Science.gov

Sample records for spinning dust radiation

  1. A new spin on primordial hydrogen recombination and a refined model for spinning dust radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Haimoud, Yacine

    2011-08-01

    This thesis describes theoretical calculations in two subjects: the primordial recombination of the electron-proton plasma about 400,000 years after the Big Bang and electric dipole radiation from spinning dust grains in the present-day interstellar medium. Primordial hydrogen recombination has recently been the subject of a renewed attention because of the impact of its theoretical uncertainties on predicted cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectra. The physics of the primordial recombination problem can be divided into two qualitatively different aspects. On the one hand, a detailed treatment of the non-thermal radiation field in the optically thick Lyman lines is required for an accurate recombination history near the peak of the visibility function. On the other hand, stimulated recombinations and out-of equilibrium effects are important at late times and a multilevel calculation is required to correctly compute the low-redshift end of the ionization history. Another facet of the problem is the requirement of computational efficiency, as a large number of recombination histories must be evaluated in Markov chains when analyzing CMB data. In this thesis, an effective multilevel atom method is presented, that speeds up multilevel atom computations by more than 5 orders of magnitude. The impact of previously ignored radiative transfer effects is quantified, and explicitly shown to be negligible. Finally, the numerical implementation of a fast and highly accurate primordial recombination code partly written by the author is described. The second part of this thesis is devoted to one of the potential galactic foregrounds for CMB experiments: the rotational emission from small dust grains. The rotational state of dust grains is described, first classically, and assuming that grains are rotating about their axis of greatest inertia. This assumption is then lifted, and a quantum-mechanical calculation is presented for disk-like grains with a

  2. 2-DUST: Dust radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Toshiya; Meixner, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    2-DUST is a general-purpose dust radiative transfer code for an axisymmetric system that reveals the global energetics of dust grains in the shell and the 2-D projected morphologies of the shell that are strongly dependent on the mixed effects of the axisymmetric dust distribution and inclination angle. It can be used to model a variety of axisymmetric astronomical dust systems.

  3. Using Spinning Dust Emission To Constrain The Evolution Of Dust Grains In Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbs, C.; Paladini, R.; Cleary, K.; Grainge, K.; Muchovej, S.; Pearson, T.; Perrott, Y.; Rumsey, C.; Scaife, A.; Stevenson, M.; Villadsen, J.

    Within many molecular clouds in our Galaxy there are cold, dense regions known as cold clumps in which stars form. These dense environments provide a great location in which to study dust grain evolution. Given the low temperatures (˜10-15 K) and high densities (˜105 cm-3 ), these environments are dark at mid-infrared (IR) wavelengths and emit strongly at wavelengths ≥160 µm. The lack of mid-IR emission can be attributed to one of two reasons: i) a deficit of the small dust grains that emit stochastically at mid-IR wavelengths; or ii) small dust grains are present, but due to the high densities, the stellar photons cannot penetrate deep enough into the clumps to excite them. Using mid-IR observations alone it is impossible to distinguish between these two scenarios. However, by using spinning dust emission at cm wavelengths it is possible to break this degeneracy, because if small dust grains are present in these clumps, then even though stellar photons cannot excite them to emit at mid-IR wavelengths, these dust grains will be spunup by collisions and hence emit spinning dust radiation. If spinning dust were detected in these clumps it would prove that there are small dust grains present and that the lack of mid-IR emission is due to a lack of stellar photons. Conversely, a lack of spinning dust emission would indicate a deficit of small dust grains in these clumps. Since small dust grains require harsh radiation fields to be destroyed, a lack of small dust grains is likely a result of dust grain coagulation. With this in mind, we present preliminary results illustrating our method of using spinning dust observations to determine the evolution of small dust grains in these environments.

  4. Modelling the spinning dust emission from dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ysard, N.; Juvela, M.; Verstraete, L.

    2011-11-01

    Context. Electric dipole emission arising from rapidly rotating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is often invoked to explain the anomalous microwave emission. This assignation is based on i) an observed tight correlation between the mid-IR emission of PAHs and the anomalous microwave emission; and ii) a good agreement between models of spinning dust and the broadband anomalous microwave emission spectrum. So far often detected at large scale in the diffuse interstellar medium, the anomalous microwave emission has recently been studied in detail in well-known dense molecular clouds with the help of Planck data. Aims: While much attention has been given to the physics of spinning dust emission, the impact of varying local physical conditions has not yet been considered in detail. Our aim is to study the emerging spinning dust emission from interstellar clouds with realistic physical conditions and radiative transfer. Methods: We use the DustEM code to describe the extinction and IR emission of all dust populations. The spinning dust emission is obtained with SpDust, which we have coupled to DustEM. We carry out full radiative transfer simulations and carefully estimate the local gas state as a function of position within interstellar clouds. Results: We show that the spinning dust emission is sensitive to the abundances of the major ions (H ii, C ii) and we propose a simple scheme to estimate these abundances. We also investigate the effect of changing the cosmic-ray rate. In dense media, where radiative transfer is mandatory to estimate the temperature of the grains, we show that the relationship between the spinning and mid-IR emissivities of PAHs is no longer linear and that the spinning dust emission may actually be strong at the centre of clouds where the mid-IR PAH emission is weak. These results provide new ways to trace grain growth from diffuse to dense medium and will be useful for the analysis of anomalous microwave emission at the scale of

  5. A New Spin on Galactic Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira-Costa, Angélica; Tegmark, Max; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Davies, R. D.; Gutierrez, Carlos M.; Haffner, L. M.; Jones, Aled W.; Lasenby, A. N.; Rebolo, R.; Reynolds, Ron J.; Tufte, S. L.; Watson, R. A.

    2002-03-01

    We present a new puzzle involving Galactic microwave emission and attempt to resolve it. On one hand, a cross-correlation analysis of the Wisconsin Hα Mapper map with the Tenerife 10 and 15 GHz maps shows that the well-known DIRBE correlated microwave emission cannot be dominated by free-free emission. On the other hand, recent high-resolution observations in the 8-10 GHz range with the Green Bank 140 foot telescope by Finkbeiner et al. failed to find the corresponding 8 σ signal that would be expected in the simplest spinning-dust models. So what physical mechanism is causing this ubiquitous dust-correlated emission? We argue for a model predicting that spinning dust is the culprit after all, but that the corresponding small grains are well correlated with the larger grains seen at 100 μm only on large angular scales. In support of this grain-segregation model, we find that the best spinning-dust template involves higher frequency maps in the range 12-60 μm, in which emission from transiently heated small grains is important. Upcoming cosmic microwave background experiments such as ground-based interferometers, the Microwave Anisotropy Probe, and the Planck low-frequency interferometer with high resolution at low frequencies should allow a definitive test of this model.

  6. Cross-Correlation of Tenerife Data with Galactic Templates-Evidence for Spinning Dust?

    PubMed

    de Oliveira-Costa A; Tegmark; Gutiérrez; Jones; Davies; Lasenby; Rebolo; Watson

    1999-12-10

    The recent discovery of dust-correlated diffuse microwave emission has prompted two rival explanations: free-free emission and spinning dust grains. We present new detections of this component at 10 and 15 GHz by the switched-beam Tenerife experiment. The data show a turnover in the spectrum and thereby support the spinning dust hypothesis. We also present a significant detection of synchrotron radiation at 10 GHz, which is useful for normalizing foreground contamination of cosmic microwave background experiments at high galactic latitudes. PMID:10566987

  7. Planck early results. XX. New light on anomalous microwave emission from spinning dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casassus, S.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chiang, C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Dickinson, C.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Prézeau, G.; Procopio, P.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reich, W.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Varis, J.; Verstraete, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wilkinson, A.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2011-12-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) has been observed by numerous experiments in the frequency range ~10-60 GHz. Using Planck maps and multi-frequency ancillary data, we have constructed spectra for two known AME regions: the Perseus and ρ Ophiuchi molecular clouds. The spectra are well fitted by a combination of free-free radiation, cosmic microwave background, thermal dust, and electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The spinning dust spectra are the most precisely measured to date, and show the high frequency side clearly for the first time. The spectra have a peak in the range 20-40 GHz and are detected at high significances of 17.1σ for Perseus and 8.4σ for ρ Ophiuchi. In Perseus, spinning dust in the dense molecular gas can account for most of the AME; the low density atomic gas appears to play a minor role. In ρ Ophiuchi, the ~30 GHz peak is dominated by dense molecular gas, but there is an indication of an extended tail at frequencies 50-100 GHz, which can be accounted for by irradiated low density atomic gas. The dust parameters are consistent with those derived from other measurements. We have also searched the Planck map at 28.5 GHz for candidate AME regions, by subtracting a simple model of the synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust. We present spectra for two of the candidates; S140 and S235 are bright Hii regions that show evidence for AME, and are well fitted by spinning dust models. Corresponding author: C. Dickinson, Clive.Dickinson@manchester.ac.uk

  8. Quantum dust magnetosonic waves with spin and exchange correlation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroof, R.; Mushtaq, A.; Qamar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Dust magnetosonic waves are studied in degenerate dusty plasmas with spin and exchange correlation effects. Using the fluid equations of magnetoplasma with quantum corrections due to the Bohm potential, temperature degeneracy, spin magnetization energy, and exchange correlation, a generalized dispersion relation is derived. Spin effects are incorporated via spin force and macroscopic spin magnetization current. The exchange-correlation potentials are used, based on the adiabatic local-density approximation, and can be described as a function of the electron density. For three different values of angle, the dispersion relation is reduced to three different modes under the low frequency magnetohydrodynamic assumptions. It is found that the effects of quantum corrections in the presence of dust concentration significantly modify the dispersive properties of these modes. The results are useful for understanding numerous collective phenomena in quantum plasmas, such as those in compact astrophysical objects (e.g., the cores of white dwarf stars and giant planets) and in plasma-assisted nanotechnology (e.g., quantum diodes, quantum free-electron lasers, etc.).

  9. Radiation transport in dust in disk geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, Ming Leung

    1986-01-01

    The main objective of the research program is twofold: (1) to develop a computer code to solve the problem of scattering, absorption and emission of photons by dust grains in a dusty medium with 2 dimensional disk geometry, and (2) to study the various physical and geometrical effects of 2 dimensional radiation transport on the thermal structure and radiation field. These tasks were accomplished and are briefly summarized. The method for solving the radiation transport problem in disk geometry is a generalization of the quasi-diffusion method (QDM) previously developed by the author.

  10. Constraint on the polarization of electric dipole emission from spinning dust

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Thiem; Martin, P. G.; Lazarian, A.

    2013-12-20

    Planck results have revealed that the electric dipole emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is the most reliable explanation for the anomalous microwave emission that interferes with cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation experiments. The emerging question is to what extent this emission component contaminates the polarized CMB radiation. We present constraints on polarized dust emission for the model of grain-size distribution and grain alignment that best fits the observed extinction and polarization curves. Two stars with a prominent polarization feature at λ = 2175 Å—HD 197770 and HD 147933-4—are chosen for our study. For HD 197770, we find that the model with aligned silicate grains plus weakly aligned PAHs can successfully reproduce the 2175 Å polarization feature; in contrast, for HD 147933-4, we find that the alignment of only silicate grains can account for that feature. The alignment function of PAHs for the best-fit model to the HD 197770 data is used to constrain polarized spinning dust emission. We find that the degree of polarization of spinning dust emission is about 1.6% at frequency ν ≈ 3 GHz and declines to below 0.9% for ν > 20 GHz. We also predict the degree of polarization of thermal dust emission at 353 GHz to be P {sub em} ≈ 11% and 14% for the lines of sight to the HD 197770 and HD 147933-4 stars, respectively.

  11. SPINNING DUST EMISSION: EFFECTS OF IRREGULAR GRAIN SHAPE, TRANSIENT HEATING, AND COMPARISON WITH WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, A.; Draine, B. T.

    2011-11-10

    Planck is expected to answer crucial questions on the early universe, but it also provides further understanding on anomalous microwave emission. Electric dipole emission from spinning dust grains continues to be the favored interpretation of anomalous microwave emission. In this paper, we present a method to calculate the rotational emission from small grains of irregular shape with moments of inertia I{sub 1} {>=} I{sub 2} {>=} I{sub 3}. We show that a torque-free rotating irregular grain with a given angular momentum radiates at multiple frequency modes. The resulting spinning dust spectrum has peak frequency and emissivity increasing with the degree of grain shape irregularity, which is defined by I{sub 1}:I{sub 2}:I{sub 3}. We discuss how the orientation of the dipole moment {mu} in body coordinates affects the spinning dust spectrum for different regimes of internal thermal fluctuations. We show that the spinning dust emissivity for the case of strong thermal fluctuations is less sensitive to the orientation of {mu} than in the case of weak thermal fluctuations. We calculate spinning dust spectra for a range of gas density and dipole moment. The effect of compressible turbulence on spinning dust emission is investigated. We show that the emission in a turbulent medium increases by a factor from 1.2 to 1.4 relative to that in a uniform medium, as the sonic Mach number M{sub s} increases from 2 to 7. Finally, spinning dust parameters are constrained by fitting our improved model to five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cross-correlation foreground spectra, for both the H{alpha}-correlated and 100-{mu}m-correlated emission spectra.

  12. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH INVESTIGATION OF RCW175: AN H II REGION HARBORING SPINNING DUST EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Tibbs, C. T.; Compiegne, M.; Carey, S.; Paladini, R.; Dickinson, C.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; Alves, M. I. R.; Flagey, N.; Shenoy, S.; Casassus, S.; Molinari, S.; Elia, D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Schisano, E.

    2012-08-01

    Using infrared, radio continuum, and spectral observations, we performed a detailed investigation of the H II region RCW175. We determined that RCW175, which actually consists of two separate H II regions, G29.1-0.7 and G29.0-0.6, is located at a distance of 3.2 {+-} 0.2 kpc. Based on the observations we infer that the more compact G29.0-0.6 is less evolved than G29.1-0.7 and was possibly produced as a result of the expansion of G29.1-0.7 into the surrounding interstellar medium. We compute a star formation rate for RCW175 of (12.6 {+-} 1.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and identified six possible young stellar object candidates within its vicinity. Additionally, we estimate that RCW175 contains a total dust mass of 215 {+-} 53 M{sub Sun }. RCW175 has previously been identified as a source of anomalous microwave emission (AME), an excess of emission at centimeter wavelengths often attributed to electric dipole radiation from the smallest dust grains. We find that the AME previously detected in RCW175 is not correlated with the smallest dust grains (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or small carbonaceous dust grains), but rather with the exciting radiation field within the region. This is a similar result to that found in the Perseus molecular cloud, another region which harbors AME, suggesting that the radiation field may play a pivotal role in the production of this new Galactic emission mechanism. Finally, we suggest that these observations may hint at the importance of understanding the role played by the major gas ions in spinning dust models.

  13. Radiation-spin interaction, Gilbert damping, and spin torque.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jeongwon; Khanna, F C; Choi, B C

    2004-03-01

    Magnetization relaxation processes, which are represented by the Gilbert damping term and the spin torque term in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, are described by the radiation-spin interaction (RSI), where the radiation field is produced by magnetization precessional motion itself. It is shown that the LLG equation including the Gilbert damping term and the spin torque term is derived from the spin Hamiltonian containing the RSI. The derivation of the LLG equation is given in a self-consistent method. It is also shown that, according to RSI, the magnitude of the magnetization vector deviates from the magnetization saturation with the order of O(alpha(2)), where alpha is the Gilbert damping parameter. PMID:15089513

  14. Active Dust Mitigation Technology for Thermal Radiators for Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; Hogue, M. D.; Johansen, M. R.; Hopkins, J. W.; Holloway, N. M. H.; Connell, J. W.; Chen, A.; Irwin, S. A.; Case, S. O.; VanSuetendael, N. J.; Snyder, S. J.; Clements, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    Dust accumulation on thermal radiator surfaces planned for lunar exploration will significantly reduce their efficiency. Evidence from the Apollo missions shows that an insulating layer of dust accumulated on radiator surfaces could not be removed and caused serious thermal control problems. Temperatures measured at different locations in the magnetometer on Apollo 12 were 38 C warmer than expected due to lunar dust accumulation. In this paper, we report on the application of the Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) technology being developed in our NASA laboratory and applied to thermal radiator surfaces. The EDS uses electrostatic and dielectrophoretic forces generated by a grid of electrodes running a 2 micro A electric current to remove dust particles from surfaces. Working prototypes of EDS systems on solar panels and on thermal radiators have been successfully developed and tested at vacuum with clearing efficiencies above 92%. For this work EDS prototypes on flexible and rigid thermal radiators were developed and tested at vacuum.

  15. The darkness of spin-0 dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, M.C. David

    2015-01-01

    We show that the scattering of a general spin-0 sector of dark radiation off the pre-recombination thermal plasma results in undetectably small spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  16. Positive Radiative-Dynamic Feedback in Martian Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafkin, S. C.; Rothchild, A.; Pielke, R. A., Sr.

    2010-12-01

    This work follows from the work of Rafkin [2010] that identified a positive radiative-dynamic feedback mechanism for the growth and maintenance of Mars dust storms under idealized conditions. In this study, the feedback mechanism is explored under more realistic settings including complex background atmospheric structures, topography, thermal tidal forcing, and a variety of mesoscale circulations. As expected, the more complex situation tends to mute the evidence and the impact of the proposed feedback process. Nonetheless, telltale signatures of the feedback mechanism are present and are consistent with the findings from the idealized scenario. Mesoscale simulations at the proposed MSL landing site of Mawrth Valles serve as the foundation for feedback studies with the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System. A background dust field is specified based on MGS-TES retrievals and a dynamically active perturbation dust field is superimposed. The perturbation field arises from dust lifting (both resolved and subgrid scale) and it is subject to transport, diffusion, and sedimentation; the perturbation field is allowed to evolve over time consistent with the dynamics. The dust is tracked via a bin model with 8 discrete mass bins. To test for radiative-dynamic feedback, the radiative activity of the perturbation dust can be toggled on or off. If lifted dust behaves as a passive tracer then the simulations with radiatively active perturbation dust should evolve similarly to those with radiatively inactive dust. In idealized cases, a large difference was noted between these two scenarios indicating that lifted dust was modifying the local circulation. In the realistic scenarios presented here, simulations with radiatively active dust produce a noticeable local drop in atmospheric pressure and an increase in wind speeds, particularly in dust lifting regions where atmospheric dust concentrations are maximized. Analysis of wind residuals show a tendency for rotational and

  17. Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the atmospheric radiation balance

    SciTech Connect

    Slingo, A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Allan, R. P.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Robinson, G. J.; Barnard, James C.; Miller, Mark; Harries, J. E.; Russell, J. E.; Dewitte, S.

    2006-12-01

    Saharan dust storms transport large quantities of material across the African continent and beyond, causing widespread disruption and hazards to health. The dust may be deposited into the Atlantic Ocean, where it provides an important source of nutrients1, and may be carried as far as the West Indies. Such events may also influence the growth of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Satellite observations have enabled estimates to be made of the effect of the dust on the radiation budget seen from space, but only limited in situ observations have hitherto been made at the surface. Here we present the first simultaneous and continuous observations of the effect of a major dust storm in March 2006 on the radiation budget both at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. We combine data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) broadband radiometer and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on the Meteosat-8 weather satellite with remote sensing and in situ measurements from a new Mobile Facility located in Niamey, Niger (13{sup o} 29'N, 2{sup o} 10'E), operated by the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. We show that the dust produced major perturbations to the radiation budget seen from space and from the surface. By combining the two datasets, we estimate the impact on the radiation budget of the atmosphere itself. Using independent data from the Mobile Facility, we derive the optical properties of the dust and input these and other information into radiation codes to simulate the radiative fluxes. Comparisons with the observed fluxes provides a stringent test of the ability of the codes to represent the radiative properties of this important component of the global aerosol burden.

  18. Spinning Dust Emission from Ultra-small Silicates: Emissivity and Polarization Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thiem; Vinh, Nguyen-Anh; Quynh Lan, Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of cosmic microwave background radiation. It is believed that AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we suppose that a new population of ultra-small silicate grains perhaps exists in the ISM, and quantify the rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We find that spinning silicate nanoparticles can produce strong rotational emission when the tiny grains follow a log-normal size distribution. The polarization fraction of spinning dust emission from tiny silicates increases with decreasing dipole moment per atom (β) and can reach P∼ 20 % for β ∼ 0.1 {{D}} at a grain temperature of 60 K. We identify a parameter space (β ,{Y}{{Si}}), with {Y}{{Si}} being the fraction of Si abundance in nanoparticles, in which its rotational emission can adequately reproduce both the observed AME and the polarization of the AME, without violating the observational constraints of ultraviolet extinction and polarization of starlight. Our results reveal that rotational emission from spinning silicate may be an important source of AME.

  19. Radiation forces between dust grains in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, J. T.; Stenflo, L.

    2008-04-01

    In this work we show that a repulsive force between nearby dust grains in a plasma can exist, due to scattering of the incident radiation. Two types of forces are discussed, one of them being formally identical to electrostatic repulsion. This leads to the definition of an effective dust charge of the dust grain, which only depends on the scattering process. Our discussion shows that such a repulsive interaction occurs in quite general physical conditions.

  20. Interactive Soil Dust Aerosol Model in the GISS GCM. Part 1; Sensitivity of the Soil Dust Cycle to Radiative Properties of Soil Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, Jan; Tegen, Ina; Miller, Ron L.

    2000-01-01

    The sensitivity of the soil dust aerosol cycle to the radiative forcing by soil dust aerosols is studied. Four experiments with the NASA/GISS atmospheric general circulation model, which includes a soil dust aerosol model, are compared, all using a prescribed climatological sea surface temperature as lower boundary condition. In one experiment, dust is included as dynamic tracer only (without interacting with radiation), whereas dust interacts with radiation in the other simulations. Although the single scattering albedo of dust particles is prescribed to be globally uniform in the experiments with radiatively active dust, a different single scattering albedo is used in those experiments to estimate whether regional variations in dust optical properties, corresponding to variations in mineralogical composition among different source regions, are important for the soil dust cycle and the climate state. On a global scale, the radiative forcing by dust generally causes a reduction in the atmospheric dust load corresponding to a decreased dust source flux. That is, there is a negative feedback in the climate system due to the radiative effect of dust. The dust source flux and its changes were analyzed in more detail for the main dust source regions. This analysis shows that the reduction varies both with the season and with the single scattering albedo of the dust particles. By examining the correlation with the surface wind, it was found that the dust emission from the Saharan/Sahelian source region and from the Arabian peninsula, along with the sensitivity of the emission to the single scattering albedo of dust particles, are related to large scale circulation patterns, in particular to the trade winds during Northern Hemisphere winter and to the Indian monsoon circulation during summer. In the other regions, such relations to the large scale circulation were not found. There, the dependence of dust deflation to radiative forcing by dust particles is probably

  1. Radiation from moving charged particles with spin

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.

    1992-10-05

    The theory of radiation emitted by a charged particle with spin in relativistic motion in an external magnetic field is reviewed. Approximate expressions suitable numerical computation, in far and near field, are derived. In particular, the case of the passage of a particle accelerator beam through an undulator is considered. It is shown that observation of the spectrum of the emitted radiation, in its two states of polarization, can be used not only for beam diagnostics, but also to measure the spin state of the accelerated particles. Undulator radiation is compared with Compton scattering of laser light by the particle beam. Examples for high energy electron and proton colliders are presented.

  2. Radiation induced rotation of interplanetary dust particles - A feasibility study for a space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliff, K. F.; Misconi, N. Y.; Paddack, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    Irregular interplanetary dust particles may acquire a considerable spin rate due to two non-statistical dynamical mechanisms induced by solar radiation. These arise from variations in surface albedo discussed by Radzievskii (1954) and from irregularities in surface geometry discussed by Paddack (1969). An experiment is reported which will lead to an evaluation in space of the effectiveness of these two spin mechanisms. The technique of optical levitation in an argon laser beam provides a stable trap for particles 10-60 microns in diameter. The objective is to design an optical trap for dielectric particles in vacuum to study these rotation mechanisms in the gravity-free environment of a Spacelab experiment.

  3. A Mars Dust Model with Interactive Dynamics, Radiation, and Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwick, Victoria; Toon, O. Brian

    2014-11-01

    Variability of the present day Martian climate is dominated by globally enveloping dust storms that recur with a frequency of approximately three years. Small-scale aeolian processes predictably generate local seasonal storms. However, factors that enhance local storm strength and grow local phenomenon to global scales are poorly understood. Research with Martian general circulation models (GCM) has recently demonstrated a strong correlation between dust storm generation, strength and long-term stability and the global distribution of dust reservoirs and their temporal permanence. Here we present results from the NCAR Mars Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) coupled with a fully interactive dust microphysics scheme. Dust devil lifting and saltation wind driven lifting are parameterized in the emission scheme. Mass is distributed into 20 size bins with a radius range of 0.1 to 8 microns. The initial radial size distribution is log-normal with a sigma value of 1.5. Dust is allowed to advect horizontally and is removed from the atmosphere by dry deposition. Dust also impacts the radiative heating rate, as do water clouds.The large number of dust bins allows for the opportunity to track the size distribution of dust deposits and investigate the long term stability of dust source regions as a function of particle size.

  4. A Mars Dust Model with Interactive Dynamics, Radiation, and Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwick, V.; Toon, B.

    2014-12-01

    Variability of the present day Martian climate is dominated by globally enveloping dust storms that recur with a frequency of approximately three years. Small-scale aeolian processes predictably generate local seasonal storms. However, factors that enhance local storm strength and grow local phenomenon to global scales are poorly understood. Research with Martian general circulation models (GCM) has recently demonstrated a strong correlation between dust storm generation, strength and long-term stability and the global distribution of dust reservoirs and their temporal permanence. Here we present results from the NCAR Mars Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) coupled with a fully interactive dust microphysics scheme. Dust devil lifting and saltation wind driven lifting are parameterized in the emission scheme. Mass is distributed into 20 size bins with a radius range of 0.1 to 8 microns. The initial radial size distribution is log-normal with a sigma value of 1.5. Dust is allowed to advect horizontally and is removed from the atmosphere by dry deposition. Dust also impacts the radiative heating rate, as do water clouds.The large number of dust bins allows for the opportunity to track the size distribution of dust deposits and investigate the long term stability of dust source regions as a function of particle size.

  5. The Effect of Martian Dust on Radiator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollingsworth, D. Keith; Witte, Larry C.; Hinke, Jaime; Hulbert, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were performed in which the effective emittance of three types of radiator Coatings was measured as Martian dust simulant was added to the radiator face. The apparatus consisted of multiple radiator coupons on which Carbondale Red Clay dust was deposited. The coupons were powered by electric heaters, using a guard-heating configuration to achieve the accuracy required for acceptable emittance calculations. The apparatus was containing in a vacuum chamber that featured a liquid-nitrogen cooled shroud that simulated the Martian sky temperature. Radiator temperatures ranged from 250 to 350 K with sky temperatures from 185 to 248 K. Results show that as dust was added to the radiator surfaces, the effective emittance of the high - emittance coatings decreased from near 0.9 to a value of about 0.5. A low-emittance control surface, polished aluminum, demonstrated a rise in effective emittance for thin dust layers, and then a decline as the dust layer thickened. This behavior is attributed to the conductive resistance caused by the dust layer.

  6. Degradation of radiator performance on Mars due to dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Forkapa, Mark

    1992-01-01

    An artificial mineral of the approximate elemental composition of Martian soil was manufactured, crushed, and sorted into four different size ranges. Dust particles from three of these size ranges were applied to arc-textured Nb-1 percent Zr and Cu radiator surfaces to assess their effect on radiator performance. Particles larger than 75 microns did not have sufficient adhesive forces to adhere to the samples at angles greater than about 27 deg. Pre-deposited dust layers were largely removed by clear wind velocities greater than 40 m/s, or by dust-laden wind velocities as low as 25 m/s. Smaller dust grains were more difficult to remove. Abrasion was found to be significant only in high velocity winds (89 m/s or greater). Dust-laden winds were found to be more abrasive than clear wind. Initially dusted samples abraded less than initially clear samples in dust laden wind. Smaller dust particles of the simulant proved to be more abrasive than large. This probably indicates that the larger particles were in fact agglomerates.

  7. Long-wave radiative forcing due to desert dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, L. N.; Collins, W.

    2011-12-01

    Radiative forcing due to aerosols has been identified by the IPCC as a major contributor to the total radiative forcing uncertainty budget. Optically thick plumes of dust and pollutants extending out from Africa and Asia can be lifted into the middle troposphere and often are transported over synoptic length scales. These events can decrease the upwelling long-wave fluxes at the top of the atmosphere, especially in the mid-infrared "window". Although the long-wave effects of dust are included in model simulations, they are hard to validate in the absence of satellite-driven global estimates. Using hyper spectral satellite measurements (from NASA's AIRS instrument) it is possible to estimate the effect of dust on the outgoing long-wave radiation directly from the measured spectra, by differencing the simulated clear sky radiance spectra (which are calculated using ECMWF analysis) and the observed dust filled radiance spectra (observations from AIRS). We will summarize this method and show global estimates of the dust radiative effect in the long-wave. These global estimates will be used to validate GCM model output and help us to improve our understanding of dust in the global energy budget.

