax and Jmax and P or SLA limiting the ability of global-scale carbon flux models do not account for P or SLA. We gathered published data from 24 studies to reveal global relationships of Vcmax and Jmax with leaf N, P, and SLA. Vcmax was strongly related to leaf N, and increasing leaf P substantially increased the sensitivity of Vcmax to leaf N. Jmax was strongly related to Vcmax, and neither leaf N, P, or SLA had a substantial impact on the relationship. Although more data are needed to expand the applicability of the relationship, we show leaf P is a globally important determinant of photosynthetic rates. In a model of photosynthesis, we showed that at high leaf N (3 gm?2), increasing leaf P from 0.05 to 0.22 gm?2 nearly doubled assimilation rates. Finally, we show that plants may employ a conservative strategy of Jmax to Vcmax coordination that restricts photoinhibition when carboxylation is limiting at the expense of maximizing photosynthetic rates when light is limiting. PMID:25473475

  5. Leaf hydraulic conductance is coordinated with leaf morpho-anatomical traits and nitrogen status in the genus Oryza

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Dongliang; Yu, Tingting; Zhang, Tong; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang

    2015-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (K leaf) is a major determinant of photosynthetic rate in plants. Previous work has assessed the relationships between leaf morpho-anatomical traits and K leaf with woody species, but there has been very little focus on cereal crops. The genus Oryza, which includes rice (Oryza sativa) and wild species (such as O. rufipogon cv. Griff), is ideal material for identifying leaf features associated with K leaf and gas exchange. Leaf morpho-anatomical traits, K leaf, leaf N content per leaf area, and CO2 diffusion efficiency were investigated in 11 Oryza cultivars. K leaf was positively correlated with leaf thickness and related traits, and therefore positively correlated with leaf mass per area and leaf N content per leaf area, and negatively with inter-veinal distance. K leaf was also positively correlated with leaf area and its related traits, and therefore negatively correlated with the proportion of minor vein length per area. In addition, coordination between K leaf and CO2 diffusion conductance in leaves was observed. We conclude that leaf morpho-anatomical traits and N content per leaf area strongly influence K leaf. Our results suggest that more detailed anatomical and structural studies are needed to elucidate the impacts of leaf feature traits on K leaf and gas exchange in grasses. PMID:25429002

  6. Leaf Isoprene Emission Rate Is Dependent on Leaf Development and the Level of Isoprene Synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, J.; Fall, R.

    1993-01-01

    Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a major volatile hydrocarbon produced by many plant species. Here we report that in velvet bean (Mucuna sp.), isoprene emission is strongly dependent on leaf developmental state and that changes in extractable isoprene synthase activity parallel isoprene emission rates during leaf development. Both leaf emission and enzyme activity exhibit over 100-fold increases from leaf emergence to leaf age 14 d and exhibit similar patterns to 23 d. This suggests that the enzyme, isoprene synthase, is responsible for the in vivo production of isoprene and that the level of the enzyme regulates the pattern of isoprene emission in response to leaf development. PMID:12231698

  7. Inactivation of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum and spinach with the new affinity label 2-bromo-1,5-dihydroxy-3-pentanone 1,5-bisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M.I.; Hartman, F.C.

    1981-11-16

    In an attempt to identify the active-site base believed to initiate catalysis by ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase, we have synthesized 2-bromo-1, 5-dihydroxy-3-pentanone 1,5-bisphosphate, a reactive analogue of a postulated intermediate of carboxylation. Although highly unstable, this compound can be shown to inactivate the carboxylases from both Rhodospirillum rubrum and spinach rapidly and irreversibly. Inactivation follows pseudo first-order kinetics, shows rate saturation and is greatly reduced by saturating amounts of the competitive inhibitor, 2-carboxyribitol 1,5-bisphosphate. The incorporation of reagent, quantified by reducing the modified carboxylases with (/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/, shows that inactivation results from the modification of approximately one residue per catalytic subunit of the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and less than one residue per protomeric unit of the spinach enzyme.

  8. Reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Fresh Spinach, using lactic acid bacteria and chlorine as a multihurdle intervention.

    PubMed

    Gragg, S E; Brashears, M M

    2010-02-01

    A 12-day shelf life study was conducted at 7 degrees C to determine whether Escherichia coli O157:H7 on spinach can be controlled effectively by selected strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) alone or in combination with chlorine as a multihurdle intervention. The multihurdle intervention consisted of both LAB and chlorine and was applied to spinach as a rinse and evaluated in comparison to LAB alone and chlorine and water rinses. Reductions achieved by all treatments also were compared with those observed for an inoculated control. The spinach was inoculated by submersion in a solution containing an E. coli O157:H7 cocktail at 1.0 x 10(6) CFU/ml. LAB were applied postharvest at a concentration of 2.0 x 10(8) CFU/ml, and 200 ppm of chlorine was used for the chlorine rinse. All spinach samples were packaged in commercial packaging, held in a retail display case, and tested for E. coli O157:H7 on days 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 using the Neo-Grid filtration system and CHROMagar. Survival of LAB throughout the shelf life also was determined. Significant reductions in pathogen populations were achieved by water (P = 0.0008), LAB (P < 0.0001), chlorine (P < 0.0001), and multihurdle (P < 0.0001) treatments when compared with controls. The multihurdle treatment produced the greatest reduction from control populations, a reduction of 1.91 log CFU/ml. This reduction was significantly greater than that achieved with water (P < 0.0001), LAB (P = 0.0025), and chlorine (P < 0.0001) alone, indicating that the application of chlorine and LAB is most effective as a combination treatment. The results obtained from this study indicate that the industry standard chlorine wash may be more effective when applied in combination with LAB. PMID:20132683

  9. Glutathione reductase: Comparison of steady-state and rapid reaction primary kinetic isotope effects exhibited by the yeast, spinach, and Escherichia coli enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Vanoni, M.A.; Wong, K.K.; Ballou, D.P.; Blanchard, J.S. )

    1990-06-19

    Kinetic parameters for NADPH and NADH have been determined at pH 8.1 for spinach, yeast, and E. coli glutathione reductases. NADPH exhibited low Km values for all enzymes (3-6 microM), while the Km values for NADH were 100 times higher (approximately 400 microM). Under our experimental conditions, the percentage of maximal velocities with NADH versus those measured with NADPH were 18.4, 3.7, and 0.13% for the spinach, yeast, and E. coli enzymes, respectively. Primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects were independent of GSSG concentration between Km and 15Km levels, supporting a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. For each of the three enzymes, NADPH yielded primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on Vmax only, while NADH exhibited primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on both V and V/K. The magnitude of DV/KNADH at pH 8.1 is 4.3 for the spinach enzyme, 2.7 for the yeast enzyme, and 1.6 for the E. coli glutathione reductase. The experimentally determined values of TV/KNADH of 7.4, 4.2, and 2.2 for the spinach, yeast, and E. coli glutathione reductases agree well with those calculated from the corresponding DV/KNADH using the Swain-Schaad expression. This suggests that the intrinsic primary kinetic isotope effect on NADH oxidation is fully expressed. In order to confirm this conclusion, single-turnover experiments have been performed. The measured primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on the enzyme reduction half-reaction using NADH match those measured in the steady state for each of the three glutathione reductases.

  10. Global variability in leaf respiration in relation to climate, plant functional types and leaf traits

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    Global variability in leaf respiration in relation to climate, plant functional types and leaf,30 , Ulo Niinemets31 , Odhran S. O'Sullivan2 , Oliver L. Phillips16 , Lourens Poorter32 , Pieter Poot21 , I

  11. Antioxidant assays - consistent findings from FRAP and ORAC reveal a negative impact of organic cultivation on antioxidant potential in spinach but not watercress or rocket leaves.

