Sample records for spinal treatment exercise

  1. Supervised exercise, spinal manipulation, and home exercise for chronic low back pain: a randomized clinical trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gert Bronfort; Michele J. Maiers; Roni L. Evans; Craig A. Schulz; Yiscah Bracha; Kenneth H. Svendsen; Richard H. Grimm; Edward F. Owens; Timothy A. Garvey; Ensor E. Transfeldt

    2011-01-01

    Background contextSeveral conservative therapies have been shown to be beneficial in the treatment of chronic low back pain (CLBP), including different forms of exercise and spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). The efficacy of less time-consuming and less costly self-care interventions, for example, home exercise, remains inconclusive in CLBP populations.

  2. Assessing small-volume spinal cord dose for repeat spinal stereotactic body radiotherapy treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun; Kirby, Neil; Korol, Renee; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2012-12-01

    Spinal cord biologically effective dose (BED) limits are critical to safe spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivery. In particular, when repeating SBRT to the same site, the problem of adding non-uniform BED distributions within small volumes of spinal cord has yet to be solved. We report a probability-based generalized BED (gBED) model to guide repeat spine SBRT treatment planning. The gBED was formulated by considering the sequential damaging probabilities of repeat spine SBRT treatments. Parameters from the standard linear-quadratic model, such as ?/? = 2 Gy for the spinal cord, were applied. We tested the model based on SBRT specific spinal cord tolerance using a simulated and ten clinical repeat SBRT cases. The gBED provides a consistent solution for superimposing non-uniform dose distributions from different fractionation schemes, analogous to the BED for uniform dose distributions. Based on ten clinical cases, the gBED was observed to eliminate discrepancies in the cumulative BED of approximately 5% to 20% within small volumes (e.g. 0.1-2.0 cc) of spinal cord, as compared to a conventional calculation method. When assessing spinal cord tolerance for repeat spinal SBRT treatments, caution should be exercised when applying conventional BED calculations for small volumes of spinal cord irradiated, and the gBED potentially provides more conservative and consistently derived dose surrogates to guide safe treatment planning and treatment outcome modeling.

  3. Exercise modulates chloride homeostasis after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Côté, Marie-Pascale; Gandhi, Sapan; Zambrotta, Marina; Houlé, John D

    2014-07-01

    Activity-based therapies are routinely integrated in spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation programs because they result in a reduction of hyperreflexia and spasticity. However, the mechanisms by which exercise regulates activity in spinal pathways to reduce spasticity and improve functional recovery are poorly understood. Persisting alterations in the action of GABA on postsynaptic targets is a signature of CNS injuries, including SCI. The action of GABA depends on the intracellular chloride concentration, which is determined largely by the expression of two cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs), KCC2 and NKCC1, which serve as chloride exporters and importers, respectively. We hypothesized that the reduction in hyperreflexia with exercise after SCI relies on a return to chloride homeostasis. Sprague Dawley rats received a spinal cord transection at T12 and were assigned to SCI-7d, SCI-14d, SCI-14d+exercise, SCI-28d, SCI-28d+exercise, or SCI-56d groups. During a terminal experiment, H-reflexes were recorded from interosseus muscles after stimulation of the tibial nerve and the low-frequency-dependent depression (FDD) was assessed. We provide evidence that exercise returns spinal excitability and levels of KCC2 and NKCC1 toward normal levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Acutely altering chloride extrusion using the KCC2 blocker DIOA masked the effect of exercise on FDD, whereas blocking NKCC1 with bumetanide returned FDD toward intact levels after SCI. Our results indicate that exercise contributes to reflex recovery and restoration of endogenous inhibition through a return to chloride homeostasis after SCI. This lends support for CCCs as part of a pathway that could be manipulated to improve functional recovery when combined with rehabilitation programs. PMID:24990918

  4. Adverse events among seniors receiving spinal manipulation and exercise in a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Maiers, Michele; Evans, Roni; Hartvigsen, Jan; Schulz, Craig; Bronfort, Gert

    2015-04-01

    Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and exercise have demonstrated effectiveness for neck pain (NP). Adverse events (AE) reporting in trials, particularly among elderly participants, is inconsistent and challenges informed clinical decision making. This paper provides a detailed report of AE experienced by elderly participants in a randomized comparative effectiveness trial of SMT and exercise for chronic NP. AE data, consistent with CONSORT recommendations, were collected on elderly participants who received 12 weeks of SMT with home exercise, supervised plus home exercise, or home exercise alone. Standardized questions were asked at each treatment; participants were additionally encouraged to report AE as they occurred. Qualitative interviews documented participants' experiences with AE. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to categorize and report these data. Compliance was high among the 241 randomized participants. Non-serious AE were reported by 130/194 participants. AE were reported by three times as many participants in supervised plus home exercise, and nearly twice as many as in SMT with home exercise, as in home exercise alone. The majority of AE were musculoskeletal in nature; several participants associated AE with specific exercises. One incapacitating AE occurred when a participant fell during supervised exercise session and fractured their arm. One serious adverse event of unknown relationship occurred to an individual who died from an aneurysm while at home. Eight serious, non-related AE also occurred. Musculoskeletal AE were common among elderly participants receiving SMT and exercise interventions for NP. As such, they should be expected and discussed when developing care plans. PMID:25454683

  5. Effects of spinal manipulation versus therapeutic exercise on adults with chronic low back pain: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Merepeza, Alban

    2014-01-01

    Background Context: Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a prevalent disorder that has a significant burden to society in terms of loss of work time and increased economic cost. Two common treatment choices of intervention for CLBP are spinal manipulation and prescribed exercise. Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of spinal manipulation vs prescribed exercise for patients diagnosed with CLBP. Studies that compared head-to-head spinal manipulation to an exercise group were included in this review. Methods: A search of the current literature was conducted using a keyword process in CINAHL, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials Database, Medline, and Embase. The search was conducted on, and included studies available up to August 29th 2014. Studies were included based on PICOS criteria 1) individuals with CLBP defined as lasting 12 weeks or longer; 2) spinal manipulation performed by a health care practitioner; 3) prescribed exercise for the treatment of CLBP and monitored by a health care practitioner; 4) measurable clinical outcomes for reducing pain, disability or improving function; 5) randomized controlled trials. The quality of included articles was determined by the author using the criteria developed and used by the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). Results: Three randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria of this systematic review and were included in this review. The outcomes used in these studies included Disability Indexes, Pain Scales and function improvement scales. The results included a mix of effects with one study finding spinal manipulation as more effective and another finding the exercises more so. The third study found both interventions offering equal effects in the long term. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this systematic review there is no conclusive evidence that clearly favours spinal manipulation or exercise as more effective in treatment of CLBP. More studies are needed to further explore which intervention is more effective. PMID:25550671

  6. Rehabilitation and treatment of spinal cord tumors

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Vishwa S.; Lofton, LaTanya

    2013-01-01

    Context Due to advances in acute oncological treatment, patients with spinal cord tumors exhibit improved survival. However, these patients have not received the full benefits of rehabilitation services to address their neurological deficits and rehabilitation goals. Objective To evaluate the epidemiology and pathophysiology of spinal cord tumors, address methods of acute oncological management, review treatment for neurological sequelae, and understand the implications as they relate to rehabilitation. Methods An extensive literature review was performed regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, acute oncological management, neurological sequelae, and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord tumors. Databases used included pubmed.gov and OVID, as well as individual journal and textbook articles. Results Access to treatment should be increased given improved survival and functional deficits for patients with spinal cord tumors. Individuals can benefit from inpatient rehabilitation programs, in spite of increased medical co-morbidity and neurological deficits. Specific areas of improvement include functionality, mood, quality of life, and survival. Adjustments to treatment plans must incorporate medical complications from cancer and its treatment, perceived quality of life, and prognosis. Conclusions Patients with spinal cord tumors who participate in rehabilitation programs show general improvement in function, mood, quality of life, and survival. Adaptations to care plans should be made to accommodate medical co-morbidities from cancer and its treatment, patient perceptions, and prognosis. PMID:23433329

  7. What Are the Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI)? Skip sharing on social media links ... no known ways to reverse damage to the spinal cord. However, researchers are continually working on new treatments, ...

  8. Effect of Regular Exercise on Cardiopulmonary Fitness in Males With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Hee; Kong, In Deok; Kim, Sung Hoon; Shinn, Jong Mock; Kim, Jong Heon; Yi, Dongsoo; Lee, Jin Hyeong; Chang, Jae Seung; Kim, Tae-ho; Kim, Eun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cardiopulmonary endurance of subjects with spinal cord injury by measuring the maximal oxygen consumption with varying degrees of spinal cord injury level, age, and regular exercise. Methods We instructed the subjects to perform exercises using arm ergometer on healthy adults at 20 years of age or older with spinal cord injury, and their maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was measured with a metabolic measurement system. The exercise proceeded stepwise according to the exercise protocol and was stopped when the subject was exhausted or when VO2 reached an equilibriu Results Among the 40 subjects, there were 10 subjects with cervical cord injury, 27 with thoracic cord injury, and 3 with lumbar cord injury. Twenty-five subjects who were exercised regularly showed statistically higher results of VO2max than those who did not exercise regularly. Subjects with cervical injury showed statistically lower VO2max than the subjects with thoracic or lumbar injury out of the 40 subjects with neurologic injury. In addition, higher age showed a statistically lower VO2max. Lastly, the regularly exercising paraplegic group showed higher VO2max than the non-exercising paraplegic group. Conclusion There are differences in VO2max of subjects with spinal cord injury according to the degree of neurologic injury, age, and whether the subject participates in regular exercise. We found that regular exercise increased the VO2max in individuals with spinal cord injury. PMID:25750877

  9. Spinal serotonin receptor activation modulates the exercise ventilatory response with increased dead space in goats.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G S; Turner, D L; Henderson, D R; Foley, K T

    2008-05-31

    Small increases in respiratory dead space (VD) augment the exercise ventilatory response by a serotonin-dependent mechanism known as short-term modulation (STM). We tested the hypotheses that the relevant serotonin receptors for STM are in the spinal cord, and are of the 5-HT2-receptor subtype. After preparing adult female goats with a mid-thoracic (T6-T8) subarachnoid catheter, ventilation and arterial blood gases were measured at rest and during treadmill exercise (4.8 km/h; 5% grade) with and without an increased VD (0.2-0.3 L). Measurements were made before and after spinal or intravenous administration of a broad-spectrum serotonin receptor antagonist (methysergide, 1-2mg total) and a selective 5-HT2-receptor antagonist (ketanserin, 5-12 mg total). Although spinal methysergide had no effect on the exercise ventilatory response in control conditions, the augmented response with increased VD was impaired, allowing Pa(CO)(2) to increase from rest to exercise. Spinal methysergide diminished both mean inspiratory flow and frequency responses to exercise with increased VD. Spinal ketanserin impaired Pa(CO)(2) regulation with increased VD, although its ventilatory effects were less clear. Intrathecal dye injections indicated CSF drug distribution was caudal to the upper cervical spinal cord and intravenous drugs at the same total dose did not affect STM. We conclude that spinal 5-HT2 receptors modulate the exercise ventilatory response with increased VD in goats. PMID:18396470

  10. Treating Back-Related Leg Pain with Spinal Manipulation and Home Exercise

    MedlinePLUS

    ... To ?nd out whether spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) plus home exercise and advice (HEA) is more effective ... receive 12 weeks of HEA alone or SMT plus HEA. Patients assigned to HEA alone met with ...

  11. Endovascular treatment in spinal perimedullary arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Phadke, Rajendra V; Bhattacharyya, Avik; Handique, Akash; Jain, Krishan; Kumar, Alok; Singh, Vivek; Baruah, Deb; Kumar, Tushant; Patwari, Sriram; Mohan, B Madan

    2014-01-01

    This study includes 20 patients with 21 spinal perimedullary fistulae. There were nine Type IVa (42.8%) lesions, ten Type IVb (47.6%) and two Type IVc (9.5%) lesions. The dominant arterial supply was from the anterior spinal artery (47.6%), posterior spinal artery (19%) and directly from the radiculomedullary artery (28.5%). Sixteen lesions in 15 patients were treated by endovascular route using n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. Endovascular treatment was not feasible in five patients. Of the ten patients with microfistulae, catheterization failed/was not attempted in 40%, complete obliteration of the lesion was seen in 60% but clinical improvement was seen in 40% of patients. Catheterization was feasible in all ten patients with macrofistulae (nine type IVb and two type IVc lesions). Complete obliteration of the lesions was seen in 60% and residue in 30%. Clinical improvement was seen in 80% and clinical deterioration in 10%. In conclusion, endovascular glue embolization is safe and efficacious in type IVb and IVc spinal perimedullary fistulae and should be considered the first option of treatment. It is also feasible in many of the type IVa lesions. PMID:24976100

  12. Low-Grade Inflammation and Spinal Cord Injury: Exercise as Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Alves, Eduardo; de Aquino Lemos, Valdir; Ruiz da Silva, Francieli; Lira, Fabio Santos; dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomathieli; Rosa, João Paulo Pereira; Caperuto, Erico; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2013-01-01

    An increase in the prevalence of obesity in people with spinal cord injury can contribute to low-grade chronic inflammation and increase the risk of infection in this population. A decrease in sympathetic activity contributes to immunosuppression due to the lower activation of immune cells in the blood. The effects of physical exercise on inflammatory parameters in individuals with spinal cord injury have not been well described. We conducted a review of the literature published from 1974 to 2012. This review explored the relationships between low-grade inflammation, spinal cord injury, and exercise to discuss a novel mechanism that might explain the beneficial effects of exercise involving an increase in catecholamines and cytokines in people with spinal cord injury. PMID:23533315

  13. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on exercise responses in Paralympic athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    West, C R; Taylor, B J; Campbell, I G; Romer, L M

    2014-10-01

    We asked whether specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improves respiratory structure and function and peak exercise responses in highly trained athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Ten Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) were paired by functional classification then randomly assigned to an IMT or placebo group. Diaphragm thickness (B-mode ultrasonography), respiratory function [spirometry and maximum static inspiratory (PI ,max ) and expiratory (PE ,max ) pressures], chronic activity-related dyspnea (Baseline and Transition Dyspnea Indices), and physiological responses to incremental arm-crank exercise were assessed before and after 6 weeks of pressure threshold IMT or sham bronchodilator treatment. Compared to placebo, the IMT group showed significant increases in diaphragm thickness (P?=?0.001) and PI ,max (P?=?0.016). There was a significant increase in tidal volume at peak exercise in IMT vs placebo (P?=?0.048) and a strong trend toward an increase in peak work rate (P?=?0.081, partial eta-squared?=?0.33) and peak oxygen uptake (P?=?0.077, partial eta-squared?=?0.34). No other indices changed post-intervention. In conclusion, IMT resulted in significant diaphragmatic hypertrophy and increased inspiratory muscle strength in highly trained athletes with cervical SCI. The strong trend, with large observed effect, toward an increase in peak aerobic performance suggests IMT may provide a useful adjunct to training in this population. PMID:23530708

  14. Exercise Decreases Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Expression in the Spinal Cord and Positively Modulates Neuronal Growth

    PubMed Central

    GHIANI, CRISTINA A.; YING, ZHE; DE VELLIS, JEAN; GOMEZ-PINILLA, FERNANDO

    2009-01-01

    To successfully grow, neurons need to overcome the effects of hostile environments, such as the inhibitory action of myelin. We have evaluated the potential of exercise to overcome the intrinsic limitation of the central nervous system for axonal growth. In line with the demonstrated ability of exercise to increase the regenerative potential of neurons, here we show that exercise reduces the inhibitory capacity of myelin. Cortical neurons grown on myelin from exercised rats showed a more pronounced neurite extension compared with neurons grown on poly-D-lysine, or on myelin extracted from sedentary animals. The activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 5, a kinase involved in neurite outgrowth, was found to be increased in cortical neurons grown on exercise-myelin and in the lumbar spinal cord enlargement of exercised animals. Exercise significantly decreased the levels of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a potent axonal growth inhibitor, suggesting that downregulation of MAG is part of the mechanism through which exercise reduces growth inhibition. It is known that exercise elevates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) spinal cord levels and that BDNF acts to overcome the inhibitory effects of myelin. Accordingly, we blocked the action of BDNF during exercise, which suppressed the exercise-related MAG decrease. Protein kinase A (PKA) has been related to the ability of BDNF to overcome growth inhibition; in agreement, we found that exercise increased PKA levels and this effect was reverted by blocking BDNF. Overall, these results show that exercise promotes a permissive cellular environment for axonal growth in the adult spinal cord requiring BDNF action. PMID:17497667

  15. Short-term exercise increases GDNF protein levels in spinal cord of young and old rats

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Monica J.; Gyorkos, Amy M.; Spitsbergen John, M.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors may play a role in exercise-induced neuroprotective effects, however it is not known if exercise mediates changes in glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) protein levels in the spinal cord. The aim of the current study was to determine if 2 weeks of exercise alters GDNF protein content in the lumbar spinal cord of young and old rats. GDNF protein was quantified via an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot. Immunohistochemical analysis localized GDNF in choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive motor neurons and cell body areas were measured. Involuntary running in the young animals appeared to elicit the greatest increase in GDNF protein content (6-fold increase), followed by swimming (3-fold increase) and voluntary running (2-fold increase); however there was no significant difference between the modalities of exercise. Low-intensity running of the old animals significantly increased GDNF protein content in the spinal cord. Both young and old exercised animals showed a doubling in ChAT-positive motor neuron cell body areas. These results suggest that GDNF protein content in spinal cord is modulated by exercise. PMID:23500094

  16. A randomised controlled trial of preventive spinal manipulation with and without a home exercise program for patients with chronic neck pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johanne Martel; Claude Dugas; Jean-Daniel Dubois; Martin Descarreaux

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence indicates that supervised home exercises, combined or not with manual therapy, can be beneficial for patients with non-specific chronic neck pain (NCNP). The objective of the study is to investigate the efficacy of preventive spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) compared to a no treatment group in NCNP patients. Another objective is to assess the efficacy of SMT with and

  17. Prognosis and Treatment of Spinal Cord Astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Minehan, Kiernan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Section of Radiation Oncology, Franciscan Skemp Healthcare, Mayo Health System, La Crosse, WI (United States)], E-mail: minehan.kiernan@mayo.edu; Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Scheithauer, Bernd W. [Division of Anatomic Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Krauss, William E. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Wright, Michael P. [Student, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To identify the prognostic factors for spinal cord astrocytoma and determine the effects of surgery and radiotherapy on outcome. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study reviewed the cases of consecutive patients with spinal cord astrocytoma treated at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 1962 and 2005. Results: A total of 136 consecutive patients were identified. Of these 136 patients, 69 had pilocytic and 67 had infiltrative astrocytoma. The median follow-up for living patients was 8.2 years (range, 0.08-37.6), and the median survival for deceased patients was 1.15 years (range, 0.01-39.9). The extent of surgery included incisional biopsy only (59%), subtotal resection (25%), and gross total resection (16%). Patients with pilocytic tumors survived significantly longer than those with infiltrative astrocytomas (median overall survival, 39.9 vs. 1.85 years; p < 0.001). Patients who underwent resection had a worse, although nonsignificant, median survival than those who underwent biopsy only (pilocytic, 18.1 vs. 39.9 years, p = 0.07; infiltrative, 19 vs. 30 months, p = 0.14). Postoperative radiotherapy, delivered in 75% of cases, gave no significant survival benefit for those with pilocytic tumors (39.9 vs. 18.1 years, p = 0.33) but did for those with infiltrative astrocytomas (24 vs. 3 months; Wilcoxon p = 0.006). On multivariate analysis, pilocytic histologic type, diagnosis after 1984, longer symptom duration, younger age, minimal surgical extent, and postoperative radiotherapy predicted better outcome. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that histologic type is the most important prognostic variable affecting the outcome of spinal cord astrocytomas. Surgical resection was associated with shorter survival and thus remains an unproven treatment. Postoperative radiotherapy significantly improved survival for patients with infiltrative astrocytomas but not for those with pilocytic tumors.

  18. Differential regulation of perineuronal nets in the brain and spinal cord with exercise training.

    PubMed

    Smith, Calvin C; Mauricio, Rui; Nobre, Luis; Marsh, Barnaby; Wüst, Rob C I; Rossiter, Harry B; Ichiyama, Ronaldo M

    2015-02-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are lattice like structures which encapsulate the cell body and proximal dendrites of many neurons and are thought to be involved in regulating synaptic plasticity. It is believed that exercise can enhance the plasticity of the Central Nervous System (CNS) in healthy and dysfunctional states by shifting the balance between plasticity promoting and plasticity inhibiting factors in favor of the former. Recent work has focused on exercise effects on trophic factors but its effect on other plasticity regulators is poorly understood. In the present study we investigated how exercise regulates PNN expression in the lumbar spinal cord and areas of the brain associated with motor control and learning and memory. Adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats with free access to a running wheel for 6 weeks had significantly increased PNN expression in the spinal cord compared to sedentary rats (PNN thickness around motoneurons, exercise=15.75±0.63?m, sedentary=7.98±1.29?m, p<0.01). Conversely, in areas of the brain associated with learning and memory there was a significant reduction in perineuronal net expression (number of neurons with PNN in hippocampus CA1-exercise 21±0.56 and sedentary 24±0.34, p<0.01, thickness-exercised=2.37±0.13?m, sedentary=4.27±0.21?m; p<0.01). Our results suggest that in response to exercise, PNNs are differentially regulated in select regions of the CNS, with a general decreased expression in the brain and increased expression in the lumbar spinal cord. This differential expression may indicate different regulatory mechanisms associated with plasticity in the brain compared to the spinal cord. PMID:25526898

  19. Surgical Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis Complicated with Extensive ABSCESS

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Joaquim Soares Do; Tirado, António; Fernandes, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tuberculosis can be responsible for extensive spinal lesions. Despite the efficacy of medical treatment, surgery is indicated to avoid or correct significant deformity, treat spinal instability, prevent neurological compromise, and to eradicate an extensive tuberculous abscess. In this paper we present our experience in the surgical management of spinal tuberculosis complicated with large abscess. Patients and Methods Fifteen patients with spinal tuberculosis complicated with extensive abscess were identified; and nine of those patients had extension of the infection into the epidural space. The average age at treatment was 34 years old. Seven patients had thoracic infection, seven patients had lumbar infection and one had thoracolumbar infection. Six patients had neurological deficit at presentation. All patients were surgically treated with abscess debridement, spinal stabilization and concurrent antituberculous chemotherapy. A single anterior surgical approach was used in three cases, a posterior approach was used in four others and a combined approach was performed in eight patients. Results Surgical management allowed for effective abscess debridement and sspinal stabilization in this cohort. In combination with antituberculous drugs, surgical treatment resulted in infection eradication and bone fusion in all patients at 24 month average follow-up. Satisfactory neurological outcomes with improved American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scores were observed in 100% of patients. Conclusion Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis abscess can lead to satisfactory clinical outcomes. PMID:25328472

  20. Spinal serotonin receptor activation modulates the exercise ventilatory response with increased dead space in goats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Mitchell; D. L. Turner; D. R. Henderson; K. T. Foley

    2008-01-01

    Small increases in respiratory dead space (VD) augment the exercise ventilatory response by a serotonin-dependent mechanism known as short-term modulation (STM). We tested the hypotheses that the relevant serotonin receptors for STM are in the spinal cord, and are of the 5-HT2-receptor subtype. After preparing adult female goats with a mid-thoracic (T6–T8) subarachnoid catheter, ventilation and arterial blood gases were

  1. Thermoregulatory stress during rest and exercise in heat in patients with a spinal cord injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerrold S. Petrofsky

    1992-01-01

    Summary  Twelve subjects with spinal cord injuries and four controls (all male) were exposed to heat while sitting at rest or working at each of three environmental temperatures, 30, 35 and 40°C, with a relative humidity of 50%. Exercise was accomplished at a load of 50 W on a friction-braked cycle ergometer which was armcranked or pedalled. Functional electrical stimulation of

  2. Biomaterial Design Strategies for the Treatment of Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Straley, Karin S.; Po Foo, Cheryl Wong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The highly debilitating nature of spinal cord injuries has provided much inspiration for the design of novel biomaterials that can stimulate cellular regeneration and functional recovery. Many experts agree that the greatest hope for treatment of spinal cord injuries will involve a combinatorial approach that integrates biomaterial scaffolds, cell transplantation, and molecule delivery. This manuscript presents a comprehensive review of biomaterial-scaffold design strategies currently being applied to the development of nerve guidance channels and hydrogels that more effectively stimulate spinal cord tissue regeneration. To enhance the regenerative capacity of these two scaffold types, researchers are focusing on optimizing the mechanical properties, cell-adhesivity, biodegradability, electrical activity, and topography of synthetic and natural materials, and are developing mechanisms to use these scaffolds to deliver cells and biomolecules. Developing scaffolds that address several of these key design parameters will lead to more successful therapies for the regeneration of spinal cord tissue. PMID:19698073

  3. Emerging treatment options for spinal muscular atrophy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barrington G. Burnett; Thomas O. Crawford; Charlotte J. Sumner

    2009-01-01

    Opinion statement  The motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is one of the leading genetic killers of infants worldwide. SMA is\\u000a caused by mutation of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and deficiency of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. All patients retain one or more copies of the SMN2 gene, which (by producing a small amount of the

  4. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Spinal Metastases Recurring in Close Proximity to Previously Irradiated Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Adler, John R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Gibbs, Iris C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Chang, Steven D.; Jackson, Paul S. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Minn, A. Yuriko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Lieberson, Robert E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Soltys, Scott G., E-mail: sgsoltys@stanford.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: As the spinal cord tolerance often precludes reirradiation with conventional techniques, local recurrence within a previously irradiated field presents a treatment challenge. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 51 lesions in 42 patients treated from 2002 to 2008 whose spinal metastases recurred in a previous radiation field (median previous spinal cord dose of 40 Gy) and were subsequently treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Results: SRS was delivered to a median marginal dose of 20 Gy (range, 10-30 Gy) in 1-5 fractions (median, 2), targeting a median tumor volume of 10.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.2-128.6 cm{sup 3}). Converting the SRS regimens with the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 3), the median spinal cord maximum single-session equivalent dose (SSED) was 12.1 Gy{sub 3} (range, 4.7-19.3 Gy{sub 3}). With a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 2-47 months), the Kaplan-Meier local control and overall survival rates at 6/12 months were 87%/73% and 81%/68%, respectively. A time to retreatment of {<=}12 months and the combination of time to retreatment of {<=}12 months with an SSED of <15 Gy{sub 10} were significant predictors of local failure on univariate and multivariate analyses. In patients with a retreatment interval of <12 months, 6/12 month local control rates were 88%/58%, with a SSED of >15 Gy{sub 10}, compared to 45%/0% with <15 Gy{sub 10}, respectively. One patient (2%) experienced Grade 4 neurotoxicity. Conclusion: SRS is safe and effective in the treatment of spinal metastases recurring in previously irradiated fields. Tumor recurrence within 12 months may correlate with biologic aggressiveness and require higher SRS doses (SSED >15 Gy{sub 10}). Further research is needed to define the partial volume retreatment tolerance of the spinal cord and the optimal target dose.

  5. Perspectives on the Treatment of the Longitudinal Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Carlstedt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The current technique for surgical treatment of the longitudinal spinal cord injury has proven to be successful for restoration of some motor function and alleviation of pain. This has been the first step in finding a cure for spinal cord injuries, but so far there are many obstacles still to be overcome. In this particular injury return of function from spinal cord surgery is only partial. Some of the main remaining problems are related to injury-induced neuronal death, direction and specificity of regeneration and muscle, and receptor disintegration from long time denervation. Currently this is a surgical procedure without any adjuvant treatments. In order to gain further functional improvement combinational therapies developed in basic science experiments are essential. PMID:21206763

  6. Vascular Complications in Lumbar Spinal Surgery: Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyoung Ho; Park, Jae Hyung; Chung, Jin Wook; Han, Joon Koo; Shin, Sang Joon; Kang, Heung Sik [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-01-15

    Four patients underwent endovascular treatment of vascular injuries complicating lumbar spinal surgery. In two patients with massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage, the extravasating lumbar arteries were successfully embolized with microcoils. Two patients with large iliac arteriovenous fistula (AVF) were treated, one with embolization using a detachable balloon and coils, which failed, and the other with placement of a stent graft after embolization of distal runoff vessels, which occluded the fistula.We conclude that acute arterial laceration or delayed AVF complicating lumbar spinal surgery can be managed effectively with selective embolization or stent-graft placement, respectively.

  7. Modulation of exercise-induced spinal loop properties in response to oxygen availability.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Thomas; Racinais, Sébastien; Bringard, Aurélien; Lapole, Thomas; Perrey, Stéphane

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of acute hypoxia on spinal reflexes and soleus muscle function after a sustained contraction of the plantar flexors at 40% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC). Fifteen males (age 25.3 ± 0.9 year) performed the fatigue task at two different inspired O? fractions (FiO? = 0.21/0.11) in a randomized and single-blind fashion. Before, at task failure and after 6, 12 and 18 min of passive recovery, the Hoffman-reflex (H max) and M-wave (M max) were recorded at rest and voluntary activation (VA), surface electromyogram (RMSmax), M-wave (M sup) and V-wave (V sup) were recorded during MVC. Normalized H-reflex (H max/M max) was significantly depressed pre-exercise in hypoxia compared with normoxia (0.31 ± 0.08 and 0.36 ± 0.08, respectively, P < 0.05). Hypoxia did not affect time to task failure (mean time of 453.9 ± 32.0 s) and MVC decrease at task failure (-18% in normoxia vs. -16% in hypoxia). At task failure, VA (-8%), RMSmax/M sup (-11%), H max/M max (-27%) and V sup/M sup (-37%) decreased (P < 0.05), but with no FiO2 effect. H max/M max restored significantly throughout recovery in hypoxia but not in normoxia, while V sup/M sup restored significantly during recovery in normoxia but not in hypoxia (P < 0.05). Collectively, these findings indicate that central adaptations resulting from sustained submaximal fatiguing contraction were not different in hypoxia and normoxia at task failure. However, the FiO?-induced differences in spinal loop properties pre-exercise and throughout recovery suggest possible specific mediation by the hypoxic-sensitive group III and IV muscle afferents, supraspinal regulation mechanisms being mainly involved in hypoxia while spinal ones may be predominant in normoxia. PMID:25361617

  8. Emerging treatment options for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Barrington G; Crawford, Thomas O; Sumner, Charlotte J

    2009-03-01

    The motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is one of the leading genetic killers of infants worldwide. SMA is caused by mutation of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and deficiency of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. All patients retain one or more copies of the SMN2 gene, which (by producing a small amount of the SMN protein) rescues embryonic lethality and modifies disease severity. Rapid progress continues in dissecting the cellular functions of the SMN protein, but the mechanisms linking SMN deficiency with dysfunction and loss of functioning motor units remain poorly defined. Clinically, SMA should to be distinguished from other neuromuscular disorders, and the diagnosis can be readily confirmed with genetic testing. Quality of life and survival of SMA patients are improved with aggressive supportive care including optimized respiratory and nutritional care and management of scoliosis and contractures. Because SMA is caused by inadequate amounts of SMN protein, one aim of current SMA therapeutics development is to increase SMN protein levels in SMA patients by activating SMN2 gene expression and/or increasing levels of full-length SMN2 transcripts. Several potential therapeutic compounds are currently being studied in clinical trials in SMA patients. PMID:19210911

  9. Nanomedicine strategies for treatment of secondary spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    White-Schenk, Désirée; Shi, Riyi; Leary, James F

    2015-01-01

    Neurological injury, such as spinal cord injury, has a secondary injury associated with it. The secondary injury results from the biological cascade after the primary injury and affects previous uninjured, healthy tissue. Therefore, the mitigation of such a cascade would benefit patients suffering a primary injury and allow the body to recover more quickly. Unfortunately, the delivery of effective therapeutics is quite limited. Due to the inefficient delivery of therapeutic drugs, nanoparticles have become a major field of exploration for medical applications. Based on their material properties, they can help treat disease by delivering drugs to specific tissues, enhancing detection methods, or a mixture of both. Incorporating nanomedicine into the treatment of neuronal injury and disease would likely push nanomedicine into a new light. This review highlights the various pathological issues involved in secondary spinal cord injury, current treatment options, and the improvements that could be made using a nanomedical approach. PMID:25673988

  10. Outcomes in Treatment for Intradural Spinal Cord Ependymomas

    SciTech Connect

    Volpp, P. Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, CA (United States)], E-mail: pvolpp@yahoo.com; Han, Khanh [Huntington Memorial Medical Center, Pasadena, CA (United States); Kagan, A. Robert; Tome, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Spinal cord ependymomas are rare tumors, accounting for <2% of all primary central nervous system tumors. This study assessed the treatment outcomes for patients diagnosed with spinal cord ependymomas within the Southern California Kaiser Permanente system. Methods and Materials: We studied 23 patients treated with surgery with or without external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The local and distant control rates and overall survival rates were determined. Results: The overall local control, overall recurrence, and 9-year overall survival rate was 96%, 17.4%, and 63.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The results of our study indicate that en bloc gross total resection should be the initial treatment, with radiotherapy reserved primarily for postoperative cases with unfavorable characteristics such as residual tumor, anaplastic histologic features, or piecemeal resection. Excellent local control and overall survival rates can be achieved using modern microsurgical techniques, with or without local radiotherapy.

  11. Nanomedicine strategies for treatment of secondary spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    White-Schenk, Désirée; Shi, Riyi; Leary, James F

    2015-01-01

    Neurological injury, such as spinal cord injury, has a secondary injury associated with it. The secondary injury results from the biological cascade after the primary injury and affects previous uninjured, healthy tissue. Therefore, the mitigation of such a cascade would benefit patients suffering a primary injury and allow the body to recover more quickly. Unfortunately, the delivery of effective therapeutics is quite limited. Due to the inefficient delivery of therapeutic drugs, nanoparticles have become a major field of exploration for medical applications. Based on their material properties, they can help treat disease by delivering drugs to specific tissues, enhancing detection methods, or a mixture of both. Incorporating nanomedicine into the treatment of neuronal injury and disease would likely push nanomedicine into a new light. This review highlights the various pathological issues involved in secondary spinal cord injury, current treatment options, and the improvements that could be made using a nanomedical approach. PMID:25673988

  12. Nanovector-mediated drug delivery for spinal cord injury treatment.

    PubMed

    Caron, Ilaria; Papa, Simonetta; Rossi, Filippo; Forloni, Gianluigi; Veglianese, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the result of a traumatic primary event followed by a so-called secondary injury, which is characterized by a large spectrum of biochemical cellular pathways able to spread the lesion, worsening neurologic recovery. A growing number of potential therapeutic interventions to counteract different neurodegenerative mechanisms of SCI have been proposed, but they did not show relevant efficacy when translated as clinical treatments. Different reasons could explain these disappointing results: on one side the multifactorial evolution of SCI after the primary injury that limits the beneficial effect of just one targeted treatment and, on the other, the restricted access of pharmacological therapies to the spinal cord. For these reasons, recently, a growing interest has been shown in the development of alternative delivery strategies to administer drugs and/or biological/cellular therapies into the spine (hydrogel and nanoparticles). PMID:24845580

  13. Surgical Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis in the Elderly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Kalbarczyk; A. Lukes; R. W. Seiler

    1998-01-01

    Summary  ?148 elderly patients, aged 70 years or more, diagnosed as having lumbar spinal stenosis, were operated upon at our institution\\u000a during 1983 to 1995. Totally 161 operative procedures were performed. We analysed retrospectively the results of the surgical\\u000a treatment.\\u000a \\u000a ?The most frequently performed procedure was multisegmental laminectomy, in 32% interlaminar fenestration and laminotomy were\\u000a done. In 9 cases fusion was

  14. Correction of Camptocormia Using a Cruciform Anterior Spinal Hyperextension Brace and Back Extensor Strengthening Exercise in a Patient With Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Byung Kook; Kim, Yong Wook

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease, one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, is characterized by cardinal motor features including bradykinesia, rigidity, resting tremor, postural instability, freezing gait, and fatigue. Of these, postural instability in the form of hyperflexion of the thoracolumbar spine upon standing and walking that disappears on recumbent positioning is called camptocormia. Many different trials have been conducted on the treatment of camptocormia, including physiotherapy, corsets, medications, and deep brain stimulation. However, there is insufficient evidence as to which treatment modality is the most valid in terms of effectiveness, cost, safety, and patient satisfaction. In this study, we present a patient whose symptom of camptocormia was effectively resolved using a cruciform anterior spinal hyperextension (CASH) brace and back extensor strengthening exercise which was modified through follow-ups based on a short-term outpatient setting for proper application with minimal discomfort. The patient was satisfied with the amount of correction provided by the brace and exercise. PMID:25750882

  15. Forced exercise as a rehabilitation strategy after unilateral cervical spinal cord contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Sandrow-Feinberg, Harra R; Izzi, Jessica; Shumsky, Jed S; Zhukareva, Victoria; Houle, John D

    2009-05-01

    Evaluation of locomotor training after spinal cord injury (SCI) has primarily focused on hind limb recovery, with evidence of functional and molecular changes in response to exercise. Since trauma at a cervical (C) level is common in human SCI, we used a unilateral C4 contusion injury model in rats to determine whether forced exercise (Ex) would affect spinal cord biochemistry, anatomy, and recovery of fore and hind limb function. SCI was created with the Infinite Horizon spinal cord impactor device at C4 with a force of 200 Kdyne and a mean displacement of 1600-1800 microm in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats that had been acclimated to a motorized exercise wheel apparatus. Five days post-operatively, the treated group began Ex on the wheel for 20 min per day, 5 days per week for 8 weeks. Wheel speed was increased daily according to the abilities of each animal up to 14 m/min. Control rats were handled daily but were not exposed to Ex. In one set of animals experiencing 5 days of Ex, there was a moderate increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and heat shock protein-27 (HSP-27) levels in the lesion epicenter and surrounding tissue. Long-term (8 weeks) survival groups were exposed to weekly behavioral tests to assess qualitative aspects of fore limb and hind limb locomotion (fore limb scale, FLS and BBB [Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor rating scale]), as well as sensorimotor (grid) and motor (grip) skills. Biweekly assessment of performance during wheel walking examined gross and fine motor skills. The FLS indicated a significant benefit of Ex during weeks 2-4. The BBB test showed no change with Ex at the end of the 8-week period, however hind limb grid performance was improved during weeks 2-4. Lesion size was not affected by Ex, but the presence of phagocytic and reactive glial cells was reduced with Ex as an intervention. These results suggest that Ex alone can influence the evolution of the injury and transiently improve fore and hind limb function during weeks 2-4 following a cervical SCI. PMID:19489718

  16. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-11

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  17. Surgical treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis with spinal instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Jiang, Lei-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis responds well to conservative treatment at early stage, but more complicated and advanced conditions, including mechanical spinal instability, epidural abscess formation, neurologic deficits, and refractoriness to antibiotic therapy, usually require surgical intervention. The subject of using metallic implants in the setting of infection remains controversial, although more and more surgeons acknowledge that instrumentation can help the body to combat the infection rather than to interfere with it. The combination of radical debridement and instrumentation has lots of merits such as, restoration and maintenance of the sagittal alignment of the spine, stabilization of the spinal column and reduction of bed rest period. This issue must be viewed in the context of the overall and detailed health conditions of the subjecting patient. We think the culprit for the recurrence of infection is not the implants itself, but is the compromised general health condition of the patients. In this review, we focus on surgical treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis with special attention to the role of spinal instrumentation in the presence of pyogenic infection. PMID:17106664

  18. Exercise addiction- diagnosis, bio-psychological mechanisms and treatment issues.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Aviv; Weinstein, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Exercise and sports activity are beneficial both physically and psychologically but excessive exercise may have adverse physiological and psychological effects. There are methodological issues in the definition, diagnosis and etiology of exercise addiction. Several questionnaires and diagnostic tools have been developed and validated and they show high validity and reliability. Exercise addiction has been suggested as having an obsessive-compulsive dimension as well as rewarding aspects that may include it among the behavioral addictions. Biological studies show that in rodents, exercise such as wheel running activates the dopamine reward system and thus contributing to stress reduction. Further evidence suggests that running is associated with endorphins and cannabinoids thus explaining the "runners high" or euphoric feelings that may lead to exercise addiction. Genetic studies suggest that genes which control preference for drugs also control the preference for naturally rewarding behaviors such as exercise. Psychological studies also explain exercise addiction in terms of reward, habituation, social support, stress-relief, avoidance of withdrawal and reduction of anxiety. It has been suggested that exercise addiction is a part of a continuum of sportive activity that develops in stages from the recreational exercise to at-risk exercise, problematic exercise and finally into exercise addiction. Assessment and treatment should take into account the various stages of exercise addiction development, its comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders such as eating disorders or substance use and alcohol disorders. Treatment approaches for exercise addiction are based on the cognitive-behavioral approach but little is known about their effectiveness. A single-case study shows promise of pharmacological treatment for exercise addiction and further studies are required. This review summarizes diagnostic and phenomenology of exercise addiction with emphasis on physiological and neuro-pharmacological mechanisms responsible for its rewarding and addictive properties. PMID:24001300

  19. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    West, Christopher R.; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.; Campbell, Ian G.

    2014-01-01

    We asked whether elastic binding of the abdomen influences respiratory mechanics during wheelchair propulsion in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Eight Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) performed submaximal and maximal incremental exercise tests on a treadmill, both with and without abdominal binding. Measurements included pulmonary function, pressure-derived indices of respiratory mechanics, operating lung volumes, tidal flow-volume data, gas exchange, blood lactate, and symptoms. Residual volume and functional residual capacity were reduced with binding (77 ± 18 and 81 ± 11% of unbound, P < 0.05), vital capacity was increased (114 ± 9%, P < 0.05), whereas total lung capacity was relatively well preserved (99 ± 5%). During exercise, binding introduced a passive increase in transdiaphragmatic pressure, due primarily to an increase in gastric pressure. Active pressures during inspiration were similar across conditions. A sudden, sustained rise in operating lung volumes was evident in the unbound condition, and these volumes were shifted downward with binding. Expiratory flow limitation did not occur in any subject and there was substantial reserve to increase flow and volume in both conditions. V?o2 was elevated with binding during the final stages of exercise (8–12%, P < 0.05), whereas blood lactate concentration was reduced (16–19%, P < 0.05). V?o2/heart rate slopes were less steep with binding (62 ± 35 vs. 47 ± 24 ml/beat, P < 0.05). Ventilation, symptoms, and work rates were similar across conditions. The results suggest that abdominal binding shifts tidal breathing to lower lung volumes without influencing flow limitation, symptoms, or exercise tolerance. Changes in respiratory mechanics with binding may benefit O2 transport capacity by an improvement in central circulatory function. PMID:24855136

  20. Menstrual state and exercise as determinants of spinal trabecular bone density in female athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Wolman, R L; Clark, P; McNally, E; Harries, M; Reeve, J

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the effects of amenorrhoea and intensive back exercise on the bone mineral density of the lumbar spine in female athletes. DESIGN--Cross sectional study comparing amenorrhoeic with eumenorrhoeic athletes and rowers with non-rowers. SETTING--The British Olympic Medical Centre, Northwick Park Hospital. PATIENTS--46 Elite female athletes comprising 19 rowers, 18 runners, and nine dancers, of whom 25 were amenorrhoeic and 21 eumenorrhoeic. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Trabecular bone mineral density of the lumbar spine measured by computed tomography. RESULTS--Mean trabecular bone mineral density was 42 mg/cm3 (95% confidence interval 22 to 62 mg/cm3) lower in the amenorrhoeic than the eumenorrhoeic athletes; this difference was highly significant (p = 0.0002). Mean trabecular bone mineral density was 21 mg/cm3 (1 to 41 mg/cm3) lower in the non-rowers than the rowers; this was also significant (p = 0.05). There was no interaction between these two effects (p = 0.28). CONCLUSION--The effect of intensive exercise on the lumbar spine partially compensates for the adverse effect of amenorrhoea on spinal trabecular bone density. Images p516-a PMID:2207417

  1. Submaximal exercise responses in tetraplegic, paraplegic and non spinal cord injured elite wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Leicht, C A; Bishop, N C; Goosey-Tolfrey, V L

    2012-12-01

    It remains unclear whether similar exercise prescription, based on physiological markers, can be applied to subgroups of wheelchair athletes with different disabilities. Therefore, 25 wheelchair athletes, divided into three subgroups [eight tetraplegic (TETRA), nine paraplegic (PARA) and eight non spinal cord injured (NON-SCI)], performed an exercise test consisting of incremental submaximal stages, covering a range from 40% to 80% peak oxygen uptake (%VO(2peak) ). Oxygen uptake (VO(2)), heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration (BLa) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were obtained for each stage. Expressed as a function of BLa, no differences were found between subgroups with respect to %VO(2peak) (group mean ± SD: 1.0 mmol/L: 53.9 ± 9.9%; 2.0 mmol/L: 70.7 ± 7.5%; 3.0 mmol/L: 78.5 ± 7.7%) and RPE [group mean (lower and upper quartile): 1.0 mmol/L: 10.8 (9.9, 12.2); 2.0 mmol/L: 13.6 (12.7, 14.3); 3.0 mmol/L: 14.9 (13.7, 16.5)]. Furthermore, no differences were found in the coefficient of determination (R(2) ) of the HR-VO(2) relationship in any of the subgroups (TETRA: 0.90 ± 0.12; PARA: 0.97 ± 0.02; NON-SCI: 0.96 ± 0.04). These results suggest that exercise prescription using measurements of VO(2), BLa or RPE can be based on the same recommendations in all the subgroups studied. This finding has added value for TETRA athletes, as it offers alternatives to HR monitoring. PMID:21599755

  2. Comparison of non-surgical treatment methods for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most common reason for spinal surgery in older adults. Previous studies have shown that surgery is effective for severe cases of stenosis, but many patients with mild to moderate symptoms are not surgical candidates. These patients and their providers are seeking effective non-surgical treatment methods to manage their symptoms; yet there is a paucity of comparative effectiveness research in this area. This knowledge gap has hindered the development of clinical practice guidelines for non-surgical treatment approaches for lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods/design This study is a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial that will be conducted from November 2013 through October 2016. The sample will consist of 180 older adults (>60 years) who have both an anatomic diagnosis of stenosis confirmed by diagnostic imaging, and signs/symptoms consistent with a clinical diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis confirmed by clinical examination. Eligible subjects will be randomized into one of three pragmatic treatment groups: 1) usual medical care; 2) individualized manual therapy and rehabilitative exercise; or 3) community-based group exercise. All subjects will be treated for a 6-week course of care. The primary subjective outcome is the Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire, a self-reported measure of pain/function. The primary objective outcome is the Self-Paced Walking Test, a measure of walking capacity. The secondary objective outcome will be a measurement of physical activity during activities of daily living, using the SenseWear Armband, a portable device to be worn on the upper arm for one week. The primary analysis will use linear mixed models to compare the main effects of each treatment group on the changes in each outcome measure. Secondary analyses will include a responder analysis by group and an exploratory analysis of potential baseline predictors of treatment outcome. Discussion Our study should provide evidence that helps to inform patients and providers about the clinical benefits of three non-surgical approaches to the management of lumbar spinal stenosis symptoms. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01943435 PMID:24872875

  3. Glutamatergic receptor dysfunction in spinal cord contributes to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han-Jun; Cahoon, Rebecca; Cahoon, Edgar B; Zheng, Hong; Patel, Kaushik P; Zucker, Irving H

    2015-03-01

    Excitatory amino acids (e.g., glutamate) released by contraction-activated skeletal muscle afferents into the dorsal horn of the spinal cord initiate the central component of the exercise pressor reflex (EPR) in physiological conditions. However, the role of glutamate and glutamate receptors in mediating the exaggerated EPR in the chronic heart failure (CHF) state remains to be determined. In the present study, we performed microinjection of glutamate receptor antagonists into ipisilateral L4/L5 dorsal horns to investigate their effects on the pressor response to static contraction induced by stimulation of the peripheral end of L4/L5 ventral roots in decerebrate sham-operated (sham) and CHF rats. Microinjection of glutamate (10 mM, 100 nl) into the L4 or L5 dorsal horn caused a greater pressor response in CHF rats compared with sham rats. Furthermore, microinjection of either the broad-spectrum glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenate (10 mM, 100 nl) or the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist dl-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (50 mM, 100 nl) or the non-NMDA-sensitive receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (5 mM, 100 nl) into L4/5 dorsal horns decreased the pressor response to static contraction in CHF rats to a greater extent than in sham rats. Molecular evidence showed that the protein expression of glutamate receptors (both non-NMDA and NMDA) was elevated in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord in CHF rats. In addition, data from microdialysis experiments demonstrated that although basal glutamate release at the dorsal horn at rest was similar between sham and CHF rats (225 ± 50 vs. 260 ± 63 nM in sham vs. CHF rats, n = 4, P > 0.05), CHF rats exhibit greater glutamate release into the dorsal horn during muscle contraction compared with sham rats (549 ± 60 vs. 980 ± 65 nM in sham vs. CHF rats, n = 4, P < 0.01). These data indicate that the spinal glutamate system contributes to the exaggerated EPR in the CHF state. PMID:25502111

  4. Onyx injection by direct puncture for the treatment of hypervascular spinal metastases close to the anterior spinal artery: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Clarençon, Frédéric; Di Maria, Federico; Cormier, Evelyne; Sourour, Nader-Antoine; Enkaoua, Eric; Sailhan, Frédéric; Iosif, Christina; Le Jean, Lise; Chiras, Jacques

    2013-06-01

    Presurgical devascularization of hypervascular spinal metastases has been shown to be effective in preventing major blood loss during open surgery. Most often, embolization can be performed using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) microparticles. However, in some cases, the close relationship between the feeders of the metastases and the feeders of the anterior spinal artery (ASA) poses a risk of spinal cord ischemia when PVA microparticle embolization is performed. The authors present their early experience in the treatment of spinal metastases close to the ASA; in 2 cases they injected Onyx-18, by direct puncture, into hypervascular posterior arch spinal metastases situated close to the ASA. Two women, one 36 and the other 55 years of age, who presented with spinal lesions (at the posterior arch of C-4 and T-6, respectively) from thyroid and a kidney tumors, were sent to the authors' department to undergo presurgical embolization. After having performed a complete spinal digital subtraction angiography study, a regular angiography catheter was positioned at the ostium of the artery that mainly supplied the lesion. Then, with the patient in the left lateral decubitus position, direct puncture with 18-gauge needles of the lesion was performed using roadmap guidance. Onyx-18 was injected through the needles under biplanar fluoroscopy. Satisfactory devascularization of the lesions was obtained; the ASA remained patent in both cases. The metastases were surgically removed in both cases within the 48 hours after the embolization and major blood loss did not occur. Presurgical devascularization of hypervascular spinal metastases close the ASA by direct puncture with Onyx-18 seems to be an effective technique and appears to be safe in terms of the preserving the ASA's patency. PMID:23600580

  5. The role of exercise in cancer treatment: bridging the gap.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Gary T; Haas, Barbara K; Hermanns, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a burgeoning amount of evidence-based scientific data demonstrating the benefit of exercise during and following cancer treatment. This compelling evidence has resulted in major stakeholders in cancer management, including the American College of Sports Medicine, American Society of Clinical Oncology, National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Cancer Society, Oncology Nursing Society, and the Commission on Cancer, advocating exercise as an integral component of cancer care. Despite the acknowledgment of exercise as an essential component, it remains virtually absent in routine cancer treatment. This article discusses the role of exercise in cancer treatment utilizing a community-based program. The rationale presented is that a scalable and replicable standard of care model is a plausible avenue to assimilate exercise into routine oncology practice. PMID:25014390

  6. Exercise as a treatment for osteoarthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kim Bennell; Rana Hinman

    2005-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This review highlights recent important research, future directions, and clinical applications for exercise and osteoarthritis. It focuses on knee osteoarthritis because of its prevalence and the dearth of research involving other joint osteoarthritis. The review covers exercise prescription for symptomatic relief, and its potential role in reducing development and slowing progression of osteoarthritis. Recent Findings: Meta-analyses support

  7. Exercise Training and Parkinson's Disease: Placebo or Essential Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter, Iris; Engelhardt, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Exercise training is often recommended for people with Parkinson's disease, though there is debate about the pathophysiologic cause of impaired movement in Parkinsonism which makes it difficult to develop a specific exercise treatment for symptoms that include hypokinesia, tremor, and muscular rigidity. Most published studies show a benefit of…

  8. The Effects of Aging and Electrical Stimulation Exercise on Bone after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dolbow, James D.; Dolbow, David R.; Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Adler, Robert A.; Gater, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Age related bone loss predisposes adults to osteoporosis. This is especially true for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The effects of decreased bone loading with older age and paralysis significantly contribute to decreased bone mass and increased risk for fragility fractures. Loading bone via volitional muscle contractions or by using electrical stimulation are common methods for helping to prevent and/or decrease bone loss. However the effectiveness and safety of electrical stimulation activities remain unclear. The purpose of this review is to investigate the factors associated with aging and osteoporosis after SCI, the accuracy of bone measurement, the effects of various forms of bone loading activities with a focus on electrical stimulation activities and the safety of physical exercise with a focus on electrical stimulation cycling. Osteoporosis remains a disabling and costly condition for older adults and for those with paralysis. Both dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography are valuable techniques for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) with the latter having the ability to differentiate trabecular and cortical bone. Physical activities have shown to be beneficial for increasing BMD however, the extent of the benefits related to aging and paralysis remain undetermined. Electrical stimulation activities administered appropriately are assumed safe due to thousands of documented safe FES cycling sessions. However, specific documentation is needed to verify safety and to development formal guidelines for optimal use. PMID:23730530

  9. Dosimetric comparison of metastatic spinal photon treatment techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Marvene M., E-mail: mewing@iuhealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Carnes, Samuel M.; Henderson, Mark A.; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Traditional palliative treatment of metastatic cancer to the vertebral bodies often results in doses to the spinal cord that are higher than the dose prescribed to the target, or gross tumor volume (GTV). This study compares traditional techniques of spine palliation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The purpose of the study is 2-fold: first, the study demonstrates the benefits of using IMRT to lower the dose to the organs at risk (OAR), particularly for the spinal cord and other nonspecified normal tissues; second, the article provides information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of commonly used conventional techniques for treating the vertebral bodies based on patient anatomy. Because the use of IMRT or other advanced techniques may be prohibitive because of insurance issues, treatment plans were created that compared optimal coverage vs. optimal sparing for single-field, wedged-pair, and opposed-beam arrangements. Fifty-five patients were selected and divided by location of target (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine) and also by the measured separation between the anterior and posterior surface of the patient at the level of mid-GTV. Within each anatomic category the patients again were divided into the categories of small, medium, and large based on separation. The patient dataset that most closely represented the average separation within each category was selected, resulting in a total of 9 patients, and the appropriate treatment plan techniques were calculated for each of the 9 patients. The results of the study do show that the use of IMRT is far superior when compared with other techniques, both for coverage and for sparing of the surrounding tissue, regardless of patient size and the section of spine being treated. Based on a combination of both target coverage and sparing of normal tissues, the conventional plan of choice may vary by both the section of spine to be treated and by the size of the patient.

  10. Comparison of general exercise, motor control exercise and spinal manipulative therapy for chronic low back pain: A randomized trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manuela L. Ferreira; Paulo H. Ferreira; Jane Latimer; Robert D. Herbert; Paul W. Hodges; Matthew D. Jennings; Christopher G. Maher; Kathryn M. Refshauge

    2007-01-01

    Practice guidelines recommend various types of exercise and manipulative therapy for chronic back pain but there have been few head-to-head comparisons of these interventions. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to compare effects of general exercise, motor control exercise and manipulative therapy on function and perceived effect of intervention in patients with chronic back pain. Two hundred and forty adults

  11. [Cystography of the spinal cord for delineating tactics for surgical treatment of syringomyelia].

