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Sample records for spinal treatment exercise

  1. VOLUNTARY EXERCISE INCREASES OLIGODENDROGENESIS IN SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    Krityakiarana, W.; Espinosa-Jeffrey, A.; Ghiani, C.A.; Zhao, P. M.; Gomez-Pinilla, F.; Yamaguchi, M.; Kotchabhakdi, N.; de Vellis, J.

    2009-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase hippocampal neurogenesis, but the effects of exercise on oligodendrocyte generation have not yet been reported. In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that voluntary exercise may affect neurogenesis, and more in particular, oligodendrogenesis, in the thoracic segment of the intact spinal cord of adult nestin-GFP transgenic mice. Voluntary exercise for 7 and 14 days increased nestin-GFP expression around the ependymal area. In addition, voluntary exercise for 7 days significantly increased nestin-GFP expression in both the white and gray matter of the thoracic segment of the intact spinal cord, whereas, 14 days-exercise decreased nestin-GFP expression. Markers for immature oligodendrocytes (Transferrin and CNPase) were significantly increased after 7 days of voluntary exercise. These results suggest that voluntary exercise positively influences oligodendrogenesis in the intact spinal cord, emphasizing the beneficial effect of voluntary exercise as a possible co-treatment for spinal cord injury. PMID:20374076

  2. EMG Biofeedback and Exercise for Treatment of Cervical and Shoulder Pain in Individuals with a Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain in the cervical and shoulder region is a common secondary problem after spinal cord injury (SCI), reported by 30% to 70% of individuals. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback training, in addition to a standard exercise program, on reducing shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users with SCI. Methods: Fifteen individuals with SCI, C6 or lower, who were manual wheelchair users with shoulder pain were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 interventions. The Exercise group (n = 7) received instruction on a standard home-based exercise program. The EMG Biofeedback plus Exercise group (n = 8) received identical exercise instruction plus EMG biofeedback training to improve muscle balance and muscle relaxation during wheelchair propulsion. Shoulder pain was assessed by the Wheelchair Users Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI) at baseline, at posttest 10 weeks after the start of intervention, and at follow-up 16 weeks after posttest. Results: The number of participants per group allowed only within-group comparisons; however, the findings indicated a beneficial effect from EMG biofeedback training. Shoulder pain, as measured by WUSPI, decreased 64% from baseline to posttest for the EMG Biofeedback plus Exercise group (P = .02). Shoulder pain for the Exercise group decreased a nonsignificant 27%. At follow-up, both groups showed continued improvement, yet the benefit of EMG biofeedback training was still discernible. The EMG Biofeedback plus Exercise group had an 82% reduction in shoulder pain from baseline to follow-up (P = .004), while the Exercise group showed a 63% reduction (P = .03) over the same time period. Conclusions: This study provides preliminary evidence that EMG biofeedback has value when added to an exercise intervention to reduce shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users with SCI. These findings indicate that EMG biofeedback may be valuable in remediating musculoskeletal pain as a secondary condition in SCI. This preliminary conclusion will need to be studied and verified through future work. PMID:24244096

  3. Short term treatment versus long term management of neck and back disability in older adults utilizing spinal manipulative therapy and supervised exercise: a parallel-group randomized clinical trial evaluating relative effectiveness and harms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Back and neck disability are frequent in older adults resulting in loss of function and independence. Exercise therapy and manual therapy, like spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), have evidence of short and intermediate term effectiveness for spinal disability in the general population and growing evidence in older adults. For older populations experiencing chronic spinal conditions, long term management may be more appropriate to maintain improvement and minimize the impact of future exacerbations. Research is limited comparing short courses of treatment to long term management of spinal disability. The primary aim is to compare the relative effectiveness of 12 weeks versus 36 weeks of SMT and supervised rehabilitative exercise (SRE) in older adults with back and neck disability. Methods/Design Randomized, mixed-methods, comparative effectiveness trial conducted at a university-affiliated research clinic in the Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota metropolitan area. Participants Independently ambulatory community dwelling adults???65 years of age with back and neck disability of minimum 12 weeks duration (n?=?200). Interventions 12 weeks SMT?+?SRE or 36 weeks SMT?+?SRE. Randomization Blocked 1:1 allocation; computer generated scheme, concealed in sequentially numbered, opaque, sealed envelopes. Blinding Functional outcome examiners are blinded to treatment allocation; physical nature of the treatments prevents blinding of participants and providers to treatment assignment. Primary endpoint 36 weeks post-randomization. Data collection Self-report questionnaires administered at 2 baseline visits and 4, 12, 24, 36, 52, and 78 weeks post-randomization. Primary outcomes include back and neck disability, measured by the Oswestry Disability Index and Neck Disability Index. Secondary outcomes include pain, general health status, improvement, self-efficacy, kinesiophobia, satisfaction, and medication use. Functional outcome assessment occurs at baseline and week 37 for hand grip strength, short physical performance battery, and accelerometry. Individual qualitative interviews are conducted when treatment ends. Data on expectations, falls, side effects, and adverse events are systematically collected. Primary analysis Linear mixed-model method for repeated measures to test for between-group differences with baseline values as covariates. Discussion Treatments that address the management of spinal disability in older adults may have far reaching implications for patient outcomes, clinical guidelines, and healthcare policy. Trial registry www.ClinicalTrials.gov; Identifier: NCT01057706. PMID:25478141

  4. Exercise awareness and barriers after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorgey, Ashraf S

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is an essential element in managing several of the non-communicable diseases after spinal cord injury (SCI). Awareness of the importance of prescribing a customized exercise program that meets the goals of persons with SCI should be highly considered in the rehabilitation community. The barriers of implementing specific exercise program as well as the factors that may mask the outcomes of regular exercise regimen need to be continuously addressed as a part of patients’ rehabilitation care. The focus of this editorial is to encourage the medical community to consider routine physical activity as one of the necessary vital signs that needs to be routinely checked in patients with SCI. Providing education tips, nutritional counseling and engaging in recreational programs may provide motivational route to the community of SCI. This may result in reinforcing active lifestyle in survivors with SCI as well as to reduce the impact of chronic life threatening medical disorders. PMID:25035817

  5. Exercise awareness and barriers after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gorgey, Ashraf S

    2014-07-18

    Exercise is an essential element in managing several of the non-communicable diseases after spinal cord injury (SCI). Awareness of the importance of prescribing a customized exercise program that meets the goals of persons with SCI should be highly considered in the rehabilitation community. The barriers of implementing specific exercise program as well as the factors that may mask the outcomes of regular exercise regimen need to be continuously addressed as a part of patients' rehabilitation care. The focus of this editorial is to encourage the medical community to consider routine physical activity as one of the necessary vital signs that needs to be routinely checked in patients with SCI. Providing education tips, nutritional counseling and engaging in recreational programs may provide motivational route to the community of SCI. This may result in reinforcing active lifestyle in survivors with SCI as well as to reduce the impact of chronic life threatening medical disorders. PMID:25035817

  6. What Are the Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI)? Skip sharing on social media links ... no known ways to reverse damage to the spinal cord. However, researchers are continually working on new treatments, ...

  7. Endovascular treatment in spinal perimedullary arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Phadke, Rajendra V; Bhattacharyya, Avik; Handique, Akash; Jain, Krishan; Kumar, Alok; Singh, Vivek; Baruah, Deb; Kumar, Tushant; Patwari, Sriram; Mohan, B Madan

    2014-01-01

    This study includes 20 patients with 21 spinal perimedullary fistulae. There were nine Type IVa (42.8%) lesions, ten Type IVb (47.6%) and two Type IVc (9.5%) lesions. The dominant arterial supply was from the anterior spinal artery (47.6%), posterior spinal artery (19%) and directly from the radiculomedullary artery (28.5%). Sixteen lesions in 15 patients were treated by endovascular route using n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. Endovascular treatment was not feasible in five patients. Of the ten patients with microfistulae, catheterization failed/was not attempted in 40%, complete obliteration of the lesion was seen in 60% but clinical improvement was seen in 40% of patients. Catheterization was feasible in all ten patients with macrofistulae (nine type IVb and two type IVc lesions). Complete obliteration of the lesions was seen in 60% and residue in 30%. Clinical improvement was seen in 80% and clinical deterioration in 10%. In conclusion, endovascular glue embolization is safe and efficacious in type IVb and IVc spinal perimedullary fistulae and should be considered the first option of treatment. It is also feasible in many of the type IVa lesions. PMID:24976100

  8. Effect of Regular Exercise on Cardiopulmonary Fitness in Males With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Hee; Kong, In Deok; Kim, Sung Hoon; Shinn, Jong Mock; Kim, Jong Heon; Yi, Dongsoo; Lee, Jin Hyeong; Chang, Jae Seung; Kim, Tae-ho; Kim, Eun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cardiopulmonary endurance of subjects with spinal cord injury by measuring the maximal oxygen consumption with varying degrees of spinal cord injury level, age, and regular exercise. Methods We instructed the subjects to perform exercises using arm ergometer on healthy adults at 20 years of age or older with spinal cord injury, and their maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was measured with a metabolic measurement system. The exercise proceeded stepwise according to the exercise protocol and was stopped when the subject was exhausted or when VO2 reached an equilibriu Results Among the 40 subjects, there were 10 subjects with cervical cord injury, 27 with thoracic cord injury, and 3 with lumbar cord injury. Twenty-five subjects who were exercised regularly showed statistically higher results of VO2max than those who did not exercise regularly. Subjects with cervical injury showed statistically lower VO2max than the subjects with thoracic or lumbar injury out of the 40 subjects with neurologic injury. In addition, higher age showed a statistically lower VO2max. Lastly, the regularly exercising paraplegic group showed higher VO2max than the non-exercising paraplegic group. Conclusion There are differences in VO2max of subjects with spinal cord injury according to the degree of neurologic injury, age, and whether the subject participates in regular exercise. We found that regular exercise increased the VO2max in individuals with spinal cord injury. PMID:25750877

  9. Update on treatment options for spinal brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ulu-Kilic, A; Karakas, A; Erdem, H; Turker, T; Inal, A S; Ak, O; Turan, H; Kazak, E; Inan, A; Duygu, F; Demiraslan, H; Kader, C; Sener, A; Dayan, S; Deveci, O; Tekin, R; Saltoglu, N; Ayd?n, M; Horasan, E S; Gul, H C; Ceylan, B; Kadanal?, A; Karabay, O; Karagoz, G; Kayabas, U; Turhan, V; Engin, D; Gulsun, S; Elald?, N; Alabay, S

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of antibiotic regimens and optimal duration of therapy in complicated and uncomplicated forms of spinal brucellosis. This is a multicentre, retrospective and comparative study involving a total of 293 patients with spinal brucellosis from 19 health institutions. Comparison of complicated and uncomplicated spinal brucellosis was statistically analysed. Complicated spinal brucellosis was diagnosed in 78 (26.6%) of our patients. Clinical presentation was found to be significantly more acute, with fever and weight loss, in patients in the complicated group. They had significantly higher leukocyte and platelet counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and C-reactive protein levels, and lower haemoglobulin levels. The involvement of the thoracic spine was significantly more frequent in complicated cases. Spondylodiscitis was complicated, with paravertebral abscess in 38 (13.0%), prevertebral abscess in 13 (4.4%), epidural abscess in 30 (10.2%), psoas abscess in 10 (3.4%) and radiculitis in 8 (2.7%) patients. The five major combination regimens were: doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and streptomycin 1 g/day; doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and gentamicin 5 mg/kg; doxycycline 200 mg/day and rifampicin 600 mg/day; doxycycline 200 mg/day and streptomycin 1 g/day; and doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and ciprofloxacin 1 g/day. There were no significant therapeutic differences between these antibiotic groups; the results were similar regarding the complicated and uncomplicated groups. Patients were mostly treated with doxycycline and rifampicin with or without an aminoglycoside. In the former subgroup, complicated cases received antibiotics for a longer duration than uncomplicated cases. Early recognition of complicated cases is critical in preventing devastating complications. Antimicrobial treatment should be prolonged in complicated spinal brucellosis in particular. PMID:24118178

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  11. The biomechanics of spinal manipulative treatments

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Walter

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to review the work that has been performed on the biomechanics of spinal manipulative treatments (SMT) over the past three years at The University of Calgary. The forces delivered to different segments of the spine during SMT vary considerably, and so do the treatment forces delivered by one chiropractor to different patients. Also, it was found that the speed of force application during SMT facilitates cavitation and is responsible for eliciting an electromyographical (reflex) response of the back musculature. We also found significant movement of thoracic vertebra T11 relative to thoracic vertebrae T10 and T12 during applications of straight posterior-to-anterior thrusts to the transverse process of T11. The relative movements occurred predominantly in the axial and sagittal rotation directions, and not as expected, in the direction of the primary thrust (posterior to anterior).

  12. Prognosis and Treatment of Spinal Cord Astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Minehan, Kiernan J. Brown, Paul D.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Krauss, William E.; Wright, Michael P.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To identify the prognostic factors for spinal cord astrocytoma and determine the effects of surgery and radiotherapy on outcome. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study reviewed the cases of consecutive patients with spinal cord astrocytoma treated at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 1962 and 2005. Results: A total of 136 consecutive patients were identified. Of these 136 patients, 69 had pilocytic and 67 had infiltrative astrocytoma. The median follow-up for living patients was 8.2 years (range, 0.08-37.6), and the median survival for deceased patients was 1.15 years (range, 0.01-39.9). The extent of surgery included incisional biopsy only (59%), subtotal resection (25%), and gross total resection (16%). Patients with pilocytic tumors survived significantly longer than those with infiltrative astrocytomas (median overall survival, 39.9 vs. 1.85 years; p < 0.001). Patients who underwent resection had a worse, although nonsignificant, median survival than those who underwent biopsy only (pilocytic, 18.1 vs. 39.9 years, p = 0.07; infiltrative, 19 vs. 30 months, p = 0.14). Postoperative radiotherapy, delivered in 75% of cases, gave no significant survival benefit for those with pilocytic tumors (39.9 vs. 18.1 years, p = 0.33) but did for those with infiltrative astrocytomas (24 vs. 3 months; Wilcoxon p = 0.006). On multivariate analysis, pilocytic histologic type, diagnosis after 1984, longer symptom duration, younger age, minimal surgical extent, and postoperative radiotherapy predicted better outcome. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that histologic type is the most important prognostic variable affecting the outcome of spinal cord astrocytomas. Surgical resection was associated with shorter survival and thus remains an unproven treatment. Postoperative radiotherapy significantly improved survival for patients with infiltrative astrocytomas but not for those with pilocytic tumors.

  13. Spinal electro-magnetic stimulation combined with transgene delivery of neurotrophin NT-3 and exercise: novel combination therapy for spinal contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Hayk A; Alessi, Valentina; Hunanyan, Arsen S; Sisto, Sue A; Arvanian, Victor L

    2015-11-15

    Our recent terminal experiments revealed that administration of a single train of repetitive spinal electromagnetic stimulation (sEMS; 35 min) enhanced synaptic plasticity in spinal circuitry following lateral hemisection spinal cord injury. In the current study, we have examined effects of repetitive sEMS applied as a single train and chronically (5 wk, every other day) following thoracic T10 contusion. Chronic studies involved examination of systematic sEMS administration alone and combined with exercise training and transgene delivery of neurotrophin [adeno-associated virus 10-neurotrophin 3 (AAV10-NT3)]. Electrophysiological intracellular/extracellular recordings, immunohistochemistry, behavioral testing, and anatomical tracing were performed to assess effects of treatments. We found that administration of a single sEMS train induced transient facilitation of transmission through preserved lateral white matter to motoneurons and hindlimb muscles in chronically contused rats with effects lasting for at least 2 h. These physiological changes associated with increased immunoreactivity of GluR1 and GluR2/3 glutamate receptors in lumbar neurons. Systematic administration of sEMS alone for 5 wk, however, was unable to induce cumulative improvements of transmission in spinomuscular circuitry or improve impaired motor function following thoracic contusion. Encouragingly, chronic administration of sEMS, followed by exercise training (running in an exercise ball and swimming), induced the following: 1) sustained strengthening of transmission to lumbar motoneurons and hindlimb muscles, 2) better retrograde transport of anatomical tracer, and 3) improved locomotor function. Greatest improvements were seen in the group that received exercise combined with sEMS and AAV-NT3. PMID:26424579

  14. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on exercise responses in Paralympic athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    West, C R; Taylor, B J; Campbell, I G; Romer, L M

    2014-10-01

    We asked whether specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improves respiratory structure and function and peak exercise responses in highly trained athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Ten Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) were paired by functional classification then randomly assigned to an IMT or placebo group. Diaphragm thickness (B-mode ultrasonography), respiratory function [spirometry and maximum static inspiratory (PI ,max ) and expiratory (PE ,max ) pressures], chronic activity-related dyspnea (Baseline and Transition Dyspnea Indices), and physiological responses to incremental arm-crank exercise were assessed before and after 6 weeks of pressure threshold IMT or sham bronchodilator treatment. Compared to placebo, the IMT group showed significant increases in diaphragm thickness (P?=?0.001) and PI ,max (P?=?0.016). There was a significant increase in tidal volume at peak exercise in IMT vs placebo (P?=?0.048) and a strong trend toward an increase in peak work rate (P?=?0.081, partial eta-squared?=?0.33) and peak oxygen uptake (P?=?0.077, partial eta-squared?=?0.34). No other indices changed post-intervention. In conclusion, IMT resulted in significant diaphragmatic hypertrophy and increased inspiratory muscle strength in highly trained athletes with cervical SCI. The strong trend, with large observed effect, toward an increase in peak aerobic performance suggests IMT may provide a useful adjunct to training in this population. PMID:23530708

  15. Exercise Decreases Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Expression in the Spinal Cord and Positively Modulates Neuronal Growth

    PubMed Central

    GHIANI, CRISTINA A.; YING, ZHE; DE VELLIS, JEAN; GOMEZ-PINILLA, FERNANDO

    2009-01-01

    To successfully grow, neurons need to overcome the effects of hostile environments, such as the inhibitory action of myelin. We have evaluated the potential of exercise to overcome the intrinsic limitation of the central nervous system for axonal growth. In line with the demonstrated ability of exercise to increase the regenerative potential of neurons, here we show that exercise reduces the inhibitory capacity of myelin. Cortical neurons grown on myelin from exercised rats showed a more pronounced neurite extension compared with neurons grown on poly-D-lysine, or on myelin extracted from sedentary animals. The activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 5, a kinase involved in neurite outgrowth, was found to be increased in cortical neurons grown on exercise-myelin and in the lumbar spinal cord enlargement of exercised animals. Exercise significantly decreased the levels of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a potent axonal growth inhibitor, suggesting that downregulation of MAG is part of the mechanism through which exercise reduces growth inhibition. It is known that exercise elevates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) spinal cord levels and that BDNF acts to overcome the inhibitory effects of myelin. Accordingly, we blocked the action of BDNF during exercise, which suppressed the exercise-related MAG decrease. Protein kinase A (PKA) has been related to the ability of BDNF to overcome growth inhibition; in agreement, we found that exercise increased PKA levels and this effect was reverted by blocking BDNF. Overall, these results show that exercise promotes a permissive cellular environment for axonal growth in the adult spinal cord requiring BDNF action. PMID:17497667

  16. Cardio Respiratory Adaptations with Long Term Personalized Exercise Program in a T12 Spinal Cord Injured Person

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasiliadis, Angelo; Christoulas, Kosmas; Evaggelinou, Christina; Vrabas, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological adaptations in cardio respiratory endurance with a personalized exercise program with arm-cranking exercise in a paraplegic person (incomplete T12 spinal cord injury). A 32 year-old man with spinal cord injury (T12) participated in the present study performing 30 minutes arm cranking…

  17. Effect of exercise on the expression of nerve growth factor in the spinal cord of rats with induced osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Yong, Min-Sik; Na, Sang-Su

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] We examined the impact of exercise on the expression pattern of nerve growth factor in the spinal cord of rats with induced osteoarthritis of the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] To produce monosodium iodoacetate-induced arthritis, rats were administered 3?mg/50?µL monosodium iodoacetate through the interarticular space of the right knee. The animals were randomly divided into four groups: rats sacrificed 3 weeks after 0.9% saline solution injection (shame group, n = 10), rats sacrificed 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (control group, n = 10), rats with 4 weeks rest from 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (no exercise group, n = 10), and rats with 4 weeks treadmill training from 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (exercise group, n = 10). Serial coronal sections of the lumbar spine were cut and processed for immunohistochemistry. [Results] The expression of nerve growth factor was significantly increased in the EG compared with the SG, CG, and NEG. [Conclusion] Increased nerve growth factor expression in the spinal cord due to exercise-induced stimulation can be effective in treating chronic pain. Such treatment will contribute not only to improving the joint function of patients with chronic pain but also their quality of life. PMID:26357438

  18. Effect of exercise on the expression of nerve growth factor in the spinal cord of rats with induced osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo-Jin; Yong, Min-Sik; Na, Sang-Su

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We examined the impact of exercise on the expression pattern of nerve growth factor in the spinal cord of rats with induced osteoarthritis of the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] To produce monosodium iodoacetate-induced arthritis, rats were administered 3?mg/50?µL monosodium iodoacetate through the interarticular space of the right knee. The animals were randomly divided into four groups: rats sacrificed 3 weeks after 0.9% saline solution injection (shame group, n = 10), rats sacrificed 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (control group, n = 10), rats with 4 weeks rest from 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (no exercise group, n = 10), and rats with 4 weeks treadmill training from 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (exercise group, n = 10). Serial coronal sections of the lumbar spine were cut and processed for immunohistochemistry. [Results] The expression of nerve growth factor was significantly increased in the EG compared with the SG, CG, and NEG. [Conclusion] Increased nerve growth factor expression in the spinal cord due to exercise-induced stimulation can be effective in treating chronic pain. Such treatment will contribute not only to improving the joint function of patients with chronic pain but also their quality of life. PMID:26357438

  19. Exercise Preconditioning Protects against Spinal Cord Injury in Rats by Upregulating Neuronal and Astroglial Heat Shock Protein 72

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng-Kuei; Chou, Willy; Lin, Hung-Jung; Huang, Yi-Ching; Tang, Ling-Yu; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Chang, Ching-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The heat shock protein 72 (HSP 72) is a universal marker of stress protein whose expression can be induced by physical exercise. Here we report that, in a localized model of spinal cord injury (SCI), exercised rats (given pre-SCI exercise) had significantly higher levels of neuronal and astroglial HSP 72, a lower functional deficit, fewer spinal cord contusions, and fewer apoptotic cells than did non-exercised rats. pSUPER plasmid expressing HSP 72 small interfering RNA (SiRNA-HSP 72) was injected into the injured spinal cords. In addition to reducing neuronal and astroglial HSP 72, the (SiRNA-HSP 72) significantly attenuated the beneficial effects of exercise preconditioning in reducing functional deficits as well as spinal cord contusion and apoptosis. Because exercise preconditioning induces increased neuronal and astroglial levels of HSP 72 in the gray matter of normal spinal cord tissue, exercise preconditioning promoted functional recovery in rats after SCI by upregulating neuronal and astroglial HSP 72 in the gray matter of the injured spinal cord. We reveal an important function of neuronal and astroglial HSP 72 in protecting neuronal and astroglial apoptosis in the injured spinal cord. We conclude that HSP 72-mediated exercise preconditioning is a promising strategy for facilitating functional recovery from SCI. PMID:25334068

  20. [Surgical treatment of spinal deformities in Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Bellen, P; Hody, J L; Clairbois, J; Denis, N; Soudon, P

    1992-01-01

    Forty seven Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy patients, operated on for spinal deformity with segmental spinal instrumentation according to Luque's technique, are reviewed with a mean post-operative follow up of 4 years 4 months. The study of the results obviously showed the interest of Luque Galveston technique for the treatment of severe curves with pelvic obliquity, whereas Dove's rectangle is an interesting choice for the early instrumentation. A total spinal arthrodesis can probably be avoided in these patients, which often demonstrate a satisfying spontaneous fusion after instrumentation. The general and mechanical complications are described, according to the consequences they have on the management technique of these patients. PMID:1306582

  1. The role of prostaglandins in spinal transmission of the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Audrey J.; Copp, Steven W.; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies found that prostaglandins in skeletal muscle play a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex; however the role played by prostaglandins in the spinal transmission of the reflex is not known. We determined, therefore, whether or not spinal blockade of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity and/or spinal blockade of endoperoxide receptor (EP) 2 or EP4 receptors attenuated the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats. We first established that intrathecal doses of a non-specific COX inhibitor Ketorolac (100ug in 10ul), a COX-2 specific inhibitor Celecoxib (100?g in 10?l), an EP2 antagonist PF-04418948 (10?g in 10?l), and an EP4 antagonist L-161,982 (4?g in 10?l) effectively attenuated the pressor responses to intrathecal injections of Arachidonic Acid (100?g in 10?l), EP2 agonist Butaprost (4ng in 10 ?l), and EP4 agonist TCS 2510 (6.25?g in 2.5 ?l), respectively. Once effective doses were established, we statically contracted the hindlimb before and after intrathecal injections of Ketorolac, Celecoxib, the EP2 antagonist and the EP4 antagonist. We found that Ketorolac significantly attenuated the pressor response to static contraction (before Ketorolac: 23±5 mmHg, after Ketorolac 14±5 mmHg; p<0.05) whereas Celecoxib had no effect. We also found that 8?g of L-161,982, but not 4 ?g of L-161,982, significantly attenuated the pressor response to static contraction (before L-161,982: 21±4 mmHg, after L-161,982 12±3 mmHg; p<0.05), whereas PF-04418948 (10?g) had no effect. We conclude that spinal COX-1, but not COX-2, plays a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex, and that the spinal prostaglandins produced by this enzyme are most likely activating spinal EP4 receptors, but not EP2 receptors. PMID:25003710

  2. Role of prostaglandins in spinal transmission of the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrated rats.

    PubMed

    Stone, A J; Copp, S W; Kaufman, M P

    2014-09-26

    Previous studies found that prostaglandins in skeletal muscle play a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex; however the role played by prostaglandins in the spinal transmission of the reflex is not known. We determined, therefore, whether or not spinal blockade of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity and/or spinal blockade of endoperoxide (EP) 2 or 4 receptors attenuated the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrated rats. We first established that intrathecal doses of a non-specific COX inhibitor Ketorolac (100 ?g in 10 ?l), a COX-2-specific inhibitor Celecoxib (100 ?g in 10 ?l), an EP2 antagonist PF-04418948 (10 ?g in 10 ?l), and an EP4 antagonist L-161,982 (4 ?g in 10 ?l) effectively attenuated the pressor responses to intrathecal injections of arachidonic acid (100 ?g in 10 ?l), EP2 agonist Butaprost (4 ng in 10 ?l), and EP4 agonist TCS 2510 (6.25 ?g in 2.5 ?l), respectively. Once effective doses were established, we statically contracted the hind limb before and after intrathecal injections of Ketorolac, Celecoxib, the EP2 antagonist and the EP4 antagonist. We found that Ketorolac significantly attenuated the pressor response to static contraction (before Ketorolac: 23 ± 5 mmHg, after Ketorolac 14 ± 5 mmHg; p<0.05) whereas Celecoxib had no effect. We also found that 8 ?g of L-161,982, but not 4 ?g of L-161,982, significantly attenuated the pressor response to static contraction (before L-161,982: 21 ± 4 mmHg, after L-161,982 12 ± 3 mmHg; p<0.05), whereas PF-04418948 (10 ?g) had no effect. We conclude that spinal COX-1, but not COX-2, plays a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex, and that the spinal prostaglandins produced by this enzyme are most likely activating spinal EP4 receptors, but not EP2 receptors. PMID:25003710

  3. Biomaterial Design Strategies for the Treatment of Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Straley, Karin S.; Po Foo, Cheryl Wong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The highly debilitating nature of spinal cord injuries has provided much inspiration for the design of novel biomaterials that can stimulate cellular regeneration and functional recovery. Many experts agree that the greatest hope for treatment of spinal cord injuries will involve a combinatorial approach that integrates biomaterial scaffolds, cell transplantation, and molecule delivery. This manuscript presents a comprehensive review of biomaterial-scaffold design strategies currently being applied to the development of nerve guidance channels and hydrogels that more effectively stimulate spinal cord tissue regeneration. To enhance the regenerative capacity of these two scaffold types, researchers are focusing on optimizing the mechanical properties, cell-adhesivity, biodegradability, electrical activity, and topography of synthetic and natural materials, and are developing mechanisms to use these scaffolds to deliver cells and biomolecules. Developing scaffolds that address several of these key design parameters will lead to more successful therapies for the regeneration of spinal cord tissue. PMID:19698073

  4. Effects of Exercise on Spinal Deformities and Quality of Life in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad; Abu Shaphe, Md.; Anwar, Dilshad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This systematic review was conducted to examine the effects of exercise on spinal deformities and quality of life in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Data Sources. Electronic databases, including PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro, and Web of Science, were searched for research articles published from the earliest available dates up to May 31, 2015, using the key words “exercise,” “postural correction,” “posture,” “postural curve,” “Cobb's angle,” “quality of life,” and “spinal deformities,” combined with the Medical Subject Heading “scoliosis.” Study Selection. This systematic review was restricted to randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials on AIS published in English language. The quality of selected studies was assessed by the PEDro scale, the Cochrane Collaboration's tool, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation System (GRADE). Data Extraction. Descriptive data were collected from each study. The outcome measures of interest were Cobb angle, trunk rotation, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar kyphosis, vertebral rotation, and quality of life. Data Synthesis. A total of 30 studies were assessed for eligibility. Six of the 9 selected studies reached high methodological quality on the PEDro scale. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence that exercise interventions reduce the Cobb angle, angle of trunk rotation, thoracic kyphosis, and lumbar lordosis and low-quality evidence that exercise interventions reduce average lateral deviation. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence that exercise interventions improve the quality of life. Conclusions. A supervised exercise program was superior to controls in reducing spinal deformities and improving the quality of life in patients with AIS. PMID:26583083

  5. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Spinal Metastases Recurring in Close Proximity to Previously Irradiated Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steven D.; Jackson, Paul S.; Minn, A. Yuriko; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: As the spinal cord tolerance often precludes reirradiation with conventional techniques, local recurrence within a previously irradiated field presents a treatment challenge. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 51 lesions in 42 patients treated from 2002 to 2008 whose spinal metastases recurred in a previous radiation field (median previous spinal cord dose of 40 Gy) and were subsequently treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Results: SRS was delivered to a median marginal dose of 20 Gy (range, 10-30 Gy) in 1-5 fractions (median, 2), targeting a median tumor volume of 10.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.2-128.6 cm{sup 3}). Converting the SRS regimens with the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 3), the median spinal cord maximum single-session equivalent dose (SSED) was 12.1 Gy{sub 3} (range, 4.7-19.3 Gy{sub 3}). With a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 2-47 months), the Kaplan-Meier local control and overall survival rates at 6/12 months were 87%/73% and 81%/68%, respectively. A time to retreatment of {<=}12 months and the combination of time to retreatment of {<=}12 months with an SSED of <15 Gy{sub 10} were significant predictors of local failure on univariate and multivariate analyses. In patients with a retreatment interval of <12 months, 6/12 month local control rates were 88%/58%, with a SSED of >15 Gy{sub 10}, compared to 45%/0% with <15 Gy{sub 10}, respectively. One patient (2%) experienced Grade 4 neurotoxicity. Conclusion: SRS is safe and effective in the treatment of spinal metastases recurring in previously irradiated fields. Tumor recurrence within 12 months may correlate with biologic aggressiveness and require higher SRS doses (SSED >15 Gy{sub 10}). Further research is needed to define the partial volume retreatment tolerance of the spinal cord and the optimal target dose.

  6. The role of exercise in migraine treatment.

    PubMed

    Koseoglu, E; Yetkin, M F; Ugur, F; Bilgen, M

    2015-09-01

    This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature on the use of exercise for migraine treatment with regard to its efficacy, mechanism of action and role in practice. Many randomized studies have reported the efficacy of prophylactic treatment of migrane with medications such as beta blockers or antiepileptic drugs. Studies on alternative approaches, like aerobic exercise and biofeedback, are however limited but also considered to be effective. Scientific databases were searched with keywords "exercise" and "migraine". The resulting publications were gathered, examined and discussed throughly. Past studies had limitations and were few in number, but more recent randomized controlled studies have concretely provided level of evidence about the effectiveness of exercise in prophylactic treatment of migraine. Core properties of exercise like intensity, duration, frequency, type and warming up period are required to be monitored while treating migraine to increase the beneficial effects and, also to prevent injuries and side effects which may include exertional headache. Isometric neck exercise is helpful when the migraine is accompanied by neck pain. Patient population with low beta endorphin level in blood, high physical fitness and high motivation receives significant benefits from the exercise treatment. The action of exercise on migraine is in general related to neurochemical factors, psychological states and increase in cardivascular and cerebrovascular fitness. Considering its effectiveness and minimal side effects, migraine patients should often be encouraged to practice physical exercise with intensity, frequency and duration that should be carefully instituted to achieve the most beneficial outcome while preventing potential injuries and side effects. PMID:24921618

  7. Lidase treatment of spinal cord transected rats.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, T F; Vahlsing, H L; Feringa, E R

    1979-07-01

    Russian investigators have recently reported clinical recovery of enzyme treated, spinal cord transected rats. Using the exact protocols outlined by Matinian and Andreasian, we repeated a portion of their experiment using a Lidase preparation manufactured in the USSR. Animals were evaluated for return of bladder function, clinical evidence of hind limb motor function, cortical evoked response after sciatic nerve stimulation, and axonal transport of cortically injected tritiate proline by regenerated corticospinal axons. The only difference between treated and control animals was that the mean total body weight of the treated animals increased more than that of controls (p less than 0.05). No animal walked, had return of voluntary motor activity, showed cortical evoked response, or had evidence for transport of tritiated proline over regenerated corticospinal axons. PMID:507763

  8. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chul-ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects] Two golfers with chronic back pain. [Methods] The pelvis and spinal vertebrae were corrected using the Thompson “drop” technique. Angle and force were adjusted to place the pelvis, lumbar spine, and thoracic vertebrae in neutral position. The technique was applied twice weekly after muscle massage in the back and pelvic areas. The golfers performed corrective, warmup stretching exercises, followed by squats on an unstable surface using the Togu ball. They then used a gym ball for repetitions of hip rotation, upper trunk extension, sit-ups, and pelvic anterior-posterior, pelvic left-right, and trunk flexion-extension exercises. The session ended with cycling as a cool-down exercise. Each session lasted 60 minutes. [Results] The difference in height was measured on the left and right sides of the pelvic bone. The pelvic tilt changed significantly in both participants after the 4-week program. [Conclusion] In golfers, core muscles are critical and are closely related to spinal deformation. Core strengthening and spinal correction play a pivotal role in the correction of spinal deformation. PMID:26504350

  9. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chul-Ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects] Two golfers with chronic back pain. [Methods] The pelvis and spinal vertebrae were corrected using the Thompson "drop" technique. Angle and force were adjusted to place the pelvis, lumbar spine, and thoracic vertebrae in neutral position. The technique was applied twice weekly after muscle massage in the back and pelvic areas. The golfers performed corrective, warmup stretching exercises, followed by squats on an unstable surface using the Togu ball. They then used a gym ball for repetitions of hip rotation, upper trunk extension, sit-ups, and pelvic anterior-posterior, pelvic left-right, and trunk flexion-extension exercises. The session ended with cycling as a cool-down exercise. Each session lasted 60 minutes. [Results] The difference in height was measured on the left and right sides of the pelvic bone. The pelvic tilt changed significantly in both participants after the 4-week program. [Conclusion] In golfers, core muscles are critical and are closely related to spinal deformation. Core strengthening and spinal correction play a pivotal role in the correction of spinal deformation. PMID:26504350

  10. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Orozco, Breanna Z

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength), negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass), increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:26543382

  11. A randomized controlled trial of exercise in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shrader, Joseph A; Kats, Ilona; Kokkinis, Angela; Zampieri, Cris; Levy, Ellen; Joe, Galen O; Woolstenhulme, Joshua G; Drinkard, Bart E; Smith, Michaele R; Ching, Willie; Ghosh, Laboni; Fox, Derrick; Auh, Sungyoung; Schindler, Alice B; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Grunseich, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety and efficacy of a home-based functional exercise program in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Methods Subjects were randomly assigned to participate in 12 weeks of either functional exercises (intervention) or a stretching program (control) at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. A total of 54 subjects enrolled, and 50 completed the study with 24 in the functional exercise group and 26 in the stretching control group. The primary outcome measure was the Adult Myopathy Assessment Tool (AMAT) total score, and secondary measures included total activity by accelerometry, muscle strength, balance, timed up and go, sit-to-stand test, health-related quality of life, creatine kinase, and insulin-like growth factor-1. Results Functional exercise was well tolerated but did not lead to significant group differences in the primary outcome measure or any of the secondary measures. The functional exercise did not produce significantly more adverse events than stretching, and was not perceived to be difficult. To determine whether a subset of the subjects may have benefited, we divided them into high and low functioning based on baseline AMAT scores and performed a post hoc subgroup analysis. Low-functioning individuals receiving the intervention increased AMAT functional subscale scores compared to the control group. Interpretation Although these trial results indicate that functional exercise had no significant effect on total AMAT scores or on mobility, strength, balance, and quality of life, post hoc findings indicate that low-functioning men with SBMA may respond better to functional exercises, and this warrants further investigation with appropriate exercise intensity. PMID:26273686

  12. Active-Arm Passive-Leg Exercise Improves Cardiovascular Function in Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    West, Christopher R; Currie, Katharine D; Gee, Cameron; Krassioukov, Andrei V; Borisoff, Jaimie

    2015-11-01

    In a 43-yr-old male subject with a chronic T3 AIS A spinal cord injury, the acute cardiorespiratory responses to active upper-extremity exercise alone and combined active-arm passive-leg exercise (AAPLE) were investigated, along with the cardiorespiratory, cardiac, vascular, and body composition responses to a 6-wk AAPLE interval training intervention. AAPLE elicited superior acute maximal cardiorespiratory responses compared with upper-extremity exercise alone. In response to a 6-wk interval training regimen, AAPLE caused a 25% increase in peak oxygen uptake, a 10% increase in resting stroke volume, and a 4-fold increase in brachial artery blood flow. Conversely, there were no changes in femoral arterial function, body composition, or bone mineral density in response to training. As a potential clinical intervention, AAPLE may be advantageous over other forms of currently available exercise, owing to the minimal setup time and cost involved and the nonreliance on specialized equipment that is required for other exercise modalities. PMID:26259052

  13. Nanomedicine strategies for treatment of secondary spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    White-Schenk, Désirée; Shi, Riyi; Leary, James F

    2015-01-01

    Neurological injury, such as spinal cord injury, has a secondary injury associated with it. The secondary injury results from the biological cascade after the primary injury and affects previous uninjured, healthy tissue. Therefore, the mitigation of such a cascade would benefit patients suffering a primary injury and allow the body to recover more quickly. Unfortunately, the delivery of effective therapeutics is quite limited. Due to the inefficient delivery of therapeutic drugs, nanoparticles have become a major field of exploration for medical applications. Based on their material properties, they can help treat disease by delivering drugs to specific tissues, enhancing detection methods, or a mixture of both. Incorporating nanomedicine into the treatment of neuronal injury and disease would likely push nanomedicine into a new light. This review highlights the various pathological issues involved in secondary spinal cord injury, current treatment options, and the improvements that could be made using a nanomedical approach. PMID:25673988

  14. Outcomes in Treatment for Intradural Spinal Cord Ependymomas

    SciTech Connect

    Volpp, P. Brian Han, Khanh; Kagan, A. Robert; Tome, Michael

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Spinal cord ependymomas are rare tumors, accounting for <2% of all primary central nervous system tumors. This study assessed the treatment outcomes for patients diagnosed with spinal cord ependymomas within the Southern California Kaiser Permanente system. Methods and Materials: We studied 23 patients treated with surgery with or without external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The local and distant control rates and overall survival rates were determined. Results: The overall local control, overall recurrence, and 9-year overall survival rate was 96%, 17.4%, and 63.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The results of our study indicate that en bloc gross total resection should be the initial treatment, with radiotherapy reserved primarily for postoperative cases with unfavorable characteristics such as residual tumor, anaplastic histologic features, or piecemeal resection. Excellent local control and overall survival rates can be achieved using modern microsurgical techniques, with or without local radiotherapy.

  15. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-25

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  16. Correction of camptocormia using a cruciform anterior spinal hyperextension brace and back extensor strengthening exercise in a patient with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Byung Kook; Kim, Hyoung-Seop; Kim, Yong Wook

    2015-02-01

    Parkinson disease, one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, is characterized by cardinal motor features including bradykinesia, rigidity, resting tremor, postural instability, freezing gait, and fatigue. Of these, postural instability in the form of hyperflexion of the thoracolumbar spine upon standing and walking that disappears on recumbent positioning is called camptocormia. Many different trials have been conducted on the treatment of camptocormia, including physiotherapy, corsets, medications, and deep brain stimulation. However, there is insufficient evidence as to which treatment modality is the most valid in terms of effectiveness, cost, safety, and patient satisfaction. In this study, we present a patient whose symptom of camptocormia was effectively resolved using a cruciform anterior spinal hyperextension (CASH) brace and back extensor strengthening exercise which was modified through follow-ups based on a short-term outpatient setting for proper application with minimal discomfort. The patient was satisfied with the amount of correction provided by the brace and exercise. PMID:25750882

  17. Spinal cord injury-induced pain: mechanisms and treatments.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Philip J; Middleton, James W

    2015-11-01

    Pain is a common consequence of a spinal cord injury (SCI) and has a major impact on quality of life through its impact on physical function, mood and participation in work, recreational and social activities. Several types of pain typically present following SCI with central neuropathic pain being a frequent and difficult to manage occurrence. Despite advances in our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to this type of pain and an increasing number of trials examining treatment efficacy, our ability to relieve neuropathic SCI pain is still very limited. Optimal management relies upon an integrated approach that uses a combination of pharmacological and nonpharmacological options. PMID:26402151

  18. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    West, Christopher R.; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.; Campbell, Ian G.

    2014-01-01

    We asked whether elastic binding of the abdomen influences respiratory mechanics during wheelchair propulsion in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Eight Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) performed submaximal and maximal incremental exercise tests on a treadmill, both with and without abdominal binding. Measurements included pulmonary function, pressure-derived indices of respiratory mechanics, operating lung volumes, tidal flow-volume data, gas exchange, blood lactate, and symptoms. Residual volume and functional residual capacity were reduced with binding (77 ± 18 and 81 ± 11% of unbound, P < 0.05), vital capacity was increased (114 ± 9%, P < 0.05), whereas total lung capacity was relatively well preserved (99 ± 5%). During exercise, binding introduced a passive increase in transdiaphragmatic pressure, due primarily to an increase in gastric pressure. Active pressures during inspiration were similar across conditions. A sudden, sustained rise in operating lung volumes was evident in the unbound condition, and these volumes were shifted downward with binding. Expiratory flow limitation did not occur in any subject and there was substantial reserve to increase flow and volume in both conditions. V?o2 was elevated with binding during the final stages of exercise (8–12%, P < 0.05), whereas blood lactate concentration was reduced (16–19%, P < 0.05). V?o2/heart rate slopes were less steep with binding (62 ± 35 vs. 47 ± 24 ml/beat, P < 0.05). Ventilation, symptoms, and work rates were similar across conditions. The results suggest that abdominal binding shifts tidal breathing to lower lung volumes without influencing flow limitation, symptoms, or exercise tolerance. Changes in respiratory mechanics with binding may benefit O2 transport capacity by an improvement in central circulatory function. PMID:24855136

  19. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    West, Christopher R; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Campbell, Ian G; Romer, Lee M

    2014-07-01

    We asked whether elastic binding of the abdomen influences respiratory mechanics during wheelchair propulsion in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Eight Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) performed submaximal and maximal incremental exercise tests on a treadmill, both with and without abdominal binding. Measurements included pulmonary function, pressure-derived indices of respiratory mechanics, operating lung volumes, tidal flow-volume data, gas exchange, blood lactate, and symptoms. Residual volume and functional residual capacity were reduced with binding (77 ± 18 and 81 ± 11% of unbound, P < 0.05), vital capacity was increased (114 ± 9%, P < 0.05), whereas total lung capacity was relatively well preserved (99 ± 5%). During exercise, binding introduced a passive increase in transdiaphragmatic pressure, due primarily to an increase in gastric pressure. Active pressures during inspiration were similar across conditions. A sudden, sustained rise in operating lung volumes was evident in the unbound condition, and these volumes were shifted downward with binding. Expiratory flow limitation did not occur in any subject and there was substantial reserve to increase flow and volume in both conditions. V?o2 was elevated with binding during the final stages of exercise (8-12%, P < 0.05), whereas blood lactate concentration was reduced (16-19%, P < 0.05). V?o2/heart rate slopes were less steep with binding (62 ± 35 vs. 47 ± 24 ml/beat, P < 0.05). Ventilation, symptoms, and work rates were similar across conditions. The results suggest that abdominal binding shifts tidal breathing to lower lung volumes without influencing flow limitation, symptoms, or exercise tolerance. Changes in respiratory mechanics with binding may benefit O2 transport capacity by an improvement in central circulatory function. PMID:24855136

  20. Effects of peripheral and spinal ?-opioid receptor stimulation on the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Audrey J.; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2014-01-01

    The exercise pressor reflex is greater in rats with ligated femoral arteries than it is in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. The exaggerated reflex in rats with ligated arteries is attenuated by stimulation of ?-opioid and ?-opioid receptors on the peripheral endings of thin-fiber muscle afferents. The effect of stimulation of ?-opioid receptors on the exercise pressor reflex is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that stimulation of ?-opioid receptors attenuates the exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated, but not freely perfused, femoral arteries. The pressor responses to static contraction were compared before and after femoral arterial or intrathecal injection of the ?-opioid receptor agonist U62066 (1, 10, and 100 ?g). Femoral arterial injection of U62066 did not attenuate the pressor responses to contraction in either group of rats. Likewise, intrathecal injection of U62066 did not attenuate the pressor response to contraction in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. In contrast, intrathecal injection of 10 and 100 ?g of U62066 attenuated the pressor response to contraction in rats with ligated femoral arteries, an effect that was blocked by prior intrathecal injection of the ?-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. In rats with ligated femoral arteries, the pressor response to stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors by sodium cyanide was not changed by intrathecal U62066 injections, indicating that these injections had no direct effect on the sympathetic outflow. We conclude that stimulation of spinal, but not peripheral, ?-opioid receptors attenuates the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated femoral arteries. PMID:24920732

  1. Dosimetric comparison of metastatic spinal photon treatment techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Marvene M.; Carnes, Samuel M.; Henderson, Mark A.; Das, Indra J.

    2012-01-01

    Traditional palliative treatment of metastatic cancer to the vertebral bodies often results in doses to the spinal cord that are higher than the dose prescribed to the target, or gross tumor volume (GTV). This study compares traditional techniques of spine palliation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The purpose of the study is 2-fold: first, the study demonstrates the benefits of using IMRT to lower the dose to the organs at risk (OAR), particularly for the spinal cord and other nonspecified normal tissues; second, the article provides information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of commonly used conventional techniques for treating the vertebral bodies based on patient anatomy. Because the use of IMRT or other advanced techniques may be prohibitive because of insurance issues, treatment plans were created that compared optimal coverage vs. optimal sparing for single-field, wedged-pair, and opposed-beam arrangements. Fifty-five patients were selected and divided by location of target (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine) and also by the measured separation between the anterior and posterior surface of the patient at the level of mid-GTV. Within each anatomic category the patients again were divided into the categories of small, medium, and large based on separation. The patient dataset that most closely represented the average separation within each category was selected, resulting in a total of 9 patients, and the appropriate treatment plan techniques were calculated for each of the 9 patients. The results of the study do show that the use of IMRT is far superior when compared with other techniques, both for coverage and for sparing of the surrounding tissue, regardless of patient size and the section of spine being treated. Based on a combination of both target coverage and sparing of normal tissues, the conventional plan of choice may vary by both the section of spine to be treated and by the size of the patient.

  2. Spinal Traumas and their Treatments According to Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Farzaneh; Naseri, Mohsen; Movahhed, Mina; Zargaran, Arman

    2015-07-01

    Spinal Traumas have been categorized as disabling diseases that cause irretrievable personal and social problems. Having conducted a rather comprehensive diagnosis of the anatomy of the backbone and spinal cord as well as their functions, Avicenna (Ibn Sina, 980-1037) stated the levels and kinds of spinal impairments that are caused by spinal traumas in his great masterpiece Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb (The Canon of Medicine). He also based his treatment process on his etiological diagnosis of such impairments. Avicenna had used the following methods to treat spinal traumas: food and drug therapy and regimental therapies such as massage, phlebotomy, cupping, dry sauna, and surgery. The authors of the present article review the bases of Avicenna's viewpoints regarding spinal traumas and their treatment. PMID:25772611

  3. Staying physically active after spinal cord injury: a qualitative exploration of barriers and facilitators to exercise participation

    PubMed Central

    Kehn, Matthew; Kroll, Thilo

    2009-01-01

    Background While enhancing physical activity has been an essential goal of public health officials, people with physical impairments such as spinal cord injury (SCI) are more likely to live a sedentary lifestyle. Exercise has been shown to decrease the risk for many of the secondary conditions associated with SCI, including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, pressure ulcers, urinary tract infections, diabetes and arthritis, yet this population is rarely a target for health promotion efforts. This paper examines the self-reported exercise experiences of people with SCI using a qualitative-exploratory design. Methods We enrolled 26 individuals with SCI (15 self-described 'exercisers' and 11 'non-exercisers') from a non-random pool of survey responders. Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted to record participants' experiences with exercise pre/post injury, barriers and facilitators to being active and perceived health impact. Results Regardless of exercise status, all participants reported physical activity prior to injury and expressed interest in becoming active or maintaining an active lifestyle. Participants identified a range of both motivational and socio-environmental factors that were either facilitating or constraining of such a lifestyle. Non-exercisers identified barriers to exercise, including a perceived low return on physical investment, lack of accessible facilities, unaffordable equipment, no personal assistance and fear of injury. Exercisers identified facilitators, including personal motivation, independence, availability of accessible facilities and personal assistants, fear of health complications, and weight management. Exercisers associated a greater range of specific health benefits with being active than non-exercisers. Conclusion Despite motivation and interest in being exercise active, people with SCI face many obstacles. Removal of barriers coupled with promotion of facilitating factors, is vital for enhancing opportunities for physical activity and reducing the risk of costly secondary conditions in this population. PMID:19486521

  4. Wind-up of stretch reflexes as a measure of spasticity in chronic spinalized rats: The effects of passive exercise and modafinil.

    PubMed

    Garrison, M Kevin; Yates, Charlotte C; Reese, Nancy B; Skinner, Robert D; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    Spasticity is a common disorder following spinal cord injury that can impair function and quality of life. While a number of mechanisms are thought to play a role in spasticity, the role of motoneuron persistent inward currents (PICs) is emerging as pivotal. The presence of PICs can be evidenced by temporal summation or wind-up of reflex responses to brief afferent inputs. In this study, a combined neurophysiological and novel biomechanical approach was used to assess the effects of passive exercise and modafinil administration on hyper-reflexia and spasticity following complete T-10 transection in the rat. Animals were divided into 3 groups (n=8) and provided daily passive cycling exercise, oral modafinil, or no intervention. After 6weeks, animals were tested for wind-up of the stretch reflex (SR) during repeated dorsiflexion stretches of the ankle. H-reflexes were tested in a subset of animals. Both torque and gastrocnemius electromyography showed evidence of SR wind-up in the transection only group that was significantly different from both treatment groups (p<0.05). H-reflex frequency dependent depression was also restored to normal levels in both treatment groups. The results provide support for the use of passive cycling exercise and modafinil in the treatment of spasticity and provide insight into the possible contribution of PICs. PMID:20932828

  5. Is exercise effective treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee?

    PubMed Central

    Petrella, R.

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To review and determine the effectiveness of exercise treatment in osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods—A computerised literature search of Medline was carried out searching between June 1966 and January 2000. Results—Twenty three randomised controlled trials were identified from the literature. Only three trials were sufficiently powered. Small to moderate beneficial effects of exercise treatment were found for pain, small beneficial effects on disability outcome measures, and moderate to great beneficial effects were observed according to patient global assessment of effect. It was not possible to obtain evidence on the content of exercise interventions, as studies were hampered by lack of attention to proper concealment, reporting of adverse effects, and long term effects of exercise treatment. The lack of standard outcomes measures is also noted. Conclusions—The available evidence indicates beneficial short term effects of exercise treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. However, the number of available studies is limited, and more research is needed to expand this recommendation. Specifically, additional trials should provide information on adherence, home based interventions, interaction with pharmacological treatments, functional outcomes measures relevant to exercise treatment in these patients, and long term effects. At present, doctors should recommend exercise to all patients with mild/moderate disease. Further study should be encouraged and exercise should be continued to be recommended as a mainstay of non-pharmacological treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee. Key Words: osteoarthritis; knee; exercise PMID:11049140

  6. Blood redistribution and circulatory responses to submaximal arm exercise in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hopman, M T; Monroe, M; Dueck, C; Phillips, W T; Skinner, J S

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate responses to submaximal arm exercise (20%, 40%, and 60% of peak power output) using four conditions to support the circulatory redistribution in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Five males with tetraplegia (TP) and four males with paraplegia (PR) exercised 1) sitting, 2) supine, and 3) sitting with the addition of a) an anti-gravity suit (anti-G), b) elastic stockings and abdominal binder, and c) functional electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. Compared to sitting, the following significant changes were observed: in the supine position, heart rate (HR) decreased (PR: 104 vs 118 b/min, TP: 76 vs 92 b/min) and stroke volume (SV) increased (PR: 132 vs 116 ml, TP: 96 vs 83 ml). The anti-G suit induced a decrease in heart rate (PR: 104 vs 118 b/min, TP: 87 vs 92 b/min) and a decrease in oxygen uptake (VO2) in PR. Stockings only affected TP, i.e. a decrease in heart rate with 5 b/min and an increase in stroke volume with 13 ml/beat. Functional electrical stimulation produced an increase in VO2 (PR: 1.00 vs 0.95 l/min, TP: 0.68 vs 0.53 l/min) and a rise in stroke volume in TP. Results indicate that the methods employed to support the circulatory redistribution have different working mechanisms and, in addition, that the effects are different for TP and PR probably because of differences in active muscle mass, sympathetic impairment and blood pressure values. PMID:9782544

  7. Sweat gland density and response during high-intensity exercise in athletes with spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nawaiseh, AM; Pritchett, KK; Nethery, V; Bishop, PA; Green, JM

    2015-01-01

    Sweat production is crucial for thermoregulation. However, sweating can be problematic for individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI), as they display a blunting of sudomotor and vasomotor responses below the level of the injury. Sweat gland density and eccrine gland metabolism in SCI are not well understood. Consequently, this study examined sweat lactate (S-LA) (reflective of sweat gland metabolism), active sweat gland density (SGD), and sweat output per gland (S/G) in 7 SCI athletes and 8 able-bodied (AB) controls matched for arm ergometry VO2peak. A sweat collection device was positioned on the upper scapular and medial calf of each subject just prior to the beginning of the trial, with iodine sweat gland density patches positioned on the upper scapular and medial calf. Participants were tested on a ramp protocol (7 min per stage, 20 W increase per stage) in a common exercise environment (21±1°C, 45-65% relative humidity). An independent t-test revealed lower (p<0.05) SGD (upper scapular) for SCI (22.3 ±14.8 glands · cm?2) vs. AB. (41.0 ± 8.1 glands · cm?2). However, there was no significant difference for S/G between groups. S-LA was significantly greater (p<0.05) during the second exercise stage for SCI (11.5±10.9 mmol · l?1) vs. AB (26.8±11.07 mmol · l?1). These findings suggest that SCI athletes had less active sweat glands compared to the AB group, but the sweat response was similar (SLA, S/G) between AB and SCI athletes. The results suggest similar interglandular metabolic activity irrespective of overall sweat rate. PMID:26424929

  8. [Cystography of the spinal cord for delineating tactics for surgical treatment of syringomyelia].

    PubMed

    Paramonov, L V

    1983-01-01

    Radiocontrast study of cystic cavities of the spinal cord was conducted in 23 patients with the clinical picture of syringomyelia and syringobulbia. Diffuse cystic cavities were demonstrated in the cervical and thoracic segments of the spinal cord in 22 patients. In 9 patients, the spinal cysts communicated with the cavity of the fourth ventricle. In 2 cases, the cysts extended to the region of the spinal cord terminal filament. The information obtained allowed a differential approach to the choice of the method and tactics of surgical treatment of syringohydromyelia. Macrosurgical operations on the craniovertebral level with tamponade of the communication between the spinal cord cyst and the cavity of the fourth ventricle were carried out in patients with the communicating form of syringomyelia. Operations for dividing the terminal filament of the spinal cord or myelotomy with drainage of the cyst at the cervical or thoracic level were performed in other cases. PMID:6650044

  9. The Effects of Aging and Electrical Stimulation Exercise on Bone after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dolbow, James D.; Dolbow, David R.; Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Adler, Robert A.; Gater, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Age related bone loss predisposes adults to osteoporosis. This is especially true for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The effects of decreased bone loading with older age and paralysis significantly contribute to decreased bone mass and increased risk for fragility fractures. Loading bone via volitional muscle contractions or by using electrical stimulation are common methods for helping to prevent and/or decrease bone loss. However the effectiveness and safety of electrical stimulation activities remain unclear. The purpose of this review is to investigate the factors associated with aging and osteoporosis after SCI, the accuracy of bone measurement, the effects of various forms of bone loading activities with a focus on electrical stimulation activities and the safety of physical exercise with a focus on electrical stimulation cycling. Osteoporosis remains a disabling and costly condition for older adults and for those with paralysis. Both dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography are valuable techniques for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) with the latter having the ability to differentiate trabecular and cortical bone. Physical activities have shown to be beneficial for increasing BMD however, the extent of the benefits related to aging and paralysis remain undetermined. Electrical stimulation activities administered appropriately are assumed safe due to thousands of documented safe FES cycling sessions. However, specific documentation is needed to verify safety and to development formal guidelines for optimal use. PMID:23730530

  10. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Brackett, Nancy L; Lynne, Charles M; Ibrahim, Emad; Ohl, Dana A; Sønksen, Jens

    2010-03-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses, and vacuum constriction devices. In anejaculatory patients who wish to father children, semen retrieval is necessary. Penile vibratory stimulation is recommended as the first line of treatment. Patients who fail penile vibratory stimulation can be referred for electroejaculation. If this approach is not possible, prostate massage is an alternative. Surgical sperm retrieval should be considered as a last resort when other methods fail. Most men with SCI have a unique semen profile characterized by normal sperm count but abnormally low sperm motility. Scientific investigations indicate that accessory gland dysfunction and abnormal semen constituents contribute to the problem. Despite abnormalities, sperm from men with SCI can successfully induce pregnancy. In selected couples, the simple method of intravaginal insemination is a viable option. Another option is intrauterine insemination. The efficacy of intrauterine insemination increases as the total motile sperm count inseminated increases. In vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection are options in cases of extremely low total motile sperm count. Reproductive outcomes for SCI male factor infertility are similar to outcomes for general male factor infertility. PMID:20157304

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Spinal Cord Injury How does the spinal cord work? What is a spinal cord injury? Why is ... stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What ...