    PubMed

    Payne, Adrienne C; Mazzer, Alice; Clarkson, Graham J J; Taylor, Gail

    2013-11-01

    Watercress (Rorippa nasturtium-aquaticum), wild rocket (Diplotaxis tenuifolia), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) are commercial crops reported to have high concentrations of antioxidants, possibly contributing to disease prevention following human consumption. Following analysis of supermarket-purchased salad leaves, we report the antioxidant content potential of these species using two comparable techniques assessing the consistency between the assays - by the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. The leaves were harvested from both conventionally and organically managed crops, to investigate whether organic agriculture results in improved crop quality. Watercress had the highest FRAP and ability to scavenge free radicals, followed by spinach and rocket. For watercress and rocket, there was no significant effect of organic agriculture on FRAP and ORAC, but for spinach, the antioxidant potential was reduced and this was significant at the 5% level of probability for FRAP but not ORAC, although the trend was clear in both tests. We conclude that there is variation in salad crop antioxidant potential and that FRAP and ORAC are useful techniques for measuring antioxidants in these salad crops with similar ranking for each salad crop studied. PMID:24804054

  12. D-Glucosone and L-sorbosone, putative intermediates of L-ascorbic acid biosynthesis in detached bean and spinach leaves. [Phaseolus vulgaris L. ; Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kazumi; Nick, J.A.; Loewus, F.A. )

    1990-11-01

    D-(6-{sup 14}C)Glucosone that had been prepared enzymically from D-(6-{sup 14}C)glucose was used to compare relative efficiencies of these two sugars for L-ascorbic acid (AA) biosynthesis in detached bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cv California small white) apices and 4-week-old spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., cv Giant Noble) leaves. At tracer concentration, {sup 14}C from glucosone was utilized by spinach leaves for AA biosynthesis much more effectively than glucose. Carbon-14 from (6-{sup 14}C)glucose underwent considerable redistribution during AA formation, whereas {sup 14}C from (6-{sup 14}C)glucosone remained almost totally in carbon 6 of AA. In other experiments with spinach leaves, L-(U-{sup 14}C)sorbosone was found to be equivalent to (6-{sup 14}C)glucose as a source of {sup 14}C for AA. In the presence of 0.1% D-glucosone, conversion of (6-{sup 14}C) glucose into labeled AA was greatly repressed. In a comparable experiment with L-sorbosone replacing D-glucosone, the effect was much less. The experiments described here give substance to the proposal that D-glucosone and L-sorbosone are putative intermediates in the conversion of D-glucose to AA in higher plants.

  13. 7 CFR 28.465 - Leaf Grade 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade 5. 28.465 Section 28.465 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.465 Leaf Grade 5. Leaf Grade 5 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  14. 7 CFR 28.462 - Leaf Grade 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade 2. 28.462 Section 28.462 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.462 Leaf Grade 2. Leaf Grade 2 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  15. 7 CFR 28.464 - Leaf Grade 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 4. 28.464 Section 28.464 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.464 Leaf Grade 4. Leaf Grade 4 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  16. 7 CFR 28.461 - Leaf Grade 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade 1. 28.461 Section 28.461 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.461 Leaf Grade 1. Leaf Grade 1 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  17. 7 CFR 28.463 - Leaf Grade 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade 3. 28.463 Section 28.463 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.463 Leaf Grade 3. Leaf Grade 3 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  18. 7 CFR 28.466 - Leaf Grade 6.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade 6. 28.466 Section 28.466 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.466 Leaf Grade 6. Leaf Grade 6 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  19. 7 CFR 28.466 - Leaf Grade 6.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 6. 28.466 Section 28.466 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.466 Leaf Grade 6. Leaf Grade 6 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  20. 7 CFR 28.467 - Leaf Grade 7.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 7. 28.467 Section 28.467 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.467 Leaf Grade 7. Leaf Grade 7 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  1. 7 CFR 28.462 - Leaf Grade 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 2. 28.462 Section 28.462 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.462 Leaf Grade 2. Leaf Grade 2 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  2. 7 CFR 28.461 - Leaf Grade 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 1. 28.461 Section 28.461 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.461 Leaf Grade 1. Leaf Grade 1 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  3. 7 CFR 28.464 - Leaf Grade 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade 4. 28.464 Section 28.464 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.464 Leaf Grade 4. Leaf Grade 4 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  4. 7 CFR 28.465 - Leaf Grade 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 5. 28.465 Section 28.465 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.465 Leaf Grade 5. Leaf Grade 5 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  5. 7 CFR 28.467 - Leaf Grade 7.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade 7. 28.467 Section 28.467 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.467 Leaf Grade 7. Leaf Grade 7 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  6. 7 CFR 28.463 - Leaf Grade 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 3. 28.463 Section 28.463 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.463 Leaf Grade 3. Leaf Grade 3 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  7. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  8. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  9. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  10. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  11. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  12. 7 CFR 28.465 - Leaf Grade 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 5. 28.465 Section 28.465 Agriculture...Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.465 Leaf Grade 5. Leaf Grade 5 is leaf which is...

  13. 7 CFR 28.463 - Leaf Grade 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 3. 28.463 Section 28.463 Agriculture...Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.463 Leaf Grade 3. Leaf Grade 3 is leaf which is...

  14. 7 CFR 28.464 - Leaf Grade 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 4. 28.464 Section 28.464 Agriculture...Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.464 Leaf Grade 4. Leaf Grade 4 is leaf which is...

  15. 7 CFR 28.461 - Leaf Grade 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 1. 28.461 Section 28.461 Agriculture...Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.461 Leaf Grade 1. Leaf Grade 1 is leaf which is...

  16. 7 CFR 28.467 - Leaf Grade 7.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 7. 28.467 Section 28.467 Agriculture...Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.467 Leaf Grade 7. Leaf Grade 7 is leaf which...

  17. 7 CFR 28.462 - Leaf Grade 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 2. 28.462 Section 28.462 Agriculture...Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.462 Leaf Grade 2. Leaf Grade 2 is leaf which is...

  18. 7 CFR 28.466 - Leaf Grade 6.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 6. 28.466 Section 28.466 Agriculture...Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.466 Leaf Grade 6. Leaf Grade 6 is leaf which is...

  19. Compound leaf development in model plant species.

    PubMed

    Bar, Maya; Ori, Naomi

    2015-02-01

    Plant leaves develop in accordance with a common basic program, which is flexibly adjusted to the species, developmental stage and environment. Two key stages of leaf development are morphogenesis and differentiation. In the case of compound leaves, the morphogenesis stage is prolonged as compared to simple leaves, allowing for the initiation of leaflets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of how plant hormones and transcriptional regulators modulate compound leaf development, yielding a substantial diversity of leaf forms, focusing on four model compound leaf organisms: cardamine (Cardamine hirsuta), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), medicago (Medicago truncatula) and pea (Pisum sativum). PMID:25449728

  20. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  1. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  2. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  3. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  4. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  5. Transcriptional networks in leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Schippers, Jos Hm

    2015-10-01

    Plant senescence is a natural phenomenon known for the appearance of beautiful autumn colors and the ripening of cereals in the field. Senescence is a controlled process that plants utilize to remobilize nutrients from source leaves to developing tissues. While during the past decades, molecular components underlying the onset of senescence have been intensively studied, knowledge remains scarce on the age-dependent mechanisms that control the onset of senescence. Recent advances have uncovered transcriptional networks regulating the competence to senesce. Here, gene regulatory networks acting as internal timing mechanisms for the onset of senescence are highlighted, illustrating that early and late leaf developmental phases are highly connected. PMID:26190740

  6. Leaf wax n-alkane ?D values reflect the evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmen, A.; Arndt, S. K.; Cernusak, L. A.; Hoffmann, B.; Schefuss, E.; West, J. B.; Sachse, D.

    2011-12-01

    Leaf wax n-alkanes are long-chained lipids that are vital components of plant cuticles. What makes leaf wax n-alkanes unique is that their stable hydrogen isotope composition (?D) contains ecohydrological information that can persist over millions of years. With these exceptional properties, leaf wax n-alkanes and their ?D values are now being celebrated as the much-needed ecohydrological proxy that could provide new ecohydrological information across spatial and temporal scales that range from leaves to biomes and from weeks to millions of years. Critical mechanisms that determine the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes are, however, not understood. The exact type of hydrological information that is recorded in the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes remains therefore unclear and prevents the robust application of this promising new proxy. In particular the influence of leaf water evaporative deuterium enrichment on the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes has not been resolved. Here we present a study where we test if and to what degree leaf water evaporative enrichment influences the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes. Based on modeling exercises, experimental data and observational investigations we show that deuterium enriched leaf water has a critically important influence on the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes. This finding has important implications for the interpretation of leaf wax n-alkane ?D values as it indicates that leaf wax n-alkanes ?D values do not simply reflect the ?D values of precipitation as has previously assumed. Instead our data show that the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes reflect deuterium enriched leaf water and reflect therefore a plant-shaped signal such as evapotranspiration.