    PubMed

    Paramonov, L V

    1983-01-01

    Radiocontrast study of cystic cavities of the spinal cord was conducted in 23 patients with the clinical picture of syringomyelia and syringobulbia. Diffuse cystic cavities were demonstrated in the cervical and thoracic segments of the spinal cord in 22 patients. In 9 patients, the spinal cysts communicated with the cavity of the fourth ventricle. In 2 cases, the cysts extended to the region of the spinal cord terminal filament. The information obtained allowed a differential approach to the choice of the method and tactics of surgical treatment of syringohydromyelia. Macrosurgical operations on the craniovertebral level with tamponade of the communication between the spinal cord cyst and the cavity of the fourth ventricle were carried out in patients with the communicating form of syringomyelia. Operations for dividing the terminal filament of the spinal cord or myelotomy with drainage of the cyst at the cervical or thoracic level were performed in other cases. PMID:6650044

  12. Spinal manipulations for the treatment of migraine: A systematic review of randomized clinical trials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Posadzki; E Ernst

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of spinal manipulations as a treatment for migraine headaches.Method: Seven databases were searched from inception to November 2010. All randomized clinical trials (RCTs) investigating spinal manipulations performed by any type of healthcare professional for treating migraine headaches in human subjects were considered. The selection of studies, data extraction

  13. The transformation of spinal curvature into spinal deformity: pathological processes and implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hawes, Martha C; O'Brien, Joseph P

    2006-01-01

    Background This review summarizes what is known about the pathological processes (e.g. structural and functional changes), by which spinal curvatures develop and evolve into spinal deformities. Methods Comprehensive review of articles (English language only) published on 'scoliosis,' whose content yielded data on the pathological changes associated with spinal curvatures. Medline, Science Citation Index and other searches yielded > 10,000 titles each of which was surveyed for content related to 'pathology' and related terms such as 'etiology,' 'inheritance,' 'pathomechanism,' 'signs and symptoms.' Additional resources included all books published on 'scoliosis' and available through the Arizona Health Sciences Library, Interlibrary Loan, or through direct contact with the authors or publishers. Results A lateral curvature of the spine–'scoliosis'–can develop in association with postural imbalance due to genetic defects and injury as well as pain and scarring from trauma or surgery. Irrespective of the factor that triggers its appearance, a sustained postural imbalance can result, over time, in establishment of a state of continuous asymmetric loading relative to the spinal axis. Recent studies support the longstanding hypothesis that spinal deformity results directly from such postural imbalance, irrespective of the primary trigger, because the dynamics of growth within vertebrae are altered by continuous asymmetric mechanical loading. These data suggest that, as long as growth potential remains, evolution of a spinal curvature into a spinal deformity can be prevented by reversing the state of continuous asymmetric loading. Conclusion Spinal curvatures can routinely be diagnosed in early stages, before pathological deformity of the vertebral elements is induced in response to asymmetric loading. Current clinical approaches involve 'watching and waiting' while mild reversible spinal curvatures develop into spinal deformities with potential to cause symptoms throughout life. Research to define patient-specific mechanics of spinal loading may allow quantification of a critical threshold at which curvature establishment and progression become inevitable, and thereby yield strategies to prevent development of spinal deformity. Even within the normal spine there is considerable flexibility with the possibility of producing many types of curves that can be altered during the course of normal movements. To create these curves during normal movement simply requires an imbalance of forces along the spine and, extending this concept a little further, a scoliotic curve is produced simply by a small but sustained imbalance of forces along the spine. In fact I would argue that no matter what you believe to be the cause of AIS, ultimately the problem can be reduced to the production of an imbalance of forces along the spine [1]. PMID:16759413

  14. PEGylated interferon-? modulates the acute inflammatory response and recovery when combined with forced exercise following cervical spinal contusion injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harra R. Sandrow-Feinberg; Victoria Zhukareva; Lauren Santi; Kassi Miller; Jed S. Shumsky; Darren P. Baker; John D. Houle

    2010-01-01

    Secondary degeneration leads to an expansion of the initial tissue damage sustained during a spinal cord injury (SCI). Dampening the cellular inflammatory response that contributes to this progressive tissue damage is one possible strategy for neuroprotection after acute SCI. We initially examined whether treatment with a PEGylated form of rat interferon-beta (IFN-?) would modulate the expression of several markers of

  15. Lower limb conduit artery endothelial responses to acute upper limb exercise in spinal cord injured and able-bodied men

    PubMed Central

    Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia O; Au, Jason S; Ditor, David S; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2015-01-01

    Vascular improvements in the nonactive regions during exercise are likely primarily mediated by increased shear rate (SR). Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) experience sublesional vascular deconditioning and could potentially benefit from upper body exercise-induced increases in lower body SR. The present study utilized a single bout of incremental arm-crank exercise to generate exercise-induced SR changes in the superficial femoral artery in an effort to evaluate the acute postexercise impact on superficial femoral artery endothelial function via flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and determine regulatory factors in the nonactive legs of individuals with and without SCI. Eight individuals with SCI and eight age, sex, and waist-circumference-matched able-bodied (AB) controls participated. Nine minutes of incremental arm-crank exercise increased superficial femoral artery anterograde SR (P = 0.02 and P < 0.01), retrograde SR (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001) in both SCI and AB, respectively. However, these SR alterations resulted in acute postexercise increases in FMD in the AB group only (SCI 6.0 ± 1.2% to 6.3 ± 2.7%, P = 0.74; AB 7.5 ± 1.4% to 11.2 ± 1.4%, P = 0.03). While arm exercise has many cardiovascular benefits and results in changes in SR patterns in the nonactive legs, these changes are not sufficient to induce acute changes in FMD among individuals with SCI, and therefore are less likely to stimulate exercise training-associated improvements in nonactive limb endothelial function. Understanding the role of SR patterns on FMD brings us closer to designing effective strategies to combat impaired vascular function in both healthy and clinical populations. PMID:25847920

  16. A Systematic Review of Exercise Training To Promote Locomotor Recovery in Animal Models of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Callister, Robert J.; Callister, Robin; Galea, Mary P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In the early 1980s experiments on spinalized cats showed that exercise training on the treadmill could enhance locomotor recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). In this review, we summarize the evidence for the effectiveness of exercise training aimed at promoting locomotor recovery in animal models of SCI. We performed a systematic search of the literature using Medline, Web of Science, and Embase. Of the 362 studies screened, 41 were included. The adult female rat was the most widely used animal model. The majority of studies (73%) reported that exercise training had a positive effect on some aspect of locomotor recovery. Studies employing a complete SCI were less likely to have positive outcomes. For incomplete SCI models, contusion was the most frequently employed method of lesion induction, and the degree of recovery depended on injury severity. Positive outcomes were associated with training regimens that involved partial weight-bearing activity, commenced within a critical period of 1–2 weeks after SCI, and maintained training for at least 8 weeks. Considerable heterogeneity in training paradigms and methods used to assess or quantify recovery was observed. A 13-item checklist was developed and employed to assess the quality of reporting and study design; only 15% of the studies had high methodological quality. We recommend that future studies include control groups, randomize animals to groups, conduct blinded assessments, report the extent of the SCI lesion, and report sample size calculations. A small battery of objective assessment methods including assessment of over-ground stepping should also be developed and routinely employed. This would allow future meta-analyses of the effectiveness of exercise interventions on locomotor recovery. PMID:22401139

  17. Spinal Manipulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edzard Ernst; Elaine Harkness

    2001-01-01

    For many years, spinal manipulation has been a popular form of treatment. Yet the debate about its clinical efficacy continues. The research question remains: Does spinal manipulation convey more than a placebo effect? To summarize the evidence from sham-controlled clinical trials of spinal manipulation as a treatment of various conditions, and to assess the methodological quality of these studies, a

  18. The Effectiveness of Spinal Manipulation for the Treatment of Headache Disorders: A Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J A Astin; E Ernst

    2002-01-01

    To carry out a systematic review of the literature examining the effectiveness of spinal manipulation for the treatment of headache disorders, computerized literature searches were carried out in Medline, Embase, Amed and CISCOM. Studies were included only if they were randomized trials of (any type of) spinal manipulation for (any type of) headache in human patients in which spinal manipulation

  19. Effectiveness of spinal manipulative therapy in the treatment of mechanical thoracic spine pain: A pilot randomized clinical trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda Schiller

    2001-01-01

    Background: To date, no substantiated studies have been performed to investigate the efficacy of spinal manipulative therapy on thoracic spinal syndromes. Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of spinal manipulative therapy in the treatment of mechanical thoracic spine pain. Study Design: A single-blind, randomized, comparative, controlled pilot study. Setting: Technikon Natal Chiropractic Clinic in Durban, South Africa. Participants: Thirty subjects selected

  20. Exercise decreases myelin-associated glycoprotein expression in the spinal cord and positively modulates neuronal growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristina A. Ghiani; Zhe Ying; Jean de Vellis; Fernando Gomez-Pinilla

    2007-01-01

    To successfully grow, neurons need to overcome the effects of hostile environments, such as the inhibitory action of myelin. We have evaluated the potential of exercise to over- come the intrinsic limitation of the central nervous system for axonal growth. In line with the demonstrated ability of exercise to increase the regenerative potential of neurons, here we show that exercise

  1. Does Supervised Exercise Offer Adjuvant Benefit Over Exercise Advice Alone for the Treatment of Intermittent Claudication? A Randomised Trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R Cheetham; L Burgess; M Ellis; A Williams; R. M Greenhalgh; A. H Davies

    2004-01-01

    Objective. Exercise advice is the main treatment for symptom relief in the UK for patients with mild to moderate Intermittent Claudication (IC). Would a weekly exercise and motivation class for 6 months offer adjuvant benefit over written and verbal exercise advice alone?Patients and methods. Fifty-nine patients attending a regional vascular centre for whom IC was the main factor affecting mobility

  2. Video-assisted thoracoscopic treatment of spinal lesions in the thoracolumbar junction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. J. Huang; R. W. W. Hsu; H. P. Liu; K. Y. Hsu; Y. S. Liao; H. N. Shih; Y. J. Chen

    1997-01-01

    Background: The endoscopic treatment of spinal lesions in the thoracolumbar junction (T11–L2) poses a great challenge to the surgeon.\\u000a From November 1, 1995 to December 31, 1996, we successfully used a combination of video-assisted thoracoscopy and conventional\\u000a spinal instruments to treat 38 patients with anterior spinal lesions. Twelve of them had lesions in the thoracolumbar junction.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods: The so-called extended

  3. Chronic intrathecal morphine treatment does not cause down-regulation of spinal adenosine A 1 receptors in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pao-Luh Tao; Chih-Shung Wong; Mei-Chuan Lin

    1996-01-01

    We have shown previously that systemic chronic morphine treatment causes down-regulation of spinal adenosine A1 receptors in rats. Recently, we have found that chronic supraspinal morphine treatment also causes this effect. In the present study, we investigated whether chronic spinal morphine treatment has the same effect of down-regulation of spinal adenosine A1 receptors. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were rendered tolerant

  4. Combinational Spinal GAD65 Gene Delivery and Systemic GABA-Mimetic Treatment for Modulation of Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kakinohana, Osamu; Hefferan, Michael P.; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Nejime, Tetsuya; Marsala, Silvia; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Motlik, Jan; Kucharova, Karolina; Strnadel, Jan; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Lazar, Peter; Galik, Jan; Vinay, Laurent; Marsala, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Loss of GABA-mediated pre-synaptic inhibition after spinal injury plays a key role in the progressive increase in spinal reflexes and the appearance of spasticity. Clinical studies show that the use of baclofen (GABAB receptor agonist), while effective in modulating spasticity is associated with major side effects such as general sedation and progressive tolerance development. The goal of the present study was to assess if a combined therapy composed of spinal segment-specific upregulation of GAD65 (glutamate decarboxylase) gene once combined with systemic treatment with tiagabine (GABA uptake inhibitor) will lead to an antispasticity effect and whether such an effect will only be present in GAD65 gene over-expressing spinal segments. Methods/Principal Findings Adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to transient spinal ischemia (10 min) to induce muscle spasticity. Animals then received lumbar injection of HIV1-CMV-GAD65 lentivirus (LVs) targeting ventral ?-motoneuronal pools. At 2–3 weeks after lentivirus delivery animals were treated systemically with tiagabine (4, 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg or vehicle) and the degree of spasticity response measured. In a separate experiment the expression of GAD65 gene after spinal parenchymal delivery of GAD65-lentivirus in naive minipigs was studied. Spastic SD rats receiving spinal injections of the GAD65 gene and treated with systemic tiagabine showed potent and tiagabine-dose-dependent alleviation of spasticity. Neither treatment alone (i.e., GAD65-LVs injection only or tiagabine treatment only) had any significant antispasticity effect nor had any detectable side effect. Measured antispasticity effect correlated with increase in spinal parenchymal GABA synthesis and was restricted to spinal segments overexpressing GAD65 gene. Conclusions/Significance These data show that treatment with orally bioavailable GABA-mimetic drugs if combined with spinal-segment-specific GAD65 gene overexpression can represent a novel and highly effective anti-spasticity treatment which is associated with minimal side effects and is restricted to GAD65-gene over-expressing spinal segments. PMID:22291989

  5. Predictive Ability of Pender's Health Promotion Model for Physical Activity and Exercise in People with Spinal Cord Injuries: A Hierarchical Regression Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keegan, John P.; Chan, Fong; Ditchman, Nicole; Chiu, Chung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to validate Pender's Health Promotion Model (HPM) as a motivational model for exercise/physical activity self-management for people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Quantitative descriptive research design using hierarchical regression analysis (HRA) was used. A total of 126 individuals with SCI were recruited…

  6. Effect of antioxidant treatment on spinal GABA neurons in a neuropathic pain model in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yowtak, June; Wang, Jigong; Kim, Hee Young; Lu, Ying; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2013-01-01

    One feature of neuropathic pain is a reduced spinal GABAergic inhibitory function. However, the mechanisms behind this attenuation remain to be elucidated. This study investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the spinal GABA neuron loss and reduced GABA neuron excitability in spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model of neuropathic pain in mice. The importance of spinal GABAergic inhibition in neuropathic pain was tested by examining the effects of intrathecally administered GABA receptor agonists and antagonists in SNL and naïve mice, respectively. The effects of SNL and antioxidant treatment on GABA neuron loss and functional changes were examined in transgenic GAD67-EGFP mice. GABA receptor agonists transiently reversed mechanical hypersensitivity of the hind paw in SNL mice. On the other hand, GABA receptor antagonists made naïve mice mechanically hypersensitive. Stereological analysis showed that the numbers of enhanced green fluorescent protein positive (EGFP+) GABA neurons were significantly decreased in the lateral superficial laminae (I-II) on the ipsilateral L5 spinal cord after SNL. Repeated antioxidant treatments significantly reduced the pain behaviors and prevented the reduction in EGFP+ GABA neurons. The response rate of the tonic firing GABA neurons recorded from SNL mice increased with antioxidant treatment, whereas no change was seen in those recorded from naïve mice, which suggested that oxidative stress impaired some spinal GABA neuron activity in the neuropathic pain condition. Together the data suggest that neuropathic pain, at least partially, is attributed to oxidative stress which induces both a GABA neuron loss and dysfunction of surviving GABA neurons. PMID:23880056

  7. Comparisons of Exercise Dose and Symptom Severity Between Exercisers and Nonexercisers in Women During and After Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Maria H.; Dodd, Marylin J.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Context Although numerous studies of the efficacy of exercise are reported, few studies have evaluated changes in characteristics of exercise dose in women with cancer both during and after cancer treatment. Objectives To describe the characteristics of exercise dose (i.e., frequency, duration, and intensity), and to evaluate for differences in symptom severity (i.e., fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, pain) between women who did and did not exercise during and after cancer treatment. Methods In a sample of 119 women, two groups were classified: exercisers and nonexercisers. Exercisers were defined as women who met specific criteria for frequency (three times per week), duration (20 minutes per session), intensity (moderate), and mode (aerobic). Nonexercisers were defined as women who did not meet all of these criteria. Evaluation of exercise dose was completed at baseline (T1: the week before chemotherapy cycle two), at the end of cancer treatment (T2), and at the end of the study (T3: approximately one year after the T1 assessment) using self-report exercise questionnaires. Results Approximately 50% of the participants exercised during and 70% exercised after treatment. At T1, exercisers had lower total fatigue, lower behavioral and sensory subscale fatigue scores, and lower depression scores (P =0.038) than nonexercisers. No significant differences in sleep disturbance or pain were found between groups. At T2, exercisers had lower cognitive/mood subscale fatigue and depression scores than nonexercisers (P =0.047). At T3, no significant differences were found between groups in any symptom severity scores. Conclusion Both during and after cancer treatment, achieving or maintaining exercise guideline levels were met by most patients. Further study is needed to examine the link between exercise dose and symptom severity. PMID:22436836

  8. A combination therapy of neural and glial restricted precursor cells and chronic quipazine treatment paired with passive cycling promotes quipazine-induced stepping in adult spinalized rats.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Elizabeth A; Shumsky, Jed S

    2014-10-20

    Introduction In order to develop optimal treatments to promote recovery from complete spinal cord injury (SCI), we examined the combination of: (1) a cellular graft of neural and glial restricted precursor (NRP/GRP) cells, (2) passive exercise, and (3) chronic quipazine treatment on behavioral outcomes and compared them with the individual treatment elements. NRP/GRP cells were transplanted at the time of spinalization. [Table: see text] Methods Daily passive exercise began 1 week after injury to give sufficient time for the animals to recover. Chronic quipazine administration began 2 weeks after spinalization to allow for sufficient receptor upregulation permitting the expression of its behavioral effects. Behavioral measures consisted of the BBB locomotor score and percent of weight-supported steps and hops on a treadmill. Results Rats displayed an increased response to quipazine (BBB?9) beginning at 8 weeks post-injury in all the animals that received the combination therapy. This increase in BBB score was persistent through the end of the study (12 weeks post-injury). Conclusion Unlike the individual treatment groups which never achieved weight support, the combination therapy animals were able to perform uncoordinated weight-supported stepping without a body weight support system while on a moving treadmill (6.5?m per minute) and were capable of supporting their own weight in stance during open field locomotion testing. No regeneration of descending serotonergic projections into and through the lesion cavity was observed. Furthermore, these results are a testament to the capacity of the lumbar spinal cord, when properly stimulated, to sustain functioning locomotor circuitry following complete SCI. PMID:25329574

  9. Neuropathology: the foundation for new treatments in spinal cord injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B A Kakulas

    2004-01-01

    The first step essential in the search for a cure of human spinal cord injury (SCI) is to appreciate the complexity of the disorder. In this regard, it is not only the loss of ambulation but the sensory and autonomic changes that are equally important in recovery. In addition, there are the serious social emotional psychological and lifestyle effects of

  10. Generalizable Class Solutions for Treatment Planning of Spinal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weksberg, David C.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Vu, Khoi N.; Rebueno, Neal C.; Sharp, Hadley J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Luo, Dershan; Yang, James N.; Shiu, Almon S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rhines, Laurence D. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McAleer, Mary Frances; Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L., E-mail: eric.L.chang@usc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Norris Cancer Hospital, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) continues to emerge as an effective therapeutic approach to spinal metastases; however, treatment planning and delivery remain resource intensive at many centers, which may hamper efficient implementation in clinical practice. We sought to develop a generalizable class solution approach for spinal SBRT treatment planning that would allow confidence that a given plan provides optimal target coverage, reduce integral dose, and maximize planning efficiency. Methods and Materials: We examined 91 patients treated with spinal SBRT at our institution. Treatment plans were categorized by lesion location, clinical target volume (CTV) configuration, and dose fractionation scheme, and then analyzed to determine the technically achievable dose gradient. A radial cord expansion was subtracted from the CTV to yield a planning CTV (pCTV) construct for plan evaluation. We reviewed the treatment plans with respect to target coverage, dose gradient, integral dose, conformality, and maximum cord dose to select the best plans and develop a set of class solutions. Results: The class solution technique generated plans that maintained target coverage and improved conformality (1.2-fold increase in the 95% van't Riet Conformation Number describing the conformality of a reference dose to the target) while reducing normal tissue integral dose (1.3-fold decrease in the volume receiving 4 Gy (V{sub 4Gy}) and machine output (19% monitor unit (MU) reduction). In trials of planning efficiency, the class solution technique reduced treatment planning time by 30% to 60% and MUs required by {approx}20%: an effect independent of prior planning experience. Conclusions: We have developed a set of class solutions for spinal SBRT that incorporate a pCTV metric for plan evaluation while yielding dosimetrically superior treatment plans with increased planning efficiency. Our technique thus allows for efficient, reproducible, and high-quality spinal SBRT treatment planning.

  11. An acute growth factor treatment that preserves function after spinal cord contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Chehrehasa, Fatemeh; Cobcroft, Mitchell; Young, Yun Wai; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Goss, Ben

    2014-11-01

    Inflammation of the spinal cord after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to destruction of healthy tissue. This "secondary degeneration" is more damaging than the initial physical damage and is the major contributor to permanent loss of functions. In our previous study, we showed that combined delivery of two growth factors, vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, significantly reduced secondary degeneration after hemisection injury of the spinal cord in the rat. Growth factor treatment reduced the size of the lesion cavity at 30 days, compared to control animals, and further reduced the cavity at 90 days in treated animals, whereas in control animals the lesion cavity continued to increase in size. Growth factor treatment also reduced astrogliosis and reduced macroglia/macrophage activation around the injury site. Treatment with individual growth factors alone had similar effects to control treatments. The present study investigated whether growth factor treatment would improve locomotor behavior after spinal contusion injury, a more relevant pre-clinical model of SCI. The growth factors were delivered for the first 7 days to the injury site by osmotic minipump. Locomotor behavior was monitored at 1-28 days after injury using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) score and at 30 days using automated gait analysis. Treated animals had BBB scores of 18; control animals scored 10. Treated animals had significantly reduced lesion cavities and reduced macroglia/macrophage activation around the injury site. We conclude that growth factor treatment preserved spinal cord tissues after contusion injury, thereby allowing functional recovery. This treatment has the potential to significantly reduce the severity of human spinal cord injuries. PMID:24836764

  12. Wheelchair Tai Chi as a Therapeutic Exercise for Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yong Tai; Chang, Li-Shan; Chen, Shihui; Zhong, Yaping; Yang, Yi; Li, Zhanghua; Madison, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) rarely participate in health-promotion programs or wellness screenings due to the lack of accessibility, adaptations, and tertiary healthcare providers. An unconditioned body is more prone to suffer injury and is at risk for more severe health problems than a conditioned one. As is common in individuals…

  13. Aerobic Exercise Training Reduces Cannabis Craving and Use in Non-Treatment Seeking Cannabis-Dependent

    E-print Network

    Palmeri, Thomas

    Aerobic Exercise Training Reduces Cannabis Craving and Use in Non-Treatment Seeking Cannabis complemented by such lifestyle change as exercise. Aims: To examine the effects of moderate aerobic exercise attended 10 supervised 30-min treadmill exercise sessions standardized using heart rate (HR) monitoring (60

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Surgical Treatments for Traumatic Spinal Injuries due to Snowboarding

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takahiro; Wakahara, Kazuhiko; Matsumoto, Kazu; Hioki, Akira; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Katsuji; Ogura, Shinji; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To assess treatment outcomes of snowboarding-related spinal and spinal cord injuries. Overview of Literature Snowboarding-related spinal or spinal cord injury have a great impact on social and sporting activities. Methods A retrospective review of 19 cases of surgically treated snowboard-related injury was done. Analyzed parameters included site of injury, type of fracture, peri- and postoperative complications, pre- and postoperative neurological status, activities of daily living, and participation in sports activities at the final follow-up. Results The major site of injury was the thoracolumbar junction caused by fracture-dislocation (13/19 cases). The remaining 6 cases had cervical spine injuries. Over 60% of the patients had Frankel A and B paralysis. All patients were surgically treated by posterior fusion with instrumentation. Five underwent additional anterior fusion. Surgical outcome was restoration of ambulatory capacity in 12 patients (63.2%). Ultimately, 15 patients (78.9%) could return to work. Patients with complete paralysis upon admission showed reduced ambulatory capacity compared to those with incomplete paralysis. None of the patients again participated in any sports activities, including snowboarding. Conclusions Snowboarding-related spinal or spinal cord injury has a great impact on social as well as sports activities. It is necessary to enhance promotion of injury prevention emphasizing the snowboarders' responsibility code. PMID:25705340

  15. Spasticity in spinal cord injured persons: quantitative effects of baclofen and placebo treatments.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, S R; Lehmann, J F; Price, R; White, O; deLateur, B J; Deitz, J

    1990-12-01

    Spasticity commonly occurs after a spinal cord injury and is characterized by increased resistance to passive movement of peripheral joints. This study examined the effect of an antispasticity medication on stiffness from the myotatic reflex response generated by passive sinusoidal ankle motion. A repeated measures, multiple base-line, single-subject, double-blind design was employed. The independent variable was spasticity medication treatment, where the levels were 40 mg/day and 80 mg/day of baclofen v placebo treatment. Viscous and elastic stiffness measurements were taken at the ankle joint during a placebo base-line phase and during treatment with baclofen for five adult males with traumatic spinal cord injuries. Ankle sinusoidal oscillation frequencies were from 3 to 12 Hz during test sessions. Mean viscous and elastic stiffness scores for all frequencies were calculated for each phase of the study. Randomization tests of mean changes in stiffness measurements between each treatment phase of the study failed to provide any convincing evidence of a significant treatment effect for reduction of spasticity in the traumatic spinal cord injured subjects studied. Further testing is needed to exclude potential confounding factors before this conclusion can be confirmed. The results suggest that baclofen is not a universal treatment of choice for all individuals with spasticity resulting from traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:2264951

  16. Eccentric Exercise Leads to Glial Activation but not Apoptosis in Mice Spinal Cords.

    PubMed

    Pereira, B C; Lucas, G; da Rocha, A L; Pauli, J R; Ropelle, E R; Cintra, D; de Souza, C T; Bueno, C R; da Silva, A S

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of 3 overtraining (OT) protocols on the glial activation and apoptosis in the spinal cords of mice. Rodents were divided into control (C; sedentary mice), overtrained by downhill running (OTR/down), overtrained by uphill running (OTR/up) and overtrained by running without inclination (OTR). The incremental load test, ambulation test, exhaustive test and functional behavioural assessment were used as performance evaluation parameters. 36?h after the exhaustive test, the dorsal and ventral parts of the lumbar spinal cord (L4-L6) were dissected for subsequent protein analysis by immunoblotting. The OT protocols led to similar responses of some performance parameters. The ventral glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) protein levels were diminished in the OTR/up and OTR compared to CT and OTR/down groups. The ventral ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1), and the dorsal GFAP and Iba-1 protein levels were increased in the OTR/down compared to the other groups. The ratio between the cleaved capase-3/caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-9/caspase-9 measured in the spinal cord were not sensitive to the OT protocols. In summary, the OTR/down activated the glial cells in the motor (i.?e. Iba-1) and sensory (i.?e. GFAP and Iba-1) neurons without leading to apoptosis. PMID:25665003

  17. Longitudinal relationship between wheelchair exercise capacity and life satisfaction in patients with spinal cord injury: A cohort study in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van Koppenhagen, Casper Floris; Post, Marcel; de Groot, Sonja; van Leeuwen, Christel; van Asbeck, Floris; Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke; van der Woude, Lucas; Lindeman, Eline

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between wheelchair exercise capacity and life satisfaction in persons with spinal cord injury from the start of active inpatient rehabilitation up to 5 years after discharge. Design Prospective cohort study. Subjects Persons with spinal cord injury, aged 18–65 years, and wheelchair dependent at least for long distances. Method Measurements at the start of active rehabilitation, after 3 months, at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation, and 1 and 5 years after discharge. A peak wheelchair exercise test was performed to record peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and peak power output (POpeak). Life satisfaction was measured as current life satisfaction and change of life satisfaction in comparison with life after spinal cord injury. Relationships between (changes in) exercise capacity and (changes in) life satisfaction were analyzed random coefficient analysis, corrected for possible confounders (age, gender, level of lesion, functional status, secondary impairments, pain, and sports activity) if necessary. Results Of 225 persons included, 130 attended two or more peak exercise tests, who were include in the analyses. Mean age at start was 39 years, 75% were male, 73% had paraplegia, and 76% had a traumatic lesion. Mean POpeak increased during the study from 32.9 to 55.9 Watts, mean VO2peak from 1.02  to 1.38 l/minute, and mean life satisfaction from 5.7 to 7.8. An increase of POpeak with 10 W was associated with a 0.3-point increase of life satisfaction (P = 0.01). An increase of VO2peak with 0.1 l/minute was associated with a 0.1-point increase of life satisfaction (P = 0.049). Conclusion High(er) wheelchair exercise capacity is related to high(er) life satisfaction in spinal cord injury patients. PMID:24621019

  18. Repeated amphetamine treatment alters spinal magnetic resonance signals and pain sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Lei, Bing-Hsuan; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Yin, Hsiang-Shu

    2014-11-01

    Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) has been extensively used in studying the structural and functional features of the central nervous system (CNS). Divalent manganese ion (Mn(2+)) not only enhances MRI contrast, but also enters cells via voltage-gated calcium channels or ionotropic glutamate receptors, which represents an index of neural activities. In the current mouse model, following the repeated amphetamine (Amph) treatment, a reduction of reactivity to thermal pain stimulus was noticed. Since the spinal dorsal horn is the first relay station for pain transmission in CNS, we examined the changes of neural activity in the dorsal spinal cord, particularly the superficial dorsal horn, by analyzing manganese-enhanced T1-weighted MR images (T1WIs). Our data revealed a temporal correlation between reduced pain sensitivity and increased MEMR signals in the spinal dorsal horn subsequent to repeated Amph treatments. PMID:25246351

  19. Efficacy of Epidural Injections in the Treatment of Lumbar Central Spinal Stenosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan David; Manchikanti, Kavita; Boswell, Mark; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Hirsch, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lumbar central spinal stenosis is common and often results in chronic persistent pain and disability, which can lead to multiple interventions. After the failure of conservative treatment, either surgical or nonsurgical modalities such as epidural injections are contemplated in the management of lumbar spinal stenosis. Evidence Acquisition: Recent randomized trials, systematic reviews and guidelines have reached varying conclusions about the efficacy of epidural injections in the management of central lumbar spinal stenosis. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of all three anatomical epidural injection approaches (caudal, interlaminar, and transforaminal) in the treatment of lumbar central spinal stenosis. A systematic review was performed on randomized trials published from 1966 to July 2014 of all types of epidural injections used in the management of lumbar central spinal stenosis. Methodological quality assessment and grading of the evidence was performed. Results: The evidence in managing lumbar spinal stenosis is Level II for long-term improvement for caudal and lumbar interlaminar epidural injections. For transforaminal epidural injections, the evidence is Level III for short-term improvement only. The interlaminar approach appears to be superior to the caudal approach and the caudal approach appears to be superior to the transforaminal one. Conclusions: The available evidence suggests that epidural injections with local anesthetic alone or with local anesthetic with steroids offer short- and long-term relief of low back and lower extremity pain for patients with lumbar central spinal stenosis. However, the evidence is Level II for the long-term efficacy of caudal and interlaminar epidural injections, whereas it is Level III for short-term improvement only with transforaminal epidural injections. PMID:25789241

  20. Rationale for Using Exercise in the Treatment of Stimulant Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tracy L.; Ring, Kolette M.; Warden, Diane; Grannemann, Bruce D.; Church, Timothy S.; Somoza, Eugene; Blair, Steven N.; Szapocznik, Jose; Stoutenberg, Mark; Rethorst, Chad; Walker, Robrina; Morris, David W.; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Kyle, Tiffany; Marcus, Bess; Crowell, Becca; Oden, Neal; Nunes, Edward; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2013-01-01

    Novel approaches to the treatment of stimulant abuse and dependence are needed. Clinical data examining the use of exercise as a treatment for the abuse of nicotine, alcohol, and other substances suggest that exercise may be a beneficial treatment for stimulant abuse. In addition, exercise has been associated with improvements in many other health-related areas that may be adversely affected by stimulant use or its treatment, such as sleep disturbance, cognitive function, mood, weight, quality of life, and anhedonia. Neurobiological evidence provides plausible mechanisms by which exercise could positively affect treatment outcomes in stimulant abuse. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) CTN-0037 Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE) study is a multisite randomized clinical trial that compares exercise to health education as potential treatments for stimulant abuse or dependence. If effective, exercise may provide an additional approach to the treatment of stimulant use disorders. PMID:25364477

  1. Spinal cord tumours: advances in genetics and their implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zadnik, Patricia L.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Burger, Peter C.; Bettegowda, Chetan

    2014-01-01

    Tumours of the spinal cord, although rare, are associated with high morbidity. Surgical resection remains the primary treatment for patients with this disease, and offers the best chance for cure. Such surgical procedures, however, carry substantial risks such as worsening of neurological deficit, paralysis and death. New therapeutic avenues for spinal cord tumours are needed, but genetic studies of the molecular mechanisms governing tumourigenesis in the spinal cord are limited by the scarcity of high-quality human tumour samples. Many spinal cord tumours have intracranial counterparts that have been extensively studied, but emerging data show that the tumours are genetically and biologically distinct. The differences between brain and spine tumours make extrapolation of data from one to the other difficult. In this Review, we describe the demographics, genetics and current treatment approaches for the most commonly encountered spinal cord tumours—namely, ependymomas, astrocytomas, haemangioblastomas and meningiomas. We highlight advances in understanding of the biological basis of these lesions, and explain how the latest progress in genetics and beyond are being translated to improve patient care. PMID:23528542

  2. Exercise

    MedlinePLUS

    Exercise - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society ... Living Well with MS Health and Wellness Exercise Exercise In addition to being essential to general health ...

  3. Exercises

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PT Physical Therapist View full profile COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercise An exercise program is another very important ... BACK: Nutrition More Exercises Information Back to Lifestyle Management Print Page Email Page Add Page I want ...

  4. Operative treatment for hip subluxation in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Zenios, M; Sampath, J; Cole, C; Khan, T; Galasko, C S B

    2005-11-01

    Subluxation of the hip is common in patients with intermediate spinal muscular atrophy. This retrospective study aimed to investigate the influence of surgery on pain and function, as well as the natural history of subluxed hips which were treated conservatively. Thirty patients were assessed clinically and radiologically. Of the nine who underwent surgery only one reported satisfaction and four had recurrent subluxation. Of the 21 patients who had no surgery, 18 had subluxation at the latest follow-up, but only one reported pain in the hip. We conclude that surgery for subluxation of the hip in these patients is not justified. PMID:16260676

  5. Effects of modified bridging exercises on static postural control of a poststroke hemiplegic patient who had received surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Dong

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the efficacy on postural control of a bridging exercise in order to suggest a pertinent procedure for the bridging exercise. [Subject] One poststroke hemiplegic patient who had received surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis participated in this study [Methods] A reverse ABAB single-case experimental design was used. To assess postural control, foot pressure and the stability limit test were evalulated once a week a total of 4 times during the intervention period. [Results] Noticeable improvement in the distribution of foot pressure and increased stability limit were shown after performing the bridging exercise supervised by a physical therapist. [Conclusion] Bridging exercise on a plinth is effective at balancing body weight-bearing and resulted in the patient putting her weight on both feet evenly and in both the anterior and posterior directions. PMID:25995605

  6. Treatment of pathologic spinal fractures with combined radiofrequency ablation and balloon kyphoplasty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pavlos Katonis; Dritan Pasku; Kalliopi Alpantaki; Artan Bano; George Tzanakakis; Apostolos Karantanas

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In oncologic patients with metastatic spinal disease, the ideal treatment should be well tolerated, relieve the pain, and preserve or restore the neurological function. The combination of fluoroscopic guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and kyphoplasty may fulfill these criteria. METHODS: We describe three pathological vertebral fractures treated with a combination of fluoroscopic guided RFA and kyphoplasty in one session: a

  7. Spinal manipulation compared with back school and with individually delivered physiotherapy for the treatment of chronic low back pain: a randomized trial with one-year follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesca Cecchi; Raffaello Molino-Lova; Massimiliano Chiti; Guido Pasquini; Anita Paperini; Andrea A Conti; Claudio Macchi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare spinal manipulation, back school and individual physiotherapy in the treatment of chronic low back pain.Design: Randomized trial, 12-month follow-up.Setting: Outpatient rehabilitation department.Participants: 210 patients with chronic, non-specific low back pain, 140\\/210 women, age 59 ± 14 years.Interventions: Back school and individual physiotherapy scheduled 15 1-hour-sessions for 3 weeks. Back school included: group exercise, education\\/ ergonomics; individual physiotherapy:

  8. Totally extradural spinal en plaque meningiomas – Diagnostic dilemmas and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Savardekar, Amey; Chatterjee, Debarshi; Chatterjee, Debajyoti; Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Mohindra, Sandeep; Salunke, Pravin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Meningiomas are the second most common intraspinal tumors, constituting ~25% of all intraspinal tumors; however, in the context of extradural spinal lesions, the diagnosis of meningioma is an uncommon one. Purely extradural spinal meningiomas, especially of the en plaque variety, frequently mimic metastatic disease and may result in inadequate therapy. Case Description: We report two cases of totally extradural en-plaque meningiomas of the spine, one each in the cervical and dorsal spine. We present the significant diagnostic dilemmas posed by these cases and discuss the pathogenesis, treatment strategies, and long-term behavior of these uncommon lesions. Conclusion: Attention needs to be drawn to this dangerous preoperative and intraoperative misinterpretation. Intraoperative histopathology support for correct identification, gross total resection at surgery, inclusion of a durotomy to rule out intradural extension, and long-term follow-up are cornerstones for successful management of totally extradural en plaque spinal meningiomas. PMID:25289148

  9. Topiramate Treatment Is Neuroprotective and Reduces Oligodendrocyte Loss after Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gensel, John C.; Tovar, C. Amy; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Micheal S.

    2012-01-01

    Excess glutamate release and associated neurotoxicity contributes to cell death after spinal cord injury (SCI). Indeed, delayed administration of glutamate receptor antagonists after SCI in rodents improves tissue sparing and functional recovery. Despite their therapeutic potential, most glutamate receptor antagonists have detrimental side effects and have largely failed clinical trials. Topiramate is an AMPA-specific, glutamate receptor antagonists that is FDA-approved to treat CNS disorders. In the current study we tested whether topiramate treatment is neuroprotective after cervical contusion injury in rats. We report that topiramate, delivered 15-minutes after SCI, increases tissue sparing and preserves oligodendrocytes and neurons when compared to vehicle treatment. In addition, topiramate is more effective than the AMPA-receptor antagonist, NBQX. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report documenting a neuroprotective effect of topiramate treatment after spinal cord injury. PMID:22428066

  10. Minimally invasive surgery through endoscopic laminotomy and foraminotomy for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Polikandriotis, John A.; Hudak, Elizabeth M.; Perry, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common cause of radicular and generalized back pain among older adults. Endoscopic minimally invasive surgery, in contrast to open decompression, may provide the opportunity for a less invasive surgical intervention. Thus, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety (operative complications, estimated blood loss, operative room time) and effectiveness (pre- versus postoperative level of disability and pain severity) of minimally invasive surgery using endoscopic laminotomy and foraminotomy among a large sample of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods This study is composed of 320 consecutive patients with lumbar spinal stenosis who underwent posterior lumbar laminotomy and foraminotomy between 2008 and 2011. Outcome measures consisted of perioperative complications, estimated blood loss, operative room time, level of disability, and pain severity. Pain severity and level of disability were prospectively analyzed to an average of 18 months (12–36 months) post-surgery. Results There was an average estimated blood loss of 39.3 cc and a mean operative room time of 74 min. Seven patients experienced minor operative complications. All patients were discharged the same day as surgery and reported a significantly lower level of disability (p = 0.00) and pain severity (p = 0.00) postoperative compared to preoperative. Conclusions Minimally invasive surgery using endoscopy for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis has a short operative time, a low operative complication rate, and minimal estimated blood loss. This study also indicates that MIS for the treatment of LSS can significantly reduce pain and disability level. Thus, minimally invasive surgery using endoscopic laminotomy and foraminotomy appears to be a safe and effective alternative surgical treatment for open decompression surgery in adult patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:24403742

  11. Spinal cord contusion

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result. PMID:25206890

  12. Early diagnosis and treatment of spinal epidural metastasis in breast cancer: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Boogerd, W; van der Sande, J J; Kröger, R

    1992-01-01

    This prospective study evaluated the usefulness of myelography in breast cancer patients who present with radiculopathy or myelopathy. A total of 124 consecutive myelograms were performed in 100 patients. Epidural metastasis (EM) was diagnosed in 67 myelograms (54%). Multiple epidural metastases were diagnosed in 15 (22%) of those, resulting in a total of 87 epidural lesions. A complete block was found in 13 EM (15%) and an incomplete block in 14 EM (16%). Clinical data could not predict the site of EM in 29 cases (33%). Fifteen asymptomatic EM were detected in myelograms with multiple EM. Plain radiographs were of no value in determining the site of EM in 29 cases (33%), including 13 cases (15%) without vertebral metastasis at the site of EM. Treatment consisted of radiotherapy (RT) with or without systemic treatment in 52 cases (80%), systemic treatment alone in 11 cases (17%) and surgery in two patients (3%). Clinical improvement was noticed in 72%, no change in 13%, and deterioration in 15%. No difference in response was noticed between RT and systemic therapy. Before treatment 21% and after treatment 15% of the patients could not walk. The one year survival was 42%. The ambulatory status at presentation was the most important prognostic factor. Examination of the spinal fluid, obtained at myelography, disclosed meningeal carcinomatosis in 9% of the patients. Imaging of the whole spinal canal with cytological examination of the spinal fluid is recommended in breast cancer patients suspected of epidural tumour with features of radiculopathy or myelopathy, irrespective of further clinical data and plain spinal radiographs. PMID:1479399

  13. No effect of arm-crank exercise on diaphragmatic fatigue or ventilatory constraint in Paralympic athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Bryan J; West, Christopher R; Romer, Lee M

    2010-08-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) results in a decrease in the capacity of the lungs and chest wall for pressure, volume, and airflow generation. We asked whether such impairments might increase the potential for exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue and mechanical ventilatory constraint in this population. Seven Paralympic wheelchair rugby players (mean + or - SD peak oxygen uptake = 16.9 + or - 4.9 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) with traumatic CSCI (C(5)-C(7)) performed arm-crank exercise to the limit of tolerance at 90% of their predetermined peak work rate. Diaphragm function was assessed before and 15 and 30 min after exercise by measuring the twitch transdiaphragmatic pressure (P(di,tw)) response to bilateral anterolateral magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves. Ventilatory constraint was assessed by measuring the tidal flow volume responses to exercise in relation to the maximal flow volume envelope. P(di,tw) was not different from baseline at any time after exercise (unpotentiated P(di,tw) = 19.3 + or - 5.6 cmH(2)O at baseline, 19.8 + or - 5.0 cmH(2)O at 15 min after exercise, and 19.4 + or - 5.7 cmH(2)O at 30 min after exercise; P = 0.16). During exercise, there was a sudden, sustained rise in operating lung volumes and an eightfold increase in the work of breathing. However, only two subjects showed expiratory flow limitation, and there was substantial capacity to increase both flow and volume (<50% of maximal breathing reserve). In conclusion, highly trained athletes with CSCI do not develop exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue and rarely reach mechanical ventilatory constraint. PMID:20489038

  14. Contemporary treatment with radiosurgery for spine metastasis and spinal cord compression in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hannah; Stessin, Alexander; Gutman, Fred; Rosiello, Arthur; Davis, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    With the progress of image-guided localization, body immobilization system, and computerized delivery of intensity-modulated radiation delivery, it became possible to perform spine radiosurgery. The next question is how to translate the high technology treatment to the clinical application. Clinical trials have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of spine radiosurgery and efficacy of the treatment in the setting of spine metastasis, leading to the randomized trials by a cooperative group. Radiosurgery has also demonstrated its efficacy to decompress the spinal cord compression in selected group of patients. The experience indicates that spine radiosurgery has a potential to change the clinical practice in the management of spine metastasis and spinal cord compression. PMID:25874172

  15. Development and treatment of spinal deformity in patients with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I

    2010-01-01

    Scoliosis is a common deformity in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. This is usually associated with pelvic obliquity due to extension of the curve to the sacrum. Sagittal plane deformity is less common and often develops along with scoliosis. Spinal deformity in patients with severe neurological handicaps can affect their ability to sit and cause significant back pain or pain due to rib impingement against the elevated side of the pelvis on the concavity of the curvature. Surgical correction followed by spinal arthrodesis is indicated in patients with progressive deformities which interfere with their level of function and quality of life. Spinal deformity correction is a major task in children with multiple medical co-morbidities and can be associated with a high risk of complications including death. A well-coordinated multidisciplinary approach is required in the assessment and treatment of this group of patients with the aim to minimize the complication rate and secure a satisfactory surgical outcome. Good knowledge of the surgical and instrumentation techniques, as well as the principles of management is needed to achieve optimum correction of the deformity and balancing of the spine and pelvis. Spinal fusion has a well-documented positive impact even in children with quadriplegia or total body involvement and is the only surgical procedure which has such a high satisfaction rate among parents and caregivers. PMID:20419001

  16. Treatment of patients with spinal cord lesions in Germany 1996 - State of the art

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F-W Meinecke; G Exner

    1997-01-01

    Modern treatment of sufferers from spinal cord lesions according to the guidelines elaborated by Sir Ludwig Guttmann in the UK started in specialised centres in Germany some 45 years ago. At the present time the incidence is 18 cases\\/1 million\\/year traumatic and non traumatic. Exact figures are available since 20 years ago. Twenty-one appropriate centres with altogether 1071 beds are

  17. Anti-CD11d monoclonal antibody treatment for rat spinal cord compression injury.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Andres; Marcillo, Alexander; Frydel, Beata; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Bramlett, Helen M; Dietrich, W Dalton

    2012-02-01

    This study was initiated due to an NIH "Facilities of Research-Spinal Cord Injury" contract to support independent replication of published studies. Transient blockage of the CD11d/CD18 integrin has been reported to reduce secondary neuronal damage as well as to improve functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. The purpose of this study was to determine whether treatment with an anti-CD11d monoclonal antibody (mAb) would improve motor performance, reduce pain and histopathological damage in animals following clip-compression injury as reported. Adult male Wistar rats (250g) were anesthetized with isoflurane, and the T12 spinal cord exposed by T10 and T11 dorsal laminectomies followed by a 60s period of clip compression utilizing a 35g clip. Control animals received an isotype-matched irrelevant antibody (1B7) while the treated group received the anti-CD11d mAb (217L; 1.0mg/kg) systemically. Open-field locomotion and sensory function were assessed and animals were perfusion-fixed at twelve weeks after injury for quantitative histopathological analysis. As compared to 1B7, 217L treated animals showed an overall non-significant trend to better motor recovery. All animals showed chronic mechanical allodynia and anti-CD11d mAb treatment did not significantly prevent its development. Histopathological analysis demonstrated severe injury to gray and white matter after compression with a non-significant trend in anti-CD11d protection compared to control animals for preserved myelin. Although positive effects with the anti-CD11d mAb treatment have been reported after compressive SCI, it is suggested that this potential treatment requires further investigation before clinical trials in spinal cord injured patients are implemented. PMID:21145887

  18. Chronic neuropathic pain management in spinal cord injury patients. What is the efficacy of pharmacological treatments with a general mode of

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Title Chronic neuropathic pain management in spinal cord injury patients. What is the efficacy of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) pain remains challenging despite new available drugs. Such treatment in SCI pain. Key words spinal cord injury pain ­ neuropathic pain ­ pregabalin ­

  19. What Is Spinal Stenosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Public 3 One type of spinal stenosis, cauda equine syndrome, is very serious. This type occurs when ... spinal stenosis, such treatments include chiropractic treatment and acupuncture. More research is needed on the value of ...

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of spinal cord injuries: A review

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Veeravalli, Krishna Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H

    2014-01-01

    With technological advances in basic research, the intricate mechanism of secondary delayed spinal cord injury (SCI) continues to unravel at a rapid pace. However, despite our deeper understanding of the molecular changes occurring after initial insult to the spinal cord, the cure for paralysis remains elusive. Current treatment of SCI is limited to early administration of high dose steroids to mitigate the harmful effect of cord edema that occurs after SCI and to reduce the cascade of secondary delayed SCI. Recent evident-based clinical studies have cast doubt on the clinical benefit of steroids in SCI and intense focus on stem cell-based therapy has yielded some encouraging results. An array of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from various sources with novel and promising strategies are being developed to improve function after SCI. In this review, we briefly discuss the pathophysiology of spinal cord injuries and characteristics and the potential sources of MSCs that can be used in the treatment of SCI. We will discuss the progress of MSCs application in research, focusing on the neuroprotective properties of MSCs. Finally, we will discuss the results from preclinical and clinical trials involving stem cell-based therapy in SCI. PMID:24772239

  1. Late spinal cord metastasis of fourth ventricle ependymoma appeared nineteen years after the initial treatment.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Hidenobu; Yamakawa, Yuzo; Kawano, Hirokazu; Shimao, Yoshiya; Hayashi, Tohru

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord dissemination (metastasis) of a fourth ventricle ependymoma more than ten years after surgical resection is extremely rare. In this report, we present an unusual case of a fourth ventricle ependymoma with metastasis to the thoracic spinal cord 19 years after the initial therapy, but without local recurrence. A 37 year-old patient underwent gross total resection of a fourth ventricle ependymoma and postoperative radiation therapy to the posterior fossa. Computed tomography (CT) scanning and/or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed during follow up examinations, conducted annually for ten years after the therapy, revealed no evidence of local tumor recurrence. However, 19 years after the initial treatment, the patient complained of back pain and gait disturbances. MR imaging revealed an intradural extramedullary tumor at the Th2-5 levels. MR imaging of the brain revealed no local tumor recurrence or intracranial tumor dissemination. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology revealed no presence of tumor cells. Total resection of the spinal cord tumor was performed, and the tumor was diagnosed as an ependymoma. We describe the clinical features of this rare lesion and particularly emphasize the need for long-term follow up, for more than ten years after the initial treatment, in patients with fourth ventricle ependymoma. PMID:19629395

  2. Endoscopic laminoforaminoplasty success rates for treatment of foraminal spinal stenosis: report on sixty-four cases

    PubMed Central

    Haufe, Scott M.W.; Mork, Anthony R.; Pyne, Morgan A.; Baker, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Foraminal stenosis is an important cause of radicular and generalized back pain. In patients who do not respond to conservative interventions, endoscopic spinal surgery provides similar results to open surgical approaches with lower rates of complication, postoperative pain, and shorter duration of hospital stay. Methods: We performed a prospective, open, uncontrolled trial of 64 patients to evaluate endoscopic laminoforaminoplasty for the treatment of refractory foraminal stenosis. Results: Fifty-nine percent of patients had at least 75% improvement in Oswestry Disability Index (Oswestry) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores. All patients were discharged the day of surgery. Dural leaks occurred in two patients, which were repaired intraoperatively. No other adverse events occurred. Conclusions: Endoscopic laminoforaminoplasty appears to be a safe alternative to open decompression in patients with spinal foraminal stenosis; additional controlled trials are warranted. PMID:19343111

  3. Hypofractionated radiotherapy boost for dose escalation as a treatment option for high-grade spinal cord astrocytic tumor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norio Katoh; Hiroki Shirato; Hidefumi Aoyama; Rikiya Onimaru; Keishiro Suzuki; Kazutoshi Hida; Kazuo Miyasaka; Yoshinobu Iwasaki

    2006-01-01

    Summary\\u000a Purpose  To retrospectively analyze the outcome of post-operative radiotherapy for spinal cord glioma with the emphasis on the hypofractionated\\u000a radiotherapy boost for dose escalation as a treatment option for high-grade spinal cord astrocytic tumors.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Forty-one patients with spinal cord glioma received post-operative radiotherapy between 1979 and 2003. The median age was\\u000a 34 years (range, 10–66 years). Median follow-up was 49 months

  4. The effects of upper body exercise on the physical capacity of people with a spinal cord injury: a systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda Valent; Annet Dallmeijer; Han Houdijk; Eelkje Talsma; Luc van der Woude

    2007-01-01

    Objective : To describe the effects of upper body training on the physical capacity of people with a spinal cord injury. Data sources : The databases of PubMed, CINAHL, Sport Discus and Cochrane were searched from 1970 to May 2006. Review methods : The keywords `spinal cord injury', `paraplegia', `tetraplegia' and `quadriplegia' were used in combination with `training'. The methodological

  5. Direct decompressive surgical resection in the treatment of spinal cord compression caused by metastatic cancer: a randomised trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roy A Patchell; Phillip A Tibbs; William F Regine; Richard Payne; Stephen Saris; Richard J Kryscio; Mohammed Mohiuddin; Byron Young

    2005-01-01

    Summary Background The standard treatment for spinal cord compression caused by metastatic cancer is corticosteroids and radiotherapy. The role of surgery has not been established. We assessed the efficacy of direct decompressive surgery. Methods In this randomised, multi-institutional, non-blinded trial, we randomly assigned patients with spinal cord compression caused by metastatic cancer to either surgery followed by radiotherapy (n=50) or

  6. Intraspinal neuroblastoma: Treatment options and neurological outcome of spinal cord compression

    PubMed Central

    FAWZY, MOHAMED; EL-BELTAGY, MOHAMED; SHAFEI, MAGED EL; ZAGHLOUL, MOHAMED SAAD; KINAAI, NAGLAA AL; REFAAT, AMAL; AZMY, SARAH

    2015-01-01

    Malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) is a common complication of cancer. Paraspinal neuroblastoma (NB) in the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic regions may extend into the neural foramina causing compression of nerve roots and even the spinal cord. The prompt initiation of specific treatment can improve the neurological outcome. The aim of the present study was to review the clinical features, the management received and the factors that may affect the outcome of patients with MSCC caused by paraspinal NB. During a period between July 2007 and December 2012, a total of 576 NB patients were treated at the Children’s Cancer Hospital (Cairo, Egypt). Intraspinal disease extension was present in 51 patients (9%). The children with intraspinal disease extension were reviewed for disease pattern, neurological manifestations and treatment outcome. Children with intraspinal disease extension had an equal male to female ratio (1:1), and approximately two-thirds of patients (34/51) had a clinically manifested cord compression. The duration of neurological manifestations was >4 weeks in 58.8% (20/34) of symptomatic patients and ?4 weeks in 41.2% (14/34). Subsequent to starting treatment, neurological manifestations showed a complete recovery in 16 patients (47.1%), partial in 11 (32.4%), and stationary course was found in 7 (20.6%). Manifestations of ?4 weeks in duration carried an improved outcome compared with longer time compression, with a complete recovery in 78.6%, versus 25% for patients with a longer symptom duration (P=0.008). The upfront treatment, patient age and site of the primary tumor did not significantly affect the neurological outcome. Spinal cord compression in NB can be effectively managed with upfront chemotherapy. Initial surgical decompression should be reserved for benign variants only, including ganglioneuroma. Neurological manifestations of <4 weeks duration upon presentation are usually reversible. PMID:25624912

  7. Prevention of deep venous thrombosis in patients with acute spinal cord injuries: use of rotating treatment tables

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.M.; Gonzalez, M.; Gentili, A.; Eismont, F.; Green, B.A.

    1987-05-01

    A randomized clinical trial of 15 patients with acute spinal cord injuries was performed to test the hypothesis that rotating treatment tables prevent deep venous thrombosis in this population. Four of 5 control (nonrotated) patients developed distal and proximal thrombi, assessed by /sup 125/I fibrinogen leg scans and impedance plethysmography. In comparison, only 1 of 10 treated (rotated) patients developed both distal and proximal thrombosis. These results suggest but do not prove that rotating treatment tables prevent the development of proximal deep venous thrombosis in spinal cord-injured patients. Larger clinical trials are needed to confirm this heretofore undocumented benefit of rotating treatment tables.

  8. The objective evaluation of effectiveness of manual treatment of spinal function disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Szulc, Pawe?; Lewandowski, Jacek; Boch-Kmieciak, Joanna; Berski, Pawe?; Matusiak, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of this paper is the evaluation of effectiveness of manual therapy in the treatment of functional disturbances of the spine. Material/Methods The study subjects were 40 persons aged 45–60 years, in whom degenerative changes in intervertebral discs and physical limitations within the spine were found (NMR), which were manifested as pain. Subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups of 20 persons each. The first group went on a monthly rehabilitation tour, where the manual therapy methods were applied. The second group was treated by means of physical methods. In order to verify the results of effectiveness of the therapies, the examination of the sectional mobility and the evaluation of the spinal curvatures before and after the completion of the therapy were made by means of a tensiometric electrogoniometer. Results The percentage differences in significance result from the lower value of parameter t1 in the group of persons treated physically. The dynamics of changes in the parameters in the sectional mobility in both tested groups was highest in the cervical and lumbar spine. The manually treated group had greater dynamics of changes in functional parameters of the spine. Conclusions Manual therapy is an effective method for treatment of functional changes and early structural changes within the spine, and may be used as supplementary therapy in relation to the standard model of treatment of spinal pain. PMID:22534712

  9. Peptide-modified inverted colloidal crystal scaffolds with bone marrow stromal cells in the treatment for spinal cord injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jen-Tsung Yang; Yung-Chih Kuo; Keng-Hsien Chiu

    2011-01-01

    Inverted colloidal crystal (ICC) scaffolds grafted with two defined peptides, CSRARKQAASIKVAVSADR and CDPGYIGSR, and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were applied to the treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI) of model rats. The results revealed that the neuronal survival, characterized by the Nissl staining, in the injured thoracic spine at T10 decreased drastically after SCI without treatment over 4 weeks.

  10. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePLUS

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  11. Effects of Bladder Function by Early Tamsulosin Treatment in a Spinal Cord Injury Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang Keun; Lee, Moon Young; Han, Dong Yeop; Jung, Hee Jong

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of early tamsulosin treatment on changes in bladder characteristics after a spinal cord injury. Methods We divided 45 rats into three groups: the control (CON) group, the spinal cord injury (SCI) group, and the SCI+tamsulosin treatment (SCI+TAM) group. Spinal cord transection was performed in the SCI and SCI+TAM groups. Tamsulosin was injected for 7 days in the SCI+TAM group. Intravesical and intra-abdominal catheters were implanted before cord injury. Basal pressure (BP), maximal vesical pressure (MVP), micturition volume (MV), and voiding interval time (VIT) were measured at 7 days after SCI. The bladder was then removed and used for an in vitro organ bath study and Western blot analysis. The percentage changes in contractility from baseline after acetylcholine alone, pretreatment with a muscarinic 2 (M2) receptor blocker (AQ-RA741), and pretreatment with a M3 receptor blocker (4-DAMP) were compared among the groups. Western blot analyses were performed to determine expression levels of pERK1/2 and rho-kinase. Results In cystometry, MVP, BP, MV, and VIT showed changes in the SCI and SCI+TAM groups versus the CON group (p<0.05). In the organ bath study, acetylcholine-induced contractility in the three groups differed significantly (p<0.05). Additionally, acetylcholine-induced contractility with 4-DAMP pretreatment was reduced significantly in the SCI+TAM group versus the SCI group. In Western blotting, pERK1/2 expression was stronger (p<0.05) and rho-kinase expression was weaker in the SCI+TAM group than the SCI group (p<0.05). Conclusion These results suggest that the bladder contraction due to acetylcholine after SCI can be decreased by tamsulosin in the acute stage and this involves changes in pERK1/2 and rho-kinase. PMID:25229021

  12. Cervical spinal cord stimulation treatment of deafferentation pain from brachial plexus avulsion injury complicated by complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang Chien, George C; Candido, Kenneth D; Saeed, Kashif; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2014-08-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion is a rare and debilitating condition frequently associated with severe, intractable neuropathic pain. Interventional treatment modalities include dorsal root entry zone lesioning, stellate ganglion blockade, and neuromodulation such as spinal cord stimulation. We present a case of a 42-year-old woman with a traumatic left upper extremity brachial plexus avulsion injury after a motor vehicle accident and treatment of deafferentation pain complicated by complex regional pain syndrome type II. Previous unsuccessful interventions included repeated stellate ganglion blocks, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and opioid medication. After a successful trial of cervical spinal cord stimulator lead placement, she went on to an uneventful permanent implantation procedure. Spinal cord stimulation is an effective treatment for deafferentation pain and complex regional pain syndrome type II secondary to brachial plexopathy refractory to pharmacotherapy and conventional interventional attempts to modulate pain. PMID:25611136

  13. Spinal cord stimulation

    MedlinePLUS

    Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses a mild electric current to block nerve impulses ... stretched into the space on top of your spinal cord. These wires will be connected to a small ...

  14. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  15. Post-Injury Estrogen Treatment of Chronic Spinal Cord Injury Improves Locomotor Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sribnick, Eric A.; Samantaray, Supriti; Das, Arabinda; Smith, Joshua; Matzelle, D. Denise; Ray, Swapan K.; Banik, Naren L.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes loss of neurological function and, depending on serverity, may cause paralysis. The only recommended pharmacotherapy for the treatment of SCI is high-dose methylprednisolone and its use is controversial. We have previously shown that estrogen treatment attenuated cell death, axonal and myelin damage, calpain and caspase activities, and inflammation in acute SCI. The aim of this study was to examine whether post-treatment of SCI with estrogen would improve locomotor function by protecting cells and axons and reducing inflammation during chronic phase following injury. Moderately severe injury (40 g.cm force) was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats following laminectomy at T10. Three groups of animals were used: sham (laminectomy only), vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide or DMSO) treated injury group, and estrogen treated injury group. Animals were treated with 4 mg/kg estrogen at 15 min and 24 h post-injury followed by 2 mg/kg estrogen daily for the next 5 days. Following treatment, animals were sacrificed at the end of 6 weeks following injury, and 1-cm segments of spinal cord (lesion, rostral to lesion, and caudal to lesion) were removed for biochemical analyses. Estrogen treatment reduced COX-2 activity, blocked NF-?B translocation, prevented glial reactivity, attenuated neuron death, inhibited activation and activity of calpain and caspase-3, decreased axonal damage, reduced myelin loss in the lesion and penumbra, and improved locomotor function when compared with vehicle treated animals. These findings suggest that estrogen may be useful as a promising therapeutic agent for prevention of damage and improvement of locomotor function in chronic SCI. PMID:20091771

  16. Sustained release of estrogens from PEGylated nanoparticles for treatment of secondary spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, John

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition which causes neurological damage and can result in paralysis. SCI results in immediate mechanical damage to the spinal cord, but secondary injuries due to inflammation, oxidative damage, and activated biochemical pathways leading to apoptosis exacerbate the injury. The only currently available treatment, methylprednisolone, is controversial because there is no convincing data to support its therapeutic efficacy for SCI treatment. In the absence of an effective SCI treatment option, 17beta-estradiol has gained significant attention for its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic abilities, all events associated with secondary. Sadly, 17beta-estradiol is associated with systemic adverse effects preclude the use of free estrogen even for local administration due to short drug half-life in the body. Biodegradable nanoparticles can be used to increase half-life after local administration and to bestow sustained release. Sustained release using PEGylated biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles constructed from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) will endow a consistent, low, but effective dose to be delivered locally. This will limit systemic effects due to local administration and low dose, sustained release. PLGA was chosen because it has been used extensively for sustained release, and has a record of safety in humans. Here, we show the in vitro efficacy of PEGylated nanoparticles loaded with 17beta-estradiol for treatment of secondary SCI. We achieved a high loading efficiency and controlled release from the particles over a several day therapeutic window. The particles also show neuroprotection in two in vitro cell culture models. Both the dose and pretreatment time with nanoparticles was evaluated in an effort to translate the treatment into an animal model for further study.

  17. Exercise, Behavioral Therapy Reduce Menopausal Symptoms Caused by Breast Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Women with breast cancer who were suffering from treatment-related menopausal symptoms experienced symptom relief with cognitive behavioral therapy, physical exercise, or both, according to a Dutch study published October 8, 2012, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  18. Weight-Loss Surgery May Beat Diet, Exercise as Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    Weight-Loss Surgery May Beat Diet, Exercise as Type 2 Diabetes Treatment After procedure, many patients no longer ... News) -- In a small study of obese patients, weight-loss surgery was better at keeping type 2 diabetes ...