  12. Exercise performance during captopril and atenolol treatment in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Van Baak, M A; Koene, F M; Verstappen, F T; Tan, E S

    1991-01-01

    1. Maximal aerobic exercise capacity, submaximal endurance exercise performance, and exercise haemodynamics have been studied in sixteen patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension during treatment with captopril and atenolol. 2. Administration of atenolol (1 x 100 mg day-1) or captopril (1 x 100 mg day-1) for 6 weeks resulted in similar supine and erect systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Heart rate was significantly lower during atenolol treatment. 3. Exercise heart rate and systolic blood pressure were significantly lower during atenolol than during captopril treatment, exercise diastolic blood pressure (at 100W) did not differ significantly. With atenolol exercise cardiac output was significantly lower and exercise stroke volume significantly higher than with captopril. 4. Maximal work rate, maximal oxygen consumption and maximal heart rate were significantly lower during atenolol than during captopril treatment (respectively 6%, 8% and 25%). Maximal respiratory exchange ratio and lactate concentration did not differ. 5. No statistically significant difference in submaximal endurance time between atenolol and captopril was found. Endurance time was reduced by 19% during atenolol and by 13% during captopril as compared with placebo. No difference in rating of perceived exertion between atenolol and captopril was present. 6. The results indicate that atenolol will reduce blood pressure during exercise more effectively than captopril in patients with hypertension. The limitation of submaximal endurance exercise performance by both agents is of similar magnitude. This may be regarded as an unwanted side effect in certain physically active patients with hypertension. PMID:1768565

  13. Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Safak; Tatar, Oner; Akpancar, Serkan; Bilgic, Serkan; Ersen, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis (TB) is a significant form of TB, causing spinal deformity and paralysis. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for avoiding multivertebral destruction and are critical for improving outcomes in spinal TB. We believe that appropriate treatment method should be implemented at the early stage of this disease and that the Gulhane Askeri T?p Akademisi classification system can be considered a practical guide for spinal TB treatment planning in all countries. PMID:26609247

  14. Hybrid Functional Electrical Stimulation Exercise Training Alters the Relationship Between Spinal Cord Injury Level and Aerobic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J. Andrew; Picard, Glen; Porter, Aidan; Morse, Leslie R.; Pronovost, Meghan F.; Deley, Gaelle

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that hybrid Functional Electrical Stimulation Row Training (FES-RT) would improve aerobic capacity but that it would remain strongly linked to level of spinal cord lesion due to limited maximal ventilation. Design Longitudinal before-after trial of 6 months FES-RT. Setting Exercise for persons with disabilities program. Participants Fourteen volunteers with complete SCI T3_T11, >2 years post-injury, aged 21–63 years. Interventions Six months of FES-RT preceded by a variable period of FES 'strength training.' Main Outcome Measures Peak aerobic capacity, and peak exercise ventilation before and after 6 months of FES-RT Results FES_RT significantly increased VO2peak and Vepeak (both p<0.05). Prior to FES-RT, there was a close relationship between level of spinal cord injury and VO2peak (adj r2=0.40, p=0.009) that was markedly reduced after FES-RT (adj r2=0.15, p=0.10) . In contrast, the relationship between level of injury and VEpeak was comparable before and after FES-RT (adj r2=0.38 vs. adj r2=0.32, both p<0.05). Conclusions The increased aerobic capacity reflects more than increased ventilation; FES_RT effectively circumvents the effect of the spinal cord injury on peak aerobic capacity by engaging more muscle mass for training, independent of level of injury. PMID:25152170

  15. The usefulness of ozone treatment in spinal pain

    PubMed Central

    Bocci, Velio; Borrelli, Emma; Zanardi, Iacopo; Travagli, Valter

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this review is to elucidate the biochemical, molecular, immunological, and pharmaceutical mechanisms of action of ozone dissolved in biological fluids. Studies performed during the last two decades allow the drawing of a comprehensive framework for understanding and recommending the integration of ozone therapy for spinal pain. Methods An in-depth screening of primary sources of information online – via SciFinder Scholar, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases as well as Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews – was performed. In this review, the most significant papers of the last 25 years are presented and their proposals critically evaluated, regardless of the bibliometric impact of the journals. Results The efficacy of standard treatments combined with the unique capacity of ozone therapy to reactivate the innate antioxidant system is the key to correcting the oxidative stress typical of chronic inflammatory diseases. Pain pathways and control systems of algesic signals after ozone administration are described. Conclusion This paper finds favors the full insertion of ozone therapy into pharmaceutical sciences, rather than as either an alternative or an esoteric approach. PMID:26028964

  16. A nurse-coached exercise program to increase muscle strength, improve quality of life, and increase self-efficacy in people with tetraplegic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Susan Budassi

    2013-08-01

    A nurse-coached exercise intervention for 10 people with tetraplegic spinal cord injuries was conducted over a period of 2 years at an accessible, community-based YMCA using an equipment especially designed for people with mobility issues and neurological deficits. In this single-subject design study, each participant completed three 3-hour exercise sessions a week for over 6 months. The purpose of the study was to determine what effects the program would have on increasing muscle strength, improving quality of life, and increasing self-efficacy after traditional outpatient therapy sessions were no longer available or affordable. The Sheehy Spinal Cord Injury Functional Improvement via Exercise Model was constructed at the conclusion of an unpublished pilot study and was tested in this study. Expectations of the model were that, if a person with a tetraplegic spinal cord injury participated in a coached program of exercise, muscle strength would increase and functional ability would improve, resulting in greater independence, a higher sense of self-efficacy, and a higher quality of life. Study results using a single-subject design of graph-trend analysis showed upward trajectories in muscle strength, quality of life, and self-efficacy in all study participants regardless of the length of time since his or her original injury. The results support the efficacy of this nurse-coached program for people with tetraplegic spinal cord injuries and validate the Sheehy Spinal Cord Injury Functional Improvement via Exercise Model. PMID:23812054

  17. Exercise Training and Parkinson's Disease: Placebo or Essential Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter, Iris; Engelhardt, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Exercise training is often recommended for people with Parkinson's disease, though there is debate about the pathophysiologic cause of impaired movement in Parkinsonism which makes it difficult to develop a specific exercise treatment for symptoms that include hypokinesia, tremor, and muscular rigidity. Most published studies show a benefit of…

  18. Mixed-Reality Exercise Effects on Participation of Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries and Developmental Disabilities: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Baumgardner, Chad A.; McLachlan, Leslie; Bodine, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the effectiveness of a mixed-reality (MR) exercise environment on engagement and enjoyment levels of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Methods: Six people participated in this cross-sectional, observational pilot study involving one MR exercise trial. The augmented reality environment was based on a first-person perspective video of a scenic biking/walking trail in Colorado. Males and females (mean age, 43.3 ± 13.7 years) were recruited from a research database for their participation in previous clinical studies. Of the 6 participants, 2 had SCI, 2 had IDD, and 2 were without disability. The primary outcome measurement of this pilot study was the self-reported engagement and enjoyment level of each participant after the exercise trial. Results: All participants reported increased levels of engagement, enjoyment, and immersion involving the MR exercise environment as well as positive feedback recommending this type of exercise approach to peers with similar disabilities. All the participants reported higher than normal levels of enjoyment and 66.7% reported higher than normal levels of being on a real trail. Conclusion: Participants’ feedback suggested that the MR environment could be entertaining, motivating, and engaging for users with disabilities, resulting in a foundation for further development of this technology for use in individuals with cognitive and physical disabilities. PMID:25477747

  19. nAture methods | VOL.9 NO.3 | MARCH2012 | 297 understanding and treatment of spinal cord pathology

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    Articles nAture methods | VOL.9 NO.3 | MARCH2012 | 297 understanding and treatment of spinal cord multiphoton microscopy of mouse spinal cord without the need for repeat surgical procedures. We routinely and observed neither motor-function deficit nor neuropathology in the spinal cord as a result of chamber

  20. Lower limb conduit artery endothelial responses to acute upper limb exercise in spinal cord injured and able-bodied men

    PubMed Central

    Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia O; Au, Jason S; Ditor, David S; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2015-01-01

    Vascular improvements in the nonactive regions during exercise are likely primarily mediated by increased shear rate (SR). Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) experience sublesional vascular deconditioning and could potentially benefit from upper body exercise-induced increases in lower body SR. The present study utilized a single bout of incremental arm-crank exercise to generate exercise-induced SR changes in the superficial femoral artery in an effort to evaluate the acute postexercise impact on superficial femoral artery endothelial function via flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and determine regulatory factors in the nonactive legs of individuals with and without SCI. Eight individuals with SCI and eight age, sex, and waist-circumference-matched able-bodied (AB) controls participated. Nine minutes of incremental arm-crank exercise increased superficial femoral artery anterograde SR (P = 0.02 and P < 0.01), retrograde SR (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001) in both SCI and AB, respectively. However, these SR alterations resulted in acute postexercise increases in FMD in the AB group only (SCI 6.0 ± 1.2% to 6.3 ± 2.7%, P = 0.74; AB 7.5 ± 1.4% to 11.2 ± 1.4%, P = 0.03). While arm exercise has many cardiovascular benefits and results in changes in SR patterns in the nonactive legs, these changes are not sufficient to induce acute changes in FMD among individuals with SCI, and therefore are less likely to stimulate exercise training-associated improvements in nonactive limb endothelial function. Understanding the role of SR patterns on FMD brings us closer to designing effective strategies to combat impaired vascular function in both healthy and clinical populations. PMID:25847920

  1. A randomised controlled trial of preventive spinal manipulation with and without a home exercise program for patients with chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence indicates that supervised home exercises, combined or not with manual therapy, can be beneficial for patients with non-specific chronic neck pain (NCNP). The objective of the study is to investigate the efficacy of preventive spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) compared to a no treatment group in NCNP patients. Another objective is to assess the efficacy of SMT with and without a home exercise program. Methods Ninety-eight patients underwent a short symptomatic phase of treatment before being randomly allocated to either an attention-group (n = 29), a SMT group (n = 36) or a SMT + exercise group (n = 33). The preventive phase of treatment, which lasted for 10 months, consisted of meeting with a chiropractor every two months to evaluate and discuss symptoms (attention-control group), 1 monthly SMT session (SMT group) or 1 monthly SMT session combined with a home exercise program (SMT + exercise group). The primary and secondary outcome measures were represented by scores on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS), active cervical ranges of motion (cROM), the neck disability index (NDI) and the Bournemouth questionnaire (BQ). Exploratory outcome measures were scored on the Fear-avoidance Behaviour Questionnaire (FABQ) and the SF-12 Questionnaire. Results Our results show that, in the preventive phase of the trial, all 3 groups showed primary and secondary outcomes scores similar to those obtain following the non-randomised, symptomatic phase. No group difference was observed for the primary, secondary and exploratory variables. Significant improvements in FABQ scores were noted in all groups during the preventive phase of the trial. However, no significant change in health related quality of life (HRQL) was associated with the preventive phase. Conclusions This study hypothesised that participants in the combined intervention group would have less pain and disability and better function than participants from the 2 other groups during the preventive phase of the trial. This hypothesis was not supported by the study results. Lack of a treatment specific effect is discussed in relation to the placebo and patient provider interactions in manual therapies. Further research is needed to delineate the specific and non-specific effects of treatment modalities to prevent unnecessary disability and to minimise morbidity related to NCNP. Additional investigation is also required to identify the best strategies for secondary and tertiary prevention of NCNP. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00566930 PMID:21303529

  2. Generalizable Class Solutions for Treatment Planning of Spinal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weksberg, David C.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Vu, Khoi N.; Rebueno, Neal C.; Sharp, Hadley J.; Luo, Dershan; Yang, James N.; Shiu, Almon S.; Rhines, Laurence D.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Brown, Paul D.; Chang, Eric L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) continues to emerge as an effective therapeutic approach to spinal metastases; however, treatment planning and delivery remain resource intensive at many centers, which may hamper efficient implementation in clinical practice. We sought to develop a generalizable class solution approach for spinal SBRT treatment planning that would allow confidence that a given plan provides optimal target coverage, reduce integral dose, and maximize planning efficiency. Methods and Materials: We examined 91 patients treated with spinal SBRT at our institution. Treatment plans were categorized by lesion location, clinical target volume (CTV) configuration, and dose fractionation scheme, and then analyzed to determine the technically achievable dose gradient. A radial cord expansion was subtracted from the CTV to yield a planning CTV (pCTV) construct for plan evaluation. We reviewed the treatment plans with respect to target coverage, dose gradient, integral dose, conformality, and maximum cord dose to select the best plans and develop a set of class solutions. Results: The class solution technique generated plans that maintained target coverage and improved conformality (1.2-fold increase in the 95% van't Riet Conformation Number describing the conformality of a reference dose to the target) while reducing normal tissue integral dose (1.3-fold decrease in the volume receiving 4 Gy (V{sub 4Gy}) and machine output (19% monitor unit (MU) reduction). In trials of planning efficiency, the class solution technique reduced treatment planning time by 30% to 60% and MUs required by {approx}20%: an effect independent of prior planning experience. Conclusions: We have developed a set of class solutions for spinal SBRT that incorporate a pCTV metric for plan evaluation while yielding dosimetrically superior treatment plans with increased planning efficiency. Our technique thus allows for efficient, reproducible, and high-quality spinal SBRT treatment planning.

  3. Exercise-induced bronchospasm - pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    1981-09-01

    The practical importance, prevalence, typical features, physiopathology and therapy of exercise-induced bronchospasm (E.I.B.) are briefly reviewed. The condition is common, especially in children. Prevalence is influenced by the mode, intensity and duration of exercise, the age and possibly the sex of the subjects, the number of test repetitions, and the criterion for presence of spasm. The main site of obstruction is in the large airways. Symptoms appear a few minutes post-effort, peaking 10-15 minutes after exercise. At different times, spasm may arise in the vagal reflex arc, from alterations of sympathetic balance, prostaglandin release, and sensitization of the mast cell. Until recently, the main basis of prophylaxis has been inhalation of sodium cromoglycate (20 mg, 60 minutes prior to competition). Beta agonists have until recently been prohibited in international competitions. However, the use of selective beta agonists such as salbutamol and terbutaline was allowed in the 1978 World Swimming Championship and the 1980 World Cross-Country Championship with a supporting medical letter. The Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee has also moved recently to sanction the use of salbutamol and terbutaline. Future prophylaxis will thus be based on combinations of selective beta agonists and sodium cromoglycate. PMID:6794921

  4. Predictive Ability of Pender's Health Promotion Model for Physical Activity and Exercise in People with Spinal Cord Injuries: A Hierarchical Regression Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keegan, John P.; Chan, Fong; Ditchman, Nicole; Chiu, Chung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to validate Pender's Health Promotion Model (HPM) as a motivational model for exercise/physical activity self-management for people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Quantitative descriptive research design using hierarchical regression analysis (HRA) was used. A total of 126 individuals with SCI were recruited…

  5. Thermoelectric device for treatment of radiculitis and spinal massage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Kobylyansky, R. R.

    2012-06-01

    Results of development of a thermoelectric device that enables controlled cyclic temperature impact on the damaged area of human organism are presented. Unlike the existing medical devices employing direct supply current for thermoelectric module, the present device controls supply current according to time dependence of temperature change assigned by doctor. It is established that such a device is an efficient means of therapy at herniation of intervertebral disks with marked radiculitis and tunicary syndromes, at meningitis, other spinal diseases and back traumas.

  6. Spinal Cord Hemangioblastoma : Diagnosis and Clinical Outcome after Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Na, Joon Ho; Kim, Hyeong Soo; Eoh, Whan; Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Jong Soo

    2007-01-01

    Objective Spinal cord hemangioblastoma is an uncommon vascular neoplasm with a benign nature and is associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease in 20-30% of patients. Total removal of these tumors without significant neurological deficit remains a great challenge. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of VHL mutation analysis and to evaluate surgical outcome of patients with spinal cord hemangioblastomas. Methods This study included nine patients treated for spinal cord hemangioblastomas at our institute between December 1994 and March 2006. There were four male and five female patients. Mean age was 37.8 years. The mean follow-up period was 22.4 months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the complete neuraxis was done in all cases and VHL mutation analysis was performed in three cases for a definite diagnosis. Results Six patients had intramedullary tumor, and the remaining patients had intradural extramedullary lesions. Five patients were associated with VHL disease. The von Hippel-Lindau mutation analysis was done in three patients and two of them showed VHL gene abnormality. Tumors were located in the cervical cord in five cases and in the thoracic cord in four cases. All patients underwent surgical intervention, and total removal was achieved in six cases. All patients showed improvement or, at least, clinically stationary state. Surgical complications did not develop in any cases. Conclusion Spinal hemangioblastoma in this series has been safely and effectively removed via a posterior approach. Postoperatively, clinical outcome was excellent in the majority of cases. The VHL mutation analysis was useful in patients with family history and in those with multiple hemangioblastomas. PMID:19096585

  7. Wheelchair Tai Chi as a Therapeutic Exercise for Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yong Tai; Chang, Li-Shan; Chen, Shihui; Zhong, Yaping; Yang, Yi; Li, Zhanghua; Madison, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) rarely participate in health-promotion programs or wellness screenings due to the lack of accessibility, adaptations, and tertiary healthcare providers. An unconditioned body is more prone to suffer injury and is at risk for more severe health problems than a conditioned one. As is common in individuals…

  8. Exercise and Pharmacotherapy in the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, James A.; Babyak, Michael A.; Murali Doraiswamy, P.; Watkins, Lana; Hoffman, Benson M.; Barbour, Krista A.; Herman, Steve; Edward Craighead, W.; Brosse, Alisha L.; Waugh, Robert; Hinderliter, Alan; Sherwood, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess whether patients receiving aerobic exercise training performed either at home or in a supervised group setting achieve reductions in depression comparable to standard antidepressant medication (sertraline) and greater reductions in depression compared to placebo controls. Methods Between October 2000 and November 2005, we performed a prospective, randomized controlled trial (SMILE study) with allocation concealment and blinded outcome assessment in a tertiary care teaching hospital. A total of 202 adults (153 women; 49 men) diagnosed with major depression were assigned randomly to one of four conditions: supervised exercise in a group setting; home-based exercise; antidepressant medication (sertraline, 50–200 mg daily); or placebo pill for 16 weeks. Patients underwent the structured clinical interview for depression and completed the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). Results After 4 months of treatment, 41% of the participants achieved remission, defined as no longer meeting the criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD) and a HAM-D score of <8. Patients receiving active treatments tended to have higher remission rates than the placebo controls: supervised exercise = 45%; home-based exercise = 40%; medication = 47%; placebo = 31% (p = .057). All treatment groups had lower HAM-D scores after treatment; scores for the active treatment groups were not significantly different from the placebo group (p = .23). Conclusions The efficacy of exercise in patients seems generally comparable with patients receiving antidepressant medication and both tend to be better than the placebo in patients with MDD. Placebo response rates were high, suggesting that a considerable portion of the therapeutic response is determined by patient expectations, ongoing symptom monitoring, attention, and other nonspecific factors. PMID:17846259

  9. Surgical treatments to restore function control in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Keith, Michael W; Peljovich, Allan

    2012-01-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) have a profound loss of control of their lives and abilities. Surgical procedures are of significant benefit in improving autonomy, self-care, and body function. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is useful at higher levels of paralysis such as ASIA C5 or C6 where there are no remaining voluntary muscles for tendon transfer and can partially replace respiration, balance, and ambulation. Outcomes studies show that surgical care improves independence, strength of grasp, and measured quality of life. Those with tetraplegia should be referred for consultation for surgical reconstruction, release of contractures, consideration for neuroprostheses, and reconstruction. PMID:23098712

  10. Early microsurgical treatment for spinal hemangioblastomas improves outcome in patients with von Hippel–Lindau disease

    PubMed Central

    Harati, Ali; Satopää, Jarno; Mahler, Lydia; Billon-Grand, Romain; Elsharkawy, Ahmed; Niemelä, Mika; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal hemangioblastomas (HB) are rare, histologically benign, highly vascularized tumors often associated with von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) disease. The aim of the current study is to demonstrate the benefit of early surgical resection of large spinal HBs in selected asymptomatic patients with VHL. Methods: Seventeen patients underwent microsurgical resection of 20 spinal HBs at the Department of Neurosurgery at Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH). Thirteen tumors were in the cervical spine, five in thoracic and one patient had two lumbar lesions. MRI tumor showed an associated syrinx in 16 patients (94%). Tumor volume ranged from 27 to 2730 mm3. Out of 17 patients, 11 (65%) tested positive for VHL in mutation analysis. Five of these patients with tumors ranging from 55 to 720 mm3 were treated prophylactically. Results: Complete tumor resection was performed in 16 patients (94%) who were followed up for a median of 57 months (range 2–165 months). No patient had neurological decline on long-term follow-up. Among the patients with VHL, five patients with preoperative sensorimotor deficits showed improvement of their symptoms but never regained full function. One patient who presented with tetraplegia remained the same. Otherwise, all five patients with prophylactic surgery remained neurologically intact. Conclusion: Although documented growth on serial MRIs and the need for pathological diagnosis have been suggested as indications for surgery in otherwise asymptomatic patients, our series showed that a potentially larger group of asymptomatic patients with spinal HB associated with VHL would benefit from microsurgical resection. Long-term results of the surgical management of spinal HB are generally favorable. Our results suggest staging and early treatment for spinal HB larger than 55 mm3, especially in patients with VHL. Small spinal HBs may be followed up. PMID:22347675

  11. Chiropractic spinal manipulative treatment of cervicogenic dizziness using Gonstead method: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Chaibi, Aleksander; Tuchin, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to present the response of a patient with chronic nonresponsive cervicogenic dizziness to chiropractic care. Case report A 29-year-old man had a 10-year history of progressive cervicogenic dizziness with symptoms including a sensation of excessive motion, imbalance, and spinning associated with neck pain and stiffness. After treatment, he reported a reduction in pain and dizziness and an improved quality of life following Gonstead method of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy. Conclusion This case study suggests that a patient with nonresponsive cervicogenic dizziness might respond to chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy approach using Gonstead method. PMID:22014910

  12. This two day symposium highlights progress in the rehabilitation and treatment of spinal cord injury and honours the contributions of more than $700,000 for spinal cord research in Winnipeg.

    E-print Network

    Manitoba, University of

    This two day symposium highlights progress in the rehabilitation and treatment of spinal cord injury and honours the contributions of more than $700,000 for spinal cord research in Winnipeg. We Cord Research Centre The Spinal Cord Research Centre and the Manitoba Paraplegia Foundation cordially

  13. Delayed Imatinib Treatment for Acute Spinal Cord Injury: Functional Recovery and Serum Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kjell, Jacob; Finn, Anja; Hao, Jingxia; Wellfelt, Katrin; Josephson, Anna; Svensson, Camilla I; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Eriksson, Ulf; Abrams, Mathew; Olson, Lars

    2015-11-01

    With no currently available drug treatment for spinal cord injury, there is a need for additional therapeutic candidates. We took the approach of repositioning existing pharmacological agents to serve as acute treatments for spinal cord injury and previously found imatinib to have positive effects on locomotor and bladder function in experimental spinal cord injury when administered immediately after the injury. However, for imatinib to have translational value, it needs to have sustained beneficial effects with delayed initiation of treatment, as well. Here, we show that imatinib improves hind limb locomotion and bladder recovery when initiation of treatment was delayed until 4?h after injury and that bladder function was improved with a delay of up to 24?h. The treatment did not induce hypersensitivity. Instead, imatinib-treated animals were generally less hypersensitive to either thermal or mechanical stimuli, compared with controls. In an effort to provide potential biomarkers, we found serum levels of three cytokines/chemokines-monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3?, and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene (interleukin 8)-to increase over time with imatinib treatment and to be significantly higher in injured imatinib-treated animals than in controls during the early treatment period. This correlated to macrophage activation and autofluorescence in lymphoid organs. At the site of injury in the spinal cord, macrophage activation was instead reduced by imatinib treatment. Our data strengthen the case for clinical trials of imatinib by showing that initiation of treatment can be delayed and by identifying serum cytokines that may serve as candidate markers of effective imatinib doses. PMID:25914996

  14. Longitudinal relationship between wheelchair exercise capacity and life satisfaction in patients with spinal cord injury: A cohort study in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Koppenhagen, Casper Floris; Post, Marcel; de Groot, Sonja; van Leeuwen, Christel; van Asbeck, Floris; Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke; van der Woude, Lucas; Lindeman, Eline

    2014-05-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between wheelchair exercise capacity and life satisfaction in persons with spinal cord injury from the start of active inpatient rehabilitation up to 5 years after discharge. Design Prospective cohort study. Subjects Persons with spinal cord injury, aged 18-65 years, and wheelchair dependent at least for long distances. Method Measurements at the start of active rehabilitation, after 3 months, at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation, and 1 and 5 years after discharge. A peak wheelchair exercise test was performed to record peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and peak power output (POpeak). Life satisfaction was measured as current life satisfaction and change of life satisfaction in comparison with life after spinal cord injury. Relationships between (changes in) exercise capacity and (changes in) life satisfaction were analyzed random coefficient analysis, corrected for possible confounders (age, gender, level of lesion, functional status, secondary impairments, pain, and sports activity) if necessary. Results Of 225 persons included, 130 attended two or more peak exercise tests, who were include in the analyses. Mean age at start was 39 years, 75% were male, 73% had paraplegia, and 76% had a traumatic lesion. Mean POpeak increased during the study from 32.9 to 55.9 Watts, mean VO2peak from 1.02  to 1.38 l/minute, and mean life satisfaction from 5.7 to 7.8. An increase of POpeak with 10 W was associated with a 0.3-point increase of life satisfaction (P = 0.01). An increase of VO2peak with 0.1 l/minute was associated with a 0.1-point increase of life satisfaction (P = 0.049). Conclusion High(er) wheelchair exercise capacity is related to high(er) life satisfaction in spinal cord injury patients. PMID:24621019

  15. New products tissue-engineering in the treatment of spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakov, I. N.; Sergienko, V. I.; Kiselev, S. L.; Lagarkova, M. A.; Remigaylo, A. A.; Mihaylov, A. A.; Prokopenko, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    In the treatment of patients with complicated spinal cord injury the Russian Health spends about one million rubles for each patient in the acute and the interim period after the injury. The number of complicated spinal cord injury is different in geographical areas Russian Federation from 30 to 50 people per 1 million that is affected by the year 5600. Applied to the present surgical and pharmacological techniques provide unsatisfactory results or minimally effective treatment. Transplantation of 100 thousand neuronal mouse predecessors (24 rats) or human neuronal predecessors (18 rats) in the anatomical gap rat spinal cord, followed by analysis of neurological deficit. The neuro-matrix implantation in the rat spinal cord containing 100 thousand neuronal precursors hESC, repeatable control neuro-matrix transplantation, non-cell mass, eliminating neurological deficit for 14 weeks after transplantation about 5-9 points on the scale of the BBB. The cultivation under conditions in vitro human induced pluripotent stem cells on collagen-chitosan matrix (hIPSC) showed that neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells grown on scaffolds as compact groups and has no neurites. Cells do not penetrate into the matrix during long-term cultivation and formed near the surface of the spherical structures resembling neurospheres. At least 90% of the cells were positive for the neuronal marker tubulin b3. Further studies should be performed to examine the compatibility of neuronal cultures and matrices.

  16. The PPAR alpha agonist gemfibrozil is an ineffective treatment for spinal cord injured mice.

    PubMed

    Almad, Akshata; Lash, A Todd; Wei, Ping; Lovett-Racke, Amy E; McTigue, Dana M

    2011-12-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor (PPAR)-? is a key regulator of lipid metabolism and recent studies reveal it also regulates inflammation in several different disease models. Gemfibrozil, an agonist of PPAR-?, is a FDA approved drug for hyperlipidemia and has been shown to inhibit clinical signs in a rodent model of multiple sclerosis. Since many studies have shown improved outcome from spinal cord injury (SCI) by anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agents, we tested the efficacy of oral gemfibrozil given before or after SCI for promoting tissue preservation and behavioral recovery after spinal contusion injury in mice. Unfortunately, the results were contrary to our hypothesis; in our first attempt, gemfibrozil treatment exacerbated locomotor deficits and increased tissue pathology after SCI. In subsequent experiments, the behavioral effects were not replicated but histological outcomes again were worse. We also tested the efficacy of a different PPAR-? agonist, fenofibrate, which also modulates immune responses and is beneficial in several neurodegenerative disease models. Fenofibrate treatment did not improve recovery, although there was a slight trend for a modest increase in histological tissue sparing. Based on our results, we conclude that PPAR-? agonists yield either no effect or worsen recovery from spinal cord injury, at least at the doses and the time points of drug delivery tested here. Further, patients sustaining spinal cord injury while taking gemfibrozil might be prone to exacerbated tissue damage. PMID:21963672

  17. Limited effect of fly-wheel and spinal mobilization exercise countermeasures on lumbar spine deconditioning during 90 d bed-rest in the Toulouse LTBR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Rittweger, Jörn; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2011-09-01

    We examined the effect of high-load fly-wheel (targeting the lower-limb musculature and concurrent loading of the spine via shoulder restraints) and spinal movement countermeasures against lumbar spine muscle atrophy, disc and spinal morphology changes and trunk isokinetic torque loss during prolonged bed-rest. Twenty-four male subjects underwent 90 d head-down tilt bed-rest and performed either fly-wheel (FW) exercises every three days, spinal movement exercises in lying five times daily (SpMob), or no exercise (Ctrl). There was no significant impact of countermeasures on losses of isokinetic trunk flexion/extension ( p?0.65). Muscle volume change by day-89 of bed-rest in the psoas, iliacus, lumbar erector spinae, lumbar multifidus and quadratus lumborum, as measured via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was statistically similar in all three groups ( p?0.33). No significant effect on MRI-measures of lumbar intervertebral disc volume, spinal length and lordosis ( p?0.09) were seen either, but there was some impact ( p?0.048) on axial plane disc dimensions (greater reduction than in Ctrl) and disc height (greater increases than in Ctrl). MRI-data from subjects measured 13 and 90-days after bed-rest showed partial recovery of the spinal extensor musculature by day-13 after bed-rest with this process complete by day-90. Some changes in lumbar spine and disc morphology parameters were still persistent 90-days after bed-rest. The present results indicate that the countermeasures tested were not optimal to maintain integrity of the spine and trunk musculature during bed rest.

  18. The genetic basis of intradural spinal tumors and its impact on clinical treatment.

    PubMed

    Karsy, Michael; Guan, Jian; Sivakumar, Walavan; Neil, Jayson A; Schmidt, Meic H; Mahan, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    Genetic alterations in the cells of intradural spinal tumors can have a significant impact on the treatment options, counseling, and prognosis for patients. Although surgery is the primary therapy for most intradural tumors, radiochemothera-peutic modalities and targeted interventions play an ever-evolving role in treating aggressive cancers and in addressing cancer recurrence in long-term survivors. Recent studies have helped delineate specific genetic and molecular differences between intradural spinal tumors and their intracranial counterparts and have also identified significant variation in therapeutic effects on these tumors. This review discusses the genetic and molecular alterations in the most common intradural spinal tumors in both adult and pediatrie patients, including nerve sheath tumors (that is, neurofibroma and schwannoma), meningioma, ependymoma, astrocytoma (that is, low-grade glioma, anaplastic astrocytoma, and glioblastoma), hemangioblastoma, and medulloblastoma. It also examines the genetics of metastatic tumors to the spinal cord, arising either from the CNS or from systemic sources. Importantly, the impact of this knowledge on therapeutic options and its application to clinical practice are discussed. PMID:26235020

  19. Physical exercise is associated with better fat mass distribution and lower insulin resistance in spinal cord injured individuals

    PubMed Central

    D’Oliveira, Giselle Louise C.; Figueiredo, Flávia A.; Passos, Magna Cottini Fonseca; Chain, Amina; Bezerra, Flávia F.; Koury, Josely Correa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to compare total and regional body composition and their relationship with glucose homeostasis in physically active and non-active individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (c-SCI). Methods Individuals with lesion level between C5–C7 were divided into two groups: physically active (PA; n = 14; who practiced physical exercise for at least 3 months, three times per week or more, minimum of 150 minutes/week): and non-physically active (N-PA n = 8). Total fat mass (t-FM) and regional fat mass (r-FM) were assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Fasting plasma insulin (FPI) was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results PA group present lower (P < 0.01) total fat mass (t-FM), % and kg, regional fat mass (r-FM), % and kg, FPI levels and HOMA index, while they had higher (P < 0.001) total free fat mass (t-FFM), %, and regional free fat mass (r-FFM), %, compared to the N-PA group. In the N-PA group, FPI and HOMA index were negatively (P < 0.05) correlated with FFM% (r = ?0.71, ?0.69, respectively) and positively correlated to trunk-FM (r = 0.71, 0.69, respectively) and trunk-FM:t-FM (kg) ratio (r = 0.83, 0.79, respectively). Conclusion Physical exercise is associated with lower t-FM, r-FM, and insulin resistance, which could contribute to the decrease of the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic conditions in individuals with c-SCI. PMID:24090139

  20. Spinal cord injury pressure ulcer treatment: an experience-based approach.

    PubMed

    Sunn, Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to impact the lives of spinal cord injury patients severely. Pressure ulcers must be accurately staged according to National Pressure Ulcer Advisory recommendations before treatment design. The first priority in treatment of pressure ulcers is offloading. Intact skin ulcers may be treated with noncontact nonthermal low-frequency ultrasound. Superficial pressure ulcers may be treated with a combination of collagenase and foam dressings. Deeper pressure ulcers warrant negative-pressure wound therapy dressings along with biologic adjuncts to fill in wound depth. Discovery and treatment of osteomyelitis is a high priority when initially evaluating pressure ulcers. Surgical intervention must always be considered. PMID:25064794

  1. Treatment of Spinal Epidural Abscess and Predisposing Factors of Motor Weakness: Experience with 48 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Min-Wook; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Koh, Hyeon-Song; Youm, Jin-Young; Song, Shi-Hun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) can be fatal if untreated, so early diagnosis and treatment are essential. We conducted a retrospective study to define its clinical features and evaluate the risk factors of motor weakness. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records and images of patients with SEA who had been hospitalized in our institute from January 2005 to June 2012. Pyogenic SEA patients were categorized as patients without motor weakness (Group A) and with motor weakness (Group B). Abscess volume was measured using the Gamma-Plan program. Intervertebral foramen height and posterior disc height were measured to evaluate degree of spinal stenosis. Results Of 48 patients with pyogenic SEA, 33 (68%) were treated surgically, and 15 (32%) were treated with antibiotics. Eleven patients had weakness and abscess volume was unrelated to motor weakness. Old age, 'spare room' (abscess volume subtracted from spinal volume) and intervertebral foramen height and posterior disc height were statistically significant. Among the 48 patients, 43 (85%) had good outcome and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was the only meaningful prognostic factor (p=0.014). The cut-off value of ESR was 112mm/h with 80% sensitivity and 79% specificity and had borderline significance (p=0.062). Conclusion SEA needs emergent diagnosis and treatment. Motor weakness is the most important factor in treatment decision. By careful image reading, early surgical treatment can be an option for selected patients with severe spinal stenosis for prevent motor weakness. Inflammatory markers, especially ESR, are valuable to identify worsening of SEA. PMID:26512265

  2. Rationale for Using Exercise in the Treatment of Stimulant Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tracy L.; Ring, Kolette M.; Warden, Diane; Grannemann, Bruce D.; Church, Timothy S.; Somoza, Eugene; Blair, Steven N.; Szapocznik, Jose; Stoutenberg, Mark; Rethorst, Chad; Walker, Robrina; Morris, David W.; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Kyle, Tiffany; Marcus, Bess; Crowell, Becca; Oden, Neal; Nunes, Edward; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2013-01-01

    Novel approaches to the treatment of stimulant abuse and dependence are needed. Clinical data examining the use of exercise as a treatment for the abuse of nicotine, alcohol, and other substances suggest that exercise may be a beneficial treatment for stimulant abuse. In addition, exercise has been associated with improvements in many other health-related areas that may be adversely affected by stimulant use or its treatment, such as sleep disturbance, cognitive function, mood, weight, quality of life, and anhedonia. Neurobiological evidence provides plausible mechanisms by which exercise could positively affect treatment outcomes in stimulant abuse. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) CTN-0037 Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE) study is a multisite randomized clinical trial that compares exercise to health education as potential treatments for stimulant abuse or dependence. If effective, exercise may provide an additional approach to the treatment of stimulant use disorders. PMID:25364477

  3. Late effects of radiation on the lumbar spinal cord of guinea pigs: Re-treatment tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, K.A. ); Withers, H.R.; Chiang, Chi-Shiun )

    1993-07-15

    Using a guinea pig model of lumbar myelopathy, various factors affecting the tolerance of spinal cord to irradiation were assessed: (a) extent of initial injury; (b) time interval between priming and test doses; and (c) animal age at the time of initial radiation treatment. A 3 cm section of lumbar spinal cord of guinea pigs was irradiated with fractionated doses of 4.5 Gy gamma rays given as 9 fractions per week. Guinea pigs were primed with 9 x 4.5 Gy in 7 days which is 60% of the ED[sub 50] for a continuous course of treatment. After 28 or 40 weeks, animal were retreated with 6-14 fractions of 4.5 Gy. Animals were observed for 2 years following the priming dose and both the incidence and latency of myelopathy recorded. Young adult guinea pigs (8 wk old) showed both a decreased radiation tolerance and latency compared to old individuals (40 wk old). At 28 or 40 wk after 9 x 4.5 Gy, only about 8% of the initial injury was remembered in young adult guinea pigs. The amount of residual injury was dependent on the initial damage as a proportion of the tolerance dose. The spinal cord shows a greater capacity for long-term recovery than generally appreciated and re-treatment doses clinically prescribed may be lower than necessary. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Treatment with resveratrol attenuates sublesional bone loss in spinal cord-injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua-Dong; Shi, Ya-Min; Li, Li; Guo, Ji-Dong; Zhang, Yu-Peng; Hou, Shu-Xun

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Sublesional osteoporosis predisposes individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to an increased risk of low-trauma fracture. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of treatment with resveratrol (RES) on sublesional bone loss in spinal cord-injured rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Complete SCI was generated by surgical transaction of the cord at the T10–12 level. Treatment with RES (400 mg·kg?1 body mass per day?1, intragastrically) was initiated 12 h after the surgery for 10 days. Then, blood was collected and femurs and tibiae were removed for evaluation of the effects of RES on bone tissue after SCI. KEY RESULTS Treatment of SCI rats with RES prevented the reduction of bone mass including bone mineral content and bone mineral density in tibiae, preserved bone structure including trabecular bone volume fraction, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness in tibiae, and preserved mechanical strength including ultimate load, stiffness, and energy in femurs. Treatment of SCI rats with RES enhanced femoral total sulfhydryl content, reduced femoral malondialdehyde and IL-6 mRNA levels. Treatment of SCI rats with RES suppressed the up-regulation of mRNA levels of PPAR?, adipose-specific fatty-acid-binding protein and lipoprotein lipase, and restored mRNA levels of Wnt1, low-density lipoprotein-related protein 5, Axin2, ctnnb1, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and receptor for IGF-1 in femurs and tibiae. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Treatment with RES attenuated sublesional bone loss in spinal-cord-injured rats, associated with abating oxidative stress, attenuating inflammation, depressing PPAR? signalling, and restoring Wnt/?-catenin and IGF-1 signalling. PMID:23848300

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Bone Disease in Multiple Myeloma: Spotlight on Spinal Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Bone disease is observed in almost 80% of newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma patients, and spine is the bone site that is more frequently affected by myeloma-induced osteoporosis, osteolyses, or compression fractures. In almost 20% of the cases, spinal cord compression may occur; diagnosis and treatment must be carried out rapidly in order to avoid a permanent sensitive or motor defect. Although whole body skeletal X-ray is considered mandatory for multiple myeloma staging, magnetic resonance imaging is presently considered the most appropriate diagnostic technique for the evaluation of vertebral alterations, as it allows to detect not only the exact morphology of the lesions, but also the pattern of bone marrow infiltration by the disease. Multiple treatment modalities can be used to manage multiple myeloma-related vertebral lesions. Surgery or radiotherapy is mainly employed in case of spinal cord compression, impending fractures, or intractable pain. Percutaneous vertebroplasty or balloon kyphoplasty can reduce local pain in a significant fraction of treated patients, without interfering with subsequent therapeutic programs. Systemic antimyeloma therapy with conventional chemotherapy or, more appropriately, with combinations of conventional chemotherapy and compounds acting on both neoplastic plasma cells and bone marrow microenvironment must be soon initiated in order to reduce bone resorption and, possibly, promote bone formation. Bisphosphonates should also be used in combination with antimyeloma therapy as they reduce bone resorption and prolong patients survival. A multidisciplinary approach is thus needed in order to properly manage spinal involvement in multiple myeloma. PMID:24381787

  6. Effect of older age on treatment decisions and outcomes among patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Rivers, Carly S.; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Tsai, Eve C.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Attabib, Najmedden; Kwon, Brian K.; Christie, Sean D.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Finkelstein, Joel; Hurlbert, R. John; Townson, Andrea; Parent, Stefan; Drew, Brian; Chen, Jason; Dvorak, Marcel F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Older people are at increased risk of traumatic spinal cord injury from falls. We evaluated the impact of older age (? 70 yr) on treatment decisions and outcomes. Methods: We identified patients with traumatic spinal cord injury for whom consent and detailed data were available from among patients recruited (2004–2013) at any of the 31 acute care and rehabilitation hospitals participating in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry. Patients were assessed by age group (< 70 v. ? 70 yr). The primary outcome was the rate of acute surgical treatment. We used bivariate and multivariate regression models to assess patient and injury-related factors associated with receiving surgical treatment and with the timing of surgery after arrival to a participating centre. Results: Of the 1440 patients included in our study cohort, 167 (11.6%) were 70 years or older at the time of injury. Older patients were more likely than younger patients to be injured by falling (83.1% v. 37.4%; p < 0.001), to have a cervical injury (78.0% v. 61.6%; p = 0.001), to have less severe injuries on admission (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade C or D: 70.5% v. 46.9%; p < 0.001), to have a longer stay in an acute care hospital (median 35 v. 28 d; p < 0.005) and to have a higher in-hospital mortality (4.2% v. 0.6%; p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis did not show that age of 70 years or more at injury was associated with a decreased likelihood of surgical treatment (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.22–1.07). An unplanned sensitivity analysis with different age thresholds showed that a threshold of 65 years was associated with a decreased chance of surgical treatment (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.19–0.80). Older patients who underwent surgical treatment had a significantly longer wait time from admission to surgery than younger patients (37 v. 19 h; p < 0.001). Interpretation: We found chronological age to be a factor influencing treatment decisions but not at the 70-year age threshold that we had hypothesized. Older patients waited longer for surgery and had a substantially higher in-hospital mortality despite having less severe injuries than younger patients. Further research into the link between treatment delays and outcomes among older patients could inform surgical guideline development. PMID:26149702

  7. No effect of arm-crank exercise on diaphragmatic fatigue or ventilatory constraint in Paralympic athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Bryan J; West, Christopher R; Romer, Lee M

    2010-08-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) results in a decrease in the capacity of the lungs and chest wall for pressure, volume, and airflow generation. We asked whether such impairments might increase the potential for exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue and mechanical ventilatory constraint in this population. Seven Paralympic wheelchair rugby players (mean + or - SD peak oxygen uptake = 16.9 + or - 4.9 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) with traumatic CSCI (C(5)-C(7)) performed arm-crank exercise to the limit of tolerance at 90% of their predetermined peak work rate. Diaphragm function was assessed before and 15 and 30 min after exercise by measuring the twitch transdiaphragmatic pressure (P(di,tw)) response to bilateral anterolateral magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves. Ventilatory constraint was assessed by measuring the tidal flow volume responses to exercise in relation to the maximal flow volume envelope. P(di,tw) was not different from baseline at any time after exercise (unpotentiated P(di,tw) = 19.3 + or - 5.6 cmH(2)O at baseline, 19.8 + or - 5.0 cmH(2)O at 15 min after exercise, and 19.4 + or - 5.7 cmH(2)O at 30 min after exercise; P = 0.16). During exercise, there was a sudden, sustained rise in operating lung volumes and an eightfold increase in the work of breathing. However, only two subjects showed expiratory flow limitation, and there was substantial capacity to increase both flow and volume (<50% of maximal breathing reserve). In conclusion, highly trained athletes with CSCI do not develop exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue and rarely reach mechanical ventilatory constraint. PMID:20489038

  8. [Combined rehabilitation treatment of patients with spinal dystrophy using epidural pharmacotherapy].

    PubMed

    Likhachev, M Iu; Razumov, A N; Sidorov, V D

    2004-01-01

    The article presents the results of treatment of 70 patients with spinal lumbosacral dystrophy complicated by dislocation of the intervertebral disks. All the patients had long-term history of the disease and exacerbation resistant to conservative treatment. Later, this treatment was changed for epidural long-term local pharmacotherapy (ELLP). The effect of this treatment was assessed by changes in pain syndrome in early and long-term periods, in MRT and CT images. ELLP proved effective as the response reached 83.2%. The maximal 95% response was achieved in combined treatment: ELLP + physio-, balneo-, kinesitherapy, massage. MRT and CT image dynamics show that pathological substrate disappears or significantly decreases in size in 83.4% cases. PMID:15216786

  9. Ultra Long Construct Minimally Invasive Spinal Stabilization Using Percutaneous Pedicle Screws in the Treatment of Symptomatic Multicentric Spinal Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chris Yin Wei; Kwan, Mun Keong

    2015-01-01

    Managing multiple level spinal metastases is challenging. We report the case of a 58-year-old female with advanced lung cancer who presented with multiple pathological fractures of the thoracic spine (T5, T6, T7, and T8 vertebrae). She was treated with palliative radiotherapy. Her resting pain improved, but the instability pain persisted. One month later, she had a trivial fall leading to a pathological fracture of the L2 vertebra with cauda equine syndrome. The patient was treated surgically with minimally invasive decompression of the L2 and with percutaneous instrumented stabilization using an ultra-long construct from T3 to L5 (15 spinal levels), spanning the previously radiated zone and the decompression site. Postoperatively, she had significant improvements in pain and neurology. There were no surgical complications. Ultra long construct minimally invasive spinal stabilization is the ideal approach for symptomatic multicentric spinal metastasis with poor prognostic scores. Using this technique, the goals of spinal stabilization and direct neural decompression can be achieved with minimal morbidity. PMID:26713131

  10. Prevention against diffuse spinal cord astrocytoma: can the Notch pathway be a novel treatment target?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian-jun; Wang, Zhen-yu; Li, Ling-song; Yu, Hai-yan; Xu, Yong-sheng; Wu, Hai-bo; Luo, Yi; Liu, Bin; Zheng, Mei; Mao, Jin-long; Lou, Xiao-hui

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the Notch pathway is involved in the development of diffuse spinal cord astrocytomas. BALB/c nude mice received injections of CD133+ and CD133? cell suspensions prepared using human recurrent diffuse spinal cord astrocytoma tissue through administration into the right parietal lobe. After 7–11 weeks, magnetic resonance imaging was performed weekly. Xenografts were observed on the surfaces of the brains of mice receiving the CD133+ cell suspension, and Notch-immunopositive expression was observed in the xenografts. By contrast, no xenografts appeared in the identical position on the surfaces of the brains of mice receiving the CD133? cell suspension, and Notch-immunopositive expression was hardly detected either. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining revealed xenografts on the convex surfaces of the brains of mice that underwent CD133+ astrocytoma transplantation. Some sporadic astroglioma cells showed pseudopodium-like structures, which extended into the cerebral white matter. However, it should be emphasized that the subcortex xenograft with Notch-immunopositive expression was found in the fourth mouse received injection of CD133? astrocytoma cells. However, these findings suggest that the Notch pathway plays an important role in the formation of astrocytomas, and can be considered a novel treatment target for diffuse spinal cord astrocytoma. PMID:25883623

  11. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePLUS

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  12. Treatment of Combined Spinal Deformity in Patient with Ollier Disease and Abnormal Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Ryabykh, S. ?.; Gubin, A. V.; Prudnikova, ?. G.; Kobyzev, ?. ?.

    2012-01-01

    We report staged treatment of severe combined spinal deformity in an 11-year-old patient with Ollier disease and abnormal cervical vertebra. Combined scoliosis with systemic pathology and abnormal vertebrae is a rare condition and features atypical deformity location and rapid progression rate and frequently involves the rib cage and pelvis, disturbing the function of chest organs and skeleton. Progressive deformity resulted in cachexia and acute respiratory failure. A halo-pelvic distraction device assembled of Ilizarov components was employed for a staged surgical treatment performed for lifesaving indications. After vital functions stabilized, the scoliosis curve of the cervical spine was corrected and fixed with a hybrid system of transpedicular supporting points, connecting rods, and connectors that provided staged distraction during growth. The treatment showed good functional and cosmetic result. PMID:24436859

  13. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  14. Exercises

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sack, MS, PT Physical Therapist View full profile COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercise An exercise program is another ... Calendar Read the News View Daily Pollen Count COPD Program This program offers comprehensive, individualized care for ...

  15. Spinal cord stimulation

    MedlinePLUS

    Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses a mild electric current to block nerve impulses ... stretched into the space on top of your spinal cord. These wires will be connected to a small ...

  16. Sustained release of estrogens from PEGylated nanoparticles for treatment of secondary spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, John

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition which causes neurological damage and can result in paralysis. SCI results in immediate mechanical damage to the spinal cord, but secondary injuries due to inflammation, oxidative damage, and activated biochemical pathways leading to apoptosis exacerbate the injury. The only currently available treatment, methylprednisolone, is controversial because there is no convincing data to support its therapeutic efficacy for SCI treatment. In the absence of an effective SCI treatment option, 17beta-estradiol has gained significant attention for its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic abilities, all events associated with secondary. Sadly, 17beta-estradiol is associated with systemic adverse effects preclude the use of free estrogen even for local administration due to short drug half-life in the body. Biodegradable nanoparticles can be used to increase half-life after local administration and to bestow sustained release. Sustained release using PEGylated biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles constructed from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) will endow a consistent, low, but effective dose to be delivered locally. This will limit systemic effects due to local administration and low dose, sustained release. PLGA was chosen because it has been used extensively for sustained release, and has a record of safety in humans. Here, we show the in vitro efficacy of PEGylated nanoparticles loaded with 17beta-estradiol for treatment of secondary SCI. We achieved a high loading efficiency and controlled release from the particles over a several day therapeutic window. The particles also show neuroprotection in two in vitro cell culture models. Both the dose and pretreatment time with nanoparticles was evaluated in an effort to translate the treatment into an animal model for further study.

  17. Spinal blocks.

    PubMed

    Kokki, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    Every anesthetist should have the expertise to perform lumbar puncture that is the prerequisite to induce spinal anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia is easy and effective technique: small amount of local anesthetic injected in the lumbar cerebrospinal fluid provides highly effective anesthesia, analgesia, and sympathetic and motor block in the lower part of the body. The main limitation of spinal anesthesia is a variable and relatively short duration of the block with a single-injection of local anesthetic. With appropriate use of adjuvant or combining spinal anesthesia with epidural anesthesia, the analgesic action can be controlled in case of early recovery of initial block or in patients with prolonged procedures. Contraindications are rare. Bleeding disorders and any major dysfunction in coagulation system are rare in children, but spinal anesthesia should not be used in children with local infection or increased intracranial pressure. Children with spinal anesthesia may develop the same adverse effects as has been reported in adults, but in contrast to adults, cardiovascular deterioration is uncommon in children even with high blocks. Most children having surgery with spinal anesthesia need sedation, and in these cases, close monitoring of sufficient respiratory function and protective airway reflexes is necessary. Postdural puncture headache and transient neurological symptoms have been reported also in pediatric patients, and thus, guardians should be provided instructions for follow-up and contact information if symptoms appear or persist after discharge. Epidural blood patch is effective treatment for prolonged, severe headache, and nonopioid analgesic is often sufficient for transient neurological symptoms. PMID:21899656

  18. Treatment of a spinal aneurysmal bone cyst using combined image-guided cryoablation and cementoplasty.

    PubMed

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Too, Chow Wei; Garnon, Julien; Steib, Jean-Paul; Gangi, Afshin

    2015-02-01

    The authors describe the case of a 6.6-cm symptomatic spinal aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) in a 17-year-old athlete treated percutaneously. Surgical treatment was not considered as the first option owing to its invasiveness and associated morbidity. CT-guided cryoablation of the expansile part of the ABC was performed for tumour shrinkage and nerve decompression. Thermal insulation, temperature monitoring and functional control/electrostimulation of the neural structures at risk were applied. Finally, the bony defect was cemented. No complications occurred during the procedure. Complete resolution of the ABC on imaging and clinical improvement were achieved. Percutaneous cryoablation should be considered as an alternative treatment option, especially when tumour size reduction is desired. PMID:25091121

  19. Outcomes and Treatment of Lumbosacral Spinal Tuberculosis: A Retrospective Study of 53 Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Maolin; Wang, Kun; Fowdur, Mitra; Wu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Study Strategy A retrospective clinic study. Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of conservative and surgical treatment for lumbosacral tuberculosis. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 53 patients with lumbosacral tuberculosis who were treated in our institution between January 2005 and January 2011. There were 29 males and 24 females with average ages of 37.53 ± 17.28 years (range 6–72 years). 11 patients were given only anti-TB drugs; the remainder underwent anterior debridement, interbody fusion with and without instrumentation, or one-stage anterior debridement combined with posterior instrumentation. Outcome data for these patients included neurologic status, lumbosacral angle, erythrocyte sedimentation rate value(ESR) and C-reactive protein value(CRP) were assessed before and after treatment. Results The mean lumbosacral angles were 23.00°± 2.90°in the conservatively treated patients and 22.36°± 3.92o in the surgically treated patients. At the final follow-up, this had improved to 24.10o ± 2.96°in the conservatively treated patients and 28.13° ± 1.93°in the surgically treated patients (all P < 0.05). There were statistically significant differences before and after treatment in terms of ESR and CRP (all P < 0.05). All patients achieved bone fusion. The mean follow-up period was 32.34 ± 8.13 months (range 18 to 55 months). The neurological deficit did not worsen in any of the patients. Conclusions It has been proven that conservative and surgical treatments are safe and effective and produce good clinical outcomes for patients with lumbosacral tuberculosis. The advantages of operation include thoroughness of debridement, decompression of the spinal cord, and adequate spinal stabilization. PMID:26121685

  20. Relationship Between Depressive State and Treatment Characteristics of Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yasufumi; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Matsuda, Shinya; Wada, Futoshi; Sugita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed whether treatment of acute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) patients contributes to depression. Methods Using an administrative database, we assessed patients for whom the diagnosis was unspecified injuries of cervical spinal cord (International Classification of Diseases and Injuries-10th (ICD-10) code; S14.1). We categorized patients with codes for depressive episode (ICD-10 code; F32) or recurrent depressive disorder (F33), or those prescribed antidepressants (tricyclic, tetracyclic, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Serotonin Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors, Trazodone, Sulpiride, or Mirtazapine) as having a depressive state. We compared the rate of each acute treatment between the depressive state group and the non-depressive state group using chi-square tests, and a multiple logistic regression model was used to identify the association between the acute treatment and depressive state. Results There were 151 patients who were judged to be in a depressive state, and the other 2115 patients were categorized into the non-depressive state group. Intervention of intravenous anesthesia, tracheostomy, artificial respiration, and gastrostomy had a significant positive correlation with depressive state. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that tracheostomy (odds ratio [OR] 2.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09–4.38) and artificial respiration (OR 2.28; 95% CI, 1.32–3.93) were significantly associated with depressive state, and men had a 36% reduction in the risk of depressive state compared with women (OR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.44–0.94), whereas age, wound-treatment, all of the orthopedic procedures, intravenous anesthesia, and gastrostomy were not associated with depressive state. Conclusions These findings suggest that tracheostomy, artificial respiration and female gender in the acute phase after cervical SCI might be associated with the development of depression. PMID:26567604

  1. Exercise Intensity during Treadmill Walking with Gait Patterned FES among Patients with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: Case Series

    E-print Network

    Popovic, Milos R.

    exercise interventions using functional electrical stimulation (FES), such as FES arm or leg cycle of exercise; and (3) short-term as a therapeutic intervention to improve voluntary function[14, 15- 1 - Exercise Intensity during Treadmill Walking with Gait Patterned FES among Patients

  2. Physical therapy after spinal cord injury: A systematic review of treatments focused on participation

    PubMed Central

    Gómara-Toldrà, Natàlia; Sliwinski, Martha; Dijkers, Marcel P.

    2014-01-01

    Context Over the last four decades, the focus of spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation has shifted from medical management to issues that affect quality of life and community participation. Physical therapists (PTs) need to design and implement interventions that result in maximal participation to provide an individual with SCI an effective rehabilitation program. Objective The aim of this review is to assess the extent, content, and outcomes of physical therapy (PT) interventions focused on improving the participation of individuals with SCI. Methods A search was conducted in Medline, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, PEDro, and PsycINFO. We included studies, of all designs, focused on improving the participation of individuals with SCI using PT interventions.The primary author and a reviewer independently selected articles for inclusion, assessed articles quality, and extracted the data. Results Five studies met the inclusion criteria. The interventions applied were 9- and 12-month body weight-supported treadmill training in two studies, a supervised 9-month exercise program, a 12-week home exercise program, and a 10-week multidisciplinary cognitive behavioral program for coping with chronic neuropathic pain. Four of five PT interventions positively impacted the individual's perceived participation and satisfaction with participation. Conclusion The body of research by PTs on interventions to improve participation is limited. PTs must document the effects of interventions with a valid outcome tool to enable more research that examines participation. Expanding participation research will allow PTs to meet the needs of individuals with SCI and identify what interventions best facilitate integration into the community. PMID:24621042

  3. UK Back pain Exercise And Manipulation (UK BEAM) trial – national randomised trial of physical treatments for back pain in primary care: objectives, design and interventions [ISRCTN32683578

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Background Low back pain has major health and social implications. Although there have been many randomised controlled trials of manipulation and exercise for the management of low back pain, the role of these two treatments in its routine management remains unclear. A previous trial comparing private chiropractic treatment with National Health Service (NHS) outpatient treatment, which found a benefit from chiropractic treatment, has been criticised because it did not take treatment location into account. There are data to suggest that general exercise programmes may have beneficial effects on low back pain. The UK Medical Research Council (MRC) has funded this major trial of physical treatments for back pain, based in primary care. It aims to establish if, when added to best care in general practice, a defined package of spinal manipulation and a defined programme of exercise classes (Back to Fitness) improve participant-assessed outcomes. Additionally the trial compares outcomes between participants receiving the spinal manipulation in NHS premises and in private premises. Design Randomised controlled trial using a 3 × 2 factorial design. Methods We sought to randomise 1350 participants with simple low back pain of at least one month's duration. These came from 14 locations across the UK, each with a cluster of 10–15 general practices that were members of the MRC General Practice Research Framework (GPRF). All practices were trained in the active management of low back pain. Participants were randomised to this form of general practice care only, or this general practice care plus manipulation, or this general practice care plus exercise, or this general practice care plus manipulation followed by exercise. Those randomised to manipulation were further randomised to receive treatment in either NHS or private premises. Follow up was by postal questionnaire one, three and 12 months after randomisation. The primary analysis will consider the main treatment effects before interactions between the two treatment packages. Economic analysis will estimate the cost per unit of health utility gained by adding either or both of the treatment packages to general practice care. PMID:12892566

  4. Australian Institute of Sport and the Australian Paralympic Committee position statement: urinary tract infection in spinal cord injured athletes.

    PubMed

    Compton, Stacey; Trease, Larissa; Cunningham, Corey; Hughes, David

    2015-10-01

    Patients with spinal cord injuries are at increased risk of developing symptomatic urinary tract infections. Current evidence-based knowledge regarding prevention and treatment of urinary tract infection in the spinal cord injured population is limited. There are currently no urinary tract infection prevention and management guidelines specifically targeted towards elite spinal cord injured athletes. This position statement represents a set of recommendations intended to provide clinical guidelines for sport and exercise medicine physicians and other healthcare providers for the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infection in spinal cord injured athletes. It has been endorsed by the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and the Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). PMID:25869093

  5. Exploring exercise as an avenue for the treatment of anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    DeBoer, Lindsey B; Powers, Mark B; Utschig, Angela C; Otto, Michael W; Smits, Jasper AJ

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders constitute a significant public health problem. Current gold standard treatments are limited in their effectiveness, prompting the consideration of alternative approaches. In this review, we examine the evidence for exercise as an intervention for anxiety disorders. This evidence comes from population studies, studies of nonclinical anxiety reduction, as well as a limited number of studies of clinically anxious individuals. All of these studies provide converging evidence for consistent beneficial effects of exercise on anxiety, and are consistent with a variety of accounts of the mechanism of anxiety reduction with exercise. Further study of clinical populations is encouraged, as are studies of the mechanism of change of exercise interventions, which have the potential to help refine exercise intervention strategies. Likewise, studies that identify moderators of treatment efficacy will assist clinicians in deciding how and for whom to prescribe exercise. PMID:23002943

  6. [Evidence and recommendations for oncologic clinical exercise - a personalized treatment concept for cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Baumann, Freerk Theeagnus; Hallek, Michael; Meyer, Janika; Galvão, Daniel Abido; Bloch, Wilhelm; Elter, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Oncological treatments can lead to acute and chronic cancer related toxicities. In recent years, a large number of clinical studies have reported positive effects of exercise to the bio-psycho-social regeneration of cancer patients. However, very few evidence-based programs have been implemented into practice with little opportunity for cancer patients to engage in such programs. Reviews and RCT studies on exercise and cancer are showing that specific exercise programs have a positive impact on fatigue syndrome, urinary incontinence, lymphedema, polyneuropathy, arthralgia, and androgen deprivation related toxicities. With the increasing evidence for exercise oncology interventions, recommendations arising from clinical trials should be translated into clinical practice and this should be viewed as an important next step in this fast moving field of exercise oncology. For that the personalized treatment concept "Oncologic clinical exercise" (OTT) was developed. PMID:26402184

  7. Folic acid in combination with adult neural stem cells for the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Shen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To observe the therapeutic effect of folic acid in combination with adult neural stem cells on spinal cord injury and to investigate the possible mechanism. Methods: A total of 120 Wistar rats were randomly assigned to six groups: normal, model, sham-surgery, folic acid injection, adult neural stem cell transplantation, and combination (folic acid injection + adult neural stem cells transplantation) groups. Morphology of neural stem cells was observed by inverted microscopy. Expression of CD105, CD45, CD44, and CD29 were detected by flow cytometry; expression of neuron-specific enolase and glial fibrillary acidic protein were determined by immunofluorescence. Motor coordination and integration capabilities were assessed using BBB scores; Morphology of spinal cord tissues was observed by hematoxylin-eosin staining and 5-bromodeoxyuridine immunohistochemistry. GDNF, BDNF and NT-3 expression in spinal cord tissues were determined by ELISA; while expression of the apoptosis-related proteins BCL-2, Bax and caspase-3 was detected using western blotting. Results: Flow cytometry showed that the isolated cells were positive for CD44 and CD29 and negative for CD105 and CD45. Combination treatment significantly improved the behavior of model rats with spinal cord injury, attenuated inflammatory reaction of spinal cord tissues, restored injured nerve cells, and increased expression of GDNF, BDNF and NT-3 in spinal cord tissues, up regulated BCL-2 expression, and down regulated Bax and caspase-3 expression. Conclusions: Folic acid in combination with adult neural stem cells significantly improved nerve function and plays a key role in maintaining microenvironment homeostasis in the neurons of rats with spinal cord injury. PMID:26379837

  8. Mechanistic principles of antisense targets for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Natalia N; Lee, Brian M; DiDonato, Christine J; Singh, Ravindra N

    2015-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a major neurodegenerative disorder of children and infants. SMA is primarily caused by low levels of SMN protein owing to deletions or mutations of the SMN1 gene. SMN2, a nearly identical copy of SMN1, fails to compensate for the loss of the production of the functional SMN protein due to predominant skipping of exon 7. Several compounds, including antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that elevate SMN protein from SMN2 hold the promise for treatment. An ASO-based drug currently under Phase III clinical trial employs intronic splicing silencer N1 (ISS-N1) as its target. Cumulative studies on ISS-N1 reveal a wealth of information with significance to the overall therapeutic development for SMA. Here, the authors summarize the mechanistic principles behind various antisense targets currently available for SMA therapy. PMID:26381381

  9. Endovascular treatment of distal thoracic aortic transection associated with severe thoracolumbar spinal fracture.

    PubMed

    Chock, Megan M; Aho, Johnathon; Naik, Nimesh; Clarke, Michelle; Heller, Stephanie; Oderich, Gustavo S

    2015-10-01

    Endovascular repair has become the first line of treatment in most patients with blunt aortic injury. The most common mechanism is deceleration injury affecting the aortic isthmus distal to the origin of the left subclavian artery. Injuries of the distal thoracic aorta are uncommon. We report the case of a 25-year-old male patient who presented with paraplegia and distal thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm associated with severe thoracolumbar vertebral fracture and displacement after a motocross accident. Endovascular repair was performed using total percutaneous technique and conformable C-TAG thoracic stent-graft (WL Gore, Flagstaff, AZ). Following stent-graft placement and angiographic confirmation of absence of endoleak, thoracolumbar spinal fixation was performed in the same operative procedure. This case illustrates a multispecialty approach to complex aortic and vertebral injury and the high conformability of newer thoracic stent-grafts to adapt to tortuous anatomy. PMID:25406266

  10. Scoliosis treatment using spinal manipulation and the Pettibon Weighting System™: a summary of 3 atypical presentations

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Mark W; Joy, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Background Given the relative lack of treatment options for mild to moderate scoliosis, when the Cobb angle measurements fall below the 25–30° range, conservative manual therapies for scoliosis treatment have been increasingly investigated in recent years. In this case series, we present 3 specific cases of scoliosis. Case presentation Patient presentation, examination, intervention and outcomes are detailed for each case. The types of scoliosis presented here are left thoracic, idiopathic scoliosis after Harrington rod instrumentation, and a left thoracic scoliosis secondary to Scheuermann's Kyphosis. Each case carries its own clinical significance, in relation to clinical presentation. The first patient presented for chiropractic treatment with a 35° thoracic dextroscoliosis 18 years following Harrington Rod instrumentation and fusion. The second patient presented with a 22° thoracic levoscoliosis and concomitant Scheuermann's Disease. Finally, the third case summarizes the treatment of a patient with a primary 37° idiopathic thoracic levoscoliosis. Each patient was treated with a novel active rehabilitation program for varying lengths of time, including spinal manipulation and a patented external head and body weighting system. Following a course of treatment, consisting of clinic and home care treatments, post-treatment radiographs and examinations were conducted. Improvement in symptoms and daily function was obtained in all 3 cases. Concerning Cobb angle measurements, there was an apparent reduction in Cobb angle of 13°, 8°, and 16° over a maximum of 12 weeks of treatment. Conclusion Although mild to moderate reductions in Cobb angle measurements were achieved in these cases, these improvements may not be related to the symptomatic and functional improvements. The lack of a control also includes the possibility of a placebo effect. However, this study adds to the growing body of literature investigating methods by which mild to moderate cases of scoliosis can be treated conservatively. Further investigation is necessary to determine whether curve reduction and/or manipulation and/or placebo was responsible for the symptomatic and functional improvements noted in these cases. PMID:16409627

  11. Exercise as an Adjunct Treatment for Opiate Agonist Treatment: Review of the Current Research and Implementation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, Jeremiah; Wadeson, Heather K.; VanHeest, Jaci L.