  7. “Breath figures” on leaf surfaces—formation and effects of microscopic leaf wetness

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, Juergen; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    “Microscopic leaf wetness” means minute amounts of persistent liquid water on leaf surfaces which are invisible to the naked eye. The water is mainly maintained by transpired water vapor condensing onto the leaf surface and to attached leaf surface particles. With an estimated average thickness of less than 1 ?m, microscopic leaf wetness is about two orders of magnitude thinner than morning dewfall. The most important physical processes which reduce the saturation vapor pressure and promote condensation are cuticular absorption and the deliquescence of hygroscopic leaf surface particles. Deliquescent salts form highly concentrated solutions. Depending on the type and concentration of the dissolved ions, the physicochemical properties of microscopic leaf wetness can be considerably different from those of pure water. Microscopic leaf wetness can form continuous thin layers on hydrophobic leaf surfaces and in specific cases can act similar to surfactants, enabling a strong potential influence on the foliar exchange of ions. Microscopic leaf wetness can also enhance the dissolution, the emission, and the reaction of specific atmospheric trace gases e.g., ammonia, SO2, or ozone, leading to a strong potential role for microscopic leaf wetness in plant/atmosphere interaction. Due to its difficult detection, there is little knowledge about the occurrence and the properties of microscopic leaf wetness. However, based on the existing evidence and on physicochemical reasoning it can be hypothesized that microscopic leaf wetness occurs on almost any plant worldwide and often permanently, and that it significantly influences the exchange processes of the leaf surface with its neighboring compartments, i.e., the plant interior and the atmosphere. The omission of microscopic water in general leaf wetness concepts has caused far-reaching, misleading conclusions in the past. PMID:24167510

  8. Wind-induced leaf transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng-Wei; Chu, Chia-Ren; Hsieh, Cheng-I.; Palmroth, Sari; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2015-12-01

    While the significance of leaf transpiration (fe) on carbon and water cycling is rarely disputed, conflicting evidence has been reported on how increasing mean wind speed (U) impacts fe from leaves. Here, conditions promoting enhancement or suppression of fe with increasing U for a wide range of environmental conditions are explored numerically using leaf-level gas exchange theories that combine a stomatal conductance model based on optimal water use strategies (maximizing the 'net' carbon gain at a given fe), energy balance considerations, and biochemical demand for CO2. The analysis showed monotonic increases in fe with increasing U at low light levels. However, a decline in modeled fe with increasing U were predicted at high light levels but only in certain instances. The dominant mechanism explaining this decline in modeled fe with increasing U is a shift from evaporative cooling to surface heating at high light levels. New and published sap flow measurements for potted Pachira macrocarpa and Messerschmidia argentea plants conducted in a wind tunnel across a wide range of U (2 - 8 m s-1) and two different soil moisture conditions were also employed to assess how fe varies with increasing U. The radiative forcing imposed in the wind tunnel was only restricted to the lower end of expected field conditions. At this low light regime, the findings from the wind tunnel experiments were consistent with the predicted trends.

  9. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.1163 Smoking Leaf (H Group...characteristic of very ripe leaf tobacco. Grades, Grade...and Tolerances H3F—Good Quality Orange Smoking Leaf...

  10. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.1163 Smoking Leaf (H Group...characteristic of very ripe leaf tobacco. Grades, Grade...and Tolerances H3F—Good Quality Orange Smoking Leaf...

  11. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.1163 Smoking Leaf (H Group...characteristic of very ripe leaf tobacco. Grades, Grade...and Tolerances H3F—Good Quality Orange Smoking Leaf...

  12. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.1163 Smoking Leaf (H Group...characteristic of very ripe leaf tobacco. Grades, Grade...and Tolerances H3F—Good Quality Orange Smoking Leaf...

  13. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.1163 Smoking Leaf (H Group...characteristic of very ripe leaf tobacco. Grades, Grade...and Tolerances H3F—Good Quality Orange Smoking Leaf...

  14. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471 Agriculture...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade...

  15. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471 Agriculture...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade...

  16. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471 Agriculture...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade...

  17. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471 Agriculture...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade...

  18. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471 Agriculture...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade...

  19. 7 CFR 29.2437 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, firm, oily, semielastic, normal...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil,...

  20. 7 CFR 29.2437 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, firm, oily, semielastic, normal...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil,...

  1. 7 CFR 29.2663 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Low Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Fair Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil,...

  2. 7 CFR 29.2663 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Low Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Fair Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil,...

  3. 7 CFR 29.2663 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Low Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Fair Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil,...

  4. 7 CFR 29.2662 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Heavy Leaf. Medium to heavy body, mature, close, lean in oil,...

  5. 7 CFR 29.2663 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Low Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Fair Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil,...

  6. 7 CFR 29.2663 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Low Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Fair Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil,...

  7. 7 CFR 29.2662 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Heavy Leaf. Medium to heavy body, mature, close, lean in oil,...

  8. 7 CFR 29.2662 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Heavy Leaf. Medium to heavy body, mature, close, lean in oil,...

  9. 7 CFR 29.2437 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, firm, oily, semielastic, normal...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil,...

  10. 7 CFR 29.2662 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic...Heavy Leaf. Medium to heavy body, mature, close, lean in oil,...

  11. 7 CFR 29.1029 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.1029 Section 29.1029 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1029 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of stemmed and unstemmed tobacco....

  12. 7 CFR 29.1029 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.1029 Section 29.1029 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1029 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of stemmed and unstemmed tobacco....

  13. 7 CFR 29.2277 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2277 Section 29.2277 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and...

  14. 7 CFR 29.1029 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.1029 Section 29.1029 Agriculture Regulations...Types 11, 12, 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1029 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of stemmed and unstemmed tobacco....

  15. Leaf Histology--Two Modern Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Two methods for examining leaf structure are presented; both methods involve use of "superglue." The first method uses the glue to form a thin, permanent, direct replica of a leaf surface on a microscope slide. The second method uses the glue to examine the three-dimensional structure of spongy mesophyll. (JN)

  16. Leaf litter decomposition in three Adirondack lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Quinby, H.L.; Hendrey, G.R.; Hoogendyk, C.G.

    1983-04-01

    Decomposition of terrestrial leaf litter in three Adirondack lakes with water pH values approximately 5, 6, and 7 was studied. Litter bags containing leaves of American beech, sugar maple, red maple, leather leaf, and red spruce were placed in the lakes. Samples were removed periodically over a 3-year period and analyzed for loss in weight, changes in leaf surface area, carbon, nitrogen, and bacterial populations. The rate of decomposition of litter depended on the leaf species tested as well as on the lake water in which they were incubated. Of the five leaf species tested, red maple decomposed much faster and red spruce more slowly, i.e., red maple > sugar maple > beech > leather leaf > red spruce. Further, the data indicated that the rate of decomposition of the leaves differed among the lakes in the order Woods (pH approx. 5) < Sagamore (pH approx. 6) < Panther (pH approx. 7), and that the microbial colonization of some leaf species was affected. Accumulations of leaf litter in acid lakes due to reduction in microbial decomposition may affect nutrient recycling in lake ecosystems. 8 references, 4 tables.

  17. EFFECTS OF DEOXYNIVALENOL ON BARLEY LEAF PIGMENTATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a first step in characterizing the role deoxynivalenol (DON) plays in pathogenesis of Fusarium graminearum in leaf and head tissues, we treated detached barley leaf tissues with DON and examined them daily for signs of injury or other alterations. As shown here, DON had pronounced and unexpected ...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is affected to some extent by the size and shrinkage of the veins or fibers. (See Elements of quality.) [24 FR 8771, Oct. 29, 1959. Redesignated at 49 FR 16758,...