  8. The wavelength dependence of Martian atmospheric dust radiative properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Ockert-Bell, M. E.; Arvidson, R.; Shepard, M.

    1993-01-01

    One of the key radiative agents in the atmosphere of Mars is the suspended dust particles. A new analysis of two data sets of the Martian atmosphere is being carried out in order to better evaluate the radiative properties of the atmospheric dust particles. The properties of interest are the size distribution, optical constants, and other radiative properties, such as the single-scattering albedo and phase function. Of prime importance is the wavelength dependence of these radiative properties throughout the visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Understanding the wavelength dependence of absorption and scattering characteristics will provide a good definition of the influence that the atmospheric dust has on heating of the atmosphere.

  9. Aeolian removal of dust from radiator surfaces on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hotes, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Simulated radiator surfaces made of arc-textured Cu and Nb-1 percent-Zr and ion beam textured graphite and C-C composite were fabricated and their integrated spectral emittance characterized from 300 to 3000 K. A thin layer of aluminum oxide, basalt, or iron (III) oxide dust was then deposited on them, and they were subjected to low pressure winds in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel. It was found that dust deposited on simulated radiator surfaces may or may not seriously lower their integrated spectral emittance, depending upon the characteristics of the dust. With Al2O3 there is no appreciable degradation of emittance on a dusted sample, with basaltic dust there is a 10 to 20 percent degradation, and with Fe2O3 a 20 to 40 percent degradation. It was also found that very high winds on dusted highly textured surfaces can result in their abrasion. Degradation in emittance due to abrasion was found to vary with radiator material. Arc-textured Cu and Nb-1 percent Zr was found to be more susceptible to emittance degradation than graphite or C-C composite. The most abrasion occurred at low angles, peaking at the 22.5 deg test samples.

  10. Aeolian removal of dust from radiator surfaces on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Gaier, J.R.; Perez-Davis, M.E.; Rutledge, S.K.; Hotes, D.

    1994-09-01

    Simulated radiator surfaces made of arc-textured copper and niobium-one percent-zirconium, and ion beam textured graphite and carbon-carbon composite were fabricated and their integrated spectral emittance characterized from 300 to 3000 K. A thin layer of aluminum oxide, basalt, or iron (III) oxide dust was then deposited on them, and they were subjected to low pressure winds in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel. It has been found that dust deposited on simulated radiator surfaces may or may not seriously lower their integrated spectral emittance, depending upon the characteristics of the dust. With Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} there is no appreciable degradation of emittance on a dusted sample, with basaltic dust there is a 10-20 percent degradation, and with Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} a 20-40 percent degradation. It was also found that very high winds on dusted highly textured surfaces can result in their abrasion. Degradation in emittance due to abrasion was found to vary with radiator material. Arc-textured copper and Nb-1%Zr was found to be more susceptible to emittance degradation than graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The most abrasion occurred at low angles, peaking at the 22.5{degrees} test samples.

  11. DIRECT STELLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AT THE DUST SUBLIMATION FRONT IN MASSIVE STAR FORMATION: EFFECTS OF A DUST-FREE DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2011-10-01

    In massive star formation ({approx}> 40 M{sub sun}) by core accretion, the direct stellar radiation pressure acting on the dust particles exceeds the gravitational force and interferes with mass accretion at the dust sublimation front, the first absorption site. Ram pressure generated by high accretion rates of 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} is thought to be required to overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We investigate the direct stellar irradiation on the dust sublimation front, including the inner accretion disk structure. We show that the ram pressure of the accretion disk is lower than the stellar radiation pressure at the dust sublimation front. Thus, another mechanism must overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We suggest that the inner hot dust-free region is optically thick, shielding the dust sublimation front from direct stellar irradiation. Thus, accretion would not halt at the dust sublimation front, even at lower accretion rates.

  12. Ultraviolet Radiative Transfer Modeling of Nearby Galaxies with Extraplanar Dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-12-01

    In order to examine their relation to the host galaxy, the extraplanar dusts of six nearby galaxies are modeled, employing a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The targets are from the highly inclined galaxies that show dust-scattered ultraviolet halos, and the archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV band images were fitted with the model. The observed images are generally well-reproduced by two dust layers and one light source layer, whose vertical and radial distributions have exponential profiles. We obtained several important physical parameters, such as star formation rate (SFRUV), face-on optical depth, and scale-heights. Three galaxies (NGC 891, NGC 3628, and UGC 11794) show clear evidence for the existence of an extraplanar dust layer. However, it is found that the remaining three targets (IC 5249, NGC 24, and NGC 4173) do not necessarily need a thick dust disk to model the ultraviolet (UV) halo, because its contribution is too small and the UV halo may be caused by the wing part of the GALEX point spread function. This indicates that the galaxy samples reported to have UV halos may be contaminated by galaxies with negligible extraplanar (halo) dust. The galaxies showing evidence of an extraplanar dust layer fall within a narrow range on the scatter plots between physical parameters such as SFRUV and extraplanar dust mass. Several mechanisms that could possibly produce the extraplanar dust are discussed. We also found a hint that the extraplanar dust scale-height might not be much different from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission characteristic height.

  13. Retrieval of dust aerosols during night: improved assessment of long wave dust radiative forcing over Afro-Asian regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepshikha, S.; Srinivasan, J.

    2010-08-01

    Several investigators in the past have used the radiance depression (with respect to clear-sky infrared radiance), resulting from the presence of mineral dust aerosols in the atmosphere, as an index of dust aerosol load in the atmosphere during local noon. Here, we have used a modified approach to retrieve dust index during night since assessment of diurnal average infrared dust forcing essentially requires information on dust aerosols during night. For this purpose, we used infrared radiance (10.5-12.5 μm), acquired from the METEOSAT-5 satellite (~ 5 km resolution). We found that the "dust index" algorithm, valid for daytime, will no longer hold during the night because dust is then hotter than the theoretical dust-free reference. Hence we followed a "minimum reference" approach instead of a conventional "maximum reference" approach. A detailed analysis suggests that the maximum dust load occurs during the daytime. Over the desert regions of India and Africa, maximum change in dust load is as much as a factor of four between day and night and factor of two variations are commonly observed. By realizing the consequent impact on long wave dust forcing, sensitivity studies were carried out, which indicate that utilizing day time data for estimating the diurnally averaged long-wave dust radiative forcing results in significant errors (as much as 50 to 70%). Annually and regionally averaged long wave dust radiative forcing (which account for the diurnal variation of dust) at the top of the atmosphere over Afro-Asian region is 2.6 ± 1.8 W m-2, which is 30 to 50% lower than those reported earlier. Our studies indicate that neglecting diurnal variation of dust while assessing its radiative impact leads to an overestimation of dust radiative forcing, which in turn result in underestimation of the radiative impact of anthropogenic aerosols.

  14. Bipolar charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Fortov, V. E.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Pal', A. F.; Petrov, O. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Sarkarov, N. E.

    2011-05-15

    The photoemission charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation from a xenon lamp has been investigated. The velocities of yttrium dust particles with a work function of 3.3 eV and their charges have been determined experimentally; the latter are about 400-500 and about 100 elementary charges per micron of radius for the positively and negatively charged fractions, respectively. The dust particle charging and the dust cloud evolution in a photoemission cell after exposure to an ultraviolet radiation source under the applied voltage have been simulated numerically. The photoemission charging of dust particles has been calculated on the basis of nonlocal and local charging models. Only unipolar particle charging is shown to take place in a system of polydisperse dust particles with the same photoemission efficiency. It has been established that bipolar charging is possible in the case of monodisperse particles with different quantum efficiencies. Polydispersity in this case facilitates the appearance of oppositely charged particles in a photoemission plasma.

  15. Gravitational radiation from collapsing magnetized dust

    SciTech Connect

    Sotani, Hajime; Yoshida, Shijun; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2007-04-15

    In this article we study the influence of magnetic fields on the axial gravitational waves emitted during the collapse of a homogeneous dust sphere. We found that while the energy emitted depends weakly on the initial matter perturbations it has strong dependence on the strength and the distribution of the magnetic field perturbations. The gravitational wave output of such a collapse can be up to an order of magnitude larger or smaller calling for detailed numerical 3D studies of collapsing magnetized configurations.

  16. Derivation of an analytical approximation of the spectrum of spinning dust emission

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Matthew A.

    2014-02-01

    An analytical function for the spectrum of spinning dust emission is presented. It is derived through the application of careful approximations, with each step tested against numerical calculations. This approach ensures accuracy while providing an intuitive picture of the physics. The final result may be useful for fitting of anomalous microwave emission observations, as is demonstrated by a comparison with the Planck observations of the Perseus Molecular Cloud. It is hoped that this will lead to a broader consideration of the spinning dust model when interpreting microwave continuum observations, and that it will provide a standard framework for interpreting and comparing the variety of anomalous microwave emission observations.

  17. Dust-induced radiative feedbacks in north China: A dust storm episode modeling study using WRF-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lixia; Huang, Xin; Ding, Aijun; Fu, Congbin

    2016-03-01

    Radiative forcing of dust aerosol and the radiative feedbacks on the planetary boundary layer (PBL) in North China during a typical Asian dust storm in the early April of 2011 was investigated by an online coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model WRF-Chem. Dust-induced daily mean radiative forcing (RF) at the ground surface and in the atmosphere were estimated to be -21.1 W m-2 and 12.7 W m-2, respectively, over Gobi desert, and -13.1 W m-2 and 4.8 W m-2, respectively, in downwind region over the North China Plain (NCP). Comparatively, radiative perturbation on short-wave radiation was approximately twice that on long-wave radiation in magnitude. In the daytime, when solar radiation dominated, the surface cooling and atmospheric heating due to dust increased PBL stability, leading to reductions of PBL height (PBLH) about 90 m and decreases in wind speed up to 0.4 m s-1. On the contrary, the radiative forcing in terrestrial radiation caused an opposite response at night, especially in the downwind region. Although dust emission was repressed by weakened wind speed during daytime, the elevated PBLH along with larger deflation at night lifted more dust particles to higher altitude (by up to 75 m in average), which prolonged dust residence time in the atmosphere and further intensified dust loading in downwind areas. Taking dust radiative feedbacks into consideration notably narrowed gaps between model-predicted air temperature vertical profiles with corresponding observations, suggesting a significant importance of dust-radiation interaction in PBL meteorology during dust storms.

  18. Saharan Dust Aerosol Radiative Forcing Measured from Space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Ramanathan, V.

    2004-07-01

    This study uses data collected from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments to determine Saharan dust broadband shortwave aerosol radiative forcing over the Atlantic Ocean near the African coast (15° 25°N, 45° 15°W). The clear-sky aerosol forcing is derived directly from these data, without requiring detailed information about the aerosol properties that are not routinely observed such as chemical composition, microphysical properties, and their height variations. To determine the diurnally averaged Saharan dust radiative forcing efficiency (i.e., broadband shortwave forcing per unit optical depth at 550 nm, W m-2 τ-1a), two extreme seasons are juxtaposed: the high-dust months [June August (JJA)] and the low-dust months [November January (NDJ)]. It is found that the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) diurnal mean forcing efficiency is -35 ± 3 W m-2 τ-1a for JJA, and -26 ± 3 W m-2 τ-1a for NDJ. These efficiencies can be fit by reducing the spectrally varying aerosol single-scattering albedo such that its value at 550 nm is reduced from 0.95 ± 0.04 for JJA to about 0.86 ± 0.04 for NDJ. The lower value for the low-dust months might be influenced by biomass-burning aerosols that were transported into the study region from equatorial Africa. Although the high-dust season has a greater (absolute value of the) TOA forcing efficiency, the low-dust season may have a greater surface forcing efficiency. Extrapolations based on model calculations suggest the surface forcing efficiencies to be about -65 W m-2 τ-1a for the high-dust season versus -81 W m-2 τ-1a for the low-dust season. These observations indicate that the aerosol character within a region can be readily modified, even immediately adjacent to a powerful source region such as the Sahara. This study provides important observational constraints for models of dust radiative forcing.


  19. Simulation of the Radiative Impact of High Dust Loading during a Dust Storm in March 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthan Purakkal, J.; Kalenderski, S.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    We investigated a severe dust storm that developed over vast areas of the Middle East on 18-19 March 2012 and affected Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Egypt, Jordan, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, Kuwait, Iraq, Iran, Israel, and Pakistan. The visible aerosol optical depth recorded by the AERONET station on the KAUST campus (22.30o N 39.10o E) during the storm reached 4.5, exceeding the average level by an order of magnitude. To quantify the effects of the dust on atmospheric radiation and dynamics, we analyzed available ground-based and satellite observations and conducted numerical simulations using a fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model (WRF-Chem). The model was able to reproduce the spatial and temporal patterns of the aerosol optical depths (AOD) observed by airborne and ground-based instruments. The major dust sources included river valleys of lower Tigris and Euphrates in Iraq, desert areas in Kuwait, Iran, United Arab Emirates, central Arabia including Rub' al Khali, An Nafud, and Ad Dahna, as well as the Red Sea coast of the Arabian Peninsula. The total amount of dust generated across the entire domain during the period of the simulation reached 93.76 Mt; 73.04 Mt of dust was deposited within the domain; 6.56 Mt of dust sunk in the adjacent sea waters, including 1.20 Mt that sedimented into the Red Sea. The model predicted a well-mixed boundary layer expanding up to 3.5 km in the afternoon. Some dust plumes were seen above the Planetary Boundary layer. In our simulations, mineral dust heated the lower atmosphere with a maximum heating rate of 9 K/day. The dust storm reduced the downwelling shortwave radiation at the surface to a maximum daily average value of -134 Wm-2 and the daily averaged long-wave forcing at the surface increased to 43 Wm-2. The combined short-wave cooling and long-wave warming effects of dust aerosols caused significant reduction in the surface air temperature -6.7 K at 1200 UTC on 19 March 2013.

  20. Direct Radiative Effect of Intense Dust Outbreaks in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, A.; Obiso, V.; Basart, S.; Jorba, O.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Gassó, S.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The broader Mediterranean basin is affected by intense desert dust outbreaks in spring. In the present study, we make use of satellite observations and modelling to investigate dust radiative impacts during three consecutive dust outbreaks occurred over the Mediterranean in the period 9/4-15/4/2008. The direct radiative effect (DRE) is estimated by using two simulations run with the NMMB/BSC-Dust model, where the interaction between dust aerosols and radiation is activated and deactivated, respectively. The simulation domain covers the North Africa, the Middle East and Europe at 0.25ºx0.25° and 40σ-layers. The first outbreak took place over the central and eastern Mediterranean on the 9th reaching aerosol optical depths (AODs) close to 1. The second one, with AODs up to 2, lasted from 10th to 14th affecting mainly the central Mediterranean. The third one, with AODs up to 5, affected the Iberian Peninsula on the 15th. DREs are computed for the outgoing radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the absorbed radiation into the atmosphere (ATMAB), for the downwelling (SURF) and the absorbed (NETSURF) radiation at surface, for the shortwave (SW), longwave (LW) and NET (SW+LW) radiation. According to our results, it is evident that DREs' spatial patterns are driven by those of AOD. Negative (cooling) instantaneous DRETOA, DRESURF and DRENETSURF values up to -500W/m2, -700W/m2 and -600W/m2, respectively, and positive (warming) instantaneous DREATMAB up to 340W/m2 are found for the SW spectrum, during daytime. Opposite but less pronounced effects are encountered for the LW radiation and during nightime. Due to these perturbations on the radiation field, the surface temperature is reduced locally by up to 8°C during daytime and increased by up to 4°C during nightime. It is found that the regional average NET DREs can be as large as -12W/m2, -45W/m2, -30W/m2 and 27W/m2 for TOA, SURF, NETSURF and ATMAB, respectively. Impacts on atmospheric stability and dust

  1. Interstellar dust as generator of x ray radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    1989-01-01

    The x ray generation due to arising of hot dense plasma balls at high-velocity (greater than or equal to 70 km/s) collisions of dust grains in the interstellar medium is considered. Analytical expressions for efficiency of conversions of colliding dust particle kinetic energy into x ray radiation are presented. The observed intensity distribution of the diffuse component of soft cosmic x rays (0.1 to 1 keV) may be partly caused by collisions between the dusty components of high velocity clouds and of the disk of the Galaxy.

  2. Influence of Dust Loading on Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Gronoff, Guillaume; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the radiation environment at the surface of Mars is the primary goal of the Radiation Assessment Detector on the NASA Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover. One of the conditions that Curiosity will likely encounter is a dust storm. The objective of this paper is to compute the cosmic ray ionization in different conditions, including dust storms, as these various conditions are likely to be encountered by Curiosity at some point. In the present work, the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety model, recently modified for Mars, was used along with the Badhwar & O'Neill 2010 galactic cosmic ray model. In addition to galactic cosmic rays, five different solar energetic particle event spectra were considered. For all input radiation environments, radiation dose throughout the atmosphere and at the surface was investigated as a function of atmospheric dust loading. It is demonstrated that for galactic cosmic rays, the ionization depends strongly on the atmosphere profile. Moreover, it is shown that solar energetic particle events strongly increase the ionization throughout the atmosphere, including ground level, and can account for the radio blackout conditions observed by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft. These results demonstrate that the cosmic rays' influence on the Martian surface chemistry is strongly dependent on solar and atmospheric conditions that should be taken into account for future studies.

  3. Influence of dust loading on atmospheric ionizing radiation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Gronoff, Guillaume; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the radiation environment at the surface of Mars is the primary goal of the Radiation Assessment Detector on the NASA Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover. One of the conditions that Curiosity will likely encounter is a dust storm. The objective of this paper is to compute the cosmic ray ionization in different conditions, including dust storms, as these various conditions are likely to be encountered by Curiosity at some point. In the present work, the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety model, recently modified for Mars, was used along with the Badhwar & O'Neill 2010 galactic cosmic ray model. In addition to galactic cosmic rays, five different solar energetic particle event spectra were considered. For all input radiation environments, radiation dose throughout the atmosphere and at the surface was investigated as a function of atmospheric dust loading. It is demonstrated that for galactic cosmic rays, the ionization depends strongly on the atmosphere profile. Moreover, it is shown that solar energetic particle events strongly increase the ionization throughout the atmosphere, including ground level, and can account for the radio blackout conditions observed by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft. These results demonstrate that the cosmic rays' influence on the Martian surface chemistry is strongly dependent on solar and atmospheric conditions that should be taken into account for future studies.

  4. The radiation-induced rotation of cosmic dust particles: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misconi, N. Y.; Ratcliff, K. F.

    1981-01-01

    A crossed beam, horizontal optical trap, used to achieve laser levitation of particles in an effort to determine how solar radiation produces high spin rate in interplanetary dust particles, is described. It is suggested that random variations in albedo and geometry give rise to a nonzero effective torque when the influence of a unidrectional source of radiaton (due to the Sun) over the surface of a interplanetary dust particle is averaged. This resultant nonzero torque is characterized by an asymmetry factor which is the ratio of the effective moment arm to the maximum linear dimension of the body and is estimated to be 5 X 10 to the minus four power. It is hoped that this symmetry factor, which stabilizes the nonstatistical response of the particle, can be measured in a future Spacelab experiment.

  5. Radiation-pressure-driven dust waves inside bursting interstellar bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsendorf, B. B.; Verdolini, S.; Cox, N. L. J.; Berné, O.; Kaper, L.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2014-06-01

    Massive stars drive the evolution of the interstellar medium through their radiative and mechanical energy input. After their birth, they form "bubbles" of hot gas surrounded by a dense shell. Traditionally, the formation of bubbles is explained through the input of a powerful stellar wind, even though direct evidence supporting this scenario is lacking. Here we explore the possibility that interstellar bubbles seen by the Spitzer- and Herschel space telescopes, blown by stars with log (L/L⊙) ≲ 5.2, form and expand because of the thermal pressure that accompanies the ionization of the surrounding gas. We show that density gradients in the natal cloud or a puncture in the swept-up shell lead to an ionized gas flow through the bubble into the general interstellar medium, which is traced by a dust wave near the star, which demonstrates the importance of radiation pressure during this phase. Dust waves provide a natural explanation for the presence of dust inside H II bubbles, offer a novel method to study dust in H II regions and provide direct evidence that bubbles are relieving their pressure into the interstellar medium through a champagne flow, acting as a probe of the radiative interaction of a massive star with its surroundings. We explore a parameter space connecting the ambient density, the ionizing source luminosity, and the position of the dust wave, while using the well studied H II bubbles RCW 120 and RCW 82 as benchmarks of our model. Finally, we briefly examine the implications of our study for the environments of super star clusters formed in ultraluminous infrared galaxies, merging galaxies, and the early Universe, which occur in very luminous and dense environments and where radiation pressure is expected to dominate the dynamical evolution.

  6. CARMA observations of Galactic cold cores: searching for spinning dust emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbs, C. T.; Paladini, R.; Cleary, K.; Muchovej, S. J. C.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Stevenson, M. A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Ysard, N.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rumsey, C.; Villadsen, J.

    2015-11-01

    We present the first search for spinning dust emission from a sample of 34 Galactic cold cores, performed using the CARMA interferometer. For each of our cores, we use photometric data from the Herschel Space Observatory to constrain bar{N}H, bar{T}d, bar{n}H, and bar{G}0. By computing the mass of the cores and comparing it to the Bonnor-Ebert mass, we determined that 29 of the 34 cores are gravitationally unstable and undergoing collapse. In fact, we found that six cores are associated with at least one young stellar object, suggestive of their protostellar nature. By investigating the physical conditions within each core, we can shed light on the cm emission revealed (or not) by our CARMA observations. Indeed, we find that only three of our cores have any significant detectable cm emission. Using a spinning dust model, we predict the expected level of spinning dust emission in each core and find that for all 34 cores, the predicted level of emission is larger than the observed cm emission constrained by the CARMA observations. Moreover, even in the cores for which we do detect cm emission, we cannot, at this stage, discriminate between free-free emission from young stellar objects and spinning dust emission. We emphasize that although the CARMA observations described in this analysis place important constraints on the presence of spinning dust in cold, dense environments, the source sample targeted by these observations is not statistically representative of the entire population of Galactic cores.

  7. Long-wave radiative forcing due to mineral dust aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, L. N.; Collins, W.

    2010-12-01

    Radiative forcing due to aerosols has been identified by the IPCC as a major contributor to the total radiative forcing uncertainty budget. Optically thick plumes of dust and pollutants extending out from Africa and Asia can be lifted into the middle troposphere and often are transported over synoptic length scales. These events can decrease the upwelling long-wave fluxes at the top of the atmosphere, especially in the mid-infrared "window". Typically these effects have not been included in model simulations and the spectrally integrated effects of aerosols on the planetary long-wave energy budget have not employed satellite data to produce systematic global estimates. In this study we will show initial results for the quantitative determination of a global radiative forcing due to mineral dust calculated using A-train satellite instrument measurements from AIRS, TES, and MODIS. The initial results focus on localized dust outbreaks, over Australia, Africa and Asia, and describe the methods that will be implemented for the determination of a quantitative global radiative forcing estimate.

  8. Dust Long-Range Transport and the Dust-Radiation Effects on the Modification of the SAL Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Wang, S.; Waylonis, M.; Sc

    2010-12-01

    A tracer model based on the Weather Research and Forecast model was developed to simulate dust long-range transport for a dust outbreak event that occurred during July 18-20, 2005. Two numerical experiments were conducted with (ON) and without (OFF) the dust-radiation effects. Simulations were compared with the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and results were very reasonable. The influence of dust-radiation effects on the modification of Saharan Air Layer (SAL), which can have a substantial influence on Tropical Cyclone (TC) activities over the eastern Atlantic Ocean, was also investigated. Suspended dust was able to reduce the net downward shortwave radiation by more than 300 W m-2 on the surface. The modification of temperature profiles due to dust-radiation effects resulted in the adjustment of the vertical shear. The dust-radiation effects also modified the dust distribution, which can have a feedback to the heating profile and the vertical shear.

  9. Exploring the Longwave Radiative Effects of Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansell, Richard A., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Dust aerosols not only affect air quality and visibility where they pose a significant health and safety risk, but they can also play a role in modulating the energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system by directly interacting with local radiative fields. Consequently, dust aerosols can impact regional climate patterns such as changes in precipitation and the evolution of the hydrological cycle. Assessing the direct effect of dust aerosols at the solar wavelengths is fairly straightforward due in part to the relatively large signal-to-noise ratio in broadband irradiance measurements. The longwave (LW) impacts, on the other hand, are rather difficult to ascertain since the measured dust signal level (10 Wm-2) is on the same order as the instrumental uncertainties. Moreover, compared to the shortwave (SW), limited experimental data on the LW optical properties of dust makes it a difficult challenge for constraining the LW impacts. Owing to the strong absorption features found in many terrestrial minerals (e.g., silicates and clays), the LW effects, although much smaller in magnitude compared to the SW, can still have a sizeable impact on the energetics of the Earth-atmosphere system, which can potentially trigger changes in the heat and moisture surface budgets, and dynamics of the atmosphere. The current endeavor is an integral part of an on-going research study to perform detailed assessments of dust direct aerosol radiative effects (DARE) using comprehensive global datasets from NASA Goddards mobile ground-based facility (cf. http://smartlabs.gsfc.nasa.gov/) during previous field experiments near key dust source regions. Here we examine and compare the results from two of these studies: the 2006 NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities and the 2008 Asian Monsoon Years. The former study focused on transported Saharan dust at Sal Island (16.73N, 22.93W), Cape Verde along the west coast of Africa while the latter focused on Asian dust at Zhangye China (39

  10. The influence of absorbed solar radiation by Saharan dust on hurricane genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretl, Sebastian; Reutter, Philipp; Raible, Christoph C.; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Poberaj, Christina Schnadt; Revell, Laura E.; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2015-03-01

    To date, the radiative impact of dust and the Saharan air layer (SAL) on North Atlantic hurricane activity is not yet known. According to previous studies, dust stabilizes the atmosphere due to absorption of solar radiation but thus shifts convection to regions more conducive for hurricane genesis. Here we analyze differences in hurricane genesis and frequency from ensemble sensitivity simulations with radiatively active and inactive dust in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM6-HAM. We investigate dust burden and other hurricane-related variables and determine their influence on disturbances which develop into hurricanes (developing disturbances, DDs) and those which do not (nondeveloping disturbances, NDDs). Dust and the SAL are found to potentially have both inhibiting and supporting influences on background conditions for hurricane genesis. A slight southward shift of DDs is determined when dust is active as well as a significant warming of the SAL, which leads to a strengthening of the vertical circulation associated with the SAL. The dust burden of DDs is smaller in active dust simulations compared to DDs in simulations with inactive dust, while NDDs contain more dust in active dust simulations. However, no significant influence of radiatively active dust on other variables in DDs and NDDs is found. Furthermore, no substantial change in the DD and NDD frequency due to the radiative effects of dust can be detected.

  11. The Influence of Dust-radiation-microphysics Processes on Tropical Cyclone Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Cheng, C.; Chen, J.; Lin, Y.; Lee, H.; Tsai, I.

    2011-12-01

    Saharan dust can modify the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) and its environment by changing the energy budget through direct and indirect radiative forcing. Scattering and absorption of radiation by suspended dust directly modifies the energy budget in the atmosphere and at the surface. Smaller dust particles can remain suspended in the air for prolonged periods and propagate over the Atlantic Ocean along with SAL. These fine particles can reach an altitude of 8-9 km, where they nucleate ice crystals and transform cloud microphysical properties, indirectly changing the energy budget. Thus, the dust within the air mass is likely to affect the evolution of hurricane properties, life cycles, and the corresponding cloud systems through the dust-cloud-radiation interactions. A tracer model based on the Weather Research and Forecasting model (named WRFT) was developed to study the influence of dust-radiation-microphysics effects on hurricane activities. The dust-radiation effects and a two-moment microphysics scheme with dust particles acting as ice nuclei were implemented into WRFT. In this work, two easterly waves, which were precursors of Tropical Storm Debby and Hurricane Ernesto, during 18-25 August 2006 were studied. Four high-resolution numerical experiments were conducted with the combinations of activating/deactivating dust-radiation and/or dust-microphysics processes. Results from these four experiments are compared to investigate the influence of dust-radiation-microphysics processes on these two storm developments.