    2014-01-01

    Opiate dependence is a significant public health concern linked to poor quality of life, co-morbid psychiatric disorders, and high costs to society. Current opiate agonist treatments are an effective but limited intervention. Adjunctive interventions could improve and augment opiate agonist treatment outcomes, including drug abstinence, quality of life, and physical health. This article reviews exercise as an adjunctive intervention for opiate agonist treatment, especially in regards to improving mood and overall quality of life, while reducing other substance use. Poor adherence and dropout frequently prevent many individuals from garnering the many physical and mental health benefits of exercise. Strategies for implementing an exercise intervention, including safety considerations, are discussed. PMID:22989278

  12. Oxidative changes in cerebral spinal fluid phosphatidylcholine during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Miketova, Petra; Kaemingk, Kris; Hockenberry, Marilyn; Pasvogel, Alice; Hutter, John; Krull, Kevin; Moore, Ida M

    2005-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) treatment contributes to improved long-term disease-free survival from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by significantly decreasing the rate of disease relapse. Methotrexate (MTX), a drug commonly used for CNS treatment, has been associated with cognitive and academic problems, white-matter changes, perfusion defects, and brain atrophy. This study investigated oxidative stress as a possible mechanism of chemotherapy induced CNS injury. Unoxidized and oxidized components of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the most prevalent phospholipid in CNS cellular membranes, were measured in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from 21 children diagnosed with low (n = 7), standard (n= 7), or high (n= 7) risk ALL. Children with high-risk ALL received the most MTX, especially during the most intensive phase of treatment (consolidation). Phospholipids were extracted from CSF samples obtained at diagnosis and during the induction, consolidation, and continuation treatment phases. Unoxidized and oxidized PC were measured by normal phase high-performance liquid chromatography at 2 ultraviolet wavelengths (206 and 234 nm, respectively). Data were analyzed by 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results support the hypotheses that the highest levels of oxidized PC would be observed during the most intensive phase of ALL therapy and in the high-risk ALL group. Findings provide preliminary evidence for chemotherapy-induced oxidative stress in CNS membrane phospholipids. PMID:15583359

  13. Spinal cord stimulation for treatment of pain in a patient with post thoracotomy pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Graybill, Jordan; Conermann, Till; Kabazie, Abraham J; Chandy, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Post Thoracotomy Pain Syndrome (PTPS) is defined as pain that occurs or persists in the area of the thoracotomy incision for at least 2 months following the initial procedure.  The true incidence of PTPS is hard to define as literature reports a wide range of occurrence from 5% to 90%.  Thoracotomy is associated with a high risk of severe chronic postoperative pain.  Presenting symptoms include both neuropathic pain in the area of the incision, as well as myofascial pain commonly in the ipsilateral scapula and shoulder.  Pain management can be challenging in these patients.  Multiple treatments have been described including conservative treatments with oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); topically applied, peripherally acting drugs; neuromodulating agents; physical therapy; transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation as well as more invasive treatments including intercostal nerve blocks, trigger point steroid injections, epidural steroid injections, radiofrequency nerve ablation, cryoablation, and one case report of spinal cord stimulation.  Unfortunately, a portion of these patients will have persistent pain in spite of multiple treatment modalities, and in some cases will experience worsening of pain. This case report describes the novel utility and complete resolution of symptoms with spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in treatment of a patient with persistent PTPS. In the operating room, a percutaneous octet electrode lead was placed using sterile technique under fluoroscopic guidance and loss-of-resistance technique.  The octet electrode lead was subsequently advanced with the aid of fluoroscopy to the level of the T3 superior endplate just right of midline.  The patient's pain distribution was captured optimally with stimulation at this level.  With the assistance of a neurosurgeon, the lead was anchored, tunneled, and connected to a generator, which was implanted over the right iliac crest.  The patient tolerated the procedure well with no complications. We report the successful use of SCS as well as complete resolution of symptoms at 4 months follow-up, in a patient with persistent PTPS, which was resistant to other modalities. In conclusion, studies designed to evaluate the effectiveness of SCS for PTPS may be warranted. PMID:21927048

  14. Aerobic Exercise Training Reduces Cannabis Craving and Use in Non-Treatment Seeking Cannabis-Dependent

    E-print Network

    Park, Sohee

    there are no approved medications for this condition, treatment must rely on behavioral approaches empirically­70% HR reserve) over 2 weeks. Exercise sessions were conducted by exercise physiologists under medical the Marijuana Craving Questionnaire (MCQ-SF). Findings: Daily cannabis use within the run-in period was 5

  15. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry

    PubMed Central

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Christie, Sean D.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Hurlbert, R. John; Linassi, A.G.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1–T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2–L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There was a significantly higher rate of total complications in the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group. These findings support guideline recommendations against routine administration of methylprednisolone in acute TSCI. PMID:26065706

  16. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry.

    PubMed

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K; Rivers, Carly S; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S; Christie, Sean D; Fourney, Daryl R; Hurlbert, R John; Linassi, A G; Fehlings, Michael G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2015-11-01

    In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1-T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2-L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There was a significantly higher rate of total complications in the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group. These findings support guideline recommendations against routine administration of methylprednisolone in acute TSCI. PMID:26065706

  17. Cranial Treatment and Spinal Manipulation for a Patient With Low Back Pain: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Wayne; Knaap, Simone F.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to present chiropractic management of a patient with chronic low back pain by focusing on the craniomandibular system. Clinical Features A 37-year-old man consulted a chiropractor for pain in the lumbosacral area with radiation down the anterolateral side of the upper left leg. The symptoms started after a fall the previous year. Examination showed a post-traumatic chronic L4-L5 facet dysfunction and left sacro-iliac joint dysfunction. Chiropractic spinal manipulation to the lumbar spine and pelvis gave only temporary relief from the pain. Intervention and Outcome A year later a bone scintigraphy was conducted, in which a lesion was found over the right sphenoid area. Cranial treatment of this area was added to the chiropractic treatment plan. After this treatment, the patient reported that he was pain free and could return to normal activities of daily living. Conclusion The clinical progress of this case suggests that for some patients, adding craniosacral therapy may be helpful in patients with low back symptoms. PMID:26644786

  18. Exercise

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines for Adults with Multiple Sclerosis can help adults with mild to moderate disability, resulting from relapsing or ... Publication Exercise as Part of Everyday Life Physical activity can be a regular part of ...

  19. The role of exercise and alternative treatments for low back pain.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Kevin A; Rittenberg, Joshua D

    2010-11-01

    The determination of whether a patient should pursue an active or passive treatment program is often made by medical practitioners. Knowledge about all forms of treatment, including complementary and alternative (CAM) treatments, is essential in the treatment of low back pain. Medical practitioner-directed active treatments that have been shown to be effective for the treatment of low back pain include physical therapy-directed exercise programs such as core stabilization and mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MDT). Based on the current literature, it appears that yoga is the most effective nonphysician-directed active treatment approach to nonspecific low back pain when comparing other CAM treatments. Acupuncture is a medical practitioner-directed passive treatment that has been shown to be a good adjunct treatment. More randomized controlled studies are needed to support both CAM treatments and exercise in the treatment of low back pain. PMID:20977960

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Treatments during the Chronic Phase of Spinal Cord Injury Improve Locomotor Function in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Sheila A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Our previous data suggested that ongoing inflammation in the spinal cord 6 weeks following spinal cord injury was detrimental to locomotor function. Others have shown in the acute and sub-acute post-injury phase that microglial/macrophage activation and T regulatory cells are detrimental to recovery. Here, C57BL/6 mice with a moderately severe T9 contusion were injected intravenously daily with minocycline, which reduces microglial/macrophage activation, or with CD25 antibodies, which reduce T regulatory cell function, starting at 6 weeks after injury. Both anti-inflammatory drugs caused an improvement in hindlimb locomotor function over the 2-week treatment, as measured by the Basso Mouse Scale (BMS). The improvement was functionally important, with mice having problems with coordinated stepping (BMS ?6) before treatment to walking essentially normally (BMS >7) at the end of the treatment. The effects diminished within 1 week after termination of the treatments, suggesting an ongoing and dynamic inflammatory process. The area of white matter or the inflammatory markers CD68 for activated microglia/macrophages and CD45 for leukocytes were not different between the groups. These data suggest that inflammation during the chronic phase following spinal cord injury reduces conduction through the epicenter, possibly by release of cytokines, and is amenable to treatment for improved neurological function. PMID:21740131

  1. Exercise, Behavioral Therapy Reduce Menopausal Symptoms Caused by Breast Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Women with breast cancer who were suffering from treatment-related menopausal symptoms experienced symptom relief with cognitive behavioral therapy, physical exercise, or both, according to a Dutch study.

  2. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore; Tarantino, Umberto; Nano, Giovanni; Iundusi, Riccardo; Fiori, Roberto Da Ros, Valerio Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  3. Radioactive bone cement for the treatment of spinal metastases: a dosimetric analysis of simulated clinical scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T. S.; Sehgal, V.; Skinner, H. B.; Al-Ghazi, M. S. A. L.; Ramsinghani, N. S.; Marquez Miranda, M.; Keyak, J. H.

    2012-07-01

    Vertebral metastases are a common manifestation of many cancers, potentially leading to vertebral collapse and neurological complications. Conventional treatment often involves percutaneous vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty followed by external beam radiation therapy. As a more convenient alternative, we have introduced radioactive bone cement, i.e. bone cement incorporating a radionuclide. In this study, we used a previously developed Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling method to evaluate dose distributions from phosphorus-32 radioactive cement in simulated clinical scenarios. Isodose curves were generally concentric about the surface of bone cement injected into cadaveric vertebrae, indicating that dose distributions are relatively predictable, thus facilitating treatment planning (cement formulation and dosimetry method are patent pending). Model results indicated that a therapeutic dose could be delivered to tumor/bone within ?4 mm of the cement surface while maintaining a safe dose to radiosensitive tissue beyond this distance. This therapeutic range should be sufficient to treat target volumes within the vertebral body when tumor ablation or other techniques are used to create a cavity into which the radioactive cement can be injected. With further development, treating spinal metastases with radioactive bone cement may become a clinically useful and convenient alternative to the conventional two-step approach of percutaneous strength restoration followed by radiotherapy.

  4. Surgical Treatment of Spinal Stenosis with and without Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: Cost-Effectiveness after 2 Years

    PubMed Central

    Tosteson, Anna N.A.; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Herkowitz, Harry; Albert, Todd; Boden, Scott D.; Bridwell, Keith; Longley, Michael; Andersson, Gunnar B.; Blood, Emily A.; Grove, Margaret R.; Weinstein, James N.

    2009-01-01

    Background The SPORT (Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial) reported favorable surgery outcomes over 2 years among patients with stenosis with and without degenerative spondylolisthesis, but the economic value of these surgeries is uncertain. Objective To assess the short-term cost-effectiveness of spine surgery relative to nonoperative care for stenosis alone and for stenosis with spondylolisthesis. Design Prospective cohort study. Data Sources Resource utilization, productivity, and EuroQol EQ-5D score measured at 6 weeks and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment among SPORT participants. Target Population Patients with image-confirmed spinal stenosis, with and without degenerative spondylolisthesis. Time Horizon 2 years. Perspective Societal. Intervention Nonoperative care or surgery (primarily decompressive laminectomy for stenosis and decompressive laminectomy with fusion for stenosis associated with degenerative spondylolisthesis). Outcome Measures Cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Results of Base-Case Analysis Among 634 patients with stenosis, 394 (62%) had surgery, most often decompressive laminectomy (320 of 394 [81%]). Stenosis surgeries improved health to a greater extent than nonoperative care (QALY gain, 0.17 [95% CI, 0.12 to 0.22]) at a cost of $77 600 (CI, $49 600 to $120 000) per QALY gained. Among 601 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis, 368 (61%) had surgery, most including fusion (344 of 368 [93%]) and most with instrumentation (269 of 344 [78%]). Degenerative spondylolisthesis surgeries significantly improved health versus non-operative care (QALY gain, 0.23 [CI, 0.19 to 0.27]), at a cost of $115 600 (CI, $90 800 to $144 900) per QALY gained. Result of Sensitivity Analysis Surgery cost markedly affected the value of surgery. Limitation The study used self-reported utilization data, 2-year time horizon, and as-treated analysis to address treatment non-adherence among randomly assigned participants. Conclusion The economic value of spinal stenosis surgery at 2 years compares favorably with many health interventions. Degenerative spondylolisthesis surgery is not highly cost-effective over 2 years but could show value over a longer time horizon. PMID:19075203

  5. Metabolic rate and cardiorespiratory response during hybrid cycling versus handcycling at equal subjective exercise intensity levels in people with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bakkum, Arjan J. T.; de Groot, Sonja; Onderwater, Mark Q.; de Jong, Jelle; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the metabolic rate and cardiorespiratory response during hybrid cycling versus handcycling at equal subjective exercise intensity levels in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Amsterdam Rehabilitation Research Centre | Reade, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Methods On separate days, nine individuals with a motor complete paraplegia or tetraplegia (eight men, age 40 ± 13 years, time since injury 12 ± 10 years) performed 5-minute bouts of hybrid cycling (day 1) and handcycling (day 2) at moderate (level 3 on a 10-point rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale) and vigorous (RPE level 6) subjective exercise intensity, while respiratory gas exchange was measured by open-circuit spirometry and heart rate was monitored using radiotelemetry. Outcome measures Metabolic rate (calculated with the Weir equation) and cardiorespiratory response (heart rate, oxygen pulse, and ventilation). Results Overall, the metabolic rate during hybrid cycling was 3.4 kJ (16%) higher (P = 0.006) than during handcycling. Furthermore, compared with handcycling, the overall heart rate and ventilation during hybrid cycling was 11 bpm (11%) and 5.3 l/minute (18%) higher (P = 0.004 and 0.024), respectively, while the oxygen pulse was the same (P = 0.26). Conclusion Hybrid cycling induces a higher metabolic rate and cardiorespiratory response at equal RPE levels than handcycling, suggesting that hybrid cycling is more suitable for fighting obesity and increasing cardiorespiratory fitness in individuals with SCI. PMID:24621028

  6. An expert consensus on the evaluation and treatment of acute thoracolumbar spine and spinal cord injury in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhicheng; Li, Fang; Sun, Tiansheng

    2013-01-01

    This is an expert consensus on the evaluation and treatment of thoracolumbar spinal injury, established from February 2009 to July 2010. The expert consensus consists mainly of six parts with a total of 54 recommendations including the overview (one item); pre-hospital care (one item); evaluation and diagnosis (13 items); treatment (23 items); prevention and treatment of major complications (12 items); and rehabilitation (four items). This is the first time that Chinese experts have published a consensus on spine and spinal cord injury. The expert consensus was established based on Delphi methods, literature analysis, and clinical experiences. Each recommendation is supported by and was interpreted using multi-level evidences. The level of agreement with the recommendation among the panel members was assessed as either low, moderate, or strong. Each panel member was asked to indicate his or her level of agreement on a 5-point scale, with “1” corresponding to neutrality and “5” representing maximum agreement. Scores were aggregated across the panel members and an arithmetic mean was calculated. This mean score was then translated into low, moderate, or strong. After all of the votes were collected and calculated, the results showed no low-level recommendations, 10 moderate-level recommendations, and 44 strong-level recommendations. An expert consensus was reached and was recognized by Chinese spine surgeons. Wide-scale adoption of these recommendations is urgent in the management of acute thoracolumbar spine and spinal cord injury in a broader attempt to create a standard evaluation and treatment strategy for acute thoracolumbar spine and spinal cord injury in China. PMID:25206628

  7. A Systematic Review of Non-Invasive Pharmacologic Neuroprotective Treatments for Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Elena; Hillyer, Jessica; Mann, Cody; Baptiste, Darryl; Weaver, Lynne C.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An increasing number of therapies for spinal cord injury (SCI) are emerging from the laboratory and seeking translation into human clinical trials. Many of these are administered as soon as possible after injury with the hope of attenuating secondary damage and maximizing the extent of spared neurologic tissue. In this article, we systematically review the available pre-clinical research on such neuroprotective therapies that are administered in a non-invasive manner for acute SCI. Specifically, we review treatments that have a relatively high potential for translation due to the fact that they are already used in human clinical applications, or are available in a form that could be administered to humans. These include: erythropoietin, NSAIDs, anti-CD11d antibodies, minocycline, progesterone, estrogen, magnesium, riluzole, polyethylene glycol, atorvastatin, inosine, and pioglitazone. The literature was systematically reviewed to examine studies in which an in-vivo animal model was utilized to assess the efficacy of the therapy in a traumatic SCI paradigm. Using these criteria, 122 studies were identified and reviewed in detail. Wide variations exist in the animal species, injury models, and experimental designs reported in the pre-clinical literature on the therapies reviewed. The review highlights the extent of investigation that has occurred in these specific therapies, and points out gaps in our knowledge that would be potentially valuable prior to human translation. PMID:20146558

  8. Prescribed Exercise Behavior in the Treatment of Spouse Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, William W., Jr.

    This presentation by a practicing marital therapist describes how exercise behavior can be used as a preventive measure against spouse abuse. This crisis intervention approach is intended to help couples develop stopgap techniques to prevent physical violence; it is one segment of a more comprehensive approach which might include contingency…

  9. Effects of Combinatorial Treatment with Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Peptide and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Spinal Cord Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Kuan-Min; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Mei-Chun; Wu, Yi-Ting; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Lin, Hsin-I; Chen, Chia-Hua; Cheng, Henrich; Yang, Chung-Shi; Tzeng, Shun-Fen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand if human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) have synergistic protective effect that promotes functional recovery in rats with severe spinal cord injury (SCI). To evaluate the effect of delayed combinatorial therapy of PACAP and hMSCs on spinal cord tissue repair, we used the immortalized hMSCs that retain their potential of neuronal differentiation under the stimulation of neurogenic factors and possess the properties for the production of several growth factors beneficial for neural cell survival. The results indicated that delayed treatment with PACAP and hMSCs at day 7 post SCI increased the remaining neuronal fibers in the injured spinal cord, leading to better locomotor functional recovery in SCI rats when compared to treatment only with PACAP or hMSCs. Western blotting also showed that the levels of antioxidant enzymes, Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and peroxiredoxin-1/6 (Prx-1 and Prx-6), were increased at the lesion center 1 week after the delayed treatment with the combinatorial therapy when compared to that observed in the vehicle-treated control. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that co-culture with hMSCs in the presence of PACAP not only increased a subpopulation of microglia expressing galectin-3, but also enhanced the ability of astrocytes to uptake extracellular glutamate. In summary, our in vivo and in vitro studies reveal that delayed transplantation of hMSCs combined with PACAP provides trophic molecules to promote neuronal cell survival, which also foster beneficial microenvironment for endogenous glia to increase their neuroprotective effect on the repair of injured spinal cord tissue. PMID:21187959

  10. Injectable hydrogels for the improved delivery of treatments in spinal cord injury

    E-print Network

    O'shea, Timothy Mark

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in sudden life-altering paralysis with chronic medical consequences. Although no clinical therapy is currently available to reverse paralysis, a number of biomacromolecule drug candidates ...

  11. Cost analysis of spinal and general anesthesia for the surgical treatment of lumbar spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Khanna, Arjun; Yanamadala, Vijay; Coumans, Jean-Valery; Peterfreund, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    Lumbar spine surgery is typically performed under general anesthesia, although spinal anesthesia can also be used. Given the prevalence of lumbar spine surgery, small differences in cost between the two anesthetic techniques have the potential to make a large impact on overall healthcare costs. We sought to perform a cost comparison analysis of spinal versus general anesthesia for lumbar spine operations. Following Institutional Review Board approval, a retrospective cohort study was performed from 2009-2012 on consecutive patients undergoing non-instrumented, elective lumbar spine surgery for spondylosis by a single surgeon. Each patient was evaluated for both types of anesthesia, with the decision for anesthetic method being made based on a combination of physical status, anatomical considerations, and ultimately a consensus agreement between patient, surgeon, and anesthesiologist. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were compared between the two groups. Operating room costs were calculated whilst blinded to clinical outcomes and reported in percentage difference. General anesthesia (n=319) and spinal anesthesia (n=81) patients had significantly different median operative times of 175 ± 39.08 and 158 ± 32.75 minutes, respectively (p<0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Operating room costs were 10.33% higher for general anesthesia compared to spinal anesthesia (p=0.003, Mann-Whitney U test). Complications of spinal anesthesia included excessive movement (n=1), failed spinal attempt (n=3), intraoperative conversion to general anesthesia (n=2), and a high spinal level (n=1). In conclusion, spinal anesthesia can be performed safely in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. It has the potential to reduce operative times, costs, and possibly, complications. Further prospective evaluation will help to validate these findings. PMID:25510535

  12. Combined treatment with alphaMSH and methylprednisolone fails to improve functional recovery after spinal injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lankhorst, A J; ter Laak, M P; Hamers, F P; Gispen, W H

    2000-03-24

    To date, relatively little progress has been made in the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI)-related neurological impairments. Until now, methylprednisolone (MP) is the only agent with clinically proven beneficial effect on functional outcome after SCI. Although the mechanism of action is not completely clear, experimental data point to protection against membrane peroxidation and edema reduction. The melanocortin melanotropin is known to improve axonal regeneration following sciatic nerve injury, and to stimulate corticospinal outgrowth after partial spinal cord transection. Recently, we showed that intrathecally administered alphaMSH had beneficial effects on functional recovery after experimental SCI. Since both drugs have shown their value in intervention studies after (experimental) spinal cord injury (ESCI), we decided to study the effects of combined treatment. Our results again showed that alphaMSH enhances functional recovery after ESCI in the rat and that MP, although not affecting functional recovery adversely by itself, abolished the effects observed with alphaMSH when combined. Our data, thus, suggest that the mechanism of action of MP interferes with that of alphaMSH. PMID:10719082

  13. N-acetylcysteine treatment following spinal cord trauma reduces neural tissue damage and improves locomotor function in mice

    PubMed Central

    GUO, JIAN; LI, YIQIAO; CHEN, ZHONG; HE, ZHENNIAN; ZHANG, BIN; LI, YONGHUAN; HU, JIANGHUA; HAN, MINGYUAN; XU, YUANLIN; LI, YONGFU

    2015-01-01

    Following spinal cord trauma, mitochondrial dysfunction associated with increased oxidative stress is a critical event leading to leukocyte inflammatory responses, neuronal cell death and demyelination, contributing to permanent locomotor and neurological disability. The present study demonstrated that the mitochondrial enhancer N-acetylcysteine (NAC) may restore redox balance via enhancement of mitochondrial respiratory activity following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). In addition, NAC ameliorates oxidative stress-induced neuronal loss, demyelination, leukocyte infiltration and inflammatory mediator expression and improves long-term locomotor function. Furthermore, neuronal survival and neurological recovery are significantly correlated with increased mitochondrial bioenergetics in SCI following treatment with NAC. Therefore, NAC may represent a potential therapeutic agent for preserving mitochondrial dynamics and integrity following traumatic SCI. PMID:25738883

  14. Cost-effectiveness of three treatment strategies for lumbar spinal stenosis: Conservative care, laminectomy, and the Superion interspinous spacer

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Louise H.; Nelson, Teresa; Patel, Vikas V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is a painful and debilitating condition resulting in healthcare costs totaling tens of billions of dollars annually. Initial treatment consists of conservative care modalities such as physical therapy, NSAIDs, opioids, and steroid injections. Patients refractory to these therapies can undergo decompressive surgery, which has good long-term efficacy but is more traumatic and can be associated with high post-operative adverse event (AE) rates. Interspinous spacers have been developed to offer a less-invasive alternative. The objective of this study was to compare the costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) gained of conservative care (CC) and decompressive surgery (DS) to a new minimally-invasive interspinous spacer. Methods A Markov model was developed evaluating 3 strategies of care for lumbar spinal stenosis. If initial therapies failed, the model moved patients to more invasive therapies. Data from the Superion FDA clinical trial, a prospective spinal registry, and the literature were used to populate the model. Direct medical care costs were modeled from 2014 Medicare reimbursements for healthcare services. QALYs came from the SF-12 PCS and MCS components. The analysis used a 2-year time horizon with a 3% discount rate. Results CC had the lowest cost at $10,540, while Spacers and DS were nearly identical at about $13,950. CC also had the lowest QALY increase (0.06), while Spacers and DS were again nearly identical (.28). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) for Spacers compared to CC was $16,300 and for DS was $15,200. Conclusions Both the Spacer and DS strategies are far below the commonly cited $50,000/QALY threshold and produced several times the QALY increase versus CC, suggesting that surgical care provides superior value (cost / effectiveness) versus sustained conservative care in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:26273546

  15. Spinal cord stimulation for treatment of the pain associated with hereditary multiple osteochondromas

    PubMed Central

    Mirpuri, Ravi G; Brammeier, Jereme; Chen, Hamilton; Hsu, Frank PK; Chiu, Vi K; Chang, Eric Y

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hereditary multiple osteochondromas (HMO) usually presents with neoplastic lesions throughout the skeletal system. These lesions frequently cause chronic pain and are conventionally treated with surgical resection and medication. In cases where conventional treatments have failed, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) could be considered as a potential option for pain relief. The objective of this case was to determine if SCS may have a role in treating pain secondary to neoplastic lesions from HMO. Case presentation We report a 65-year-old female who previously received both surgical and pharmacological interventions for treating HMO neoplastic pain in the lumbar, pelvis, femur, and tibial regions. These interventions either failed to offer significant pain relief or caused excessive lethargy. A SCS trial was then offered with a dual 16-contact lead trial leading to 70%–80% improvement in pain from baseline and 85% reduction in oxycodone IR intake. This was followed by permanent implantation of two 2×8 contact paddle leads (T7–T8 and T9–T10 interspaces). After 8-week follow-up, settings were further optimized resulting in an additional 30% improvement in pain compared to last visit. At 6-month follow-up, the patient reported continued pain relief. Conclusion This case demonstrates the first successful use of SCS to treat both HMO and nonmalignant neoplastic-related pain. The patient reported pain improvement from baseline, reduced pain medication requirements, and subjective improvement in quality of life. Additionally, this case demonstrates the potential advantage of trialing multiple painful areas with a 16-contact lead in order to avoid multiple trials and placement. PMID:26316806

  16. Pretest of the clinical application of a management model for comprehensive treatments of acute spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruimin; Chen, Qiulan; Xiao, Yilei; Chong, Zonglei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of a new management model of comprehensive treatments of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) on clinical application. Methods: From January 2010 to January 2011, there were 89 patients with acute SCI over the same admission period, including 32 cases divided into the management model group and the other 57 into the control group. Respectively, at the 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment, the score standardization, developed by the American Association of spinal cord injury (ASIA), was used to assess the motor and sensory function during the admission period. At the same time, a follow-up survey was made to investigate the satisfaction of patients and their families. Results: At 1 and 3 months after treatment, the motor and feeling function scores of patients in the experimental group both improved significantly compared with the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). In addition, six months after treatment, the motor and sensory function scores of patients in the control group were not significantly improved any longer; while those scores in the experimental group still significantly recovered, and the difference between experimental and control groups was also statistically significant (P<0.05). According to the follow-up, patients and their families in the experimental group were of greater satisfaction than the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions: The management model of acute SCI treatment performed perfect clinical effects, and was worth promoting. PMID:26464687

  17. Advances in the clinical research of the minimally invasive treatment for the posterior edge of vertebral-body defects by spinal metastases

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XUEFENG; YANG, ZUOZHANG; XIE, LIN; YUAN, ZONGQIN; REN, MINGYAN; HAN, LEI

    2015-01-01

    Spinal metastasis is one of the commonly observed complications in the advanced stages of cancer patients, and is a serious threat to human life and health. Malignant tumor invasion usually leads to defects in the posterior margins of the vertebral body, which caused significant cancer pains to patients and increased the risk of surgery. Currently, minimally invasive treatments of vertebral defects caused by spinal metastases include percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) combined with radiofrequency ablation and PVP combined with 125I seed implantation. These minimally invasive techniques have particular superiority to control pain in patients with spinal metastases, improve nerve function, reduce the incidence of fractures and surgical risk, and improve the quality of life. The present study reviewed the progress in clinical research on vertebral defects caused by spinal metastases, and the mechanisms and minimally invasive treatment. PMID:26405535

  18. The effectiveness of exercise as a treatment for postnatal depression: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postnatal depression can have a substantial impact on the woman, the child and family as a whole. Thus, there is a need to examine different ways of helping women experiencing postnatal depression; encouraging them to exercise may be one way. A meta analysis found some support for exercise as an adjunctive treatment for postnatal depression but the methodological inadequacy of the few small studies included means that it is uncertain whether exercise reduces symptoms of postnatal depression. We aim to determine whether a pragmatic exercise intervention that involves one-to-one personalised exercise consultations and telephone support plus usual care in women with postnatal depression, is superior to usual care only, in reducing symptoms of postnatal depression. Methods We aim to recruit 208 women with postnatal depression in the West Midlands. Recently delivered women who meet the ICD-10 diagnosis for depression will be randomised to usual care plus exercise or usual care only. The exercise intervention will be delivered over 6?months. The primary outcome measure is difference in mean Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score between the groups at six month follow-up. Outcome measures will be assessed at baseline and at six and 12?month post randomisation. Discussion Findings from the research will inform future clinical guidance on antenatal and postnatal mental health, as well as inform practitioners working with postnatal depression. Trial registration number ISRCTN84245563 PMID:22682671

  19. Treatment of Dyslipidemia with Statins and Physical Exercises: Recent Findings of Skeletal Muscle Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim, Mariana Rotta; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; do Amaral, Sandra Lia; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Statin treatment in association with physical exercise practice can substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality risk of dyslipidemic individuals, but this practice is associated with myopathic event exacerbation. This study aimed to present the most recent results of specific literature about the effects of statins and its association with physical exercise on skeletal musculature. Thus, a literature review was performed using PubMed and SciELO databases, through the combination of the keywords “statin” AND “exercise” AND “muscle”, restricting the selection to original studies published between January 1990 and November 2013. Sixteen studies evaluating the effects of statins in association with acute or chronic exercises on skeletal muscle were analyzed. Study results indicate that athletes using statins can experience deleterious effects on skeletal muscle, as the exacerbation of skeletal muscle injuries are more frequent with intense training or acute eccentric and strenuous exercises. Moderate physical training, in turn, when associated to statins does not increase creatine kinase levels or pain reports, but improves muscle and metabolic functions as a consequence of training. Therefore, it is suggested that dyslipidemic patients undergoing statin treatment should be exposed to moderate aerobic training in combination to resistance exercises three times a week, and the provision of physical training prior to drug administration is desirable, whenever possible. PMID:25993596

  20. Effectiveness of therapeutic physical exercise in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Martín, Pablo; Gallego-Izquierdo, T; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Romero-Franco, Natalia; Núñez-Nagy, Susana; Pecos-Martín, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of conservative treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome with physical exercise. [Subjects and Methods] A computer-based review conducted of four databases (PubMed, the Cochrane Library, PEDro, and the University Library) was completed based on the inclusion criteria of patellofemoral pain syndrome patients treated with physical exercise methods and examination with self-reported pain and/or functional questionnaires. [Results] The findings of ten clinical trials of moderate to high quality were evaluated to determine the effectiveness of physical exercise as conservative management for patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Conclusion] The intervention programs that were most effective in relieving pain and improving function in patellofemoral pain syndrome included proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and strengthening exercises for the hip external rotator and abductor muscles and knee extensor muscles. PMID:26311988

  1. Spinal stenosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... claudication; Central spinal stenosis; Foraminal spinal stenosis; Degenerative spine disease; Back pain - spinal stenosis ... to bulge. The bones and ligaments of the spine thicken or grow larger. This is caused by ...

  2. Does Scoliosis-Specific Exercise Treatment in Adolescence Alter Adult Quality of Life?

    PubMed Central

    P?aszewski, Maciej; Cie?li?ski, Igor; Kowalski, Pawe?; Truszczy?ska, Aleksandra; Nowobilski, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Health-related quality of life in adults, who in adolescence participated in a scoliosis-specific exercise program, was not previously studied. Design. Cross-sectional study, with retrospective data collection. Material and Methods. Homogenous groups of 68 persons (43 women) aged 30.10 (25–39) years, with mild or moderate scoliosis, and 76 (38 women) able-bodied persons, aged 30.11 (24–38) years, who 16.5 (12–26) years earlier had completed scoliosis-specific exercise or observation regimes, participated. Their respiratory characteristics did not differ from predicted values. The WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, and pain scale (VAS) were applied. Results. The transformed WHOQOL-BREF scores ranged from 54.6?±?11.19 in the physical domain in the mild scoliotic subgroup to 77.1?±?16.05 in the social domain in the able-bodied subgroup. The ODQ values did not generally exceed 5.3?±?7.53. Inter- and intragroup differences were nonsignificant. Age, marital status, education, and gender were significantly associated with the ODQ scores. Significant association between the ODQ and WHOQOL-BREF social relationships domain scores with the participation in exercise treatment was found. Conclusions. Participants with the history of exercise treatment generally did not differ significantly from their peers who were only under observation. This study cannot conclude that scoliosis-specific exercise treatment in adolescence alters quality of life in adulthood. PMID:25436225

  3. Spinal Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Katonis, P.; Datsis, G.; Karantanas, A.; Kampouroglou, A.; Lianoudakis, S.; Licoudis, S.; Papoutsopoulou, E.; Alpantaki, K.

    2013-01-01

    Although osteosarcoma represents the second most common primary bone tumor, spinal involvement is rare, accounting for 3%–5% of all osteosarcomas. The most frequent symptom of osteosarcoma is pain, which appears in almost all patients, whereas more than 70% exhibit neurologic deficit. At a molecular level, it is a tumor of great genetic complexity and several genetic disorders have been associated with its appearance. Early diagnosis and careful surgical staging are the most important factors in accomplishing sufficient management. Even though overall prognosis remains poor, en-block tumor removal combined with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy is currently the treatment of choice. This paper outlines histopathological classification, epidemiology, diagnostic procedures, and current concepts of management of spinal osteosarcoma. PMID:24179411

  4. Spinal tuberculosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Somvanshi, Dilip Singh

    2011-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis is a destructive form of tuberculosis. It accounts for approximately half of all cases of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is more common in children and young adults. The incidence of spinal tuberculosis is increasing in developed nations. Genetic susceptibility to spinal tuberculosis has recently been demonstrated. Characteristically, there is destruction of the intervertebral disk space and the adjacent vertebral bodies, collapse of the spinal elements, and anterior wedging leading to kyphosis and gibbus formation. The thoracic region of vertebral column is most frequently affected. Formation of a 'cold' abscess around the lesion is another characteristic feature. The incidence of multi-level noncontiguous vertebral tuberculosis occurs more frequently than previously recognized. Common clinical manifestations include constitutional symptoms, back pain, spinal tenderness, paraplegia, and spinal deformities. For the diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive imaging technique than x-ray and more specific than computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging frequently demonstrates involvement of the vertebral bodies on either side of the disk, disk destruction, cold abscess, vertebral collapse, and presence of vertebral column deformities. Neuroimaging-guided needle biopsy from the affected site in the center of the vertebral body is the gold standard technique for early histopathological diagnosis. Antituberculous treatment remains the cornerstone of treatment. Surgery may be required in selected cases, e.g. large abscess formation, severe kyphosis, an evolving neurological deficit, or lack of response to medical treatment. With early diagnosis and early treatment, prognosis is generally good. PMID:22118251

  5. [Physical exercise in the treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Fernando; Leite, Mário; Silva, Francisco; Sousa, Otília

    2007-01-01

    Physical exercise (PE) is a regular component in various disorders management, such as ankylosing spondilitis (AS). AS is a chronic and systematic rheumatic disorder without an effective treatment to restore the health. PE plays an important role on the prevention and management of the deformities related to AS. This review summarizes the randomized controlled trials that have examined the role of PE in AS patients' therapeutic process in order to promote an evidence based practise and to improve the AS patients care. Thirteen randomized controlled trials with a total of 1056 participants were identified in a Cochrane Central, Pubmed/ Medline and PEDro databases computer-based search. The quality assessment of the thirteen randomized controlled trial was 5,62 points in the PEDro scoring scale. Three trials assessed the effects induced by the addition of PE interventions to the medication program, three trials compared individualized home exercise with supervised group exercise, five trials compared alternative exercise programs (hydrotherapy and global posture reeducation) with traditional exercise programs usually recommended to treat AS patients, and two trials investigated the therapy effectiveness. The trials included in this review suggest that PE is a helpful therapy in the management of AS patients; PE should be performed in group under the physiotherapist supervision. New exercise-based approaches, hydrotherapy or global posture reeducation, offers promising results in the management of patients suffering AS. PMID:17572651

  6. Holistic Treatment Approaches to ADHD: Nutrition, Sleep,and Exercise, Part 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavoie, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This article is part of a series exploring Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). In this seventh installment, the author discusses three holistic treatments for children and adults with ADHD: diet and nutrition, sleep, and exercise. These approaches focus and improve the overall health of ADHD patients. (For Part 6 of this series, see…

  7. A Direct Comparison of Three Clinically Relevant Treatments in a Rat Model of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hosier, Hillary; Peterson, David; Tsymbalyuk, Orest; Keledjian, Kaspar; Smith, Bradley R.; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent preclinical studies have identified three treatments that are especially promising for reducing acute lesion expansion following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI): riluzole, systemic hypothermia, and glibenclamide. Each has demonstrated efficacy in multiple studies with independent replication, but there is no way to compare them in terms of efficacy or safety, since different models were used, different laboratories were involved, and different outcomes were evaluated. Here, using a model of lower cervical hemicord contusion, we compared safety and efficacy for the three treatments, administered beginning 4?h after trauma. Treatment-associated mortality was 30% (3/10), 30% (3/10), 12.5% (1/8), and 0% (0/7) in the control, riluzole, hypothermia, and glibenclamide groups, respectively. For survivors, all three treatments showed overall favorable efficacy, compared with controls. On open-field locomotor scores (modified Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scores), hypothermia- and glibenclamide-treated animals were largely indistinguishable throughout the study, whereas riluzole-treated rats underperformed for the first two weeks; during the last four weeks, scores for the three treatments were similar, and significantly different from controls. On beam balance, hypothermia and glibenclamide treatments showed significant advantages over riluzole. After trauma, rats in the glibenclamide group rapidly regained a normal pattern of weight gain that differed markedly and significantly from that in all other groups. Lesion volumes at six weeks were: 4.8±0.7, 3.5±0.4, 3.1±0.3 and 2.5±0.3?mm3 in the control, riluzole, hypothermia, and glibenclamide groups, respectively; measurements of spared spinal cord tissue confirmed these results. Overall, in terms of safety and efficacy, systemic hypothermia and glibenclamide were superior to riluzole. PMID:26192071

  8. [Eccentric exercises in the treatment of overuse injuries of the musculoskeletal system].

    PubMed

    Dimnjakovi?, Damjan; Bojani?, Ivan; Smoljanovi?, Tomislav; Mahnik, Alan; Barbari?-Perai?, Nevenka

    2012-01-01

    Overuse injuries of the musculoskeletal system are a common problem in both general population and among athletes. Researches made in the last decade have shown that overuse injuries are mainly caused by degenerative changes and not inflammation, as was thought before. Although they can be present everywhere in musculoskeletal system, overuse injuries are most often seen on tendons. The main goal of this article is to refer to latest guidelines in the treatment of overuse injuries, with special attention to eccentric exercise treatment program for most common tendinopathies (patellar tendinopathy, Achilles tendinopathy and lateral epicondylitis). The main reason is the fact that very good results are accomplished after eccentric exercises in the treatment of tendinopathies and are thus suggested as the first treatment option. PMID:22519251

  9. Transfer of the Brachialis to the Anterior Interosseous Nerve as a Treatment Strategy for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Hawasli, Ammar H.; Chang, Jodie; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Ray, Wilson Z.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design?Technical report. Objective?To provide a technical description of the transfer of the brachialis to the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) for the treatment of tetraplegia after a cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods?In this technical report, the authors present a case illustration of an ideal surgical candidate for a brachialis-to-AIN transfer: a 21-year-old patient with a complete C7 spinal cord injury and failure of any hand motor recovery. The authors provide detailed description including images and video showing how to perform the brachialis-to-AIN transfer. Results?The brachialis nerve and AIN fascicles can be successfully isolated using visual inspection and motor mapping. Then, careful dissection and microsurgical coaptation can be used for a successful anterior interosseous reinnervation. Conclusion?The nerve transfer techniques for reinnervation have been described predominantly for the treatment of brachial plexus injuries. The majority of the nerve transfer techniques have focused on the upper brachial plexus or distal nerves of the lower brachial plexus. More recently, nerve transfers have reemerged as a potential reinnervation strategy for select patients with cervical SCI. The brachialis-to-AIN transfer technique offers a potential means for restoration of intrinsic hand function in patients with SCI. PMID:25844283

  10. Transfer of the brachialis to the anterior interosseous nerve as a treatment strategy for cervical spinal cord injury: technical note.

    PubMed

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Chang, Jodie; Reynolds, Matthew R; Ray, Wilson Z

    2015-04-01

    Study Design?Technical report. Objective?To provide a technical description of the transfer of the brachialis to the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) for the treatment of tetraplegia after a cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods?In this technical report, the authors present a case illustration of an ideal surgical candidate for a brachialis-to-AIN transfer: a 21-year-old patient with a complete C7 spinal cord injury and failure of any hand motor recovery. The authors provide detailed description including images and video showing how to perform the brachialis-to-AIN transfer. Results?The brachialis nerve and AIN fascicles can be successfully isolated using visual inspection and motor mapping. Then, careful dissection and microsurgical coaptation can be used for a successful anterior interosseous reinnervation. Conclusion?The nerve transfer techniques for reinnervation have been described predominantly for the treatment of brachial plexus injuries. The majority of the nerve transfer techniques have focused on the upper brachial plexus or distal nerves of the lower brachial plexus. More recently, nerve transfers have reemerged as a potential reinnervation strategy for select patients with cervical SCI. The brachialis-to-AIN transfer technique offers a potential means for restoration of intrinsic hand function in patients with SCI. PMID:25844283

  11. Mass Spectrometry in Pharmacokinetic Studies of a Synthetic Compound for Spinal Cord Injury Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Lillo, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The studies of drugs that could constitute a palliative to spinal cord injury (SCI) are a continuous and increasing demand in biomedicine field from developed societies. Recently we described the chemical synthesis and antiglioma activity of synthetic glycosides. A synthetic sulfated glycolipid (here IG20) has shown chemical stability, solubility in polar solvents, and high inhibitory capacity over glioma growth. We have used mass spectrometry (MS) to monitor IG20 (m/z = 550.3) in cells and tissues of the central nervous system (CNS) that are involved in SCI recovery. IG20 was detected by MS in serum and homogenates from CNS tissue of rats, though in the latter a previous deproteinization step was required. The pharmacokinetic parameters of serum clearance at 24?h and half-life at 4?h were determined for synthetic glycoside in the adult rat using MS. A local administration of the drug near of spinal lesion site is proposed. PMID:26090386

  12. Intravenous multipotent adult progenitor cell treatment decreases inflammation leading to functional recovery following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    DePaul, Marc A.; Palmer, Marc; Lang, Bradley T.; Cutrone, Rochelle; Tran, Amanda P.; Madalena, Kathryn M.; Bogaerts, Annelies; Hamilton, Jason A.; Deans, Robert J.; Mays, Robert W.; Busch, Sarah A.; Silver, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), immune-mediated secondary processes exacerbate the extent of permanent neurological deficits. We investigated the capacity of adult bone marrow-derived stem cells, which exhibit immunomodulatory properties, to alter inflammation and promote recovery following SCI. In vitro, we show that human multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) have the ability to modulate macrophage activation, and prior exposure to MAPC secreted factors can reduce macrophage-mediated axonal dieback of dystrophic axons. Using a contusion model of SCI, we found that intravenous delivery of MAPCs one day, but not immediately, after SCI significantly improves urinary and locomotor recovery, which was associated with marked spinal cord tissue sparing. Intravenous MAPCs altered the immune response in the spinal cord and periphery, however biodistribution studies revealed that no MAPCs were found in the cord and instead preferentially homed to the spleen. Our results demonstrate that MAPCs exert their primary effects in the periphery and provide strong support for the use of these cells in acute human contusive SCI. PMID:26582249

  13. Intravenous multipotent adult progenitor cell treatment decreases inflammation leading to functional recovery following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    DePaul, Marc A; Palmer, Marc; Lang, Bradley T; Cutrone, Rochelle; Tran, Amanda P; Madalena, Kathryn M; Bogaerts, Annelies; Hamilton, Jason A; Deans, Robert J; Mays, Robert W; Busch, Sarah A; Silver, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), immune-mediated secondary processes exacerbate the extent of permanent neurological deficits. We investigated the capacity of adult bone marrow-derived stem cells, which exhibit immunomodulatory properties, to alter inflammation and promote recovery following SCI. In vitro, we show that human multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) have the ability to modulate macrophage activation, and prior exposure to MAPC secreted factors can reduce macrophage-mediated axonal dieback of dystrophic axons. Using a contusion model of SCI, we found that intravenous delivery of MAPCs one day, but not immediately, after SCI significantly improves urinary and locomotor recovery, which was associated with marked spinal cord tissue sparing. Intravenous MAPCs altered the immune response in the spinal cord and periphery, however biodistribution studies revealed that no MAPCs were found in the cord and instead preferentially homed to the spleen. Our results demonstrate that MAPCs exert their primary effects in the periphery and provide strong support for the use of these cells in acute human contusive SCI. PMID:26582249

  14. Regenerative medicine for the treatment of spinal cord injury: more than just promises?

    PubMed Central

    Pêgo, Ana Paula; Kubinova, Sarka; Cizkova, Dasa; Vanicky, Ivo; Mar, Fernando Milhazes; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Sykova, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury triggers a complex set of events that lead to tissue healing without the restoration of normal function due to the poor regenerative capacity of the spinal cord. Nevertheless, current knowledge about the intrinsic regenerative ability of central nervous system axons, when in a supportive environment, has made the prospect of treating spinal cord injury a reality. Among the range of strategies under investigation, cell-based therapies offer the most promising results, due to the multifactorial roles that these cells can fulfil. However, the best cell source is still a matter of debate, as are clinical issues that include the optimal cell dose as well as the timing and route of administration. In this context, the role of biomaterials is gaining importance. These can not only act as vehicles for the administered cells but also, in the case of chronic lesions, can be used to fill the permanent cyst, thus creating a more favourable and conducive environment for axonal regeneration in addition to serving as local delivery systems of therapeutic agents to improve the regenerative milieu. Some of the candidate molecules for the future are discussed in view of the knowledge derived from studying the mechanisms that facilitate the intrinsic regenerative capacity of central nervous system neurons. The future challenge for the multidisciplinary teams working in the field is to translate the knowledge acquired in basic research into effective combinatorial therapies to be applied in the clinic. PMID:22805417

  15. Specific exercises in the treatment of scoliosis--differential indication.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Maier-Hennes, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Different methods of physiotherapy are applied in scoliosis management and different opinions exist about the efficacy of conservative scoliosis treatment. Because this divergence of opinions corresponds to a great variety of standards applied, it is not surprising that also the results of conservative treatment greatly differ. Scoliosis normally does not have such dramatic effects that immediate surgery would be indicated. Moreover it is clear that functional and physiological impairments of scoliosis patients-including pain, torso deformity, psychological disturbance and pulmonary dysfunction-require therapeutic intervention. The triad of out-patient physiotherapy, intensive in-patient rehabilitation (SIR) and bracing has proven effective in conservative scoliosis treatment in central Europe. Indication, content and results of physiotherapy are described and discussed in this paper. The differential indication of methods of physiotherapy assigned to current "Best Practice" is documented here as well. The positive outcome of current "Best Practice" conservative management validates a policy of offering conservative treatment as an alternative to scoliosis patients, including those for whom surgery is discussed. PMID:18401090

  16. Exercise increases pyridinoline cross-linking and counters the mechanical effects of concurrent lathyrogenic treatment.

    PubMed

    McNerny, Erin M B; Gardinier, Joseph D; Kohn, David H

    2015-12-01

    The collagen cross-link profile of bone, associated with bone strength and fracture toughness, is tightly regulated (affecting cross-link quantity, type, lysine hydroxylation and maturity) and may contribute to the improvements in bone quality during exercise. We hypothesized that 1) exercise promotes mature cross-link formation, 2) increased mature cross-linking is accompanied by shifts in lysine hydroxylation, and 3) these changes in collagen cross-link profile have positive effects on mechanical properties. Growing male C57Bl6 mice were treated with 30min/day of running exercise, 350mg/kg/day ?-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) injected subcutaneously to inhibit enzymatic collagen cross-linking, or both exercise and BAPN, from 5 to 8weeks of age. Bone collagen cross-linking profile, mechanical properties, morphology, and mineralization were measured from the tibiae. Cross-link measures, including immature, pyridinoline, pyrrole and pentosidine cross-links, ratios reflecting cross-link maturity and hydroxylation, and mineralization were tested for their importance to mechanical properties across 8week groups through correlation analyses and step-wise linear regressions. BAPN treatment significantly reduced lysylpyridinoline, pyrrole, hydroxylysinorleucine, and total mature collagen cross-linking, resulting in decreased bone elastic modulus and increased yield strain despite a marginal increase in TMD. Exercise caused a shift toward pyridinoline cross-linking, with increased hydroxylysylpyridinoline and decreased pyrrole cross-linking resulting in total mature cross-linking and estimated tissue level mechanical properties matching sedentary control levels. Exercise superimposed on BAPN treatment increased total mature cross-linking from BAPN to control levels, but did so by increasing pyridinoline, not pyrrole, cross-links. Exercise also counteracted the BAPN effects on modulus and strain, without a change in TMD. Pyrrole cross-linking was the strongest correlate of modulus (r=0.470, p<0.01) and yield strain (r=-0.467, p<0.01). Cross-links with similar levels of telopeptide lysine hydroxylation to pyrrole (lysylpyridinoline and hydroxylysinorleucine) also correlated with modulus and strain to a lesser extent. In conclusion, exercise in growing mice promotes pyridinoline collagen cross-linking in bone, the resulting increase in total mature cross-linking is sufficient to counteract the mechanical effects of concurrent cross-link inhibition, and this responsiveness to loading is a potential means by which exercise might improve bone quality in diseased or otherwise compromised bone. PMID:26211995

  17. Prevention of exercised induced cardiomyopathy following Pip-PMO treatment in dystrophic mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Betts, Corinne A.; Saleh, Amer F.; Carr, Carolyn A.; Hammond, Suzan M.; Coenen-Stass, Anna M. L.; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Varela, Miguel A.; Roberts, Thomas C.; Clarke, Kieran; Gait, Michael J.; Wood, Matthew J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene. In addition to skeletal muscle wasting, DMD patients develop cardiomyopathy, which significantly contributes to mortality. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are a promising DMD therapy, restoring functional dystrophin protein by exon skipping. However, a major limitation with current AOs is the absence of dystrophin correction in heart. Pip peptide-AOs demonstrate high activity in cardiac muscle. To determine their therapeutic value, dystrophic mdx mice were subject to forced exercise to model the DMD cardiac phenotype. Repeated peptide-AO treatments resulted in high levels of cardiac dystrophin protein, which prevented the exercised induced progression of cardiomyopathy, normalising heart size as well as stabilising other cardiac parameters. Treated mice also exhibited significantly reduced cardiac fibrosis and improved sarcolemmal integrity. This work demonstrates that high levels of cardiac dystrophin restored by Pip peptide-AOs prevents further deterioration of cardiomyopathy and pathology following exercise in dystrophic DMD mice. PMID:25758104

  18. Likelihood of Reaching Minimal Clinically Important Difference in Adult Spinal Deformity: A Comparison of Operative and Nonoperative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shian; Schwab, Frank; Smith, Justin S.; Klineberg, Eric; Ames, Christopher P.; Mundis, Gregory; Hostin, Richard; Kebaish, Khaled; Deviren, Vedat; Gupta, Munish; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba; Hart, Robert A.; Bess, Shay; Lafage, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined threshold improvements in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) by measuring minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) in treatment of adult spinal deformity. We hypothesized that patients undergoing operative treatment would be more likely to achieve MCID threshold improvement compared with those receiving nonoperative care, although a subset of nonoperative patients may still reach threshold. Methods We analyzed a multicenter, prospective, consecutive case series of 464 patients: 225 nonoperative and 239 operative. To be included in the study, patients had to have adult spinal deformity, be older than 18 years, and have both baseline and 1-year follow-up HRQOL measures (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], Short Form-36 [SF-36] health survey, and Scoliosis Research Society-22 [SRS-22] questionnaire). We compared the percentages of patients achieving established MCID thresholds between operative and nonoperative groups using risk ratios (RR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Compared to nonoperative patients, surgical patients demonstrated significant mean improvement (P<0.01) and were more likely to achieve threshold MCID improvement across all HRQOL scores (ODI RR = 7.37 [CI 4.45, 12.21], SF-36 physical component score RR = 2.96 [CI 2.11, 4.15], SRS Activity RR = 3.16 [CI 2.32, 4.31]). Furthermore, operative patients were more likely to reach threshold MCID improvement in 2 or more HRQOL measures simultaneously and were less likely to deteriorate. Conclusion Patients in both the operative and nonoperative treatment groups demonstrated improvement in at least one HRQOL measure at 1 year. However, surgical treatment was more likely to result in threshold improvement and more likely to lead to simultaneous improvement across multiple measures of ODI, SF-36, and SRS-22. Although a subset of nonoperative patients achieved threshold improvement, nonoperative patients were significantly less likely to improve in multiple HRQOL measures and more likely to sustain MCID deterioration or no change. PMID:24688336

  19. The Ethics of the Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury: Stem Cell Transplants, Motor Neuroprosthetics, and Social Equity

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V.; Bandopadhayay, Prateek; Goldschlager, Tony; Brown, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    The intense desire for a “cure” in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) has resulted in the transplantation of stem cells and embryonic and other cell types into the injured spinal cord to enable limb function. We review the ethical issues concerning the procurement and use of embryonic stem cells. A brief survey of the current state of human SCI transplantation is presented. We explore the interface between basic science and the clinical management of SCI and discuss the ethical issues of therapy. At what point is it ethical to conduct human experiments when the experimental data is still at an early stage of development? Is it ethical to perform these operations on a vulnerable group of patients without adequate scientific controls and analysis of the results? Motor neuroprosthetics is developing rapidly and will enable limb movement controlled by the paralyzed patient and other device control such as wheelchairs and communication boards. How can there be a more equitable distribution of such expensive technology and other treatments of SCI? Both clinicians and scientists should be mindful of these complex ethical issues when undertaking pioneering therapies for patients with SCI. PMID:20351789

  20. Ligustilide treatment promotes functional recovery in a rat model of spinal cord injury via preventing ROS production

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Weidong; Yu, Aixi; Liu, Danli; Shen, Jun; Xu, Zhigao

    2015-01-01

    Ligustilide from traditional Chinese medicine extract, angelica sinensis is one of the main active components, and has many pharmacological activities related to the effectiveness. This study sought to determine whether neuro-protection of ligustilide promotes functional recovery in a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI) via preventing ROS production. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were induced using operation for model SCI. Furthermore, Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) scale and footprint analysis of gait was used to assess the neuro-protection of ligustilide on SCI. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), interleukin-1? (IL-1?) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? production levels were measured by monoclonal enzyme immunoassay kit. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression, activator protein-1 (AP-1) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) protein expressions were detected using Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) and western blot analyses, respectively. Interestingly, treatment with ligustilide significantly increased BBB scale and reduced recovery of coordination in SCI rats. After SCI, the iROS, PGE(2), IL-1?, TNF-? production levels and iNOS gene expression were significantly suppressed in SCI rats. These results suggest that the neuro-protection of ligustilide promotes functional recovery in a rat model of spinal cord injury via preventing ROS production. PMID:26722386

  1. Teamwork approach to prevention and treatment of skin breakdown in spinal cord patients.

    PubMed

    Ponce de Leon, Marcus

    2015-02-01

    Pressure ulcers, which are localized injuries to skin and underlying tissue resulting from prolonged pressure, are a significant complication among patients with spinal cord injury. They threaten patients' quality of life, prolong stays at health care facilities, and pose a burden on the overall health care system through increased costs. Familiarity with the risk factors for developing pressure ulcers and the methods used to treat them is paramount to decreasing their occurrence and lessening the negative impact from both a human and economic standpoint. PMID:25651227

  2. The feasibility of utilizing pseudo CT-data for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation for a stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of spinal bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Hoogcarspel, Stan J; Van der Velden, Joanne M; Lagendijk, Jan J W; van Vulpen, Marco; Raaymakers, Bas W

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what pseudo-CT (pCT) strategy is sufficient for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation of a stereotactic treatment for spinal bone metastases. For this purpose, the dosimetric accuracy of five increasingly complex pCT strategies was evaluated using the planning CT data of 20 patients suffering from spinal metastases. For each pCT, a treatment plan was developed and simulated on both the pCT and the original CT data of the patient. The two resulting dose distributions were compared using gamma analysis of 2%/2 mm. In this paper, a Gamma Pass Rate (GPR) of ? 95% within the Target Volume (TV) was considered clinically acceptable. We additionally demonstrated in this paper the automatic generation of each investigated pCT strategy with the use of dedicated MRI data complemented with pre-treatment CT data of a patient in treatment position. The dosimetric accuracy of a pCT increases when additional bulk densities are utilized for a pCT. However, the dosimetric accuracy of even the most complex 'bulk density' pCT strategy used in this study had an average GPR of only 78% within the TV. However, if information on the heterogeneous electron density distribution within the affected vertebral body was available, a clinically acceptable 99% mean GPR was observed. All pCTs could successfully be generated using the MRI data in combination with the CT data of a patient in treatment position. The results presented in this study show that a simple 'bulk density' pseudo-CT strategy is not feasible for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation for spinal bone metastases. However, a clinically acceptable result is generated if the information on the heterogeneous electron density (ED) distribution within the affected vertebral bone is available. Therefore, any pCT strategy for this tumor site should include a method which can estimate the heterogeneous ED of the affected vertebral bone. PMID:25386792

  3. Early versus late treatment of spinal cord compression with long-term intrathecal enzyme replacement therapy in canine mucopolysaccharidosis type I

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Patricia I.; Hanson, Stephen; McEntee, Michael F.; Vite, Charles H.; Vogler, Carole A.; Mlikotic, Anton; Chen, Agnes H.; Ponder, Katherine P.; Haskins, Mark E.; Tippin, Brigette L.; Le, Steven Q.; Passage, Merry B.; Guerra, Catalina; Dierenfeld, Ashley; Jens, Jackie; Snella, Elizabeth; Kan, Shih-hsin; Ellinwood, N. Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with intravenous recombinant human alpha-l-iduronidase (IV rhIDU) is a treatment for patients with mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I). Spinal cord compression develops in MPS I patients due in part to dural and leptomeningeal thickening from accumulated glycosaminoglycans (GAG). We tested long-term and every three month intrathecal (IT) and weekly IV rhIDU in MPS I dogs age 12-15 months (Adult) and MPS I pups age 2-23 days (Early) to determine whether spinal cord compression could be reversed, stabilized, or prevented. Five treatment groups of MPS I dogs were evaluated (n=4 per group): IT+IV Adult, IV Adult, IT+IV Early, 0.58 mg/kg IV Early and 1.57 mg/kg IV Early. IT+IV rhIDU (Adult and Early) led to very high iduronidase levels in cervical, thoracic, and lumber spinal meninges (3,600-29,000% of normal), while IV rhIDU alone (Adult and Early) led to levels that were 8.2-176% of normal. GAG storage was significantly reduced from untreated levels in spinal meninges of IT+IV Early (p<0.001), IT+IV Adult (p=0.001), 0.58 mg/kg IV Early (p=0.002) and 1.57 mg/kg IV Early (p<0.001) treatment groups. Treatment of dogs shortly after birth with IT+IV rhIDU (IT+IV Early) led to normal to near-normal GAG levels in the meninges and histologic absence of storage vacuoles. Lysosomal storage was reduced in spinal anterior horn cells in 1.57 mg/kg IV Early and IT+IV Early animals. All dogs in IT+IV Adult and IV Adult groups had compression of their spinal cord at 12-15 months of age determined by magnetic resonance imaging and was due to protrusion of spinal disks into the canal. Cord compression developed in 3 of 4 dogs in the 0.58 mg/kg IV Early group; 2 of 3 dogs in the IT+IV Early group; and 0 of 4 dogs in the 1.57 mg/kg IV Early group by 12-18 months of age. IT+IV rhIDU was more effective than IV rhIDU alone for treatment of meningeal storage, and it prevented meningeal GAG accumulation when begun early. High-dose IV rhIDU from birth (1.57 mg/kg weekly) appeared to prevent cord compression due to protrusion of spinal disks. PMID:20655780

  4. Various attitudes to the use of corrective exercises in conservative treatment of scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Janusz; Nowotny-Czupryna, Olga; Czupryna, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    In acquired scoliosis, the degree of the curve is initially low and its type becomes apparent only after it has progressed. The characteristics of scoliosis include an abnormal spatial arrangement of individual body segments, which the central nervous system (CNS) interprets as a defect and automatically launches compensatory mechanisms. Neglecting low-degree scoliosis poses a two-fold danger. It usually leads to the development of structural changes, while the child gets used to the abnormal body arrangement, thus reinforcing the poor postural habits. The basic aim of early rehabilitation is to manage the compensatory mechanisms and prevent the development of adverse secondary changes, rehabilitation in scoliosis being no exception.Some cases of scoliosis require surgery. The point is to minimise the changes resulting from the progression of scoliosis. The role of corrective exercises seems to be significant here. However, views on the usefulness of such exercises are sometimes extremely varied, even though both favourable and sceptical opinions are not fully supported by the literature. However, a number of reports indicate that corrective exercises are useful.
    The selection and of corrective exercises and how they should be performed are another question. A number of methods of conservative treatment of scoliosis have been devised. Currently, none of them is considered a comprehensive regimen since each patient requires an individual approach. The most difficult aspect is to ensure that local correction translates to the automatic maintenance of the corrected body posture in a standing position. This is facilitated by corrective exercises supported with biofeedback.
    The aim of this paper is to elucidate this complex issue that often leads to divergent and improper attitudes to the conservative treatment of scoliosis. PMID:20203340

  5. The Effects of Combined Treatment with Naringin and Treadmill Exercise on Osteoporosis in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Xiaolei; Fengbo, LI; Xinlong, MA; Jianxiong, MA; ZHAO, Bin; ZHANG, Yang; Yanjun, LI; Jianwei, LV; MENG, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and progressive destruction of bone microstructure, resulting in increased the risk of fracture. Previous studies have demonstrated the effect of naringin (NG) or treadmill exercise (EX) on osteoporosis, however, reports about effects of NG plus EX on osteoporosis are limited. This study was designed to investigate the impact of combined treatment with naringin and treadmill exercise on osteoporosis in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Three months after bilateral ovariectomy, Seventy-five rats were randomly assigned to the following treatment groups: OVX, sham-operated (SHAM), NG, EX, or NG plus EX treatment. Treatments were administered for 60 days. Bone metabolism, bone mineral density, trabecular bone parameters, immunohistochemistry, and the bone strength were evaluated. Compared to the OVX groups, all treatments increased bone volume (BV/TV), trabecula number (Tb.N), trabecula thickness (Tb.Th), bone mineral density (BMD), and mechanical strength. NG?+?EX showed the strongest effects on BV/TV, Tb.Th, and biomechanical strength. Additionally, decreased C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX-1) and enhanced osteocalcin (OCN) expression were observed in the NG?+?EX group. The present study demonstrates that the NG?+?EX may have a therapeutic advantage over each monotherapy for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:26260240

  6. Treatment of chronic low back pain in patients with spinal deformities using a sagittal re-alignment brace

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Werkmann, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Background For adult scoliosis patients with chronic low back pain bracing is initially indicated before spinal surgery is considered. Until recently there has been a lack of research into the effect upon pain reductions in the mid and long-term. Promising results have been documented in short-term studies for the application of a sagittal re-alignment brace in patients with spinal deformities and along with pain; however mid-term and long-term results are not yet available. The purpose of this study is to investigate the mid-term effects of this brace with respect to pain control. Materials and methods 67 patients (58 females and 9 males) with chronic low back pain (> 24 months) and the diagnosis of scoliosis or hyperkyphosis were treated with a sagittal re-alignment brace (physio-logic brace™) between January 2006 and July 2007. The indication for this kind of brace treatment was derived from a positive sagittal re-alignment test (SRT) and the exclusion of successful conservative treatment during the last 24 months. The aim of this type of conservative intervention was to avoid surgery for chronic low back pain. Results The average pain intensity was measured on the Roland and Morris VRS (5 steps) before treatment. This was 3.3 (t1), at the time of brace adjustment it was 2.7 (t2) and after at an average observation time of 18 months it was 2.0 (t3). The differences were highly significant in the Wilcoxon test. Discussion Short-term measurements showed that a significant pain reduction is possible in chronic postural low back pain using a sagittal re-alignment brace inducing lumbar re-lordosation. In a preliminary report at adjustment (t2), highly significant improvements of pain intensity have also been demonstrated. At 6 months of treatment however, no improvement was measured. The improvement of the mid-term effects (18 months) found in this study compared to the preliminary report may be due to the changed approach to compliance: whilst the bracing standard was not changed; the patients in this study were obligated to wear the brace for a minimum of 20 hrs per day for the first 6 months of treatment. Conclusion The effect of the sagittal re-alignment brace leads to promising short-term improvements in patients with chronic low back pain and spinal deformities. Contrary to unspecific orthoses, which after a short period without persistent pain reduction are omitted by the patients, the sagittal re-alignment brace (physio-logic™ brace) leads to an effective reduction of pain intensity in mid-term even in patients who have stopped brace treatment after the initial 6 months of treatment. In conservative treatment of chronic low back pain specific approaches such as the sagittal re-alignment brace are indicated prior to considering the surgical options. PMID:19272146