  19. Treatment of a spinal aneurysmal bone cyst using combined image-guided cryoablation and cementoplasty.

    PubMed

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Too, Chow Wei; Garnon, Julien; Steib, Jean-Paul; Gangi, Afshin

    2015-02-01

    The authors describe the case of a 6.6-cm symptomatic spinal aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) in a 17-year-old athlete treated percutaneously. Surgical treatment was not considered as the first option owing to its invasiveness and associated morbidity. CT-guided cryoablation of the expansile part of the ABC was performed for tumour shrinkage and nerve decompression. Thermal insulation, temperature monitoring and functional control/electrostimulation of the neural structures at risk were applied. Finally, the bony defect was cemented. No complications occurred during the procedure. Complete resolution of the ABC on imaging and clinical improvement were achieved. Percutaneous cryoablation should be considered as an alternative treatment option, especially when tumour size reduction is desired. PMID:25091121

  20. Salmon fibrin treatment of spinal cord injury promotes functional recovery and density of serotonergic innervation

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Kelli G.; Dickson, Amanda R.; Marchenko, Steve A.; Yee, Kelly M.; Emery, Pauline N.; Laidmåe, Ivo; Uibo, Raivo; Sawyer, Evelyn S.; Steward, Oswald; Flanagan, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    The neural degeneration caused by spinal cord injury leaves a cavity at the injury site that greatly inhibits repair. One approach to promoting repair is to fill the cavity with a scaffold to limit further damage and encourage regrowth. Injectable materials are advantageous scaffolds because they can be placed as a liquid in the lesion site then form a solid in vivo that precisely matches the contours of the lesion. Fibrin is one type of injectable scaffold, but risk of infection from blood borne pathogens has limited its use. We investigated the potential utility of salmon fibrin as an injectable scaffold to treat spinal cord injury since it lacks mammalian infectious agents and encourages greater neuronal extension in vitro than mammalian fibrin or Matrigel®, another injectable material. Female rats received a T9 dorsal hemisection injury and were treated with either salmon or human fibrin at the time of injury while a third group served as untreated controls. Locomotor function was assessed using the BBB scale, bladder function was analyzed by measuring residual urine, and sensory responses were tested by mechanical stimulation (von Frey hairs). Histological analyses quantified the glial scar, lesion volume, and serotonergic fiber density. Rats that received salmon fibrin exhibited significantly improved recovery of both locomotor and bladder function and a greater density of serotonergic innervation caudal to the lesion site without exacerbation of pain. Rats treated with salmon fibrin also exhibited less autophagia than those treated with human fibrin, potentially pointing to amelioration of sensory dysfunction. Glial scar formation and lesion size did not differ significantly among groups. The pattern and timing of salmon fibrin’s effects suggest that it acts on neuronal populations but not by stimulating long tract regeneration. Salmon fibrin clearly has properties distinct from those of mammalian fibrin and is a beneficial injectable scaffold for treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:22414309

  1. Astrocytic and Vascular Remodeling in the Injured Adult Rat Spinal Cord after Chondroitinase ABC Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Milbreta, Ulla; von Boxberg, Ysander; Mailly, Philippe; Nothias, Fatiha

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Upregulation of extracellular chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) is a primary cause for the failure of axons to regenerate after spinal cord injury (SCI), and the beneficial effect of their degradation by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) is widely documented. Little is known, however, about the effect of ChABC treatment on astrogliosis and revascularization, two important factors influencing axon regrowth. This was investigated in the present study. Immediately after a spinal cord hemisection at thoracic level 8–9, we injected ChABC intrathecally at the sacral level, repeated three times until 10 days post-injury. Our results show an effective cleavage of CSPG glycosaminoglycan chains and stimulation of axonal remodeling within the injury site, accompanied by an extended period of astrocyte remodeling (up to 4 weeks). Interestingly, ChABC treatment favored an orientation of astrocytic processes directed toward the injury, in close association with axons at the lesion entry zone, suggesting a correlation between axon and astrocyte remodeling. Further, during the first weeks post-injury, ChABC treatment affected the morphology of laminin-positive blood vessel basement membranes and vessel-independent laminin deposits: hypertrophied blood vessels with detached or duplicated basement membrane were more numerous than in lesioned untreated animals. In contrast, at later time points, laminin expression increased and became more directly associated with newly formed blood vessels, the size of which tended to be closer to that found in intact tissue. Our data reinforce the idea that ChABC injection in combination with other synergistic treatments is a promising therapeutic strategy for SCI repair. PMID:24380419

  2. Postinjury estrogen treatment of chronic spinal cord injury improves locomotor function in rats.

    PubMed

    Sribnick, Eric A; Samantaray, Supriti; Das, Arabinda; Smith, Joshua; Matzelle, D Denise; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2010-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes loss of neurological function and, depending on serverity, may cause paralysis. The only recommended pharmacotherapy for the treatment of SCI is high-dose methylprednisolone, and its use is controversial. We have previously shown that estrogen treatment attenuated cell death, axonal and myelin damage, calpain and caspase activities, and inflammation in acute SCI. The aim of this study was to examine whether posttreatment of SCI with estrogen would improve locomotor function by protecting cells and axons and reducing inflammation during the chronic phase following injury. Moderately severe injury (40 g . cm force) was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats following laminectomy at T10. Three groups of animals were used: sham (laminectomy only), vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO)-treated injury group, and estrogen-treated injury group. Animals were treated with 4 mg/kg estrogen at 15 min and 24 hr postnjury, followed by 2 mg/kg estrogen daily for the next 5 days. After treatment, animals were sacrificed at the end of 6 weeks following injury, and 1-cm segments of spinal cord (lesion, rostral to lesion, and caudal to lesion) were removed for biochemical analyses. Estrogen treatment reduced COX-2 activity, blocked nuclear factor-kappaB translocation, prevented glial reactivity, attenuated neuron death, inhibited activation and activity of calpain and caspase-3, decreased axonal damage, reduced myelin loss in the lesion and penumbra, and improved locomotor function compared with vehicle-treated animals. These findings suggest that estrogen may be useful as a promising therapeutic agent for prevention of damage and improvement of locomotor function in chronic SCI. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20091771

  3. Outcomes and Treatment of Lumbosacral Spinal Tuberculosis: A Retrospective Study of 53 Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Maolin; Wang, Kun; Fowdur, Mitra; Wu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Study Strategy A retrospective clinic study. Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of conservative and surgical treatment for lumbosacral tuberculosis. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 53 patients with lumbosacral tuberculosis who were treated in our institution between January 2005 and January 2011. There were 29 males and 24 females with average ages of 37.53 ± 17.28 years (range 6–72 years). 11 patients were given only anti-TB drugs; the remainder underwent anterior debridement, interbody fusion with and without instrumentation, or one-stage anterior debridement combined with posterior instrumentation. Outcome data for these patients included neurologic status, lumbosacral angle, erythrocyte sedimentation rate value(ESR) and C-reactive protein value(CRP) were assessed before and after treatment. Results The mean lumbosacral angles were 23.00°± 2.90°in the conservatively treated patients and 22.36°± 3.92o in the surgically treated patients. At the final follow-up, this had improved to 24.10o ± 2.96°in the conservatively treated patients and 28.13° ± 1.93°in the surgically treated patients (all P < 0.05). There were statistically significant differences before and after treatment in terms of ESR and CRP (all P < 0.05). All patients achieved bone fusion. The mean follow-up period was 32.34 ± 8.13 months (range 18 to 55 months). The neurological deficit did not worsen in any of the patients. Conclusions It has been proven that conservative and surgical treatments are safe and effective and produce good clinical outcomes for patients with lumbosacral tuberculosis. The advantages of operation include thoroughness of debridement, decompression of the spinal cord, and adequate spinal stabilization. PMID:26121685

  4. A novel thermoelectric cooling device using Peltier modules for inducing local hypothermia of the spinal cord: the effect of local electrically controlled cooling for the treatment of spinal cord injuries in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Morizane, Kei; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Horiuchi, Hideki; Yamaoka, Gotaro; Hino, Masayuki; Miura, Hiromasa

    2012-03-01

    We developed a novel thermoelectric cooling device using Peltier modules for the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats. The extracorporeal electrically cooling component was attached to the aluminum arched plate which was placed on the surface of the spinal cord after the contusion injury in the 11th thoracic spinal cord. During the hypothermic treatment, rats were awake and could move in the cage. Hind limb motor function, evaluated using a BBB scale, in the hypothermic animals (33°C for 48 h) was significantly higher than that in the normothermic animals from 2 weeks to 8 weeks after the injury. PMID:22192468

  5. Post-trauma Lipitor treatment prevents endothelial dysfunction, facilitates neuroprotection, and promotes locomotor recovery following spinal cord injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ravinder Pannu; Douglas K. Christie; Ernest Barbosa; Inderjit Singh; Avtar K. Singh

    2007-01-01

    We have previously reported neuroprotection in spinal cord injury (SCI) by Lipitor (atorvastatin (AT))-pre-treatment. Though informative, pre-treatment studies find only limited clinical application as trauma occurrence is unpredictable. Therefore, this study investigates the efficacy of AT treat- ment post-SCI. In a rat model of contusion-SCI resulting in complete hindlimb paralysis, AT treatment (5 mg\\/kg; gavage) was begun 2, 4, or

  6. Endovascular treatment of spinal arteriovenous fistula in a young child with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Case report.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Mark J; Nesbit, Gary M; Behrens, Melinda L; Whitaker, Malcolm A; Barnwell, Stanley L; Selden, Nathan R

    2005-11-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia ([HHT] or Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome) can manifest as sudden onset of epistaxis or neurological deficit in a child with characteristic mucocutaneous telangiectasias or as an asymptomatic bruit with or without overlying cutaneous vascular lesions. The authors present a case study of a pediatric patient with HHT in whom a screening computerized tomography (CT) scan of the chest revealed an asymptomatic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the spine. An 18-month-old child with a strong family history of HHT, including fatal central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhage and pulmonary AVMs, presented with a cutaneous telangiectasia of the pinna. The child was subsequently screened for potentially morbid pulmonary and CNS AVMs by using chest CT scanning and brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. A spinal MR image revealed a perimedullary macro-AVF (MAVF) resulting in a large venous varix within the parenchyma of the thoracic spinal cord. A transarterial embolization of the fistula was performed using N-butyl cyanoacrylate and ethiodol. Postembolization angiography confirmed obliteration of the fistula, and MR imaging revealed thrombosis and reduction in size of the venous varix. There were no neurological sequelae due to the treatment. In families with HHT and a high risk of sudden severe morbidity or death from undisclosed pulmonary or CNS AVMs, screening chest CT scanning and CNS MR imaging should be considered. Interdisciplinary teams of neurosurgery and interventional radiology specialists should evaluate and treat such patients by using diagnostic and therapeutic angiography and, if necessary, surgery. PMID:16302622

  7. The effects of exercise on cardiovascular outcomes before, during, and after treatment for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sturgeon, Kathleen M.; Ky, Bonnie; Libonati, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic cardiotoxicity following breast cancer treatment is a significant issue for many patients, as these patients typically face an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Exercise has well established benefits to improve and maintain cardiovascular function across patients with and without CVD. However, there is a dearth of information on the effects of exercise on cardiovascular outcomes in breast cancer patients. While pre-clinical studies support the use of exercise in mitigating cardiotoxicity, only one human study has specifically investigated cardiac function following an exercise intervention during chemotherapy treatment. No significant differences were observed between groups, which high-lights the unidentified role of exercise in altering the risk of cardiotoxicity in breast cancer patients. Issues such as establishing the optimal timing, type, and intensity of an exercise program before, during, or after oncologic treatment for breast cancer are unclear. CVD risk and incidence increase in breast cancer survivors post therapy, and CVD is the number one killer of women in the United States. Thus, there is an increasing need to define the efficacy of exercise as a non-pharmacologic intervention in this growing population. PMID:24337598

  8. History of spinal osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Dennis S; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2014-07-01

    Spinal deformity is one of the oldest known diseases with descriptions documented many of the earliest civilizations. Historical treatments have had little efficacy, especially in adults. However, in the modern era, there has been a rapid expansion of new technologies and surgical techniques aided by advances in supportive care that now allow the spinal surgeon to have powerful tools to correct spinal deformity. In this manuscript, we review the origins of spinal deformity surgery and the development of spinal instrumentation. The focus of the manuscript is to review the relationship of these developments to the implementation of spinal osteotomies for deformity correction. PMID:24390043

  9. Who Will Drop Out & Who Will Drop In, Exercise Adherence in a RCT among Patients Receiving Active Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jingjing; Wenzel, Jennifer; Krumm, Sharon; Griffith, Kathleen; Stewart, Kerry

    2011-01-01

    Background Adherence has significantly affected the efficacy of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) to test exercise interventions. Objective To analyze exercise-related adherence patterns among patients receiving active cancer treatment and to identify factors related to exercise adherence and contamination in both the intervention and control groups. Methods This is a secondary analysis of data from a RCT of a home-based walking intervention for patients receiving active cancer treatment. Hierarchical Poisson regression analysis was used to identify factors related to exercise adherence and exercise contamination in the exercise intervention and control groups. Results A total of 126 patients finished the study. Exercise adherence rate in the intervention group was 32.35%, while exercise contamination rate in the control group was 12.07%. Independent predictors of adherence for the exercise group were baseline physical fitness, pre-treatment fatigue level, treatment-related mood disturbance, and marital status (p < 0.01); past exercise history significantly predicted exercise contamination (p < 0.00) in the control group. Conclusions Adherence remains an issue in an exercise RCT among patients on active cancer treatment. Adherence is related to symptom, physical function, and exercise history. Implications for Practice Exercise researchers should consider stratifying samples based on pre-treatment variables found to be significantly associated with outcome variables in this study to reduce confounding effects. Oncology clinicians can use the study findings to appropriately tailor strategies to encourage exercise adherence among patients receiving active cancer treatment so that these patients can receive the known benefits of exercise. PMID:22228393

  10. Treatment and prognosis of patients with paraplegia or quadriplegia because of metastatic spinal cord compression in prostate cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Nagata; T Ueda; A Komiya; H Suzuki; K Akakura; M Ishihara; T Tobe; T Ichikawa; T Igarashi; H Ito

    2003-01-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is a serious complication of metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). This study retrospectively evaluated patients who presented with paraplegia or quadriplegia because of MSCC of PCa. Of 847 patients with PCa who were treated between 1989 and 1998, 26 (3.1%) demonstrated paraplegia or quadriplegia because of MSCC. Characteristics, treatment efficacy, and prognosis of these patients were

  11. Minocycline Treatment Reduces Delayed Oligodendrocyte Death, Attenuates Axonal Dieback, and Improves Functional Outcome after Spinal Cord Injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. P. Stirling; Kourosh Khodarahmi; Jie Liu; Lowell T. Mcphail; Christopher B. Mcbride; John D. Steeves; Matt S. Ramer; Wolfram Tetzlaff

    2004-01-01

    Minocycline has been demonstrated to be neuroprotective after spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the cellular consequences of minocy- cline treatment on the secondary injury response are poorly understood. We examined the ability of minocycline to reduce oligodendro- cyte apoptosis, microglial\\/macrophage activation, corticospinal tract (CST) dieback, and lesion size and to improve functional outcome after SCI. Adult rats were subjected to

  12. Selective nanovector mediated treatment of activated proinflammatory microglia/macrophages in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Papa, Simonetta; Rossi, Filippo; Ferrari, Raffaele; Mariani, Alessandro; De Paola, Massimiliano; Caron, Ilaria; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Bisighini, Cinzia; Sammali, Eliana; Colombo, Claudio; Gobbi, Marco; Canovi, Mara; Lucchetti, Jacopo; Peviani, Marco; Morbidelli, Massimo; Forloni, Gianluigi; Perale, Giuseppe; Moscatelli, Davide; Veglianese, Pietro

    2013-11-26

    Much evidence shows that acute and chronic inflammation in spinal cord injury (SCI), characterized by immune cell infiltration and release of inflammatory mediators, is implicated in development of the secondary injury phase that occurs after spinal cord trauma and in the worsening of damage. Activation of microglia/macrophages and the associated inflammatory response appears to be a self-propelling mechanism that leads to progressive neurodegeneration and development of persisting pain state. Recent advances in polymer science have provided a huge amount of innovations leading to increased interest for polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) as drug delivery tools to treat SCI. In this study, we tested and evaluated in vitro and in vivo a new drug delivery nanocarrier: minocycline loaded in NPs composed by a polymer based on poly-?-caprolactone and polyethylene glycol. These NPs are able to selectively target and modulate, specifically, the activated proinflammatory microglia/macrophages in subacute progression of the secondary injury in SCI mouse model. After minocycline-NPs treatment, we demonstrate a reduced activation and proliferation of microglia/macrophages around the lesion site and a reduction of cells with round shape phagocytic-like phenotype in favor of a more arborized resting-like phenotype with low CD68 staining. Treatment here proposed limits, up to 15 days tested, the proinflammatory stimulus associated with microglia/macrophage activation. This was demonstrated by reduced expression of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and persistent reduced expression of CD68 in traumatized site. The nanocarrier drug delivery tool developed here shows potential advantages over the conventionally administered anti-inflammatory therapy, maximizing therapeutic efficiency and reducing side effects. PMID:24138479

  13. Exercise as an Adjunct Treatment for Opiate Agonist Treatment: Review of the Current Research and Implementation Strategies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeremiah Weinstock; Heather K. Wadeson; Jaci L. VanHeest

    2012-01-01

    Opiate dependence is a significant public health concern linked to poor quality of life, co-morbid psychiatric disorders, and high costs to society. Current opiate agonist treatments are an effective but limited intervention. Adjunctive interventions could improve and augment opiate agonist treatment outcomes, including drug abstinence, quality of life, and physical health. This article reviews exercise as an adjunctive intervention for

  14. EFFECTIVENESS OF PHYSICAL THERAPIST ADMINISTERED SPINAL MANIPULATION FOR THE TREATMENT OF LOW BACK PAIN: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynski, John J.; Schwieterman, Braun; Columber, Kirby; Knupp, Darren; Shaub, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Background Context: Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent disorder in society that has been associated with increased loss of work time and medical expenses. A common intervention for LBP is spinal manipulation, a technique that is not specific to one scope of practice or profession. Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of physical therapy spinal manipulations for the treatment of patients with low back pain. Methods: A search of the current literature was conducted using PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, Pro Quest Nursing and Allied Health Source, Scopus, and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. Studies were included if each involved: 1) individuals with LBP; 2) spinal manipulations performed by physical therapists compared to any control group that did not receive manipulations; 3) measurable clinical outcomes or efficiency of treatment measures, and 4) randomized control trials. The quality of included articles was determined by two independent authors using the criteria developed and used by the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). Results: Six randomized control trials met the inclusion criteria of this systematic review. The most commonly used outcomes in these studies were some variation of pain rating scales and disability indexes. Notable results included varying degrees of effect sizes favoring physical therapy spinal manipulations and minimal adverse events resulting from this intervention. Additionally, the manipulation group in one study reported statistically significantly less medication use, health care utilization, and lost work time. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this systematic review there is evidence to support the use of spinal manipulation by physical therapists in clinical practice. Physical therapy spinal manipulation appears to be a safe intervention that improves clinical outcomes for patients with low back pain. PMID:23316428

  15. Effects of a Supervised Exercise Intervention on Recovery From Treatment Regimens in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, City C.; Sprod, Lisa K.; Hydock, David S.; Carter, Susan D.; Hayward, Reid; Schneider, Carole M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To investigate the effects of supervised exercise training on cardiopulmonary function and fatigue in cancer survivors undergoing various clinical treatments. Design Pretest and post-test quasiexperimental. Setting Outpatient oncology rehabilitation center. Sample 96 breast cancer survivors undergoing various clinical treatments. Methods Subjects were divided into four groups based on the specific type of clinical treatment: surgery alone (n = 22); surgery and chemotherapy (n = 30); surgery and radiation (n = 17); and surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation (n = 27). Following a comprehensive screening and medical examination, cardiovascular endurance, pulmonary function, and fatigue were assessed, leading to the development of an individualized exercise prescription and a six-month exercise intervention. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and covariance were used to compare the effectiveness of the intervention and differences among treatment groups. Main Research Variables Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, resting heart rate, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume, predicted oxygen consumption, time on treadmill, and fatigue. Findings Cardiopulmonary function (predicted maximal oxygen consumption and time on treadmill) significantly increased in all groups after exercise training. In addition, resting heart rate and forced vital capacity significantly improved in those receiving surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Psychologically, the exercise intervention resulted in significant reductions in behavioral, affective, sensory, cognitive and mood, and total fatigue scale scores in all three groups who received treatment with surgery. The breast cancer survivors in the surgery-alone group showed significant reductions in behavioral, affective, and total fatigue scale scores but not in sensory and cognitive and mood fatigue scale scores. Conclusions The results suggest that moderate intensity, individualized, prescriptive exercise maintains or improves cardiopulmonary function with concomitant reductions in fatigue regardless of treatment type. Moreover, cancer survivors receiving combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy following surgery appear to benefit to a greater extent as a result of an individualized exercise intervention. Implications for Nursing Clinicians need to be aware of adjuvant therapies such as moderate exercise that attenuate negative side effects of cancer treatments. Symptom management recommendations should be given to cancer survivors concerning the effectiveness of exercise throughout the cancer continuum and the importance of participating in a cancer rehabilitation exercise program. PMID:18980921

  16. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Feng; Wu, Er-Jun; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Li-Ya, A; Kou, Yu-Hui; Yin, Xiao-Feng; Han, Na

    2015-01-01

    We examined the restorative effect of modified biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantation in vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker) at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve fibers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our findings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvironment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury. PMID:25788929

  17. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Feng; Wu, Er-jun; Zhang, Pei-xun; Li-ya, A; Kou, Yu-hui; Yin, Xiao-feng; Han, Na

    2015-01-01

    We examined the restorative effect of modified biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantation in vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker) at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve fibers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our findings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvironment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury. PMID:25788929

  18. Testosterone deficiency and exercise intolerance in heart failure: treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Iellamo, Ferdinando; Rosano, Giuseppe; Volterrani, Maurizio

    2010-06-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is characterized by a metabolic shift favoring catabolism with impairment in skeletal muscle bulk and function. There is evidence that low plasma levels of testosterone play a role in this shift, and that hypotestosteronemia could be involved in the impairment of skeletal muscle function and exercise tolerance, which characterize CHF syndrome. Testosterone supplementation at replacement doses has been hypothesized as a potential therapy to counteract anabolic deficiency in CHF also acting on pathophysiological mechanisms, which sustain the progression of CHF. Recent studies have indeed indicated that testosterone supplementation increases functional capacity and muscle performance in patients with CHF. This review summarizes current knowledge on the role of testosterone deficiency in exercise intolerance in CHF and the potential implications of testosterone therapy. The links between testosterone and exercise tolerance in CHF, as well as the potential mechanisms of testosterone benefits in CHF syndrome, are also emphasized. Finally, unsolved issues regarding testosterone therapy in CHF and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:20424990

  19. Efficacy of Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone in the Treatment of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshihiro Takeuchi; Yuri Miyanomae; Hiroshi Komatsu; Yoshikazu Oomizono; Akira Nishimura; Sozo Okano; Tetuo Nishiki; Tadashi Sawada

    1994-01-01

    Children with spinal muscular atrophy were treated by the administration of thyrotropin-releasing hormone. In three infants with spinal muscular atrophy type I, thyrotropin-releasing hormone showed little efficacy, but in children with types II and III, there was improvement in motor function and electromyographic findings after the thyrotropin-releasing hormone therapy. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone has a neurotrophic effect on the spinal anterior motor

  20. Erythropoietin plus methylprednisolone or methylprednisolone in the treatment of acute spinal cord injury: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Alibai, Ehsanali; Zand, Farid; Rahimi, Aziz; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in animal models indicate that recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is very effective in enhancing neurological recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). We aimed to evaluate the effect of rhEPO plus methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) compared to MPSS alone to improve neurological function of patients after SCI in a randomized clinical trial. During a 15-month period 30 patients presenting to emergency departments of two university affiliated hospitals within less than 6 hours after acute SCI were randomized to two groups. Both groups received MPSS 30 mg/kg initially and 5.4 mg/kg every hour till 23 hours if admitted within 3 hours and till 47 hours if recruited within 3-6 hours after injury. Group EPO also received 500 unit/kg rhEPO on admission and another 500 unit/kg 24 hours later instead of placebo in group MPSS. Neurologic evaluation was performed on admission, 24, 48, 72 hours and one and 6 months later. Range of patients' age was 18-65 years. There was no significant difference between patients receiving two types of treatment in neurological exam on admission (P=0.125), 24 hours after admission (P=0.108) and 48 hours after admission (P=0.085). However, one week (P=0.046), one month (P=0.021) and six months (P=0.018) after admission these differences were significant. MPSS plus rhEPO started within 6 hours after acute spinal injury may be more effective than MPSS plus placebo in improvement of neurologic dysfunction. More studies with larger sample sizes are warranted. PMID:24901857

  1. A meta-analysis of surgery versus conventional radiotherapy for the treatment of metastatic spinal epidural disease

    PubMed Central

    Klimo, Paul; Thompson, Clinton J.; Kestle, John R.W.; Schmidt, Meic H.

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy has been the primary therapy for managing metastatic spinal disease; however, surgery that decompresses the spinal cord circumferentially, followed by reconstruction and immediate stabilization, has also proven effective. We provide a quantitative comparison between the “new” surgery and radiotherapy, based on articles that report on ambulatory status before and after treatment, age, sex, primary neoplasm pathology, and spinal disease distribution. Ambulation was categorized as “success” or “rescue” (proportion of patients ambulatory after treatment and proportion regaining ambulatory function, respectively). Secondary outcomes were also analyzed. We calculated cumulative success and rescue rates for our ambulatory measurements and quantified heterogeneity using a mixed-effects model. We investigated the source of the heterogeneity in both a univariate and multivariate manner with a meta-regression model. Our analysis included data from 24 surgical articles (999 patients) and 4 radiation articles (543 patients), mostly uncontrolled cohort studies (Class III). Surgical patients were 1.3 times more likely to be ambulatory after treatment and twice as likely to regain ambulatory function. Overall ambulatory success rates for surgery and radiation were 85% and 64%, respectively. Primary pathology was the principal factor determining survival. We present the first known formal meta-analysis using data from nonrandomized clinical studies. Although we attempted to control for imbalances between the surgical and radiation groups, significant heterogeneity undoubtedly still exists. Nonetheless, we believe the differences in the outcomes indicate a true difference resulting from treatment. We conclude that surgery should usually be the primary treatment with radiation given as adjuvant therapy. Neurologic status, overall health, extent of disease (spinal and extraspinal), and primary pathology all impact proper treatment selection. PMID:15701283

  2. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore, E-mail: salva.masala@tiscali.it [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Tarantino, Umberto [University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Nano, Giovanni, E-mail: gionano@gmail.com [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Iundusi, Riccardo [University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Fiori, Roberto, E-mail: fiori.r@libero.it; Da Ros, Valerio, E-mail: valeriodaros@hotmail.com; Simonetti, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  3. Suprascapular nerve release for treatment of shoulder and periscapular pain following intracranial spinal accessory nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2008-11-01

    Iatrogenic injury to the spinal accessory nerve is one of the most common causes of trapezius muscle palsy. Dysfunction of this muscle can be a painful and disabling condition because scapular winging may impose traction on the soft tissues of the shoulder region, including the suprascapular nerve. There are few reports regarding therapeutic options for an intracranial injury of the accessory nerve. However, the surgical release of the suprascapular nerve at the level of the scapular notch is a promising alternative approach for treatment of shoulder pain in these cases. The author reports on 3 patients presenting with signs and symptoms of unilateral accessory nerve injury following resection of posterior fossa tumors. A posterior approach was used to release the suprascapular nerve at the level of the scapular notch, transecting the superior transverse scapular ligament. All patients experienced relief of their shoulder and scapular pain following the decompressive surgery. In 1 patient the primary dorsal branch of the C-2 nerve root was transferred to the extracranial segment of the accessory nerve, and in the other 2 patients a tendon transfer (the Eden-Lange procedure) was used. Results from this report show that surgical release of the suprascapular nerve is an effective treatment for shoulder and periscapular pain in patients who have sustained an unrepairable injury to the accessory nerve. PMID:18976092

  4. Responses of brown adipose tissue to diet-induced obesity, exercise, dietary restriction and ephedrine treatment.

    PubMed

    Slocum, Nikki; Durrant, Jessica R; Bailey, David; Yoon, Lawrence; Jordan, Holly; Barton, Joanna; Brown, Roger H; Clifton, Lisa; Milliken, Tula; Harrington, Wallace; Kimbrough, Carie; Faber, Catherine A; Cariello, Neal; Elangbam, Chandikumar S

    2013-07-01

    Drug-induced weight loss in humans has been associated with undesirable side effects not present in weight loss from lifestyle interventions (caloric restriction or exercise). To investigate the mechanistic differences of weight loss by drug-induced and lifestyle interventions, we examined the gene expression (mRNA) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and conducted histopathologic assessments in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice given ephedrine (18 mg/kg/day orally), treadmill exercise (10 m/min, 1-h/day), and dietary restriction (DR: 26% dietary restriction) for 7 days. Exercise and DR mice lost more body weight than controls and both ephedrine and exercise reduced percent body fat. All treatments reduced BAT and liver lipid accumulation (i.e., cytoplasmic lipids in brown adipocytes and hepatocytes) and increased oxygen consumption (VO2 ml/kg/h) compared with controls. Mitochondrial biogenesis/function-related genes (TFAM, NRF1 and GABPA) were up-regulated in the BAT of all groups. UCP-1 was up-regulated in exercise and ephedrine groups, whereas MFSD2A was up-regulated in ephedrine and DR groups. PGC-1? up-regulation was observed in exercise and DR groups but not in ephedrine group. In all experimental groups, except for ephedrine, fatty acid transport and metabolism genes were up-regulated, but the magnitude of change was higher in the DR group. PRKAA1 was up-regulated in all groups but not significantly in the ephedrine group. ADRß3 was slightly up-regulated in the DR group only, whereas ESRRA remained unchanged in all groups. Although our data suggest a common pathway of BAT activation elicited by ephedrine treatment, exercise or DR, mRNA changes were indicative of additional nutrient-sensing pathways in exercise and DR. PMID:22542811

  5. Treatment of obesity by exercise in the cold.

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, W. J.; Allen, C.; Shephard, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Six obese men aged 25 to 46 years exercised vigorously for 3 1/2 hours in a cold chamber (-34 degrees C) on 10 successive days. There was an early water loss of about 1 kg, probably due to mobilization of glycogen stores, and a subsequent fat loss of about 4 kg (as estimated from readings of skinfold thickness and confirmed by underwater weighing). The total fat loss was much greater than the calculated external energy deficit (as estimated from dietary records, an activity diary and use of a Kofranyi-Michaelis respirometer). Although some energy was "wasted" through ketosis, much of the additional energy was apparently used for synthesis of additional muscle protein. Both readings of skinfold thickness and underwater weighing indicated that the loss of adipose tissue was well sustained in the first 2 months after the exercise program. Further experiments are recommended to determine whether cold exposure makes a specific contribution to the observed weight loss, and whether this approach would be equally effective in a larger and less selected sample of obese patients. PMID:907950

  6. Surgical Treatment of Spinal Stenosis with and without Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: Cost-Effectiveness after 2 Years

    PubMed Central

    Tosteson, Anna N.A.; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Herkowitz, Harry; Albert, Todd; Boden, Scott D.; Bridwell, Keith; Longley, Michael; Andersson, Gunnar B.; Blood, Emily A.; Grove, Margaret R.; Weinstein, James N.

    2009-01-01

    Background The SPORT (Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial) reported favorable surgery outcomes over 2 years among patients with stenosis with and without degenerative spondylolisthesis, but the economic value of these surgeries is uncertain. Objective To assess the short-term cost-effectiveness of spine surgery relative to nonoperative care for stenosis alone and for stenosis with spondylolisthesis. Design Prospective cohort study. Data Sources Resource utilization, productivity, and EuroQol EQ-5D score measured at 6 weeks and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment among SPORT participants. Target Population Patients with image-confirmed spinal stenosis, with and without degenerative spondylolisthesis. Time Horizon 2 years. Perspective Societal. Intervention Nonoperative care or surgery (primarily decompressive laminectomy for stenosis and decompressive laminectomy with fusion for stenosis associated with degenerative spondylolisthesis). Outcome Measures Cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Results of Base-Case Analysis Among 634 patients with stenosis, 394 (62%) had surgery, most often decompressive laminectomy (320 of 394 [81%]). Stenosis surgeries improved health to a greater extent than nonoperative care (QALY gain, 0.17 [95% CI, 0.12 to 0.22]) at a cost of $77 600 (CI, $49 600 to $120 000) per QALY gained. Among 601 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis, 368 (61%) had surgery, most including fusion (344 of 368 [93%]) and most with instrumentation (269 of 344 [78%]). Degenerative spondylolisthesis surgeries significantly improved health versus non-operative care (QALY gain, 0.23 [CI, 0.19 to 0.27]), at a cost of $115 600 (CI, $90 800 to $144 900) per QALY gained. Result of Sensitivity Analysis Surgery cost markedly affected the value of surgery. Limitation The study used self-reported utilization data, 2-year time horizon, and as-treated analysis to address treatment non-adherence among randomly assigned participants. Conclusion The economic value of spinal stenosis surgery at 2 years compares favorably with many health interventions. Degenerative spondylolisthesis surgery is not highly cost-effective over 2 years but could show value over a longer time horizon. PMID:19075203

  7. An expert consensus on the evaluation and treatment of acute thoracolumbar spine and spinal cord injury in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhicheng; Li, Fang; Sun, Tiansheng

    2013-01-01

    This is an expert consensus on the evaluation and treatment of thoracolumbar spinal injury, established from February 2009 to July 2010. The expert consensus consists mainly of six parts with a total of 54 recommendations including the overview (one item); pre-hospital care (one item); evaluation and diagnosis (13 items); treatment (23 items); prevention and treatment of major complications (12 items); and rehabilitation (four items). This is the first time that Chinese experts have published a consensus on spine and spinal cord injury. The expert consensus was established based on Delphi methods, literature analysis, and clinical experiences. Each recommendation is supported by and was interpreted using multi-level evidences. The level of agreement with the recommendation among the panel members was assessed as either low, moderate, or strong. Each panel member was asked to indicate his or her level of agreement on a 5-point scale, with “1” corresponding to neutrality and “5” representing maximum agreement. Scores were aggregated across the panel members and an arithmetic mean was calculated. This mean score was then translated into low, moderate, or strong. After all of the votes were collected and calculated, the results showed no low-level recommendations, 10 moderate-level recommendations, and 44 strong-level recommendations. An expert consensus was reached and was recognized by Chinese spine surgeons. Wide-scale adoption of these recommendations is urgent in the management of acute thoracolumbar spine and spinal cord injury in a broader attempt to create a standard evaluation and treatment strategy for acute thoracolumbar spine and spinal cord injury in China. PMID:25206628

  8. Interspinous spacers in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disease: our experience with DIAM and Aperius devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio P. Fabrizi; Raffaella Maina; Luigi Schiabello

    2011-01-01

    Insertion of an interspinous devices has became a common procedure for the treatment of different clinical picture of degenerative\\u000a spinal disease. We present our experience in 1,575 patients with the use of two different interspinous spacers: Device for\\u000a Intervertebral Assisted Motion (DIAM) and Aperius PercLID system. From 2000 through 2008, 1,315 consecutive patients underwent\\u000a DIAM implantation and 260 had an

  9. Combined ischemic compression and spinal manipulation in the treatment of fibromyalgia: A preliminary estimate of dose and efficacy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guy Hains; François Hains

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To provide preliminary information on whether a regimen of 30 chiropractic treatments that combines ischemic compression and spinal manipulation effectively reduces the intensity of pain, sleep disturbance, and fatigue associated with fibromyalgia. In addition, to study the dose-response relation and identify the baseline characteristics that may serve as predictors of outcome.Design: Subjects were assessed with self-administered questionnaires taken at

  10. Exercise as a Novel Treatment for Drug Addiction: A Neurobiological and Stage-Dependent Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Wendy J.; Peterson, Alexis B.; Sanchez, Victoria; Abel, Jean; Smith, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity, and specifically exercise, has been suggested as a potential treatment for drug addiction. In this review, we discuss clinical and preclinical evidence for the efficacy of exercise at different phases of the addiction process. Potential neurobiological mechanisms are also discussed focusing on interactions with dopaminergic and glutamatergic signaling and chromatin remodeling in the reward pathway. While exercise generally produces an efficacious response, certain exercise conditions may be either ineffective or lead to detrimental effects depending on the level/type/timing of exercise exposure, the stage of addiction, the drug involved, and the subject population. During drug use initiation and withdrawal, its efficacy may be related to its ability to facilitate dopaminergic transmission, and once addiction develops, its efficacy may be related to its ability to normalize glutamatergic and dopaminergic signaling and reverse drug-induced changes in chromatin via epigenetic interactions with BDNF in the reward pathway. We conclude with future directions, including the development of exercise-based interventions alone or as an adjunct to other strategies for treating drug addiction. PMID:23806439

  11. Splicing regulation of the Survival Motor Neuron genes and implications for treatment of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bebee, Thomas W.; Gladman, Jordan T.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2010-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by low levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. The reduced SMN levels are due to loss of the survival motor neuron-1 (SMN1) gene. Humans carry a nearly identical SMN2 gene that generates a truncated protein, due to a C to T nucleotide alteration in exon 7 that leads to inefficient RNA splicing of exon 7. This exclusion of SMN exon 7 is central to the onset of the SMA disease, however, this offers a unique therapeutic intervention in which corrective splicing of the SMN2 gene would restore SMN function. Exon 7 splicing is regulated by a number of exonic and intronic splicing regulatory sequences and trans-factors that bind them. A better understanding of the way SMN pre-mRNA is spliced has lead to the development of targeted therapies aimed at correcting SMN2 splicing. As therapeutics targeted toward correction of SMN2 splicing continue to be developed available SMA mouse models can be utilized in validating their potential in disease treatment. PMID:20515750

  12. An exploration of fluoroscopically guided spinal steroid injections in patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain

    PubMed Central

    Neve, Leon; Orchard, John; Gibbs, Nathan; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert; Sesel, Ken; Burgess, Ian; Hines, Brett

    2010-01-01

    Background Fluoroscopically guided lumbar cortisone injections have been proven useful in cases of lower-limb pain caused by lumbar disc prolapse (with evidence levels ll-1/ll-2). These injections are also sometimes used clinically in sports medicine for patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain, where no prolapse or other obvious cause of nerve-impingement is diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT), even though this treatment scenario has not been adequately studied for this last diagnosis. Objectives To explore whether fluoroscopically guided transforaminal lumbar cortisone injections may be a valid treatment method for non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain. Study design Retrospective case series. Methods Patients were selected from databases at two sports clinics and divided into two groups: Group D, with back-related lower-limb pain and disc prolapse proven on CT or MR; and Group N, with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain. Patients were sent a questionnaire regarding: symptoms, improvement, effect of injections, satisfaction, side effects and other used treatments. Outcomes were compared between Group D and N. Results 153 patients were eligible for the study (Group D: 93/Group N: 60). Eventually 110 patients responded (Group D: 67/Group N: 43). Twelve percent of Group D and 14% of Group N indicated that the injections had fully cured their symptoms. Altogether, 27% of Group D and 24% of Group N were certain the injections had improved their symptoms in the long term. A larger proportion however, indicated that the injection had certainly improved their symptoms in the short term, but noted that the effects were non-lasting (Group D: 28%/Group N: 30%). Two patients were certain the injections had actually worsened their symptoms. No significant differences in characteristics and outcomes between Group D and Group N were noted. Conclusions Outcomes of this study suggest fluoroscopically guided lumbar cortisone injections may have similar outcomes in patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain compared to patients with disc prolapse proven on MRI or CT causing back-related lower-limb pain. This might suggest a potential role for these injections in the treatment of non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain. It should be noted that this is a low level of evidence study (level 3) and further study is warranted. PMID:24198556

  13. Prevention of exercised induced cardiomyopathy following Pip-PMO treatment in dystrophic mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Betts, Corinne A; Saleh, Amer F; Carr, Carolyn A; Hammond, Suzan M; Coenen-Stass, Anna M L; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Varela, Miguel A; Roberts, Thomas C; Clarke, Kieran; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene. In addition to skeletal muscle wasting, DMD patients develop cardiomyopathy, which significantly contributes to mortality. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are a promising DMD therapy, restoring functional dystrophin protein by exon skipping. However, a major limitation with current AOs is the absence of dystrophin correction in heart. Pip peptide-AOs demonstrate high activity in cardiac muscle. To determine their therapeutic value, dystrophic mdx mice were subject to forced exercise to model the DMD cardiac phenotype. Repeated peptide-AO treatments resulted in high levels of cardiac dystrophin protein, which prevented the exercised induced progression of cardiomyopathy, normalising heart size as well as stabilising other cardiac parameters. Treated mice also exhibited significantly reduced cardiac fibrosis and improved sarcolemmal integrity. This work demonstrates that high levels of cardiac dystrophin restored by Pip peptide-AOs prevents further deterioration of cardiomyopathy and pathology following exercise in dystrophic DMD mice. PMID:25758104

  14. Minimally invasive surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis: Two-year follow-up in 54 patients

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Sylvain; Davison, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Minimally invasive surgery has seen increasing application in the treatment of spinal disorders. Treatment of degenerative spinal stenosis, with or without spondylolisthesis, with minimally invasive technique preserves stabilizing ligaments, bone, and muscle. Satisfactory results can be achieved without the need for fusion in most cases. Methods: Fifty-four consecutive patients underwent bilateral decompressions from a unilateral approach for spinal stenosis using METRx instrumentation. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain scores were recorded preoperatively and patients were interviewed, in person or by phone, by our office nurse practitioner (LD) to assess postoperative VAS scores, and patient satisfaction with the clinical results 21-39 months postoperatively (median 27 months). Results: Fifty-four patients underwent decompression at 77 levels (L4/5 = 43, L3/4 = 22, L5/S1 = 8, L1/2 = 4, L2/3 = 4), (single = 35, double = 16, triple = 2, quadruple = 1). There were 39 females and 15 males. The average age was 67 years. The average operative time was 78 minutes and the average blood loss was 37 ml per level. Twenty-seven patients had preoperative degenerative spondylolisthesis (Grade 1 = 26, Grade 2 = 1). Eight patients had discectomies and four had synovial cysts. Patient satisfaction was high. Use of pain medication for leg and back pain was low, and VAS scores improved by more than half. There were three dural tears. There were no deaths or infections. One patient with an unrecognized dural tear required re-exploration for repair of a pseudomeningocele and one patient required a lumbar fusion for pain associated with progression of her spondylolisthesis. Conclusions: Minimally invasive bilateral decompression of acquired spinal stenosis from a unilateral approach can be successfully accomplished with reasonable operative times, minimal blood loss, and acceptable morbidity. Two-year outcomes in this series revealed high patient satisfaction and only one patient progressed to lumbar fusion. PMID:22530175

  15. Repeated morphine treatment-mediated hyperalgesia, allodynia and spinal glial activation are blocked by co-administration of a selective cannabinoid receptor type-2 agonist

    PubMed Central

    Tumati, Suneeta; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Keresztes, Attila; Ren, Jiyang; Roeske, William R; Vanderah, Todd W.; Varga, Eva V

    2012-01-01

    Spinal glial activation has been implicated in sustained morphine-mediated paradoxical pain sensitization. Since activation of glial CB2 cannabinoid receptors attenuates spinal glial activation in neuropathies, we hypothesized that CB2 agonists may also attenuate sustained morphine–mediated spinal glial activation and pain sensitization. Our data indicate that co-administration of a CB2-selective agonist (AM 1241) attenuates morphine (intraperitoneal; twice daily; 6 days)-mediated thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia in rats. A CB2 (AM 630) but not a CB1 (AM 251) antagonist mitigated this effect. AM 1241 co-treatment also attenuated spinal astrocyte and microglial marker and pro-inflammatory mediator (IL-1?, TNF?) immunoreactivities in morphine-treated rats, suggesting that CB2 agonists may be useful to prevent the neuroinflammatory consequences of sustained morphine treatment. PMID:22285397

  16. Aerobic Exercise Training Reduces Cannabis Craving and Use in Non-Treatment Seeking Cannabis-Dependent Adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maciej S. Buchowski; Natalie N. Meade; Evonne Charboneau; Sohee Park; Mary S. Dietrich; Ronald L. Cowan; Peter R. Martin; Antonio Verdejo García

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundCannabis dependence is a significant public health problem. Because there are no approved medications for this condition, treatment must rely on behavioral approaches empirically complemented by such lifestyle change as exercise.AimsTo examine the effects of moderate aerobic exercise on cannabis craving and use in cannabis dependent adults under normal living conditions.DesignParticipants attended 10 supervised 30-min treadmill exercise sessions standardized using

  17. Spinal cord compression in two related Ursus arctos horribilis.

    PubMed

    Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Roberts, Greg R; Schmidt, Carrie E; Layton, Arthur W

    2012-09-01

    Two 15-yr-old grizzly bear littermates were evaluated within 9 mo of each other with the symptom of acute onset of progressive paraparesis and proprioceptive ataxia. The most significant clinical examination finding was pelvic limb paresis in both bears. Magnetic resonance examinations of both bears showed cranial thoracic spinal cord compression. The first bear had left-sided extradural, dorsolateral spinal cord compression at T3-T4. Vertebral canal stenosis was also observed at T2-T3. Images of the second bear showed lateral spinal cord compression from T2-T3 to T4-T5. Intervertebral disk disease and associated spinal cord compression was also observed at T2-T3 and T3-T4. One grizzly bear continued to deteriorate despite reduced exercise, steroid, and antibiotic therapy. The bear was euthanized, and a necropsy was performed. The postmortem showed a spinal ganglion cyst that caused spinal cord compression at the level of T3-T4. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C3-T6. The second bear was prescribed treatment that consisted of a combination of reduced exercise and steroid therapy. He continued to deteriorate with these medical therapies and was euthanized 4 mo after diagnosis. A necropsy showed hypertrophy and protrusion of the dorsal longitudinal ligament at T2-T3 and T3-T4, with resulting spinal cord compression in this region. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C2-L1. This is one of few case reports that describes paresis in bears. It is the only case report, to the authors' knowledge, that describes spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings in a grizzly bear and also the only report that describes a cranial thoracic myelopathy in two related grizzly bears with neurologic signs. PMID:23082524

  18. The application of electron beam delivery using dose rate variation and dynamic couch motion in conformal treatment of the cranial-spinal axis

    SciTech Connect

    Chapek, Julie; Watson, Gordon; Smith, Lynn M.; Leavitt, Dennis

    2002-12-31

    Radiation therapy to the cranial-spinal axis is typically targeted to the spinal cord and to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the subarachnoid space adjacent to the spinal cord and brain. Standard techniques employed in the treatment of the whole central nervous system do little to compensate for the varying depths of spinal cord along the length of the spinal field. Lateral simulation films, sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or computerized tomography (CT) are used to estimate an average prescription depth for treatment along the spine field. However, due to the varying depth of the target along the spinal axis, even with the use of physical compensators, there can be considerable dose inhomogeneity along the spine field. With the advent of treatment machines that have full dynamic capabilities, a technique has been devised that will allow for more conformal dose distribution along the full length of the spinal field. This project simulates this technique utilizing computer-controlled couch motion to deliver multiple small electron beams of differing energies and intensities. CT planning determines target depth along the entire spine volume. The ability to conform dose along the complete length of the treatment field is investigated through the application of superpositioning of the fields as energies and intensities change. The positioning of each beam is registered with the treatment couch dynamic motion. This allows for 1 setup in the treatment room rather than multiple setups for each treatment position, which would have been previously required. Dose-volume histograms are utilized to evaluate the dose delivered to structures in the beam exit region. This technique will allow for precise localization and delivery of a homogeneous dose to the entire CSF space.

  19. A typology of alcohol use patterns among persons with recent traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury: Implications for treatment matching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aaron P. Turner; Charles H. Bombardier; Carl T. Rimmele

    2003-01-01

    Turner AP, Bombardier CH, Rimmele CT. A typology of alcohol use patterns among persons with recent traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury: implications for treatment matching. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2003;84:358-64. Objective: To describe empirically valid and clinically meaningful types of alcohol use among persons with recent traumatic brain or spinal cord injury. Design: Cross-sectional cohort survey. Setting: Acute

  20. Evaluation of an exercise-based treatment for children with reading difficulties.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, David; Nicolson, Roderick I; Hambly, Helen

    2003-02-01

    An evaluation is reported of an exercise-based approach to remediation of dyslexia-related disorders. Pupils in three years of a Warwickshire junior school were screened for risk of literacy difficulty using the Dyslexia Screening Test (DST). The 35 children scoring 0.4 or over on the DST were divided randomly into two groups matched for age and DST score. One quarter of the participants had an existing diagnosis of dyslexia, dyspraxia or ADHD. Both groups received the same treatment at school but the intervention group used the DDAT exercise programme daily at home. Performance on the DST and specialist cerebellar/vestibular and eye movement tests were assessed initially and after six months. Cerebellar/vestibular signs were substantially alleviated following the exercise treatment whereas there were no significant changes for the control group. Even after allowing for the passage of time, there were significant improvements for the intervention group in postural stability, dexterity, phonological skill, and (one-tailed) for naming fluency and semantic fluency. Reading fluency showed a highly significant improvement for the intervention group, and nonsense passage reading was also improved significantly. Significantly greater improvements for the intervention group than the control group occurred for dexterity, reading, verbal fluency and semantic fluency. Substantial and significant improvements (compared with those in the previous year) also occurred for the exercise group on national standardized tests of reading, writing and comprehension. It is concluded that, in addition to its direct effects on balance, dexterity and eye movement control, the benefits of the DDAT exercise treatment transferred significantly to cognitive skills underlying literacy, to the reading process, and to standardized national literacy attainment tests. PMID:12625376

  1. Long-term treatment with PP2 after spinal cord injury resulted in functional locomotor recovery and increased spared tissue.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Odrick R; Torrado, Aranza I; Santiago, Jose M; Rodriguez, Ana E; Salgado, Iris K; Miranda, Jorge D

    2014-12-15

    The spinal cord has the ability to regenerate but the microenvironment generated after trauma reduces that capacity. An increase in Src family kinase (SFK) activity has been implicated in neuropathological conditions associated with central nervous system trauma. Therefore, we hypothesized that a decrease in SFK activation by a long-term treatment with 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyramidine (PP2), a selective SFK inhibitor, after spinal cord contusion with the New York University (NYU) impactor device would generate a permissive environment that improves axonal sprouting and/or behavioral activity. Results demonstrated that long-term blockade of SFK activation with PP2 increases locomotor activity at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post-injury in the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan open field test, round and square beam crossing tests. In addition, an increase in white matter spared tissue and serotonin fiber density was observed in animals treated with PP2. However, blockade of SFK activity did not change the astrocytic response or infiltration of cells from the immune system at 28 days post-injury. Moreover, a reduced SFK activity with PP2 diminished Ephexin (a guanine nucleotide exchange factor) phosphorylation in the acute phase (4 days post-injury) after trauma. Together, these findings suggest a potential role of SFK in the regulation of spared tissue and/or axonal outgrowth that may result in functional locomotor recovery during the pathophysiology generated after spinal cord injury. Our study also points out that ephexin1 phosphorylation (activation) by SFK action may be involved in the repulsive microenvironment generated after spinal cord injury. PMID:25657738

  2. Long-term treatment with PP2 after spinal cord injury resulted in functional locomotor recovery and increased spared tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Odrick R.; Torrado, Aranza I.; Santiago, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Ana E.; Salgado, Iris K.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2014-01-01

    The spinal cord has the ability to regenerate but the microenvironment generated after trauma reduces that capacity. An increase in Src family kinase (SFK) activity has been implicated in neuropathological conditions associated with central nervous system trauma. Therefore, we hypothesized that a decrease in SFK activation by a long-term treatment with 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyramidine (PP2), a selective SFK inhibitor, after spinal cord contusion with the New York University (NYU) impactor device would generate a permissive environment that improves axonal sprouting and/or behavioral activity. Results demonstrated that long-term blockade of SFK activation with PP2 increases locomotor activity at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post-injury in the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan open field test, round and square beam crossing tests. In addition, an increase in white matter spared tissue and serotonin fiber density was observed in animals treated with PP2. However, blockade of SFK activity did not change the astrocytic response or infiltration of cells from the immune system at 28 days post-injury. Moreover, a reduced SFK activity with PP2 diminished Ephexin (a guanine nucleotide exchange factor) phosphorylation in the acute phase (4 days post-injury) after trauma. Together, these findings suggest a potential role of SFK in the regulation of spared tissue and/or axonal outgrowth that may result in functional locomotor recovery during the pathophysiology generated after spinal cord injury. Our study also points out that ephexin1 phosphorylation (activation) by SFK action may be involved in the repulsive microenvironment generated after spinal cord injury. PMID:25657738

  3. Branched chain amino acids chronic treatment and muscular exercise performance in athletes: a study through plasma acetyl-carnitine levels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. F. Palo; P. Metus; R. Gatti; O. Previti; L. Bigon; C. B. Palo

    1993-01-01

    In relation to energy request during physical exercise, muscular tissue Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAA) are metabolized particularly when the oxidation rises. But in the whole-human body, it is difficult to estimate, in a quantitative sense, the role played by BCAA in sustaining exercise. During a BCAA treatment, made on a group of athletes kept under observation, it was observed,

  4. Unusual Spinal Dysraphic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Pollyana; Wanderley, Luiz Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Human tail and multiple spinal dysraphism are unusual congenital malformations. Human tail appeared as a prominent lesion from the lumbosacrococcygeal region, generally without connection between the tail and the neurospinal axis. Spinal dysraphisms are usually isolated, reaching 0.038% of incidence of multiple spinal dysraphisms in the same child. There were three cases described of unusual spinal dysraphic lesions: two cases of human tail and a case of a multiple thoracic myelomeningocele. The literature about diagnosis and treatment was reviewed. Microsurgical technique was performed to provide better exploration of the lesions, and resection could be done in those congenital malformations, without morbidity. PMID:24194997

  5. Spinal tuberculosis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Somvanshi, Dilip Singh

    2011-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis is a destructive form of tuberculosis. It accounts for approximately half of all cases of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is more common in children and young adults. The incidence of spinal tuberculosis is increasing in developed nations. Genetic susceptibility to spinal tuberculosis has recently been demonstrated. Characteristically, there is destruction of the intervertebral disk space and the adjacent vertebral bodies, collapse of the spinal elements, and anterior wedging leading to kyphosis and gibbus formation. The thoracic region of vertebral column is most frequently affected. Formation of a ‘cold’ abscess around the lesion is another characteristic feature. The incidence of multi-level noncontiguous vertebral tuberculosis occurs more frequently than previously recognized. Common clinical manifestations include constitutional symptoms, back pain, spinal tenderness, paraplegia, and spinal deformities. For the diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive imaging technique than x-ray and more specific than computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging frequently demonstrates involvement of the vertebral bodies on either side of the disk, disk destruction, cold abscess, vertebral collapse, and presence of vertebral column deformities. Neuroimaging-guided needle biopsy from the affected site in the center of the vertebral body is the gold standard technique for early histopathological diagnosis. Antituberculous treatment remains the cornerstone of treatment. Surgery may be required in selected cases, e.g. large abscess formation, severe kyphosis, an evolving neurological deficit, or lack of response to medical treatment. With early diagnosis and early treatment, prognosis is generally good. PMID:22118251

  6. Treatment of Type I Spinal Muscular Atrophy With Noninvasive Ventilation and Gastrostomy Feeding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J Birnkrant; John F Pope; James E Martin; Anthony H Repucci; Robert M Eiben

    1998-01-01

    Type I spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a rapidly progressive, degenerative neuromuscular disease of infancy. In severe SMA, weakness, hypotonia, and bulbar involvement lead to progressive respiratory insufficiency and swallowing dysfunction, which are frequently complicated by aspirations. There are few studies reported in the literature that address the respiratory management of type I SMA. This article reports the results of

  7. Is there a place for pudendal nerve maximal electrical stimulation for the treatment of detrusor hyperreflexia in spinal cord injury patients?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J G Prévinaire; J M Soler; M Perrigot

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine whether pudendal nerve maximal electrical stimulation (MES) could represent an alternative treatment for detrusor hyperreflexia in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Six suprasacral SCI patients participated in the study. The treatment consisted of daily stimulation periods of 20 min, repeated five times a week, during 4 weeks, with continuous electrical stimulation of

  8. Influence of setup errors on spinal cord dose and treatment plan quality for cervical spine tumours: a phantom study for photon IMRT and heavy charged particle radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karger, Christian P.; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Didinger, Bernd H.; Debus, Jürgen; Jäkel, Oliver

    2003-10-01

    Tumours partly surrounding the cervical spine may be treated by conformal radiotherapy (RT) using intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) with photons or heavy charged particle RT. For both, a high setup accuracy is required to spare the radiosensitive spinal cord, if a high dose is to be delivered. A phantom study was performed to determine the variation of the dose to the spinal cord surface by predefined setup errors. The measured doses were compared to those calculated by the treatment planning programme. The influence of systematic setup errors on characteristic parameters of the treatment plan quality was quantified. The largest variation of the mean and maximum doses to the spinal cord due to setup errors was significantly larger for carbon ions than for IMRT (mean: 11.9% versus 3.9%, max: 29.2% versus 10.8% of the prescribed dose). For the comparison of measured and calculated doses, mean deviations of 3% (IMRT) and 6% (carbon ions) of the prescribed dose were obtained. These deviations have to be considered, when the spinal cord dose is assessed from the treatment plan and they may also influence the dose prescription. Carbon ions yield better values for coverage (99.9% versus 93.1%) and conformality (110% versus 126%) of the PTV as compared to IMRT, while the spinal cord is better spared. Dose distributions produced with carbon ions, however, are more sensitive to setup errors, which have to be considered during treatment.

  9. Transfer of the Brachialis to the Anterior Interosseous Nerve as a Treatment Strategy for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Hawasli, Ammar H.; Chang, Jodie; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Ray, Wilson Z.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design?Technical report. Objective?To provide a technical description of the transfer of the brachialis to the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) for the treatment of tetraplegia after a cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods?In this technical report, the authors present a case illustration of an ideal surgical candidate for a brachialis-to-AIN transfer: a 21-year-old patient with a complete C7 spinal cord injury and failure of any hand motor recovery. The authors provide detailed description including images and video showing how to perform the brachialis-to-AIN transfer. Results?The brachialis nerve and AIN fascicles can be successfully isolated using visual inspection and motor mapping. Then, careful dissection and microsurgical coaptation can be used for a successful anterior interosseous reinnervation. Conclusion?The nerve transfer techniques for reinnervation have been described predominantly for the treatment of brachial plexus injuries. The majority of the nerve transfer techniques have focused on the upper brachial plexus or distal nerves of the lower brachial plexus. More recently, nerve transfers have reemerged as a potential reinnervation strategy for select patients with cervical SCI. The brachialis-to-AIN transfer technique offers a potential means for restoration of intrinsic hand function in patients with SCI. PMID:25844283

  10. Transfer of the brachialis to the anterior interosseous nerve as a treatment strategy for cervical spinal cord injury: technical note.

    PubMed

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Chang, Jodie; Reynolds, Matthew R; Ray, Wilson Z

    2015-04-01

    Study Design?Technical report. Objective?To provide a technical description of the transfer of the brachialis to the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) for the treatment of tetraplegia after a cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods?In this technical report, the authors present a case illustration of an ideal surgical candidate for a brachialis-to-AIN transfer: a 21-year-old patient with a complete C7 spinal cord injury and failure of any hand motor recovery. The authors provide detailed description including images and video showing how to perform the brachialis-to-AIN transfer. Results?The brachialis nerve and AIN fascicles can be successfully isolated using visual inspection and motor mapping. Then, careful dissection and microsurgical coaptation can be used for a successful anterior interosseous reinnervation. Conclusion?The nerve transfer techniques for reinnervation have been described predominantly for the treatment of brachial plexus injuries. The majority of the nerve transfer techniques have focused on the upper brachial plexus or distal nerves of the lower brachial plexus. More recently, nerve transfers have reemerged as a potential reinnervation strategy for select patients with cervical SCI. The brachialis-to-AIN transfer technique offers a potential means for restoration of intrinsic hand function in patients with SCI. PMID:25844283

  11. Mass Spectrometry in Pharmacokinetic Studies of a Synthetic Compound for Spinal Cord Injury Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Lillo, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The studies of drugs that could constitute a palliative to spinal cord injury (SCI) are a continuous and increasing demand in biomedicine field from developed societies. Recently we described the chemical synthesis and antiglioma activity of synthetic glycosides. A synthetic sulfated glycolipid (here IG20) has shown chemical stability, solubility in polar solvents, and high inhibitory capacity over glioma growth. We have used mass spectrometry (MS) to monitor IG20 (m/z = 550.3) in cells and tissues of the central nervous system (CNS) that are involved in SCI recovery. IG20 was detected by MS in serum and homogenates from CNS tissue of rats, though in the latter a previous deproteinization step was required. The pharmacokinetic parameters of serum clearance at 24?h and half-life at 4?h were determined for synthetic glycoside in the adult rat using MS. A local administration of the drug near of spinal lesion site is proposed. PMID:26090386

  12. The present status of spinal fusion in the treatment of lumbar intervertebral joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Farfan, H F; Kirkaldy-Willis, W H

    1981-01-01

    Every type of fusion has its enthusiastic supporters. Unfortunately, the literature includes comparative analyses of various fusion procedures. Much of the effort spent in the clinical assessment of spinal fusion must be reinvested; neither the indications for diskectomy nor spinal fusion have been sufficiently clear-cut and accurately recorded. Moreover, spinal fusions often have not been applied to treat the disorder or to correct the deformity. It is essential at the outset to establish the mechanical fault; this is achieved only by a thorough understanding of the underlying pathologic lesion. Diagnosis follows a careful history and physical examination assisted by plain radiographs, lateral radiographs in flexion and extension, radiographs (anteroposterior in left and right lateral bending), and by information obtained from the CAT scan. We have designed a protocol for a prospective investigation wherein a specific fault with a specific etiology and pathologic anatomy is identified and submitted to a surgical procedure in a specified sequence. In future reviews, emphasis must be paid to selection of patients, the individual joint requiring stabilization and the type of fusion performed. Only then can we put this theoretically effective procedure to the acid test of objective clinical evaluation. PMID:6456101

  13. Do exercise motives predict obligatory exercise?

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Mary E; Beaver, Jessica L

    2012-04-01

    Few studies have examined whether factors predicting obligatory exercise differ by gender. 303 participants completed the Obligatory Exercise Questionnaire and the Reason for Exercise Inventory. All variables correlated significantly. However, the correlation between exercising for fitness and obligatory exercise was significantly stronger in women than men. In women, obligatory exercise was predicted by exercising to improve body tone, fitness, and to enhance mood; in men, obligatory exercise was predicted by exercising to improve body tone, enjoyment, and perceived attractiveness. Implications for treatment are discussed. PMID:22365798

  14. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with spinal cord injuries and aggressive treatment and rehabilitation can minimize damage to the nervous system and ... given within the first 8 hours after injury. Rehabilitation programs combine physical therapies with skill-building activities ...