  12. Magnon emission and radiation induced by spin-polarized current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zholud, Andrei; Freeman, Ryan; Cao, Rongxing; Urazhdin, Sergei

    The spin-torque effect due to spin injection into ferromagnets can affect their effective dynamical damping, and modify the magnon populations. The latter leads to the onset of nonlinear damping that can prevent spontaneous current-induced magnetization oscillations. It has been argued that these nonlinear processes can be eliminate by the radiation of magnons excited by local spin injection in extended magnetic films. To test these effects, studied of the effects of spin injection on the magnon populations in nanoscale spin valves and magnetic point contacts. Measurements of the giant magnetoresistance show a significant resistance component that is antisymmetric in current, and linearly dependent on temperature T. This component is significantly larger for the nanopatterned ferromagnets than for point contacts. We interpret our observations in terms of stimulated generation of magnons by the spin current, and their radiation in point contacts. Supported by NSF ECCS-1305586, ECCS-1509794.

  13. Radiative Effects of Saharan Mineral Dust Aerosols on the Structure of African Easterly Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercos-Hickey, E.; Nathan, T. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    How Saharan mineral dust affects the structure of African easterly waves (AEWs) is an outstanding scientific question. Addressing this question is important because AEWs often serve as precursors to the development of tropical storms off of West Africa. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting Dust (WRFD) model is used to examine the radiative effects of Saharan dust on the structure of AEWs that occurred in July 1995. Two numerical experiments are conducted. The first (control) experiment uses the standard WRF model in the absence of dust. The second experiment is identical to the first, but includes the transport and radiative effects of dust. Dust is modeled by 12 continuity equations for dust-sized particles that represent the spectrum of mineral dust in the atmosphere. Analysis and comparison of the no-dust and dust experiments show that Saharan dust significantly affects the structure of AEWs. For example, a spectral density analysis of the AEWs shows that dust causes higher peak power during the 3 to 6 day period at 700mb. For the meridional wind over Dakar in West Africa, the dust causes the power to increase by about 82% and to shift to a lower frequency by about a half day. Covariance plots show spatial shifts, structural changes and magnitude differences in the AEWs between the dust and no dust experiments. Calculations show that the dust causes the maximum in momentum flux to increase by about 4%. The African easterly jet (AEJ) also shows changes between the dust and no dust experiments. Ongoing work includes quantifying the structural changes of AEWs and the AEJ.

  14. Outward Motion of Porous Dust Aggregates by Stellar Radiation Pressure in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazaki, Ryo; Nomura, Hideko

    2015-02-01

    We study the dust motion at the surface layer of protoplanetary disks. Dust grains in the surface layer migrate outward owing to angular momentum transport via gas-drag force induced by the stellar radiation pressure. In this study we calculate the mass flux of the outward motion of compact grains and porous dust aggregates by the radiation pressure. The radiation pressure force for porous dust aggregates is calculated using the T-Matrix Method for the Clusters of Spheres. First, we confirm that porous dust aggregates are forced by strong radiation pressure even if they grow to be larger aggregates, in contrast to homogeneous and spherical compact grains, for which radiation pressure efficiency becomes lower when their sizes increase. In addition, we find that the outward mass flux of porous dust aggregates with monomer size of 0.1 μm is larger than that of compact grains by an order of magnitude at the disk radius of 1 AU, when their sizes are several microns. This implies that large compact grains like calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions are hardly transported to the outer region by stellar radiation pressure, whereas porous dust aggregates like chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles are efficiently transported to the comet formation region. Crystalline silicates are possibly transported in porous dust aggregates by stellar radiation pressure from the inner hot region to the outer cold cometary region in the protosolar nebula.

  15. OUTWARD MOTION OF POROUS DUST AGGREGATES BY STELLAR RADIATION PRESSURE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tazaki, Ryo; Nomura, Hideko

    2015-02-01

    We study the dust motion at the surface layer of protoplanetary disks. Dust grains in the surface layer migrate outward owing to angular momentum transport via gas-drag force induced by the stellar radiation pressure. In this study we calculate the mass flux of the outward motion of compact grains and porous dust aggregates by the radiation pressure. The radiation pressure force for porous dust aggregates is calculated using the T-Matrix Method for the Clusters of Spheres. First, we confirm that porous dust aggregates are forced by strong radiation pressure even if they grow to be larger aggregates, in contrast to homogeneous and spherical compact grains, for which radiation pressure efficiency becomes lower when their sizes increase. In addition, we find that the outward mass flux of porous dust aggregates with monomer size of 0.1 μm is larger than that of compact grains by an order of magnitude at the disk radius of 1 AU, when their sizes are several microns. This implies that large compact grains like calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions are hardly transported to the outer region by stellar radiation pressure, whereas porous dust aggregates like chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles are efficiently transported to the comet formation region. Crystalline silicates are possibly transported in porous dust aggregates by stellar radiation pressure from the inner hot region to the outer cold cometary region in the protosolar nebula.

  16. A critical evaluation of the ability of the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) thermal infrared red-green-blue rendering to identify dust events: Theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindley, Helen; Knippertz, Peter; Ryder, Claire; Ashpole, Ian

    2012-04-01

    Using a combination of idealized radiative transfer simulations and a case study from the first field campaign of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) in southern Morocco, this paper provides a systematic assessment of the limitations of the widely used Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) red-green-blue (RGB) thermal infrared dust product. Both analyses indicate that the ability of the product to identify dust, via its characteristic pink coloring, is strongly dependent on the column water vapor, the lower tropospheric lapse rate, and dust altitude. In particular, when column water vapor exceeds ˜20-25 mm, dust presence, even for visible optical depths of the order 0.8, is effectively masked. Variability in dust optical properties also has a marked impact on the imagery, primarily as a result of variability in dust composition. There is a moderate sensitivity to the satellite viewing geometry, particularly in moist conditions. The underlying surface can act to confound the signal seen through variations in spectral emissivity, which are predominantly manifested in the 8.7μm SEVIRI channel. In addition, if a temperature inversion is present, typical of early morning conditions over the Sahara and Sahel, an increased dust loading can actually reduce the pink coloring of the RGB image compared to pristine conditions. Attempts to match specific SEVIRI observations to simulations using SAMUM measurements are challenging because of high uncertainties in surface skin temperature and emissivity. Recommendations concerning the use and interpretation of the SEVIRI RGB imagery are provided on the basis of these findings.

  17. Sensitivity simulations with direct shortwave radiative forcing by aeolian dust during glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, E.; Ganopolski, A.

    2014-07-01

    Possible feedback effects between aeolian dust, climate and ice sheets are studied for the first time with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity over the late Pleistocene period. Correlations between climate and dust deposition records suggest that aeolian dust potentially plays an important role for the evolution of glacial cycles. Here climatic effects from the dust direct radiative forcing (DRF) caused by absorption and scattering of solar radiation are investigated. Key elements controlling the dust DRF are the atmospheric dust distribution and the absorption-scattering efficiency of dust aerosols. Effective physical parameters in the description of these elements are varied within uncertainty ranges known from available data and detailed model studies. Although the parameters can be reasonably constrained, the simulated dust DRF spans a~wide uncertainty range related to the strong nonlinearity of the Earth system. In our simulations, the dust DRF is highly localized. Medium-range parameters result in negative DRF of several watts per square metre in regions close to major dust sources and negligible values elsewhere. In the case of high absorption efficiency, the local dust DRF can reach positive values and the global mean DRF can be insignificantly small. In the case of low absorption efficiency, the dust DRF can produce a significant global cooling in glacial periods, which leads to a doubling of the maximum glacial ice volume relative to the case with small dust DRF. DRF-induced temperature and precipitation changes can either be attenuated or amplified through a feedback loop involving the dust cycle. The sensitivity experiments suggest that depending on dust optical parameters, dust DRF has the potential to either damp or reinforce glacial-interglacial climate changes.

  18. The Mars Dust Cycle: Investigating the Effects of Radiatively Active Water Ice Clouds on Surface Stresses and Dust Lifting Potential with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Hollingsworth, Jeffery

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is a critically important component of Mars' current climate system. Dust is present in the atmosphere of Mars year-round but the dust loading varies with season in a generally repeatable manner. Dust has a significant influence on the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation. The dust cycle is the most difficult of the three climate cycles (CO2, water, and dust) to model realistically with general circulation models. Until recently, numerical modeling investigations of the dust cycle have typically not included the effects of couplings to the water cycle through cloud formation. In the Martian atmosphere, dust particles likely provide the seed nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation of water ice clouds. As ice coats atmospheric dust grains, the newly formed cloud particles exhibit different physical and radiative characteristics. Thus, the coupling between the dust and water cycles likely affects the distributions of dust, water vapor and water ice, and thus atmospheric heating and cooling and the resulting circulations. We use the NASA Ames Mars GCM to investigate the effects of radiatively active water ice clouds on surface stress and the potential for dust lifting. The model includes a state-of-the-art water ice cloud microphysics package and a radiative transfer scheme that accounts for the radiative effects of CO2 gas, dust, and water ice clouds. We focus on simulations that are radiatively forced by a prescribed dust map, and we compare simulations that do and do not include radiatively active clouds. Preliminary results suggest that the magnitude and spatial patterns of surface stress (and thus dust lifting potential) are substantial influenced by the radiative effects of water ice clouds.

  19. Uniform Dust Distributor for Testing Radiative Emittance of Dust-Coated Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, Kathryn Miller; Witte, Larry C.; Hollingsworth, D. Keith

    2012-01-01

    This apparatus distributes dust (typical of the Martian surface) in a uniform fashion on the surface of multiple samples simultaneously. The primary innovation is that the amount of dust deposited on the multiple surfaces can be controlled by the time that the apparatus operates, and each sample will be subject to the same amount of dust deposition. The exact weight of dust that is added per unit of sample area is determined by the use of slides that can be removed sequentially after each dusting.

  20. Response of mesoscale convective system (MCS) and cold pool formation to dust-radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waylonis, M. T.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the role of dust in the development of a mesoscale convective system (MCS) over the central-west Sahara, and how cold pools from the MCS feedback to dust emissions. Few studies have simulated the direct-radiative effects of dust on cloud development. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging Spectrometer (MISR) Retrieved aerosol optical depth and Meteosat Second Generation dust enhancement product were used to examine a dust outbreak that occurred between 13 and 15 August 2005 and revealed that an moist intrusion into the Sahara caused a MCS to form and resulted in dust emission due to cold pool outflow from the MCS. A dust model based on the Weather Research and Forecasting model was developed to include dust emissions, transport, dry and moist deposition, and radiation interactions and was used to simulate the case. Dust-radiation interactions were found to enhance convective strength through low-level heating, which increased convective available potential energy and low-level convergence. The increased intensity of the convection led to stronger and more widespread cold pool formation, which in turn emitted more dust into the atmosphere.

  1. Sensitivity simulations with direct radiative forcing by aeolian dust during glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, E.; Ganopolski, A.

    2014-01-01

    Possible feedback effects between aeolian dust, climate and ice sheets are studied for the first time with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity over the late Pleistocene period. Correlations between climate variables and dust deposits suggest that aeolian dust potentially plays an important role for the evolution of glacial cycles. Here climatic effects from the dust direct radiative forcing (DRF) caused by absorption and scattering of solar radiation are investigated. Key factors controlling the dust DRF are the atmospheric dust distribution and the absorption-scattering efficiency of dust aerosols. Effective physical parameters in the description of these factors are varied within uncertainty ranges known from available data and detailed model studies. Although the parameters are reasonably constrained by use of these studies, the simulated dust DRF spans a wide uncertainty range related to nonlinear dependencies. In our simulations, the dust DRF is highly localized. Medium-range parameters result in negative DRF of several W m-2 in regions close to major dust sources and negligible values elsewhere. In case of high absorption efficiency, the local dust DRF can reach positive values and the global mean DRF can be insignificantly small. In case of low absorption efficiency, the dust DRF can produce a significant global cooling in glacial periods which leads to a doubling of the maximum glacial ice volume relative to the case with small dust DRF. DRF-induced temperature and precipitation changes can either be attenuated or amplified through a feedback loop involving the dust cycle. The sensitivity experiments suggest that depending on dust optical parameters the DRF has the potential to either damp or reinforce glacial-interglacial climate changes.

  2. Impact of radiatively interactive dust aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 climate model: Sensitivity to dust particle shape and refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colarco, Peter R.; Nowottnick, Edward P.; Randles, Cynthia A.; Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Smith, Jamison A.; Bardeen, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    The radiative effects of Saharan dust aerosols are investigated in the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model. A sectional aerosol microphysics model (CARMA) is run online in GEOS-5. CARMA treats the dust aerosol lifecycle, and its tracers are radiatively coupled to GEOS-5. A series of AMIP-style simulations are performed, in which input dust optical properties (particle shape and refractive index) are varied. Simulated dust distributions for summertime Saharan dust compare well to observations, with best results found when the most absorbing dust optical properties are assumed. Dust absorption leads to a strengthening of the summertime Hadley cell circulation, increased dust lofting to higher altitudes, and a strengthening of the African easterly jet, resulting in increased dust atmospheric lifetime and farther northward and westward transport. We find a positive feedback of dust radiative forcing on emissions, in contrast with previous studies, which we attribute to our having a relatively strong longwave forcing caused by our simulating larger effective particle sizes. This longwave forcing reduces the magnitude of midday net surface cooling relative to other studies, and leads to a nighttime warming that results in higher nighttime wind speeds and dust emissions. The radiative effects of dust particle shape have only minor impact on transport and emissions, with small (~5%) impact on top of atmosphere shortwave forcing, in line with previous studies, but relatively more pronounced effects on shortwave atmospheric heating and surface forcing (~20% increase in atmospheric forcing for spheroids). Shape effects on longwave heating terms are of order ~10%.

  3. Mineral dust radiative effect on snow in European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, Biagio; Fava, Francesco; Ferrero, Luca; Garzonio, Roberto; Baccolo, Giovanni; Delmonte, Barbara; Colombo, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Mineral Dust (MD) is known to increase the absorption of solar radiation when deposited on snow and ice. This process causes a decrease in the albedo and may enhance snow melting, resulting in a positive radiative forcing (RF) in climate system. The RF from MD on snow can assume high values (~100-200 W/m2) after depositional events altering snow and ice radiative balance and hydrological cycle. In this study, we analyzed a significant MD transport happened during spring in 2014 and in particular its impact on snow optical properties. The dust plume was entrained in the troposphere over the Saharan desert (North African Grand Erg Oriental) during the passage of a cold front, and then transported NE over the Mediterranean by cyclonic atmospheric conditions. MD reached the European Alps where it was deposited by snowfall. We conducted a field proximal sensing survey in 10 plots (2x2 meters) at the Artavaggio plains (Lecco, Italy) with a hyperspectral radiometer (ASD Field-spec pro) collecting reflected radiance of snow in a spectral range between 350 and 2500 nm. Surface snow samples were collected and analyzed in clean room with microparticle counter in order to determine the size distribution and the concentration of MD in each sample. In addition, total mass of insoluble material was also measured by filtering the melted snow. Observed spectra were compared to those simulated by parameterizing the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) radiative transfer model with observed variables such as snow grain size, snow density and size distribution of MD. We defined a novel spectral index, the Snow Darkening Index (SDI) to combine red and green wavelengths showing nonlinear correlation with measured MD concentration. Instantaneous radiative forcing was then estimated as the spectral difference between upwelling irradiance of plot containing MD and pure snow plots. MD concentration was up to 107 ppm and total mass of insoluble material up to 325 ppm. Measured RF values

  4. A solar escalator on Mars: Self-lifting of dust layers by radiative heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daerden, F.; Whiteway, J. A.; Neary, L.; Komguem, L.; Lemmon, M. T.; Heavens, N. G.; Cantor, B. A.; Hébrard, E.; Smith, M. D.

    2015-09-01

    Dust layers detected in the atmosphere of Mars by the light detection and ranging (LIDAR) instrument on the Phoenix Mars mission are explained using an atmospheric general circulation model. The layers were traced back to observed dust storm activity near the edge of the north polar ice cap where simulated surface winds exceeded the threshold for dust lifting by saltation. Heating of the atmospheric dust by solar radiation caused buoyant instability and mixing across the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Differential advection by wind shear created detached dust layers above the PBL that ascended due to radiative heating and arrived at the Phoenix site at heights corresponding to the LIDAR observations. The self-lifting of the dust layers is similar to the "solar escalator" mechanism for aerosol layers in the Earth's stratosphere.

  5. Effects of dust accumulation and removal on radiator surfaces on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Gaier, J.R.; Perez-Davis, M.E.; Rutledge, S.K.; Hotes, D.; Olle, R.

    1991-01-01

    Tests were carried out to assess the impact of wind blown dust accumulation and abrasion on radiator surfaces on Mars. High emittance arc-textured copper (Cu) and niobium-1%-zirconium (Nb-1%Zr) samples were subjected to basaltic dust laden wind at Martian pressure (1000 Pa) at speeds varying from 19 to 97 m/s in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The effect of accumulated dust was also observed by pre-dusting some of the samples before the test. Radiator degradation was determined by measuring the change in the emittance after dust was deposited and/or removed. The principal mode of degradation was abrasion. Arc-textured Nb-1%Zr proved to be more susceptible to degradation than Cu, and pre-dusting appeared to have lessened the abrasion.

  6. Accounting for dust aerosol size distribution in radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangnan; Min, Qilong; Peng, Yiran; Sun, Zhian; Zhao, Jian-Qi

    2015-07-01

    The impact of size distribution of mineral dust aerosol on radiative transfer was investigated using the Aerosol Robotic Network-retrieved aerosol size distributions. Three methods for determining the aerosol optical properties using size distributions were discussed. The first is referred to as a bin method in which the aerosol optical properties are determined for each bin of the size distribution. The second is named as an assembly mean method in which the aerosol optical properties are determined with an integration of the aerosol optical parameters over the observed size distribution. The third is a normal parameterization method based on an assumed size distribution. The bin method was used to generate the benchmark results in the radiation calculations against the methods of the assembly mean, and parameterizations based on two size distribution functions, namely, lognormal and gamma were examined. It is seen that the assembly mean method can produce aerosol radiative forcing with accuracy of better than 1%. The accuracies of the parameterizations based on lognormal and gamma size distributions are about 25% and 5%, respectively. Both the lognormal and gamma size distributions can be determined by two parameters, the effective radius and effective variance. The better results from the gamma size distribution can be explained by a third parameter of skewness which is found to be useful for judging how close the assumed distribution is to the observation result. The parameterizations based on the two assumed size distributions are also evaluated in a climate model. The results show that the reflected solar fluxes over the desert areas determined by the scheme based on the gamma size distribution are about 1 W m-2 less than those from the scheme based on the lognormal size distribution, bringing the model results closer to the observations.

  7. Impact of Asian Dust on Global Surface Air Quality and Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Yu, Hongbin; Ginoux, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Dust originating from Asian deserts and desertification areas can be transported regionally and globally to affect surface air quality, visibility, and radiation budget not only at immediate downwind locations (e.g., eastern Asia) but also regions far away from the sources (e.g., North America). Deposition of Asian dust to the North Pacific Ocean basin influences the ocean productivity. In this study, we will use the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model, remote sensing data form satellite and from the ground-based network, and in-situ data from aircraft and surface observations to address the following questions: - What are the effects of Asian dust on the surface air quality and visibility over Asia and North America? - What are the seasonal and spatial variations of dust deposition to the North Pacific Ocean? How does the Asian dust affect surface radiation budget?

  8. Regional Modeling of Dust Mass Balance and Radiative Forcing over East Asia using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Siyu; Zhao, Chun; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, J.; Huang, Zhongwei; Bi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wu; Shi, Jinsen; Yang, Lei; Li, Deshuai; Li, Jinxin

    2014-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to investigate the seasonal and annual variations of mineral dust over East Asia during 2007-2011, with a focus on the dust mass balance and radiative forcing. A variety of measurements from in-stu and satellite observations have been used to evaluate simulation results. Generally, WRF-Chem reproduces not only the column variability but also the vertical profile and size distribution of mineral dust over and near the dust source regions of East Asia. We investigate the dust lifecycle and the factors that control the seasonal and spatial variations of dust mass balance and radiative forcing over the seven sub-regions of East Asia, i.e. source regions, the Tibetan Plateau, Northern China, Southern China, the ocean outflow region, and Korea-Japan regions. Results show that, over the source regions, transport and dry deposition are the two dominant sinks. Transport contributes to ~30% of the dust sink over the source regions. Dust results in a surface cooling of up to -14 and -10 W m-2, atmospheric warming of up to 20 and 15 W m-2, and TOA cooling of -5 and -8 W m-2 over the two major dust source regions of East Asia, respectively. Over the Tibetan Plateau, transport is the dominant source with a peak in summer. Over identified outflow regions, maximum dust mass loading in spring is contributed by the transport. Dry and wet depositions are the comparably dominant sinks, but wet deposition is larger than dry deposition over the Korea-Japan region, particularly in spring (70% versus 30%). The WRF-Chem simulations can generally capture the measured features of dust aerosols and its radaitve properties and dust mass balance over East Asia, which provides confidence for use in further investigation of dust impact on climate over East Asia.

  9. Weakly Dissipative Dust Ion-Acoustic Solitons in the Presence of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Golub', A. P.; Izvekova, Y. N.; Losseva, T. V.; Popel, S. I.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-11-29

    We present the model, which describes nonlinear dust ion-acoustic (DIA) perturbations in complex plasmas with electromagnetic radiation. We study time-evolution of the individual DIA soliton and interaction of two DIA solitons.

  10. Estimation of Asian Dust Aerosol Effect on Cloud Radiation Forcing Using Fu-Liou Radiative Model and CERES Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Jing; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang; Minnis, Patrick; Ge, Jinming; Bi, Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    The impact of Asian dust on cloud radiative forcing during 2003-2006 is studied by using the Earth's Radiant Energy Budget Scanner (CERES) data and the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model. Analysis of satellite data shows that the dust aerosol significantly reduced the cloud cooling effect at TOA. In dust contaminated cloudy regions, the 4-year mean values of the instantaneous shortwave, longwave and net cloud radiative forcing are -138.9, 69.1, and -69.7 Wm(sup -2), which are 57.0, 74.2, and 46.3%, respectively, of the corresponding values in more pristine cloudy regions. The satellite-retrieved cloud properties are significantly different in the dusty regions and can influence the radiative forcing indirectly. The contributions to the cloud radiation forcing by the dust direct, indirect and semi-direct effects are estimated using combined satellite observations and Fu-Liou model simulation. The 4-year mean value of combination of indirect and semi-direct shortwave radiative forcing (SWRF) is 82.2 Wm(sup -2), which is 78.4% of the total dust effect. The direct effect is only 22.7 Wm(sup -2), which is 21.6% of the total effect. Because both first and second indirect effects enhance cloud cooling, the aerosol-induced cloud warming is mainly the result of the semi-direct effect of dust.

  11. Saharan Dust Event Impacts on Cloud Formation and Radiation over Western Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, M.; Nenes, A.; Vogel, B.; Vogel, H.; Barahona, D.; Karydis, V. A.; Kumar, P.; Kottmeier, C.; Blahak, U.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the impact of mineral dust particles on clouds, radiation and atmospheric state during a strong Saharan dust event over Europe in May 2008, applying a comprehensive online-coupled regional model framework that explicitly treats particle-microphysics and chemical composition. Sophisticated parameterizations for aerosol activation and ice nucleation, together with two-moment cloud microphysics are used to calculate the interaction of the different particles with clouds depending on their physical and chemical properties. The impact of dust on cloud droplet number concentration was found to be low, with just a slight increase in cloud droplet number concentration for both uncoated and coated dust. For temperatures lower than the level of homogeneous freezing, no significant impact of dust on the number and mass concentration of ice crystals was found, though the concentration of frozen dust particles reached up to 100 l-1 during the ice nucleation events. Mineral dust particles were found to have the largest impact on clouds in a temperature range between freezing level and the level of homogeneous freezing, where they determined the number concentration of ice crystals due to efficient heterogeneous freezing of the dust particles and modified the glaciation of mixed phase clouds. Our simulations show that during the dust events, ice crystals concentrations were increased twofold in this temperature range (compared to if dust interactions are neglected). This had a significant impact on the cloud optical properties, causing a reduction in the incoming short-wave radiation at the surface up to -75Wm-2. Including the direct interaction of dust with radiation caused an additional reduction in the incoming short-wave radiation by 40 to 80Wm-2, and the incoming long-wave radiation at the surface was increased significantly in the order of +10Wm-2. The strong radiative forcings associated with dust caused a reduction in surface temperature in the order of -0

  12. Dust radiative forcing in snow of the Upper Colorado River Basin: 2. Interannual variability in radiative forcing and snowmelt rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiles, S. Mckenzie; Painter, Thomas H.; Deems, Jeffrey S.; Bryant, Ann C.; Landry, Christopher C.

    2012-07-01

    Here we present the radiative and snowmelt impacts of dust deposition to snow cover using a 6-year energy balance record (2005-2010) at alpine and subalpine micrometeorological towers in the Senator Beck Basin Study Area (SBBSA) in southwestern Colorado, USA. These results follow from the measurements described in part I. We simulate the evolution of snow water equivalent at each station under scenarios of observed and dust-free conditions, and +2°C and +4°C melt-season temperature perturbations to these scenarios. Over the 6 years of record, daily mean dust radiative forcing ranged from 0 to 214 W m-2, with hourly peaks up to 409 W m-2. Mean springtime dust radiative forcings across the period ranged from 31 to 49 W m-2 at the alpine site and 45 to 75 W m-2 at the subalpine site, in turn shortening snow cover duration by 21 to 51 days. The dust-advanced loss of snow cover (days) is linearly related to total dust concentration at the end of snow cover, despite temporal variability in dust exposure and solar irradiance. Under clean snow conditions, the temperature increases shorten snow cover by 5-18 days, whereas in the presence of dust they only shorten snow duration by 0-6 days. Dust radiative forcing also causes faster and earlier peak snowmelt outflow with daily mean snowpack outflow doubling under the heaviest dust conditions. On average, snow cover at the towers is lost 2.5 days after peak outflow in dusty conditions, and 1-2 weeks after peak outflow in clean conditions.

  13. The spatial distribution of mineral dust and its shortwave radiative forcing over North Africa. Modeling sensitivities to dust emissions and aerosol size treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Johnson, Ben; McFarlane, Sally A.; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-09-20

    A fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model (WRF-Chem) with the implementation of two dust emission schemes (GOCART and DUSTRAN) into two aerosol models (MADE/SORGAM and MOSAIC) is applied over North Africa to investigate the modeling sensitivities to dust emissions and aerosol size treatments in simulating mineral dust and its shortwave (SW) radiative forcing. Model results of the spatial distribution of mineral dust and its radiative forcing are evaluated using measurements from the AMMA SOP0 campaign in January and February of 2006 over North Africa. Our study suggests that the size distribution of emitted dust can result in significant differences (up to 100%) in simulating mineral dust and its SW radiative forcing. With the same dust emission and dry deposition processes, two aerosol models, MADE/SORGAM and MOSAIC, can yield large difference in size distributions of dust particles due to their different aerosol size treatments using modal and sectional approaches respectively. However, the difference between the two aerosol models in simulating the mass concentrations and the SW radiative forcing of mineral dust is small (< 10%). The model simulations show that mineral dust increases AOD by a factor of 2, heats the lower atmosphere (1-3 km) with a maximum rate of 0.7±0.5 K day-1 below 1 km, and reduces the downwelling SW radiation by up to 25 W m-2 on 24-hour average at surface, highlighting the importance of including dust radiative impact in understanding the regional climate of North Africa. When compared to the available measurements, WRF-Chem simulations can generally capture the measured features of mineral dust and its radiative properties over North Africa, suggesting that the model can be used to perform more extensive simulations of regional climate over North Africa.

  14. The Effect of Asian Dust Aerosols on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing from MODIS and CERES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jianping; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bing; Wang, Tianhe; Yi, Yuhong; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Ayers, Kirk

    2005-01-01

    The effects of dust storms on cloud properties and radiative forcing are analyzed over northwestern China from April 2001 to June 2004 using data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on the Aqua and Terra satellites. On average, ice cloud effective particle diameter, optical depth and ice water path of the cirrus clouds under dust polluted conditions are 11%, 32.8%, and 42% less, respectively, than those derived from ice clouds in dust-free atmospheric environments. The humidity differences are larger in the dusty region than in the dust-free region, and may be caused by removal of moisture by wet dust precipitation. Due to changes in cloud microphysics, the instantaneous net radiative forcing is reduced from -71.2 W/m2 for dust contaminated clouds to -182.7 W/m2 for dust-free clouds. The reduced cooling effects of dusts may lead to a net warming of 1 W/m2, which, if confirmed, would be the strongest aerosol forcing during later winter and early spring dust storm seasons over the studied region.