  7. The Effects of Ice Massage, Ice Massage with Exercise, and Exercise on the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Isabell, William Kirk; Durrant, Earlene; Myrer, William; Anderson, Shauna

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, and exercise on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty-two subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Preexercise measures were recorded for range of motion (ROM), strength, perceived soreness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. Subjects performed up to 300 concentric/eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with 90% of their 10 repetition maximum to induce muscle soreness. Dependent variables were assessed at 2, 4, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours postexercise. Significant differences occurred in all variables with respect to time (ANOVA(p<.05)). However, no significant mode of treatment, or mode of treatment/assessment time interaction was present. Decreases in range of motion and flexion strength correspond with increases in perceived soreness. The nonsignificant mode of treatment/assessment time interaction suggests that the use of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, or exercise alone is not effective in significantly reducing the symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness. In fact, though not statistically significant, the pattern of the data suggested the use of ice in the treatment of DOMS may be contraindicated. Further investigation is recommended. PMID:16558163

  8. Apamin-mediated actively targeted drug delivery for treatment of spinal cord injury: more than just a concept.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin; Jiang, Hong; Bi, Qiuyan; Luo, Qingsong; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Zhangbao; Li, Chong

    2014-09-01

    Faced with the complex medical challenge presented by spinal cord injuries (SCI) and considering the lack of any available curative therapy, the development of a novel method of delivering existing drugs or candidate agents can be perceived to be as important as the development of new therapeutic molecules. By combining three ingredients currently in clinical use or undergoing testing, we have designed a central nervous system targeted delivery system based on apamin-modified polymeric micelles (APM). Apamin, one of the major components of honey bee venom, serves as the targeting moiety, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE) serves as the drug-loaded material, and curcumin is used as the therapeutic agent. Apamin was conjugated with NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide)-PEG-DSPE in a site-specific manner, and APM were prepared by a thin-film hydration method. A formulation comprising 0.5 mol % targeting ligand with 50 nm particle size showed strong targeting efficiency in vivo and was evaluated in pharmacodynamic assays. A 7-day treatment by daily intravenous administration of low doses of APM (corresponding to 5 mg/kg of curcumin) was performed. Significantly enhanced recovery and prolonged survival was found in the SCI mouse model, as compared to sham-treated groups, with no apparent toxicity. A single dose of apamin-conjugated polymers was about 700-fold lower than the LD50 amount, suggesting that APM and apamin have potential for clinical applications as spinal cord targeting ligand for delivery of agents in treatment of diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:25098949

  9. Spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease: results of a single-center study of 258 patients.

    PubMed

    Horsch, Svante; Schulte, Stefan; Hess, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    This report is of a retrospective study of data from 258 patients who received spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for the treatment of peripheral vascular disease as a result of arteriosclerosis. The patients' clinical outcomes were monitored over a period of 18 months. In patients with a low baseline transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO(2)) value of <10 mm Hg, limb survival at 18 months of follow-up (estimated by use of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis) was 77.8%, and this was even higher, at 89.5%, in patients with a medium baseline TcPO(2) value of 10-30 mm Hg. This successful treatment was accompanied by a sustained increase in TcPO(2) values to approximately 30 mm Hg in both of these groups. In looking at diabetic and nondiabetic patients, there is no difference in limb survival as a result of the treatment. It is concluded that SCS is an effective therapy in improving limb survival in patients with peripheral vascular disease. In addition, TcPO(2) values at baseline may be a useful predictor of treatment outcome. PMID:15026864

  10. We need to move more: Neurobiological hypotheses of physical exercise as a treatment for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Junior, Renato S; Cevada, Thais; Oliveira, Bruno R R; Lattari, Eduardo; Portugal, Eduardo M M; Carvalho, Alessandro; Deslandes, Andrea C

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases in the world. The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and chronic inflammation impair specific brain areas, which in turn result in lesser motor control, behavioral changes and cognitive decline. Nowadays, drug-treatments are the foremost approaches in treating PD. However, exercise has been shown to have powerful effects on PD, based on several neurobiological mechanisms. These effects may decrease the risk of developing PD by 33%. However, these mechanisms are unclear and little explored. Among several mechanisms, we propose two specific hypotheses: 1. Physical exercise reduces chronic oxidative stress and stimulates mitochondria biogenesis and up-regulation of authophagy in PD patients. Moreover, antioxidant enzymes (e.g. superoxide dismutase) become more active and effective in response to physical exercise. 2. Exercise stimulates neurotransmitter (e.g. dopamine) and trophic factors (BDNF, GDNF, FGF-2, IGF-1, among others) synthesis. These neurochemical phenomena promote neuroplasticity, which, in turn, decreases neural apoptosis and may delay the neurodegeneration process, preventing or decreasing PD development and symptoms, respectively. PMID:26209418

  11. Atypical spinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pande, Ketan C; Babhulkar, Sudhir S

    2002-05-01

    Typical spinal tuberculosis is readily diagnosed and treated. Certain atypical clinical and radiologic presentations of spinal tuberculosis are described. Failure to recognize these presentations may lead to delay in diagnosis and initiation of treatment. In some atypical forms of the disease, this may have disastrous consequences. The current authors present a new classification for atypical spinal tuberculosis and describe the various presentations. The role of advanced imaging studies such as computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging and imaging-guided aspiration cytology is discussed. PMID:11964633

  12. The neuroprotective effect of treatment with curcumin in acute spinal cord injury: laboratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Cho, Dae-Chul; Park, Seong-Hyun; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Sung, Joo-Kyung; Cho, Hee-Jung; Jeon, Younghoon

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was investigating the effects of curcumin on the histological changes and functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) in a rat model. Following either sham operation or SCI, 36 male Sprague-Dawley rats were distributed into three groups: sham group, curcumin-treated group, and vehicle-injected group. Locomotor function was assessed according to the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale in rats who had received daily intraperitoneal injections of 200 mg/kg curcumin or an equivalent volume of vehicle for 7 days following SCI. The injured spinal cord was then examined histologically, including quantification of cavitation. BBB scores were significantly higher in rats receiving curcumin than receiving vehicle (P < 0.05). The cavity volume was significantly reduced in the curcumin group as compared to the control group (P = 0.039). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was significantly elevated in the curcumin group as compared to the vehicle group but was not significantly different from the sham group (P < 0.05, P > 0.05, respectively) at one and two weeks after SCI. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly elevated in the vehicle group as compared to the sham group (P < 0.05 at 1 and 2 weeks). MDA activity was significantly reduced in the curcumin group at 2 weeks after SCI when compared to the vehicle group (P = 0.004). The numbers of macrophage were significantly decreased in the curcumin group (P = 0.001). This study demonstrated that curcumin enhances early functional recovery after SCI by diminishing cavitation volume, anti-inflammatory reactions, and antioxidant activity. PMID:24477066

  13. An Injectable, Calcium Responsive Composite Hydrogel for the Treatment of Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Immediately following spinal cord injury, further injury can occur through several secondary injury cascades. As a consequence of cell lysis, an increase in extracellular Ca2+ results in additional neuronal loss by inducing apoptosis. Thus, hydrogels that reduce extracellular Ca2+ concentration may reduce secondary injury severity. The goal of this study was to develop composite hydrogels consisting of alginate, chitosan, and genipin that interact with extracellular Ca2+ to enable in situ gelation while maintaining an elastic modulus similar to native spinal cord (?1000 Pa). It was hypothesized that incorporation of genipin and chitosan would regulate hydrogel electrostatic characteristics and influence hydrogel porosity, degradation, and astrocyte behavior. Hydrogel composition was varied to create hydrogels with statistically similar mechanical properties (?1000 Pa) that demonstrated tunable charge characteristics (6-fold range in free amine concentration) and degradation rate (complete degradation between 7 and 28 days; some blends persist after 28 days). Hydrogels demonstrate high sensitivity to Ca2+ concentration, as a 1 mM change during fabrication induced a significant change in elastic modulus. Additionally, hydrogels incubated in a Ca2+-containing solution exhibited an increased linear viscoelastic limit (LVE) and an increased elastic modulus above the LVE limit in a time dependent manner. An extension of the LVE limit implies a change in hydrogel cross-linking structure. Attachment assays demonstrated that addition of chitosan/genipin to alginate hydrogels induced up to a 4-fold increase in the number of attached astrocytes and facilitated astrocyte clustering on the hydrogel surface in a composition dependent manner. Furthermore, Western blots demonstrated tunable glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) expression in astrocytes cultured on hydrogel blends, with some hydrogel compositions demonstrating no significant increase in GFAP expression compared to astrocytes cultured on glass. Thus, alginate/chitosan/genipin hydrogel composites show promise as scaffolds that regulate astrocyte behavior and for the prevention of Ca2+-related secondary neuron damage during acute SCI. PMID:24397537

  14. Survival-Related Factors of Spinal Metastasis with Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Current Surgical Treatment Modalities : A Single Institute Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Ho; Kim, Eun-Sang; Eoh, Whan; Chung, Sung-Soo; Lee, Chong-Suh

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recently, the survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been prolonged with improvements in various diagnostic tools and medical treatment modalities. Consequently, spine metastases from HCC are being diagnosed more frequently. The accurate prediction of prognosis plays a critical role in determining a patient's treatment plan, including surgery for patients with spinal metastases of HCC. We investigated the clinical features, surgical outcomes, and prognostic factors of HCC presenting with spine metastases, in patients who underwent surgery. Methods A retrospective review was conducted on 33 HCC patients who underwent 36 operations (three patients underwent surgical treatment twice) from February 2006 to December 2013. The median age of the patients was 56 years old (range, 28 to 71; male : female=30 : 3). Results Overall survival was not correlated with age, sex, level of metastases, preoperative Child-Pugh classification, preoperative ambulatory function, preoperative radiotherapy, type of operation, administration of Sorafenib, or the Tokuhashi scoring system. Only the Tomita scoring system was shown to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival. Comparing the Child-Pugh classification and ambulatory ability, there were no statistically differences between patients pre- and post-operatively. Conclusion The Tomita scoring system represents a practicable and highly predictive prognostic tool. Even though surgical intervention may not restore ambulatory function, it should be considered to prevent deterioration of the patient's overall condition. Additionally, aggressive management may be needed if there is any ambulatory ability remaining. PMID:26713145

  15. Exercise therapy for depression in middle-aged and older adults: predictors of early dropout and treatment failure.

    PubMed

    Herman, Steve; Blumenthal, James A; Babyak, Michael; Khatri, Parinda; Craighead, W Edward; Krishnan, K Ranga; Doraiswamy, P Murali

    2002-11-01

    Psychosocial factors predicting treatment dropout or failure to benefit from treatment were identified in a randomized trial of exercise therapy and pharmacotherapy for major depression. One hundred fifty-six men and women over age 50 diagnosed with major depressive disorder were assigned to a 16-week program of aerobic exercise, medication (sertraline), or a combination of exercise and medication. Thirty-two patients (21%) failed to complete the program and were considered treatment "dropouts." At the end of 16 weeks, 83 patients (53%) were in remission; the remaining patients not in remission were considered treatment "failures." Baseline levels of self-reported anxiety and lift satisfaction were the best predictors of both patient dropout and treatment success or failure across all treatment conditions. PMID:12433007

  16. SU-C-17A-07: The Development of An MR Accelerator-Enabled Planning-To-Delivery Technique for Stereotactic Palliative Radiotherapy Treatment of Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogcarspel, S J; Kontaxis, C; Velden, J M van der; Bol, G H; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR accelerator-enabled online planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases. The technical challenges include; automated stereotactic treatment planning, online MR-based dose calculation and MR guidance during treatment. Methods: Using the CT data of 20 patients previously treated at our institution, a class solution for automated treatment planning for spinal bone metastases was created. For accurate dose simulation right before treatment, we fused geometrically correct online MR data with pretreatment CT data of the target volume (TV). For target tracking during treatment, a dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR sequence was developed. An in house developed GPU based IMRT optimization and dose calculation algorithm was used for fast treatment planning and simulation. An automatically generated treatment plan developed with this treatment planning system was irradiated on a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator and evaluated using a Delta4 dosimeter. Results: The automated treatment planning method yielded clinically viable plans for all patients. The MR-CT fusion based dose calculation accuracy was within 2% as compared to calculations performed with original CT data. The dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR Sequence was able to provide an update of the anatomical location of the TV every 10 seconds. Dose calculation and optimization of the automatically generated treatment plans using only one GPU took on average 8 minutes. The Delta4 measurement of the irradiated plan agreed with the dose calculation with a 3%/3mm gamma pass rate of 86.4%. Conclusions: The development of an MR accelerator-enabled planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases was presented. Future work will involve developing an intrafraction motion adaptation strategy, MR-only dose calculation, radiotherapy quality-assurance in a magnetic field, and streamlining the entire treatment process on an MR accelerator.

  17. Adjacent Segment Pathology Following Anterior Decompression and Fusion Using Cage and Plate for the Treatment of Degenerative Cervical Spinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jong-Kil

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To analyze the incidence and prevalence of clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) following anterior decompression and fusion with cage and plate augmentation for degenerative cervical diseases. Overview of Literature No long-term data on the use of cage and plate augmentation have been reported. Methods The study population consisted of 231 patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with cage and plate for degenerative cervical spinal disease. The incidence and prevalence of CASP was determined by using the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. To analyze the factors that influence CASP, data on preoperative and postoperative sagittal alignment, spinal canal diameter, the distance between the plate and adjacent disc, extent of fusion level, and the presence or absence of adjacent segment degenerative changes by imaging studies were evaluated. Results CASP occurred in 15 of the cases, of which 9 required additional surgery. At 8-year follow-up, the average yearly incidence was 1.1%. The rate of disease-free survival based on Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was 93.6% at 5 years and 90.2% at 8 years. No statistically significant differences in CASP incidence based on radiological analysis were observed. Significantly high incidence of CASP was observed in the presence of increased adjacent segment degenerative changes (p<0.001). Conclusions ACDF with cage and plate for the treatment of degenerative cervical disease is associated with a lower incidence in CSAP by 1.1% per year, and the extent of preoperative adjacent segment degenerative changes has been shown as a risk factor for CASP. PMID:25558313

  18. Spinal Cord Stereotaxy: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Nadvornik, Pavel

    2015-07-01

    The origin of spinal cord stereotaxy can be traced back to the 19th-century work of Woroshiloff, the pioneer of brain stereotaxy. The development of clinical brain stereotaxy began in the mid-20th century, but spinal cord stereotaxy lagged behind. The first stereotactic spinal cord surgery was successfully performed by Hitchcock for pain treatment in the 1960s, and surgery for urinary bladder hyperspasticity performed by Nádvorník followed several years later. Other stereotactic surgeries of the spinal cord movement system could not be considered until Slovak anatomist ?ierny used animal experiments (with cats) to discover the exact location of motoneurons for the individual muscles in the anterior horns of the spinal cord. Having compared the data with the pattern of Riley's atlas based on microscopic investigation of the human spinal cord (only motoneuron groups without functional properties), the first stereotactic spinal cord atlas was transferred to human structures. With the construction of a universal spinal cord stereotactic device began a new era in spinal cord stereotaxy. The investigation of spinal cord movement functions will probably become the main focus of this discipline that aims to restore physiologic movement after spinal cord injury associated with paraplegia. PMID:25798803

  19. Spinal Manipulation for Low-Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NCCIH fact sheet Chiropractic: An Introduction . What the Science Says About Spinal Manipulation for Low-Back Pain Overall, studies have shown that spinal manipulation is one of several options—including exercise, massage, and physical therapy—that can provide mild- ...

  20. The management of bilateral high hamstring tendinopathy with ASTYM® treatment and eccentric exercise: a case report

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Joshua R

    2012-01-01

    High hamstring tendinopathy (HHT) is an overuse injury that occurs most commonly in runners. The management of HHT is often challenging and the research supporting many interventions is limited. Eccentric exercise has been proven effective in the treatment of various tendinopathies but has not been thoroughly studied with HHT. Soft tissue mobilization, including ASTYM, is often utilized in the treatment of tendinopathies, though there is limited evidence supporting this approach. The purpose of this paper is to present the case of a patient referred to physical therapy with bilateral HHT. The patient was a 41-year-old recreational runner that had an insidious onset of right buttock pain 12 months prior to initiating therapy and left buttock pain 9 months prior. Her primary complaints included an inability to run, pain with prolonged or brisk walking, and pain with sitting on hard surfaces. The patient was treated in physical therapy two times per week for 16 visits with treatment focused on eccentric hamstring strengthening and ASTYM. By her eighth visit, the patient was able to walk 2·5 miles without pain and by her 12 visit, she was able to jog 1 mile before the onset of pain. After 16 visits, the patient reported that she was approximately 95% improved, was able to run 2·5 miles without pain, and had no pain with sitting on hard surfaces. This case suggests that eccentric exercise combined with ASTYM may be an effective treatment for HHT. PMID:23904753

  1. Repetitive Treatment with Diluted Bee Venom Attenuates the Induction of Below-Level Neuropathic Pain Behaviors in a Rat Spinal Cord Injury Model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Suk-Yun; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Choi, Jung-Wan; Ryu, Yeonhee; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2015-07-01

    The administration of diluted bee venom (DBV) into an acupuncture point has been utilized traditionally in Eastern medicine to treat chronic pain. We demonstrated previously that DBV has a potent anti-nociceptive efficacy in several rodent pain models. The present study was designed to examine the potential anti-nociceptive effect of repetitive DBV treatment in the development of below-level neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury (SCI) rats. DBV was applied into the Joksamli acupoint during the induction and maintenance phase following thoracic 13 (T13) spinal hemisection. We examined the effect of repetitive DBV stimulation on SCI-induced bilateral pain behaviors, glia expression and motor function recovery. Repetitive DBV stimulation during the induction period, but not the maintenance, suppressed pain behavior in the ipsilateral hind paw. Moreover, SCI-induced increase in spinal glia expression was also suppressed by repetitive DBV treatment in the ipsilateral dorsal spinal cord. Finally, DBV injection facilitated motor function recovery as indicated by the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan rating score. These results indicate that the repetitive application of DBV during the induction phase not only decreased neuropathic pain behavior and glia expression, but also enhanced locomotor functional recovery after SCI. This study suggests that DBV acupuncture can be a potential clinical therapy for SCI management. PMID:26184310

  2. Repetitive Treatment with Diluted Bee Venom Attenuates the Induction of Below-Level Neuropathic Pain Behaviors in a Rat Spinal Cord Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Suk-Yun; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Choi, Jung-Wan; Ryu, Yeonhee; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2015-01-01

    The administration of diluted bee venom (DBV) into an acupuncture point has been utilized traditionally in Eastern medicine to treat chronic pain. We demonstrated previously that DBV has a potent anti-nociceptive efficacy in several rodent pain models. The present study was designed to examine the potential anti-nociceptive effect of repetitive DBV treatment in the development of below-level neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury (SCI) rats. DBV was applied into the Joksamli acupoint during the induction and maintenance phase following thoracic 13 (T13) spinal hemisection. We examined the effect of repetitive DBV stimulation on SCI-induced bilateral pain behaviors, glia expression and motor function recovery. Repetitive DBV stimulation during the induction period, but not the maintenance, suppressed pain behavior in the ipsilateral hind paw. Moreover, SCI-induced increase in spinal glia expression was also suppressed by repetitive DBV treatment in the ipsilateral dorsal spinal cord. Finally, DBV injection facilitated motor function recovery as indicated by the Basso–Beattie–Bresnahan rating score. These results indicate that the repetitive application of DBV during the induction phase not only decreased neuropathic pain behavior and glia expression, but also enhanced locomotor functional recovery after SCI. This study suggests that DBV acupuncture can be a potential clinical therapy for SCI management. PMID:26184310

  3. Exercise as an add-on strategy for the treatment of major depressive disorder: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mura, Gioia; Moro, Maria Francesca; Patten, Scott B; Carta, Mauro G

    2014-12-01

    Antidepressants are currently the treatment of choice for major depressive disorder (MDD). Nevertheless, a high percentage of patients do not respond to a first-line antidepressant drug, and combination treatments and augmentation strategies increase the risk of side effects. Moreover, a significant proportion of patients are treatment-resistant. In the last 30 years, a number of studies have sought to establish whether exercise could be regarded as an alternative to antidepressants, but so far no specific analysis has examined the efficacy of exercise as an adjunctive treatment in combination with antidepressants. We carried out a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of exercise as an adjunctive treatment with antidepressants on depression. A search of relevant papers was carried out in PubMed/Medline, Google Scholar, and Scopus with the following keywords: "exercise," "physical activity," "physical fitness," "depressive disorder," "depression," "depressive symptoms," "add-on," "augmentation," "adjunction," and "combined therapy." Twenty-two full-text articles were retrieved by the search. Among the 13 papers that fulfilled our inclusion criteria, we found methodological weaknesses in the majority. However, the included studies showed a strong effectiveness of exercise combined with antidepressants. Further analyses and higher quality studies are needed; nevertheless, as we have focused on a particular intervention (exercise in adjunction to antidepressants) that better reflects clinical practice, we can hypothesize that this strategy could be appropriately and safely translated into real-world practice. PMID:24589012

  4. Intensity-dependent alterations in the excitability of cortical and spinal projections to the knee extensors during isometric and locomotor exercise.

    PubMed

    Weavil, J C; Sidhu, S K; Mangum, T S; Richardson, R S; Amann, M

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the role of exercise intensity and associated central motor drive in determining corticomotoneuronal excitability. Ten participants performed a series of nonfatiguing (3 s) isometric single-leg knee extensions (ISO; 10-100% of maximal voluntary contractions, MVC) and cycling bouts (30-160% peak aerobic capacity, W peak). At various exercise intensities, electrical potentials were evoked in the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) via transcranial magnetic stimulation (motor-evoked potentials, MEP), and electrical stimulation of both the cervicomedullary junction (cervicomedullary evoked potentials, CMEP) and the femoral nerve (maximal M-waves, M max). Whereas M max remained unchanged in both muscles (P > 0.40), voluntary electromyographic activity (EMG) increased in an exercise intensity-dependent manner for ISO and cycling exercise in VL and RF (both P < 0.001). During ISO exercise, MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased in VL and RF until a plateau was reached at ? 75% MVC; further increases in contraction intensity did not cause additional changes (P > 0.35). During cycling exercise, VL-MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ? 65% until a plateau was reached at W peak. In contrast, RF MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ? 110% throughout the tested cycling intensities without the occurrence of a plateau. Furthermore, alterations in EMG below the plateau influenced corticomotoneuronal excitability similarly between exercise modalities. In both exercise modalities, the MEP-to-CMEP ratio did not change with exercise intensity (P > 0.22). In conclusion, increases in exercise intensity and EMG facilitates the corticomotoneuronal pathway similarly in isometric knee extension and locomotor exercise until a plateau occurs at a submaximal exercise intensity. This facilitation appears to be primarily mediated by increases in excitability of the motoneuron pool. PMID:25876651

  5. Astym treatment vs. eccentric exercise for lateral elbow tendinopathy: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Stegink-Jansen, Caroline W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with chronic lateral elbow (LE) tendinopathy, commonly known as tennis elbow, often experience prolonged symptoms and frequent relapses. Astym treatment, evidenced in animal studies to promote the healing and regeneration of soft tissues, is hypothesized to improve outcomes in LE tendinopathy patients. This study had two objectives: (1) to compare the efficacy of Astym treatment to an evidence-based eccentric exercise program (EE) for patients with chronic LE tendinopathy, and (2) to quantify outcomes of subjects non-responsive to EE who were subsequently treated with Astym treatment. Study Design. Prospective, two group, parallel, randomized controlled trial completed at a large orthopedic center in Indiana. Inclusion criteria: age range of 18–65 years old, with clinical indications of LE tendinopathy greater than 12 weeks, with no recent corticosteriod injection or disease altering comorbidities. Methods. Subjects with chronic LE tendinopathy (107 subjects with 113 affected elbows) were randomly assigned using computer-generated random number tables to 4 weeks of Astym treatment (57 elbows) or EE treatment (56 elbows). Data collected at baseline, 4, 8, 12 weeks, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcome measure: DASH; secondary outcome measures: pain with activity, maximum grip strength and function. The treating physicians and the rater were blinded; subjects and treating clinicians could not be blinded due to the nature of the treatments. Results. Resolution response rates were 78.3% for the Astym group and 40.9% for the EE group. Astym subjects showed greater gains in DASH scores (p = 0.047) and in maximum grip strength (p = 0.008) than EE subjects. Astym therapy also resolved 20/21 (95.7%) of the EE non-responders, who showed improvements in DASH scores (p < 0.005), pain with activity (p = 0.002), and function (p = 0.004) following Astym treatment. Gains continued at 6 and 12 months. No adverse effects were reported. Conclusion. This study suggests Astym therapy is an effective treatment option for patients with LE tendinopathy, as an initial treatment, and after an eccentric exercise program has failed. Registration/Funding. Ball Memorial Hospital provided limited funding. Trial registration was not required by FDAAA 801. Known about the Subject. Under the new paradigm of degenerative tendinopathy, eccentric exercise (EE) is emerging as a first line conservative treatment for LE tendinopathy. EE and Astym treatment are among the few treatment options aiming to improve the degenerative pathophysiology of the tendon. In this trial, Astym therapy, which has shown success in the treatment of tendinopathy, is compared to EE, which has also shown success in the treatment of tendinopathy. Clinical Relevance. There is a need for more effective, conservative treatment options. Based on the current efficacy study, Astym therapy appears to be a promising, non-invasive treatment option. PMID:26038722

  6. Epidural spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Horsch, S; Claeys, L

    1994-09-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS) has been suggested to improve microcirculatory blood flow and reduce amputation rates in patients with severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Pain relief, limb salvage, and skin circulation were studied in 177 patients with ischemic pain caused by nonreconstructible PAOD who were receiving ESCS. Medical or surgical therapy had failed and vascular reconstruction was impossible in all cases. Clinical status was classified as Fontaine's stage III (chronic ischemic rest pain) in 114 patients and Fontaine's stage IV (ischemic pain and ulcers or dry gangrene) in 63 patients. PAOD was essentially due to arteriosclerosis, but 36 patients also had diabetic vascular disease. After a mean follow-up of 35.6 months, significant pain relief (> 75%) with limb salvage was achieved in 110 patients. In 11 patients with limb salvage, pain alleviation was determined to be between 50% and 70%. ESCS was ineffective in reducing pain, leading to major amputation in 56 patients. The cumulative limb salvage rate was 66% at 4 years. The systolic ankle/brachial blood pressure index did not change under stimulation. TcPO2 was assessed on the dorsum of the foot. Clinical improvement was associated with increased TcPO2, with limb salvage improving from 24.2 to 48.1 mm Hg in stage III (p < 0.02) and from 16.4 to 37.2 mm Hg in stage IV (p < 0.03) disease. A TcPO2 increase of more than 50% within the first 3 months after implantation was predictive of success. TcPO2 changes are correlated with the presence of adequate paresthesias in the painful area during the trial period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7811584

  7. The functional and neuroprotective actions of Neu2000, a dual-acting pharmacological agent, in the treatment of acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Springer, Joe E; Rao, Ravikumar Rangaswamy; Lim, Hyang Ran; Cho, Sung Ig; Moon, Gyoeng Joon; Lee, Hee Young; Park, Eui Jin; Noh, Jai Sung; Gwag, Byoung Joo

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine the neuroprotective and functional significance of targeting both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and oxidative stress using a dual-acting compound, Neu2000, in rat model of moderate spinal cord injury (SCI). An initial set of experiments was conducted in uninjured rats to study the pharmacokinetic profile of Neu2000 following intraperitoneal and intravenous administration. A second experiment measured free radical production in mitochondria isolated from sham or injured spinal cords of animals receiving vehicle or Neu2000 treatment. A third set of animals was divided into three treatment groups consisting of vehicle treatment, a single dose of Neu2000 (50 mg/kg) administered at 10 min following injury, or a repeated treatment paradigm consisting of a single bolus of Neu2000 at 10 min following injury (50 mg/kg) plus a maintenance dose (25 mg/kg) administered every 24 h for an additional 6 days. Animals were tested once a week for a period of 6 weeks for evidence of locomotor recovery in an open field and kinematic analysis of fine motor control using the DigiGait Image Analysis System. At the end of the testing period, spinal cord reconstruction was performed to obtain nonbiased stereological measures of tissue sparing. The results of this study demonstrate that Neu2000 treatment significantly reduced the production of mitochondrial free radicals and improved locomotor outcomes that were associated with a significant increase in the volume of spared spinal cord tissue. PMID:19772458

  8. The Functional and Neuroprotective Actions of Neu2000, a Dual-Acting Pharmacological Agent, in the Treatment of Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ravikumar Rangaswamy; Lim, Hyang Ran; Cho, Sung Ig; Moon, Gyoeng Joon; Lee, Hee Young; Park, Eui Jin; Gwag, Byoung Joo; Noh, Jai Sung

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The goal of the present study was to examine the neuroprotective and functional significance of targeting both N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor–mediated excitotoxicity and oxidative stress using a dual-acting compound, Neu2000, in rat model of moderate spinal cord injury (SCI). An initial set of experiments was conducted in uninjured rats to study the pharmacokinetic profile of Neu2000 following intraperitoneal and intravenous administration. A second experiment measured free radical production in mitochondria isolated from sham or injured spinal cords of animals receiving vehicle or Neu2000 treatment. A third set of animals was divided into three treatment groups consisting of vehicle treatment, a single dose of Neu2000 (50?mg/kg) administered at 10?min following injury, or a repeated treatment paradigm consisting of a single bolus of Neu2000 at 10?min following injury (50?mg/kg) plus a maintenance dose (25?mg/kg) administered every 24?h for an additional 6 days. Animals were tested once a week for a period of 6 weeks for evidence of locomotor recovery in an open field and kinematic analysis of fine motor control using the DigiGait Image Analysis System. At the end of the testing period, spinal cord reconstruction was performed to obtain nonbiased stereological measures of tissue sparing. The results of this study demonstrate that Neu2000 treatment significantly reduced the production of mitochondrial free radicals and improved locomotor outcomes that were associated with a significant increase in the volume of spared spinal cord tissue. PMID:19772458

  9. A systematic review of electrical stimulation for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment in people with spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang Qin; Moody, Julie; Traynor, Michael; Dyson, Sue; Gall, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Context Electrical stimulation (ES) can confer benefit to pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and treatment in spinal cord injuries (SCIs). However, clinical guidelines regarding the use of ES for PU management in SCI remain limited. Objectives To critically appraise and synthesize the research evidence on ES for PU prevention and treatment in SCI. Method Review was limited to peer-reviewed studies published in English from 1970 to July 2013. Studies included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), non-RCTs, prospective cohort studies, case series, case control, and case report studies. Target population included adults with SCI. Interventions of any type of ES were accepted. Any outcome measuring effectiveness of PU prevention and treatment was included. Methodological quality was evaluated using established instruments. Results Twenty-seven studies were included, 9 of 27 studies were RCTs. Six RCTs were therapeutic trials. ES enhanced PU healing in all 11 therapeutic studies. Two types of ES modalities were identified in therapeutic studies (surface electrodes, anal probe), four types of modalities in preventive studies (surface electrodes, ES shorts, sacral anterior nerve root implant, neuromuscular ES implant). Conclusion The methodological quality of the studies was poor, in particular for prevention studies. A significant effect of ES on enhancement of PU healing is shown in limited Grade I evidence. The great variability in ES parameters, stimulating locations, and outcome measure leads to an inability to advocate any one standard approach for PU therapy or prevention. Future research is suggested to improve the design of ES devices, standardize ES parameters, and conduct more rigorous trials. PMID:24969965

  10. Conspicuous effect on treatment of mild-to-moderate COPD by combining deep-breathing exercise with oxygen inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yan, Ling-Xian; Zhang, Li-Yan; Song, Qing-Hua; Xu, Rong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can lead to respiratory failure, but current pharmacological treatments focus on symptom relief or slowing disease progression. Here, the effectiveness of an alternative therapy combining deep-breathing exercises and oxygen inhalation therapy was assessed in mild-to-moderate COPD patients. Forty-two male mild-to-moderate COPD patients were randomly divided into a deep-breathing training group, an oxygen inhalation group, and a combination group (n=14 in each). In the deep-breathing training group, the patients were treated only by the deep-breathing exercise; in the oxygen inhalation group, the patients were treated only by oxygen inhalation; in the combination group, the patients were treated by combining the deep-breathing exercises with oxygen inhalation. Before treatment, there were no statistical differences in the general characteristics or lung function indexes between the three groups of patients (P > 0.05). However, after treatment, patients in the combination group had significantly better lung function indexes than they did before treatment, and their improvement was also superior to that of patients from the deep-breathing training group and the oxygen inhalation group (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, a treatment method combining deep-breathing exercise with oxygen inhalation offers more significant lung function improvement in COPD patients than either the deep-breathing exercise or oxygen inhalation alone. This approach should be further explored for use in the clinic. PMID:26309676

  11. Physical exercises in the treatment of idiopathic scoliosis at risk of brace treatment – SOSORT consensus paper 2005

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Negrini, Stefano; Hawes, Martha C; Rigo, Manuel; Kotwicki, Tomasz; Grivas, Theodoros B; Maruyama, Toru

    2006-01-01

    Background Based on a recognized need for research to examine the premise that nonsurgical approaches can be used effectively to treat signs and symptoms of scoliosis, a scientific society on scoliosis orthopaedic and rehabilitation treatment (SOSORT) was established in Barcelona in 2004. SOSORT has a primary goal of implementing multidisciplinary research to develop quantitative, objective data to address the role of conservative therapies in the treatment of scoliosis. This international working group of clinicians and scientists specializing in treatment of scoliosis met in Milan, Italy in January 2005. Methods As a baseline for developing a consensus for language and goals for proposed multicenter clinical studies, we developed questionnaires to examine current beliefs, before and after the meeting, regarding (1) the aims of physical exercises; (2) standards of treatment; and (3) the impact of such treatment performed by specialists in the field. Results The responses to the questionnaires show that, in principle, specialists in scoliosis physiotherapy do not disagree and that several features can be regarded, currently, as standard features in the rehabilitation of scoliosis patients. These features include autocorrection in 3D, training in ADL, stabilizing the corrected posture, and patient education. PMID:16759360

  12. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2014-12-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mmol/L that occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited and often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Treatment of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):228-240. PMID:25498260

  13. Efficacy of treatment with verbascoside, biotechnologically produced by Syringa vulgaris plant cell cultures in an experimental mice model of spinal cord trauma.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Tiziana; Paterniti, Irene; Mazzon, Emanuela; Esposito, Emanuela; Di Paola, Rosanna; Galuppo, Maria; Bramanti, Placido; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2010-10-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of glycosylated phenylpropanoid verbascoside (VB), isolated from cultured cells of the medicinal plant Syringa vulgaris (Oleaceae) in experimental animal model of spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI was induced by the application of vascular clips to the dura via a four-level T5-T8 laminectomy. SCI in mice resulted in severe trauma characterized by edema, tissue damage, and apoptosis. At 1 and 6 h after injury, the mice were treated with VB extract, administered at the dose of 2 mg/kg with intraperitoneal administration. Immunohistochemical examination demonstrated a marked increase on expression for nitrotyrosine, inducible nitric oxide synthase, poly(ADP-ribose), and apoptosis events (increase of Bax and Bcl-2 expression) in the spinal cord tissue. Additionally, we demonstrate that these inflammatory events were associated with the cytokines expression (TNF-? and IL-1?), neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase), and activation of NF-?B. In contrast, all of these parameters of inflammation were attenuated by treatment with VB. In a separate set of experiment, we have clearly demonstrated that VB treatment significantly ameliorated the recovery of function (evaluated by motor recovery score). Taken together, our results clearly demonstrate that treatment with VB extract reduces the development of inflammation and tissue injury events associated with spinal cord trauma. PMID:20799028

  14. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Fang, Marong; Chen, Haohao; Gou, Fangming; Ding, Mingxing

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies. PMID:25598784

  15. The Outcomes of Manipulation or Mobilization Therapy Compared with Physical Therapy or Exercise for Neck Pain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Josh; Kaplan, Leon; Fischer, Dena J.; Skelly, Andrea C.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design?Systematic review. Study Rationale?Neck pain is a prevalent condition. Spinal manipulation and mobilization procedures are becoming an accepted treatment for neck pain. However, data on the effectiveness of these treatments have not been summarized. Objective?To compare manipulation or mobilization of the cervical spine to physical therapy or exercise for symptom improvement in patients with neck pain. Methods?A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse Database, and bibliographies of key articles, which compared spinal manipulation or mobilization therapy with physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. Articles were included based on predetermined criteria and were appraised using a predefined quality rating scheme. Results?From 197 citations, 7 articles met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. There were no differences in pain improvement when comparing spinal manipulation to exercise, and there were inconsistent reports of pain improvement in subjects who underwent mobilization therapy versus physical therapy. No disability improvement was reported between treatment groups in studies of acute or chronic neck pain patients. No functional improvement was found with manipulation therapy compared with exercise treatment or mobilization therapy compared with physical therapy groups in patients with acute pain. In chronic neck pain subjects who underwent spinal manipulation therapy compared to exercise treatment, results for short-term functional improvement were inconsistent. Conclusion?The data available suggest that there are minimal short- and long-term treatment differences in pain, disability, patient-rated treatment improvement, treatment satisfaction, health status, or functional improvement when comparing manipulation or mobilization therapy to physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. This systematic review is limited by the variability of treatment interventions and lack of standardized outcomes to assess treatment benefit. PMID:24436697

  16. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  17. The effect of an extended source-to-skin distance in the treatment of the spinal field in children receiving craniospinal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Mary; Paulino, Arnold C.; Marcus, Robert B.; Ting, Joseph

    2004-03-31

    In this study, we compared a single extended source-to-skin difference (SSD) spinal field and the alternative 2-field gapped approach at 100 SSD on dose to surrounding normal tissues. Five female patients ranging in age from 3 to 20 years underwent computed tomography (CT) simulation for treatment planning of the craniospinal axis, which was treated in its entirety to 36 Gy. For each slice, the clinical target volume (thecal sac and contents), mandible, thyroid gland, esophagus, heart, lungs, liver, and ovaries were contoured. Technique A employed the use of a single posterior spinal field delivered at SSD = 140 cm (140 SSD), and Technique B employed the use of 2 gapped spinal fields using a traditional SSD of 100 cm (100 SSD). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained for each organ contoured and for each technique used. In all patients, the average mean dose to all surrounding structures was increased with the use of a single extended SSD (Technique A) when compared to the 2 spinal fields prescribed at 100 SSD (Technique B). The average mean doses to the mandible, thyroid gland, esophagus, and heart were 78%, 19%, 6%, and 16%, respectively, higher with Technique A as compared to Technique B. In addition, the average mean doses to the lungs, liver, and ovaries were 53%, 33% and 69%, respectively, higher as compared to Technique B. However, the clinical target volume at the spinal junction site received a less homogenous dose with Technique B as compared to Technique A. We conclude that although the use of a single-field extended SSD delivered a more homogenous dose to the spine, a higher dose to the ovaries, thyroid gland, mandible, lungs, liver, and heart was seen.

  18. Treatment of Costal Osteochondroma Causing Spinal Cord Compression by Costotransversectomy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Marcus D.; Mumert, Michael L.; Schmidt, Meic H.

    2015-01-01

    In laminectomies for costal osteochondroma causing spinal cord compression, visualization of the extraforaminal part of the tumor is limited. The authors describe using a costotransversectomy to resolve spinal cord compression by a costal osteochondroma invading through the neural foramen. A 21-year-old woman with hereditary multiple exostoses presented with hand numbness and progressive neck and upper back pain. Plain radiographs identified a large lesion of the T2 and T3 pedicles, with encroachment on the T2-3 neural foramen causing ~50% spinal canal stenosis. Costotransversectomy was performed to resect the cartilaginous portions of the osteochondroma, debulk the mass, and decompress the spinal canal. A mass of mature bone was left, but no appreciable cartilaginous tumor. At five-year follow-up, the patient had improvement of neck pain, no new neurological deficits. a stable residual mass, and no new osteochondromas, indicating that appropriate surgical management can yield good results and no evidence of recurrence. PMID:26236451

  19. SU-E-T-197: Helical Cranial-Spinal Treatments with a Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J; Bernard, D; Liao, Y; Templeton, A; Turian, J; Chu, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) of systemic disease requires a high level of beam intensity modulation to reduce dose to bone marrow and other critical structures. Current helical delivery machines can take 30 minutes or more of beam-on time to complete these treatments. This pilot study aims to test the feasibility of performing helical treatments with a conventional linear accelerator using longitudinal couch travel during multiple gantry revolutions. Methods: The VMAT optimization package of the Eclipse 10.0 treatment planning system was used to optimize pseudo-helical CSI plans of 5 clinical patient scans. Each gantry revolution was divided into three 120° arcs with each isocenter shifted longitudinally. Treatments requiring more than the maximum 10 arcs used multiple plans with each plan after the first being optimized including the dose of the others (Figure 1). The beam pitch was varied between 0.2 and 0.9 (couch speed 5- 20cm/revolution and field width of 22cm) and dose-volume histograms of critical organs were compared to tomotherapy plans. Results: Viable pseudo-helical plans were achieved using Eclipse. Decreasing the pitch from 0.9 to 0.2 lowered the maximum lens dose by 40%, the mean bone marrow dose by 2.1% and the maximum esophagus dose by 17.5%. (Figure 2). Linac-based helical plans showed dose results comparable to tomotherapy delivery for both target coverage and critical organ sparing, with the D50 of bone marrow and esophagus respectively 12% and 31% lower in the helical linear accelerator plan (Figure 3). Total mean beam-on time for the linear accelerator plan was 8.3 minutes, 54% faster than the tomotherapy average for the same plans. Conclusions: This pilot study has demonstrated the feasibility of planning pseudo-helical treatments for CSI targets using a conventional linac and dynamic couch movement, and supports the ongoing development of true helical optimization and delivery.

  20. Effects of aquatic exercise and CES treatment on the changes of cognitive function, BDNF, IGF-1, and VEGF of persons with intellectual disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In Ho; Seo, Eun Jung; Lim, In Soo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aquatic exercise and CES treatment on the cognitive function by using K-WAB and BDNF, IGF-1, and VEGF of persons with intellectual disabilities. [Methods] All subjects were 15 male with intellectual disabilities who were participating in the aquatic training program and CES treatment during 12 weeks at rehabilitation center. The subjects were divided into control group, exercise group, and exercise+CES group. Blood samples for BDNF, IGF-1, and VEGF were taken from brachial vein at rest between before and after treatment. [Results] The results are summarized as follows: Cognitive function level increased significantly in the exercise+CES group compared to those in the exercise and control group. The changes of blood IGF-1 concentration were no significant difference among groups. The changes of blood BDNF and VEGF concentration were significantly increased in exercise group and exercise+CES group than control group. However, blood BDNF and VEGF concentration were significantly difference between exercise group and exercise+CES group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, it can be concluded that CES treatment with exercise can amend cognitive function of persons with intellectual disabilities more effectively and increase of BDNF and VEGF by exercise can explain the cognitive function improvement of persons with intellectual disabilities. PMID:25566435

  1. Exercise Regulation of Marrow Fat in the Setting of PPAR? Agonist Treatment in Female C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Styner, Maya; Pagnotti, Gabriel M; Galior, Kornelia; Wu, Xin; Thompson, William R; Uzer, Gunes; Sen, Buer; Xie, Zhihui; Horowitz, Mark C; Styner, Martin A; Rubin, Clinton; Rubin, Janet

    2015-08-01

    The contribution of marrow adipose tissue (MAT) to skeletal fragility is poorly understood. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)? agonists, associated with increased fractures in diabetic patients, increase MAT. Here, we asked whether exercise could limit the MAT accrual and increase bone formation in the setting of PPAR? agonist treatment. Eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were treated with 20-mg/kg · d rosiglitazone (Rosi) and compared with control (CTL) animals. Exercise groups ran 12 km/d when provided access to running wheels (CTL exercise [CTL-E], Rosi-E). After 6 weeks, femoral MAT (volume of lipid binder osmium) and tibial bone morphology were assessed by microcomputer tomography. Rosi was associated with 40% higher femur MAT volume compared with CTL (P < .0001). Exercise suppressed MAT volume by half in CTL-E mice compared with CTL (P < .01) and 19% in Rosi-E compared with Rosi (P < .0001). Rosi treatment increased fat markers perilipin and fatty acid synthase mRNA by 4-fold (P < .01). Exercise was associated with increased uncoupling protein 1 mRNA expression in both CTL-E and Rosi-E groups (P < .05), suggestive of increased brown fat. Rosi increased cortical porosity (P < .0001) but did not significantly impact trabecular or cortical bone quantity. Importantly, exercise induction of trabecular bone volume was not prevented by Rosi (CTL-E 21% > CTL, P < .05; Rosi-E 26% > Rosi, P < .01). In summary, despite the Rosi induction of MAT extending well into the femoral diaphysis, exercise was able to significantly suppress MAT volume and induce bone formation. Our results suggest that the impact of PPAR? agonists on bone and marrow health can be partially mitigated by exercise. PMID:26052898

  2. Incidence and Treatment Patterns in Hospitalizations for Malignant Spinal Cord Compression in the United States, 1998-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Kimberley S.; Lee, Leslie K.; Mak, Raymond H.; Wang, Shuang; Pile-Spellman, John; Abrahm, Janet L.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Balboni, Tracy A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To characterize patterns in incidence, management, and costs of malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) hospitalizations in the United States, using population-based data. Methods and Materials: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, an all-payer healthcare database representative of all U.S. hospitalizations, MSCC-related hospitalizations were identified for the period 1998-2006. Cases were combined with age-adjusted Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer death data to estimate annual incidence. Linear regression characterized trends in patient, treatment, and hospital characteristics, costs, and outcomes. Logistic regression was used to examine inpatient treatment (radiotherapy [RT], surgery, or neither) by hospital characteristics and year, adjusting for confounding. Results: We identified 15,367 MSCC-related cases, representing 75,876 hospitalizations. Lung cancer (24.9%), prostate cancer (16.2%), and multiple myeloma (11.1%) were the most prevalent underlying cancer diagnoses. The annual incidence of MSCC hospitalization among patients dying of cancer was 3.4%; multiple myeloma (15.0%), Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (13.9%), and prostate cancer (5.5%) exhibited the highest cancer-specific incidence. Over the study period, inpatient RT for MSCC decreased (odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.81), whereas surgery increased (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17-1.84). Hospitalization costs for MSCC increased (5.3% per year, p < 0.001). Odds of inpatient RT were greater at teaching hospitals (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.19-1.67), whereas odds of surgery were greater at urban institutions (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.29-2.58). Conclusions: In the United States, patients dying of cancer have an estimated 3.4% annual incidence of MSCC requiring hospitalization. Inpatient management of MSCC varied over time and by hospital characteristics, with hospitalization costs increasing. Future studies are required to determine the impact of treatment patterns on MSCC outcomes and strategies for reducing MSCC-related costs.

  3. The fascial system and exercise intolerance in patients with chronic heart failure: hypothesis of osteopathic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli, F

    2015-01-01

    Chronic heart failure is a progressive, debilitating disease, resulting in a decline in the quality of life of the patient and incurring very high social economic costs. Chronic heart failure is defined as the inability of the heart to meet the demands of oxygen from the peripheral area. It is a multi-aspect complex disease which impacts negatively on all of the body systems. Presently, there are no texts in the modern literature that associate the symptoms of exercise intolerance of the patient with a dysfunction of the fascial system. In the first part of this article, we will discuss the significance of the disease, its causes, and epidemiology. The second part will explain the pathological adaptations of the myofascial system. The last section will outline a possible osteopathic treatment for patients with heart failure in order to encourage research and improve the general curative approach for the patient. PMID:26586951

  4. Usefulness of combining intermittent hypoxia and physical exercise in the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Urdampilleta, Aritz; González-Muniesa, Pedro; Portillo, María P; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2012-06-01

    Obesity is an important public health problem worldwide and is a major risk factor for a number of chronic diseases such as type II diabetes, adverse cardiovascular events and metabolic syndrome-related features. Different treatments have been applied to tackle body fat accumulation and its associated clinical manifestations. Often, relevant weight loss is achieved during the first 6 months under different dietary treatments. From this point, a plateau is reached, and a gradual recovery of the lost weight may occur. Therefore, new research approaches are being investigated to assure weight maintenance. Pioneering investigations have reported that oxygen variations in organic systems may produce changes in body composition. Possible applications of intermittent hypoxia to promote health and in various pathophysiological states have been reported. The hypoxic stimulus in addition to diet and exercise can be an interesting approach to lose weight, by inducing higher basal noradrenalin levels and other metabolic changes whose mechanisms are still unclear. Indeed, hypoxic situations increase the diameter of arterioles, produce peripheral vasodilatation and decrease arterial blood pressure. Furthermore, hypoxic training increases the activity of glycolytic enzymes, enhancing the number of mitochondria and glucose transporter GLUT-4 levels as well as improving insulin sensitivity. Moreover, hypoxia increases blood serotonin and decreases leptin levels while appetite is suppressed. These observations allow consideration of the hypothesis that intermittent hypoxia induces fat loss and may ameliorate cardiovascular health, which might be of interest for the treatment of obesity. This new strategy may be useful and practical for clinical applications in obese patients. PMID:22045452

  5. Traumatic lumbar artery rupture after lumbar spinal fracture dislocation causing hypovolemic shock: An endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Eun, Jong-Pil; Oh, Young-Min

    2015-10-01

    Recently, we observed a case of lumbar artery injury after trauma, which was treated by endovascular embolization. A 67-year-old woman who was injured in a traffic accident was brought to the emergency room. She was conscious and her hemodynamic condition was stable, but she had paraplegia below L1 dermatome. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of abdomen and pelvis revealed fracture dislocation of L3/4 along with retroperitoneal hematomas. However, there was no evidence of traumatic injury in both thoracic and abdominal cavity. At that time, her blood pressure suddenly decreased to 60/40 mmHg and her mental status deteriorated. Also, her hemoglobin level was 5.4 g/dl. While her hemodynamic condition stabilized with massive fluid resuscitation including blood transfusion, an angiography was immediately performed to look for and embolize site of retroperitoneal hemorrhage. On the angiographic images, there was an active extravasation from ruptured left 3rd lumbar artery, and we performed complete embolization with GELFOAM and coil. Lumbar artery injury after trauma is rare and endovascular treatment is useful in case of hemodynamic instability. PMID:25958959

  6. The Felix-trial. Double-blind randomization of interspinous implant or bony decompression for treatment of spinal stenosis related intermittent neurogenic claudication

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Decompressive laminotomy is the standard surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with canal stenosis related intermittent neurogenic claudication. New techniques, such as interspinous process implants, claim a shorter hospital stay, less post-operative pain and equal long-term functional outcome. A comparative (cost-) effectiveness study has not been performed yet. This protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) on (cost-) effectiveness of the use of interspinous process implants versus conventional decompression surgery in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods/Design Patients (age 40-85) presenting with intermittent neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis lasting more than 3 months refractory to conservative treatment, are included. Randomization into interspinous implant surgery versus bony decompression surgery will take place in the operating room after induction of anesthesia. The primary outcome measure is the functional assessment of the patient measured by the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ), at 8 weeks and 1 year after surgery. Other outcome parameters include perceived recovery, leg and back pain, incidence of re-operations, complications, quality of life, medical consumption, absenteeism and costs. The study is a randomized multi-institutional trial, in which two surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses are kept blinded of the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 1 year. Discussion Currently decompressive laminotomy is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. Whether surgery with interspinous implants is a reasonable alternative can be determined by this trial. Trial register Dutch Trial register number: NTR1307 PMID:20507568

  7. Superion® InterSpinous Spacer for treatment of moderate degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: durable three-year results of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vikas V; Nunley, Pierce D; Whang, Peter G; Haley, Thomas R; Bradley, W Daniel; Davis, Raphael P; Block, Jon E; Geisler, Fred H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This report provides the 3-year clinical outcomes from the randomized, controlled US Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trial of the Superion® for the treatment of moderate degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Patients and methods The Superion® was evaluated in the treatment of subjects aged 45 years or older suffering from symptoms of intermittent neurogenic claudication, secondary to a confirmed diagnosis of moderate degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis at one or two contiguous levels from L1 to L5. Patients were treated between June 2008 and December 2011 at 31 investigational sites. Three hundred ninety-one subjects were included in the randomized study group consisting of 190 Superion® and 201 X-STOP® control subjects. The primary composite endpoint was individual patient success based on four components: improvement in two of three domains of the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire, no reoperations at the index level, no major implant/procedure-related complications, and no clinically significant confounding treatments. Results At 3 years, the proportion of subjects achieving the primary composite endpoint was greater for Superion® (63/120, 52.5%) than for X-STOP® (49/129, 38.0%) (P=0.023) and the corresponding success rates exceeded 80% for each of the individual components of the primary endpoint in the Superion® group (range: 81%–91%). Improvements in back and leg pain severity as well as back- and disease-specific functional outcomes were also maintained through 36 months. Conclusion The 3-year outcomes from this randomized controlled trial demonstrate durable clinical improvement consistently across all clinical outcomes for the Superion® in the treatment of patients with moderate degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:26491369

  8. Surgical versus Non-Operative Treatment for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Four-Year Results of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, James N.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Anna; Blood, Emily; Herkowitz, Harry; Cammisa, Frank; Albert, Todd; Boden, Scott D.; Hilibrand, Alan; Goldberg, Harley; Berven, Sigurd; An, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Randomized trial and concurrent observational cohort study Objective To compare 4 year outcomes of surgery to non-operative care for spinal stenosis. Summary of Background Data Surgery for spinal stenosis has been shown to be more effective compared to non-operative treatment over two years, but longer-term data have not been analyzed. Methods Surgical candidates from 13 centers in 11 U.S. states with at least 12 weeks of symptoms and confirmatory imaging were enrolled in a randomized cohort (RC) or observational cohort (OC). Treatment was standard decompressive laminectomy or standard non-operative care. Primary outcomes were SF-36 bodily pain (BP) and physical function (PF) scales and the modified Oswestry Disability index (ODI) assessed at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and yearly up to 4 years. Results 289 patients enrolled in the RC and 365 patients enrolled in the OC. An as-treated analysis combining the RC and OC and adjusting for potential confounders found that the clinically significant advantages for surgery previously reported were maintained through 4 years, with treatment effects (defined as mean change in surgery group minus mean change in non-op group) for BP 12.6 (95% CI, 8.5 to 16.7); PF 8.6 (95% CI, 4.6 to 12.6); and ODI ?9.4 (95% CI, ?12.6, to ?6.2). Early advantages for surgical treatment for secondary measures such as bothersomeness, satisfaction with symptoms and self-rated progress also were maintained. Conclusions Patients with symptomatic spinal stenosis treated surgically compared to those treated non-operatively maintain substantially greater improvement in pain and function through four years. PMID:20453723

  9. eIF5A1/RhoGDI? pathway: a novel therapeutic target for treatment of spinal cord injury identified by a proteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Shang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Yang; Belegu, Visar; Xia, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Ran; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jin; Li, Chen-Yun; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is frequently accompanied by a degree of spontaneous functional recovery. The underlying mechanisms through which such recovery is generated remain elusive. In this study, we observed a significant spontaneous motor function recovery 14 to 28 days after spinal cord transection (SCT) in rats. Using a comparative proteomics approach, caudal to the injury, we detected difference in 20 proteins. Two of these proteins, are eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A1 (eIF5A1) that is involved in cell survival and proliferation, and Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha (RhoGDI?), a member of Rho GDI family that is involved in cytoskeletal reorganization. After confirming the changes in expression levels of these two proteins following SCT, we showed that in vivo eIF5A1 up-regulation and down-regulation significantly increased and decreased, respectively, motor function recovery. In vitro, eIF5A1 overexpression in primary neurons increased cell survival and elongated neurite length while eIF5A1 knockdown reversed these results. We found that RhoGDI? up-regulation and down-regulation rescues the effect of eIF5A1 down-regulation and up-regulation both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, we have identified eIF5A1/RhoGDI? pathway as a new therapeutic target for treatment of spinal cord injured patients. PMID:26593060

  10. eIF5A1/RhoGDI? pathway: a novel therapeutic target for treatment of spinal cord injury identified by a proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Shang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Yang; Belegu, Visar; Xia, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Ran; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jin; Li, Chen-Yun; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is frequently accompanied by a degree of spontaneous functional recovery. The underlying mechanisms through which such recovery is generated remain elusive. In this study, we observed a significant spontaneous motor function recovery 14 to 28 days after spinal cord transection (SCT) in rats. Using a comparative proteomics approach, caudal to the injury, we detected difference in 20 proteins. Two of these proteins, are eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A1 (eIF5A1) that is involved in cell survival and proliferation, and Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha (RhoGDI?), a member of Rho GDI family that is involved in cytoskeletal reorganization. After confirming the changes in expression levels of these two proteins following SCT, we showed that in vivo eIF5A1 up-regulation and down-regulation significantly increased and decreased, respectively, motor function recovery. In vitro, eIF5A1 overexpression in primary neurons increased cell survival and elongated neurite length while eIF5A1 knockdown reversed these results. We found that RhoGDI? up-regulation and down-regulation rescues the effect of eIF5A1 down-regulation and up-regulation both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, we have identified eIF5A1/RhoGDI? pathway as a new therapeutic target for treatment of spinal cord injured patients. PMID:26593060

  11. Translating Empirically Supported Strategies into Accessible Interventions: The Potential Utility of Exercise for the Treatment of Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, Jasper A. J.; Powers, Mark B.; Berry, Angela C.; Otto, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Many patients suffering from panic disorder do not receive adequate care. Advances in the conceptualization and treatment of panic disorder encourage innovative strategies for targeting core fears (fears of anxiety sensations) that underlie this disorder. In this article, we discuss the use of exercise as a potential strategy for therapeutic…

  12. Spinal codes

    E-print Network

    Perry, Jonathan

    Spinal codes are a new class of rateless codes that enable wireless networks to cope with time-varying channel conditions in a natural way, without requiring any explicit bit rate selection. The key idea in the code is the ...

  13. Spinal Tap

    MedlinePLUS

    ... test that involves taking a small sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for examination. Cerebrospinal fluid is a clear, colorless liquid that delivers ... medications into a person's spinal fluid. Testing the cerebrospinal fluid can help doctors detect or rule out ...

  14. Spinal injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... messages between your brain and body. The cord passes through your neck and back. A spinal cord ... Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Mosby; 2009:chap 40. Torg JS. Cervical ...

  15. Spinal codes

    E-print Network

    Perry, Jonathan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Spinal codes are a new class of rateless codes that enable wireless networks to cope with time-varying channel conditions in a natural way, without requiring any explicit bit rate selection. The key idea in the code is the ...

  16. Overcoming Limitations in Previous Research on Exercise as a Smoking Cessation Treatment: Rationale and Design of the “Quit for Health” Trial

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David M.; Ussher, Michael; Dunsiger, Shira; Miranda, Robert; Gwaltney, Chad J.; Monti, Peter M.; Emerson, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic exercise has been proposed as a stand-alone or adjunct smoking cessation treatment, but findings have been mixed. Laboratory studies have shown that individual exercise sessions lead to decreases in withdrawal symptoms and cigarette cravings, but findings are limited by lack of follow-up and artificial settings. On the other hand, smoking cessation treatment RCTs have generally failed to show positive effects of exercise on smoking cessation, but have been plagued by poor and/or unverified compliance with exercise programs. This paper describes the rationale and design for Quit for Health (QFH)—an RCT designed to determine the efficacy of aerobic exercise as an adjunct smoking cessation treatment among women. To overcome limitations of previous research, compliance with the exercise (and wellness contact control) program is incentivized and directly observed, and ecological momentary assessment is used to examine change over time in withdrawal symptoms and cigarette cravings in participants’ natural environments. PMID:24246818

  17. Effectiveness of additional supervised exercises compared with conventional treatment alone in patients with acute lateral ankle sprains: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To summarise the effectiveness of adding supervised exercises to conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone in patients with acute lateral ankle sprains. Design Systematic review. Data sources Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cinahl, and reference screening. Study selection Included studies were randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised controlled trials, or clinical trials. Patients were adolescents or adults with an acute lateral ankle sprain. The treatment options were conventional treatment alone or conventional treatment combined with supervised exercises. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias, and one reviewer extracted data. Because of clinical heterogeneity we analysed the data using a best evidence synthesis. Follow-up was classified as short term (up to two weeks), intermediate (two weeks to three months), and long term (more than three months). Results 11 studies were included. There was limited to moderate evidence to suggest that the addition of supervised exercises to conventional treatment leads to faster and better recovery and a faster return to sport at short term follow-up than conventional treatment alone. In specific populations (athletes, soldiers, and patients with severe injuries) this evidence was restricted to a faster return to work and sport only. There was no strong evidence of effectiveness for any of the outcome measures. Most of the included studies had a high risk of bias, with few having adequate statistical power to detect clinically relevant differences. Conclusion Additional supervised exercises compared with conventional treatment alone have some benefit for recovery and return to sport in patients with ankle sprain, though the evidence is limited or moderate and many studies are subject to bias. PMID:20978065

  18. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brain and Spinal Tumors Information Page Synonym(s): Spinal Cord ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Brain and Spinal Tumors? Brain and spinal cord tumors ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Injury Information Page Condensed from Spinal Cord Injury: ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Spinal Cord Injury? A spinal cord injury usually begins with ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePLUS

    Spinal Cord Injury Map Loss of function depends on what part of the spinal cord is damaged, as ... control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed ...