  15. An open-label study examining the effect of pharmacological treatment on mannitol- and exercise-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic children and adolescents with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mannitol- and exercise bronchial provocation tests are both used to diagnose exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. The study aim was to compare the short-term treatment response to budesonide and montelukast on airway hyperresponsiveness to mannitol challenge test and to exercise challenge test in children and adolescents with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Methods Patients were recruited from a paediatric asthma rehabilitation clinic located in the Swiss Alps. Individuals with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and a positive result in the exercise challenge test underwent mannitol challenge test on day 0. All subjects then received a treatment with 400 ?g budesonide and bronchodilators as needed for 7 days, after which exercise- and mannitol-challenge tests were repeated (day 7). Montelukast was then added to the previous treatment and both tests were repeated again after 7 days (day 14). Results Of 26 children and adolescents with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, 14 had a positive exercise challenge test at baseline and were included in the intervention study. Seven of 14 (50%) also had a positive mannitol challenge test. There was a strong correlation between airway responsiveness to exercise and to mannitol at baseline (r?=?0.560, p?=?0.037). Treatment with budesonide and montelukast decreased airway hyperresponsiveness to exercise challenge test and to a lesser degree to mannitol challenge test. The fall in forced expiratory volume in one second during exercise challenge test was 21.7% on day 0 compared to 6.7% on day 14 (p?=?0.001) and the mannitol challenge test dose response ratio was 0.036%/mg on day 0 compared to 0.013%/mg on day 14 (p?=?0.067). Conclusion Short-term treatment with an inhaled corticosteroid and an additional leukotriene receptor antagonist in children and adolescents with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction decreases airway hyperresponsiveness to exercise and to mannitol. PMID:25084607

  16. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of complete and chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Dai, Guanghui; Liu, Xuebin; Zhang, Zan; Yang, Zhijun; Dai, Yiwu; Xu, Ruxiang

    2013-10-01

    Neuronal injuries have been a challenging problem for treatment, especially in the case of complete and chronic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, particular attention is paid to the potential of stem cell in treating SCI, but there are only few clinical studies and insufficient data. This study explored the efficacy of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) transplantation in the treatment of SCI. Forty patients with complete and chronic cervical SCI were selected and randomly assigned to one of the two experimental groups, treatment group and control group. The treatment group received BMMSCs transplantation to the area surrounding injury, while the control group was not treated with any cell transplantation. Both the transplant recipients and the control group were followed up to 6 months, postoperatively. Preoperative and postoperative neurological functions were evaluated with AIS grading, ASIA score, residual urine volume and neurophysiological examination. Results showed that in the treatment group 10 patients had a significant clinical improvement in terms of motor, light touch, pin prick sensory and residual urine volume, while nine patients showed changes in AIS grade. Neurophysiological examination was consistent with clinical observations. No sign of tumor was evident until 6 months postoperatively. In the control group, no improvement was observed in any of the neurological functions specified above. BMMSCs transplantation improves neurological function in patients with complete and chronic cervical SCI, providing valuable information on applications of BMMSCs for the treatment of SCI. PMID:23948102

  17. [Effectiveness of two aerobic exercise programs in the treatment of metabolic syndrome: a preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Salas-Romero, Rebeca; Sánchez-Muñoz, Verónica; Franco-Sánchez, José Gilberto; Del Villar-Morales, Ariadna; Pegueros-Pérez, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of two aerobic exercise programs on the modification of the metabolic syndrome (MS) components and its influence in reducing cardiovascular risk was evaluated in 16 sedentary women (30-66 years old). Patients were randomly divided into two exercise groups: continuous training (CE: 45 minutes at 65-70% of heart rate reserve or HRR) or interval training (IE: 5 x 3 minute intervals at 80-85% HRR with two minutes of active recovery at 65-70% HRR), and each participant gave previous informed consent. The components of MS were assessed according to the criteria for women of the National Cholesterol Education/Third Treatment Adult Panel, and cardiovascular risk factors at baseline and 16 weeks later. Data analyses were performed with the Wilcoxon signed test and the Mann-Whitney U-test (SPSS v. 12.0 Windows: p < 0.05). Both exercise programs were effective in the modification of a number of MS components (triglycerides, systolic/diastolic blood pressure), however IE had a higher percentage of patients without MS diagnosis at the end of the study (62.5%). The CE improved the physical fitness by increasing the VO?peak and METs and decreasing heart rate recovery, which is reflected on the reduction of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25375279

  18. Systems Biology Investigation of cAMP Modulation to Increase SMN Levels for the Treatment of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Sean G.; Cook, Daniel J.; Dhurjati, Prasad; Butchbach, Matthew E. R.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant death worldwide, is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the loss of SMN1 (survival motor neuron 1), which encodes the protein SMN. The loss of SMN1 causes a deficiency in SMN protein levels leading to motor neuron cell death in the anterior horn of the spinal cord. SMN2, however, can also produce some functional SMN to partially compensate for loss of SMN1 in SMA suggesting increasing transcription of SMN2 as a potential therapy to treat patients with SMA. A cAMP response element was identified on the SMN2 promoter, implicating cAMP activation as a step in the transcription of SMN2. Therefore, we investigated the effects of modulating the cAMP signaling cascade on SMN production in vitro and in silico. SMA patient fibroblasts were treated with the cAMP signaling modulators rolipram, salbutamol, dbcAMP, epinephrine and forskolin. All of the modulators tested were able to increase gem formation, a marker for SMN protein in the nucleus, in a dose-dependent manner. We then derived two possible mathematical models simulating the regulation of SMN2 expression by cAMP signaling. Both models fit well with our experimental data. In silico treatment of SMA fibroblasts simultaneously with two different cAMP modulators resulted in an additive increase in gem formation. This study shows how a systems biology approach can be used to develop potential therapeutic targets for treating SMA. PMID:25514431

  19. Follow-up of an exercise-based treatment for children with reading difficulties.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, David; Nicolson, Roderick I

    2007-05-01

    This study reports the results of a long-term follow-up of an exercise-based approach to dyslexia-related disorders (Reynolds, Nicolson, & Hambly, Dyslexia, 2003; 9(1): 48-71). In the initial study, children at risk of dyslexia were identified in 3 years of a junior school. One half then undertook a 6 month, home-based exercise programme. Evaluation after 6 months indicated that the exercise group improved significantly more than the controls on a range of cognitive and motor skills. Critics had suggested that the improvement might be attributable to artifactual issues including Hawthorne effects; an initial literacy imbalance between the groups; and inclusion of non-dyslexic participants. The present study evaluated the issue of whether the gains were maintained over the following 18 months, and whether they were in some sense artifactual as postulated by critics of the original study. Comparison of (age-adjusted) initial and follow-up performance indicated significant gains in motor skill, speech/language fluency, phonology, and working memory. Both dyslexic and non-dyslexic low achieving children benefited. There was also a highly significant reduction in the incidence of symptoms of inattention. Interestingly there were no significant changes in speeded tests of reading and spelling, but there was a significant improvement in (age-adjusted) reading (NFER). It is concluded that the gains were indeed long-lasting, and that the alternative hypotheses based on potential artifacts were untenable, and that the exercise treatment therefore achieved its applied purpose. Further research is needed to determine the underlying reasons for the benefits. Possible (and potentially synergistic) explanations include: improved cerebellar function (neural level); improved learning ability and/or attentional ability (cognitive level); improved self-esteem and self-efficacy (affective level); and improved parental/familial support (social level). PMID:17557685

  20. Astym treatment vs. eccentric exercise for lateral elbow tendinopathy: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Stegink-Jansen, Caroline W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with chronic lateral elbow (LE) tendinopathy, commonly known as tennis elbow, often experience prolonged symptoms and frequent relapses. Astym treatment, evidenced in animal studies to promote the healing and regeneration of soft tissues, is hypothesized to improve outcomes in LE tendinopathy patients. This study had two objectives: (1) to compare the efficacy of Astym treatment to an evidence-based eccentric exercise program (EE) for patients with chronic LE tendinopathy, and (2) to quantify outcomes of subjects non-responsive to EE who were subsequently treated with Astym treatment. Study Design. Prospective, two group, parallel, randomized controlled trial completed at a large orthopedic center in Indiana. Inclusion criteria: age range of 18–65 years old, with clinical indications of LE tendinopathy greater than 12 weeks, with no recent corticosteriod injection or disease altering comorbidities. Methods. Subjects with chronic LE tendinopathy (107 subjects with 113 affected elbows) were randomly assigned using computer-generated random number tables to 4 weeks of Astym treatment (57 elbows) or EE treatment (56 elbows). Data collected at baseline, 4, 8, 12 weeks, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcome measure: DASH; secondary outcome measures: pain with activity, maximum grip strength and function. The treating physicians and the rater were blinded; subjects and treating clinicians could not be blinded due to the nature of the treatments. Results. Resolution response rates were 78.3% for the Astym group and 40.9% for the EE group. Astym subjects showed greater gains in DASH scores (p = 0.047) and in maximum grip strength (p = 0.008) than EE subjects. Astym therapy also resolved 20/21 (95.7%) of the EE non-responders, who showed improvements in DASH scores (p < 0.005), pain with activity (p = 0.002), and function (p = 0.004) following Astym treatment. Gains continued at 6 and 12 months. No adverse effects were reported. Conclusion. This study suggests Astym therapy is an effective treatment option for patients with LE tendinopathy, as an initial treatment, and after an eccentric exercise program has failed. Registration/Funding. Ball Memorial Hospital provided limited funding. Trial registration was not required by FDAAA 801. Known about the Subject. Under the new paradigm of degenerative tendinopathy, eccentric exercise (EE) is emerging as a first line conservative treatment for LE tendinopathy. EE and Astym treatment are among the few treatment options aiming to improve the degenerative pathophysiology of the tendon. In this trial, Astym therapy, which has shown success in the treatment of tendinopathy, is compared to EE, which has also shown success in the treatment of tendinopathy. Clinical Relevance. There is a need for more effective, conservative treatment options. Based on the current efficacy study, Astym therapy appears to be a promising, non-invasive treatment option. PMID:26038722

  1. The short-term effect of spinal manipulation in the treatment of infantile colic: A randomized controlled clinical trial with a blinded observer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jesper M. M. Wiberg; Jan Nordsteen; Niels Nilsson

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is a short-term effect of spinal manipulation in the treatment of infantile colic. Design: A randomized controlled trial. Setting: A private chiropractic practice and the National Health Service's health visitor nurses in the uburb Ballerup (Copenhagen, Denmark). Subjects: Infants seen by the health visitor nurses, who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for infantile colic. Intervention: One

  2. Effects of different cooling treatments on water diffusion, microcirculation, and water content within exercised muscles: evaluation by magnetic resonance T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Osamu; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of different cooling treatments on exercised muscles. Seven adults underwent four post-exercise treatments (20-min ice-bag application, 60-min gel-pack application at 10 degrees C and 17 degrees C, and non-cooling treatment) with at least 1 week between treatments. Magnetic resonance diffusion- and T2-weighted images were obtained to calculate the apparent diffusion coefficients (apparent diffusion coefficient 1, which reflects intramuscular water diffusion and microcirculation, and apparent diffusion coefficient 2, which is approximately equal to the true diffusion coefficient that excludes as much of the effect of intramuscular microcirculation as possible) and the T2 values (intramuscular water content level) of the ankle dorsiflexors, respectively, before and after ankle dorsiflexion exercise and after post-exercise treatment. The T2 values increased significantly after exercise and returned to pre-exercise values after each treatment; no significant differences were observed among the four post-exercise treatments. Both apparent diffusion coefficients also increased significantly after exercise and decreased significantly after the three cooling treatments; no significant difference was detected among the three cooling treatments. Local cooling suppresses both water diffusion and microcirculation within exercised muscles. Moreover, although the treatment time was longer, adequate cooling effects could be achieved using the gel-pack applications at relatively mild cooling temperatures. PMID:20845216

  3. Postinjury treatment with magnesium sulfate attenuates neuropathic pains following spinal cord injury in male rats.

    PubMed

    Farsi, Leila; Afshari, Khashayar; Keshavarz, Mansoor; NaghibZadeh, Maryam; Memari, Fereidoon; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas

    2015-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has a number of severe and disabling consequences including chronic pain. Approximately 40% of patients experience neuropathic pain, which appears to be persistent. Previous studies have demonstrated the neuroprotective effects of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4). We aimed to investigate the effect of MgSO4 on neuropathic pains following SCI in male rats. Thirty-two adult male rats (weight 300-350?g) were used. After laminectomy, a complete SCI was induced by compression of the spinal cord for 1?min with an aneurysm clip. A single dose of 300 or 600?mg/kg MgSO4 was injected intraperitoneally. Tail-flick latency and acetone drop test scores were evaluated before surgery and once a week for 4 weeks after surgery. Rats in groups SCI+Mg300 and SCI+Mg600 showed significantly higher mean tail-flick latencies and lower mean scores in the acetone test compared with those in the SCI+veh group 4 weeks after surgery (P<0.05). These findings revealed that systemic single-dose administration of MgSO4 can attenuate thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia induced by SCI in rats. PMID:25369748

  4. Surgical treatment of a 180° thoracolumbar fixed kyphosis in a young achondroplastic patient: a one-stage "in situ" combined fusion and spinal cord translocation.

    PubMed

    Aurégan, J C; Odent, T; Zerah, M; Padovani, J P; Glorion, C

    2010-11-01

    An achondroplastic patient with a thoracolumbar kyphosis was first seen at the age of 16 at our institution. His only concern at that time was the aesthetic implication of his deformity. His physical examination was normal except for loss of the neurologic reflexes in the lower limbs. The radiographs showed a fixed 180° thoracolumbar kyphosis with correct frontal and sagittal balances. No spinal cord anomaly was found on MRI. Two years later, he developed a progressive neurogenic claudication of the lower limbs. He was still neurologically intact at rest. The MRI showed an abnormal central spinal cord signal in front of the apex of the kyphosis associated with the narrow congenital spinal canal. In regards to this progressive neurological worsening, a surgical treatment was decided. We decided to perform a front and back arthrodesis combined with a spinal cord decompression without reduction of the deformity. A five-level hemilaminotomy was performed with a posterior approach at the kyphosis deformity. The spinal cord was individualised onto 10 cm and the left nerve roots were isolated. A decancellation osteotomy of the three apex vertebrae and a disc excision were performed. The posterior aspect of the vertebral body was then translated forward 2 cm and in association with the spinal cord. Two nerve roots were severed laterally to approach the anterior part of the kyphosis and a peroneal strut graft was inlayed anterolaterally. A complementary anterior and a right posterolateral fusion was made with cancellous bone. The patient was immobilised in a cast for 3 months relayed by a thoracolumbosacral orthosis for 6 months. At 3 years follow-up, the neurogenic claudication had disappeared. No worsening of the kyphosis was observed. His only complaint is violent electric shock in the lower limbs with any external sudden pressure on the spinal cord in the area uncovered by bone. PMID:20714758

  5. Localized and sustained delivery of fibroblast growth factor-2 from a nanoparticle-hydrogel composite for treatment of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kang, Catherine E; Baumann, M Douglas; Tator, Charles H; Shoichet, Molly S

    2013-01-01

    After traumatic spinal cord injury, grossly injured blood vessels leak blood and fluid into the parenchyma, leading to a large cystic cavity. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) can reduce immediate vasoconstriction of vessels in the tissue surrounding the primary injury and promote angiogenesis. A localized delivery system would both achieve restricted delivery of FGF2 to the spinal cord and limit possible systemic effects such as mitogenesis. To enhance the endogenous angiogenic response after spinal cord injury, FGF2 was encapsulated in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles which were embedded in a biopolymer blend of hyaluronan and methylcellulose (HAMC) and then injected into the intrathecal space. Treatment began immediately after a 26 g clip compression spinal cord injury in rats and consisted of intrathecal delivery of FGF2 from the HAMC/PLGA/FGF2 composite. Control animals received intrathecal HAMC loaded with blank nanoparticles, intrathecal HAMC alone or intrathecal artificial cerebrospinal fluid alone. Sustained and localized delivery of FGF2 from composite HAMC/PLGA/FGF2 achieved higher blood vessel density in the dorsal horns 28 days post-injury, due to either greater angiogenesis near the epicenter of the injury or vasoprotection acutely after spinal cord injury. Importantly, delivery of FGF2 from composite HAMC/PLGA/FGF2 did not produce proliferative lesions that had been previously reported for FGF2 delivered locally using a minipump/catheter. These results suggest that localized and sustained delivery with composite HAMC/PLGA/FGF2 is an excellent system to deliver biomolecules directly to the spinal cord, thereby circumventing the blood spinal cord barrier and avoiding systemic side effects. PMID:22796886

  6. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2014-12-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mmol/L that occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited and often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Treatment of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):228-240. PMID:25498260

  7. Apamin-mediated actively targeted drug delivery for treatment of spinal cord injury: more than just a concept.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin; Jiang, Hong; Bi, Qiuyan; Luo, Qingsong; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Zhangbao; Li, Chong

    2014-09-01

    Faced with the complex medical challenge presented by spinal cord injuries (SCI) and considering the lack of any available curative therapy, the development of a novel method of delivering existing drugs or candidate agents can be perceived to be as important as the development of new therapeutic molecules. By combining three ingredients currently in clinical use or undergoing testing, we have designed a central nervous system targeted delivery system based on apamin-modified polymeric micelles (APM). Apamin, one of the major components of honey bee venom, serves as the targeting moiety, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE) serves as the drug-loaded material, and curcumin is used as the therapeutic agent. Apamin was conjugated with NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide)-PEG-DSPE in a site-specific manner, and APM were prepared by a thin-film hydration method. A formulation comprising 0.5 mol % targeting ligand with 50 nm particle size showed strong targeting efficiency in vivo and was evaluated in pharmacodynamic assays. A 7-day treatment by daily intravenous administration of low doses of APM (corresponding to 5 mg/kg of curcumin) was performed. Significantly enhanced recovery and prolonged survival was found in the SCI mouse model, as compared to sham-treated groups, with no apparent toxicity. A single dose of apamin-conjugated polymers was about 700-fold lower than the LD50 amount, suggesting that APM and apamin have potential for clinical applications as spinal cord targeting ligand for delivery of agents in treatment of diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:25098949

  8. The Outcomes of Manipulation or Mobilization Therapy Compared with Physical Therapy or Exercise for Neck Pain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Josh; Kaplan, Leon; Fischer, Dena J.; Skelly, Andrea C.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design?Systematic review. Study Rationale?Neck pain is a prevalent condition. Spinal manipulation and mobilization procedures are becoming an accepted treatment for neck pain. However, data on the effectiveness of these treatments have not been summarized. Objective?To compare manipulation or mobilization of the cervical spine to physical therapy or exercise for symptom improvement in patients with neck pain. Methods?A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse Database, and bibliographies of key articles, which compared spinal manipulation or mobilization therapy with physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. Articles were included based on predetermined criteria and were appraised using a predefined quality rating scheme. Results?From 197 citations, 7 articles met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. There were no differences in pain improvement when comparing spinal manipulation to exercise, and there were inconsistent reports of pain improvement in subjects who underwent mobilization therapy versus physical therapy. No disability improvement was reported between treatment groups in studies of acute or chronic neck pain patients. No functional improvement was found with manipulation therapy compared with exercise treatment or mobilization therapy compared with physical therapy groups in patients with acute pain. In chronic neck pain subjects who underwent spinal manipulation therapy compared to exercise treatment, results for short-term functional improvement were inconsistent. Conclusion?The data available suggest that there are minimal short- and long-term treatment differences in pain, disability, patient-rated treatment improvement, treatment satisfaction, health status, or functional improvement when comparing manipulation or mobilization therapy to physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. This systematic review is limited by the variability of treatment interventions and lack of standardized outcomes to assess treatment benefit. PMID:24436697

  9. Intensity-dependent alterations in the excitability of cortical and spinal projections to the knee extensors during isometric and locomotor exercise.

    PubMed

    Weavil, J C; Sidhu, S K; Mangum, T S; Richardson, R S; Amann, M

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the role of exercise intensity and associated central motor drive in determining corticomotoneuronal excitability. Ten participants performed a series of nonfatiguing (3 s) isometric single-leg knee extensions (ISO; 10-100% of maximal voluntary contractions, MVC) and cycling bouts (30-160% peak aerobic capacity, Wpeak). At various exercise intensities, electrical potentials were evoked in the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) via transcranial magnetic stimulation (motor-evoked potentials, MEP), and electrical stimulation of both the cervicomedullary junction (cervicomedullary evoked potentials, CMEP) and the femoral nerve (maximal M-waves, Mmax). Whereas Mmax remained unchanged in both muscles (P > 0.40), voluntary electromyographic activity (EMG) increased in an exercise intensity-dependent manner for ISO and cycling exercise in VL and RF (both P < 0.001). During ISO exercise, MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased in VL and RF until a plateau was reached at ?75% MVC; further increases in contraction intensity did not cause additional changes (P > 0.35). During cycling exercise, VL-MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ?65% until a plateau was reached at Wpeak. In contrast, RF MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ?110% throughout the tested cycling intensities without the occurrence of a plateau. Furthermore, alterations in EMG below the plateau influenced corticomotoneuronal excitability similarly between exercise modalities. In both exercise modalities, the MEP-to-CMEP ratio did not change with exercise intensity (P > 0.22). In conclusion, increases in exercise intensity and EMG facilitates the corticomotoneuronal pathway similarly in isometric knee extension and locomotor exercise until a plateau occurs at a submaximal exercise intensity. This facilitation appears to be primarily mediated by increases in excitability of the motoneuron pool. PMID:25876651

  10. An Injectable, Calcium Responsive Composite Hydrogel for the Treatment of Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Immediately following spinal cord injury, further injury can occur through several secondary injury cascades. As a consequence of cell lysis, an increase in extracellular Ca2+ results in additional neuronal loss by inducing apoptosis. Thus, hydrogels that reduce extracellular Ca2+ concentration may reduce secondary injury severity. The goal of this study was to develop composite hydrogels consisting of alginate, chitosan, and genipin that interact with extracellular Ca2+ to enable in situ gelation while maintaining an elastic modulus similar to native spinal cord (?1000 Pa). It was hypothesized that incorporation of genipin and chitosan would regulate hydrogel electrostatic characteristics and influence hydrogel porosity, degradation, and astrocyte behavior. Hydrogel composition was varied to create hydrogels with statistically similar mechanical properties (?1000 Pa) that demonstrated tunable charge characteristics (6-fold range in free amine concentration) and degradation rate (complete degradation between 7 and 28 days; some blends persist after 28 days). Hydrogels demonstrate high sensitivity to Ca2+ concentration, as a 1 mM change during fabrication induced a significant change in elastic modulus. Additionally, hydrogels incubated in a Ca2+-containing solution exhibited an increased linear viscoelastic limit (LVE) and an increased elastic modulus above the LVE limit in a time dependent manner. An extension of the LVE limit implies a change in hydrogel cross-linking structure. Attachment assays demonstrated that addition of chitosan/genipin to alginate hydrogels induced up to a 4-fold increase in the number of attached astrocytes and facilitated astrocyte clustering on the hydrogel surface in a composition dependent manner. Furthermore, Western blots demonstrated tunable glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) expression in astrocytes cultured on hydrogel blends, with some hydrogel compositions demonstrating no significant increase in GFAP expression compared to astrocytes cultured on glass. Thus, alginate/chitosan/genipin hydrogel composites show promise as scaffolds that regulate astrocyte behavior and for the prevention of Ca2+-related secondary neuron damage during acute SCI. PMID:24397537

  11. [Significance of dorsal decompression and instrumentation in the treatment of spinal malignancies].

    PubMed

    Rompe, J D; Hopf, C; Heine, J

    1992-01-01

    From 1986 to 1990 50 patients with increasing spinal instability due to pathologic fractures of one or more vertebrae were operated in the Orthopedic Department of Mainz University Hospital. In the course of 57 operations anterior decompression and stabilization were performed 3 times, whereas dorsal spondylodesis was done with Cotrel-Dubousset's instrumentation (CDI) 32 times, with Luque's 7 times and with Harrington's 1 time; a combination of CDI and Luque was chosen in 2 cases, a combination of Harrington and Luque in 1 case. 3 times a single-stage combination and 4 times a two-stage combination of ventral and dorsal stabilization was used. The application of the CDI required no postoperative external support. 35 patients suffered from major neurologic deficits preoperatively--among them 11 from a complete and 6 from an incomplete paraparesis--which made spinal cord decompression necessary in advance of the dorsal stabilization. Of these, 16 improved significantly; however, deterioration of the neurologic status occurred in 4 cases with a paraparesis in 3 of them. Survival time postoperatively was approximately 13 months in 27 patients. 9 of these died within half a year after the operative intervention. Failure of fixation as a result of tumor lesion was found in 2 cases of CDI procedure and in 1 case of the Harrington instrumentation. All required a revisional operation. 3 patients developed a radiologic lysis of methylmethacrylate implants fixed by an anterior procedure. Posterior decompression and stabilization render possible resolution of spine pain as well as restoration of mobility until a few days before exitus letalis without restricting adjuvant radio- or chemotherapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1532272

  12. Lumbar spinal stenosis: surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Nasca, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    Spinal stenosis is an acquired or congenital narrowing of the spinal or nerve-root canals. Surgical treatment is often effective. Acquired spinal stenosis most commonly occurs in those with degenerative disk disease and arthritic facets. If the degenerative process stabilizes and there is adequate room to accommodate the neural contents, symptomatic patients become asymptomatic. Residual stability after decompression must be assessed in patients having multilevel decompression. Fusion maybe indicated. In women with osteoporosis coexisting with degenerative scoliosis and spinal stenosis, decompression for concave nerve-root compression and fusion are necessary. Spinal fusion is not indicated in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis having unilateral decompression for lateral stenosis. Patients with central-mixed stenosis may not need fusion. Patients with spinal stenosis after laminectomies and diskectomies had better results when arthrodesis was done in conjunction with repeated decompression. Arthrodesis with instrumentation and decompression is recommended for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis. PMID:12539936

  13. Spinal Tuberculosis: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Rasouli, Mohammad R.; Mirkoohi, Maryam; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Yarandi, Kourosh Karimi

    2012-01-01

    The spinal column is involved in less than 1% of all cases of tuberculosis (TB). Spinal TB is a very dangerous type of skeletal TB as it can be associated with neurologic deficit due to compression of adjacent neural structures and significant spinal deformity. Therefore, early diagnosis and management of spinal TB has special importance in preventing these serious complications. In order to extract current trends in diagnosis and medical or surgical treatment of spinal TB we performed a narrative review with analysis of all the articles available for us which were published between 1990 and 2011. Althoug h the development of more accurate imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and advanced surgical techniques have made the early diagnosis and management of spinal TB much easier, these are still very challenging topics. In this review we aim to discuss the diagnosis and management of spinal TB based on studies with acceptable design, clearly explained results and justifiable conclusions. PMID:23275816

  14. Effects of chronic exercise and treatment with the antipsychotic drug olanzapine on hippocampal volume in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Barr, A M; Wu, C H; Wong, C; Hercher, C; Töpfer, E; Boyda, H N; Procyshyn, R M; Honer, W G; Beasley, C L

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that the hippocampus in schizophrenia patients is reduced in volume compared to the normal population. Antipsychotic medications have had mixed benefits in maintaining hippocampal volume or reversing volume loss. Recent evidence indicates that routine aerobic exercise represents a promising intervention for reversing hippocampal loss and cognitive deficits. In the present study, we measured the effects of chronic treatment with olanzapine and daily exercise on the hippocampal volumes of rats. Adult female rats were treated during the week with either olanzapine (10mg/kg) or vehicle for 9 consecutive weeks. Subgroups of animals were provided access to exercise running wheels for 1 or 3h per day during the same period, or were sedentary. Metabolic indices, including glucose tolerance, were measured on a weekly basis. At the conclusion of the study, brains were perfused and hippocampal sections were Nissl stained. Total hippocampal volume was measured using the Cavalieri estimator. Treatment with olanzapine caused a significant decrease in hippocampal volume in sedentary rats. However, exercise was able to reverse most of this volume loss. The hippocampal sub-regions of the dentate gyrus and CA1 were most strongly affected by olanzapine and exercise. Of interest, there was a strong and highly significant negative correlation between glucose intolerance and hippocampal volume, whereby greater glucose intolerance was associated with a smaller hippocampal volume. These findings indicate that exercise may have beneficial effects on the hippocampus when antipsychotic medication can contribute to changes in volume. PMID:24141179

  15. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the spine. Other surgery, such as a diskectomy , laminectomy , or a foraminotomy , is almost always done first. ... procedures for spinal stenosis , such as foraminotomy or laminectomy After diskectomy in the neck Spinal fusion may ...

  16. SU-C-17A-07: The Development of An MR Accelerator-Enabled Planning-To-Delivery Technique for Stereotactic Palliative Radiotherapy Treatment of Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogcarspel, S J; Kontaxis, C; Velden, J M van der; Bol, G H; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR accelerator-enabled online planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases. The technical challenges include; automated stereotactic treatment planning, online MR-based dose calculation and MR guidance during treatment. Methods: Using the CT data of 20 patients previously treated at our institution, a class solution for automated treatment planning for spinal bone metastases was created. For accurate dose simulation right before treatment, we fused geometrically correct online MR data with pretreatment CT data of the target volume (TV). For target tracking during treatment, a dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR sequence was developed. An in house developed GPU based IMRT optimization and dose calculation algorithm was used for fast treatment planning and simulation. An automatically generated treatment plan developed with this treatment planning system was irradiated on a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator and evaluated using a Delta4 dosimeter. Results: The automated treatment planning method yielded clinically viable plans for all patients. The MR-CT fusion based dose calculation accuracy was within 2% as compared to calculations performed with original CT data. The dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR Sequence was able to provide an update of the anatomical location of the TV every 10 seconds. Dose calculation and optimization of the automatically generated treatment plans using only one GPU took on average 8 minutes. The Delta4 measurement of the irradiated plan agreed with the dose calculation with a 3%/3mm gamma pass rate of 86.4%. Conclusions: The development of an MR accelerator-enabled planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases was presented. Future work will involve developing an intrafraction motion adaptation strategy, MR-only dose calculation, radiotherapy quality-assurance in a magnetic field, and streamlining the entire treatment process on an MR accelerator.

  17. Pain Management Following Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Center Spinal Cord Injury InfoSheet 10 Level - Consumer Pain Management following Spinal Cord Injury coming from somewhere other ... pain is described as burning, cramping and constant. PAIN MANAGEMENT Pain management usually includes treatment with medications, modified ...

  18. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Treatment Following Spinal Cord Injury Improves Mitochondrial Function Correlated with Remarkable Tissue Sparing and Functional Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Samir P.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Lyttle, Travis S.; Magnuson, David S. K.; Rabchevsky, Alexander G.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently documented that treatment with the alternative biofuel, acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC, 300 mg/kg), as late as 1 hr after T10 contusion spinal cord injury (SCI), significantly maintained mitochondrial function 24 hrs after injury. Here we report that following more severe contusion SCI centered on the L1/L2 segments that are postulated to contain lamina X neurons critical for locomotion (the “central pattern generator”), ALC treatment resulted in significant improvements in acute mitochondrial bioenergetics and long-term hindlimb function. While control-injured rats were only able to achieve slight movements of hindlimb joints, ALC-treated animals produced consistent weight-supported plantar steps one month after injury. Such landmark behavioral improvements were significantly correlated with increased tissue sparing of both gray and white matter proximal to the injury, as well as preservation of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive neurons in lamina X rostral to the injury site. These findings signify that functional improvements with ALC treatment are mediated, in part, by preserved locomotor circuitry rostral to upper lumbar contusion SCI. Based on beneficial effects of ALC on mitochondrial bioenergetics after injury, our collective evidence demonstrate that preventing mitochondrial dysfunction acutely “promotes” neuroprotection that may be associated with the milestone recovery of plantar, weight-supported stepping. PMID:22445934

  19. Exercise Regulation of Marrow Fat in the Setting of PPAR? Agonist Treatment in Female C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Styner, Maya; Pagnotti, Gabriel M; Galior, Kornelia; Wu, Xin; Thompson, William R; Uzer, Gunes; Sen, Buer; Xie, Zhihui; Horowitz, Mark C; Styner, Martin A; Rubin, Clinton; Rubin, Janet

    2015-08-01

    The contribution of marrow adipose tissue (MAT) to skeletal fragility is poorly understood. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)? agonists, associated with increased fractures in diabetic patients, increase MAT. Here, we asked whether exercise could limit the MAT accrual and increase bone formation in the setting of PPAR? agonist treatment. Eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were treated with 20-mg/kg·d rosiglitazone (Rosi) and compared with control (CTL) animals. Exercise groups ran 12 km/d when provided access to running wheels (CTL exercise [CTL-E], Rosi-E). After 6 weeks, femoral MAT (volume of lipid binder osmium) and tibial bone morphology were assessed by microcomputer tomography. Rosi was associated with 40% higher femur MAT volume compared with CTL (P < .0001). Exercise suppressed MAT volume by half in CTL-E mice compared with CTL (P < .01) and 19% in Rosi-E compared with Rosi (P < .0001). Rosi treatment increased fat markers perilipin and fatty acid synthase mRNA by 4-fold (P < .01). Exercise was associated with increased uncoupling protein 1 mRNA expression in both CTL-E and Rosi-E groups (P < .05), suggestive of increased brown fat. Rosi increased cortical porosity (P < .0001) but did not significantly impact trabecular or cortical bone quantity. Importantly, exercise induction of trabecular bone volume was not prevented by Rosi (CTL-E 21% > CTL, P < .05; Rosi-E 26% > Rosi, P < .01). In summary, despite the Rosi induction of MAT extending well into the femoral diaphysis, exercise was able to significantly suppress MAT volume and induce bone formation. Our results suggest that the impact of PPAR? agonists on bone and marrow health can be partially mitigated by exercise. PMID:26052898

  20. Invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation for treatment of neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury: A review

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Leis, Stefan; Höller, Peter; Thon, Natasha; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2014-01-01

    Context Past evidence has shown that invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation may be effective for relieving central pain. Objective To perform a topical review of the literature on brain neurostimulation techniques in patients with chronic neuropathic pain due to traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess the current evidence for their therapeutic efficacy. Methods A MEDLINE search was performed using following terms: “Spinal cord injury”, “Neuropathic pain”, “Brain stimulation”, “Deep brain stimulation” (DBS), “Motor cortex stimulation” (MCS), “Transcranial magnetic stimulation” (TMS), “Transcranial direct current stimulation” (tDCS), “Cranial electrotherapy stimulation” (CES). Results Invasive neurostimulation therapies, in particular DBS and epidural MCS, have shown promise as treatments for neuropathic and phantom limb pain. However, the long-term efficacy of DBS is low, while MCS has a relatively higher potential with lesser complications that DBS. Among the non-invasive techniques, there is accumulating evidence that repetitive TMS can produce analgesic effects in healthy subjects undergoing laboratory-induced pain and in chronic pain conditions of various etiologies, at least partially and transiently. Another very safe technique of non-invasive brain stimulation – tDCS – applied over the sensory-motor cortex has been reported to decrease pain sensation and increase pain threshold in healthy subjects. CES has also proved to be effective in managing some types of pain, including neuropathic pain in subjects with SCI. Conclusion A number of studies have begun to use non-invasive neuromodulatory techniques therapeutically to relieve neuropathic pain and phantom phenomena in patients with SCI. However, further studies are warranted to corroborate the early findings and confirm different targets and stimulation paradigms. The utility of these protocols in combination with pharmacological approaches should also be explored. PMID:24090372

  1. [Comparison of metaraminol, phenylephrine and ephedrine in prophylaxis and treatment of hypotension in cesarean section under spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Aragão, Fábio Farias de; Aragão, Pedro Wanderley de; Martins, Carlos Alberto de Souza; Salgado Filho, Natalino; Barroqueiro, Elizabeth de Souza Barcelos

    2014-01-01

    Maternal hypotension is a common complication after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section, with deleterious effects on the fetus and mother. Among the strategies aimed at minimizing the effects of hypotension, vasopressor administration is the most efficient. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of phenylephrine, metaraminol, and ephedrine in the prevention and treatment of hypotension after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. Ninety pregnant women, not in labor, undergoing cesarean section were randomized into three groups to receive a bolus followed by continuous infusion of vasopressor as follows: phenylephrine group (50?g+50?g/min); metaraminol group (0.25mg+0.25mg/min); ephedrine group (4mg+4mg/min). Infusion dose was doubled when systolic blood pressure decreased to 80% of baseline and a bolus was given when systolic blood pressure decreased below 80%. The infusion dose was divided in half when systolic blood pressure increased to 120% and was stopped when it became higher. The incidence of hypotension, nausea and vomiting, reactive hypertension, bradycardia, tachycardia, Apgar scores, and arterial cord blood gases were assessed at the 1st and 5th minutes. There was no difference in the incidence of hypotension, bradycardia, reactive hypertension, infusion discontinuation, atropine administration or Apgar scores. Rescue boluses were higher only in the ephedrine group compared to metaraminol group. The incidence of nausea and vomiting and fetal acidosis were greater in the ephedrine group. The three drugs were effective in preventing hypotension; however, fetal effects were more frequent in the ephedrine group, although transient. PMID:25168433

  2. Metoprolol treatment for two years after coronary bypass grafting: effects on exercise capacity and signs of myocardial ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Sjöland, H.; Caidahl, K.; Lurje, L.; Hjalmarson, A.; Herlitz, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate whether prophylactic treatment with metoprolol for two years after coronary artery bypass grafting improves working capacity and reduces the occurrence of myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease. METHODS--After coronary artery bypass grafting, patients were randomised to treatment with metoprolol or placebo for two years. Two years after randomisation, a computerised 12-lead electrocardiogram was obtained during a standardised bicycle exercise test in 618 patients (64% of all those randomised). RESULTS--The median exercise capacity was 140 W in the metoprolol group (n = 307) and 130 W in the placebo group (n = 311) (P > 0.20). An ST depression of > or = 1 mm at maximum exercise was present in 34% of the patients in the metoprolol group and 38% in the placebo group (P > 0.20) and an ST depression of > or = 2 mm at maximum exercise was present in 11% in the metoprolol group and 16% in the placebo group (P = 0.09). The median values for maximum systolic blood pressure were 200 mm Hg in the metoprolol group and 210 mm Hg in the placebo group (P < 0.0001), while the median values for maximum heart rate were 126 beats/min in the metoprolol group and 143 beats/min in the placebo group (P < 0.0001). The occurrence of cardiac and neurological clinical events two years postoperatively among exercised patients was comparable in the treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS--Treatment with metoprolol for two years after coronary artery bypass grafting did not significantly change exercise capacity or electrocardiographic signs of myocardial ischaemia. PMID:7547016

  3. Usefulness of combining intermittent hypoxia and physical exercise in the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Urdampilleta, Aritz; González-Muniesa, Pedro; Portillo, María P; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2012-06-01

    Obesity is an important public health problem worldwide and is a major risk factor for a number of chronic diseases such as type II diabetes, adverse cardiovascular events and metabolic syndrome-related features. Different treatments have been applied to tackle body fat accumulation and its associated clinical manifestations. Often, relevant weight loss is achieved during the first 6 months under different dietary treatments. From this point, a plateau is reached, and a gradual recovery of the lost weight may occur. Therefore, new research approaches are being investigated to assure weight maintenance. Pioneering investigations have reported that oxygen variations in organic systems may produce changes in body composition. Possible applications of intermittent hypoxia to promote health and in various pathophysiological states have been reported. The hypoxic stimulus in addition to diet and exercise can be an interesting approach to lose weight, by inducing higher basal noradrenalin levels and other metabolic changes whose mechanisms are still unclear. Indeed, hypoxic situations increase the diameter of arterioles, produce peripheral vasodilatation and decrease arterial blood pressure. Furthermore, hypoxic training increases the activity of glycolytic enzymes, enhancing the number of mitochondria and glucose transporter GLUT-4 levels as well as improving insulin sensitivity. Moreover, hypoxia increases blood serotonin and decreases leptin levels while appetite is suppressed. These observations allow consideration of the hypothesis that intermittent hypoxia induces fat loss and may ameliorate cardiovascular health, which might be of interest for the treatment of obesity. This new strategy may be useful and practical for clinical applications in obese patients. PMID:22045452

  4. The Relationship Between Function, Self-perception, and Spinal Deformity Implications for Treatment of Scoliosis in Children With Spina Bifida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eugene K. Wai; Nancy L. Young; Brian M. Feldman; Elizabeth M. Badley; James G. Wright

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rela- tionship of spinal deformity with physical function and self- perception in children with spina bifida. Ninety-eight eligible children with scoliosis and spina bifida were identified; 80 of them (82%) consented to participate. Spinal deformity was measured in many ways, including scoliosis, coronal balance, and pelvic obliquity. Mea- sures of physical

  5. Treatment of the Chronically Injured Spinal Cord with Neurotrophic Factors Can Promote Axonal Regeneration from Supraspinal Neurons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jian-Hui Ye; John D. Houle

    1997-01-01

    Axonal regeneration has been demonstrated by supraspinal neurons long after a spinal cord injury, although this potential seems limited to a few neurons in specific nuclear groups. Whether the regenerative response could be enhanced by exposure to neurotrophic factors was examined in this study. Neurons injured during a cervical spinal cord hemisection lesion were labeled with true blue (TB). Four

  6. Axonal regeneration of Clarke’s neurons beyond the spinal cord injury scar after treatment with chondroitinase ABC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leung-Wah Yick; Pik-To Cheung; Kwok-Fai So; Wutian Wu

    2003-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that enzymatic digestion of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) at the scar promotes the axonal regrowth of Clarke’s nucleus (CN) neurons into an implanted peripheral nerve graft after hemisection of the spinal cord. The present study examined whether degradation of CSPG using chondroitinase ABC promoted the regeneration of CN neurons through the scar into the rostral spinal

  7. Physical exercise as a preventive or disease-modifying treatment of dementia and brain aging.

    PubMed

    Ahlskog, J Eric; Geda, Yonas E; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Petersen, Ronald C

    2011-09-01

    A rapidly growing literature strongly suggests that exercise, specifically aerobic exercise, may attenuate cognitive impairment and reduce dementia risk. We used PubMed (keywords exercise and cognition) and manuscript bibliographies to examine the published evidence of a cognitive neuroprotective effect of exercise. Meta-analyses of prospective studies documented a significantly reduced risk of dementia associated with midlife exercise; similarly, midlife exercise significantly reduced later risks of mild cognitive impairment in several studies. Among patients with dementia or mild cognitive impairment, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) documented better cognitive scores after 6 to 12 months of exercise compared with sedentary controls. Meta-analyses of RCTs of aerobic exercise in healthy adults were also associated with significantly improved cognitive scores. One year of aerobic exercise in a large RCT of seniors was associated with significantly larger hippocampal volumes and better spatial memory; other RCTs in seniors documented attenuation of age-related gray matter volume loss with aerobic exercise. Cross-sectional studies similarly reported significantly larger hippocampal or gray matter volumes among physically fit seniors compared with unfit seniors. Brain cognitive networks studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging display improved connectivity after 6 to 12 months of exercise. Animal studies indicate that exercise facilitates neuroplasticity via a variety of biomechanisms, with improved learning outcomes. Induction of brain neurotrophic factors by exercise has been confirmed in multiple animal studies, with indirect evidence for this process in humans. Besides a brain neuroprotective effect, physical exercise may also attenuate cognitive decline via mitigation of cerebrovascular risk, including the contribution of small vessel disease to dementia. Exercise should not be overlooked as an important therapeutic strategy. PMID:21878600

  8. The future of spine surgery: New horizons in the treatment of spinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Noojan; Crew, Laura K.; Tredway, Trent L.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Methods: As with any evolving surgical discipline, it is difficult to predict the future of the practice and science of spine surgery. In the last decade, there have been dramatic developments in both the techniques as well as the tools employed in the delivery of better outcomes to patients undergoing such surgery. In this article, we explore four specific areas in spine surgery: namely the role of minimally invasive spine surgery; motion preservation; robotic-aided surgery and neuro-navigation; and the use of biological substances to reduce the number of traditional and revision spine surgeries. Results: Minimally invasive spine surgery has flourished in the last decade with an increasing amount of surgeries being performed for a wide variety of degenerative, traumatic, and neoplastic processes. Particular progress in the development of a direct lateral approach as well as improvement of tubular retractors has been achieved. Improvements in motion preservation techniques have led to a significant number of patients achieving arthroplasty where fusion was the only option previously. Important caveats to the indications for arthroplasty are discussed. Both robotics and neuro-navigation have become further refined as tools to assist in spine surgery and have been demonstrated to increase accuracy in spinal instrumentation placement. There has much debate and refinement in the use of biologically active agents to aid and augment function in spine surgery. Biological agents targeted to the intervertebral disc space could increase function and halt degeneration in this anatomical region. Conclusions: Great improvements have been achieved in developing better techniques and tools in spine surgery. It is envisaged that progress in the four focus areas discussed will lead to better outcomes and reduced burdens on the future of both our patients and the health care system. PMID:23653885

  9. Effects of different cooling treatments on water diffusion, microcirculation, and water content within exercised muscles: Evaluation by magnetic resonance T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osamu Yanagisawa; Hideyuki Takahashi; Toru Fukubayashi

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of different cooling treatments on exercised muscles. Seven adults underwent four post-exercise treatments (20-min ice-bag application, 60-min gel-pack application at 10°C and 17°C, and non-cooling treatment) with at least 1 week between treatments. Magnetic resonance diffusion- and T2-weighted images were obtained to calculate the apparent diffusion coefficients (apparent diffusion coefficient 1, which reflects

  10. Coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis and spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Özaras, Nihal; Poyraz, Emine; Toprak, Hüseyin; Güler, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Osteopoikilosis is a rare hereditary bone disease that is usually asymptomatic. It is generally diagnosed incidentally on plain radiography. The coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis or spinal stenosis is rarely reported. Here, we report the case of a 27-year-old male patient with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. [Subject] A 27-year-old male patient with buttock pain and back pain radiating to the legs. [Methods] A plain anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis revealed numerous round and oval sclerotic bone areas of varying size. Investigation of the knee joints showed similar findings, and the patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis. Lumbar magnetic resonance images showed spinal stenosis and degenerative changes in his lumbar facet joints. Magnetic resonance images of the sacroiliac joints showed bilateral involvement with narrowing of both sacroiliac joints, nodular multiple sclerotic foci, and contrast enhancement in both joint spaces and periarticular areas. HLA B-27 test was negative. [Results] The patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. Treatment included asemetasin twice daily and exercise therapy. [Conclusion] Symptomatic patients with osteopoikilosis should be investigated for other possible coexisting medical conditions; this will shorten the times to diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or diabetes benefit from regular exercise. Exercise also helps people ... watch this video To learn about exercise and diabetes, see "Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes" from Go4Life®, ...

  12. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Fang, Marong; Chen, Haohao; Gou, Fangming; Ding, Mingxing

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies. PMID:25598784

  13. Contemporary Management of Spinal Osteomyelitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali R. Rezai; Henry H. Woo; Thomas J. Errico; Paul R. Cooper

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We review the results of treatment of a series of patients with spinal osteomyelitis, to formulate a systematic and comprehensive approach to the management of this disease in light of recent technical and conceptual advances in imaging, spinal biomechanics, and internal fixation.

  14. Treatment of spinal muscular atrophy cells with drugs that upregulate SMN expression reveals inter- and intra-patient variability

    PubMed Central

    Also-Rallo, Eva; Alías, Laura; Martínez-Hernández, Rebeca; Caselles, Lidia; Barceló, María J; Baiget, Montserrat; Bernal, Sara; Tizzano, Eduardo F

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene. The homologous copy (SMN2) is always present in SMA patients. SMN1 gene transcripts are usually full-length (FL), but exon 7 is spliced out in a high proportion of SMN2 transcripts (delta7) (?7). Advances in drug therapy for SMA have shown that an increase in SMN mRNA and protein levels can be achieved in vitro. We performed a systematic analysis of SMN expression in primary fibroblasts and EBV-transformed lymphoblasts from seven SMA patients with varying clinical severity and different SMN1 genotypes to determine expression differences in two accessible tissues (skin and blood). The basal expression of SMN mRNA FL and ?7 in fibroblasts and lymphoblasts was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. The FL-SMN and FL/?7 SMN ratios were higher in control cells than in patients. Furthermore, we investigated the response of these cell lines to hydroxyurea, valproate and phenylbutyrate, drugs previously reported to upregulate SMN2. The response to treatments with these compounds was heterogeneous. We found both intra-patient and inter-patient variability even within haploidentical siblings, suggesting that tissue and individual factors may affect the response to these compounds. To optimize the stratification of patients in clinical trials, in vitro studies should be performed before enrolment so as to define each patient as a responder or non-responder to the compound under investigation. PMID:21610752

  15. Rest versus exercise as treatment for patients with low back pain and Modic changes. a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical experience suggests that many patients with Modic changes have relatively severe and persistent low back pain (LBP), which typically appears to be resistant to treatment. Exercise therapy is the recommended treatment for chronic LBP, however, due to their underlying pathology, Modic changes might be a diagnostic subgroup that does not benefit from exercise. The objective of this study was to compare the current state-of-the art treatment approach (exercise and staying active) with a new approach (load reduction and daily rest) for people with Modic changes using a randomized controlled trial design. Methods Participants were patients from an outpatient clinic with persistent LBP and Modic changes. They were allocated using minimization to either rest therapy for 10 weeks with a recommendation to rest for two hours daily and the option of using a flexible lumbar belt or exercise therapy once a week for 10 weeks. Follow-up was at 10 weeks after recruitment and 52 weeks after intervention and the clinical outcome measures were pain, disability, general health and global assessment, supplemented by weekly information on low back problems and sick leave measured by short text message (SMS) tracking. Results In total, 100 patients were included in the study. Data on 87 patients at 10 weeks and 96 patients at one-year follow-up were available and were used in the intention-to-treat analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two intervention groups on any outcome. Conclusions No differences were found between the two treatment approaches, 'rest and reduced load' and 'exercise and staying active', in patients with persistent LBP and Modic changes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00454792 PMID:22376791

  16. Nociceptive spinal cord neurons of laminae I-III exhibit oxidative stress damage during diabetic neuropathy which is prevented by early antioxidant treatment with epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG).

    PubMed

    Raposo, D; Morgado, C; Pereira-Terra, P; Tavares, I

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord neurons located in laminae I-III respond to nociceptive stimuli and participate in the transmission of painful information to the brain. In the present study we evaluated if nociceptive laminae I-III neurons are affected by oxidative stress damage in a model of diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP), the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat (STZ rat). Additionally, we evaluated the effects of a preventive antioxidant treatment with epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) in nociceptive neuronal activation and behavioural signs of DNP. Three days after diabetes induction, a treatment protocol of STZ rats with an aqueous solution of EGCG in the drinking water was initiated. Ten weeks after the onset of treatment, the spinal cords were immunoreacted against validated markers of oxidative stress damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine; 8-OHdG) and of nociceptive neuronal activation (Fos). Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed before and after EGCG treatment. Untreated STZ rats presented increased levels of 8-OHdG immunoreaction, higher numbers of Fos-immunoreacted neurons and high levels of co-localization of 8-OHdG and Fos in laminae I-III. Treatment with EGCG normalized the increase of the above mentioned parameters and ameliorated mechanical hypersensitivity. The present study shows that nociceptive neurons in spinal cord laminae I-III exhibit oxidative stress damage during diabetic neuropathy, which probably affects ascending pain transmission during DNP. The neurobiological mechanisms and translational perspectives of the beneficial effects of a preventive and sustained EGCG treatment in DNP need to be evaluated in the future. PMID:25522867

  17. Chiropractic spinal manipulation for neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Edzard

    2003-10-01

    Chiropractic spinal manipulation (CSM) is often used as a treatment for neck pain. However, its effectiveness is unclear. The aim of this article was to evaluate systematically and critically the effectiveness of CSM for neck pain. Six electronic databases were searched for all relevant randomized clinical trials. Strict inclusion/exclusion criteria had been predefined. Key data were validated and extracted. Methodologic quality was assessed by using the Jadad score. Statistical pooling was anticipated but was deemed not feasible. Four studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Two studies were on single interventions, and 2 included series of CSM treatments, both with a 12-month follow-up. The 2 short-term trials used spinal mobilization as a control intervention. The 2 long-term studies compared CSM with exercise therapy. None of the 4 trials convincingly demonstrated the superiority of CSM over control interventions. In conclusion, the notion that CSM is more effective than conventional exercise treatment in the treatment of neck pain was not supported by rigorous trial data. PMID:14622659

  18. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ciricillo, S F; Weinstein, P R

    1993-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis, the results of congenital and degenerative constriction of the neural canal and foramina leading to lumbosacral nerve root or cauda equina compression, is a common cause of disability in middle-aged and elderly patients. Advanced neuroradiologic imaging techniques have improved our ability to localize the site of nerve root entrapment in patients presenting with neurogenic claudication or painful radiculopathy. Although conservative medical management may be successful initially, surgical decompression by wide laminectomy or an intralaminar approach should be done in patients with serious or progressive pain or neurologic dysfunction. Because the early diagnosis and treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis may prevent intractable pain and the permanent neurologic sequelae of chronic nerve root entrapment, all physicians should be aware of the different neurologic presentations and the treatment options for patients with spinal stenosis. Images PMID:8434469

  19. Metabolic Consequences of Dieting and Exercise in the Treatment of Obesity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahoe, Clyde P.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the effects of dieting and exercise on resting metabolic rate (RMR) in overweight women (N=10). Results showed that dieting lowered RMR by nearly double that expected on the basis of resulting weight loss; and that exercise caused RMR to rise to a level appropriate to prevailing body weight. (LLL)

  20. The effects of alkaline treatment on short?term maximal exercise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Inbar; A. Rotstein; I. Jacobs; P. Kaiser; R. Dlin; R. Dotan

    1983-01-01

    The effects of alkalosis on submaximal and maximal exercise performance of a relatively long duration have been investigated previously. The present study examined the effects of sodium bicarbonate ingestion on cycling performance of the 30 s Wingate Anaerobic Test using 13 male physical education students. Three hours prior to exercise, subjects ingested either table salt (control) or sodium bicarbonate (alkalosis)

  1. Mechanistic investigation of adult myotube response to exercise and drug treatment in vitro using a multiplexed functional assay system.

    PubMed

    McAleer, C W; Smith, A S T; Najjar, S; Pirozzi, K; Long, C J; Hickman, J J

    2014-12-01

    The ability to accurately measure skeletal muscle functional performance at the single-cell level would be advantageous for exercise physiology studies and disease modeling applications. To that end, this study characterizes the functional response of individual skeletal muscle myotubes derived from adult rodent tissue to creatine treatment and chronic exercise. The observed improvements to functional performance in response to these treatments appear to correlate with alterations in hypertrophic and mitochondrial biogenesis pathways, supporting previously published in vivo and in vitro data, which highlights the role of these pathways in augmenting skeletal muscle output. The developed system represents a multiplexed functional in vitro assay capable of long-term assessment of contractile cellular outputs in real-time that is compatible with concomitant molecular biology analysis. Adoption of this system in drug toxicity and efficacy studies would improve understanding of compound activity on physical cellular outputs and provide more streamlined and predictive data for future preclinical analyses. PMID:25301895

  2. Emerging technologies for degenerative disk disease: potential synergy between biochemical signaling and spinal biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Steven; Sowa, Gwendolyn

    2009-05-01

    Interventional spinal procedures are performed with increasing frequency, and they remain an important tool for physiatrists treating patients with spine pain. As the potential treatment options expand with novel technologies on the horizon, such as gene- and cell-based therapies, the physiatrist will be uniquely poised to deliver such treatments in conjunction with exercise-based therapies. Therefore, the development of novel technologies requires particular attention to the potential synergy between biochemical signaling and spinal biomechanics. It is hoped that such insight will result in improved treatment options for patients with pain related to degenerative disk disease, leading to improved nonoperative outcomes. This article reviews the current knowledge of precipitants of disk degeneration, the effects of beneficial and traumatic levels of disk loading, and how each of these can be impacted by novel treatment options. PMID:19627934

  3. Incidence and Treatment Patterns in Hospitalizations for Malignant Spinal Cord Compression in the United States, 1998-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Kimberley S. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Leslie K. [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Mak, Raymond H. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Wang, Shuang [Department of Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Pile-Spellman, John [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Abrahm, Janet L. [Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Center for Palliative Care, Boston, MA (United States); Prigerson, Holly G. [Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Center for Palliative Care, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Psycho-oncology and Palliative Care Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Balboni, Tracy A., E-mail: tbalboni@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Center for Palliative Care, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Psycho-oncology and Palliative Care Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To characterize patterns in incidence, management, and costs of malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) hospitalizations in the United States, using population-based data. Methods and Materials: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, an all-payer healthcare database representative of all U.S. hospitalizations, MSCC-related hospitalizations were identified for the period 1998-2006. Cases were combined with age-adjusted Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer death data to estimate annual incidence. Linear regression characterized trends in patient, treatment, and hospital characteristics, costs, and outcomes. Logistic regression was used to examine inpatient treatment (radiotherapy [RT], surgery, or neither) by hospital characteristics and year, adjusting for confounding. Results: We identified 15,367 MSCC-related cases, representing 75,876 hospitalizations. Lung cancer (24.9%), prostate cancer (16.2%), and multiple myeloma (11.1%) were the most prevalent underlying cancer diagnoses. The annual incidence of MSCC hospitalization among patients dying of cancer was 3.4%; multiple myeloma (15.0%), Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (13.9%), and prostate cancer (5.5%) exhibited the highest cancer-specific incidence. Over the study period, inpatient RT for MSCC decreased (odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.81), whereas surgery increased (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17-1.84). Hospitalization costs for MSCC increased (5.3% per year, p < 0.001). Odds of inpatient RT were greater at teaching hospitals (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.19-1.67), whereas odds of surgery were greater at urban institutions (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.29-2.58). Conclusions: In the United States, patients dying of cancer have an estimated 3.4% annual incidence of MSCC requiring hospitalization. Inpatient management of MSCC varied over time and by hospital characteristics, with hospitalization costs increasing. Future studies are required to determine the impact of treatment patterns on MSCC outcomes and strategies for reducing MSCC-related costs.