  15. Mineral Dust Impact on Short- and Long-Wave Radiation and Comparison with Ceres Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Salvatore; Perrone, Maria Rita

    2016-06-01

    Clear-sky downward and upward radiative flux measurements both in the short- and in the long-wave spectral range have been used to estimate and analyze the radiation changes at the surface due to the mineral dust advection at a Central Mediterranean site. Then, short- and long-wave radiative fluxes retrieved from the CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) radiometer sensors operating on board the EOS (Earth Observing System) AQUA and TERRA platforms have been used to evaluate the mineral dust radiative impact at the top of the atmosphere. Satellite-derived radiative fluxes at the surface have been compared with corresponding ground-based flux measurements, collocated in space and time, to better support and understand the desert dust radiative impact. Results referring to the year 2012 are reported.

  16. Characterisation of mineral dust emission in the Middle EAST using the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennen, M.; Shahgedanova, M.; White, K.

    2015-12-01

    Using the Spinning Enhanced Visual and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on-board Meteosat's second generation satellite (MSG), mineral dust emissions from the Middle East were observed at a high temporal and spatial resolution between the years 2006 and 2013. This research provides a subjective derivation of mineral dust source locations in the Middle East using the thermal infrared Dust RGB product. Focusing on the brightness temperature difference around 10.8 µm channel and their spectral contrast with clear sky conditions, the Dust RGB product has been recognised as a major asset in detecting dust. While the product has already been used to map dust emissions in Sahara and south Africa, this research is the first to map dust emissions in the Middle East using SEVIRI, one of the dustiest regions in the world second only to the Sahara Desert. For every dust storm activation within the Middle East, the point of first emission is derived from visual inspection of each 15 minute image, these points were then recorded in a dust source climatology (DSC) database, along with time and direction of dust movement. To take account of potential errors inherent in this subjective detection method, a degree of confidence is associated with each data point with relevance to time of day (which has a strong effect on ability to detect dust in these products) and weather conditions, in particular presence of clouds. These results are compared with an automated retrieval using Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) measurements form the Moderate Resolution Image Spectrometer (MODIS); which, due to its sun-synchronous orbit allows a measurement of dust in the atmosphere once a day. Differences in the spatial distribution of SEVIRI dust sources and MODIS inferred dust source regions can be explained by inherent transport bias in the latter's low sampling rate and prevailing wind conditions. This database will provide an important tool in further understanding dust emission processes in the region

  17. Uncertainty in Modeling Dust Mass Balance and Radiative Forcing from Size Parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Chen, Siyu; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Kok, Jasper; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Huang, J.

    2013-11-05

    This study examines the uncertainties in simulating mass balance and radiative forcing of mineral dust due to biases in the aerosol size parameterization. Simulations are conducted quasi-globally (180oW-180oE and 60oS-70oN) using the WRF24 Chem model with three different approaches to represent aerosol size distribution (8-bin, 4-bin, and 3-mode). The biases in the 3-mode or 4-bin approaches against a relatively more accurate 8-bin approach in simulating dust mass balance and radiative forcing are identified. Compared to the 8-bin approach, the 4-bin approach simulates similar but coarser size distributions of dust particles in the atmosphere, while the 3-mode pproach retains more fine dust particles but fewer coarse dust particles due to its prescribed og of each mode. Although the 3-mode approach yields up to 10 days longer dust mass lifetime over the remote oceanic regions than the 8-bin approach, the three size approaches produce similar dust mass lifetime (3.2 days to 3.5 days) on quasi-global average, reflecting that the global dust mass lifetime is mainly determined by the dust mass lifetime near the dust source regions. With the same global dust emission (~6000 Tg yr-1), the 8-bin approach produces a dust mass loading of 39 Tg, while the 4-bin and 3-mode approaches produce 3% (40.2 Tg) and 25% (49.1 Tg) higher dust mass loading, respectively. The difference in dust mass loading between the 8-bin approach and the 4-bin or 3-mode approaches has large spatial variations, with generally smaller relative difference (<10%) near the surface over the dust source regions. The three size approaches also result in significantly different dry and wet deposition fluxes and number concentrations of dust. The difference in dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) (a factor of 3) among the three size approaches is much larger than their difference (25%) in dust mass loading. Compared to the 8-bin approach, the 4-bin approach yields stronger dust absorptivity, while the 3-mode

  18. Impact of Radiatively Interactive Dust Aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 Climate Model: Sensitivity to Dust Particle Shape and Refractive Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter R.; Nowottnick, Edward Paul; Randles, Cynthia A.; Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Smith, Jamison A.; Bardeen, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the radiative effects of dust aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model. GEOS-5 is improved with the inclusion of a sectional aerosol and cloud microphysics module, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). Into CARMA we introduce treatment of the dust and sea salt aerosol lifecycle, including sources, transport evolution, and sinks. The aerosols are radiatively coupled to GEOS-5, and we perform a series of multi-decade AMIP-style simulations in which dust optical properties (spectral refractive index and particle shape distribution) are varied. Optical properties assuming spherical dust particles are from Mie theory, while those for non-spherical shape distributions are drawn from a recently available database for tri-axial ellipsoids. The climatologies of the various simulations generally compare well to data from the MODIS, MISR, and CALIOP space-based sensors, the ground-based AERONET, and surface measurements of dust deposition and concentration. Focusing on the summertime Saharan dust cycle we show significant variability in our simulations resulting from different choices of dust optical properties. Atmospheric heating due to dust enhances surface winds over important Saharan dust sources, and we find a positive feedback where increased dust absorption leads to increased dust emissions. We further find that increased dust absorption leads to a strengthening of the summertime Hadley cell circulation, increasing dust lofting to higher altitudes and strengthening the African Easterly Jet. This leads to a longer atmospheric residence time, higher altitude, and generally more northward transport of dust in simulations with the most absorbing dust optical properties. We find that particle shape, although important for radiance simulations, is a minor effect compared to choices of refractive index, although total atmospheric forcing is enhanced by greater than 10 percent for simulations incorporating a

  19. Dust Transport, Deposition and Radiative Effects Observed from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Koren, I.; Remer, L. A.; Tanre, D.; Ginoux, P.; Fan, S.

    2003-01-01

    Carlson (1977) used satellite (AVHRR) observation of dust episodes 3 estimate that 90 tg of dust are emitted from Africa (0-30 N) to the Atlantic Ocean between June and August. MODIS systematic measurements of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and the fraction of the AOT (f) due to the fine mode (see Remer et al abstract), are used to derive the column concentration, flux and deposition of African dust over the Atlantic Ocean. The main data set is for 2001 but the results are consistent with MODIS measurements from 2002. The analysis first determines the properties of maritime baseline aerosol (AOT=0.06, f=0.5); followed by linear scaling of the dust AOT and the anthropogenic AOT, based on MODIS measured values of the fraction "f" being 0.9 for anthropogenic aerosol and 0.5 for dust. NCEP winds are used in the analysis and are evaluated against observed dust movements between the Terra and Aqua passes (see Koren et al. abstract). Monthly values of dust transport and deposition are calculated. Preliminary results show that 280 tg of dust are emitted annually from Africa to the Atlantic Ocean between 20s and 30N, with 40 tg returning to Africa and Europe between 30N and 50N. 85 tg reach the Americas, with 130-150 tg are deposited in the Atlantic Ocean. The results are compared with dust transport models that indicate 110-230 tg of dust being deposited in the Ocean. It is interesting to note that the early estimates of Carlson (1977) and Carlson & Prosper0 (1972) are very close to our estimate from MODIS of 100 tg for the same latitude range and monthly period.

  20. Hydrological and ecological implications of radiative forcing by dust in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T.; Bryant, A. C.; Deems, J. S.; Skiles, M.

    2012-12-01

    The runoff from the Colorado River supplies water to over 30 million people in seven US states and Mexico. Climate change projections suggest that this runoff will decrease in the next 50 years by 7-20% due to increases in evapotranspiration and decreases in the ratio of snowfall to rain. Such scenarios challenge the sustainability of the freshwater supply to the southwest US. Recent research however has shown that radiative forcing by dust in snow has been shortening snow cover duration by several weeks due to a 5-7-fold increase in dust loading relative to prior to the European-settlement of the western US in the mid-1800s. In the mountains of the Upper Colorado River, the absolute dust radiative forcing across the period ranges from 30 to 75 W m-2, in turn shortening snow cover duration by 21 to 51 days. Extended to the scale of the Upper Colorado River Basin, this impact has brought peak normalized runoff at Lee's Ferry, AZ (Lake Powell) more than three weeks earlier and reduced the total annual runoff by an average of ~5%. In this region, earlier snowmelt forced by dust radiative forcing impacts alpine vegetation by increasing synchronicity in phenology across the alpine landscape with increasingly earlier snowmelt. Whereas reduced dust load results in topographically-sensitive melt and loss of snow cover, the more spatially-uniform snowmelt from dust radiative forcing leads to synchronized growth and flowering across the landscape. Water managers in the Upper Colorado basin now seek detailed real-time knowledge of dust presence, radiative forcing, and its potential to accelerate snowmelt, as well as understanding its implications for water supply under current conditions and in a changed climate. Likewise, water stakeholder groups, water conservation districts, and state and federal agencies are discussing efforts to restabilize soil surfaces in the dust-emitting regions to mitigate impacts of dust on snowmelt and runoff. However, as these policy

  1. Radiative Forcing of Dust in Mountain Snow from MODIS surface reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T. H.

    2009-05-01

    Here I present an algorithm that retrieves the radiative forcing by desert dust in mountain snow cover from surface reflectance data from NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Dust emitted from natural and disturbed lands frequently deposits to mountain snow cover through dry and wet deposition, particularly in spring when synoptic scale storms entrain material from recently dried surfaces. Dust decreases snow spectral albedo, primarily in the visible wavelengths where the imaginary parts of the complex refractive indices of dust and ice have the greatest contrast. This surface radiative forcing accelerates melt and contributes to the snow-albedo feedback. In the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, this has been shown to shorten the duration of snow cover by approximately a month. The algorithm presented here, MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MOD-DRFS), determines the per pixel radiative forcing by dust in snow from a coupled radiative transfer model that infers the reflectance difference between clean snow spectra and dust- laden snow spectra according to a grain size matching in the near infrared and shortwave infrared wavelengths that are not affected by dust absorption. The spectral residuals are splined to a high spectral resolution and convolved with the at surface spectral irradiance modulated by local topography, and subsequently integrated to the instantaneous surface radiative forcing. I demonstrate the model with retrievals in the Zagros Mountains, Iran and the San Juan Mountains, Colorado, USA. Preliminary validation of the model with in situ detailed pyranometer measurements in the San Juan Mountains indicates that the model has uncertainties of < 7 W/m2.

  2. The heating of dust in starburst galaxies: The contribution of the nonionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calzetti, D.; Bohlin, R. C.; Kinney, Anne L.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    1995-01-01

    The IUE UV and optical spectra and the far-infrared (FIR) IRAS flux densities of a sample of starburst and blue compact galaxies are used to investigate the relationship between dust obscuration and dust emission. The amount of dust obscuration at UV wavelengths correlates with the FIR-to-blue ratio; and an analysis of the correlation indicates that not only the ionizing but also the nonionizing radiation contribute to the FIR emission. The amount of UV and optical energy lost to dust obscuration accounts for most of the cool dust FIUR emission and for about 70% of the warm dust FIR emission. The remaining 30% of the warm dust FIR flux is probably due to dust emission from regions of star formation which are embedded in opaque giant molecular clouds and do not contribute to the integrated UV and optical spectrum. The use of the FIR emission as an indicator of high-mass star formation rate in star-forming galaxies can be problematic, since the contribution to the FIR flux from cool dust emission heated by relatively old stars is nonnegligible.

  3. Investigating the Effects of Water Ice Cloud Radiative Forcing on the Predicted Patterns and Strength of Dust Lifting on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Haberle, Robert M.

    2014-11-01

    The dust cycle is critical for the current Mars climate system because airborne dust significantly influences the thermal and dynamical structure of the atmosphere. The atmospheric dust loading varies with season and exhibits variability on a range of spatial and temporal scales. Until recently, interactive dust cycle modeling studies that include the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust have not included the formation or radiative effects of water ice clouds. While the simulated patterns of dust lifting and global dust loading from these investigations of the dust cycle in isolation reproduce some characteristics of the observed dust cycle, there are also marked differences between the predictions and the observations. Water ice clouds can influence when, where, and how much dust is lifted from the surface by altering the thermal structure of the atmosphere and the character and strength of the general circulation. Using an updated version of the NASA Ames Mars Global Climate Model (GCM), we show that including water ice cloud formation and their radiative effects affect the magnitude and spatial extent of dust lifting, particularly in the northern hemisphere during the pre- and post- winter solstitial seasons. Feedbacks between dust lifting, cloud formation, circulation intensification and further dust lifting are isolated and shown to be important for improving the behavior of the simulated dust cycle.

  4. The impacts of optical properties on radiative forcing due to dust aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Shi, G. Y.; Li, S. Y.; Li, W.; Wang, B.; Huang, Y. B.

    2006-05-01

    There are large uncertainties in the quantitative assessment of radiative effects due to atmospheric dust aerosol. The optical properties contribute much to those uncertainties. The authors perform several sensitivity experiments to estimate the impacts of optical characteristics on regional radiative forcing in this paper. The experiments involve in refractive indices, single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor and optical depth. An updated dataset of refractive indices representing East Asian dust and the one recommended by the World Meteorology Organization (WMO) are contrastively analyzed and used. A radiative transfer code for solar and thermal infrared radiation with detailed aerosol parameterization is employed. The strongest emphasis is on the refractive indices since other optical parameters strongly depend on it, and the authors found a strong sensitivity of radiative forcing on refractive indices. Studies show stronger scattering, weaker absorption and forward scattering of the East Asian dust particles at solar wavelengths, which leads to higher negative forcing, lower positive forcing and bigger net forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) than that of the WMO dust model. It is also found that the TOA forcings resulting from these two dust models have opposite signs in certain regions, which implies the importance of accurate measurements of optical properties in the quantitative estimation of radiative forcing.

  5. Investigations of Dust Radiative Heating Over the Indo-Gangetic Plains During the Pre- Monsoon Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, R.; Hsu, C.; Tsay, S.; Lau, W.; Kafatos, M.

    2007-12-01

    Satellite and ground observations show maximum column aerosol loading over the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) during the pre-monsoon period (April-May-June) caused by wind-blown dust storms that originate in deserts around the Arabian Peninsula. High dust loading significantly affects aerosol optical properties and the radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere and surface. The frequency of dust storms over IGP peaks during May and long- term satellite data show strong positive trend in the aerosol loading over desert regions around the IGP. We use multi-satellite and ground observations obtained from MODIS, CERES, AIRS and AERONET data along with radiative transfer simulations to calculate the radiative forcing due to dust aerosols and analyze changes in temperature profiles caused by the heating associated with dust aerosols over the IGP during the pre-monsoon period. Long-term analysis of the mid-tropospheric temperature obtained from the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) data indicates a significant upward trend over the IGP. This positive trend is found to be highest in May with an increase of ~2.0º C in the last 25 years. In addition, higher values of temperature were found in the AIRS profile data on heavy dust loading days compared to low dust environment. This effect was particularly observed in the mid-troposphere from AIRS data. Radiative transfer model simulations combined with inputs from ground measurements of aerosol optical properties from AERONET data and CERES fluxes in conjunction with Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) modeled values of aerosol properties are used to estimate the radiative heating associated with dust aerosols.

  6. Radiative transfer in dusty nebulae. III - The effects of dust albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.; Dana, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of an albedo of internal dust, such as ionization structure and temperature of dust grain, were studied by the quasi-diffusion method with an iterative technique for solving the radiative heat transfer equations. It was found that the generalized on-the-spot approximation solution is adequate for most astrophysical applications for a zero albedo; for a nonzero albedo, the Eddington approximation is more accurate. The albedo increases the average energy of the diffuse photons, increasing the ionization level of hydrogen and heavy elements if the Eddington approximation is applied; the dust thermal gradient is reduced so that the infrared spectrum approaches blackbody spectrum with an increasing albedo.

  7. Direct radiative effects induced by intense desert dust outbreaks over the broader Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, Antonis; Obiso, Vincenzo; Vendrell, Lluis; Basart, Sara; Jorba, Oriol; Pérez Garcia-Pando, Carlos; Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Gassó, Santiago; Baldasano, Jose Maria

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the year, under favorable conditions, massive loads of mineral particles originating in the northern African and Middle East deserts are transported over the Mediterranean basin. Due to their composition and size, dust aerosols perturb the Earth-Atmosphere system's energy budget interacting directly with the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiation. The present study aims to compute the Mediterranean dust outbreaks' direct radiative effects (DREs) as well as to assess the effect of including dust DREs in numerical simulations of a regional model. To this aim, 20 intense dust outbreaks have been selected based on their spatial coverage and intensity. Their identification, over the period 2000-2013, has been achieved through an objective and dynamic algorithm which utilizes as inputs daily satellite retrievals derived by the MODIS-Terra, EP-TOMS and OMI-Aura sensors. For each outbreak, two simulations of the NMMB/BSC-Dust model were made for a forecast period of 84 hours, with the model initialized at 00 UTC of the day when the dust outbreak was ignited, activating (RADON) and deactivating (RADOFF) dust-radiation interactions. The simulation domain covers the northern Africa, the Middle East and Europe at 0.25° x 0.25° horizontal resolution, for 40 hybrid sigma pressure levels up to 50 hPa. The instantaneous and regional DREs have been calculated at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), into the atmosphere (ATMAB), and at surface, for the downwelling (SURF) and the absorbed (NETSURF) radiation, for the SW, LW and NET (SW+LW) radiation. The interaction between dust aerosols and NET radiation, locally leads to an atmospheric warming (DREATMAB) by up to 150 Wm-2, a surface cooling (DRENETSURF) by up to 250 Wm-2 and a reduction of the downwelling radiation at the surface (DRESURF) by up to 300 Wm-2. At TOA, DREs are mainly negative (down to -150 Wm-2) indicating a cooling of the Earth-Atmosphere system, although positive values (up to 50 Wm-2) are encountered

  8. The Impact of Desert Dust Aerosol Radiative Forcing on Global and West African Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Dezfuli, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Desert dust aerosols exert a radiative forcing on the atmosphere, influencing atmospheric temperature structure and modifying radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and surface. As dust aerosols perturb radiative fluxes, the atmosphere responds by altering both energy and moisture dynamics, with potentially significant impacts on regional and global precipitation. Global Climate Model (GCM) experiments designed to characterize these processes have yielded a wide range of results, owing to both the complex nature of the system and diverse differences across models. Most model results show a general decrease in global precipitation, but regional results vary. Here, we compare simulations from GFDL's CM2Mc GCM with multiple other model experiments from the literature in order to investigate mechanisms of radiative impact and reasons for GCM differences on a global and regional scale. We focus on West Africa, a region of high interannual rainfall variability that is a source of dust and that neighbors major Sahara Desert dust sources. As such, changes in West African climate due to radiative forcing of desert dust aerosol have serious implications for desertification feedbacks. Our CM2Mc results show net cooling of the planet at TOA and surface, net warming of the atmosphere, and significant increases in precipitation over West Africa during the summer rainy season. These results differ from some previous GCM studies, prompting comparative analysis of desert dust parameters across models. This presentation will offer quantitative analysis of differences in dust aerosol parameters, aerosol optical properties, and overall particle burden across GCMs, and will characterize the contribution of model differences to the uncertainty of forcing and climate response affecting West Africa.

  9. Dust Aerosols Investigated Using an Integrated Microphysical-Climate-Radiation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lin

    I have developed a three-dimensional coupled microphysical-climate-radiation model based on the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheres Model (CAM3.0 and CAM5.0) and the University of Colorado/NASA Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA2.3 and CARMA3.0). The model has been used to investigate the sources, removal processes, transport, optical properties, and radiative effects of Asian dust aerosols on climate. In the initial project, a A Weibull distribution is implemented to estimate the sub-grid scale wind speed variability. The dust AOD agrees well with AERONET data and the timing of dust events is comparable to the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) lidar data in Beijing and Nagasaki. In the second project, the simulated properties of atmospheric dust from the Saharan deserts and the Asian deserts are compared using data from CALIPSO and AERONET during 2006 and 2007. In my model the yearly horizontal dust flux just downwind of the African dust source is about 1088 Tg (10S-40N, 10W) and from the Asian dust source it is about 355 Tg (25N-55N, 105E) in 2007. I find the difference in dust flux is mainly due to the larger area over which dust is lifted in Africa than Asia. However, Africa also has stronger winds in some seasons. Some previous studies suggested that the observed descent of Saharan dust is due to sedimentation of the particles, but my work and satellite data show instead it is dominated by meteorology. I find the size distributions of Asian and African dust are similar when the dust is lifted, but the mode size can differ and secondary size modes can develop probably due to differences in vertical wind velocities during transport. The importance of the uncertainty in the single scattering albedo (SSA) to the radiative effects of dust on the climate of China is explored in my final project through two case studies based on the modeled and observed solar diffuse fluxes/irradiances at

  10. Effects of Multi-Decadal Variation of SST and Dust Radiative Forcing on Rainfall and Dust Transport over West Africa and Northern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. M.; Lau, W. K. M.; Colarco, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of multi-decadal variations of sea surface temperature (SST) and dust radiative forcing on the West African monsoon rainfall and circulation, and consequent change in dust emission and transport are examined based on model experiments with the NASA GEOS-5 GCM with prescribed SST. SST patterns representing the 1950s and 1980s are obtained based on Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) between Sahel rainfall and global SST distribution, and prescribed for 7-year simulations for each period. Results show that the subtropical high is strengthened and expanded southwestward associated with colder northern Atlantic Ocean SST in 1980s. As a result, the rain band in the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Sahel moves southward and rainfall is reduced over the Sahel. Stronger surface winds associated with strong surface temperature gradients increase dust emission in the southern Saharan desert and northern Sahel. Combined with circulation changes induced by strengthening the subtropical high and reduced wet deposition, dust transport is increased in the deep tropics (10-20N), but reduced in the northern path (20-30N)To examine the effect of aerosol radiative forcing, additional experiments are conducted after dust radiative feedback is turned off. Without aerosol radiative feedback, model still simulate aforementioned contrast between 1980s and 1950s, but the anomalies of Sahel drought and dust transports are a lot weaker. Preliminary results indicate that atmospheric heating due to shortwave absorption by dust provides additional buoyance and lifts dust particles to higher altitudes. Dust radiative forcing also increases meridional temperature gradients and strengthens the African Easterly Jet, resulting in an increased residence time of dust and farther westward transport.

  11. Longwave Radiative Forcing of Saharan Dust Aerosols Estimated from MODIS, MISR and CERES Observations on Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Jiang-Long; Christopher, Sundar A.

    2003-01-01

    Using observations from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments onboard the Terra satellite; we present a new technique for studying longwave (LW) radiative forcing of dust aerosols over the Saharan desert for cloud-free conditions. The monthly-mean LW forcing for September 2000 is 7 W/sq m and the LW forcing efficiency' (LW(sub eff)) is 15 W/sq m. Using radiative transfer calculations, we also show that the vertical distribution of aerosols and water vapor are critical to the understanding of dust aerosol forcing. Using well calibrated, spatially and temporally collocated data sets, we have combined the strengths of three sensors from the same satellite to quantify the LW radiative forcing, and show that dust aerosols have a "warming" effect over the Saharan desert that will counteract the shortwave "cooling effect" of aerosols.

  12. Dust and Black Carbon Radiative Forcing Controls on Snowmelt in the Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiles, Sara McKenzie

    Light absorbing impurities (LAIs), like dust and black carbon (BC), initiate powerful albedo feedbacks when deposited on snow cover, yet due to a scarcity of observations radiative forcing by LAIs is often neglected, or poorly constrained, in climate and hydrological models. This has important consequences for regions like the Colorado River Basin, where dust deposition to mountain snow cover frequently occurs in the upper basin in the springtime, a relatively new phenomenon since western expansion of the US. Previous work showed that dust on snow (DOS) enhances snowmelt by 3-7 weeks, shifts timing and intensity of runoff, and reduces total water yield. Here, advanced methods are presented to measure, model, and monitor DOS in the hydrologically sensitive Colorado River Basin. A multi-year multi-site spatial variability analysis indicates the heaviest dust loading comes from point sources in the southern Colorado Plateau, but also shows that lower levels of dust loading from diffuse sources still advances melt by 3-4 weeks. A high-resolution snow property dataset, including vertically resolved measurements of snow optical grain size and dust/BC concentrations, confirms that impurity layers remain in the layer in which they are deposited and converge at the surface as snow melts: influencing snow properties, rapidly reducing snow albedo, and increasing snowmelt rates. The optical properties of deposited impurities, which are mainly dust, are determined using an inversion technique from measurements of hemispherical reflectance and particle size distributions. Using updated optical properties in the snow+aerosols radiative transfer model SNICAR improves snow albedo modeling over a more general dust characterization, reducing errors by 50% across the full range of snow reflectance. Radiative forcing by LAIs in the CRB, estimated directly from measurements and updated optical properties, is most strongly controlled by dust concentrations in the uppermost surface layer

  13. Dust, Elemental Carbon and Other Impurities on Central Asian Glaciers: Origin and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmale, J.; Flanner, M.; Kang, S.; Sprenger, M.; Zhang, Q.; Li, Y.; Guo, J.; Schwikowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    In Central Asia, more than 60 % of the population depends on water stored in glaciers and mountain snow. While temperature, precipitation and dynamic processes are key drivers of glacial change, deposition of light absorbing impurities such as mineral dust and black carbon can lead to accelerated melting through surface albedo reduction. Here, we discuss the origin of deposited mineral dust and black carbon and their impacts on albedo change and radiative forcing (RF). 218 snow samples were taken from 13 snow pits on 4 glaciers, Abramov (Pamir), Suek, Glacier No. 354 and Golubin (Tien Shan), representing deposition between summer 2012 and 2014. They were analyzed for elemental and organic carbon by a thermo-optical method, mineral dust by gravimetry, and iron by ICP-MS. Back trajectory ensembles were released every 6 hours with the Lagranto model for the covered period at all sites. Boundary layer "footprints" were calculated to estimate general source regions and combined with MODIS fire counts for potential fire contributions. Albedo reduction due to black carbon and mineral dust was calculated with the Snow-Ice-Aerosol-Radiative model (SNICAR), and surface spectral irradiances were derived from atmospheric radiative transfer calculations to determine the RF under clear-sky and all sky conditions using local radiation measurements. Dust contributions came from Central Asia, the Arabian Peninsula, the Sahara and partly the Taklimakan. Fire contributions were higher in 2014 and generally came from the West and North. We find that EC exerts roughly 3 times more RF than mineral dust in fresh and relatively fresh snow (~5 W/m2) and up to 6 times more in snow that experienced melting (> 10 W/m2) even though EC concentrations (average per snow pit from 90 to 700 ng/g) were up to two orders of magnitude lower than mineral dust (10 to 140 μg/g).

  14. Influence of dust charge fluctuation and polarization force on radiative condensation instability of magnetized gravitating dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, R. P.; Bhakta, S.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of dust charge fluctuation, thermal speed and polarization force due to massive charged dust grains is studied on the radiative condensation instability (RCI) of magnetized self-gravitating astrophysical dusty (complex) plasma. The dynamics of the charged dust and inertialess electrons are considered while the Boltzmann distributed ions are assumed to be thermal. The dusty fluid model is formulated and the general dispersion relations are derived analytically using the plane wave solutions under the long wavelength limits in both the presence and the absence of dust charge fluctuations. The combined effects of polarization force, dust thermal speed, dust charge fluctuation and dust cyclotron frequency are observed on the low frequency wave modes and radiative modified Jeans Instability. The classical criterion of RCI is also derived which remains unaffected due to the presence of these parameters. Numerical calculations have been performed to calculate the growth rate of the system and plotted graphically. We find that dust charge fluctuation, radiative cooling and polarization force have destabilizing while dust thermal speed and dust cyclotron frequency have stabilizing influence on the growth rate of Jeans instability. The results have been applied to understand the radiative cooling process in dusty molecular cloud when both the dust charging and polarization force are dominant.

  15. Radiative impact of mineral dust on monsoon precipitation variability over West Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hagos, Samson M.

    2011-03-01

    The radiative forcing of dust and its impact on precipitation over the West Africa monsoon (WAM) region is simulated using a coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model (WRF-Chem). During the monsoon season, dust is a dominant contributor to AOD over West Africa. In the standard simulation, on 24-hour domain average, dust has a cooling effect (-6.11 W/m2) at the surface, a warming effect (6.94 W/m2) in the atmosphere, and a relatively small TOA forcing (0.83 W/m2). Dust modifies the surface energy budget and atmospheric diabatic heating and hence causes lower atmospheric cooling in the daytime but warming in the nighttime. As a result, atmospheric stability is increased in the daytime and reduced in the nighttime, leading to a reduction of late afternoon precipitation by up to 0.14 mm/hour (30%) and an increase of nocturnal and early morning precipitation by up to 0.04 mm/hour (23%) over the WAM region. Dust-induced reduction of diurnal precipitation variation improves the simulated diurnal cycle of precipitation when compared to measurements. However, daily precipitation is only changed by a relatively small amount (-0.14 mm/day or -4%). On the other hand, sensitivity simulations show that, for weaker-to-stronger absorbing dust, dust longwave warming effect in the nighttime surpasses its shortwave cooling effect in the daytime at the surface, leading to a less stable atmosphere associated with more convective precipitation in the nighttime. As a result, the dust-induced change of daily WAM precipitation varies from a significant reduction of -0.40 mm/day (-12%, weaker absorbing dust) to a small increase of 0.05 mm/day (1%, stronger absorbing dust). This variation originates from the competition between dust impact on daytime and nighttime precipitation, which depends on dust shortwave absorption. Dust reduces the diurnal variation of precipitation regardless of its absorptivity, but more reduction is associated with stronger absorbing dust.