  1. Staging Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  2. Central Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sujin; Zhao, Xing; Hatch, Maya; Chun, Sophia; Chang, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating medical condition affecting 1.2 million people in the United States. Central neuropathic pain is one of the most common medical complications of SCI. Current treatment options include opioids, antiepileptic agents such as gabapentin, antispastic agents such as baclofen or tizanidine, and tricyclic acid. Other options include complementary, nonpharmacological treatment such as exercise or acupuncture, interventional treatments, and psychological approaches. Although these treatment options exist, central neuropathic pain in patients with SCI is still extremely difficult to treat because of its complexity. To develop and provide more effective treatment options to these patients, proper assessment of and classification tools for central neuropathic pain, as well as a better understanding of the pathophysiology, are needed. A combination of approaches, from standard general pain assessments to medically specific questions unique to SCI pathophysiology, is essential for this population. A multidisciplinary approach to patient care, in addition with a better understanding of pathophysiology and diagnosis, will lead to improved management and treatment of patients with SCI displaying central neuropathic pain. Here we summarize the most recent classification tools, pathophysiology, and current treatment options for patients with SCI with central neuropathic pain. PMID:25750485

  3. Epidural Steroid Injections Are Associated with Less Improvement in the Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A subgroup analysis of the SPORT

    PubMed Central

    Radcliff, Kris; Kepler, Christopher; Hilibrand, Alan; Rihn, Jeffrey; Zhao, Wenyan; Lurie, Jon; Tosteson, Tor; Vaccaro, Alexander; Albert, Todd; Weinstein, James

    2013-01-01

    Summary of Background Data Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common incidental finding among adults over the age of 60, The use of ESI in these patients is common, although there is little evidence in the literature to demonstrate the long-term benefit of ESI in the treatment of lumbar stenosis. Objective The hypothesis of this study was that patients who received epidural steroid injections (ESI) during initial treatment as part of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) would have improved clinical outcomes and a lower rate of crossover to surgery compared to patients who did not receive ESI. Methods Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis who received epidural steroid injections within the first three months of enrollment in SPORT (ESI) were compared to patients who did not receive epidural injections during the first three months of the study (No ESI). Results There were 69 ESI patients and 207 No-ESI patients. There were no significant differences in demographic factors, baseline clinical outcome scores, or operative details although there was a significant increase in baseline preference for nonsurgical treatment among ESI patients (62% vs. 33%, p <0.001). There was an average 26 minute increase in operative time and an increased length of stay by 0.9 days among the ESI patients who ultimately underwent surgical treatment. Averaged over four years, there was significantly less improvement in SF36 PF among surgically treated ESI patients (ESI 14.8 vs. No-ESI 22.5, p=0.025). In addition, there was also significantly less improvement among the nonsurgically treated patients in SF36 BP (ESI 7.3 vs. No-ESI 16.7, p=0.007) and SF36 PF (ESI 5.5 vs. No-ESI 15.2, p=0.009). Of the patients assigned to surgical treatment, there was a significantly increased crossover to nonsurgical treatment among patients who received an ESI (ESI 33% vs. No ESI 11%, p=0.012). Of the patients assigned to non-operative treatment, there was a significantly increased crossover to surgical treatment in the ESI patients (ESI 58% vs. No ESI 32%, p=0.003). Conclusion Despite equivalent baseline status, ESI were associated with significantly less improvement at four years among all patients with spinal stenosis in SPORT. Furthermore, ESI were associated with longer duration of surgery and longer hospital stay. There was no improvement in outcome with ESI whether patients were treated surgically or nonsurgically. PMID:23238485

  4. Non-Traumatic Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma in a Patient with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation During Treatment with Rivaroxaban

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Jessica M.; Afanador, Hayley F.; Manjarrez, Efren; Morales, Ximena A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 69 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma Symptoms: Paraplegia Medication: Rivaroxaban Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: General Internal Medicine • Hospital Medicine • Cardiology • Hematology • Neurology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) is a rare but disabling condition, accounting for only 4.1% of all intraspinal hematomas. Risk factors include arteriovenous malformations, coagulopathy, therapeutic anticoagulation, underlying neoplasms, or following spinal puncture. Vitamin K antagonists, antiplatelet agents, and heparinoids have been associated with SSDHs in prior reports. To the best of our knowledge, no cases have reported this association with the factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, and SSDHs. Case Report: We report the case of a 69-year-old Honduran man with a 5-year history of symptomatic palpitations due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation. He was initially refractory to pharmacologic therapy. He underwent cardioversion in February 2014. After cardioversion, he remained asymptomatic on flecainide. He was anticoagulated on rivaroxaban 20 mg daily without incident since early 2013 until presentation in August 2014. He presented with sudden onset of excruciating upper and lower back pain after minimal movement. This was immediately followed by bilateral lower extremity paresis rapidly progressing to paraplegia with bowel and bladder dysfunction over 15 minutes. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an acute spinal subdural hematoma extending from T3 inferiorly to the conus medullaris. Six months after undergoing cervical and lumbar drainage procedures, he has not recovered bowel, bladder, or lower extremity neurologic function. Conclusions: Non-traumatic spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma is a rare neurological emergency that may occur during the use of rivaroxaban in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Physicians should suspect SSDH in patients on rivaroxaban with acute onset of severe back pain and neurologic symptoms to improve the odds of a favorable outcome. PMID:26090890

  5. Rest versus exercise as treatment for patients with low back pain and Modic changes. a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical experience suggests that many patients with Modic changes have relatively severe and persistent low back pain (LBP), which typically appears to be resistant to treatment. Exercise therapy is the recommended treatment for chronic LBP, however, due to their underlying pathology, Modic changes might be a diagnostic subgroup that does not benefit from exercise. The objective of this study was to compare the current state-of-the art treatment approach (exercise and staying active) with a new approach (load reduction and daily rest) for people with Modic changes using a randomized controlled trial design. Methods Participants were patients from an outpatient clinic with persistent LBP and Modic changes. They were allocated using minimization to either rest therapy for 10 weeks with a recommendation to rest for two hours daily and the option of using a flexible lumbar belt or exercise therapy once a week for 10 weeks. Follow-up was at 10 weeks after recruitment and 52 weeks after intervention and the clinical outcome measures were pain, disability, general health and global assessment, supplemented by weekly information on low back problems and sick leave measured by short text message (SMS) tracking. Results In total, 100 patients were included in the study. Data on 87 patients at 10 weeks and 96 patients at one-year follow-up were available and were used in the intention-to-treat analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two intervention groups on any outcome. Conclusions No differences were found between the two treatment approaches, 'rest and reduced load' and 'exercise and staying active', in patients with persistent LBP and Modic changes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00454792 PMID:22376791

  6. Web-based therapeutic exercise resource center as a treatment for knee osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although beneficial effects of exercise in the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) have been established, only 14 -18% of patients with knee OA receive an exercise from their primary care provider. Patients with knee OA cite lack of physician exercise advice as a major reason why they do not exercise to improve their condition. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate use of a web-based Therapeutic Exercise Resource Center (TERC) as a tool to prescribe strength, flexibility and aerobic exercise as part of knee OA treatment. It was hypothesized that significant change in clinical outcome scores would result from patients’ use of the TERC. Methods Sixty five individuals diagnosed with mild/moderate knee OA based on symptoms and radiographs were enrolled through outpatient physician clinics. Using exercise animations to facilitate proper technique, the TERC assigned and progressed patients through multiple levels of exercise intensity based on exercise history, co-morbidities and a validated measure of pain and function. Subjects completed a modified short form WOMAC (mSF-WOMAC), World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHO-QOL) and Knee Self-Efficacy Scale (K-SES) at baseline and completion of the 8 week program, and a user satisfaction survey. Outcomes were compared over time using paired t-tests and effect sizes calculated using partial point biserial (pr). Results Fifty two participants completed the 8 week program with average duration of knee pain 8.0?±?11.0 yrs (25 females; 61.0?±?9.4 yrs; body mass index, 28.8?±?6.3 kg/m2). During the study period, all outcome measures improved: mSF-WOMAC scores decreased (better pain and function) (p?exercise animations were especially helpful). Conclusion This pilot study demonstrated the web-based TERC to be feasible and efficacious in improving clinical outcomes for patients with mild/moderate knee OA and supports future studies to compare TERC to current standard of care, such as educational brochures. PMID:24884547

  7. Opening of Aortic Valve During Exercise Is Key to Preventing Development of Aortic Insufficiency During Ventricular Assist Device Treatment.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Nitta, Daisuke; Hatano, Masaru; Ono, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Although we previously demonstrated that opening of the native aortic valve (AV) at rest prevents development of aortic insufficiency (AI) during continuous-flow (CF) left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support, the clinical impact of native AV opening during exercise remained unknown. We enrolled 37 patients with a closed native AV at rest 3 months after CF LVAD implantation and followed them from 2006 to 2014. Seven patients (19%) who achieved opening of the native AV during cardiopulmonary exercise testing at 3 months (opening AV group) had higher exercise tolerability and improved left ventricular contractility during exercise compared with those with a closed native AV (closed AV group) (p < 0.05 for all). The opening group experienced no AI at 6 months and had a higher readmission-free rate because of cardiovascular events compared with the closed group during the 2 years study period (100% vs. 56%, p = 0.005). Among those with a closed AV, use of the centrifugal pump was a significant predictor of AI-free status (p < 0.05; odds ratio, 5.400). In conclusion, opening of the native AV during exercise and centrifugal pump use were key to preventing the development of AI. Aggressive cardiac rehabilitation may have a prophylactic impact on development of AI during CF LVAD treatment. PMID:25955152

  8. Sodium bicarbonate treatment prevents gastric emptying delay caused by acute exercise in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Moisés T B; Palheta-Junior, Raimundo C; Sousa, Daniel F; Fonseca-Magalhães, Patrícia A; Okoba, Willy; Campos, Caio P S; Oliveira, Ricardo B; Magalhães, Pedro J C; Santos, Armenio A

    2014-05-01

    Physical exercise, mainly after vigorous activity, may induce gastrointestinal dysmotility whose mechanisms are still unknown. We hypothesized that physical exercise and ensuing lactate-related acidemia alter gastrointestinal motor behavior. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of short-term exercise on gastric emptying rate in awake rats subjected to 15-min swimming sessions against a load equivalent to 5% of their body weight. After 0, 10, or 20 min of exercise testing, the rats were gavage fed with 1.5 ml of a liquid test meal (0.5 mg/ml of phenol red in 5% glucose solution) and euthanized 10 min postprandially to measure fractional gastric dye recovery. In addition to inducing acidemia and increasing blood lactate levels, acute exercise increased (P < 0.05) gastric retention. Such a phenomenon presented a positive correlation (P < 0.001) between blood lactate levels and fractional gastric dye recovery. Gastric retention and other acidbase-related changes were all prevented by NaHCO3 pretreatment. Additionally, exercise enhanced (P < 0.05) the marker's progression through the small intestine. In anesthetized rats, exercise increased (P < 0.05) gastric volume, measured by a balloon catheter in a barostat system. Compared with sedentary control rats, acute exercise also inhibited (P < 0.05) the contractility of gastric fundus strips in vitro. In conclusion, acute exercise delayed the gastric emptying of a liquid test meal by interfering with the acid-base balance. PMID:24557800

  9. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma on the Ventral Portion of Whole Spinal Canal: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Young; Ha, Young-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is an uncommon but disabling disease. This paper reports a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma and treatment by surgical management. A 32-year-old male presented with a 30-minute history of sudden headache, back pain, chest pain, and progressive quadriplegia. Whole-spinal sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed spinal epidural hematoma on the ventral portion of the spinal canal. Total laminectomy from T5 to T7 was performed, and hematoma located at the ventral portion of the spinal cord was evacuated. Epidural drainages were inserted in the upper and lower epidural spaces. The patient improved sufficiently to ambulate, and paresthesia was fully recovered. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma should be considered when patients present symptoms of spinal cord compression after sudden back pain or chest pain. To prevent permanent neurologic deficits, early and correct diagnosis with timely surgical management is necessary. PMID:26512277

  10. Device-guided breathing exercises for the treatment of hypertension: An overview.

    PubMed

    van Hateren, Kornelis Jj; Landman, Gijs Wd; Logtenberg, Susan Jj; Bilo, Henk Jg; Kleefstra, Nanne

    2014-05-26

    The American Heart Association considers device-guided breathing as a reasonable treatment modality in their statement on non-pharmacological options for lowering blood pressure. This review discusses all randomized controlled trials that have investigated the effects of device-guided breathing on blood pressure in patients with hypertension. Thirteen studies were included in this review. In total, 627 patients were included, of which 365 patients were allocated to device-guided breathing. Only 6 studies used acceptable control groups: listening to music, meditative relaxation exercises, or a sham-device. Two sponsored trials showed beneficial effects of device-guided breathing, both used listening to music as a control group. The remaining 4 studies, which had no employees of the manufacturer listed as co-author, observed no beneficial effects on blood pressure. There is only 1 study that used a sham device as a control group. All other studies were to some extend methodologically flawed. Based on the studies with an acceptable methodological quality, there is no clear evidence supporting a short-term beneficial effect on blood pressure by using device-guided breathing. PMID:24944757

  11. Metabolic Consequences of Dieting and Exercise in the Treatment of Obesity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahoe, Clyde P.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the effects of dieting and exercise on resting metabolic rate (RMR) in overweight women (N=10). Results showed that dieting lowered RMR by nearly double that expected on the basis of resulting weight loss; and that exercise caused RMR to rise to a level appropriate to prevailing body weight. (LLL)

  12. A review article on the diagnosis and treatment of cerebrospinal fluid fistulas and dural tears occurring during spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In spinal surgery, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas attributed to deliberate dural opening (e.g., for tumors, shunts, marsupialization of cysts) or inadvertent/traumatic dural tears (DTs) need to be readily recognized, and appropriately treated. Methods: During spinal surgery, the dura may be deliberately opened to resect intradural lesions/tumors, to perform shunts, or to open/marsupialize cysts. DTs, however, may inadvertently occur during primary, but are seen more frequently during revision spinal surgery often attributed to epidural scarring. Other etiologies of CSF fistulas/DTs include; epidural steroid injections, and resection of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) or ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL). Whatever the etiology of CSF fistulas or DTs, they must be diagnosed utilizing radioisotope cisternography (RIC), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed axial tomography (CT) studies, and expeditiously repaired. Results: DTs should be repaired utilizing interrupted 7-0 Gore-Tex (W.L. Gore and Associates Inc., Elkton, MD, USA) sutures, as the suture itself is larger than the needle; the larger suture occludes the dural puncture site. Closure may also include muscle patch grafts, dural patches/substitutes (bovine pericardium), microfibrillar collagen (Duragen: Integra Life Sciences Holdings Corporation, Plainsboro, NJ), and fibrin glues or dural sealants (Tisseel: Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Deerfield, IL, USA). Only rarely are lumbar drains and wound-peritoneal and/or lumboperitoneal shunts warranted. Conclusion: DTs or CSF fistulas attributed to primary/secondary spinal surgery, trauma, epidural injections, OPLL, OYL, and other factors, require timely diagnosis (MRI/CT/Cisternography), and appropriate reconstruction. PMID:24163783

  13. Postoperative Spinal Wound Infections and Postprocedural Diskitis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Saad B; Vives, Michael J; Basra, Sushil K; Reiter, Mitchell F

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Postprocedural infections are a significant cause of morbidity after spinal interventions. Methods: Literature review. An extensive literature review was conducted on postprocedural spinal infections. Relevant articles were reviewed in detail and additional case images were included. Results: Clinical findings, laboratory markers, and imaging modalities play important roles in the detection of postprocedural spinal infections. Treatment may range from biopsy and antibiotics to multiple operations with complex strategies for soft tissue management. Conclusions: Early detection and aggressive treatment are paramount in managing postprocedural spinal infections and limiting their long-term sequelae. PMID:18092559

  14. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... column provides the main support for the upper body, allowing humans to stand upright or bend and twist, and ... of nerve roots that continues from the lumbar region, where the spinal cord ends, ... part of the body. It resembles a “horse’s tail” ( cauda equina in ...

  15. Evaluation of locomotor function and microscopic structure of the spinal cord in a mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis following treatment with syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Nilesh Kumar; Bindal, Umesh; Eng Hwa, Wong; Chua, Caroline LL; Tan, Chek Ying

    2015-01-01

    Out of the minor myelin proteins, most significant one is myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have proven immunoregulatory capacity. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of syngeneic MSCs on mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) through observation of locomotion by footprint analysis, histological analysis of spinal cord and estimation IL-17. C57BL/6 mice (10 weeks, n = 16) were immunized with 300 µg of MOG35-55 and 200 µL of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) to produce EAE model. Sham-treated control (n = 8) were injected with CFA. Half of immunized mice were given 100 µL of PBS (n = 8) and next half (n = 8) received 1 × 105 MSCs on day 11 through the tail veins. Clinical scoring showed development of EAE (loss of tonicity of tail and weakness of hind limb) on day 10. Following MSC treatment, clinical scores and hindlimb stride length showed significant improvement on day 15 onwards, compared to day 10 (P < 0.05). Under LFB staining, while PBS-treated group of EAE mice showed pale and degenerated axons in anterolateral white column of lumbar spinal cord, MSC-treated group showed numerous normal-looking axons. H&E staining showed normal axons in anterolateral white column and reduction of macrophages in MSC-treated EAE mice group. A lower level of IL-17 was observed in MSC treated EAE mice, compared to PBS-treated EAE mice. Our results suggest that Intravenous MSC has the potential to improve the locomotion and regeneration of axons in spinal cord in MOG-induced EAE model. PMID:26722389

  16. Endovascular treatment of chronic cerebro spinal venous insufficiency in patients with multiple sclerosis modifies circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction and coagulation activation: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Mariasanta; Bruno, Aldo; Mastrangelo, Diego; De Vizia, Marcella; Bernardo, Benedetto; Rosa, Buonagura; De Lucia, Domenico

    2014-10-01

    We performed a monocentric observational prospective study to evaluate coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis undergoing endovascular treatment for cerebro-spinal-venous insufficiency. Between February 2011 and July 2012, 144 endovascular procedures in 110 patients with multiple sclerosis and chronical cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency were performed and they were prospectively analyzed. Each patient was included in the study according to previously published criteria, assessed by the investigators before enrollment. Endothelial dysfunction and coagulation activation parameters were determined before the procedure and during follow-up at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 months after treatment, respectively. After the endovascular procedure, patients were treated with standard therapies, with the addition of mesoglycan. Fifty-five percent of patients experienced a favorable outcome of multiple sclerosis within 1 month after treatment, 25% regressed in the following 3 months, 24.9% did not experience any benefit. In only 0.1% patients, acute recurrence was observed and it was treated with high-dose immunosuppressive therapy. No major complications were observed. Coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction parameters were shown to be reduced at 1 month and stable up to 12-month follow-up, and they were furthermore associated with a good clinical outcome. Endovascular procedures performed by a qualified staff are well tolerated; they can be associated with other currently adopted treatments. Correlations between inflammation, coagulation activation and neurodegenerative disorders are here supported by the observed variations in plasma levels of markers of coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:24806325

  17. Treatments of pelvic girdle pain in pregnant women: adverse effects of standard treatment, acupuncture and stabilising exercises on the pregnancy, mother, delivery and the fetus/neonate

    PubMed Central

    Elden, Helen; Ostgaard, Hans-Christian; Fagevik-Olsen, Monika; Ladfors, Lars; Hagberg, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous publications indicate that acupuncture is efficient for the treatment of pelvic girdle pain, PGP, in pregnant women. However, the use of acupuncture for PGP is rare due to insufficient documentation of adverse effects of this treatment in this specific condition. The aim of the present work was to assess adverse effects of acupuncture on the pregnancy, mother, delivery and the fetus/neonate in comparison with women that received stabilising exercises as adjunct to standard treatment or standard treatment alone. Methods In all, 386 women with PGP entered this controlled, single-blind trial. They were randomly assigned to standard treatment plus acupuncture (n = 125), standard treatment plus specific stabilising exercises (n = 131) or to standard treatment alone (n = 130) for 6 weeks. Acupuncture that may be considered strong was used and treatment was started as early as in the second trimester of pregnancy. Adverse effects were recorded during treatment and throughout the pregnancy. Influence on the fetus was measured with cardiotocography (CTG) before-during and after 43 acupuncture sessions in 43 women. A standardised computerized method to analyze the CTG reading numerically (Oxford 8000, Oxford, England) was used. After treatment, the women rated their overall experience of the treatment and listed adverse events if any in a questionnaire. Data of analgesia and oxytocin augmentation during labour, duration of labour, frequency of preterm birth, operative delivery, Apgar score, cord-blood gas/acid base balance and birth weight were also recorded. Results There were no serious adverse events after any of the treatments. Minor adverse events were common in the acupuncture group but women rated acupuncture favourably even despite this. The computerized or visually assessed CTG analyses of antenatal recordings in connection with acupuncture were all normal. Conclusion This study shows that acupuncture administered with a stimulation that may be considered strong led to minor adverse complaints from the mothers but had no observable severe adverse influences on the pregnancy, mother, delivery or the fetus/neonate. PMID:18582370

  18. An Empirical Assessment of a Home-Based Exercise Treatment Package for People with Severe Mobility-Related Disabilities Using a Changing Criterion Design: Two Studies

    E-print Network

    Nary, Dorothy E.

    2010-12-13

    A single-subject changing criterion design was used in two studies to empirically assess a home-based exercise treatment package for sedentary participants with severe mobility-related disabilities. The independent variable ...

  19. Intradural approach to selective stimulation in the spinal cord for treatment of intractable pain: design principles and wireless protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, M. A.; Utz, M.; Brennan, T. J.; Dalm, B. D.; Viljoen, S.; Jeffery, N. D.; Gillies, G. T.

    2011-08-01

    We introduce an intradural approach to spinal cord stimulation for the relief of intractable pain, and describe the biophysical rationale that underlies its design and performance requirements. The proposed device relies on wireless, inductive coupling between a pial surface implant and its epidural controller, and we present the results of benchtop experiments that demonstrate the ability to transmit and receive a frequency-modulated 1.6 MHz carrier signal between micro-coil antennae scaled to the ? 1 cm dimensions of the implant, at power levels of about 5 mW. Plans for materials selection, microfabrication, and other aspects of future development are presented and discussed.

  20. Use of Mometasone furoate in prolonged treatment of experimental spinal cord injury in mice: A comparative study of three different glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Galuppo, Maria; Rossi, Antonietta; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Pace, Simona; Bramanti, Placido; Sautebin, Lidia; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) represents one of the most disabling injuries of the human body causing temporary or permanent sensory and/or motor system deficit, particularly hind limb locomotor function impairment. At present, steroidal inflammatory drugs, in particular methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) are the first line choice treatment of acute SCI. Despite progress in pharmacological, surgical and rehabilitative treatment approaches, SCI still remains a very complex medical and psychological challenge, with no curative therapy available. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of MPSS in respect to other GCs such as dexamethasone (Dex) and mometasone furoate (MF) in an in vitro suitable model of LPS-induced inflammation in J774 cells as well as in an in vivo experimental mouse SCI (compression model). In both the in vitro and in vivo experiments, MF resulted surprisingly more potent than Dex and MPSS. In detail, mice sacrificed seven days after induction of SCI trauma resulted not only in tissue damage, cellular infiltration, fibrosis, astrocyte activation, iNOS expression, extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation in injured tissue, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) activation but also apoptosis (Bax and Bcl-2 expression). All three GCs demonstrated the ability to modulate inflammatory, oxidative as well as apoptotic pathways, but MF demonstrated the best efficacy, while Dex and MPSS showed alternative potency with a different degree of protection. Therefore, we can conclude that MF is the best candidate for post-traumatic chronic treatment, since it ameliorates different molecular pathways involved in the damage's propagation to the surrounding areas of the injured spinal cord. PMID:26192346

  1. BDNF: the career of a multifaceted neurotrophin in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Weishaupt, N; Blesch, A; Fouad, K

    2012-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been identified as a potent promoter of neurite growth, a finding that has led to an ongoing exploration of this neurotrophin as a potential treatment for spinal cord injury. BDNF's many effects in the nervous system make it an excellent candidate for neuroprotective strategies as well as for promoting axonal regeneration, plasticity and re-myelination. In addition, neuronal activity and physical exercise can modulate the expression of BDNF, suggesting that non-invasive means to increase BDNF levels might exist. Nonetheless, depending on the location, amount and duration of BDNF delivery, this potent neurotrophin can also have adverse effects, such as modulation of nociceptive pathways or contribution to spasticity. Taken together, the benefits and possible risks require careful assessment when considering this multifaceted neurotrophin as a treatment option for spinal cord injury. PMID:22982152

  2. Spinal Bracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Dr. Arthur Copes of the Copes Foundation, Baton Rouge, LA, says that 35 percent of the 50 technical reports he received from the NASA/Southern University Industrial Applications Center in Baton Rouge and the Central Industrial Applications Center, Durant, OK, were vital to the development of his Copes Scoliosis Braces, which are custom designed and feature a novel pneumatic bladder that exerts constant corrective pressure to the torso to slowly reduce or eliminate the spinal curve.

  3. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke - www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  4. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually ...

  7. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  8. Spinal Cord Infarction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Infarction Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Organizations Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Spinal Cord Infarction? Spinal cord infarction is a stroke either ...

  9. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can ... yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a ...

  10. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The cervical spinal column is made up of vertebral bodies which protect the spinal cord. ... spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine ...

  11. Conservative Treatment of Subacute Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy Using Eccentric Exercises Performed With a Treadmill: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    CUSHMAN, DANIEL; RHO, MONICA E.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Case report. BACKGROUND Proximal hamstring tendinopathy in runners is characterized by pain with passive hip flexion with the knee extended, active hip extension, and pain with sitting. Relatively little literature exists on the condition, and publications on nonsurgical treatment protocols are even more scarce. Surgical intervention, which comprises the majority of literature for treatment of this condition, is an option for cases that fail to respond to nonsurgical treatment. CASE DESCRIPTION The patient was a 34-year-old, otherwise healthy male triathlete with unilateral proximal hamstring tendinopathy diagnosed by ultrasound, who had pain only with running and prolonged sitting. After he failed to respond to 4 weeks of eccentric knee flexion and lumbopelvic musculature strengthening exercises, an eccentric hip extensor strengthening program using a treadmill was initiated. This treadmill exercise was performed on a daily basis, in addition to a lumbopelvic musculature strengthening program. OUTCOMES The patient noted a decrease in pain within 2 weeks of initiating the new exercise, and was able to return to gradual running after 4 weeks and to speed training after 12 weeks. He returned to competition shortly thereafter and had no recurrence for 12 months after the initiation of therapy. His score on the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-proximal hamstring tendons improved from 23 on initial presentation to 83 at 12 weeks after the initiation of therapy. DISCUSSION We described the management of a triathlete with subacute proximal hamstring tendinopathy, who responded well to nonsurgical treatment using eccentric hip extension strengthening using a treadmill. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Therapy, level 4. PMID:25996362

  12. Transplantation of stem cell-derived astrocytes for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Nicaise, Charles; Mitrecic, Dinko; Falnikar, Aditi; Lepore, Angelo C

    2015-01-01

    Neglected for years, astrocytes are now recognized to fulfill and support many, if not all, homeostatic functions of the healthy central nervous system (CNS). During neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal cord injury (SCI), astrocytes in the vicinity of degenerating areas undergo both morphological and functional changes that might compromise their intrinsic properties. Evidence from human and animal studies show that deficient astrocyte functions or loss-of-astrocytes largely contribute to increased susceptibility to cell death for neurons, oligodendrocytes and axons during ALS and SCI disease progression. Despite exciting advances in experimental CNS repair, most of current approaches that are translated into clinical trials focus on the replacement or support of spinal neurons through stem cell transplantation, while none focus on the specific replacement of astroglial populations. Knowing the important functions carried out by astrocytes in the CNS, astrocyte replacement-based therapies might be a promising approach to alleviate overall astrocyte dysfunction, deliver neurotrophic support to degenerating spinal tissue and stimulate endogenous CNS repair abilities. Enclosed in this review, we gathered experimental evidence that argue in favor of astrocyte transplantation during ALS and SCI. Based on their intrinsic properties and according to the cell type transplanted, astrocyte precursors or stem cell-derived astrocytes promote axonal growth, support mechanisms and cells involved in myelination, are able to modulate the host immune response, deliver neurotrophic factors and provide protective molecules against oxidative or excitotoxic insults, amongst many possible benefits. Embryonic or adult stem cells can even be genetically engineered in order to deliver missing gene products and therefore maximize the chance of neuroprotection and functional recovery. However, before broad clinical translation, further preclinical data on safety, reliability and therapeutic efficiency should be collected. Although several technical challenges need to be overcome, we discuss the major hurdles that have already been met or solved by targeting the astrocyte population in experimental ALS and SCI models and we discuss avenues for future directions based on latest molecular findings regarding astrocyte biology. PMID:25815122

  13. Randomized trial comparing exercise therapy, alternating cold and hot therapy, and low intensity laser therapy for chronic lumbar muscle strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Jie; Liu, Timon Chengyi; Yuan, Jianqin; Luo, Qingming

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of exercise therapy, alternating cold and hot (ACH) therapy and low intensity laser (LIL) therapy in patients with chronic lumbar muscle strain (CLMS). Thirty-two patients were randomly allocated to four groups: exercise group, ACH group, LIL group, and combination group of exercise, ACH and LIL, eight in each group. Sixteen treatments were given over the course of 4 weeks. Lumbar muscle endurance, flexion and lateral flexion measures, visual analogue scale (VAS) and lumbar disability questionnaire (LDQ) were used in the clinical and functional evaluations before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after treatment. It was found that the values of endurance, VAS and LDQ in all groups were significantly improved from before to after treatment (P < 0.01). The combination group showed significantly larger reduction on pain level and functional disability than the other groups immediately and 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.01). Pain level reduced significantly more in the ACH group than in the exercise group or the LIL group immediately and 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.05). Lumbar muscle endurance and spinal ranges of motion in all groups were improved after treatment but there was no significant difference between any therapy groups. In conclusion, exercise therapy, ACH therapy and LIL therapy were effective in the treatment of CLMS. ACH therapy was more effective than exercise therapy or LIL therapy. The combination therapy of exercise, ACH and LIL had still better rehabilitative effects on CLMS.

  14. CyberKnife radiosurgery for spinal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gerszten, Peter C; Burton, Steven A; Ozhasoglu, Cihat

    2007-01-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial lesions is well established. Its use for the treatment of spinal lesions has been limited by the availability of effective target immobilization and localization technologies. Conventional external beam radiotherapy lacks the precision to allow delivery of large doses of radiation near radiosensitive structures such as the spinal cord. The CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, Calif., USA) is an imageguided frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system that allows for the radiosurgical treatment of spinal lesions. The system utilizes the coupling of an orthogonal pair of X-ray cameras to a dynamically manipulated robot-mounted lightweight linear accelerator which has 6 d.f. that guides the therapy beam to the intended target without the use of frame-based fixation. Realtime imaging tracking allows for patient movement tracking with 1mm spatial accuracy. Cervical spine lesions are located and tracked relative to skull bony landmarks; lower spinal lesions are tracked relative to percutaneously placed gold fiducial bone markers. Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery using a frameless image-guided system is now both feasible and safe. The major potential benefits of radiosurgical ablation of spinal lesions are short treatment time in an outpatient setting with rapid recovery and good symptomatic response. This technique offers a successful therapeutic modality for the treatment of a variety of spinal lesions as a primary treatment or for lesions not amenable to open surgical techniques, in medically inoperable patients, lesions located in previously irradiated sites, or as an adjunct to surgery. PMID:17318002

  15. Routine initial exercise stress testing for treatment stratification in comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Salzwedel, Annett; Rieck, Angelika; Reibis, Rona K; Völler, Heinz

    2015-12-01

    There is evidence of substantial benefit of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for patients with low exercise capacity at admission. Nevertheless, some patients are not able to perform an initial exercise stress test (EST). We aimed to describe this group using data of 1094 consecutive patients after a cardiac event (71±7 years, 78% men) enrolled in nine centres for inpatient CR. We analysed sociodemographic and clinical variables (e.g. cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidities, complications at admission), amount of therapy (e.g. exercise training, nursing care) and the results of the initial and the final 6-min walking test (6MWT) with respect to the application of an EST. Fifteen per cent of patients did not undergo an EST (non-EST group). In multivariable analysis, the probability of obtaining an EST was higher for men [odds ratio (OR) 1.89, P=0.01], a 6MWT (per 10?m, OR 1.07, P<0.01) and lower for patients with diabetes mellitus (OR 0.48, P<0.01), NYHA-class III/IV (OR 0.27, P<0.01), osteoarthritis (OR 0.39, P<0.01) and a longer hospital stay (per 5 days, OR 0.87, P=0.02). The non-EST group received fewer therapy units of exercise training, but more units of nursing care and physiotherapy than the EST group. However, there were no significant differences between both groups in the increase of the 6MWT during CR (123 vs. 108?m, P=0.122). The present study confirms the feasibility of an EST at the start of CR as an indicator of disease severity. Nevertheless, patients without EST benefit from CR even if exercising less. Thus, there is a justified need for individualized, comprehensive and interdisciplinary CR. PMID:26397275

  16. The Effect of Extreme Obesity on Outcomes of Treatment for Lumbar Spinal Conditions: Subgroup Analysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Kevin J; Khaleel, Mohammed A; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Lurie, Jon D; Zhao, Wenyan; Weinstein, James N

    2015-01-01

    Study Design/Setting SPORT subgroup analysis Objective To evaluate the effect of extreme obesity on management of lumbar spinal stenosis (SpS), degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS), and intervertebral disc herniation (IDH) Summary of Background Data Prior SPORT analyses compared nonobese and obese. This study compares nonobese to class I obesity and class II/III extreme obesity. Methods For SpS, 250/634 nonobese, 104/167 obese, and 59/94 extremely obese patients underwent surgery. For DS, 233/376 nonobese, 90/129 obese, and 66/96 extremely obese patients had surgery. For IDH, 542/854 nonobese, 151/207 obese, 94/129 extremely obese patients had surgery. Outcomes included SF-36, Oswestry Disability Index, Stenosis/Sciatica Bothersomeness Index, Low Back Pain Bothersomeness Index, operative events, complications, and reoperations. Results Extremely obese patients had increased comorbidities. Baseline SF-36 physical function scores were lower for obese; lowest for extremely obese. For SpS, surgical treatment effect and operative events among groups were not significantly different. For DS, 4-year SF-36 physical function scores had greatest treatment effect in extremely obese. This observation was found in most primary outcome measures, and is attributable to the significantly poorer nonoperative outcomes. Operative times and wound infection rates were greatest for the extremely obese. Additional surgery at 3 and 4 years was higher in both obese cohorts. For IDH, extremely obese experienced less improvement post-op than obese and nonobese; however, nonoperative treatment for extremely obese patients was worse, resulting in treatment effect still greater in almost all measures. Operative time was greatest for extremely obese. Blood loss and length of stay was greater for both obese cohorts compared to non-obese. Conclusions Extremely obese with DS experienced longer operative times and increased infection. Operative time was greatest for extremely obese with IDH. DS and IDH saw greater surgical treatment effect for extremely obese due to poor outcomes of nonsurgical management. PMID:25365713

  17. The effects on depression of Internet-administered behavioural activation and physical exercise with treatment rationale and relapse prevention: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite their potential as low-threshold, low-cost and high-flexibility treatments of depression, behavioural activation and physical exercise have not yet been directly compared. This study will examine the effects of these interventions, administered via the Internet. The added effect of providing a treatment rationale will also be studied, as well as a relapse prevention program featuring cognitive behavioural therapy components. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial will include 500 participants meeting the diagnostic criteria for major depression, recruited in multiple cycles and randomised to either a waiting list control group with delayed treatment, or one of the four treatment groups: (1) physical exercise without a clear treatment rationale; (2) physical exercise with treatment rationale; (3) behavioural activation with treatment rationale; or (4) behavioural activation without a clear treatment rationale. Post treatment, half of the participants will be offered a relapse prevention program. Primary outcome measure will be the Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item. Secondary measures include diagnostic criteria for depression, as well as self-reported anxiety, physical activity and quality of life. Measurements - done via telephone and the Internet - will be collected pre-treatment, weekly during treatment period, immediately post treatment and then monthly during a 24-month follow-up period. Discussion The results of this study will constitute an important contribution to the body of knowledge of the respective interventions. Limitations are discussed. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01619930 PMID:23374879

  18. A pilot study to evaluate the role of the Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) in clinical decisions for pressure ulcer treatment.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Susan S; Graves, Barbara Ann; Madaris, Linda

    2014-12-01

    The Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) was designed to assess pressure ulcer (PrU) healing in the spinal cord impaired (SCI) population. The tool contains 7 variables: wound surface area, depth, edges, tunneling, undermining, exudate type, and necrotic tissue amount. A 2-phased, quantitative pilot study based on the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior was conducted at a large SCI/Disorders Center in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). In the first phase of the study, a convenience sample of 5 physicians, 3 advanced practice registered nurses, and 3 certified wound care nurses (CWCN) was surveyed using a 2-part questionnaire to assess use of the SCI-PUMT instrument, its anticipated improvement in PrU assessment, and intent to use the SCI-PUMT in clinical practice. Attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral controls, and barriers related to the intent to use the SCI-PUMT were evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale (range: 1= extremely likely, 5 = extremely unlikely). In the second phase of the study, the electronic health records (EHR) of 24 veterans (with 30 PrUs) who had at least 2 completed SCI-PUMT scores during a 4-week period were used to evaluate whether an association existed between magnitudes of change of total SCI-PUMT scores and ordered changes in PrU treatment. The overall mean score for intent to use SCI-PUMT was 1.80 (SD 0.75). The least favorable scores were for convenience and motivation to use the SCI-PUMT. Analysis of EHR data showed no significant difference in magnitudes of change in the SCI-PUMT score and changes in PrU treatment recommendations made by the CWCNs. The significance was not affected regardless of an increase or no change in the score (?2 with 1 degree of freedom = 1.158, P = 0.282) or for a decrease in the score (?2 with 1 degree of freedom = 0.5, P = 0.478). In this pilot study, the expressed intent to use the SCI-PUMT in making clinical decisions was generally positive but reservations remain. Additional research is being conducted to determine the barriers and facilitators to SCI-PUMT implementation. The SCI-PUMT was the first tool found to be valid, reliable, and sensitive to assess PrU healing in persons with SCI, and studies to examine the prospective validity of using this instrument on ulcer treatment decisions and outcomes are warranted. PMID:25485550

  19. Operational Applications of Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise as a Treatment for Airsickness in the Military

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebreyesus, Fiyore; Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Airsickness is experienced by about 50% of military aviators some time in their career. Aviators who suffer from recurrent episodes of airsickness are typically referred to the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) at Pensacola where they undergo extensive evaluation and 8 weeks of training in the Self-Paced Airsickness Desensitization (SPAD) program. Researchers at NASA Ames have developed an alternative mitigation training program, Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) that has demonstrated an 80% success rate for improving motion sickness tolerance.

  20. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  1. Rehabilitation in spinal infection diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Karakoç, Mehmet; Ayd?n, Abdulkadir; Öne?, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord infections were the diseases defined by Hypocrite yet the absence of modern medicine and there was not a real protocol in rehabilitation although there were many aspects in surgical treatment options. The patients whether surgically or conservatively treated had a lot of neurological, motor, and sensory disturbances. Our clinic has quite experience from our previous researchs. Unfortunately, serious spinal cord infections are still present in our region. In these patients the basic rehabilitation approaches during early, pre-operation, post-operation period and in the home environment will provide significant contributions to improve the patients’ sensory and motor skills, develop the balance and proriocaption, increase the independence of patients in daily living activities and minimize the assistance of other people. There is limited information in the literature related with the nature of the rehabilitation programmes to be applied for patients with spinal infections. The aim of this review is to share our clinic experience and summarise the publications about spinal infection rehabilitation. There are very few studies about the rehabilitation of spinal infections. There are still not enough studies about planning and performing rehabilitation programs in these patients. Therefore, a comprehensive rehabilitation programme during the hospitalisation and home periods is emphasised in order to provide optimal management and prevent further disability. PMID:25621205

  2. Exercise prevents Western diet-associated erectile dysfunction and coronary artery endothelial dysfunction: response to acute apocynin and sepiapterin treatment.

    PubMed

    La Favor, Justin D; Anderson, Ethan J; Dawkins, Jillian T; Hickner, Robert C; Wingard, Christopher J

    2013-08-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate aerobic exercise training as a means to prevent erectile dysfunction (ED) and coronary artery disease (CAD) development associated with inactivity and diet-induced obesity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a Western diet (WD) or a control diet (CD) for 12 wk. Subgroups within each diet remained sedentary (Sed) or participated in aerobic interval treadmill running throughout the dietary intervention. Erectile function was evaluated under anesthesia by measuring the mean arterial pressure and intracavernosal pressure in response to electrical field stimulation of the cavernosal nerve, in the absence or presence of either apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, or sepiapterin, a tetrahydrobiopterin precursor. Coronary artery endothelial function (CAEF) was evaluated ex vivo with cumulative doses of ACh applied to preconstricted segments of the left anterior descending coronary artery. CAEF was assessed in the absence or presence of apocynin or sepiapterin. Erectile function (P < 0.0001) and CAEF (P < 0.001) were attenuated in WD-Sed. Exercise preserved erectile function (P < 0.0001) and CAEF (P < 0.05) within the WD. Erectile function (P < 0.01) and CAEF (P < 0.05) were augmented by apocynin only in WD-Sed, while sepiapterin (P < 0.05) only augmented erectile function in WD-Sed. These data demonstrate that a chronic WD induces impairment in erectile function and CAEF that are commonly partially reversible by apocynin, whereas sepiapterin treatment exerted differential functional effects between the two vascular beds. Furthermore, exercise training may be a practical means of preventing diet-induced ED and CAD development. PMID:23761637

  3. General Information about Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  4. Early dexamethasone treatment after implantation of a sciatic-nerve cuff decreases the concentration of substance P in the lumbar spinal cord of rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, Francis; Girard, Christiane; Vachon, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of early dexamethasone treatment on pain-related peptides at an early stage in the development of neuropathic pain induced by implantation of a sciatic nerve cuff in Sprague Dawley rats (body weight 250 to 350 g). The rats were tested for touch sensitivity with the use of von Frey filaments before and 3 d after cuff implantation (n = 12) or sham surgery (n = 6). Half of the cuff-implanted rats received dexamethasone, 1 mg/kg intraperitoneally, 1 h after surgery. Spinal cords were collected on the 3rd day after surgery, and the lumbar enlargement was processed for the detection of selected peptides (neurotensin, substance P, cholecystokinin [CCK], vasoactive intestinal peptide, and calcitonin gene-related peptide) by means of liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The right sciatic nerve of each rat was collected, fixed, and stained for histopathological evaluation. Except for neurotensin, all the peptides showed an increased concentration with neuropathic pain; however, the differences were significant (P < 0.05) only for substance P and CCK. In the animals treated with dexamethasone, mechanical allodynia was less pronounced (P < 0.01), and only the concentration of substance P was decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Sciatic nerve sections showed a decrease in C (P < 0.01) and A? (P < 0.03) fibres with neuropathic pain and a nearly normal percentage of C fibres after dexamethasone treatment. The dexamethasone-treated animals also had less inflammation detectable microscopically at the nerve constriction site compared with cuff-implanted animals that were not treated with dexamethasone. Our results suggest that in the early stages of neuropathic pain induced by an inflammatory process, dexamethasone may be a useful treatment and that substance P plays an important role in pain perception. PMID:17479771

  5. Validation of a Score Predicting Post-Treatment Ambulatory Status After Radiotherapy for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Douglas, Sarah; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Rudat, Volker; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Basic, Hiba; Karstens, Johann H.; Hoskin, Peter J.; Adamietz, Irenaeus A.; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: A score predicting post-radiotherapy (RT) ambulatory status was developed based on 2,096 retrospectively evaluated metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) patients. This study aimed to validate the score in a prospective series. Methods and Materials: The score included five factors associated with post-RT ambulatory status: tumor type, interval tumor diagnosis to MSCC, visceral metastases, pre-RT motor function, time developing motor deficits. Patients were divided into five groups: 21-28, 29-31, 32-34, 35-37, 38-44 points. In this study, 653 prospectively followed patients were divided into the same groups. Furthermore, the number of prognostic groups was reduced from five to three (21-28, 29-37, 38-44 points). Post-RT ambulatory rates from this series were compared with the retrospective series. Additionally, this series was compared with 104 patients receiving decompressive surgery plus RT (41 laminectomy, 63 laminectomy plus stabilization of vertebrae). Results: In this study, post-RT ambulatory rates were 10.6% (21-28 points), 43.5% (29-31 points), 71.0% (32-34 points), 89.5% (35-37 points), and 98.5% (38-44 points). Ambulatory rates from the retrospective study were 6.2%, 43.5%, 70.0%, 86.1%, and 98.7%. After regrouping, ambulatory rates were 10.6% (21-28 points), 70.9% (29-37 points), and 98.5% (38-44 points) in this series, and 6.2%, 68.4%, and 98.7% in the retrospective series. Ambulatory rates were 0%, 62.5%, and 90.9% in the laminectomy plus RT group, and 14.3%, 83.9%, and 100% in the laminectomy + stabilization plus RT group. Conclusions: Ambulatory rates in the different groups in this study were similar to those in the retrospective study demonstrating the validity of the score. Using only three groups is simplier for clinical routine.

  6. What is the ideal study design for evaluation of treatment for heart failure? Insights from trials assessing the effect of ACE inhibitors on exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Narang, R; Swedberg, K; Cleland, J G

    1996-01-01

    There is a wealth of evidence that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors improve symptoms, morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure. In this context the use of ACE inhibitors could be considered a tool with which to assess the effect of trial design and methodology on the ability to detect improvement in symptoms and exercise performance. Thirty-five published, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trials, involving a total of 3411 patients, which compared the effect of ACE inhibitors and placebo on exercise capacity in patients with symptomatic chronic heart failure were identified. Studies were examined in relation to whether they used cross-over or parallel group study design, study size, use of treadmill vs bicycle exercise test, year of publication, patient entry criteria, duration of follow-up and the particular ACE inhibitor used. Exercise duration improved in 23 of the studies, while symptoms improved in 25 of the 33 studies which evaluated this. In the majority of the trials (27 of 33) there was concordance between the effect on symptoms and on exercise capacity. There were six trials which showed discrepant results. Study size, duration of follow-up and method of exercise testing used were found to be major factors affecting the outcome. Trials using treadmill exercise tests were more likely to be positive than those using bicycle ergometry. All nine trials with study size more than 50, follow-up of 3-6 months and using treadmill exercise tests showed improved exercise capacity as well as symptoms. These findings may be useful in designing future trials for evaluating treatment for heart failure. PMID:8682118

  7. Cranial and spinal leptomeningeal dissemination in esthesioneuroblastoma: Two reports of distant central nervous system metastasis and rationale for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Walavan; Oh, Nathan; Cutler, Aaron; Colman, Howard; Couldwell, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Esthesioneuroblastoma is a locally aggressive cancer of the nasal cavity. While systemic metastasis can occur in 10-30% of patients, there are only six reported cases of distal metastasis from leptomeningeal dissemination. Case Description: The authors report two cases of esthesioneuroblastoma treated previously with multimodal therapy in which distal metastatic recurrence was found and describe their treatment protocol, which has resulted in long-term success. Conclusion: Understanding the drivers of leptomeningeal dissemination in more prevalent primary neuroectodermal tumors may hold the key to developing successful treatment algorithms for this disease. PMID:26682087

  8. Operationalizing Pain Treatment in the Biopsychosocial Model: Take a Daily "SWEM"-Socialize, Work, Exercise, Meditate.

    PubMed

    Collen, Mark

    2015-09-01

    In the United States, chronic pain is often poorly treated at an exceedingly high cost. The use of the biomedical model to manage pain is frequently ineffective, and evidence suggests that the biopsychosocial (BPS) model is a better choice. A problem with the BPS model is that it has not been operationalized in terms of patient behavior. This commentary addresses that issue by suggesting that people with chronic pain and illness participate daily in four self-management health behaviors: socialize, work, exercise, and meditation, and discusses evidence that supports these recommendations. These self-management behaviors may decrease pain and thus reduce the need for pain medications and other medical interventions. Additional topics include patient adherence and health coaching. PMID:26367791

  9. Clinical Assessment Of Stereotactic IGRT: Spinal Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerszten, Peter C. Burton, Steven A.

    2008-07-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial lesions is well established. Its use for the treatment of spinal lesions has been limited because of the availability of effective target immobilization devices. Recent advances in stereotactic IGRT have allowed for spinal applications. Large clinical experience with spinal radiosurgery to properly assess clinical outcomes has previously been limited. At our institution, we have developed a successful multidisciplinary spinal radiosurgery program in which 542 spinal lesions (486 malignant and 56 benign lesions) were treated with a single-fraction radiosurgery technique. Patient ages ranged from 18 to 85 years (mean 56 years). Lesion location included 92 cervical, 234 thoracic, 130 lumbar, and 86 sacral. The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell (89 cases), breast (74 cases), and lung (71 cases). The most common benign tumors were neurofibroma (24 cases), schwannoma (13 cases), and meningioma (7 cases). Eighty-nine cervical lesions were treated using skull tracking. Thoracic, lumbar, and sacral tumors were tracked relative to either gold or stainless steel fiducial markers. The maximum intratumoral dose ranged from 12.5 to 30 Gy (mean 20 Gy). Tumor volume ranged from 0.16 to 298 mL (mean 47 mL). Three hundred thirty-seven lesions had received prior external beam irradiation with spinal cord doses precluding further conventional irradiation. The primary indication for radiosurgery was pain in 326 cases, as a primary treatment modality in 70 cases, for tumor radiographic tumor progression in 65 cases, for post-surgical treatment in 38 cases, for progressive neurological deficit in 35 cases, and as a radiation boost in 8 cases. Follow-up period was at least 3 to 49 months. Axial and/or radicular pain improved in 300 of 326 cases (92%). Long-term tumor control was demonstrated in 90% of lesions treated with radiosurgery as a primary treatment modality and in 88% of lesions treated for radiographic tumor progression. Thirty of 35 patients (85%) with progressive neurological deficits experienced at least some improvement after treatment. Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery is now a feasible, safe, and clinically effective technique for the treatment of a variety of spinal lesions. The potential benefits of radiosurgical ablation of spinal lesions are short treatment time in an outpatient setting with essentially no recovery time and excellent symptomatic response. This technique offers a new therapeutic modality for the primary treatment of a variety of spinal lesions, including the treatment of neoplasms in medically inoperable patients, previously irradiated sites, for lesions not amenable to open surgical techniques, and as an adjunct to surgery.

  10. A hardware spinal decoder

    E-print Network

    Iannucci, Peter A.

    Spinal codes are a recently proposed capacity-achieving rateless code. While hardware encoding of spinal codes is straightforward, the design of an efficient, high-speed hardware decoder poses significant challenges. We ...

  11. Treatment Integrity Enhancement via Performance Feedback Conceptualized as an Exercise in Social Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erchul, William P.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary is in response to the article "Effects of Verbal and Written Performance Feedback on Treatment Adherence" (Kaufman, Codding, Markus, Tryon, & Kyse, this issue). The overall recommendation to those who study treatment integrity using performance feedback methods is to incorporate theories and research on social…

  12. Combining Teletherapy and On-line Language Exercises in the Treatment of Chronic Aphasia: An Outcome Study

    PubMed Central

    STEELE, RICHARD D.; BAIRD, ALLISON; MCCALL, DENISE; HAYNES, LISA

    2015-01-01

    We report a 12-week outcome study in which nine persons with long-term chronic aphasia received individual and group speech-language teletherapy services, and also used on-line language exercises to practice from home between therapy sessions. Participants were assessed at study initiation and completion using the Western Aphasia Battery, a portion of the Communicative Effectiveness Index, ASHA National Outcome Measurement System, and RIC Communication Confidence Rating Scale for Aphasia; additionally participants were polled regarding satisfaction at discharge. Pretreatment and post-treatment means were calculated and compared, and matched t-tests were used to determine significance of improvements following treatment, with patterns of independent on-line activity analyzed. Analysis of scores shows that means improved on most measures following treatment, generally significantly: the WAB AQ improved +3.5 (p = .057); the CETI Overall (of items administered) — +17.8 (p = .01), and CCRSA Overall — + 10.4 (p = .0004). Independent work increased with time, and user satisfaction following participation was high. PMID:25945225

  13. Idiopathic spinal cord herniation.

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Mimatsu, K; Matsuyama, Y; Yoneda, M; Iwata, H

    1996-02-01

    Idiopathic spinal cord herniation is a rare disease, few cases having been reported. We encountered a case of idiopathic spinal cord herniation presenting with severe spasticity in the right leg and urinary dysfunction. The spinal cord was herniated into a cavity created by duplication of the dura mater and resection of the inner layer improved the neurological deficits. MRI, myelography, and CT myelography were useful for diagnosing this disease. Four radiological signs of spinal cord herniation are described. PMID:8692428

  14. The changing pattern of spinal arachnoiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, M D; Russell, J A; Grossart, K W

    1978-01-01

    Spinal arachnoiditis is a rare condition. Eighty cases, diagnosed during a period when 7600 spinal contrast investigations were undertaken, have been reviewed. The majority had suffered a previous spinal condition, the most common being lumbar disc disease. There has been a change in the distribution of arahnoiditis with the lumbar region now most frequently involved. This accounts for the persistence of radicular symptoms and the relatively low incidence of paraplegia when compared with earlier series. Surgery does not appear to have any role in the treatment. Images PMID:632824

  15. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Painful Spinal Tumors Adjacent to the Spinal Cord with Real-Time Monitoring of Spinal Canal Temperature: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Uraki, Junji; Makita, Masashi; Oshima, Fumiyoshi; Takeda, Kan

    2009-01-15

    PurposeTo prospectively evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical utility of bone radiofrequency (RF) ablation with real-time monitoring of the spinal canal temperature for the treatment of spinal tumors adjacent to the spinal cord.Materials and MethodsOur Institutional Review Board approved this study. Patients gave informed consent. The inclusion criteria were (a) a painful spinal metastasis and (b) a distance of 1 cm or less between the metastasis and the spinal cord. The thermocouple was placed in the spinal canal under CT fluoroscopic guidance. When the spinal canal temperature reached 45{sup o}C, RF application was immediately stopped. RF ablation was considered technically successful when the procedure was performed without major complications. Clinical success was defined as a fall in the visual analogue scale score of at least 2 points.ResultsTen patients with spinal tumors measuring 3-8 cm (mean, 4.9 {+-} 1.5 cm) were enrolled. The distance between the tumor and the spinal cord was 1-6 mm (mean, 2.4 {+-} 1.6 mm). All procedures were judged technically successful (100%). The spinal canal temperature did not exceed 45{sup o}C in 9 of the 10 patients (90%). In the remaining patient, the temperature rose to 48{sup o}C, resulting in transient neural damage, although RF application was immediately stopped when the temperature reached 45{sup o}C. Clinical success was achieved within 1 week in all patients (100%).ConclusionBone RF ablation with real-time monitoring of the spinal canal temperature is feasible, safe, and clinically useful for the treatment of painful spinal metastases adjacent to the spinal cord.

  16. Short-term follow-up of exercise training program and beta-blocker treatment on quality of life in dogs with naturally acquired chronic mitral valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Marcondes-Santos, M.; Mansur, A.P.; Fragata, F.S.; Strunz, C.M.C.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of carvedilol treatment and a regimen of supervised aerobic exercise training on quality of life and other clinical, echocardiographic, and biochemical variables in a group of client-owned dogs with chronic mitral valve disease (CMVD). Ten healthy dogs (control) and 36 CMVD dogs were studied, with the latter group divided into 3 subgroups. In addition to conventional treatment (benazepril, 0.3-0.5 mg/kg once a day, and digoxin, 0.0055 mg/kg twice daily), 13 dogs received exercise training (subgroup I; 10.3±2.1 years), 10 dogs received carvedilol (0.3 mg/kg twice daily) and exercise training (subgroup II; 10.8±1.7 years), and 13 dogs received only carvedilol (subgroup III; 10.9±2.1 years). All drugs were administered orally. Clinical, laboratory, and Doppler echocardiographic variables were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Exercise training was conducted from months 3-6. The mean speed rate during training increased for both subgroups I and II (ANOVA, P>0.001), indicating improvement in physical conditioning at the end of the exercise period. Quality of life and functional class was improved for all subgroups at the end of the study. The N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level increased in subgroup I from baseline to 3 months, but remained stable after training introduction (from 3 to 6 months). For subgroups II and III, NT-proBNP levels remained stable during the entire study. No difference was observed for the other variables between the three evaluation periods. The combination of carvedilol or exercise training with conventional treatment in CMVD dogs led to improvements in quality of life and functional class. Therefore, light walking in CMVD dogs must be encouraged. PMID:26445331

  17. Short-term follow-up of exercise training program and beta-blocker treatment on quality of life in dogs with naturally acquired chronic mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Marcondes-Santos, M; Mansur, A P; Fragata, F S; Strunz, C M C

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of carvedilol treatment and a regimen of supervised aerobic exercise training on quality of life and other clinical, echocardiographic, and biochemical variables in a group of client-owned dogs with chronic mitral valve disease (CMVD). Ten healthy dogs (control) and 36 CMVD dogs were studied, with the latter group divided into 3 subgroups. In addition to conventional treatment (benazepril, 0.3-0.5 mg/kg once a day, and digoxin, 0.0055 mg/kg twice daily), 13 dogs received exercise training (subgroup I; 10.3±2.1 years), 10 dogs received carvedilol (0.3 mg/kg twice daily) and exercise training (subgroup II; 10.8±1.7 years), and 13 dogs received only carvedilol (subgroup III; 10.9±2.1 years). All drugs were administered orally. Clinical, laboratory, and Doppler echocardiographic variables were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Exercise training was conducted from months 3-6. The mean speed rate during training increased for both subgroups I and II (ANOVA, P>0.001), indicating improvement in physical conditioning at the end of the exercise period. Quality of life and functional class was improved for all subgroups at the end of the study. The N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level increased in subgroup I from baseline to 3 months, but remained stable after training introduction (from 3 to 6 months). For subgroups II and III, NT-proBNP levels remained stable during the entire study. No difference was observed for the other variables between the three evaluation periods. The combination of carvedilol or exercise training with conventional treatment in CMVD dogs led to improvements in quality of life and functional class. Therefore, light walking in CMVD dogs must be encouraged. PMID:26445331

  18. Management of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon; Tomkins-Lane, Christy

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200?000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality. PMID:26727925

  19. Meditation over medication for irritable bowel syndrome? On exercise and alternative treatments for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Asare, Fredrick; Störsrud, Stine; Simrén, Magnus

    2012-08-01

    Complimentary alternative treatment regimens are widely used in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but the evidence supporting their use varies. For psychological treatment options, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness, gut-directed hypnotherapy, and psychodynamic therapy, the evidence supporting their use in IBS patients is strong, but the availability limits their use in clinical practice. Dietary interventions are commonly included in the management of IBS patients, but these are primarily based on studies assessing physiological function in relation to dietary components, and to a lesser degree upon research examining the role of dietary components in the therapeutic management of IBS. Several probiotic products improve a range of symptoms in IBS patients. Physical activity is of benefit for health in general and recent data implicates its usefulness also for IBS patients. Acupuncture does not seem to have an effect beyond placebo in IBS. A beneficial effect of some herbal treatments has been reported. PMID:22661301

  20. Findings from frozen sections of spinal subependymomas: Is it possible to differentiate this diagnosis from other common spinal tumors?

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Kyu; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Byeongwoo; Minn, Yang Ki; Kim, Keung-Nyun; Kim, Se Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Subependymomas are slow-growing, benign neoplasms that are rarely found in the spinal cord. Because of the differences in the treatment plans, it might be very helpful for neurosurgeons to intraoperatively establish a diagnosis of spinal subependymoma, differentiated from other spinal intramedullary tumors. In this study, we analyzed frozen sections of spinal subependymomas to identify potential histological clues of spinal subependymomas to differentiate them from tumors that mimic spinal subependymoma. We reviewed the frozen sections and the corresponding permanent slides for 7 cases of spinal subependymoma. The spinal subependymomas showed several characteristic patterns, including, most importantly, an eccentric or both central and eccentric location in the axial plane. Histologically, they showed a (1) well-demarcated and multinodular mass with (2) low or moderate cellularity, (3) a microlobular pattern, and (4) small clusters of neoplastic cells. These features appear to be very specific to spinal subependymomas and could help differentiate them from ependymomas or astrocytomas. Although we might not be able to provide an exact diagnosis of all spinal subependymomas using these histological features, we hope that they help neuropathologists and neurosurgeons to adequately diagnose and treat spinal subependymomas. PMID:26515302

  1. Ganglioglioma of the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Daniel C; Johnson, Mahlon D; Judkins, Alexander R

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioglioma is a rare tumor consisting of neoplastic glial and neuronal elements. It accounts for only 0.5% of all primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms. We report an unusual case of extensive intramedullary thoracic spinal cord ganglioglioma in a 14-month-old girl who underwent subtotal resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. The epidemiology, histopathologic features, imaging findings, treatment, and prognosis are subsequently reviewed. PMID:26605127

  2. Spinal muscular atrophies.

    PubMed

    Darras, Basil T

    2015-06-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are hereditary degenerative disorders of lower motor neurons associated with progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Proximal 5q SMA is caused by decreased levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein and is the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. Its inheritance pattern is autosomal recessive, resulting from mutations involving the SMN1 gene on chromosome 5q13. Unlike other autosomal recessive diseases, the SMN gene has a unique structure (an inverted duplication) that presents potential therapeutic targets. Although there is currently no effective treatment of SMA, the field of translational research in this disorder is active and clinical trials are ongoing. Advances in the multidisciplinary supportive care of children with SMA also offer hope for improved life expectancy and quality of life. PMID:26022173

  3. Specific rehabilitation exercise for the treatment of patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Tomanova, Michaela; Lippert-Grüner, Marcela; Lhotska, Lenka

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the efficacy of our special rehabilitation method for patients with low back pain (LBP). [Subjects and Methods] All participants (n=33) received at least five individual 30-minute therapy sessions per week using the INFINITY method(®) and six group therapy sessions per week in a gymnasium and swimming pool, each lasting 30 minutes and including the INFINITY method(®). The treatment lasted between four to seven weeks. Plantar function using a graphic method (computer plantography), graphical quantification of postural control during static standing (posturography), and pain were measured and evaluated before and after rehabilitation therapy. The INFINITY method(®) is a special rehabilitation method for patients with musculoskeletal problems. The method focuses on stabilization and strengthening of the trunk, dorsal and abdominal muscles, including the deep stabilization system which is closely linked with diaphragmatic breathing. It teaches the central nervous system to control muscles more precisely. [Results] Plantar functions, postural control in the upright stance and pain of LBP patients were significantly improved by 4-7 weeks of rehabilitation treatment with the INFINITY method(®). There were significant differences in all measured dependent variables of the patients between before and after treatment. [Conclusion] Rehabilitation therapy with the INFINITY method(®) positively influences body stabilization and pain in patients with problems of the lumbar spine. This method presents a new improved approach (with enhanced effect) to rehabilitation therapy for LBP patients. PMID:26356065

  4. Specific rehabilitation exercise for the treatment of patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Tomanova, Michaela; Lippert-Grüner, Marcela; Lhotska, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the efficacy of our special rehabilitation method for patients with low back pain (LBP). [Subjects and Methods] All participants (n=33) received at least five individual 30-minute therapy sessions per week using the INFINITY method® and six group therapy sessions per week in a gymnasium and swimming pool, each lasting 30 minutes and including the INFINITY method®. The treatment lasted between four to seven weeks. Plantar function using a graphic method (computer plantography), graphical quantification of postural control during static standing (posturography), and pain were measured and evaluated before and after rehabilitation therapy. The INFINITY method® is a special rehabilitation method for patients with musculoskeletal problems. The method focuses on stabilization and strengthening of the trunk, dorsal and abdominal muscles, including the deep stabilization system which is closely linked with diaphragmatic breathing. It teaches the central nervous system to control muscles more precisely. [Results] Plantar functions, postural control in the upright stance and pain of LBP patients were significantly improved by 4?7 weeks of rehabilitation treatment with the INFINITY method®. There were significant differences in all measured dependent variables of the patients between before and after treatment. [Conclusion] Rehabilitation therapy with the INFINITY method® positively influences body stabilization and pain in patients with problems of the lumbar spine. This method presents a new improved approach (with enhanced effect) to rehabilitation therapy for LBP patients. PMID:26356065

  5. Exercise Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Martin G.; Sharman, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Irrespective of apparent ‘normal' resting blood pressure (BP), some individuals may experience an excessive elevation in BP with exercise (i.e. systolic BP ?210 mm Hg in men or ?190 mm Hg in women or diastolic BP ?110 mm Hg in men or women), a condition termed exercise hypertension or a ‘hypertensive response to exercise' (HRE). An HRE is a relatively common condition that is identified during standard exercise stress testing; however, due to a lack of information with respect to the clinical ramifications of an HRE, little value is usually placed on such a finding. In this review, we discuss both the clinical importance and underlying physiological contributors of exercise hypertension. Indeed, an HRE is associated with an increased propensity for target organ damage and also predicts the future development of hypertension, cardiovascular events and mortality, independent of resting BP. Moreover, recent work has highlighted that some of the elevated cardiovascular risks associated with an HRE may be related to high-normal resting BP (pre-hypertension) or ambulatory ‘masked' hypertension and that an HRE may be an early warning signal of abnormal BP control that is otherwise undetected with clinic BP. Whilst an HRE may be amenable to treatment via pharmacological and lifestyle interventions, the exact physiological mechanism of an HRE remains elusive, but it is likely a manifestation of multiple factors including large artery stiffness, increased peripheral resistance, neural circulatory control and metabolic irregularity. Future research focus may be directed towards determining threshold values to denote the increased risk associated with an HRE and further resolution of the underlying physiological factors involved in the pathogenesis of an HRE.