  4. Effects of Low-Level Laser Therapy and Eccentric Exercises in the Treatment of Recreational Athletes With Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Apostolos Stergioulas; Marianna Stergioula; Reidar Aarskog; Rodrigo A. B. Lopes-Martins; Jan M. Bjordal

    2008-01-01

    Background: Eccentric exercises (EEs) are recommended for the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy, but the clinical effect from EE has a slow onset.Hypothesis: The addition of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to EE may cause more rapid clinical improvement.Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1.Methods: A total of 52 recreational athletes with chronic Achilles tendinopathy symptoms were randomized to groups

  5. A Feasibility study on Combining Internet-Based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy with Physical Exercise as Treatment for Panic Disorder-Treatment Protocol and Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Hovland, Anders; Johansen, Henning; Sjøbø, Trond; Vøllestad, Jon; Nordhus, Inger Hilde; Pallesen, Ståle; Havik, Odd E; Martinsen, Egil W; Nordgreen, Tine

    2015-06-01

    Internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) is a recommended, cost-effective and efficacious treatment for panic disorder (PD). However, treatment effects in psychiatric settings indicate that a substantial proportion fail to achieve remission. Physical exercise improves symptoms in patients with PD, and acts through mechanisms that can augment the effect of ICBT. The feasibility of combining these two interventions has not previously been investigated, and this was the aim of this study. The intervention comprised guided ICBT combined with one weekly session of supervised and two weekly sessions of unsupervised physical exercise for a total of 12 weeks. Treatment rationale, procedures and protocols are presented together with preliminary results for four patients with PD who have currently finished treatment. Quantitative and qualitative results are reported on the feasibility of adhering to the treatments, treatment outcome as assessed by clinician rating and estimation of reliable and clinically significant change for outcome measures, and participants' satisfactions with the combined treatment. The preliminary results indicate that the combined treatment is feasible to complete, and that the combination is perceived by the participants as beneficial. PMID:25785484

  6. Management of spinal metastases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank D Vrionis; Rafael Miguel

    2003-01-01

    Spinal metastasis is a frequent oncologic and neurosurgical emergency in patients with cancer. Most patients present with back pain and the diagnosis is established with a screening MRI of the spine. Treatment options include steroids, biphosphonates, radiation therapy, surgery and radiosurgery. Pain management is a very important aspect and includes opioids, anti-inflammatory agents, newer anticonvulsants and tricyclic anti-depressants, as well

  7. Surgical versus Non-Operative Treatment for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Four-Year Results of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, James N.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Anna; Blood, Emily; Herkowitz, Harry; Cammisa, Frank; Albert, Todd; Boden, Scott D.; Hilibrand, Alan; Goldberg, Harley; Berven, Sigurd; An, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Randomized trial and concurrent observational cohort study Objective To compare 4 year outcomes of surgery to non-operative care for spinal stenosis. Summary of Background Data Surgery for spinal stenosis has been shown to be more effective compared to non-operative treatment over two years, but longer-term data have not been analyzed. Methods Surgical candidates from 13 centers in 11 U.S. states with at least 12 weeks of symptoms and confirmatory imaging were enrolled in a randomized cohort (RC) or observational cohort (OC). Treatment was standard decompressive laminectomy or standard non-operative care. Primary outcomes were SF-36 bodily pain (BP) and physical function (PF) scales and the modified Oswestry Disability index (ODI) assessed at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and yearly up to 4 years. Results 289 patients enrolled in the RC and 365 patients enrolled in the OC. An as-treated analysis combining the RC and OC and adjusting for potential confounders found that the clinically significant advantages for surgery previously reported were maintained through 4 years, with treatment effects (defined as mean change in surgery group minus mean change in non-op group) for BP 12.6 (95% CI, 8.5 to 16.7); PF 8.6 (95% CI, 4.6 to 12.6); and ODI ?9.4 (95% CI, ?12.6, to ?6.2). Early advantages for surgical treatment for secondary measures such as bothersomeness, satisfaction with symptoms and self-rated progress also were maintained. Conclusions Patients with symptomatic spinal stenosis treated surgically compared to those treated non-operatively maintain substantially greater improvement in pain and function through four years. PMID:20453723

  8. Effect of acute intermittent hypoxia treatment on ventilatory load compensation and magnitude estimation of inspiratory resistive loads in an individual with chronic incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Poonam B; Tester, Nicole J; Davenport, Paul W

    2014-11-15

    Context Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes disruption of the efferent input to and afferent input from respiratory muscles, which impairs respiratory motor and sensory functions, respectively. This disturbs the injured individual's ability to respond to ventilatory loads and may alter the respiratory perceptual sensitivity of applied loads. Acute intermittent hypoxia with elevated CO2 (AIH treatment) has been shown to induce ventilatory long-term facilitation in individuals with chronic SCI. This study evaluated the effect of ten days of AIH treatment on ventilatory load compensation and respiratory perceptual sensitivity to inspiratory resistive loads (IRL), in an individual with chronic, incomplete cervical SCI. Methods Case report and literature review. Findings We report a case of a 55-year-old female with a C4 chronic, incomplete SCI (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale D). The subject underwent evaluation at four time-points: Baseline, Post Sham, AIH Day 1 and AIH Day 10. Significant improvements in airflow generated in response to applied IRL were found after AIH treatment compared to Baseline. There were no significant changes in the respiratory perceptual sensitivity to applied IRL after AIH treatment. Clinical relevance Rehabilitative interventions after SCI demand restoration of the respiratory motor function. However, they must also ensure that the respiratory perceptual sensitivity of the injured individual does not hinder their capability to compensate to ventilatory challenges. PMID:25400130

  9. Spinal Cord Injury

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patient Education Institute

    This patient education program discusses how spinal cord injuries are caused and their treatment options. It also includes tips on how to prevent spinal cord injuries. This resource is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: This tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

  10. Transplantation of Nogo-66 receptor gene-silenced cells in a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Fan, Yuhong; Zhang, Jianjun

    2013-03-15

    Inhibition of neurite growth, which is in large part mediated by the Nogo-66 receptor, affects neural regeneration following bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. The tissue engineering scaffold poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) has good histocompatibility and can promote the growth of regenerating nerve fibers. The present study used small interfering RNA to silence Nogo-66 receptor gene expression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and Schwann cells, which were subsequently transplanted with poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) into the spinal cord lesion regions in rats. Simultaneously, rats treated with scaffold only were taken as the control group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry revealed that at 4 weeks after transplantation, rats had good motor function of the hind limb after treatment with Nogo-66 receptor gene-silenced cells plus the poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) scaffold compared with rats treated with scaffold only, and the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and neuron-like cells was also increased. At 8 weeks after transplantation, horseradish peroxidase tracing and transmission electron microscopy showed a large number of unmyelinated and myelinated nerve fibers, as well as intact regenerating axonal myelin sheath following spinal cord hemisection injury. These experimental findings indicate that transplantation of Nogo-66 receptor gene-silenced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and Schwann cells plus a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) scaffold can significantly enhance axonal regeneration of spinal cord neurons and improve motor function of the extremities in rats following spinal cord injury. PMID:25206713

  11. Follow-up of an Exercise-Based Treatment for Children with Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, David; Nicolson, Roderick I.

    2007-01-01

    This study reports the results of a long-term follow-up of an exercise-based approach to dyslexia-related disorders (Reynolds, Nicolson, & Hambly, "Dyslexia," 2003; 9(1): 48-71). In the initial study, children at risk of dyslexia were identified in 3 years of a junior school. One half then undertook a 6 month, home-based exercise programme.…

  12. Thoracic Aortic Injury: Embolization of the Tenth Intercostal Artery and Endovascular Treatment in a Young Woman after Posterior Spinal Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Lagios, Konstantinos; Karaolanis, Georgios; Perdikides, Theodossios; Bazinas, Theodoros; Kouris, Nikolaos; Sfikas, Spiros; Paxinos, Odysseas

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic aortic injuries are rare and well-recognized complications of a variety of procedures, including spinal surgery. The placement of pedicle screws is sometimes associated with devastating consequences. Aortic perforation with rapid hematoma formation and delayed aortic trauma leading to pseudoaneurysm formation have been described in the literature. A case describing a significant time interval between iatrogenic aortic injury and diagnosis in the absence of pseudoaneurysm formation is described in this paper and, according to our knowledge, is unique in the literature. The aortic injury was successfully treated, selecting the appropriate graft and, as a consequence, normal spinal cord blood flow was achieved. PMID:26064771

  13. Ventral Transdural Herniation of the Thoracic Spinal Cord: Surgical Treatment in Four Cases and Review of Literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Vallée; Ph. Mercier; Ph. Menei; F. Bouhour; C. Fischer; D. Fournier; R. Bougeard; S. Diabira; K. Mahla

    1999-01-01

    Summary  ?Background. A specific cause of progressive Brown-Sequard syndrome has been identified: a ventral herniation of the thoracic spinal\\u000a cord through the dural sleeve on one side.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method. Four female patients who were affected by a progressive Brown Sequard syndrome related to a transdural spinal cord herniation\\u000a have been investigated and were submitted to surgery and postoperative evaluation.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Findings. The MRI

  14. Adding exercise to rosuvastatin treatment: influence on C-reactive protein, monocyte toll-like receptor 4 expression, and inflammatory monocyte (CD14+CD16+) population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul M. Coen; Michael G. Flynn; Melissa M. Markofski; Brandt D. Pence; Robert E. Hannemann

    2010-01-01

    Statin treatment and exercise training can reduce markers of inflammation when administered separately. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of rosuvastatin treatment and the addition of exercise training on circulating markers of inflammation including C-reactive protein (CRP), monocyte toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression, and CD14+CD16+ monocyte population size. Thirty-three hypercholesterolemic and physically inactive subjects were randomly

  15. Exercise as a Potential Treatment for Drug Abuse: Evidence from Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Mark A.; Lynch, Wendy J.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies reveal that individuals who engage in regular aerobic exercise are less likely to use and abuse illicit drugs. Until recently, very few studies had examined the causal influences that mediate this relationship, and it was not clear whether exercise was effective at reducing substance use and abuse. In the past few years, several preclinical studies have revealed that exercise reduces drug self-administration in laboratory animals. These studies have revealed that exercise produces protective effects in procedures designed to model different transitional phases that occur during the development of, and recover from, a substance use disorder (e.g., acquisition, maintenance, escalation, and relapse/reinstatement of drug use). Moreover, recent studies have revealed several behavioral and neurobiological consequences of exercise that may be responsible for its protective effects in these assays. Collectively, these studies have provided convincing evidence to support the development of exercise-based interventions to reduce compulsive patterns of drug intake in clinical and at-risk populations. PMID:22347866

  16. Central Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sujin; Zhao, Xing; Hatch, Maya; Chun, Sophia; Chang, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating medical condition affecting 1.2 million people in the United States. Central neuropathic pain is one of the most common medical complications of SCI. Current treatment options include opioids, antiepileptic agents such as gabapentin, antispastic agents such as baclofen or tizanidine, and tricyclic acid. Other options include complementary, nonpharmacological treatment such as exercise or acupuncture, interventional treatments, and psychological approaches. Although these treatment options exist, central neuropathic pain in patients with SCI is still extremely difficult to treat because of its complexity. To develop and provide more effective treatment options to these patients, proper assessment of and classification tools for central neuropathic pain, as well as a better understanding of the pathophysiology, are needed. A combination of approaches, from standard general pain assessments to medically specific questions unique to SCI pathophysiology, is essential for this population. A multidisciplinary approach to patient care, in addition with a better understanding of pathophysiology and diagnosis, will lead to improved management and treatment of patients with SCI displaying central neuropathic pain. Here we summarize the most recent classification tools, pathophysiology, and current treatment options for patients with SCI with central neuropathic pain. PMID:25750485

  17. Advantages of exercise in rehabilitation, treatment and prevention of altered morphological features in knee osteoarthritis. A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Loreto, Carla; Imbesi, Rosa; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Di Giunta, Angelo; Lombardo, Claudia; Castorina, Sergio; Castrogiovanni, Paola

    2014-06-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) represents one of the most common causes of disability in the world. It leads to social, psychological and economic costs with financial consequences, also because a further increase is expected. Different knee OA treatments are usually considered in relation to the stage of the disease, such as surgical management and pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments. Treatment should begin with the safest and least invasive one, before proceeding to more invasive, expensive ones. Non-pharmacologic, behavioral treatments of knee OA are recommended not only in rehabilitation but also in prevention because many risk factors, such as excess weight, obesity and joint tissue inflammation, can be monitored and thus prevented. In the present review, we analyze data from the most recent literature in relation to the effects of physical exercise on prevention, therapy and rehabilitation in knee OA. All data suggest that physical exercise is an effective, economical and accessible tool to everyone, in the treatment and prevention of knee OA. The literature search was conducted on PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar using appropriate keywords in relation to knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24452819

  18. Spinal Tap

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the area. The sample is sent to a lab for analysis and testing. Your doctor might ask you to lie on your back for a few hours after the procedure. Safety A spinal tap is considered a safe procedure ...

  19. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the spinal cord and nerve roots pass. Ligaments. Elastic bands of tissue that support the spine by ... explanations from researchers, and links to how to search for a trial or enroll in a research- ...

  20. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Is ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  1. Cost-effectiveness evaluation of an RCT in rehabilitation after lumbar spinal fusion: a low-cost, behavioural approach is cost-effective over individual exercise therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rikke Søgaard; Cody E. Bünger; Ida Laurberg; Finn B. Christensen

    2008-01-01

    Recently, Christensen et al. reported the clinical effects of a low-cost rehabilitation program equally efficient to a relatively\\u000a intensive program of individual, physiotherapist-guided exercise therapy. Yet, the low-cost approach is not fully supported\\u000a as an optimal strategy until a full-scale economic evaluation, including extra-hospital effects such as service utilization\\u000a in the primary health care sector and return-to-work, is conducted. The

  2. Efficacy of radiofrequency procedures for the treatment of spinal pain: A systematic review of randomized clinical trials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jos W. Geurts; Roelof M. van Wijk; Robert J. Stolker; Gerbrand J. Groen

    2001-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The use of radiofrequency (RF) procedures in the peripheral nervous system to treat chronic spinal pain has been the subject of controversy. Publications concerned only uncontrolled studies, and irreversible nervous tissue damage was believed to be responsible for the effect, if any. In recent years, randomized, controlled studies have appeared, which have attested to an increasing use

  3. Congenital stenosis of lumbar spinal canal: Comparison of results of surgical treatment for this and other causes of lumbar syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Reale; R. Delfini; D. Gambacorta; G. P. Cantore

    1978-01-01

    Summary The operative results in 37 consecutive patients suffering from developmental stenosis of the lumbar spinal canal, compared with those in spondylosis and disc herniations, are discussed. The diagnostic certainty of stenosis, suspected on the bases of clinical and radiographic data, is reached only at the operating table. To judge the usefulness of the operation we have considered not only

  4. Treatment of Patients with Degenerative Diseases of the Central Nervous System by Electrical Stimulation of the Spinal Cord

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald M. Dooley; Ian Nisonson

    1981-01-01

    Patients with dystonia, spinocerebellar and cerebellar ataxia and spasmodic torticollis have a reasonable chance of being significantly aided in their control of motor function and neurogenic bladder by electrical stimulation of the cervical or thoracic spinal cord. This mode of therapy has the advantages that it is not destructive of neurological tissue, effects can be varied by altering the intensity

  5. Non-Traumatic Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma in a Patient with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation During Treatment with Rivaroxaban

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Jessica M.; Afanador, Hayley F.; Manjarrez, Efren; Morales, Ximena A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 69 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma Symptoms: Paraplegia Medication: Rivaroxaban Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: General Internal Medicine • Hospital Medicine • Cardiology • Hematology • Neurology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) is a rare but disabling condition, accounting for only 4.1% of all intraspinal hematomas. Risk factors include arteriovenous malformations, coagulopathy, therapeutic anticoagulation, underlying neoplasms, or following spinal puncture. Vitamin K antagonists, antiplatelet agents, and heparinoids have been associated with SSDHs in prior reports. To the best of our knowledge, no cases have reported this association with the factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, and SSDHs. Case Report: We report the case of a 69-year-old Honduran man with a 5-year history of symptomatic palpitations due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation. He was initially refractory to pharmacologic therapy. He underwent cardioversion in February 2014. After cardioversion, he remained asymptomatic on flecainide. He was anticoagulated on rivaroxaban 20 mg daily without incident since early 2013 until presentation in August 2014. He presented with sudden onset of excruciating upper and lower back pain after minimal movement. This was immediately followed by bilateral lower extremity paresis rapidly progressing to paraplegia with bowel and bladder dysfunction over 15 minutes. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an acute spinal subdural hematoma extending from T3 inferiorly to the conus medullaris. Six months after undergoing cervical and lumbar drainage procedures, he has not recovered bowel, bladder, or lower extremity neurologic function. Conclusions: Non-traumatic spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma is a rare neurological emergency that may occur during the use of rivaroxaban in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Physicians should suspect SSDH in patients on rivaroxaban with acute onset of severe back pain and neurologic symptoms to improve the odds of a favorable outcome. PMID:26090890

  6. Conservative Treatment of Subacute Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy Using Eccentric Exercises Performed With a Treadmill: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cushman, Daniel; Rho, Monica E

    2015-07-01

    Study Design Case report. Background Proximal hamstring tendinopathy in runners is characterized by pain with passive hip flexion with the knee extended, active hip extension, and pain with sitting. Relatively little literature exists on the condition, and publications on nonsurgical treatment protocols are even more scarce. Surgical intervention, which comprises the majority of literature for treatment of this condition, is an option for cases that fail to respond to nonsurgical treatment. Case Description The patient was a 34-year-old, otherwise healthy male triathlete with unilateral proximal hamstring tendinopathy diagnosed by ultrasound, who had pain only with running and prolonged sitting. After he failed to respond to 4 weeks of eccentric knee flexion and lumbopelvic musculature strengthening exercises, an eccentric hip extensor strengthening program using a treadmill was initiated. This treadmill exercise was performed on a daily basis, in addition to a lumbopelvic musculature strengthening program. Outcomes The patient noted a decrease in pain within 2 weeks of initiating the new exercise, and was able to return to gradual running after 4 weeks and to speed training after 12 weeks. He returned to competition shortly thereafter and had no recurrence for 12 months after the initiation of therapy. His score on the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-proximal hamstring tendons improved from 23 on initial presentation to 83 at 12 weeks after the initiation of therapy. Discussion We described the management of a triathlete with subacute proximal hamstring tendinopathy, who responded well to nonsurgical treatment using eccentric hip extension strengthening using a treadmill. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(7):557-562. Epub 21 May 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5762. PMID:25996362

  7. Reciprocal effects of treatment-induced increases in exercise and improved eating, and their psychosocial correlates, in obese adults seeking weight loss: a field-based trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A better understanding of interrelations of exercise and improved eating, and their psychosocial correlates of self-efficacy, mood, and self-regulation, may be useful for the architecture of improved weight loss treatments. Theory-based research within field settings, with samples possessing high probabilities of health risks, might enable rapid application of useful findings. Methods Adult volunteers with severe obesity (body mass index [BMI] 35–50 kg/m2; age?=?43.0?±?9.5 y; 83% female) were randomly assigned to six monthly cognitive-behavioral exercise support sessions paired with either group-based nutrition education (n?=?145) or cognitive behavioral methods applied to improved eating (n?=?149). After specification of mediation models using a bias-corrected bootstrapping procedure, a series of reciprocal effects analyses assessed: a) the reciprocal effects of changes in exercise and fruit and vegetable intake, resulting from the treatments, b) the reciprocal effects of changes in the three psychosocial variables tested (i.e. self-efficacy, mood, and self-regulation) and fruit and vegetable change, resulting from change in exercise volume, and c) the reciprocal effects of changes in the three psychosocial variables and exercise change, resulting from change in fruit and vegetable intake. Results Mediation analyses suggested a reciprocal effect between changes in exercise volume and fruit and vegetable intake. After inclusion of psychosocial variables, also found were reciprocal effects between change in fruit and vegetable intake and change in mood, self-efficacy for controlled eating, and self-regulation for eating; and change in exercise volume and change in mood and exercise-related self-regulation. Conclusion Findings had implications for behavioral weight-loss theory and treatment. Specifically, results suggested that treatments should focus upon, and leverage, the transfer effects from each of the primary weight-loss behaviors (exercise and healthy eating) to the other. Findings on psychosocial correlates of these behavioral processes may also have practical applications. PMID:24308572

  8. A treatment-refractory spinal dural arteriovenous fistula sharing arterial origin with the Artery of Adamkiewicz: Repeated endovascular treatment after failed microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Eneling, Johanna; Karlsson, Per M.; Rossitti, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Background: Effective management of a spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) can be accomplished with either microsurgery or endovascular embolization, but there is a consensus that in patients in whom a radiculomedullary artery supplying the anterior spinal artery (ASA) originates from the same feeding artery as the SDAVF, the endovascular approach is to be avoided. Case Description: The patient was a 46-year-old woman with progressive lower limb paraparesis, sensory deficit, and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spinal angiography showed an SDAVF fed by a branch from the left second lumbar segmental artery, and the artery of Adamkiewicz (AA), a major ASA supplier, originating from the same segmental artery just proximal to the SDAVF. Microsurgical disconnection of the SDAVF was attempted, but failed. Embolization with cyanoacrylates was done in two occasions, the first time through a microcatheter placed just distal to the origin of the AA and the second time through another feeder coming from the same segmental artery that could not be visualized in the previous angiographies. All procedures were neurologically uncomplicated. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 1 month after the last embolization showed resolution of the spinal cord edema. MRI scan taken 68 months after embolization revealed a slightly atrophic spinal cord with visible central canal and no recurrence of medullary edema. The patient presented good, but incomplete neurological improvement. Conclusion: Microsurgery is the first choice for an SDAVF branching off the same radiculomedullary artery supplying the ASA, but uncomplicated embolization can be feasible after failed surgery. PMID:25071941

  9. Spinal Cord Stimulation in a Patient with Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yi Zhang; Monica J. Wood; Christopher Gilligan

    2011-01-01

    Background and ObjectiveSpinal cord stimulation is the most commonly used implantable neurostimulation modality for management of pain syndromes. For treatment of lower extremity pain, the spinal cord stimulator lead is typically placed in the thoracic epidural space, at the T10–T12 levels. Typically, satisfactory stimulation can be obtained relatively easily. Anatomical variability in the epidural space, such as epidural scarring, has

  10. BOLD MRI of the human cervical spinal cord at 3 tesla

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. W. Stroman; P. W. Nance; L. N. Ryner

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of functional MRI of the spinal cord was investi- gated by carrying out blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) imaging of the human cervical spinal cord at a field of 3 T. BOLD imaging of the cervical spinal cord showed an average intensity increase of 7.0% during repeated exercise with the dominant hand with a return to baseline during rest

  11. Prognostic value of predischarge low-level exercise thallium testing after thrombolytic treatment of acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Tilkemeier, P.L.; Guiney, T.E.; LaRaia, P.J.; Boucher, C.A. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (USA))

    1990-11-15

    Low-level exercise thallium testing is useful in identifying the high-risk patient after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To determine whether this use also applies to patients after thrombolytic treatment of AMI, 64 patients who underwent early thrombolytic therapy for AMI and 107 patients without acute intervention were evaluated. The ability of both the electrocardiogram and thallium tests to predict future events was compared in both groups. After a mean follow-up of 374 days, there were 25 and 32% of cardiac events in the 2 groups, respectively, with versus without acute intervention. These included death, another AMI, coronary artery bypass grafting or angioplasty with 75% of the events occurring in the 3 months after the first infarction. The only significant predictors of outcome were left ventricular cavity dilatation in the intervention group and ST-segment depression and increased lung uptake in the nonintervention group. The sensitivity of exercise thallium was 55% in the intervention group and 81% in the nonintervention group (p less than 0.05). Therefore, in patients having thrombolytic therapy for AMI, nearly half the events after discharge are not predicted by predischarge low-level exercise thallium testing. The relatively weak correlation of outcome with unmasking ischemia in the laboratory before discharge may be due to an unstable coronary lesion or rapid progression of disease after the test. Tests considered useful for prognostication after AMI may not necessarily have a similar value if there has been an acute intervention, such as thrombolytic therapy.

  12. The effect of N-nitro-L-arginine and aminoguanidine treatment on changes in constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthases in the spinal cord after sciatic nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Lukacova, Nadezda; Davidova, Alexandra; Kolesar, Dalibor; Kolesarova, Maria; Schreiberova, Andrea; Lackova, Monika; Krizanova, Olga; Marsala, Martin; Marsala, Jozef

    2008-04-01

    Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, and neuronal and inducible NOS immunoreactivity (nNOS-IR and iNOS-IR), were investigated in the rabbit lower lumbar spinal cord after i) sciatic nerve transection and survival of experimental animals for 2 weeks, ii) treatment of animals with N-nitro-L-arginine (NNLA), an inhibitor of nNOS dosed at 20 mg/b.w. for 12 days, and iii) after treatment of animals with the inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitor, aminoguanidine, dosed at 100 mg/b.w. for 4 and 12 days. Our attention was focused on the dorsal part of L4-L6 segments receiving sensory inputs from the sciatic nerve, and on the ventral part consisting of sciatic nerve motor neurons. Sciatic nerve transection increased Ca2+-dependent NOS activity and the density of nNOS in the dorsal part of the spinal cord on the ipsilateral side. NNLA treatment effectively reduced nNOS-IR in both the dorsal horn and the dorsal column, and decreased Ca2+-dependent NOS activity in the lower lumbar segments. Immunocytochemical analysis disclosed the up-regulation of iNOS immunoreactive staining after peripheral axotomy in alpha-motoneurons. The changes in iNOS expression and Ca2+-independent NOS activity were not significantly corrected by aminoguanidine treatment for 4 days. Long-lasting iNOS inhibition decreased Ca2+-independent NOS activity, but caused motor neuron degeneration and mediated small necrotic foci in the ventrolateral portion of the ventral horn. The results of the present study provide evidence that constitutive NOS inhibition by NNLA is more effective than specific long-lasting inhibition of iNOS by aminoguanidine treatment. PMID:18360686

  13. Aerobic Interval Training Versus Continuous Moderate Exercise as a Treatment for the Metabolic Syndrome

    E-print Network

    Brand, Paul H.

    --Individuals with the metabolic syndrome are 3 times more likely to die of heart disease than healthy counterparts. Exercise to variables associated with cardiovascular function and prognosis in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Methods and Results--Thirty-two metabolic syndrome patients (age, 52.3 3.7 years; maximal oxygen uptake [V

  14. Quality of life in patients with spinal cord injury receiving VIAGRA® (sildenafil citrate) for the treatment of erectile dysfunction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Hultling; F Giuliano; F Quirk; B Peña; A Mishra

    2000-01-01

    Study design: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, flexible-dose, two-way crossover study conducted June 1996 through January 1997.Objectives: To evaluate the effect of sildenafil citrate (VIAGRA®) on the quality of life (QoL) of men with erectile dysfunction (ED) caused by spinal cord injury (SCI).Setting: Study centers in Australia, Belgium, France, Germany, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom.Methods: Questions 13 and 14

  15. A review article on the diagnosis and treatment of cerebrospinal fluid fistulas and dural tears occurring during spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In spinal surgery, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas attributed to deliberate dural opening (e.g., for tumors, shunts, marsupialization of cysts) or inadvertent/traumatic dural tears (DTs) need to be readily recognized, and appropriately treated. Methods: During spinal surgery, the dura may be deliberately opened to resect intradural lesions/tumors, to perform shunts, or to open/marsupialize cysts. DTs, however, may inadvertently occur during primary, but are seen more frequently during revision spinal surgery often attributed to epidural scarring. Other etiologies of CSF fistulas/DTs include; epidural steroid injections, and resection of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) or ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL). Whatever the etiology of CSF fistulas or DTs, they must be diagnosed utilizing radioisotope cisternography (RIC), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed axial tomography (CT) studies, and expeditiously repaired. Results: DTs should be repaired utilizing interrupted 7-0 Gore-Tex (W.L. Gore and Associates Inc., Elkton, MD, USA) sutures, as the suture itself is larger than the needle; the larger suture occludes the dural puncture site. Closure may also include muscle patch grafts, dural patches/substitutes (bovine pericardium), microfibrillar collagen (Duragen: Integra Life Sciences Holdings Corporation, Plainsboro, NJ), and fibrin glues or dural sealants (Tisseel: Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Deerfield, IL, USA). Only rarely are lumbar drains and wound-peritoneal and/or lumboperitoneal shunts warranted. Conclusion: DTs or CSF fistulas attributed to primary/secondary spinal surgery, trauma, epidural injections, OPLL, OYL, and other factors, require timely diagnosis (MRI/CT/Cisternography), and appropriate reconstruction. PMID:24163783

  16. Use of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Bone Marrow for the Treatment of Naturally Injured Spinal Cord in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Penha, Euler Moraes; Meira, Cássio Santana; Guimarães, Elisalva Teixeira; Mendonça, Marcus Vinícius Pinheiro; Gravely, Faye Alice; Pinheiro, Cláudia Maria Bahia; Pinheiro, Taiana Maria Bahia; Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ricardo; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The use of stem cells in injury repair has been extensively investigated. Here, we examined the therapeutic effects of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) transplantation in four dogs with natural traumatic spinal cord injuries. MSC were cultured in vitro, and proliferation rate and cell viability were evaluated. Cell suspensions were prepared and surgically administered into the spinal cord. The animals were clinically evaluated and examined by nuclear magnetic resonance. Ten days after the surgical procedure and MSC transplantation, we observed a progressive recovery of the panniculus reflex and diminished superficial and deep pain response, although there were still low proprioceptive reflexes in addition to a hyperreflex in the ataxic hind limb movement responses. Each dog demonstrated an improvement in these gains over time. Conscious reflex recovery occurred simultaneously with moderate improvement in intestine and urinary bladder functions in two of the four dogs. By the 18th month of clinical monitoring, we observed a remarkable clinical amelioration accompanied by improved movement, in three of the four dogs. However, no clinical gain was associated with alterations in magnetic resonance imaging. Our results indicate that MSC are potential candidates for the stem cell therapy following spinal cord injury. PMID:24723956

  17. Improvement of exercise capacity of rats with chronic heart failure by long-term treatment with trandolapril

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Fuminari; Kawana, Ken-ichiro; Tanonaka, Kouichi; Kamano, Isamu; Igarashi, Takahiro; Gen, Eigyoku; Fujimoto, Yoko; Maki, Toshiyuki; Sanbe, Atsushi; Nasa, Yoshihisa; Takeo, Satoshi

    1999-01-01

    The effects of long-term treatment with trandolapril, an angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor, on exercise capacity of rats with chronic heart failure (CHF) following coronary artery ligation were examined. CHF was developed by 8 weeks after the coronary artery ligation. The running time of rats with CHF in the treadmill test was shortened to approximately 65% of that of sham-operated rats (16.3±1.2 vs 25.1±1.6?min, n=7; P<0.05). ATP, creatine phosphate (CP), and lactate contents of the gracilis muscle of rats with CHF were similar to those of sham-operated rats before running. After running, ATP and CP were decreased and lactate was increased in both rats with CHF and sham-operated rats. There were no significant differences in the levels of energy metabolites between rats with CHF and sham-operated rats. The rates of decrease in ATP and CP and rate of increase in lactate in the gracilis muscle of rats with CHF during exercise were greater than those of sham operated rats (2.5, 2.0 and 1.5 fold high, respectively), suggesting wastage of energy during exercise in the animals with CHF. Myofibrillar Ca2+-stimulated ATPase (Ca-ATPase) activity of skeletal muscle of rats with CHF was increased over that of the sham-operated control (62.03±1.88 vs 52.34±1.19??mol?Pi?mg?1 protein h?1 n=7; P<0.05). The compositions of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms of gracilis muscle were altered by CHF; decreases in MHC types I and IIb and an increase in MHC type IIa were found (P<0.05). Rats with CHF were treated with 1?mg?kg?1 day?1 trandolapril from the 2nd to 8th week after surgery. Treatment with trandolapril prolonged the running time, reversed the rates of decrease in ATP and CP and the rate of increase in lactate, and restored the Ca-ATPase activity (51.11±0.56??mol?Pi?mg?1 protein h?1, n=7; P<0.05) and composition ratio of MHC isoforms in the gracilis muscle. The results suggest that long-term trandolapril treatment of rats with CHF may restore their ability to utilize energy without wastage and thus improve exercise capacity. PMID:10323590

  18. Operational Applications of Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise as a Treatment for Airsickness in the Military

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebreyesus, Fiyore; Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Airsickness is experienced by about 50% of military aviators some time in their career. Aviators who suffer from recurrent episodes of airsickness are typically referred to the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) at Pensacola where they undergo extensive evaluation and 8 weeks of training in the Self-Paced Airsickness Desensitization (SPAD) program. Researchers at NASA Ames have developed an alternative mitigation training program, Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) that has demonstrated an 80% success rate for improving motion sickness tolerance.

  19. Spinal muscular atrophy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan T. Iannaccone; Stephen A. Smith; Louise R. Simard

    2004-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a common genetic disease of the motor neuron (frequency of eight cases per 100,000 live births)\\u000a with a high mortality during infancy and no known treatment. Death is caused by severe and progressive restrictive lung disease.\\u000a New information regarding the nature and function of the SMN protein and the availability of new pharmacologic agents now\\u000a make

  20. Intradural approach to selective stimulation in the spinal cord for treatment of intractable pain: design principles and wireless protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, M. A.; Utz, M.; Brennan, T. J.; Dalm, B. D.; Viljoen, S.; Jeffery, N. D.; Gillies, G. T.

    2011-08-01

    We introduce an intradural approach to spinal cord stimulation for the relief of intractable pain, and describe the biophysical rationale that underlies its design and performance requirements. The proposed device relies on wireless, inductive coupling between a pial surface implant and its epidural controller, and we present the results of benchtop experiments that demonstrate the ability to transmit and receive a frequency-modulated 1.6 MHz carrier signal between micro-coil antennae scaled to the ? 1 cm dimensions of the implant, at power levels of about 5 mW. Plans for materials selection, microfabrication, and other aspects of future development are presented and discussed.

  1. BDNF Facilitates Instrumental Learning and Spinal Plasticity In Vivo. 

    E-print Network

    Niemerski, Ashley

    2014-01-27

    of drug treatment was assessed by testing its effect on mechanical reactivity and spinal learning. Spinally transected rats had the BDNF-containing hydrogel applied over the lumbosacral spinal cord. Subjects were tested 3-24 hrs later. Prior work has shown...

  2. Injectable multifunctional scaffold for spinal cord repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lauren Conova; Pamela Kubinski; Ying Jin; Jennifer Vernengo; Birgit Neuhuber; Itzhak Fischer; Anthony Lowman

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects thousands of Americans each year. The injury results in local cell loss in the spinal cord, interrupting the connections between brain and periphery. Current treatment options for SCI are limited due to the inability of adult neurons to regenerate in the inhibitory environment of the injured central nervous system (CNS). The primary goal of this

  3. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are a good resource for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke - www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury Association - ...

  4. Spinal Cord Infarction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Infarction Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Spinal Cord Infarction? Spinal cord infarction is a stroke either ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  6. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  7. Spinal accessory nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wiater, J M; Bigliani, L U

    1999-11-01

    Injury to the spinal accessory nerve can lead to dysfunction of the trapezius. The trapezius is a major scapular stabilizer and is composed of three functional components. It contributes to scapulothoracic rhythm by elevating, rotating, and retracting the scapula. The superficial course of the spinal accessory nerve in the posterior cervical triangle makes it susceptible to injury. Iatrogenic injury to the nerve after a surgical procedure is one of the most common causes of trapezius palsy. Dysfunction of the trapezius can be a painful and disabling condition. The shoulder droops as the scapula is translated laterally and rotated downward. Patients present with an asymmetric neckline, a drooping shoulder, winging of the scapula, and weakness of forward elevation. Evaluation should include a complete electrodiagnostic examination. If diagnosed within 1 year of the injury, microsurgical reconstruction of the nerve should be considered. Conservative treatment of chronic trapezius paralysis is appropriate for older patients who are sendentary. Active and healthy patients in whom 1 year of conservative treatment has failed are candidates for surgical reconstruction. Studies have shown the Eden-Lange procedure, in which the insertions of the levator scapulae, rhomboideus minor, and rhomboideus major muscles are transferred, relieves pain, corrects deformity, and improves function in patients with irreparable injury to the spinal accessory nerve. PMID:10613148

  8. Action Mechanism of Ginkgo biloba Leaf Extract Intervened by Exercise Therapy in Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chiung-Chi; Liu, Jia-Hong; Chang, Chi-Huang; Chung, Jin-Yuan; Chen, Kuan-Chou

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), an imbalance between androgen/estrogen, overexpression of stromal, and epithelial growth factors associated with chronic inflammation, has become an atypical direct cause of mortality of aged male diseases. Ginkgo possesses anti-inflammatory, blood flow-enhancing, and free radical scavenging effects. Considering strenuous exercise can reduce BPH risks, we hypothesize Ginkgo + exercise (Ginkgo + Ex) could be beneficial to BPH. To verify this, rat BPH model was induced by s.c. 3.5?mg testosterone (T) and 0.1?mg estradiol (E2) per head per day successively for 8 weeks, using mineral oil as placebo. Cerenin® 8.33??L/100?g was applied s.c. from the 10th to the 13th week, and simultaneously, Ex was applied (30?m/min, 3 times/week). In BPH, Ginkgo alone had no effect on T, 5?-reductase, and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), but suppressed androgen receptor (AR), aromatase, E2 and estrogen receptor (ER), and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA); Ex alone significantly reduced T, aromatase, E2, ER, AR, and PCNA, but highly raised DHT. While Ginkgo + Ex androgenically downregulated T, aromatase, E2, and ER, but upregulated DHT, AR, and PCNA, implying Ginkgo + Ex tended to worsen BPH. Conclusively, Ginkgo or Ex alone may be more beneficial than Ginkgo + Ex for treatment of BPH. PMID:23690843

  9. Oral treatment with Euterpe oleracea Mart. (açaí) extract improves cardiac dysfunction and exercise intolerance in rats subjected to myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was designed to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of Euterpe oleracea Mart., popularly known as “açaí”, on rats subjected to myocardial infarction (MI). Methods Hydroalcoholic extracts of açaí were obtained from a decoction of the seeds. Two male Wistar rat groups were delineated: 1) the sham-operated group (control, n = 6), with no surgical amendment, and 2) the MI group (n?=?12), in which the anterior descendent coronary artery was occluded during surgery. MI group was divided into two subgroups, in which rats were either treated with hydroalcoholic extract of Euterpe oleracea seeds (100 mg/kg/day p.o.) or received no treatment. Treatment began on the day of surgery, and lasted 4 weeks. Subsequently, rats were subject to an exercise test protocol, hemodynamic evaluation, and histological analysis of the left ventricle. Groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Dunnett’s test. Results The total running distance of sham rats was 1339.0?±?276.6 m, MI rats was 177.6?±?15.8 m (P?treatment prevented a reduction in systolic arterial pressure (130.00?±?8.16 mmHg) compared to MI rats (P?treatment prevented this reduction. Açaí treatment prevented cardiac hypertrophy and LV fibrosis in MI rats. Conclusions Euterpe oleracea treatment of MI rats prevented the development of exercise intolerance, cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction. PMID:25000822

  10. Primary spinal epidural lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Cugati, Goutham; Singh, Manish; Pande, Anil; Ramamurthi, Ravi; Balasubramanyam, Mahalakshmi; Sethi, Sumer K.; Singh, Ajai Kumar

    2011-01-01

    An epidural location for lymphoma is observed in 0.1–6.5% of all the lymphomas. Primary spinal epidural lymphoma (PSEL) is a subset of lymphomas, where there are no other recognizable sites of lymphomas at the time of diagnosis. The incidence of this subset of lymphomas is much less. It, however, is increasingly diagnosed, due to the increased use of more sensitive imaging modalities. For the electronic search, Pubmed was used to identify journals that enlisted and enumerated PSEL from 1961 to January 2011. The following combination of terms: “primary,” “spinal,” “epidural,” and “lymphoma” were used. The most significant articles and their bibliographies were analyzed by the authors. The symptoms, pathogenesis, diagnostic workup, histopathology, treatment, and outcome have been analyzed in a systematic manner PMID:22013369

  11. Cerebral and spinal schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Carod Artal, Francisco Javier

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral schistosomiasis and spinal schistosomiasis are severe underrecognized complications of Schistosoma sp. infection, and can occur at any time during the parasitic infection. Neuroschistosomiasis has been increasingly reported not only in endemic areas but also in Western countries owing to immigration and international travel. Immunogenic interaction between schistosome egg deposition and the delayed hypersensitivity reaction of the host are the main neuropathogenic mechanisms involved. Eggs induce a periovular granulomatous reaction in the tissues. In some cases, schistosome adult worms may aberrantly migrate to the central nervous system via the vertebral venous plexus and place the ova at an ectopic site. Headache and seizures are common in cerebral schistosomiasis, and intracranial hypertension and hydrocephalus may occur in tumour-like and cerebellar schistosomiasis. Spinal schistosomiasis may manifest itself as acute myelitis and/or myeloradiculopathy. Recognition of neuroschistosomiasis is important so that early treatment with praziquantel and steroids can be started in an attempt to prevent severe disability. PMID:22903225

  12. Spinal Metastases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan H. Sherman; Dawit G. Aregawi; Mark E. Shaffrey; David Schiff

    Spinal cord metastases are a common complication of systemic malignancy, most commonly from lung, breast, and prostate cancer.\\u000a Patients may present with a variety of symptoms, most notably pain and weakness. The ultimate goals in managing these patients\\u000a include maximizing neurologic function, length of survival, and quality of life. These goals can best be reached via early,\\u000a accurate diagnosis followed

  13. Acquired lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Deasy, JoAnn

    2015-04-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most frequent reason for spinal surgery in patients over age 65 years. In this condition, narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal and nerve root canals leads to painful, debilitating compression of spinal nerves and blood vessels. As the population ages, an increasing number of patients will be diagnosed and treated for lumbar spinal stenosis by primary care providers. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of lumbar spinal stenosis in adults over age 50 years. PMID:25763664

  14. The anti-inflammatory effects of exercise: mechanisms and implications for the prevention and treatment of disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolette C. Bishop; David J. Stensel; Martin R. Lindley; Sarabjit S. Mastana; Myra A. Nimmo; Michael Gleeson

    2011-01-01

    Regular exercise reduces the risk of chronic metabolic and cardiorespiratory diseases, in part because exercise exerts anti-inflammatory effects. However, these effects are also likely to be responsible for the suppressed immunity that makes elite athletes more susceptible to infections. The anti-inflammatory effects of regular exercise may be mediated via both a reduction in visceral fat mass (with a subsequent decreased

  15. The impact of adding weight-bearing exercise versus nonweight bearing programs to the medical treatment of elderly patients with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Shanb, Alsayed A.; Youssef, Enas F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is a major public health problem affecting the elderly population, particularly women. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of adding weight-bearing exercise as opposed to nonweight-bearing programs to the medical treatment of bone mineral density (BMD) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of elderly patients with osteoporosis. Materials and Methods: Participating in the study were 40 elderly osteoporotic patients (27 females and 13 males), with ages ranging from 60 to 67 years, who were receiving medical treatment for osteoporosis. They were assigned randomly into two groups: Group-I: Twenty patients practiced weight-bearing exercises. Group-II: Twenty patients did nonweight-bearing exercises. All patients trained for 45-60 min/session, two sessions/week for 6 months. BMD of the lumbar spine, right neck of femur, and right distal radial head of all patients were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry before and after both treatment programs. In addition, the QoL was measured by means of the HRQoL “ECOS-16” questionnaire. Results: T-tests proved that mean values of BMD of the lumbar spine, right neck of femur and right distal radial head were significantly increased in both groups with greater improvement in the weight-bearing group. The QoL was significantly improved in both groups, but the difference between them was not significant. Conclusion: Addition of weight-bearing exercise program to medical treatment increases BMD more than nonweight-bearing exercise in elderly subjects with osteoporosis. Furthermore, both weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing exercise programs significantly improved the QoL of patients with osteoporosis. PMID:25374469

  16. Solitary spinal dural syphilis granuloma mimicking a spinal meningioma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heng-Jun; Zhan, Ren-Ya; Chen, Man-Tao; Cao, Fei; Zheng, Xiu-Jue

    2014-01-01

    Dural granuloma is extremely rare. To our knowledge, there has no case reported solitary spinal dural syphilis granuloma worldwide so far. Here we report our findings in a 49-year-old woman, who presented with 10-year progressive left lower-limb numbness and two weeks of right lower-limb numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested a homogeneous enhanced spindle-shaped lesion, 2.9 × 1.5 cm in size, occupying the spinal intradural extramedullary space, at the level of Thoracic (T)-2/3, which mimicked the appearance of spinal meningioma. The Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) test titer of 1:8, and the venereal diseases research laboratory of cerebral spinal fluid (VDRL-CSF) was reactive, so confirmed neurosyphilis was considered. After formal anti-syphilis treatment, posterior laminectomy surgery was performed, and the lesion was completely separated and extirpated. Final histopathologic diagnosis of the lesion was confirmed as chronic granulomatous inflammation, combined with the neurosyphilis history, spinal dural syphilis granuloma was finally diagnosed. Postoperatively, the patient recovered without any further treatment. PMID:24831378

  17. Tablet Technology for Rehabilitation after Spinal Cord Injury: a Proof-of-Concept.

    PubMed

    Fizzotti, Gabriella; Rognoni, Carla; Imarisio, Arianna; Meneghini, Alessandro; Pistarini, Caterina; Quaglini, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a damage to the spinal cord resulting in a change, either temporary or permanent, in motor, sensory, or autonomic functions. Patients with SCI usually have permanent and often devastating neurologic deficits and disability. Trunk motor control is crucial for postural stability and propulsion after low thoracic SCI and several rehabilitative strategies are aimed at trunk stability and control. Tablet technology and gaming systems are novel and potentially useful strategies that apply relevant concepts in rehabilitation for these patients. In this study we combined the traditional training of trunk control with exercises administered through two iPad games apps, 2 or 3 times a week. All the participant patients showed increasing game scores during the treatment, as well as increasing Trunk Recovery Scale scores, showing a significant improvement in trunk control. Also the personal judgment of the patients, collected through evaluation questionnaires, was very positive. PMID:25991193

  18. Antidepressant treatment with MAO-inhibitors during general and regional anesthesia: a review and case report of spinal anesthesia for lower extremity surgery without discontinuation of tranylcypromine.

    PubMed

    Krings-Ernst, Ilana; Ulrich, Sven; Adli, Mazda

    2013-10-01

    Monoamine oxidase-(MAO)-inhibitors are a treatment of last resort in treatment resistant depression, which is regarded as a condition of increased psychiatric risk. General and regional anesthesia for elective surgery during use of long-term MAO-inhibitors remains a matter of debate because of an increased risk of drug interactions and decreased sympathetic stability. A series of case reports and new comparative studies reveal the safety of anesthesia/analgesia in non-cardiac surgery without discontinuation of the MAO-inhibitor if best effort is made for maintenance of sympathetic homeostasis and if known drug interactions are avoided. Very few reports with severe adverse incidents have been noted. Severe cardiovascular morbidity, a contraindication of MAO-inhibitors, probably contributed to peri- and postoperative complications. According to new studies, the risk of pharmacokinetic drug interactions is lower for tranylcypromine than for phenelzine. In the present case, a 66-year-old psychiatric patient on permanent treatment with 20 mg/day tranylcypromine was admitted for forefoot surgery. Anesthetic premedication consisted of 7.5 mg oral midazolam. Intravenous midazolam (0.5 mg) was dispensed for intraoperative sedation. After local anesthesia of the puncture site with 30 mg isobar prilocaine, spinal anesthesia was achieved by a single shot of 13.5 mg hyperbar bupivacaine (0.5%) intrathecally. Postoperative regional and general analgesia were accomplished by a peripheral nerve block with 50 mg isobar bupivacaine as well as oral etoricoxib and oxycodone. No peri- or postoperative complications were encountered. It is concluded that general or regional anesthesia for noncardiac surgery without discontinuation of MAO-inhibitor treatment may be a safe intervention after careful evaluation of an individual's perioperative and psychiatric risk. The increased psychiatric risk in patients treated with MAO-inhibitors outweighs the increased, however manageable, perioperative risk from continuing treatment during surgery. PMID:23993253

  19. Innovative treatment approaches in schizophrenia enhancing neuroplasticity: aerobic exercise, erythropoetin and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wobrock, T; Hasan, A; Falkai, P

    2012-06-01

    Schizophrenia is a brain disorder associated with subtle, but replicable cerebral volume loss mostly prevalent in frontal and temporal brain regions. Post-mortem studies of the hippocampus point to a reduction of the neuropil constituting mainly of synapses associated with changes of molecules mediating plastic responses of neurons during development and learning. Derived from animal studies interventions to enhance neuroplasticity by inducing adult neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, angiogenesis and long-term potentiation (LTP) were developed and the results translated into clinical studies in schizophrenia. Out of these interventions aerobic exercise has been shown to increase hippocampal volume, elevate N-acetyl-aspartate in the hippocampus as neuronal marker, and improve short-term memory in schizophrenia. The hematopoietic growth factor erythropoetin (EPO) is involved in brain development and associated with the production and differentiation of neuronal precursor cells. A first study demonstrated a positive effect of EPO application on cognition in schizophrenia patients. In randomised controlled studies with small sample size, the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a biological intervention focussing on the enhancement of LTP, has been shown for the improvement of positive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia,. The putative underlying neurobiological mechanisms of these interventions including the role of neurotrophic factors are outlined and implications for future research regarding neuroprotection strategies to improve schizophrenia are discussed. PMID:22283764

  20. A pilot study to evaluate the role of the Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) in clinical decisions for pressure ulcer treatment.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Susan S; Graves, Barbara Ann; Madaris, Linda

    2014-12-01

    The Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) was designed to assess pressure ulcer (PrU) healing in the spinal cord impaired (SCI) population. The tool contains 7 variables: wound surface area, depth, edges, tunneling, undermining, exudate type, and necrotic tissue amount. A 2-phased, quantitative pilot study based on the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior was conducted at a large SCI/Disorders Center in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). In the first phase of the study, a convenience sample of 5 physicians, 3 advanced practice registered nurses, and 3 certified wound care nurses (CWCN) was surveyed using a 2-part questionnaire to assess use of the SCI-PUMT instrument, its anticipated improvement in PrU assessment, and intent to use the SCI-PUMT in clinical practice. Attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral controls, and barriers related to the intent to use the SCI-PUMT were evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale (range: 1= extremely likely, 5 = extremely unlikely). In the second phase of the study, the electronic health records (EHR) of 24 veterans (with 30 PrUs) who had at least 2 completed SCI-PUMT scores during a 4-week period were used to evaluate whether an association existed between magnitudes of change of total SCI-PUMT scores and ordered changes in PrU treatment. The overall mean score for intent to use SCI-PUMT was 1.80 (SD 0.75). The least favorable scores were for convenience and motivation to use the SCI-PUMT. Analysis of EHR data showed no significant difference in magnitudes of change in the SCI-PUMT score and changes in PrU treatment recommendations made by the CWCNs. The significance was not affected regardless of an increase or no change in the score (?2 with 1 degree of freedom = 1.158, P = 0.282) or for a decrease in the score (?2 with 1 degree of freedom = 0.5, P = 0.478). In this pilot study, the expressed intent to use the SCI-PUMT in making clinical decisions was generally positive but reservations remain. Additional research is being conducted to determine the barriers and facilitators to SCI-PUMT implementation. The SCI-PUMT was the first tool found to be valid, reliable, and sensitive to assess PrU healing in persons with SCI, and studies to examine the prospective validity of using this instrument on ulcer treatment decisions and outcomes are warranted. PMID:25485550

  1. Sleep disordered breathing in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Mellies, Uwe; Dohna-Schwake, Christian; Stehling, Florian; Voit, Thomas

    2004-12-01

    Sleep disordered breathing is a common but under-diagnosed complication causing sleep disturbance and daytime symptoms in children with spinal muscular atrophy. Non-invasive (positive pressure) ventilation is an established treatment of respiratory failure; its role in treatment of sleep disordered breathing though remains controversial. Aim of this study was to verify the hypothesis that nocturnal non-invasive ventilation has beneficial impact on breathing during sleep, sleep quality and daytime complaints in children with spinal muscular atrophy. Twelve children with spinal muscular atrophy type I or II (7.8+/-1.9 years) underwent polysomnography and were asked to fill out a symptom questionnaire. Seven patients (six with spinal muscular atrophy I and one with spinal muscular atrophy II) had sleep disordered breathing and received non-invasive ventilation during sleep. Five less severely affected patients (one with spinal muscular atrophy I and four with spinal muscular atrophy II) had no sleep disordered breathing and served as reference group. Patients were restudied after 6-12 months. In patients with sleep disordered breathing both sleep architecture and disease related symptoms were significantly worse than in the reference-group. Non-invasive ventilation during sleep completely eliminated disordered breathing, normalized sleep architecture and improved symptoms (P<0.05 for all). In children with spinal muscular atrophy sleep disordered breathing may cause relevant impairment of sleep and well-being. Both can be highly improved by nocturnal non-invasive ventilation. PMID:15564035

  2. Education, progressive muscle relaxation therapy, and exercise for the treatment of night eating syndrome. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Maraldo, Toni M; Vercellone, Allison C; Gagne, Danielle A

    2015-06-01

    Night eating syndrome (NES) is a circadian rhythm disorder in which food intake is shifted toward the end of the day, interfering with sleep. According to the biobehavioral model of NES, the disorder is the result of a genetic predisposition that, coupled with stress, leads to enhanced reuptake of serotonin, thereby dysregulating circadian rhythms and decreasing satiety. Using the biobehavioral model as a guide, we developed a brief behavioral intervention using education, relaxation strategies, and exercise to address the core symptoms of NES. In this pilot randomized controlled clinical trial, 44 participants with NES were randomly assigned to an educational group (E; n?=?14), E plus progressive muscle relaxation therapy (PMR; n?=?15); or PMR plus exercise (PMR Plus, n?=?15). Participants received a baseline intervention with 1- and 3-week follow-up sessions. Effectiveness analyses showed that participants in all three groups evidenced significant reductions on measures of NES symptoms (p?treatment of NES. PMID:25660340

  3. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  4. Meditation over medication for irritable bowel syndrome? On exercise and alternative treatments for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Asare, Fredrick; Störsrud, Stine; Simrén, Magnus

    2012-08-01

    Complimentary alternative treatment regimens are widely used in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but the evidence supporting their use varies. For psychological treatment options, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness, gut-directed hypnotherapy, and psychodynamic therapy, the evidence supporting their use in IBS patients is strong, but the availability limits their use in clinical practice. Dietary interventions are commonly included in the management of IBS patients, but these are primarily based on studies assessing physiological function in relation to dietary components, and to a lesser degree upon research examining the role of dietary components in the therapeutic management of IBS. Several probiotic products improve a range of symptoms in IBS patients. Physical activity is of benefit for health in general and recent data implicates its usefulness also for IBS patients. Acupuncture does not seem to have an effect beyond placebo in IBS. A beneficial effect of some herbal treatments has been reported. PMID:22661301

  5. Spinal Fixator for the Management of Spinal Injury (the Mechanical Rationale)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S M Rezaian; E T Dombrowski; D N Ghista

    1983-01-01

    The goal of successful treatment of spinal injury is to achieve a stable pain-free spine with no deformity and also the complete anterior decompression of the cord for maximum neurological recovery, the minimum bed-ridden time and hospitalization, and reduction of complications and expenses. A special ‘spinal fixator’ has been developed to fulfill these aims. It is a small apparatus with

  6. Pediatric Cranio-spinal Axis Irradiation: Comparison of Radiation-induced Secondary Malignancy Estimations Based on Three Methods of Analysis for Three Different Treatment Modalities.

    PubMed

    Myers, P A; Mavroidis, P; Komisopoulos, G; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2015-04-01

    Pediatric cranio-spinal axis irradiation (CSI) is a valuable treatment for many central nervous system (CNS) diseases, but due to the life expectancies and quality of life expectations for children, the minimization of the risk for radiation-induced secondary malignancies must be a high priority. This study compared the estimated CSI-induced secondary malignancy risks of three radiation therapy modalities using three different models. Twenty-four (n = 24) pediatric patients previously treated with CSI for tumors of the CNS were planned using three different treatment modalities: three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and Tomotherapy. Each plan was designed to deliver 23.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) to the target which was defined as the entire brain and spinal column with a 0.7 cm expansion. The mean doses as well as the dose volume histograms (DVH) of specific organs were analyzed for secondary malignancy risk according to three different methods: the effective dose equivalent (EDE), the excess relative risk (ERR), and the linear quadratic (LQ) models. Using the EDE model, the average secondary risk was highest for the 3D-CRT plans (37.60%), compared to VMAT (28.05%) and Tomotherapy (27.90%). The ERR model showed similarly that the 3D-CRT plans had considerably higher risk (10.84%) than VMAT and Tomotherapy, which showed almost equal risks (7.05 and 7.07%, respectively). The LQ model requires organ-specific cell survival parameters, which for the lungs, heart, and breast relevant values were found and applied. The lung risk for secondary malignancy was found to be 1.00, 1.96, and 2.07% for 3D-CRT, VMAT, and Tomotherapy, respectively. The secondary cancer risk for breast was estimated to be 0.09, 0.21, and 0.27% and for heart it was 9.75, 6.02 and 6.29% for 3D-CRT, VMAT, and Tomotherapy, respectively. Based on three methods of secondary malignancy estimation, the 3D-CRT plans produced highest radiation-induced secondary malignancy risk, and the VMAT and Tomotherapy plans had nearly equal risk. Pediatric patients must be treated with reducing long term sequelae as a priority. PMID:24684581

  7. Spinal morphine anesthesia and urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Mahan, K T; Wang, J

    1993-11-01

    Spinal anesthetic is a common form of surgical anesthetic used in foot and ankle surgery. Spinal morphine anesthetic is less common, but has the advantage of providing postoperative analgesia for 12 to 24 hr. A number of complications can occur with spinal anesthesia, including urinary retention that may be a source of severe and often prolonged discomfort and pain for the patient. Management of this problem may require repeated bladder catheterization, which may lead to urinary tract infections or impairment of urethrovesicular function. This study reviews the incidence of urinary retention in 80 patients (40 after general anesthesia and 40 after spinal anesthesia) who underwent foot and ankle surgery at Saint Joseph's Hospital, Philadelphia, PA. Twenty-five percent of the patients who had spinal anesthesia experienced urinary retention, while only 7 1/2% of the group who had general anesthesia had this complication. Predisposing factors, treatment regimen, and recommendations for the prevention and management of urinary retention are presented. PMID:8258772

  8. Spinal subdural abscess following epidural steroid injection.

    PubMed

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Bozzay, Joseph D; Walker, Matthew P; John, Kuruvilla

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 58-year-old man who presented with a cervicothoracolumbosacral spinal subdural abscess about a month after receiving an epidural steroid injection for management of low-back pain due to L5-S1 disc herniation. Although he presented with symptoms concerning for a spinal etiology, the subdural empyema was not evident on the initial MRI study and was observed on imaging 5 days later. This patient was successfully managed with surgical intervention and antibiotic treatment, and he is doing well more than 21 months after the operation. It is possible that a prior history of disc herniation or other spinal abnormality may increase a patient's risk of developing spinal subdural empyema. This case illustrates the risk of infection following spinal epidural steroid injections and the importance of early recognition and intervention to successfully treat an extensive subdural abscess. PMID:25343407

  9. Spinal Cord Ischemia Secondary to Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Siddhant; Koh, Roy KM; Yang, Eugene WR; Hee, Hwan-Tak

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old male presented with symptoms of spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic prostate cancer. An urgent decompression at the cervical-thoracic region was performed, and there were no complications intraoperatively. Three hours postoperatively, the patient developed acute bilateral lower-limb paralysis (motor grade 0). Clinically, he was in class 3 hypovolemic shock. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, showing no epidural hematoma. He was managed aggressively with medical therapy to improve his spinal cord perfusion. The patient improved significantly, and after one week, he was able to regain most of his motor functions. Although not commonly reported, spinal cord ischemia post-surgery should be recognized early, especially in the presence of hypovolemic shock. MRI should be performed to exclude other potential causes of compression. Spinal cord ischemia needs to be managed aggressively with medical treatment to improve spinal cord perfusion. The prognosis depends on the severity of deficits, and is usually favorable. PMID:25558328

  10. Rehabilitation in spinal infection diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Karakoç, Mehmet; Ayd?n, Abdulkadir; Öne?, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord infections were the diseases defined by Hypocrite yet the absence of modern medicine and there was not a real protocol in rehabilitation although there were many aspects in surgical treatment options. The patients whether surgically or conservatively treated had a lot of neurological, motor, and sensory disturbances. Our clinic has quite experience from our previous researchs. Unfortunately, serious spinal cord infections are still present in our region. In these patients the basic rehabilitation approaches during early, pre-operation, post-operation period and in the home environment will provide significant contributions to improve the patients’ sensory and motor skills, develop the balance and proriocaption, increase the independence of patients in daily living activities and minimize the assistance of other people. There is limited information in the literature related with the nature of the rehabilitation programmes to be applied for patients with spinal infections. The aim of this review is to share our clinic experience and summarise the publications about spinal infection rehabilitation. There are very few studies about the rehabilitation of spinal infections. There are still not enough studies about planning and performing rehabilitation programs in these patients. Therefore, a comprehensive rehabilitation programme during the hospitalisation and home periods is emphasised in order to provide optimal management and prevent further disability. PMID:25621205

  11. Exercise Habit

    MedlinePLUS

    ... swimming, and cross-country skiing. What is weight-bearing exercise? The term “weight-bearing” is used to describe exercises that work against the force of gravity. Weight-bearing exercise is important for building strong bones. Having ...