  16. Spinning mode acoustic radiation from the flight inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for spinning mode acoustic radiation from a thick wall duct without flow. This model is based on a series of experiments (with and without flow). A nearly pure azimuthal spinning mode was isolated and then reflection coefficients and far field pressure (amplitude and phase) were measured. In our model the governing boundary value problem for the Helmholtz equation is first converted into an integral equation for the unknown acoustic pressure over a disk, S1, near the mouth of the duct and over the exterior surface, S2, of the duct. Assuming a pure azimuthal mode excitation, the azimuthal dependence is integrated out which yields an integral equation over the generator C1 of S1 and the generator C2 of S2. The sound pressure on C1 was approximated by a truncated modal expansion of the interior acoustic pressure. Piecewise linear spline approximation on C2 was used.

  17. Attenuation of Ultraviolet Radiation by Dust in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalante, V.

    1994-07-01

    Se han obtenido soluciones de la ecuación de transporte para la dispersión coherente, no conservativa y anisotrópica para estimar la precisión de métodos aproximados, usados en modelos de nubes en que la luz es atenuada principalmente por el polvo. En los cálculos se ha aplicado el metodo de armónicos esféricos para distintos parámetros del polvo. Se ha explorado la posibilidad de descubrir cambios en las caracterísiticas del polvo mediante observaciones de regiones fotodisociadas. Se muestra que para altos valores del albedo de dispersión simple y del parametro de asimetria de Ia función de fase que son adecuados para el polvo galáctico, no es posible determinar variaciones de más de un factor de 2 en el cociente de gas a polvo. Solutions to the transfer equation for coherent, non-conservative, anisotropic scattering have been obtained in order to estimate the accuracy of approximate methods used in models of clouds where light is attenuated mostly by dust. In the calculations the spherical harmonic method has been applied for different grain parameters. The possibility of discovering changes of dust characteristics through observations of photodissociation regions has been considered. It is shown that for the high values of the single scattering albedo and the asymmetry parameter of the phase function for redistribution that appear to be appropriate for galactic dust, it is not possible to determine variations of more than a factor of 2 in the gas to dust ratio.

  18. The Martian polar CAP - Radiative effects of ozone, clouds, and airborne dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, B. L.

    1990-02-01

    The solar and thermal flux striking the polar cap of Mars is computed for various ozone, dust, and cloud abundances and for three solar zenith angles. Ozone does not significantly affect the total energy budget of the polar cap. Hence the observed hemispherical asymmetry in ozone abundance causes only an insignificant hemispherical asymmetry in the polar caps. Vertical optical depths of dust and cloud ranging from zero to 1 cause little change in the total flux absorbed by the polar cap near its edge but increase the absorbed flux significantly as one travels poleward. Hemispherical asymmetries in dust abundance, cloud cover, and surface pressure combine to cause a significant hemispherical asymmetry in the total flux absorbed by the residual polar caps, which helps to explain the dichotomy in the residual polar caps on Mars. Other processes which affect the energy budget of the polar cap are proposed and reviewed, particularly with respect to their interaction with the radiative effects of clouds and dust.

  19. Radiative Energetics of Mineral Dust Aerosols from Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Hansell, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne dust aerosols worldwide contribute a significant part to air quality problems and, to some extent, regional climatic issues (e.g., radiative forcing, hydrological cycle, and primary biological productivity in oceans). Evaluating the direct solar radiative effect of dust aerosols is relatively straightforward due in part to the relatively large SIN ratio in broadband irradiance measurements. The longwave (LW) impact, on the other hand, is rather difficult to ascertain since the measured dust signal level (approx.10 W/sq m) is on the same order as the instrumental uncertainties. Although the magnitude of the LW impact is much smaller than that of the shortwave (SW), it can still have a noticeable influence on the energy distribution of Earth-atmosphere system, particularly due to the strong light-absorptive properties commonly found in many terrestrial minerals. The current effort is part of an ongoing research study to perform a global assessment of dust direct aerosol radiative effects (DARE) during major field deployments of key dust source regions worldwide. In this work we present results stemming from two previous field deployments: the 2006 NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities and the 2008 Asian Monsoon Years, both utilizing NASA Goddard's mobile ground-based facility. The former study focused on transported Saharan dust at Sal (16.73degN, 22.93degW), Cape Verde along the west coast of Africa while the latter focused on Asian dust at Zhangye (39.082degN, 100.276degE), China near the source between the Taklimakan and Gobi deserts. Due to the compelling variability in spatial and temporal scale of dust properties during field experiments, a deterministic I-D radiative transfer model constrained by local measurements (i.e., spectral photometry/interferometry and lidar for physical/microphysical, mineralogy, and single-scattering properties) is employed to evaluate dust's local instantaneous SW/LW DARE both at the surface and at the top of

  20. Can desert dust explain the outgoing longwave radiation anomaly over the Sahara during July 2003?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Jim M.; Allan, Richard P.; Culverwell, Ian; Slingo, Tony; Milton, Sean; Edwards, John; Clerbaux, Nicolas

    2005-03-01

    Measurements of the top-of-the-atmosphere outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) for July 2003 from Meteosat-7 are used to assess the performance of the numerical weather prediction version of the Met Office Unified Model. A significant difference is found over desert regions of northern Africa where the model emits too much OLR by up to 35 Wm-2 in the monthly mean. By cloud-screening the data we find an error of up to 50 Wm-2 associated with cloud-free areas, which suggests an error in the model surface temperature, surface emissivity, or atmospheric transmission. By building up a physical model of the radiative properties of mineral dust based on in situ, and surface-based and satellite remote sensing observations we show that the most plausible explanation for the discrepancy in OLR is due to the neglect of mineral dust in the model. The calculations suggest that mineral dust can exert a longwave radiative forcing by as much as 50 Wm-2 in the monthly mean for 1200 UTC in cloud-free regions, which accounts for the discrepancy between the model and the Meteosat-7 observations. This suggests that inclusion of the radiative effects of mineral dust will lead to a significant improvement in the radiation balance of numerical weather prediction models with subsequent improvements in performance.

  1. What happens when spins meet for ionizing radiation dosimetry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavoni, Juliana F.; Neves-Junior, Wellington F. P.; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2016-07-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to measure radiation dose deposited in different milieu through its effects. Radiation can break chemical bonds and if they produce stable free radicals, ESR can measure their concentration through their spins and a dose can be inferred. Ionizing radiation can also promote polymerization and in this case proton relaxation times can be measured and an image weighed by T2 can be produced giving spatial information about dose. A review of the basics of these applications is presented concluding with an end-to-end test using a composite Gel-Alanine phantom to validate 3-dimensionally dose distribution delivered in a simulation of Volume Modulated Arch Therapy on the simultaneous treatment of multiple brain metastases. The results obtained with the gel and alanine dosimeters are consistent with the expected by the treatment planning system, showing the potential of this multidosimetric approach and validating dosimetrically the multiple brain metastases treatment using VMAT.

  2. Response of the Water Cycle of West Africa and Atlantic to Radiative Forcing by Saharan Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Sud, Yogesh C.; Walker, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    The responses of the atmospheric water cycle and climate of West Africa and the Atlantic to radiative forcing of Saharan dust are studied using the NASA finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), coupled to a mixed layer ocean. We find evidence in support of the "elevated heat pump" (EHP) mechanism that underlines the responses of the atmospheric water cycle to dust forcing as follow. During the boreal summer, as a result of large-scale atmospheric feed back triggered by absorbing dust aerosols, rainfall and cloudiness are enhanced over the West Africa/Easter Atlantic ITCZ, and suppressed over the West Atlantic and Caribbean. region. Shortwave radiation absorption by dust warms the atmosphere and cools the surface, while long wave has the opposite response. The elevated dust layer warms the air over Nest Africa and the eastern Atlantic. The condensation heating associated with the induced deep convection drives and maintains an anomalous large-scale east-west overturning circulation with rising motion over West Africa/eastern Atlantic, and sinking motion over the Caribbean region. The response also includes a strengthening of the West African monsoon, manifested in northward shift of the West Africa precipitation over land, increased low-level westerlies flow over West Africa at the southern edge of the dust layer, and a near surface energy fluxes, resulting in cooling of the Nest African land and the eastern Atlantic, and a warming in the West Atlantic and Caribbean. The EHP effect is most effective for moderate to highly absorbing dusts, and becomes minimized for reflecting dust with single scattering albedo at 0.95 or higher.

  3. Determination of Radiative Forcing of Saharan Dust using Combined TOMS and ERBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. Christina; Herman, Jay R.; Weaver, Clark

    1999-01-01

    The direct radiative forcing of Saharan dust aerosols has been determined by combining aerosol information derived from Nimbus-7 TOMS with radiation measurements observed at the top of atmosphere (TOA) by NOAA-9 ERBE made during February-July 1985. Cloud parameters and precipitable water derived from the NOAA-9 HIRS2 instrument were used to aid in screening for clouds and water vapor in the analyses. Our results indicate that under "cloud-free" and "dry" conditions there is a good correlation between the ERBE TOA outgoing longwave fluxes and the TOMS aerosol index measurements over both land and ocean in areas under the influence of airborne Saharan dust. The ERBE TOA outgoing shortwave fluxes were also found to correlate well with the dust loading derived from TOMS over ocean. However, the calculated shortwave forcing of Saharan dust aerosols is very weak and noisy over land for the range of solar zenith angle viewed by the NOAA-9 ERBE in 1985. Sensitivity factors of the TOA outgoing fluxes to changes in aerosol index were estimated using a linear regression fit to the ERBE and TOMS measurements. The ratio of the shortwave-to-longwave response to changes in dust loading over the ocean is found to be roughly 2 to 3, but opposite in sign. The monthly averaged "clear-sky" TOA direct forcing of airborne Saharan dust was also calculated by multiplying these sensitivity factors by the TOMS monthly averaged "clear-sky" aerosol index. Both the observational and theoretical analyses indicate that the dust layer height, ambient moisture content as well as the presence of cloud all play an important role in determining the TOA direct radiative forcing due to mineral aerosols.

  4. THE IMPORTANCE OF PHYSICAL MODELS FOR DERIVING DUST MASSES AND GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN SUPERNOVA EJECTA. I. RADIATIVELY HEATED DUST IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli

    2013-09-01

    Recent far-infrared (IR) observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) have revealed significantly large amounts of newly condensed dust in their ejecta, comparable to the total mass of available refractory elements. The dust masses derived from these observations assume that all the grains of a given species radiate at the same temperature, regardless of the dust heating mechanism or grain radius. In this paper, we derive the dust mass in the ejecta of the Crab Nebula, using a physical model for the heating and radiation from the dust. We adopt a power-law distribution of grain sizes and two different dust compositions (silicates and amorphous carbon), and calculate the heating rate of each dust grain by the radiation from the pulsar wind nebula. We find that the grains attain a continuous range of temperatures, depending on their size and composition. The total mass derived from the best-fit models to the observed IR spectrum is 0.019-0.13 M{sub Sun }, depending on the assumed grain composition. We find that the power-law size distribution of dust grains is characterized by a power-law index of 3.5-4.0 and a maximum grain size larger than 0.1 {mu}m. The grain sizes and composition are consistent with what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Our derived dust mass is at least a factor of two less than the mass reported in previous studies of the Crab Nebula that assumed more simplified two-temperature models. These models also require a larger mass of refractory elements to be locked up in dust than was likely available in the ejecta. The results of this study show that a physical model resulting in a realistic distribution of dust temperatures can constrain the dust properties and affect the derived dust masses. Our study may also have important implications for deriving grain properties and mass estimates in other SNRs and for the ultimate question of whether SNe are major sources of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium and in

  5. The Importance of Physical Models for Deriving Dust Masses and Grain Size Distributions in Supernova Ejecta. I. Radiatively Heated Dust in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Recent far-infrared (IR) observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) have revealed significantly large amounts of newly condensed dust in their ejecta, comparable to the total mass of available refractory elements. The dust masses derived from these observations assume that all the grains of a given species radiate at the same temperature, regardless of the dust heating mechanism or grain radius. In this paper, we derive the dust mass in the ejecta of the Crab Nebula, using a physical model for the heating and radiation from the dust. We adopt a power-law distribution of grain sizes and two different dust compositions (silicates and amorphous carbon), and calculate the heating rate of each dust grain by the radiation from the pulsar wind nebula. We find that the grains attain a continuous range of temperatures, depending on their size and composition. The total mass derived from the best-fit models to the observed IR spectrum is 0.019-0.13 Solar Mass, depending on the assumed grain composition. We find that the power-law size distribution of dust grains is characterized by a power-law index of 3.5-4.0 and a maximum grain size larger than 0.1 micron. The grain sizes and composition are consistent with what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Our derived dust mass is at least a factor of two less than the mass reported in previous studies of the Crab Nebula that assumed more simplified two-temperature models. These models also require a larger mass of refractory elements to be locked up in dust than was likely available in the ejecta. The results of this study show that a physical model resulting in a realistic distribution of dust temperatures can constrain the dust properties and affect the derived dust masses. Our study may also have important implications for deriving grain properties and mass estimates in other SNRs and for the ultimate question of whether SNe are major sources of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium and in

  6. Radiative Transfer Modeling of the Extended Dust Shell of AFGL 618

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartar, J.; Speck, A.; Meixner, M.; Nenkova, M.; Elitzur, M.

    2005-12-01

    AFGL 618 is a carbon-rich post AGB star/protoplanetary nebula (PPN), and is surrounded by extremely large circumstellar dust shells, containing the fossil record of its AGB mass loss. This dust shell ahs been observed at 120μ m and 180μ m by ISOPHT. We present results of radiative-transfer (RT) modeling of these dust shells, using the 1-d RT code DUSTY. While AFGL 618 is clearly axisymmetric close to the central star, this axisymmetry is contained well within the PSF of the ISO FIR observation. Our models are intended to determine several parameters AFGL 618 which are not currently wll constrained; among tehse being distance, gross dust distribution, stellar temperature, inner dust shell radius, dust grain size distribution, and dust grain composition. While there is some degeneracy within the models providing good fits to the data, some general results have emerged. We found that the optical depth of the dust shell in the mid-IR (τ 9.7μ m) is between 3 and 7. Furthermore, we have found that in order for the modeled brightnesses to match the observational data at both wavelengths (for the central region), it is necessary to include a considerable amount of crystalline dust (graphite and SiC) into the circumstellar shell in addition to amorphous carbon. Finally we show that the radial density distributions needed to match the observations are indicative of either constant mass-loss rate throughout the histor of the shell, or increasing mass-loss rates for the last few hundred years of the AGB. This increasing mass loss is interpreted as the superwind phase.

  7. Radiation Pressure Measurements on Micron-Size Individual Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Witherow, W. K.; West, E. A.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.; Fishman, G. J.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic radiation pressure have been made on individual silica (SiO2) particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance. These measurements were made by inserting single charged particles of known diameter in the 0.2- to 6.82-micron range and irradiating them from above with laser radiation focused to beam widths of approximately 175- 400 microns at ambient pressures particle due to the radiation force is balanced by the electrostatic force indicated by the compensating dc potential applied to the balance electrodes, providing a direct measure of the radiation force on the levitated particle. Theoretical calculations of the radiation pressure with a least-squares fit to the measured data yield the radiation pressure efficiencies of the particles, and comparisons with Mie scattering theory calculations provide the imaginary part of the refractive index of SiO2 and the corresponding extinction and scattering efficiencies.

  8. Dust aerosol radiative effect and influence on urban atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Chen, M.; Li, L.

    2007-11-01

    An 1.5-level-closure and 3-D non-stationary atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model and a radiation transfer model with the output of Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) Model and lidar AML-1 are employed to simulate the dust aerosol radiative effect and its influence on ABL in Beijing for the period of 23-26 January 2002 when a dust storm occurred. The simulation shows that daytime dust aerosol radiative effect heats up the ABL at the mean rate of about 0.68 K/h. The horizontal wind speed from ground to 900 m layer is also overall increased, and the value changes about 0.01 m/s at 14:00 LT near the ground. At night, the dust aerosol radiative effect cools the ABL at the mean rate of -0.21 K/h and the wind speed lowers down at about -0.19 m/s at 02:00 LT near the ground.

  9. Long-wave radiative forcing due to dust aerosols: observations and climatology comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, L. N.; Collins, W.

    2012-12-01

    Dust aerosols have been identified by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change as a major source of uncertainty in the radiative forcing of the climate system. Optically thick plumes of dust and pollutants originating from arid regions can be lifted into the middle troposphere and are often transported over synoptic length scales. These events can decrease the upwelling long-wave fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA), especially in the mid-infrared portion of the spectrum. Although the long-wave effects of dust are included in model simulations, it is difficult to validate these effects in the absence of satellite-derived global estimates. Using hyper-spectral measurements from NASA's AIRS instrument, we estimate long-wave radiative forcing due to dust over the oceans for the year 2007. Firstly, we will present the results of these global, year long, radiative forcing estimates and secondly, we will use these estimates, along with other variables available from A-train instruments (e.g. MODIS aerosol optical depth) to evaluate the long-wave radiative forcing values from climatological data.

  10. Spin radiative corrections to the radiation probability and power in classical and quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Spin radiative effects in a one-particle sector of QED have a dual nature and can be understood with the Frenkel classical rotating-electron model. In the region of parameters under study γ⊥ 2 ≫ 1 (γ⊥ 2 = 1 + p ⊥ 2/ m 2) and χ ≪ 1 (χ = {{√ {{{( {e{F_{μ v}}{p_v}} )}^2}} } {/ {{√ ( {e{F_{μ v}}{p_v}} )}^2}} {m^3}, the imaginary part of the mass shift and radiation power contain two types of spin contributions. The contributions of the first type are related to the intrinsic magnetic moment of a fermion representing an additional source of electromagnetic radiation. The contributions of the second type have the opposite sign and are caused by a small change in the electron acceleration appearing due to the Frenkel addition to the particle mass. Contributions of the second type dominate, which explains the "wrong" sign of total spin corrections. We show that not only the sign but also the values of coefficients can be explained with specified accuracy using classical electrodynamics if corrections to the mass shift (action) and radiation power are calculated in canonical variables, i.e., for fixed velocity and momentum values, respectively. The results can be treated as a demonstration of the correspondence principle in the field of radiative spin effects, in addition to correspondence between classical and quantum theories at the tree (in the external filed) level. For a e ≡ ( g-2)/2 ≲ χ ≪ 1, equations of the Frenkel model lead to generalization of the system of Lorentz-BMT (Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi) equations taking into account the Frenkel addition to mass. Some features of experimental observations of the spin light are discussed.

  11. Analysis of the radiated information in spinning sound fields.

    PubMed

    Carley, Michael

    2010-10-01

    The information content of a spinning sound field is analyzed using a combination of exact and asymptotic results, in order to set limits on how accurately source identification can be carried out. Using a transformation of the circular source to an exactly equivalent set of line source modes, given by Chebyshev polynomials, it is found that the line source modes of order greater than the source wavenumber generate exponentially small fields. Asymptotic analysis shows that the remaining, lower order, modes radiate efficiently only into a region around the source plane, with this region shrinking as the mode order is increased. The results explain the ill-conditioning of source identification methods; the successful use of low order models in active noise control; and the low radiation efficiency of subsonic jets. PMID:20968340

  12. Aerosol-radiation-cloud and precipitation processes during dust events (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallos, G. B.; Solomos, S.; Kushta, J.; Mitsakou, C.; Athanasiadis, P.; Spyrou, C.; Tremback, C.

    2010-12-01

    In places like the Mediterranean region where anthropogenic aerosols coexist with desert dust the aerosol-radiation-cloud processes are rather complicated. The mixture of different age of air pollutants of anthropogenic origin with Saharan dust and sea salt may lead to the formation of other particles with different characteristics. The mixture of the aerosols and gases from anthropogenic and natural origin (desert dust and sea salt) results in the formation of new types of PM with different physico-chemical properties and especially hygroscopicity (e.g. inside clouds or within the marine boundary layer) through heterogeneous processes. The new particle formation has different characteristics and therefore they have different impacts on cloud formation and precipitation. In an attempt to better understand links and feedbacks between air pollution and climate the new Integrated Community Limited Area Modeling System - ICLAMS has been developed. ICLAMS is an enhanced version of RAMS.v6 modeling system. It includes sub-models for the dust and sea salt cycles, gas and aqueous phase chemistry, gas to particle conversion and heterogeneous chemistry processes. All these processes are directly coupled with meteorology. RAMS has an explicit cloud microphysical scheme with eight categories of hydrometeors. The cloud droplets spectrum is explicitly calculated from model meteorology and prognostic CCN and IN properties (total number concentration, size distribution properties and chemical composition). Sulphate coated dust particles are efficient CCN because of their increased hygroscopicity while uncoated dust particles are efficient IN. The photochemical processes are directly linked to the RAMS radiative transfer scheme, which in the new model is RRTM. Absorption of short wave solar radiation from airborne dust leads to heating of the dust layer which can also affect the cloud processes. Mid and low tropospheric warming by dust is one of the new features that the model can

  13. Infrared radiative transfer in the dust-free Martian atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, D. )

    1990-08-30

    Gases in the Martian atmosphere, including CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO, and O{sub 3}, combine to produce some absorption at most infrared wavelengths. Line-by-line and quasi-random models are used to derive synthetic spectra of dust-free Martian atmospheres. These spectra show where gases absorb most strongly and provide a baseline for comparison with the results from more complete models that include the effects of dust. Gas absorption and emission features at many infrared wavelengths provide a source of contamination that must be removed from remote sensing observations of the Martian surface. For example, the weak reflectance minimum observed at wavelengths near 2.35 {mu}m, which has been interpreted as evidence for a variety of surface materials, is produced almost entirely by atmospheric CO and CO{sub 2} absorption. Isotopic CO{sub 2} bands near 7 and 8 {mu}m and near-infrared water vapor absorption bands partially overlap strong carbonate and hydrate features and frustrate systematic spectroscopic searches for these important candidate surface materials on Mars. In other spectral regions, gas absorption bands provide opportunities to study the structure and composition of the Martian atmosphere. Computed radiances within the strong CO{sub 2} 15-{mu}m band are incorporated into an atmospheric retrieval algorithm to derive the atmospheric temperature structure from Mariner 9 IRIS observations. Absorption and emission by gases also contributes to the energetics of the Martian atmosphere. Near-infrared CO{sub 2} bands absorb enough sunlight to produce globally-averaged solar heating rates that vary from 1 K/Earth day at the surface, to 10 K/Earth day at pressures near 0.01 mbar. Other gases contribute 1-5% of the heating at some levels.

  14. Radiation Pressure Measurements on Micron Size Individual Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P.D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; Witherow, W. K.; LeClair, A.; West, E.; Sheldon, R.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic radiation pressure have been made on individual silica (SiO2) particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance. These measurements were made by inserting single charged particles of known diameter in the 0.2 micron to 6.82 micron range and irradiating them from above with laser radiation focused to beam-widths of approx. 175-400 micron, at ambient pressures approx. 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -4) torr. The downward displacement of the particle due to the radiation force is balanced by the electrostatic force indicated by the compensating dc potential applied to the balance electrodes, providing a direct measure of the radiation force on the levitated particle. Theoretical calculations of the radiation pressure with a least-squares fit to the measured data yield the radiation pressure efficiencies of the particles, and comparisons with Mie scattering theory calculations provide the imaginary part of the refractive index of silica and the corresponding extinction and scattering efficiencies.

  15. Influences of dust aerosols on regional aerosol optical properties, radiation budget and tropospheric chemistry during a typical pre-monsoon season dust storm in northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Madronich, S.; Naja, M. K.; Carmichael, G. R.; Pfister, G.; Knote, C. J.; Brasseur, G. P.; Ojha, N.; Sarangi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of dust aerosols on the regional aerosol optical properties, radiation budget and tropospheric chemistry during a typical pre-monsoon season (April-June) dust storm event in northern India are analyzed. The MOZCART chemical mechanism of WRF-Chem is extended to simulate heterogeneous chemistry on dust surface and F-TUV photolysis scheme is updated to account for effects of dust aerosols on photolysis rates. The dust storm event lasted from 17 to 22 April 2010 and large changes (>50%) in local to regional scale aerosol optical properties are observed in both AERONET and satellite observations during this period. The extended version of WRF-Chem model captured several important features of the spatio-temporal distributions of dust plumes, aerosol optical properties and trace gases during the dust storm. Model results show that dust particles cool the surface and the top of the atmosphere, and warm the atmosphere. The regionally averaged radiative perturbation due to dust aerosols is estimated as -2.0×3.0 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere, 2.3×1.8 W m-2 in the atmosphere and -4.4×3.1 W m-2 at the surface. The impact of these radiative perturbations on the surface energy budget is estimated to be small on a regional scale but significant locally. The dust storm acted as a sink for many key trace gases including ozone, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen oxides, methanol, acetic acid and formaldehyde, and significantly perturbed their spatial and vertical distributions. The reductions in these gases are estimated as 5-99% and more than 80% of this reduction came from the heterogeneous chemistry. The RH dependence of reactive uptake coefficient is found to have a significant impact on the distributions of trace gases. A set of sensitivity analyses revealed that dust aging can play an important role in heterogeneous chemistry. Model experiments based on laboratory measurements of changes in the uptake of ozone by dust with aging showed that dust aging can lead to

  16. Spherically symmetric cosmological spacetimes with dust and radiation — numerical implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Woei Chet; Regis, Marco; Clarkson, Chris E-mail: regis@to.infn.it

    2013-10-01

    We present new numerical cosmological solutions of the Einstein Field Equations. The spacetime is spherically symmetric with a source of dust and radiation approximated as a perfect fluid. The dust and radiation are necessarily non-comoving due to the inhomogeneity of the spacetime. Such a model can be used to investigate non-linear general relativistic effects present during decoupling or big-bang nucleosynthesis, as well as for investigating void models of dark energy with isocurvature degrees of freedom. We describe the full evolution of the spacetime as well as the redshift and luminosity distance for a central observer. After demonstrating accuracy of the code, we consider a few example models, and demonstrate the sensitivity of the late time model to the degree of inhomogeneity of the initial radiation contrast.

  17. Radiative Forcing Effects Due to Black Carbon and Dust in the Atmosphere and Snow in the Western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Y.; Li, Q.; Liou, K. N.; Liao, H.; Gu, Y.; He, C.; Zhang, L.

    2014-12-01

    BC and dust are two of the most important light absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere and thus have significant direct radiative forcing and snow albedo effects regionally. There are large uncertainties in the estimates of direct radiative forcing of BC and dust, which range from 0.2 to 0.9 W m-2 for BC (Bond et al., 2013) and 0.07 to 0.31 W m-2 in the long waves for dust (IPCC, 2007). BC and dust deposited on snow can significantly reduce the surface albedos and further affect the regional hydrological cycle. In the western U.S. (WUS), mountain snowmelt accounts for over 70% of the annual fresh water supply, which is facing severe challenges in the region recently. Transpacific transport of Asian emissions is likely becoming an even larger contributor to the fine particulate matter in the WUS in spring, as the Asian emissions are increasing under the rapid economic development in this region. We thus intend to better understand the radiative forcing effects of BC and dust in the atmosphere and snow in the WUS using an offline coupled 3-D global chemical transport model with a radiative transfer model. With improved dust and BC emissions and dust particle size distributions, we would like to quantify the relative contributions from different sources and source regions to the radiative forcing of BC and dust.