  6. Spinal Gap Junction Channels in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves or the spinal cord is often accompanied by neuropathic pain, which is a complex, chronic pain state. Increasing evidence indicates that alterations in the expression and activity of gap junction channels in the spinal cord are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Thus, this review briefly summarizes evidence that regulation of the expression, coupling, and activity of spinal gap junction channels modulates pain signals in neuropathic pain states induced by peripheral nerve or spinal cord injury. We particularly focus on connexin 43 and pannexin 1 because their regulation vastly attenuates symptoms of neuropathic pain. We hope that the study of gap junction channels eventually leads to the development of a suitable treatment tool for patients with neuropathic pain. PMID:26495077

  7. Questionable Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell; Haydu, Traci; Phillips, Dawn

    1999-01-01

    This publication presents general guidelines for exercise prescription that have an anatomical basis but also consider the exerciser's ability to do the exercise correctly. It reviews various common questionable exercises, explaining how some exercises, especially those designed for flexibility and muscle fitness, can cause harm. Safer…

  8. Physical exercise as non-pharmacological treatment of chronic pain: Why and when.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Kirsten R; Golightly, Yvonne M

    2015-02-01

    Chronic pain broadly encompasses both objectively defined conditions and idiopathic conditions that lack physical findings. Despite variance in origin or pathogenesis, these conditions are similarly characterized by chronic pain, poor physical function, mobility limitations, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance, and they are treated alone or in combination by pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches, such as physical activity (aerobic conditioning, muscle strengthening, flexibility training, and movement therapies). Physical activity improves general health, disease risk, and progression of chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. When applied to chronic pain conditions within appropriate parameters (frequency, duration, and intensity), physical activity significantly improves pain and related symptoms. For chronic pain, strict guidelines for physical activity are lacking, but frequent movement is preferable to sedentary behavior. This gives considerable freedom in prescribing physical activity treatments, which are most successful when tailored individually, progressed slowly, and account for physical limitations, psychosocial needs, and available resources. PMID:26267006

  9. Exercise therapy normalizes BDNF upregulation and glial hyperactivity in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cayo; DeMaman, Aline; Kusuda, Ricardo; Cadetti, Flaviane; Ravanelli, Maria Ida; Queiroz, André L; Sousa, Thais A; Zanon, Sonia; Silveira, Leonardo R; Lucas, Guilherme

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of neuropathic pain is a clinical challenge likely because of the time-dependent changes in many neurotransmitter systems, growth factors, ionic channels, membrane receptors, transcription factors, and recruitment of different cell types. Conversely, an increasing number of reports have shown the ability of extended and regular physical exercise in alleviating neuropathic pain throughout a wide range of mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the effect of swim exercise on molecules associated with initiation and maintenance of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. BALB/c mice were submitted to partial ligation of the sciatic nerve followed by a 5-week aerobic exercise program. Physical training reversed mechanical hypersensitivity, which lasted for an additional 4 weeks after exercise interruption. Swim exercise normalized nerve injury-induced nerve growth factor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhanced expression in the dorsal root ganglion, but had no effect on the glial-derived neurotrophic factor. However, only BDNF remained at low levels after exercise interruption. In addition, exercise training significantly reduced the phosphorylation status of PLC?-1, but not CREB, in the spinal cord dorsal horn in response to nerve injury. Finally, prolonged swim exercise reversed astrocyte and microglia hyperactivity in the dorsal horn after nerve lesion, which remained normalized after training cessation. Together, these results demonstrate that exercise therapy induces long-lasting analgesia through various mechanisms associated with the onset and advanced stages of neuropathy. Moreover, the data support further studies to clarify whether appropriate exercise intensity, volume, and duration can also cause long-lasting pain relief in patients with neuropathic pain. PMID:25687543

  10. Upper cervical spinal cord gunshot injury without bone destruction???

    PubMed Central

    Seçer, Mehmet; Uluta?, Murat; Yayla, Erdal; Ç?nar, Kadir

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This report describes a rare case of the gunshot injury of the spine and spinal cord. PRESENTATION OF CASE A rare case of the bullet lodged intra-durally in the upper cervical region without damaging the vertebrae or the spinal cord. The bullet was removed as microneurosurgical and duraplasty was performed. DISCUSSION Surgical management of the gunshot wounds of the spine and spinal cord is not widely advocated and controversial. CONCLUSION Advances in microneurosurgical instrumentation and microscopic techniques may open up a new era of surgical treatment of spinal cord gunshot wounds. PMID:24566426

  11. Better exercise adherence after treatment for cancer (BEAT Cancer) study: Rationale, design, and methods

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Laura Q.; McAuley, Edward; Anton, Philip M.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Vicari, Sandra; Hopkins-Price, Patricia; Verhulst, Steven; Mocharnuk, Robert; Hoelzer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Most breast cancer survivors do not engage in regular physical activity. Our physical activity behavior change intervention for breast cancer survivors significantly improved physical activity and health outcomes post-intervention during a pilot, feasibility study. Testing in additional sites with a larger sample and longer follow-up is warranted to confirm program effectiveness short and longer term. Importantly, the pilot intervention resulted in changes in physical activity and social cognitive theory constructs, enhancing our potential for testing mechanisms mediating physical activity behavior change. Here, we report the rationale, design, and methods for a two-site, randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of the BEAT Cancer physical activity behavior change intervention to usual care on short and longer term physical activity adherence among breast cancer survivors. Secondary aims include examining social cognitive theory mechanisms of physical activity behavior change and health benefits of the intervention. Study recruitment goal is 256 breast cancer survivors with a history of ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I, II, or IIIA disease who have completed primary cancer treatment. Outcome measures are obtained at baseline, 3 months (i.e., immediately post-intervention), 6 months, and 12 months and include physical activity, psychosocial factors, fatigue, sleep quality, lower extremity joint dysfunction, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength, and waist-to-hip ratio. Confirming behavior change effectiveness, health effects, and underlying mechanisms of physical activity behavior change interventions will facilitate translation to community settings for improving the health and well-being of breast cancer survivors. PMID:21983625

  12. Disuse bone loss in hindquarter suspended rats: partial weightbearing, exercise and ibandronate treatment as countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultheis, L.; Ruff, C. B.; Rastogi, S.; Bloomfield, S.; Hogan, H. A.; Fedarko, N.; Thierry-Palmer, M.; Ruiz, J.; Bauss, F.; Shapiro, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential countermeasures for bone loss during long-term space missions in the hindquarter suspended rat, including partial weight bearing (surrogate for artificial gravity) episodic full weight bearing (2 hour/day full weight bearing) and treatment with the third generation bisphosphonate ibandronate (Roche). Graded mechanical loading was studied by housing the animals on a novel servo controlled force plate system which permitted the titration of mechanical force at varying frequency and amplitude and different levels of weight bearing. The force plate, which forms the cage floor, is a glass platform supported by an 18" diameter speaker cone filled with expanding polyurethane foam. An infrared optical sensor attached to the speaker cone yields a voltage linearly related to vertical displacement of the glass platform. The dynamic force on the paw was computed as a product of the apparent mass of the animal on the platform at rest and the acceleration of the platform determined from the second derivative of the optical sensor output. The mass of the animal on the platform was varied by adjusting tension on the tether suspending the animal. Mechanical impact loading was titrated with the force plate resonating at different frequencies, including 3 Hz and 16 Hz.

  13. Exercise Physiologists

    MedlinePLUS

    ... personal trainers) or athletic trainers . <- Summary Work Environment -> Work Environment About this section Exercise physiologists perform fitness ... of exercise physiologists were self-employed in 2014. Work Schedules Most exercise physiologists work full time. <- What ...

  14. Effect of epidural injection of prosidol with clonidine on the state of spinal cord and spinal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Volchkov, V A; Strashnov, V I; Tomson, V V; Boikova, N V; Zaitsev, A A

    2001-09-01

    Morphological and histoenzymatic changes in cells of the spinal cord and spinal ganglia after epidural injection of a combination of prosidol with clonidine were studied on dogs. No pathological structural and metabolic changes in the nervous tissue were found after combined treatment with the test drugs. Higher activity of nucleic acids and alkaline phosphatase in spinal neurons and spinal ganglion in experimental animals in comparison with those in controls indicates intensification of protein synthesis and active transport in the endothelium of nerve tissue capillaries, which is a favorable factor. PMID:11740590

  15. The Effect of Pulsatile Flow on Intrathecal Drug Delivery in the Spinal Canal

    E-print Network

    Linninger, Andreas A.

    the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to specific receptor sites in dorsal regions of the spinal cord.12,28,30 Clinical injury, and spinal cord injury.29,31 IT is also considered as a highly promising treatment methodThe Effect of Pulsatile Flow on Intrathecal Drug Delivery in the Spinal Canal H. D. M

  16. OEG implantation and step training enhance hindlimb-stepping ability in adult spinal transected rats

    E-print Network

    Jindrich, Devin L.

    . E-mail: pphelps@physci.ucla.edu Numerous treatment strategies for spinal cord injury seek-derived OEG implantation. We studied complete mid-thoracic spinal cord transected adult female rats-specific training may enhance this OEG effect. Keywords: locomotion; regeneration; spinal cord injury

  17. Burst Spinal Cord Stimulation for Limb and Back Pain Dirk De Ridder1,2

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Burst Spinal Cord Stimulation for Limb and Back Pain Dirk De Ridder1,2 , Mark Plazier3 , Niels. In 1967, Shealy et al. (33) implanted the first spinal cord stimulator as a treatment for neuropathic of which are activated by pain-transmitting small (C and Ad) fibers (21). In spinal cord stimulation (SCS

  18. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Genevay, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is most commonly due to degenerative changes in older individuals. LSS is being more commonly diagnosed and may relate to better access to advanced imaging and to an aging population. This review focuses on radicular symptoms related to degenerative central and lateral stenosis and updates knowledge of LSS pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. Since patients with anatomic LSS can range from asymptomatic to severely disabled, the clinical diagnosis focuses on symptoms and examination findings associated with LSS. Imaging findings are helpful for patients with persistent, bothersome symptoms in whom invasive treatments are being considered. There is limited information from high quality studies about the relative benefits and harms of commonly used treatments. Interpreting and comparing results of available research is limited by a lack of consensus about the definition of LSS. Nevertheless, evidence supports decompressive laminectomy for patients with persistent and bothersome symptoms. Recommendations favor a shared decision making approach due to important trade-offs between alternative therapies and differences among patients in their preferences and values. PMID:20227646

  19. Scoliosis Screening and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Viviani, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    Scoliosis—a spinal curve of 5° or more, with a rotational deformity—may be present in up to 4% of patients aged 12-14. However, only about 0.3% require treatment, for progressive curves of 20° or more. About 70% of all scoliosis in North America is idiopathic. Non-idiopathic varieties include congenital and neuromuscular scoliosis, mesenchymal disorders, non-structural scoliosis, juvenile kyphosis and Scheuermann's disease. A clinical evaluation for early detection of scoliosis need take only a few seconds during an office visit. Treatment can include periodic check-ups and X-rays, exercises, braces, electrical stimulation and surgery. Scoliosis associated with other conditions can be discovered in patients of any age, and recognition early is important for proper treatment. ImagesFig. 3 PMID:21274222

  20. Spinal cord injury rehabilitation. 2. Medical complications.

    PubMed

    Bergman, S B; Yarkony, G M; Stiens, S A

    1997-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights new advances in understanding medical complications of spinal cord injury through the lifespan. It is part of the chapter on spinal cord injury rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article covers reasons for transferring patients to specialized spinal cord injury centers once they have been stabilized, and the management of common medical problems, including fever, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary tract infection, acute and chronic abdominal complications, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary complications, and heterotopic ossification. Formulation of an educational program for prevention of late complications is also discussed, including late renal complications, syringomyelia, myelomalacia, burns, pathologic fractures, pressure ulcers, and cardiovascular disease. New advances covered in this section include new information on old problems, and a discussion of exercise tolerance in persons with tetraplegia, the pathophysiology of late neurologic deterioration after spinal cord injury, and a view of the care of these patients across the lifespan. PMID:9084368

  1. Can exercise ameliorate treatment toxicity during the initial phase of testosterone deprivation in prostate cancer patients? Is this more effective than delayed rehabilitation?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been substantial increase in use of androgen deprivation therapy as adjuvant management of prostate cancer. However, this leads to a range of musculoskeletal toxicities including reduced bone mass and increased skeletal fractures compounded with rapid metabolic alterations, including increased body fat, reduced lean mass, insulin resistance and negative lipoprotein profile, increased incidence of cardiovascular and metabolic morbidity, greater distress and reduced quality of life. Numerous research studies have demonstrated certain exercise prescriptions to be effective at preventing or even reversing these treatment toxicities. However, all interventions to date have been of rehabilitative intent being implemented after a minimum of 3 months since initiation of androgen deprivation, by which time considerable physical and psychological health problems have manifested. The pressing question is whether it is more efficacious to commence exercise therapy at the same time as initiating androgen deprivation, so treatment induced adverse effects can be immediately attenuated or indeed prevented. Methods/design We are proposing a multi-site randomized controlled trial with partial crossover to examine the effects of timing of exercise implementation (immediate or delayed) on preserving long-term skeletal health, reversing short- and long-term metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors, and supporting mental health in men receiving androgen deprivation therapy. 124 men who are about to initiate androgen deprivation for prostate cancer will be randomized to immediate or delayed groups. Immediate will commence a 6-month exercise program within 7–10 days of their first dose. Delayed will receive usual care for 6 months and then commence the exercise program for 6 months (partial cross-over). Immediate will be free to adopt the lifestyle of their choosing following the initial 6-month intervention. Measurements for primary and secondary endpoints will take place at baseline, 6 months and 12 months. Discussion This project is unique as it explores a fundamental question of when exercise implementation will be of most benefit and addresses both physical and psychological consequences of androgen deprivation initiation. The final outcome may be adjunct treatment which will reduce if not prevent the toxicities of androgen deprivation, ultimately resulting in reduced morbidity and mortality for men with prostate cancer. Trial registration ACTRN12612000097842 PMID:23013489

  2. Spinal Crawlers: Deformable Organisms for Spinal Cord Segmentation and Analysis

    E-print Network

    Hamarneh, Ghassan

    Spinal Crawlers: Deformable Organisms for Spinal Cord Segmentation and Analysis Chris Mc, Canada {cmcintos, hamarneh}@cs.sfu.ca Abstract. Spinal cord analysis is an important problem relating to the study of various neurological diseases. We present a novel approach to spinal cord segmentation

  3. Overview and classification of spinal infections.

    PubMed

    Calderone, R R; Larsen, J M

    1996-01-01

    Hematogenous spread is the most common cause for vertebral osteomyelitis. S. aureus is the most common organism in pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis. Hematogenous osteomyelitis is common among diabetics and intravenous drug abusers. Tuberculous spondylitis remains common worldwide. In general, vertebral body infections not responding to antibiotic treatment and those creating unacceptable deformity or neurologic compromise require debridement via an anterior approach with strut grafting. Posterior infections are almost always postsurgical and require posterior irrigation and debridement in addition to antibiotics. Abscesses within the canal require antibiotics and surgical debridement especially when neurologic symptoms are present. Infections within the canal are approached posteriorly unless the pathology involves the anterior spine. Use of metal fixation within the site of an adequately debrided spinal infection is controversial but necessary on rare occasions. Posterior fixation for anterior infections is preferred. Much has been written about spinal infections and their treatment. Landmark articles and additional comprehensive sources on spinal infections have been included in the references. PMID:8539040

  4. Cannabinoids to treat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition for which there is no standard treatment beyond rehabilitation strategies. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the use of cannabinoids to treat this condition. The endocannabinoid system is expressed in the intact spinal cord, and it is dramatically upregulated after lesion. Endogenous activation of this system counteracts secondary damage following SCI, and treatments with endocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists promote a better functional outcome in experimental models. The use of cannabinoids in SCI is a new research field and many questions remain open. Here, we discuss caveats and suggest some future directions that may help to understand the role of cannabinoids in SCI and how to take advantage of this system to regain functions after spinal cord damage. PMID:25805333

  5. Brain-Computer Interface Driven Functional Electrical Stimulation System for Overground Walking in Spinal Cord Injury Participant

    E-print Network

    Nenadic, Zoran

    in Spinal Cord Injury Participant Christine E. King1, Po T. Wang1, Colin M. McCrimmon1, Cathy C.Y. Chou2, An H. Do3, and Zoran Nenadic1,4 Abstract-- The current treatment for ambulation after spinal cord for the restoration of overground walking after SCI. I. INTRODUCTION The current treatment for ambulation after spinal

  6. Treatment of knee osteoarthritis with platelet-rich plasma in comparison with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation plus exercise: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Angoorani, Hooman; Mazaherinezhad, Ali; Marjomaki, Omid; Younespour, Shima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis is a disabling musculoskeletal disease with no definite treatment. This study compared the effect of Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) plus exercise in the treatment of patients with knee joint osteoarthritis. Methods: 54 eligible patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomly allocated into two groups. (IRCT2012110611382N) Group A (27 patients) received 2 injections of PRP (4 weeks apart) and group B (27 patients) received 10 sessions of TENS as well as exercise during the study period. Clinical outcome was evaluated using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores (KOOS) questionnaire before the treatment, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks after that the treatment. Pain was also assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Time to an intolerable knee pain during treadmill workout was also evaluated using an objective test. Results: In the PRP group, the mean KOOS symptom score improved significantly from baseline to the end of study, while the change was not significant over this period for the group B. In both groups, significant reductions were observed in VAS scores from baseline till the end of study. The mean time to feel intolerable knee pain during treadmill work out of PRP group increased significantly from baseline to week 4, but no significant changes were found in this parameter over the time of study in the group B. Conclusion: Intraarticular injection of PRP is an effective, safe method for short-term treatment of patients with knee joint osteoarthritis. PMID:26478881

  7. Genetic and molecular distinctions in spinal ependymomas: A review.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Ian D; Ali, Rohaid; Li, Yingmei; Gephart, Melanie Hayden

    2015-12-01

    While gross total resection of spinal ependymomas prevents recurrence, this surgical result is not always possible. Increasing evidence suggests that ependymomas occurring in the spine are genetically distinct from those originating in the brain. Herein we review the most recent developments detailing the molecular and genetic characteristics of spinal ependymomas, which may inform more effective and personalized adjuvant therapies for spinal ependymomas that are ineligible for gross total resection. We performed a key-word search for articles published on the molecular, genetic, chromosomal, and epigenetic transformations inherent in spinal ependymomas. We reviewed appropriate articles and their relevant citations. While resection can often achieve favorable outcomes in the treatment of spinal ependymoma, more research on the unique molecular, genetic, chromosomal and epigenetic traits must be conducted in order to tailor treatment and intervention for those patients for whom total resection is not possible. PMID:26519890

  8. Decision making in surgical treatment of chronic low back pain: the performance of prognostic tests to select patients for lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Willems, Paul

    2013-02-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is one of the main causes of disability in the western world with a huge economic burden to society. As yet, no specific underlying anatomic cause has been identified for CLBP. Imaging often reveals degenerative findings of the disc or facet joints of one or more lumbar motion segments. These findings, however, can also be observed in asymptomatic people. It has been suggested that pain in degenerated discs may be caused by the ingrowth of nerve fibers into tears or clefts of the annulus fibrosus or nucleus pulposus, and by reported high levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. As this so-called discogenic pain is often exacerbated by mechanical loading, the concept of relieving pain by spinal fusion to stabilise a painful spinal segment, has been developed. For some patients lumbar spinal fusion indeed is beneficial, but its results are highly variable and hard to predict for the individual patient. To identify those CLBP patients who will benefit from fusion, many surgeons rely on tests that are assumed to predict the outcome of spinal fusion. The three most commonly used prognostic tests in daily practice are immobilization in a lumbosacral orthosis, provocative discography and trial immobilization by temporary external transpedicular fixation. Aiming for consensus on the indications for lumbar fusion and in order to improve its results by better patient selection, it is essential to know the role and value of these prognostic tests for CLBP patients in clinical practice. The overall aims of the present thesis were: 1) to evaluate whether there is consensus among spine surgeons regarding the use and appreciation of prognostic tests for lumbar spinal fusion; 2) to verify whether a thoracolumbosacral orthosisis (TLSO) truly minimises lumbosacral motion; 3) to verify whether a TLSO can predict the clinical outcome of fusion for CLBP; 4) to assess whether provocative discography of adjacent segments actually predicts the long-term clinical outcome fusion; 5) to determine the incidence of postdiscography discitis, and whether there is a need for routine antibiotic prophylaxis; 6) to assess whether temporary external transpedicular fixation (TETF) can help to predict the outcome of spinal fusion; 7) to determine the prognostic accuracy of the most commonly used tests in clinical practice to predict the outcome of fusion for CLBP. The results of a national survey among spine surgeons in the Netherlands were presented in Study I. The surgeons were questioned about their opinion on prognostic factors and about the use of predictive tests for lumbar fusion in CLBP patients. The comments were compared with findings from the prevailing literature. The survey revealed a considerable lack of uniformity in the use and appreciation of predictive tests. Prognostic factors known from the literature were not consistently incorporated in the surgeons' decision making process either. This heterogeneity in strategy is most probably caused by the lack of sound scientific evidence for current predictive tests and it was concluded that currently there is not enough consensus among spine surgeons in the Netherlands to create national guidelines for surgical decision making in CLBP. In Study II, the hypothesized working mechanism of a pantaloon cast (i.e., minimisation of lumbosacral joint mobility) was studied. In patients who were admitted for a temporary external transpedicular fixation test (TETF), infrared light markers were rigidly attached to the protruding ends of Steinman pins that were fixed in two spinal levels. In this way three-dimensional motion between these levels could be analysed opto-electronically. During dynamic test conditions such as walking, a plaster cast, either with or without unilateral hip fixation, did not significantly decrease lumbosacral joint motion. Although not substantiated by sound scientific support, lumbosacral orthoses or pantaloon casts are often used in everyday practice as a predictor for the outcome of fusion. A systematic review of the literature supplemented with a prospec

  9. Aerobic Exercise Prescription for Rheumatoid Arthritics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.; Williams, Hilda L.

    The use of exercise as a general treatment for rheumatoid arthritics (RA) has included range of motion, muscular strength, water exercise and rest therapy while virtually ignoring possible benefits of aerobic exercise. The purposes of this project were to examine the guidelines for exercise prescription in relation to this special population and…

  10. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  11. New treatment strategy for cupulolithiasis associated with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the lateral canal: the head-tilt hopping exercise.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Sawai, Yachiyo; Murai, Takayuki; Okamoto, Hideyuki; Fujita, Nobuya; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    This study was performed to determine whether a novel treatment was effective against cupulolithiasis associated with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) of the lateral semicircular canal, which is characterized by apogeotropic direction-changing nystagmus. We herein describe our head-tilt hopping (HtH) exercise, which is designed to release otoconial debris strongly adhered to the cupula. The subjects were trained to hop while tilting their heads laterally. They completed 3 to 5 exercise sessions per day over a 4-week period. Each session ended with a 20-hop trial. The HtH exercises were performed by 27 patients with intractable lateral canal BPPV who exhibited positional vertigo and persistent nystagmus beating toward the uppermost ear for more than 4 weeks, despite performing therapeutic head shaking in the horizontal plane maneuver. All the patients were subjected to the supine roll test before and immediately after the first trial as well as after 1 and 4 weeks of the program to evaluate the effect of the treatment on their apogeotropic nystagmus. Nystagmus of 9 (33.3 %) patients disappeared immediately after the first training session. After 1 and 4 weeks of the training, the number of patients that had experienced either of these improvements had increased to 15 (55.6 %) and 19 (70.4 %) subjects, respectively. These results suggest that HtH exercises aimed at releasing otoconial debris from the cupula are feasible as a new therapy for cupulolithiasis associated with intractable lateral canal BPPV. However, further studies for comparison with control are required to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:24232831

  12. Cost-effectiveness of guideline-endorsed treatments for low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Haas, Marion; Maher, Chris G; Machado, Luciana A C; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2011-07-01

    Healthcare costs for low back pain (LBP) are increasing rapidly. Hence, it is important to provide treatments that are effective and cost-effective. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the cost-effectiveness of guideline-endorsed treatments for LBP. We searched nine clinical and economic electronic databases and the reference list of relevant systematic reviews and included studies for eligible studies. Economic evaluations conducted alongside randomised controlled trials investigating treatments for LBP endorsed by the guideline of the American College of Physicians and the American Pain Society were included. Two independent reviewers screened search results and extracted data. Data extracted included the type and perspective of the economic evaluation, the treatment comparators, and the relative cost-effectiveness of the treatment comparators. Twenty-six studies were included. Most studies found that interdisciplinary rehabilitation, exercise, acupuncture, spinal manipulation or cognitive-behavioural therapy were cost-effective in people with sub-acute or chronic LBP. Massage alone was unlikely to be cost-effective. There were inconsistent results on the cost-effectiveness of advice, insufficient evidence on spinal manipulation for people with acute LBP, and no evidence on the cost-effectiveness of medications, yoga or relaxation. This review found evidence supporting the cost-effectiveness of the guideline-endorsed treatments of interdisciplinary rehabilitation, exercise, acupuncture, spinal manipulation and cognitive-behavioural therapy for sub-acute or chronic LBP. There is little or inconsistent evidence for other treatments endorsed in the guideline. PMID:21229367

  13. Core strengthening exercises for low back pain.

    PubMed

    Baerga-Varela, Luis; Abréu Ramos, Antonio M

    2006-01-01

    Core strengthening concepts have gained increased popularity in low back rehabilitation. Traditional low back pain rehabilitation is based on a static spine stability model and is composed mostly of modalities, stretching and strengthening exercises. More recent theories, however, include newer concepts of dynamic spinal stability, coordination and neuromuscular control. Core strengthening exercises incorporate these new concepts. Although more research is necessary, the best available evidence suggests that a core strengthening program may be beneficial in reducing pain scores, functional disability and recurrences of acute low back pain episodes. This article reviews "core" anatomy, physiologic models of spinal stability, effects, of low back pain on spinal stability, evidence-based reasoning behind core strengthening and the basic concepts involved in designing a core strengthening program. PMID:19610550

  14. Spinal infections with and without hardware: the viewpoint of an infectious disease specialist.

    PubMed

    Miksi?, Nina Gorišek

    2013-07-01

    The incidence rate of spinal infections has been rising in last decades, and despite the advances in medicine, they still represent a therapeutic challenge, especially when related to spinal implants. The majority of spinal infections in developed world are caused by pyogenic bacteria, with Staphylococcus aureus as a leading cause among gram-positive cocci and Escherichia coli among gram-negative bacteria, whereas coagulase-negative staphylococci are frequently involved in implant-associated spinal infections. Implant-associated spinal infections are caused by bacteria capable of biofilm production on the implant surface rendering them resistant to majority of antimicrobial drugs. Spinal infections in patients without implants can be treated conservatively with pathogen-directed antimicrobial therapy, whereas in implant-associated spinal infections combined surgical and antibiotic therapy is necessary. Empiric antimicrobial treatment of spinal infections without microbiological diagnosis should be discouraged in the era of drug resistant pathogens. PMID:23712669

  15. Does treatment of subsyndromal depression improve depression and diabetes related outcomes: protocol for a randomised controlled comparison of psycho-education, physical exercise and treatment as usual

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence of mood difficulties in persons with diabetes is approximately twice that in the general population, affecting the health outcomes and patients' quality of life in an undesirable way. Although subsyndromal depression is an important predictor of a more serious clinical depression, it is often overlooked. This study aims to compare the effects of two non-pharmacological interventions for subsyndromal depression, psychoeducation and physical exercise, with diabetes treatment as usual on mood- and diabetes-related outcomes. Methods and Design Type 2 diabetic patients aged 18-65 yrs. who report mood difficulties and the related need for help in a mail survey will be potential participants. After giving informed consent, they will be randomly assigned to one of the three groups (psychoeducation, physical activity, treatment as usual). Depressive symptoms, diabetes distress, health-related quality of life and diabetes self-care activities will be assessed at baseline, at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months. A structured clinical interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) will be performed at baseline and at one-year follow-up in order to determine the clinical significance of the patients' depressive symptoms. Disease-related data will be collected from patients' files and from additional physical examinations and laboratory tests. The two interventions will be comparable in terms of format (small group work), duration (six sessions) and approach (interactive learning; supporting the participants' active roles). The group treated as usual will be informed about their screening results and about the importance of treating depression. They will be provided with brief re-education on diabetes and written self-help instructions to cope with mood difficulties. Primary outcomes will be depressive symptoms. Secondary outcomes will be glycaemic control, diabetes-related distress, self-management of diabetes and health-related quality of life. Tertiary outcomes will be biochemical markers reflecting common pathophysiological processes of insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative damage that are assumed to be intertwined in both diabetes and depression. The mixed-effect linear model will be used to compare the outcome variables. Power analysis has indicated that the two intervention groups and the control group should comprise 59 patients to enable detection of clinically meaningful differences in depressive symptoms with a power of 80% and alpha = 0.05. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN05673017 PMID:21251307

  16. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...1) Class II (special controls), when intended to provide immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the treatment of the following acute and chronic instabilities or deformities of...

  17. Advanced therapy learning algorithm for spinal cord stimulation

    E-print Network

    Gaudreau Balderrama, Amanda Dawn

    2010-01-01

    Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) is a technique used to treat chronic pain and has been shown to be an effective method of treatment, both financially and socioeconomically. Stimulating electrodes are surgically implanted ...

  18. Spinal injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P; Jarvis, Christopher G

    2008-02-01

    Athletic competition has long been a known source of spinal injuries. Approximately 8.7% of all new cases of spinal cord injuries in the United States are related to sports activities. The sports activities that have the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and cheerleading. Axial compression forces to the top of the head can lead to cervical fracture and quadriplegia in any sport. It is critical for any medical personnel responsible for athletes in team sports to have a plan for stabilization and transfer of an athlete who sustains a cervical spine injury. PMID:18295084

  19. Spinal injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P; Jarvis, Christopher G

    2009-02-01

    Athletic competition has long been a known source of spinal injuries. Approximately 8.7% of all new cases of spinal cord injuries in the United States are related to sports activities. The sports activities that have the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and cheerleading. Axial compression forces to the top of the head can lead to cervical fracture and quadriplegia in any sport. It is critical for any medical personnel responsible for athletes in team sports to have a plan for stabilization and transfer of an athlete who sustains a cervical spine injury. PMID:19084763

  20. Cardiac dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Iacobini, MA; Stoian, R; Neascu, C; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze cardiac dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Cardiac dysfunctions are common complications following SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. We reviewed epidemiology of cardiac disturbances after SCI, and neuroanatomy and pathophysiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic. SCI causes disruption of descendent pathways from central control centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating into intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 spinal cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant cardiac dysfunction. Impairment of autonomic nervous control system, mostly in patients with cervical or high thoracic SCI, causes cardiac dysrrhythmias, especially bradycardia and, rarely, cardiac arrest, or tachyarrhytmias and hypotension. Specific complication dependent on the period of time after trauma like spinal shock and autonomic dysreflexia are also reviewed. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe bradycardia and hypotension. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Besides all this, additional cardiac complications, such as cardiac deconditioning and coronary heart disease may also occur. Proper prophylaxis, including nonpharmacologic and pharmacological strategies and cardiac rehabilitation diminish occurrence of the cardiac dysfunction following SCI. Each type of cardiac disturbance requires specific treatment. PMID:20108532

  1. Physical Therapy Interventions for Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Luciana Gazzi; Hum, Abraham; Kuleba, Laura; Mo, Joey; Truong, Linda; Yeung, Mankeen

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical therapy is commonly prescribed for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS); however, little is known about its effectiveness. Purpose The purpose of this study was to systematically review randomized controlled trials (RCTs), controlled trials, and cohort studies evaluating the effectiveness of physical therapy for LSS. Data Sources Studies were searched on electronic databases to January 2012. Study Selection Inclusion criteria were: clinical diagnosis of LSS with confirmatory imaging, evaluation of physical therapy treatment, presence of a comparison group, and outcomes of pain, disability, function, or quality of life. Data Extraction Outcomes were extracted and, when possible, pooled using RevMan 5, a freely available review program from the Cochrane Library. Data Synthesis Ten studies were included: 5 RCTs, 2 controlled trials, 2 mixed-design studies, and 1 longitudinal cohort study. Pooled effects of 2 studies revealed that the addition of a physical therapy modality to exercise had no statistically significant effect on outcome. Pooled effects results of RCTs evaluating surgery versus physical therapy demonstrated that surgery was better than physical therapy for pain and disability at long term (2 years) only. Other results suggested that exercise is significantly better than no exercise, that cycling and body-weight–supported treadmill walking have similar effects, and that corsets are better than no corsets. Limitations The limitations of this review include the low quality and small number of studies, as well as the heterogeneity in outcomes and treatments. Conclusions No conclusions could be drawn from the review regarding which physical therapy treatment is superior for LSS. There was low-quality evidence suggesting that modalities have no additional effect to exercise and that surgery leads to better long-term (2 years) outcomes for pain and disability, but not walking distance, than physical therapy in patients with LSS. PMID:23886845

  2. Bridging spinal cord injuries

    E-print Network

    2008-10-15

    Abstract One strategy for spinal cord injury repair is to make cellular bridges that support axon regeneration. However, the bridging cells often fail to integrate with host tissue and may lead to increased pain sensitivity. Recent work has tested...

  3. What Is Spinal Stenosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... To order the Sports Injuries Handout on Health full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ... publication. To order the Spinal Stenosis Q&A full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ...

  4. Surgical Strategies for Cervical Spinal Neurinomas

    PubMed Central

    ITO, Kiyoshi; AOYAMA, Tatsuro; MIYAOKA, Yoshinari; HORIUCHI, Tetsuyoshi; HONGO, Kazuhiro

    Cervical spinal neurinomas are benign tumors that arise from nerve roots. Based on their location, these tumors can also take the form of a dumbbell-shaped mass. Treatment strategies for these tumors have raised several controversial issues such as appropriate surgical indications and selection of surgical approaches for cervical dumbbell-shaped spinal neurinomas. In this report, we review previous literature and retrospectively analyze cervical spinal neurinoma cases that have been treated at our hospital. Surgical indications and approaches based on tumor location and severity are discussed in detail. Thus, with advances in neuroimaging and neurophysiological monitoring, we conclude that appropriate surgical approaches and intraoperative surgical manipulations should be chosen on a case-by-case basis. PMID:26119900

  5. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage following thoracic spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Morofuji, Yoichi; Tsunoda, Keishi; Takeshita, Tomonori; Hayashi, Kentaro; Kitagawa, Naoki; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Izumi

    2009-03-01

    A 51-year-old man underwent surgery for ossification of the ligamentum flavum at the T9-T10 levels. Intraoperatively, the dura was opened unintentionally and a subcutaneous suction drain was placed. The patient complained of severe headache and nausea postoperatively. Brain computed tomography obtained 3 days after the surgery demonstrated remote cerebellar hemorrhage and hydrocephalus. Suboccipital decompression, C1 laminectomy, and ventriculostomy were performed and his symptoms subsided 2 months later. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage following spinal surgery is extremely rare, but may occur after any type of spinal surgery resulting in dural tear or intradural manipulation. Early diagnosis is particularly important for the treatment of remote cerebellar hemorrhage following spinal surgery. PMID:19318737

  6. Cell Therapy Augments Functional Recovery Subsequent to Spinal Cord Injury under Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, Vikram; Tharion, George; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord injury leads to enervation of normal tissue homeostasis ultimately leading to paralysis. Until now there is no proper cure for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, cell therapy in animal spinal cord injury models has shown some progress of recovery. At present, clinical trials are under progress to evaluate the efficacy of cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Different types of cells such as pluripotent stem cells derived neural cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, neural stem cells, glial cells are being tested in various spinal cord injury models. In this review we highlight both the advances and lacuna in the field of spinal cord injury by discussing epidemiology, pathophysiology, molecular mechanism, and various cell therapy strategies employed in preclinical and clinical injury models and finally we discuss the limitations and ethical issues involved in cell therapy approach for treating spinal cord injury. PMID:26240569

  7. Endoscopic approaches to the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Lopez, William Omar Contreras; de Oliveira, Ywzhe Sifuentes Almeida; Lara, Nilton Alves; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive procedures have been used to treat various diseases in medicine. Great improvements in these techniques have provided intraventricular, transnasal and more recently cisternal intracranial accesses used to treat different conditions. Endoscopic approaches have been proposed for the treatment of disk herniation or degenerative disease of the spine with great progress in the recent years. However the spinal cord has not yet been reached by video-assisted procedures. This article describes our recent experience in procedures to approach the spinal cord itself in order to provide either diagnosis by tissue biopsies or inducing radiofrequency spinal ablation to treat chronic pain syndromes. We describe three different approaches proposed to provide access to the entire length of the spinal canal from the cranium-cervical transition, cervico-thoracic canal (spinal cord and radiculi) to the lumbar-sacral intraraquidian structures (conus medularis and sacral roots). We idealized the use of endoscopy to assist cervical anterolateral cordotomies and trigeminal nucleotractotomies, avoiding the use of contrast medium as well as vascular injuries and consequent unpredictable neurological deficits. This technique can also provide minimally invasive procedures to possibly treat spasticity through selective rhizotomies, assist catheter placements in the lumbar canal or debridation of adherences in cystic syringomyelia and arachnoid cysts, providing normalization of CSF flow. PMID:21107941

  8. In vitro sustained release of bioactive anti-NogoA, a molecule in clinical development for treatment of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Stanwick, Jason C; Baumann, M Douglas; Shoichet, Molly S

    2012-04-15

    Anti-NogoA is a promising anti-inhibitory molecule that has been shown to enhance functional recovery after spinal cord injury when delivered in rat and primate models over the span of weeks. To achieve this sustained release, anti-NogoA is typically delivered by osmotic minipumps; however, external minipumps are susceptible to infection. To address this issue, we developed a drug delivery system that consists of anti-NogoA-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles dispersed in a hydrogel of hyaluronan and methylcellulose (composite HAMC). To optimize in vitro release, we screened formulations for improved anti-NogoA bioactivity and sustained release based on combinations of co-encapsulated trehalose, hyaluronan, MgCO(3), and CaCO(3). Co-encapsulated MgCO(3) and CaCO(3) slowed the rate of anti-NogoA release and did not influence anti-NogoA bioactivity. Co-encapsulated trehalose significantly improved anti-NogoA bioactivity at early release time points by stabilizing the protein during lyophilization. Co-encapsulated trehalose with hyaluronan improved bioactivity up to 28d and dramatically increased the rate and duration of sustained delivery. The sustained release of bioactive anti-NogoA from composite HAMC is a compelling formulation for in vivo evaluation in a model of spinal cord injury. PMID:22306041

  9. Spinal Injury: Regeneration, Recovery, and a Possible New Approach

    ScienceCinema

    Cohen, Avis [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States

    2010-01-08

    Spinal injury is most frequent in young healthy men, desperate to walk. Most treatments have focused on regeneration of the injured axons, but no one has as yet achieved success with this approach. However, in the lamprey, a primitive fish with a spinal cord having all the critical features of the human spinal cored, spinal injury is followed by complete regeneration of injured axons. Additionally, the animal recovers the ability to swim, and in many, the swimming is normal. Unfortunately, in most others, it is highly abnormal. This talk will review evidence from the abnormal regeneration, why it bespeaks difficulties heretofore not considered, and suggest an alternate approach for the near future. In so doing, the speaker will introduce the normal function of the spinal cord, what happens in normal and abnormal regeneration, and the new techniques that employ methods from neuromorphic engineering, a synthesis of neuroscience and engineering to engineer smart devices.

  10. Spinal Injury: Regeneration, Recovery, and a Possible New Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Avis

    2009-02-04

    Spinal injury is most frequent in young healthy men, desperate to walk. Most treatments have focused on regeneration of the injured axons, but no one has as yet achieved success with this approach. However, in the lamprey, a primitive fish with a spinal cord having all the critical features of the human spinal cored, spinal injury is followed by complete regeneration of injured axons. Additionally, the animal recovers the ability to swim, and in many, the swimming is normal. Unfortunately, in most others, it is highly abnormal. This talk will review evidence from the abnormal regeneration, why it bespeaks difficulties heretofore not considered, and suggest an alternate approach for the near future. In so doing, the speaker will introduce the normal function of the spinal cord, what happens in normal and abnormal regeneration, and the new techniques that employ methods from neuromorphic engineering, a synthesis of neuroscience and engineering to engineer smart devices.

  11. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... Pregnant? What to Expect Compulsive Exercise KidsHealth > Parents > Emotions & Behavior > Behavior > Compulsive Exercise Print A A A ...

  12. Management of postoperative spinal infections

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vishal; Meredith, Dennis S; Kepler, Christopher K; Huang, Russel C

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after posterior lumbar spine surgery. This review details an approach to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of SSIs. Factors contributing to the development of a SSI can be split into three categories: (1) microbiological factors; (2) factors related to the patient and their spinal pathology; and (3) factors relating to the surgical procedure. SSI is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The virulence of the organism causing the SSI can affect its presentation. SSI can be prevented by careful adherence to aseptic technique, prophylactic antibiotics, avoiding myonecrosis by frequently releasing retractors and preoperatively optimizing modifiable patient factors. Increasing pain is commonly the only symptom of a SSI and can lead to a delay in diagnosis. C-reactive protein and magnetic resonance imaging can help establish the diagnosis. Treatment requires acquiring intra-operative cultures to guide future antibiotic therapy and surgical debridement of all necrotic tissue. A SSI can usually be adequately treated without removing spinal instrumentation. A multidisciplinary approach to SSIs is important. It is useful to involve an infectious disease specialist and use minimum serial bactericidal titers to enhance the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. A plastic surgeon should also be involved in those cases of severe infection that require repeat debridement and delayed closure. PMID:23330073

  13. Spinal dural ossification causing neurological signs in a cat.

    PubMed

    Antila, Johanna M; Jeserevics, Janis; Rakauskas, Mindaugas; Anttila, Marjukka; Cizinauskas, Sigitas

    2013-01-01

    A six-year-old Ragdoll cat underwent examination due to a six-month history of slowly progressive gait abnormalities. The cat presented with an ambulatory tetraparesis with a neurological examination indicating a C1-T2 myelopathy. Radiographs of the spine showed a radiopaque irregular line ventrally in the vertebral canal dorsal to vertebral bodies C3-C5. In this area, magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural extramedullary/extradural lesion compressing the spinal cord. The spinal cord was surgically decompressed. The cause of the spinal cord compression was dural ossification, a diagnosis confirmed by histopathological examination of the surgically dissected sample of dura mater. The cat gradually improved after the procedure and was ambulating better than prior to the surgery. The cat's locomotion later worsened again due to ossified plaques in the dura causing spinal cord compression on the same cervical area as before. Oral prednisolone treatment provided temporary remission. Ten months after surgery, the cat was euthanized due to severe worsening of gait abnormalities, non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Necropsy confirmed spinal cord compression and secondary degenerative changes in the spinal cord on cervical and lumbar areas caused by dural ossification. To our knowledge, this is the first report of spinal dural ossification in a cat. The reported cat showed neurological signs associated with these dural changes. Dural ossification should be considered in the differential diagnosis of compressive spinal cord disorders in cats. PMID:23777582

  14. Spinal dural ossification causing neurological signs in a cat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A six-year-old Ragdoll cat underwent examination due to a six-month history of slowly progressive gait abnormalities. The cat presented with an ambulatory tetraparesis with a neurological examination indicating a C1-T2 myelopathy. Radiographs of the spine showed a radiopaque irregular line ventrally in the vertebral canal dorsal to vertebral bodies C3-C5. In this area, magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural extramedullary/extradural lesion compressing the spinal cord. The spinal cord was surgically decompressed. The cause of the spinal cord compression was dural ossification, a diagnosis confirmed by histopathological examination of the surgically dissected sample of dura mater. The cat gradually improved after the procedure and was ambulating better than prior to the surgery. The cat’s locomotion later worsened again due to ossified plaques in the dura causing spinal cord compression on the same cervical area as before. Oral prednisolone treatment provided temporary remission. Ten months after surgery, the cat was euthanized due to severe worsening of gait abnormalities, non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Necropsy confirmed spinal cord compression and secondary degenerative changes in the spinal cord on cervical and lumbar areas caused by dural ossification. To our knowledge, this is the first report of spinal dural ossification in a cat. The reported cat showed neurological signs associated with these dural changes. Dural ossification should be considered in the differential diagnosis of compressive spinal cord disorders in cats. PMID:23777582

  15. Exercise Habit

    MedlinePLUS

    ... aim for the lower end of your target heart rate range. As your exercise program progresses, you can gradually build up to ... family doctor to find out what your target heart rate should be. What is aerobic exercise? Aerobic exercise is the type that moves large ...

  16. FGF-2-Responsive and Spinal Cord-Resident Cells Improve Locomotor Function after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Masaki; Jikoh, Takahiro; Fukumitsu, Hidefumi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The adult central nervous system has only a limited capacity for axonal regeneration. In this study, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) was injected once into the spinal cord tissue around the injury site immediately after complete spinal cord transection in rats. This treatment markedly improved the locomotor function of the animals. Histological analysis demonstrated that tissue composed of FGF-2-induced fibronectin-positive cells (FIFs) had infiltrated the injury site and filled large cystic cavities, into which numerous axons with growth-associated protein-43 immunoreactivity penetrated. The FIFs could also be cultured from the intact spinal cord tissue, demonstrating that they were resident in the non-injured spinal cord. They had a spindle-shaped morphology and enhanced expression of mRNAs of N-cadherin and neurotrophic factors, suggesting the beneficial properties of the FIFs for axonal regeneration. Thus, these results argue for the continual use of autologous transplantation as a novel and promising cell therapy for the treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:20199141

  17. Quality of life and fatigue of patients with spinal bone metastases under combined treatment with resistance training and radiation therapy- a randomized pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this trial was to compare the effects of resistance training versus passive physical therapy on quality of life (QoL), fatigue, and emotional distress outcomes during radiation therapy in patients with spinal bone metastases under radiotherapy (RT). Methods In this randomized trial, 60 patients were treated from September 2011 until March 2013 into one of the two groups: isometric resistance training or physical therapy with thirty patients in each group during RT. EORTC QLQ-BM22, EORTC QLQ-FA13, and FBK-R10 were assessed at baseline, three months, and six months after RT. Results Psychosocial aspects in resistance training group (Arm A) were significantly improved after three (p?=?0.001) and six months (p?=?0.010). Other rated items of the QLQ-BM22 painful site, and pain characteristics were without significant differences. Functional interference showed a positive trend after six months (p?=?0.081). After six months, physical fatigue (p?=?0.013), and interference with daily life (p?=?0.006) according to the QLQ-FA13 assessment improved in Arm A significantly. Emotional distress was in Arm A lower after six months (p?=?0.016). The Cohen’s effect size confirmed the clinically significant improvement of these findings. Conclusions In this group of patients we were able to show that guided isometric resistance training of the paravertebral muscles can improve functional capacity, reduce fatigue and thereby enhance QoL over a 6-months period in patients with stable spinal metastases. The results offer a rationale for future large controlled investigations to confirm these findings. Trial registration Clinical trial identifier NCT01409720 PMID:24998293

  18. Spinal Loads during Cycling on an Ergometer

    PubMed Central

    Rohlmann, Antonius; Zander, Thomas; Graichen, Friedmar; Schmidt, Hendrik; Bergmann, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Cycling on an ergometer is an effective exercise for improving fitness. However, people with back problems or previous spinal surgery are often not aware of whether cycling could be harmful for them. To date, little information exists about spinal loads during cycling. A telemeterized vertebral body replacement allows in vivo measurement of implant loads during the activities of daily living. Five patients with a severe compression fracture of a lumbar vertebral body received these implants. During one measurement session, four of the participants exercised on a bicycle ergometer at various power levels. As the power level increased, the maximum resultant force and the difference between the maximum and minimum force (force range) during each pedal revolution increased. The average maximum-force increases between the two power levels 25 and 85 W were 73, 84, 225 and 75 N for the four patients. The corresponding increases in the force range during a pedal revolution were 84, 98, 166 and 101 N. There were large variations in the measured forces between the patients and also within the same patient, especially for high power levels. In two patients, the maximum forces during high-power cycling were higher than the forces during walking measured on the same day. Therefore, the authors conclude that patients with back problems should not cycle at high power levels shortly after surgery as a precaution. PMID:24743577

  19. Living with Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... techniques that may prevent injury and disease. A spinal cord injury (SCI) can result from trauma, such as ... with daily living skills. What can persons with spinal cord injuries and their friends and families do? ? Get ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury Prevention Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    Spinal Cord Injury Prevention Tips American Association of Neurological Surgeons 5550 Meadowbrook Drive, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-3852 ... NeurosurgeryToday.org Every year, an estimated 11,000 spinal cord injury (SCI) accidents occur in the United States. ...

  1. What Is Spinal Cord Injury?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Spinal Cord Injury (SCI): Condition Information Skip sharing on social ... with SCI is the lowest point on the spinal cord below which sensory feeling and motor movement diminish ...

  2. Pediatric spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Wagner, Matthias W; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Tekes, Aylin; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric spinal trauma is unique. The developing pediatric spinal column and spinal cord deal with direct impact and indirect acceleration/deceleration or shear forces very different compared to adult patients. In addition children are exposed to different kind of traumas. Moreover, each age group has its unique patterns of injury. Familiarity with the normal developing spinal anatomy and kind of traumas is essential to correctly diagnose injury. Various imaging modalities can be used. Ultrasound is limited to the neonatal time period; plain radiography and computer tomography are typically used in the acute work-up and give highly detailed information about the osseous lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive for disco-ligamentous and spinal cord injuries. Depending on the clinical presentation and timing of trauma the various imaging modalities will be employed. In the current review article, a summary of the epidemiology and distribution of posttraumatic lesions is discussed in the context of the normal anatomical variations due to progressing development of the child. PMID:25512255

  3. Complementary Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatment Medications for Motor Symptoms Surgical Treatment Options Exercise Complementary Treatment Clinical Studies and Clinical Trials You Can Make A Difference Your donation to the National Parkinson Foundation goes directly to support and develop treatments ...

  4. Spontaneous spinal epidural hemorrhage from intense piano playing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Ju; Su, Fang Jy; Huang, Ying C; Chen, Shih-Han

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare but real neurosurgical emergency. It is caused by atraumatic rupture of the vertebral epidural vein that results in nerve root or spinal cord compression. Most cases of SSEH have a multifactorial etiology, including congenital and acquired coagulopathies; platelet dysfunction; vascular malformation; tumors; uncontrolled hypertension; pregnancy; and, very rarely, activities requiring Valsalva. Herein we reported the case of a young pianist who was attacked by SSEH during piano practice. Playing the piano is a joyful, relaxing entertainment; however, this musical activity can be a highly demanding physical and mental exercise for pianists. Emotional and expressive performance, especially in professional performing, has been reported to result in significant increase of sympathetic and decrease of parasympathetic activities and thus influence the cardiorespiratory variables. The increased biomechanical stress from fluctuating hemodynamics was thought to trigger the rupture of her spinal arteriovenous malformation. PMID:24418452

  5. Vascular dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Sinescu, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the vascular dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Vascular dysfunctions are common complications of SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. Neuroanatomy and physiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, is reviewed. SCI implies disruption of descendent pathways from central centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating in intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant vascular dysfunction. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and it is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Arterial hypotension with orthostatic hypotension occurs in both acute and chronic phases. The etiology is multifactorial. We described a few factors influencing the orthostatic hypotension occurrence in SCI: sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, low plasma catecholamine levels, rennin–angiotensin–aldosterone activity, peripheral alpha–adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness, impaired function of baroreceptors, hyponatremia and low plasmatic volume, cardiovascular deconditioning, morphologic changes in sympathetic neurons, plasticity within spinal circuits, and motor deficit leading to loss of skeletal muscle pumping activity. Additional associated cardiovascular concerns in SCI, such as deep vein thrombosis and long–term risk for coronary heart disease and systemic atherosclerosis are also described. Proper prophylaxis, including non–pharmacologic and pharmacological strategies, diminishes the occurrence of the vascular dysfunction following SCI. Each vascular disturbance requires a specific treatment. PMID:20945818

  6. Clinical Results of Cyberknife® Radiosurgery for Spinal Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Sang Min; Park, Sukh Que; Rhee, Chang Hun

    2009-01-01

    Objective Primary treatment of spinal metastasis has been external beam radiotherapy. Recent advance of technology enables radiosurgery to be extended to extracranial lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical effectiveness and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery using Cyberknife in spinal metastasis. Methods From June, 2002 to December, 2007, 129 patients with 167 spinal metastases were treated with Cyberknife. Most of the patients (94%) presented with pain and nine patients suffered from motor deficits. Twelve patients were asymptomatic. Fifty-three patients (32%) had previous radiation therapy. Using Cyberknife, 16-39 Gy in 1-5 fractions were delivered to spinal metastatic lesions. Radiation dose was not different regarding the tumor pathology or tumor volume. Results After six months follow-up, patient evaluation was possible in 108 lesions. Among them, significant pain relief was seen in 98 lesions (91%). Radiological data were obtained in 83 lesions. The mass size was decreased or stable in 75 lesions and increased in eight lesions. Radiological control failure cases were hepatocellular carcinoma (5 cases), lung cancer (1 case), breast cancer (1 case) and renal cell carcinoma (1 case). Treatment-related radiation injury was not detected. Conclusion Cyberknife radiosurgery is clinically effective and safe for spinal metastases. It is true even in previously irradiated patients. Compared to conventional radiation therapy, Cyberknife shows higher pain control rate and its treatment process is more convenient for patients. Thus, it can be regarded as a primary treatment modality for spinal metastases. PMID:20062569

  7. Diet, exercise or diet with exercise: comparing the effectiveness of treatment options for weight-loss and changes in fitness for adults (18-65 years old) who are overfat, or obese; systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Clark, James E

    2015-01-01

    There are number of means of methods to alter body composition, and metabolic issues, available for the adult who is overfat. The following is a systematic review and meta-analysis focused on comparing changes from treatment program for adults who are overfat based on analysis of aggregated effect size (ES) of inducing changes. So as to determine the relative effectiveness of such protocols and intervention plans of choice. This tiered meta-analysis of 66-population based studies, and 162-studywise groups, a clear pattern of ES being established across and within treatments. First, hypocaloric balance is necessary for changing body composition, but the effectiveness for establishing imbalance does not equate with the effectiveness for body compositional changes, or any biomarkers associated with metabolic issues. With analysis showing that there is a necessity to include exercise in combination with diet effectively elicit changes in body composition and biomarkers of metabolic issues. More importantly, the combination, resistance training (RT) was more effective than endurance training (ET) or combination of RT and ET, particularly when progressive training volume of 2-to-3 sets for 6-to-10 reps at an intensity of ?75% 1RM, utilizing whole body and free-weight exercises, at altering body compositional measures (ES of 0.47, 0.30, and 0.40 for loss of BM, FM, and retention of FFM respectively) and reducing total cholesterol (ES?=?0.85), triglycerides (ES?=?0.86) and low-density lipoproteins (ES?=?0.60). Additionally RT was more effective at reducing fasting insulin levels (ES?=?3.5) than ET or ET and RT. Even though generally lower ES than RT, the inclusion of ET was more effective when performed at high intensity (e.g. ?70% VO2max or HRmax for 30-minutes 3-4x's/wk), or in an interval training style than when utilizing the relatively common prescribed method of low-to-moderate (e.g., 50-70% VO2max or HRmax for at least equal time) steady state method, ES of 0.35, 0.39, and 0.13 for BM, FM, and FFM respectively. Thus indicating that focus of treatment should be on producing a large metabolic stress (as induced by RT or high levels of ET) rather than an energetic imbalance for adults who are overfat. PMID:25973403

  8. Cardiac and respiratory function before and after spinal fusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shneerson, J M; Edgar, M A

    1979-01-01

    Ten girls with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were studied before and 17-23 months after spinal fusion. None had any cardiac or respiratory disease complicating the scoliosis. They underwent a range of resting lung function tests and a progressive exercise test. The mean angle of scoliosis decreased from 65.8 to 27.3 degrees after operation but the only significant physiological benefit detected in this study was a decrease in the submaximal minute ventilation. The physiological benefit of spinal fusion was therefore much less prominent than the anatomical improvement of the spinal curvature. PMID:515986

  9. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; ?ah, Volkan; Ayd?n, Abdulkadir; Öne?, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients’ family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary. PMID:25621206

  10. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; ?ah, Volkan; Ayd?n, Abdulkadir; Öne?, Kadriye

    2015-01-18

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients' family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary. PMID:25621206

  11. Spinal cord monitoring.

    PubMed

    Nuwer, M R

    1999-12-01

    Over the past two decades, intraoperative spinal cord monitoring has matured into a widely used clinical tool. It is used when the spinal cord is at risk for damage during a surgical procedure. This includes orthopedic, neurosurgical, and certain cardiothoracic procedures. Both somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and direct motor pathway stimulation techniques are available. The SEP techniques are used most widely, are generally accepted, and have been shown to reduce surgical morbidity. A large multicenter study has shown that SEP monitoring reduces postoperative paraplegia by more than 50-60%. Techniques and literature on clinical applications are reviewed in this report. PMID:10567073

  12. Microbiology and Epidemiology of Infectious Spinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Se-Jin; Youm, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Ha, Ho-Gyun; Yi, Jin-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Objective Infectious spinal disease is regarded as an infection by a specific organism that affects the vertebral body, intervertebral disc and adjacent perivertebral soft tissue. Its incidence seems to be increasing as a result of larger proportion of the older patients with chronic debilitating disease, the rise of intravenous drug abuser, and the increase in spinal procedure and surgery. In Korea, studies assessing infectious spinal disease are rare and have not been addressed in recent times. The objectives of this study are to describe the epidemiology of all kind of spinal infectious disease and their clinical and microbiological characteristics as well as to assess the diagnostic methodology and the parameters related to the outcomes. Methods A retrospective study was performed in all infectious spinal disease cases presenting from January 2005 to April 2010 to three tertiary teaching hospitals within a city of 1.5 million in Korea. Patient demographics, risk factors, clinical features, and outcomes were assessed. Risk factors entailed the presence of diabetes, chronic renal failure, liver cirrhosis, immunosuppressants, remote infection, underlying malignancy and previous spinal surgery or procedure. We comparatively analyzed the results between the groups of pyogenic and tuberculous spinal infection. SPSS version 14 statistical software was used to perform the analyses of the data. The threshold for statistical significance was established at p<0.05. Results Ninety-two cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Overall, patients of tuberculous spinal infection (TSI) and pyogenic spinal infection (PSI) entailed 20 (21.7%) and 72 (78.3%) cases, respectively. A previous spinal surgery or procedure was the most commonly noted risk factor (39.1%), followed by diabetes (15.2%). The occurrence of both pyogenic and tuberculous spondylitis was predominant in the lumbar spine. Discs are more easily invaded in PSI. At initial presentation, white cell blood count and C-reactive protein levels were higher in PSI compared to TSI (p<0.05). Etiological agents were identified in 53.3%, and the most effective method for identification of etiological agents was tissue culture (50.0%). Staphyococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated infective agent associated with pyogenic spondylitis, followed by E. coli. Surgical treatment was performed in 31.5% of pyogenic spondylitis and in 35.0% of tuberculous spondylitis cases. Conclusion Many previous studies in Korea usually reported that tuberculous spondylitis is the predominant infection. However, in our study, the number of pyogenic infection was 3 times greater than that of tuberculous spinal disease. Etiological agents were identified in a half of all infectious spinal disease. For better outcomes, we should try to identify the causative microorganism before antibiotic therapy and make every effort to improve the result of culture and biopsy. PMID:25289121

  13. [Morphofunctional changes in the spinal cord and spinal ganglion tissues following epidural injection of clopheline].

    PubMed

    Volchkov, V A

    2002-01-01

    Epidural injection of clophelin extends the possibilities and increases of the effectiveness of regional anesthesia in clinical treatment of pain syndromes. Morphological and histoenzymological changes in spinal cord and spinal ganglion neurons were analyzed in dogs after epidural injection of clophelin. The results indicate the absence of pathological structural and metabolic changes in nervous tissue following clophelin administration. Increase in neuronal RNA content and microvascular alkaline phosphatase activity in experimental group as compared to the control one indicates the activation of protein synthesis and the augmentation of active transport processes in the nervous tissue capillary endothelium, both of which may be interpreted as the favorable phenomena. PMID:12108102

  14. Neurologic recovery and neurologic decline after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Little, J W; Burns, S P; James, J J; Stiens, S A

    2000-02-01

    Physicians caring for patients with spinal cord injury facilitate neurologic recovery by optimizing nutrition and general health, by coordinating active exercise and functional training to enhance the underlying synapse growth, reversal of muscle atrophy, and motor learning, and by controlling interfering spasticity. SCI physicians also must monitor for neurologic decline during initial rehabilitation and later in life, diagnose promptly and accurately such decline, and orchestrate the appropriate intervention. PMID:10680159

  15. Exercise training combined with antioxidant supplementation prevents the antiproliferative activity of their single treatment in prostate cancer through inhibition of redox adaptation.