  19. The Use of Contact Mode Atomic Force Microscopy in Aqueous Medium for Structural Analysis of Spinach Photosynthetic Complexes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Phuthong, Witchukorn; Huang, Zubin; Wittkopp, Tyler M.; Sznee, Kinga; Heinnickel, Mark L.; Dekker, Jan P.; Frese, Raoul N.; Prinz, Fritz B.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the dynamics of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in vascular plants at high resolution in an aqueous environment, membrane-protruding oxygen-evolving complexes (OECs) associated with photosystem II (PSII) on spinach (Spinacia oleracea) grana membranes were examined using contact mode atomic force microscopy. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first use of atomic force microscopy to distinguish the putative large extrinsic loop of Photosystem II CP47 reaction center protein (CP47) from the putative oxygen-evolving enhancer proteins 1, 2, and 3 (PsbO, PsbP, and PsbQ) and large extrinsic loop of Photosystem II CP43 reaction center protein (CP43) in the PSII-OEC extrinsic domains of grana membranes under conditions resulting in the disordered arrangement of PSII-OEC particles. Moreover, we observed uncharacterized membrane particles that, based on their physical characteristics and electrophoretic analysis of the polypeptides associated with the grana samples, are hypothesized to be a domain of photosystem I that protrudes from the stromal face of single thylakoid bilayers. Our results are interpreted in the context of the results of others that were obtained using cryo-electron microscopy (and single particle analysis), negative staining and freeze-fracture electron microscopy, as well as previous atomic force microscopy studies. PMID:26220954

  20. Nanodomains of Cytochrome b6f and Photosystem II Complexes in Spinach Grana Thylakoid Membranes[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew P.; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Olsen, John D.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2014-01-01

    The cytochrome b6f (cytb6f) complex plays a central role in photosynthesis, coupling electron transport between photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I to the generation of a transmembrane proton gradient used for the biosynthesis of ATP. Photosynthesis relies on rapid shuttling of electrons by plastoquinone (PQ) molecules between PSII and cytb6f complexes in the lipid phase of the thylakoid membrane. Thus, the relative membrane location of these complexes is crucial, yet remains unknown. Here, we exploit the selective binding of the electron transfer protein plastocyanin (Pc) to the lumenal membrane surface of the cytb6f complex using a Pc-functionalized atomic force microscope (AFM) probe to identify the position of cytb6f complexes in grana thylakoid membranes from spinach (Spinacia oleracea). This affinity-mapping AFM method directly correlates membrane surface topography with Pc-cytb6f interactions, allowing us to construct a map of the grana thylakoid membrane that reveals nanodomains of colocalized PSII and cytb6f complexes. We suggest that the close proximity between PSII and cytb6f complexes integrates solar energy conversion and electron transfer by fostering short-range diffusion of PQ in the protein-crowded thylakoid membrane, thereby optimizing photosynthetic efficiency. PMID:25035407

  1. Basella alba rubra spinach pigment-sensitized TiO2 thin film-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokilamani, N.; Muthukumarasamy, N.; Thambidurai, M.; Ranjitha, A.; Velauthapillai, Dhayalan

    2015-03-01

    Nanocrystalline TiO2 thin films have been prepared by sol-gel dip coating method. The X-ray diffraction results showed that TiO2 thin films annealed at 400, 450 and 500 °C are of anatase phase and the peak corresponding to the (101) plane is present in all the samples. The grain size of TiO2 thin films was found to increase with increasing annealing temperature. The grain size is found to be 20, 25 and 33 nm for the films annealed at 400, 450 and 500 °C. The structure of the TiO2 nanocrystalline thin films have been examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy. TiO2 thin films were sensitized by natural dyes extracted from basella alba rubra spinach. It was found that the absorption peak of basella alba rubra extract is at about 665 nm. The dye-sensitized TiO2-based solar cell sensitized using basella alba rubra exhibited a J sc of 4.35 mA cm-2, V oc of 0.48 V, FF of 0.35 and efficiency of 0.70 %. Natural dyes as sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells are promising because of their environmental friendliness, low-cost production and fully biodegradable.

  2. Derivatives of diterpen labdane-8?,15-diol as photosynthetic inhibitors in spinach chloroplasts and growth plant inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Morales-Flores, Félix; Aguilar, María Isabel; King-Díaz, Beatriz; Lotina-Hennsen, Blas

    2013-08-01

    In a search of new efficient herbicides of natural origin, four derivatives were prepared from labdane-8?,15-diol (1) and 15-O-acetyl-8?-hydroxy labdane (2) isolated from Croton ciliatoglanduliferus. Their inhibitory activity on photosynthetic electron transport on fresh, broken spinach chloroplasts and on the growth of plants were determined. Derivative 15-O-benzoyl-8?-hydroxy labdane (5) was seven times more active than 2 as reaction Hill inhibitor. Complex of 5 with the adjuvant 2-hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin (5:HPB) (200 ?M) was sprayed on Physalys ixocarpa (green tomato) plants; 48 h later the complex inhibited PS II by transforming the active reaction centers to silent reaction centers or "heat sinks". After 72 h this effect disappeared, probably 5:HPB was metabolized by the plant. Chlorophyll a fluorescence of Trifolium alexandrinum (clover) leaves was affected with 5:HPB at the level of PQ pool reduction. 5:HPB decreases the tomato and clover dry-biomass, without affecting Lolium perenne (grass) plants, suggesting that complex 5 acts as selective herbicide for dicotyledonous plants. PMID:23733160

  3. Comparison of the levels of six endogenous gibberellins in roots and shoots of spinach in relation to photoperiod

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, J.D.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1980-10-01

    This communication describes the distribution of gibberellins (GAs) in roots and shoots of spinach in relation to photoperiod. From previous work shoots were known to contain GA/sub 53/, GA/sub 44/, GA/sub 19/, GA/sub 17/, GA/sub 20/, and GA/sub 29/. We now show by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry that roots contain gas chromatography-selected ion current monitoring. Neither GA/sub 17/ nor GA/sub 20/ were detected in root extracts. Analysis by the d-5 corn bioassay also showed no effect of photoperiodic treatment on the levels of GA-like substances in root extracts. Both phloem and xylem exudates had patterns of GA-like activity similar to those found in shoots and roots, respectively. Moreover, foliar application of (/sup 3/H)GA/sub 20/ resulted in the transport of label from the shoot to the roots. Over half of the label in the roots represented unmetabolized (/sup 3/H)GA/sub 20/, indicating that part of the GA/sub 20/ in the phloem is transported to the roots. Consequently, if GA/sub 20/ is made in, or transported to the roots, it is rapidly metabolized in that organ. This is a clear indication that regulation of GA metabolism is greatly different in roots and shoots.

  4. Quantification and source identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediment, soil, and water spinach from Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Boll, Esther S; Christensen, Jan H; Holm, Peter E

    2008-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were quantified in sediment, soil, and plant material from Hanoi, Vietnam, and an aquatic production system in peri-urban Hanoi. The sum of the concentration of 16 US-EPA priority PAHs ( summation PAH16) ranged between 0.44 and 6.21 mg kg(-1) dw in sediment and between 0.26 and 1.35 mg kg(-1) dw in soil, with decreasing concentrations from the urban area to the peri-urban area, indicating contributions from urban and industrial sources. Double plots of diagnostic source ratios indicate that PAHs originate from mixed petrogenic and pyrogenic sources, the latter being predominant. The predominance of low molecular weight (LMW) PAHs in the sediment samples suggests that petrogenic sources are more prevalent in the water environment than in the soil. In contrast, high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs dominated in water spinach which probably reflects the plant's uptake of particle-bound PAHs that originate from pyrogenic sources. PMID:18246221

  5. Rapid, enhanced detection of Salmonella Typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves using micron-scale, phage-coated magnetoelastic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Shin; Vaglenov, Kiril A.; Gerken, Dana M.; Chai, Yating; Park, Mi-Kyung; Li, Suiqiong; Petrenko, Valery A.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2012-05-01

    In order to cost-effectively and rapidly detect bacterial food contamination in the field, the potential usefulness of phage-coated magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors has been recently reported. These biosensors are freestanding, mass-sensitive biosensors that can be easily batch-fabricated, thereby reducing the fabrication cost per sensor to a fraction of a cent. In addition, the biosensors can be directly placed on fresh produce surfaces and used to rapidly monitor possible bacterial food contamination without any preceding sample preparation. Previous investigations showed that the limit of detection (LOD) with millimeter-scale ME biosensors was fairly low for fresh produce with smooth surfaces (e.g., tomatoes and shell eggs). However, the LOD is anticipated to be dependent on the size of the biosensors as well as the topography of produce surfaces of interest. This paper presents an investigation into the use of micron-scale, phage-coated ME biosensors for the enhanced detection of Salmonella Typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves.

  6. The Use of Contact Mode Atomic Force Microscopy in Aqueous Medium for Structural Analysis of Spinach Photosynthetic Complexes.

