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Sample records for spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate

  1. Kinetic Characterization of Spinach Leaf Sucrose-Phosphate Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Jacob; Preiss, Jack

    1982-01-01

    The spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase was partially purified via DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and its kinetic properties were studied. Fructose-6-phosphate saturation curves were sigmoidal, while UDPglucose saturation curves were hyperbolic. At subsaturating concentrations of fructose-6-phosphate, 1,5 anhydroglucitol-6-phosphate had a stimulatory effect on enzyme activity, suggesting multiple and interacting fructose-6-phosphate sites on sucrose-phosphate synthase. The concentrations required for 50% of maximal activity were 3.0 millimolar and 1.3 millimolar, respectively, for fructose-6-phosphate and UDPglucose. The enzyme was not stimulated by divalent cations. Inorganic phosphate proved to be a potent inhibitor, particularly at low concentrations of substrate. Phosphate inhibition was competitive with UDPglucose, and its Ki was determined to be 1.75 millimolar. Sucrose phosphate, the product of the reaction, was also shown to be a competitive inhibitor towards UDPglucose concentration and had Ki of 0.4 millimolar. The kinetic results suggest that spinach leaf sucrose-phospahte synthase is a regulatory enzyme and that its activity is modulated by the concentrations of phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, and UDPglucose occurring in the cytoplasm of the leaf cell. PMID:16662338

  2. Multisite phosphorylation of spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L.; Huber, S.C. )

    1990-05-01

    Spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase is phosphorylated both in vivo and in vitro on serine residues. Phosphorylation of SPS in vivo yields twelve major phosphopeptides after a tryptic digest and two dimensional mapping. The in vivo labeling of three of these SPS P-peptides is reduced in illuminated leaves where the extracted enzyme is activated relative to that of dark leaves. Two of these inhibitory sites are phosphorylated as well when SPS is inactivated in vitro using ({sup 32}P)ATP. In vivo phosphorylation of two other sites is enhanced during mannose feeding of the leaves (in light or dark) which produces the highest activation state of SPS. Overall, the results confirm that light-dark regulation of SPS activity occurs as a result of regulatory seryl-phosphorylation and involves a balance between phosphorylation of sites which inhibit or stimulate activity. Regulation of the SPS protein kinase that inhibits activity is relatively unaffected by phosphate but inhibited by G1c 6-P (IC{sub 50}{approx}5 mM), which may explain the control of SPS activation state by light-dark signals.

  3. Inactivation of highly activated spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase by dephosphorylation. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L. ); Huber, S.C. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh ); Hite, D.R.C.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) can be phosphorylated and inactivated in vitro with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. Thus, it was surprising to find that SPS, extracted from leaves fed mannose in the light to highly activate the enzyme, could be inactivated in an ATP-independent manner when desalted crude extracts were preincubated at 25{degrees}C before assay. The spontaneous inactivation involved a loss in activity measured with limiting substrate concentrations in the presence of the inhibitor, Pi, without affecting maximum catalytic activity. The spontaneous inactivation was unaffected by exogenous carrier proteins and protease inhibitors, but was inhibited by inorganic phosphate, fluoride, and molybdate, suggesting that a phosphatase may be involved. Okadaic acid, a potent inhibitor of mammalian type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases, had no effect up to 5 micromolar. Inactivation was stimulated about twofold by exogenous Mg{sup 2+} and was relatively insensitive to Ca{sup 2+} and to pH over the range pH 6.5 to 8.5. Radioactive phosphate incorporated into SPS during labeling of excised leaves with ({sup 32}P)Pi (initially in the dark and then in the light with mannose) was lost with time when desalted crude extracts were incubated at 25 C, and the loss in radiolabel was substantially reduced by fluoride. These results provide direct evidence for action of an endogenous phosphatase(s) using SPS as substrate.

  4. Protein phosphorylation as a mechanism for regulation of spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L.A.; Huber, S.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation has been identified as a mechanism for the light-dark regulation of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) activity, previously shown to involve some type of covalent modification of the enzyme. The 120 kD subunit of SPS in extracts of light-treated leaves was labeled with {sup 32}P in the presence of ({gamma}-{sup 32}P) ATP. In this in vitro system, {sup 32}P incorporation into light-activated SPS was dependent upon ATP and magnesium concentrations as well as time, and was closely paralleled by inactivation of the enzyme. The soluble protein kinase involved in the interconversion of SPS between activated and deactivated forms may be specific for SPS as it co-purifies with SPS during partial purification of the enzyme. The kinase appears not to be calcium activated and no evidence has been obtained for metabolite control of SPS phosphorylation/inactivation.

  5. Site-directed mutagenesis of serine 158 demonstrates its role in spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; McMichael, R. Jr; Krause, K. P.; Kurreck, J.; Sonnewald, U.; Stitt, M.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) was performed to investigate the role of Ser158 in the modulation of spinach leaf SPS. Tobacco plants expressing the spinach wild-type (WT), S158A, S158T and S157F/S158E SPS transgenes were produced. Expression of transgenes appeared not to reduce expression of the tobacco host SPS. SPS activity in the WT and the S158T SPS transgenics showed light/dark modulation, whereas the S158A and S157F/S158E mutants were not similarly light/dark modulated: the S158A mutant enzyme was not inactivated in the dark, and the S157F/S158E was not activated in the light. The inability to modulate the activity of the S158A mutant enzyme by protein phosphorylation was demonstrated in vitro. The WT spinach enzyme immunopurified from dark transgenic tobacco leaves had a low initial activation state, and could be activated by PP2A and subsequently inactivated by SPS-kinase plus ATP. Rapid purification of the S158A mutant enzyme from dark leaves of transgenic plants using spinach-specific monoclonal antibodies yielded enzyme that had a high initial activation state, and pre-incubation with leaf PP2A or ATP plus SPS-kinase (the PKIII enzyme) caused little modulation of activity. The results demonstrate the regulatory significance of Ser158 as the major site responsible for dark inactivation of spinach SPS in vivo, and indicate that the significance of phosphorylation is the introduction of a negative charge at the Ser158 position.

  6. Site-specific regulatory interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase and 14-3-3 proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; Athwal, G. S.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We report an Mg2+-dependent interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) and endogenous 14-3-3 proteins, as evidenced by co-elution during gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation. The content of 14-3-3s associated with an SPS immunoprecipitate was inversely related to activity, and was specifically reduced when tissue was pretreated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside, suggesting metabolite control in vivo. A synthetic phosphopeptide based on Ser-229 was shown by surface plasmon resonance to bind a recombinant plant 14-3-3, and addition of the phosphorylated SPS-229 peptide was found to stimulate the SPS activity of an SPS:14-3-3 complex. Taken together, the results suggest a regulatory interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with Ser-229 of SPS.

  7. Sucrose Phosphate Synthase and Sucrose Accumulation at Low Temperature 1

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Charles L.; Huber, Joan L. A.; Huber, Steven C.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of growth temperature on the free sugar and sucrose phosphate synthase content and activity of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf tissue was studied. When plants were grown at 25°C for 3 weeks and then transferred to a constant 5°C, sucrose, glucose, and fructose accumulated to high levels during a 14-d period. Predawn sugar levels increased from 14- to 20-fold over the levels present at the outset of the low-temperature treatment. Sucrose was the most abundant free sugar before, during, and after exposure to 5°C. Leaf sucrose phosphate synthase activity was significantly increased by the low-temperature treatment, whereas sucrose synthase and invertases were not. Synthesis of the sucrose phosphate synthase subunit was increased during and after low-temperature exposure and paralleled an increase in the steady-state level of the subunit. The increases in sucrose and its primary biosynthetic enzyme, sucrose phosphate synthase, are discussed in relation to adjustment of metabolism to low nonfreezing temperature and freezing stress tolerance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16652990

  8. Interaction between Silver Nanoparticles and Spinach Leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Li, H.; Zhang, Y.; Riser, E.; He, S.; Zhang, W.

    2013-12-01

    Interactions of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) with plant surfaces are critical to assessing the bioavailability of ENPs to edible plants and to further evaluating impacts of ENPs on ecological health and food safety. Silver nanoparticles (i.e., nanoAg) could enter the agroecosystems either as an active ingredient in pesticides or from other industrial and consumer applications. Thus, in the events of pesticide application, rainfall, and irrigation, vegetable leaves could become in contact and then interact with nanoAg. The present study was to assess whether the interaction of nanoAg with spinach leaves can be described by classical sorption models and to what extent it depends on and varies with dispersion methods, environmental temperature, and ion release. We investigated the stability and ion release of nanoAg dispersed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, 1%) and humic acid (HA, 10 mg C/L) solutions, as well as sorption and desorption of nanoAg on and from the fresh spinach leaf. Results showed SDS-nanoAg released about 2%-8% more Ag ion than HA-nanoAg. The sorption of Ag ion, described by the Freundlich model in the initial concentration range of 0.6-50 mg/L, was 2-4 times higher than that of nanoAg. The sorption of nanoAg on spinach leaf can be fitted by the Langmuir model, and the maximum sorption amount of HA-nanoAg and SDS-nanoAg was 0.21 and 0.41 mg/g, respectively. The higher sorption of SDS-nanoAg relative to that of HA-nanoAg could be partially resulted from the higher release of Ag ion from the former. The maximum desorption amount of HA-nanoAg and SDS-nanoAg in 1% SDS solution was 0.08 and 0.10 mg/g, respectively. NanoAg attachment on and its penetration to the spinach leaf was visualized by the Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS). It is equally important that the less sorption of nanoAg under low environmental temperature could be partially due to the closure of stomata, as verified by SEM-EDS. Cyto

  9. SCREENING FOR RESISTANCE TO STEMPHYLIUM LEAF SPOT OF SPINACH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf spot disease of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) caused by Stemphylium botryosum has continued to occur in California and six other states since 1997, posing another challenge for growers to produce high quality and defect-free products. No resistance to the pathogen has been reported in spinach....

  10. Screening for Resistance to Leaf Spot Diseases of Spinach.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf spot of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) caused by Stemphylium botryosum has continued to occur in California and at least six other states since 1997, posing yet another challenge for growers to produce high quality and defect-free products. Resistance to the pathogen has not been reported in sp...

  11. Population structure and association analysis of bolting, plant height, and leaf erectness in spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is an important vegetable worldwide with high nutritional and health-promoting compounds. Bolting is an important trait to consider in order to grow spinach in different seasons and regions. Plant height and leaf erectness are important traits for machine-harvesting. B...

  12. Antioxidant capacity and phenolic content in leaf extracts of tree spinach (Cnidoscolus spp.).

    PubMed

    Kuti, Joseph O; Konuru, Hima B

    2004-01-14

    Total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity of two tree spinach species (Cnidoscolus chayamansa McVaugh and C. aconitifolius Miller.) were determined in raw and cooked leaf extracts. Antioxidant capacity was assessed by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay, and flavonoid glycoside composition was quantified by HPLC and identified by GC. Total phenolics and antioxidant capacity were higher in raw than in cooked leaf extracts. The ORAC values were strongly correlated with total phenolic content (r = 0.926) in all leaf extracts. The major flavonoids isolated from the leaf extracts were kaempferol-3-O-glycosides and quercetin-3-O-glycosides. C. aconitifolius leaves contained more varieties of the flavonoid glycosides than C. chayamansa. Cooking reduced antioxidant activity and phenolic content and resulted in losses of some kaempferol glycoside and quercetin glycoside residues in leaf extracts. The results of this study indicate that tree spinach leaves are a rich source of natural antioxidants for foods. PMID:14709023

  13. Abscisic acid accumulation in spinach leaf slices in the presence of penetrating and nonpenetrating solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Creelman, R.A.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1985-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) accumulated in detached, wilted leaves of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv Savoy Hybrid 612) and reached a maximum level within 3 to 4 hours. The increase in ABA over that found in detached turgid leaves was approximately 10-fold. The effects of water stress could be mimicked by the use of thin slices of spinach leaves incubated in the presence of 0.6 molar mannitol, a compound which causes plasmolysis (loss of turgor). When spinach leaf slices were incubated with ethylene glycol, a compound which rapidly penetrates the cell membrane causing a decrease in the osmotic potential of the tissue and only transient loss of turgor, no ABA accumulated. Spinach leaf slices incubated in both ethylene glycol and mannitol had ABA levels similar to those found when slices were incubated with mannitol alone. Increases similar to those found with mannitol also occurred when Aquacide III, a highly purified form of polyethylene glycol, was used. When spinach leaf slices were incubated with solutes which are supposed to disturb membrane integrity no increase in ABA was observed. These data indicate that, with respect to the accumulation of ABA, mannitol caused a physical stress rather than a chemical stress.

  14. EFFECT OF LIGHT INTENSITY, SOIL TYPE, AND LITHIUM ADDITION ON SPINACH AND MUSTARD GREENS LEAF CONSTITUENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26o 8' N, Long. 97o 57' W) between 14 Dec. 2005 and 17 Feb 2006 to evaluate the effect of soil type, light environment, and lithium addition on the leaf nutrients of spinach and mustard greens. Cultivars Samish (Spinacia oleracea) and...

  15. Loss of the two major leaf isoforms of sucrose-phosphate synthase in Arabidopsis thaliana limits sucrose synthesis and nocturnal starch degradation but does not alter carbon partitioning during photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Volkert, Kathrin; Debast, Stefan; Voll, Lars M.; Voll, Hildegard; Schießl, Ingrid; Hofmann, Jörg; Schneider, Sabine; Börnke, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc)-phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyses one of the rate-limiting steps in the synthesis of Suc in plants. The Arabidopsis genome contains four annotated SPS genes which can be grouped into three different families (SPSA1, SPSA2, SPSB, and SPSC). However, the functional significance of this multiplicity of SPS genes is as yet only poorly understood. All four SPS isoforms show enzymatic activity when expressed in yeast although there is variation in sensitivity towards allosteric effectors. Promoter–reporter gene analyses and quantitative real-time reverse transcription–PCR studies indicate that no two SPS genes have the same expression pattern and that AtSPSA1 and AtSPSC represent the major isoforms expressed in leaves. An spsa1 knock-out mutant showed a 44% decrease in leaf SPS activity and a slight increase in leaf starch content at the end of the light period as well as at the end of the dark period. The spsc null mutant displayed reduced Suc contents towards the end of the photoperiod and a concomitant 25% reduction in SPS activity. In contrast, an spsa1/spsc double mutant was strongly impaired in growth and accumulated high levels of starch. This increase in starch was probably not due to an increased partitioning of carbon into starch, but was rather caused by an impaired starch mobilization during the night. Suc export from excised petioles harvested from spsa1/spsc double mutant plants was significantly reduced under illumination as well as during the dark period. It is concluded that loss of the two major SPS isoforms in leaves limits Suc synthesis without grossly changing carbon partitioning in favour of starch during the light period but limits starch degradation during the dark period. PMID:24994761

  16. Sucrose phosphate synthase and sucrose phosphate phosphatase interact in planta and promote plant growth and biomass accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Victoria J.; Park, Ji-Young; Unda, Faride; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2015-01-01

    Bioinformatic analysis indicates that sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) contains a putative C-terminal sucrose phosphate phosphatase (SPP)-like domain that may facilitates the binding of SPP. If an SPS–SPP enzyme complex exists, it may provide sucrose biosynthesis with an additional level of regulation, forming a direct metabolic channel for sucrose-6-phosphate between these two enzymes. Herein, the formation of an enzyme complex between SPS and SPP was examined, and the results from yeast two-hybrid experiments suggest that there is indeed an association between these proteins. In addition, in planta bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) was observed in Arabidopsis seedlings, providing physical evidence for a protein interaction in live cells and in real time. Finally, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) was employed in an attempt to detect SPS–SPP interactions visually. The findings clearly demonstrated that SPS interacts with SPP and that this interaction impacts soluble carbohydrate pools and affects carbon partitioning to starch. Moreover, a fusion construct between the two genes promotes plant growth in both transgenic Arabidopsis and hybrid poplar. PMID:25873678

  17. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis XIX. The Identification of Sucrose Phosphate in Sugar Beet Leaves

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Buchanan, J. G.

    1952-09-01

    The recognition and characterization of a sucrose phosphate as an intermediate in sucrose by synthesis by green plants is described. A tentative structure for this phosphate is proposed and its mode of formation suggested.

  18. Photosynthesis-related infrared light transmission changes in spinach leaf segments

    SciTech Connect

    Akimoto, T.

    1985-10-01

    The time courses of infrared light transmission changes and fluorescence induced by light in spinach leaf segments were measured. The illumination by red light exhibited a complex wave pattern. The transmission approached the baseline after repeating decreases and increases. Illumination by far-red light decreased the transmission. One of the differences between the two responses was the difference between the two amplitudes of the first increasing component. The component in the red light response was larger than the component in the far-red light response. The transmission decrease by far-red light is supposed to correspond to ''red drop.'' The transmission decrease by far-red light was suppressed by red light. This is due to an activation of a transmission-increasing component. This probably corresponds to ''enhancement.'' A proportional correlation existed between the intensity of far-red light and the minimum intensity of red light that suppressed the transmission decrease induced by far-red light. The component which made Peak D in the time course of fluorescence yield and the first increasing component in the transmission changes were suppressed by intense light.

  19. Identification of Ser-543 as the major regulatory phosphorylation site in spinach leaf nitrate reductase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, M.; Shiraishi, N.; Campbell, W. H.; Yoo, B. C.; Harmon, A. C.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Spinach leaf NADH:nitrate reductase (NR) responds to light/dark signals and photosynthetic activity in part as a result of rapid regulation by reversible protein phosphorylation. We have identified the major regulatory phosphorylation site as Ser-543, which is located in the hinge 1 region connecting the cytochrome b domain with the molybdenum-pterin cofactor binding domain of NR, using recombinant NR fragments containing or lacking the phosphorylation site sequence. Studies with NR partial reactions indicated that the block in electron flow caused by phosphorylation also could be localized to the hinge 1 region. A synthetic peptide (NR6) based on the phosphorylation site sequence was phosphorylated readily by NR kinase (NRk) in vitro. NR6 kinase activity tracked the ATP-dependent inactivation of NR during several chromatographic steps and completely inhibited inactivation/phosphorylation of native NR in vitro. Two forms of NRk were resolved by using anion exchange chromatography. Studies with synthetic peptide analogs indicated that both forms of NRk had similar specificity determinants, requiring a basic residue at P-3 (i.e., three amino acids N-terminal to the phosphorylated serine) and a hydrophobic residue at P-5. Both forms are strictly calcium dependent but belong to distinct families of protein kinases because they are distinct immunochemically.

  20. Antisense repression of sucrose phosphate synthase in transgenic muskmelon alters plant growth and fruit development

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hongmei; Ma, Leyuan; Zhao, Cong; Hao, Hui; Gong, Biao; Yu, Xiyan; Wang, Xiufeng

    2010-03-12

    To unravel the roles of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), we reduced its activity in transgenic muskmelon plants by an antisense approach. For this purpose, an 830 bp cDNA fragment of muskmelon sucrose phosphate synthase was expressed in antisense orientation behind the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus. The phenotype of the antisense plants clearly differed from that of control plants. The transgenic plant leaves were markedly smaller, and the plant height and stem diameter were obviously shorter and thinner. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the membrane degradation of chloroplast happened in transgenic leaves and the numbers of grana and grana lamella in the chloroplast were significantly less, suggesting that the slow growth and weaker phenotype of transgenic plants may be due to the damage of the chloroplast ultrastructure, which in turn results in the decrease of the net photosynthetic rate. The sucrose concentration and levels of sucrose phosphate synthase decreased in transgenic mature fruit, and the fruit size was smaller than the control fruit. Together, our results suggest that sucrose phosphate synthase may play an important role in regulating the muskmelon plant growth and fruit development.

  1. Spinach leaf chloroplast CO sub 2 and NO sub 2 sup minus photoassimilations do not compete for photogenerated reductant

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.M. )

    1988-12-01

    Potential competition between CO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} photoassimilation for photogenerated reductant (e.g. reduced ferredoxin and NADPH) was examined employing isolates of mesophyll cells and intact chloroplasts derived from mature source spinach leaves. Variations in the magnitude of incident light energy were used to manipulate the supply of reductant in situ within chloroplasts. Leaf cell and plastid isolates were fed with saturating CO{sub 2} and/or NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} to produce the highest demand for reductant by CO{sub 2} and/or NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} assimilatory processes (enzymes). Even in the presence of CO{sub 2} fixation, NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} reduction in intact leaf cell isolates as well as plastid isolates was maximal at light energies as low as 50 to 200 microeinsteins per second per square meter. Simultaneously, 500 to 800 microeinsteins per second per square meter were required to support maximal CO{sub 2} assimilation. Regardless of the magnitude of the incident light energy, CO{sub 2} assimilation did not repress NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} reduction, nor were these two processes mutually repressed. These observations have been interpreted to mean that reduced ferredoxin levels in situ in the plastids of mature source leaf mesophyll cells were adequate to supply the concurrent maximal demands exerted by enzymes associated with CO{sub 2} as well as with inorganic nitrogen photoassimilation.

  2. Light/Dark Profiles of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase, Sucrose Synthase, and Acid Invertase in Leaves of Sugar Beets

    PubMed Central

    Vassey, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    The activity of sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase, and acid invertase was monitored in 1- to 2-month-old sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves. Sugar beet leaves achieve full laminar length in 13 days. Therefore, leaves were harvested at 2-day intervals for 15 days. Sucrose phosphate synthase activity was not detectable for 6 days in the dark-grown leaves. Once activity was measurable, sucrose phosphate synthase activity never exceeded half that observed in the light-grown leaves. After 8 days in the dark, leaves which were illuminated for 30 minutes showed no significant change in sucrose phosphate synthase activity. Leaves illuminated for 24 hours after 8 days in darkness, however, recovered sucrose phosphate synthase activity to 80% of that of normally grown leaves. Sucrose synthase and acid invertase activity in the light-grown leaves both increased for the first 7 days and then decreased as the leaves matured. In contrast, the activity of sucrose synthase oscillated throughout the growth period in the dark-grown leaves. Acid invertase activity in the dark-grown leaves seemed to be the same as the activity found in the light-grown leaves. PMID:16666537

  3. Summer (subarctic) versus winter (subtropic) production affects spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf bionutrients: vitamins (C, E, Folate, K1, provitamin A), lutein, phenolics, and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Lester, Gene E; Makus, Donald J; Hodges, D Mark; Jifon, John L

    2013-07-24

    Comparison of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) cultivars Lazio and Samish grown during the summer solstice in the subarctic versus the winter solstice in the subtropics provided insight into interactions between production environment (light intensity), cultivar, and leaf age/maturity/position affecting bionutrient concentrations of vitamins (C, E, folate, K1, provitamin A), lutein, phenolics, and antioxidants. Growing spinach during the winter solstice in the subtropics resulted in increased leaf dry matter %, oxidized (dehydro) ascorbic acid (AsA), α- and γ-tocopherol, and total phenols but lower reduced (free) AsA, α-carotene, folate, and antioxidant capacity compared to summer solstice-grown spinach in the subarctic. Both cultivars had similar bionutrients, except for higher dehydroAsA, and lower α- and γ-tocopherol in 'Samish' compared to 'Lazio'. For most bionutrients measured, there was a linear, and sometimes quadratic, increase in concentrations from bottom to top canopy leaves. However, total phenolics and antioxidant capacity increased basipetally. The current study has thus demonstrated that dehydroAsA, α-tocopherol, and γ-tocopherol were substantially lower in subarctic compared to subtropical-grown spinach, whereas the opposite relationship was found for antioxidant capacity, α-carotene, and folates (vitamin B9). The observations are consistent with previously reported isolated effects of growth environment on bionutrient status of crops. The current results clearly highlight the effect of production environment (predominantly radiation capture), interacting with genetics and plant phenology to alter the bionutrient status of crops. While reflecting the effects of changing growing conditions, these results also indicate potential alterations in the nutritive value of foods with anticipated shifts in global climatic conditions. PMID:23834651

  4. Deep two-photon microscopic imaging through brain tissue using the second singlet state from fluorescent agent chlorophyll α in spinach leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; An Nguyen, Thien; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-06-01

    Two-photon (2P) excitation of the second singlet (S) state was studied to achieve deep optical microscopic imaging in brain tissue when both the excitation (800 nm) and emission (685 nm) wavelengths lie in the "tissue optical window" (650 to 950 nm). S2 state technique was used to investigate chlorophyll α (Chl α) fluorescence inside a spinach leaf under a thick layer of freshly sliced rat brain tissue in combination with 2P microscopic imaging. Strong emission at the peak wavelength of 685 nm under the 2P S state of Chl α enabled the imaging depth up to 450 μm through rat brain tissue.

  5. Activation of SPS from darkened spinach leaves by an endogenous protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, S.C.; Huber, J.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Sucrose-phosphate synthase from darkened spinach leaves has a low activation state but can undergo a time-dependent activation in desalted leaf extracts that is inhibited by Pi, molybdate, okadaic acid and vanadate, but stimulated by fluoride. SPS labeled in vivo with ({sup 32}P)Pi in excised leaves in the dark loses incorporated {sup 32}P with time when extracts are incubated at 25{degree}C. This loss is largely prevented by vanadate, suggesting that an endogenous protein phosphatase can use SPS as substrate. Changes in phosphorylation state are closely paralleled by changes in SPS activation state. The spontaneous activation achieved in the extracts can be reversed by addition of 2 mM MgATP. Feeding okadaic acid to darkened leaves prevents light activation of SPS suggesting that the endogenous protein phosphatase is similar to the type-1 enzyme of animal tissues. Overall, the results are consistent with the notion that light activation of SPS involves dephosphorylation of inhibitory phosphorylation site(s). Regulation of the protein phosphatase by Pi may be of physiological significance.

  6. Circadian Regulation of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase Activity in Tomato by Protein Phosphatase Activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, T. L.; Ort, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), a key enzyme in sucrose biosynthesis, is regulated by protein phosphorylation and shows a circadian pattern of activity in tomato. SPS is most active in its dephosphorylated state, which normally coincides with daytime. Applying okadaic acid, a potent protein phosphatase inhibitor, prevents SPS activation. More interesting is that a brief treatment with cycloheximide, a cytoplasmic translation inhibitor, also prevents the light activation of SPS without any effect on the amount of SPS protein. Cordycepin, an inhibitor of transcript synthesis and processing, has the same effect. Both of these inhibitors also prevent the activation phase of the circadian rhythm in SPS activity. Conversely, cycloheximide and cordycepin do not prevent the decline in circadian SPS activity that normally occurs at night. These observations indicate that SPS phosphatase activity but not SPS kinase activity is controlled, directly or indirectly, at the level of gene expression. Taken together, these data imply that there is a circadian rhythm controlling the transcription of a protein phosphatase that subsequently dictates the circadian rhythm in SPS activity via effects on this enzyme's phosphorylation state. PMID:12223667

  7. Nectar secretion requires sucrose phosphate synthases and the sugar transporter SWEET9.

    PubMed

    Lin, I Winnie; Sosso, Davide; Chen, Li-Qing; Gase, Klaus; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Kessler, Danny; Klinkenberg, Peter M; Gorder, Molly K; Hou, Bi-Huei; Qu, Xiao-Qing; Carter, Clay J; Baldwin, Ian T; Frommer, Wolf B

    2014-04-24

    Angiosperms developed floral nectaries that reward pollinating insects. Although nectar function and composition have been characterized, the mechanism of nectar secretion has remained unclear. Here we identify SWEET9 as a nectary-specific sugar transporter in three eudicot species: Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassica rapa (extrastaminal nectaries) and Nicotiana attenuata (gynoecial nectaries). We show that SWEET9 is essential for nectar production and can function as an efflux transporter. We also show that sucrose phosphate synthase genes, encoding key enzymes for sucrose biosynthesis, are highly expressed in nectaries and that their expression is also essential for nectar secretion. Together these data are consistent with a model in which sucrose is synthesized in the nectary parenchyma and subsequently secreted into the extracellular space via SWEET9, where sucrose is hydrolysed by an apoplasmic invertase to produce a mixture of sucrose, glucose and fructose. The recruitment of SWEET9 for sucrose export may have been a key innovation, and could have coincided with the evolution of core eudicots and contributed to the evolution of nectar secretion to reward pollinators. PMID:24670640

  8. Differences in the metabolite profiles of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf in different concentrations of nitrate in the culture solution.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Keiki; Oka, Norikuni; Shinano, Takuro; Osaki, Mitsuru; Takebe, Masako

    2008-02-01

    The nitrogen (N) status of a plant determines the composition of its major components (amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates and organic acids) and, directly or indirectly, affects the quality of agricultural products in terms of their calorific value and taste. Although these effects are guided by changes in metabolic pathways, no overall metabolic analysis has previously been conducted to demonstrate such effects. Here, metabolite profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to evaluate the effect of N levels on spinach tissue, comparing two cultivars that differed in their ability to use N. Wide variation in N content was observed without any distinct inhibition of growth in either cultivar. Principal component analysis (PCA) and self-organizing mapping (SOM) were undertaken to describe changes in the metabolites of mature spinach leaves. In PCA, the first component accounted for 44.5% of the total variance, the scores of which was positively correlated with the plant's N content, and a close relationship between metabolite profiles and N status was observed. Both PCA and SOM revealed that metabolites could be broadly divided into two types, correlating either positively or negatively with plant N content. The simple and co-coordinated metabolic stream, containing both general and spinach-specific aspects of plant N content, will be useful in future research on such topics as the detection of environmental effects on spinach through comprehensive metabolic profiling. PMID:18089581

  9. Role of sucrose phosphate synthase in sucrose biosynthesis in ripening bananas and its relationship to the respiratory climacteric.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, N L; Pharr, D M; Huber, S C

    1990-09-01

    During ripening of bananas (Musa spp. [AAA group, Cavendish subgroup]), there is a massive conversion of starch to sucrose. Also during ripening there is a rise in respiration known as the respiratory climacteric. In this study changes in carbohydrate content, activities of starch and sucrose metabolizing enzymes, and respiration were measured to assess their potential interrelationships. Sucrose phosphate synthase activity increased dramatically during the first 4 days after initiation of ripening by ethylene treatment. Starch concentration decreased and sucrose concentration increased during this time period. Developmental changes in sucrose phosphate synthase activity were measured with limiting substrate (plus Pi) and saturating substrate concentrations. Activities were not parallel under the two assay conditions, providing tentative evidence that kinetically different forms of the enzyme may exist at different stages of ripening. Sucrose accumulation rate was most highly correlated with sucrose phosphate synthase activity assayed with limiting substrate concentrations (plus Pi). The cumulative amount of CO(2) respired during ripening was positively correlated with sugar accumulation (R(2) = 0.97). From this linear regression it was calculated that a constant 0.605 millimoles of CO(2) was evolved per mole of sucrose formed throughout ripening. Using this quantity, the percentage of the total respiratory ATP produced which was required for the conversion of starch to sucrose was calculated assuming different models for carbon export from the amyloplast. The results suggest that sucrose biosynthesis during ripening constitutes a significant sink for respiratory ATP. PMID:16667688

  10. Summer (sub-arctic) versus winter (sub-tropical) production affects on spinach leaf bio-nutrients: Vitamins (C, E, Folate, K1, provitamin A), lutein, phenolics, and antioxidants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparison of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) cultivars Lazio and Samish grown during the summer solstice in the sub-arctic versus the winter solstice in the sub-tropics provided insight into interactions between plant environment (day length, light intensity, ambient temperatures), cultivar and leaf...