  12. Posture Exercises

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search You are here Home » Posture Exercises Posture Exercises When a person develops kyphosis, the posture becomes ... and strengthen the back. Try the following two exercises to keep your spine more limber and flexible. ...

  13. Validation of a Score Predicting Post-Treatment Ambulatory Status After Radiotherapy for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.ne [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Douglas, Sarah; Huttenlocher, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Basic, Hiba [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Karstens, Johann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover (Germany); Hoskin, Peter J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Mount Vernon Cancer Center, Northwood (United Kingdom); Adamietz, Irenaeus A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ruhr University Bochum (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: A score predicting post-radiotherapy (RT) ambulatory status was developed based on 2,096 retrospectively evaluated metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) patients. This study aimed to validate the score in a prospective series. Methods and Materials: The score included five factors associated with post-RT ambulatory status: tumor type, interval tumor diagnosis to MSCC, visceral metastases, pre-RT motor function, time developing motor deficits. Patients were divided into five groups: 21-28, 29-31, 32-34, 35-37, 38-44 points. In this study, 653 prospectively followed patients were divided into the same groups. Furthermore, the number of prognostic groups was reduced from five to three (21-28, 29-37, 38-44 points). Post-RT ambulatory rates from this series were compared with the retrospective series. Additionally, this series was compared with 104 patients receiving decompressive surgery plus RT (41 laminectomy, 63 laminectomy plus stabilization of vertebrae). Results: In this study, post-RT ambulatory rates were 10.6% (21-28 points), 43.5% (29-31 points), 71.0% (32-34 points), 89.5% (35-37 points), and 98.5% (38-44 points). Ambulatory rates from the retrospective study were 6.2%, 43.5%, 70.0%, 86.1%, and 98.7%. After regrouping, ambulatory rates were 10.6% (21-28 points), 70.9% (29-37 points), and 98.5% (38-44 points) in this series, and 6.2%, 68.4%, and 98.7% in the retrospective series. Ambulatory rates were 0%, 62.5%, and 90.9% in the laminectomy plus RT group, and 14.3%, 83.9%, and 100% in the laminectomy + stabilization plus RT group. Conclusions: Ambulatory rates in the different groups in this study were similar to those in the retrospective study demonstrating the validity of the score. Using only three groups is simplier for clinical routine.

  14. Running training alters fiber type composition in spinal muscles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Puustjärvi; M. Tammi; M. Reinikainen; H. J. Helminen; L. Paljärvi

    1994-01-01

    Summary  The issue of whether exercise can induce changes in muscle fiber types has been long debated. Knowledge about the alterations\\u000a in spinal muscle fiber types is scarce. In this study, the alterations initiated by long-distance running on spinal muscle\\u000a fiber type distribution was studied. Ten young dogs were run on a treadmill for 55 weeks, 5 days a week, and

  15. Treatment of multilevel degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis using a combination of microendoscopic discectomy and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    WU, HAN; YU, WEI-DONG; JIANG, RUI; GAO, ZHONG-LI

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) has become increasingly common and is characterized by multilevel disc herniation and lumbar spondylolisthesis, which are difficult to treat. The current study aimed to evaluate the short-term clinical outcomes and value of the combined use of microendoscopic discectomy (MED) and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for the treatment of multilevel DLSS with spondylolisthesis, and to compare the combination with traditional posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). A total of 26 patients with multilevel DLSS and spondylolisthesis underwent combined MED and MI-TLIF surgery using a single cage and pedicle rod-screw system. These cases were compared with 27 patients who underwent traditional PLIF surgery during the same period. Data concerning incision length, surgery time, blood loss, time of bed rest and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score prior to and following surgery were analyzed statistically. Statistical significance was reached in terms of incision length, blood loss and the time of bed rest following surgery (P<0.05), but there was no significant difference between the surgery time and ODI scores of the two groups. The combined use of MED and MI-TLIF has the advantages of reduced blood loss, less damage to the paraspinal soft tissue, shorter length of incision, shorter bed rest time, improved outcomes and shorter recovery times and has similar short-term clinical outcomes to traditional PLIF. PMID:23403827

  16. Exercise Training Benefits Growth Hormone (GH)Deficient Adults in the Absence or Presence of GH Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SCOTT G. THOMAS; JOHN G. ESPOSITO; SHEREEN EZZAT

    Reduced aerobic capacity is a prominent manifestation among patients with GH deficiency (GHD). Exercise training may improve the physiological capacity to undertake aerobic activity. The ability of patients with GHD to participate in and benefit from a structured program of aerobic exercise with or without replacement recombinant human GH (rhGH) was in- vestigated. We examined the effect of aerobic training

  17. Clinical Assessment Of Stereotactic IGRT: Spinal Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerszten, Peter C. [Departments of Neurological Surgery and Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)], E-mail: gersztenpc@upmc.edu; Burton, Steven A. [Departments of Neurological Surgery and Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial lesions is well established. Its use for the treatment of spinal lesions has been limited because of the availability of effective target immobilization devices. Recent advances in stereotactic IGRT have allowed for spinal applications. Large clinical experience with spinal radiosurgery to properly assess clinical outcomes has previously been limited. At our institution, we have developed a successful multidisciplinary spinal radiosurgery program in which 542 spinal lesions (486 malignant and 56 benign lesions) were treated with a single-fraction radiosurgery technique. Patient ages ranged from 18 to 85 years (mean 56 years). Lesion location included 92 cervical, 234 thoracic, 130 lumbar, and 86 sacral. The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell (89 cases), breast (74 cases), and lung (71 cases). The most common benign tumors were neurofibroma (24 cases), schwannoma (13 cases), and meningioma (7 cases). Eighty-nine cervical lesions were treated using skull tracking. Thoracic, lumbar, and sacral tumors were tracked relative to either gold or stainless steel fiducial markers. The maximum intratumoral dose ranged from 12.5 to 30 Gy (mean 20 Gy). Tumor volume ranged from 0.16 to 298 mL (mean 47 mL). Three hundred thirty-seven lesions had received prior external beam irradiation with spinal cord doses precluding further conventional irradiation. The primary indication for radiosurgery was pain in 326 cases, as a primary treatment modality in 70 cases, for tumor radiographic tumor progression in 65 cases, for post-surgical treatment in 38 cases, for progressive neurological deficit in 35 cases, and as a radiation boost in 8 cases. Follow-up period was at least 3 to 49 months. Axial and/or radicular pain improved in 300 of 326 cases (92%). Long-term tumor control was demonstrated in 90% of lesions treated with radiosurgery as a primary treatment modality and in 88% of lesions treated for radiographic tumor progression. Thirty of 35 patients (85%) with progressive neurological deficits experienced at least some improvement after treatment. Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery is now a feasible, safe, and clinically effective technique for the treatment of a variety of spinal lesions. The potential benefits of radiosurgical ablation of spinal lesions are short treatment time in an outpatient setting with essentially no recovery time and excellent symptomatic response. This technique offers a new therapeutic modality for the primary treatment of a variety of spinal lesions, including the treatment of neoplasms in medically inoperable patients, previously irradiated sites, for lesions not amenable to open surgical techniques, and as an adjunct to surgery.

  18. The effect of exercise therapy in head and neck cancer patients in the treatment of radiotherapy-induced trismus: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Scherpenhuizen, Anne; van Waes, Anne M A; Janssen, Luuk M; Van Cann, Ellen M; Stegeman, Inge

    2015-08-01

    Trismus is characterized by a reduced ability to open the mouth, directly affecting many aspects of daily life, such as chewing, swallowing, speaking and maintaining oral hygiene. Several studies have shown that trismus affects health related quality of life. Radiotherapy in the head and neck area is identified as one of the most frequent causes of trismus in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Currently, there is no standard treatment for trismus. Several stretching techniques and jaw mobilizing devices are available, but their effect in radiotherapy-induced trismus is still largely unknown. With this review we give an overview of the present relevant literature and compare the effect of exercise therapy versus no exercise therapy on jaw mobility, expressed in millimeters mouth opening, in HNC patients with radiotherapy-induced trismus. A systematic literature search in four electronic bibliographic databases was conducted in July 2014. Selected articles were critically appraised on relevance and validity. Best available evidence was analyzed and compared. Three of the four selected articles show a significant increase (p-value<0.05) in maximal interincisal opening (MIO) after exercise therapy using a jaw-mobilizing device. One article reports a significant decrease in MIO. However, this decrease is less in the intervention group, which implies a positive effect of exercise therapy. Based on this current best clinical evidence, it can be assumed that exercise therapy with a jaw-mobilizing device yields better results than no exercise, with regards to opening of the mouth in HNC patients with radiotherapy-induced trismus. PMID:26058916

  19. Manipulation under anesthesia with home exercises versus home exercises alone in the treatment of frozen shoulder: a randomized, controlled trial with 125 patients.

    PubMed

    Kivimäki, Jorma; Pohjolainen, Timo; Malmivaara, Antti; Kannisto, Mikko; Guillaume, Jacques; Seitsalo, Seppo; Nissinen, Maunu

    2007-01-01

    We aimed to determine the effect of manipulation under anesthesia in frozen shoulder patients. A blinded randomized trial with a 1-year follow-up was performed at 3 referral hospitals in Southern Finland. We randomly assigned 125 patients with clinically verified frozen shoulder to the manipulation group (n = 65) or control group (n = 60). Both the intervention group and the control group were instructed in specific therapeutic exercises by physiotherapists. Clinical data were gathered at baseline and at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months after randomization. The 2 groups did not differ at any time of the follow-up in terms of shoulder pain or working ability. Small differences in the range of movement were detected in favor of the manipulation group. Perceived shoulder pain decreased during follow-up equally in the 2 groups, and at 1 year after randomization, only slight pain remained. Manipulation under anesthesia does not add effectiveness to an exercise program carried out by the patient after instruction. PMID:17931902

  20. Anti-Nogo-A antibody treatment enhances sprouting of corticospinal axons rostral to a unilateral cervical spinal cord lesion in adult macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Freund, Patrick; Wannier, Thierry; Schmidlin, Eric; Bloch, Jocelyne; Mir, Anis; Schwab, Martin E; Rouiller, Eric M

    2007-06-01

    After injury, regrowth of axons in mammalian adult central nervous system is highly limited. However, in monkeys subjected to unilateral cervical lesion (C7-C8 level), neutralization of an important neurite outgrowth inhibitor, Nogo-A, stimulated axonal sprouting caudal to the lesion, accompanied by enhanced functional recovery of manual dexterity, compared with lesioned monkeys treated with a control antibody (Freund et al. [2006] Nat. Med. 12:790-792). The present study aimed at comparing the same two groups of monkeys for axonal sprouting rostral to the cervical lesion. The corticospinal tract was labeled by injecting the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine into the contralesional motor cortex. The corticospinal axons were interrupted at the level of the lesion, accompanied by retrograde axonal degeneration (axon dieback), reflected by the presence of terminal retraction bulbs. The number of terminal retraction bulbs was lower in anti-Nogo-A antibody treated monkeys, and, when present, they were found closer to the lesion than in control-antibody treated monkeys. Compared with control antibody treated monkeys, the anti-Nogo-A antibody treated monkeys exhibited an increased cumulated axon arbor length and a higher number of axon arbors going in the medial direction from the white to the gray matter. Higher in the cervical cord (at C5 level), the anti-Nogo-A treatment enhanced the number of corticospinal fibers crossing the midline, suggesting axonal sprouting. Thus, the anti-Nogo-A antibody treatment enhanced axonal sprouting rostral to the cervical lesion; some of these fibers grew around the lesion and into the caudal spinal segments. These processes paralleled the observed improved functional recovery. PMID:17394135

  1. Better exercise adherence after treatment for cancer (BEAT Cancer) study: Rationale, design, and methods

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Laura Q.; McAuley, Edward; Anton, Philip M.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Vicari, Sandra; Hopkins-Price, Patricia; Verhulst, Steven; Mocharnuk, Robert; Hoelzer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Most breast cancer survivors do not engage in regular physical activity. Our physical activity behavior change intervention for breast cancer survivors significantly improved physical activity and health outcomes post-intervention during a pilot, feasibility study. Testing in additional sites with a larger sample and longer follow-up is warranted to confirm program effectiveness short and longer term. Importantly, the pilot intervention resulted in changes in physical activity and social cognitive theory constructs, enhancing our potential for testing mechanisms mediating physical activity behavior change. Here, we report the rationale, design, and methods for a two-site, randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of the BEAT Cancer physical activity behavior change intervention to usual care on short and longer term physical activity adherence among breast cancer survivors. Secondary aims include examining social cognitive theory mechanisms of physical activity behavior change and health benefits of the intervention. Study recruitment goal is 256 breast cancer survivors with a history of ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I, II, or IIIA disease who have completed primary cancer treatment. Outcome measures are obtained at baseline, 3 months (i.e., immediately post-intervention), 6 months, and 12 months and include physical activity, psychosocial factors, fatigue, sleep quality, lower extremity joint dysfunction, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength, and waist-to-hip ratio. Confirming behavior change effectiveness, health effects, and underlying mechanisms of physical activity behavior change interventions will facilitate translation to community settings for improving the health and well-being of breast cancer survivors. PMID:21983625

  2. Disuse bone loss in hindquarter suspended rats: partial weightbearing, exercise and ibandronate treatment as countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultheis, L.; Ruff, C. B.; Rastogi, S.; Bloomfield, S.; Hogan, H. A.; Fedarko, N.; Thierry-Palmer, M.; Ruiz, J.; Bauss, F.; Shapiro, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential countermeasures for bone loss during long-term space missions in the hindquarter suspended rat, including partial weight bearing (surrogate for artificial gravity) episodic full weight bearing (2 hour/day full weight bearing) and treatment with the third generation bisphosphonate ibandronate (Roche). Graded mechanical loading was studied by housing the animals on a novel servo controlled force plate system which permitted the titration of mechanical force at varying frequency and amplitude and different levels of weight bearing. The force plate, which forms the cage floor, is a glass platform supported by an 18" diameter speaker cone filled with expanding polyurethane foam. An infrared optical sensor attached to the speaker cone yields a voltage linearly related to vertical displacement of the glass platform. The dynamic force on the paw was computed as a product of the apparent mass of the animal on the platform at rest and the acceleration of the platform determined from the second derivative of the optical sensor output. The mass of the animal on the platform was varied by adjusting tension on the tether suspending the animal. Mechanical impact loading was titrated with the force plate resonating at different frequencies, including 3 Hz and 16 Hz.

  3. Better exercise adherence after treatment for cancer (BEAT Cancer) study: rationale, design, and methods.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Laura Q; McAuley, Edward; Anton, Philip M; Courneya, Kerry S; Vicari, Sandra; Hopkins-Price, Patricia; Verhulst, Steven; Mocharnuk, Robert; Hoelzer, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Most breast cancer survivors do not engage in regular physical activity. Our physical activity behavior change intervention for breast cancer survivors significantly improved physical activity and health outcomes post-intervention during a pilot, feasibility study. Testing in additional sites with a larger sample and longer follow-up is warranted to confirm program effectiveness short and longer term. Importantly, the pilot intervention resulted in changes in physical activity and social cognitive theory constructs, enhancing our potential for testing mechanisms mediating physical activity behavior change. Here, we report the rationale, design, and methods for a two-site, randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of the BEAT Cancer physical activity behavior change intervention to usual care on short and longer term physical activity adherence among breast cancer survivors. Secondary aims include examining social cognitive theory mechanisms of physical activity behavior change and health benefits of the intervention. Study recruitment goal is 256 breast cancer survivors with a history of ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I, II, or IIIA disease who have completed primary cancer treatment. Outcome measures are obtained at baseline, 3 months (i.e., immediately post-intervention), 6 months, and 12 months and include physical activity, psychosocial factors, fatigue, sleep quality, lower extremity joint dysfunction, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength, and waist-to-hip ratio. Confirming behavior change effectiveness, health effects, and underlying mechanisms of physical activity behavior change interventions will facilitate translation to community settings for improving the health and well-being of breast cancer survivors. PMID:21983625

  4. Doxycycline plus streptomycin versus ciprofloxacin plus rifampicin in spinal brucellosis [ISRCTN31053647

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emine Alp; Rahmi Kemal Koc; Ahmet Candan Durak; Orhan Yildiz; Bilgehan Aygen; Bulent Sumerkan; Mehmet Doganay

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal treatment regimen and duration of the therapy is still controversial in spinal brucellosis. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy, adverse drug reactions, complications and cost of ciprofloxacin plus rifampicin versus doxycycline plus streptomycin in the treatment of spinal brucellosis. METHODS: The patients diagnosed as spinal brucellosis between January 2002 to December 2004 were

  5. A diagnosis-based clinical decision rule for spinal pain part 2: review of the literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald R Murphy; Eric L Hurwitz; Craig F Nelson

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal pain is a common and often disabling problem. The research on various treatments for spinal pain has, for the most part, suggested that while several interventions have demonstrated mild to moderate short-term benefit, no single treatment has a major impact on either pain or disability. There is great need for more accurate diagnosis in patients with spinal pain.

  6. The changing pattern of spinal arachnoiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, M D; Russell, J A; Grossart, K W

    1978-01-01

    Spinal arachnoiditis is a rare condition. Eighty cases, diagnosed during a period when 7600 spinal contrast investigations were undertaken, have been reviewed. The majority had suffered a previous spinal condition, the most common being lumbar disc disease. There has been a change in the distribution of arahnoiditis with the lumbar region now most frequently involved. This accounts for the persistence of radicular symptoms and the relatively low incidence of paraplegia when compared with earlier series. Surgery does not appear to have any role in the treatment. Images PMID:632824

  7. Spinal epidural abscess: contemporary trends in etiology, evaluation, and management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniele Rigamonti; Leon Liem; Prakash Sampath; Nachshon Knoller; Yuji Numaguchi; David L Schreibman; Michael A Sloan; Aizik Wolf; Seth Zeidman

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUNDDespite advances in neuroimaging and neurosurgical treatment, spinal epidural abscess remains a challenging problem; early diagnosis is often difficult and treatment is delayed. Optimal management is unclear, and morbidity and mortality are significant. To define contemporary trends in etiology and management, and establish diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines, we reviewed our 10-year experience with spinal epidural abscess.METHODSWe examined medical records, laboratory

  8. What Are the Key Statistics about Brain and Spinal Cord Cancers?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and spinal cord tumors? What are the key statistics about brain and spinal cord tumors? The American ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

  9. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Painful Spinal Tumors Adjacent to the Spinal Cord with Real-Time Monitoring of Spinal Canal Temperature: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro, E-mail: nakatuka@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Uraki, Junji; Makita, Masashi; Oshima, Fumiyoshi; Takeda, Kan [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    PurposeTo prospectively evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical utility of bone radiofrequency (RF) ablation with real-time monitoring of the spinal canal temperature for the treatment of spinal tumors adjacent to the spinal cord.Materials and MethodsOur Institutional Review Board approved this study. Patients gave informed consent. The inclusion criteria were (a) a painful spinal metastasis and (b) a distance of 1 cm or less between the metastasis and the spinal cord. The thermocouple was placed in the spinal canal under CT fluoroscopic guidance. When the spinal canal temperature reached 45{sup o}C, RF application was immediately stopped. RF ablation was considered technically successful when the procedure was performed without major complications. Clinical success was defined as a fall in the visual analogue scale score of at least 2 points.ResultsTen patients with spinal tumors measuring 3-8 cm (mean, 4.9 {+-} 1.5 cm) were enrolled. The distance between the tumor and the spinal cord was 1-6 mm (mean, 2.4 {+-} 1.6 mm). All procedures were judged technically successful (100%). The spinal canal temperature did not exceed 45{sup o}C in 9 of the 10 patients (90%). In the remaining patient, the temperature rose to 48{sup o}C, resulting in transient neural damage, although RF application was immediately stopped when the temperature reached 45{sup o}C. Clinical success was achieved within 1 week in all patients (100%).ConclusionBone RF ablation with real-time monitoring of the spinal canal temperature is feasible, safe, and clinically useful for the treatment of painful spinal metastases adjacent to the spinal cord.

  10. Uncommon Progression of an Extradural Spinal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Boughamoura, Mohamed; Mahmoudi, Houda; Kilani, Mohamed; Hattab, Nejib

    2014-01-01

    Extradural spinal meningiomas are rare. Our understanding of purely extradural spinal meningiomas is still incomplete and they may be easily confused with malignant neoplasms, much more common in this location. We report a rare case of a purely extradural thoracic spine meningioma in a 70-year-old man, with an unusual progression. In addition we discuss the pathogenesis of these tumors and the potential pitfalls in differential diagnosis and review the relevant literature concerning their treatment and outcome. PMID:25243091

  11. Fat cell-secreted adiponectin mediates physical exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis: an alternative anti-depressive treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Suk Yu; Li, Ang; Xu, Aimin; So, Kwok-fai

    2015-01-01

    Psychological depression is drawing accumulating attention nowadays, due to the skyrocketing incidence worldwide and the enormous burdens it incurs. Physical exercise has been long recognized for its therapeutic effects on depressive disorders, although knowledge of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. Suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis in adult brains has been regarded, at least partly, contributive to depression, whereas physical exercise that restores neurogenesis accordingly exerts the anti-depressive action. Several recent publications have suggested the potential role of adiponectin, a protein hormone secreted by peripheral mature adipocytes, in mediating physical exercise-triggered enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis and alleviation of depression. Here, we briefly review these novel findings and discuss the possibility of counteracting depression by modulating adiponectin signaling in the hippocampus with interventions including physical exercise and administration of pharmacological agents. PMID:25788905

  12. New Prophylactic and Therapeutic Strategies for Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sookyoung; Park, Kanghui; Lee, Youngjeon; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin production by the pineal gland in the vertebrate brain has attracted much scientific attention. Pineal melatonin is regulated by photoperiodicity, whereas circadian secretion of melatonin produced in the gastrointestinal tract is regulated by food intake. Thus, the circadian rhythm of pineal melatonin depends upon whether a species is diurnal or nocturnal. Spinal cord injury (SCI) involves damage to the spinal cord caused by trauma or disease that results in compromise or loss of body function. Melatonin is the most efficient and commonly used pharmacological antioxidant treatment for SCI. Melatonin is an indolamine secreted by the pineal gland during the dark phase of the circadian cycle. Neurorehabilitation is a complex medical process that focuses on improving function and repairing damaged connections in the brain and nervous system following injury. Physical activity associated with an active lifestyle reduces the risk of obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, and depression and protects against neurological conditions, including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and ischemic stroke. Physical activity has been shown to increase the gene expression of several brain neurotrophins (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], nerve growth factor, and galanin) and the production of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2, which promotes neuronal survival, differentiation, and growth. In summary, melatonin is a neural protectant, and when combined with therapeutic exercise, the hormone prevents the progression of secondary neuronal degeneration in SCI. The present review briefly describes the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying SCI, focusing on therapeutic targets and combined melatonin and exercise therapy, which can attenuate secondary injury mechanisms with minimal side effects.

  13. Can exercise ameliorate treatment toxicity during the initial phase of testosterone deprivation in prostate cancer patients? Is this more effective than delayed rehabilitation?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been substantial increase in use of androgen deprivation therapy as adjuvant management of prostate cancer. However, this leads to a range of musculoskeletal toxicities including reduced bone mass and increased skeletal fractures compounded with rapid metabolic alterations, including increased body fat, reduced lean mass, insulin resistance and negative lipoprotein profile, increased incidence of cardiovascular and metabolic morbidity, greater distress and reduced quality of life. Numerous research studies have demonstrated certain exercise prescriptions to be effective at preventing or even reversing these treatment toxicities. However, all interventions to date have been of rehabilitative intent being implemented after a minimum of 3 months since initiation of androgen deprivation, by which time considerable physical and psychological health problems have manifested. The pressing question is whether it is more efficacious to commence exercise therapy at the same time as initiating androgen deprivation, so treatment induced adverse effects can be immediately attenuated or indeed prevented. Methods/design We are proposing a multi-site randomized controlled trial with partial crossover to examine the effects of timing of exercise implementation (immediate or delayed) on preserving long-term skeletal health, reversing short- and long-term metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors, and supporting mental health in men receiving androgen deprivation therapy. 124 men who are about to initiate androgen deprivation for prostate cancer will be randomized to immediate or delayed groups. Immediate will commence a 6-month exercise program within 7–10 days of their first dose. Delayed will receive usual care for 6 months and then commence the exercise program for 6 months (partial cross-over). Immediate will be free to adopt the lifestyle of their choosing following the initial 6-month intervention. Measurements for primary and secondary endpoints will take place at baseline, 6 months and 12 months. Discussion This project is unique as it explores a fundamental question of when exercise implementation will be of most benefit and addresses both physical and psychological consequences of androgen deprivation initiation. The final outcome may be adjunct treatment which will reduce if not prevent the toxicities of androgen deprivation, ultimately resulting in reduced morbidity and mortality for men with prostate cancer. Trial registration ACTRN12612000097842 PMID:23013489

  14. Cordectomy for intramedullary spinal cord glioblastoma with a 12-year survival

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, Stephanus; Hitchon, Patrick W.; Ahmed, Raheel; Kirby, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prognosis of patients with spinal cord glioblastoma is poor, with an average survival of 18 months. There are reports in the literature describing cordectomy as a treatment option for patients with spinal cord tumors. Case Description: This is a case report of a patient with spinal cord glioblastoma who, in addition to radiation and chemotherapy, was treated with cordectomy. Outcome of treatment resulted in 12-year survival. Conclusion: Cordectomy in spinal cord glioblastoma can result in prolonged and meaningful survival. PMID:25101196

  15. Application of exercise transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurements for detection of proximal lower extremity arterial disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Mahe, Guillaume; Kalra, Manju; Abraham, Pierre; Liedl, David A; Wennberg, Paul W

    2015-06-01

    Proximal claudication is secondary to ischemia caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), whereas proximal pseudo-claudication is secondary to other disease processes such as hip arthritis, spinal stenosis, neuropathy, and so forth. The differentiation between the two can be challenging. Exercise transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurement (exercise-TcPO2) allows noninvasive detection of flow-reducing lesions in the proximal arteries and tributaries of the lower extremity arterial tree. We present the first case report in the United States using an exercise-TcPO2 algorithm. A 71-year-old diabetic patient with proximal left-sided and right-calf claudication with indeterminate ankle-brachial indices underwent an exercise-TcPO2 study before and after endovascular intervention. Four TcPO2 probes were placed: one at chest level (reference probe), one on each buttock, and one on the symptomatic calf. The Delta from Resting Oxygen Pressure (DROP) index was calculated at each probe site using a previously validated protocol. Proximal left- and right-calf ischemia were confirmed by the initial exercise-TcPO2, and, after endovascular treatment of the left iliac artery lesion, improvements in proximal exercise-TcPO2 values were found. These data suggest that exercise-TcPO2 can be useful in PAD evaluation in patients with non-compressible arteries and/or proximal claudication. PMID:25750011

  16. Clinical decision rules, spinal pain classification and prediction of treatment outcome: A discussion of recent reports in the rehabilitation literature.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Jeffrey J; Fritz, Julie M

    2012-01-01

    Clinical decision rules are an increasingly common presence in the biomedical literature and represent one strategy of enhancing clinical-decision making with the goal of improving the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare delivery. In the context of rehabilitation research, clinical decision rules have been predominantly aimed at classifying patients by predicting their treatment response to specific therapies. Traditionally, recommendations for developing clinical decision rules propose a multistep process (derivation, validation, impact analysis) using defined methodology. Research efforts aimed at developing a "diagnosis-based clinical decision rule" have departed from this convention. Recent publications in this line of research have used the modified terminology "diagnosis-based clinical decision guide." Modifications to terminology and methodology surrounding clinical decision rules can make it more difficult for clinicians to recognize the level of evidence associated with a decision rule and understand how this evidence should be implemented to inform patient care. We provide a brief overview of clinical decision rule development in the context of the rehabilitation literature and two specific papers recently published in Chiropractic and Manual Therapies. PMID:22726639

  17. Erythropoietin in Spinal Cord Injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Brines; Anthony Cerami

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition lacking a clearly effective pharmacological treatment. The cytokine erythropoietin\\u000a (EPO), which mediates cytoprotection in a variety of tissues through activation of multiple signaling pathways, is markedly\\u000a effective in preclinical models of ischemic, traumatic and inflammatory SCI. The recent development of non-erythropoietic\\u000a derivatives of EPO with outstanding preclinical characteristics encourages evaluation of tissue-protective

  18. Combined treatment of isoflavone supplementation and exercise restores the changes in hepatic protein expression in ovariectomized rats - a proteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Postmenopausal women experience adverse physiological changes caused by estrogen deprivation. Here, we hypothesized that the administration of isoflavone, a phytoestrogn, and/or physical exercise could reverse changes in the levels of hepatic enzymes disturbed by loss of estrogen to ameliorate postmenopause-related health problems. Methods Thirty-week-old female Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into five groups: a sham-operated (SHAM) group, ovariectomized groups on a regular diet with exercise (EXE) and without exercise (OVX), and ovariectomized groups on an isoflavone supplemented diet with (ISO?+?EXE) and without exercise (ISO). Proteomic tools were employed to identify candidate hepatic proteins that were differentially expressed among the five animal groups. Results INMT was detected in the SHAM but not in all of the ovariectomized rats. Seven proteins (PPIA, AKR1C3, ALDH2, PSME2, BUCS1, OTC, and GAMT) were identified to have differential expression among the groups. When compared to the SHAM group, the ovariectomy elevated the levels of PPIA, BUCS1, PSME2, AKR1C3, and GAMT while decreasing ALDH2 and OTC. Among these OVX-induced changes, OVX-increased BUCS1 and GAMT levels were noticeably decreased by ISO or EXE and further greatly down-regulated by ISO?+?EXE. In the case of PSME2, ISO and EXE further increased OVX-upregulated expression levels but ISO?+?EXE greatly reduced OVX-increased levels. On the other hand OVX-lowered OTC levels were elevated by ISO, EXE, or ISO?+?EXE. The protein levels of ALDH2, PPIA, and AKR1C3 were not significantly reverted by ISO, EXE or ISO?+?EXE. Conclusion The combination of an isoflavone diet and exercise partly reversed ovariectomy-induced changes in hepatic protein expression levels. Our data suggest that the combinatory regimen of isoflavone supplementation and exercise may be beneficial to menopausal women through modulating hepatic protein expression profiles. PMID:25006332

  19. LISP Exercises

    E-print Network

    Hart, Timothy P.

    1964-01-01

    The following exercises are carefully graded to mesh with the sections in Chapter I, "The LISP Language", in the LISP 1.5 Programmer's Manual. Each exercise should be worked immediately after reading the manual section indicated.

  20. Collateral Sprouting of Uninjured Primary Afferent A-Fibers into the Superficial Dorsal Horn of the Adult Rat Spinal Cord after Topical Capsaicin Treatment to the Sciatic Nerve

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard J. Mannion; Tim P. Doubell; Richard E. Coggeshall; Clifford J. Woolf

    1996-01-01

    That terminals of uninjured primary sensory neurons terminat- ing in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord can collaterally sprout was first suggested by Liu and Chambers (1958), but this has since been disputed. Recently, horseradish peroxidase conju- gated to the B subunit of cholera toxin (B-HRP) and intracellular HRP injections have shown that sciatic nerve section or crush produces

  1. A sham-controlled, phase II trial of transcranial direct current stimulation for the treatment of central pain in traumatic spinal cord injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Felipe Fregni; Paulo S. Boggio; Moises C. Lima; Merari J. L. Ferreira; Tim Wagner; Sergio P. Rigonatti; Anita W. Castro; Daniel R. Souza; Marcelo Riberto; Steven D. Freedman; Michael A. Nitsche; Alvaro Pascual-Leone

    2006-01-01

    Past evidence has shown that motor cortical stimulation with invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation is effective to relieve central pain. Here we aimed to study the effects of another, very safe technique of non-invasive brain stimulation – transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) – on pain control in patients with central pain due to traumatic spinal cord injury. Patients were randomized

  2. ACR Appropriateness Criteria(®) Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression and Recurrent Spinal Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Simon Shek-Man; Ryu, Samuel; Chang, Eric L; Galanopoulos, Nicholas; Jones, Joshua; Kim, Edward Y; Kubicky, Charlotte D; Lee, Charles P; Rose, Peter S; Sahgal, Arjun; Sloan, Andrew E; Teh, Bin S; Traughber, Bryan J; Van Poznak, Catherine; Vassil, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) is an oncologic emergency and if left untreated, permanent paralysis will ensue. The treatment of MESCC is governed by disease, patient, and treatment factors. Patient's preferences and goals of care are to be weighed into the treatment plan. Ideally, a patient with MESCC is evaluated by an interdisciplinary team promptly to determine the urgency of the clinical scenario. Treatment recommendations must take into consideration the risk-benefit profiles of surgical intervention and radiotherapy for the particular individual's circumstance, including neurologic status, performance status, extent of epidural disease, stability of the spine, extra-spinal disease status, and life expectancy. In patients with high spinal instability neoplastic score (SINS) or retropulsion of bone fragments in the spinal canal, surgical intervention should be strongly considered. The rate of development of motor deficits from spinal cord compression may be a prognostic factor for ultimate functional outcome, and should be taken into account when a treatment recommendation is made. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:25974663

  3. Treatment and complications in flaccid neuromuscular scoliosis (Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy) with posterior-only pedicle screw instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Hitesh N.; Hong, Jae-Young; Cho, Jae-Woo; Park, Jong-Hoon; Yang, Jae-Hyuk

    2009-01-01

    Literature has described treatment of flaccid neuromuscular scoliosis using different instrumentation; however, only one article has been published using posterior-only pedicle screw fixation. Complications using pedicle screws in paralytic neuromuscular scoliosis has not been described before. To present results and complications with posterior-only pedicle screws, a retrospective study was carried out in 27 consecutive patients with flaccid neuromuscular scoliosis (Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy), who were operated between 2002 and 2006 using posterior-only pedicle screw instrumentation. Immediate postoperative and final follow-up results were compared using t test for Cobb angle, pelvic obliquity, thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis. Perioperative and postoperative complications were noted from the hospital records of each patient. Complications, not described in literature, were discussed in detail. Average follow-up was 32.2 months. Preoperative, immediate postoperative and final follow-up Cobb angle were 79.8°, 30.2° (63.3% correction, p < 0.0001) and 31.9°, respectively; and pelvic obliquity was 18.3°, 8.9° (52% correction, p < 0.0001) and 8.9°. Postoperative thoracic kyphosis remained unchanged from 27.6° to 19.9° (p = 0.376); while lumbar lordosis improved significantly from +15.6° to ?22.4° lordosis (p = 0.0002). Most patients had major to moderate improvement in postoperative functional and ambulatory status compared to the preoperative status. Thirteen (48.1%) perioperative complications were noted with five major complications (four respiratory in the form of hemothorax or respiratory failure that required ventilator support and one death) and eight minor complications (three UTI, two atelectasis, two neurological and one ileus). Postoperatively, we noted complications, such as coccygodynia with subluxation in 7, back sore on the convex side in 4 and dislodging of rod distally in 1 patient making a total of 12 (44.4%) postoperative complications. Of 12 postoperative complications, 6 (50%) required secondary procedure. We conclude that although flaccid neuromuscular scoliosis can be well corrected with posterior-only pedicle screw, there is a high rate of associated complications. PMID:19885687

  4. Schwann Cell Precursors Transplanted into the Injured Spinal Cord Multiply, Integrate

    E-print Network

    Jessen, Kristjan R

    Schwann Cell Precursors Transplanted into the Injured Spinal Cord Multiply, Integrate KEY WORDS sprouting; chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan; cortico spinal tract ABSTRACT There is a strong current interest in the use of cell trans- plantation for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. We report

  5. Burst Spinal Cord Stimulation for Limb and Back Pain Dirk De Ridder1,2

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Burst Spinal Cord Stimulation for Limb and Back Pain Dirk De Ridder1,2 , Mark Plazier3 , Niels. In 1967, Shealy et al. (33) implanted the first spinal cord stimulator as a treatment for neuropathic of which are activated by pain-transmitting small (C and Ad) fibers (21). In spinal cord stimulation (SCS

  6. Chronic in vivo imaging in the mouse spinal cord using an implanted chamber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew J Farrar; Ida M Bernstein; Donald H Schlafer; Thomas A Cleland; Joseph R Fetcho; Chris B Schaffer

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and treatment of spinal cord pathology is limited in part by a lack of time-lapse in vivo imaging strategies at the cellular level. We developed a chronically implanted spinal chamber and surgical procedure suitable for time-lapse in vivo multiphoton microscopy of mouse spinal cord without the need for repeat surgical procedures. We routinely imaged mice repeatedly for more than

  7. Late-onset spinal deformities in children treated by laminectomy and radiation therapy for malignant tumours

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tamas de Jonge; Hernan Slullitel; Jean Dubousset; Lotfi Miladi; Philip Wicart; Tamás Illés

    2005-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of 76 children who had had malignant tumours treated with laminectomy or laminoplasty and\\/or radiation therapy affecting the spine. Spinal tumours in children are extremely rare. However, their treatment can result in progressive spinal deformity. Radiation therapy affecting the growing spine can lead to asymmetric vertebral growth, causing kyphosis and\\/or scoliosis. These spinal deformities pose

  8. Normal intraoperative spinal sonography.

    PubMed

    Quencer, R M; Montalvo, B M

    1984-12-01

    The normal intraoperative sonographic features of the spinal canal, spinal cord, conus medullaris, and cauda equina are described and illustrated. Important observations concerning the normal spinal cord include its highly reflective dorsal and ventral surfaces, its uniform hypoechogenicity, and the presence of a central echo. Other easily identified structures within the spinal canal include the dura-arachnoid layer, subarachnoid space, denticulate ligament, dorsal arachnoid septations, and the roots of the cauda equina. In addition the sonographic appearance of commonly encountered iatrogenically introduced material including Gelfoam, Pantopaque, cottonoid pledgets, suture material, Harrington rods, and freeze-dried dura is also demonstrated. These normal images can serve as a baseline for the interpretation of various pathologic conditions of the spinal canal and its contents as seen with intraoperative spinal sonography. PMID:6388284

  9. Cost-effectiveness of guideline-endorsed treatments for low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Haas, Marion; Maher, Chris G; Machado, Luciana A C; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2011-07-01

    Healthcare costs for low back pain (LBP) are increasing rapidly. Hence, it is important to provide treatments that are effective and cost-effective. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the cost-effectiveness of guideline-endorsed treatments for LBP. We searched nine clinical and economic electronic databases and the reference list of relevant systematic reviews and included studies for eligible studies. Economic evaluations conducted alongside randomised controlled trials investigating treatments for LBP endorsed by the guideline of the American College of Physicians and the American Pain Society were included. Two independent reviewers screened search results and extracted data. Data extracted included the type and perspective of the economic evaluation, the treatment comparators, and the relative cost-effectiveness of the treatment comparators. Twenty-six studies were included. Most studies found that interdisciplinary rehabilitation, exercise, acupuncture, spinal manipulation or cognitive-behavioural therapy were cost-effective in people with sub-acute or chronic LBP. Massage alone was unlikely to be cost-effective. There were inconsistent results on the cost-effectiveness of advice, insufficient evidence on spinal manipulation for people with acute LBP, and no evidence on the cost-effectiveness of medications, yoga or relaxation. This review found evidence supporting the cost-effectiveness of the guideline-endorsed treatments of interdisciplinary rehabilitation, exercise, acupuncture, spinal manipulation and cognitive-behavioural therapy for sub-acute or chronic LBP. There is little or inconsistent evidence for other treatments endorsed in the guideline. PMID:21229367

  10. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Bianchi, Patrizia; De Bellis, Alberto; Soligo, Marzia; Rocco, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an increased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deficits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells. PMID:25206755

  11. Extracranial radiosurgery—applications in the management of benign intradural spinal neoplasms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Saraceni; Jonathan B. Ashman; James S. Harrop

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has enabled the delivery of higher doses of radiation and decreased fractionation due to improved\\u000a accuracy. Spinal radiosurgery has been increasingly utilized for the management of metastatic extradural spinal disease. However,\\u000a surgical resection remains the primary treatment strategy for intradural spinal tumors. Preliminary evidence suggests that\\u000a radiosurgical ablation with stereotactic radiation for intradural spinal lesions may be efficacious

  12. Diffusion tensor MRI of spinal decompression sickness

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Elizabeth B.; Sobakin, Aleksey S.; Meyerand, Mary E.; Eldridge, Marlowe; Ferrazzano, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop more sensitive imaging tools for clinical use and basic research of spinal decompression sickness (DCS), we used diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) validated by histology to assess DCS-related tissue injury in sheep spinal cords. DTI is based on the measurement of water diffusion indices, including fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusion (MD) to detect tissue microstructural abnormalities. In this study, we measured FA and MD in white and gray matter spinal cord regions in samples taken from sheep following hyperbaric exposure to 60–132 fsw and 0–180 minutes of oxygen pre-breathing treatment before rapid decompression. The main finding of the study was that decompression from >60 fsw resulted in reduced FA that was associated with cell death and disrupted tissue microstructure in spinal cord white matter tracts. Additionally, animals exposed to prolonged oxygen pre-breathing prior to decompression demonstrated reduced MD in spinal cord gray matter regions regardless of dive depth. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the utility of DTI for the investigation of DCS-related injury and to define DTI biomarkers of spinal DCS. PMID:23397865

  13. Feasibility of isometric spinal muscle training in patients with bone metastases under radiation therapy - first results of a randomized pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal bone metastases are commonly diagnosed in cancer patients. The consequences are pain both at rest and under exercise, impairment of activities of daily life (ADL), reduced clinical performance, the risk of pathological fractures, and neurological deficits. The aim of this randomized, controlled pilot trial was to investigate the feasibility of muscle-training exercises in patients with spinal bone metastases under radiotherapy. Secondary endpoints were local control, pain response and survival. Methods This study was a prospective, randomized, monocentre, controlled explorative intervention trial to determine the multidimensional effects of exercises for strengthening the paravertebral muscles. On the days of radiation treatment, patients in the control group were physically treated in form of respiratory therapy. Sixty patients were randomized between September 2011 and March 2013 into one of the two groups: differentiated resistance training or physical measure with thirty patients in each group. Results The resistance training of the paravertebral muscles was feasible in 83.3% of patients (n?=?25). Five patients died during the first three months. The exercise group experienced no measurable side effects. “Chair stand test” in the intervention group was significant enhanced with additionally improved analgesic efficiency. Patients in intervention group improved in pain score (VAS, 0–10) over the course (p?spinal bone metastases. The results offer a rationale for future large controlled investigations to confirm these findings. Trial registration Clinical trial identifier NCT01409720. PMID:24499460

  14. Stereotactic radiosurgery and immunotherapy for metastatic spinal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Caruso, James P; Cohen-Inbar, Or; Bilsky, Mark H; Gerszten, Peter C; Sheehan, Jason P

    2015-03-01

    The management of metastatic spinal melanoma involves maximizing local control, preventing recurrence, and minimizing treatment-associated toxicity and spinal cord damage. Additionally, therapeutic measures should promote mechanical stability, facilitate rehabilitation, and promote quality of life. These objectives prove difficult to achieve given melanoma's elusive nature, radioresistant and chemoresistant histology, vascular character, and tendency for rapid and early metastasis. Different therapeutic modalities exist for metastatic spinal melanoma treatment, including resection (definitive, debulking, or stabilization procedures), stereotactic radiosurgery, and immunotherapeutic techniques, but no single treatment modality has proven fully effective. The authors present a conceptual overview and critique of these techniques, assessing their effectiveness, separately and combined, in the treatment of metastatic spinal melanoma. They provide an up-to-date guide for multidisciplinary treatment strategies. Protocols that incorporate specific, goal-defined surgery, immunotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery would be beneficial in efforts to maximize local control and minimize toxicity. PMID:25727228

  15. Time\\/duration effectiveness of sildenafil versus tadalafil in the treatment of erectile dysfunction in male spinal cord-injured patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Del Popolo; V Li Marzi; N Mondaini; G Lombardi

    2004-01-01

    Study design: A randomized, blinded, crossover clinical trial comparing sildenafil versus tadalafil for erectile dysfunction (ED) in male spinal cord-injured (SCI) patients.Objectives: To compare the safety, time\\/duration effectiveness, and the impact on the quality of life (QoL) of tadalafil 10 mg versus sildenafil 50 mg.Setting: Neurourology Section, Careggi Hospital, Florence, Italy.Methods: During a screening (visit 1), a diary card was

  16. Spinal hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    I?lekel, S; Er?ahin, Y; Zileli, M; Oktar, N; Oner, K; Ovül, I; Ozdamar, N; Tunçbay, E

    1998-03-01

    Vertebral hydatid cysts are rare and found in less than 1% of all the cases of hydatidosis. Neural compression is common in vertebral hydatidosis. The prognosis is generally regarded as very poor. This paper examines the natural history and complications which may arise during the treatment of vertebral hydatid cyst, and discusses their treatment. Thirteen cases of hydatid disease affecting the vertebrae are presented. The patients were admitted with symptoms of spinal cord compression. Twelve were treated by laminectomy and one by costotransversectomy. Low back pain radiating to the legs and lower extremity weakness were the predominant symptoms. Different degrees of pareses were present in 12 patients. Nine patients had impaired sensation in lower extremities. In 13 patients, 27 operations were performed. The major complication of surgery was the death of one patient due to the formaline irrigation. The surgical goal should be an extensive removal of the cysts and affected bone. The surgical area needs to be irrigated with hypertonic saline. Mebendazole or albendazole therapy seems to retard the recurrences and control the disease. PMID:9554015

  17. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Genevay, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is most commonly due to degenerative changes in older individuals. LSS is being more commonly diagnosed and may relate to better access to advanced imaging and to an aging population. This review focuses on radicular symptoms related to degenerative central and lateral stenosis and updates knowledge of LSS pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. Since patients with anatomic LSS can range from asymptomatic to severely disabled, the clinical diagnosis focuses on symptoms and examination findings associated with LSS. Imaging findings are helpful for patients with persistent, bothersome symptoms in whom invasive treatments are being considered. There is limited information from high quality studies about the relative benefits and harms of commonly used treatments. Interpreting and comparing results of available research is limited by a lack of consensus about the definition of LSS. Nevertheless, evidence supports decompressive laminectomy for patients with persistent and bothersome symptoms. Recommendations favor a shared decision making approach due to important trade-offs between alternative therapies and differences among patients in their preferences and values. PMID:20227646

  18. Spinal metastasis in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of head and neck cancer is relatively low in developed countries and highest in South East Asia. Notwithstanding advances in surgery and radiotherapy over the past several decades, the 5-year survival rate for head and neck cancer has stagnated and remains at 50–55%. This is due, in large part, to both regional and distant disease spread, including spinal metastasis. Spinal metastasis from head and neck cancer is rare, has a poor prognosis and can significantly impede end-stage quality of life; normally only palliative care is given. This study aims to conduct a systematic review of the evidence available on management of spinal metastasis from head and neck cancer and to use such evidence to draw up guiding principles in the management of the distant spread. Methods Systematic review of the electronic literature was conducted regarding the management of spinal metastasis of head and neck malignancies. Results Due to the exceptional rarity of head and neck cancers metastasizing to the spine, there is a paucity of good randomized controlled trials into the management of spinal metastasis. This review produced only 12 case studies/reports and 2 small retrospective cohort studies that lacked appropriate controls. Conclusion Management should aim to improve end-stage quality of life and maintain neurological function. This review has found that radiotherapy +/? medical adjuvant is considered the principle treatment of spinal metastasis of head and neck cancers. There is an absence of a definitive treatment protocol for head and neck cancer spinal metastasis. Our failure to find and cite high-quality scientific evidence only serves to stress the need for good quality research in this area. PMID:22716187

  19. Hemodynamic responses of quadriplegics to maximal arm-cranking and FNS leg cycling exercise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen F. Figoni; Roger M. Glaser; Debra M. Hendershot; Satyendra C. Gupta; Agaram G. Suryaprasad; Mary M. Rodgers; Bertram N. Ezenwa

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare maximal central hemodynamic responses of spinal-cord-injured quadriplegic subjects to voluntary arm-crank exercise (ACE) and to electrically induced leg cycling exercise. Six C6-C7 quadriplegic men performed graded exercises to maximum with both an arm-crank ergometer and a leg-cycle ergometer, utilizing functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) of paralyzed leg musculature. Both exercise modes produced a

  20. Les amyotrophies spinales distales

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Devic; P. Petiot

    2011-01-01

    IntroductionDistal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN), also known as spinal muscular atrophy, represents a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases caused by degenerations of spinal motor neurons and leading to distal muscle weakness and wasting. Nerve conduction studies reveal a pure motor axonopathy and needle examination shows chronic denervation.

  1. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Petur Ludvigsson; Elias Olafsson; W. Allen Hauser

    1999-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is among the commonest degenerative disorders of the nervous system in childhood. This is an inherited autosomal recessive disease which results in premature death of anterior horn cells of the spinal cord and is manifested by progressive weakness and atrophy of skeletal muscles. Few studies have looked at the frequency of the disease in a defined

  2. Spinal Crawlers: Deformable Organisms for Spinal Cord Segmentation and Analysis

    E-print Network

    Hamarneh, Ghassan

    Spinal Crawlers: Deformable Organisms for Spinal Cord Segmentation and Analysis Chris Mc, Canada {cmcintos, hamarneh}@cs.sfu.ca Abstract. Spinal cord analysis is an important problem relating to the study of various neurological diseases. We present a novel approach to spinal cord segmentation

  3. Cooling athletes with a spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Katy E; Price, Michael J; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L

    2015-01-01

    Cooling strategies that help prevent a reduction in exercise capacity whilst exercising in the heat have received considerable research interest over the past 3 decades, especially in the lead up to a relatively hot Olympic and Paralympic Games. Progressing into the next Olympic/Paralympic cycle, the host, Rio de Janeiro, could again present an environmental challenge for competing athletes. Despite the interest and vast array of research into cooling strategies for the able-bodied athlete, less is known regarding the application of these cooling strategies in the thermoregulatory impaired spinal cord injured (SCI) athletic population. Individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI) have a reduced afferent input to the thermoregulatory centre and a loss of both sweating capacity and vasomotor control below the level of the spinal cord lesion. The magnitude of this thermoregulatory impairment is proportional to the level of the lesion. For instance, individuals with high-level lesions (tetraplegia) are at a greater risk of heat illness than individuals with lower-level lesions (paraplegia) at a given exercise intensity. Therefore, cooling strategies may be highly beneficial in this population group, even in moderate ambient conditions (~21 °C). This review was undertaken to examine the scientific literature that addresses the application of cooling strategies in individuals with an SCI. Each method is discussed in regards to the practical issues associated with the method and the potential underlying mechanism. For instance, site-specific cooling would be more suitable for an athlete with an SCI than whole body water immersion, due to the practical difficulties of administering this method in this population group. From the studies reviewed, wearing an ice vest during intermittent sprint exercise has been shown to decrease thermal strain and improve performance. These garments have also been shown to be effective during exercise in the able-bodied. Drawing on additional findings from the able-bodied literature, the combination of methods used prior to and during exercise and/or during rest periods/half-time may increase the effectiveness of a strategy. However, due to the paucity of research involving athletes with an SCI, it is difficult to establish an optimal cooling strategy. Future studies are needed to ensure that research outcomes can be translated into meaningful performance enhancements by investigating cooling strategies under the constraints of actual competition. Cooling strategies that meet the demands of intermittent wheelchair sports need to be identified, with particular attention to the logistics of the sport. PMID:25119157

  4. Advanced therapy learning algorithm for spinal cord stimulation

    E-print Network

    Gaudreau Balderrama, Amanda Dawn

    2010-01-01

    Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) is a technique used to treat chronic pain and has been shown to be an effective method of treatment, both financially and socioeconomically. Stimulating electrodes are surgically implanted ...

  5. Therapeutic interventions after spinal cord injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandrine Thuret; Lawrence D. F. Moon; Fred H. Gage

    2006-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can lead to paraplegia or quadriplegia. Although there are no fully restorative treatments for SCI, various rehabilitative, cellular and molecular therapies have been tested in animal models. Many of these have reached, or are approaching, clinical trials. Here, we review these potential therapies, with an emphasis on the need for reproducible evidence of safety and efficacy.

  6. Coping with Cancer. Can Exercise Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courneya, Kerry S.; Mackey, John R.; Jones, Lee W.

    2000-01-01

    Exercise can positively affect a broad range of quality of life parameters in people with cancer. The general exercise prescription is moderate-intensity exercise 3-5 days per week. Conditions that warrant prescription modification include fatigue during treatment, acute or chronic physical impairments, and presence of bone cancer. Research…

  7. Exercise at Home

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Information > Healthy Lifestyle > Exercise > Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Exercise and staying active are an ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  8. Exercise and age

    MedlinePLUS

    Age and exercise ... It's never too late to start exercising. Exercise has benefits at any age. Don't worry if you've never exercised, or if you stopped exercising for some reason. Being physically ...

  9. Spinal Injury: Regeneration, Recovery, and a Possible New Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Avis (U of Maryland, Dept of Biology) [U of Maryland, Dept of Biology

    2009-02-04

    Spinal injury is most frequent in young healthy men, desperate to walk. Most treatments have focused on regeneration of the injured axons, but no one has as yet achieved success with this approach. However, in the lamprey, a primitive fish with a spinal cord having all the critical features of the human spinal cored, spinal injury is followed by complete regeneration of injured axons. Additionally, the animal recovers the ability to swim, and in many, the swimming is normal. Unfortunately, in most others, it is highly abnormal. This talk will review evidence from the abnormal regeneration, why it bespeaks difficulties heretofore not considered, and suggest an alternate approach for the near future. In so doing, the speaker will introduce the normal function of the spinal cord, what happens in normal and abnormal regeneration, and the new techniques that employ methods from neuromorphic engineering, a synthesis of neuroscience and engineering to engineer smart devices.

  10. Fate of rubrospinal neurons after unilateral section of the cervical spinal cord in adult macaque monkeys: effects of an antibody treatment neutralizing Nogo-A.

    PubMed

    Wannier-Morino, P; Schmidlin, E; Freund, P; Belhaj-Saif, A; Bloch, J; Mir, A; Schwab, M E; Rouiller, E M; Wannier, T

    2008-06-27

    The present study describes in primates the effects of a spinal cord injury on the number and size of the neurons in the magnocellular part of the red nucleus (RNm), the origin of the rubrospinal tract, and evaluates whether a neutralization of Nogo-A reduces the lesioned-induced degenerative processes observed in RNm. Two groups of monkeys were subjected to unilateral section of the spinal cord affecting the rubrospinal tract; one group was subsequently treated with an antibody neutralizing Nogo-A; the second group received a control antibody. Intact animals were also included in the study. Counting neurons stained with a monoclonal antibody recognizing non-phosphorylated epitopes on neurofilaments (SMI-32) indicated that their number in the contralesional RNm was consistently inferior to that in the ipsilesional RNm, in a proportion amounting up to 35%. The lesion also induced shrinkage of the soma of the neurons detected in the contralesional RNm. Infusing an anti-Nogo-A antibody at the site of the lesion did not increase the proportion of SMI-32 positive rubrospinal neurons in the contralesional RNm nor prevent shrinkage. PMID:18508036

  11. In vitro sustained release of bioactive anti-NogoA, a molecule in clinical development for treatment of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Stanwick, Jason C; Baumann, M Douglas; Shoichet, Molly S

    2012-04-15

    Anti-NogoA is a promising anti-inhibitory molecule that has been shown to enhance functional recovery after spinal cord injury when delivered in rat and primate models over the span of weeks. To achieve this sustained release, anti-NogoA is typically delivered by osmotic minipumps; however, external minipumps are susceptible to infection. To address this issue, we developed a drug delivery system that consists of anti-NogoA-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles dispersed in a hydrogel of hyaluronan and methylcellulose (composite HAMC). To optimize in vitro release, we screened formulations for improved anti-NogoA bioactivity and sustained release based on combinations of co-encapsulated trehalose, hyaluronan, MgCO(3), and CaCO(3). Co-encapsulated MgCO(3) and CaCO(3) slowed the rate of anti-NogoA release and did not influence anti-NogoA bioactivity. Co-encapsulated trehalose significantly improved anti-NogoA bioactivity at early release time points by stabilizing the protein during lyophilization. Co-encapsulated trehalose with hyaluronan improved bioactivity up to 28d and dramatically increased the rate and duration of sustained delivery. The sustained release of bioactive anti-NogoA from composite HAMC is a compelling formulation for in vivo evaluation in a model of spinal cord injury. PMID:22306041

  12. The Complementary Effects of Atorvastatin and Exercise Treatment on the Composition and Stability of the Atherosclerotic Plaques in ApoE Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moustardas, Petros; Kadoglou, Nikolaos P. E.; Katsimpoulas, Michalis; Kapelouzou, Alkistis; Kostomitsopoulos, Nikolaos; Karayannacos, Panayotis E.; Kostakis, Alkiviadis; Liapis, Christos D.

    2014-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to investigate the effects of combined atorvastatin and exercise treatment on the composition and stability of the atherosclerotic plaques in apolipoproteinE (apoE) knockout mice. Methods Forty male, apoE?/? mice were fed a high-fat diet for 16 weeks. Thereafter, while maintained on high-fat diet, they were randomized into four (n?=?10) groups for 8 additional weeks: Group CO: Control. Group AT: Atorvastatin treatment (10 mg/Kg/day). Group EX: Exercise-training on treadmill. Group AT+EX: Atorvastatin and simultaneous exercise training. At the study’s end, plasma cholesterol levels, lipids and triglycerides were measured, along with the circulating concentrations of matrix-metalloproteinases (MMP-2,3,8,9) and their inhibitors (TIMP-1,2,3). Plaque area and the relative concentrations of collagen, elastin, macrophages, smooth muscle cells, MMP-2,3,8,9 and TIMP-1,2,3 within plaques were determined. Lastly, MMP activity was assessed in the aortic arch. Results All intervention groups showed a lower degree of lumen stenosis, with atheromatous plaques containing more collagen and elastin. AT+EX group had less stenosis and more elastin compared to single intervention groups. MMP-3,-8 -9 and macrophage intra-plaque levels were reduced in all intervention groups. EX group had increased TIMP-1 levels within the lesions, while TIMP-2 was decreased in all intervention groups. The blood levels of the above molecules increased during atherosclerosis development, but they did not change after the therapeutic interventions in accordance to their intra-plaque levels. Conclusion The two therapeutic strategies act with synergy regarding the extent of the lesions and lumen stenosis. They stabilize the plaque, increasing its content in elastin and collagen, by influencing the MMP/TIMP equilibrium, which is mainly associated with the macrophage amount. While the increased MMP-2,-3,-8 -9, as well as TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 circulating levels are markers of atherosclerosis, they are not correlated with their corresponding concentrations within the lesions after the therapeutic interventions, and cannot serve as markers for the disease development/amelioration. PMID:25264981

  13. Effective physical treatment for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Maher, C G

    2004-01-01

    It is now feasible to adopt an evidence-based approach when providing physical treatment for patients with chronic LBP. A summary of the efficacy of a range of physical treatments is provided in Table 1. The evidence-based primary care options are exercise, laser, massage, and spinal manipulation; however, the latter three have small or transient effects that limit their value as therapies for chronic LBP. In contrast, exercise produces large reductions in pain and disability, a feature that suggests that exercise should play a major role in the management of chronic LBP. Physical treatments, such as acupuncture, backschool, hydrotherapy, lumbar supports, magnets, TENS, traction, ultrasound, Pilates therapy, Feldenkrais therapy, Alexander technique, and craniosacral therapy are either of unknown value or ineffective and so should not be considered. Outside of primary care, multidisciplinary treatment or functional restoration is effective; however, the high cost probably means that these programs should be reserved for patients who do not respond to cheaper treatment options for chronic LBP. Although there are now effective treatment options for chronic LBP, it needs to be acknowledged that the problem of chronic LBP is far from solved. Though treatments can provide marked improvements in the patient's condition, the available evidence suggests that the typical chronic LBP patient is left with some residual pain and disability. Developing new, more powerful treatments and refining the current group of known effective treatments is the challenge for the future. PMID:15062718

  14. Arachnoiditis ossificans after spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Di; Zhao, Song; Liu, Wan-Guo; Zhang, Shao-Kun

    2015-05-01

    This article presents an unusual case of arachnoiditis ossificans after spinal surgery. A case of arachnoiditis ossificans secondary to lumbar fixation and decompression surgery for the treatment of multilevel lumbar fractures is reported and the relevant literature is reviewed. A 29-year-old man who previously underwent posterior pedicle screw fixation and fusion for multiple lumbar spine fractures reported lower back stiffness and discomfort 23 months postoperatively. A laminectomy was performed at L2 and at L3-L4. At L2, bone fragments from the burst fracture had injured the dural sac and some nerve roots. A posterolateral fusion was performed using allogeneic bone. Postoperatively, there were no signs of fever, infection, or systemic inflammatory responses. Arachnoiditis ossificans of the thecal sac from L1-L5 was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography at the 2-year follow-up. His postoperative neurological status progressively improved and he regained motor and sensory functions. Because of neurological improvements, fixation hardware was removed without further decompression. The authors report a case of arachnoiditis ossificans secondary to lumbar fixation and decompression surgery, which involved a large region. Arachnoiditis ossificans is a relatively rare disorder with unclear etiologies and limited treatment options. Spinal surgical intervention of arachnoiditis ossificans should be carefully considered because it may lead to poor outcomes and multiple revision surgeries. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(5):e437-e442.]. PMID:25970374

  15. Seismological Exercises

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stephen Nelson

    This homework exercise, which was designed for an undergraduate level geology class at Tulane University, asks the student to make evaluations about the Loma Prieta Earthquake and other earthquakes using seismograms, time travel curves, maps and other information.