    PubMed

    Phuthong, Witchukorn; Huang, Zubin; Wittkopp, Tyler M; Sznee, Kinga; Heinnickel, Mark L; Dekker, Jan P; Frese, Raoul N; Prinz, Fritz B; Grossman, Arthur R

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the dynamics of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in vascular plants at high resolution in an aqueous environment, membrane-protruding oxygen-evolving complexes (OECs) associated with photosystem II (PSII) on spinach (Spinacia oleracea) grana membranes were examined using contact mode atomic force microscopy. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first use of atomic force microscopy to distinguish the putative large extrinsic loop of Photosystem II CP47 reaction center protein (CP47) from the putative oxygen-evolving enhancer proteins 1, 2, and 3 (PsbO, PsbP, and PsbQ) and large extrinsic loop of Photosystem II CP43 reaction center protein (CP43) in the PSII-OEC extrinsic domains of grana membranes under conditions resulting in the disordered arrangement of PSII-OEC particles. Moreover, we observed uncharacterized membrane particles that, based on their physical characteristics and electrophoretic analysis of the polypeptides associated with the grana samples, are hypothesized to be a domain of photosystem I that protrudes from the stromal face of single thylakoid bilayers. Our results are interpreted in the context of the results of others that were obtained using cryo-electron microscopy (and single particle analysis), negative staining and freeze-fracture electron microscopy, as well as previous atomic force microscopy studies. PMID:26220954

  7. Translocation of the potato 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase into isolated spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jianmin; Weaver, L.M.; Herrmann, K.M. )

    1990-05-01

    A cDNA for potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase, the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, encodes a 56 KD polypeptide whose amino terminus resembles a chloroplast transit sequence. The cDNA was placed downstream of the phage T7 polymerase recognition sequence in plasmid pGEM-3Z. DNA of the resulting plasmid pGEM-DWZ directed T7 polymerase to synthesize potato DAHP synthase mRNA in vitro. The mRNA was used in wheat germ and rabbit reticulocyte lysates for the synthesis of {sup 35}S-labeled pro-DAHP synthase. The predominant translation product is a 59 KD polypeptide that can be immunoprecipitated by rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against the 53 KD DAHP synthase purified from potato tubers. Isolated spinach chloroplasts process the 59 KD pro-DAHP synthase to a 50 KD polypeptide. The processed polypeptide is protected from protease degradation, suggesting uptake of the enzyme into the cell organelle. Fractionation of reisolated chloroplasts after import of pro-DAHP synthase showed mature enzyme in the stroma. The uptake and processing of DAHP synthase is inhibited by antibodies raised against the mature enzyme. Our results are consistent with the assumption that potato contains a nuclear DNA encoded DAHP synthase that is synthesized as a proenzyme and whose mature form resides in the chloroplasts. Our data provide further evidence that green plants synthesize aromatic amino acids in plastids.

  8. Partial purification of a spinach thylakoid protein kinase that can phosphorylate light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.D.; Hind, G.; Bennett, J.

    1985-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation in plant tissues is particularly marked in chloroplasts, protein kinase activity being associated with the outer envelope, the soluble stromal fraction, and the thylakoid membrane. Furthermore, thylakoid-bound activity probably includes several distinct kinases, as suggested by studies of divalent cation specificity and thermal lability carried out with intact thylakoids and by subfractionation of solubilized membranes. Illumination of thylakoids, particularly with red light, promotes the rapid and extensive phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex (LHCII) on a threonine residue near the amino terminus of the protein. This phosphorylation is thought to be involved in regulating the distribution of absorbed quanta between photosystems II and I and is modulated by the redox state of the thylakoid plastoquinone pool. Neither of the thylakoid kinases reported to date was capable of phosphorylating purified LHCII in vitro or of incorporating phosphate into threonyl residues of exogenous substrates, that some LHCII phosphorylation was catalyzed by a preliminary fraction led workers to suggest that at least one other kinase remained to be isolated. Here, the authors report the solubilization and partial purification of a protein kinase from spinach thylakoids that is capable of phosphorylating LHCII in vitro, and they show that the specific site of phosphorylation is very nearly the same as, if not identical with, the site phosphorylated in organello.

  9. Inferring climate from angiosperm leaf venation networks.

    PubMed

    Blonder, Benjamin; Enquist, Brian J

    2014-10-01

    Leaf venation networks provide an integrative linkage between plant form, function and climate niche, because leaf water transport underlies variation in plant performance. Here, we develop theory based on leaf physiology that uses community-mean vein density to predict growing season temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The key assumption is that leaf water supply is matched to water demand in the local environment. We test model predictions using leaves from 17 temperate and tropical sites that span broad climatic gradients. We find quantitative agreement between predicted and observed climate values. We also highlight additional leaf traits that may improve predictions. Our study provides a novel approach for understanding the functional linkages between functional traits and climate that may improve the reconstruction of paleoclimate from fossil assemblages. PMID:24725225

  10. MOLECULAR PHYLOGENY OF THE SHINING LEAF BEETLES (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE: CRIOCERINAE)

    E-print Network

    Munoz, Sofia Isabel

    2014-05-31

    Shining leaf beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Criocerinae; ~1500 spp) are considered amongst the earliest diverging leaf beetle lineage to attack early angiosperms. Although they are distributed worldwide, little is ...

  11. Physiological, anatomical and leaf hydraulic effects on leaf water ?18O enrichment in different plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmen, A.; Arndt, S. K.; Dawson, T. E.

    2007-12-01

    Stable oxygen isotope ratios (?18O) of plant and source waters are valuable tools in the analysis of water and carbon fluxes at leaf, plant, and ecosystem scales. Recent improvements in mechanistic models have significantly advanced the understanding of isotopic leaf water enrichment, which is an important source of ?18O variability in plants and ecosystems. However, the marked variability in leaf water ?18O values that have been reported for different plant species hampers efforts to interpret and then apply data on leaf water ?18O values for studies conducted at the ecosystem scale. To improve the understanding and application of ?18O values in leaf water, we tested the interplay of physiological, morphological, anatomical and leaf hydraulic properties as drivers of leaf water ?18O values across 17 Eucalyptus species growing in a common garden. We observed large differences in leaf water ?18O across the 17 species. These differences were only partly driven by physiological and leaf morphological differences across species. A sensitivity analysis using state-of-the-art leaf water enrichment models showed that the parameter - effective path length - (L) is of critical importance for the variability of leaf water ?18O across different species. The data show that L can be related to a suite of leaf properties that include physiology, anatomy and hydraulics. Consequently, consideration of leaf properties will significantly improve the interpretation of ?18O values in leaf water across different plant species and will therefore help in the application of ?18O values in carbon and water cycle assessments at both the plant and the ecosystem scale.

  12. Relating Stomatal Conductance to Leaf Functional Traits

    PubMed Central

    Kröber, Wenzel; Plath, Isa; Heklau, Heike; Bruelheide, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Leaf functional traits are important because they reflect physiological functions, such as transpiration and carbon assimilation. In particular, morphological leaf traits have the potential to summarize plants strategies in terms of water use efficiency, growth pattern and nutrient use. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) is a recognized framework in functional plant ecology and reflects a gradient of increasing specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen, phosphorus and cation content, and decreasing leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and carbon nitrogen ratio (CN). The LES describes different strategies ranging from that of short-lived leaves with high photosynthetic capacity per leaf mass to long-lived leaves with low mass-based carbon assimilation rates. However, traits that are not included in the LES might provide additional information on the species' physiology, such as those related to stomatal control. Protocols are presented for a wide range of leaf functional traits, including traits of the LES, but also traits that are independent of the LES. In particular, a new method is introduced that relates the plants’ regulatory behavior in stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit. The resulting parameters of stomatal regulation can then be compared to the LES and other plant functional traits. The results show that functional leaf traits of the LES were also valid predictors for the parameters of stomatal regulation. For example, leaf carbon concentration was positively related to the vapor pressure deficit (vpd) at the point of inflection and the maximum of the conductance-vpd curve. However, traits that are not included in the LES added information in explaining parameters of stomatal control: the vpd at the point of inflection of the conductance-vpd curve was lower for species with higher stomatal density and higher stomatal index. Overall, stomata and vein traits were more powerful predictors for explaining stomatal regulation than traits used in the LES. PMID:26484692