  11. Deep two-photon microscopic imaging through brain tissue using the second singlet state from fluorescent agent chlorophyll α in spinach leaf

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lingyan; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; An Nguyen, Thien; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Two-photon (2P) excitation of the second singlet (S2) state was studied to achieve deep optical microscopic imaging in brain tissue when both the excitation (800 nm) and emission (685 nm) wavelengths lie in the “tissue optical window” (650 to 950 nm). S2 state technique was used to investigate chlorophyll α (Chl α) fluorescence inside a spinach leaf under a thick layer of freshly sliced rat brain tissue in combination with 2P microscopic imaging. Strong emission at the peak wavelength of 685 nm under the 2P S2 state of Chl α enabled the imaging depth up to 450 μm through rat brain tissue. PMID:24967915

  12. Epidemiology and control of spinach downy mildew in coastal California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most serious threat to global fresh market spinach production is spinach downy mildew, caused by the obligate biotrophic pathogen, Peronospora effusa. Downy mildew causes yellow chlorotic lesions on spinach leaf tissue, often accompanied by abundant sporulation on the undersides of leaves. Very ...

  13. Extraction and characterization of mixed phase KNO2-KNO3 nanocrystals derived from flat-leaf green spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, S.; Mohanta, D.

    2013-01-01

    Naturally available green spinach, which is a rich source of potassium, was used as the key ingredient to extract mixed-phase ferroelectric crystals of nitrite and nitrate derivatives (KNO2 + KNO3). The KNO3 phase was found to be dominant for higher pH values, as revealed by the x-ray diffraction patterns. The characteristic optical absorption spectra exhibited intra-band π-π* electronic transitions, whereas Fourier transform infrared spectra exhibited characteristic N-O stretching vibrations. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed a broad endothermic peak at ˜121.8 °C, highlighting a transition from phase II to I via phase III of KNO3. Obtaining nanoscale ferroelectrics via the adoption of green synthesis is economically viable for large-scale production and possible application in ferroelectric elements/devices.

  14. Testing models of fatty acid transfer and lipid synthesis in spinach leaf using in vivo oxygen-18 labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, M.; Ohlrogge, J.

    1999-12-01

    Oxygen-18 labeling has been applied to the study of plant lipid biosynthesis for the first time. [{sup 13}C{sub 2}{sup 18}O{sub 2}]Acetate was incubated with spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves and the {sup 18}O content in fatty acid methyl esters isolated from different lipid classes measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fatty acids isolated from lipids synthesized within the plastid, such as monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, show an {sup 18}O content consistent with the exogenous acetate undergoing a single activation step and with the direct utilization of acyl-acyl carrier protein by the acyl transferases of the chloroplast. In contrast, fatty acids isolated from lipids assembled in the cytosol, such as phosphatidylcholine, show a 50% reduction in the {sup 18}O content. This is indicative of export of the fatty acyl groups from the plastid via a free carboxylate anion, and is consistent with the acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase:acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase mediated export mechanism. If this were not the case and the acyl group was transferred directly from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an acyl acceptor on the cytosolic side, there would be either complete retention of {sup 18}O or, less likely, complete loss of {sup 18}O, but not a 50% loss of {sup 18}O. Thus, existing models for fatty acid transfer from the plastid and for spatially separate synthesis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic lipids have both been confirmed.

  15. Differential effects of severe water stress on linear and cyclic electron fluxes through Photosystem I in spinach leaf discs in CO(2)-enriched air.

    PubMed

    Jia, Husen; Oguchi, Riichi; Hope, Alexander B; Barber, James; Chow, Wah Soon

    2008-10-01

    Linear and cyclic electron fluxes through Photosystem I in 1% CO(2) were quantified in spinach leaf tissue under severe water stress. Using actinic light with a peak at 697 nm for preferential light absorption by Photosystem I while also stimulating Photosystem II to improve redox poising, the cyclic electron flux after 60 s of illumination was a substantial proportion (33-44%) of the total electron flux through PSI at irradiances up to ~1,070 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1). At the maximum irradiance, the cyclic electron flux changed little with the progressive water loss from leaf tissue up to ~60%; by contrast, the linear electron flux was approximately halved. A reason for this differential effect of water stress on the capacity for cyclic and linear electron flow could be the increased crowding of soluble proteins in the stroma due to chloroplast shrinkage. Indeed the confinement of soluble proteins to a smaller chloroplast volume was indicated by cryo-scanning electron microscopy. It is known that the diffusion coefficient of large proteins is decreased when the background concentration of small proteins is raised; by contrast, the diffusion coefficient of small proteins is not affected by increasing the concentration of a large protein (Muramatsu and Minton in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 85:2984-2988, 1988). Therefore, we suggest that linear electron flow, being coupled to the Calvin-Benson cycle, is limited by the diffusion of large macromolecules, especially the ribulose 1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase complex. By contrast, cyclic electron flow, involving relatively small macromolecules such as ferredoxin, is less susceptible to inhibition by crowding in the stroma. PMID:18636271

  16. Three spinach leaf nitrate reductase-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase kinases that are required by reversible phosphorylation and/or Ca2+ ions.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, P; Pigaglio, E; Ferrer, A; Halfords, N G; MacKintosh, C

    1997-01-01

    In spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaf extracts, three protein kinases (PKI, PKII and PKIII) were identified each of which phosphorylated spinach nitrate reductase on serine-543, and inactivated the enzyme in the presence of nitrate reductase inhibitor, 14-3-3. PKIII was also very active in phosphorylating and inactivating Arabidopsis (Landsberg erecta) 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase 1 (HMGR1). PKI and PKII phosphorylated HMGR1 more slowly than PKIII, compared with their relative rates of phosphorylation of nitrate reductase. HMGR1 identical with those that are seen after phosphorylation of serine-577 by the sucrose non-fermenting (SNF1)-like PK, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Co A reductase kinase A (HRK-A), from cauliflower [Dale, Arró, Becerra, Morrice, Boronat, Hardie and Ferrer (1995) Eur. J. Biochem. 233, 506-513]. PKI was Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the absence of protein phosphatase (PP) inhibitors, and largely Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the presence of PP inhibitors (NaF and EGTA). The Ca2+-independent portion of PKI was inactivated by either PP2A or PP2C, while the Ca2+-dependent portion of PKI became increasingly activated during storage, which we presume was mimicking the effect of an unidentified PP. These findings indicate that PK1 is regulated by two functionally distinct phosphorylations. PKI had a molecular mass of 45 kDa on gel filtration and was active towards substrate peptides that terminated at the +2 residue from the phosphorylation site, whereas PKIII was inactive towards these peptides. PKII was Ca2+-stimulated under all conditions tested. PKIII was Ca2+-indepdented, inactivated by PP2A or PP2C, had a requirement for a hydrophobic residue in the +4 position of peptide substrates, had a molecular mass by gel filtration of approximately 140 kDa, and an antibody against the rye SNF1-related PK (RKIN1) recognized a 58 kDa subunit in fractions containing PKIII. These properties of PKIII are identical with those reported

  17. Mild water stress of Phaseolus vulgaris plants leads to reduced starch synthesis and extractable sucrose phosphate synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Vassey, T.L.; Sharkey, T.D. )

    1989-04-01

    Mild water stress, on the order of {minus}1.0 megapascals xylem water potential, can reduce the rate of photosynthesis and eliminate the inhibition of photosynthesis caused by O{sub 2} in water-stress-sensitive plants such as Phaseolus vulgaris. To investigate the lack of O{sub 2} inhibition of photosynthesis, we measured stromal and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, sucrose phosphate synthase, and partitioning of newly fixed carbon between starch and sucrose before, during, and after mild water stress. The extractable activity of the fructose bisphosphatases was unaffected by mild water stress. The extractable activity of SPS was inhibited by more than 60% in plants stressed to water potentials of {minus}0.9 megapascals. Water stress caused a decline in the starch/sucrose partitioning ratio indicating that starch synthesis was inhibited more than sucrose synthesis. We conclude that the reduced rate of photosynthesis during water stress is caused by stomatal closure, and that the restriction of CO{sub 2} supply caused by stomatal closure leads to a reduction in the capacity for both starch and sucrose synthesis. This causes the reduced O{sub 2} inhibition and abrupt CO{sub 2} saturation of photosynthesis.

  18. The Structure of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase from Halothermothrix orenii Reveals Its Mechanism of Action and Binding Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Chua,T.; Bujnicki, J.; Tan, T.; Huynh, F.; Patel, B.; Sivaraman, J.; Ogimoto, Y.; Miyano, K.; Sawa, H.

    2008-01-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyzes the transfer of a glycosyl group from an activated donor sugar, such as uridine diphosphate glucose (UDP-Glc), to a saccharide acceptor D-fructose 6-phosphate (F6P), resulting in the formation of UDP and D-sucrose-6'-phosphate (S6P). This is a central regulatory process in the production of sucrose in plants, cyanobacteria, and proteobacteria. Here, we report the crystal structure of SPS from the nonphotosynthetic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii and its complexes with the substrate F6P and the product S6P. SPS has two distinct Rossmann-fold domains with a large substrate binding cleft at the interdomain interface. Structures of two complexes show that both the substrate F6P and the product S6P bind to the A-domain of SPS. Based on comparative analysis of the SPS structure with other related enzymes, the donor substrate, nucleotide diphosphate glucose, binds to the B-domain of SPS. Furthermore, we propose a mechanism of catalysis by H. orenii SPS. Our findings indicate that SPS from H. orenii may represent a valid model for the catalytic domain of plant SPSs and thus may provide useful insight into the reaction mechanism of the plant enzyme.

  19. Alternative soaking media for the FDA procedure in the detection of salmonella from tomatoes and spinach leaf using phage magnetoelastic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, I.-Hsuan; Hu, Jiajia; Wang, Fengen; Horikawa, Shin; Barbaree, James M.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2016-05-01

    Efforts were made to incorporate the phage Magnetoelastic (ME) biosensor in FDA's Spinach Soaking procedures according to FDA 2015 BAM method. Three soaking materials (Lactose broth, LB broth, and Peptone water) and various soaking times were investigated. Using merely 100 Salmonella cells spiked on the produce surfaces, the phage biosensors detected Salmonella within 5 hours when soaking tomatoes in LB broth as opposed to taking up to 24 hours. Salmonella was detected on spinach leaves within 7 hours. These phage ME biosensors provide a promising rapid detection platform using LB broth in FDA's soaking procedures while shortening the incubation period.

  20. Effect of spinach cultivar and strain variation on survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on spinach leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks of infections associated with the consumption of fresh produce have increased in recent years. Bacterial cell surface appendages such as curli and the spinach leaf structure topography influence pathogen attachment and subsequent survival on spinach ...

  1. Conversion of L-sorbosone to L-ascorbic acid by a NADP-dependent dehydrogenase in bean and spinach leaf. [Phaseolus vulgaris L. ; Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Loewus, M.W.; Bedgar, D.L.; Saito, Kazumi; Loewus, F.A. )

    1990-11-01

    An NADP-dependent dehydrogenase catalyzing the conversion of L-sorbosone to L-ascorbic acid has been isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Spinacia oleracea L. and partially purified. It is stable at {minus}20{degree}C for up to 8 months. Molecular masses, as determined by gel filtration, were 21 and 29 kilodaltons for bean and spinach enzymes, respectively. K{sub m} for sorbosone were 12 {plus minus} 2 and 18 {plus minus} 2 millimolar and for NADP{sup +}, 0.14 {plus minus} 0.05 and 1.2 {plus minus} 0.5 millimolar, for bean and spinach, respectively. Lycorine, a purported inhibitor of L-ascorbic acid biosynthesis, had no effect on the reaction.

  2. Characterization of technetium species induced in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, A.V.; Krijger, G.C.; Elteren, J.T. van; Goeij, J.J.M. de

    1999-08-01

    Plants have the ability to accumulate the long-lived fission product {sup 99}Tc. In this work, an attempt was made to separate and characterize technetium species induced by spinach plants (Spinacia oleracea L.) grown on a TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} containing nutrient solution. Combination of data obtained with selective extraction and chromatography gave us insight into Tc speciation in spinach plants. The following classes of Tc species in spinach leaf homogenate were found after an incubation period of 11 d: TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} (ca. 7%), Tc{sup V}-cysteine (ca. 25%), Tc bound to insoluble cell-wall polysaccharides (ca. 17%), Tc bound to proteins (ca. 26%), and hydrophilic non-protein Tc species (ca. 25%). These results may yield a new insight into the metabolic pathways of Tc in plants.

  3. Leaf photosynthesis and carbohydrates of CO2-enriched maize and grain sorghum exposed to a short period of soil water deficit during vegetative development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought was imposed on 26-day old corn and grain sorghum grown in carbon dioxide (CO2) at 360 (ambient) or 720 (elevated) ppm. Midday leaf CO2 exchange rates (CER), and afternoon carbohydrate concentrations and activities of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) & adenosine 5’-diphosphoglucose pyrophosph...

  4. Expression Patterns, Activities and Carbohydrate-Metabolizing Regulation of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase, Sucrose Synthase and Neutral Invertase in Pineapple Fruit during Development and Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Wang, Wei; Du, Li-Qing; Xie, Jiang-Hui; Yao, Yan-Li; Sun, Guang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Differences in carbohydrate contents and metabolizing-enzyme activities were monitored in apical, medial, basal and core sections of pineapple (Ananas comosus cv. Comte de paris) during fruit development and ripening. Fructose and glucose of various sections in nearly equal amounts were the predominant sugars in the fruitlets, and had obvious differences until the fruit matured. The large rise of sucrose/hexose was accompanied by dramatic changes in sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and sucrose synthase (SuSy) activities. By contrast, neutral invertase (NI) activity may provide a mechanism to increase fruit sink strength by increasing hexose concentrations. Furthermore, two cDNAs of Ac-sps (accession no. GQ996582) and Ac-ni (accession no. GQ996581) were first isolated from pineapple fruits utilizing conserved amino-acid sequences. Homology alignment reveals that the amino acid sequences contain some conserved function domains. Transcription expression analysis of Ac-sps, Ac-susy and Ac-ni also indicated distinct patterns related to sugar accumulation and composition of pineapple fruits. It suggests that differential expressions of multiple gene families are necessary for sugar metabolism in various parts and developmental stages of pineapple fruit. A cycle of sucrose breakdown in the cytosol of sink tissues could be mediated through both Ac-SuSy and Ac-NI, and Ac-NI could be involved in regulating crucial steps by generating sugar signals to the cells in a temporally and spatially restricted fashion. PMID:22949808

  5. International collaborative study of the endogenous reference gene, sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of genetically modified rice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lingxi; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Haibo; Guo, Jinchao; Mazzara, Marco; Van den Eede, Guy; Zhang, Dabing

    2009-05-13

    One rice ( Oryza sativa ) gene, sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), has been proven to be a suitable endogenous reference gene for genetically modified (GM) rice detection in a previous study. Herein are the reported results of an international collaborative ring trial for validation of the SPS gene as an endogenous reference gene and its optimized qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems. A total of 12 genetically modified organism (GMO) detection laboratories from seven countries participated in the ring trial and returned their results. The validated results confirmed the species specificity of the method through testing 10 plant genomic DNAs, low heterogeneity, and a stable single-copy number of the rice SPS gene among 7 indica varieties and 5 japonica varieties. The SPS qualitative PCR assay was validated with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1%, which corresponded to about 230 copies of haploid rice genomic DNA, while the limit of quantification (LOQ) for the quantitative PCR system was about 23 copies of haploid rice genomic DNA, with acceptable PCR efficiency and linearity. Furthermore, the bias between the test and true values of eight blind samples ranged from 5.22 to 26.53%. Thus, we believe that the SPS gene is suitable for use as an endogenous reference gene for the identification and quantification of GM rice and its derivates. PMID:19326953

  6. Nitrogen Uptake in Spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, J.; VanBenthem, P.

    2013-12-01

    A plant's absorption of nitrogen can be encouraged by a variety of environmental factors, especially the application of fertilizers. As a common limiting factor in plant growth, not up taking enough nitrogen can be a result of an unhealthy plant. Moreover, as farmers seek out methods to increase growth of plants, fertilizers are used as a solution to the issue of nitrogen deficiency to incorporate additional nitrogen from chemical or organic sources, by not using the right fertilizer can greatly affect the plats. The point of this research project is to determine the effect of various fertilizers on the plant growth, and to correlate the measured nitrogen, water and chlorophyll content in spinach leaves. Spinach leaves were used because they are known to quickly uptake chemicals in the environment. The spinach plants were exposed to four different growing parameters, which are referred to as control, ammonium nitrate, MiracleGro , and organic. The spinach was originally placed in nitrogen deficient soil with only 2.2x10 4 weight percent (wt. %) nitrogen. The leaves in the control group were grown in this nitrogen deficient soil without any fertilizer added. Ammomium nitrate and MiracleGro were added to the spinach in the A and MG groups, respectively, and organic chicken stool was used for the O group. By using a spectral imaging system and flame combustion techniques, the chlorophyll content can be related to the nitrogen content in the spinach leaves. In these spinach leaves, nitrogen and chlorophyll content were measured, chlorophyll is a green pigment that plays a crucial role in producing nutrients for green plants. The lack of chlorophyll will allow the plant to become susceptible to diseases, so it is extremely important that the plants have a high content of chlorophyll. The role of nitrogen in chlorophyll is very important and helps in the creation of chlorophyll; therefore it is necessary that an appropriate amount of nitrogen is added for optimal growth

  7. Physical and mechanical properties of spinach for whole-surface online imaging inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiuying; Mo, Chang Y.; Chan, Diane E.; Peng, Yankun; Qin, Jianwei; Yang, Chun-Chieh; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kuanglin

    2011-06-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of baby spinach were investigated, including density, Young's modulus, fracture strength, and friction coefficient. The average apparent density of baby spinach leaves was 0.5666 g/mm3. The tensile tests were performed using parallel, perpendicular, and diagonal directions with respect to the midrib of each leaf. The test results showed that the mechanical properties of spinach are anisotropic. For the parallel, diagonal, and perpendicular test directions, the average values for the Young's modulus values were found to be 2.137MPa, 1.0841 MPa, and 0.3914 MPa, respectively, and the average fracture strength values were 0.2429 MPa, 0.1396 MPa, and 0.1113 MPa, respectively. The static and kinetic friction coefficient between the baby spinach and conveyor belt were researched, whose test results showed that the average coefficients of kinetic and maximum static friction between the adaxial (front side) spinach leaf surface and conveyor belt were 1.2737 and 1.3635, respectively, and between the abaxial (back side) spinach leaf surface and conveyor belt were 1.1780 and 1.2451 respectively. These works provide the basis for future development of a whole-surface online imaging inspection system that can be used by the commercial vegetable processing industry to reduce food safety risks.

  8. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  9. In vitro liberation of carotenoids from spinach and Asia salads after different domestic kitchen procedures.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jane N; Luu, Amy Y; Dragsted, Lars O; Arrigoni, Eva

    2016-07-15

    Green-leafy vegetables are rich in nutritionally important constituents including carotenoids. Their potential health benefits depend among others on their liberation from the plant matrix. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of particle size and heat treatments on lutein and β-carotene liberation from spinach and Asia salads by applying an in vitro digestion protocol and UHPLC analysis. Reduction of particle size resulted in a three- to fourfold increase in liberation of lutein and β-carotene when comparing whole leaf and puree preparations of spinach. However, this positive effect was shown to be nullified by the severe heat impact during stir-frying of minced spinach, showing that domestic treatments need to be chosen carefully to maximise carotenoid liberation. Steaming significantly improved lutein liberation from Asia salads, but had no or a negative effect in spinach samples, possibly due to differences in liberation or degradation between the two plant matrices. PMID:26948584

  10. Understanding the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation of banana Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) gene during fruit ripening: an insight into the functions of various cis-acting regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Roy, Sujit; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2010-05-01

    Recently, we have reported the characterization of promoter region of Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) gene in banana and investigated the role of some cis-elements/motifs, present in the promoter of SPS, in the transcriptional regulation of the gene. DNA-protein interaction studies have demonstrated the presence of specific trans-acting factors which showed specific interactions with ethylene, auxin, low temperature and light responsive elements in regulating SPS transcription. Transient expression analyses have demonstrated the functional significance of the various cis-acting regulatory elements present in banana SPS promoter in regulating SPS expression during ripening. (1) Here, we have further discussed the possible role of these regulatory sequences in the regulation of transcriptional network and comment on their function in relation to sucrose metabolism during banana fruit ripening. PMID:20139735

  11. Association analysis for oxalate concentration in spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening and breeding low-oxalate germplasm is a major objective in spinach breeding. This research aims to conduct association analysis and identify SNP markers associated with oxalate concentration in spinach germplasm. A total of 310 spinach genotypes including 300 USDA germplasm accessions and ...

  12. Spinach and mustard greens response to soil type, sulfur addition and lithium level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26o 8' N, Long. 97o 57' W) between Dec. 2006 and Feb 2007 to evaluate the effect of soil type, added sulfur and lithium level on the growth and leaf nutrients, particularly biofortified levels of Li and S, in spinach and mustard gree...

  13. Genetic diversity and association analysis of leafminer (Liriomyza langei) resistance in spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

    PubMed

    Shi, Ainong; Mou, Beiquan

    2016-08-01

    Leafminer (Liriomyza langei) is a major insect pest of many important agricultural crops, including spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Use of genetic resistance is an efficient, economic, and environment-friendly method to control this pest. The objective of this research was to conduct association analysis and identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with leafminer resistance in spinach germplasm. A total of 300 USDA spinach germplasm accessions were used for the association analysis of leafminer resistance. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) was used for genotyping and 783 SNPs from GBS were used for association analysis. The leafminer resistance showed a near normal distribution with a wide range from 1.1 to 11.7 stings per square centimeter leaf area, suggesting that the leafminer resistance in spinach is a complex trait controlled by multiple genes with minor effect in this spinach panel. Association analysis indicated that five SNP markers, AYZV02040968_7171, AYZV02076752_412, AYZV02098618_4615, AYZV02147304_383, and AYZV02271373_398, were associated with the leafminer resistance with LOD 2.5 or higher. The SNP markers may be useful for breeders to select plants and lines for leafminer resistance in spinach breeding programs through marker-assisted selection. PMID:27490441

  14. Characterization of multiple SPS knockout mutants reveals redundant functions of the four Arabidopsis sucrose phosphate synthase isoforms in plant viability, and strongly indicates that enhanced respiration and accelerated starch turnover can alleviate the blockage of sucrose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bahaji, Abdellatif; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Ricarte-Bermejo, Adriana; Sánchez-López, Ángela María; Muñoz, Francisco José; Romero, Jose M; Ruiz, María Teresa; Baslam, Marouane; Almagro, Goizeder; Sesma, María Teresa; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2015-09-01

    We characterized multiple knock-out mutants of the four Arabidopsis sucrose phosphate synthase (SPSA1, SPSA2, SPSB and SPSC) isoforms. Despite their reduced SPS activity, spsa1/spsa2, spsa1/spsb, spsa2/spsb, spsa2/spsc, spsb/spsc, spsa1/spsa2/spsb and spsa2/spsb/spsc mutants displayed wild type (WT) vegetative and reproductive morphology, and showed WT photosynthetic capacity and respiration. In contrast, growth of rosettes, flowers and siliques of the spsa1/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsc mutants was reduced compared with WT plants. Furthermore, these plants displayed a high dark respiration phenotype. spsa1/spsb/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsb/spsc seeds poorly germinated and produced aberrant and sterile plants. Leaves of all viable sps mutants, except spsa1/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsc, accumulated WT levels of nonstructural carbohydrates. spsa1/spsc leaves possessed high levels of metabolic intermediates and activities of enzymes of the glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways, and accumulated high levels of metabolic intermediates of the nocturnal starch-to-sucrose conversion process, even under continuous light conditions. Results presented in this work show that SPS is essential for plant viability, reveal redundant functions of the four SPS isoforms in processes that are important for plant growth and nonstructural carbohydrate metabolism, and strongly indicate that accelerated starch turnover and enhanced respiration can alleviate the blockage of sucrose biosynthesis in spsa1/spsc leaves. PMID:26259182

  15. Purification and characterization of recombinant sugarcane sucrose phosphate synthase expressed in E. coli and insect Sf9 cells: an importance of the N-terminal domain for an allosteric regulatory property.

    PubMed

    Sawitri, Widhi Dyah; Narita, Hirotaka; Ishizaka-Ikeda, Etsuko; Sugiharto, Bambang; Hase, Toshiharu; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyses the transfer of glycosyl group of uridine diphosphate glucose to fructose-6-phosphate to form sucrose-6-phosphate. Plant SPS plays a key role in photosynthetic carbon metabolisms, which activity is modulated by an allosteric activator glucose-6-phosphate (G6P). We produced recombinant sugarcane SPS using Escherichia coli and Sf9 insect cells to investigate its structure-function relationship. When expressed in E. coli, two forms of SPS with different sizes appeared; the larger was comparable in size with the authentic plant enzyme and the shorter was trimmed the N-terminal 20 kDa region off. In the insect cells, only enzyme with the authentic size was produced. We purified the trimmed SPS and the full size enzyme from insect cells and found their enzymatic properties differed significantly; the full size enzyme was activated allosterically by G6P, while the trimmed one showed a high activity even without G6P. We further introduced a series of N-terminal truncations up to 171 residue and found G6P-independent activity was enhanced by the truncation. These combined results indicated that the N-terminal region of sugarcane SPS is crucial for the allosteric regulation by G6P and may function like a suppressor domain for the enzyme activity. PMID:26826371

  16. Differential transcriptional regulation of banana sucrose phosphate synthase gene in response to ethylene, auxin, wounding, low temperature and different photoperiods during fruit ripening and functional analysis of banana SPS gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Swarup; Roy, Sujit; Das, Ranjan; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2008-12-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) (EC 2.3.1.14) is the key regulatory component in sucrose formation in banana (Musa acuminata subgroup Cavendish, cv Giant governor) fruit during ripening. This report illustrates differential transcriptional responses of banana SPS gene following ethylene, auxin, wounding, low temperature and different photoperiods during ripening in banana fruit. Whereas ethylene strongly stimulated SPS transcript accumulation, auxin and cold treatment only marginally increased the abundance of SPS mRNA level, while wounding negatively regulated SPS gene expression. Conversely, SPS transcript level was distinctly increased by constant exposure to white light. Protein level, enzymatic activity of SPS and sucrose synthesis were substantially increased by ethylene and increased exposure to white light conditions as compared to other treatments. To further study the transcriptional regulation of SPS in banana fruit, the promoter region of SPS gene was cloned and some cis-acting regulatory elements such as a reverse GCC-box ERE, two ARE motifs (TGTCTC), one LTRE (CCGAA), a GAGA-box (GAGA...) and a GATA-box LRE (GATAAG) were identified along with the TATA and CAAT-box. DNA-protein interaction studies using these cis-elements indicated a highly specific cis-trans interaction in the banana nuclear extract. Furthermore, we specifically studied the light responsive characteristics of GATA-box containing synthetic as well as native banana SPS promoter. Transient expression assays using banana SPS promoter have also indicated the functional importance of the SPS promoter in regulating gene expression. Together, these results provide insights into the transcriptional regulation of banana SPS gene in response to phytohormones and other environmental factors during fruit ripening. PMID:18830708

  17. Effect of Light and Chilling Temperatures on Chilling-sensitive and Chilling-resistant Plants. Pretreatment of Cucumber and Spinach Thylakoids in Vivo and in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Garber, M P

    1977-05-01

    The effects of chilling temperatures, in light or dark, on the isolated thylakoids and leaf discs of cucumber (Cucumis sativa L. "Marketer") and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. "Bloomsdale") were studied. The pretreatment of isolated thylakoids and leaf discs at 4 C in the dark did not affect the phenazine methosulfate-dependent phosphorylation, proton uptake, osmotic response to sucrose, Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase activity, or chlorophyll content. Exposure of cucumber cotyledon discs and isolated thylakoids of cucumber and spinach to 4 C in light resulted in a rapid inactivation of the thylakoids. The sequence of activities or components lost during inactivation (starting with the most sensitive) are: phenazine methosulfate-dependent cyclic phosphorylation, proton uptake, osmotic response to sucrose, Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase activity, and chlorophyll. The rate of loss of proton uptake, osmotic response to sucrose, Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase activity and chlorophyll is similar for isolated cucumber and spinach thylakoids, whereas spinach thylakoids are more resistant to the loss of phenazine methosulfate-dependent phosphorylation. The thylakoids of spinach leaf discs were unaffected by exposure to 4 C in light. The results question whether the extreme resistance of spinach thylakoids treated in vivo is solely a function of the chloroplast thylakoid membranes and establish the validity of using in vitro results to make inferences about cucumber thylakoids treated in vivo at 4 C in light. PMID:16659980

  18. Functional metagenomics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 interactions with spinach indigenous microorganisms during biofilm formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increase in foodborne outbreaks worldwide attributed to fresh fruit and vegetables suggests that produce may serve as an ecological niche for enteric pathogens. Here we examined the interaction of E. coli O157:H7 (EcO157) with spinach leaf microflora during co-colonization and establishment of a...