  18. Characterization and radiative impact of dust aerosols over northwestern part of India: a case study during a severe dust storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Atinderpal; Tiwari, Shani; Sharma, Deepti; Singh, Darshan; Tiwari, Suresh; Srivastava, Atul Kumar; Rastogi, Neeraj; Singh, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    The present study focused on examining the impact of a severe dust storm (DS) on aerosol properties over Patiala (30.33°N, 76.4°E), a site located in the northwestern part of India during 20th-23rd March, 2012. On 20th March, average PM10 mass concentration increased abruptly from 182 to 817 µg m-3 along with significant increase in the number density of coarser particles (diameter >0.45 µm). During DS, spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) increases significantly with more increase at longer wavelengths resulting in weak wavelength dependence (AOD at 380 nm increases by ~210 % and at 870 nm by ~270 % on 20th March). Significant decrease in Ångström exponent (AE; α 380-870) from 0.56 to 0.11 and fine-mode fraction (FMF; PM2.5/PM10) from 0.49 to 0.25 indicates dominance of coarser particles over the station. Net short wave (SW) radiation flux has been decreased by ~20 % and single scattering albedo (SSA675) has been increased from 0.86 (19th March) to 0.90 (20th March). This observation is attributed to additional loading of scattering type aerosols on arrival of DS. Wavelength dependence of SSA reverses during DS and it increases with wavelength due to dominance of coarse-mode particles. Atmospheric aerosol radiative forcing (ATM ARF) during DS ranged from +45 to +77 W m-2, consequently heating the lower atmosphere up to 2.2 K day-1. Significant atmospheric heating rate due to severe dust storm may affect the regional atmospheric dynamics and hence the climate system.

  19. Radiation of spin waves from the open end of a microscopic magnetic-film waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Vladislav E.; Demokritov, Sergej O.; Birt, Daniel; O'Gorman, Brian; Tsoi, Maxim; Li, Xiaoqin

    2009-07-01

    We have studied experimentally the radiation of spin waves from a permalloy-film microwaveguide into a continuous permalloy film. We show that due to a strong mismatch of the spin-wave spectrum caused by a variation in the demagnetizing field at the interface between the waveguide and the film, a frequency interval exists, where spin waves experience total reflection from the junction penetrating into the permalloy film in a tunnelinglike manner. At frequencies above this interval, complex frequency-dependent radiation patterns were observed characterized by a preferential radiation direction appearing due to the intrinsic anisotropy of the spin-wave dispersion characteristics in the film.

  20. Radiation of spin waves from the open end of a microscopic magnetic-film waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birt, Daniel; Demidov, Vladislav; Demokritov, Sergej; O'Gorman, Brian; Tsoi, Maxim; Li, Xiaoqin

    2010-03-01

    We have studied experimentally the radiation of spin waves from a permalloy-film microwaveguide into a continuous permalloy film. We show that due to a strong mismatch of the spin-wave spectrum caused by a variation in the demagnetizing field at the interface between the waveguide and the film, a frequency interval exists, where spin waves experience total reflection from the junction penetrating into the permalloy film in a tunnelinglike manner. At frequencies above this interval, complex frequency-dependent radiation patterns were observed characterized by a preferential radiation direction appearing due to the intrinsic anisotropy of the spin-wave dispersion characteristics in the film.

  1. Dust scattering and the radiation pressure force in the M82 superwind

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Carl T.; Thompson, Todd A.; Martini, Paul E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2013-11-20

    Radiation pressure on dust grains may be an important physical mechanism driving galaxy-wide superwinds in rapidly star-forming galaxies. We calculate the combined dust and gas Eddington ratio (Γ) for the archetypal superwind of M82. By combining archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer data, a standard dust model, Monte Carlo dust scattering calculations, and the Herschel map of the dust surface density distribution, the observed far-UV/near-UV surface brightness in the outflow constrains both the total UV luminosity escaping from the starburst along its minor axis (L {sub *,UV}) and the flux-mean opacity, thus allowing a calculation of Γ. We find that L {sub *,UV} ≈ (1-6) × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}, ∼2-12 times greater than the UV luminosity observed from our line of sight. On a scale of 1-3 kpc above the plane of M82, we find that Γ ∼ 0.01-0.06. On smaller scales (∼0.25-0.5 kpc), where the enclosed mass decreases, our calculation of L {sub *,UV} implies that Γ ∼ 0.1 with factor of few uncertainties. Within the starburst itself, we estimate the single-scattering Eddington ratio to be of order unity. Thus, although radiation pressure is weak compared to gravity on kpc scales above the plane of M82, it may yet be important in launching the observed outflow. We discuss the primary uncertainties in our calculation, the sensitivity of Γ to the dust grain size distribution, and the time evolution of the wind following M82's recent starburst episodes.

  2. Radiative Effects of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning, Dust Storms, and Forest Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher Sundar A.; Vulcan, Donna V.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, both natural and anthropogenic, are important to the earth's radiative balance. They scatter the incoming solar radiation and modify the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by acting as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). Although it has been recognized that aerosols exert a net cooling influence on climate (Twomey et al. 1984), this effect has received much less attention than the radiative forcings due to clouds and greenhouse gases. The radiative forcing due to aerosols is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign (Houghton et al. 1990). Atmospheric aerosol particles generated from biomass burning, dust storms and forest fires are important regional climatic variables. A recent study by Penner et al. (1992) proposed that smoke particles from biomass burning may have a significant impact on the global radiation balance. They estimate that about 114 Tg of smoke is produced per year in the tropics through biomass burning. The direct and indirect effects of smoke aerosol due to biomass burning could add up globally to a cooling effect as large as 2 W/sq m. Ackerman and Chung (1992) used model calculations and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data to show that in comparison to clear days, the heavy dust loading over the Saudi Arabian peninsula can change the Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) clear sky shortwave and longwave radiant exitance by 40-90 W/sq m and 5-20 W/sq m, respectively. Large particle concentrations produced from these types of events often are found with optical thicknesses greater than one. These aerosol particles are transported across considerable distances from the source (Fraser et al. 1984). and they could perturb the radiative balance significantly. In this study, the regional radiative effects of aerosols produced from biomass burning, dust storms and forest fires are examined using the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Local Area

  3. Spin-down of Pulsars, and Their Electromagnetic and Gravitational Wave Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue-zhu, Zhang; Yan-yan, Fu; Yi-huan, Wei; Cheng-min, Zhang; Shao-hua, Yu; Yuan-yue, Pan; Yuan-qi, Guo; De-hua, Wang

    2016-04-01

    Pulsars posses extremely strong magnetic fields, and their magnetic axis does not coincide with their rotation axis, this causes the pulsars to emit electromagnetic radiations. Pulsars rely on their rotational energy to compensate for the energy loss caused by the electromagnetic radiation, which leads to the gradually decelerated spin of pulsars. According to the theoretical deduction, we have calculated the initial period of the Crab Nebula pulsar, and derived the period evolution of the pulsar at any time in the future under the effect of the electromagnetic radiation. Considered the possible existence of quadrupole moment in the mass distribution of a pulsar, the gravitational wave radiation will also make the pulsar spin down, hence the variation of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the effect of gravitational wave radiation is further analyzed. Finally, combining the two kinds of radiation mechanisms, the evolution of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the joint action of these two kinds of radiation mechanisms is analyzed.

  4. Gravitational radiation from a spinning compact object around a supermassive Kerr black hole in circular orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Han Wenbiao

    2010-10-15

    The gravitational waves and energy radiation from a spinning compact object with stellar mass in a circular orbit in the equatorial plane of a supermassive Kerr black hole are investigated in this paper. The effect of how the spin acts on energy and angular moment fluxes is discussed in detail. The calculation results indicate that the spin of a small body should be considered in waveform-template production for the upcoming gravitational wave detections. It is clear that when the direction of spin axes is the same as the orbitally angular momentum ('positive' spin), spin can decrease the energy fluxes which radiate to infinity. For antidirection spin ('negative'), the energy fluxes to infinity can be enlarged. And the relations between fluxes (both infinity and horizon) and spin look like quadratic functions. From frequency shift due to spin, we estimate the wave-phase accumulation during the inspiraling process of the particle. We find that the time of particle inspiral into the black hole is longer for positive spin and shorter for negative compared with the nonspinning particle. Especially, for extreme spin value, the energy radiation near the horizon of the extreme Kerr black hole is much more than that for the nonspinning one. And consequently, the maximum binging energy of the extreme spinning particle is much larger than that of the nonspinning particle.

  5. Response of Colorado river runoff to dust radiative forcing in snow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Painter, T.H.; Deems, J.S.; Belnap, J.; Hamlet, A.F.; Landry, C.C.; Udall, B.

    2010-01-01

    The waters of the Colorado River serve 27 million people in seven states and two countries but are overallocated by more than 10% of the river's historical mean. Climate models project runoff losses of 7-20% from the basin in this century due to human-induced climate change. Recent work has shown however that by the late 1800s, decades prior to allocation of the river's runoff in the 1920s, a fivefold increase in dust loading from anthropogenically disturbed soils in the southwest United States was already decreasing snow albedo and shortening the duration of snow cover by several weeks. The degree to which this increase in radiative forcing by dust in snow has affected timing and magnitude of runoff from the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) is unknown. Hereweuse the Variable Infiltration Capacity model with postdisturbance and predisturbance impacts of dust on albedo to estimate the impact on runoff from the UCRB across 1916-2003. We find that peak runoff at Lees Ferry, Arizona has occurred on average 3 wk earlier under heavier dust loading and that increases in evapotranspiration from earlier exposure of vegetation and soils decreases annual runoff by more than 1.0 billion cubic meters or ???5% of the annual average. The potential to reduce dust loading through surface stabilization in the deserts and restore more persistent snow cover, slow runoff, and increase water resources in the UCRB may represent an important mitigation opportunity to reduce system management tensions and regional impacts of climate change.

  6. SPARTA - Solver for Polarized Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Applications: Introduction and application to Saharan dust fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlakas, Vasileios; Macke, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred

    2016-07-01

    Non-spherical particles in the atmosphere absorb and scatter solar radiation. They change the polarization state of solar radiation depending on their shape, size, chemical composition and orientation. To quantify polarization effects, a new three-dimensional (3D) vector radiative transfer model, SPARTA (Solver for Polarized Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Applications) is introduced and validated against benchmark results. SPARTA employs the statistical forward Monte Carlo technique for efficient column-response pixel-based radiance calculations including polarization for 3D inhomogeneous cloudless and cloudy atmospheres. A sensitivity study has been carried out and exemplarily results are presented for two lidar-based mineral dust fields. The scattering and absorption properties of the dust particles have been computed for spheroids and irregular shaped particles. Polarized radiance fields in two-dimensional (2D) and one-dimensional (1D) inhomogeneous Saharan dust fields have been calculated at 532 nm wavelength. The domain-averaged results of the normalized reflected radiance are almost identical for the 1D and 2D modes. In the areas with large spatial gradient in optical thickness with expected significant horizontal photon transport, the radiance fields of the 2D mode differ by about ±12% for the first Stokes component (radiance, I) and ±8% for the second Stokes component (linear polarization, Q) from the fields of the 1D mode.

  7. Global mountain snow and ice loss driven by dust and black carbon radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in mountain snow and glaciers have been our strongest indicators of the effects of changing climate. Earlier melt of snow and losses of glacier mass have perturbed regional water cycling, regional climate, and ecosystem dynamics, and contributed strongly to sea level rise. Recent studies however have revealed that in some regions, the reduction of albedo by light absorbing impurities in snow and ice such as dust and black carbon can be distinctly more powerful than regional warming at melting snow and ice. In the Rocky Mountains, dust deposition has increased 5 to 7 fold in the last 150 years, leading to ~3 weeks earlier loss of snow cover from forced melt. In absolute terms, in some years dust radiative forcing there can shorten snow cover duration by nearly two months. Remote sensing retrievals are beginning to reveal powerful dust and black carbon radiative forcing in the Hindu Kush through Himalaya. In light of recent ice cores that show pronounced increases in loading of dust and BC during the Anthropocene, these forcings may have contributed far more to glacier retreat than previously thought. For example, we have shown that the paradoxical end of the Little Ice Age in the European Alps beginning around 1850 (when glaciers began to retreat but temperatures continued to decline and precipitation was unchanged) very likely was driven by the massive increases in deposition to snow and ice of black carbon from industrialization in surrounding nations. A more robust understanding of changes in mountain snow and ice during the Anthropocene requires that we move past simplistic treatments (e.g. temperature-index modeling) to energy balance approaches that assess changes in the individual forcings such as the most powerful component for melt - net solar radiation. Remote sensing retrievals from imaging spectrometers and multispectral sensors are giving us more powerful insights into the time-space variation of snow and ice albedo.

  8. Dust in Card Rooms: A Continuing Problem in the Cotton-Spinning Industry

    PubMed Central

    Wood, C. H.; Roach, S. A.

    1964-01-01

    The results are given of environmental and clinical investigations in four card rooms where one of the latest systems of exhaust ventilation to control dust has been installed. The concentration of air-borne coarse dust particles, larger than 2 mm., was reduced by between 80% and 90% around the carding engines. The card rooms consequently looked less dusty. However, the concentrations of medium and fine sized dust particles were not always reduced and were actually increased in some places. In one mill, when the new control system had been running for three years, there was found to be no reduction in the prevalence of non-specific chest symptoms, and there was an increase in the number of those with chest tightness on Mondays, a symptom characteristic of byssinosis. Evidence is given of a similar failure to reduce the dust sufficiently in three other mills where the same exhaust system is installed. There is an urgent need to extend the limited investigations reported here to a larger number of mills. Meanwhile there is a continuing morbidity and mortality from byssinosis. Until work in card rooms has been made safe and proved to be so, it is necessary to have regular measurement of dust conditions and for the workers to have periodical medical examinations to enable managements to be advised about the hazards in their mills and advice to be given to the individuals affected by the dust. PMID:14180475

  9. Radiative Effects of African Dust and Smoke Observed from CERES and CALIOP Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorks, John E.; McGill, Matt; Rodier, Sharon; Vaughan, Mark; Xu, Yongxiang; Hlavka, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Cloud and aerosol effects have a significant impact on the atmospheric radiation budget in the Tropical Atlantic because of the spatial and temporal extent of desert dust and smoke from biomass burning in the atmosphere. The influences of African dust and smoke aerosols on cloud radiative properties over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean were analyzed for the month of July for three years (2006-2008) using collocated data collected by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on the CALIPSO and Aqua satellites. Aerosol layer height and type can be more accurately determined using CALIOP data, through parameters such as cloud and aerosol layer height, optical depth and depolarization ratio, than data from atmospheric imagers used in previous cloud-aerosol interaction studies. On average, clouds below 5 km had a daytime instantaneous shortwave (SW) radiative flux of 270.2 +/- 16.9 W/sq m and thin cirrus clouds had a SW radiative flux of 208.0 +/- 12.7 W/sq m. When dust aerosols interacted with clouds below 5 km, as determined from CALIPSO, the SW radiative flux decreased to 205.4 +/- 13.0 W/sq m. Similarly, smoke aerosols decreased the SW radiative flux of low clouds to a value of 240.0 +/- 16.6 W/sq m. These decreases in SW radiative flux were likely attributed to the aerosol layer height and changes in cloud microphysics. CALIOP lidar observations, which more accurately identify aerosol layer height than passive instruments, appear essential for better understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions, a major uncertainty in predicting the climate system.

  10. Deflection of the local interstellar dust flow by solar radiation pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgraf, M.; Augustsson, K.; Grun, E.; Gustafson, B. A.

    1999-01-01

    Interstellar dust grains intercepted by the dust detectors on the Ulysses and Galileo spacecrafts at heliocentric distances from 2 to 4 astronomical units show a deficit of grains with masses from 1 x 10(-17) to 3 x 10(-16) kilograms relative to grains intercepted outside 4 astronomical units. To divert grains out of the 2- to 4-astronomical unit region, the solar radiation pressure must be 1.4 to 1.8 times the force of solar gravity. These figures are consistent with the optical properties of spherical or elongated grains that consist of astronomical silicates or organic refractory material. Pure graphite grains with diameters of 0.2 to 0.4 micrometer experience a solar radiation pressure force as much as twice the force of solar gravity.

  11. [Evaluation of working environment in the textile industry. IV. Dust concentration in the air of the flax spinning and weaving plants].

    PubMed

    Gościcki, J; Wiecek, E; Matecki, W; Bielichowska, G

    1980-01-01

    Evaluation of dust concentration in the air of spinning and weaving rooms was made by gravimetric sampling of dust in 3 flax plants, where short flax fibres (flax--tow) and long flax fibres were manufactured. Besides, the dispersion of dusts and concentration of free silica were determined. The highest concentration of dust (10 mg/m3) was found in hackling room, mixing mill, and the one where spreading machines are operated, while in the carding room it was - 7.0 mg/m3. In other shops the concentration was - 5.5 mg/m3. The dust in the air of spinning rooms contained 2.3% of free silica and 53% of its particles were smaller than 5 micrometers. In the weaving rooms it contained 1.6% of free silica and 57% particles were smaller than 5 micrometers. The geometric mean of dust concentration higher than MAC for vegetable dusts (4 mg/m3) was found in hackling mill, mixing mill and the one where spreading machines are operated. PMID:6246327

  12. Polarization of Magnetic Dipole Emission and Spinning Dust Emission from Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, Alex

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic dipole emission (MDE) from interstellar magnetic nanoparticles is potentially an important Galactic foreground in the microwave frequencies, and its polarization level may pose great challenges for achieving reliable measurements of cosmic microwave background B-mode signal. To obtain realistic predictions for the polarization of MDE, we first compute the degree of alignment of big silicate grains incorporated with magnetic inclusions. We find that thermally rotating big grains with magnetic inclusions are weakly aligned and can achieve alignment saturation when the magnetic alignment rate becomes much faster than the rotational damping rate. We then compute the degree of alignment for free-flying magnetic nanoparticles, taking into account various interaction processes of grains with the ambient gas and radiation field, including neutral collisions, ion collisions, and infrared emission. We find that the rotational damping by infrared emission can significantly decrease the degree of alignment of small particles from the saturation level, whereas the excitation by ion collisions can enhance the alignment of ultrasmall particles. Using the computed degrees of alignment, we predict the polarization level of MDE from free-flying magnetic nanoparticles to be rather low. Such a polarization level is within the upper limits measured for anomalous microwave emission (AME), which indicates that MDE from free-flying iron particles may not be ruled out as a source of AME. We also quantify rotational emission from free-flying iron nanoparticles with permanent magnetic moments and find that its emissivity is about one order of magnitude lower than that from spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  13. Dust Propagation and Radiation In the Presence of a Low-level Jet in Central China on March 17, 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, B. K.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Suspended dust in the air can directly change the energy budget in the atmosphere and at the surface through scattering and absorption of radiation. Thus, dust can potentially modify the development of weather systems. To explore the dust-radiation effects on weather systems, a dust model was developed based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The calculations of dust processes in the WRF dust model include emission, advection, boundary layer mixing, cumulus mixing, dust-radiation interaction, wet scavenging, and sedimentation. Due to a high vertical spatial resolution near the surface a time splitting method was applied to the calculation of dust sedimentation to relax the numerical time step. The "Hexi Corridor" is the historical name given to a string of oases along the northern slope of the Tibetan Plateau that formed a relatively easy transportation route between eastern China and central Asia. As trade developed over the centuries, this route became known as the Silk Road. This corridor also marks the transition from the relatively flat Gobi desert area in northern China to the elevated mountains of the Tibetan Plateau. These mountains present a southern barrier to the paths of dust storms that develop during spring outbreaks of the Mongolian Cyclone. In March of 2010, a series of dust storms developed in the Gobi Desert north of the Hexi Corridor that transported massive amounts of dust eastward to central and northeastern China, Korea and Japan. On March 17 during this event, a low-level jet developed along the northern perimeter of the Plateau, in alignment with upper level winds and the Hexi Corridor. Over the course of the day, a well-defined short-duration dust plume was emitted in the southern Gobi desert area and was transported over 1300 km in a southeast direction, over the Loess Plateau and into the Gansu Province. In this study, the interactions of synoptic conditions with regional topography that led to the development of the low

  14. Transport, vertical structure and radiative properties of dust events in southeast China determined from ground and space sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jianjun; Zheng, Y.; Li, Zhanqing; Flynn, Connor J.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Cribb, Maureen

    2011-11-01

    Two dust events were detected over the Yangtze Delta region of China during March 14-17 and April 25-26 in 2009 where such dust events are uncommon. The transport behavior, spatio-temporal evolution, vertical structure, direct radiative effects, as well as induced heating rates, are investigated using a combination of ground-based and satellite-based measurements, a back-trajectory analysis, an aerosol model and a radiative transfer model.

  15. Radiation and temperature effects of the intensive injection of dust aerosol into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchakova, I. A.; Mokhov, I. I.; Rublev, A. N.

    2015-03-01

    Based on the measurements at the AERONET station (Ilorin, Nigeria), quantitative estimates of radiation and temperature effects of dust aerosol during the intensive sand storm in the Sahara Desert from January 28 to February 6, 2000, are obtained. The model used in calculations implies particles of dust aerosol being no more than 15 μm in radius (according to the data from AERONET station); another model takes into account large particles (LPs) up to 60 μm in radius and involves a spectral variation in the OPAC refraction index. In the short infrared region, the optical thickness of aerosol weakening increases with LPs taken into account in the aerosol model; the albedo of aerosol single scattering reduces in comparison to the respective optical parameters of the first model. Dust aerosol cools the earth's surface. In the presence of LPs in dust aerosol, the surface-atmosphere system can both cool and warm, while if LPs less than 15 μm in size are not taken into account, the surface cools. The rate of cooling of the 10-m near-surface atmospheric layer Δ T/Δ t changes in the interval of -(4-21)°C/day without the influence of LPs over 15 μm in size on solar radiation transfer taken into account; if this influence is taken into account, the rate is -(6-36)°C/day. In the long infrared region, the surface-atmosphere system warms more intensively if LPs are taken into account by the aerosol model. The heating rate of the 10-m near-surface atmospheric layer does not exceed ~0.5°C/day during the entire period of dust emission without LPs taken into account (AERONET algorithm); if LPs are taken into account (modeling results), heating rate reaches a maximal value of ~0.6°C/day.

  16. Radiative transfer modeling of dust-coated Pancam calibration target materials: Laboratory visible/near-infrared spectrogoniometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Sohl-Dickstein, J.; Grundy, W.M.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J.F., III; Christensen, P.R.; Graff, T.; Guinness, E.A.; Kinch, K.; Morris, R.; Shepard, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory visible/near-infrared multispectral observations of Mars Exploration Rover Pancam calibration target materials coated with different thicknesses of Mars spectral analog dust were acquired under variable illumination geometries using the Bloomsburg University Goniometer. The data were fit with a two-layer radiative transfer model that combines a Hapke formulation for the dust with measured values of the substrate interpolated using a He-Torrance approach. We first determined the single-scattering albedo, phase function, opposition effect width, and amplitude for the dust using the entire data set (six coating thicknesses, three substrates, four wavelengths, and phase angles 3??-117??). The dust exhibited single-scattering albedo values similar to other Mars analog soils and to Mars Pathfinder dust and a dominantly forward scattering behavior whose scattering lobe became narrower at longer wavelengths. Opacity values for each dust thickness corresponded well to those predicted from the particles sizes of the Mars analog dust. We then restricted the number of substrates, dust thicknesses, and incidence angles input to the model. The results suggest that the dust properties are best characterized when using substrates whose reflectances are brighter and darker than those of the deposited dust and data that span a wide range of dust thicknesses. The model also determined the dust photometric properties relatively well despite limitations placed on the range of incidence angles. The model presented here will help determine the photometric properties of dust deposited on the MER rovers and to track the multiple episodes of dust deposition and erosion that have occurred at both landing sites. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Modelling direct radiative effect of mineral dust with the NMMB/BSC-CTM for dust outbreak events over the Mediterranean in summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obiso, Vincezo; Jorba, Oriol; Basart, Sara; Baldasano, Jose M.; Nabat, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols interact with the atmospheric system scattering and absorbing solar radiation, with a significant impact on atmospheric energy and hydrologic processes. Radiative forcing associated with these perturbations affects climate and meteorology. In this contribution, we analyse model results of the Direct Radiative Effect (DRE) of mineral dust over the western-Mediterranean during summer 2012. For that, the NMMB/BSC Chemical Transport Model (NMMB/BSC-CTM) is applied on a regional domain at 0.1º horizontal resolution. The NMMB/BSC-CTM is a new on-line chemical weather prediction system coupling atmospheric and chemistry processes. In the radiation module of the model mineral dust is treated as a radiatively active substance interacting both short and longwave radiation. The impact of the mineral dust outbreaks on meteorology is discussed by comparing model forecasts with atmospheric analysis and meteorological observations. The analysis focuses in the vertical structure of the atmosphere and the resulting surface meteorological conditions. The authors acknowledge the support from the grant SEV-2011-00067 of Severo Ochoa Program, awarded by the Spanish Government.

  18. Modification of Saharan air layer and environmental shear over the eastern Atlantic Ocean by dust-radiation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Hua; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Waylonis, Mark

    2010-11-01

    This study investigates the influence of dust-radiation effects on the modification of the Saharan air layer (SAL) and environmental shear. A tracer model based on the Weather Research and Forecast model was developed to examine the influence using a dust outbreak event. Two numerical experiments were conducted with (ON) and without (OFF) the dust-radiation effects. Both simulations reasonably reproduced SAL's features. However, the 700 hPa maximum temperature within SAL was slightly underestimated and shifted northwestward from OFF. These were improved from ON, but the maximum temperature became slightly overestimated, which might be due to inaccurate optical properties. The dust-radiation interactions mainly warmed the dusty air between 750 and 550 hPa because dust shortwave absorption dominated dust longwave cooling. Another major warming area was found near the surface over the ocean due to longwave radiative heating by dust aloft. The modification of temperature resulted in an adjustment of the vertical wind shear. To the south of SAL, where easterly wave disturbances and tropical storms usually occur, the vertical zonal wind shear increased by about 1˜2.5 m s-1 km-1 from 750 to 550 hPa, resulting in a maximum wind change of 3˜5 m s-1, a 30˜40% increase, around the top of this layer. The enhancement of the vertical shear in this layer could potentially have an impact on TC genesis and development. The dust-radiation effects also modified the moisture and dust distribution, which can have a feedback (i.e., a secondary effect) on the heating profile and the vertical shear.

  19. SKIRT: An advanced dust radiative transfer code with a user-friendly architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, P.; Baes, M.

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the architecture and design principles that underpin the latest version of SKIRT, a state-of-the-art open source code for simulating continuum radiation transfer in dusty astrophysical systems, such as spiral galaxies and accretion disks. SKIRT employs the Monte Carlo technique to emulate the relevant physical processes including scattering, absorption and emission by the dust. The code features a wealth of built-in geometries, radiation source spectra, dust characterizations, dust grids, and detectors, in addition to various mechanisms for importing snapshots generated by hydrodynamical simulations. The configuration for a particular simulation is defined at run-time through a user-friendly interface suitable for both occasional and power users. These capabilities are enabled by careful C++ code design. The programming interfaces between components are well defined and narrow. Adding a new feature is usually as simple as adding another class; the user interface automatically adjusts to allow configuring the new options. We argue that many scientific codes, like SKIRT, can benefit from careful object-oriented design and from a friendly user interface, even if it is not a graphical user interface.