  13. Relating Stomatal Conductance to Leaf Functional Traits.

    PubMed

    Kröber, Wenzel; Plath, Isa; Heklau, Heike; Bruelheide, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Leaf functional traits are important because they reflect physiological functions, such as transpiration and carbon assimilation. In particular, morphological leaf traits have the potential to summarize plants strategies in terms of water use efficiency, growth pattern and nutrient use. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) is a recognized framework in functional plant ecology and reflects a gradient of increasing specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen, phosphorus and cation content, and decreasing leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and carbon nitrogen ratio (CN). The LES describes different strategies ranging from that of short-lived leaves with high photosynthetic capacity per leaf mass to long-lived leaves with low mass-based carbon assimilation rates. However, traits that are not included in the LES might provide additional information on the species' physiology, such as those related to stomatal control. Protocols are presented for a wide range of leaf functional traits, including traits of the LES, but also traits that are independent of the LES. In particular, a new method is introduced that relates the plants' regulatory behavior in stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit. The resulting parameters of stomatal regulation can then be compared to the LES and other plant functional traits. The results show that functional leaf traits of the LES were also valid predictors for the parameters of stomatal regulation. For example, leaf carbon concentration was positively related to the vapor pressure deficit (vpd) at the point of inflection and the maximum of the conductance-vpd curve. However, traits that are not included in the LES added information in explaining parameters of stomatal control: the vpd at the point of inflection of the conductance-vpd curve was lower for species with higher stomatal density and higher stomatal index. Overall, stomata and vein traits were more powerful predictors for explaining stomatal regulation than traits used in the LES. PMID:26484692

  14. A model for leaf initiation

    PubMed Central

    Abraham-Shrauner, Barbara; Pickard, Barbara G

    2011-01-01

    A biophysical model is proposed for how leaf primordia are positioned on the shoot apical
    meristem in both spiral and whorl phyllotaxes. Primordia are initiated by signals that propagate
    in the epidermis in both azimuthal directions away from the cotyledons or the most recently
    specified primordia. The signals are linear waves as inferred from the spatial periodicity of the
    divergence angle and a temporal periodicity. The periods of the waves, which represent actively
    transported auxin, are much smaller than the plastochron interval. Where oppositely directed
    waves meet at one or more angular positions on the periphery of the generative circle, auxin
    concentration builds and as in most models this stimulates local movement of auxin to
    underlying cells, where it promotes polarized cell division and expansion. For higher order
    spirals the wave model requires asymmetric function of auxin transport; that is, opposite wave
    speeds differ. An algorithm for determination of the angular positions of leaves in common leaf
    phyllotaxic configurations is proposed. The number of turns in a pattern repeat, number of leaves
    per level and per pattern repeat, and divergence angle are related to speed of auxin transport and
    radius of the generative circle. The rule for composition of Fibonacci or Lucas numbers
    associated with some phyllotaxes is discussed. A subcellular model suggests how the shoot
    meristem might specify either symmetric or asymmetric transport of auxin away from the
    forming primordia that produce it. Biological tests that could make or break the mathematical
    and molecular hypotheses are proposed. PMID:22212121

  15. An Apparent Anomaly in Peanut Leaf Conductance

    PubMed Central

    Pallas, James E.

    1980-01-01

    Conductance to gaseous transfer is normally considered to be greater from the abaxial than from the adaxial side of a leaf. Measurements of the conductance to water vapor of peanut leaves (Arachis hypogaea L.) under well watered and stress conditions in a controlled environment, however, indicated a 2-fold higher conductance from the adaxial side of the leaf than from the abaxial. Studies of conductance as light level was varied showed an increase in conductance from either surface with increasing light level, but conductance was always greater from the adaxial surface at any given light level. In contrast, measurements of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) and snapbean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaf conductance showed an approximate 2-fold greater conductance from the abaxial surface than from the adaxial. Approximately the same number of stomata were present on both peanut leaf surfaces and stomatal size was similar. Electron microscopic examination of peanut leaves did not reveal any major structural differences between stomata on the two surfaces that would account for the differences in conductance. Light microscope studies of leaf sections revealed an extensive network of bundle sheaths with achloraplastic bundle sheath extensions; the lower epidermis was lined with a single layer of large achloraplastic parenchyma cells. Measurements of net photosynthesis made on upper and lower leaf surfaces collectively and individually indicated that two-thirds of the peanut leaf's total net photosynthesis can be attributed to diffusion of CO2 through the adaxial leaf surface. Possibly the high photosynthetic efficiency of peanut cultivars as compared with certain other C3 species is associated with the greater conductance of CO2 through their upper leaf surfaces. Images PMID:16661294

  16. A climatology of leaf surface wetness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, O.; Milford, C.; Sutton, M. A.; Spindler, G.; van Putten, E.

    The wetness of plant leaf surfaces is an important parameter in the deposition process of atmospheric trace gases. Particularly gases with high water solubility tend to deposit faster to a wet surface, compared to a dry one. Further, drying up of a wet leaf surface may lead to revolatilization of previously deposited gases. Despite the high importance of leaf surface wetness in biosphere/atmosphere exchange, there is no quantitative description of this parameter on the ecosystem scale, quantifying its initiation, duration, dissipation, correlation with parameters such as air humidity, turbulence, vegetation type, plant physiology, and others. This contribution is a first step towards a climatology of leaf surface wetness, based on a large data basis from various ecosystems. Leaf surface wetness was monitored at two grassland and two forest research sites in NW and central Europe throughout the vegetation period of 1998. It was sensed through measurement of the electrical conductivity between two electrodes that were clipped to the living plant leaf surfaces. This yields a relative signal that responds promptly to the presence of leaf wetness. A routine is presented that combines the data from several sensors to the dimensionless leaf wetness, LW, with values between zero and one. Periods of high leaf wetness (LW>0.9) were in most cases triggered by precipitation events. After termination of rain, LW decreased quickly at the forest sites and dropped to values below 0.1 within less than 24 hours in most cases. At the grassland sites, the formation of dew led to a more complex pattern, with the occurrence of diurnal cycles of LW. Although periods of low relative air humidity (e.g., rH<50%) are normally associated with periods of low leaf wetness, the extent of correlation between these two parameters at rH>60% varies between the different sites. The grassland sites show very similar distributions of the LW data with rH, indicating a positive correlation between LW and rH, although there is much scatter in the relationship. One forest site also exhibited a positive correlation, although LW was typically lower for a given rH than at the grassland sites. At another forest site in central mountainous Europe, the correlation between LW and rH was less well established, with low leaf wetness (LW<0.001) occurring within the entire air humidity range 60%leaf wetness should be included in routine measurement programs studying biosphere-atmosphere exchange.

  17. The times they are a-changin': seasonal variations of leaf spectra in relation with leaf biochemical and biophysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Tang, J.; Mustard, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Leaf traits such as chlorophyll concentration, leaf mass per area (LMA), and mesophyll cell area exposed to the internal area space per leaf area (Ames/A) are key biochemical or biophysical properties to understand the vegetation functioning. Measurements of leaf spectra provided a non-destructive way to estimate those parameters. Many studies have linked leaf spectra with some of leaf traits successfully, but the understanding of spectra-traits relationship is still limited in the following aspects: (1) how does the ability of spectra to estimate leaf traits change (or not) throughout the growing season? (2) How to quantify leaf internal structure with leaf spectra? (3) What are the leaf traits that contribute to the structure parameter in leaf reflectance model such as PROSPECT? To answer the questions above, we conducted weekly measurements of leaf spectra, leaf biochemical properties (chlorophyll, carotenoids, water, and total carbon and nitrogen) and biophysical properties (LMA and internal structures) during the growing seasons of year 2011 and 2012. We found that leaf traits express themselves in the leaf spectra at different wavelengths; the relationships between spectra and leaf traits vary throughout the season. Leaf internal structure parameters are mostly related to the near-infrared reflectance. The structure parameter (N) in PROSPECT is related to the Ames/A, LMA, and water content. Our results have broad implications for using hyperspectral imagers/sensors to monitor vegetations that have clear seasonal patterns.