  19. Comparison of survival of Campylobacter jejuni in the phyllosphere with that in the rhizosphere of spinach and radish plants.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Maria T; Haxo, Aileen F; Bates, Anna H; Mandrell, Robert E

    2004-02-01

    Campylobacter jejuni has been isolated previously from market produce and has caused gastroenteritis outbreaks linked to produce. We have tested the ability of this human pathogen to utilize organic compounds that are present in leaf and root exudates and to survive in the plant environment under various conditions. Carbon utilization profiles revealed that C. jejuni can utilize many organic acids and amino acids available on leaves and roots. Despite the presence of suitable substrates in the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere, C. jejuni was unable to grow on lettuce and spinach leaves and on spinach and radish roots of plants incubated at 33 degrees C, a temperature that is conducive to its growth in vitro. However, C. jejuni was cultured from radish roots and from the spinach rhizosphere for at least 23 and 28 days, respectively, at 10 degrees C. This enteric pathogen also persisted in the rhizosphere of spinach for prolonged periods of time at 16 degrees C, a temperature at which many cool-season crops are grown. The decline rate constants of C. jejuni populations in the spinach and radish rhizosphere were 10- and 6-fold lower, respectively, than on healthy spinach leaves at 10 degrees C. The enhanced survival of C. jejuni in soil and in the rhizosphere may be a significant factor in its contamination cycle in the environment and may be associated with the sporadic C. jejuni incidence and campylobacteriosis outbreaks linked to produce. PMID:14766604

  20. Analysis of energy utilization in spinach processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chhinnan, M.S.; Singh, R.P.; Pedersen, L.D.; Carroad, P.A.; Rose, W.W.; Jacob, N.L.

    1980-03-01

    The equipment and methods used to monitor the electrical and thermal energy consumed in various unit operations in a spinach processing plant are described and the results of a processing plant energy audit are presented. It is concluded that it requires 6.5 MJ of natural gas and fuel oil and 0.072 MJ of electric power to process one kg of new spinach; the energy intensive operations in spinach processing are associated with exhaust boxes, blanchers, and retorts; uniform product flow through the canning line is essential to energy conservation; and design improvements are needed for the blancher, exhaust box, and retort. (LCL)

  1. Choline oxidation by intact chloroplasts isolated directly from spinach leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, P.; Hanson, A.D.

    1986-04-01

    Illuminated chloroplasts derived from spinach leaf protoplasts synthesize betaine from choline via the intermediate betaine aldehyde (BAL) (PNAS 82:3678). Photosynthetically active chloroplasts isolated directly from spinach leaves oxidized (/sup 14/C)choline in the light at rates 10 times higher (25-80 nmol/mg chl b) than protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Up to 20% of the (/sup 14/C)choline supplied during a 30 min incubation was oxidized in the light; the main product was (/sup 14/C)BAL. Rates of (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in darkness were only 5-30% of rates in light. Light-dependent (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation was abolished by DCMU and 5 mM DTT. Pre-illumination of the chloroplasts did not promote (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in darkness. The uncouplers nigericin and CCCP at concentrations which eliminated CO/sub 2/-dependent O/sub 2/ evolution did not affect (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in the light. They hypothesize that (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation is not dependent upon light activation of an enzymatic system or upon the electrochemical proton gradient but requires an oxidant generated in the light.

  2. Degradation kinetics and pathways of spirotetramat in different parts of spinach plant and in the soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojun; Meng, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yanyan; Gu, Haotian; Ren, Yajun; Lu, Chunliang

    2016-08-01

    Spirotetramat is a new pesticide against a broad spectrum of sucking insects and exhibits a unique property with a two-way systemicity. In order to formulate a scientific rationale for a reasonable spray dose and the safe interval period of 22.4 % spirotetramat suspension concentrate on controlling vegetable pests, we analyzed degradation dynamics and pathways of spirotetramat in different parts of spinach plant (leaf, stalk, and root) and in the soil. We conducted experimental trials under field conditions and adopted a simple and reliable method (dispersive solid phase extraction) combined with liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry to evaluate the dissipation rates of spirotetramat residue and its metabolites. The results showed that the spirotetramat was degraded into different metabolite residues in different parts of spinach plant (leaf, stalk, and root) and in the soil. Specifically, spirotetramat was degraded into B-keto, B-glu, and B-enol in the leaf; B-glu and B-enol in the stalk; and only B-enol in the root. In the soil where the plants grew, spirotetramat followed a completely different pathway compared to the plant and degraded into B-keto and B-mono. Regardless of different degradation pathways, the dissipation dynamic equations of spirotetramat in different parts of spinach plant and in the soil were all based on the first-order reaction dynamic equations. This work provides guidelines for the safe use of spirotetramat in spinach fields, which would help prevent potential health threats to consumers. PMID:27083908

  3. Persistence of poultry associated Salmonella spp. on spinach plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Pre-harvest spinach contamination can occur via irrigation water and can influence the persistence of Salmonella on spinach leaves. Salmonella persistence on spinach plants should be evaluated as nearby poultry farms can be a critical source of contaminated water run-off. Purpose: The...

  4. THREE NEW RACES OF THE SPINACH DOWNY MILDEW PATHOGEN IDENTIFIED BY A MODIFIED SET OF SPINACH DIFFERENTIALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spinach downy mildew, caused by Peronospora farinosa f. sp. spinaciae, is the most economically important disease of spinach worldwide. In the past few years, field observations in both the United States and the European Union indicated that spinach cultivars resistant to the seven previously descr...

  5. Effects of plant maturity and bacterial inoculum level on the colonization and internalization of escherichia coli 0157:H7 in growing spinach leaves.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence of foodborne outbreaks linked to fresh produce has increased in the United States. Particularly noteworthy, was the 2006 Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreak associated with pre-packaged baby spinach. The study aimed to determine whether E. coli O157:H7 would be present in the aerial leaf...

  6. Inactivation of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 Internalized in Romaine Lettuce and Baby Spinach Leaves:Sodium Hypochlorite Wash vs. Irradiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic bacteria which are internalized in leaf tissues are protected from the antimicrobial effects of surface treatments. Ionizing radiation is known to penetrate foods, but the efficacy of the process against internalized bacteria is unknown. Leaves of romaine lettuce and baby spinach were cut...

  7. Relative Efficacy of Sodium Hypochlorite Wash Versus Irradiation to Inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 Internalized in Leaves of Romaine Lettuce and Baby Spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic bacteria which are internalized in leaf tissues are protected from the antimicrobial effects of surface treatments. Ionizing radiation is known to penetrate foods, but the efficacy of the process against internalized bacteria is unknown. Leaves of romaine lettuce and baby spinach were cut...

  8. Sans study of spinach CF 1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmettes, P.; Girault, G.; Berger, G.; Galmiche, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    SANS experiments were performed on solutions of spinach chloroplast CF 1-ATPase in heavy water. Removal of the ɛ subunit partially activates the enzyme and further addition of dithiothreitol fully activates it. Molar masses and gyration radii values are given for these different conditions.

  9. Microtubules in Mesophyll Cells of Nonacclimated and Cold-Acclimated Spinach 1

    PubMed Central

    Bartolo, Michael E.; Carter, John V.

    1991-01-01

    Responses of cortical microtubules in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv Bloomsdale) mesophyll cells to freezing, thawing, supercooling, and dehydration were assessed. Microtubules were visualized using a modified procedure for indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Leaf sections of nonacclimated and cold-acclimated spinach were slowly frozen to various temperatures, fixed while frozen, and microtubules immunolabelled. Both nonacclimated and cold-acclimated cells exhibited nearly complete microtubule depolymerization after ice formation. After 1 hour thawing at 23°C, microtubules in both nonacclimated and cold-acclimated cells repolymerized. With time, however, microtubules in nonacclimated cells again depolymerized. Since microtubules in cells of leaf tissue frozen slowly are subjected to dehydration as well as subzero temperatures, these stresses were applied separately and their effects on microtubules noted. Supercooling induced microtubule depolymerization in both nonacclimated and cold-acclimated cells, but to a smaller extent than did freezing. Exposing leaf sections to solutions of sorbitol (a cell wall-penetrating osmoticum) or polyethylene glycol 10,000 (a nonpenetrating osmoticum) at room temperature caused microtubule depolymerization. The effects of low temperature and dehydration are roughly additive in producing the observed microtubule responses during freezing. Only small differences in microtubule stability were resolved between nonacclimated and cold-acclimated cells. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:16668366

  10. Rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves using phage-immobilized magnetoelastic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Shin; Li, Suiqiong; Chai, Yating; Park, Mi-Kyung; Shen, Wen; Barbaree, James M.; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the use of magnetoelastic biosensors for the rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves. The biosensors used in this investigation were comprised of a strip-shaped, goldcoated sensor platform (2 mm-long) diced from a ferromagnetic, amorphous alloy and a filamentous fd-tet phage which specifically binds with S. typhimurium. After surface blocking with bovine serum albumin, these biosensors were, without any preceding sample preparation, directly placed on wet spinach leaves inoculated with various concentrations of S. typhimurium. Upon contact with cells, the phage binds S. typhimurium to the sensor thereby increasing the total mass of the sensor. This change in mass causes a corresponding decrease in the sensor's resonant frequency. After 25 min, the sensors were collected from the leaf surface and measurements of the resonant frequency were performed immediately. The total assay time was less than 30 min. The frequency changes for measurement sensors (i.e., phageimmobilized) were found to be statistically different from those for control sensors (sensors without phage), down to 5 × 106 cells/ml. The detection limit may be improved by using smaller, micron-sized sensors that will have a higher probability of contacting Salmonella on the rough surfaces of spinach leaves.

  11. Proximate composition and mineral content of two edible species of Cnidoscolus (tree spinach).

    PubMed

    Kuti, J O; Kuti, H O

    1999-01-01

    Proximate composition and mineral content of raw and cooked leaves of two edible tree spinach species (Cnidoscolus chayamansa and C. aconitifolius), known locally as 'chaya', were determined and compared with that of a traditional green vegetable, spinach (Spinicia oleraceae). Results of the study indicated that the edible leafy parts of the two chaya species contained significantly (p<0.05) greater amounts of crude protein, crude fiber, Ca, K, Fe, ascorbic acid and beta-carotene than the spinach leaf. However, no significant (p>0.05) differences were found in nutritional composition and mineral content between the chaya species, except minor differences in the relative composition of fatty acids, protein and amino acids. Cooking of chaya leaves slightly reduced nutritional composition of both chaya species. Cooking is essential prior to consumption to inactivate the toxic hydrocyanic glycosides present in chaya leaves. Based on the results of this study, the edible chaya leaves may be good dietary sources of minerals (Ca, K and Fe) and vitamins (ascorbic acid and beta-carotene). PMID:10540979

  12. Toxicity effects of olive-mill wastewater on growth, photosynthesis and pollen morphology of spinach plants.

    PubMed

    Asfi, Maria; Ouzounidou, Georgia; Panajiotidis, Sampson; Therios, Ioannis; Moustakas, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Olive mill-wastewater (OMW), a by-product of the olive oil extraction process, represents a significant environmental problem in Mediterranean areas. We studied the impact of OMW dilutions (1:10 and 1:20) on growth, photosynthesis, proline and sugar accumulation as well as on pollen morphology of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) plants, to evaluate the application of OMW dilutions as pretreatment technique, prior to land disposal. Biomass, height, total chlorophyll and leaf area of spinach declined progressively with decreasing OMW dilution. Since fatty acids and phenolic compounds (present in the OMW) are considered precursors in the polymerization of sporopollenin, we suggest that under OMW treatment spinach plants seem to 'direct' the excess of these substances in the production and formation of increased pollen grains. Proline did not accumulate under OMW stress, but decreased possible due to transport to pollens in response to increased demand to over-production of pollens. Both OMW dilutions resulted in a decreased efficiency of PSII functioning and an increased excitation pressure (1-q(p)). It is concluded that, higher than 1:20 OMW dilutions should be used, and/or additional treatment should be applied before use of the OMW in the environment. PMID:22455663

  13. A Spinach molecular beacon triggered by strand displacement

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Sanchita; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    We have re-engineered the fluorescent RNA aptamer Spinach to be activated in a sequence-dependent manner. The original Spinach aptamer was extended at its 5′- and 3′-ends to create Spinach.ST, which is predicted to fold into an inactive conformation and thus prevent association with the small molecule fluorophore DFHBI. Hybridization of a specific trigger oligonucleotide to a designed toehold leads to toehold-initiated strand displacement and refolds Spinach into the active, fluorophore-binding conformation. Spinach.ST not only specifically detects its target oligonucleotide but can discriminate readily against single-nucleotide mismatches. RNA amplicons produced during nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) of DNA or RNA targets could be specifically detected and reported in real-time by conformational activation of Spinach.ST generated by in vitro transcription. In order to adapt any target sequence to detection by a Spinach reporter we used a primer design technique that brings together otherwise distal toehold sequences via hairpin formation. The same techniques could potentially be used to adapt common Spinach reporters to non-nucleic acid analytes, rather than by making fusions between aptamers and Spinach. PMID:24942625

  14. SpinachDB: A Well-Characterized Genomic Database for Gene Family Classification and SNP Information of Spinach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Dong; Tan, Hua-Wei; Zhu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), which originated in central and western Asia, belongs to the family Amaranthaceae. Spinach is one of most important leafy vegetables with a high nutritional value as well as being a perfect research material for plant sex chromosome models. As the completion of genome assembly and gene prediction of spinach, we developed SpinachDB (http://222.73.98.124/spinachdb) to store, annotate, mine and analyze genomics and genetics datasets efficiently. In this study, all of 21702 spinach genes were annotated. A total of 15741 spinach genes were catalogued into 4351 families, including identification of a substantial number of transcription factors. To construct a high-density genetic map, a total of 131592 SSRs and 1125743 potential SNPs located in 548801 loci of spinach genome were identified in 11 cultivated and wild spinach cultivars. The expression profiles were also performed with RNA-seq data using the FPKM method, which could be used to compare the genes. Paralogs in spinach and the orthologous genes in Arabidopsis, grape, sugar beet and rice were identified for comparative genome analysis. Finally, the SpinachDB website contains seven main sections, including the homepage; the GBrowse map that integrates genome, genes, SSR and SNP marker information; the Blast alignment service; the gene family classification search tool; the orthologous and paralogous gene pairs search tool; and the download and useful contact information. SpinachDB will be continually expanded to include newly generated robust genomics and genetics data sets along with the associated data mining and analysis tools. PMID:27148975

  15. SpinachDB: A Well-Characterized Genomic Database for Gene Family Classification and SNP Information of Spinach

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), which originated in central and western Asia, belongs to the family Amaranthaceae. Spinach is one of most important leafy vegetables with a high nutritional value as well as being a perfect research material for plant sex chromosome models. As the completion of genome assembly and gene prediction of spinach, we developed SpinachDB (http://222.73.98.124/spinachdb) to store, annotate, mine and analyze genomics and genetics datasets efficiently. In this study, all of 21702 spinach genes were annotated. A total of 15741 spinach genes were catalogued into 4351 families, including identification of a substantial number of transcription factors. To construct a high-density genetic map, a total of 131592 SSRs and 1125743 potential SNPs located in 548801 loci of spinach genome were identified in 11 cultivated and wild spinach cultivars. The expression profiles were also performed with RNA-seq data using the FPKM method, which could be used to compare the genes. Paralogs in spinach and the orthologous genes in Arabidopsis, grape, sugar beet and rice were identified for comparative genome analysis. Finally, the SpinachDB website contains seven main sections, including the homepage; the GBrowse map that integrates genome, genes, SSR and SNP marker information; the Blast alignment service; the gene family classification search tool; the orthologous and paralogous gene pairs search tool; and the download and useful contact information. SpinachDB will be continually expanded to include newly generated robust genomics and genetics data sets along with the associated data mining and analysis tools. PMID:27148975

  16. LEAFMINER-RESISTANT SPINACH GERMPLASM 03-04-63

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture announces the release of a spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) breeding line 03-04-63. 03-04-63 is a semi-flat type of spinach with dark green, semi-erect leaves. The line may be suitable for commercial production, and is suitable...

  17. Release of Spinach Germplasm With Resistance to Leafminers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture announces the release of a spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) breeding line 03-04-63. 03-04-63 is a semi-flat type of spinach with dark green, semi-erect leaves. The line may be suitable for commercial production, and is suitable...

  18. Short-term and long-term effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates of spinach.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, K; Kurata, K

    2003-01-01

    In this study, spinach plants were grown under atmospheric and low pressure conditions with constant O2 and CO2 partial pressures, and the effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates were investigated. CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates of spinach grown under atmospheric pressure increased after short-term exposure to low total pressure due to the enhancement of leaf conductance. However, gas exchange rates of plants grown at 25 kPa total pressure were not greater than those grown at atmospheric pressure. Stomatal pore length and width were significantly smaller in leaves grown at low total pressure. This result suggested that gas exchange rates of plants grown under low total pressure were not stimulated even with the enhancement of gas diffusion because the stomatal size and stomatal aperture decreased. PMID:12580188

  19. Short-term and long-term effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates of spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, K.; Kurata, K.

    In this study, spinach plants were grown under atmospheric and low pressure conditions with constant O2 and CO2 partial pressures, and the effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates were investigated. CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates of spinach grown under atmospheric pressure increased after short-term exposure to low total pressure due to the enhancement of leaf conductance. However, gas exchange rates of plants grown at 25 kPa total pressure were not greater than those grown at atmospheric pressure. Stomatal pore length and width were significantly smaller in leaves grown at low total pressure. This result suggested that gas exchange rates of plants grown under low total pressure were not stimulated even with the enhancement of gas diffusion because the stomatal size and stomatal aperture decreased.

  20. cDNA sequence and heterologous expression of monomeric spinach pullulanase: multiple isomeric forms arise from the same polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Renz, A; Schikora, S; Schmid, R; Kossmann, J; Beck, E

    1998-05-01

    The spinach pullulanase gene was cloned and sequenced using peptide sequences of the purified enzyme as a starting point and employing PCR techniques and cDNA library screening. Its open reading frame codes for a protein of 964 amino acids which represents a precursor of the pullulanase. The N-terminal transit peptide consists of 65 amino acids, and the mature protein, comprising 899 amino acids, has a calculated molecular mass of 99kDa. Pullulanase is a member of the alpha-amylase family. In addition to a characteristic catalytic (beta/alpha)8-barrel domain, it contains a domain, F, that is specific for branching and debranching enzymes. Pullulanase cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified protein was compared with the enzyme from spinach leaves. Identity of the two proteins was confirmed in terms of catalytic properties, N-terminal amino acid sequences and molecular masses. The pullulanase produced by E. coli showed the same microheterogeneity as the spinach leaf enzyme: it could be resolved into two substrate-induced forms by electrophoresis in amylopectin-containing polyacrylamide gels, and, in the absence of substrate, into several free forms (charge isomers) by isoelectric focusing or chromatofocusing. Rechromatofocusing of single free forms resulted in the originally observed pattern of molecular forms. However, heterogeneity of the protein disappeared on isoelectric focusing under completely denaturing conditions when only one protein band was observed. Post-translational modifications such as glycosylation and phosphorylation could be excluded as potential explanations for the protein heterogeneity. Therefore the microheterogeneity of spinach leaf pullulanase results from neither genetic variation nor post-translational modifications, but is a property of the single unmodified gene product. The different interconvertible forms of the pullulanase represent protein populations of different tertiary structure of the same polypeptide. PMID

  1. Impact of pigeon pea biochar on cadmium mobility in soil and transfer rate to leafy vegetable spinach.

    PubMed

    Coumar, M Vassanda; Parihar, R S; Dwivedi, A K; Saha, J K; Rajendiran, S; Dotaniya, M L; Kundu, S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction of heavy metals in the environment by various anthropogenic activities has become a potential treat to life. Among the heavy metals, cadmium (Cd) shows relatively high soil mobility and has high phyto-mammalian toxicity. Integration of soil remediation and ecosystem services, such as carbon sequestration in soils through organic amendments, may provide an attractive land management option for contaminated sites. The application of biochar in agriculture has recently received much attention globally due to its associated multiple benefits, particularly, long-term carbon storage in soil. However, the application of biochar from softwood crop residue for heavy metal immobilization, as an alternative to direct field application, has not received much attention. Hence, a pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of pigeon pea biochar on cadmium mobility in a soil-plant system in cadmium-spiked sandy loam soil. The biochar was prepared from pigeon pea stalk through a slow pyrolysis method at 300 °C. The experiment was designed with three levels of Cd (0, 5, and 10 mg Cd kg(-1) soil) and three levels of biochar (0, 2.5, and 5 g kg(-1) soil) using spinach as a test crop. The results indicate that with increasing levels of applied cadmium at 5 and 10 mg kg(-1) soil, the dry matter yield (DMY) of spinach leaf decreased by 9.84 and 18.29 %, respectively. However, application of biochar (at 2.5 and 5 g kg(-1) soil) significantly increased the dry matter yield of spinach leaf by 5.07 and 15.02 %, respectively, and root by 14.0 and 24.0 %, respectively, over the control. Organic carbon content in the post-harvest soil increased to 34.9 and 60.5 % due to the application of biochar 2.5 and 5 g kg(-1) soil, respectively. Further, there was a reduction in the diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable cadmium in the soil and in transfer coefficient values (soil to plant), as well as its concentrations in spinach leaf and root, indicating that

  2. Growth Conditions To Reduce Oxalic Acid Content of Spinach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Rutzke, Corinne

    2003-01-01

    A controlled-environment agricultural (CEA) technique to increase the nutritive value of spinach has been developed. This technique makes it possible to reduce the concentration of oxalic acid in spinach leaves. It is desirable to reduce the oxalic acid content because oxalic acid acts as an anti-nutritive calcium-binding component. More than 30 years ago, an enzyme (an oxidase) that breaks down oxalic acid into CO2 and H2O2 was discovered and found to be naturally present in spinach leaves. However, nitrate, which can also be present because of the use of common nitratebased fertilizers, inactivates the enzyme. In the CEA technique, one cuts off the supply of nitrate and keeps the spinach plants cool while providing sufficient oxygen. This technique provides the precise environment that enables the enzyme to naturally break down oxalate. The result of application of this technique is that the oxalate content is reduced by 2/3 in one week.

  3. Functional Metagenomics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Interactions with Spinach Indigenous Microorganisms during Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Michelle Q.; Xue, Kai; Brandl, Maria T.; Liu, Feifei; Wu, Liyou; Louie, Jacqueline W.; Mandrell, Robert E.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2012-01-01

    The increase in foodborne outbreaks worldwide attributed to fresh fruit and vegetables suggests that produce may serve as an ecological niche for enteric pathogens. Here we examined the interaction of E. coli O157:H7 (EcO157) with spinach leaf indigenous microorganisms during co-colonization and establishment of a mixed biofilm on a stainless steel surface. Stainless steel surface was selected to mimic the surface of produce-processing equipment, where retention of foodborne pathogens such as EcO157 could serve as a potential source for transmission. We observed a positive effect of spinach-associated microbes on the initial attachment of EcO157, but an antagonistic effect on the EcO157 population at the later stage of biofilm formation. Metagenomic analyses of the biofilm community with the GeoChip revealed an extremely diverse community (gene richness, 23409; Shannon-Weiner index H, 9.55). Presence of EcO157 in the mixed biofilm resulted in a significant decrease in the community α-diversity (t test, P<0.05), indicating a putative competition between the pathogen and indigenous spinach microbes. The decrease in the β-diversity of the EcO157-inoculated biofilm at 48 h (ANOVA, P<0.05) suggested a convergent shift in functional composition in response to EcO157 invasion. The success of EcO157 in the mixed biofilm is likely associated with its metabolic potential in utilizing spinach nutrients: the generation time of EcO157 in spinach lysates at 28°C is ∼ 38 min, which is comparable to that in rich broth. The significant decrease in the abundance of many genes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycling in the EcO157-inoculated biofilms (t test, P<0.05) further support our conclusion that competition for essential macronutrients is likely the primary interaction between the EcO157 and indigenous spinach-biofilm species. PMID:22957052

  4. Functional properties of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) phytochemicals and bioactives.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Joseph L; Moreau, Régis

    2016-08-10

    Overwhelming evidence indicates that diets rich in fruits and vegetables are protective against common chronic diseases, such as cancer, obesity and cardiovascular disease. Leafy green vegetables, in particular, are recognized as having substantial health-promoting activities that are attributed to the functional properties of their nutrients and non-essential chemical compounds. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is widely regarded as a functional food due to its diverse nutritional composition, which includes vitamins and minerals, and to its phytochemicals and bioactives that promote health beyond basic nutrition. Spinach-derived phytochemicals and bioactives are able to (i) scavenge reactive oxygen species and prevent macromolecular oxidative damage, (ii) modulate expression and activity of genes involved in metabolism, proliferation, inflammation, and antioxidant defence, and (iii) curb food intake by inducing secretion of satiety hormones. These biological activities contribute to the anti-cancer, anti-obesity, hypoglycemic, and hypolipidemic properties of spinach. Despite these valuable attributes, spinach consumption remains low in comparison to other leafy green vegetables. This review examines the functional properties of spinach in cell culture, animals and humans with a focus on the molecular mechanisms by which spinach-derived non-essential phytochemicals and bioactives, such as glycolipids and thylakoids, impart their health benefits. PMID:27353735

  5. Role of curli and plant cultivation conditions on Escherichia coli O157:H7 internalization into spinach grown on hydroponics and in soil.

    PubMed

    Macarisin, Dumitru; Patel, Jitendra; Sharma, Vijay K

    2014-03-01

    Contamination of fresh produce could represent a public health concern because no terminal kill step is applied during harvest or at the processing facility to kill pathogens. In addition, once contaminated, pathogens may internalize into produce and be protected from disinfectants during the postharvest processing step. The objective of the current study was to determine the potential internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 into spinach roots and subsequent transfer to the edible parts. Because curli are involved in biofilm formation, we investigated whether their presence influence the internalization of E. coli O157:H7 into spinach. Further, the effect of the spinach cultivar on E. coli O157:H7 internalization was evaluated. Spinach plants were grown in contaminated soil as well as hydroponically to prevent mechanical wounding of the roots and inadvertent transfer of pathogens from the contamination source to the non-exposed plant surfaces. Results showed that E. coli O157:H7 could internalize into hydroponically grown intact spinach plants through the root system and move to the stem and leaf level. The incidence of internalization was significantly higher in hydroponically grown plants when roots were exposed to 7 log CFU/mL compared to those exposed to 5 log CFU/mL. The effect of cultivar on E. coli O157:H7 internalization was not significant (P>0.05) for the analyzed spinach varieties, internalization incidences showing almost equal distribution between Space and Waitiki, 49.06% and 50.94% respectively. Wounding of the root system in hydroponically grown spinach increased the incidence of E. coli O157:H7 internalization and translocation to the edible portions of the plant. Experimental contamination of the plants grown in soil resulted in a greater number of internalization events then in those grown hydroponically, suggesting that E. coli O157:H7 internalization is dependent on root damage, which is more likely to occur when plants are grown in soil

  6. Biosynthesis of sucrose and mannitol as a function of leaf age in celery (Apium graveolens L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.M.; Fellman, J.K.; Loescher, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    In celery (Apium graveolens L.), the two major translocated carbohydrates are sucrose and the acyclic polyol mannitol. Their metabolism, however, is different and their specific functions are uncertain. To compare their roles in carbon partitioning and sink-source transitions, developmental changes in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ labeling, pool sizes, and key enzyme activities in leaf tissues were examined. The proportion of label in mannitol increased dramatically with leaf maturation whereas that in sucrose remained fairly constant. Mannitol content, however, was high in all leaves and sucrose content increased as leaves developed. Activities of mannose-6-P reductase, cytoplasmic and chloroplastic fructose-1,6-bis-phosphatases, sucrose phosphate synthase, and sucrose synthase increased with leaf maturation and decreased as leaves senesced. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and nonreversible glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase activities rose as leaves developed but did not decrease. Thus, sucrose is produced in all photosynthetically active leaves whereas mannitol is synthesized primarily in mature leaves and stored in all leaves. Onset of sucrose export in celery may result from sucrose accumulation in expanding leaves, but mannitol export is clearly unrelated to mannitol concentration. Mannitol export, however, appears to coincide with increased mannitol biosynthesis. Although mannitol and sucrose arise from a common precursor in celery, subsequent metabolism and transport must be regulated separately.