  20. Self-similarity and scaling behaviour of infrared emission from radiatively heated dust - I. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivezic, Zeljko; Elitzur, Moshe

    1997-06-01

    Dust infrared emission possesses scaling properties that yield powerful results with far-reaching observational consequences. Scaling was first noticed by Rowan-Robinson for spherical shells and is shown here to be a general property of dust emission in arbitrary geometries. Overall luminosity is never an input parameter of the radiative transfer problem; spectral shape is the only relevant property of the heating radiation when the inner boundary of the dusty region is controlled by dust sublimation. Similarly, the absolute scales of densities and distances are irrelevant; the geometry enters only through angles, relative thicknesses and aspect ratios, and the actual magnitudes of densities and distances enter only through one independent parameter, the overall optical depth. That is, as long as the overall optical depth stays the same, the system dimensions can be scaled up or down by an arbitrary factor without any effect on the radiative transfer problem. Dust properties enter only through dimensionless, normalized distributions that describe the spatial variation of density and the wavelength dependence of scattering and absorption efficiencies. Scaling enables a systematic approach to modelling and classification of IR spectra. We develop a new, fully scale-free method for solving radiative transfer, present exact numerical results, and derive approximate analytical solutions for spherical geometry, covering the entire range of parameter space relevant to observations. For a given type of grains, the spectral energy distribution (SED) is primarily controlled by the profile of the spatial dust distribution and the optical depth - each density profile produces a family of solutions, with position within the family determined by optical depth. From the model SEDs presented here, the density distribution and optical depth can be observationally determined for various sources. Scaling implies tight correlations among the SEDs of various members of the same class

  1. Aerosol chemical and radiative properties in the tropical Atlantic trade winds: The importance of African mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-Jones, Xu

    This dissertation presents results relevant to aerosol radiative forcing. The focus of this dissertation is the role of mineral dust in atmospheric radiative processes over the tropical Atlantic Ocean. The aerosol mass and light scattering data concurrently measured over the tropical North Atlantic ocean yield a dust mass scattering efficiency of 0.77 m2/g, about a quarter of that measured for non-sea-salt sulfate (nss SO4=) in the North Atlantic marine boundary layer. Because of the high concentration of mineral dust relative to nss SO4= over the tropical North Atlantic, the total scattering by mineral dust is about four times that by nss SO4 = aerosol in this region. On an annual basis, aerosol optical depth is apportioned to: mineral dust 71%, nss- SO4 = 16% and sea salt 13%. The coarse-particle fraction (CPF) (aerodynamic diameter > 1 μm) of nss SO4= varied from about 21% to 73%, with the highest CPF values associated with African dust events. The CPF nss SO 4= was believed to be a result of the heterogeneous reactions of SO2 (presumably from European sources) with dust particles suspended in the air over North Africa. This study provides the first direct evidence that confirms the importance of dust in sulfate production and resulting the coarse particle sulfate in the tropical Atlantic Ocean region. An important implication is that dust particles may reduce the effectiveness of sulfate aerosol as a radiative forcing agent in many regions where dust events are frequent and where dust concentrations are high. The aerosol scattering coefficient (ASC) measured during this experiment increased by a factor of 1.13 to 1.69 when RH was increased from about 40% to 80%. Through chemical apportioning of ASC, the HGF for sea-salt was found to be 1.8 +/- 0.2, while that of mineral dust was close to unity. This study shows that climate studies must consider the effect of mineral dust not only because of its direct effects on the radiation balance but also because of its

  2. Response of Colorado River runoff to dust radiative forcing in snow

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Thomas H.; Deems, Jeffrey S.; Belnap, Jayne; Hamlet, Alan F.; Landry, Christopher C.; Udall, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    The waters of the Colorado River serve 27 million people in seven states and two countries but are overallocated by more than 10% of the river’s historical mean. Climate models project runoff losses of 7–20% from the basin in this century due to human-induced climate change. Recent work has shown however that by the late 1800s, decades prior to allocation of the river’s runoff in the 1920s, a fivefold increase in dust loading from anthropogenically disturbed soils in the southwest United States was already decreasing snow albedo and shortening the duration of snow cover by several weeks. The degree to which this increase in radiative forcing by dust in snow has affected timing and magnitude of runoff from the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) is unknown. Here we use the Variable Infiltration Capacity model with postdisturbance and predisturbance impacts of dust on albedo to estimate the impact on runoff from the UCRB across 1916–2003. We find that peak runoff at Lees Ferry, Arizona has occurred on average 3 wk earlier under heavier dust loading and that increases in evapotranspiration from earlier exposure of vegetation and soils decreases annual runoff by more than 1.0 billion cubic meters or ∼5% of the annual average. The potential to reduce dust loading through surface stabilization in the deserts and restore more persistent snow cover, slow runoff, and increase water resources in the UCRB may represent an important mitigation opportunity to reduce system management tensions and regional impacts of climate change. PMID:20855581

  3. Radiative transfer in dusty nebulae. III. The effects of dust albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosian, V.; Dana, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of an albedo of dust internal to nebulae on the observable parameters of the nebulae, such as ionization structure and temperature of dust grain have been investigated. We have used the quasi-diffusion method which entails an iterative procedure for solution of the radiative transfer equations to determine the accuracy of less-complicated, but approximate, solutions such as the Eddington approximation, a modified Eddington approximation, the on-the-spot approximation, and the generalized on-the-spot appproximation of Paper I. It is found that for zero albedo the generalized on-the-spot approximation is sufficiently accurate for most astrophysical applications. Similarly, for nonzero albedo the Eddington approximation gives accurate results, and the additional accuracy achieved through the modification of this approximation is, in most cases, negligible.

  4. Retrievals of Dust and Black Carbon Radiative Forcing in Snow using Imaging Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, F. C.; Painter, T.; Bryant, A. C.; Skiles, M.; Rittger, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    The reduction of snow albedo due to impurities of dust and black carbon provides an additional energy flux into a snowpack. This positive radiative forcing accelerates snowmelt, reduces snow cover duration and water runoff. Extensive information in time and space on dust and black carbon radiative forcing in snow are therefore required to model and predict water availability from snow and ice reservoirs. We present a novel processing chain to retrieve dust and black carbon radiative forcing in snow from orthorectified remote sensing data. We use JPL's classic version of the Airborne Visible / Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) to measure upwelling solar radiance at the sensor level. The first stage of processing comprises the modeling and compensation for atmospheric and topographic influences on the AVIRIS data. The resulting directional surface reflectance factor is used to determine snow cover and to retrieve the snow grain size distribution. The latter requires a simple inversion strategy using a look up table with pre-calculated values of spectral ice absorption features, which depend to the first order on the snow grain size. Spectral snow albedo is determined by generalizing the directional snow surface spectral reflectance with the anisotropy factor given by the bidirectional reflectance distribution function. The integration over the visible spectral range of solar light yields the broadband snow albedo. The difference of the latter with a modeled clean snow albedo multiplied by the irradiance provides the spatial distribution of the radiative forcing in snow. In addition, we validate the spectral irradiance and directional surface reflectance of snow against independent in-situ reference observations in the Senator Beck Basin Study Area, Upper Colorado River Basin, San Juan Mountains, Colorado, USA. The results indicate that the products derived from AVIRIS data enable us to retrieve and monitor quantitative snow surface properties relevant to

  5. A 4-year shortwave and longwave radiation climatology in a dust-influenced mountain snow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T. H.; Barrett, A. P.; Landry, C. C.; McNeally, P. B.

    2008-12-01

    In winter 2005, we established detailed radiation infrastructure in the Senator Beck Basin Study Area (SBBSA), which lies near Red Mountain Pass in the San Juan Mountains, SW Colorado, US. The San Juan Mountains are subject to multiple dust deposition events each year, primarily in spring and summer. In the period 2004-2008, the study site received 4 to 9 deposition events a year, with mass coming primarily from the Colorado Plateau. The loading observed today is approximately 500% greater than that prior to the disturbance of fragile desert surfaces in the southwest US in the 1870s when numbers of grazing cattle and sheep began to increase dramatically. Snowmelt model sensitivity analyses indicate that snow cover duration is reduced by 25-35 days as a result of enhanced absorption of shortwave radiation by dust in the snow cover. Land surface radiative forcing as a result of early removal of snowcover is of the order 150 W/m2. In this study, we describe the shortwave and longwave climatology (winter 2005 through summer 2008) at alpine and subalpine towers in the SBBSA. At each tower, we measure incident and reflected fluxes for broadband shortwave and NIR/SWIR (from which we infer the visible fluxes), longwave irradiance and snow surface temperature (from which we infer snow longwave exitance), and noontime diffuse irradiance. A CIMEL sunphotometer (NASA AERONET site RedMountainPass) is situated near the subalpine tower to measure aerosol optical depth coordinated with the above radiation measurements. During winter and spring, the top 30 cm of the snow column was sampled at 3 cm resolution to determine the stratigraphy of dust concentration contributing to enhanced absorption.

  6. Effect of polyfunctional monomers on properties of radiation crosslinked EPDM/waste tire dust blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Tariq; Khan, Sajid; Nho, Young-Chang; Ahmad, Rashid

    2012-04-01

    In this study, waste tire dust is recycled as filler and blended with ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber. Three different polyfuntional monomers (PFMs) are incorporated into the standard formulation and irradiated under electron beam at different doses up to maximum of 100 kGy. The combined effects of PFMs and absorbed dose on the physical properties of EPDM/WTD blend are measured and compared with sulfur crosslinked formulation. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that radiation developed better crosslinked network with higher thermal stability than sulfur crosslinked structure. The physical properties of radiation crosslinked blend are similar to the sulfur crosslinked blend. The absence of toxic chemicals/additives in radiation crosslinked blends made them an ideal candidate for many applications such as roof sealing sheets, water retention pond, playground mat, sealing profile for windows etc.

  7. Transport, vertical structure and radiative properties of dust events in southeast China determined from ground and space sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianjun; Zheng, Youfei; Li, Zhanqing; Flynn, Connor; Welton, E. J.; Cribb, Mareen

    2011-11-01

    Two dust events were detected over the Yangtze Delta region of China during March 14-17 and April 25-26 in 2009 where such dust events are uncommon. The transport behavior, spatio-temporal evolution, vertical structure, direct radiative effects, as well as induced heating rates, are investigated using a combination of ground-based and satellite-based measurements, a back-trajectory analysis, an aerosol model and a radiative transfer model. Back-trajectories, wind fields and aerosol model analyses show that the first dust originated in northern/northwestern China and the second generated in the Taklimakan desert in northwest China, and traveled across the Hexi corridor and Loess Plateau to the Yangtze Delta region (the so-called "dust corridor"). The mean lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio (LR) during the two dust events was 38.7 ± 10.4 sr and 42.7 ± 15.2 sr, respectively. The mean aerosol depolarization ratio ( δa) for the first dust event was 0.16 ± 0.07, with a maximum value of 0.32. For the second, the mean δa was around 0.19 ± 0.06, with a maximum value of 0.29. Aerosol extinction coefficient and δa profiles for the two events were similar: two aerosol layers consisting of dust aerosols and a mixture of dust and anthropogenic pollution aerosols. The topmost aerosol layer is above 3.5 km. The maximum mean aerosol extinction coefficients were 0.5 km -1 and 0.54 km -1 at about 0.7 km and 1.1 km, respectively. Significant effects of cooling at the surface and heating in the atmosphere were found during these dust events. Diurnal mean shortwave radiative forcings (efficiencies) at the surface, the top-of-the-atmosphere and within the atmosphere were -36.8 (-80.0), -13.6 (-29.6) and 23.2 (50.4) W m -2, respectively, during the first dust event, and -48.2 (-70.9), -21.4 (-31.5) and 26.8 (39.4) W m -2, respectively, during the second dust event. Maximum heating rates occurred at 0.7 km during the first dust event and at 1.1 km during the second dust event

  8. Direct Radiative Effect of Mineral Dust on the Development of African Easterly Waves in Late Summer, 2003-07

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Po-Lun; Zhang, Kai; Shi, Jainn Jong; Matsui, Toshihisa; Arking, Albert

    2012-12-19

    Episodic events of both Saharan dust outbreaks and African easterly waves (AEWs) are observed to move westward over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. The relationship between the warm, dry, and dusty Saharan air layer on the nearby storms has been the subject of considerable debate. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting model is used to investigate the radiative effect of dust on the development of AEWs during August and September, the months of maximumtropical cyclone activity, in years 2003–07. The simulations show that dust radiative forcing enhances the convective instability of the environment. As a result, mostAEWsintensify in the presence of a dust layer. The Lorenz energy cycle analysis reveals that the dust radiative forcing enhances the condensational heating, which elevates the zonal and eddy available potential energy. In turn, available potential energy is effectively converted to eddy kinetic energy, in which local convective overturning plays the primary role. The magnitude of the intensification effect depends on the initial environmental conditions, including moisture, baroclinity, and the depth of the boundary layer. The authors conclude that dust radiative forcing, albeit small, serves as a catalyst to promote local convection that facilitates AEW development.

  9. Direct Radiative Effect of Mineral Dust on the Development of African Easterly Wave in Late Summer, 2003-2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Po-Lun; Zhang, Kai; Shi, Jainn Jong; Matsui, Toshihisa; Arking, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Episodic events of both Saharan dust outbreaks and African Easterly Waves (AEWs) are observed to move westward over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. The relationship between the warm, dry, and dusty Saharan Air Layer (SAL) on the nearby storms has been the subject of considerable debate. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to investigate the radiative effect of dust on the development of AEWs during August and September, the months of maximum tropical cyclone activity, in years 2003-2007. The simulations show that dust radiative forcing enhances the convective instability of the environment. As a result, most AEWs intensify in the presence of a dust layer. The Lorenz energy cycle analysis reveals that the dust radiative forcing enhances the condensational heating, which elevates the zonal and eddy available potential energy. In turn, available potential energy is effectively converted to eddy kinetic energy, in which local convective overturning plays the primary role. The magnitude of the intensification effect depends on the initial environmental conditions, including moisture, baroclinity, and the depth of the boundary layer. We conclude that dust radiative forcing, albeit small, serves as a catalyst to promote local convection that facilitates AEW development.

  10. Spin polarized energy-resolved photoemission from Ni(111) using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudat, W.; Kisker, E.; Kuhlmann, E.; Campagna, M.

    1981-03-01

    We report on the first energy-resolved (retarding field mode) spin polarized photoemission measurement from a Ni(111) single crystal using synchrotron radiation from the ACO storage ring at LURE(ORSAY) It is shown that exchange effects can be detected for electron states well below the Fermi energy and that spin polarized, constant-initial-state spectroscopy of ferromagnets using synchrotron radiation is feasible.

  11. GPU-based Monte Carlo Dust Radiative Transfer Scheme Applied to Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymann, Frank; Siebenmorgen, Ralf

    2012-05-01

    A three-dimensional parallel Monte Carlo (MC) dust radiative transfer code is presented. To overcome the huge computing-time requirements of MC treatments, the computational power of vectorized hardware is used, utilizing either multi-core computer power or graphics processing units. The approach is a self-consistent way to solve the radiative transfer equation in arbitrary dust configurations. The code calculates the equilibrium temperatures of two populations of large grains and stochastic heated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Anisotropic scattering is treated applying the Heney-Greenstein phase function. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the object is derived at low spatial resolution by a photon counting procedure and at high spatial resolution by a vectorized ray tracer. The latter allows computation of high signal-to-noise images of the objects at any frequencies and arbitrary viewing angles. We test the robustness of our approach against other radiative transfer codes. The SED and dust temperatures of one- and two-dimensional benchmarks are reproduced at high precision. The parallelization capability of various MC algorithms is analyzed and included in our treatment. We utilize the Lucy algorithm for the optical thin case where the Poisson noise is high, the iteration-free Bjorkman & Wood method to reduce the calculation time, and the Fleck & Canfield diffusion approximation for extreme optical thick cells. The code is applied to model the appearance of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at optical and infrared wavelengths. The AGN torus is clumpy and includes fluffy composite grains of various sizes made up of silicates and carbon. The dependence of the SED on the number of clumps in the torus and the viewing angle is studied. The appearance of the 10 μm silicate features in absorption or emission is discussed. The SED of the radio-loud quasar 3C 249.1 is fit by the AGN model and a cirrus component to account for the far-infrared emission.

  12. GPU-BASED MONTE CARLO DUST RADIATIVE TRANSFER SCHEME APPLIED TO ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Heymann, Frank; Siebenmorgen, Ralf

    2012-05-20

    A three-dimensional parallel Monte Carlo (MC) dust radiative transfer code is presented. To overcome the huge computing-time requirements of MC treatments, the computational power of vectorized hardware is used, utilizing either multi-core computer power or graphics processing units. The approach is a self-consistent way to solve the radiative transfer equation in arbitrary dust configurations. The code calculates the equilibrium temperatures of two populations of large grains and stochastic heated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Anisotropic scattering is treated applying the Heney-Greenstein phase function. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the object is derived at low spatial resolution by a photon counting procedure and at high spatial resolution by a vectorized ray tracer. The latter allows computation of high signal-to-noise images of the objects at any frequencies and arbitrary viewing angles. We test the robustness of our approach against other radiative transfer codes. The SED and dust temperatures of one- and two-dimensional benchmarks are reproduced at high precision. The parallelization capability of various MC algorithms is analyzed and included in our treatment. We utilize the Lucy algorithm for the optical thin case where the Poisson noise is high, the iteration-free Bjorkman and Wood method to reduce the calculation time, and the Fleck and Canfield diffusion approximation for extreme optical thick cells. The code is applied to model the appearance of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at optical and infrared wavelengths. The AGN torus is clumpy and includes fluffy composite grains of various sizes made up of silicates and carbon. The dependence of the SED on the number of clumps in the torus and the viewing angle is studied. The appearance of the 10 {mu}m silicate features in absorption or emission is discussed. The SED of the radio-loud quasar 3C 249.1 is fit by the AGN model and a cirrus component to account for the far-infrared emission.

  13. Dust aerosol properties and radiative forcing observed in spring during 2001-2014 over urban Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xingna; Lü, Rui; Kumar, K Raghavendra; Ma, Jia; Zhang, Qiuju; Jiang, Yilun; Kang, Na; Yang, Suying; Wang, Jing; Li, Mei

    2016-08-01

    The ground-based characteristics (optical and radiative properties) of dust aerosols measured during the springtime between 2001 and 2014 were investigated over urban Beijing, China. The seasonal averaged aerosol optical depth (AOD) during spring of 2001-2014 was about 0.78 at 440 nm. During dust days, higher AOD occurred associated with lower Ångström exponent (AE). The mean AE440-870 in the springtime was about 1.0, indicating dominance of fine particles over the region. The back-trajectory analysis revealed that the dust was transported from the deserts of Inner Mongolia and Mongolia arid regions to Beijing. The aerosol volume size distribution showed a bimodal distribution pattern, with its highest peak observed in coarse mode for all episodes (especially for dust days with increased volume concentration). The single scattering albedo (SSA) increased with wavelength on dust days, indicating the presence of more scattering particles. Furthermore, the complex parts (real and imaginary) of refractive index showed distinct characteristics with lower imaginary values (also scattering) on dust days. The shortwave (SW; 0.2-4.0 μm) and longwave (LW; 4-100 μm) aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) values were computed from the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model both at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and the bottom of atmosphere (BOA) during dust and non-dust (dust free) days, and the corresponding heating rates and forcing efficiencies were also estimated. The SW (LW) ARF, therefore, produced significant cooling (warming) effects at both the TOA and the BOA over Beijing. PMID:27117151

  14. Laboratory Experiments on Rotation and Alignment of the Analogs of Interstellar Dust Grains by Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Witherow, W. K.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment with respect to the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in grain rotation and alignment has not been achieved. As there appears to be no experimental data available on this subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron size nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approximately 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 Angstroms, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low frequency (approximately 0-100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in the light of the current theories of alignment.

  15. Laboratory Experiments on Rotation and Alignment of the Analogs of Interstellar Dust Grains by Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Witherow, W. K.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models, and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment with respect to the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in the rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron-sized, nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approximately 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 A, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low-frequency (approximately 0 - 100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in light of the current theories of alignment.

  16. Laboratory Experiments on Rotation of Micron Size Cosmic Dust Grains with Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E.; Weingartner, J.; Witherow, W. K.

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment along the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in grain rotation and alignment has not been achieved. As there appears to be no experimental data available on this subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron size nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approx. 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 A, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low frequency (approx. 0-100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in the light of the current theories of alignment.

  17. On realistic size equivalence and shape of spheroidal Saharan mineral dust particles applied in solar and thermal radiative transfer calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, S.; Trautmann, T.; Wendisch, M.

    2010-11-01

    Realistic size equivalence and shape of Saharan mineral dust particles are derived from on in-situ particle, lidar and sun photometer measurements during SAMUM-1 in Morocco (19 May 2006), dealing with measured size- and altitude-resolved axis ratio distributions of assumed spheroidal model particles. The data were applied in optical property, radiative effect, forcing and heating effect simulations to quantify the realistic impact of particle non-sphericity. It turned out that volume-to-surface equivalent spheroids with prolate shape are most realistic: particle non-sphericity only slightly affects single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter but may enhance extinction coefficient by up to 10%. At the bottom of the atmosphere (BOA) the Saharan mineral dust always leads to a loss of solar radiation, while the sign of the forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) depends on surface albedo: solar cooling/warming over a mean ocean/land surface. In the thermal spectral range the dust inhibits the emission of radiation to space and warms the BOA. The most realistic case of particle non-sphericity causes changes of total (solar plus thermal) forcing by 55/5% at the TOA over ocean/land and 15% at the BOA over both land and ocean and enhances total radiative heating within the dust plume by up to 20%. Large dust particles significantly contribute to all the radiative effects reported.

  18. Light Absorbing Impurities in Snow in the Western US: Partitioning Radiative Impacts from Mineral Dust and Black Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiles, M.; Painter, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Melt of annual mountain snow cover dominates water resources in the western United States. Recent studies in the Upper Colorado River Basin have shown that radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities (LAIs) in mountain snow cover has accelerated snowmelt, impacted runoff timing and magnitude, and reduced annual flow. However, these studies have assumed that LAIs are primarily mineral dust, and have not quantified the radiative contribution by carbonaceous particles from bio and fossil fuel (industrial and urban) sources. Here we quantify both dust and black carbon (BC) content and assess the unique BC radiative forcing contribution in this dust dominated impurity regime using a suite of advanced field, lab, and modeling techniques. Daily measurements of surface spectral albedo and optical grain radius were collected with a field spectrometer over the 2013 spring melt season in Senator Beck Basin Study Area in the San Juan Mountains, CO, Southwestern US. Coincident snow samples were collected daily and processed for; (1) dust and BC content (2) impurity particle size, and (3) impurity optical properties. Measured snow and impurity properties were then used to drive the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model. Partitioning the unique radiative contribution from each constituents is achieved through unique model runs for clean snow, dust only, and BC only.

  19. Altitude-resolved shortwave and longwave radiative effects of desert dust in the Mediterranean during the GAMARF campaign: Indications of a net daily cooling in the dust layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meloni, D.; Junkermann, W.; Sarra, A.; Cacciani, M.; De Silvestri, L.; Di Iorio, T.; Estellés, V.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Pace, G.; Sferlazzo, D. M.

    2015-04-01

    Desert dust interacts with shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiation, influencing the Earth radiation budget and the atmospheric vertical structure. Uncertainties on the dust role are large in the LW spectral range, where few measurements are available and the dust optical properties are not well constrained. The first airborne measurements of LW irradiance vertical profiles over the Mediterranean were carried out during the Ground-based and Airborne Measurements of Aerosol Radiative Forcing (GAMARF) campaign, which took place in spring 2008 at the island of Lampedusa. The experiment was aimed at estimating the vertical profiles of the SW and LW aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) and heating rates (AHR), taking advantage of vertically resolved measurements of irradiances, meteorological parameters, and aerosol microphysical and optical properties. Two cases, characterized respectively by the presence of a homogeneous dust layer (3 May, with aerosol optical depth, AOD, at 500 nm of 0.59) and by a low aerosol burden (5 May, with AOD of 0.14), are discussed. A radiative transfer model was initialized with the measured vertical profiles and with different aerosol properties, derived from measurements or from the literature. The simulation of the irradiance vertical profiles, in particular, provides the opportunity to constrain model-derived estimates of the AHR. The measured SW and LW irradiances were reproduced when the model was initialized with the measured aerosol size distributions and refractive indices. For the dust case, the instantaneous (solar zenith angle, SZA, of 55.1°) LW-to-SW ADRF ratio was 23% at the surface and 11% at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), with a more significant LW contribution on a daily basis (52% at the surface and 26% at TOA), indicating a relevant reduction of the SW radiative effects. The AHR profiles followed the aerosol extinction profile, with comparable peaks in the SW (0.72 ± 0.11 K d-1) and in the LW (-0.52 ± 0.12 K d-1

  20. Aerosol characteristics and surface radiative forcing components during a dust outbreak in Gwangju, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Ogunjobi, K O; Kim, Y J

    2008-02-01

    Atmospheric surface aerosol radiative forcing (SARF) DeltaF, forcing efficiency DeltaF(e) and fractional forcing efficiency DeltaFF(e) evaluated from cloud-screened narrowband spectral and thermal-offset-corrected radiometric observations during the Asia dust outbreak episodes in Gwangju, Republic of Korea are reported in this study. Columnar aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth (AOD), tau (alambda), Angstrom exponent alpha, mass concentration of fine and coarse mode particles) were also reported for the station between January 2000 and May 2001 consisting of 211cloud-free days. Results indicate that majority of the AOD were within the range 0.25-0.45 while some high aerosol events in which AODs > or = 0.6 were observed during the severe dust episodes. For example, AOD increases from annual average value of 0.34 +/- 0.13 at 501 nm to values >0.60 during the major dust events of March 27-30 and April 7-9, 2000, respectively. The alpha (501-870 nm) which is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size had values ranging from 0.01 to 1.77. The diurnal forcing efficiency DeltaDF(e) at Gwangju was estimated to be -81.10 +/- 5.14 W m (-2)/tau (501 nm) and -47.09 +/- 2.20 W m (-2)/tau (501 nm) for the total solar broadband and visible band pass, respectively while the fractional diurnal forcing efficiency DeltaFDF(e) were -15.8 +/- 0.64%/tau (501 nm) and -22.87 +/- 1.13%/tau (501 nm) for the same band passes. Analyses of the 5-day air-mass back trajectories were further developed for Gwangju in order to classify the air-mass and types of aerosol reaching the site during the Asia dust episodes. PMID:17458510

  1. The contrasting roles of water and dust in controlling daily variations in radiative heating of the summertime Saharan heat low

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsham, John H.; Parker, Douglas J.; Todd, Martin C.; Banks, Jamie R.; Brindley, Helen E.; Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Roberts, Alexander J.; Ryder, Claire L.

    2016-03-01

    The summertime Sahara heat low (SHL) is a key component of the West African monsoon (WAM) system. Considerable uncertainty remains over the relative roles of water vapour and dust aerosols in controlling the radiation budget over the Sahara and therefore our ability to explain variability and trends in the SHL, and in turn, the WAM. Here, new observations from Fennec supersite-1 in the central Sahara during June 2011 and June 2012, together with satellite retrievals from GERB, are used to quantify how total column water vapour (TCWV) and dust aerosols (from aerosol optical depth, AOD) control day-to-day variations in energy balance in both observations and ECWMF reanalyses (ERA-I). The data show that the earth-atmosphere system is radiatively heated in June 2011 and 2012. Although the empirical analysis of observational data cannot completely disentangle the roles of water vapour, clouds and dust, the analysis demonstrates that TCWV provides a far stronger control on TOA net radiation, and so the net heating of the earth-atmosphere system, than AOD does. In contrast, variations in dust provide a much stronger control on surface heating, but the decreased surface heating associated with dust is largely compensated by increased atmospheric heating, and so dust control on net TOA radiation is weak. Dust and TCWV are both important for direct atmospheric heating. ERA-I, which assimilated radiosondes from the Fennec campaign, captures the control of TOA net flux by TCWV, with a positive correlation (r = 0.6) between observed and modelled TOA net radiation, despite the use of a monthly dust climatology in ERA-I that cannot capture the daily variations in dustiness. Variations in surface net radiation, and so the vertical profile of radiative heating, are not captured in ERA-I, since it does not capture variations in dust. Results show that ventilation of the SHL by cool moist air leads to a radiative warming, stabilising the SHL with respect to such perturbations. It is

  2. Lyalpha RADIATIVE TRANSFER WITH DUST: ESCAPE FRACTIONS FROM SIMULATED HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, Peter; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper; Andersen, Anja C. E-mail: jslarsen@astro.ku.d

    2009-10-20

    The Lyalpha emission line is an essential diagnostic tool for probing galaxy formation and evolution. Not only is it commonly the strongest observable line from high-redshift galaxies, but from its shape detailed information about its host galaxy can be revealed. However, due to the scattering nature of Lyalpha photons increasing their path length in a nontrivial way, if dust is present in the galaxy, the line may be severely suppressed and its shape altered. In order to interpret observations correctly, it is thus of crucial significance to know how much of the emitted light actually escapes the galaxy. In the present work, using a combination of high-resolution cosmological hydrosimulations and an adaptively refinable Monte Carlo Lyalpha radiative transfer code including an environment dependent model of dust, the escape fractions f {sub esc} of Lyalpha radiation from high-redshift (z = 3.6) galaxies are calculated. In addition to the average escape fraction, the variation of f {sub esc} in different directions and from different parts of the galaxies is investigated, as well as the effect on the emergent spectrum. Escape fractions from a sample of simulated galaxies of representative physical properties are found to decrease for increasing galaxy virial mass M {sub vir}, from f {sub esc} approaching unity for M {sub vir} approx 10{sup 9} M {sub sun} to f {sub esc} less than 10% for M {sub vir} approx 10{sup 12} M {sub sun}. In spite of dust being almost gray, it is found that the emergent spectrum is affected nonuniformly, with the escape fraction of photons close to the line center being much higher than of those in the wings, thus effectively narrowing the Lyalpha line.

  3. Tables of phase functions, opacities, albedos, equilibrium temperatures, and radiative accelerations of dust grains in exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaj, J.; Kocifaj, M.; Salmeron, R.; Hubeny, I.