  18. Farm Management, Environment, and Weather Factors Jointly Affect the Probability of Spinach Contamination by Generic Escherichia coli at the Preharvest Stage

    PubMed Central

    Navratil, Sarah; Gregory, Ashley; Bauer, Arin; Srinath, Indumathi; Szonyi, Barbara; Nightingale, Kendra; Anciso, Juan; Jun, Mikyoung; Han, Daikwon; Lawhon, Sara; Ivanek, Renata

    2014-01-01

    The National Resources Information (NRI) databases provide underutilized information on the local farm conditions that may predict microbial contamination of leafy greens at preharvest. Our objective was to identify NRI weather and landscape factors affecting spinach contamination with generic Escherichia coli individually and jointly with farm management and environmental factors. For each of the 955 georeferenced spinach samples (including 63 positive samples) collected between 2010 and 2012 on 12 farms in Colorado and Texas, we extracted variables describing the local weather (ambient temperature, precipitation, and wind speed) and landscape (soil characteristics and proximity to roads and water bodies) from NRI databases. Variables describing farm management and environment were obtained from a survey of the enrolled farms. The variables were evaluated using a mixed-effect logistic regression model with random effects for farm and date. The model identified precipitation as a single NRI predictor of spinach contamination with generic E. coli, indicating that the contamination probability increases with an increasing mean amount of rain (mm) in the past 29 days (odds ratio [OR] = 3.5). The model also identified the farm's hygiene practices as a protective factor (OR = 0.06) and manure application (OR = 52.2) and state (OR = 108.1) as risk factors. In cross-validation, the model showed a solid predictive performance, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 81%. Overall, the findings highlighted the utility of NRI precipitation data in predicting contamination and demonstrated that farm management, environment, and weather factors should be considered jointly in development of good agricultural practices and measures to reduce produce contamination. PMID:24509926

  19. Evaluation of Methane from Sisal Leaf Residue and Palash Leaf Litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arisutha, S.; Baredar, P.; Deshpande, D. M.; Suresh, S.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate methane production from sisal leaf residue and palash leaf litter mixed with different bulky materials such as vegetable market waste, hostel kitchen waste and digested biogas slurry in a laboratory scale anaerobic reactor. The mixture was prepared with 1:1 proportion. Maximum methane content of 320 ml/day was observed in the case of sisal leaf residue mixed with vegetable market waste as the feed. Methane content was minimum (47 ml/day), when palash leaf litter was used as feed. This was due to the increased content of lignin and polyphenol in the feedstock which were of complex structure and did not get degraded directly by microorganisms. Sisal leaf residue mixtures also showed highest content of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) as compared to palash leaf litter mixtures. It was observed that VFA concentration in the digester first increased, reached maximum (when pH was minimum) and then decreased.

  20. Effects of pH and other factors on the phosphate dependence of photosynthesis in spinach chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Huber, S C

    1980-10-01

    Chloroplast stromal volume and pH influenced the phosphate (Pi)-dependence of photosynthesis of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts. Decreasing the sorbitol concentration in the reaction mixture from 0.35 to 0.25 M, or decreasing the external pH from 8.3 to 7.3, extended the induction period of photosynthesis and decreased both the optimal [Pi] and the minimal [Pi] required to inhibit O2 evolution completely. At least part of the effect of external pH was attributable to changes in stromal pH on the basis of effects of NH4Cl and sodium acetate at a constant external pH. When the external pH was increased from 7.3 to 8.3, the stromal pH changed only about 0.6 pH units. Hence, the pH gradient across the envelope was diminished and the efflux of phosphoglycerate relative to dihydroxyacetone phosphate was enhanced.Calvin-cycle activity, varied with light intesity or electron transport inhibitors, affected the rate of photosynthesis but not the induction period or the Pi optimum for photosynthesis. Relatively low Calvin-cycle activity was apparently sufficient to fill metabolite pools and thus terminate the induction period. The results indicate that pH does not affect the Pi dependence of photosynthesis by reducing Calvin-cycle activity. Rather, it is postulated that at low stromal pH, larger metabolic pools are required to maintain maximum rates of photosynthesis because of changes in substrate affinity of some Calvin-cycle enzymes. Consequently, chloroplast photosynthesis would be more sensitive to exogenous Pi. PMID:24306478

  1. Inhibition of Photosynthetic Electron Transport in Isolated Spinach Chloroplasts by Two 1,3,4-Thiadiazolyl Derivatives 1

    PubMed Central

    Hatzios, Kriton K.; Penner, Donald; Bell, Duncan

    1980-01-01

    Buthidazole (3-[5-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl]-4-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-imidazolidinone) and tebuthiuron (N-[5-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl]-N,N?-dimethylurea) are two new promising herbicides for selective weed control in corn (Zea mays L.) and sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.), respectively. The effects of these two compounds on various photochemical reactions of isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts were studied at concentrations of 0, 0.05, 0.5, 5, and 500 micromolar. Buthidazole and tebuthiuron at concentrations higher than 0.5 micromolar inhibited uncoupled electron transport from water to ferricyanide or to methyl viologen very strongly. Photosystem II-mediated transfer of electrons from water to oxidized diamonodurene, with 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone (DBMIB) blocking photosystem I, was inhibited 34 and 37% by buthidazole and tebuthiuron, respectively, at 0.05 micromolar. Inhibition of photosystem I-mediated transfer of electrons from diaminodurene to methyl viologen with 3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) blocking photosystem II was insignificant with either herbicide at all concentrations tested. Transfer of electrons from catechol to methyl viologen in hydroxylamine-washed chloroplasts was inhibited 50 and 47% by buthidazole and tebuthiuron, respectively, at 0.5 micromolar. The data indicate that the inhibition of electron transport by both herbicides is primarily at the reducing side of photosystem II. However, since catechol is an electron donor at the oxidizing side of photosystem II, between water and chlorophyll a680, and lower inhibition levels were observed in the last study (catechol to methyl viologen), it may be that there is also a small inhibition of the mechanism of water oxidation by both herbicides. PMID:16661181

  2. Roles of ATP and NADPH in formation of the Fe-S cluster of spinach ferredoxin. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Akira; Fujita, Yuichi; Matsubara, Hiroshi )

    1991-01-01

    The present study investigated whether ATP and NADPH in the chloroplast system of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) are involved in the supply of ({sup 35}S)sulfide or iron, or in Fe-S cluster formation itself. ({sup 35}S)Sulfide was liberated from ({sup 35}S)cysteine in an NADPH-dependent manner, whereas ATP was not necessary for this process. This desulfhydration of ({sup 35}S)cysteine occurred before the formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster, and the amount of radioactivity in ({sup 35}S)sulfide was greater than that in {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd by a factor of more than 20. Addition of nonradioactive sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) inhibited competitively formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster along with the addition of nonradioactive cysteine, indicating that some of the inorganic sulfide released from cysteine is incorporated into the Fe-S cluster of Fd. ATP hydrolysis was not involved in the production of inorganic sulfide or in the supply of iron for assembly into the Fe-S cluster. However, ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation was observed even in the presence of sufficient amounts of ({sup 35}S)sulfide and iron. These results suggest a novel type of ATP-dependent in vivo Fe-S cluster formation that is distinct from in vitro chemical reconstitution. The implications of these results for the possible mechanisms of ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation are discussed.

  3. Identification of novel QTL for leaf traits in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several leaf traits of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.), including leaf area (LA), leaf shape (LS) and specific leaf weight (SLW) may be related to soybean yield. The objective of this study was to identify novel quantitative trait loci (QTL) for LA, LS and SLW in a recombinant inbred line (RIL) popul...

  4. 7 CFR 28.514 - Leaf Grade No. 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 4. 28.514 Section 28.514 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.514 Leaf Grade No. 4. Leaf grade No. 4 shall be American Pima cotton which...

  5. 7 CFR 28.512 - Leaf Grade No. 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 2. 28.512 Section 28.512 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.512 Leaf Grade No. 2. Leaf grade No. 2 shall be American Pima cotton which...

  6. 7 CFR 28.515 - Leaf Grade No. 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 5. 28.515 Section 28.515 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.515 Leaf Grade No. 5. Leaf grade No. 5 shall be American Pima cotton which...

  7. 7 CFR 28.517 - Leaf Grade No. 7.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 7. 28.517 Section 28.517 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.517 Leaf Grade No. 7. American Pima cotton which in leaf is inferior to...

  8. 7 CFR 28.517 - Leaf Grade No. 7.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 7. 28.517 Section 28.517 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.517 Leaf Grade No. 7. American Pima cotton which in leaf is inferior to...

  9. 7 CFR 28.511 - Leaf Grade No. 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 1. 28.511 Section 28.511 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.511 Leaf Grade No. 1. Leaf grade No. 1 shall be American Pima cotton which...

  10. 7 CFR 30.31 - Classification of leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Classification of leaf tobacco. 30.31 Section 30.31... REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.31 Classification of leaf tobacco. For the purpose of this classification leaf tobacco...

  11. 7 CFR 28.516 - Leaf Grade No. 6.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 6. 28.516 Section 28.516 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.516 Leaf Grade No. 6. Leaf grade No. 6 shall be American Pima cotton which...

  12. 7 CFR 28.512 - Leaf Grade No. 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 2. 28.512 Section 28.512 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.512 Leaf Grade No. 2. Leaf grade No. 2 shall be American Pima cotton which...

  13. 7 CFR 28.515 - Leaf Grade No. 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 5. 28.515 Section 28.515 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.515 Leaf Grade No. 5. Leaf grade No. 5 shall be American Pima cotton which...