  7. Novel antifungal peptides from Ceylon spinach seeds.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Ng, T B

    2001-11-01

    Two novel antifungal peptides, designated alpha- and beta-basrubrins, respectively, were isolated from seeds of the Ceylon spinach Basella rubra. The purification procedure involved saline extraction, (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex peptide column. alpha- and beta-basrubrins exhibited a molecular weight of 4.3 and 5 kDa, respectively. They inhibited translation in a rabbit reticulocyte system with an IC(50) value of 400 and 100 nM, respectively. alpha- and beta-basrubrin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by (79.4 +/- 7.8)% and (54.6 +/- 3.6)%, respectively, at a concentration of 400 microM, and (10.56 +/- 0.92)% and (2.12 +/- 0.81)%, respectively, at a concentration of 40 microM. Both alpha- and beta-basrubrins exerted potent antifungal activity toward Botrytis cinerea, Mycosphaerella arachidicola, and Fusarium oxysporum. PMID:11688973

  8. Effect of Greens and Soil Type, Sulfur Addition and Lithium Level on Leaf Constituents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26o 8' N, Long. 97o 57' W) between Dec. 2006 and Feb 2007 to evaluate the effect of soil type, added sulfur and lithium level on the growth and leaf nutrients, particularly biofortified levels of Li and S, in spinach and mustard gree...

  9. 3-Ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is not similar to other condensing enzymes of fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Tai, H; Jaworski, J G

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding spinach (Spinacia oleracea) 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (KAS III), which catalyzes the initial condensing reaction in fatty acid biosynthesis, was isolated. Based on the amino acid sequence of tryptic digests of purified spinach KAS III, degenerate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed and used to amplify a 612-bp fragment from first-strand cDNA of spinach leaf RNA. A root cDNA library was probed with the PCR fragment, and a 1920-bp clone was isolated. Its deduced amino acid sequence matched the sequences of the tryptic digests obtained from the purified KAS III. Northern analysis confirmed that it was expressed in both leaf and root. The clone contained a 1218-bp open reading frame coding for 405 amino acids. The identity of the clone was confirmed by expression in Escherichia coli BL 21 as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. The deduced amino acid sequence was 48 and 45% identical with the putative KAS III of Porphyra umbilicalis and KAS III of E. coli, respectively. It also had a strong local homology to the plant chalcone synthases but had little homology with other KAS isoforms from plants, bacteria, or animals. PMID:8290632

  10. First report of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus infecting spinach in California.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2009, plants from two spinach (Spinacia oleracea) experimental fields in Monterey County and one commercial spinach field in Ventura County of California exhibited vein clearing, mottling, interveinal yellowing and stunting symptoms. For experimental fields, up to 44% of spinach plants were infec...

  11. Light intensity is the main factor affecting fresh market spinach tolerance for Phenmedipham

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The few available herbicides for fresh market spinach do not provide adequate weed control, and there is need for additional herbicide tools. Phenmedipham is registered for use in processing spinach but not in fresh spinach due to its crop injury potential and short time window from application to h...

  12. Colonization of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) by GFP-tagged verticillium dahliae.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soilborne fungus, Verticillium dahliae, causes wilt in a wide range of hosts, including spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). The interaction between a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged V. dahliae strain and spinach was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The roots of spinach seedlings...

  13. A new endornavirus species infecting Malabar spinach (Basella alba L.).

    PubMed

    Okada, Ryo; Kiyota, Eri; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Toshiyuki, Fukuhara; Valverde, Rodrigo A

    2014-04-01

    A putative new endornavirus was isolated from Malabar spinach (Basella alba). The viral dsRNA consisted of 14,027 nt with a single ORF that coded for a polyprotein of 4,508 aa. The genome organization was similar to that of four other endornaviruses. Conserved domains for helicase-1, capsular synthase, UDP-glucose-glycosyltransferase (UGT), and RdRp were detected. Infected plants were phenotypically undistinguishable from healthy ones. The name Basella alba endornavirus is proposed for the virus isolated from Malabar spinach. PMID:24122112

  14. Influence of Extracellular Cellulose and Colanic Acid Production on the Survival of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli on Spinach and Lettuce after Chlorine Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Ching; Chen, Jinru; Frank, Joseph F

    2016-04-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains produce extracellular cellulose and colanic acid, which may influence stress tolerance. This study investigates the role of these extracellular polymers on the tolerance of STEC to chlorine treatment after attachment to lettuce and spinach. Four STEC strains, two wild-type cellulose-producing and their cellulose-deficient derivatives, were used. One strain pair produced colanic acid in addition to cellulose. Spinach and lettuce with attached cells were treated with chlorinated water (50 and 150 ppm of free chlorine). The production of the extracellular polymers by the planktonic cells had small, but significant, effects on the survival of the attached pathogen when subjected to chlorine treatment. On the lettuce surface, the colanic acid-producing, cellulose-negative mutant (49d) was most susceptible to the treatment, declining significantly (P < 0.05) in population by 0.9 and 1.4 log units after treatment with 50 and 150 ppm of chlorine, respectively. Chlorine treatment reduced populations of cellulose-deficient cells on the intact spinach surface 1.2 log units more than the wild type when treated with 150 ppm of chlorine (P < 0.05). However, populations of cellulose-producing cells were reduced by 1.5 log units more than their mutant counterparts when the cells also produced colanic acid (P < 0.05). A greater proportion of cells attached to the spinach leaf edge were injured by chlorine treatment compared with attached to the leaf surface. These results indicate that extracellular polymers do not generally increase the ability of STEC to survive chlorine treatment and that any effects on survival are influenced by location of attachment, type of leafy green, and concentration of chlorine. PMID:27052873

  15. Role of ascorbate in detoxifying ozone in the apoplast of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. ) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Luwe, M.W.F.; Takahama, Umeo; Heber, U. )

    1993-03-01

    Both reduced and oxidized ascorbate (AA and DHA) are present in the aqueous phase of the extracellular space, the apoplast, of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves. Fumigation with 0.3 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1] of ozone resulted in ozone uptake by the leaves close to 0.9 pmol cm[sup [minus]2] of leaf surface area s[sup [minus]1]. Apoplastic AA was slowly oxidized by ozone. The initial decrease of apoplastic AA was <0.1 pmol cm[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1]. The apoplastic ratio of AA to (AA + DHA) decreased within 6 h of fumigation from 0.9 to 0.1. Initially, the concentration of (AA + DHA) did not change in the apoplast, but when fumigation was continued, DHA increased and AA remained at a very low constant level. After fumigation was discontinued, DHA decreased very slowly in the apoplast, reaching control level after 70 h. Insufficient AA reached the apoplast from the cytosol to detoxify ozone in the apoplast when the ozone flux into the leaves was 0.9 pmol cm[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1]. The transport of DHA back into the cytosol was slower than AA transport into the apoplast. No dehydroascorbate reductase activity could be detected in the apoplast of spinach leaves. In contrast to its extracellular redox state, the intracellular redox state of AA did not change appreciably during a 24-h fumigation period. However, intracellular glutathione became slowly oxidized. At the beginning of fumigation, 90% of the total glutathione was reduced. Only 10% was reduced after 24-h exposure of the leaves to 0.3 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1] of ozone. Necrotic leaf damage started to become visible when fumigation was extended beyond a 24-h period. A close correlation between the extent of damage, on the one hand, and the AA content and the ascorbate redox state of whole leaves, on the other, was observed after 48 h of fumigation. Only the youngest leaves that contained high ascorbate concentrations did not exhibit necrotic leaf damage after 48 h. 30 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Design, Synthesis, and Application of Spinach Molecular Beacons Triggered by Strand Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Sanchita; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    We describe design parameters for the synthesis and analytical application of a label-free RNA molecular beacon, termed Spinach.ST. The RNA aptamer Spinach fluoresces upon binding the small-molecule fluorophore DFHBI ((Z)-4-(3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-dimethyl-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-one). Spinach has been reengineered by extending its 5′- and 3′-ends to create Spinach.ST, which is predicted to fold into an inactive conformation that fails to bind DHFBI. Hybridization of a trigger oligonucleotide to a designed toehold on Spinach.ST initiates toehold-mediated strand displacement and restores the DFHBI-binding, fluorescence-enhancing conformation of Spinach. The versatile Spinach.ST sensor can detect DNA or RNA trigger sequences and can readily distinguish single-nucleotide mismatches in the trigger toehold. Primer design techniques are described that augment amplicons produced by enzymatic amplification with Spinach.ST triggers. Interaction between these triggers and Spinach.ST molecular beacons leads to the real-time, sequence-specific quantitation of these amplicons. The use of Spinach.ST with isothermal amplification reactions such as nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) may enable point-of-care applications. The same design principles could also be used to adapt Spinach reporters to the assay of nonnucleic acid analytes in trans. PMID:25605388

  17. Betaine Accumulation and Betaine-Aldehyde Dehydrogenase in Spinach Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shu-Mei; Moreau, Robert A.; Yu, Charles; Huang, Anthony H. C.

    1981-01-01

    Spinach leaf discs accumulated betaine when exposed to a mannitol solution of −20 bars. The accumulation was 12 micromoles per gram original fresh weight in a 24-hour period. Betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.8) was assayed in various subcellular fractions prepared from spinach leaves, and it was found only in the soluble fraction. This cytosolic enzyme was purified 175-fold, and its properties were studied. The enzyme was relatively specific for betaine aldehyde as the substrate with an apparent Km value of 2.08 × 10−4 molar. It also exerted activity on other aldehyde analogs tested, but with lower Vmax and higher Km values. The enzyme was relatively specific for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as the coenzyme, having an apparent Km value of 9.46 × 10−6 molar; lower activities were observed when nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate or 3-acetyl pyridine adenine dinucleotide were tested as electron acceptors. The activity was enhanced by dithiothreitol and inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, and the inhibition by p-chloromercuribenzoate was partially reversed by the subsequent addition of dithiothreitol. The activity was inhibited by high concentrations of NaCl and, to a lesser extent, proline. The equilibrium of the enzymic reaction was strongly in favor of betaine formation. The in vitro activity of the enzyme under optimal assay conditions was high enough to account for the amount of betaine accumulated under water stress conditions. The enzyme activity was the same in unstressed leaves and in leaves that had been water stressed for 24 hours. PMID:16661818

  18. Salt tolerance of spinach as related to seasonal climate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is decreasing availability of fresh water for irrigated agriculture in semiarid regions throughout the world. Unfortunately most high value irrigated crops are relatively sensitive to salinity, mostly limiting use of saline waters for irrigation to use with low value crops. Spinach is an excep...

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Phosphatidyl Choline from Spinach Leaves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devor, Kenneth A.

    1979-01-01

    This inexpensive but informative experiment for undergraduate biochemistry students involves isolating phosphatidyl choline from spinach leaves. Emphasis is on introducing students to techniques of lipid extraction, separation of lipids, identification using thin layer chromatography, and identification of fatty acids. Three periods of three hours…

  20. First report of Tobacco rattle virus in spinach in California.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2009 in coastal California (Santa Barbara County), commercially grown spinach (Spinacia oleracea) in two nearby fields exhibited symptoms of a previously unrecognized virus-like disease. Symptoms consisted of general chlorosis and bright yellow blotches and spots. Necrotic spots were also associa...

  1. Survival of pathogenic Escherichia coli on basil, lettuce, and spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contamination of lettuce, spinach and basil with pathogenic E. coli has caused numerous illnesses over the past decade. E. coli O157:H7, E. coli O104:H4 and avian pathogenic E. coli (APECstx- and APECstx+) were inoculated on basil plants and in promix soiless substrate using drip and overhead ir...

  2. Isolation and kinetic properties of acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts overexpressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dumas, R; Job, D; Ortholand, J Y; Emeric, G; Greiner, A; Douce, R

    1992-12-15

    Acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase catalyses a two-step reaction, an alkyl migration and a NADPH-dependent reduction, in the assembly of the carbon skeletons of branched-chain amino acids. Detailed investigations of acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase aimed at elucidating the biosynthetic pathway of branched-chain amino acids and at designing new inhibitors of the enzyme having herbicidal potency have so far been conducted with the enzymes isolated from bacteria. To gain more information on a plant system, the gene encoding the mature acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf chloroplasts has been used to transform Escherichia coli cells and to overexpress the enzyme. A rapid protocol is described that allows the preparation of large quantities of pure spinach chloroplast acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase. Kinetic and structural properties of the plant enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli are compared with those reported in our previous studies on the native enzymes purified from spinach chloroplasts and with those reported for the corresponding enzymes isolated from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Both the plant and the bacterial enzymes obey an ordered mechanism in which NADPH binds first, followed by substrate (either 2-acetolactate or 2-aceto-2-hydroxybutyrate). Inhibition studies employing an inactive substrate analogue, 2-hydroxy-2-methyl-3-oxopentanoate, showed, however, that the binding of 2-hydroxy-2-methyl-3-oxopentanoate and NADPH occurs randomly, suggestive of some flexibility of the plant enzyme active site. The observed preference of the enzyme for 2-aceto-2-hydroxybutyrate over 2-acetolactate is discussed with regard to the contribution of acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase activity in the partitioning between isoleucine and valine biosyntheses. Moreover, the kinetic properties of the chloroplast enzyme support the notion that biosynthesis of branched-chain amino acids in plants is controlled by light. As

  3. Improving spinach, radish, and lettuce growth under red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with blue light supplementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorio, N. C.; Goins, G. D.; Kagie, H. R.; Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherriette), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Waldmann's Green), and spinach (Spinacea oleracea L. cv. Nordic IV) plants were grown under 660-nm red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and were compared at equal photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) with either plants grown under cool-white fluorescent lamps (CWF) or red LEDs supplemented with 10% (30 micromoles m-2 s-1) blue light (400-500 nm) from blue fluorescent (BF) lamps. At 21 days after planting (DAP), leaf photosynthetic rates and stomatal conductance were greater for plants grown under CWF light than for those grown under red LEDs, with or without supplemental blue light. At harvest (21 DAP), total dry-weight accumulation was significantly lower for all species tested when grown under red LEDs alone than when grown under CWF light or red LEDs + 10% BF light. Moreover, total dry weight for radish and spinach was significantly lower under red LEDs + 10% BF than under CWF light, suggesting that addition of blue light to the red LEDs was still insufficient for achieving maximal growth for these crops.

  4. Expression and purification of spinach nitrite reductase in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Bellissimo, D.; Privalle, L. )

    1991-03-11

    The study of structure-function relationships in nitrite reductase (NiR) by site-directed mutagenesis requires an expression system from which suitable quantities of active enzyme can be purified. Spinach NiR cDNA was cloned into pUC18 and expressed in E.coli JM109 as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein. The IPTG-induced fusion protein contains five additional amino acids at the N-terminus. The expressed NiR in aerobic cultures was mostly insoluble and inactive indicating the presence of inclusion bodies. By altering growth conditions, active NiR could represent 0.5-1.0% of the total E.coli protein, Effects of the addition of delta-aminolevulinic acid, a heme precursor, and anaerobic growth were also examined. Spinach NiR was purified approximately 200 fold to homogeneity. When subjected to electrophoresis on SDS polyacrylamide gels, the NiR migrated as a single band with similar mobility to pure spinach enzyme. The expressed enzyme also reacted with rabbit anti-spinach NiR antibody as visualized by Western blot analysis. The absorption spectrum of the E.coli-expressed enzyme was identical to spinach enzyme with a Soret and alpha band a 386 and 573 nm, respectively, and an A{sub 278}/A{sub 386} = 1.9. The addition of nitrite produced the characteristic shifts in the spectrum. The E. coli-expressed NiR catalyzed the methylviologen-dependent reduction of nitrite. The specific activity was 100 U/mg. The K{sub m} determined for nitrite was 0.3 mM which is in agreement with values reported for the enzyme. These results indicate that the E.coli-expressed NiR is fully comparable to spinach NiR in purity, catalytic activity and physical state. Site-directed mutants have been made using PCR to examine structure-function relationships in this enzyme.

  5. Coupling Spore Traps and Quantitative PCR Assays for Detection of the Downy Mildew Pathogens of Spinach (Peronospora effusa) and Beet (P. schachtii)

    PubMed Central

    Klosterman, Steven J.; Anchieta, Amy; McRoberts, Neil; Koike, Steven T.; Subbarao, Krishna V.; Voglmayr, Hermann; Choi, Young-Joon; Thines, Marco; Martin, Frank N.

    2016-01-01

    Downy mildew of spinach (Spinacia oleracea), caused by Peronospora effusa, is a production constraint on production worldwide, including in California, where the majority of U.S. spinach is grown. The aim of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for detection of airborne inoculum of P. effusa in California. Among oomycete ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences examined for assay development, the highest nucleotide sequence identity was observed between rDNA sequences of P. effusa and P. schachtii, the cause of downy mildew on sugar beet and Swiss chard in the leaf beet group (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were detected between P. effusa and P. schachtii in the 18S rDNA regions for design of P. effusa- and P. schachtii-specific TaqMan probes and reverse primers. An allele-specific probe and primer amplification method was applied to determine the frequency of both P. effusa and P. schachtii rDNA target sequences in pooled DNA samples, enabling quantification of rDNA of P. effusa from impaction spore trap samples collected from spinach production fields. The rDNA copy numbers of P. effusa were, on average, ≈3,300-fold higher from trap samples collected near an infected field compared with those levels recorded at a site without a nearby spinach field. In combination with disease-conducive weather forecasting, application of the assays may be helpful to time fungicide applications for disease management. PMID:24964150

  6. Sizes of Mn-binding sites in spinach thylakoids

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, M.; Asada, K.

    1986-12-25

    The sizes of the Mn-binding sites in spinach thylakoids were estimated by target size analysis, assaying the membrane-bound Mn that was resistant to EDTA washing after radiation inactivation. The inactivation curve showed well the inactivation of two independent Mn-binding sites of different sizes: about two-thirds of the Mn coordinated to a binding site of 65 kDa, and the rest bound to a much smaller site of only about 3 kDa. In the large site, there was about 1 g atom of Mn/110 mol of chlorophyll in spinach thylakoids, which was constant in normally grown plants, although the Mn level in the small site depended on culture conditions. Thylakoids that had been incubated with hydroxylamine or in 0.8 M Tris lost Mn exclusively from the large binding site.

  7. Photosynthate partitioning during flowering in relation to senescence of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Sklensky, D.; Davies, P.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Male spinach plants are frequently cited as a counter-example to the nutrient drain hypothesis. Photosynthate partitioning in both male and female plants was examined. Leaves just below the inflorescences in plants at various stages of flowering were labelled with {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and the photosynthate allowed to partition for three hours. The leaves, flowers and stems of the inflorescence, and the other above ground vegetative tissue were harvested. These parts were combusted in a sample oxidizer for the collection of the {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Allocation to the male and female flowers at very early stages are similar. As the flowers develop further, male flowers receive more photosynthate than do female flowers in early fruit production. Thus it is possible that nutrient drain to the flowers in male spinach plants is sufficient to account for senescence.

  8. Studies of GA sub 53 oxidase from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. )

    1990-05-01

    GA{sub 53} oxidase was purified 1,750-fold with 1% recovery of activity from spinach after exposure to 8 long days. This preparation was injected into balb/c mice and hybridomas from spleen cells were produced. Upon preliminary screening by immunoprecipitation of enzyme activity, three positive cell lines were selected. These are being cloned to select a true monoclonal antibody cell line. This antibody will be used to study the light/dark regulation of this enzyme.

  9. Spinach RNA aptamer detects lead (II) with high selectivity†

    PubMed Central

    DasGupta, Saurja; Shelke, Sandip A.; Li, Nan-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Spinach RNA aptamer contains a G-quadruplex motif that serves as a platform for binding and fluorescence activation of a GFP-like fluorophore. Here we show that Pb2+ induces formation of Spinach’s G-quadruplex and activates fluorescence with high selectivity and sensitivity. This device establishes the first example of an RNA-based sensor that provides a simple and inexpensive tool for Pb2+ detection. PMID:25940073

  10. Enzyme-assisted extraction of stabilized chlorophyll from spinach.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Gülay; Ersus Bilek, Seda

    2015-06-01

    Zinc complex formation with chlorophyll derivatives in spinach pulp was studied by adding 300ppm Zn(2+) for production of stable food colorant, followed by the heating at 110°C for 15min. Zinc complex formation increased at pH values of 7.0 or greater. Pectinex Ultra SP-L was selected for enzyme-assisted release of zinc-chlorophyll derivatives from spinach pulp. Effect of enzyme concentration (1-9%), treatment temperature (30-60°C), and time (30-210min) on total chlorophyll content (TCC) were optimized using response surface methodology. A quadratic regression model (R(2)=0.9486) was obtained from the experimental design. Optimum treatment conditions were 8% enzyme concentration, 45°C, and 30min, which yielded a 50.747mgTCC/100g spinach pulp. Enzymatic treatment was followed by solvent extraction with ethanol at a solvent-to-sample ratio of 2.5:1 at 60°C for 45min for the highest TCC recovery. Pretreatment with enzyme and extraction in ethanol resulted in 39% increase in Zn-chlorophyll derivative yield. PMID:25624218

  11. Comparative uptake of enteric viruses into spinach and green onions.

    PubMed

    Hirneisen, Kirsten A; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2013-03-01

    Root uptake of enteric pathogens and subsequent internalization has been a produce safety concern and is being investigated as a potential route of pre-harvest contamination. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and the human norovirus surrogate, murine norovirus (MNV), to internalize in spinach and green onions through root uptake in both soil and hydroponic systems. HAV or MNV was inoculated into soil matrices or into two hydroponic systems, floating and nutrient film technique systems. Viruses present within spinach and green onions were detected by RT-qPCR or infectivity assays after inactivating externally present viruses with Virkon(®). HAV and MNV were not detected in green onion plants grown up to 20 days and HAV was detected in only 1 of 64 spinach plants grown in contaminated soil substrate systems up to 20 days. Compared to soil systems, a drastic difference in virus internalization was observed in hydroponic systems; HAV or pressure-treated HAV and MNV were internalized up to 4 log RT-qPCR units and internalized MNV was shown to remain infectious. Understanding the interactions of human enteric viruses on produce can aid in the elucidation of the mechanisms of attachment and internalization, and aid in understanding risks associated with contamination events. PMID:23412715

  12. The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase of spinach leaves responds to blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Penel, Claude; Greppin, Hubert; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2002-01-01

    The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase (NOX) of spinach leaf disks is characterized by oscillations in activity with a regular period length of ca. 24 min. Within a single population of plants exposed to light at the same time, NOX activities of all plants function synchronously. Exposure of plants transferred from darkness to blue light (495 nm, 2 min, 50 micromoles m-2 s-1) resulted in a complex response pattern but with a new maximum in the rate of NOX activity 36 (24+12) min after illumination and then with maxima in the rate of NOX activity every 24 min thereafter. Transient maxima in NOX activity were observed as well after 9.3 + /- 1.4 and 20.7 +/- 2.1 min. The blue light response differed from the response to red (650 nm, 10 min, 50 micromoles m-2 s-1) or white light where activity maxima were initiated 12 min after the light exposure followed by maxima every 24 min thereafter. Green or yellow light was ineffective. The light response was independent of the time in the 24-min NOX cycle when the light was given. The net effects of blue and red light were ultimately the same with a new maximum in the rate of NOX activity at 12+24=36 min (and every 24 min thereafter), but the mechanisms appear to be distinct.

  13. Localization, Purification, and Characterization of Shikimate Oxidoreductase-Dehydroquinate Hydrolyase from Stroma of Spinach Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Erich; Schultz, Gernot

    1985-01-01

    The stroma of chloroplasts is probably the sole site of the shikimate pathway enzymes shikimate oxidoreductase/dehydroquinate hydrolyase (SORase/DHQase) in spinach leaves. (a) The chromatographic behavior of the bifunctional protein SORase/DHQase on several separation materials with extracts from stroma compared with leaf extracts showed only one peak of enzymic activity originating from the stroma. (b) Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of these extracts followed by specific staining resulted in the same pattern without a band of extraplastidic enzyme. (c) In protoplast fractionation experiments it was shown that SORase/DHQase was present only in the soluble chloroplast protein fraction. An improved purification procedure for SORase/DHQase from stroma of chloroplasts, yield 40%, 1600 times as pure, gave essentially one protein band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. Our results demonstrate that both enzyme functions are carried out by a single polypeptide. Nondenaturing PAGE exhibited a pattern of four bands with SORase/DHQase showing that they differ in charge but not in their molecular weight. Molecular weight was determined to be 67 kilodaltons (gel filtration) and 59 kilodaltons (PAGE) for all four forms. It was proven they were not due to artifacts. The four forms show similar kinetic properties, their Km and pH optima differing only very slightly. Response to some metabolites is reported. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 7 PMID:16664373

  14. Effect of Photoperiod on the Metabolism of Deuterium-Labeled Gibberellin A53 in Spinach 1

    PubMed Central

    Gianfagna, Thomas; Zeevaart, Jan A. D.; Lusk, William J.

    1983-01-01

    Application of gibberellin A53 (GA53) to short-day (SD)-grown spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) plants caused an increase in petiole length and leaf angle similar to that found in plants transferred to long days (LD). [2H] GA53 was fed to plants in SD, LD, and in a SD to LD transition experiment, and the metabolites were identified by gas chromatography with selected ion monitoring. After 2, 4, or 6 SD, [2H]GA53 was converted to [2H]GA19 and [2H]GA44. No other metabolites were detected. After 2 LD, only [2H] GA20 was identified. In the transition experiment in which plants were given 4 SD followed by 2 LD, all three metabolites were found. The results demonstrate unequivocally that GA19, GA20, and GA44 are metabolic products of GA53, and strongly suggest that photoperiod regulates GA metabolism, in part, by controlling the conversion of GA19 to GA20. PMID:16662988

  15. Quantification of cyclic electron flow around Photosystem I in spinach leaves during photosynthetic induction.

    PubMed

    Fan, Da-Yong; Nie, Qin; Hope, Alexander B; Hillier, Warwick; Pogson, Barry J; Chow, Wah Soon

    2007-01-01

    The variation of the rate of cyclic electron transport around Photosystem I (PS I) during photosynthetic induction was investigated by illuminating dark-adapted spinach leaf discs with red + far-red actinic light for a varied duration, followed by abruptly turning off the light. The post-illumination re-reduction kinetics of P700+, the oxidized form of the photoactive chlorophyll of the reaction centre of PS I (normalized to the total P700 content), was well described by the sum of three negative exponential terms. The analysis gave a light-induced total electron flux from which the linear electron flux through PS II and PS I could be subtracted, yielding a cyclic electron flux. Our results show that the cyclic electron flux was small in the very early phase of photosynthetic induction, rose to a maximum at about 30 s of illumination, and declined subsequently to <10% of the total electron flux in the steady state. Further, this cyclic electron flow, largely responsible for the fast and intermediate exponential decays, was sensitive to 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea, suggesting an important role of redox poising of the cyclic components for optimal function. Significantly, our results demonstrate that analysis of the post-illumination re-reduction kinetics of P700+ allows the quantification of the cyclic electron flux in intact leaves by a relatively straightforward method. PMID:17211579

  16. Differences in biofilm formation of produce and poultry Salmonella enterica isolates and their persistence on spinach plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Repeat irrigation of spinach plants with water containing Salmonella was used to determine Salmonella persistence on spinach leaves. Spinach plants were irrigated four times (biweekly) with water containing ca. 2.1 log CFU Salmonella per 100 ml water (the maximum generic E. coli MPN recommended by...

  17. Spinach: A new natural host of Impatiens necrotic spot virus in California.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impatiens necrotic spot tospovirus (INSV; family Bunyaviridae) was detected in a spinach (Spinacia oleracea) experimental field in Monterey County, CA in October of 2008. Spinach plants exhibiting severe stunting and with leaves that showed interveinal yellowing, thickening, and deformation were obs...

  18. Biofilm formation Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella on spinach harvester blades

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Outbreaks associated with leafy greens have focused attention on the transfer of human pathogens to leafy greens during mechanical harvesting. Harvesting of baby spinach presents an opportunity for contaminated blades to transfer bacterial foodborne pathogens to recently harvested spinach. Biofilm f...

  19. Changes in quality, liking and purchase intent of irradiated fresh-cut spinach during storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of ionizing radiation to enhance microbial safety of fresh spinach at a maximum dose of 4 kGy has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. However, whether spinach can tolerate those high doses of radiation is unclear. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate effect...

  20. Development of a qPCR assay for quantification of verticillium dahliae in spinach seed.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium wilt, caused by the soilborne fungus Verticillium dahliae, is an important disease of lettuce and other specialty crops in the Salinas Valley of California. Although spinach is not affected by Verticillium wilt in commercial production, spinach seed infected with V. dahliae from locatio...

  1. A qPCR assay for detection and quantification of Verticillium dahliae in spinach seed.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Verticillium dahliae is the causal agent of Verticillium wilt of lettuce and other specialty crops in the Salinas Valley of California. Spinach, another major specialty crop in California, is not affected by Verticillium wilt in commercial production. However, spinach seed infected with ...

  2. Plasmolysis and vital staining reveal viable oospores of Peronospora effusa in spinach seed lots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of oospores by Peronospora effusa, the causal agent of downy mildew on spinach (Spinacia oleracea), was reported on spinach seed over three decades ago. In view of the rapid proliferation of new races of P. effusa worldwide, seed borne transmission has been suspected but methods to test ...

  3. Biodegradable PLA (polylactic acid) hinged trays keep quality of fresh-cut and cooked spinach.

    PubMed

    Botondi, Rinaldo; Bartoloni, Serena; Baccelloni, Simone; Mencarelli, Fabio

    2015-09-01

    This work examines the effects of packaging using two different polymeric trays with hinged lids, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polylactic acid (PLA), on fresh-cut and cooked spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Samples were stored in a cold room for 16 days at 4 °C. Chemical (total pigments, total polyphenols, ascorbic acid, antioxidant activity), physical (water activity), technological (colour evaluation), sensorial (aroma, visual appearance and water accumulation) and microbial (total aerobic mesophilic and psychrotrophic counts) parameters were tested. Both polymeric trays maintained the overall quality of fresh spinach for 6 days but spinach stored in PLA trays maintained its flavour longer. A significant increase in total polyphenols, antiradical activity, total carotenoids as well as a decrease in ascorbic acid in fresh spinach was observed in the first 3 days of storage in both samples. Unfortunately, the PLA package accumulated condensed water. The total microbial load of fresh-cut spinach reached about 6.3-7.3 log CFU g(-1) within 8 days. Cooked spinach packed in PLA and PET polymeric hinged trays showed the same behaviour as fresh spinach in terms of quality and shelf life. In conclusion, PLA plastic hinged trays can be used for packaging fresh-cut and cooked cut spinach, but the problem of condensed water must be solved. PMID:26345011

  4. Effects of Growth Temperature on the Responses of Ribulose-1,5-Biphosphate Carboxylase, Electron Transport Components, and Sucrose Synthesis Enzymes to Leaf Nitrogen in Rice, and Their Relationships to Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Makino, A.; Nakano, H.; Mae, T.