  16. Astragalus membranaceus improves exercise performance and ameliorates exercise-induced fatigue in trained mice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Huang, Wen-Ching; Chen, Yi-Ming; Huang, Chi-Chang; Hsu, Mei-Chich

    2014-01-01

    Astragalus membranaceus (AM) is a popular "Qi-tonifying" herb with a long history of use as a Traditional Chinese Medicine with multiple biological functions. However, evidence for the effects of AM on exercise performance and physical fatigue is limited. We evaluated the potential beneficial effects of AM on ergogenic and anti-fatigue functions following physiological challenge. Male ICR strain mice were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10 per group) for treatment: (1) sedentary control and vehicle treatment (vehicle control); (2) exercise training with vehicle treatment (exercise control); and (3) exercise training with AM treatment at 0.615 g/kg/day (Ex-AM1) or (4) 3.075 g/kg/day (Ex-AM5). Both the vehicle and AM were orally administered for 6 weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase after 15-min swimming exercise. Exercise training combined with AM supplementation increased endurance exercise capacity and increased hepatic and muscle glycogen content. AM reduced exercise-induced accumulation of the byproducts blood lactate and ammonia with acute exercise challenge. Moreover, we found no deleterious effects from AM treatment. Therefore, AM supplementation improved exercise performance and had anti-fatigue effects in mice. It may be an effective ergogenic aid in exercise training. PMID:24595275

  17. Ischemic Preconditioning Protects against Spinal Cord Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rabbits by Attenuating Blood Spinal Cord Barrier Disruption.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bo; Li, Xiao-Man; Sun, Xi-Jia; Bao, Na-Ren; Ren, Xiao-Yan; Lv, Huang-Wei; Ma, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning has been reported to protect against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. To investigate this, Japanese white rabbits underwent I-R (30 min aortic occlusion followed by reperfusion), ischemic preconditioning (three cycles of 5 min aortic occlusion plus 5 min reperfusion) followed by I-R, or sham surgery. At 4 and 24 h following reperfusion, neurological function was assessed using Tarlov scores, blood spinal cord barrier permeability was measured by Evan's Blue extravasation, spinal cord edema was evaluated using the wet-dry method, and spinal cord expression of zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) were measured by Western blot and a real-time polymerase chain reaction. ZO-1 was also assessed using immunofluorescence. Spinal cord I-R injury reduced neurologic scores, and ischemic preconditioning treatment ameliorated this effect. Ischemic preconditioning inhibited I-R-induced increases in blood spinal cord barrier permeability and water content, increased ZO-1 mRNA and protein expression, and reduced MMP-9 and TNF-? mRNA and protein expression. These findings suggest that ischemic preconditioning attenuates the increase in blood spinal cord barrier permeability due to spinal cord I-R injury by preservation of tight junction protein ZO-1 and reducing MMP-9 and TNF-? expression. PMID:23685868

  18. Ischemic Preconditioning Protects against Spinal Cord Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rabbits by Attenuating Blood Spinal Cord Barrier Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bo; Li, Xiao-Man; Sun, Xi-Jia; Bao, Na-Ren; Ren, Xiao-Yan; Lv, Huang-Wei; Ma, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning has been reported to protect against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. To investigate this, Japanese white rabbits underwent I-R (30 min aortic occlusion followed by reperfusion), ischemic preconditioning (three cycles of 5 min aortic occlusion plus 5 min reperfusion) followed by I-R, or sham surgery. At 4 and 24 h following reperfusion, neurological function was assessed using Tarlov scores, blood spinal cord barrier permeability was measured by Evan’s Blue extravasation, spinal cord edema was evaluated using the wet-dry method, and spinal cord expression of zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) were measured by Western blot and a real-time polymerase chain reaction. ZO-1 was also assessed using immunofluorescence. Spinal cord I-R injury reduced neurologic scores, and ischemic preconditioning treatment ameliorated this effect. Ischemic preconditioning inhibited I-R-induced increases in blood spinal cord barrier permeability and water content, increased ZO-1 mRNA and protein expression, and reduced MMP-9 and TNF-? mRNA and protein expression. These findings suggest that ischemic preconditioning attenuates the increase in blood spinal cord barrier permeability due to spinal cord I-R injury by preservation of tight junction protein ZO-1 and reducing MMP-9 and TNF-? expression. PMID:23685868

  19. Exercise rehabilitation for smartphone addiction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunna

    2013-01-01

    Internet addiction after launching smartphone is becoming serious. Therefore this paper has attempted to sketch out the diverse addiction treatment and then check the feasibility of exercise rehabilitation. The reason to addict the internet or smartphone is personalized individual characters related personal psychological and emotional factors and social environmental factors around them. We have shown that 2 discernible approaches due to 2 different addiction causes: that is behavioral treatment and complementary treatment. In the behavioral treatment, cognitive behavioral approach (CBT) is representative methods for changing additive thoughts and behaviors. Motivational interviewing (MI) is also the brief approach for persons not ready to change their behavior. Mindfulness behavioral cognitive treatment (MBCT) also the adapted treatment based on CBT. There are different types following the emphatic point, mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) or mindfulness oriented recovery enhancement (MORE). It is apparent that therapeutic recreation, music therapy using drumming activity, and art therapy are useful complementary treatment. Exercise rehabilitation contained the systematic procedures and comprehensive activities compared to previous addiction treatments by contents and techniques. Exercise rehabilitation can treat both physical symptoms at first and mental problems in the next step. So more evidence-based exercise rehabilitation researches need to do, but it is highly probable that exercise rehab can apply for smartphone addiction. PMID:24409425

  20. Quality of life and fatigue of patients with spinal bone metastases under combined treatment with resistance training and radiation therapy- a randomized pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this trial was to compare the effects of resistance training versus passive physical therapy on quality of life (QoL), fatigue, and emotional distress outcomes during radiation therapy in patients with spinal bone metastases under radiotherapy (RT). Methods In this randomized trial, 60 patients were treated from September 2011 until March 2013 into one of the two groups: isometric resistance training or physical therapy with thirty patients in each group during RT. EORTC QLQ-BM22, EORTC QLQ-FA13, and FBK-R10 were assessed at baseline, three months, and six months after RT. Results Psychosocial aspects in resistance training group (Arm A) were significantly improved after three (p?=?0.001) and six months (p?=?0.010). Other rated items of the QLQ-BM22 painful site, and pain characteristics were without significant differences. Functional interference showed a positive trend after six months (p?=?0.081). After six months, physical fatigue (p?=?0.013), and interference with daily life (p?=?0.006) according to the QLQ-FA13 assessment improved in Arm A significantly. Emotional distress was in Arm A lower after six months (p?=?0.016). The Cohen’s effect size confirmed the clinically significant improvement of these findings. Conclusions In this group of patients we were able to show that guided isometric resistance training of the paravertebral muscles can improve functional capacity, reduce fatigue and thereby enhance QoL over a 6-months period in patients with stable spinal metastases. The results offer a rationale for future large controlled investigations to confirm these findings. Trial registration Clinical trial identifier NCT01409720 PMID:24998293

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves local microenvironment after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shuquan; Luo, Min; Li, Yajun

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves motor function in patients with spinal cord injury. In the present study, we explored the mechanisms associated with the recovery of neurological function after hyperbaric oxygen therapy in a rat model of spinal cord injury. We established an acute spinal cord injury model using a modification of the free-falling object method, and treated the animals with oxygen at 0.2 MPa for 45 minutes, 4 hours after injury. The treatment was administered four times per day, for 3 days. Compared with model rats that did not receive the treatment, rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen had fewer apoptotic cells in spinal cord tissue, lower expression levels of aquaporin 4/9 mRNA and protein, and more NF-200 positive nerve fibers. Furthermore, they had smaller spinal cord cavities, rapid recovery of somatosensory and motor evoked potentials, and notably better recovery of hindlimb motor function than model rats. Our findings indicate that hyperbaric oxygen therapy reduces apoptosis, downregulates aquaporin 4/9 mRNA and protein expression in injured spinal cord tissue, improves the local microenvironment for nerve regeneration, and protects and repairs the spinal cord after injury. PMID:25657740

  2. Diagonal Trunk Muscle Exercises in Peripartum Pelvic Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jan MA Mens; Chris J Snijders; Henk J Stam

    Background and Purpose. Exercises for low back and pelvic pain are supposed to increase muscle force to reduce symptoms, but they could exacerbate symptoms by loading of the spinal and pelvic structures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of graded exercises of the diagonal trunk muscle systems. Subjects. The subjects were 44 women with persistent pelvic

  3. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after cervical spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Hsien; Wu, Jau-Ching; Cheng, Henrich; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Huang, Wen-Cheng

    2013-10-01

    Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) is an unpredictable and rare complication of spinal surgery. We report five cases of RCH following cervical spinal surgery, and summarize another seven similar cases from the literature. Dural opening with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypovolemia seems to be an important factor contributing to RCH following cervical spinal surgery. As other authors have proposed, surgical positioning may be another factor contributing to RCH. RCH is thought to be hemorrhagic venous infarction, resulting from the stretching occlusion of the superior cerebellar vein by the cerebellar sag effect. Either intraoperative CSF loss or a postoperative CSF leak from drainage may cause cerebellar sag, further resulting in RCH. RCH is usually self-limiting, and most patients with RCH have an optimal outcome after conservative treatment. Severe cases that involved surgical intervention because of evidence of brainstem compression or hydrocephalus also had acceptable outcomes, compared to spontaneous CH. It has been suggested that one way to prevent RCH is to avoid extensive perioperative loss of CSF, by paying attention to surgical positioning during spinal surgery. We also underline the importance of early diagnosis and CSF expansion in the early treatment of RCH. PMID:23746536

  4. Unilateral laminotomy for bilateral decompression of lumbar spinal stenosis part II: Clinical experiences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. Spetzger; H. Bertalanffy; M. H. T. Reinges; J. M. Gilsbach

    1997-01-01

    Summary The surgical aim in the treatment of symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis is the relief of the patient's complaints by an adequate neural decompression. Unilateral laminotomy and bilateral spinal canal decompression represents such a safe, effective and minimally invasive surgical method. This technique has been successfully used in the operative treatment of 29 patients with symptomatic mono- or multisegmental lumbar

  5. Comparison of deep and superficial abdominal muscle activity between experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors and controls during stabilization exercise

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Sang-Min; Kim, Chang-Won; Shin, Yun-A

    2015-01-01

    Pilates and resistance exercises are used for lumbar stabilization training. However, it is unclear which exercise is more effective for lumbar stabilization. In our study, we aimed to compare surface muscle activity and deep muscle thickness during relaxation and spinal stabilization exercise in experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors. This study is a retrospective case control study set in the Exercise Prescription Laboratory and Sports Medicine Center. The participants included Pilates instructors (mean years of experience, 3.20±1.76; n=10), resistance exercise instructors (mean years of experience, 2.53±0.63; n=10), and controls (n=10). The participants performed 4 different stabilization exercises: abdominal drawing-in maneuver, bridging, roll-up, and one-leg raise. During the stabilization exercises, surface muscle activity was measured with electromyography, whereas deep muscle thickness was measured by ultrasound imaging. During the 4 stabilization exercises, the thickness of the transverse abdominis (TrA) was significantly greater in the Pilates-trained group than the other 2 other groups. The internal oblique (IO) thickness was significantly greater in the Pilates- and resistance-trained group than the control group, during the 4 exercises. However, the surface muscle activities were similar between the groups. Both Pilates and resistance exercise instructors had greater activation of deep muscles, such as the TrA and IO, than the control subjects. Pilates and resistance exercise are both effective for increasing abdominal deep muscle thickness.

  6. Vascular dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Sinescu, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the vascular dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Vascular dysfunctions are common complications of SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. Neuroanatomy and physiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, is reviewed. SCI implies disruption of descendent pathways from central centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating in intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant vascular dysfunction. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and it is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Arterial hypotension with orthostatic hypotension occurs in both acute and chronic phases. The etiology is multifactorial. We described a few factors influencing the orthostatic hypotension occurrence in SCI: sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, low plasma catecholamine levels, rennin–angiotensin–aldosterone activity, peripheral alpha–adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness, impaired function of baroreceptors, hyponatremia and low plasmatic volume, cardiovascular deconditioning, morphologic changes in sympathetic neurons, plasticity within spinal circuits, and motor deficit leading to loss of skeletal muscle pumping activity. Additional associated cardiovascular concerns in SCI, such as deep vein thrombosis and long–term risk for coronary heart disease and systemic atherosclerosis are also described. Proper prophylaxis, including non–pharmacologic and pharmacological strategies, diminishes the occurrence of the vascular dysfunction following SCI. Each vascular disturbance requires a specific treatment. PMID:20945818

  7. Operative treatment of 733 patients with acute thoracolumbar spinal injuries: comprehensive results from the second, prospective, internet-based multicenter study of the Spine Study Group of the German Association of Trauma Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Knop, C.; Beisse, R.; Audigé, L.; Kandziora, F.; Pizanis, A.; Pranzl, R.; Gercek, E.; Schultheiss, M.; Weckbach, A.; Bühren, V.; Blauth, M.

    2010-01-01

    The second, internet-based multicenter study (MCSII) of the Spine Study Group of the German Association of Trauma Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie) is a representative patient collection of acute traumatic thoracolumbar (T1–L5) injuries. The MCSII results are an update of those obtained with the first multicenter study (MCSI) more than a decade ago. The aim of the study was to assess and bring into focus: the (1) epidemiologic data, (2) surgical and radiological outcome, and (3) 2-year follow-up (FU) results of these injuries. According to the Magerl/AO classification, there were 424 (57.8%) compression fractures (A type), 178 (24.3%) distractions injuries (B type), and 131 (17.9%) rotational injuries (C type). B and C type injuries carried a higher risk for neurological deficits, concomitant injuries, and multiple vertebral fractures. The level of injury was located at the thoracolumbar junction (T11–L2) in 67.0% of the case. 380 (51.8%) patients were operated on by posterior stabilization and instrumentation alone (POSTERIOR), 34 (4.6%) had an anterior procedure (ANTERIOR), and 319 (43.5%) patients were treated with combined posteroanterior surgery (COMBINED). 65% of patients with thoracic (T1–T10) and 57% with lumbar spinal (L3–L5) injuries were treated with a single posterior approach (POSTERIOR). 47% of the patients with thoracolumbar junction (T11–L2) injuries were either operated from posterior or with a combined posterior–anterior surgery (COMBINED) each. Short angular stable implant systems have replaced conventional non-angular stable instrumentation systems to a large extent. The posttraumatic deformity was restored best with COMBINED surgery. T-spine injuries were accompanied by a higher number and more severe neurologic deficits than TL junction or L-spine injuries. At the same time T-spine injuries showed less potential for neurologic recovery especially in paraplegic (Frankel/AISA A) patients. 5% of all patients required revision surgery for perioperative complications. Follow-up data of 558 (76.1%) patients were available and collected during a 30-month period from 1 January 2004 until 31 May 2006. On average, a posterior implant removal was carried out in a total of 382 COMBINED and POSTERIOR patients 12 months after the initial surgery. On average, the rehabilitation process required 3–4 weeks of inpatient treatment, followed by another 4 months of outpatient therapy and was significantly shorter when compared with MCSI in the mid-1990s. From the time of injury until FU, 80 (60.6%) of 132 patients with initial neurological deficits improved at least one grade on the Frankel/ASIA Scale; 8 (1.3%) patients deteriorated. A higher recovery rate was observed for incomplete neurological injuries (73%) than complete neurological injuries (44%). Different surgical approaches did not have a significant influence on the neurologic recovery until FU. Nevertheless, neurological deficits are the most important factors for the functional outcome and prognosis of TL spinal injuries. POSTERIOR patients had a better functional and subjective outcome at FU than COMBINED patients. However, the posttraumatic radiological deformity was best corrected in COMBINED patients and showed significantly less residual kyphotic deformity (biseg GDW ?3.8° COMBINED vs. ?6.1° POSTERIOR) at FU (p = 0.005). The sagittal spinal alignment was better maintained when using vertebral body replacement implants (cages) in comparison to iliac strut grafts. Additional anterior plate systems did not have a significant influence on the radiological FU results. In conclusion, comprehensive data of a large patient population with acute thoracolumbar spinal injuries has been obtained and analyzed with this prospective internet-based multicenter study. Thus, updated results and the clinical outcome of the current operative treatment strategies in participating German and Austrian trauma centers have been presented. Nevertheless, it was

  8. What Is Spinal Cord Injury?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Spinal Cord Injury (SCI): Condition Information Skip sharing on social ... with SCI is the lowest point on the spinal cord below which sensory feeling and motor movement diminish ...

  9. Living with Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... techniques that may prevent injury and disease. A spinal cord injury (SCI) can result from trauma, such as ... with daily living skills. What can persons with spinal cord injuries and their friends and families do? ? Get ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury Prevention Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    Spinal Cord Injury Prevention Tips Preventing SCI Biking prevention tips While many cycling injuries are head injuries, the ... NeurosurgeryToday.org Every year, an estimated 11,000 spinal cord injury (SCI) accidents occur in the United States. ...

  11. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The cervical spinal column is made up of vertebral bodies which protect the spinal cord. ... Cervical spine disease is usually caused by herniated intervertebral discs, abnormal growth of bony processes on the ...

  12. Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Transition from Hospital to Home ... Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury What's ...

  13. Dosimetric Comparison Between 2-Dimensional Radiation Therapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Treatment of Advanced T-Stage Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: To Treat Less or More in the Planning Organ-At-Risk Volume of the Brainstem and Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, Ricky [Department of Clinical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: S033928@mailserv.cuhk.edu.hk; Teo, Peter [Department of Clinical Oncology, Sanatorium Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Kam, Michael; Leung, S.F.; Cheung, K.Y.; Chan, Anthony [Department of Clinical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the deficiencies in target coverage and organ protection of 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2DRT) in the treatment of advanced T-stage (T3-4) nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and assess the extent of improvement that could be achieved with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), with special reference to of the dose to the planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) of the brainstem and spinal cord. A dosimetric study was performed on 10 patients with advanced T-stage (T3-4 and N0-2) NPC. Computer tomography (CT) images of 2.5-mm slice thickness of the head and neck were acquired with the patient immobilized in semi-extended-head position. A 2D plan based on Ho's technique, and an IMRT plan based on a 7-coplanar portals arrangement, were established for each patient. 2DRT was planned with the field borders and shielding drawn on the simulator radiograph with reference to bony landmarks, digitized, and entered into a planning computer for reconstruction of the 3D dose distribution. The 2DRT and IMRT treatment plans were evaluated and compared with respect to the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the targets and the organs-at-risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). With IMRT, the dose coverage of the target was superior to that of 2DRT. The mean minimum dose of the GTV and PTV were increased from 33.7 Gy (2DRT) to 62.6 Gy (IMRT), and 11.9 Gy (2DRT) to 47.8 Gy (IMRT), respectively. The D{sub 95} of the GTV and PTV were also increased from 57.1 Gy (2DRT) to 67 Gy (IMRT), and 45 Gy (2DRT) to 63.6 Gy (IMRT), respectively. The TCP was substantially increased to 78.5% in IMRT. Better protection of the critical normal organs was also achieved with IMRT. The mean maximum dose delivered to the brainstem and spinal cord were reduced significantly from 61.8 Gy (2DRT) to 52.8 Gy (IMRT) and 56 Gy (2DRT) to 43.6 Gy (IMRT), respectively, which were within the conventional dose limits of 54 Gy for brainstem and of 45 Gy for spinal cord. The mean maximum doses deposited on the PRV of the brainstem and spinal cord were 60.7 Gy and 51.6 Gy respectively, which were above the conventional dose limits. For the chiasm, the mean dose maximum and the dose to 5% of its volume were reduced from 64.3 Gy (2DRT) to 53.7 Gy (IMRT) and from 62.8 Gy (2DRT) to 48.7 Gy (IMRT), respectively, and the corresponding NTCP was reduced from 18.4% to 2.1%. For the temporal lobes, the mean dose to 10% of its volume (about 4.6 cc) was reduced from 63.8 Gy (2DRT) to 55.4 Gy (IMRT) and the NTCP was decreased from 11.7% to 3.4%. The therapeutic ratio for T3-4 NPC tumors can be significantly improved with IMRT treatment technique due to improvement both in target coverage and the sparing of the critical normal organ. Although the maximum doses delivered to the brainstem and spinal cord in IMRT can be kept at or below their conventional dose limits, the maximum doses deposited on the PRV often exceed these limits due to the close proximity between the target and OARs. In other words, ideal dosimetric considerations cannot be fulfilled in IMRT planning for T3-4 NPC tumors. A compromise of the maximal dose limit to the PRV of the brainstem and spinal cord would need be accepted if dose coverage to the targets is not to be unacceptably compromised. Dosimetric comparison with 2DRT plans show that these dose limits to PRV were also frequently exceeded in 2DRT plans for locally advanced NPC. A dedicated retrospective study on the incidence of clinical injury to neurological organs in a large series of patients with T3-4 NPC treated by 2DRT may provide useful reference data in exploring how far the PRV dose constraints may be relaxed, to maximize the target coverage without compromising the normal organ function.

  14. Cervical spinal injury in elderly: report of 20 cases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Hanci; B. E. Gençosmanoglu; M. Uzan; C. Kuday

    2000-01-01

    Summary  According to epidemiological studies; spinal injuries seem to be a disease of younger population. However it is not uncommon\\u000a in elderly. In this retrospective study we analysed twenty patients with cervical spinal injury, aged from 65 to 90 years\\u000a with respect to age, gender, trauma admission interval, bony lesions, neurological status and treatment modalities. In this\\u000a series the major etiological

  15. Spinal muscular atrophy in childhood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Moosa; V. Dubowitz

    1973-01-01

    A coarse tremor was noted in 13 children suffering from the childhood form of spinal muscular atrophy. Tremor has not been seen in any other condition producing proximal muscle weakness in childhood, and its presence should therefore suggest the diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy.In addition, the feet of patients with spinal muscular atrophy tended to evert, whereas in Duchenne muscular

  16. Neurophysiological effects of spinal manipulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel G Pickar

    2002-01-01

    Background context: Despite clinical evidence for the benefits of spinal maniputation and the apparent wide usage of it, the biological mechanisms underlying the effects of spinal manipulation are not known. Although this does not negate the clinical effects of spinal manipulation, it hinders acceptance by the wider scientific and health-care communities and hinders rational strategies for improving the delivery of

  17. Neurophysiological effects of spinal manipulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel G. Pickar

    2002-01-01

    Background context: Despite clinical evidence for the benefits of spinal maniputation and the appar- ent wide usage of it, the biological mechanisms underlying the effects of spinal manipulation are not known. Although this does not negate the clinical effects of spinal manipulation, it hinders acceptance by the wider scientific and health-care communities and hinders rational strategies for improving the delivery

  18. Burnei’s anterior transthoracic retropleural approach of the thoracic spine: a new operative technique in the treatment of spinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gavriliu, TS; Japie, EM; Ghi??, RA; Hamei, ?; Dughil?, C; ?iripa, IL; Elnayef, T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Up to the middle of the last century, the thoracic spine, especially in its upper part, has been considered an unapproachable site, a no-man’s land, but the constant evolution of medicine imposed techniques of the spine at these levels in order to solve a large area of pathology (infectious, tumoral, traumatic, and last but not least, deformative). This way, a series of anterior approaches allowed surgeons to gain access to the anterior part of the spine and the posterior mediastinum. The approaches described by Hodgson, Mirbaha or transthoracic transpleural approach (T4-T11), are enumerated. The idea to allow a more visible and extensive approach, but to avoid respiratory issues due to the lesion of the pleura, led to the description of a new anterior approach by Burnei in 2000. Material and method: Burnei’s approach represents an anterior approach to the thoracic spine, being a transthoracic and retropleural one. This approach allows a large area of spinal pathology due to infectious, traumatic, tumoral and degenerative (idiopathic or congenital scoliosis) causes. Statistically, this approach has been performed more frequently in cases of spinal instrumentation after diskectomy, in order to perform a partial correction of severe, rigid idiopathic scoliosis with more than 70 degrees Cobb and in cases of congenital scoliosis for hemivertebra resection and somatic synthesis to correct the scoliotic curve. Results: This kind of anterior approach allows the surgeon a large visibility of the anterior thoracic spine, diskectomies of up to 5 levels to tender the curve of the deformity and to ensure somatic or/ and transpedicular synthesis of up to 6 thoracic vertebrae. By performing a thoracotomy involving the resection of the posterior arches of the ribs, a thoracoplasty is also ensured with functional and aesthetic effects, by ameliorating the thoracic hump due to the scoliotic deformity. Conclusions: Burnei’s approach joins all the other anterior approaches of the spine, addressing a large area of pathology of the thoracic spine. Even if difficult to be performed, requiring a thorough and perfect technique in the hands of a skilled surgeon, it will ensure satisfaction due to the detailed and visible exposure of the thoracic spine. PMID:25866572

  19. Comparison of treadmill exercise testing protocols for wheelchair users

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Harley Hartung; David A. Lally; Roberta J. Blancq

    1993-01-01

    Summary  The reduced early mortality and the increased life span of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) and other chronically disabling conditions which result in loss of use of the legs places them at increased risk of coronary heart disease, diabetes, and hypertension. Exercise testing in this population is becoming more common, but there is a need for assessment of protocols

  20. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; ?ah, Volkan; Ayd?n, Abdulkadir; Öne?, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients’ family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary. PMID:25621206

  1. Brain and spinal tumour.

    PubMed

    Goh, C H; Lu, Y Y; Lau, B L; Oy, J; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2014-12-01

    This study reviewed the epidemiology of brain and spinal tumours in Sarawak from January 2009 till December 2012. The crude incidence of brain tumour in Sarawak was 4.6 per 100,000 population/year with cumulative rate 0.5%. Meningioma was the most common brain tumour (32.3%) and followed by astrocytoma (19.4%). Only brain metastases showed a rising trend and cases were doubled in 4 years. This accounted for 15.4% and lung carcinoma was the commonest primary. Others tumour load were consistent. Primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and astrocytoma were common in paediatrics (60%). We encountered more primary spinal tumour rather than spinal metastases. Intradural schwannoma was the commonest and frequently located at thoracic level. The current healthcare system in Sarawak enables a more consolidate data collection to reflect accurate brain tumours incidence. This advantage allows subsequent future survival outcome research and benchmarking for healthcare resource planning. PMID:25934956

  2. Daily exercise routines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Patrick L.; Amoroso, Michael T.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on daily exercise routines are presented. Topics covered include: daily exercise and periodic stress testings; exercise equipment; physiological monitors; exercise protocols; physiological levels; equipment control; control systems; and fuzzy logic control.

  3. Physical Activity (Exercise)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Physical activity (exercise) fact sheet ePublications Physical activity (exercise) fact sheet How can physical activity improve my ... recent hip surgery More information on physical activity (exercise) For more information about physical activity (exercise), call ...

  4. Exercise and HIV

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 21, 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 802 Exercise and HIV WHY IS EXERCISE IMPORTANT? WHAT ARE ... may prevent you from losing lean body mass. Exercise with Weights Weight training (resistance exercise) is one ...

  5. Congenital spinal lipomatous malformations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natarajan Muthukumar

    2009-01-01

    Background  To report this author’s experience with patients with a congenital spinal lipomatous malformation with special emphasis on\\u000a variations in clinical presentation, operative findings, and outcome based on the classification scheme proposed in the first\\u000a part of this two part article.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  From January 1995 to July 2005, 80 patients with a congenital spinal lipomatous malformation were treated. All patients underwent\\u000a routine

  6. Percutaneous interspinous distraction device for the treatment of lumbar spinal canal stenosis: Clinical and radiographic results at 2-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Chaichankul, Chaiyos; Limthongkul, Worawat

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the In- space (Synthes, Umkirch, Germany) and the correlation between radiographic parameters and clinical outcome in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS). Methods Between June 2009 and May 2013, 56 patients with LSS underwent In-space by one senior surgeon. All of the patients were evaluated both clinically and radiographic measurements before the procedure and each visit at the postoperative follow-up. Preoperative and postoperative X-ray imaging was performed before the procedure and at follow-up to assess the correlation with the clinical outcome. Radiological measurements and clinical outcomes were recorded to establish a relationship between the radiographic parameters and clinical outcome of this procedure. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up. Results The mean VAS score of back pain decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusions Our data suggest that percutaneous interspinous devices are a good alternative to treat LSS. The device offers significant decrease in back pain, leg pain and ODI score with 2-year lasting relief from symptoms. The increased intervertebral foramenal space explains the improvement of leg pain, but the mechanism of back pain relief remains unclear. A very weak correlation between the radiographic changes and improvement of pain was found. PMID:25694917

  7. Exercise for tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos

    2015-06-26

    Tendinopathies are one of the most common sports/musculoskeletal injury in modern western societies. Many physiotherapy approaches have been recommended in the literature for the management of tendinopathy. The most effective treatment in the management of tendinopathy is the eccentric training. Load, speed and frequency of contractions are the three principles of eccentric exercises, discussed in this report. However, eccentric training is not effective for all patients with tendinopathy and the effectiveness of this approach when applied as monotherapy is lower than it is applied as part of the rehabilitation process. For this reason, clinicians combine eccentric training with other physiotherapy techniques such as stretching, isometric and lumbar stability exercises, electrotherapy, manual therapy, soft tissue manipulation techniques, taping and acupuncture in the management of tendinopathies. Further research is needed to find out which treatment strategy combined with eccentric training will provide the best results in the rehabilitation of tendinopathy. PMID:26140271

  8. Exercise for tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Tendinopathies are one of the most common sports/musculoskeletal injury in modern western societies. Many physiotherapy approaches have been recommended in the literature for the management of tendinopathy. The most effective treatment in the management of tendinopathy is the eccentric training. Load, speed and frequency of contractions are the three principles of eccentric exercises, discussed in this report. However, eccentric training is not effective for all patients with tendinopathy and the effectiveness of this approach when applied as monotherapy is lower than it is applied as part of the rehabilitation process. For this reason, clinicians combine eccentric training with other physiotherapy techniques such as stretching, isometric and lumbar stability exercises, electrotherapy, manual therapy, soft tissue manipulation techniques, taping and acupuncture in the management of tendinopathies. Further research is needed to find out which treatment strategy combined with eccentric training will provide the best results in the rehabilitation of tendinopathy. PMID:26140271

  9. Anterior spinal cord syndrome of unknown etiology

    PubMed Central

    Klakeel, Merrine; Thompson, Justin; McDonald, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A spinal cord injury encompasses a physical insult to the spinal cord. In the case of anterior spinal cord syndrome, the insult is a vascular lesion at the anterior spinal artery. We present the cases of two 13-year-old boys with anterior spinal cord syndrome, along with a review of the anatomy and vasculature of the spinal cord and an explanation of how a lesion in the cord corresponds to anterior spinal cord syndrome. PMID:25552812

  10. The effects of forced exercise prior to race training on two-year-old racehorses 

    E-print Network

    Hiney, Kristina Marie

    1998-01-01

    The effects of forced exercise prior to race training hics. were investigated in two-year-old horses. of two treatment groups-one which received forced exercise and the other which served as a non-exercised control group. ...

  11. Desensitization of bladder sensory fibers by intravesical capsaicin or capsaicin analogs. A new strategy for treatment of urge incontinence in patients with spinal detrusor hyperreflexia or bladder hypersensitivity disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Cruz

    1998-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have identified a category of unmyelinated type C bladder afferent fibers in the pelvic nerves which are extremely sensitive to capsaicin. Sensory input conveyed by these fibers triggers a spinal reflex which, in chronic spinalized animals, facilitates and controls micturition. In addition, bladder C fibers were also shown to have a role in bladder pain perception. In

  12. Cellular and paracellular transplants for spinal cord injury: a review of the literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin M. Mortazavi; Ketan Verma; R. Shane Tubbs; Nicholas Theodore

    2011-01-01

    Background  Experimental approaches to limit the spinal cord injury and to promote neurite outgrowth and improved function from a spinal\\u000a cord injury have exploded in recent decades. Due to the cavitation resulting after a spinal cord injury, newer important treatment\\u000a strategies have consisted of implanting scaffolds with or without cellular transplants. There are various scaffolds, as well\\u000a as various different cellular

  13. Flooding Exercises

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stephen Nelson

    This homework exercise, developed for an undergraduate geology course at Tulane University, leads students through the steps involved in determining the probability that a flood of a given discharge will occur in any given year. Students retrieve discharge data from U.S. Geological Services Internet sites for Dry Creek, LA, Rapid Creek, SD and Red River, ND to make their calculations.

  14. Eating & Exercise

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-01-01

    This PheT interactive, downloadable simulation allows students to Explore issues such as calories in food, how to burn calories, and the relationship between calories and weight by choosing diet and exercise and keeping an eye on your weight.Sample earning goals, teaching ideas, and translated versions are available.

  15. 17-Year-Delayed Fistula Formation After Elective Spinal Instrumentation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Etemadrezaei, Hamid; Zabihyan, Samira; Shakeri, Aidin; Ganjeifar, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A late-developing infection after an uneventful initial spinal instrumentation procedure is rare. Delayed infection and new fistula formation have been reported from a few months to 13 years. Here we report an unusual 17-year-delayed fistula formation after primary spinal instrumentation. The patient underwent hardware removal surgery with antibiotic therapy as a definitive treatment. Case Presentation Here we report an unusual 17-year delayed fistula formation after primary spinal instrumentation due to spinal trauma. He was admitted to Ghaem General Hospital, a chief referral center, Mashhad, North-East of Iran in August 2014. The patient underwent hardware removal surgery with antibiotic therapy as a definitive treatment. Conclusions Late inflammation may occur around spinal instruments and results in cutaneous fistula formation. After oral or intravenous antibiotic treatment, total device extraction is the cornerstone of treatment.

  16. Use of electrical stimulation and exercise to increase muscle strength in a patient after surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Donna

    2010-02-01

    Current literature offers little research on the restoration of function in patients following anterior decompression surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. This case report describes the functional outcomes for a physical therapy program using a protocol of alternate day electrical stimulation to hip and knee extensor muscles along with exercise. The protocol, designed to increase lower extremity strength necessary for ambulation in a patient who was status post anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery, consisted of treatment sessions five times per week for 6 weeks and included electrical stimulation [medium frequency alternating current (MFAC)] in conjunction with active range of motion exercises, followed by functional mobility training and gait training. Outcome measures included Manual Muscle testing, the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and the Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injuries (WISCI). Improvement was demonstrated in all three measures following the use of the treatment regimen, suggesting there may be a benefit to the use of electrical stimulation and exercise to increase lower extremity strength and improve gait outcomes in this population. Definitive conclusions regarding the correlation between this treatment protocol and the outcomes achieved are limited by the case report design. Carefully designed research studies are needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the protocol. PMID:20067363

  17. Spinal cord injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bob Winter; Hina Pattani

    2008-01-01

    The annual incidence of acute spinal cord injury in the UK is 15–40 cases per million. More than half these injuries are the result of road traffic accidents, with falls, industrial accidents, sports or violence making up most of the remainder. Violent injury accounts for only a small percentage of cases in this country. The typical patient is male (male

  18. Spinal cord injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bob Winter; Hina Pattani

    2011-01-01

    The annual incidence of acute spinal cord injury in the UK is 15–40 cases per million. More than half of these injuries are the result of road traffic accidents, with falls, industrial accidents, sports or violence making up most of the remainder. Violent injury accounts for only a small percentage of cases in the UK. The typical patient is male

  19. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weiying Zhong; Haifeng Chen; Chao You; Jin Li; Yi Liu; Siqing Huang

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare emergent condition. It may result in paraplegia, quadriplegia and even death. Prompt diagnosis and emergent decompressive surgical management have been recommended to prevent mortality and morbidity. Although several factors have been associated with prognosis, controversy remains, partly due to its rarity. Thus, the history, clinical presentation, physical examination findings, radiological images, and

  20. Dorsal epidural spinal lipomatosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Chibbaro; G Mirone; M Nouri; P Di Emidio; M Polivka; M Marsella; B George

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a thoracic epidural spinal lipomatosis causing severe neurological deficits along the review of pertinent literature. The patient is a 56-year-old woman who presented with acute onset of severe paraparesis; she was investigated with cervical and thoracic MRI and then surgically managed because of an intraspinal mass compressing the cord. The operation consisted in the

  1. Posterior spinal anatomy (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The vertebral column is divided into the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar region. It provides structural support for the trunk and surrounds and protects the spinal cord. The vertebral column also provides attachment points for the muscles of the back and ribs.

  2. Acute Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Witiw, Christopher D; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-07-01

    Our understanding of the pathophysiological processes that comprise the early secondary phases of spinal cord injury such as spinal cord ischemia, cellular excitotoxicity, ionic dysregulation, and free-radical mediated peroxidation is far greater now than ever before, thanks to substantial laboratory research efforts. These discoveries are now being translated into the clinical realm and have led to targeted upfront medical management with a focus on tissue oxygenation and perfusion and include avoidance of hypotension, induction of hypertension, early transfer to specialized centers, and close monitoring in a critical care setting. There is also active exploration of neuroprotective and neuroregenerative agents; a number of which are currently in late stage clinical trials including minocycline, riluzole, AC-105, SUN13837, and Cethrin. Furthermore, new data have emerged demonstrating that the timing of spinal cord decompression after injury impacts recovery and that early decompression leads to significant improvements in neurological recovery. With this review we aim to provide a concise, clinically relevant and up-to-date summary of the topic of acute spinal cord injury, highlighting recent advancements and areas where further study is needed. PMID:26098670

  3. Cardiovascular benefits of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shashi K

    2012-01-01

    Regular physical activity during leisure time has been shown to be associated with better health outcomes. The American Heart Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine all recommend regular physical activity of moderate intensity for the prevention and complementary treatment of several diseases. The therapeutic role of exercise in maintaining good health and treating diseases is not new. The benefits of physical activity date back to Susruta, a 600 BC physician in India, who prescribed exercise to patients. Hippocrates (460–377 BC) wrote “in order to remain healthy, the entire day should be devoted exclusively to ways and means of increasing one’s strength and staying healthy, and the best way to do so is through physical exercise.” Plato (427–347 BC) referred to medicine as a sister art to physical exercise while the noted ancient Greek physician Galen (129–217 AD) penned several essays on aerobic fitness and strengthening muscles. This article briefly reviews the beneficial effects of physical activity on cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22807642

  4. Chronic exercise confers neuroprotection in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Pryor, William M; Freeman, Kimberly G; Larson, Rebecca D; Edwards, Gaylen L; White, Lesley J

    2015-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that affects the CNS, resulting in accumulated loss of cognitive, sensory, and motor function. This study evaluates the neuropathological effects of voluntary exercise in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. Two groups of C57BL/6J mice were injected with an emulsion containing myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein and then randomized to housing with a running wheel or a locked wheel. Exercising EAE mice exhibited a less severe neurological disease score and later onset of disease compared with sedentary EAE animals. Immune cell infiltration and demyelination in the ventral white matter tracts of the lumbar spinal cord were significantly reduced in the EAE exercise group compared with sedentary EAE animals. Neurofilament immunolabeling in the ventral pyramidal and extrapyramidal motor tracts displayed a more random distribution of axons and an apparent loss of smaller diameter axons, with a greater loss of fluorescence immunolabeling in the sedentary EAE animals. In lamina IX gray matter regions of the lumbar spinal cord, sedentary animals with EAE displayed a greater loss of ?-motor neurons compared with EAE animals exposed to exercise. These findings provide evidence that voluntary exercise results in reduced and attenuated disability, reductions in autoimmune cell infiltration, and preservation of axons and motor neurons in the lumbar spinal cord of mice with EAE. PMID:25510644

  5. Spinal Subdural Abscess: A Rare Complication of Decubitus Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Usoltseva, Natalia; Medina-Flores, Rafael; Rehman, Ateeq; Samji, Swetha; D’Costa, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Spinal subdural abscess (SSA) is an uncommon entity. The exact incidence is unknown, with very few cases reported in the literature. This condition may result in spinal cord compression, thus constituting a medical and neurosurgical emergency. The pathogenesis of SSA is not well-described, and the available knowledge is based on case observations only. There is only one case report that describes direct seeding from decubitus ulcers as a possible mechanism for development of SSA. We report a case of subacute onset of quadriplegia in a male patient, age 55 years, due to spinal cord compression from SSA and superimposed spinal subdural hematoma. The direct seeding from decubitus ulcers is thought to be the cause of infection in our patient. We present this case of SSA to elucidate and review the predisposing factors, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities, and treatment regarding management of this rare disorder. PMID:24667217

  6. Multiple-channel scaffolds to promote spinal cord axon regeneration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Moore; Jonathan A. Friedman; Eric B. Lewellyn; Sara M. Mantila; Aaron J. Krych; Syed Ameenuddin; Andrew M. Knight; Lichun Lu; Bradford L. Currier; Robert J. Spinner; Richard W. Marsh; Anthony J. Windebank; Michael J. Yaszemski

    2006-01-01

    As molecular, cellular, and tissue-level treatments for spinal cord injury are discovered, it is likely that combinations of such treatments will be necessary to elicit functional recovery in animal models or patients. We describe multiple-channel, biodegradable scaffolds that serve as the basis for a model to investigate simultaneously the effects on axon regeneration of scaffold architecture, transplanted cells, and locally

  7. Spinal Arteriovenous Fistula with Progressive Paraplegia after Spinal Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Argyrakis, Nikolaos; Matis, Georgios K.; Mpata-Tshibemba, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    A case of an iatrogenic spinal arteriovenous fistula with progressive paraplegia in a young woman is reported. The fistula was eventually created after repetitive lumbar punctures performed in the process of spinal anaesthesia. Her symptoms were progressed to paraplegia over a period of 2 years. The digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a single-hole fistula, involving the anterior spinal artery and vein. The lesion was occluded by embolization with immediate improvement. The potential mechanism is discussed. PMID:24653807

  8. Role of spinal cord glutamate transporter during normal sensory transmission and pathological pain states

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Gu, Jianguo; Stephens, Robert L

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter critical for spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and for generation and maintenance of spinal states of pain hypersensitivity via activation of glutamate receptors. Understanding the regulation of synaptically and non-synaptically released glutamate associated with pathological pain is important in exploring novel molecular mechanisms and developing therapeutic strategies of pathological pain. The glutamate transporter system is the primary mechanism for the inactivation of synaptically released glutamate and the maintenance of glutamate homeostasis. Recent studies demonstrated that spinal glutamate transporter inhibition relieved pathological pain, suggesting that the spinal glutamate transporter might serve as a therapeutic target for treatment of pathological pain. However, the exact function of glutamate transporter in pathological pain is not completely understood. This report will review the evidence for the role of the spinal glutamate transporter during normal sensory transmission and pathological pain conditions and discuss potential mechanisms by which spinal glutamate transporter is involved in pathological pain. PMID:16242033

  9. Spinal mechanisms underlying potentiation of hindpaw responses observed after transient hindpaw ischemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tatsunori; Sasaki, Mika; Komagata, Seiji; Tsukano, Hiroaki; Hishida, Ryuichi; Kohno, Tatsuro; Baba, Hiroshi; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2015-01-01

    Transient ischemia produces postischemic tingling sensation. Ischemia also produces nerve conduction block that may modulate spinal neural circuits. In the present study, reduced mechanical thresholds for hindpaw-withdrawal reflex were found in mice after transient hindpaw ischemia, which was produced by a high pressure applied around the hindpaw for 30?min. The reduction in the threshold was blocked by spinal application of LY354740, a specific agonist of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors. Neural activities in the spinal cord and the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) were investigated using activity-dependent changes in endogenous fluorescence derived from mitochondrial flavoproteins. Ischemic treatment induced potentiation of the ipsilateral spinal and contralateral S1 responses to hindpaw stimulation. Both types of potentiation were blocked by spinal application of LY354740. The contralateral S1 responses, abolished by lesioning the ipsilateral dorsal column, reappeared after ischemic treatment, indicating that postischemic tingling sensation reflects a sensory modality shift from tactile sensation to nociception in the spinal cord. Changes in neural responses were investigated during ischemic treatment in the contralateral spinal cord and the ipsilateral S1. Potentiation already appeared during ischemic treatment for 30?min. The present findings suggest that the postischemic potentiation shares spinal mechanisms, at least in part, with neuropathic pain. PMID:26165560

  10. Measuring a broad spectrum of clinically relevant outcomes after experimental spinal cord injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacqueline C. Bresnahan; Yvette S. Nout

    Measuring recovery of function after central nervous system injury is an important aspect of experimental models of brain and spinal cord injury. Our laboratory has been focused on developing models, especially for spinal cord injury, for many years. The purpose of the models is to mimic the neurological condition in humans and to provide a test ground for evaluating treatments

  11. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide were incorporated in the PEG-PCL-PEG gel and injected into a lesion transecting the main dorsomedial and minor ventral medial corticospinal tract (CST). The degree of collateralization of the transected CST was quantified as an indicator of the regenerative potential of these treatments. At one month post-injury, we observed the robust rostral collateralization of the CST tract in response to the bFGF plasmid-loaded gel. In conclusion, we hope that this platform technology can be applied to the sustained local delivery of other proteins for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  12. FDG-PET SUV can distinguish between spinal sarcoidosis and myelopathy with canal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sakushima, Ken; Yabe, Ichiro; Shiga, Tohru; Yashima-Yamada, Moemi; Tsuji-Akimoto, Sachiko; Terae, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2011-02-01

    Spinal cord sarcoidosis is a rare manifestation of sarcoidosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of spinal cord sarcoidosis sometimes resembles that of the non-inflammatory spinal cord lesion. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is an effective method to detect both systemic and central nervous system lesions in sarcoidosis. This study compared the standard uptake value (SUV) of FDG-PET between spinal cord sarcoidosis and non-inflammatory spinal cord lesions. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who underwent both spinal MRI and FDG-PET scans. We used SUV to evaluate the FDG-PET uptake of the lesion. The region of interest was the center of high-intensity areas on T2-weighted MR images. We included three patients with spinal cord sarcoidosis, five with myelomalacia caused by cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, one with spinal cord edema associated with cervical spondylosis, and one with spinal cord edema associated with dural arteriovenous fistula. The spinal cord sarcoidosis group had a significantly higher SUV (mean 4.38, range 3.30-4.93) than patients with the other diseases (mean 1.87, range 1.42-2.74). The SUV of FDG-PET thus may be able to distinguish spinal cord sarcoidosis from other non-inflammatory lesions. FDG-PET can play an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord sarcoidosis because the gadolinium enhancement in MRI is sometimes seen in spondylotic myelopathy or vascular malformation. FDG-PET is informative for the accurate diagnosis of spinal cord sarcoidosis and may enable clinicians to start treatment at an earlier stage. PMID:20820799

  13. MASCIS Spinal Cord Contusion Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wise Young

    The impactor is the most widely used rodent spinal cord injury model. The Multicenter Animal Spinal Cord Injury Study (MASCIS)\\u000a adopted the model in 1993 and standardized protocols for anesthesia, surgery, spinal cord contusion, and post-injury care\\u000a of rats, as well as specific outcome measures. The MASCIS model stipulates Long-Evan's hooded rats that are 77 ± 1-day old\\u000a and anesthetized

  14. Cardiolipin profiles as a potential biomarker of mitochondrial health in diet-induced obese mice subjected to exercise, diet-restriction and ephedrine treatment.

    PubMed

    Faber, Catherine; Zhu, Zhaohai J; Castellino, Stephen; Wagner, David S; Brown, Roger H; Peterson, Richard A; Gates, Lisa; Barton, Joanna; Bickett, Mark; Hagerty, Laura; Kimbrough, Carie; Sola, Mario; Bailey, David; Jordan, Holly; Elangbam, Chandikumar S

    2014-11-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is crucial for mitochondrial energy metabolism and structural integrity. Alterations in CL quantity or CL species have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in several pathological conditions and diseases, including mitochondrial dysfunction-related compound attrition and post-market withdrawal of promising drugs. Here we report alterations in the CL profiles in conjunction with morphology of soleus muscle (SM) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice, subjected to ephedrine treatment (EPH: 200?mg?kg(-1) ?day(-1) orally), treadmill exercise (EX: 10 meters per min, 1?h per day), or dietary restriction (DR: 25% less of mean food consumed by the EX group) for 7?days. Mice from the DR and EPH groups had a significant decrease in percent body weight and reduced fat mass compared with DIO controls. Morphologic alterations in the BAT included brown adipocytes with reduced cytoplasmic lipid droplets and increased cytoplasmic eosinophilia in the EX, DR and EPH groups. Increased cytoplasmic eosinophilia in the BAT was ultrastructurally manifested by increased mitochondrial cristae, fenestration of mitochondrial cristae, increased electron density of mitochondrial matrix, and increased complexity of shape and elongation of mitochondria. Mitochondrial ultrastructural alterations in the SM of the EX and DR groups included increased mitochondrial cristae, cup-shaped mitochondria and mitochondrial degeneration. All four CL species (tri-linoleoyl-mono-docosahexaenoyl, tetralinoleoyl, tri-linoleoyl-mono-oleoyl, and di-linoleoyl-di-oleoyl) were increased in the BAT of the DR and EPH groups and in the SM of the EPH and EX groups. In conclusion, cardiolipin profiling supported standard methods for assessing mitochondrial biogenesis and health, and may serve as a potential marker of mitochondrial dysfunction in preclinical toxicity studies. PMID:25132005

  15. Spinal modulations accompany peripheral fatigue during prolonged tennis playing.

    PubMed

    Girard, O; Racinais, S; Micallef, J-P; Millet, G P

    2011-06-01

    To examine the time course of alteration in neural process (spinal loop properties) during prolonged tennis playing, 12 competitive players performed a series of neuromuscular tests every 30 min during a 3-h match protocol. Muscle activation (twitch interpolation) and normalized EMG activity were assessed during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of plantar flexors. Spinal reflexes and M-waves were evoked at rest (i.e., H(max) and M(max) , respectively) and during MVC (i.e., H(sup) , V-wave, M(sup) , respectively). MVC torque declined significantly (P<0.001) across the match protocol, due to decrease (P<0.001) in muscle activation and in normalized EMG activity. The impairment in MVC was significantly correlated (r=0.77; P<0.05) with the decline in muscle activation. H(max) /M(max) (P<0.001), H(sup) /M(sup) (P<0.01) and V/M(sup) (P<0.05) ratios were depressed with fatigue and decreased by ?80%, 46% and 61% at the end of exercise, respectively. Simultaneously, peak twitch torque and M-wave amplitude were significantly (P<0.01) altered with exercise, suggesting peripheral alterations. During prolonged tennis playing, the compromised voluntary strength capacity is linked to a reduced neural input to the working muscles. This central activation deficit partly results from a modulation in spinal loop properties. PMID:20030784

  16. Spinal muscular atrophy: newborn and carrier screening.

    PubMed

    Prior, Thomas W

    2010-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal-recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron (SMN1) gene, affecting approximately 1 in 10,000 live births. The disease is characterized by progressive symmetric muscle weakness resulting from the degeneration and loss of anterior horn cells in the spinal cord and brainstem nuclei. The management of SMA involves supportive and preventive strategies. New treatments based on increasing the expression of full-length SMN protein levels from the SMN2 gene are being investigated and may be dependent on early detection of the disorder, before the irreversible loss of motor neurons. This article focuses on the prevention of SMA through population carrier screening and newborn screening as a means of ensuring early intervention for SMA. PMID:20494255

  17. Spinal muscular atrophy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Talbot

    1999-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a common cause of disability in childhood and is characterized by weakness and wasting of voluntary\\u000a muscle. It is frequently fatal. The gene for this disorder has been identified as the SMN gene and is part of a highly complex\\u000a duplicated region of chromosome 5 that is subject to a high rate of gene deletion and

  18. Malignant spinal cord compression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Madhuri Yalamanchili; Glenn J. Lesser

    2003-01-01

    Opinion statement  Malignant spinal cord compression is one of the most dreaded complications of cancer. If untreated, it can lead to worsening\\u000a neurologic function culminating in paralysis and sphincter incontinence. The most challenging aspect in the management of\\u000a this complication is early diagnosis because the single most important factor determining outcome is the level of neurologic\\u000a function at initiation of therapy.

  19. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN); Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  20. Spinal and Paraspinal Ewing Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, Daniel J., E-mail: dindelicato@floridaproton.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Keole, Sameer R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Shahlaee, Amir H. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Gibbs, C. Parker; Scarborough, Mark T. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Pincus, David W. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Marcus, Robert B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To perform a review of the 40-year University of Florida experience treating spinal and paraspinal Ewing tumors. Patients and Methods: A total of 27 patients were treated between 1965 and 2007. For local management, 21 patients were treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone and 6 with surgery plus RT. All patients with metastatic disease were treated with RT alone. The risk profiles of each group were otherwise similar. The median age was 17 years, and the most frequent subsite was the sacral spine (n = 9). The median potential follow-up was 16 years. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rate was 62%, 62%, and 90%, respectively. For the nonmetastatic subset (n = 22), the 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rate was 71%, 71%, and 89%, respectively. The local control rate was 84% for patients treated with RT alone vs. 100% for those treated with surgery plus RT. Patients who were >14 years old and those who were treated with intensive therapy demonstrated superior local control. Of 9 patients in our series with Frankel C or greater neurologic deficits at presentation, 7 experienced a full recovery with treatment. Of the 27 patients, 37% experienced Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 3 or greater toxicity, including 2 deaths from sepsis. Conclusion: Aggressive management of spinal and paraspinal Ewing tumors with RT with or without surgery results in high toxicity but excellent local control and neurologic outcomes. Efforts should be focused on identifying disease amenable to combined modality local therapy and improving RT techniques.

  1. Continuity Plan Exercise Form

    E-print Network

    Derisi, Joseph

    Continuity Plan Exercise Form 1 of 2 The purpose of this form is to document a Continuity Plan Exercise Exercises An exercise is an activity that is designed to: Practice and improve the procedures available when needed. There are many approaches to exercising a continuity plan but we recommend

  2. Exercise prescription and thrombogenesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jong-Shyan Wang

    2006-01-01

    Summary  Lifestyle habits, such as exercise, may significantly influence risk of major vascular thrombotic events. The risk of primary cardiac arrest has been shown to transiently increase during vigorous exercise, whereas regular moderate-intensity exercise is associated with an overall reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases. What are the mechanisms underlying these paradoxical effects of vigorous exercise versus exercise training on thrombotic modification?

  3. Rodent Models and Behavioral Outcomes of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Sydney A.; Schmidt, Christine E.; Schallert, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Rodent spinal cord injury (SCI) models have been developed to examine functional and physiological deficits after spinal cord injury with the hope that these models will elucidate information about human SCI. Models are needed to examine possible treatments and to understand histopathology after SCI; however, they should be considered carefully and chosen based on the goals of the study being performed. Contusion, compression, transection, and other models exist and have the potential to reveal important information about SCI that may be related to human SCI and the outcomes of treatment and timing of intervention. PMID:25309824

  4. Epidemiology, etiology, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of low back pain.

    PubMed

    Borenstein, D G

    2001-03-01

    Low back pain affects a minority of individuals over 65 years of age. Four years after the onset of sciatica, the number of individuals working is independent of their workers' compensation status. A complex interaction of metalloproteinases, cytokines, chondrocytes, and macrophages are necessary for the resorption of herniated intervertebral discs. Positional magnetic resonance imaging in the seated extended posture identifies foraminal narrowing that is not visualized with conventional magnetic resonance studies. Compression associated with cauda equina syndrome must be reversed within 48 hours to preserve neurologic function. The gene for transforming growth factor can be transferred to intervertebral discs, resulting in increased proteogylcan production in a rabbit animal model. An aerobic exercise program is as effective as more expensive exercise programs in the treatment of chronic low back pain. Complementary therapies, willow bark and magnets, have marginal benefit for low back pain. Surgical intervention results in improved function for spinal stenosis patients. PMID:11224737

  5. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma under CT guidance

    PubMed Central

    Morassi, L G; Kokkinis, K; Karargyris, O; Vlachou, I; Kalokairinou, K; Pneumaticos, S G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Osteoid osteoma (OO) accounts for approximately 10–12% of all benign bone tumours and 3% of all bone tumours. Spinal involvement appears in 10–25% of all cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation in the treatment of spinal OOs and report our experience. Methods: 13 patients suffering from spinal OO and treated at the authors' institution using CT-guided RF ablation were retrospectively evaluated. The RF probe was introduced through a 11-G Jamshidi® needle, and the lesion was heated at 90?°C for 6?min. Results: All procedures were considered technically successful as the correct positioning of the probe was proven by CT. 11 of the 13 patients reported pain relief after RF ablation. In two cases, RF ablation was repeated 1 month after the first procedure. Pain relief was achieved in both cases after the second procedure. No recurrence was reported throughout the follow-up. No complications like skin burn, soft-tissue haematoma, infection, vessel damage or neurological deficit were reported. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that CT-guided percutaneous RF ablation is a safe and effective method for the treatment of spinal OOs. Advances in knowledge: The data of this study support the efficacy and safety of the recently applied CT-guided percutaneous RF ablation technique for the treatment of spinal OOs. PMID:24712322

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Kamran A. [Mayo Medical School, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Rose, Peter S. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Brinkmann, Debra H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Laack, Nadia N., E-mail: laack.nadia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  7. Demographics of acute admissions to a National Spinal Injuries Unit

    PubMed Central

    Boran, S.; Street, J.; Higgins, T.; McCormack, D.; Poynton, A. R.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective demographic study was undertaken to review the epidemiology and demographics of all acute admissions to the National Spinal Injuries Unit in Ireland for the 5 years to 2003. The study was conducted at the National Spinal Injuries Unit, Mater Miscericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Records of all patients admitted to our unit from 1999 to 2003 were compiled from a prospective computerized spinal database. In this 5-year period, 942 patients were acutely hospitalized at the National Spinal Injuries Unit. There were 686 (73%) males and 256 (27%) females, with an average age of 32 years (range 16–84 years). The leading cause of admission with a spinal injury was road traffic accidents (42%), followed by falls (35%), sport (11%), neoplasia (7.5%) and miscellaneous (4.5%). The cervical spine was most commonly affected (51%), followed by lumbar (28%) and thoracic (21%). On admission 38% of patients were ASIA D or worse, of which one-third were AISA A. Understanding of the demographics of spinal column injuries in unique populations can help us to develop preventative and treatment strategies at both national and international levels. PMID:19283414

  8. Calibrated forceps model of spinal cord compression injury.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Ashley; Monterrubio, Angela; Ariza, Jeanelle; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Compression injuries of the murine spinal cord are valuable animal models for the study of spinal cord injury (SCI) and spinal regenerative therapy. The calibrated forceps model of compression injury is a convenient, low cost, and very reproducible animal model for SCI. We used a pair of modified forceps in accordance with the method published by Plemel et al. (2008) to laterally compress the spinal cord to a distance of 0.35 mm. In this video, we will demonstrate a dorsal laminectomy to expose the spinal cord, followed by compression of the spinal cord with the modified forceps. In the video, we will also address issues related to the care of paraplegic laboratory animals. This injury model produces mice that exhibit impairment in sensation, as well as impaired hindlimb locomotor function. Furthermore, this method of injury produces consistent aberrations in the pathology of the SCI, as determined by immunohistochemical methods. After watching this video, viewers should be able to determine the necessary supplies and methods for producing SCI of various severities in the mouse for studies on SCI and/or treatments designed to mitigate impairment after injury. PMID:25938880

  9. Osteoporotic fractures and hospitalization risk in chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Battaglino, R. A.; Stolzmann, K. L.; Hallett, L. D.; Waddimba, A.; Gagnon, D.; Lazzari, A. A.; Garshick, E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a well acknowledged complication of spinal cord injury. We report that motor complete spinal cord injury and post-injury alcohol consumption are risk factors for hospitalization for fracture treatment. The clinical assessment did not include osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment considerations, indicating a need for improved clinical protocols. Introduction Treatment of osteoporotic long bone fractures often results in lengthy hospitalizations for individuals with spinal cord injury. Clinical features and factors that contribute to hospitalization risk have not previously been described. Methods Three hundred and fifteen veterans ? 1 year after spinal cord injury completed a health questionnaire and underwent clinical exam at study entry. Multivariate Cox regression accounting for repeated events was used to assess longitudinal predictors of fracture-related hospitalizations in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers 1996–2003. Results One thousand four hundred and eighty-seven hospital admissions occurred among 315 participants, and 39 hospitalizations (2.6%) were for fracture treatment. Median length of stay was 35 days. Fracture-related complications occurred in 53%. Independent risk factors for admission were motor complete versus motor incomplete spinal cord injury (hazard ratio = 3.73, 95% CI = 1.46–10.50). There was a significant linear trend in risk with greater alcohol consumption after injury. Record review indicated that evaluation for osteoporosis was not obtained during these admissions. Conclusions Assessed prospectively, hospitalization in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers for low-impact fractures is more common in motor complete spinal cord injury and is associated with greater alcohol use after injury. Osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment considerations were not part of a clinical assessment, indicating the need for improved protocols that might prevent low-impact fractures and related admissions. PMID:18581033

  10. Personal digital exercise trainer for managing, monitoring and recording the exercise.

    PubMed

    Kumar Diwakar, Praveen; Keun Oh, Young; Park, Seung-Hun; Yoon, Young-Ro

    2005-01-01

    We developed a portable digital exercise trainer device which manages, monitors and records the user's physical status and workout during exercise session. It guides the user in doing efficient exercise to reach specific fitness goals. It keeps the full exercise program i.e. exercises start date and time, duration, mode, control parameter, intensity in its memory which helps the user in managing his exercise. Exercise program can be downloaded from the internet. During exercise it continuously monitors the user's physiological parameters: heart rate, number of steps walked, and energy consumed. If these parameters do not range within prescribed target zone, the device will alarm the user as a feedback to control exercise. The device displays these parameters on graphic LCD. During exercise it continuously records the heart rate and number of steps walked every 10 seconds along with exercise date and time. This stored information can be used as treatment for the user by an exercise expert. Real-time ECG monitoring can be viewed wirelessly on a remote PC. PMID:17281036

  11. Treatment and complications in flaccid neuromuscular scoliosis (Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy) with posterior-only pedicle screw instrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hitesh N. Modi; Seung-Woo Suh; Jae-Young Hong; Jae-Woo Cho; Jong-Hoon Park; Jae-Hyuk Yang

    2010-01-01

    Literature has described treatment of flaccid neuromuscular scoliosis using different instrumentation; however, only one article\\u000a has been published using posterior-only pedicle screw fixation. Complications using pedicle screws in paralytic neuromuscular\\u000a scoliosis has not been described before. To present results and complications with posterior-only pedicle screws, a retrospective\\u000a study was carried out in 27 consecutive patients with flaccid neuromuscular scoliosis (Duchenne

  12. Spinal cord stimulation: therapeutic benefits and movement generation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tator, Charles H; Minassian, Karen; Mushahwar, Vivian K

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological condition that leads to loss of motor and sensory function. It commonly causes impairments in limb movements, respiration, bowel and bladder function, as well as secondary complications including pain, spasticity, and pressure ulcers. Numerous interventions such as neuroprotection, regeneration, pharmacology, rehabilitation training, and functional electrical stimulation are under investigation for improving function after SCI. This chapter discusses the use of spinal cord stimulation (epidural and intraspinal electrical stimulation) for alleviating pain and spasticity, and restoring standing and walking. Epidural stimulation is effective in reducing the intensity of intractable pain, but its effectiveness in the treatment of spasticity remains unclear. It can induce rhythmic, locomotor-like movements in the legs, presumably due to the activation of afferent pathways. Intraspinal microstimulation is a new electrical stimulation approach that activates locomotor-related networks within the ventral regions of the lumbosacral spinal cord. In animals, this approach is capable of producing prolonged, fatigue-resistant standing and stepping of the hindlegs. While the results in animals have been very encouraging, technical advancements are necessary prior to its implementation in humans with SCI. Taken collectively, spinal cord stimulation holds substantial promise in restoring function after neural injury or disease. PMID:23098720

  13. Exercise stress test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... EKG - exercise treadmill; Stress ECG; Exercise electrocardiography; Stress test - exercise treadmill ... This test is done at a medical center or health care provider's office. The technician will place 10 flat, ...