    PubMed

    Gueritat, Jordan; Lefeuvre-Orfila, Luz; Vincent, Sophie; Cretual, Armel; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Gratas-Delamarche, Arlette; Rannou-Bekono, Françoise; Rebillard, Amélie

    2014-12-01

    In preclinical models, exercise training (ET) or pomegranate juice (PJ) prevents prostate cancer progression. Here, we hypothesized that physical exercise combined with antioxidants could induce synergistic effects through oxidative stress modulation. Forty male Copenhagen rats with prostate tumors were divided into four groups: control, PJ, ET, and PJ+ET. Rats from the PJ group consumed 750 µl of PJ daily, rats from the ET group ran on a treadmill 5 days per week, and PJ+ET rats received the combined treatment. Each week, tumor growth was evaluated. After 4 weeks of treatment, the rats were euthanized and blood, muscles, and tumors were collected. Tumor Ki67, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, Bcl-2 expression, and enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant defenses, as well as oxidative stress markers (oxidized base, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation), were measured. PJ or ET significantly decreased prostate tumor proliferation (Ki67 staining, p<0.05) through the modulation of ERK phosphorylation, whereas the combination of treatments did not limit cancer progression. PJ significantly reduced Bcl-2 expression in tumors (p<0.05) and the combination of PJ and ET prevented this effect. PJ or ET increased enzymatic antioxidant defenses in muscle, PJ increased nonenzymatic antioxidant defenses in plasma and whole blood. In addition, PJ reduced TBARS and 8-oxodGuo levels in tumors as well as ET (p<0.05), whereas protein carbonyl levels were not affected by these two strategies. Paradoxically, association of PJ+ET did not increase antioxidant defenses and no reduction in oxidative stress markers was induced. Loading cancer cells with antioxidants blunts the positive effects of ET and interferes with important reactive oxygen species-mediated physiological processes such as antioxidant adaptations. PMID:25236740

  16. Optimizing the management of patients with spinal myeloma disease.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Sean; Lai, Maggie; Pratt, Guy; Ramasamy, Karthik; Wilson, David; Quraishi, Nasir; Auger, Martin; Cumming, David; Punekar, Maqsood; Quinn, Michael; Ademonkun, Debo; Willis, Fenella; Tighe, Jane; Cook, Gordon; Stirling, Alistair; Bishop, Timothy; Williams, Cathy; Boszczyk, Bronek; Reynolds, Jeremy; Grainger, Mel; Craig, Niall; Hamilton, Alastair; Chalmers, Isobel; Ahmedzai, Sam; Selvadurai, Susanne; Low, Eric; Kyriakou, Charalampia

    2015-11-01

    Myeloma is one of the most common malignancies that results in osteolytic lesions of the spine. Complications, including pathological fractures of the vertebrae and spinal cord compression, may cause severe pain, deformity and neurological sequelae. They may also have significant consequences for quality of life and prognosis for patients. For patients with known or newly diagnosed myeloma presenting with persistent back or radicular pain/weakness, early diagnosis of spinal myeloma disease is therefore essential to treat and prevent further deterioration. Magnetic resonance imaging is the initial imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of spinal disease. Treatment of the underlying malignancy with systemic chemotherapy together with supportive bisphosphonate treatment reduces further vertebral damage. Additional interventions such as cement augmentation, radiotherapy, or surgery are often necessary to prevent, treat and control spinal complications. However, optimal management is dependent on the individual nature of the spinal involvement and requires careful assessment and appropriate intervention throughout. This article reviews the treatment and management options for spinal myeloma disease and highlights the value of defined pathways to enable the proper management of patients affected by it. PMID:26184699

  17. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID:23087647

  18. Therapy of acute and delayed spinal infections after spinal surgery treated with negative pressure wound therapy in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Pawel; König, Matthias Alexander; Osterhoff, Georg; Wilzeck, Verena; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Jukema, Gerrolt Nico

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland) nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43-87 years) were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30). The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy. PMID:24416474

  19. Malignancies of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Waters, J Dawn; Peran, Encarnacion Maria Navarro; Ciacci, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The management of intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCT) is primarily concerned with the preservation of existing neurologic function. To this end, clinical scientists are continually seeking tools and techniques to improve the safety and efficacy of tumor resection and control. Further advances in safety and efficacy can be proposed at each phase of management, from pre-operative screening to post-treatment monitoring. Innovations within the areas of molecular biology and genetics, intraoperative imaging and stereotactic radiosurgery offer exciting new options to explore in the management of IMSCT. This section will review the pathophysiology and epidemiology of IMSCT and the state-of-the-art management before delving into the promising new tools and techniques for each phase of management. PMID:23281516

  20. Spinal epidural abscess in brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Boyaci, Ahmet; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Sen Dokumac?, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    Involvement of the skeletal system is a common complication of brucellosis. However, muscle involvement or paraspinal abscess formation are rare complications. Paraspinal abscess usually develops secondary to spondylitis. A case is reported here of a 33-year-old woman with symptoms of night sweats, fever and low back pain. Rose-Bengal test for brucellosis was positive and Brucella standard tube agglutination test was positive at a titre of 1/160. The diagnosis was made on MRI. The patient was treated with doxycycline and rifampin daily for 16?weeks. On day 14 of treatment, decline was observed in the patient’s symptoms. In the presence of inflammatory lower back pain and fever, brucellosis should be considered particularly in the endemic areas. Furthermore, tuberculosis should be remembered in the differential diagnosis when a spinal epidural abscess is determined. PMID:24072838

  1. Barriers to implementing intermittent catheterisation in spinal cord injury patients in Northwest Regional Spinal Injuries Centre, Southport, U.K.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul M; Singh, Gurpreet; Oo, Tun; Hughes, Peter L

    2011-01-01

    Intermittent catheterisation is the preferred method of managing the neurogenic bladder in patients with spinal cord injury. However, spinal cord physicians experienced problems when trying to implement an intermittent catheterisation regime in some spinal cord injury patients in the northwest of England. We present illustrative cases to describe practical difficulties encountered by patients while trying to adopt an intermittent catheterisation regime. Barriers to intermittent catheterisation are (1) caregivers or nurses are not available to carry out five or six catheterisations a day; (2) lack of time to perform intermittent catheterisations; (3) unavailability of suitable toilet facilities in public places, including restaurants and offices; (4) redundant prepuce in a male patient, which prevents ready access to urethral meatus; (5) urethral false passage; (6) urethral sphincter spasm requiring the use of flexible-tip catheters and á-adrenoceptor-blocking drugs; (7) reluctance to perform intermittent catheterisation in patients >60 years by some health professionals; and (8) difficulty in accessing the urethral meatus for catheterisation while the patient is sitting up, especially in female patients. These cases demonstrate the urgent need for provision of trained caregivers who can perform intermittent catheterisation, and improvement in public facilities that are suitable for performing catheterisation in spinal cord injury patients. Further, vigilance should be exercised during each catheterisation in order to prevent complications, such as urethral trauma and consequent false passages. Health professionals should make additional efforts to implement intermittent catheterisation in female spinal cord injury patients and in those >60 years. PMID:21218264

  2. Spinal cord stimulation for the treatment of refractory angina pectoris: a multicenter randomized single-blind study (the SCS-ITA trial).

    PubMed

    Lanza, Gaetano A; Grimaldi, Roberto; Greco, Salvatore; Ghio, Stefano; Sarullo, Filippo; Zuin, Guerrino; De Luca, Anna; Allegri, Massimo; Di Pede, Francesco; Castagno, Davide; Turco, Annalisa; Sapio, Monica; Pinato, Giampaolo; Cioni, Beatrice; Trevi, Giampaolo; Crea, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is believed to be effective in treating refractory angina. The need for SCS-related chest paresthesia, however, has hitherto made impossible placebo-controlled trials. Subliminal (non paresthesic) SCS, however, might be also effective on anginal pain. In this trial we compared subliminal SCS with paresthesic SCS and with sham SCS. Twenty-five refractory angina patients, who had never received SCS before, underwent SCS device implantation and were randomized to three groups: paresthesic SCS (group PS; n=10), subliminal SCS (group SS; n=7) or "sham" SCS (group NS; n=8). After 1month group NS patients were randomized to either group PS or SS. After 1month, changes in angina episodes (p=0.016), nitroglycerin use (p=0.015), angina class (p=0.02), quality of life score (p=0.05), and items 2 (p=0.008) and 3 (p=0.009) of Seattle angina questionnaire differed significantly among groups. Group PS showed significant improvement in outcomes compared to group NS, whereas there were no significant differences between groups SS and NS; furthermore, only nitroglycerin use differed significantly between groups PS and SS. At 3months, a significant difference between groups PS and SS was observed in angina attacks (p=0.002), but not in other variables. Thus, in this study, paresthesic, but not subliminal SCS was superior to sham SCS in improving clinical status in refractory angina patients. The lack of significant differences between PS and SS groups in this small study suggests that a possible role for subliminal SCS in individual patients deserves to be assessed in larger trials with appropriate statistical power. PMID:21084162

  3. Psychological Changes in Exercising COPD Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayle, Richard C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Fifteen adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were divided into treatment subjects who participated in a 28-week exercise regime and control subjects who participated in a 14-week exercise program. Analyses showed the aerobic exercise to have little impact on state-trait anxiety or depression scores. (Author/JDD)

  4. 17-Year-Delayed Fistula Formation After Elective Spinal Instrumentation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Etemadrezaei, Hamid; Zabihyan, Samira; Shakeri, Aidin; Ganjeifar, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A late-developing infection after an uneventful initial spinal instrumentation procedure is rare. Delayed infection and new fistula formation have been reported from a few months to 13 years. Here we report an unusual 17-year-delayed fistula formation after primary spinal instrumentation. The patient underwent hardware removal surgery with antibiotic therapy as a definitive treatment. Case Presentation Here we report an unusual 17-year delayed fistula formation after primary spinal instrumentation due to spinal trauma. He was admitted to Ghaem General Hospital, a chief referral center, Mashhad, North-East of Iran in August 2014. The patient underwent hardware removal surgery with antibiotic therapy as a definitive treatment. Conclusions Late inflammation may occur around spinal instruments and results in cutaneous fistula formation. After oral or intravenous antibiotic treatment, total device extraction is the cornerstone of treatment. PMID:26082855

  5. Biomechanics of the spine. Part I: spinal stability.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Roberto; Guarnieri, Gianluigi; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Muto, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Biomechanics, the application of mechanical principles to living organisms, helps us to understand how all the bony and soft spinal components contribute individually and together to ensure spinal stability, and how traumas, tumours and degenerative disorders exert destabilizing effects. Spine stability is the basic requirement to protect nervous structures and prevent the early mechanical deterioration of spinal components. The literature reports a number of biomechanical and clinical definitions of spinal stability, but a consensus definition is lacking. Any vertebra in each spinal motion segment, the smallest functional unit of the spine, can perform various combinations of the main and coupled movements during which a number of bony and soft restraints maintain spine stability. Bones, disks and ligaments contribute by playing a structural role and by acting as transducers through their mechanoreceptors. Mechanoreceptors send proprioceptive impulses to the central nervous system which coordinates muscle tone, movement and reflexes. Damage to any spinal structure gives rise to some degree of instability. Instability is classically considered as a global increase in the movements associated with the occurrence of back and/or nerve root pain. The assessment of spinal instability remains a major challenge for diagnostic imaging experts. Knowledge of biomechanics is essential in view of the increasing involvement of radiologists and neuroradiologists in spinal interventional procedures and the ongoing development of new techniques and devices. Bioengineers and surgeons are currently focusing on mobile stabilization systems. These systems represent a new frontier in the treatment of painful degenerative spine and aim to neutralize noxious forces, restore the normal function of spinal segments and protect the adjacent segments. This review discusses the current concepts of spine stability. PMID:23088879

  6. Spinal Subdural Abscess: A Rare Complication of Decubitus Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Usoltseva, Natalia; Medina-Flores, Rafael; Rehman, Ateeq; Samji, Swetha; D’Costa, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Spinal subdural abscess (SSA) is an uncommon entity. The exact incidence is unknown, with very few cases reported in the literature. This condition may result in spinal cord compression, thus constituting a medical and neurosurgical emergency. The pathogenesis of SSA is not well-described, and the available knowledge is based on case observations only. There is only one case report that describes direct seeding from decubitus ulcers as a possible mechanism for development of SSA. We report a case of subacute onset of quadriplegia in a male patient, age 55 years, due to spinal cord compression from SSA and superimposed spinal subdural hematoma. The direct seeding from decubitus ulcers is thought to be the cause of infection in our patient. We present this case of SSA to elucidate and review the predisposing factors, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities, and treatment regarding management of this rare disorder. PMID:24667217

  7. Spinal Tuberculosis Resembling Neoplastic Lesions on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculous spondylitis is one of the commonest forms of skeletal tuberculosis in developing countries like India causing significant morbidity due to compression of spinal cord and adjacent nerve roots. Diagnosis and intervention at early stage can prevent permanent damage such as spinal deformity and neurological deficits. Aim The purpose of this study was to demonstrate atypical MRI features in cases of tubercular spondylitis resembling neoplastic lesions and to stress that tuberculous spondylitis should be one of the differential diagnoses in any spinal pathology especially in developing countries. Materials and Methods This was a prospective study done in the patients diagnosed as tuberculous spondylitis on 0.2 T Siemens MRI between June 2011 and December 2014 in a tertiary care hospital in India. Total 529 cases of tubercular spinal lesions were diagnosed. Out of which only 59 patients showed atypical features on MR imaging which resembled neoplastic lesions were included in the study. The diagnosis was confirmed by cytology, histopathology, serology and corroborative findings. Results Lumbo-sacral region involvement (30.5%) is the commonest in our study followed by dorsal and cervical region. Multiple level lesions are seen in 14 cases (23.7%). All the 59 (100%) cases show no involvement of intervetebral disc. Posterior appendage involvement seen in 32 cases (54.2%). Soft tissue component seen in Intraspinal (37.2%) and paraspinal (45.7%) compartments. Cord compression seen in 19 cases (32.2%), out which only 7 cases (11.8%) shows cord oedema. Conclusion On MRI, tubercular spondylitis may have variable pictures on imaging. For any spinal and paraspinal lesions, we should also consider the possibility of tubercular aetiology along with other. Since early diagnosis avoids unnecessary delay in the treatment thereby reducing morbidity and possible complications. PMID:26675162

  8. Exercise at Home

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Healthy Lifestyle > Exercise > Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Exercise and staying active are an important part ... Below are some exercises you can do at home, but be sure to discuss any plans to ...

  9. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  10. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chad, David A

    2007-05-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis may be congenital or acquired. A classic clinical presentation is described as neurogenic claudication. Physical signs of sensory loss, weakness, and attenuation of reflexes often are mild and limited in distribution. Neuroimaging of the lumbosacral spine with MRI and electrodiagnostic (electromyographic [EMG]) tests are the most informative diagnostic modalities. Conservative management often is successful, but surgical decompression may be indicated in refractory cases. PMID:17445736

  11. [Information analysis of spinal ganglia].

    PubMed

    Lobko, P I; Kovaleva, D V; Kovalchuk, I E; Pivchenko, P G; Rudenok, V V; Davydova, L A

    2000-01-01

    Information parameters (entropia and redundancy) of cervical and thoracic spinal ganglia of albino rat foetuses, mature animals (cat and dog) and human subjects were analysed. Information characteristics of spinal ganglia were shown to be level-specified and to depend on their functional peculiarities. Information parameters of thoracic spinal ganglia of man and different animals are specie specified and may be used in assessment of morphological structures as information systems. PMID:12629803

  12. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide were incorporated in the PEG-PCL-PEG gel and injected into a lesion transecting the main dorsomedial and minor ventral medial corticospinal tract (CST). The degree of collateralization of the transected CST was quantified as an indicator of the regenerative potential of these treatments. At one month post-injury, we observed the robust rostral collateralization of the CST tract in response to the bFGF plasmid-loaded gel. In conclusion, we hope that this platform technology can be applied to the sustained local delivery of other proteins for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  13. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ventricular puncture; Lumbar puncture; Cisternal puncture; Cerebrospinal fluid culture ... pressure may be due to spinal cord tumor, shock, fainting, or diabetic coma . CSF PROTEIN Increased CSF ...

  14. Spinal and Paraspinal Ewing Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R.; Shahlaee, Amir H.; Morris, Christopher G.; Gibbs, C. Parker; Scarborough, Mark T.; Pincus, David W.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To perform a review of the 40-year University of Florida experience treating spinal and paraspinal Ewing tumors. Patients and Methods: A total of 27 patients were treated between 1965 and 2007. For local management, 21 patients were treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone and 6 with surgery plus RT. All patients with metastatic disease were treated with RT alone. The risk profiles of each group were otherwise similar. The median age was 17 years, and the most frequent subsite was the sacral spine (n = 9). The median potential follow-up was 16 years. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rate was 62%, 62%, and 90%, respectively. For the nonmetastatic subset (n = 22), the 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rate was 71%, 71%, and 89%, respectively. The local control rate was 84% for patients treated with RT alone vs. 100% for those treated with surgery plus RT. Patients who were >14 years old and those who were treated with intensive therapy demonstrated superior local control. Of 9 patients in our series with Frankel C or greater neurologic deficits at presentation, 7 experienced a full recovery with treatment. Of the 27 patients, 37% experienced Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 3 or greater toxicity, including 2 deaths from sepsis. Conclusion: Aggressive management of spinal and paraspinal Ewing tumors with RT with or without surgery results in high toxicity but excellent local control and neurologic outcomes. Efforts should be focused on identifying disease amenable to combined modality local therapy and improving RT techniques.

  15. Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: A Review.

    PubMed

    Maimon, Shimon; Luckman, Yehudit; Strauss, Ido

    2016-01-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is a rare disease, the etiology of which is not entirely clear. It is the most common vascular malformation of the spinal cord, comprising 60-80 % of the cases. The clinical presentation and imaging findings may be nonspecific and misleading, often mistaking it for other entities like demyelinating or degenerative diseases of the spine.This chapter describes the imaging findings, clinical signs, and symptoms of this disease and also the available treatment options according to the current literature.Angiography is still considered the gold standard for diagnosis; however, MRI/MRA is increasingly used as a screening tool. Modern endovascular techniques are becoming increasingly more effective in treating SDAVF offering a less invasive treatment option; however, they still lag behind surgical success rates which approach 100 %. The outcome of both treatment options is similar if complete obliteration of the fistula is obtained and depends mainly on the severity of neurological dysfunction before treatment.Heightened awareness by radiologists and clinicians to this rare entity is essential to make a timely diagnosis of this treatable disease. A multidisciplinary treatment approach is required in order to make appropriate treatment decisions. PMID:26508408

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy combined with Schwann cell transplantation promotes spinal cord injury recovery

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chuan-gang; Zhang, Shu-quan; Wu, Min-fei; Lv, Yang; Wu, Dan-kai; Yang, Qi; Gu, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cell transplantation and hyperbaric oxygen therapy each promote recovery from spinal cord injury, but it remains unclear whether their combination improves therapeutic results more than monotherapy. To investigate this, we used Schwann cell transplantation via the tail vein, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, or their combination, in rat models of spinal cord contusion injury. The combined treatment was more effective in improving hindlimb motor function than either treatment alone; injured spinal tissue showed a greater number of neurite-like structures in the injured spinal tissue, somatosensory and motor evoked potential latencies were notably shorter, and their amplitudes greater, after combination therapy than after monotherapy. These findings indicate that Schwann cell transplantation combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy is more effective than either treatment alone in promoting the recovery of spinal cord in rats after injury. PMID:26604910

  17. Current trends in spinal cord injury repair.

    PubMed

    Yu, W-Y; He, D-W

    2015-09-01

    One of the rapidly prevailing neurological disorders affecting thousands of people per year is spinal cord injury (SCI). Though, great research has been made in recent past to understand thoroughly the molecular bases of the diseases, no fully restorative treatments for SCI are available. However, various rehabilitative, cellular and molecular therapies are being tested in animal models. Some of them have shown promising results. So, the present review shall enlighten all these latest developments in the field of spinal cord injury repair. The review shall discuss latest upcoming areas being focused for the management of SCI patients like stem cell therapy approach, cell-based approaches, combination therapeutic approaches, neuronal plasticity and possible use of omega-3 fatty acids in SCI repair. PMID:26439026

  18. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Spinal Cord Compression.

    PubMed

    O'Phalen, Kristine H; Bunney, E Bradshaw; Kuluz, John W

    2015-12-01

    There are many causes of acute myelopathy including multiple sclerosis, systemic disease (SD), and acute spinal cord compression (SCC). SCC should be among the first potential causes considered given the significant permanent loss of neurologic function commonly associated with SCC. This impairment can occur over a short period of time, and may be avoided through rapid and acute surgical intervention. Patients with SCC typically present with a combination of motor and sensory dysfunction that has a distribution referable to a spinal level. Bowel and bladder dysfunction and neck or back pain may also be part of the clinical presentation, but are not uniformly present. Because interventions are critically time-sensitive, the recognition and treatment of SCC was chosen as an ENLS protocol. PMID:26438458

  19. Functional Electrical Stimulation and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chester H.; Triolo, Ronald J.; Elias, Anastasia L.; Kilgore, Kevin L.; DiMarco, Anthony F.; Bogie, Kath; Vette, Albert H.; Audu, Musa; Kobetic, Rudi; Chang, Sarah R.; Chan, K. Ming; Dukelow, Sean; Bourbeau, Dennis J.; Brose, Steven W.; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Kiss, Zelma; Mushahwar, Vivian K.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can disrupt communications between the brain and the body, leading to a loss of control over otherwise intact neuromuscular systems. The use of electrical stimulation (ES) of the central and peripheral nervous system can take advantage of these intact neuromuscular systems to provide therapeutic exercise options, to allow functional restoration, and even to manage or prevent many medical complications following SCI. The use of ES for the restoration of upper extremity, lower extremity and truncal functions can make many activities of daily living a potential reality for individuals with SCI. Restoring bladder and respiratory functions and preventing pressure ulcers may significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality following SCI. Many of the ES devices are already commercially available and should be considered by all SCI clinicians routinely as part of the lifelong rehabilitation care plan for all eligible individuals with SCI. PMID:25064792

  20. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePLUS

    ... diets, and for some, this may develop into eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia. And some people ... exercise, especially when it is combined with an eating disorder, can cause serious and permanent health problems, and ...

  1. Morning Exercise 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    Evidence revealing the importance of chronic exercise for improving general physical health and maintaining long?term successful cognitive function is widely available but less information addressing the potential efficacy of an acute bout...

  2. Spinal mechanisms underlying potentiation of hindpaw responses observed after transient hindpaw ischemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tatsunori; Sasaki, Mika; Komagata, Seiji; Tsukano, Hiroaki; Hishida, Ryuichi; Kohno, Tatsuro; Baba, Hiroshi; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2015-01-01

    Transient ischemia produces postischemic tingling sensation. Ischemia also produces nerve conduction block that may modulate spinal neural circuits. In the present study, reduced mechanical thresholds for hindpaw-withdrawal reflex were found in mice after transient hindpaw ischemia, which was produced by a high pressure applied around the hindpaw for 30?min. The reduction in the threshold was blocked by spinal application of LY354740, a specific agonist of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors. Neural activities in the spinal cord and the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) were investigated using activity-dependent changes in endogenous fluorescence derived from mitochondrial flavoproteins. Ischemic treatment induced potentiation of the ipsilateral spinal and contralateral S1 responses to hindpaw stimulation. Both types of potentiation were blocked by spinal application of LY354740. The contralateral S1 responses, abolished by lesioning the ipsilateral dorsal column, reappeared after ischemic treatment, indicating that postischemic tingling sensation reflects a sensory modality shift from tactile sensation to nociception in the spinal cord. Changes in neural responses were investigated during ischemic treatment in the contralateral spinal cord and the ipsilateral S1. Potentiation already appeared during ischemic treatment for 30?min. The present findings suggest that the postischemic potentiation shares spinal mechanisms, at least in part, with neuropathic pain. PMID:26165560

  3. Influence of Alcohol Intake on the Course and Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiwerski, J. E.; Krasuski, M.

    1992-01-01

    This study compared the neurological state and results of treatment for patients with traumatic spinal cord injury who were intoxicated (n=424) or sober (n=769) on admission to a Warsaw (Poland) hospital. In the intoxicated group, the number of patients with symptoms of complete spinal cord injury was much greater than that of the sober group. (DB)

  4. Spinal mechanisms underlying potentiation of hindpaw responses observed after transient hindpaw ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tatsunori; Sasaki, Mika; Komagata, Seiji; Tsukano, Hiroaki; Hishida, Ryuichi; Kohno, Tatsuro; Baba, Hiroshi; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2015-01-01

    Transient ischemia produces postischemic tingling sensation. Ischemia also produces nerve conduction block that may modulate spinal neural circuits. In the present study, reduced mechanical thresholds for hindpaw-withdrawal reflex were found in mice after transient hindpaw ischemia, which was produced by a high pressure applied around the hindpaw for 30 min. The reduction in the threshold was blocked by spinal application of LY354740, a specific agonist of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors. Neural activities in the spinal cord and the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) were investigated using activity-dependent changes in endogenous fluorescence derived from mitochondrial flavoproteins. Ischemic treatment induced potentiation of the ipsilateral spinal and contralateral S1 responses to hindpaw stimulation. Both types of potentiation were blocked by spinal application of LY354740. The contralateral S1 responses, abolished by lesioning the ipsilateral dorsal column, reappeared after ischemic treatment, indicating that postischemic tingling sensation reflects a sensory modality shift from tactile sensation to nociception in the spinal cord. Changes in neural responses were investigated during ischemic treatment in the contralateral spinal cord and the ipsilateral S1. Potentiation already appeared during ischemic treatment for 30 min. The present findings suggest that the postischemic potentiation shares spinal mechanisms, at least in part, with neuropathic pain. PMID:26165560

  5. Exercise response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Michel, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    The bicycle ergometer and a graded stress protocol were used to conduct exercise stress tests for the Apollo project. The graded exercise tests permitted a progressive evaluation of physiological control system response and provided a better understanding of safe stress limits; heart rate was used for determining stress levels. During each test, workload, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory gas exchange (oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and minute volume) measurements were made. The results are presented and discussed.

  6. Spinal cord injury: overview of experimental approaches used to restore locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Fakhoury, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury affects more than 2.5 million people worldwide and can lead to paraplegia and quadriplegia. Anatomical discontinuity in the spinal cord results in disruption of the impulse conduction that causes temporary or permanent changes in the cord's normal functions. Although axonal regeneration is limited, damage to the spinal cord is often accompanied by spontaneous plasticity and axon regeneration that help improve sensory and motor skills. The recovery process depends mainly on synaptic plasticity in the preexisting circuits and on the formation of new pathways through collateral sprouting into neighboring denervated territories. However, spontaneous recovery after spinal cord injury can go on for several years, and the degree of recovery is very limited. Therefore, the development of new approaches that could accelerate the gain of motor function is of high priority to patients with damaged spinal cord. Although there are no fully restorative treatments for spinal injury, various rehabilitative approaches have been tested in animal models and have reached clinical trials. In this paper, a closer look will be given at the potential therapies that could facilitate axonal regeneration and improve locomotor recovery after injury to the spinal cord. This article highlights the application of several interventions including locomotor training, molecular and cellular treatments, and spinal cord stimulation in the field of rehabilitation research. Studies investigating therapeutic approaches in both animal models and individuals with injured spinal cords will be presented. PMID:25870961

  7. Reciprocal effects of exercise and nutrition treatment-induced weight loss with improved body image and physical self-concept.

    PubMed

    Annesi, James J; Porter, Kandice J

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in self-image and mood are often reported as outcomes of obesity interventions. However, they may also concurrently influence weight loss, suggesting a reciprocal effect. Although previously reported for overweight women, such relationships were untested in morbidly obese women whose psychosocial responses to treatment may be different, and health-risks greater. Women (N = 161, Meanage = 42 years) with morbid obesity (MeanBMI = 45.1 kg/m(2)) participated in a 6-month, behaviorally based physical activity and nutrition treatment. Significant within-group improvements in weight-loss behaviors (physical activity and eating), weight, body satisfaction, physical self-concept, and depression were found. After controlling for age, mediation analyses indicated that, as a result of the treatment, weight loss was both an outcome and mediator of improvements in body-areas satisfaction and physical self-concept (reciprocal effects), but not depression. Results replicated findings from women with lower degrees of overweight, and suggested that weight-loss treatments emphasize changes in self-perception. PMID:24965514

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J.; Rose, Peter S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Brown, Paul D.; Brinkmann, Debra H.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  9. FDG-PET SUV can distinguish between spinal sarcoidosis and myelopathy with canal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sakushima, Ken; Yabe, Ichiro; Shiga, Tohru; Yashima-Yamada, Moemi; Tsuji-Akimoto, Sachiko; Terae, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2011-02-01

    Spinal cord sarcoidosis is a rare manifestation of sarcoidosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of spinal cord sarcoidosis sometimes resembles that of the non-inflammatory spinal cord lesion. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is an effective method to detect both systemic and central nervous system lesions in sarcoidosis. This study compared the standard uptake value (SUV) of FDG-PET between spinal cord sarcoidosis and non-inflammatory spinal cord lesions. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who underwent both spinal MRI and FDG-PET scans. We used SUV to evaluate the FDG-PET uptake of the lesion. The region of interest was the center of high-intensity areas on T2-weighted MR images. We included three patients with spinal cord sarcoidosis, five with myelomalacia caused by cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, one with spinal cord edema associated with cervical spondylosis, and one with spinal cord edema associated with dural arteriovenous fistula. The spinal cord sarcoidosis group had a significantly higher SUV (mean 4.38, range 3.30-4.93) than patients with the other diseases (mean 1.87, range 1.42-2.74). The SUV of FDG-PET thus may be able to distinguish spinal cord sarcoidosis from other non-inflammatory lesions. FDG-PET can play an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord sarcoidosis because the gadolinium enhancement in MRI is sometimes seen in spondylotic myelopathy or vascular malformation. FDG-PET is informative for the accurate diagnosis of spinal cord sarcoidosis and may enable clinicians to start treatment at an earlier stage. PMID:20820799

  10. Comparison of deep and superficial abdominal muscle activity between experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors and controls during stabilization exercise

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Sang-Min; Kim, Chang-Won; Shin, Yun-A

    2015-01-01

    Pilates and resistance exercises are used for lumbar stabilization training. However, it is unclear which exercise is more effective for lumbar stabilization. In our study, we aimed to compare surface muscle activity and deep muscle thickness during relaxation and spinal stabilization exercise in experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors. This study is a retrospective case control study set in the Exercise Prescription Laboratory and Sports Medicine Center. The participants included Pilates instructors (mean years of experience, 3.20±1.76; n=10), resistance exercise instructors (mean years of experience, 2.53±0.63; n=10), and controls (n=10). The participants performed 4 different stabilization exercises: abdominal drawing-in maneuver, bridging, roll-up, and one-leg raise. During the stabilization exercises, surface muscle activity was measured with electromyography, whereas deep muscle thickness was measured by ultrasound imaging. During the 4 stabilization exercises, the thickness of the transverse abdominis (TrA) was significantly greater in the Pilates-trained group than the other 2 other groups. The internal oblique (IO) thickness was significantly greater in the Pilates- and resistance-trained group than the control group, during the 4 exercises. However, the surface muscle activities were similar between the groups. Both Pilates and resistance exercise instructors had greater activation of deep muscles, such as the TrA and IO, than the control subjects. Pilates and resistance exercise are both effective for increasing abdominal deep muscle thickness. PMID:26171383

  11. Corticosteroids for Pain of Spinal Origin: Epidural and Intraarticular Administration.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Louisa S; Markman, John D

    2016-02-01

    Targeted interventional delivery of corticosteroids remains a mainstay of treatment for spinal pain syndromes because this approach has a wider therapeutic index than other approaches. The best evidence for analgesic efficacy is in subacute radicular syndromes associated with new-onset or recurrent lumbar radiculitis. Complications often relate to drug delivery technique as much as actions of the steroid itself and require careful consideration and vigilance by the administering physician. Considerable uncertainty persists concerning which patients with chronic pain are most likely to benefit from corticosteroid injections. Matching this treatment option with specific spinal pain syndromes remains a major challenge. PMID:26611556

  12. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma under CT guidance

    PubMed Central

    Morassi, L G; Kokkinis, K; Karargyris, O; Vlachou, I; Kalokairinou, K; Pneumaticos, S G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Osteoid osteoma (OO) accounts for approximately 10–12% of all benign bone tumours and 3% of all bone tumours. Spinal involvement appears in 10–25% of all cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation in the treatment of spinal OOs and report our experience. Methods: 13 patients suffering from spinal OO and treated at the authors' institution using CT-guided RF ablation were retrospectively evaluated. The RF probe was introduced through a 11-G Jamshidi® needle, and the lesion was heated at 90?°C for 6?min. Results: All procedures were considered technically successful as the correct positioning of the probe was proven by CT. 11 of the 13 patients reported pain relief after RF ablation. In two cases, RF ablation was repeated 1 month after the first procedure. Pain relief was achieved in both cases after the second procedure. No recurrence was reported throughout the follow-up. No complications like skin burn, soft-tissue haematoma, infection, vessel damage or neurological deficit were reported. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that CT-guided percutaneous RF ablation is a safe and effective method for the treatment of spinal OOs. Advances in knowledge: The data of this study support the efficacy and safety of the recently applied CT-guided percutaneous RF ablation technique for the treatment of spinal OOs. PMID:24712322

  13. Exercise rehabilitation for peripheral artery disease: An exercise physiology perspective with special emphasis on the emerging trend of home-based exercise.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew W

    2015-11-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a significant medical concern that is highly prevalent, costly, and deadly. Additionally, patients with PAD have significant impairments in functional independence and health-related quality of life due to leg symptoms and ambulatory dysfunction. Exercise therapy is a primary treatment for patients with PAD, as ambulatory outcome measures improve following a program of exercise rehabilitation. This review describes the outcomes that improve with exercise, the potential mechanisms for improved leg symptoms, key exercise program considerations for training patients with PAD with walking-based exercise, other exercise modalities that have been utilised, the use of on-site supervised exercise programs, and a major focus on historical and contemporary trials on conducting home-based, minimally supervised exercise program to treat PAD. The review concludes with recommendations for future exercise trials, with particular emphasis on reported greater details of the exercise prescription to more accurately quantify the total exercise dose of the program. PMID:26515218

  14. Calibrated forceps model of spinal cord compression injury.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Ashley; Monterrubio, Angela; Ariza, Jeanelle; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Compression injuries of the murine spinal cord are valuable animal models for the study of spinal cord injury (SCI) and spinal regenerative therapy. The calibrated forceps model of compression injury is a convenient, low cost, and very reproducible animal model for SCI. We used a pair of modified forceps in accordance with the method published by Plemel et al. (2008) to laterally compress the spinal cord to a distance of 0.35 mm. In this video, we will demonstrate a dorsal laminectomy to expose the spinal cord, followed by compression of the spinal cord with the modified forceps. In the video, we will also address issues related to the care of paraplegic laboratory animals. This injury model produces mice that exhibit impairment in sensation, as well as impaired hindlimb locomotor function. Furthermore, this method of injury produces consistent aberrations in the pathology of the SCI, as determined by immunohistochemical methods. After watching this video, viewers should be able to determine the necessary supplies and methods for producing SCI of various severities in the mouse for studies on SCI and/or treatments designed to mitigate impairment after injury. PMID:25938880

  15. Calibrated Forceps Model of Spinal Cord Compression Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Jeanelle; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Compression injuries of the murine spinal cord are valuable animal models for the study of spinal cord injury (SCI) and spinal regenerative therapy. The calibrated forceps model of compression injury is a convenient, low cost, and very reproducible animal model for SCI. We used a pair of modified forceps in accordance with the method published by Plemel et al. (2008) to laterally compress the spinal cord to a distance of 0.35 mm. In this video, we will demonstrate a dorsal laminectomy to expose the spinal cord, followed by compression of the spinal cord with the modified forceps. In the video, we will also address issues related to the care of paraplegic laboratory animals. This injury model produces mice that exhibit impairment in sensation, as well as impaired hindlimb locomotor function. Furthermore, this method of injury produces consistent aberrations in the pathology of the SCI, as determined by immunohistochemical methods. After watching this video, viewers should be able to determine the necessary supplies and methods for producing SCI of various severities in the mouse for studies on SCI and/or treatments designed to mitigate impairment after injury. PMID:25938880

  16. Clinical Value of Procalcitonin in Patients with Spinal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Deok-Ki; Lee, Hyun-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluation the diagnostic value of procalcitonin (PCT) in patients with spinal infection, compare to the classical biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood cell (WBC) count. Methods All patients who were diagnosed as a spinal infection between January, 2013 and July, 2014 were included in this study. Serum PCT, CRP, ESR, and WBC count were checked at initial hospital visit and once a week serially until they were discharged. Patient's medical history, causes and pathogens of spinal infection were reviewed. Results Total 34 (16 men, 18 women) patients were included in this study. Mean age of the patients was 65.6 year-old. Causes of spinal infection were pain block procedure (14, 41.2%) and post-operation (5, 14.7%). Out of 25 patients who showed elevated initial serum PCT level, 20 patients (80%) had a combined systemic infection. 14 patients (6.7%) had a sepsis, 3 patients (14.2%) had a urinary tract infection and 2 (9.6%) had a pneumonia. 14 patients (41.2%) showed elevation of serum PCT level during treatment. Among them, 9 patients (64.3%) had a combined infection such as sepsis and urinary tract infection. Conclusion Serum CRP showed more sensitivity compared to serum PCT in patients with spinal infection. Patients with spinal infection who showed elevated serum PCT level should be investigated for combined infection and proper antibiotics should be applied. PMID:26539272

  17. Osteoporotic fractures and hospitalization risk in chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Battaglino, R. A.; Stolzmann, K. L.; Hallett, L. D.; Waddimba, A.; Gagnon, D.; Lazzari, A. A.; Garshick, E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a well acknowledged complication of spinal cord injury. We report that motor complete spinal cord injury and post-injury alcohol consumption are risk factors for hospitalization for fracture treatment. The clinical assessment did not include osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment considerations, indicating a need for improved clinical protocols. Introduction Treatment of osteoporotic long bone fractures often results in lengthy hospitalizations for individuals with spinal cord injury. Clinical features and factors that contribute to hospitalization risk have not previously been described. Methods Three hundred and fifteen veterans ? 1 year after spinal cord injury completed a health questionnaire and underwent clinical exam at study entry. Multivariate Cox regression accounting for repeated events was used to assess longitudinal predictors of fracture-related hospitalizations in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers 1996–2003. Results One thousand four hundred and eighty-seven hospital admissions occurred among 315 participants, and 39 hospitalizations (2.6%) were for fracture treatment. Median length of stay was 35 days. Fracture-related complications occurred in 53%. Independent risk factors for admission were motor complete versus motor incomplete spinal cord injury (hazard ratio = 3.73, 95% CI = 1.46–10.50). There was a significant linear trend in risk with greater alcohol consumption after injury. Record review indicated that evaluation for osteoporosis was not obtained during these admissions. Conclusions Assessed prospectively, hospitalization in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers for low-impact fractures is more common in motor complete spinal cord injury and is associated with greater alcohol use after injury. Osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment considerations were not part of a clinical assessment, indicating the need for improved protocols that might prevent low-impact fractures and related admissions. PMID:18581033

  18. Gene expression changes in spinal motoneurons of the SOD1G93A transgenic model for ALS after treatment with G-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Alexandre; Kastner, Stefan; Chatzikonstantinou, Eva; Pitzer, Claudia; Plaas, Christian; Kirsch, Friederike; Wafzig, Oliver; Krüger, Carola; Spoelgen, Robert; Gonzalez De Aguilar, Jose-Luis; Gretz, Norbert; Schneider, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable fatal motoneuron disease with a lifetime risk of approximately 1:400. It is characterized by progressive weakness, muscle wasting, and death ensuing 3–5 years after diagnosis. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a drug candidate for ALS, with evidence for efficacy from animal studies and interesting data from pilot clinical trials. To gain insight into the disease mechanisms and mode of action of G-CSF, we performed gene expression profiling on isolated lumbar motoneurons from SOD1G93A mice, the most frequently studied animal model for ALS, with and without G-CSF treatment. Results: Motoneurons from SOD1G93A mice present a distinct gene expression profile in comparison to controls already at an early disease stage (11 weeks of age), when treatment was initiated. The degree of deregulation increases at a time where motor symptoms are obvious (15 weeks of age). Upon G-CSF treatment, transcriptomic deregulations of SOD1G93A motoneurons were notably restored. Discriminant analysis revealed that SOD1 mice treated with G-CSF has a transcriptom close to presymptomatic SOD1 mice or wild type mice. Some interesting genes modulated by G-CSF treatment relate to neuromuscular function such as CCR4-NOT or Prss12. Conclusions: Our data suggest that G-CSF is able to re-adjust gene expression in symptomatic SOD1G93A motoneurons. This provides further arguments for G-CSF as a promising drug candidate for ALS. PMID:25653590

  19. Sexual and Reproductive Function in Spinal Cord Injury and Spinal Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Albright, Theodore H.; Grabel, Zachary; DePasse, J. Mason; Palumbo, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Sexual and reproductive health is important quality of life outcomes, which can have a major impact on patient satisfaction. Spinal pathology arising from trauma, deformity, and degenerative disease processes may be detrimental to sexual and reproductive function. Furthermore, spine surgery may impact sexual and reproductive function due to post-surgical mechanical, neurologic, and psychological factors. The aim of this paper is to provide a concise evidence-based review on the impact that spine surgery and pathology can have on sexual and reproductive function. A review of published literature regarding sexual and reproductive function in spinal injury and spinal surgery patients was performed. We have found that sexual and reproductive dysfunction can occur due to numerous etiological factors associated with spinal pathology. Numerous treatment options are available for those patients, depending on the degree of dysfunction. Spine surgeons and non-operative healthcare providers should be aware of the issues surrounding sexual and reproductive function as related to spine pathology and spine surgery. It is important for spine surgeons to educate their patients on the operative risks that spine surgery encompasses with regard to sexual dysfunction, although current data examining these topics largely consists of level IV data. PMID:26605025

  20. Multifocal spinal and extra-spinal Mycobacterium chelonae osteomyelitis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Korres, D S; Papagelopoulos, P J; Zahos, K A; Kolia, M D; Poulakou, G G; Falagas, M E

    2007-03-01

    Only localized cases of Mycobacterium chelonae osteomyelitis have been reported. In this article, a 55-year-old immunosuppressed man with M. chelonae osteomyelitis and multiple spinal and extra-spinal involvement is presented. The patient had nodule-pustular skin lesions, spondylodiscitis at multiple levels, and osteolytic lesions at extra-spinal locations. Biopsy and cultures of the osseous lesions showed M. chelonae osteomyelitis. The patient started antimycobacterial chemotherapy with ciprofloxacin and clarithromycin. Progressive cervical kyphosis associated with anterior wedged deformity of the C5 vertebra and posterior C5-C6 spondylolisthesis resulted in compression of the spinal cord and neurological impairment. The patient underwent anterior decompression and C4-C6 arthrodesis using a titanium mesh cage and cervical plate. About 15 months after the initiation of chemotherapy and 5 months after surgery, the patient was pain free, with significant improvement of his neurological function. In the presence of immunosuppression, the physician should be alert for unusual or opportunistic pathogens of osteomyelitis. Long-term antimicrobial chemotherapy and surgical intervention is the cornerstone of successful treatment of multifocal bone M. chelonae infection. PMID:17313477

  1. Exercise guidelines for gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Padayachee, Cliantha; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide. This disease has many detrimental consequences for the woman, the unborn foetus and child. The management of GDM aims to mediate the effects of hyperglycaemia by controlling blood glucose levels. Along with pharmacology and dietary interventions, exercise has a powerful potential to assist with blood glucose control. Due to the uncertainty of risks and benefits of exercise during pregnancy, women tend to avoid exercise. However, under adequate supervision exercise is both safe and beneficial in the treatment of GDM. Therefore it is vital that exercise is incorporated into the continuum of care for women with GDM. Medical doctors should be able to refer to competently informed exercise professionals to aid in GDM treatment. It is important that exercise treatment is informed by research. Hence, the development of evidence-based guidelines is important to inform practice. Currently there are no guidelines for exercise in GDM. This review aims to assess the efficacy of exercise for the management of GDM in order to establish an exercise prescription guideline specific to the condition. It is recommended that women with GDM should do both aerobic and resistance exercise at a moderate intensity, a minimum of three times a week for 30-60 min each time. PMID:26240700

  2. Imaging modalities in spinal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kricun, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an approach to the various imaging modalities used to view the spine. It discusses the indications, limitations and practical use of each in the diagnosis, work-up and staging of various spinal disorders, and compares each of them in various clinical settings. Topics covered include low back pain syndrome, disk disease, spinal cord lesions, congenital abnormalities, and trauma.

  3. Spinal Injury Rehabilitation in Singapore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, H. L.; Chua, K.; Chan, W.

    1998-01-01

    This study reviewed 231 cases of spinal cord injury treated in Singapore. Data on demographic characteristics, common causes (mostly falls and traffic accidents), types of spinal damage, and outcomes are reported. Following rehabilitation, 68 patients were able to ambulate independently and 45 patients achieved independence in activities of daily…

  4. Brugada syndrome, exercise, and exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Masrur, Shihab; Memon, Sarfaraz; Thompson, Paul D

    2015-05-01

    There are few data on the risk of exercise and the role of exercise stress testing in Brugada syndrome. We sought to address this deficiency using a systematic literature review. We identified 98 English-language articles possibly addressing exercise in Brugada syndrome by searching PubMed and Google Scholar from January 1990 through November 2013 using the keywords "Brugada syndrome," "exercise," "exercise testing," and "syncope" alone and in combinations. Abstracts were reviewed, and those articles pertaining to Brugada syndrome and exercise were reviewed in full. We identified 18 articles reporting on Brugada syndrome and exercise. This pool included 2 large studies of 93 and 50 Brugada subjects undergoing exercise testing, plus 16 case reports. There were no reports of exercise-related sudden death, but there were 4 cases of syncope after exercise. We identified 166 Brugada patients who underwent exercise testing. During exercise testing, there were 2 reports of ventricular tachycardia and 1 report of multiple ventricular extrasystoles. ST-segment elevation increased (ST augmentation) during the early recovery phase of exercise in 57% of patients. Exercise unmasked a Brugada electrocardiographic pattern in 5 patients. Exercise is associated with syncope and ST augmentation after exercise and may be helpful in unmasking Brugada syndrome. There are insufficient data on the risks of exercise in Brugada syndrome to make recommendations for exercise, but the observations that exercise can worsen the ST abnormalities in Brugada and produce ventricular arrhythmias suggest that patients with Brugada syndrome should be restricted from vigorous exercise. PMID:25955277

  5. Urinary considerations for adult patients with spinal dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Veenboer, Paul W; de Kort, Laetitia M O; Chrzan, Rafal J; de Jong, Tom P V M

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of newborns with spinal dysraphism is diminishing worldwide, although survival of individuals with this condition into adulthood continues to improve. The number of adults with spinal dysraphism will, therefore, increase in the coming years, which will pose new challenges in patient management. Urological manifestations of spinal dysraphism can include increased risks of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infection, urinary calculi, sexual dysfunction, end-stage renal disease and iatrogenic metabolic disturbances; however, the severity and incidence of these symptoms varies substantially between patients. Owing to the presence of multiple comorbidities, treatment and follow-up protocols often have to be adapted to best suit the needs of specific patients. Authors describe bladder and kidney function and long-term complications of treatments initiated in childhood, as well as the potential for improvements in quality of life through better follow-up schedules and future developments. PMID:25963964

  6. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  7. Subdural hematoma following spinal cord stimulator implant.

    PubMed

    Chiravuri, Srinivas; Wasserman, Ronald; Chawla, Amit; Haider, Naeem

    2008-01-01

    Headache following interventional procedures is a diagnostic challenge due to the multitude of possible etiologies involved. Presentation can be simple (PDPH alone) or complex (exacerbation of pre-existing chronic headache along with PDPH) or headache associated with a new onset intracranial process. Subdural hematoma is a rare complication of cranio-spinal trauma. Cranial subdural hematoma may present in an acute, sub-acute, or chronic fashion. Diagnosis of a subdural hematoma in the wake of a PDPH is difficult, requiring a high level of suspicion. Delayed diagnosis of subdural hematoma is usually related to failure to consider it in the differential diagnosis. Thorough history, assessment of the evolution of symptoms, and imaging studies may identify the possible cause and help direct treatment. Change in the character of initial presenting symptoms may be a sign of resolution of the headache or the onset of a secondary process. We report a case of acute intracranial subdural hematoma secondary to unintentional dural puncture during placement of a permanent spinal cord stimulator lead for refractory angina. There is need for careful follow-up of patients with a known post-dural tear. Failure to identify uncommon adverse events in patients with complicated spinal cord stimulator implantation may lead to permanent injury. PMID:18196176

  8. [History of conservative spinal therapy].

    PubMed

    Kladny, B

    2015-12-01

    Hippocrates was the first to intensively describe and document the principles for the treatment of injuries and diseases of the spine. His principles for abrupt treatment of the "hunchback" were followed by physicians even up to the end of the nineteenth century. The non-operative treatment of scoliosis was improved in the beginning of the sixteenth century by the introduction of mechanical devices that started the development of corsets which are still in use in modern scoliosis treatment. Stretching beds were only in temporary use. With the beginning of the nineteenth century gymnastics and physiotherapy became more and more important. Manual therapy was exercised by physicians until the late Middle Ages. After a long period of time in which bonesetters and other laymen performed manual therapy it was professionalized at the end of the nineteenth century again by the introduction of osteopathy and chiropractic. In Germany the development and introduction of manual treatment started relatively late in the twentieth century, predominantly as manual medicine. PMID:26542053

  9. Exercise for tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Tendinopathies are one of the most common sports/musculoskeletal injury in modern western societies. Many physiotherapy approaches have been recommended in the literature for the management of tendinopathy. The most effective treatment in the management of tendinopathy is the eccentric training. Load, speed and frequency of contractions are the three principles of eccentric exercises, discussed in this report. However, eccentric training is not effective for all patients with tendinopathy and the effectiveness of this approach when applied as monotherapy is lower than it is applied as part of the rehabilitation process. For this reason, clinicians combine eccentric training with other physiotherapy techniques such as stretching, isometric and lumbar stability exercises, electrotherapy, manual therapy, soft tissue manipulation techniques, taping and acupuncture in the management of tendinopathies. Further research is needed to find out which treatment strategy combined with eccentric training will provide the best results in the rehabilitation of tendinopathy. PMID:26140271

  10. Attitudes Towards Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Cassandra Sligh D.; Gooden, Randy; Nowell, Jennifer; Wilson, Navodda

    2010-01-01

    This paper will shed light on the lives of persons with spinal cord injuries by revealing the literature on spinal cord injuries that focuses on research that can shed light on attitudes towards persons with spinal cord injuries. The background literature related to incidences, the definition of spinal cord injury, and vocational opportunities are…

  11. Daily exercise routines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Patrick L.; Amoroso, Michael T.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on daily exercise routines are presented. Topics covered include: daily exercise and periodic stress testings; exercise equipment; physiological monitors; exercise protocols; physiological levels; equipment control; control systems; and fuzzy logic control.

  12. Effects of a Clinician Referral and Exercise Program for Men Who Have Completed Active Treatment for Prostate Cancer: A Multicenter Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial (ENGAGE)

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Patricia M; Craike, Melinda J; Salmon, Jo; Courneya, Kerry S; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Fraser, Steve F; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza; Broadbent, Suzanne; Botti, Mari; Kent, Bridie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a clinician referral and exercise program in improving exercise levels and quality of life for men with prostate cancer. METHODS This was a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in Melbourne, Australia comprising 15 clinicians: 8 clinicians were randomized to refer eligible participants (n = 54) to a 12-week exercise program comprising 2 supervised gym sessions and 1 home-based session per week, and 7 clinicians were randomized to follow usual care (n = 93). The primary outcome was self-reported physical activity; the secondary outcomes were quality of life, anxiety, and symptoms of depression. RESULTS A significant intervention effect was observed for vigorous-intensity exercise (effect size: Cohen's d, 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.09-0.82; P = .010) but not for combined moderate and vigorous exercise levels (effect size: d, 0.08; 95% CI, ?0.28 to 0.45; P = .48). Significant intervention effects were also observed for meeting exercise guidelines (?150 min/wk; odds ratio, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.9-7.8; P = .002); positive intervention effects were observed in the intervention group for cognitive functioning (effect size: d, 0.34; 95% CI, ?0.02 to 0.70; P = .06) and depression symptoms (effect size: d, ?0.35; 95% CI, ?0.71 to 0.02; P = .06). Eighty percent of participants reported that the clinician's referral influenced their decision to participate in the exercise program. CONCLUSIONS The clinician referral and 12-week exercise program significantly improved vigorous exercise levels and had a positive impact on mental health outcomes for men living with prostate cancer. Further research is needed to determine the sustainability of the exercise program and its generalizability to other cancer populations. Cancer 2015;121:2646–2654. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:25877784

  13. Clinical analysis of 36 multiple myeloma patients with extramedullary plasmacytoma invasion of the spinal canal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiajia; Zhong, Yuping

    2015-06-01

    Few physicians are familiar with extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) invasion of the spinal canal in multiple myeloma (MM) patients, and little information about this rare disease is available. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical features, prognosis and treatment of MM patients with EMP invasion of the spinal canal. We evaluated 36 MM patients with EMP invasion of the spinal canal. EMP invasion was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and/or histopathological analysis of bone marrow biopsy samples. Patients underwent surgery followed by chemotherapy or received chemotherapy alone. Chemotherapy consisted of bortezomib-containing regimens and other combination therapies. The patients' median age was 58.6 years (range, 31-78 years). Eight patients had negative immunofixation electrophoresis results, and nine patients had a bone marrow plasma cell infiltration rate of less than 5%. Of the 36 MM patients with EMP invasion of the spinal canal that we identified, 19 had thoracic spinal cord involvement, 10 had lumbar spinal cord involvement, 2 had sacral spinal cord involvement and 5 had both lumbar and thoracic spinal cord involvement. The findings of our study, which is the largest study in MM patients with EMP spinal canal invasion conducted to date, suggest the importance of the early detection of spinal invasion in MM patients. Extramedullary disease was resistant to conventional treatments but responded well to regimens containing novel drugs such as bortezomib. In patients with symptoms of nerve root involvement, the tumour should be resected as soon as possible to relieve spinal cord compression. PMID:24395149

  14. Exercise apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Grant (Inventor); Bentley, Jason R. (Inventor); Loehr, James A. (Inventor); Gundo, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus and method for exercising whereby the user is supported by various mechanisms in such as way that the user's shoulder area is free to translate and rotate; the user's pelvic area is free to translate and rotate; or in any combination.

  15. Analgesia or Addiction: Implications for Morphine Use After Spinal Cord Injury 

    E-print Network

    Woller, Sarah Ann

    2012-07-16

    Up to 65% of individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI) experience neuropathic pain, and cite this as one of the most significant consequences of injury. Opiate analgesics are one of the most effective, but also most concerning, treatments...

  16. The Rehabilitation of the Spinal Cord-Injured Street Person.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coven, Arnold B.; Glazeroff, Herbert

    1978-01-01

    The spinal cord-injured street person is especially resistant to rehabilitation. His life style is characterized by the use of physical power and mobility to survive and gain respect. He loses this main form of control and attempts to manipulate the treatment environment to care for him while he avoids confronting his disability. (Author)

  17. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. (a) Identification. A spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis...spondylolisthesis (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome....

  18. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. (a) Identification. A spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis...spondylolisthesis (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome....

  19. Spinal arteriovenous malformation masquerating zoster sine herpete.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Young; Ok, Se Jin; Oh, Chang Keun; Park, Sun Kyung; Kim, Do Wan; Yang, Jong Yeun

    2013-01-01

    Zoster sine herpete (ZSH) is difficult to diagnosis during an acute period due to the absence of the characteristic zosteriform dermatomal rash; therefore, progression to postherpetic neuralgia is more common than typical zoster. In addition, misdiagnosis of other neuropathic pain as ZSH is common in clinical situations. Here, we report a case of spinal arteriovenous malformation that mimics ZSH. This is a rare condition; therefore, high clinical suspicion for a correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. However, early diagnosis and definitive treatment are essential to prevent neurologic deficit and mortality. PMID:23342212

  20. Spinal Arteriovenous Malformation Masquerating Zoster Sine Herpete

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Ok, Se Jin; Oh, Chang Keun; Park, Sun Kyung; Kim, Do Wan

    2013-01-01

    Zoster sine herpete (ZSH) is difficult to diagnosis during an acute period due to the absence of the characteristic zosteriform dermatomal rash; therefore, progression to postherpetic neuralgia is more common than typical zoster. In addition, misdiagnosis of other neuropathic pain as ZSH is common in clinical situations. Here, we report a case of spinal arteriovenous malformation that mimics ZSH. This is a rare condition; therefore, high clinical suspicion for a correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. However, early diagnosis and definitive treatment are essential to prevent neurologic deficit and mortality. PMID:23342212

  1. Cardiovascular benefits of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shashi K

    2012-01-01

    Regular physical activity during leisure time has been shown to be associated with better health outcomes. The American Heart Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine all recommend regular physical activity of moderate intensity for the prevention and complementary treatment of several diseases. The therapeutic role of exercise in maintaining good health and treating diseases is not new. The benefits of physical activity date back to Susruta, a 600 BC physician in India, who prescribed exercise to patients. Hippocrates (460–377 BC) wrote “in order to remain healthy, the entire day should be devoted exclusively to ways and means of increasing one’s strength and staying healthy, and the best way to do so is through physical exercise.” Plato (427–347 BC) referred to medicine as a sister art to physical exercise while the noted ancient Greek physician Galen (129–217 AD) penned several essays on aerobic fitness and strengthening muscles. This article briefly reviews the beneficial effects of physical activity on cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22807642

  2. Exercise Testing, Training, and Beta-Adrenergic Blockade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmore, Jack H.

    1988-01-01

    This article summarizes the current knowledge on the effects of beta-adrenergic blocking drugs, used widely for treatment of cardiovascular diseases, on exercise performance, training benefits, and exercise prescription. (IAH)

  3. 9 CFR 3.8 - Exercise for dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Exercise for dogs. 3.8 Section 3.8 Animals...Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.8 Exercise for dogs. Dealers, exhibitors, and...

  4. 9 CFR 3.8 - Exercise for dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Exercise for dogs. 3.8 Section 3.8 Animals...Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.8 Exercise for dogs. Dealers, exhibitors, and...

  5. 9 CFR 3.8 - Exercise for dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Exercise for dogs. 3.8 Section 3.8 Animals...Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.8 Exercise for dogs. Dealers, exhibitors, and...

  6. Pediatric and adult spinal tuberculosis: imaging and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Kilborn, Tracy; Janse van Rensburg, Pieter; Candy, Sally

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) has increased in developing and developed countries as a consequence of the AIDS epidemic, immigration, social deprivation, and inadequate TB control and screening programs. Spinal TB may be osseous or nonosseous. Classic findings of multiple contiguous vertebral body involvement, gibbus formation, and subligamentous spread with paravertebral abscesses are optimally evaluated with MR imaging. Nonspondylitic spinal TB is less well described in the literature, may develop in the absence of TB meningitis, and is often associated with meningovascular cord ischemia. Radiologists should be familiar with the spectrum of imaging findings, allowing early diagnosis and treatment of this serious condition. PMID:25952174

  7. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jin Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26512268

  8. Spinal axis irradiation with electrons: Measurements of attenuation by the spinal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Muller-Runkel, R.; Vijayakumar, S.

    1986-07-01

    Electrons may be used beneficially for spinal axis irradiation in medulloblastoma children to avoid some of the long-term sequelae induced by megavoltage photons. However, the attenuation by the intervening bone ought to be considered. Three-dimensional computer treatment planning with inhomogeneity correction for electron beams is not yet generally available, and alternate methods are needed to evaluate the attenuation by the complex bony structure of the spine. Here, we present our experimental data showing the alteration in the electron isodoses due to the intervening spinous processes. Film dosimetric measurements were made in the vertebral columns obtained from autopsies of a goat, a dog, and a child. Our results show that electron beam therapy for the spinal axis is a viable option.

  9. What's New in Research and Treatment for Brain Tumors in Children?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... brain and spinal cord tumors in children What’s new in research and treatment for brain and spinal ... an investigational method, and studies are continuing. Other new treatment strategies Researchers are also testing some newer ...

  10. Relationship between Spinal Cord Volume and Spinal Cord Injury due to Spinal Shortening

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Feng; Yang, Jin-Cheng; Ma, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Jun-Jie; Yang, Qing-Lei; Zhou, Xin; Xiao, Yao-Sheng; Hu, Hai-Sheng; Xia, Li-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral column resection is associated with a risk of spinal cord injury. In the present study, using a goat model, we aimed to investigate the relationship between changes in spinal cord volume and spinal cord injury due to spinal shortening, and to quantify the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height in order to clarify a safe limit for shortening. Vertebral column resection was performed at T10 in 10 goats. The spinal cord was shortened until the somatosensory-evoked potential was decreased by 50% from the baseline amplitude or delayed by 10% relative to the baseline peak latency. A wake-up test was performed, and the goats were observed for two days postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the spinal cord volume, T10 height, disc height, osteotomy segment height, and spinal segment height pre- and postoperatively. Two of the 10 goats were excluded, and hence, only data from eight goats were analyzed. The somatosensory-evoked potential of these eight goats demonstrated meaningful changes. With regard to neurologic function, five and three goats were classified as Tarlov grades 5 and 4 at two days postoperatively. The mean shortening distance was 23.6 ± 1.51 mm, which correlated with the d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment (r = 0.95, p < 0.001) and with the height of the T10 body (r = 0.79, p = 0.02). The mean d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment was 142.87 ± 0.59 mm3 (range, 142.19–143.67 mm3). The limit for shortening was approximately 106% of the vertebral height. The mean volumes of the osteotomy and spinal segments did not significantly change after surgery (t = 0.310, p = 0.765 and t = 1.241, p = 0.255, respectively). Thus, our results indicate that the safe limit for shortening can be calculated using the change in spinal cord volume per 1-mm height. PMID:26001196

  11. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... temperature from the body to the spinal cord. Did You Know... Doctors can often tell where the ... on symptoms and results of a physical examination. Did You Know... Nerves from the lowest parts of ...

  12. Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to adjusting to spinal cord injury is personal motivation . Individuals who are newly injured are often motivated ... to find purpose in your life and the motivation to achieve your goals. It may help to ...

  13. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... colleagues, with an educational grant from Pfizer Inc. University of Washington-operated SCI Clinics: Harborview Medical Center ... Spinal Cord Injury Clinic nurses: 206-744-5862 University of Washington Medical Center Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic 1959 ...

  14. Spinal deformity in children treated for neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, J.K.; Riseborough, E.J.; Jaffe, N.; Nehme, M.E.

    1981-02-01

    Of seventy-four children who were treated at a mean age of seventeen months for neuroblastoma and survived more than five years, fifty-six had spinal deformity due either to the disease or to the treatment after a mean follow-up of 12.9 years. Of these fifty-six, 50 per cent had post-radiation scoliosis, and 16 per cent had post-radiation kyphosis, most frequently at the thoracolumbar junction, at the time of follow-up. Two kyphotic thoracolumbar curve patterns were identified: an angular kyphosis with a short radius of curvature and its apex at the twelfth thoracic and first lumbar vertebrae, and a thoracic kyphosis with a long radius of curvature that extended into the lumbar spine. The post-radiation deformity - both the scoliosis and the kyphosis - progressed with growth, the scoliosis at a rate of 1 degree per year and the kyphosis at a rate of 3 degrees per year. Epidural spread of the neuroblastoma was associated with most of the cases of severe scoliosis and kyphosis. The deformity was due either to the laminectomy or to the paraplegia acting in conjunction with the radiation. Eighteen per cent of 419 children with this malignant disease survived more than five years, and of the survivors, 20 per cent had spinal deformity severe enough to warrant treatment. The factors associated with the development of spinal deformity in patient treated for neuroblastoma were: orthovoltage radiation exceeding 3000 rads, asymmetrical radiation of the spine, thoracolumbar kyphosis, and epidural spread of the tumor.