    1994-08-01

    Effects of growth temperature on the photosynthetic gas-exchange rates and their underlying biochemical properties were examined in young, fully expanded leaves of rice (Oryza sativa L.). The plants were grown hydroponically under day/night temperature regimes of 18/15[deg]C, 23/18[deg]C, and 30/23[deg]C and all photosynthetic measurements were made at a leaf temperature of 25[deg]C and an irradiance of 1800 [mu]mol quanta m-2 s-1. Growth temperature affected the photosynthetic CO2 response curve. The relative ratio of the initial slope to the CO2-saturated photosynthesis increased with rising growth temperature. This was caused mainly by an increase in CO2-limited photosynthesis for a given leaf nitrogen content with rising growth temperature. However, there was no difference in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) content at any given leaf nitrogen content among temperature treatments. In addition, the activation state and catalytic turnover rate of Rubisco were not affected by growth temperature. The increase in CO2-limited photosynthesis with rising growth temperature was the result of an increase in the CO2 transfer conductance between the intercellular airspaces and the carboxylation sites. The amounts of total chlorophyll and light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein II increased for the same leaf nitrogen content with rising growth temperature, but the amounts of cytochrome f and coupling factor 1 and the activities of cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and sucrose-phosphate synthase were the same between plants grown at 23/18[deg]C and those grown at 30/23[deg]C. Similarly, CO2-saturated photosynthesis was not different for the same leaf nitrogen content between these treatments. For the 18/15[deg]C-grown plants, a slight decrease in the amounts of cytochrome f and coupling factor 1 and an increase in the activities of cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and sucrose-phosphate synthase were found, but these were not reflected in CO2-saturated

  5. Influences of lead (II) chloride on the nitrogen metabolism of spinach.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Xiao, Wu; Liu, Chao; Chao, Liu; Qu, Chunxiang; Chunxiang, Qu; Huang, Hao; Hao, Huang; Liu, Xiaoqing; Xiaoqing, Liu; Chen, Liang; Liang, Chen; Su, Mingyu; Mingyu, Su; Hong, Fashui; Fashui, Hong

    2008-03-01

    Lead (Pb(2+)) is a well-known highly toxic element. The mechanisms of the Pb(2+) toxicity are not well understood for nitrogen metabolism of higher plants. In this paper, we studied the effects of various concentrations of PbCl(2) on the nitrogen metabolism of growing spinach. The experimental results showed that Pb(2+) treatments significantly decreased the nitrate nitrogen (NO(-)(3)-N) absorption and inhibited the activities of nitrate reductase, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthase, and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase of spinach, and inhibited the synthesis of organic nitrogen compounds such as protein and chlorophyll. However, Pb(2+) treatments increased the accumulation of ammonium nitrogen NH(+)(4)-N)in spinach cell. It implied that Pb(2+) could inhibit inorganic nitrogen to be translated into organic nitrogen in spinach, thus led to the reduction in spinach growth. PMID:17955201

  6. A superfolding Spinach2 reveals the dynamic nature of trinucleotide repeat-containing RNA.

    PubMed

    Strack, Rita L; Disney, Matthew D; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2013-12-01

    Imaging RNA in living cells is a challenging problem in cell biology. One strategy for genetically encoding fluorescent RNAs is to express them as fusions with Spinach, an 'RNA mimic of GFP'. We found that Spinach was dimmer than expected when used to tag constructs in living cells owing to a combination of thermal instability and a propensity for misfolding. Using systematic mutagenesis, we generated Spinach2 that overcomes these issues and can be used to image diverse RNAs. Using Spinach2, we detailed the dynamics of the CGG trinucleotide repeat-containing 'toxic RNA' associated with Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, and show that these RNAs form nuclear foci with unexpected morphological plasticity that is regulated by the cell cycle and by small molecules. Together, these data demonstrate that Spinach2 exhibits improved versatility for fluorescently labeling RNAs in living cells. PMID:24162923

  7. Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Leaves are the most important organs for plants. Without leaves, plants cannot capture light energy or synthesize organic compounds via photosynthesis. Without leaves, plants would be unable perceive diverse environmental conditions, particularly those relating to light quality/quantity. Without leaves, plants would not be able to flower because all floral organs are modified leaves. Arabidopsis thaliana is a good model system for analyzing mechanisms of eudicotyledonous, simple-leaf development. The first section of this review provides a brief history of studies on development in Arabidopsis leaves. This history largely coincides with a general history of advancement in understanding of the genetic mechanisms operating during simple-leaf development in angiosperms. In the second section, I outline events in Arabidopsis leaf development, with emphasis on genetic controls. Current knowledge of six important components in these developmental events is summarized in detail, followed by concluding remarks and perspectives. PMID:23864837

  8. Correlating Arsenic-Induced Morphological Change in Spinach Leaves With Leaf Spectral Characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arsenic (As) is a widely spread soil contaminant which can be accumulated into plant parts. The presence of As in edible portions of plants allows for potentially dangerous ingestion by humans and animals. The ability to detect As in plants is an important tool to minimize such risks. Remote sens...

  9. Metabolic Interactions between Spinach Leaf Nitrite Reductase and Ferredoxin-NADP Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Baysdorfer, Chris; Robinson, J. Michael

    1985-01-01

    Steady state rates of NADP reduction decline upon commencement of nitrite reduction in reconstituted chloroplast preparations. Similarly, steady state rates of nitrite reduction are lower, but not zero, during concurrent NADP reduction. These results imply that competition for substrate occurs and suggest that nitrite reduction can successfully compete for reduced ferredoxin, even at high rates of NADP reduction. PMID:16664050

  10. Pathway for the synthesis of triacylglycerols from monogalactosyldiacylglycerols in ozone-fumigated spinach leaves. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaki, Takeshi; Kondo, Noriaki; Yamada, Mitsuhiro Univ. of Tokyo )

    1990-10-01

    When the upper leaf surface of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) plants was treated with (1-{sup 14}C)acetate and grown for 2 days, {sup 14}C was effectively incorporated into acyl moieties of leaf lipids in ratios approximately their composition by mass. Fumigation of the plants with ozone (0.5 microliter per liter) caused a redistribution of {sup 14}C among lipid classes, i.e. a marked increase of {sup 14}C content in triacylglycerol (TG) and 1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DG) and a decrease of label in monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) without affecting {sup 14}C distribution in leaf fatty acids. Label in both TG and 1,2-DG was found predominantly in their polyene molecular species. Since MGDG consists of similar polyene molecular species, the results indicate the synthesis of TG from MGDG via 1,2-DG. Label was also accumulated in tri- and tetragalactosyldiacylglycerol, products of galactolipid:galactolipid galactosyltransferase (GGGT). Moreover, there was a close relation between increases in the amounts of TG and the oligogalactolipids in ozone-treated leaves. These results indicate that MGDG was converted to 1,2-DG by GGGT and then to TG. In intact chloroplasts isolated from ozone-treated leaves, there was an enhanced production of free fatty acid (FFA), which was diminished by the addition of coenzyme A (CoA) and ATP, indicating that ozone stimulated the hydrolysis of MGDG to liberate FFA, which was in turn converted to acyl-CoA. The final step of TG synthesis, acylation of 1,2-DG with acyl-CoA, was confirmed by feeding with (1-{sup 14}C)linolenic acid in leaf discs excised from ozone-fumigated leaves; {sup 14}C was effectively incorporated into TG but not into 1,2-DG.

  11. Insect molting hormone and sterol biosynthesis in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Grebenok, R.J.; Adler, J.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Insect molting hormones, which are produced by plants and are effective molecules in the control of insect crop pests, are biosynthesized in developing spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea L.). The major sterols biosynthesized by spinach are avenasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholesta-7,24(28)-dien-3{beta}-ol), spinasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholesta-7,22-dien-3{beta}-ol), and 22-dihydrospinasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholest-7-en-3{beta}-ol). The major ecdysteroids biosynthesized are ecdysterone (2{beta},3{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-hexahydroxy-5{beta}-cholest-7-en-6-one) and polypodine B (2{beta},3{beta},5{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-heptahycroxycholest-7-en-6-one) and polypodine B (2{beta},3{beta},5{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-heptahydroxycholest-7-en-6-one). When labeled 2-{sup 14}C-mevalonic acid was incorporated into young leaves isolated squalene, sterols and ecdysteroids contained the label. During a short (16 h) incorporation period in intact young leaves of 100 day old plants, the avenasterol has the highest specific activity in counts per minute per {mu}g of sterol followed by 22-dihydrospinasterol which is more highly labeled than spinasterol. The ecdysteroids synthesized, on an entire plant basis, account for 20% of the total steroid (sterol and ecdysteroid) isolated from the plant.

  12. Choline oxidation by intact spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, P.; Lerma, C.; Hanson, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Plants synthesize betaine by a two-step oxidation of choline (choline ..-->.. betaine aldehyde ..-->.. betaine). Protoplast-derived chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) carry out both reactions, more rapidly in light than in darkness. We investigated the light-stimulated oxidation of choline, using spinach chloroplasts isolated directly from leaves. The rates of choline oxidation obtained (dark and light rates: 10-50 and 100-300 nanomoles per hour per milligram chlorophyll, respectively) were approximately 20-fold higher than for protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Betaine aldehyde was the main product. Choline oxidation in darkness and light was suppressed by hypoxia. Neither uncouplers not the Calvin cycle inhibitor glyceraldehyde greatly affected choline oxidation in the light, and maximal choline oxidation was attained far below light saturation of CO/sub 2/ fixation. The light stimulation of choline oxidation was abolished by the PSII inhibitors DCMU and dibromothymoquinone, and was partially restored by adding reduced diaminodurene, an electron donor to PSI. Both methyl viologen and phenazine methosulfate prevented choline oxidation. Adding dihydroxyacetone phosphate, which can generate NADPH in organello, doubled the dark rate of choline oxidation. These results indicate that choline oxidation in chloroplasts requires oxygen, and reducing power generated from PSI. Enzymic reactions consistent with these requirements are discussed.

  13. Effect of photoperiod on gibberellin biosynthetic enzymes in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, S.J.; Bleecker, A.B.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-04-01

    The photoperiodic control of stem elongation in spinach, a long day (LD) rosette plant, is mediated by gibberellins (GAs). The early 13-hydroxylated GA biosynthetic pathway from GA/sub 12/ to GA/sub 20/ operates in spinach: GA/sub 12/ ..-->.. GA/sub 53/ ..-->.. GA/sub 44/ ..-->.. GA/sub 19/ ..-->.. GA/sub 20/. Two enzymes of this pathway, those converting GA/sub 53/ to GA/sub 44/ (GA/sub 53/ oxidase) and GA/sub 19/ to GA/sub 20/ (GA/sub 19/ oxidase), are regulated by light. The enzyme converting GA/sub 44/ to GA/sub 19/ (GA/sub 44/ oxidase) is not light-regulated. In the light GA/sub 53/ and GA/sub 18/ oxidase activities are increased, therefore causing the GA biosynthetic pathway to be turned on. This leads to the production of an active GA in LD, which causes an increase in stem elongation. Two the enzymes, GA/sub 44/ and GA/sub 53/ oxidases, can be separated from one another by anion exchange HPLC. Estimates of the molecular weights of these two enzymes based on gel filtration HPLC will be reported.

  14. Assay, Purification, and Partial Characterization of Choline Monooxygenase from Spinach.

    PubMed Central

    Burnet, M.; Lafontaine, P. J.; Hanson, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    The osmoprotectant glycine betaine is synthesized via the path-way choline -> betaine aldehyde -> glycine betaine. In spinach (Spinacia oleracea), the first step is catalyzed by choline monooxygenase (CMO), and the second is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase. Because betaine aldehyde is unstable and not easily detected, we developed a coupled radiometric assay for CMO. [14C]Choline is used as substrate; NAD+ and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase prepared from Escherichia coli are added to oxidize [14C]betaine aldehyde to [14C]glycine betaine, which is isolated by ion exchange. The assay was used in the purification of CMO from leaves of salinized spinach. The 10-step procedure included polyethylene glycol precipitation, polyethyleneimine precipitation, hydrophobic interaction, anion exchange on choline-Sepharose, dimethyldiethanolamine-Sepharose, and Mono Q, hydroxyapatite, gel filtration, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Following gel filtration, overall purification was about 600-fold and recovery of activity was 0.5%. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 45 kD. Taken with the value of 98 kD estimated for native CMO (R. Brouquisse, P. Weigel, D. Rhodes, C.F. Yocum, A.D. Hanson [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 322-329), this indicates that CMO is a homodimer. CMO preparations were red-brown, showed absorption maxima at 329 and 459 nm, and lost color upon dithionite addition, suggesting that CMO is an iron-sulfur protein. PMID:12228495

  15. A superfolding Spinach2 reveals the dynamic nature of trinucleotide repeat RNA

    PubMed Central

    Strack, Rita L.; Disney, Matthew D.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent imaging of RNA in living cells is a technically challenging problem in cell biology. One strategy for genetically encoding fluorescent RNAs is to express them as fusions with ‘RNA mimics of GFP’. These are short aptamer tags that exhibit fluorescence upon binding otherwise nonfluorescent fluorophores that resemble those found in GFP. We find that the brightest of these aptamers, Spinach, often exhibits reduced fluorescence after it is fused to RNAs of interest. We show that a combination of thermal instability and a propensity for misfolding account for the low fluorescence of various Spinach-RNA fusions. Using systematic mutagenesis, we identified nucleotides that account for the poor folding of Spinach, and generated Spinach2, which exhibits markedly improved thermal stability and folding in cells. Furthermore, we show that Spinach2 largely retains its fluorescence when fused to various RNAs. Using Spinach2, we detail the cellular dynamics of the CGG trinucleotide-repeat containing “toxic RNA” associated with Fragile-X tremor/ataxia syndrome, and show that these RNAs form nuclear foci with unexpected morphological plasticity that is regulated by the cell cycle and by small molecules. Together, these data demonstrate that Spinach2 exhibits improved versatility for fluorescently labeling RNAs in living cells. PMID:24162923

  16. Leaf Carbohydrate Status and Enzymes of Translocate Synthesis in Fruiting and Vegetative Plants of Cucumis sativus L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Pharr, David M.; Huber, Steven C.; Sox, Harriet N.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon partitioning in the leaves of Cucumis sativus L., a stachyose translocating plant, was influenced by the presence or absence of a single growing fruit on the plant. Fruit growth was very rapid with rates of fresh weight gain as high as 3.3 grams per hour. Fruit growth was highly competitive with vegetative growth as indicated by lower fresh weights of leaf blades, petioles, stem internodes and root systems on plants bearing a single growing fruit compared to plants not bearing a fruit. Carbon exchange rates, starch accumulation rates and carbon export rates were higher in leaves of plants bearing a fruit. Dry weight loss from leaves was higher at night from fruiting plants, and morning starch levels were consistently lower in leaves of fruiting than in leaves of vegetative plants indicating rapid starch mobilization at night from the leaves of fruiting plants. Galactinol, the galactosyl donor for stachyose biosynthesis, was present in the leaves of fruit-bearing plants at consistently lower concentration than in leaves of vegetative plants. Galactinol synthase, and sucrose phosphate synthase activities were not different on a per gram fresh weight basis in leaves from the two plant types; however, stachyose synthase activity was twice as high in leaves from fruiting plants. Thus, the lower galactinol pools may be associated with an activation of the terminal step in stachyose biosynthesis in leaves in response to the high sink demand of a growing cucumber fruit. PMID:16663989

  17. Suppression effects of betaine-enriched spinach on hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid and choline deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Qun; Jia, Zheng; Han, Feng; Inakuma, Takahiro; Miyashita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio; Sun, Li-Cui; Xiang, Xue-Song; Huang, Zhen-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Betaine is an important natural component of rich food sources, especially spinach. Rats were fed diets with betaine or spinach powder at the same level of betaine for 10 days to investigate the dose-dependent effects of spinach powder supplementation on hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) addition and choline deprivation. The GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats fed 25% casein diet (25 C) was significantly suppressed by supplementation with betaine or spinach, and it was completely suppressed by taking 11.0% spinach supplementation. The choline deprivation-induced enhancement of plasma homocysteine concentration in rats fed 25% soybean protein diet (25S) was markedly suppressed by 3.82% spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach partially prevented the effects of GAA on hepatic concentrations of methionine metabolites. The decrease in activity of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) in GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia was recovered by supplementation with betaine or spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach did not affect BHMT activity, whereas it partially restored CBS activity in choline-deprived 25S. The results indicated that betaine or spinach could completely suppress the hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline deficiency resulting from stimulating the homocysteine removal by both remethylation and cystathionine formation. PMID:25250392

  18. Suppression Effects of Betaine-Enriched Spinach on Hyperhomocysteinemia Induced by Guanidinoacetic Acid and Choline Deficiency in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Qun; Jia, Zheng; Han, Feng; Inakuma, Takahiro; Miyashita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio; Sun, Li-Cui; Xiang, Xue-Song; Huang, Zhen-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Betaine is an important natural component of rich food sources, especially spinach. Rats were fed diets with betaine or spinach powder at the same level of betaine for 10 days to investigate the dose-dependent effects of spinach powder supplementation on hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) addition and choline deprivation. The GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats fed 25% casein diet (25C) was significantly suppressed by supplementation with betaine or spinach, and it was completely suppressed by taking 11.0% spinach supplementation. The choline deprivation-induced enhancement of plasma homocysteine concentration in rats fed 25% soybean protein diet (25S) was markedly suppressed by 3.82% spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach partially prevented the effects of GAA on hepatic concentrations of methionine metabolites. The decrease in activity of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) in GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia was recovered by supplementation with betaine or spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach did not affect BHMT activity, whereas it partially restored CBS activity in choline-deprived 25S. The results indicated that betaine or spinach could completely suppress the hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline deficiency resulting from stimulating the homocysteine removal by both remethylation and cystathionine formation. PMID:25250392

  19. Purification and characterization of ribulose-5-phosphate kinase from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, M.A.; Milanez, S.; Stringer, C.D.; Hartman, F.C.

    1986-02-15

    An efficient purification procedure utilizing affinity chromatography is described for spinach ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, a light-regulated chloroplastic enzyme. Gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified enzyme reveal a dimeric structure of 44,000 Mr subunits. Chemical crosslinking with dimethyl suberimidate confirms the presence of two subunits per molecule of native kinase, which are shown to be identical by partial NH2-terminal sequencing. Based on sulfhydryl titrations and on amino acid analyses, each subunit contains four to five cysteinyl residues. The observed slow loss of activity during spontaneous oxidation in air-saturated buffer correlates with the intramolecular oxidation of two sulfhydryl groups, presumably those involved in thioredoxin-mediated regulation.

  20. Influence of nutrient level on methylmercury content in water spinach.

    PubMed

    Greger, Maria; Dabrowska, Beata

    2010-08-01

    Widely consumed vegetables are often cultivated in sewage waters with high nutrient levels. They can contain high levels of methylmercury (MeHg), because they can form MeHg from inorganic Hg in their young shoots. We determined whether the MeHg uptake and the MeHg formation in the shoots of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) were affected by the presence of a high nutrient level in the growth medium. Water spinach shoots were rooted and pretreated in growth medium containing 7% (low) or 70% (high) Hoagland nutrient solution; thereafter, the plants were treated with either 0.02 microM MeHg or 0.2 microM HgCl2 for 3 d. Half the plants were then analyzed for total Hg and MeHg. The remaining plants were transferred to mercury-free medium with low or high nutrient levels and posttreated for 3 days before analysis of total Hg and MeHg in order to measure MeHg formation in the absence of external Hg. The results indicate that nutrient level did not influence MeHg uptake, but that a high nutrient level reduced the distribution of MeHg to the shoots 2.7-fold versus low nutrient level. After treatment with HgCl2, MeHg was found in roots and new shoots but not in old shoots. The MeHg:total-Hg ratio was higher in new shoots than in roots, being 13 times higher at high versus low nutrient levels. Thus, MeHg formation was the same in new shoots independent of inorganic Hg concentration, since the total Hg level decreased at a high nutrient level. PMID:20821626

  1. Activity of phosphatidylcholine-transfer protein from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves with mitochondria and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Julienne, M; Vergnolle, C; Kader, J C

    1981-09-01

    A low-molecular-weight protein catalysing the transfer of phosphatidylcholine from liposomes to mitochondria and chloroplasts has been isolated from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) by chromatography on Sephadex G-75. PMID:7325986

  2. Phytotoxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on red spinach (Amaranthus tricolor L) and the role of ascorbic acid as an antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Begum, Parvin; Fugetsu, Bunshi

    2012-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a novel nanomaterial with wide potential applications; however the adverse effects of CNTs following environmental exposure have recently received significant attention. Herein, we explore the systemic toxicity and potential influence of 0-1000 mg L(-1) the multi-walled CNTs on red spinach. The multi-walled CNTs exposed plants exhibited growth inhibition and cell death after 15 days of hydroponic culture. The multi-walled CNTs had adverse effects on root and leaf morphology, as observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman spectroscopy detected the multi-walled CNTs in leaves. Biomarkers of nanoparticle toxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell damage in the red spinach were greatly increased 15 days post-exposure to the multi-walled CNTs. These effects were reversed when the multi-walled CNTs were supplemented with ascorbic acid (AsA), suggesting a role of ROS in the multi-walled CNT-induced toxicity and that the primary mechanism of the multi-walled CNTs' toxicity is oxidative stress. PMID:23146354

  3. Spinach-associated Escherichia coli O157:H7 Outbreak, Utah and New Mexico, 2006

    PubMed Central

    Wendelboe, Aaron M.; Wendel, Arthur; Jepson, Barbara; Torres, Paul; Smelser, Chad; Rolfs, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, Utah and New Mexico health departments investigated a multistate cluster of Escherichia coli O157:H7. A case–control study of 22 case-patients found that consuming bagged spinach was significantly associated with illness (p<0.01). The outbreak strain was isolated from 3 bags of 1 brand of spinach. Nationally, 205 persons were ill with the outbreak strain. PMID:18826833

  4. Bioavailability of iron from spinach using an in vitro/human Caco-2 cell bioassay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutzke, Corinne J.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Rutzke, Michael A.; Welch, Ross M.; Langhans, Robert W.; Albright, Louis D.; Combs, Gerald F Jr; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) cv Whitney was tested for iron bioavailabilty using an in vitro human intestinal cell culture ferritin bioassay technique previously developed. Spinach was cultured in a growth chamber for 33 days, harvested, and freeze-dried. Total iron in the samples was an average of 71 micrograms/g dry weight. Spinach was digested in vitro (pepsin and 0.1 M HCl followed by pancreatin and 0.1 M NaHCO3) with and without the addition of supplemental ascorbic acid. Caco-2 cell cultures were used to determine iron bioavailability from the spinach mixtures. Production of the iron-binding protein ferritin in the Caco-2 cells showed the supplemental ascorbic acid doubled bioavailability of iron from spinach. The data show fresh spinach is a poor source of iron, and emphasize the importance of evaluation of whole meals rather than single food items. The data support the usefulness of the in vitro/Caco-2 cell ferritin bioassay model for prescreening of space flight diets for bioavailable iron.

  5. Effect of spinach cultivar and bacterial adherence factors on survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on spinach leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Similarly to phytopathogens and epiphytic microorganisms, human bacterial pathogens have been shown to colonize on plant phylloplane. Along with environmental variables such as temperate, UV light, relative humidity, etc., plant cultivar and specifically the leaf blade morphological characteristics ...

  6. Whole-Transcriptome Analysis of Verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Sakai) Suggests Plant-Species-Specific Metabolic Responses on Exposure to Spinach and Lettuce Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Crozier, Louise; Hedley, Pete E.; Morris, Jenny; Wagstaff, Carol; Andrews, Simon C.; Toth, Ian; Jackson, Robert W.; Holden, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) can contaminate crop plants, potentially using them as secondary hosts, which can lead to food-borne infection. Currently, little is known about the influence of the specific plant species on the success of bacterial colonization. As such, we compared the ability of the VTEC strain, E. coli O157:H7 ‘Sakai,’ to colonize the roots and leaves of four leafy vegetables: spinach (Spinacia oleracea), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), vining green pea (Pisum sativum), and prickly lettuce (Lactuca serriola), a wild relative of domesticated lettuce. Also, to determine the drivers of the initial response on interaction with plant tissue, the whole transcriptome of E. coli O157:H7 Sakai was analyzed following exposure to plant extracts of varying complexity (spinach leaf lysates or root exudates, and leaf cell wall polysaccharides from spinach or lettuce). Plant extracts were used to reduce heterogeneity inherent in plant–microbe interactions and remove the effect of plant immunity. This dual approach provided information on the initial adaptive response of E. coli O157:H7 Sakai to the plant environment together with the influence of the living plant during bacterial establishment and colonization. Results showed that both the plant tissue type and the plant species strongly influence the short-term (1 h) transcriptional response to extracts as well as longer-term (10 days) plant colonization or persistence. We show that propagation temperature (37 vs. 18°C) has a major impact on the expression profile and therefore pre-adaptation of bacteria to a plant-relevant temperature is necessary to avoid misleading temperature-dependent wholescale gene-expression changes in response to plant material. For each of the plant extracts tested, the largest group of (annotated) differentially regulated genes were associated with metabolism. However, large-scale differences in the metabolic and biosynthetic pathways between treatment types indicate

  7. Whole-Transcriptome Analysis of Verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Sakai) Suggests Plant-Species-Specific Metabolic Responses on Exposure to Spinach and Lettuce Extracts.

    PubMed

    Crozier, Louise; Hedley, Pete E; Morris, Jenny; Wagstaff, Carol; Andrews, Simon C; Toth, Ian; Jackson, Robert W; Holden, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    Verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) can contaminate crop plants, potentially using them as secondary hosts, which can lead to food-borne infection. Currently, little is known about the influence of the specific plant species on the success of bacterial colonization. As such, we compared the ability of the VTEC strain, E. coli O157:H7 'Sakai,' to colonize the roots and leaves of four leafy vegetables: spinach (Spinacia oleracea), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), vining green pea (Pisum sativum), and prickly lettuce (Lactuca serriola), a wild relative of domesticated lettuce. Also, to determine the drivers of the initial response on interaction with plant tissue, the whole transcriptome of E. coli O157:H7 Sakai was analyzed following exposure to plant extracts of varying complexity (spinach leaf lysates or root exudates, and leaf cell wall polysaccharides from spinach or lettuce). Plant extracts were used to reduce heterogeneity inherent in plant-microbe interactions and remove the effect of plant immunity. This dual approach provided information on the initial adaptive response of E. coli O157:H7 Sakai to the plant environment together with the influence of the living plant during bacterial establishment and colonization. Results showed that both the plant tissue type and the plant species strongly influence the short-term (1 h) transcriptional response to extracts as well as longer-term (10 days) plant colonization or persistence. We show that propagation temperature (37 vs. 18°C) has a major impact on the expression profile and therefore pre-adaptation of bacteria to a plant-relevant temperature is necessary to avoid misleading temperature-dependent wholescale gene-expression changes in response to plant material. For each of the plant extracts tested, the largest group of (annotated) differentially regulated genes were associated with metabolism. However, large-scale differences in the metabolic and biosynthetic pathways between treatment types indicate

  8. Purification of gibberellin sub 53 -oxidase from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.M.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. )

    1989-04-01

    Spinach is a long-day rosette plants, in which stem growth is mediated by gibberellins. It has been shown that two enzymatic steps, GA{sub 53}-oxidase and GA{sub 19}-oxidase, are controlled by light. To develop an understanding into this light regulation, purification of GA{sub 53}-oxidase has been undertaken. The original assay relied on the HPLC separation of the product and substrate, but was considered too slow for the development of a purification scheme. A TLC system was developed which in conjunction with improvements to the assay conditions was sensitive and gave rapid results. The partial purification of the GA{sub 53}-oxidase is achieved by a high speed centrifugation, 40-55% ammonium sulfate precipitation, an hydroxyapatite column, Sephadex G-100 column and an anion exchange FPLC column, Mono Q HR10/10, yielding 1000-fold purification and 15% recovery. Monoclonal antibodies to the protein will be raised and used to further characterize the enzyme.

  9. Spinach pyruvate kinase isoforms: partial purification and regulatory properties

    SciTech Connect

    Baysdorfer, C.; Bassham, J.A.

    1984-02-01

    Pyruvate kinase from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves consists of two isoforms, separable by blue agarose chromatography. Both isoforms share similar pH profiles and substrate and alternate nucleotide K/sub m/ values. In addition, both isoforms are inhibited by oxalate and ATP and activated by AMP. The isoforms differ in their response to three key metabolites; citrate, aspartate, and glutamate. The first isoform is similar to previously reported plant pyruvate kinases in its sensitivity to citrate inhibition. The K/sub i/ for this inhibition is 1.2 millimolar citrate. The second isoform is not affected by citrate but is regulated by aspartate and glutamate. Aspartate is an activator with a K/sub a/ of 0.05 millimolar, and glutamate is an inhibitor with a K/sub i/ of 0.68 millimolar. A pyruvate kinase with these properties has not been previously reported. Based on these considerations, the authors suggest that the activity of the first isoform is regulated by respiratory metabolism. The second isoform, in contrast, may be regulated by the demand for carbon skeletons for use in ammonia assimilation.