  14. Exercise-Induced Urticaria

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Exercise-induced Urticaria Overview What is exercise-induced urticaria? Exercise-induced urticaria is a condition that causes hives and other allergic symptoms. It can occur during ...

  15. Effects of reversible spinalization on individual spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Zelenin, Pavel V; Lyalka, Vladimir F; Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N; Deliagina, Tatiana G

    2013-11-27

    Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of the postural system responsible for stabilization of dorsal-side-up trunk orientation in quadrupeds. Spinalization causes spinal shock, that is a dramatic reduction of extensor tone and spinal reflexes, including PLRs. The goal of our study was to determine changes in activity of spinal interneurons, in particular those mediating PLRs, that is caused by spinalization. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits, activity of individual interneurons from L5 was recorded during stimulation causing PLRs under two conditions: (1) when neurons received supraspinal influences and (2) when these influences were temporarily abolished by a cold block of spike propagation in spinal pathways at T12 ("reversible spinalization"; RS). The effect of RS, that is a dramatic reduction of PLRs, was similar to the effect of surgical spinalization. In the examined population of interneurons (n = 199), activity of 84% of them correlated with PLRs, suggesting that they contribute to PLR generation. RS affected differently individual neurons: the mean frequency decreased in 67% of neurons, increased in 15%, and did not change in 18%. Neurons with different RS effects were differently distributed across the spinal cord: 80% of inactivated neurons were located in the intermediate area and ventral horn, whereas 50% of nonaffected neurons were located in the dorsal horn. We found a group of neurons that were coactivated with extensors during PLRs before RS and exhibited a dramatic (>80%) decrease in their activity during RS. We suggest that these neurons are responsible for reduction of extensor tone and postural reflexes during spinal shock. PMID:24285903

  16. Exercising with Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... everyone. In fact, studies show that people with osteoarthritis benefit from regular exercise and physical activity. For people with osteoarthritis, regular exercise can help: l Maintain healthy and ...

  17. Emergency exercise methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Klimczak, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    Competence for proper response to hazardous materials emergencies is enhanced and effectively measured by exercises which test plans and procedures and validate training. Emergency exercises are most effective when realistic criteria is used and a sequence of events is followed. The scenario is developed from pre-determined exercise objectives based on hazard analyses, actual plans and procedures. The scenario should address findings from previous exercises and actual emergencies. Exercise rules establish the extent of play and address contingencies during the exercise. All exercise personnel are assigned roles as players, controllers or evaluators. These participants should receive specialized training in advance. A methodology for writing an emergency exercise plan will be detailed.

  18. Emergency exercise methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Klimczak, C.A.

    1993-03-01

    Competence for proper response to hazardous materials emergencies is enhanced and effectively measured by exercises which test plans and procedures and validate training. Emergency exercises are most effective when realistic criteria is used and a sequence of events is followed. The scenario is developed from pre-determined exercise objectives based on hazard analyses, actual plans and procedures. The scenario should address findings from previous exercises and actual emergencies. Exercise rules establish the extent of play and address contingencies during the exercise. All exercise personnel are assigned roles as players, controllers or evaluators. These participants should receive specialized training in advance. A methodology for writing an emergency exercise plan will be detailed.

  19. Spinal muscular atrophy: MR evaluation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G.-C. Liu; Y.-J. Jong; C.-H. Chiang; C.-W. Yang

    1992-01-01

    The neurogenic myopathy of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is degeneration of anterior horn cells of the spinal cord and associated muscle weakness. In three patients with the severe type, according to Dubowitz's classification, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lower extremity showed severe atrophy of the entire muscle bundles of the thigh and the calf. Nine intermediate type patients had

  20. Medication-assisted Spinal Manipulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank J Kohlbeck; Scott Haldeman

    2002-01-01

    Background context: The acceptance of spinal manipulation as a reasonable method of treating certain patients with spinal pain over the past decade has led to a renewed interest and increased use of these techniques performed in conjunction with commonly used medications and procedures. Manual therapy is increasingly being used in conjunction with anesthetics, sedatives or analgesics as well as local,

  1. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  2. Extramedullary intradural spinal tumors: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Beall, Douglas P; Googe, David J; Emery, Robert L; Thompson, Darin B; Campbell, Scot E; Ly, Justin Q; DeLone, David; Smirniotopoulos, James; Lisanti, Chris; Currie, T Jenks

    2007-01-01

    Defining the location of tumors and mass lesions of the spine in relation to the spinal cord and the dura is of the utmost importance as certain types of lesions tend to occur in certain locations. The differential diagnostic considerations will vary according to location of the mass lesion as will the treatment and prognosis of these various lesions. The category of extramedullary intradural masses includes a variety of lesions from meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors (neurofibromas, schwannomas) to less common tumors (hemangiopericytoma), metastases, benign tumors (lipoma, dermoid, epidermoid), inflammatory disorders (arachnoid adhesions, sarcoidosis), vascular lesions (spinal-dural arteriovenous fistula), and cystic lesions (perineural or Tarlov cysts). Characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings are helpful for localization and characterization of these lesions before treatment, as well as for follow-up after treatment. We present a pictorial review of the various extramedullary intradural lesions of the spine, with pathologic correlation. We discuss imaging features that are typical for the various entities and describe various therapeutic options that are important considerations for surgical treatment of these lesions. PMID:17765798

  3. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  4. Clinical analysis of 36 multiple myeloma patients with extramedullary plasmacytoma invasion of the spinal canal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiajia; Zhong, Yuping

    2015-06-01

    Few physicians are familiar with extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) invasion of the spinal canal in multiple myeloma (MM) patients, and little information about this rare disease is available. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical features, prognosis and treatment of MM patients with EMP invasion of the spinal canal. We evaluated 36 MM patients with EMP invasion of the spinal canal. EMP invasion was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and/or histopathological analysis of bone marrow biopsy samples. Patients underwent surgery followed by chemotherapy or received chemotherapy alone. Chemotherapy consisted of bortezomib-containing regimens and other combination therapies. The patients' median age was 58.6?years (range, 31-78?years). Eight patients had negative immunofixation electrophoresis results, and nine patients had a bone marrow plasma cell infiltration rate of less than 5%. Of the 36 MM patients with EMP invasion of the spinal canal that we identified, 19 had thoracic spinal cord involvement, 10 had lumbar spinal cord involvement, 2 had sacral spinal cord involvement and 5 had both lumbar and thoracic spinal cord involvement. The findings of our study, which is the largest study in MM patients with EMP spinal canal invasion conducted to date, suggest the importance of the early detection of spinal invasion in MM patients. Extramedullary disease was resistant to conventional treatments but responded well to regimens containing novel drugs such as bortezomib. In patients with symptoms of nerve root involvement, the tumour should be resected as soon as possible to relieve spinal cord compression. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24395149

  5. Unlike Physical Exercise, Modified Environment Increases the Lifespan of SOD1G93A Mice However Both Conditions Induce Cellular Changes

    PubMed Central

    Hugnot, Jean-Philippe; Perrin, Florence E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by a gradual muscular paralysis resulting from progressive motoneurons death. ALS etiology remains unknown although it has been demonstrated to be a multifactorial disease involving several cellular partners. There is currently no effective treatment. Even if the effect of exercise is under investigation for many years, whether physical exercise is beneficial or harmful is still under debate. Methods and Findings We investigated the effect of three different intensities of running exercises on the survival of SOD1G93A mice. At the early-symptomatic stage (P60), males were isolated and randomly assigned to 5 conditions: 2 sedentary groups (“sedentary” and “sedentary treadmill” placed on the inert treadmill), and 3 different training intensity groups (5 cm/s, 10 cm/s and 21 cm/s; 15 min/day, 5days/week). We first demonstrated that an appropriate “control” of the environment is of the utmost importance since comparison of the two sedentary groups evidenced an 11.6% increase in survival in the “sedentary treadmill” group. Moreover, we showed by immunohistochemistry that this increased lifespan is accompanied with motoneurons survival and increased glial reactivity in the spinal cord. In a second step, we showed that when compared with the proper control, all three running-based training did not modify lifespan of the animals, but result in motoneurons preservation and changes in glial cells activation. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that increase in survival induced by a slight daily modification of the environment is associated with motoneurons preservation and strong glial modifications in the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1G93A. Using the appropriate control, we then demonstrate that all running intensities have no effect on the survival of ALS mice but induce cellular modifications. Our results highlight the critical importance of the control of the environment in ALS studies and may explain discrepancy in the literature regarding the effect of exercise in ALS. PMID:23029057

  6. The influence of stacked generators on source impedance of a piezoelectric spinal fusion implant

    E-print Network

    Goetzinger, Nathan

    2014-08-31

    The failure rate for difficult-to-fuse patients undergoing spinal fusion surgeries can be as high as 29-46%. The primary adjunct treatments which currently address this problem are bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and DC electrical stimulation...

  7. Neuroprotective effects of rosuvastatin against traumatic spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kahveci, Ramazan; Gökçe, Emre Cemal; Gürer, Bora; Gökçe, Aysun; Kisa, Uçler; Cemil, Duran Berker; Sargon, Mustafa Fevzi; Kahveci, Fatih Ozan; Aksoy, Nurkan; Erdo?an, Bülent

    2014-10-15

    Rosuvastatin, which is a potent statin, has never been studied in traumatic spinal cord injury. The aim of this study was to investigate whether rosuvastatin treatment could protect the spinal cord after experimental spinal cord injury. Rats were randomized into the following five groups of eight animals each: control, sham, trauma, rosuvastatin, and methylprednisolone. In the control group, no surgical intervention was performed. In the sham group, only laminectomy was performed. In all the other groups, the spinal cord trauma model was created by the occlusion of the spinal cord with an aneurysm clip. In the spinal cord tissue, caspase-3 activity, tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels, myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde levels, nitric oxide levels, and superoxide dismutase levels were analyzed. Histopathological and ultrastructural evaluations were also performed. Neurological evaluation was performed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor scale and the inclined-plane test.After traumatic spinal cord injury, increases in caspase-3 activity, tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels, myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde levels, and nitric oxide levels were detected. In contrast, the superoxide dismutase levels were decreased. After the administration of rosuvastatin, decreases were observed in the tissue caspase-3 activity, tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels, myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde levels, and nitric oxide levels. In contrast, tissue superoxide dismutase levels were increased. Furthermore, rosuvastatin treatment showed improved results concerning the histopathological scores, the ultrastructural score and the functional tests. Biochemical, histopathological, ultrastructural analysis and functional tests revealed that rosuvastatin exhibits meaningful neuroprotective effects against spinal cord injury. PMID:25084223

  8. Spinal lumbar synovial cysts. Diagnosis and management challenge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amir M. Khan; Federico Girardi

    2006-01-01

    Sophisticated and newer imaging capabilities have resulted in increased reporting and treatment options of spinal lumbar synovial cysts (LSS). Most of the patients with lumbar cysts tend to be in their sixth decade of life with a slight female predominance. The incidence of LSS is thought to be less than 0.5% of the general symptomatic population. They may be asymptomatic

  9. Chiropractic spinal manipulation for neck pain: a systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edzard Ernst

    2003-01-01

    Chiropractic spinal manipulation (CSM) is often used as a treatment for neck pain. However, its effectiveness is unclear. The aim of this article was to evaluate systematically and critically the effectiveness of CSM for neck pain. Six electronic databases were searched for all relevant randomized clinical trials. Strict inclusion\\/exclusion criteria had been predefined. Key data were validated and extracted. Methodologic

  10. Hormonal responses to graded-resistance, FES-assisted strength training in spinal cord-injured.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, G D; Ashley, E A; Harber, V; Laskin, J J; Olenik, L M; Sloley, D; Burnham, R; Steadward, R D; Cumming, D C

    1996-05-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) assisted resistance training has been effective in increasing muscular strength and endurance in spinal cord injured men and women in preparation for FES-assisted cycle programs and for FES-assisted standing and walking. Increases in blood pressure and a concomitant bradycardia suggestive of autonomic dysreflexia have been reported during FES-assisted resistance training. Self-induced autonomic dysreflexia in athletes who use wheelchairs suppressed the normal exercise induced serum testosterone increase. We, therefore, examined the changes in hematocrit and circulating levels of testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), cortisol, prolactin, norepinephrine and epinephrine during FES assisted resistance exercise in five high spinal cord injured men (SCI) and comparable maximal exercise in five able bodied controls (AB). Mean serum testosterone levels significantly increased with FES-assisted resistance training in SCI and maximal resistance exercise in AB with no significant change in hematocrit or SHBG. Prolactin, cortisol and epinephrine levels were unchanged while norepinephrine levels were significantly increased in SCI and AB. These findings suggest that there is no concern over inadequate physiological androgen response to an exercise stimulus in SCI. The data do not support the previous findings that elevated levels of norepinephrine in autonomic dysreflexia suppress testosterone response to exercise. PMID:8963972

  11. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... any changes with your child's breathing problems. Recommended Activities for Kids With EIA Exercise is a great idea for ... With Exercise-Induced Asthma For the most part, kids with exercise-induced ... activity, in addition to stretching or flexibility exercises.) Take ...

  12. Kegel Exercise Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Español Kegel Exercise Tips Page Content What are Kegel exercises? To do Kegel exercises, you just squeeze your ... help with your bladder control. How do you exercise your pelvic muscles? Find the right muscles. Try ...

  13. Exercise in pregnancy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nahed M Ezmerli

    2000-01-01

    Exercise has become an integral part of the life styles of many women. However, many women stop exercising during pregnancy because of concerns regarding the well-being of the fetus. Although pregnancy is associated with several physiologic changes and response to exercise is different in the pregnant state than in the nonpregnant state, exercise can be beneficial to the pregnant woman

  14. Potential Clinical Applications for Spinal Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kornelsen, Jennifer; Mackey, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) of the spinal cord is a noninvasive technique for obtaining information regarding spinal cord neuronal function. This article provides a brief overview of recent developments in spinal cord fMRI and outlines potential applications, as well as the limitations that must be overcome, for using spinal fMRI in the clinic. This technique is currently used for research purposes, but significant potential exists for spinal fMRI to become an important clinical tool. PMID:17504642

  15. Emergency neurological life support: spinal cord compression (SCC).

    PubMed

    O'Phelan, Kristine H; Bunney, E Bradshaw; Weingart, Scott D; Smith, Wade S

    2012-09-01

    Acute spinal cord compression (SCC) is the most serious of the diseases of the cord and should be accorded special attention in neurocritical care. Patients with SCC have a combination of motor and sensory dysfunction that has a distribution referable to one, or a few contiguous, spinal levels. Bowel and bladder dysfunction and neck or back pain are usually part of the clinical presentation but are not uniformly present. Because interventions are time-sensitive, the recognition and treatment of SCC was chosen as an ENLS protocol. PMID:22956117

  16. Acute management of traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ropper, Alexander E; Neal, Matthew T; Theodore, Nicholas

    2015-08-01

    Patients with acute cervical spinal cord injury present complex clinical challenges. These injuries may result in motor and sensory deficits and also in cardiovascular and respiratory perturbations. Increased attention to critical care support has led to improved survival and recovery in many patients. The methods and technology used to diagnose and classify these injuries as well as medical and surgical treatments have evolved significantly in recent decades. We review important aspects of the diagnosis and acute care of patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injuries, emphasising the recent evidence. PMID:25986457

  17. Learn About Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    What is spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)? It is an inherited disease that affects approximately 1 in 10,000 infants born in the United States each year. There are four types of SMA, which can cause the muscles to function improperly and become smaller and weaker over time. Visitors to this site, which was created by researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, should start their journey here by clicking on the What is SMA? section. Here they can watch Dr. Darryl De Vivo provide an overview of the four types of SMA and then look through video clips from other professionals who provide additional insights into the genetics behind SMA. Moving on, the SMA Science area provides high-quality animations that illustrate the various processes involved with the SMN gene (mutations of which are responsible for SMA) and protein splicing. Visitors can also click on the SMA Therapies to learn more about what's being done for people living with SMA, along with potential new treatments.

  18. Unusual presentation of spinal lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, William; Kauflin, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) is a rare condition characterized by overgrowth of normal adipose tissue in the extradural space within the spinal canal that can lead to significant spinal cord compression. It is most commonly reported in patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Other causes can include obesity and hypercortisolism. Occasionally, idiopathic SEL will occur in patients with no known risk factors, but cases are more generally reported in obesity and males. We present the case of a 35 year-old non-obese woman found to have rapidly progressive SEL that was not associated with any of the common causes of the disorder. PMID:25285024

  19. Spinal axis irradiation with electrons: Measurements of attenuation by the spinal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Muller-Runkel, R.; Vijayakumar, S.

    1986-07-01

    Electrons may be used beneficially for spinal axis irradiation in medulloblastoma children to avoid some of the long-term sequelae induced by megavoltage photons. However, the attenuation by the intervening bone ought to be considered. Three-dimensional computer treatment planning with inhomogeneity correction for electron beams is not yet generally available, and alternate methods are needed to evaluate the attenuation by the complex bony structure of the spine. Here, we present our experimental data showing the alteration in the electron isodoses due to the intervening spinous processes. Film dosimetric measurements were made in the vertebral columns obtained from autopsies of a goat, a dog, and a child. Our results show that electron beam therapy for the spinal axis is a viable option.

  20. Superficial NK1 expressing spinal dorsal horn neurones modulate inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by spinal GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Wahida; Sikandar, Shafaq; Sikander, Shafaq; Suzuki, Rie; Hunt, Stephen P; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2007-06-01

    Lamina 1 projection neurones which express the NK1 receptor (NK1R+) drive a descending serotonergic pathway from the brainstem that enhances spinal dorsal horn neuronal activity via the facilitatory spinal 5-HT3 receptor. Selective destruction of these cells via lumbar injection of substance P-saporin (SP-SAP) attenuates pain behaviours, including mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity, which are mirrored by deficits in the evoked responses of lamina V-VI wide dynamic range (WDR) neurones to noxious stimuli. To assess whether removing the origin of this facilitatory spino-bulbo-spinal loop results in alterations in GABAergic spinal inhibitory systems, the effects of spinal bicuculline, a selective GABA(A) receptor antagonist, on the evoked neuronal responses to electrical (Abeta-, Adelta-, C-fibre, post-discharge and Input) and mechanical (brush, prod and von Frey (vF) 8 and 26 g) stimuli were measured in SAP and SP-SAP groups. In the SAP control group, bicuculline produced a significant dose related facilitation of the electrically evoked Adelta-, C-fibre, post-discharge and input neuronal responses. The evoked mechanical (prod, vF8 g and 26 g) responses were also significantly increased. Brush evoked neuronal responses in these animals were enhanced but did not reach significance. This facilitatory effect of bicuculline, however, was lost in the SP-SAP treated group. The generation of intrinsic GABAergic transmission in the spinal cord appears dependent on NK1 bearing neurons, yet despite the loss of GABAergic inhibitory controls after SP-SAP treatment, the net effect is a decrease in spinal cord excitability. Thus activation of these cells predominantly drives facilitation. PMID:17493751

  1. Effects of Exercise on Physiological and Psychological Variables in Cancer Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Timothy; Wilcox, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the effect of aerobic exercise on physiological and psychological function in people rehabilitating from cancer treatment. Data on people participating in control, moderate-intensity exercise, and low-intensity exercise groups indicated that both exercise programs were equally effective in improving physiological function,…

  2. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Dialysis patient-perceived Exercise Benefits and Barriers Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing Zheng; Li-Ming You; Tan-Qi Lou; Nian-Chang Chen; De-Yuan Lai; Yan-Yi Liang; Ying-Na Li; Ying-Ming Gu; Shao-Fen Lv; Cui-Qiu Zhai

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundPerceptions of exercise benefits and barriers affect exercise behavior. Because of the clinical course and treatment, dialysis patients differ from the general population in their perceptions of exercise benefits and barriers, especially the latter. At present, no valid instruments for assessing perceived exercise benefits and barriers in dialysis patients are available.

  3. Spinal meningioma becoming symptomatic in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pikis, Stylianos; Cohen, José E; Rosenthal, Guy; Barzilay, Yair; Kaplan, Leon; Shoshan, Yigal; Itshayek, Eyal

    2013-12-01

    We report a rare case of a spinal meningioma leading to symptoms of spinal cord compression starting in the third trimester of gestation in a 32-year-old woman. Neurological symptoms, which continued to progress after the patient had given birth, were assumed to be sequelae of pregnancy and delivery, leading to a 6 month delay in diagnosis and treatment. Fortunately a gross total resection was achieved at surgery and the patient recovered fully, without permanent consequences. Associated symptoms of spinal cord compression may be falsely attributed to pregnancy, both by the pregnant women and her treating physician. A high index of suspicion and thorough history and physical examination to identify red flags should be performed in patients with neurological symptoms. PMID:24094360

  4. Relationship of Initial Self-Regulatory Ability with Changes in Self-Regulation and Associated Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Severely Obese Women Initiating an Exercise and Nutrition Treatment: Moderation of Mood and Self-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Annesi, James J.

    2011-01-01

    An emphasis on increasing self-regulation is an alternate to nutrition education, which has had poor results in the behavioral treatment of obesity. Although appropriately designed weight-loss treatments may enhance one’s self-regulatory ability to control eating, whether improvements are moderated by psychosocial factors such as initial self-regulatory skills use, self-efficacy to control eating, and mood is unknown. Severely obese women (BMI 35-50 kg·m-2) were randomized into 26-week treatments of exercise supported by cognitive-behavioral methods paired with either nutrition education (n = 114) or cognitive-behavioral methods applied to controlled eating (n = 121). Improvement in self-regulation for controlled eating was 36.9% greater (p < 0.01) for the group incorporating cognitive-behavioral methods for controlled eating. Change in self-regulation was significantly associated with self-regulation at baseline (? = -0.33). Both mood and self-efficacy for controlled eating significantly moderated this relationship. Increased self-regulation was associated with both increases in fruit and vegetable consumption and fruit and vegetable intake at treatment end. The present findings increase our understanding of psychosocial variables associated with increased self-regulatory skills usage and improvements in eating that, after replication, may be used to improve the effects of behavioral weight-loss treatments. Key points Initial self-regulatory abilities do not appear to affect improvements in self-regulation for eating, however direct training in behavioral skills are predictors of change. The relationship of self-regulation improvements and improved eating is significant, and affected by mood and self-efficacy in women with obesity. Instruction in behavioral skills such as cognitive restructuring and relapse prevention is associated with better improvements in eating than typical methods of nutrition education. Cognitive-behavioral methods for exercise may be paired with cognitive-behavioral methods for eating to maximize longer-term effects on eating behaviors. PMID:24149553

  5. Extradural Giant Multiloculated Arachnoid Cyst Causing Spinal Cord Compression in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Serdar; Anik, Ihsan; Gocmen, Selcuk; Sirin, Sait

    2008-01-01

    Background: Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts are rare expanding lesions in the spinal canal. Enlargement may cause progressive signs and symptoms caused by spinal cord compression. They are associated with trauma, surgery, arachnoiditis, and neural tube defects. Most nontraumatic spinal extradural arachnoid cysts are thought to be congenital. Design: Case report and literature review. Findings: A 9-year-old boy with mild paraparesis was found to have an extradural multiloculated arachnoid cyst with fibrous septa at T4-L3 levels and anterior compression and displacement of the spinal cord. Conclusions: Definitive treatment of arachnoid cyst entails radical cyst removal and dura cleft repair. Formation of a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid fistula may require external lumbar drainage. PMID:18795482

  6. Dorsal epidural spinal lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Chibbaro, S; Mirone, G; Nouri, M; Di Emidio, P; Polivka, M; Marsella, M; George, B

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a thoracic epidural spinal lipomatosis causing severe neurological deficits along the review of pertinent literature. The patient is a 56-year-old woman who presented with acute onset of severe paraparesis; she was investigated with cervical and thoracic MRI and then surgically managed because of an intraspinal mass compressing the cord. The operation consisted in the excision of the mass confirmed to be a fibrolipoma by pathological analysis. The patient attained complete neurological recovery and at 18 months follow-up she reported a generalised well-being. Thoracic lipomas are rare lesions that presenting mostly with back pain; however, in rare instances they may cause progressive and/or abrupt neurological dysfunction. Appropriate imaging can help in the diagnosis and management of such cases. PMID:22707370

  7. Dorsal epidural spinal lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Chibbaro, S; Mirone, G; Nouri, M; Di Emidio, P; Polivka, M; Marsella, M; George, B

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a thoracic epidural spinal lipomatosis causing severe neurological deficits along the review of pertinent literature. The patient is a 56-year-old woman who presented with acute onset of severe paraparesis; she was investigated with cervical and thoracic MRI and then surgically managed because of an intraspinal mass compressing the cord. The operation consisted in the excision of the mass confirmed to be a fibrolipoma by pathological analysis. The patient attained complete neurological recovery and at 18 months follow-up she reported a generalised well-being. Thoracic lipomas are rare lesions that presenting mostly with back pain; however, in rare instances they may cause progressive and/or abrupt neurological dysfunction. Appropriate imaging can help in the diagnosis and management of such cases. PMID:22707370

  8. A paradigm for the evaluation and management of spinal coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Skoch, Jesse M.; Zaninovich, Orel; Zoccali, Carmine; Galgiani, John N.; Baaj, Ali A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal infection that is endemic to parts of the Southwestern United States. When infection involves the spine, the treatment strategies can be challenging. We have devised a management protocol for spinal coccidioidomycosis based on a review of the literature and our experience. Methods: The electronic literature search of National Library of Medicine for publications from 1964 to 2014 was performed using the following keywords: Coccidioidomycosis and spine. The search yielded 24 papers. Treatment strategies were summarized into a treatment protocol. Results: A total of 164 cases of spinal coccidioidomycosis were identified, ranging in age from <10 to >80 years. Males (n = 131) and African-Americans (n = 79) were strikingly over-represented. Medical therapy: Once a diagnosis of spinal coccidioidomycosis is established, antifungal therapy should always be started. Antifungal therapy with amphotericin B or azoles like fluconazole. Medical therapy needs to be continued for many years and sometimes indefinitely to reduce disease recurrence or progression. Surgical management is indicated in cases with mechanical instability, neurologic deficit, medically intractable pain, or progression of infection despite antifungal therapy. Conclusions: This work provides a working protocol involving assessment and reassessment for the management of spinal coccidioidomycosis. Medical management with antifungal agents in some cases can provide satisfactory disease control. However, in patients with mechanical instability, neurologic deficit, medically intractable pain or disease progression disease control may only be achieved with surgical debridement and stabilization. PMID:26167359

  9. Spinal deformity in children treated for neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, J.K.; Riseborough, E.J.; Jaffe, N.; Nehme, M.E.

    1981-02-01

    Of seventy-four children who were treated at a mean age of seventeen months for neuroblastoma and survived more than five years, fifty-six had spinal deformity due either to the disease or to the treatment after a mean follow-up of 12.9 years. Of these fifty-six, 50 per cent had post-radiation scoliosis, and 16 per cent had post-radiation kyphosis, most frequently at the thoracolumbar junction, at the time of follow-up. Two kyphotic thoracolumbar curve patterns were identified: an angular kyphosis with a short radius of curvature and its apex at the twelfth thoracic and first lumbar vertebrae, and a thoracic kyphosis with a long radius of curvature that extended into the lumbar spine. The post-radiation deformity - both the scoliosis and the kyphosis - progressed with growth, the scoliosis at a rate of 1 degree per year and the kyphosis at a rate of 3 degrees per year. Epidural spread of the neuroblastoma was associated with most of the cases of severe scoliosis and kyphosis. The deformity was due either to the laminectomy or to the paraplegia acting in conjunction with the radiation. Eighteen per cent of 419 children with this malignant disease survived more than five years, and of the survivors, 20 per cent had spinal deformity severe enough to warrant treatment. The factors associated with the development of spinal deformity in patient treated for neuroblastoma were: orthovoltage radiation exceeding 3000 rads, asymmetrical radiation of the spine, thoracolumbar kyphosis, and epidural spread of the tumor.

  10. Relationship between Spinal Cord Volume and Spinal Cord Injury due to Spinal Shortening.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Feng; Yang, Jin-Cheng; Ma, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Jun-Jie; Yang, Qing-Lei; Zhou, Xin; Xiao, Yao-Sheng; Hu, Hai-Sheng; Xia, Li-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral column resection is associated with a risk of spinal cord injury. In the present study, using a goat model, we aimed to investigate the relationship between changes in spinal cord volume and spinal cord injury due to spinal shortening, and to quantify the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height in order to clarify a safe limit for shortening. Vertebral column resection was performed at T10 in 10 goats. The spinal cord was shortened until the somatosensory-evoked potential was decreased by 50% from the baseline amplitude or delayed by 10% relative to the baseline peak latency. A wake-up test was performed, and the goats were observed for two days postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the spinal cord volume, T10 height, disc height, osteotomy segment height, and spinal segment height pre- and postoperatively. Two of the 10 goats were excluded, and hence, only data from eight goats were analyzed. The somatosensory-evoked potential of these eight goats demonstrated meaningful changes. With regard to neurologic function, five and three goats were classified as Tarlov grades 5 and 4 at two days postoperatively. The mean shortening distance was 23.6 ± 1.51 mm, which correlated with the d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment (r = 0.95, p < 0.001) and with the height of the T10 body (r = 0.79, p = 0.02). The mean d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment was 142.87 ± 0.59 mm3 (range, 142.19-143.67 mm3). The limit for shortening was approximately 106% of the vertebral height. The mean volumes of the osteotomy and spinal segments did not significantly change after surgery (t = 0.310, p = 0.765 and t = 1.241, p = 0.255, respectively). Thus, our results indicate that the safe limit for shortening can be calculated using the change in spinal cord volume per 1-mm height. PMID:26001196

  11. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... colleagues, with an educational grant from Pfizer Inc. University of Washington-operated SCI Clinics: Harborview Medical Center ... Spinal Cord Injury Clinic nurses: 206-744-5862 University of Washington Medical Center Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic 1959 ...

  12. Toll-like receptor 2-mediated alternative activation of microglia is protective after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Stirling, David P; Cummins, Karen; Mishra, Manoj; Teo, Wulin; Yong, V Wee; Stys, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Improving neurological outcome after spinal cord injury is a major clinical challenge because axons, once severed, do not regenerate but 'dieback' from the lesion site. Although microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the brain and spinal cord respond rapidly to spinal cord injury, their role in subsequent injury or repair remains unclear. To assess the role of microglia in spinal cord white matter injury we used time-lapse two-photon and spectral confocal imaging of green fluorescent protein-labelled microglia, yellow fluorescent protein-labelled axons, and Nile Red-labelled myelin of living murine spinal cord and revealed dynamic changes in white matter elements after laser-induced spinal cord injury in real time. Importantly, our model of acute axonal injury closely mimics the axonopathy described in well-characterized clinically relevant models of spinal cord injury including contusive-, compressive- and transection-based models. Time-lapse recordings revealed that microglia were associated with some acute pathophysiological changes in axons and myelin acutely after laser-induced spinal cord injury. These pathophysiological changes included myelin and axonal spheroid formation, spectral shifts in Nile Red emission spectra in axonal endbulbs detected with spectral microscopy, and 'bystander' degeneration of axons that survived the initial injury, but then succumbed to secondary degeneration. Surprisingly, modulation of microglial-mediated release of neurotoxic molecules failed to protect axons and myelin. In contrast, sterile stimulation of microglia with the specific toll-like receptor 2 agonist Pam2CSK4 robustly increased the microglial response to ablation, reduced secondary degeneration of central myelinated fibres, and induced an alternative (mixed M1:M2) microglial activation profile. Conversely, Tlr2 knock out: Thy1 yellow fluorescent protein double transgenic mice experienced greater axonal dieback than littermate controls. Thus, promoting an alternative microglial response through Pam2CSK4 treatment is neuroprotective acutely following laser-induced spinal cord injury. Therefore, anti-inflammatory treatments that target microglial activation may be counterintuitive after spinal cord injury. PMID:24369381

  13. Erythropoietin in spinal cord injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georgios K. Matis; Theodossios A. Birbilis

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition for individual patients and costly for health care systems requiring significant\\u000a long-term expenditures. Cytokine erythropoietin (EPO) is a glycoprotein mediating cytoprotection in a variety of tissues,\\u000a including spinal cord, through activation of multiple signaling pathways. It has been reported that EPO exerts its beneficial\\u000a effects by apoptosis blockage, reduction of inflammation, and

  14. Infection with spinal instrumentation: Review of pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and management

    PubMed Central

    Kasliwal, Manish K.; Tan, Lee A.; Traynelis, Vincent C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Instrumentation has become an integral component in the management of various spinal pathologies. The rate of infection varies from 2% to 20% of all instrumented spinal procedures. Every occurrence produces patient morbidity, which may adversely affect long-term outcome and increases health care costs. Methods: A comprehensive review of the literature from 1990 to 2012 was performed utilizing PubMed and several key words: Infection, spine, instrumentation, implant, management, and biofilms. Articles that provided a current review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and management of instrumented spinal infections over the years were reviewed. Results: There are multiple risk factors for postoperative spinal infections. Infections in the setting of instrumentation are more difficult to diagnose and treat due to biofilm. Infections may be early or delayed. C Reactive Protein (CRP) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are important diagnostic tools. Optimal results are obtained with surgical debridement followed by parenteral antibiotics. Removal or replacement of hardware should be considered in delayed infections. Conclusions: An improved understanding of the role of biofilm and the development of newer spinal implants has provided insight in the pathogenesis and management of infected spinal implants. This literature review highlights the mechanism, pathogenesis, prevention, and management of infection after spinal instrumentation. It is important to accurately identify and treat postoperative spinal infections. The treatment is often multimodal and prolonged. PMID:24340238

  15. Novel alternative therapy for spinal tuberculosis during surgery: reconstructing with anti-tuberculosis bioactivity implants.

    PubMed

    Dong, JunFeng; Zhang, ShengMin; Liu, HaoMing; Li, XinZhi; Liu, YongHui; Du, YingYing

    2014-03-01

    Accompanied with the worsening of the pulmonary tuberculosis bacterium (TB) epidemic, the incidence of spinal TB has increased in recent years. Spinal reconstruction and stabilisation, and bone defect repair play a crucial role in the surgical treatment of spinal TB. Unfortunately, the existing materials have not completely met the requirements for spinal TB reconstruction due to their diverse deficiencies. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel reconstructing implants. Poly-DL-lactide (PDLLA) and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) are two promising drug delivery systems (DDS) and materials for bone repair, which could help us to overcome the difficulties in spinal TB reconstruction in the future. In this article, we discuss the properties of PDLLA and nHA, two potential drug delivering and bone repair materials for spinal TB reconstruction. We also presented two alternatives for spinal TB in future. Two strategies have the potential for treating spinal TB in the future. One such strategy consists of mixing anti-TB drugs, PDLLA with nHA to fabricate a novel three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffold via 3D printing (3DP) technology. Another is preparing a novel titanium mesh implant coated with drugs/PDLLA/nHA composites by solvent evaporation and low-temperature drying technology. These two hypotheses have recently been tested in a laboratory setting by our team. PMID:24328922

  16. Spondylocostal dysostosis (Jarcho-Levine syndrome) associated with occult spinal dysraphism: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumar, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Spondylocostal dysostosis, also known as Jarcho-Levine syndrome, is a rare disorder characterized by multiple vertebral and rib anomalies at birth. The association of occult spinal dysraphic lesions with this entity is rare. Two patients with spondylocostal dysostosis and occult spinal dysraphic lesions, one with type I split cord malformation and another with spinal dermal sinus are being reported. A 7-month-old female child who was operated at birth for imperforate anus was noted to have a dimple at the low back with altered skin color around the dimple. Examination revealed the right lower extremity was slightly thinner than the left. Plain radiographs showed features of spondylocostal dysostosis with scoliosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a type I split cord malformation at the lumbosacral junction with low-lying conus and terminal syringomyelia. Patient underwent excision of the bony spur uneventfully. A 14-month-old male child was noted to have a small swelling in the low back along with deformity of the right lower chest since birth. Plain radiographs revealed features of spondylocostal dysostosis. MRI showed a spinal dermal sinus at the lumbosacral junction with a low-lying conus. The patient underwent excision of the spinal dermal sinus and untethering of the cord uneventfully. Although rare, spondylocostal dysostosis can be associated with occult spinal dysraphic lesions like type I split cord malformations or spinal dermal sinus. Physicians should be aware about the possibility of children with spondylocostal dysostosis harboring occult spinal dysraphic lesions so that these patients receive appropriate treatment.

  17. Spinal astrocyte gap junctions contribute to oxaliplatin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Robinson, Caleb R.; Zhang, Haijun; Dougherty, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal glial cells contribute to the development of many types of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Here the contribution of spinal astrocytes and astrocyte gap junctions to oxaliplatin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity was explored. The expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in spinal dorsal horn was significantly increased at day 7 but recovered at day 14 after oxaliplatin treatment, suggesting a transient activation of spinal astrocytes by chemotherapy. Astrocyte-specific gap junction protein connexin 43 was significantly increased in dorsal horn at both day 7 and day 14 following chemotherapy but neuronal (connexin 36) and oligodendrocyte (connexin 32) gap junction proteins did not show any change. Blockade of astrocyte gap junction with carbenoxolone prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in a dose-dependent manner and the increase of spinal GFAP expression, but had no effect once the mechanical hypersensitivity induced by oxaliplatin had fully developed. These results suggest that oxaliplatin chemotherapy induces the activation of spinal astrocytes and this is accompanied by increased expression of astrocyte-astrocyte gap junction connections via connexin 43. These alterations in spinal astrocytes appear to contribute to the induction but not the maintenance of oxaliplatin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Combined these results suggest that targeting spinal astrocyte/astrocyte-specific gap junction could be a new therapeutic strategy to prevent oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. PMID:23374942

  18. Current Status of Adult Spinal Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, J. A.; Orndorff, D. O.; Patty, C. A.; Scott, M. A.; Price, H. L.; Hamlin, L. F.; Williams, T. L.; Uribe, J. S.; Deviren, V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose?To review the current literature for the nonoperative and operative treatment for adult spinal deformity. Recent Findings?With more than 11 million baby boomers joining the population of over 60 years of age in the United States, the incidence of lumbar deformity is greatly increasing. Recent literature suggests that a lack of evidence exists to support the effectiveness of nonoperative treatment for adult scoliosis. In regards to operative treatment, current literature reports a varying range of improved clinical outcomes, curve correction, and complication rates. The extension of fusion to S1 compared with L5 and lower thoracic levels compared with L1 remains a highly controversial topic among literature. Summary?Most adult deformity patients never seek nonoperative or operative treatment. Of the few that seek treatment, many can benefit from nonoperative treatment. However, in selected patients who have failed nonoperative treatment and who are candidates for surgical intervention, the literature reflects positive outcomes related to surgical intervention as compared with nonoperative treatment despite varying associated ranges in morbidity and mortality rates. If nonoperative therapy fails in addressing a patient's complaints, then an appropriate surgical procedure that relieves neural compression, corrects excessive sagittal or coronal imbalance, and results in a solidly fused, pain-free spine is warranted. PMID:24436852

  19. Neurotrophins and spinal circuit function

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Vanessa S.; Mendell, Lorne M.

    2014-01-01

    Work early in the last century emphasized the stereotyped activity of spinal circuits based on studies of reflexes. However, the last several decades have focused on the plasticity of these spinal circuits. These considerations began with studies of the effects of monoamines on descending and reflex circuits. In recent years new classes of compounds called growth factors that are found in peripheral nerves and the spinal cord have been shown to affect circuit behavior in the spinal cord. In this review we will focus on the effects of neurotrophins, particularly nerve growth factor (NGF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), on spinal circuits. We also discuss evidence that these molecules can modify functions including nociceptive behavior, motor reflexes and stepping behavior. Since these substances and their receptors are normally present in the spinal cord, they could potentially be useful in improving function in disease states and after injury. Here we review recent findings relevant to these translational issues. PMID:24926235

  20. Electroacupuncture in the repair of spinal cord injury: inhibiting the Notch signaling pathway and promoting neural stem cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xin; Sun, Tao; Li, Jing-hui; Zhao, Ning; Wang, Yong; Yu, Hua-lin

    2015-01-01

    Electroacupuncture for the treatment of spinal cord injury has a good clinical curative effect, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In our experiments, the spinal cord of adult Sprague-Dawley rats was clamped for 60 seconds. Dazhui (GV14) and Mingmen (GV4) acupoints of rats were subjected to electroacupuncture. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that the expression of serum inflammatory factors was apparently downregulated in rat models of spinal cord injury after electroacupuncture. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry results demonstrated that electroacupuncture contributed to the proliferation of neural stem cells in rat injured spinal cord, and suppressed their differentiation into astrocytes. Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot assays showed that electroacupuncture inhibited activation of the Notch signaling pathway induced by spinal cord injury. These findings indicate that electroacupuncture repaired the injured spinal cord by suppressing the Notch signaling pathway and promoting the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells. PMID:25878587

  1. Immediate effects of spinal manipulation on thermal pain sensitivity: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    George, Steven Z; Bishop, Mark D; Bialosky, Joel E; Zeppieri, Giorgio; Robinson, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    Background The underlying causes of spinal manipulation hypoalgesia are largely unknown. The beneficial clinical effects were originally theorized to be due to biomechanical changes, but recent research has suggested spinal manipulation may have a direct neurophysiological effect on pain perception through dorsal horn inhibition. This study added to this literature by investigating whether spinal manipulation hypoalgesia was: a) local to anatomical areas innervated by the lumbar spine; b) correlated with psychological variables; c) greater than hypoalgesia from physical activity; and d) different for A-delta and C-fiber mediated pain perception. Methods Asymptomatic subjects (n = 60) completed baseline psychological questionnaires and underwent thermal quantitative sensory testing for A-delta and C-fiber mediated pain perception. Subjects were then randomized to ride a stationary bicycle, perform lumbar extension exercise, or receive spinal manipulation. Quantitative sensory testing was repeated 5 minutes after the intervention period. Data were analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc testing was performed with Bonferroni correction, as appropriate. Results Subjects in the three intervention groups did not differ on baseline characteristics. Hypoalgesia from spinal manipulation was observed in lumbar innervated areas, but not control (cervical innervated) areas. Hypoalgesic response was not strongly correlated with psychological variables. Spinal manipulation hypoalgesia for A-delta fiber mediated pain perception did not differ from stationary bicycle and lumbar extension (p > 0.05). Spinal manipulation hypoalgesia for C-fiber mediated pain perception was greater than stationary bicycle riding (p = 0.040), but not for lumbar extension (p = 0.105). Conclusion Local dorsal horn mediated inhibition of C-fiber input is a potential hypoalgesic mechanism of spinal manipulation for asymptomatic subjects, but further study is required to replicate this finding in subjects with low back pain. PMID:16911795

  2. Neuroprotective Effects of Ginseng Total Saponin and Ginsenosides Rb1 and Rg1 on Spinal Cord Neurons in Vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Baisong Liao; Harold Newmark; Renping Zhou

    2002-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability and results in many serious physical, psychological, and social difficulties. Numerous studies have shown that traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCI) lead to neuronal loss and axonal degeneration in and around the injury site that cause partial disability or complete paralysis. An important strategy in the treatment of SCI is to promote

  3. Acceleration of Spinal Fusion Using Syngeneic and Allogeneic Adult Adipose Derived Stem Cells in a Rat Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mandi J. Lopez; Kevin R. McIntosh; Nakia D. Spencer; Jade N. Borneman; Ronald Horswell; Paul Anderson; Gang Yu; Lorrie Gaschen; Jeffrey M. Gimble

    2008-01-01

    Posterolateral spinal fusion is the standard treatment for lumbar compression fractures. Adult adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) promote osteogenesis in vivo and in vitro. The hypothesis tested in this study was that syngeneic and allogeneic ASCs on a biomaterial scaffold composed of tricalcium phosphate and collagen I will accelerate spinal fusion in a rat model. ASCs from male Fischer or

  4. Calcium Sulfate Spinal Cord Scaffold: A Study on Degradation and Fibroblast Growth Factor 1 Loading and Release

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonas Åberg; Olof Eriksson; Erika Spens; Jonathan Nordblom; Per Mattsson; Johan Sjödahl; Mikael Svensson; Håkan Engqvist

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is no regenerative strategy for the spinal cord that is part of clinical standard of core. Current paths usually include combinations of scaffold materials and active molecules. In a recent study, a permanent dental resin scaffold for treatment of spinal cord injury was designed. The results from studies on rats were promising. However, for potential clinical use, a

  5. Systemic Bisperoxovanadium Activates Akt\\/mTOR, Reduces Autophagy, and Enhances Recovery following Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chandler L. Walker; Melissa J. Walker; Nai-Kui Liu; Emelie C. Risberg; Xiang Gao; Jinhui Chen; Xiao-Ming Xu

    2012-01-01

    Secondary damage following primary spinal cord injury extends pathology beyond the site of initial trauma, and effective management is imperative for maximizing anatomical and functional recovery. Bisperoxovanadium compounds have proven neuroprotective effects in several central nervous system injury\\/disease models, however, no mechanism has been linked to such neuroprotection from bisperoxovanadium treatment following spinal trauma. The goal of this study was

  6. Genetic Inactivation of ERK1 and ERK2 in Chondrocytes Promotes Bone Growth and Enlarges the Spinal Canal

    E-print Network

    Canal Arjun Sebastian,1 Takehiko Matsushita,1 Aya Kawanami,1 Susan Mackem,2 Gary E. Landreth,3 Shunichi and vertebrae, accounting for the sometimes fatal stenosis of the foramen magnum and spinal canal and enlarges the spinal canal. These observations make ERK1 and ERK2 an attractive target for the treatment

  7. Exercise in the Management of Chronic Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Dreisinger, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic back pain is one of the most common and expensive medical conditions facing today's population. Its costs are estimated to be as much as $100 billion in the United States alone. Causation is poorly understood and healthcare providers share little common language concerning this pain. In addition, costly medical diagnostic tests are performed that do little to inform treatment. In the era of evidence-based medicine, back pain healthcare providers must find better ways to communicate with one another. Methods The key to better communication is measurement within the context of an evidence-based, protocol-driven clinical rehabilitation model. Measurement is the key to better communication among providers treating spinal pain. Measurement means acquiring both patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and clinician-based outcomes (CBOs). Results Musculoskeletal strengthening of the lumbar and cervical extensors has been shown to significantly reduce pain and provide successful clinical results for patients suffering from chronic back and neck pain. Lumbar strengthening has been successful because it is a safe exercise, it is prescribed based on pretreatment evaluation, and it provides objective measurements. Conclusion Without measurement, clinical results rely more on opinion than on objectively prescribed courses of treatment. Although indirect measures (PROs) are typically presented in clinical papers and clinical reviews, they are not often used in normal physical therapy practices. Adding direct patient-performance measures (CBOs) creates a much clearer clinical picture. The key to understanding the value of clinical practice and its predictable impact on patient treatment is objective measurement. PMID:24688341

  8. Spinal stimulation for pain: future applications.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Konstantin V

    2014-07-01

    With continuous progress and rapid technological advancement of neuromodulation it is conceivable that within next decade or so, our approach to the electrical stimulation of the spinal cord used in treatment of chronic pain will change radically. The currently used spinal cord stimulation (SCS), with its procedural invasiveness, bulky devices, simplistic stimulation paradigms, and frustrating decline in effectiveness over time will be replaced by much more refined and individually tailored modality. Better understanding of underlying mechanism of action will allow us to use SCS in a more rational way, selecting patient-specific targets and techniques that properly fit each patient with chronic pain based on pain characteristics, distribution, and cause. Based on the information available today, this article will summarize emerging applications of SCS in the treatment of pain and theorize on further developments that may be introduced in the foreseeable future. An overview of clinical and technological innovations will serve as a basis for better understanding of SCS landscape for the next several years. PMID:24696306

  9. Central Cardiovascular Responses of Quadriplegic Subjects to Arm Exercise at Varying Levels of Oxygen Uptake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figoni, Stephen F.

    The purpose of this study was to assess selected central cardiovascular functions of spinal cord injured, quadriplegic subjects at varying levels of oxygen uptake (VO sub 2). Subjects included 11 untrained, male college students with C5, C6, or C7 complete quadriplegia and 11 able-bodied reference subjects. Exercise was performed on a Monark cycle…

  10. Contusive spinal cord injury up regulates mu-opioid receptor (mor) gene expression in the brain and down regulates its expression in the spinal cord: possible implications in spinal cord injury research.

    PubMed

    Michael, Felicia Mary; Mohapatra, Alok Nath; Venkitasamy, Lavanya; Chandrasekar, Kirubhanand; Seldon, Tenzin; Venkatachalam, Sankar

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the dreaded neurological conditions and finding a cure for it has been a hot area of research. Naloxone - a mu-opiate receptor (mor) antagonist was considered for SCI treatment based on its positive effects under shock conditions. In contrary to animal studies based reports about the potential benefits of naloxone in treating SCI, a large scale clinical trial [National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study II (NASCIS II)] conducted in USA failed to witness any effectiveness. The inconsistency noticed was intriguing. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to re-examine the role of naloxone in treating SCI using a highly standardised Multicenter Animal Spinal Cord Injury Study (MASCIS) animal model of contusive SCI. Results indicated that naloxone produced negligible and insignificant neuroprotection. In an attempt to understand the cause for the failure, it was found that mu-opioid receptor (mor) gene expression was upregulated in the brain but was down regulated in the spinal cord after contusive SCI. Given that the beneficial effects of naloxone are through its action on the mor, the results indicate that unlike the brain, spinal cord might not be bracing to utilise the opiate system in the repair process. This could possibly explain the failure of naloxone treatment in NASCIS II. To conclude, opiate antagonists like naloxone may be neuroprotective for treating traumatic brain injuries, but not for traumatic/contusive spinal cord injuries. PMID:26039701

  11. Randomised controlled trial of graded exercise in patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, K. Y.; White, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the efficacy of a graded aerobic exercise programme in the chronic fatigue syndrome. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with control treatment crossover after the first follow up examination. SETTING: Chronic fatigue clinic in a general hospital department of psychiatry. SUBJECTS: 66 patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome who had neither a psychiatric disorder nor appreciable sleep disturbance. INTERVENTIONS: Random allocation to 12 weeks of either graded aerobic exercise or flexibility exercises and relaxation therapy. Patients who completed the flexibility programme were invited to cross over to the exercise programme afterwards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The self rated clinical global impression change score, "very much better" or "much better" being considered as clinically important. RESULTS: Four patients receiving exercise and three receiving flexibility treatment dropped out before completion. 15 of 29 patients rated themselves as better after completing exercise treatment compared with eight of 30 patients who completed flexibility treatment. Analysis by intention to treat gave similar results (17/33 v 9/33 patients better). Fatigue, functional capacity, and fitness were significantly better after exercise than after flexibility treatment. 12 of 22 patients who crossed over to exercise after flexibility treatment rated themselves as better after completing exercise treatment 32 of 47 patients rated themselves as better three months after completing supervised exercise treatment 35 of 47 patients rated themselves as better one year after completing supervised exercise treatment. CONCLUSION: These findings support the use of appropriately prescribed graded aerobic exercise in the management of patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome. PMID:9180065

  12. Intraoperative sonography in spinal surgery: current state of the art

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. M. Montalvo; R. M. Quencer

    1986-01-01

    Intraoperative spinal sonography (IOSS) has significant impact on the surgical management of spinal lesions. This paper describes the techniques involved, illustrates the sonographic anatomy of the spinal canal and its contents and discusses the role of IOSS in the surgical management of spinal trauma, spinal tumors, spinal stenosis and congenital anomalies.

  13. Pathophysiology of primary spinal syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, John D.; Snyder, Kendall; Peterson, Matthew M.; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Butman, John A.; Smith, René K.; DeVroom, Hetty L.; Sansur, Charles A.; Eskioglu, Eric; Kammerer, William A.; Oldfield, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    Object The pathogenesis of syringomyelia in patients with an associated spinal lesion is incompletely understood. The authors hypothesized that in primary spinal syringomyelia, a subarachnoid block effectively shortens the length of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS), reducing compliance and the ability of the spinal theca to dampen the subarachnoid CSF pressure waves produced by brain expansion during cardiac systole. This creates exaggerated spinal subarachnoid pressure waves during every heartbeat that act on the spinal cord above the block to drive CSF into the spinal cord and create a syrinx. After a syrinx is formed, enlarged subarachnoid pressure waves compress the external surface of the spinal cord, propel the syrinx fluid, and promote syrinx progression. Methods To elucidate the pathophysiology, the authors prospectively studied 36 adult patients with spinal lesions obstructing the spinal SAS. Testing before surgery included clinical examination; evaluation of anatomy on T1-weighted MRI; measurement of lumbar and cervical subarachnoid mean and pulse pressures at rest, during Valsalva maneuver, during jugular compression, and after removal of CSF (CSF compliance measurement); and evaluation with CT myelography. During surgery, pressure measurements from the SAS above the level of the lesion and the lumbar intrathecal space below the lesion were obtained, and cardiac-gated ultrasonography was performed. One week after surgery, CT myelography was repeated. Three months after surgery, clinical examination, T1-weighted MRI, and CSF pressure recordings (cervical and lumbar) were repeated. Clinical examination and MRI studies were repeated annually thereafter. Findings in patients were compared with those obtained in a group of 18 healthy individuals who had already undergone T1-weighted MRI, cine MRI, and cervical and lumbar subarachnoid pressure testing. Results In syringomyelia patients compared with healthy volunteers, cervical subarachnoid pulse pressure was increased (2.7 ± 1.2 vs 1.6 ± 0.6 mm Hg, respectively; p = 0.004), pressure transmission to the thecal sac below the block was reduced, and spinal CSF compliance was decreased. Intraoperative ultrasonography confirmed that pulse pressure waves compressed the outer surface of the spinal cord superior to regions of obstruction of the subarachnoid space. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the theory that a spinal subarachnoid block increases spinal subarachnoid pulse pressure above the block, producing a pressure differential across the obstructed segment of the SAS, which results in syrinx formation and progression. These findings are similar to the results of the authors' previous studies that examined the pathophysiology of syringomyelia associated with obstruction of the SAS at the foramen magnum in the Chiari Type I malformation and indicate that a common mechanism, rather than different, separate mechanisms, underlies syrinx formation in these two entities. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00011245. (http://thejns.org/doi/abs/10.3171/2012.8.SPINE111059) PMID:22958075

  14. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    MedlinePLUS

    Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are a series of exercises designed to strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor. ... Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are recommended for: Women ... have fecal incontinence Pelvic floor muscle training exercises ...

  15. Effects of air stacking on pulmonary function and peak cough flow in patients with cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong-hwa; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of air stacking on pulmonary function and peak cough flow in patients with cervical spinal cord injury. [Subjects] Twenty-six patients were included in the study and were randomized into experimental (n = 14) and control (n = 12) groups. [Methods] Both groups performed therapeutic exercises: the control group performed incentive spirometry, while the experimental group performed 20 repetitions of air stacking exercise twice a day. The training for both groups continued for 5 days a week for 6 weeks. [Results] Forced vital capacity and peak cough flow increased significantly in the experimental group compared to the controls. All within-group variables in the experimental group differed significantly at 6 weeks compared to baseline, while in the control group only Forced vital capacity differed significantly at 6 weeks compared to baseline. [Conclusion] Air stacking exercise significantly improved pulmonary function and peak cough flow in patients with a cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:26180355

  16. Statistics for Chemists: Exercises

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wehrens, Ron

    This website contains a group of exercises that allow students to practice basic statistical calculations for descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, regression and experimental design. The exercises are interactive and provide feedback for students who submit wrong answers.

  17. Exercise and Asthma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Exercise and Asthma Article Body Almost every child (and adult) with ... of Pediatrics about asthma and exercise. What is asthma Asthma is the most common chronic medical problem ...

  18. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Increase your chances of living longer Fitting regular exercise into your daily schedule may seem difficult at ... fine. The key is to find the right exercise for you. It should be fun and should ...

  19. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePLUS

    ... System How the Body Works Main Page Why Exercise Is Cool KidsHealth > Kids > Staying Healthy > Keeping Fit ... day and your body will thank you later! Exercise Makes Your Heart Happy You may know that ...

  20. Exercise Tips for Travelers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... business or pleasure, you can stick to your exercise routine when you’re on the road. It ... foot rather than by car. Check out local exercise facilities. Many hotels have workout rooms or pools ...