  14. 7 CFR 28.516 - Leaf Grade No. 6.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 6. 28.516 Section 28.516 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.516 Leaf Grade No. 6. Leaf grade No. 6 shall be American Pima cotton which...

  15. 7 CFR 28.513 - Leaf Grade No. 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 3. 28.513 Section 28.513 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.513 Leaf Grade No. 3. Leaf grade No. 3 shall be American Pima cotton which...

  16. 7 CFR 28.513 - Leaf Grade No. 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 3. 28.513 Section 28.513 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.513 Leaf Grade No. 3. Leaf grade No. 3 shall be American Pima cotton which...

  17. 7 CFR 28.514 - Leaf Grade No. 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 4. 28.514 Section 28.514 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.514 Leaf Grade No. 4. Leaf grade No. 4 shall be American Pima cotton which...

  18. 7 CFR 28.511 - Leaf Grade No. 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 1. 28.511 Section 28.511 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.511 Leaf Grade No. 1. Leaf grade No. 1 shall be American Pima cotton which...

  19. 7 CFR 30.31 - Classification of leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classification of leaf tobacco. 30.31 Section 30.31... REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.31 Classification of leaf tobacco. For the purpose of this classification leaf tobacco...

  20. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... waste. B4G—Fair Quality Green Leaf Immature, close leaf structure, fleshy, oily, normal width... Quality Green Leaf Immature, tight leaf structure, fleshy, lean in oil, narrow. Uniformity, 70...

  1. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... waste. B4G—Fair Quality Green Leaf Immature, close leaf structure, fleshy, oily, normal width... Quality Green Leaf Immature, tight leaf structure, fleshy, lean in oil, narrow. Uniformity, 70...

  2. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... waste. B4G—Fair Quality Green Leaf Immature, close leaf structure, fleshy, oily, normal width... Quality Green Leaf Immature, tight leaf structure, fleshy, lean in oil, narrow. Uniformity, 70...

  3. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... waste. B4G—Fair Quality Green Leaf Immature, close leaf structure, fleshy, oily, normal width... Quality Green Leaf Immature, tight leaf structure, fleshy, lean in oil, narrow. Uniformity, 70...

  4. 7 CFR 28.515 - Leaf Grade No. 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 5. 28.515 Section 28.515...Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.515 Leaf Grade No. 5. Leaf grade No. 5 shall...

  5. 7 CFR 28.516 - Leaf Grade No. 6.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 6. 28.516 Section 28.516...Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.516 Leaf Grade No. 6. Leaf grade No. 6 shall...

  6. 7 CFR 28.512 - Leaf Grade No. 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 2. 28.512 Section 28.512...Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.512 Leaf Grade No. 2. Leaf grade No. 2 shall...

  7. 7 CFR 28.514 - Leaf Grade No. 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 4. 28.514 Section 28.514...Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.514 Leaf Grade No. 4. Leaf grade No. 4 shall...

  8. 7 CFR 28.513 - Leaf Grade No. 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 3. 28.513 Section 28.513...Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.513 Leaf Grade No. 3. Leaf grade No. 3 shall...

  9. 7 CFR 28.511 - Leaf Grade No. 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade No. 1. 28.511 Section 28.511...Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Pima Cotton § 28.511 Leaf Grade No. 1. Leaf grade No. 1 shall...

  10. Model for the regulation of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf margin development

    E-print Network

    Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    influence leaf shape. Leaf margin morphology is commonly used to distinguish dif- ferent plant species development in the model plant Ara- bidopsis is one such example where the repeated generation of leaf margin and often evolves in close correspon- dence with the environment. For example, the degree of leaf serration

  11. ECOPHYSIOLOGY Genetic variation in leaf pigment, optical and photosynthetic

    E-print Network

    Sack, Lawren

    Leaf morphology and biochemistry often vary in pre- dictable ways across environments, apparently morphological, bio- chemical and physiological properties was expressed in the leaf reflectance an integrated metric of leaf status among and between plant phenotypes. Keywords Light-use efficiency Á Leaf

  12. What Is a Leaf? An Online Tutorial and Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    A leaf is a fundamental unit in botany and understanding what constitutes a leaf is fundamental to many plant science activities. My observations and subsequent testing indicated that many students could not confidently and consistently recognise a leaf from a leaflet, or recognise basic leaf arrangements and the various types of compound or…

  13. Leaf litter ant diversity in Guyana JOHN S. LAPOLLA1,

    E-print Network

    Miller, Scott

    -1 Leaf litter ant diversity in Guyana JOHN S. LAPOLLA1, *, TED SUMAN1 , JEFFREY SOSA-CALVO1 Shield, Leaf litter ants Abstract. Leaf litter ants are an important group of organisms for informing conservation plan- ning. This study presents the beginning of a leaf litter ant dataset for Guyana. Following

  14. Can Leaf Litter from Genetically Modified Trees Affect Aquatic

    E-print Network

    LeRoy, Carri J.

    Can Leaf Litter from Genetically Modified Trees Affect Aquatic Ecosystems? E. Petter Axelsson,1) in Populus sp. affected leaf litter quality, the decomposition of leaf litter, and the assemblages of aquatic insects colonizing the litter in three natural streams. The decomposition of leaf litter from one

  15. Simulating Leaf Area of Corn Plants at Contrasting Water Status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An exponential decay function was fitted with literature data to describe the decrease in leaf expansion rate as leaf water potential decreases. The fitted function was then applied to modify an existing leaf area simulation module in a soil-plant-atmosphere continuum model in order to simulate leaf...

  16. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Smoking Leaf (H Group). 29.1163 Section 29.1163... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.1163 Smoking Leaf (H Group). This group consists of... Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, strong color...

  17. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Smoking Leaf (H Group). 29.1163 Section 29.1163... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.1163 Smoking Leaf (H Group). This group consists of... Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, strong color...

  18. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Smoking Leaf (H Group). 29.1163 Section 29.1163... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.1163 Smoking Leaf (H Group). This group consists of... Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, strong color...

  19. Independence of stem and leaf hydraulic traits in six Euphorbiaceae tree species with contrasting leaf phenology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Wen; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Xiao-Shuang; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2009-08-01

    Hydraulic traits and hydraulic-related structural properties were examined in three deciduous (Hevea brasiliensis, Macaranga denticulate, and Bischofia javanica) and three evergreen (Drypetes indica, Aleurites moluccana, and Codiaeum variegatum) Euphorbiaceae tree species from a seasonally tropical forest in south-western China. Xylem water potential at 50% loss of stem hydraulic conductivity (P50(stem)) was more negative in the evergreen tree, but leaf water potential at 50% loss of leaf hydraulic conductivity (P50(leaf)) did not function as P50(stem) did. Furthermore, P50(stem) was more negative than P50(leaf) in the evergreen tree; contrarily, this pattern was not observed in the deciduous tree. Leaf hydraulic conductivity overlapped considerably, but stem hydraulic conductivity diverged between the evergreen and deciduous tree. Correspondingly, structural properties of leaves overlapped substantially; however, structural properties of stem diverged markedly. Consequently, leaf and stem hydraulic traits were closely correlated with leaf and stem structural properties, respectively. Additionally, stem hydraulic efficiency was significantly correlated with stem hydraulic resistance to embolism; nevertheless, such a hydraulic pattern was not found in leaf hydraulics. Thus, these results suggest: (1) that the evergreen and deciduous tree mainly diverge in stem hydraulics, but not in leaf hydraulics, (2) that regardless of leaf or stem, their hydraulic traits result primarily from structural properties, and not from leaf phenology, (3) that leaves are more vulnerable to drought-induced embolism than stem in the evergreen tree, but not always in the deciduous tree and (4) that there exists a trade-off between hydraulic efficiency and safety for stem hydraulics, but not for leaf hydraulics. PMID:19495788

  20. The function and properties of the iron-sulfur center in spinach ferredoxin: Thioredoxin reductase: A new biological role for iron-sulfur clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, C.R.; Ameyibor, E.; Fu, Weiguang; Johnson, M.K.

    1996-09-03

    Thioredoxin reduction in chloroplasts in catalyzed by a unique class of disulfide reductases which use a [2Fe-2S]{sup 2+/+} ferredoxin as the electron donor and contain an Fe-S cluster as the sole prosthetic group in addition to the active-site disulfide. The nature, properties, and function of the Fe-S cluster in spinach ferredoxin: thioredoxin reductase (FTR) have been investigated by the combination of UV/visible absorption, variable-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), EPR, and resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopies. 66 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.