  10. Jumping mode atomic force microscopy on grana membranes from spinach.

    PubMed

    Sznee, Kinga; Dekker, Jan P; Dame, Remus T; van Roon, Henny; Wuite, Gijs J L; Frese, Raoul N

    2011-11-11

    The thylakoid membrane system is a complex membrane system that organizes and reorganizes itself to provide plants optimal chemical energy from sunlight under different and varying environmental conditions. Grana membranes are part of this system and contain the light-driven water-splitting enzyme Photosystem II (PSII) and light-harvesting antenna complexes. Here, we present a direct visualization of PSII complexes within grana membranes from spinach. By means of jumping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid, minimal forces were applied between the scanning tip and membrane or protein, allowing complexes to be imaged with high detail. We observed four different packing arrangements of PSII complexes, which occur primarily as dimers: co-linear crystalline rows, nanometric domains of straight or skewed rows, and disordered domains. Upon storing surface-adhered membranes at low temperature prior to imaging, large-scale reorganizations of supercomplexes between PSII and light-harvesting complex II could be induced. The highest resolution images show the existence of membrane domains without obvious topography extending beyond supercomplexes. These observations illustrate the possibility for diffusion of proteins and smaller molecules within these densely packed membranes. PMID:21911498

  11. Phosphoglycolate phosphatase of spinach acts as a phosphoenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Z.B.; Seal, S.N.

    1987-05-01

    When /sup 32/P-glycolate and phosphoglycolate phosphatase from spinach are mixed, /sup 32/P is incorporated into acid precipitated protein. Properties that relate this phosphorylation to the enzyme are: The K/sub m/ value for P-glycolate is similar for protein phosphorylation and substrate hydrolysis; the /sup 32/P appearing in the phosphoenzyme is diluted by unlabeled P-glycolate or the alternative substrate, ethyl-P; the activator Cl/sup -/ enhances the effectiveness of ethyl-P as a substrate and as an inhibitor of the formation of /sup 32/P-enzyme; and /sup 32/P is lost from the enzyme when /sup 32/P-glycolate is consumed. The acid denatured phosphorylated protein is a molecule of 34,000 Da, which is half of the molecular weight of the native protein and is similar in size to the labeled band that is seen on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. The enzyme-bound phosphoryl group appears to be an acyl-phosphate from its pH stability, being quite stable at pH 1, less stable at pH 5, and very unstable above pH 5. The bond is readily hydrolyzed in acid molybdate and it is sensitive to cleavage by hydroxylamine at pH 6.8. The demonstration of enzyme phosphorylation by /sup 32/P-glycolate resolves the dilemma presented by initial rate studies in which alternative substrates appeared to have different mechanisms.

  12. Spinach curly top virus: A Newly Described Curtovirus Species from Southwest Texas with Incongruent Gene Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Baliji, Surendranath; Black, Mark C; French, Roy; Stenger, Drake C; Sunter, Garry

    2004-07-01

    ABSTRACT A curtovirus associated with a disease of spinach was isolated in southwest Texas during 1996. Disease symptoms included severe stunting and chlorosis, with younger leaves curled, distorted, and dwarfed. Viral DNA was purified and an infectious clone obtained. Agroinoculation using a construct bearing full-length tandem repeats of the cloned viral genome resulted in systemic infection of species in six of seven plant families tested, indicating that the virus has a wide host range. Symptoms produced in spinach agroinoculated with cloned viral DNA were similar to those observed in the field. Viral single-stranded and double-stranded DNA forms typical of curtovirus infection were detected in host plants by Southern blot hybridization. The complete sequence of the infectious clone comprised 2,925 nucleotides, with seven open reading frames encoding proteins homologous to those of other curtoviruses. Complete genome comparisons revealed that the spinach curtovirus shared 64.2 to 83.9% nucleotide sequence identity relative to four previously characterized curtovirus species: Beet curly top virus, Beet severe curly top virus, Beet mild curly top virus, and Horseradish curly top virus. Phylogenetic analysis of individual open reading frames indicated that the evolutionary history of the three virion-sense genes was different from that of the four complementary-sense genes, suggesting that recombination among curtoviruses may have occurred. Collectively, these results indicate that the spinach curtovirus characterized here represents a newly described species of the genus Curtovirus, for which we propose the name Spinach curly top virus. PMID:18943911

  13. Pesticide residue analysis in parsley, lettuce and spinach by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Esturk, Okan; Yakar, Yasin; Ayhan, Zehra

    2014-03-01

    In this study, pesticide residues in parsley, lettuce and spinach (120 samples) were analyzed by the application of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). All samples of spinach, parsley or lettuce contained residues of three or more active substances. In parsley, carbendazim (100.0%), dichlorvos (100.0%), fenarimol (40.0%), pendimethalin (95.0%), in lettuce, diazinon (30.0%), dichlorvos (100.0%), pendimethalin (92.5%) phenthoate (12.5%), and in spinach, carbendazim (45.0%), cymoxanil (85.0%), dichlorvos (100.0%) and fenarimol (85.0%) were the significant active compounds. The maximum residue limits were exceeded in 28, 20 and 40 samples of parsley, lettuce and spinach, respectively. The results showed that there was a high occurrence of pesticide residues in parsley, lettuce and spinach samples from Hatay province, in which most of them were prohibited from use in Turkey for these vegetables. The contamination levels of these residues may be considered a serious public health problem according to the maximum residue limits (MRLs) of Turkey and the European Union (EU). PMID:24587520

  14. Distinct transcriptional profiles and phenotypes exhibited by Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates related to the 2006 spinach-associated outbreak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006, an outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was linked to the consumption of ready-to-eat bagged spinach. The likely sources of pre-harvest spinach contamination were soil and water that became contaminated via cattle or feral pigs in the proximity of the spinach fields. In this study, we compa...

  15. Quality of fresh-cut iceberg lettuce and spinach irradiated at doses up to 4kGy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to investigate radiation tolerance of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce and spinach. Fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce packaged in modified atmosphere packages and spinach in perforated film bags were irradiated with gamma rays at doses of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 kGy. After irradiation, the sam...

  16. Colonization of spinach by Verticillium dahliae and effects of pathogen localization on the efficacy of seed treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium wilt is caused by the soilborne fungus V. dahliae on spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) but the disease is a serious problem only in seed production fields. Spinach crops are harvested well before symptom expression, and thus, Verticillium wilt is not a significant threat in fresh and proc...

  17. Ultrasound enhanced sanitizer efficacy in reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 population on spinach leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of ultrasound to enhance the efficacy of selected sanitizers in reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 populations on spinach was investigated. Spot-inoculated spinach samples were treated with water, chlorine, acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), peroxyacetic acid (POAA), and acidic electrolyzed...

  18. An Improved Method for the Extraction and Thin-Layer Chromatography of Chlorophyll A and B from Spinach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quach, Hao T.; Steeper, Robert L.; Griffin, William G.

    2004-01-01

    A simple and fast method, which resolves chlorophyll a and b from spinach leaves on analytical plates while minimizing the appearance of chlorophyll degradation products is shown. An improved mobile phase for the Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of spinach extract that allows for the complete resolution of the common plant pigments found in…

  19. iSpinach: a fluorogenic RNA aptamer optimized for in vitro applications.

    PubMed

    Autour, Alexis; Westhof, Eric; Ryckelynck, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Using random mutagenesis and high throughput screening by microfluidic-assisted In Vitro Compartmentalization, we report the isolation of an order of magnitude times brighter mutants of the light-up RNA aptamers Spinach that are far less salt-sensitive and with a much higher thermal stability than the parent molecule. Further engineering gave iSpinach, a molecule with folding and fluorescence properties surpassing those of all currently known aptamer based on the fluorogenic co-factor 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI). We illustrate the potential of iSpinach in a new sensitive and high throughput-compatible fluorogenic assay that measures co-transcriptionally the catalytic constant (kcat) of a model ribozyme. PMID:26932363

  20. Systematic reconstruction of binding and stability landscapes of the fluorogenic aptamer spinach.

    PubMed

    Ketterer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Weber, Wilfried; Meier, Matthias

    2015-10-30

    Fluorogenic RNAs that are based on the complex formed by 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) derivatives and the RNA aptamer named Spinach were used to engineer a new generation of in vitro and in vivo sensors for bioanalytics. With the resolved crystal structure of the RNA/small molecule complex, the engineering map becomes available, but comprehensive information regarding the thermodynamic profile of the molecule is missing. Here, we reconstructed the full thermodynamic binding and stability landscapes between DFHBI and a truncated sequence of first-generation Spinach. For this purpose, we established a systematic screening procedure for single- and double-point mutations on a microfluidic large-scale integrated chip platform for 87-nt long RNAs. The thermodynamic profile with single base resolution was used to engineer an improved fluorogenic spinach generation via a directed rather than evolutional approach. PMID:26400180

  1. iSpinach: a fluorogenic RNA aptamer optimized for in vitro applications

    PubMed Central

    Autour, Alexis; Westhof, Eric; Ryckelynck, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Using random mutagenesis and high throughput screening by microfluidic-assisted In Vitro Compartmentalization, we report the isolation of an order of magnitude times brighter mutants of the light-up RNA aptamers Spinach that are far less salt-sensitive and with a much higher thermal stability than the parent molecule. Further engineering gave iSpinach, a molecule with folding and fluorescence properties surpassing those of all currently known aptamer based on the fluorogenic co-factor 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI). We illustrate the potential of iSpinach in a new sensitive and high throughput-compatible fluorogenic assay that measures co-transcriptionally the catalytic constant (kcat) of a model ribozyme. PMID:26932363

  2. Systematic reconstruction of binding and stability landscapes of the fluorogenic aptamer spinach

    PubMed Central

    Ketterer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Weber, Wilfried; Meier, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Fluorogenic RNAs that are based on the complex formed by 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) derivatives and the RNA aptamer named Spinach were used to engineer a new generation of in vitro and in vivo sensors for bioanalytics. With the resolved crystal structure of the RNA/small molecule complex, the engineering map becomes available, but comprehensive information regarding the thermodynamic profile of the molecule is missing. Here, we reconstructed the full thermodynamic binding and stability landscapes between DFHBI and a truncated sequence of first-generation Spinach. For this purpose, we established a systematic screening procedure for single- and double-point mutations on a microfluidic large-scale integrated chip platform for 87-nt long RNAs. The thermodynamic profile with single base resolution was used to engineer an improved fluorogenic spinach generation via a directed rather than evolutional approach. PMID:26400180

  3. Postharvest handling conditions affect internalization of Salmonella in baby spinach during washing.

    PubMed

    Gómez-López, Vicente M; Marín, Alicia; Allende, Ana; Beuchat, Larry R; Gil, María I

    2013-07-01

    Internalization of foodborne pathogens in fruits and vegetables is an increasing safety concern. The aim of this research was to assess the potential for internalization of an enteric pathogen (Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium) in a leafy vegetable (baby spinach) during washing as influenced by three postharvest handling conditions: (i) illumination, (ii) negative temperature differential, and (iii) relative humidity (RH). To compare these potential postharvest handling conditions, leaves were exposed to different levels of illumination (0, 1,000, and 2,000 lx), temperature differential (5, 11, 14, 20, and 26°C), and RH (99, 85, and 74%) for a short time before or during washing. Washing of baby spinach was carried out in water containing green fluorescent protein-tagged Salmonella Typhimurium (6.5 log CFU/ml) at 5°C for 2 min, followed by surface disinfection with chlorine (10,000 μg/ml) for 1 min, two rinses in water for 10 s, and spin drying for 15 s. Internalization was assessed by enumerating the pathogen on Salmonella-Shigella agar and by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Illumination of spinach leaves before and during washing and a negative temperature differential during washing did not significantly (P > 0.05) increase the number of internalized bacteria. However, exposure of leaves to low-RH conditions before washing, which reduced the tissue water content, decreased internalization of Salmonella compared with internalization in baby spinach exposed to high RH (P ≤ 0.05). Green fluorescent protein-tagged Salmonella Typhimurium was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy at a depth of up to 30 m m beneath the surface of spinach leaves after exposure to a high inoculum level (8 log CFU/ml) for an extended time (2 h). Results show that internalization of Salmonella into baby spinach leaves can occur but can be minimized under specific postharvest handling conditions such as low RH. PMID:23834788

  4. Nutritional Composition of Water Spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) Leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, K. J.; Hassan, L. G.; Dangoggo, S. M.; Ladan, M. J.

    Analyses of the nutritional composition of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) Forsk leaves were carried out using standard methods of food analysis. The proximate composition as well as mineral elements were determined. The leaves were found on dry weight basis to have high moisture (72.83±0.29%), ash (10.83±0.80%), crude lipid (11.00±0.50%), crude fibre (17.67±0.35%) and available carbohydrate (54.20±0.68%), but low in crude protein content (6.30±0.27%). The leaves also have energy value (300.94±5.31 kcal/100 g) that is within the range reported in some Nigerian leafy vegetables. The mineral element contents were high with remarkable concentration of K (5,458.33±954.70 mg/100 g) and Fe (210.30±2.47 mg/100 g). Also the leaves content moderate concentrations of Na (135.00±2.50 mg/100 g), calcium (416.70±5.77 mg/100 g), Magnesium (301.64±12.69 mg/100 g) and P (109.29±0.55 mg/100 g), with low Cu (0.36±0.01 mg/100 g), Mn (2.14±0.22 mg/100 g) and Zn (2.47±0.27 mg/100 g) contents. Comparing the mineral content with recommended dietary allowance, it was showed that the plant leaves is good sources of K, Mn and Fe for all categories of people, while Mg is adequate enough for adult female and children. From the result, Ipomoea aquatica Forsk leaves could be used for nutritional purposes, due to the amount and diversity of nutrients it contains.

  5. Isolation of chlorophylls a and b from spinach by counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jubert, Carole; Bailey, George

    2007-01-26

    A method for the isolation of chlorophylls from spinach by counter-current chromatography was developed. An initial extraction protocol was devised to avoid the notorious sensitivity of chlorophylls to degradation by light, heat, oxygen, acids and bases. Further purification and separation of chlorophylls a and b were achieved using counter-current chromatography. Chlorophyll structures and purities were established by HPLC, fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. Purity was estimated to be >95% (100% by HPLC). Typical yields from 30g of freeze-dried spinach were 300mg of chlorophyll a and 100mg of chlorophyll b. PMID:17164074

  6. Isolation of a cDNA clone for spinach lipid transfer protein and evidence that the protein is synthesized by the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard, W.R.; Thoma, S.; Botella, J.; Somerville, C.R. )

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a nonspecific lipid transfer protein from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was isolated by probing a library with synthetic oligonucleotides based on the amino acid sequence of the protein. Determination of the DNA sequence indicated a 354-nucleotide open reading frame which encodes a 118-amino acid residue polypeptide. The first 26 amino acids of the open reading frame, which are not present in the mature protein, have all the characteristics of a signal sequence which is normally associated with the synthesis of membrane proteins or secreted proteins. In vitro transcription of the cDNA and translation in the presence of canine pancreatic microsomes or microsomes from cultured maize endosperm cells indicated that proteolytic processing of the preprotein to the mature form was associated with cotranslational insertion into the microsomal membranes. Because there is no known mechanism by which the polypeptide could be transferred from the microsomal membranes to the cytoplasm, the proposed role of this protein in catalyzing lipid transfer between intracellular membranes is in doubt. Although the lipid transfer protein is one of the most abundant proteins in leaf cells, the results of genomic Southern analysis were consistent with the presence of only one gene. Analysis of the level of mRNA by Northern blotting indicated that the transcript was several-fold more abundant than an actin transcript in leaf and petiole tissue, but was present in roots at less than 1% of the level in petioles.

  7. Potential anticancer effect of red spinach (Amaranthus gangeticus) extract.

    PubMed

    Sani, Huzaimah Abdullah; Rahmat, Asmah; Ismail, Maznah; Rosli, Rozita; Endrini, Susi

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the anti cancer effects of red spinach (Amaranthus gangeticus Linn) in vitro and in vivo. For in vitro study, microtitration cytotoxic assay was done using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-il)-2,5-diphenil tetrazolium bromide (MTT) kit assay. Results showed that aqueous extract of A gangeticus inhibited the proliferation of liver cancer cell line (HepG2) and breast cancer cell line (MCF-7). The IC(50) values were 93.8 mu g/ml and 98.8 mu g/ml for HepG2 and MCF-7, respectively. The inhibitory effect was also observed in colon cancer cell line (Caco-2), but a lower percentage compared to HepG2 and MCF-7. For normal cell line (Chang Liver), there was no inhibitory effect. In the in vivo study, hepatocarcinogenesis was monitored in rats according to Solt and Farber (1976) without partial hepatectomy. Assay of tumour marker enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase (GST), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), uridyl diphosphoglucuronyl transferase (UDPGT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were carried out to determine the severity of hepatocarcinogenesis. The result found that supplementation of 5%, 7.5% and 10% of A. gangeticus aqueous extract to normal rats did not show any significant difference towards normal control (P <0.05). The exposure of the rats to chemical carcinogens diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) showed a significant increase in specific enzyme activity of GGT, GST, UDPGT and ALP compared to normal control (P <0.05). However, it was found that the supplementation of A. gangeticus aqueous extract in 5%, 7.5% and 10% to cancer-induced rats could inhibit the activity of all tumour marker enzymes especially at 10% (P <0.05). Supplementation of anti cancer drug glycyrrhizin at suggested dose (0.005%) did not show any suppressive effect towards cancer control (P <0.05). In conclusion, A. gangeticus showed anticancer potential in in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:15563447

  8. GROWTH RESPONSE IN SPINACH TO SEQUENTIAL AND SIMULTANEOUS EXPOSURE TO NO2 AND SO2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was exposed intermittently to NO2 and SO2 (2 hours/week; 0.8 or 1.5ppm) in a simultaneous or sequential fashion over the 42-day growth period. Nighttime simultaneous exposure to NO2 and SO2 reduced growth and altered assimilate partitioning to the root...

  9. Multispectral fluorescence imaging for detection of bovine feces on Romaine lettuce and baby spinach leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging with ultraviolet-A excitation was used to evaluate the feasibility of two-waveband fluorescence algorithms for the detection of bovine fecal contaminants on the abaxial and adaxial surfaces of Romaine lettuce and baby spinach leaves. Correlation analysis was used t...

  10. Polycations Globally Enhance Binding of 14-3-3 omega to Target Proteins in Spinach Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The binding of 14-3-3' to phosphorylated NR (pNR) is stimulated by cations such as Mg2+ or spermine, and decreased by 5'-AMP. In order to determine whether binding to other cellular proteins is affected similarly, Far-Western overlays of extracts prepared from light- or dark-treated spinach (Spinac...

  11. Adherence of curli producing Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli to baby spinach leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellular appendages, such as curli fibers have been suggested to be involved in STEC persistence in fresh produce as these curli are critical in biofilm formation and adherence to animal cells. We determined the role of curli in attachment of STEC on spinach leaves. The curli expression by wild-ty...

  12. [Effect of cooking on content of nitrates, vitamin C, magnesium and iron in spinach].

    PubMed

    Astier-Dumas, M

    1975-01-01

    Cooking is known to lower the mineral and vitaminic content of foodstuffs. Recently, contaminant became to be a problem in foods, and it was proposed to use blanching or boiling to diminish contaminant residues in foods, specially vegetables. An example of this attitude is given by the use of blanching to lower nitrates levels in spinach specially prepared for baby foods. PMID:1211733

  13. Survival of Salmonella on spinach leaves treated with contaminated irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Salmonella outbreaks have been associated with the consumption of fresh produce. The produce may be contaminated with Salmonella during on-farm contact with contaminated water. Transmission of Salmonella from contaminated irrigation water to spinach plants in growth chamber settings ...

  14. Internalization of E. coli O157:H7 in spinach cultivated in soil and hydroponic media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Internalization of E. coli O157:H7 into spinach plants through root uptake is a potential route of contamination. Previous studies that have investigated uptake of E. coli O157:H7 into leafy greens have expressed green fluorescent protein (gfp) from a plasmid, possibly limiting detecti...

  15. Responses of spinach to salinity and nutrient deficiency in growth, physiology and nutritional value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salinity and nutrient depleted soil are major constraints to crop production, especially for vegetable crops. The effects of salinity and nutrient deficiency on spinach were evaluated in sand cultures under greenhouse conditions. Plants were watered every day with Hoagland nutrition solution, depriv...

  16. Evaluation of Oxalate Concentration in the U.S. Spinach Germplasm Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to its high nutrient content, spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is also known to have greater amount of oxalic acid than most crops. Oxalic acid may form crystals with minerals to reduce the bioavailability and absorption of calcium and iron in diets, and calcium oxalate may deposit in the...

  17. De novo and comparative transcriptome analysis of cultivated and wild spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we performed deep transcriptome sequencing for nine spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., 2n = 2× = 12) accessions, three from cultivated S. oleracea, three from wild S. turkestanica and three from wild S. tetrandra, using the Illumina sequencing technology. A total of approximately 100 mill...

  18. Acute Effects of a Spinach Extract Rich in Thylakoids on Satiety: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rebello, Candida J.; Chu, Jessica; Beyl, Robbie; Edwall, Dan; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte; Greenway, Frank L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: By retarding fat digestion, thylakoids, the internal photosynthetic membrane system of green plants, promote the release of satiety hormones. This study examined the effect of consuming a single dose of concentrated extract of thylakoids from spinach on satiety, food intake, lipids, and glucose compared to a placebo. Design: Sixty overweight and obese individuals enrolled in a double-blind randomized crossover study consumed the spinach extract or placebo in random order at least a week apart. Blood was drawn for assessments of lipids and glucose before a standard breakfast meal, followed 4 hours later by a 5 g dose of the extract and a standard lunch. Visual analog scales were administered before lunch and at intervals until an ad libitum pizza dinner served 4 hours later. Two hours after lunch a second blood draw was conducted. Mixed models were used to analyze response changes. Results: Compared to placebo, consuming the spinach extract reduced hunger (p < 0.01) and longing for food over 2 hours (p < 0.01) and increased postprandial plasma glucose concentrations (p < 0.01). There were no differences in plasma lipids and energy intake at dinner, but males showed a trend toward decreased energy intake (p = 0.08). Conclusions: At this dose, the spinach extract containing thylakoids increases satiety over a 2-hour period compared to a placebo. Thylakoid consumption may influence gender-specific food cravings. PMID:26029978

  19. Genetic diversity and association analysis of leafminer (Liriomyza langei) resistance in spinach (Spinacia oleracea)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leafminer (Liriomyza spp.) is a major insect pest of many important agricultural crops, including spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Use of genetic resistance is an efficient, economic and environment-friendly method to control this pest. The objective of this research was to conduct association analysis ...

  20. Biofilm formation and bacteriophage inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on spinach harvester blades

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Outbreaks associated with leafy greens have focused attention on the transfer of human pathogens to leafy greens during harvest with commercial equipment. The role of this equipment should be investigated to develop mitigation strategies. Biofilm formation by Escherichia coli O157:H7 on a spinach ha...

  1. Persistence of enterohemorrhagic and non-pathogenic E. coli on spinach leaves and in rhizosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Outbreaks associated with leafy greens have focused attention on the persistence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on produce. Ecological interactions of E. coli O157:H7 and spinach require detailed characterization. Purpose: Survival of E. coli O157:H7 and non-pathogenic E. coli was evalua...

  2. Perchlorate uptake in spinach as related to perchlorate, nitrate and chloride concentrations in irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several studies have reported on the detection of perchlorate in edible leafy vegetables irrigated with Colorado River water. However, there is no information on spinach as related to perchlorate in irrigation water nor on the effect of other anions on perchlorate uptake. A greenhouse perchlorate up...

  3. 24-epibrassinolide and 20-hydroxyecdysone affect photosynthesis differently in maize and spinach.

    PubMed

    Rothová, Olga; Holá, Dana; Kočová, Marie; Tůmová, Lenka; Hnilička, František; Hniličková, Helena; Kamlar, Marek; Macek, Tomáš

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the work was to examine the effect of brassinosteroid (24-epibrassinolide; 24E) and ecdysteroid (20-hydroxyecdysone; 20E) on various parts of primary photosynthetic processes in maize and spinach. Additionally, the effect of steroids on gaseous exchange, pigment content and biomass accumulation was studied. The efficiency of the photosynthetic whole electron-transport chain responded negatively to the 24E or 20E treatment in both species, but there were interspecific differences regarding Photosystem (PS) II response. A positive effect on its oxygen-evolving complex and a slightly better energetical connectivity between PSII units were observed in maize whereas the opposite was true for spinach. The size of the pool of the PSI end electron acceptors was usually diminished due to 24E or 20E treatment. The treatment of plants with 24E or 20E applied individually positively influenced the content of photosynthetic pigments in maize (not in spinach). On the other hand, it did not affect gaseous exchange in maize but resulted in its reduction in spinach. Plants treated with combination of both steroids mostly did not significantly differ from the control plants. We have demonstrated for the first time that 20E applied in low (10nM) concentration can affect various parts of photosynthetic processes similarly to 24E and that brassinosteroids regulate not only PSII but also other parts of the photosynthetic electron transport chain - but not necessarily in the same way. PMID:24769061

  4. Persistence of enterohemorrhagic and non-pathogenic E. coli on spinach leaves and in rhizosphere soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne illness outbreaks associated with leafy greens have raised concerns about the persistence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on fresh produce and in the cropping environment. The set of characteristics that enable the enteric bacterium E. coli O157:H7 to survive on undamaged spinach leaves, roots...