  15. Current Molecular Imaging of Spinal Tumors in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, Nora; Pöpperl, Gabriele; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Spiriev, Toma; Arasho, Belachew; Orabi, Mikael; Schaller, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Energy metabolism measurements in spinal cord tumors, as well as in osseous spinal tumors/metastasis in vivo, are rarely performed only with molecular imaging (MI) by positron emission tomography (PET). This imaging modality developed from a small number of basic clinical science investigations followed by subsequent work that influenced and enhanced the research of others. Apart from precise anatomical localization by coregistration of morphological imaging and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of this imaging is the opportunity to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Most importantly, MI represents one of the key technologies in translational molecular neuroscience research, helping to develop experimental protocols that may later be applied to human patients. PET may help monitor a patient at the vertebral level after surgery and during adjuvant treatment for recurrent or progressive disease. Common clinical indications for MI of primary or secondary CNS spinal tumors are: (i) tumor diagnosis, (ii) identification of the metabolically active tumor compartments (differentiation of viable tumor tissue from necrosis) and (iii) prediction of treatment response by measurement of tumor perfusion or ischemia. While spinal PET has been used under specific circumstances, a question remains as to whether the magnitude of biochemical alterations observed by MI in CNS tumors in general (specifically spinal tumors) can reveal any prognostic value with respect to survival. MI may be able to better identify early disease and to differentiate benign from malignant lesions than more traditional methods. Moreover, an adequate identification of treatment effectiveness may influence patient management. MI probes could be developed to image the function of targets without disturbing them or as treatment to modify the target’s function. MI therefore closes the gap between in vitro and in vivo integrative biology of disease. At the spinal level, MI may help to detect progression or recurrence of metastatic disease after surgical treatment. In cases of nonsurgical treatments such as chemo-, hormone- or radiotherapy, it may better assess biological efficiency than conventional imaging modalities coupled with blood tumor markers. In fact, PET provides a unique possibility to correlate topography and specific metabolic activity, but it requires additional clinical and experimental experience and research to find new indications for primary or secondary spinal tumors. PMID:21210073

  16. Chronic in vivo imaging in the mouse spinal cord using an implanted chamber

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, Matthew J.; Bernstein, Ida M.; Schlafer, Donald H.; Cleland, Thomas A.; Fetcho, Joseph R.; Schaffer, Chris B.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and treatment of spinal cord pathology is limited in part by a lack of longitudinal in vivo imaging strategies at the cellular level. We developed a chronically implanted spinal chamber and surgical procedure suitable for time-lapse in vivo multiphoton microscopy of mouse spinal cord without the need for repeat surgical procedures. Repeated imaging was routinely achieved for more than five weeks post-operatively with up to ten separate imaging sessions. We observed neither motor function deficit nor neuropathology in the spinal cord as a result of chamber implantation. Using this chamber we quantified microglia and afferent axon dynamics following a laser-induced spinal cord lesion and observed massive microglia infiltration within one day along with a heterogeneous dieback of axon stumps. By enabling chronic imaging studies over timescales ranging from minutes to months, our method offers an ideal platform for understanding cellular dynamics in response to injury and therapeutic interventions. PMID:22266542

  17. Acute paraplegia due to spinal arteriovenous fistula in two patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Poisson, Alice; Vasdev, Ashok; Brunelle, Francis; Plauchu, Henri; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie

    2009-02-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by recurrent epistaxis, cutaneous telangiectasia, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Of these, spinal AVM is a rare manifestation that concerns mainly children. In this report, we describe two cases of spinal AVM revealed by acute paraparesis due to subarachnoid hemorrhage in children with HHT and reviewed the literature on spinal arteriovenous malformations in HHT. In most of the cases reported, the clinical presentation was acute in the pediatric population and insidious during adulthood. The prognosis of spinal AVM mainly depends on the presence or not of medullar signs and symptoms and on the delay before treatment. In conclusion, any child with a family history of HHT should be considered at risk for spinal AVM in order to improve management of such complications and to decrease the risk of neurological sequellae. PMID:19020899

  18. A paradigm for the evaluation and management of spinal coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Skoch, Jesse M.; Zaninovich, Orel; Zoccali, Carmine; Galgiani, John N.; Baaj, Ali A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal infection that is endemic to parts of the Southwestern United States. When infection involves the spine, the treatment strategies can be challenging. We have devised a management protocol for spinal coccidioidomycosis based on a review of the literature and our experience. Methods: The electronic literature search of National Library of Medicine for publications from 1964 to 2014 was performed using the following keywords: Coccidioidomycosis and spine. The search yielded 24 papers. Treatment strategies were summarized into a treatment protocol. Results: A total of 164 cases of spinal coccidioidomycosis were identified, ranging in age from <10 to >80 years. Males (n = 131) and African-Americans (n = 79) were strikingly over-represented. Medical therapy: Once a diagnosis of spinal coccidioidomycosis is established, antifungal therapy should always be started. Antifungal therapy with amphotericin B or azoles like fluconazole. Medical therapy needs to be continued for many years and sometimes indefinitely to reduce disease recurrence or progression. Surgical management is indicated in cases with mechanical instability, neurologic deficit, medically intractable pain, or progression of infection despite antifungal therapy. Conclusions: This work provides a working protocol involving assessment and reassessment for the management of spinal coccidioidomycosis. Medical management with antifungal agents in some cases can provide satisfactory disease control. However, in patients with mechanical instability, neurologic deficit, medically intractable pain or disease progression disease control may only be achieved with surgical debridement and stabilization. PMID:26167359

  19. Review of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Intramedullary Spinal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae-Chil

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SR) represents an increasingly utilized modality in the treatment of intracranial and extracranial pathologies. Stereotactic spine radiosurgery (SSR) uses an alternative strategy to increase the probability of local control by delivering large cumulative doses of radiation therapy (RT) in only a few fractions. SSR in the treatment of intramedullary lesions remains in its infancy-this review summarizes the current literature regarding the use of SSR for treating intramedullary spinal lesions. Several studies have suggested that SSR should be guided by the principles of intracranial radiosurgery with radiation doses placed no further than 1-2mm apart, thereby minimizing exposure to the surrounding spinal cord and allowing for delivery of higher radiation doses to target areas. Maximum dose-volume relationships and single-point doses with SSR for the spinal cord are currently under debate. Prior reports of SR for intramedullary metastases, arteriovenous malformations, ependymomas, and hemangioblastomas demonstrated favorable outcomes. In the management of intrame-dullary spinal lesions, SSR appears to provide an effective and safe treatment compared to conventional RT. SSR should likely be utilized for select patient-scenarios given the potential for radiation-induced myelopathy, though high-quality literature on SSR for intramedullary lesions remains limited. PMID:24757449

  20. Alterations of spinal range of motion while sitting in hemiplegic patients with or without gait available.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Dong; Lee, Kyoung-Bo; Lee, Dong-Geol

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine alterations of spinal range of motion while sitting, in hemiplegic patients with or without gait available. [Subjects] There was a gait group (GG) of 6 subjects, and a non-gait group (NGG) of 6 subjects, both with hemiplegia after a stroke. [Methods] The subjects in both groups were given an intervention focusing on ankle dorsi-flexion of the affected foot only once for 30 minutes. The Spinal Mouse was used to gain data of the spinal range of motion before and after the intervention and 30 minutes later for follow-up test. [Results] Only in the gait group, lumbar spinal range of motion showed a significant difference when using flexion extension. Sacral hip and inclination were both increased gradually when upright flexion and flexion extension were used. [Conclusion] Facilitating foot for ankle dorsi-flexion is effective on spinal range of motion especially sacrohip, lumbar spine and inclination only for the subjects in the gait group. The results suggested that ankle dorsi-flexion exercise influences spinal range of motion in a sitting position. PMID:26504339

  1. Alterations of spinal range of motion while sitting in hemiplegic patients with or without gait available

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-dong; Lee, Kyoung-bo; Lee, Dong-geol

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine alterations of spinal range of motion while sitting, in hemiplegic patients with or without gait available. [Subjects] There was a gait group (GG) of 6 subjects, and a non-gait group (NGG) of 6 subjects, both with hemiplegia after a stroke. [Methods] The subjects in both groups were given an intervention focusing on ankle dorsi-flexion of the affected foot only once for 30 minutes. The Spinal Mouse was used to gain data of the spinal range of motion before and after the intervention and 30 minutes later for follow-up test. [Results] Only in the gait group, lumbar spinal range of motion showed a significant difference when using flexion extension. Sacral hip and inclination were both increased gradually when upright flexion and flexion extension were used. [Conclusion] Facilitating foot for ankle dorsi-flexion is effective on spinal range of motion especially sacrohip, lumbar spine and inclination only for the subjects in the gait group. The results suggested that ankle dorsi-flexion exercise influences spinal range of motion in a sitting position. PMID:26504339

  2. Autograft-derived spinal cord mass following olfactory mucosal cell transplantation in a spinal cord injury patient: Case report.

    PubMed

    Dlouhy, Brian J; Awe, Olatilewa; Rao, Rajesh C; Kirby, Patricia A; Hitchon, Patrick W

    2014-10-01

    Over the last decade, human cell transplantation and neural stem cell trials have examined the feasibility and safety of these potential therapies for treatment of a variety of neurological disorders. However, significant safety concerns have surrounded these trials due to the possibility of ectopic, uncontrolled cellular growth and tumor formation. The authors present the case of an 18-year-old woman who sustained a complete spinal cord injury at T10-11. Three years after injury, she remained paraplegic and underwent olfactory mucosal cell implantation at the site of injury. She developed back pain 8 years later, and imaging revealed an intramedullary spinal cord mass at the site of cell implantation, which required resection. Intraoperative findings revealed an expanded spinal cord with a multicystic mass containing large amounts of thick mucus-like material. Histological examination and immunohistochemical staining revealed that the mass was composed mostly of cysts lined by respiratory epithelium, submucosal glands with goblet cells, and intervening nerve twigs. This is the first report of a human spinal cord mass complicating spinal cord cell transplantation and neural stem cell therapy. Given the prolonged time to presentation, safety monitoring of all patients with cell transplantation and neural stem cell implantation should be maintained for many years. PMID:25002238

  3. Novel alternative therapy for spinal tuberculosis during surgery: reconstructing with anti-tuberculosis bioactivity implants.

    PubMed

    Dong, JunFeng; Zhang, ShengMin; Liu, HaoMing; Li, XinZhi; Liu, YongHui; Du, YingYing

    2014-03-01

    Accompanied with the worsening of the pulmonary tuberculosis bacterium (TB) epidemic, the incidence of spinal TB has increased in recent years. Spinal reconstruction and stabilisation, and bone defect repair play a crucial role in the surgical treatment of spinal TB. Unfortunately, the existing materials have not completely met the requirements for spinal TB reconstruction due to their diverse deficiencies. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel reconstructing implants. Poly-DL-lactide (PDLLA) and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) are two promising drug delivery systems (DDS) and materials for bone repair, which could help us to overcome the difficulties in spinal TB reconstruction in the future. In this article, we discuss the properties of PDLLA and nHA, two potential drug delivering and bone repair materials for spinal TB reconstruction. We also presented two alternatives for spinal TB in future. Two strategies have the potential for treating spinal TB in the future. One such strategy consists of mixing anti-TB drugs, PDLLA with nHA to fabricate a novel three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffold via 3D printing (3DP) technology. Another is preparing a novel titanium mesh implant coated with drugs/PDLLA/nHA composites by solvent evaporation and low-temperature drying technology. These two hypotheses have recently been tested in a laboratory setting by our team. PMID:24328922

  4. Infection with spinal instrumentation: Review of pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and management

    PubMed Central

    Kasliwal, Manish K.; Tan, Lee A.; Traynelis, Vincent C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Instrumentation has become an integral component in the management of various spinal pathologies. The rate of infection varies from 2% to 20% of all instrumented spinal procedures. Every occurrence produces patient morbidity, which may adversely affect long-term outcome and increases health care costs. Methods: A comprehensive review of the literature from 1990 to 2012 was performed utilizing PubMed and several key words: Infection, spine, instrumentation, implant, management, and biofilms. Articles that provided a current review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and management of instrumented spinal infections over the years were reviewed. Results: There are multiple risk factors for postoperative spinal infections. Infections in the setting of instrumentation are more difficult to diagnose and treat due to biofilm. Infections may be early or delayed. C Reactive Protein (CRP) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are important diagnostic tools. Optimal results are obtained with surgical debridement followed by parenteral antibiotics. Removal or replacement of hardware should be considered in delayed infections. Conclusions: An improved understanding of the role of biofilm and the development of newer spinal implants has provided insight in the pathogenesis and management of infected spinal implants. This literature review highlights the mechanism, pathogenesis, prevention, and management of infection after spinal instrumentation. It is important to accurately identify and treat postoperative spinal infections. The treatment is often multimodal and prolonged. PMID:24340238

  5. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... through the spine. It may be caused by tuberculosis in some areas of the world, but this ... Thorough treatment of boils, tuberculosis, and other infections decreases the risk. Early diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent complications.

  6. Pathophysiology of primary spinal syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, John D.; Snyder, Kendall; Peterson, Matthew M.; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Butman, John A.; Smith, René K.; DeVroom, Hetty L.; Sansur, Charles A.; Eskioglu, Eric; Kammerer, William A.; Oldfield, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    Object The pathogenesis of syringomyelia in patients with an associated spinal lesion is incompletely understood. The authors hypothesized that in primary spinal syringomyelia, a subarachnoid block effectively shortens the length of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS), reducing compliance and the ability of the spinal theca to dampen the subarachnoid CSF pressure waves produced by brain expansion during cardiac systole. This creates exaggerated spinal subarachnoid pressure waves during every heartbeat that act on the spinal cord above the block to drive CSF into the spinal cord and create a syrinx. After a syrinx is formed, enlarged subarachnoid pressure waves compress the external surface of the spinal cord, propel the syrinx fluid, and promote syrinx progression. Methods To elucidate the pathophysiology, the authors prospectively studied 36 adult patients with spinal lesions obstructing the spinal SAS. Testing before surgery included clinical examination; evaluation of anatomy on T1-weighted MRI; measurement of lumbar and cervical subarachnoid mean and pulse pressures at rest, during Valsalva maneuver, during jugular compression, and after removal of CSF (CSF compliance measurement); and evaluation with CT myelography. During surgery, pressure measurements from the SAS above the level of the lesion and the lumbar intrathecal space below the lesion were obtained, and cardiac-gated ultrasonography was performed. One week after surgery, CT myelography was repeated. Three months after surgery, clinical examination, T1-weighted MRI, and CSF pressure recordings (cervical and lumbar) were repeated. Clinical examination and MRI studies were repeated annually thereafter. Findings in patients were compared with those obtained in a group of 18 healthy individuals who had already undergone T1-weighted MRI, cine MRI, and cervical and lumbar subarachnoid pressure testing. Results In syringomyelia patients compared with healthy volunteers, cervical subarachnoid pulse pressure was increased (2.7 ± 1.2 vs 1.6 ± 0.6 mm Hg, respectively; p = 0.004), pressure transmission to the thecal sac below the block was reduced, and spinal CSF compliance was decreased. Intraoperative ultrasonography confirmed that pulse pressure waves compressed the outer surface of the spinal cord superior to regions of obstruction of the subarachnoid space. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the theory that a spinal subarachnoid block increases spinal subarachnoid pulse pressure above the block, producing a pressure differential across the obstructed segment of the SAS, which results in syrinx formation and progression. These findings are similar to the results of the authors' previous studies that examined the pathophysiology of syringomyelia associated with obstruction of the SAS at the foramen magnum in the Chiari Type I malformation and indicate that a common mechanism, rather than different, separate mechanisms, underlies syrinx formation in these two entities. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00011245. (http://thejns.org/doi/abs/10.3171/2012.8.SPINE111059) PMID:22958075

  7. Exercise and Compulsive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polivy, Janet; Clendenen, Vanessa

    Although reports on the positive effects of fitness and exercise predominate in the exercise literature, some researchers describe frequent exercise as compulsive or addictive behavior. This paper addresses these "negative addictions" of exercise. As early as 1970, researchers recognized the addictive qualities of exercise. Short-term studies on…

  8. Central oxytocin modulates exercise-induced tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Braga, D C; Mori, E; Higa, K T; Morris, M; Michelini, L C

    2000-06-01

    We have shown that vasopressinergic projections to dorsal brain stem are activated during exercise and facilitate exercise tachycardia in both trained (T) and sedentary (S) rats (Dufloth DL, Morris M, and Michelini LC. Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol 273: R1271-R1282, 1997). In the present study, we investigated whether oxytocinergic projections to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS)-dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) complex (NTS/DMV) are involved in the differential heart rate (HR) response to exercise in T and S rats. Arterial pressure (AP) and HR responses to dynamic exercise (0.4-1.4 km/h) were compared in S and T pretreated with vehicle (saline), oxytocin (OT; 20 pmol/200 nl) or OT-receptor antagonist (OT(ant); 20 pmol/200 nl) into the NTS/DMV. OT content in specific brain regions and plasma were measured in separate S and T groups at rest and immediately after exercise. Exercise increased OT content in dorsal (4.5-fold) and ventral brain stem (2.7-fold) and spinal cord (3.4-fold) only in T rats. No significant changes were observed in neurosecretory regions or medial eminence and posterior pituitary, but plasma levels of T rats were reduced immediately after exercise. Blockade of NTS/DMV OT receptors did not change basal mean AP (MAP) and HR or the MAP response to exercise. However, OT(ant) potentiated exercise-induced tachycardia (average increase of 26%) only in the T group. Pretreatment with exogenous OT in the NTS/DMV blunted the tachycardic response both in S and T rats without changing the MAP response. Administration of OT-receptor antagonist or OT into the fourth cerebral ventricle had no effect on the cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise. Taken together, the results suggest that oxytocinergic projections to the NTS/DMV are stimulated when T rats exercise and that OT released at this level acts on OT receptors to restrain exercise-induced tachycardia. PMID:10848513

  9. Exercise haemodynamics and maximal exercise capacity during beta-adrenoceptor blockade in normotensive and hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed Central

    van Baak, M A; Koene, F M; Verstappen, F T

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of atenolol administration on maximal exercise capacity and exercise haemodynamics have been compared in eight normotensive and eight mildly hypertensive subjects, matched for sex, age, body weight, and maximal oxygen uptake, and familiar with maximal exercise testing. 2. Supine and exercise blood pressure, and exercise total peripheral resistance were significantly higher, and exercise cardiac output was significantly lower in the hypertensive than in the normotensive subjects. 3. Administration of atenolol (1 X 100 mg day-1) for 3 days reduced supine and exercise systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output, and increased exercise stroke volume. Supine and exercise diastolic blood pressure and exercise total peripheral resistance were unaffected by atenolol. The effects of atenolol did not differ in the normotensive and the hypertensive subjects. 4. Maximal work load, maximal oxygen uptake, and maximal heart rate were reduced to a similar extent in normotensive and hypertensive subjects during atenolol treatment. 5. It is concluded that there is no difference in the effects of short-term atenolol administration on exercise haemodynamics and maximal exercise capacity in normotensive and mildly hypertensive subjects. PMID:2896013

  10. Volume effects in Rhesus monkey spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, T.E. ); Stephens, L.C.; Price, R.E.; Ang, K.K.; Peters, L.J. )

    1994-04-30

    An experiment was conducted to test for the existence of a volume effect in radiation myelopathy using Rhesus monkeys treated with clinically relevant field sizes and fractionation schedules. Five groups of Rhesus monkeys were irradiated using 2.2 Gy per fraction to their spinal cords. Three groups were irradiated with 8 cm fields to total doses of 70.4, 77, and 83.6 Gy. Two additional groups were irradiated to 70.4 Gy using 4 and 16 cm fields. The incidence of paresis expressed within 2 years following the completion of treatment was determined for each group. Maximum likelihood estimation was used to determine parameters of a logistic dose response function. The volume effect was modeled using the probability model in which the probability of producing a lesion in an irradiated volume is governed by the probability of the occurrence of independent events. This is a two parameter model requiring only the estimates of the parameters of the dose-response function for the reference volume, but not needing any additional parameters for describing the volume effect. The probability model using a logistic dose-response function fits the data well with the D[sub 50] = 75.8 Gy for the 8-cm field. No evidence was seen for a difference in sensitivities for different anatomical levels of the spinal cord. Most lesions were type 3, combined white matter parenchymal and vascular lesions. Latent periods did not differ significantly from those of type 3 lesions in humans. The spinal cord exhibits a volume effect that is well described by the probability model. Because the dose response function for radiation myelopathy is steep, the volume effect is modest. The Rhesus monkey remains the animal model most similar to humans in dose response, histopathology, and latency for radiation myelopathy. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Central nervous system adaptation to exercise training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Lois Anne

    Exercise training causes physiological changes in skeletal muscle that results in enhanced performance in humans and animals. Despite numerous studies on exercise effects on skeletal muscle, relatively little is known about adaptive changes in the central nervous system. This study investigated whether spinal pathways that mediate locomotor activity undergo functional adaptation after 28 days of exercise training. Ventral horn spinal cord expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a trophic factor at the neuromuscular junction, choline acetyltransferase (Chat), the synthetic enzyme for acetylcholine, vesicular acetylcholine transporter (Vacht), a transporter of ACh into synaptic vesicles and calcineurin (CaN), a protein phosphatase that phosphorylates ion channels and exocytosis machinery were measured to determine if changes in expression occurred in response to physical activity. Expression of these proteins was determined by western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Comparisons between sedentary controls and animals that underwent either endurance training or resistance training were made. Control rats received no exercise other than normal cage activity. Endurance-trained rats were exercised 6 days/wk at 31m/min on a treadmill (8% incline) for 100 minutes. Resistance-trained rats supported their weight plus an additional load (70--80% body weight) on a 60° incline (3 x 3 min, 5 days/wk). CGRP expression was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). CGRP expression in the spinal dorsal and ventral horn of exercise-trained animals was not significantly different than controls. Chat expression measured by Western blot and IHC was not significantly different between runners and controls but expression in resistance-trained animals assayed by IHC was significantly less than controls and runners. Vacht and CaN immunoreactivity in motor neurons of endurance-trained rats was significantly elevated relative to control and resistance-trained animals. Ventral horn CaN expression by immunoblot was found to be significantly elevated (1.7 fold) in endurance-trained animals relative to sedentary controls. C-terminal Vacht immunoreactivity was greater in runners than controls and hangers. The number of Vacht immunoreactive "C" terminals was greater in exercise-trained animals than controls. It is hypothesized that an increase in CaN could lead to a decrease in release of ACh from the motor terminal by preventing phosphorylation of exocytosis machinery. Thus, preventing desensitization of ACh receptors and depletion of ACh stores. The elevation in motor neuron Vacht immunoreactivity may indicate a functional increase in ACh recycling. The increase in Vacht terminal staining in the spinal ventral horn in exercise trained animals suggests that sprouting of excitatory cholinergic terminals was induced by activity affecting motor neuron excitability. Thus, the findings are evidence that a relatively short period of exercise training can produce adaptive changes in motoneurons and associated ventral horn neural circuits.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Spinal muscular atrophy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a loss of specialized nerve cells, called motor neurons, in the spinal cord and the part of ... spinal cord (the brainstem). The loss of motor neurons leads to weakness and wasting (atrophy) of muscles ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the UAB-SCIMS Contact the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living ... Information Network The University of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information ...

  14. How Is Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... should be assessed for possible damage to the spinal cord 1 : Head injuries, particularly those with trauma to ... show if nerve signals can pass through the spinal cord. Spine X-rays. These may show fracture or ...

  15. The role of BDNF in spinal learning 

    E-print Network

    Huie, John Russell

    2009-05-15

    Previous research in our laboratory has shown that the spinal cord is capable of a simple form of instrumental learning. Spinally transected rats that receive controllable shock to an extended hindlimb exhibit a progressive increase in flexion...

  16. Spinal deformities rehabilitation - state of the art review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Medical rehabilitation aims at an improvement in function, capacity and participation. For the rehabilitation of spinal deformities, the goal is to maintain function and prevent secondary symptoms in the short- and long-term. In patients with scoliosis, predictable signs and symptoms include pain and reduced pulmonary function. Materials and methods A Pub Med review was completed in order to reveal substantial evidence for inpatient rehabilitation as performed in Germany. No evidence has been found in general to support claims for actual inpatient rehabilitation programmes as used today. Nevertheless, as there is some evidence that inpatient rehabilitation may be beneficial to patients with spinal deformities complicated by certain additional conditions, the body of evidence there is for conservative treatment of spinal deformities has been reviewed in order to allow suggestions for outpatient conservative treatment and inpatient rehabilitation. Discussion Today, for both children and adolescents, we are able to offer intensive rehabilitation programmes lasting three to five days, which enable the patients to acquire the skills necessary to prevent postures fostering scoliosis in everyday life without missing too much of school teaching subjects at home. The secondary functional impairments adult scoliosis patients might have, as in the opinion of the author, still today require the time of 3-4 weeks in the clinical in-patient setting. Time to address psychosocial as well as somatic limitations, namely chronic pains and cardiorespiratory malfunction is needed to preserve the patients working capability in the long-term. Conclusion Outpatient treatment/rehabilitation is sufficient for adolescents with spinal deformities. Inpatient rehabilitation is recommended for patients with spinal deformities and pain or severe restrictive ventilation disorder. PMID:21184673

  17. Exercise and immunity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... know exactly if or how exercise increases your immunity to certain illnesses, but there are several theories ( ... not exercise more intensely just to increase their immunity. Heavy, long-term exercise (such as marathon running ...

  18. Exercise stress test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... EKG - exercise treadmill; Stress ECG; Exercise electrocardiography; Stress test - exercise treadmill ... This test is done at a medical center or health care provider's office. The technician will place 10 flat, ...

  19. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePLUS

    ... help this important muscle get stronger by doing aerobic (say: air-OH-bik) exercise. Exercise is good ... your lungs. Which of these is your favorite? Aerobic means "with air," so aerobic exercise is a ...

  20. Rotator cuff exercises

    MedlinePLUS

    Shoulder exercises ... A key part in your recovery is doing exercises to make the muscles and tendons in your ... for everyday tasks or sports activities Before doing exercises at home, ask your doctor or physical therapist ...

  1. Name:_____________________________ (Web Exercise)

    E-print Network

    Richardson, David

    Name:_____________________________ (Web Exercise) Model quality, validation exercise. You will need:_____________________________ Model quality, validation exercise (cont'd). Part 2: local comparison of 2Å and 1.25Å structures. One

  2. Altered rate-dependent depression of the spinal H-reflex as an indicator of spinal disinhibition in models of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Lee-Kubli, Corinne A G; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2014-02-01

    The unpredictable efficacy of current therapies for neuropathic pain may reflect diverse etiological mechanisms operating between, and within, diseases. As descriptions of pain rarely establish specific mechanisms, a tool that can identify underlying causes of neuropathic pain would be useful in developing patient-specific treatments. Rate-dependent depression (RDD), a measure of the change in amplitude of the Hoffman reflex over consecutive stimulations, is attenuated in diabetic rats that also exhibit impaired spinal ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor function, reduced spinal potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC2) expression, and indices of painful neuropathy. To investigate whether loss of RDD is a reliable indicator of the contribution of spinal GABAergic dysfunction to neuropathic pain, we assessed RDD, tactile allodynia, and formalin-evoked hyperalgesia in 3 models: rats treated acutely with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), diabetic rats treated with the BDNF-sequestering molecule tyrosine receptor kinase B/Fc (TrkB/Fc), and rats with paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Delivery of BDNF to the spinal cord of normal rats produced RDD deficits and features of painful neuropathy associated with disrupted GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory function and reduced dorsal spinal KCC2 expression. Treating diabetic rats with TrkB/Fc restored RDD and alleviated indices of painful neuropathy. In paclitaxel-treated rats, RDD was not impaired and behavioral indices of neuropathic pain were not associated with spinal GABAergic dysfunction or reduced dorsal spinal KCC2 expression. Our data reveal BDNF as part of the mechanism underlying spinal cord disinhibition caused by altered GABAA receptor function in diabetic rats and suggest that RDD deficits may be a useful indicator of neuropathic pain states associated with spinal disinhibition, thereby revealing specific therapeutic targets. PMID:24103402

  3. Exercise therapy for claudication: Should home-based exercise therapy be prescribed in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Lindo, Fae A

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral artery disease is a cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The literature suggests evidence that an exercise program can be beneficial in the treatment of patients with claudication. Supervised exercise therapy is well documented in the literature, and national guidelines recommend it as an initial conservative management. When a supervised exercise program is unavailable or not covered by insurance, an alternative to supervised exercise is vital. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence regarding the efficacy of a home-based exercise program. Four studies were included in this review, and although the evidence supporting a home-based exercise program is limited in the literature, the findings indicate that a home-based exercise program increases claudication onset time, resulting in greater mobility and improvement in the patient's quality of life. PMID:26567053

  4. Exercise for Breast Cancer Survivors: Research Evidence and Clinical Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courneya, Kerry S.; Mackey, John R.; McKenzie, Donald C.

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can significantly benefit breast cancer survivors during and after treatment. Moderate intensity aerobic exercise as well as resistance training are important. Psychological health is optimized by enjoyable exercise that develops new skills, incorporates social interaction, and occurs in a stimulating environment. Several conditions…

  5. Evaluation of Avulsion-Induced Neuropathology in Rat Spinal Cords with 18F-FDG Micro-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying-Qin; Luo, Hao-Xuan; Liu, Lin-Lin; Tu, Qing-Qiang; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Brachial plexus root avulsion (BPRA) leads to dramatic motoneuron death and glial reactions in the corresponding spinal segments at the late stage of injury. To protect spinal motoneurons, assessment of the affected spinal segments should be done at an earlier stage of the injury. In this study, we employed 18F-FDG small-animal PET/CT to assess the severity of BPRA-induced cervical spinal cord injuries. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly treated and divided into three groups: Av+NS (brachial plexus root avulsion (Av) treated with normal saline), Av+GM1 (treated with monosialoganglioside), and control. At time points of 3 day (d), 1 week (w), 2 w, 4 w and 8 w post-injury, 18F-FDG micro-PET/CT scans and neuropathology assessments of the injured spinal roots, as well as the spinal cord, were performed. The outcomes of the different treatments were compared. The results showed that BPRA induced local bleeding and typical Wallerian degeneration of the avulsed roots accompanied by 18F-FDG accumulations at the ipsilateral cervical intervertebral foramen. BPRA-induced astrocyte reactions and overexpression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the motoneurons correlated with higher 18F-FDG uptake in the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord during the first 2 w post-injury. The GM1 treatment reduced BPRA-induced astrocyte reactions and inhibited the de novo nNOS expressions in spinal motoneurons. The GM1 treatment also protected spinal motoneurons from avulsion within the first 4 w post-injury. The data from this study suggest that 18F-FDG PET/CT could be used to assess the severity of BPRA-induced primary and secondary injuries in the spinal cord. Furthermore, GM1 is an effective drug for reducing primary and secondary spinal cord injuries following BPRA. PMID:26010770

  6. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Care? Emergency Medical Services Hospital (Acute) Care Rehabilitation More FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) If you or a loved one ... spinal cord injury? What recovery is expected following spinal cord injury? Where is ... on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number H133N110008). NIDILRR is a ...

  7. Intramedullary spinal metastasis of a carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jay I; Yanamadala, Vijay; Shin, John H

    2015-12-01

    We report an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from a bronchial carcinoid, and discuss its mechanisms and management. Intramedullary spinal cord metastases from any cancer are rare, and bronchial carcinoids account for only a small fraction of lung cancers. To our knowledge, an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from a bronchial carcinoid has been described only once previously. PMID:26260116

  8. RESEARCH ARTICLE Spinal Cord Segmentation by One

    E-print Network

    Fleet, David J.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Spinal Cord Segmentation by One Dimensional Normalized Template Matching: A Novel, Ontario, Canada * michael.fehlings@uhn.ca Abstract Spinal cord segmentation is a developing area cord atrophy. Spinal cord segmentation is difficult due to the variety of MRI contrasts

  9. Spinal reflexes in brain death.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Yesim; Çiftçi, Yeliz; Incesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Akhan, Galip

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous and reflex movements have been described in brain death and these unusual movements might cause uncertainties in diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the presence of spinal reflexes in patients who fulfilled the criteria for brain death. Thirty-two (22 %) of 144 patients presented unexpected motor movements spontaneously or during examinations. These patients exhibited the following signs: undulating toe, increased deep tendon reflexes, plantar responses, Lazarus sign, flexion-withdrawal reflex, facial myokymia, neck-arm flexion, finger jerks and fasciculations. In comparison, there were no significant differences in age, sex, etiology of brain death and hemodynamic laboratory findings in patients with and without reflex motor movement. Spinal reflexes should be well recognized by physicians and it should be born in mind that brain death can be determined in the presence of spinal reflexes. PMID:24604683

  10. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  11. Ice & Exercise for Injury Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suspenski, Thomas J.

    Utilization of ice and exercise conjunctively decreases recovery time of muscle tendon injury considerably. In the healing process, collagen (a major element of scar formation) is laid down. If heat and rest are used as treatment, healing takes place; however, collagen is laid down in a haphazard arrangement increasing the likelihood of reinjury.…

  12. THE EFFECTS OF BACK EXTENSION TRAINING ON BACK MUSCLE STRENGTH AND SPINAL RANGE OF MOTION IN YOUNG FEMALES

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a 10-week dynamic back extension training programme and its effects on back muscle strength, back muscle endurance and spinal range of motion (ROM) for healthy young females. Seventy-three young females (age: 19.32±1.80 years, height: 158.89±4.71 cm, body weight: 55.67±6.30 kg) volunteered for the study. Prior to the training period, all participants completed anthropometric measurements, back muscle strength and endurance test, lateral bending and spinal ROM measurements. After measurements, the participants were divided into two groups. The exercise group (N:35) performed the dynamic back extension exercise 3 days per week for 10 weeks. The control group (N:38) did not participate in any type of exercise. The mixed design ANOVA (group x time) was used to determine the difference in pre- and post-training values. The present findings show that there were significant differences between pre-training and post-training values for back muscle strength and spinal ROM in the exercise group. Following the dynamic strength training programme, back muscle strength and spine ROM values except flexion of the lumbar 5-sacrum 1 (L5-S1) segment of the exercise group showed a significant increase when compared with the pre test values. The control group did not show any significant changes when compared with the pre-training values. The results demonstrate that the 10-week dynamic strength training programme was effective for spinal extension ROM and back muscle strength, but there was no change in back muscle endurance. In this context, this programme could potentially be used to prevent the decrease of spinal ROM as well as provide an increase in the fitness parameters of healthy individuals. PMID:24744489

  13. A randomised trial comparing the efficacy and safety of topical ketoprofen in Transfersome(®) gel (IDEA-033) with oral ketoprofen and drug-free ultra-deformable Sequessome™ vesicles (TDT 064) for the treatment of muscle soreness following exercise.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Egbert J; Rother, Matthias; Regenspurger, Katja; Rother, Ilka

    2016-01-01

    We compared the effectiveness of topical ketoprofen in Transfersome(®) gel (IDEA-033) with oral ketoprofen and drug-free Sequessome™ vesicles (FLEXISEQ(®) Sport; TDT 064) in reducing calf muscle soreness. One hundred and sixty eight healthy individuals with a pain score ?3 (10-point scale) 12-16 h post-exercise (walking down stairs with an altitude of 300-400 m) were randomised to receive IDEA-033 plus oral placebo (two dose groups), oral ketoprofen plus TDT 064, or TDT 064 plus oral placebo. The primary endpoint was muscle soreness reduction from pre-dosing to Day 7. Higher pain scores were recorded with oral ketoprofen plus TDT 064 (mean ± s 462.4 ± 160.4) versus IDEA-033 plus oral placebo (434.7 ± 190.8; P = 0.2931) or TDT 064 plus oral placebo (376.2 ± 159.1; P = 0.0240) in the 7 days post-exercise. Recovery from muscle soreness was longer with oral ketoprofen plus TDT 064 (mean 91.0 ± 19.5 h) versus IDEA-033 plus placebo (mean 81.4 ± 22.9 h; P = 0.5964) or TDT 064 plus placebo (mean 78.9 ± 22.8 h; P = 0.0262). In conclusion, ultradeformable phospholipid vesicles ± ketoprofen did not retard recovery from muscle soreness. TDT 064 improves osteoarthritis-related pain and could be of interest as a treatment for joint pain during and post-exercise. PMID:25893979

  14. Obesity treatment—more than food and exercise: a qualitative study exploring obese adolescents' and their parents' views on the former's obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lindelof, Anders; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Pedersen, Birthe D.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore obese adolescents’ and their parents’ views on the former's obesity; especially to gain knowledge about barriers and motivational factors that influence obese adolescents’ ability to lose weight. This is a qualitative study involving field observation and semi-structured interviews with obese adolescents and their parents. The analysis takes a phenomenological–hermeneutic approach. Fifteen obese adolescents aged 13–16 years and their parents/grandparents participated in this study (one father, seven mothers, five sets of parents and two sets of grandparents). The results showed that obese adolescents’ are aware that they have unhealthy eating habits and they wish they were able to attain to a healthier diet. Although in poor physical shape, obese adolescents perceive their daily level of exercise as moderate. Obese adolescents blame themselves for being obese and blame their parents for an unhealthy diet, and for being unsupportive regarding exercise. Parents blame their obese child of lacking will power to change eating and exercise habits. As a consequence, the homely atmosphere is often characterised by quarrels and negative feelings. The conclusion is that despite obese adolescents’ intention of reducing weight, underlying issues interfere with this goal. This is particularly related to quarrels with parents, self-blame and misguided understanding of eating and exercising habits. These matters need to be addressed when treating obesity among adolescents. PMID:20640019

  15. Therapeutic developments in spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sproule, Douglas M.; Kaufmann, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a potentially devastating disease marked by progressive weakness and muscle atrophy resulting from the dysfunction and loss of motor neurons of the spinal cord, has emerged in recent years as an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Caused by a homozygous mutation to the Survival of Motor Neurons 1 (SMN1) gene on chromosome 5q, the severity of the clinical phenotype in SMA is modulated by the function of a related protein, Survival of Motor Neurons 2 (SMN2). SMN2 predominantly produces an unstable SMN transcript lacking exon 7; only about 10% of the transcription product produces a full-length, functional SMN protein. Several therapeutic strategies have targeted this gene with the goal of producing increased full-length SMN transcript, thereby modifying the underlying mechanism. Drugs that have increased SMN2 function, in vitro, are now explored for potential therapeutic benefit in this disease. Alternative approaches, including neuroprotective, muscle anabolic, gene and cell replacement strategies, also hold promise. The recent advances in preclinical research and the development of a wider range of animal models for SMA continue to provide cautious optimism that effective treatments for SMA will eventually emerge. PMID:21179609

  16. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  17. Exercise for patients with osteoporosis: management of vertebral compression fractures and trunk strengthening for fall prevention.

    PubMed

    Sinaki, Mehrsheed

    2012-11-01

    Maintenance of bone health and quality requires mechanical strain, but the mechanical force needs to be within the bone's biomechanical competence. In osteoporosis, compression of vertebral bodies can be insidious. Therefore, absence of pain does not necessarily indicate absence of vertebral microfracture and deformity. Further, patients with previous vertebral fractures are at risk for further vertebral fractures and their associated morbidity. Exercise is a part of the comprehensive management of patients with osteoporosis and has been associated with improvement of quality of life and lowered risk of future fracture. The exercise prescription needs to match the needs of the patient. If exercise is not prescribed properly, then it may have negative consequences. In general, an exercise program, therapeutic or recreational, needs to address flexibility, muscle strength, core stability, cardiovascular fitness, and gait steadiness. As with pharmacotherapy, therapeutic exercises need to be individualized on the basis of musculoskeletal status and an individual's exercise interest. In osteoporosis, axial strength and stability are of primary importance. In particular, a spinal extensor strengthening program should be performed with progressive measured resistance as tolerated. To address falls and fractures, an exercise program should also include balance and lower extremity strength training. Proper dosing of oral cholecalciferol and calcium supplements can enhance the effect of strengthening exercises. Finally, a coordinated approach, such as the Spinal Proprioception Extension Exercise Dynamic (SPEED) program, can improve back extensor strength, the level of physical activity, and locomotion, and reduce back pain and fear and risk of falls. PMID:23174554

  18. Spinal translocator protein alleviates chronic neuropathic pain behavior and modulates spinal astrocyte-neuronal function in rats with L5 spinal nerve ligation model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Liu, Hongjun; Xu, Shuangshuang; Tang, Zongxiang; Xia, Weiliang; Cheng, Zhuqiang; Li, Weiyan; Jin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies reported the translocator protein (TSPO) to play critical roles in several kinds of neurological diseases including the inflammatory and neuropathic pain. However, the precise mechanism remains unclear. This study was undertaken to explore the distribution and possible mechanism of spinal TSPO against chronic neuropathic pain (CNP) in a rat model of L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Our results showed that TSPO was upregulated in a time-related manner in the spinal dorsal horn after SNL. Spinal TSPO was predominately expressed in astrocytes. A single intrathecal injection of TSPO agonist Ro5-4864, but not TSPO antagonist PK11195, alleviated the mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner. A single intraspinal injection of TSPO overexpression lentivirus (LV-TSPO), but not TSPO inhibited lentivirus (LV-shTSPO), also relieved the development of CNP. Intrathecal administration of 2 ?g Ro5-4864 on day 3 induced a significant increase of TSPO protein content at the early stage (days 5-7) while inhibited the TSPO activation during the chronic period (days 14-21) compared with the control group. Ro5-4864 suppressed the astrocytes and p-JNK1 activation and decreased the CXCL1 expression in both in vivo and in vitro studies. Ro5-4864 also attenuated the spinal CXCR2 and p-ERK expressions. These results suggested that early upregulation of TSPO could elicit potent analgesic effects against CNP, which might be partly attributed to the inhibition of CXCL1-CXCR2-dependent astrocyte-to-neuron signaling and central sensitization. TSPO signaling pathway may present a novel strategy for the treatment of CNP. PMID:26307860

  19. Association between history and physical examination factors and change in lumbar multifidus muscle thickness after spinal manipulation in patients with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Koppenhaver, Shane L.; Fritz, Julie M.; Hebert, Jeffrey J.; Kawchuk, Greg N.; Parent, Eric C.; Gill, Norman W.; Childs, John D.; Teyhen, Deydre S.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the clinical characteristics of patients with low back pain (LBP) who display improved lumbar multifidus (LM) muscle function after spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) may provide insight into a potentially synergistic interaction between SMT and exercise. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the baseline historical and physical examination factors associated with increased contracted LM muscle thickness one week after SMT. Eighty-one participants with LBP underwent a baseline physical examination and ultrasound imaging assessment of the LM muscle during submaximal contraction before and one week after SMT. The relationship between baseline examination variables and 1-week change in contracted LM thickness was assessed using correlation analysis and hierarchical multiple linear regression. Four variables best predicted the magnitude of increases in contracted LM muscle thickness after SMT. When combined, these variables suggest that patients with LBP, (1) that are fairly acute, (2) have at least a moderately good prognosis without focal and irritable symptoms, and (3) exhibit signs of spinal instability, may be the best candidates for a combined SMT and LSE treatment approach. PMID:22516351

  20. Management of severe spinal cord injury following hyperbaric exposure.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Bruce; Laden, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence that drainage of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) improves functional neurological outcome after reperfusion injury to the spinal cord that occasionally follows aortic reconstructive surgery. This beneficial effect is considered owing to lowering of the CSF pressure thereby normalising spinal cord blood flow and reducing the 'secondary' cord injury caused by vascular congestion and cord swelling in the relatively confined spinal canal. Whilst lacking definitive proof, there are convincing randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cohort data and systematic reviews supporting this intervention. The therapeutic window for lumbar CSF drainage requires further elucidation; however, it appears to be days rather than hours post insult. We contend that the same benefit is likely to be achieved following other primary spinal cord injuries that cause cord swelling and elicit the 'secondary' injury. Traditionally the concept of CSF drainage has been considered more applicable to the brain as contained in a 'closed box' by lowering intracranial pressure (ICP) to improve cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). The control of CPP is intended to limit 'secondary' brain injury and is a key concept of brain injury management. Using microdialysis in the spinal cords of trauma patients, it has been shown that intraspinal pressure (ISP) needs to be kept below 20 mmHg and spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP) above 70 mmHg to avoid biochemical evidence of secondary cord damage. Vasopressor have also been used in spinal cord injury to improve perfusion, however complications are common, typically cardiac in nature, and require very careful monitoring; the evidence supporting this approach is notably less convincing. Decompression illness (DCI) of the spinal cord is treated with recompression, hyperbaric oxygen, various medications designed to reduce the inflammatory response and fluid administration to normalise blood pressure and haematocrit. These management protocols are based largely on anecdote and transferred evidence from conventional cord trauma, as the low numbers and sporadic nature of DCI in divers makes RCTs nigh on impossible. Unfortunately even with best management, some patients are left with significant neurological deficit. The 'iceberg phenomenon', occurs when patients with DCI of the cord make a good neurological recovery but actually have profound cord damage as revealed in one case some four years later at post mortem and another example in a diver who developed late functional deterioration due to loss of neuronal reserve. This clinical evidence, together with animal study data, support the notion that even a modest preservation of spinal cord axons is associated with significant improvement in neurological outcome. In the light of the positive level two evidence in the vascular literature that CSF drainage limits 'secondary' injury thereby improving neurological outcome, we propose that centres with appropriate clinical experience consider using lumbar CSF drainage to normalise SCPP, as an adjunct to the conventional treatment of severe spinal cord DCI. Divers with severe spinal cord DCI are generally in the most productive years of their lives and, given the potentially devastating impact of this condition, should be given the benefit of any possible adjuvant treatment that may serve to improve long-term outcome. PMID:26415075

  1. Prediction of Muscle Performance During Dynamic Repetitive Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byerly, D. L.; Byerly, K. A.; Sognier, M. A.; Squires, W. G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for predicting human muscle performance was developed. Eight test subjects performed a repetitive dynamic exercise to failure using a Lordex spinal machine. Electromyography (EMG) data was collected from the erector spinae. Evaluation of the EMG data using a 5th order Autoregressive (AR) model and statistical regression analysis revealed that an AR parameter, the mean average magnitude of AR poles, can predict performance to failure as early as the second repetition of the exercise. Potential applications to the space program include evaluating on-orbit countermeasure effectiveness, maximizing post-flight recovery, and future real-time monitoring capability during Extravehicular Activity.

  2. Melatonin lowers edema after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Chen, Xiao; Qiao, Suchi; Liu, Xinwei; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Degang; Su, Jiacan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin has been shown to diminish edema in rats. Melatonin can be used to treat spinal cord injury. This study presumed that melatonin could relieve spinal cord edema and examined how it might act. Our experiments found that melatonin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) could reduce the water content of the spinal cord, and suppress the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein after spinal cord injury. This suggests that the mechanism by which melatonin alleviates the damage to the spinal cord by edema might be related to the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. PMID:25657743

  3. An exercise programme for the management of lateral elbow tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stasinopoulos, D; Stasinopoulou, K; Johnson, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Home exercise programmes and exercise programmes carried out in a clinical setting are commonly advocated for the treatment of lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET), a very common lesion of the arm with a well-defined clinical presentation. The aim of this study is to describe the use and effects of strengthening and stretching exercise programmes in the treatment of LET. Eccentric exercises: Slow progressive eccentric exercises for LET should be performed with the elbow in extension, forearm in pronation, and wrist in extended position (as high as possible). However, it is unclear how the injured tendon, which is loaded eccentrically, returns to the starting position without experiencing concentric loading and how the "slowness" of eccentric exercises should be defined. Nor has the treatment regimen of the eccentric exercises of a supervised exercise programme been defined. Stretching exercises: Static stretching is defined as passively stretching a given muscle-tendon unit by slowly placing and maintaining it in a maximal position of stretch. We recommend the position should be held for 30–45 s, three times before and three times after eccentric exercises during each treatment session with a 30 s rest interval between each procedure. The treatment region of static stretching exercises when a supervised exercise programme is performed is unknown. Discussion: A well designed trial is needed to study the effectiveness of a supervised exercise programme for LET consisting of eccentric and static stretching exercises. The issues relating to the supervised exercise programme should be defined so that therapists can replicate the programme. PMID:16306504

  4. Effect of prolonged exercise and pre-exercise dietary manipulation on hepatic triglycerides in trained men.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N A; van Overbeek, D; Chapman, P G; Thompson, M W; Sachinwalla, T; George, J

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise and pre-exercise dietary manipulation on hepatic triglyceride concentration (HTGC). HTGC was measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) before and after 90 min of moderate intensity cycling in six endurance trained males following 67 h of mixed diet (M) and an isocaloric minimal carbohydrate (2%) high fat (83%) diet (HF). Diets were administered by balanced crossover design. Whole-body fat oxidation, plasma-free fatty acid (FFA), glycerol and triglyceride concentrations were significantly elevated during exercise in HF versus M (P < 0.05 for all). There was no significant treatment × time interaction for HTGC (P = 0.368). However, there was a significant net increase in HTGC (time effect) during the combined 6 h exercise and post-exercise period (P = 0.037). In conclusion, we observed no measurable net change in the hepatic triglyceride pool across a period involving a prolonged exercise bout. Furthermore, manipulation of pre-exercise dietary intake did not influence the interaction between the hepatic triglyceride concentration and exercise in lean trained men. This supports the contention that hepatic triglycerides do not meaningfully contribute to the high rate of fat oxidation observed during acute exercise, or the enhancement of this with regular exercise training and/or pre-exercise dietary manipulation. PMID:21915700

  5. Edaravone combined with Schwann cell transplantation may repair spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Quan; Wu, Min-Fei; Piao, Zhe; Yao, Jin; Li, Ji-Hai; Wang, Xin-Gang; Liu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Edaravone has been shown to delay neuronal apoptosis, thereby improving nerve function and the microenvironment after spinal cord injury. Edaravone can provide a favorable environment for the treatment of spinal cord injury using Schwann cell transplantation. This study used rat models of complete spinal cord transection at T9. Six hours later, Schwann cells were transplanted in the head and tail ends of the injury site. Simultaneously, edaravone was injected through the caudal vein. Eight weeks later, the PKH-26-labeled Schwann cells had survived and migrated to the center of the spinal cord injury region in rats after combined treatment with edaravone and Schwann cells. Moreover, the number of PKH-26-labeled Schwann cells in the rat spinal cord was more than that in rats undergoing Schwann cell transplantation alone or rats without any treatment. Horseradish peroxidase retrograde tracing revealed that the number of horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers was greater in rats treated with edaravone combined withSchwann cells than in rats with Schwann cell transplantation alone. The results demonstrated that lower extremity motor function and neurophysiological function were better in rats treated with edaravone and Schwann cells than in rats with Schwann cell transplantation only. These data confirmed that Schwann cell transplantation combined with edaravone injection promoted the regeneration of nerve fibers of rats with spinal cord injury and improved neurological function. PMID:25883621

  6. Understanding physical activity participation in spinal cord injured populations: Three narrative types for consideration

    PubMed Central

    Papathomas, Anthony; Williams, Toni L.; Smith, Brett

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identity the types of physical activity narratives drawn upon by active spinal injured people. More than 50 h of semi-structured life-story interview data, collected as part of larger interdisciplinary program of disability lifestyle research, was analysed for 30 physically active male and female spinal cord injury (SCI) participants. A structural narrative analysis of data identified three narrative types which people with SCI draw on: (1) exercise is restitution, (2) exercise is medicine, and (3) exercise is progressive redemption. These insights contribute new knowledge by adding a unique narrative perspective to existing cognitive understanding of physical activity behaviour in the spinal cord injured population. The implications of this narrative typology for developing effective positive behavioural change interventions are critically discussed. It is concluded that the identified narratives types may be constitutive, as well as reflective, of physical activity experiences and therefore may be a useful tool on which to base physical activity promotion initiatives. PMID:26282868

  7. Comparison of neuromuscular and quadriceps strengthening exercise in the treatment of varus malaligned knees with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis of the knee involving predominantly the medial tibiofemoral compartment is common in older people, giving rise to pain and loss of function. Many people experience progressive worsening of the disease over time, particularly those with varus malalignment and increased medial knee joint load. Therefore, interventions that can reduce excessive medial knee loading may be beneficial in reducing the risk of structural progression. Traditional quadriceps strengthening can improve pain and function in people with knee osteoarthritis but does not appear to reduce medial knee load. A neuromuscular exercise program, emphasising optimal alignment of the trunk and lower limb joints relative to one another, as well as quality of movement performance, while dynamically and functionally strengthening the lower limb muscles, may be able to reduce medial knee load. Such a program may also be superior to traditional quadriceps strengthening with respect to improved pain and physical function because of the functional and dynamic nature. This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect of a neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint loading, pain and function in individuals with medial knee joint osteoarthritis. We hypothesise that the neuromuscular program will reduce medial knee load as well as pain and functional limitations to a greater extent than a traditional quadriceps strengthening program. Methods/Design 100 people with medial knee pain, radiographic medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of two 12-week exercise programs: quadriceps strengthening or neuromuscular exercise. Each program will involve 14 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist plus four unsupervised sessions per week at home. The primary outcomes are medial knee load during walking (the peak external knee adduction moment from 3D gait analysis), pain, and self-reported physical function measured at baseline and immediately following the program. Secondary outcomes include the external knee adduction moment angular impulse, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, knee and hip muscle strength, balance, functional ability, and quality-of-life. Discussion The findings will help determine whether neuromuscular exercise is superior to traditional quadriceps strengthening regarding effects on knee load, pain and physical function in people with medial knee osteoarthritis and varus malalignment. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry reference: ACTRN12610000660088 PMID:22141334

  8. Spinal hamartoma in an elderly man.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Daisuke; Shimono, Taro; Takami, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Sayaka; Tsukamoto, Taro; Miki, Yukio

    2015-11-01

    Spinal hamartoma is a very rare, benign spinal lesion, usually occurring in children with either spinal dysraphism or neurofibromatosis type 1. We report a case of thoracic spinal hamartoma in a 75-year-old male without associated lesions. This patient represents the oldest of 19 patients whose cases we found reported in detail and one of only nine reported cases without associated lesions. On magnetic resonance imaging, the current patient showed a well-defined exophytic appearance arising from the dorsal midline surface of the spinal cord. We discuss the radiological and pathological features of spinal hamartoma and review the literature, focusing on magnetic resonance imaging features for diagnosing spinal hamartoma. PMID:26316189

  9. Full Endoscopic Spinal Surgery Techniques: Advancements, Indications, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yue, James J; Long, William

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in both surgical instrumentation and full endoscopic spine techniques have resulted in positive clinical outcomes in the treatment of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pathologies. Endoscopic techniques impart minimal approach related disruption of non-pathologic spinal anatomy and function while concurrently maximizing functional visualization and correction of pathological tissues. An advanced understanding of the applicable functional neuroanatomy, in particular the neuroforamen, is essential for successful outcomes. Additionally, an understanding of the varying types of disc prolapse pathology in relation to the neuroforamen will result in more optimal surgical outcomes. Indications for lumbar endoscopic spine surgery include disc herniations, spinal stenosis, infections, medial branch rhizotomy, and interbody fusion. Limitations are based on both non spine and spine related findings. A high riding iliac wing, a more posteriorly located retroperitoneal cavity, an overly distal or proximally migrated herniated disc are all relative contra-indications to lumbar endoscopic spinal surgery techniques. Modifications in scope size and visual field of view angulation have enabled both anterior and posterior cervical decompression. Endoscopic burrs, electrocautery, and focused laser technology allow for the least invasive spinal surgical techniques in all age groups and across varying body habitus. Complications include among others, dural tears, dysesthsia, nerve injury, and infection. PMID:26114086

  10. Spinal dorsal dermal sinus tract: An experience of 21 cases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ishwar; Rohilla, Seema; Kumar, Prashant; Sharma, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal dorsal dermal sinus is a rare entity, which usually comes to clinical attention by cutaneous abnormalities, neurologic deficit, and/or infection. The present study was undertaken to know the clinical profile of these patients, to study associated anomalies and to assess the results of surgical intervention. Methods: Medical records of 21 patients treated for spinal dorsal dermal sinus from September 2007 to December 2013 were reviewed. Results: We had 21 patients with male: female ratio of 13:8. Only 2 patients were below 1-year of age, and most cases (15) were between 2 and 15 years (mean age = 8.2 years). Lumbar region (11 cases) was most frequently involved, followed by thoracic (4 cases), lumbosacral, and cervical region in 3 patients each. All of our patients presented with neurological deficits. Three patients were admitted with acute meningitis with acute onset paraplegia and had intraspinal abscess. The motor, sensory, and autonomic deficits were seen in 14, 6, and 8 patients, respectively. Scoliosis and congenital talipes equinovarus were the common associated anomalies. All patients underwent surgical exploration and repair of dysraphic state and excision of the sinus. Overall, 20 patients improved or neurological status stabilized and only 1 patient deteriorated. Postoperative wound infection was seen in 2 cases. Conclusions: All patients with spinal dorsal dermal sinuses should be offered aggressive surgical treatment in the form of total excision of sinus tract and correction of spinal malformation, as soon as diagnosed. PMID:26539316

  11. Application of a novel spinal posture and motion measurement system in active and static sitting.

    PubMed

    Pries, Esther; Dreischarf, Marcel; Bashkuev, Maxim; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of work-related musculoskeletal risk factors is of great importance; however, only a few tools allow objective, unrestricted measurements of spinal posture and motion in workplaces. This study was performed to evaluate the applicability of the Epionics system in a sedentary workplace. The system is mobile and wireless and assesses lumbar lordosis, pelvic orientation and spinal motion, without restricting subjects in their movements. In total, 10 males were monitored while sitting for 2 h on static and dynamic office chairs and on an exercise ball, to evaluate the effect of dynamic sitting. The volunteers were able to perform their work unhampered. No differences among the tested furniture could be detected with respect to either the lordosis or the number of spinal movements after habituation to the furniture; however, differences in pelvic orientation were statistically significant. The results of the present study indicate that Epionics may be useful for the quantitative assessment of work-related risk factors. Practitioner Summary: Only a few tools allow objective, unrestricted measurements of spinal posture and motion in the workplace. Epionics SPINE measures lumbar lordosis, pelvic orientation and spinal motion under nearly unrestricted conditions and can be used to quantify work-related musculoskeletal risk factors. We demonstrated the use of this tool in the workplace-analysis. PMID:25712870

  12. Vestibulo-spinal reflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The specific objectives of experiments designed to investigate postural reflex behavior during sustained weightlessness are discussed. The first is to investigate, during prolonged weightlessness with Hoffmann response (H-reflex) measurement procedures, vestibulo-spinal reflexes associated with vestibular (otolith) responses evoked during an applied linear acceleration. This objective includes not only an evaluation of otolith-induced changes in a major postural muscle but also an investigation with this technique of the adaptive process of the vestibular system and spinal reflex mechanisms to this unique environment. The second objective is to relate space motion sickness to the results of this investigation. Finally, a return to the vestibulo-spinal and postural reflexes to normal values following the flight will be examined. The flight experiment involves activation of nerve tissue (tibial N) with electrical shock and the recording of resulting muscle activity (soleus) with surface electrodes. Soleus/spinal H-reflex testing procedures will be used in conjuction with linear acceleration through the subject's X-axis.

  13. SPINAL CORD INJURY (SCI) DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Spinal Cord Injury Database has been in existence since 1973 and captures data from SCI cases in the United States. Since its inception, 24 federally funded Model SCI Care Systems have contributed data to the National SCI Database. Statistics are derived from this da...

  14. G-CSF promotes autophagy and reduces neural tissue damage after spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuji; Liu, Shangming; Zhang, Xianghong; Wang, Liyan; Gao, Jiangang; Han, Aiqing; Hao, Aijun

    2015-12-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was investigated for its capacity to induce autophagy and related neuroprotective mechanisms in an acute spinal cord injury model. To accomplish this goal, we established a mouse spinal cord hemisection model to test the effects of recombinant human G-CSF. The results showed that autophagy was activated after spinal cord injury and G-CSF appears to induce a more rapid activation of autophagy within injured spinal cords as compared with that of non-treated animals. Apoptosis as induced in mechanically injured neurons with G-CSF treatment was enhanced after inhibiting autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), which partially blocked the neuroprotective effect of autophagy as induced by G-CSF. In addition, G-CSF inhibited the activity of the NF-?B signal pathway in neurons after mechanical injury. We conclude that G-CSF promotes autophagy by inhibiting the NF-?B signal pathway and protects neuronal structure after spinal cord injury. We therefore suggest that G-CSF, which rapidly induces autophagy after spinal cord injury to inhibit neuronal apoptosis, may thus provide an effective auxiliary therapeutic intervention for spinal cord injury. PMID:26524416

  15. Survival and neurite growth of chick embryo spinal cord cells in serum-free culture.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Obata, K

    1982-07-01

    Cell survival and neurite growth were investigated in serum-free spinal cord cell cultures on polyornithine coating (PORN). Cells were obtained from 6- or 7-day-old chick embryos. Isolated spinal cord cells required promoting factors for their survival and neurite growth. The survival-promoting factors were initially present in spinal cord cells. High density cultures, co-cultures with spinal cord explants, and spinal cord extract promoted survival of isolated spinal cord cells in MEM with no additives. Other tissue extracts (brain, liver, heart and skeletal muscle), serum, and serum-free conditioned medium (SF-CM) of muscle or glioma C6 cells also promoted survival. The active substances in the brain extract and SF-CM were shown to be protein and were separated into 3 fractions (approximately molecular weight 150,000, 70,000, 40,000) by gel filtration chromatography. Survival and neurite growth were suggested to be promoted by different factors because: (1) survival was promoted by both tissue extract and SF-CM, but neurite growth was promoted only by SF-CM; (2) the neurite growth-stimulating activity of SF-CM was lost following dialysis and heat (100 degrees C, 2 min) treatment; however, the survival-promoting activity was not. It was also suggested that spinal cord cells produce neurite growth promoting factors, but did not initially contain these factors. PMID:7104764

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress impairment in the spinal dorsal horn of a neuropathic pain model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Enji; Yi, Min-Hee; Shin, Nara; Baek, Hyunjung; Kim, Sena; Kim, Eunjee; Kwon, Kisang; Lee, Sunyeul; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Chul Bae, Yong; Kim, Yonghyun; Kwon, O.-Yu; Lee, Won Hyung; Kim, Dong Woon

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, but its role in neuropathic pain remains unclear. In this study, we examined the ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) activation in a L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced rat neuropathic pain model. SNL-induced neuropathic pain was assessed behaviorally using the CatWalk system, and histologically with microglial activation in the dorsal spinal horn. L5 SNL induced BIP upregulation in the neuron of superficial laminae of dorsal spinal horn. It also increased the level of ATF6 and intracellular localization into the nuclei in the neurons. Moreover, spliced XBP1 was also markedly elevated in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn. The PERK-elF2 pathway was activated in astrocytes of the spinal dorsal horn in the SNL model. In addition, electron microscopy revealed the presence of swollen cisternae in the dorsal spinal cord after SNL. Additionally, inhibition of the ATF6 pathway by intrathecal treatment with ATF6 siRNA reduced pain behaviors and BIP expression in the dorsal horn. The results suggest that ER stress might be involved in the induction and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, a disturbance in UPR signaling may render the spinal neurons vulnerable to peripheral nerve injury or neuropathic pain stimuli. PMID:26109318

  17. Kegel Exercise Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Español Kegel Exercise Tips Page Content What are Kegel exercises? To do Kegel exercises, you just squeeze your ... help with your bladder control. How do you exercise your pelvic muscles? Find the right muscles. Try ...

  18. Exercise Is Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrick, Harold

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that exercise should be the first-line therapy for preventing and treating many common diseases; however, physicians need more training in how best to use exercise therapy. The paper explains the power of exercise and discusses how to motivate individuals to start safe, enjoyable, and life-saving exercise routines. (SM)

  19. Patient-reported improvements in health are maintained 2?years after completing a short course of cognitive behaviour therapy, exercise or both treatments for chronic widespread pain: long-term results from the MUSICIAN randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Marcus; Prescott, Gordon J; Scotland, Graham; McBeth, John; Lovell, Karina; Keeley, Phil; Hannaford, Philip C; Symmons, Deborah P M; MacDonald, Ross I R; Woby, Steve; Macfarlane, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The MUSICIAN study has previously shown short-term benefit but only marginal cost-effectiveness for two non-pharmacological interventions for chronic widespread pain (CWP). We wished to determine their long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Methods A 2×2 factorial randomised controlled trial based in primary care in the UK. People were eligible if they were aged ?25?years with CWP for which they had consulted their general practitioner. The interventions were a 6-month telephone cognitive behaviour therapy (tCBT) and/or a tailored exercise programme, in comparison to usual care. The primary outcome was patient-reported change in health. Results 884 persons were eligible, 442 were randomised and 81.7% were followed up 24?months post-treatment. In comparison to usual care (positive outcome 12.8%), tCBT (35.4%; OR 3.7 95% CI (1.8 to 8.0)), exercise (29.3%; OR 2.8 95% CI (1.3 to 6.0)) and both interventions (31.2%; OR 3.1 95% CI (1.3 to 6.0)) were significantly more effective. There was only a small decrease in effectiveness over time for individual and combined treatments. Those with more intense/disabling pain, higher distress and those who exhibited passive coping at baseline were more likely to have a positive outcome with tCBT than persons without these characteristics. tCBT was associated with the greatest increase in quality of life and lowest costs. Cost per quality adjusted life year was £3957–£5917 depending on method of analysis. Conclusions A short course of tCBT for people with CWP was effective long-term and was highly cost-effective. Exercise was also effective but delivered positive outcome for fewer patients at greater cost, and there was no advantage for patients receiving both interventions. Trial registration number ISRCTN67013851. PMID:26509056

  20. Examining mechanisms underlying the selective vulnerability of motor units in a mouse model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy 

    E-print Network

    Thomson, Sophie Rose

    2014-06-28

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a childhood form of motor neuron disease that causes a progressive paralysis that, in its most severe form, results in death before two years of age. There is currently no cure or treatment ...