  5. De novo and comparative transcriptome analysis of cultivated and wild spinach

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenxi; Jiao, Chen; Zheng, Yi; Sun, Honghe; Liu, Wenli; Cai, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoli; Liu, Shuang; Xu, Yimin; Mou, Beiquan; Dai, Shaojun; Fei, Zhangjun; Wang, Quanhua

    2015-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is an economically important green leafy vegetable crop. In this study, we performed deep transcriptome sequencing for nine spinach accessions: three from cultivated S. oleracea, three from wild S. turkestanica and three from wild S. tetrandra. A total of approximately 100 million high-quality reads were generated, which were de novo assembled into 72,151 unigenes with a total length of 46.5 Mb. By comparing sequences of these unigenes against different protein databases, nearly 60% of them were annotated and 50% could be assigned with Gene Ontology terms. A total of 387 metabolic pathways were predicted from the assembled spinach unigenes. From the transcriptome sequencing data, we were able to identify a total of ~320,000 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Phylogenetic analyses using SNPs as well as gene expression profiles indicated that S. turkestanica was more closely related to the cultivated S. oleracea than S. tetrandra. A large number of genes involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses were found to be differentially expressed between the cultivated and wild spinach. Finally, an interactive online database (http://www.spinachbase.org) was developed to allow the research community to efficiently retrieve, query, mine and analyze our transcriptome dataset. PMID:26635144

  6. De novo and comparative transcriptome analysis of cultivated and wild spinach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenxi; Jiao, Chen; Zheng, Yi; Sun, Honghe; Liu, Wenli; Cai, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoli; Liu, Shuang; Xu, Yimin; Mou, Beiquan; Dai, Shaojun; Fei, Zhangjun; Wang, Quanhua

    2015-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is an economically important green leafy vegetable crop. In this study, we performed deep transcriptome sequencing for nine spinach accessions: three from cultivated S. oleracea, three from wild S. turkestanica and three from wild S. tetrandra. A total of approximately 100 million high-quality reads were generated, which were de novo assembled into 72,151 unigenes with a total length of 46.5 Mb. By comparing sequences of these unigenes against different protein databases, nearly 60% of them were annotated and 50% could be assigned with Gene Ontology terms. A total of 387 metabolic pathways were predicted from the assembled spinach unigenes. From the transcriptome sequencing data, we were able to identify a total of ~320,000 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Phylogenetic analyses using SNPs as well as gene expression profiles indicated that S. turkestanica was more closely related to the cultivated S. oleracea than S. tetrandra. A large number of genes involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses were found to be differentially expressed between the cultivated and wild spinach. Finally, an interactive online database (http://www.spinachbase.org) was developed to allow the research community to efficiently retrieve, query, mine and analyze our transcriptome dataset. PMID:26635144

  7. Generic Escherichia coli Contamination of Spinach at the Preharvest Stage: Effects of Farm Management and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Navratil, Sarah; Gregory, Ashley; Bauer, Arin; Srinath, Indumathi; Jun, Mikyoung; Szonyi, Barbara; Nightingale, Kendra; Anciso, Juan; Ivanek, Renata

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of farm management and environmental factors on preharvest spinach contamination with generic Escherichia coli as an indicator of fecal contamination. A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted by visiting spinach farms up to four times per growing season over a period of 2 years (2010 to 2011). Spinach samples (n = 955) were collected from 12 spinach farms in Colorado and Texas as representative states of the Western and Southwestern United States, respectively. During each farm visit, farmers were surveyed about farm-related management and environmental factors using a questionnaire. Associations between the prevalence of generic E. coli in spinach and farm-related factors were assessed by using a multivariable logistic regression model including random effects for farm and farm visit. Overall, 6.6% of spinach samples were positive for generic E. coli. Significant risk factors for spinach contamination with generic E. coli were the proximity (within 10 miles) of a poultry farm, the use of pond water for irrigation, a >66-day period since the planting of spinach, farming on fields previously used for grazing, the production of hay before spinach planting, and the farm location in the Southwestern United States. Contamination with generic E. coli was significantly reduced with an irrigation lapse time of >5 days as well as by several factors related to field workers, including the use of portable toilets, training to use portable toilets, and the use of hand-washing stations. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an association between field workers' personal hygiene and produce contamination with generic E. coli at the preharvest level. Collectively, our findings support that practice of good personal hygiene and other good farm management practices may reduce produce contamination with generic E. coli at the preharvest level. PMID:23666336

  8. Automated immunomagnetic separation for the detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from spinach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Shi, Xianming; Gehring, Andrew G; Paoli, George C

    2014-06-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a major cause of foodborne illness and methods for rapid and sensitive detection of this deadly pathogen are needed to protect consumers. The use of immunomagnetic separation (IMS) for capturing and detecting foodborne pathogens has gained popularity, partially due to the introduction of automated and high throughput IMS instrumentation. Three methods for automated IMS that test different sample volumes, Kingfisher mL, Pathatrix Auto, and Pathatrix Ultra, were compared using microbiological detection of E. coli O157:H7 from buffered peptone water (BPW), in the presence of background microbial flora derived from spinach leaves, and from culture enrichments from artificially contaminated spinach leaves. The average efficiencies of capture of E. coli O157:H7 using the three methods were 32.1%, 3.7%, and 1.3%, respectively, in BPW; 43.4%, 8.8%, 2.9%, respectively, in the presence of spinach microbial flora; and 63.0%, 7.0%, and 6.3%, respectively, from artificially contaminated spinach. Despite the large differences in IMS capture efficiencies between the KingFisher and two Pathatrix methods, all three methods allowed the detection of E. coli O157:H7 from spinach that was artificially contaminated with the pathogen at relatively high (25 cfu/30 g sample) and low (1 cfu/30 g sample) levels after 4-6h of culture enrichment. The differences in capture efficiency were compensated for by the differences in sample volume used by the KingFisher mL (1 mL), Pathatrix Auto (50 mL) and Pathatrix Ultra (250 mL) instruments. Thus, despite the reduced capture efficiencies observed for the Pathatrix methods, the large increase in sample volume results in a greater number of captured cells for downstream detection resulting in improved detection sensitivity. PMID:24718031

  9. Antioxidant Effects of Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) Supplementation in Hyperlipidemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sang-Heui; Park, Jae-Hee; Kim, So-Yun; Lee, Seon Woo; Chun, Soon-Sil; Park, Eunju

    2014-01-01

    Increased consumption of fresh vegetables that are high in polyphenols has been associated with a reduced risk of oxidative stress-induced disease. The present study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of spinach in vitro and in vivo in hyperlipidemic rats. For measurement of in vitro antioxidant activity, spinach was subjected to hot water extraction (WE) or ethanol extraction (EE) and examined for total polyphenol content (TPC), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), cellular antioxidant activity (CAA), and antigenotoxic activity. The in vivo antioxidant activity of spinach was assessed using blood and liver lipid profiles and antioxidant status in rats fed a high fat-cholesterol diet (HFCD) for 6 weeks. The TPC of WE and EE were shown as 1.5±0.0 and 0.5±0.0 mg GAE/g, respectively. Increasing the concentration of the extracts resulted in increased ORAC value, CAA, and antigenotoxic activity for all extracts tested. HFCD-fed rats displayed hyperlipidemia and increased oxidative stress, as indicated by a significant rise in blood and liver lipid profiles, an increase in plasma conjugated diene concentration, an increase in liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level, and a significant decrease in manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity compared with rats fed normal diet. However, administration of 5% spinach showed a beneficial effect in HFCD rats, as indicated by decreased liver TBARS level and DNA damage in leukocyte and increased plasma conjugated dienes and Mn-SOD activity. Thus, the antioxidant activity of spinach may be an effective way to ameliorate high fat and cholesterol diet-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24772405

  10. Antioxidant Effects of Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) Supplementation in Hyperlipidemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Heui; Park, Jae-Hee; Kim, So-Yun; Lee, Seon Woo; Chun, Soon-Sil; Park, Eunju

    2014-01-01

    Increased consumption of fresh vegetables that are high in polyphenols has been associated with a reduced risk of oxidative stress-induced disease. The present study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of spinach in vitro and in vivo in hyperlipidemic rats. For measurement of in vitro antioxidant activity, spinach was subjected to hot water extraction (WE) or ethanol extraction (EE) and examined for total polyphenol content (TPC), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), cellular antioxidant activity (CAA), and antigenotoxic activity. The in vivo antioxidant activity of spinach was assessed using blood and liver lipid profiles and antioxidant status in rats fed a high fat-cholesterol diet (HFCD) for 6 weeks. The TPC of WE and EE were shown as 1.5±0.0 and 0.5±0.0 mg GAE/g, respectively. Increasing the concentration of the extracts resulted in increased ORAC value, CAA, and antigenotoxic activity for all extracts tested. HFCD-fed rats displayed hyperlipidemia and increased oxidative stress, as indicated by a significant rise in blood and liver lipid profiles, an increase in plasma conjugated diene concentration, an increase in liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level, and a significant decrease in manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity compared with rats fed normal diet. However, administration of 5% spinach showed a beneficial effect in HFCD rats, as indicated by decreased liver TBARS level and DNA damage in leukocyte and increased plasma conjugated dienes and Mn-SOD activity. Thus, the antioxidant activity of spinach may be an effective way to ameliorate high fat and cholesterol diet-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24772405

  11. Effect of γ-irradiation on the thermomechanical and morphological properties of chitosan obtained from prawn shell: Evaluation of potential for irradiated chitosan as plant growth stimulator for Malabar spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mohammed Mizanur; Kabir, Shahriar; Rashid, Taslim Ur; Nesa, Bodrun; Nasrin, Romana; Haque, Papia; Khan, Mubarak A.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we have synthesized chitosan from waste prawn shell via γ-irradiation of chitin and subsequent alkaline treatment. The detailed experimental studies demonstrated that nonirradiated chitin deacetylated by 40% NaOH solution showed 72% degree of deacetylation (DD), however 50 kGy irradiated chitin, deacetylated by 20% NaOH demonstrated 81.5% DD. Chitosan in solid state as obtained from γ-irradiation of chitin was further irradiated by different doses (2-100 kGy) of gamma irradiation and the effects of irradiation on the molecular weight, thermo-mechanical by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and antimicrobial properties were evaluated with respect to nonirradiated chitosan sample. Gamma irradiation of chitosan with a dose of 100 kGy caused a decrease in average molecular weight from 1.9×105 to 6.5×104 Da and thus increased its solubility in water. Nonirradiated and γ-irradiated chitosan at concentration 1% (w/w) in water were prepared and used to evaluate of its potentiality for growth stimulation of Malabar spinach. The chitosan solution was sprayed on the specimen plants and neighboring soil where germinations were taken place and various plant growth parameters such as plant height, number of leaves, leaf areas, dry and wet weight of the plants and roots were investigated. The details study revealed that application of 30 kGy irradiated chitosan yielded 60% higher growth of the Malabar spinach than that obtained from nonirradiated chitosan. The data are consistent with preliminary results from field experiments and unambiguously confirms that a minor amount of chitosan has a profound effect on the growth and development of Malabar spinach.

  12. Spatial and Temporal Factors Associated with an Increased Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in Spinach Fields in New York State

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Daniel; Wiedmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    While rain and irrigation events have been associated with an increased prevalence of foodborne pathogens in produce production environments, quantitative data are needed to determine the effects of various spatial and temporal factors on the risk of produce contamination following these events. This study was performed to quantify these effects and to determine the impact of rain and irrigation events on the detection frequency and diversity of Listeria species (including L. monocytogenes) and L. monocytogenes in produce fields. Two spinach fields, with high and low predicted risks of L. monocytogenes isolation, were sampled 24, 48, 72, and 144 to 192 h following irrigation and rain events. Predicted risk was a function of the field's proximity to water and roads. Factors were evaluated for their association with Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolation by using generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs). In total, 1,492 (1,092 soil, 334 leaf, 14 fecal, and 52 water) samples were collected. According to the GLMM, the likelihood of Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolation from soil samples was highest during the 24 h immediately following an event (odds ratios [ORs] of 7.7 and 25, respectively). Additionally, Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolates associated with irrigation events showed significantly lower sigB allele type diversity than did isolates associated with precipitation events (P = <0.001), suggesting that irrigation water may be a point source of L. monocytogenes contamination. Small changes in management practices (e.g., not irrigating fields before harvest) may therefore reduce the risk of L. monocytogenes contamination of fresh produce. PMID:26116668

  13. Spatial and Temporal Factors Associated with an Increased Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in Spinach Fields in New York State.

    PubMed

    Weller, Daniel; Wiedmann, Martin; Strawn, Laura K

    2015-09-01

    While rain and irrigation events have been associated with an increased prevalence of foodborne pathogens in produce production environments, quantitative data are needed to determine the effects of various spatial and temporal factors on the risk of produce contamination following these events. This study was performed to quantify these effects and to determine the impact of rain and irrigation events on the detection frequency and diversity of Listeria species (including L. monocytogenes) and L. monocytogenes in produce fields. Two spinach fields, with high and low predicted risks of L. monocytogenes isolation, were sampled 24, 48, 72, and 144 to 192 h following irrigation and rain events. Predicted risk was a function of the field's proximity to water and roads. Factors were evaluated for their association with Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolation by using generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs). In total, 1,492 (1,092 soil, 334 leaf, 14 fecal, and 52 water) samples were collected. According to the GLMM, the likelihood of Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolation from soil samples was highest during the 24 h immediately following an event (odds ratios [ORs] of 7.7 and 25, respectively). Additionally, Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolates associated with irrigation events showed significantly lower sigB allele type diversity than did isolates associated with precipitation events (P = <0.001), suggesting that irrigation water may be a point source of L. monocytogenes contamination. Small changes in management practices (e.g., not irrigating fields before harvest) may therefore reduce the risk of L. monocytogenes contamination of fresh produce. PMID:26116668

  14. Structure and Stability of the Spinach Aquaporin SoPIP2;1 in Detergent Micelles and Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Plasencia, Inés; Survery, Sabeen; Ibragimova, Sania; Hansen, Jesper S.; Kjellbom, Per; Helix-Nielsen, Claus; Johanson, Urban; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2011-01-01

    Background SoPIP2;1 constitutes one of the major integral proteins in spinach leaf plasma membranes and belongs to the aquaporin family. SoPIP2;1 is a highly permeable and selective water channel that has been successfully overexpressed and purified with high yields. In order to optimize reconstitution of the purified protein into biomimetic systems, we have here for the first time characterized the structural stability of SoPIP2;1. Methodology/Principal Finding We have characterized the protein structural stability after purification and after reconstitution into detergent micelles and proteoliposomes using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The structure of SoPIP2;1 was analyzed either with the protein solubilized with octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (OG) or reconstituted into lipid membranes formed by E. coli lipids, diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPhPC), or reconstituted into lipid membranes formed from mixtures of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPE), 1-palmitoyl-2oleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylserine (POPS), and ergosterol. Generally, SoPIP2;1 secondary structure was found to be predominantly α-helical in accordance with crystallographic data. The protein has a high thermal structural stability in detergent solutions, with an irreversible thermal unfolding occurring at a melting temperature of 58°C. Incorporation of the protein into lipid membranes increases the structural stability as evidenced by an increased melting temperature of up to 70°C. Conclusion/Significance The results of this study provide insights into SoPIP2;1 stability in various host membranes and suggest suitable choices of detergent and lipid composition for reconstitution of SoPIP2;1 into biomimetic membranes for biotechnological applications. PMID:21339815

  15. Flavonoid content and antioxidant capacity of spinach genotypes determined by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavonoids in different spinach genotypes were separated, identified, and quantified by a high-performance liquid chromatographic method with photodiode array and mass spectrometric detection. The antioxidant capacities of the genotypes were also measured using two antioxidant assays - oxygen radica...

  16. Nitrogen removal from eutrophic water by floating-bed-grown water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) with ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Wu, Yue-Jin; Yu, Zeng-Liang; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) with N(+) ion-beam implantation for removal of nutrient species from eutrophic water. The mutated water spinach was grown on floating beds, and growth chambers were used to examine the growth of three cultivars of water spinach with ion implantation for 14 days in simulated eutrophic water at both high and low nitrogen levels. The specific weight growth rates of three cultivars of water spinach with ion implantation were significantly higher than the control, and their NO(3)-N and NH(4)-N removal efficiencies were also greater than those of the control. Furthermore, compared with the control, the nitrogen contents in the plant biomass with ion implantation were higher as well. PMID:17524443

  17. Assessing soybean leaf area and leaf biomass by spectral measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tucker, C. J.; Fan, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    Red and photographic infrared spectral radiances were correlated with soybean total leaf area index, green leaf area index, chlorotic leaf area index, green leaf biomass, chlorotic leaf biomass, and total biomass. The most significant correlations were found to exist between the IR/red radiance ratio data and green leaf area index and/or green leaf biomass (r squared equals 0.85 and 0.86, respectively). These findings demonstrate that remote sensing data can supply information basic to soybean canopy growth, development, and status by nondestructive determination of the green leaf area or green leaf biomass.

  18. De novo transcriptome sequencing and gene expression profiling of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves under heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Yu, Li; Xuan, Jiping; Lu, Ying; Lu, Shijun; Zhu, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) has cold tolerant but heat sensitive characteristics. The spinach variety ‘Island,’ is suitable for summer periods. There is lack molecular information available for spinach in response to heat stress. In this study, high throughput de novo transcriptome sequencing and gene expression analyses were carried out at different spinach variety ‘Island’ leaves (grown at 24 °C (control), exposed to 35 °C for 30 min (S1), and 5 h (S2)). A total of 133,200,898 clean reads were assembled into 59,413 unigenes (average size 1259.55 bp). 33,573 unigenes could match to public databases. The DEG of controls vs S1 was 986, the DEG of control vs S2 was 1741 and the DEG of S1 vs S2 was 1587. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis indicated that a great deal of heat-responsive genes and other stress-responsive genes were identified in these DEGs, suggesting that the heat stress may have induced an extensive abiotic stress effect. Comparative transcriptome analysis found 896 unique genes in spinach heat response transcript. The expression patterns of 13 selected genes were verified by RT-qPCR (quantitative real-time PCR). Our study found a series of candidate genes and pathways that may be related to heat resistance in spinach. PMID:26857466

  19. Heavy metals phyto-assessment in commonly grown vegetables: water spinach (I. aquatica) and okra (A. esculentus).

    PubMed

    Ng, Chuck Chuan; Rahman, Md Motior; Boyce, Amru Nasrulhaq; Abas, Mhd Radzi

    2016-01-01

    The growth response, metal tolerance and phytoaccumulation properties of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) and okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) were assessed under different contaminated spiked metals: control, 50 mg Pb/kg soil, 50 mg Zn/kg soil and 50 mg Cu/kg soil. The availability of Pb, Zn and Cu metals in both soil and plants were detected using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The concentration and accumulation of heavy metals from soil to roots and shoots (edible parts) were evaluated in terms of translocation factor, accumulation factor and tolerance index. Okra recorded the highest accumulation of Pb (80.20 mg/kg) in its root followed by Zn in roots (35.70 mg/kg) and shoots (34.80 mg/kg) of water spinach, respectively. Different accumulation trends were observed with, Pb > Zn > Cu in okra and Zn > Pb > Cu in water spinach. Significant differences (p < 0.01) of Pb, Zn and Cu accumulation were found in both water spinach and okra cultivated among tested treatments. However, only the accumulation of Pb metal in the shoots of water spinach and okra exceeded the maximum permissible levels of the national Malaysian Food Act 1983 and Food Regulations 1985 (2006) as well as the international Codex Alimentarius Commission limits. This study has shown that both water spinach and okra have good potential as Pb and Zn phytoremediators. PMID:27119073

  20. De novo transcriptome sequencing and gene expression profiling of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Yu, Li; Xuan, Jiping; Lu, Ying; Lu, Shijun; Zhu, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) has cold tolerant but heat sensitive characteristics. The spinach variety 'Island,' is suitable for summer periods. There is lack molecular information available for spinach in response to heat stress. In this study, high throughput de novo transcriptome sequencing and gene expression analyses were carried out at different spinach variety 'Island' leaves (grown at 24 °C (control), exposed to 35 °C for 30 min (S1), and 5 h (S2)). A total of 133,200,898 clean reads were assembled into 59,413 unigenes (average size 1259.55 bp). 33,573 unigenes could match to public databases. The DEG of controls vs S1 was 986, the DEG of control vs S2 was 1741 and the DEG of S1 vs S2 was 1587. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis indicated that a great deal of heat-responsive genes and other stress-responsive genes were identified in these DEGs, suggesting that the heat stress may have induced an extensive abiotic stress effect. Comparative transcriptome analysis found 896 unique genes in spinach heat response transcript. The expression patterns of 13 selected genes were verified by RT-qPCR (quantitative real-time PCR). Our study found a series of candidate genes and pathways that may be related to heat resistance in spinach. PMID:26857466

  1. Enhancement of iron content in spinach plants stimulated by magnetic nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulianto, Agus; Astuti, Budi; Amalia, Saptaria Rosa

    2016-04-01

    In our previous study, the iron content in spinach plants could be detected by magnetic susceptibility values. In the present work, magnetic nano particles were found from the iron sand. The magnetic nano particles are synthesis by using co-precipitation process and sol-gel technique. The stimulation of magnetic nano particles in the plant has been done by the provision of magnetic nano particles in growing media. After certain time, plant samples was characterized using susceptibility-meter MS2B and atomic absorption spectroscopy to measure the magnetic susceptibility and the amount of iron content that absorbed of the plant, respectively. The iron content in the spinach plants was increased when the magnetic nano particles was injected in the growing media.

  2. Impact of coal mine dump contaminated soils on elemental uptake by Spinacia oleracea (spinach)

    SciTech Connect

    Chunilall, V.; Kindness, A.; Jonnalagadda, S.B.

    2006-07-01

    The elemental uptake and the growth response of Spinacia oleracea (spinach) to the soil contaminated with the South African bituminous coal mine dump soil, viz. 0%, 5%, 15%, and 25% w/w, was investigated. The contaminated soils were analyzed for pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), soil organic matter (SOM), and concentrations of selected heavy metals. The pH, SOM, and CEC decreased with an increase in contamination indicating the acidic nature of coal mine soil and the raise in the soil binding sites. The distribution of Fe, Mn, Ni, Cd, and Pb in the roots and leaves of the plants was determined in two stages of plant growth. Spinach showed high accumulation of Fe and increased levels of Ni and Cd with an increase in contamination. No plant growth was recorded with 25% contamination.

  3. Increasing total and biologically active chromium in wheat grain and spinach by spraying with chromium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, F.A.; Ellis, B.G.

    1981-06-01

    Recently, chromium has been shown to be necessary for glucose metabolism in man. But most plant species greatly restrict the uptake of Cr. This study was conducted to determine if both total and biologically active Cr could be increased in wheat grain or spinach by spraying the plants with either Cr/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ or Cr-EDTA. Concentrations of Cr in wheat grain were about doubled in a greenhouse experiment by spraying with either Cr source. Biologically active Cr (estimated by extraction with ethanol or NH/sub 4/OH) was increased from about 40 to greater than 50% of total Cr when wheat was sprayed with Cr salts. Total Cr in spinach leaves was increased by as much as 10-fold by spraying, with the sulfate source being more effective than the EDTA.

  4. Retail display conditions of continuous light and dark on the disposition of vitamins in baby-leaf spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human-health benefits from the consumption of fruits and vegetables are due to the many bioactive compounds in these foods. Many of these compounds are heavily influenced by genetics (i.e. cultivar) and the environment, especially the many pigments and vitamins that can degrade during processing an...

  5. Gamma irradiation dose: Effects on spinach baby-leaf ascorbic acid, carotenoids, folate, alpha-tocopherol, and phylloquinone concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ionizing radiation of fruits and vegetables, in the form of gamma rays or electron beams, is effective in overcoming quarantine barriers in trade, decontamination, disinfestation and prolonging shelf life, but a void of information persists on ionizing radiation effects of vitamin profiles in indivi...

  6. Spinach - A software library for simulation of spin dynamics in large spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogben, H. J.; Krzystyniak, M.; Charnock, G. T. P.; Hore, P. J.; Kuprov, Ilya

    2011-02-01

    We introduce a software library incorporating our recent research into efficient simulation algorithms for large spin systems. Liouville space simulations (including symmetry, relaxation and chemical kinetics) of most liquid-state NMR experiments on 40+ spin systems can now be performed without effort on a desktop workstation. Much progress has also been made with improving the efficiency of ESR, solid state NMR and Spin Chemistry simulations. Spinach is available for download at http://spindynamics.org.

  7. Interactions between food-borne pathogens and protozoa isolated from lettuce and spinach.

    PubMed

    Gourabathini, Poornima; Brandl, Maria T; Redding, Katherine S; Gunderson, John H; Berk, Sharon G

    2008-04-01

    The survival of Salmonella enterica was recently shown to increase when the bacteria were sequestered in expelled food vacuoles (vesicles) of Tetrahymena. Because fresh produce is increasingly linked to outbreaks of enteric illness, the present investigation aimed to determine the prevalence of protozoa on spinach and lettuce and to examine their interactions with S. enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes. Glaucoma sp., Colpoda steinii, and Acanthamoeba palestinensis were cultured from store-bought spinach and lettuce and used in our study. A strain of Tetrahymena pyriformis previously isolated from spinach and a soil-borne Tetrahymena sp. were also used. Washed protozoa were allowed to graze on green fluorescent protein- or red fluorescent protein-labeled enteric pathogens. Significant differences in interactions among the various protist-enteric pathogen combinations were observed. Vesicles were produced by Glaucoma with all of the bacterial strains, although L. monocytogenes resulted in the smallest number per ciliate. Vesicle production was observed also during grazing of Tetrahymena on E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica but not during grazing on L. monocytogenes, in vitro and on leaves. All vesicles contained intact fluorescing bacteria. In contrast, C. steinii and the amoeba did not produce vesicles from any of the enteric pathogens, nor were pathogens trapped within their cysts. Studies of the fate of E. coli O157:H7 in expelled vesicles revealed that by 4 h after addition of spinach extract, the bacteria multiplied and escaped the vesicles. The presence of protozoa on leafy vegetables and their sequestration of enteric bacteria in vesicles indicate that they may play an important role in the ecology of human pathogens on produce. PMID:18310421

  8. Uptake and transport of roxarsone and its metabolites in water spinach as affected by phosphate supply.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lixian; Li, Guoliang; Dang, Zhi; Yang, Baomei; He, Zhaohuan; Zhou, Changmin

    2010-04-01

    Roxarsone (ROX) is widely used as a feed additive in intensive animal production. While an animal is fed with ROX, the As compounds in the manure primarily occur as ROX and its metabolites, including arsenate (As[V]), arsenite (As[III]), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Animal manure is commonly land applied with phosphorous fertilizers in China. A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the phytoavailability of ROX, As(V), As(III), MMA, and DMA in water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica), with the soil amended with 0, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, and 2.0 g PO(4)/kg, respectively, plus 2% (w/w manure/soil) chicken manure (CM) bearing ROX and its metabolites. The results indicate that this species of water spinach cannot accumulate ROX and MMA at detectable levels, but As(V), As(III), and DMA were present in all plant samples. Increased phosphorous decreased the shoot As(V) and As(III) in water spinach but did not affect the root As(V). The shoot DMA and root As(III) and DMA were decreased/increased and then increased/decreased by elevated phosphorous. The total phosphorous content (P) in plant tissue did not correlate with the total As or the three As species in tissues. Arsenate, As(III), and DMA were more easily accumulated in the roots, and phosphate considerably inhibited their upward transport. Dimethylarsinic acid had higher transport efficiency than As(V) and As(III), but As(III) was dominant in tissues. Conclusively, phosphate had multiple effects on the accumulation and transport of ROX metabolites, which depended on their levels. However, proper utilization of phosphate fertilizer can decrease the accumulation of ROX metabolites in water spinach when treated with CM containing ROX and its metabolites. PMID:20821525

  9. Uptake, translocation, and transformation of pentachlorophenol in soybean and spinach plants

    SciTech Connect

    Casterline, J.L. Jr.; Barnett, N.M.; Ku, Y.

    1985-06-01

    Soybean plants were grown for 90 days and spinach plants for 64 days in a mixture of sterilized greenhouse soil and sand containing 10 ppm pentachlorophenol. All plant parts and soil samples were extracted and separated into nonpolar and polar fractions. Major nonpolar and polar metabolites were identified by gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Nonpolar fractions from both soybean and spinach plants were found to contain pentachlorophenol and its metabolites, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, methoxytetrachlorophenol, 2,3,4,6-tetrachloroanisole, and pentachloroanisole. Cleavage of polar metabolites from the soybean plants by acid hydrolysis yielded organic solvent-extractable products. These products were identified as pentachlorophenol, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, and methoxytetrachlorophenol. Cleavage of polar materials from spinach plants yielded only pentachlorophenol. The polar metabolites from the soybean plants were also subjected to enzymatic cleavage by beta-glucosidase. The conjugates consisted mostly of O-glucosides of the same metabolites released by acid hydrolysis. Failure of hydrolysis by aryl sulfatase indicated that very little or no sulfates were present. The metabolites found in the plants were not detected in soil samples obtained from pots immediately after the plants were harvested.

  10. Conversion of monogalactosyldiacylglycerols to triacylglycerols in ozone-fumigated spinach leaves. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaki, Takeshi; Saito, Kazuki; Kawaguchi, Akihiko; Kondo, Noriaki; Yamada, Mitsuhiro Keio Univ., Tokyo Univ. of Tokyo )

    1990-10-01

    Molecular species and fatty acid distribution of triacylglycerol (TG) accumulated in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves fumigated with ozone (0.5 microliter per liter) were compared with those of monogalactosyldiacylglyerol (MGDG). Analysis of positional distribution of the fatty acids in MGDG and the accumulated TG by the enzymatic digestion method showed that hexadecatrienoate (16:3) was restricted to sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone in both MGDG and TG, whereas {alpha}-linolenate (18:3) was preferentially located at sn-1 position in MGDG, and sn-1 and/or sn-3 positions in TG, suggesting that 1,2-diacylglycerol moieties of MGDG are the direct precursor of TG in ozone-fumigated leaves. Further analysis of TG molecular species by argentation chromatography and mass spectrometry showed that TG increased with ozone fumigation consisted of approximately an equal molar ratio of sn-1,3-18:3-2-16:3 and sn-1,2,3-18:3. Because the molecular species of MGDG in spinach leaves is composed of a similar molar ratio of sn-1-18:3-2-16:3 and sn-1,2-18:3, we conducted that MGDG was converted to 1,2-diacylglycerol and acylated with 18:3 to TG in ozone-fumigated spinach leaves.

  11. Influence of nutrient levels on uptake and effects of mercury, cadmium, and lead in water spinach.

    PubMed

    Göthberg, Agneta; Greger, Maria; Holm, Karin; Bengtsson, Bengt-Erik

    2004-01-01

    In Southeast Asia the aquatic macrophyte water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) is a popular vegetable that is cultivated in freshwater courses. These often serve as recipients for domestic and other sorts of wastewater that often contain a variety of pollutants, such as heavy metals. In addition, fertilizers are frequently used where water spinach is cultivated commercially for the food market. To estimate the importance of ambient nutrient concentrations for accumulation of mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) in water spinach, plants were exposed to nutrient solutions of different strength and with varying metal concentrations. Metal-induced toxic effects, which might possibly affect the yield of the plants, were also studied. The lower the nutrient strength in the medium was, the higher the metal concentrations that accumulated in the different plant parts and the lower the metal concentration in the medium at which metal-induced toxic effects occurred. Accordingly, internal metal concentrations in the plants were correlated to toxic effects. Plants exposed to metals retained a major proportion of the metals in the roots, which had a higher tolerance than shoots for high internal metal concentrations. PMID:15254106

  12. Yellow leaf blotch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow leaf blotch occurs worldwide in temperate climates. The disease is reported from countries in Asia, Australasia, Oceania, Europe, North America, Central America, the West Indies, and South America. In the northern Great Plains of North America, it is often the major leaf disease on alfalfa....

  13. Decrease in Leaf Sucrose Synthesis Leads to Increased Leaf Starch Turnover and Decreased RuBP-limited Photosynthesis But Not Rubisco-limited Photosynthesis in Arabidopsis Null Mutants of SPSA1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SPS (Sucrose phosphate synthase) isoforms from dicots cluster into families A, B and C. In this study, we investigated the individual effect of null mutations of each of the four SPS genes in Arabidopsis (spsa1, spsa2, spsb and spsc) on photosynthesis and carbon partitioning. Null mutants spsa1 and ...

  14. Employing response surface methodology for the optimization of ultrasound assisted extraction of lutein and β-carotene from spinach.

    PubMed

    Altemimi, Ammar; Lightfoot, David A; Kinsel, Mary; Watson, Dennis G

    2015-01-01

    The extraction of lutein and β-carotene from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves is important to the dietary supplement industry. A Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology (RSM) were used to investigate the effect of process variables on the ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of lutein and β-carotene from spinach. Three independent variables, extraction temperature (°C), extraction power (%) and extraction time (min) were studied. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) followed by UV visualization and densitometry was used as a simple and rapid method for both identification and quantification of lutein and β-carotene during UAE. Methanol extracts of leaves from spinach and authentic standards of lutein and β-carotene were separated by normal-phase TLC with ethyl acetate-acetone (5:4 (v/v)) as the mobile phase. In this study, the combination of TLC, densitometry, and Box-Behnken with RSM methods were effective for the quantitative analysis of lutein and β-carotene from spinach extracts. The resulting quadratic polynomial models for optimizing lutein and β-carotene from spinach had high coefficients of determination of 0.96 and 0.94, respectively. The optimal UAE settings for output of lutein and β-carotene simultaneously from spinach extracts were an extraction temperature of 40 °C, extraction power of 40% (28 W/cm3) and extraction time of 16 min. The identity and purity of each TLC spot was measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Therefore, UAE assisted extraction of carotenes from spinach can provide a source of lutein and β-carotene for the dietary supplement industry. PMID:25875040

  15. Short Term Acclimation of Spinach to High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Engelbert

    1984-01-01

    Using intact leaves of Spinacia oleracea (L.), reversible temperature-induced changes in chlorophyll fluorescence emitted at room temperature and at 77K were studied. Interpretation of fluorescence at 77K was largely facilitated by developing a new method to minimize reabsorption artifacts (`diluted leaf-powder'). Leaves of plants grown at 15 to 20°C were exposed for several hours to different temperatures. Upon incubation at 35°C in the dark or in the light, the following changes in 77K fluorescence occurred with a half-time of less than 1 hour: (a) the initial fluorescence (F0) of photosystem I increased by 15%, while that one of photosystem II somewhat decreased; (b) although variable fluorescence declined in both photosystems, the decrease in photosystem II (40%) was more severe; (c) the changes were less significant after 480-nanometer excitation light was replaced by 430-nanometer light. The data were interpreted in terms of a reversible, temperature-induced change in thylakoid structure and related change in the distribution of the absorbed energy in favor of photosystem I, at the expense of photosystem II excitation, probably accompanied by an increase in the rate of thermal deactivation of excited states. The considerable decrease in the variable part of room temperature fluorescence gives rise to the suggestion that this transition has lowered the reduction level of plastoquinone, i.e. has increased electron flow through photosystem I, relative to photosystem II. Possible physiological and mechanistic analogies between this temperature-induced state transition and the light-dependent state 1-state 2 regulation has been discussed. PMID:16663430

  16. Leaf conductance and carbon gain under salt-stressed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, V.; Manzoni, S.; Marani, M.; Katul, G.

    2011-12-01

    Exposure of plants to salt stress is often accompanied by reductions in leaf photosynthesis and in stomatal and mesophyll conductances. To separate the effects of salt stress on these quantities, a model based on the hypothesis that carbon gain is maximized subject to a water loss cost is proposed. The optimization problem of adjusting stomatal aperture for maximizing carbon gain at a given water loss is solved for both a non-linear and a linear biochemical demand function. A key novel theoretical outcome of the optimality hypothesis is an explicit relationship between the stomatal and mesophyll conductances that can be evaluated against published measurements. The approaches here successfully describe gas-exchange measurements reported for olive trees (Olea europea L.) and spinach (Spinacia oleraceaL.) in fresh water and in salt-stressed conditions. Salt stress affected both stomatal and mesophyll conductances and photosynthetic efficiency of both species. The fresh water/salt water comparisons show that the photosynthetic capacity is directly reduced by 30%-40%, indicating that reductions in photosynthetic rates under increased salt stress are not due only to a limitation of CO2diffusion. An increase in salt stress causes an increase in the cost of water parameter (or marginal water use efficiency) exceeding 100%, analogous in magnitude to findings from extreme drought stress studies. The proposed leaf-level approach can be incorporated into physically based models of the soil-plant-atmosphere system to assess how saline conditions and elevated atmospheric CO2 jointly impact transpiration and photosynthesis.

  17. Leaf growth is conformal.

    PubMed

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour. PMID:27597439

  18. Assessment of microbial risk factors and impact of meteorological conditions during production of baby spinach in the Southeast of Spain.

    PubMed

    Castro-Ibáñez, I; Gil, M I; Tudela, J A; Ivanek, R; Allende, A

    2015-08-01

    There is a timely need to evaluate the effect agricultural factors and meteorological conditions on fresh produce contamination. This study evaluated those risk factors and described, for the first time, the distribution of indicator microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, coliforms, and Enterobacteriaceae) and the prevalence of foodborne pathogens (Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella spp.) in baby spinach grown in the Southeast of Spain. A longitudinal study was conducted on three farms (2011-2013). Results obtained for E. coli highlighted soil and irrigation water as important factors affecting the microbial safety of baby spinach. Significant differences in the proportion of E. coli positive samples were found between treated (46.1%) and untreated (100%) irrigation water. However, the microbial quality of irrigation water didn't affect E. coli prevalence in produce. All E. coli positive spinach samples were detected at the highest observed temperature range suggesting that ambient temperature affects the probability and extent of spinach contamination. Salmonella spp. was detected by RT-PCR in manure, soil, irrigation water and baby spinach but only two of them (manure and irrigation water) were confirmed by isolation in culture media. Salmonella RT-PCR positive samples showed higher levels of E. coli than Salmonella negative samples. This preliminary finding supports recent identification of E. coli as a suitable parameter for the hygiene criterion at the primary production of leafy greens. PMID:25846928

  19. Effect of electrolyzed oxidizing water treatment on the reduction of nitrite levels in fresh spinach during storage.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jianxiong; Li, Huiying; Wan, Yangfang; Liu, Haijie

    2015-03-01

    Leafy vegetables are the major source of nitrite intake in the human diet, and technological processing to control nitrite levels in harvested vegetables is necessary. In the current work, the effect of electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) on the nitrite and nitrate levels in fresh spinach during storage was studied. EOW treatment, including slightly acidic electrolyzed water and acidic electrolyzed water, was found to effectively reduce nitrite levels in fresh spinach during storage; levels in the late period were 30 to 40% lower than that of the control. However, the nitrate levels in fresh spinach during storage were not influenced by EOW treatment. The reduction of nitrite levels in EOW-treated fresh spinach during storage can be attributed to the inactivation of nitrate reductase directly and to the reduction of bacterial populations. Our results suggest that treatment with slightly acidic electrolyzed water may be a better choice to control nitrite levels in fresh vegetables during storage. This study provided a useful method to reduce nitrite levels in fresh spinach. PMID:25719879

  20. Leaf Tissue Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Manos, Peter J.; Goldthwaite, Jonathan

    1975-01-01

    During winter, excised leaf tissue from Rumex obtusifolius degrades chlorophyll at twice the summer rate but the plant hormones, gibberellic acid and zeatin, inhibit the senescence rate by a constant percentage, regardless of season. PMID:16659225

  1. Detection of the downy mildew pathogens of spinach (Peronospora effusa) and beet (P. schachtii) using spore traps and quantitative PCR assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Downy mildew of spinach, caused by Peronospora effusa, is a disease constraint on spinach production worldwide. The aim of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative PCR assay for detection of airborne inoculum of P. effusa in California. This type of assay may, in combination with disease-...

  2. Coupling spore traps and quantitative PCR assays for detection of the downy mildew pathogens of spinach (Peronospora effusa) and beet (Peronospora schachtii)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Downy mildew of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), caused by Peronospora effusa, is a disease constraint on production worldwide, including in California where the majority of United States spinach is grown. The aim of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for detection o...

  3. Fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in the presence of indigenous microorganisms on commercially packaged baby spinach as impacted by storage temperature and time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effect of storage temperature and time on the survival and growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7, the growth of indigenous microorganisms, and the changes in product quality of packaged baby spinach. Commercial packages of spinach within 2 days of processing were cut at one en...

  4. Tripartite mitochondrial genome of spinach: physical structure, mitochondrial gene mapping, and locations of transposed chloroplast DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, D B; Palmer, J D

    1986-01-01

    A complete physical map of the spinach mitochondrial genome has been established. The entire sequence content of 327 kilobase pairs (kb) is postulated to occur as a single circular molecule. Two directly repeated elements of approximately 6 kb, located on this "master chromosome", are proposed to participate in an intragenomic recombination event that reversibly generates two "subgenomic" circles of 93 kb and 234 kb. The positions of protein and ribosomal RNA-encoding genes, determined by heterologous filter hybridizations, are scattered throughout the genome, with duplicate 26S rRNA genes located partially or entirely within the 6 kb repeat elements. Filter hybridizations between spinach mitochondrial DNA and cloned segments of spinach chloroplast DNA reveal at least twelve dispersed regions of inter-organellar sequence homology. Images PMID:3016660

  5. Element contents and food safety of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forssk.) cultivated with wastewater in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Marcussen, Helle; Joergensen, Karin; Holm, Peter E; Brocca, Daniela; Simmons, Robert W; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2008-04-01

    Extensive aquatic or semi-aquatic production of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forssk.) for human consumption takes place in Southeast Asia. The aim of this study was to assess the concentrations of 38 elements in soil and water spinach cultivated under different degrees of wastewater exposure in Hanoi, Vietnam. The results showed no effect of wastewater use on the overall element concentrations in soil and water spinach. Mean soil concentrations for selected potentially toxic elements at the studied field sites had the following ranges 9.11-18.7 As, 0.333-0.667 Cd, 10.8-14.5 Co, 68-122 Cr, 34.0-62.1 Cu, 29.9-52.8 Ni, 32.5-67.4 Pb, 0.578-0.765 Tl and 99-189 Zn mg kg(-1) dry weight (d.w.). In all samples Cd, Pb and Zn soil concentrations were below the Vietnamese Guideline Values (TCVN 7209-2002) for agricultural soils whereas As and Cu exceeded the guideline values. Maximum site element concentrations in water spinach were 0.139 As, 0.032 Cd, 0.135 Cr, 2.01 Cu, 39.1 Fe, 57.3 Mn, 0.16 Ni, 0.189 Pb and 6.01 Zn mg kg(-1) fresh weight (f.w.). The site and soil content of organic carbon were found to have high influence on the water spinach element concentrations whereas soil pH and the total soil element concentrations were of less importance. The estimated average daily intake of As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn for adult Vietnamese consumers amounts to <11% of the maximum tolerable intake proposed by FAO/WHO for each element. It is assessed that the occurrence of the investigated elements in water spinach will pose low health risk for the consumers. PMID:17593534

  6. Effect of chemical sanitizer combined with modified atmosphere packaging on inhibiting Escherichia coli O157:H7 in commercial spinach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young; Baek, Seung-Youb

    2008-06-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 contaminated spinach has recently caused several outbreaks of human illness in the USA and Canada. However, to date, there has been no study demonstrating an effective way to eliminate E. coli O157:H7 in spinach. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of chemical sanitizers alone or in combination with packaging methods such as vacuum and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on inactivating E. coli O157:H7 in spinach during storage time. Spinach inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 was packaged in four different methods (air, vacuum, N(2) gas, and CO(2) gas packaging) following treatment with water, 100 ppm chlorine dioxide, or 100 ppm sodium hypochlorite for 5 min at room temperature and stored at 7+/-2 degrees C. Treatment with water did not significantly reduce levels of E. coli O157:H7 in spinach. However, treatment with chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite significantly decreased levels of E. coli O157:H7 by 2.6 and 1.1 log(10)CFU/g, respectively. Levels of E. coli O157:H7 in samples packaged in air following treatments grew during storage time, whereas levels were maintained in samples packaged in other packaging methods (vacuum, N(2) gas, and CO(2) gas packaging). Therefore there were significant differences (about 3-4 log) of E. coli O157:H7 populations between samples packed in air and other packaging methods following treatment with chemical sanitizers after 7 days storage. These results suggest that the combination of treatment with chlorine dioxide and packaging methods such as vacuum and MAP may be useful for improving the microbial safety of spinach against E. coli O157:H7 during storage. PMID:18456113

  7. Deer predation on leaf miners via leaf abscission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Kazuo; Sugiura, Shinji

    2008-03-01

    The evergreen oak Quercus gilva Blume sheds leaves containing mines of the leaf miner Stigmella sp. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae) earlier than leaves with no mines in early spring in Nara, central Japan. The eclosion rates of the leaf miner in abscised and retained leaves were compared in the laboratory to clarify the effects of leaf abscission on leaf miner survival in the absence of deer. The leaf miner eclosed successfully from both fallen leaves and leaves retained on trees. However, sika deer ( Cervus nippon centralis Kishida) feed on the fallen mined leaves. Field observations showed that deer consume many fallen leaves under Q. gilva trees, suggesting considerable mortality of leaf miners due to deer predation via leaf abscission. This is a previously unreported relationship between a leaf miner and a mammalian herbivore via leaf abscission.

  8. Changes in Chloroplast mRNA Stability during Leaf Development.

    PubMed Central

    Klaff, P; Gruissem, W

    1991-01-01

    During spinach leaf development, chloroplast-encoded mRNAs accumulate to different steady-state levels. Their relative transcription rates alone, however, cannot account for the changes in mRNA amount. In this study, we examined the importance of mRNA stability for the regulation of plastid mRNA accumulation using an in vivo system to measure mRNA decay in intact leaves by inhibiting transcription with actinomycin D. Decay of psbA and rbcL mRNAs was assayed in young and mature leaves. The psbA mRNA half-life was increased more than twofold in mature leaves compared with young leaves, whereas rbcL mRNA decayed with a similar relative half-life at both leaf developmental stages. The direct in vivo measurements demonstrated that differential mRNA stability in higher plant plastids can account for differences in mRNA accumulation during leaf development. The role of polysome association in mRNA decay was also investigated. Using organelle-specific translation inhibitors that force mRNAs into a polysome-bound state or deplete mRNAs of ribosomes, we measured mRNA decay in vivo in either state. The results showed that rbcL and psbA mRNAs are less stable when bound to polysomes relative to the polysome-depleted mRNAs and that their stabilities are differentially affected by binding to polysomes. The results suggested that ribosome binding and/or translation of the psbA and rbcL mRNAs may function to modulate the rate of their decay in chloroplasts. PMID:12324602

  9. Characterization of a prokaryotic topoisomerase I activity in chloroplast extracts from spinach.

    PubMed

    Siedlecki, J; Zimmermann, W; Weissbach, A

    1983-03-11

    A topoisomerase I activity has been partially purified from crude extracts of spinach chloroplasts. This activity relaxes the supercoiled covalently closed circular DNA of pBR322. The enzyme requires Mg++, but not ATP, and has an apparent molecular weight of about 115,000. It catalyzes a unit change in the linkage number of supercoiled DNA but cannot relax positive supercoiled DNA. These characteristics of the topoisomerase suggest it is of the prokaryotic type and would tend to support the endosymbiotic theory of plastid origin and evolution. PMID:6298746

  10. Damped leaf flexure hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage.

  11. Damped leaf flexure hinge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage. PMID:26026549

  12. Effects of Pb 2+ on energy distribution and photochemical activity of spinach chloroplast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao; Hong, Fashui; Liu, Chao; Su, Mingyu; Zheng, Lei; Gao, Fengqing; Yang, Fan

    2008-03-01

    Lead (Pb 2+) is a well-known highly toxic element. The mechanisms of the Pb 2+ toxicity are not well understood for photosynthesis. In this paper, we reported the effect of Pb 2+ on light absorption, distribution and conversion of spinach chloroplast by spectroscopy, and photochemical reaction activities. Several effects of Pb 2+ were observed: (1) the absorption peak intensity of chloroplast obviously decreased in red and blue region and produced optical flattering; (2) fluorescence quantum yield nearby 680 nm of chloroplast greatly declined; (3) the excitation band nearby 440 nm of chloroplast significantly descended; (4) Pb 2+ treatments reduced of the rate of whole chain electron transport, photochemical activities of PSII DCPIP photoreduction and oxygen evolution, but the photoreduction activities of PSI were little changed. Together, the studies of the experiments showed that Pb 2+ decreased absorption of light on spinach chloroplast and inhibited excitation energy to be absorbed by LHCII and transferred to PSII, then reduced the conversion from light energy to electron energy, and decelerated electron transport, water photolysis and oxygen evolution.

  13. Active site histidine in spinach ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase modified by diethyl pyrocarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Y.; McFadden, B.A.; el-Gul, T.

    1985-07-16

    (TH) Diethyl pyrocarbonate was synthesized from (TH) ethanol prepared by the reduction of acetaldehyde by NaB3H4. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) from spinach was inactivated with this reagent at pH 7.0 the presence of 20 mM MgS , and tryptic peptides that contained modified histidine residues were isolated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Labeling of the enzyme was conducted in the presence and absence of the competitive inhibitor sedoheptulose 1,7-bisphosphate. The amount of one peptide that was heavily labeled in the absence of this compound was reduced 10-fold in its presence. The labeled residue was histidine-298. This result, in combination with earlier experiments, suggests that His-298 in spinach RuBisCO is located in the active site domain and is essential to enzyme activity. This region of the primary structure is strongly conserved in seven other ribulosebisphosphate carboxylases from divergent sources.

  14. Effects of Mg 2+on spectral characteristics and photosynthetic functions of spinach photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chen; Xiao, Wu; Hao, Huang; Xiaoqing, Liu; Chao, Liu; Lei, Zheng; Fashui, Hong

    2009-03-01

    In the present paper we report the results obtained with the photosystem II (PSII) isolated from spinach treated by MgCl 2, and studied the effect of Mg 2+ on spectral characteristics and photosynthetic functions of PSII. The results showed that Mg 2+ treatment at a suitable concentration could significantly increase the absorption intensity of PSII and the intensity ratio of Soret band to Q band of chlorophyll-a. The treatment also elevated the excited peak intensity at 230, 278 and 343 nm, and the emitted peak intensity at 304 and 682 nm, and the ratio of F278/ F230, respectively. The results implied that Mg 2+ increased absorbance for visible light, improving energy transfer among amino acids within PSII protein complex and accelerating energy transport from tyrosine residue to chlorophyll-a. The photochemical activity and oxygen evolving rate of PSII were also enhanced by Mg 2+. This is viewed as evidence that Mg 2+ can promote energy transfer and oxygen evolution in PSII of spinach.

  15. Flavonoids in baby spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.): changes during plant growth and storage.

    PubMed

    Bergquist, Sara A M; Gertsson, Ulla E; Knuthsen, Pia; Olsson, Marie E

    2005-11-30

    The variation in flavonoid concentration and composition was investigated in baby spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) cv. Emilia sown on three occasions, each harvested at three growth stages at 6-day intervals. After harvest, leaves were stored in polypropylene bags at 2 or 10 degrees C. Flavonoids were analyzed by reversed phase HPLC. Twelve flavonoid peaks were detected. The main flavonoid, making up on average 43% of the total flavonoid concentration, was identified as 5,3',4'-trihydroxy-3-methoxy-6:7-methylenedioxyflavone-4'-glucuronide. Four other flavonoids each contributed 7-12% of the total flavonoid content. Total flavonoid content was relatively stable during normal retail storage conditions, although some of the individual flavonoid compounds showed considerable variation. The youngest plants had the highest flavonoid concentration, indicating that by harvesting the baby spinach a few days earlier than the current commercial stage of harvest, the flavonoid concentration in the product may be increased and the content of potentially health-promoting compounds enhanced. PMID:16302762

  16. Effects of Pb2+ on energy distribution and photochemical activity of spinach chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Hong, Fashui; Liu, Chao; Su, Mingyu; Zheng, Lei; Gao, Fengqing; Yang, Fan

    2008-03-01

    Lead (Pb(2+)) is a well-known highly toxic element. The mechanisms of the Pb(2+) toxicity are not well understood for photosynthesis. In this paper, we reported the effect of Pb(2+) on light absorption, distribution and conversion of spinach chloroplast by spectroscopy, and photochemical reaction activities. Several effects of Pb(2+) were observed: (1) the absorption peak intensity of chloroplast obviously decreased in red and blue region and produced optical flattering; (2) fluorescence quantum yield nearby 680 nm of chloroplast greatly declined; (3) the excitation band nearby 440 nm of chloroplast significantly descended; (4) Pb(2+) treatments reduced of the rate of whole chain electron transport, photochemical activities of PSII DCPIP photoreduction and oxygen evolution, but the photoreduction activities of PSI were little changed. Together, the studies of the experiments showed that Pb(2+) decreased absorption of light on spinach chloroplast and inhibited excitation energy to be absorbed by LHCII and transferred to PSII, then reduced the conversion from light energy to electron energy, and decelerated electron transport, water photolysis and oxygen evolution. PMID:17602861

  17. Solution Structures of Spinach Acyl Carrier Protein with Decanoate and Stearate†

    PubMed Central

    Zornetzer, Gregory A.; Fox, Brian G.; Markley, John L.

    2008-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a cofactor in a variety of biosynthetic pathways, including fatty acid metabolism. Thus it is of interest to determine structures of physiologically relevant ACP-fatty acid complexes. We report here the NMR solution structures of spinach ACP with decanoate (10:0-ACP) and stearate (18:0-ACP) attached to the 4′ phosphopantetheine prosthetic group. The protein in the fatty acid complexes adopts a single conformer, unlike apo- and holo-ACP, which interconvert in solution between two major conformers. The protein component of both 10:0- and 18:0-ACP adopts the four-helix bundle topology characteristic of ACP, and a fatty acid binding cavity was identified in both structures. Portions of the protein close in space to the fatty acid and the 4′ phosphopantetheine were identified using filtered/edited NOESY experiments. A docking protocol was used to generate protein structures containing bound fatty acid for 10:0- and 18:0-ACP. In both cases, the predominant structure contained fatty acid bound down the center of the helical bundle, in agreement with the location of the fatty acid binding pockets. These structures demonstrate the conformational flexibility of spinach-ACP and suggest how the protein changes to accommodate its myriad binding partners. PMID:16618110

  18. Polypeptide profiles of chlorophyll . protein complexes and thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Wessels, J S; Borchert, M T

    1978-07-01

    In addition to the major chlorophyll . protein complexes I and II, two minor chlorophyll proteins have been observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS))-polyacrylamide gels of spinach chloroplast membranes. These minor pigmented zones appeared to be derived from the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b . protein and from the reaction centre complex of Photosystem II. Data are presented on the polypeptide profiles of purified digitonin-subschloroplast particles, with special regard to the effect of solubilization temperature and extraction of lipids. The results are compared with the SDS-polypeptide pattern of spinach thylakoids obtained under exactly the same conditions with respect to electrophoresis technique, solubilization method and presence of lipid. In addition, the effects of temperature and lipid extraction on the distinct chlorophyll . protein complexes appearing in SDS gel electrophoretograms of chloroplast membranes were studied by slicing the chlorophyll-containing regions and subjecting them to a second run with or without heating or extraction with acetone. By supplementing these data with an examination of the polypeptide composition of cytochrome f and coupling factor, it has been possible to identify most of the major chloroplast membrane polypeptides. PMID:667027

  19. Participation of β-carotene in reactivation of PSI of heptane-extracted spinach chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Tukendorf, A; Subczynski, W K; Baszynski, T

    1981-09-01

    A carotenoid requirement for photosystem I activity in spinach chloroplasts using extraction-reconstitution technique has been investigated. The transfer of electron from N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylene diamine through the chloroplast photosystem to methyl viologen dye or to NADP(+) was used as an assay of photosystem I activity. Extraction of lyophilized spinach chloroplasts with heptane at near 0°C removed almost all β-carotene and reduced photochemical activities associated with photosystem I to a low level (about 15% of the original activity). Reconstitution of the extracted chloroplasts with β-carotene completely restored photosystem I activity. The maximum rate of methyl viologen photoreduction in reconstituted chloroplasts occurred at an β-carotene/chlorophyll molar ratio of 0.5. Cyclic phosphorylation mediated by phenazine methosulphate was partially restored. Xanthophylls (lutein, neoxanthin, violaxanthin), as components of chloroplast membranes, were not able to replace β-carotene in reconstitution of chloroplasts and had essentially no effect on restoring photoreactions. On the basis of the P700/total chlorophyll ratio it can be assumed that extraction of lyophilized chloroplasts with heptane do not affect photosystem I reaction centre. Therefore it is possible that β-carotene, removed during heptane extraction and belonging mainly to the antenna pigment pool of photosystem I, is effective in the restoration of photosystem I activity. PMID:24470228

  20. Topological studies of spinach 22 kDa protein of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Pichersky, E; Yocum, C F

    1994-12-30

    An intrinsic 22 kDa polypeptide is associated with the O2-evolving Photosystem II core complex in a variety of green plants, although it does not appear to be required for O2 evolution. Digestion of thylakoid membranes and isolated Photosystem II preparations with trypsin, followed by immunoblotting using spinach anti-22 kDa antibodies, leads to two observations: (1) the domain between the 2nd and 3rd transmembrane helices of the 22 kDa protein is stromally exposed, and (2) only in a reaction center complex preparation, lacking the chlorophyll a/b-light harvesting complex II, is there extensive proteolytic cleavage of the 22 kDa protein. We also found that after, but not prior to, selective extraction of the 22 and 10 kDa proteins from Photosystem II membranes, the chlorophyll a/b-light harvesting complex II can be separated from the Photosystem II reaction center core by precipitation with MgCl2. This result suggests that the 22 kDa polypeptide is located between the Photosystem II reaction center polypeptides and light-harvesting complex II; it is possible that the protein serves as a link between the two protein complexes. The presence of the 22 kDa protein in several species was also examined by immunoblotting with polyclonal spinach anti-22 kDa antibodies. PMID:7803450

  1. Bioactive compounds during storage of fresh-cut spinach: the role of endogenous ascorbic acid in the improvement of product quality.

    PubMed

    Bottino, Antonella; Degl'Innocenti, Elena; Guidi, Lucia; Graziani, Giulia; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2009-04-01

    Spinach is rich in bioactive constituents such as vitamin C, flavonoids and phenolic acids. In this work, the biochemical modifications occurring during one week of storage at 4 degrees C were evaluated both in intact and in fresh-cut spinach. Results showed that vitamin C concentration is less affected by storage in fresh-cut spinach with respect to intact spinach. MS/MS analysis showed that the main flavonoids are not modified during storage in intact leaves, while some of them increased significantly during storage in the fresh-cut samples. Fresh-cut spinach did not show color alteration even if PPO activity increased significantly during storage. This finding was related to the high ascorbic acid content, which delays the subsequent polymerization events. This finding was confirmed by the unaltered concentration of phenolic compounds in fresh-cut spinach during storage. In conclusion, data about nutritional content and visual performance concurrently suggest that spinach is a suitable species for marketing as a fresh-cut product. PMID:19253961

  2. Effect of surface characteristics on retention and removal of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on surfaces of spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The topography and the spatial heterogeneity of produce surfaces may impact the attachment of microbial cells onto produce surfaces and affect disinfection efficacy. In this study, the effects of produce surface characteristics on the removal of bacteria were studied. Fresh spinach leaves were sp...

  3. Comparative survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Murine Norovirus on spinach plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Outbreaks resulting from the consumption of leafy greens contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and norovirus have occurred. It is unclear how the stress response factor rpoS in E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. affects their survival on spinach. Purpose: A comparison ...

  4. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in vitro and on the surface of spinach leaves by biobased surfactants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of biosurfactants on the populations of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in suspension and on spinach leaves. Eight surfactants including four soybean oil-based biosurfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80), sopho...

  5. Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Feral Swine Near Spinach Fields and Cattle, Central California Coast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated involvement of feral swine in contamination of agriculture fields and surface waterways with Escherichia coli O157:H7 after a nationwide outbreak traced to bagged spinach from California. Isolates from feral swine, cattle, surface water, sediment, and soil at 1 ranch were matched to ...

  6. Quality of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce and spinach irradiated at doses up to 4 kGy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xuetong; Guan, Wenqiang; Sokorai, Kimberly J. B.

    2012-08-01

    Fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce packaged in modified atmosphere packages and spinach in perforated film bags were irradiated with gamma rays at doses of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 kGy. After irradiation, the samples were stored for 14 days at 4 °C. O2 levels in the packages of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce decreased and CO2 levels increased with increasing radiation dose, suggesting that irradiation increased respiration rates of lettuce. Tissue browning of irradiated cut lettuce was less severe than that of non-irradiated, probably due to the lower O2 levels in the packages. However, samples irradiated at 3 and 4 kGy had lower maximum force and more severe sogginess than the non-irradiated control. In addition, ascorbic acid content of irradiated lettuce was 22-40% lower than the non-irradiated samples after 14 days of storage. The visual appearance of spinach was not affected by irradiation even at a dose of 4 kGy. Consumer acceptance suggested that more people would dislike and would not buy spinach that was treated at 3 and 4 kGy as compared to the non-irradiated sample. Overall, irradiation at doses of 1 and 2 kGy may be employed to enhance microbial safety of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce and spinach while maintaining quality.

  7. Use of Spinach, Radish, and Perennial Ryegrass to Assess the Availability of Metals in Waste Foundry Sands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant uptake is a major pathway by which potentially toxic metals can enter the food chain. In this laboratory study we grew spinach, radish, and perennial ryegrass in sand blends containing 50% waste foundry sand (WFS) to assess the availability of Al, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn,...

  8. Survival and transfer of murine norovirus 1, a surrogate for human noroviruses, during the production process of deep-frozen onions and spinach.

    PubMed

    Baert, Leen; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Vermeersch, Mattias; Van Coillie, Els; Debevere, Johan

    2008-08-01

    The reduction of murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) on onions and spinach by washing was investigated as was the risk of contamination during the washing procedure. To decontaminate wash water, the industrial sanitizer peracetic acid (PAA) was added to the water, and the survival of MNV-1 was determined. In contrast to onions, spinach undergoes a heat treatment before freezing. Therefore, the resistance of MNV-1 to blanching of spinach was examined. MNV-1 genomic copies were detected with a real-time reverse transcription PCR assay in PAA-treated water and blanched spinach, and PFUs (representing infectious MNV-1 units) were determined with a plaque assay. A < or = 1-log reduction in MNV-1 PFUs was achieved by washing onion bulbs and spinach leaves. More than 3 log PFU of MNV-1 was transmitted to onion bulbs and spinach leaves when these vegetables were washed in water containing approximately 5 log PFU/ml. No decline of MNV-1 occurred in used industrial spinach wash water after 6 days at room temperature. A concentration of 20 ppm of PAA in demineralized water (pH 4.13) and in potable water (pH 7.70) resulted in reductions of 2.88 +/- 0.25 and 2.41 +/- 0.18 log PFU, respectively, after 5 min of exposure, but no decrease in number of genomic copies was observed. No reduction of MNV-1 PFUs was observed on frozen onions or spinach during storage for 6 months. Blanching spinach (80 degrees C for 1 min) resulted in at least 2.44-log reductions of infectious MNV-1, but many genomic copies were still present. PMID:18724752

  9. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  10. Raspberry leaf curl virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry leaf curl virus (RLCV) is limited to hosts in the genus Rubus and is transmitted persistently by the small raspberry aphid, Aphis rubicola Oestlund. It is found only in North America, principally in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada and in the Rocky Mountain regions of...