    2015-11-01

    There has been growing observational evidence for the presence of condensates in the atmospheres and/or comet-like tails of extrasolar planets. As a result, systematic and homogeneous tables of dust properties are useful in order to facilitate further observational and theoretical studies. In this paper we present calculations and analysis of non-isotropic phase functions, asymmetry parameter (mean cosine of the scattering angle), absorption and scattering opacities, single scattering albedos, equilibrium temperatures, and radiative accelerations of dust grains relevant for extrasolar planets. Our assumptions include spherical grain shape, Deirmendjian particle size distribution, and Mie theory. We consider several species: corundum/alumina, perovskite, olivines with 0 and 50 per cent iron content, pyroxenes with 0, 20, and 60 per cent iron content, pure iron, carbon at two different temperatures, water ice, liquid water, and ammonia. The presented tables cover the wavelength range of 0.2-500 μm and modal particle radii from 0.01 to 100 μm. Equilibrium temperatures and radiative accelerations assume irradiation by a non-blackbody source of light with temperatures from 7000 to 700 K seen at solid angles from 2π to 10-6 sr. The tables are provided to the community together with a simple code which allows for an optional, finite, angular dimension of the source of light (star) in the phase function.

  4. Bioprocess of Kosa bioaerosols: effect of ultraviolet radiation on airborne bacteria within Kosa (Asian dust).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Maki, Teruya; Kakikawa, Makiko; Yamada, Maromu; Puspitasari, Findya; Iwasaka, Yasunobu

    2015-05-01

    Kosa (Asian dust) is a well-known weather phenomenon in which aerosols are carried by the westerly winds from inland China to East Asia. Recently, the frequency of this phenomenon and the extent of damage caused have been increasing. The airborne bacteria within Kosa are called Kosa bioaerosols. Kosa bioaerosols have affected ecosystems, human health and agricultural productivity in downwind areas. In order to develop a new and useful bacterial source and to identify the source region of Kosa bioaerosols, sampling, isolation, identification, measurement of ultraviolet (UV) radiation tolerance and experimental simulation of UV radiation conditions were performed during Kosa bioaerosol transportation. We sampled these bioaerosols using a Cessna 404 airplane and a bioaerosol sampler at an altitude of approximately 2900 m over the Noto Peninsula on March 27, 2010. The bioaerosol particles were isolated and identified as Bacillus sp. BASZHR 1001. The results of the UV irradiation experiment showed that the UV radiation tolerance of Kosa bioaerosol bacteria was very high compared with that of a soil bacterium. Moreover, the UV radiation tolerance of Kosa bioaerosol spores was higher than that of soil bacterial spores. This suggested that Kosa bioaerosols are transported across the atmosphere as living spores. Similarly, by the experimental simulation of UV radiation conditions, the limited source region of this Kosa bioaerosol was found to be southern Russia and there was a possibility of transport from the Kosa source area. PMID:25735592

  5. Translational anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation and far-infrared emission by galactic dust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    The predicted emission spectrum of galactic dust at about 10 K is compared with the spectrum of 2.8-K universal blackbody radiation and with the spectrum of the anisotropy expected in the 2.8-K radiation due to motion of earth with respect to the coordinate system in which the radiation was last scattered. The extremely anisotropic galactic-dust emission spectrum may contribute a significant background to anisotropy measurements which scan through the galactic plane. The contamination would appear in an 8-mm scan around the celestial equator, for example, as a spurious 200 km/s velocity toward declination 0 deg, right ascension 19 hr, if predictions are correct. The predicted spectrum of dust emission in the galactic plane at longitudes not exceeding about 30 deg falls below the total 2.8-K cosmic background intensity at wavelengths of at least 1 mm.

  6. Alteration of Organic Compounds in Small Bodies and Cosmic Dusts by Cosmic Rays and Solar Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kensei; Kaneko, Takeo; Mita, Hajime; Obayashi, Yumiko; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Sarker, Palash K.; Kawamoto, Yukinori; Okabe, Takuto; Eto, Midori; Kanda, Kazuhiro

    2012-07-01

    A wide variety of complex organic compounds have been detected in extraterrestrial bodies like carbonaceous chondrites and comets, and their roles in the generation of terrestrial life are discussed. It was suggested that organics in small bodies were originally formed in ice mantles of interstellar dusts in dense cloud. Irradiation of frozen mixture of possible interstellar molecules including CO (or CH _{3}OH), NH _{3} and H _{2}O with high-energy particles gave complex amino acid precursors with high molecular weights [1]. Such complex organic molecules were taken in planetesimals or comets in the early solar system. In prior to the generation of the terrestrial life, extraterrestrial organics were delivered to the primitive Earth by such small bodies as meteorites, comets and space dusts. These organics would have been altered by cosmic rays and solar radiation (UV, X-rays) before the delivery to the Earth. We examined possible alteration of amino acids, their precursors and nucleic acid bases in interplanetary space by irradiation with high energy photons and heavy ions. A mixture of CO, NH _{3} and H _{2}O was irradiated with high-energy protons from a van de Graaff accelerator (TIT, Japan). The resulting products (hereafter referred to as CAW) are complex precursors of amino acids. CAW, amino acids (dl-Isovaline, glycine), hydantoins (amino acid precursors) and nucleic acid bases were irradiated with continuous emission (soft X-rays to IR; hereafter referred to as soft X-rays irradiation) from BL-6 of NewSUBARU synchrotron radiation facility (Univ. Hyogo). They were also irradiated with heavy ions (eg., 290 MeV/u C ^{6+}) from HIMAC accelerator (NIRS, Japan). After soft X-rays irradiation, water insoluble materials were formed. After irradiation with soft X-rays or heavy ions, amino acid precursors (CAW and hydantoins) gave higher ratio of amino acids were recovered after hydrolysis than free amino acids. Nucleic acid bases showed higher stability than free

  7. Evidence for dust-driven, radial plasma transport in Saturn's inner radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Andriopoulou, M.

    2016-08-01

    A survey of Cassini MIMI/LEMMS data acquired between 2004 and 2015 has led to the identification of 13 energetic electron microsignatures that can be attributed to particle losses on one of the several faint rings of the planet. Most of the signatures were detected near L-shells that map between the orbits of Mimas and Enceladus or near the G-ring. Our analysis indicates that it is very unlikely for these signatures to have originated from absorption on Mimas, Enceladus or unidentified Moons and rings, even though most were not found exactly at the L-shells of the known rings of the saturnian system (G-ring, Methone, Anthe, Pallene). The lack of additional absorbers is apparent in the L-shell distribution of MeV ions which are very sensitive for tracing the location of weakly absorbing material permanently present in Saturn's radiation belts. This sensitivity is demonstrated by the identification, for the first time, of the proton absorption signatures from the asteroid-sized Moons Pallene, Anthe and/or their rings. For this reason, we investigate the possibility that the 13 energetic electron events formed at known saturnian rings and the resulting depletions were later displaced radially by one or more magnetospheric processes. Our calculations indicate that the displacement magnitude for several of those signatures is much larger than the one that can be attributed to radial flows imposed by the recently discovered noon-to-midnight electric field in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. This observation is consistent with a mechanism where radial plasma velocities are enhanced near dusty obstacles. Several possibilities are discussed that may explain this observation, including a dust-driven magnetospheric interchange instability, mass loading by the pick-up of nanometer charged dust grains and global magnetospheric electric fields induced by perturbed orbits of charged dust due to the act of solar radiation pressure. Indirect evidence for a global scale interaction

  8. On Influence of Neutrals on Dust Particle Charging in Complex Plasmas in the Presence of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, S. I.; Morzhakova, A. A.; Popel, S. I.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-11-29

    Effects associated with neutral component of complex (dusty) ionospheric plasmas which affect dust particle charging are studied. Microscopic ion currents on dust particles with taking into account ion-neutral interaction are presented. Calculations are performed both for the case of negative charges of dust particles, when the influence of Solar radiation on dust particle charging processes is negligible, and for the case of positive charges which is realized in the presence of sufficiently intensive UV or X-ray radiation. We also carry out investigation of the electron heating due to the photoelectric effect. We show that the efficiency of electron heating depends on the density of neutral component of the plasma. As result, we determine altitudes where the influence of the neutral plasma component on dust particle charging processes as well as the electron heating effect are significant and should be taken into account under consideration of the ionospheric complex plasmas. In particular, we show that the effects considered could be important for the description of noctilucent clouds, polar mesosphere summer echoes, and some other physical phenomena associated with dust particles in the ionosphere.

  9. On realistic size equivalence and shape of spheroidal Saharan mineral dust particles applied in solar and thermal radiative transfer calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, S.; Trautmann, T.; Wendisch, M.

    2011-05-01

    Realistic size equivalence and shape of Saharan mineral dust particles are derived from in-situ particle, lidar and sun photometer measurements during SAMUM-1 in Morocco (19 May 2006), dealing with measured size- and altitude-resolved axis ratio distributions of assumed spheroidal model particles. The data were applied in optical property, radiative effect, forcing and heating effect simulations to quantify the realistic impact of particle non-sphericity. It turned out that volume-to-surface equivalent spheroids with prolate shape are most realistic: particle non-sphericity only slightly affects single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter but may enhance extinction coefficient by up to 10 %. At the bottom of the atmosphere (BOA) the Saharan mineral dust always leads to a loss of solar radiation, while the sign of the forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) depends on surface albedo: solar cooling/warming over a mean ocean/land surface. In the thermal spectral range the dust inhibits the emission of radiation to space and warms the BOA. The most realistic case of particle non-sphericity causes changes of total (solar plus thermal) forcing by 55/5 % at the TOA over ocean/land and 15 % at the BOA over both land and ocean and enhances total radiative heating within the dust plume by up to 20 %. Large dust particles significantly contribute to all the radiative effects reported. They strongly enhance the absorbing properties and forward scattering in the solar and increase predominantly, e.g., the total TOA forcing of the dust over land.

  10. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scanza, R. A.; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, S.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Albani, S.

    2015-01-15

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale, using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral componentsmore » in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as + 0.05 Wm−2 for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy. We compare this to the radiative forcing from simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17 Wm−2) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, −0.05 and −0.17 Wm−2, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.« less

  11. The contrasting roles of water and dust in controlling daily variations in radiative heating of the summertime Saharan Heat Low

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsham, J. H.; Parker, D. J.; Todd, M. C.; Banks, J. R.; Brindley, H. E.; Garcia-Carreras, L.; Roberts, A. J.; Ryder, C. L.

    2015-07-01

    The summertime Sahara Heat Low (SHL) is a key component of the West African Monsoon (WAM) system. Considerable uncertainty remains over the relative roles of water vapour and dust aerosols in controlling the radiation budget over the Sahara and therefore our ability to explain variability and trends in the SHL, and in turn, the WAM. Here, new observations from the Fennec field campaign during June 2011 and June 2012, together with satellite retrievals from GERB, are used to quantify how total column water vapour (TCWV) and dust aerosols (from aerosol optical depth, AOD) control day-to-day variations in energy balance in both observations and ECWMF reanalyses (ERA-I). The data show that the earth-atmosphere system is radiatively heated in June 2011 and 2012. It is TCWV that largely determines variations in daily mean TOA net flux and the net heating of the earth-atmosphere system. In contrast, dust provides the primary control on surface heating, but the decreased surface heating from dust is largely compensated by increased atmospheric heating, and so dust control on net TOA radiation is weak. Dust and TCWV are both important for direct atmospheric heating. ERA-I captures the control of TOA net flux by TCWV, with a positive correlation (r=0.6) between observed and modelled TOA net radiation, despite the use of a monthly dust climatology in ERA-I that cannot capture the daily variations in dustiness. Variations in surface net radiation, and so the vertical profile of radiative heating, are not captured in ERA-I, since it does not capture variations in dust. Results show that ventilation of the SHL by cool moist air leads to a radiative warming, stabilising the SHL with respect to such perturbations. It is known that models struggle to capture the advective moistening of the SHL, especially that associated with mesoscale convective systems. Our results show that the typical model errors in Saharan water vapour will lead to substantial errors in the modelled TOA

  12. Improving radiative transfer processes in snow-covered areas prone to dust loading using a regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oaida, C. M.; Xue, Y.; Painter, T. H.; Flanner, M. G.; De Sales, F.

    2011-12-01

    Radiative processes play an important role on both global and regional scales. This study focuses on their effects over snow-covered surfaces, both clean and dust loaded. It is well understood that dust in snow enhances solar radiation absorption, leading to a decrease in snow albedo. However, the quantitative assessment of dust's influence on radiative forcing and runoff timing in mountain snow packs has only been recently investigated. Painter et al. (2007) have shown that snow cover was shortened by 18 to 35 days due to dust radiative forcing in snow in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado, USA. This dust largely originates from the Colorado Plateau with increases of 5-7 fold in the last century and a half due to grazing and agricultural practices. For this study, we employ NCAR's WRF ARW v3.3+ model, which is coupled with a land surface model, Simplified Simple Biosphere version 3 (SSiB3). We first investigate the impact of different atmospheric radiative transfer schemes in WRF3.3+-SSiB3 on the regional climate downscaling. After conducting simulations over North America for the period March through June, we found substantial differences in the downscaling skills with different atmospheric radiative schemes. These differences indicate the uncertainty due to the atmospheric radiative transfer parameterizations. To develop a regional climate model that is capable of realistically simulating radiative forcing on snow covered areas with aerosol loading, we coupled WRF3.3+-SSiB3 with a snow-radiative transfer model, Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiative (SNICAR) model. SNICAR considers the effects of snow grain size and aerosol on snow albedo evolution. Snow grain size and growth is important in snow albedo feedbacks, especially when aerosols in snow are considered, because larger snow grains decrease snow albedo, and in the presence of dust, grain growth rates increase, decreasing snow reflectance even further than if the snow was pure. Our previous version of WRF3.3+-SSi

  13. Benchmarking the calculation of stochastic heating and emissivity of dust grains in the context of radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, Peter; Misselt, Karl; Bianchi, Simone; Lunttila, Tuomas; Pinte, Christophe; Natale, Giovanni; Juvela, Mika; Fischera, Joerg; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Gordon, Karl; Baes, Maarten; Steinacker, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    Context. Thermal emission by stochastically heated dust grains (SHGs) plays an important role in the radiative transfer (RT) problem for a dusty medium. It is therefore essential to verify that RT codes properly calculate the dust emission before studying the effects of spatial distribution and other model parameters on the simulated observables. Aims: We define an appropriate problem for benchmarking dust emissivity calculations in the context of RT simulations, specifically including the emission from SHGs. Our aim is to provide a self-contained guide for implementors of such functionality and to offer insight into the effects of the various approximations and heuristics implemented by the participating codes to accelerate the calculations. Methods: The benchmark problem definition includes the optical and calorimetric material properties and the grain size distributions for a typical astronomical dust mixture with silicate, graphite, and PAH components. It also includes a series of analytically defined radiation fields to which the dust population is to be exposed and instructions for the desired output. We processed this problem using six RT codes participating in this benchmark effort and compared the results to a reference solution computed with the publicly available dust emission code DustEM. Results: The participating codes implement different heuristics to keep the calculation time at an acceptable level. We study the effects of these mechanisms on the calculated solutions and report on the level of (dis)agreement between the participating codes. For all but the most extreme input fields, we find agreement within 10% across the important wavelength range 3 μm ≤ λ ≤ 1000 μm. Conclusions: We conclude that the relevant modules in RT codes can and do produce fairly consistent results for the emissivity spectra of SHGs. This work can serve as a reference for implementors of dust RT codes, and it will pave the way for a more extensive benchmark effort

  14. The Continuous Monitoring of Desert Dust using an Infrared-based Dust Detection and Retrieval Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duda, David P.; Minnis, Patrick; Trepte, Qing; Sun-Mack, Sunny

    2006-01-01

    Airborne dust and sand are significant aerosol sources that can impact the atmospheric and surface radiation budgets. Because airborne dust affects visibility and air quality, it is desirable to monitor the location and concentrations of this aerosol for transportation and public health. Although aerosol retrievals have been derived for many years using visible and near-infrared reflectance measurements from satellites, the detection and quantification of dust from these channels is problematic over bright surfaces, or when dust concentrations are large. In addition, aerosol retrievals from polar orbiting satellites lack the ability to monitor the progression and sources of dust storms. As a complement to current aerosol dust retrieval algorithms, multi-spectral thermal infrared (8-12 micron) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Meteosat-8 Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) are used in the development of a prototype dust detection method and dust property retrieval that can monitor the progress of Saharan dust fields continuously, both night and day. The dust detection method is incorporated into the processing of CERES (Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System) aerosol retrievals to produce dust property retrievals. Both MODIS (from Terra and Aqua) and SEVERI data are used to develop the method.

  15. Penetration of solar radiation into pure and Mars-dust contaminated snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, E.; Hagermann, A.

    2015-05-01

    Rock and soil surface layers absorb and reflect incoming solar radiation immediately at the surface. Ices on the other hand, whilst opaque in the infrared, are partially transparent in the visible spectral range. These properties are responsible for the "solid-state greenhouse effect" (SSGE), which may play an important role in the energy balance of icy surfaces in the Solar System. To model the SSGE, we need to know not only thermal properties but also optical properties such as the albedo and the absorption scale length of the ice. We have investigated the absorption scale length, also known as e-folding scale, of snow/dust mixtures within the scope of a project directed at investigating the behaviour of the martian polar caps. After measuring the e-folding scale of recrystallized snow we can now also relate the dust content of contaminated snow to the penetration depth of sunlight into the mixture. Equally important, however, is our observation that light penetration through the mixture is dramatically affected by small-scale inhomogeneities.

  16. Dust Attenuation Curve in External Galaxies: Radiative Transfer Model in Turbulent Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Kwangil

    2015-08-01

    The dust attenuation curve of starlight in galactic environments is investigated through radiative transfer simulations in a spherical, turbulent interstellar medium (ISM), which is modeled using fractional Brownian motion structures appropriate for the isothermal turbulent ISM. The photon source is uniformed distributed within a varying radius in the medium. Extinction and scattering properties for the Milky Way (MW), Large Magellanic Cloud and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) are considered. Attenuation curves consistent in overall shape with the “Calzetti attenuation law” are found by adopting the extinction and scattering curves that are similar to the MW-type dust, but with no or a much weaker 2175Å UV bump. The resulting attenuation curves are well represented by a modified Calzetti curve with varying slope and UV bump strength. A strong correlation between the slope and UV bump strength, with steeper curve having stronger bump as revealed in star-forming galaxies, is also found. It is also illustrated that the attenuation curve strongly depends not only on extinction curve but also on scattering albedo.

  17. DUST DESTRUCTION IN A NON-RADIATIVE SHOCK IN THE CYGNUS LOOP SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Sankrit, Ravi; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Raymond, John C.; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.

    2010-04-01

    We present 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m images of a non-radiative shock in the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The post-shock region is resolved in these images. The ratio of the 70 {mu}m to the 24 {mu}m flux rises from about 14 at a distance 0.'1 behind the shock front to about 22 in a zone 0.'75 further downstream, as grains are destroyed in the hot plasma. Models of dust emission and destruction using post-shock electron temperatures between 0.15 keV and 0.30 keV and post-shock densities, n{sub H}{approx} 2.0 cm{sup -3}, predict flux ratios that match the observations. Non-thermal sputtering (i.e., sputtering due to bulk motion of the grains relative to the gas) contributes significantly to the dust destruction under these shock conditions. From the model calculations, we infer that about 35% by mass of the grains are destroyed over a 0.14 pc region behind the shock front.

  18. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scanza, R. A.; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, S.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-07-02

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral componentsmore » in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as +0.05 W m−2 for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy and compare this both with simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17 W m−2) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, −0.05 and −0.17 W m−2, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in-situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.« less

  19. Vertical distribution and radiative effects of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol over West Africa during DABEX

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Ben; Heese, B.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Chazette, P.; Jones, A.; Bellouin, N.

    2008-09-12

    This paper presents measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol extinction coefficient over West Africa, during the Dust and Biomass burning aerosol Experiment (DABEX) / African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis dry season Special Observing period zero (AMMA-SOP0). In situ aircraft measurements from the UK FAAM aircraft are compared with two ground based lidars (POLIS and ARM MPL) and an airborne lidar on an ultra-light aircraft. In general mineral dust was observed at low altitudes (up to 2km) and a mixture of biomass burning aerosol and dust was observed at altitudes of 2-5km. The study exposes difficulties associated with spatial and temporal variability when inter-comparing aircraft and ground measurements. Averaging over many profiles provided a better means of assessing consistent errors and biases associated with in situ sampling instruments and retrievals of lidar ratios. Shortwave radiative transfer calculations and a 3-year simulation with the HadGEM2-A climate model show that the radiative effect of biomass burning aerosol is somewhat sensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosol. Results show a 15% increase in absorption of solar radiation by elevated biomass burning aerosol when the observed low-level dust layer is included as part of the background atmospheric state in the model. This illustrates that the radiative forcing of anthropogenic absorbing aerosol is sensitive to the treatment of other aerosol species and that care is needed in simulating natural aerosols assumed to exist in the pre-industrial, or natural state of the atmosphere.

  20. Aerosol's optical and physical characteristics and direct radiative forcing during a shamal dust storm, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, T. M.; Al-Dashti, H.; Spyrou, C.

    2014-04-01

    Dust aerosols are analyzed for their optical and physical properties during an episode of a dust storm that blew over Kuwait on 26 March 2003 when the military Operation Iraqi Freedom was in full swing. The intensity of the dust storm was such that it left a thick suspension of dust throughout the following day, 27 March. The synoptic sequence leading to the dust storm and the associated wind fields are discussed. Ground-based measurements of aerosol optical thickness reached 3.617 and 4.17 on 26 and 27 March respectively while the Ångstrom coefficient, α870/440, dropped to -0.0234 and -0.0318. Particulate matter concentration of 10 μm diameter or less, PM10, peaked at 4800 μg m-3 during dust storm hours of 26 March. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) by Deep Blue algorithm and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aerosol index (AI) exhibited high values. Latitude-longitude maps of AOD and AI were used to deduce source regions of dust transport over Kuwait. The vertical profile of the dust layer was simulated using the SKIRON atmospheric model. Instantaneous net direct radiative forcing is calculated at top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface level. The thick dust layer of 26 March resulted in cooling the TOA by -60 Wm-2 and surface level by -175 Wm-2 for a surface albedo of 0.35. Slightly higher values were obtained for 27 March due to the increase in aerosol optical thickness. Radiative heating/cooling rates in the shortwave and longwave bands were also examined. Shortwave heating rate reached a maximum value of 2 K day-1 between 3 and 5 km, dropped to 1.5 K day-1 at 6 km and diminished at 8 km. Longwave radiation initially heated the lower atmosphere by a maximum value of 0.2 K day-1 at surface level, declined sharply at increasing altitude and diminished at 4 km. Above 4 km longwave radiation started to cool the atmosphere slightly reaching a maximum rate of -0.1 K day-1 at 6 km.

  1. On the Role of Flash Floods for Dust Emission over North Africa: Alluvial Sediments acting as Dust Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepanski, K.; Klueser, L.; Tegen, I.

    2014-12-01

    Studies analyzing satellite dust products show that numerous dust sources are located in the foothills of arid and semi-arid mountain regions. There, alluvial sediments deposited on valley bottoms and flood plains are very susceptible to wind erosion and frequently serve as dust source. This study focuses on the spatio-temporal distribution of dust source activation events over the mountain foothills and flood plains over North Africa. Satellite dust retrievals with sub-daily resolution such as from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and METOP A/B Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instruments are used to identify dust source regions. Identified dust source regions are then linked to soil properties and land type classification data sets. Information on the mineralogical composition of transported dust inferred from IASI observation are used (a) to investigate the impact of different source geomorphologies and thus different radiative properties of airborne dust particles, and (b) to estimate the contribution of dust uplift from alluvial sediments compared to dust emission from non-hydrological sources. Ultimately, this study contributes to the understanding of controlling mechanism on the interannual variability of dust source activation and will improve current dust emission modules coupled to atmosphere models.

  2. Effect of mineral dust on ocean color retrievals from space: A radiative transfer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Z.; Franz, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral aerosols (dust) are one of the major components of all aerosols found in the Earth's atmosphere. They are mainly soil particles that originate from arid and semiarid regions of the world that can be carried by winds for thousands of kilometers. They are a major impediment in the remote sensing of the ocean color (spectral water-leaving reflectance), because they absorb solar radiation in the UV and visible part of the spectrum and their micro-physical and optical properties are highly variable. Further, there are no reliable working algorithms to detect their presence from spaceborne ocean color observations alone, when they are present in small amount (optical thickness < 0.2). In this paper we examine effect of mineral dust on ocean color retrieval from space. We use Ahmad-Fraser's vector radiative transfer (RT) code (v3.0) for ocean-atmosphere system to simulate the pseudo observations (top of atmosphere radiance) for models containing different types of aerosols (absorbing and non-absorbing) in the atmosphere. We consider the mineral aerosols as consisting of an external mixture of illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, quartz, and calcite with a small amount of hematite (as an internal mixture), which provide the spectral dependence of single scattering albedo consistent with the values reported in the literature. We also vary the aerosol layer height in the atmosphere and amount of chlorophyll in the ocean. The simulated pseudo observations were processed through standard NASA algorithms to determine the ocean color (spectral water-leaving reflectance) and derived chlorophyll in the ocean. Results of the RT simulation study for different Sun-satellite viewing geometry, aerosol layer height and chlorophyll amount in the ocean is presented.

  3. Aerosols optical and physical characteristics and direct radiative forcing during a "Shamal" dust storm, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, T. M.; Al-Dashti, H.; Spyrou, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dust aerosols are analyzed for their optical and physical properties during an episode of dust storm that hit Kuwait on 26 March 2003 when "Iraqi Freedom" military operation was in full swing. The intensity of the dust storm was such that it left a thick suspension of dust throughout the following day, 27 March, resulting in a considerable cooling effect at the surface on both days. Ground-based measurements of aerosol optical thickness reached 3.617 and 4.17 on 26-27 March respectively while Ångstrom coefficient, α870/440, dropped to -0.0234 and -0.0318. Particulate matter concentration of diameter 10 μm or less, PM10, peaked at 4800 μg m-3 during dust storm hours of 26 March. Moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) retrieved optical and physical characteristics that exhibited extreme values as well. The synoptic of the dust storm is presented and source regions are identified using total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) aerosol index retrieved images. The vertical profile of the dust layer was simulated using SKIRON atmospheric model. Instantaneous net direct radiative forcing is calculated at top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface level. The thick dust layer of 26 March resulted in cooling the TOA by -60 Wm-2 and surface level by -175 Wm-2 for a surface albedo of 0.35. Slightly higher values were obtained for 27 March due to the increase in aerosol optical thickness. The large reduction in the radiative flux at the surface level had caused a drop in surface temperature by approximately 6 °C below its average value. Radiative heating/cooling rates in the shortwave and longwave bands were also examined. Shortwave heating rate reached a maximum value of 2 °K day-1 between 3 and 5 km, dropped to 1.5 °K day-1 at 6 km and diminished at 8 km. Longwave radiation initially heated the lower atmosphere by a maximum value of 0.2 °K day-1 at surface level, declined sharply at increasing altitude and diminished at 4 km. Above 4 km longwave radiation started to

  4. Composition, size distribution, optical properties, and radiative effects of laboratory-resuspended PM10 from geological dust of the Rome area, by electron microscopy and radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrodangelo, A.; Salzano, R.; Bassani, C.; Pareti, S.; Perrino, C.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, new information has been gained on the laboratory-resuspended PM10 fraction from geological topsoil and outcropped rocks representative of the Rome area (Latium). Mineralogical composition, size distribution, optical properties and the surface radiative forcing efficiency (RFE) of dust types representing the compositional end members of this geological area have been addressed. A multi-disciplinary approach was used, based on chamber resuspension of raw materials and sampling of the PM10 fraction, to simulate field sampling at dust source, scanning electron microscopy/X-ray energy-dispersive microanalysis (SEM XEDS) of individual mineral particles, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of bulk dust samples, building of number and volume size distribution (SD) from microanalysis data of mineral particles and fitting to a log-normal curve, and radiative transfer modelling (RTM) to retrieve optical properties and radiative effects of the compositional end-member dust samples. The mineralogical composition of Rome lithogenic PM10 varies between an end-member dominated by silicate minerals (from volcanics lithotypes), and one mostly composed of calcite (from travertine or limestones). Lithogenic PM10 with intermediate composition derives mainly from siliciclastic rocks or marlstones. Size and mineral species of PM10 particles of silicate-dominated dust types are tuned mainly by rock weathering and, to lesser extent, by debris formation or crystallization; chemical precipitation of CaCO3 plays a major role in calcite-dominated types. These differences are reflected in the diversity of volume distributions, either within dust types or mineral species. Differences are also observed between volume distributions of calcite from travertine (natural source; SD unimodal at 5 μm a.d.) and from road dust (anthropic source; SD bimodal at 3.8 and 1.8 μm a.d.). The volcanics and travertine dusts differently affect the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the asymmetry

  5. Universality, maximum radiation, and absorption in high-energy collisions of black holes with spin.

    PubMed

    Sperhake, Ulrich; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Pretorius, Frans

    2013-07-26

    We explore the impact of black hole spins on the dynamics of high-energy black hole collisions. We report results from numerical simulations with γ factors up to 2.49 and dimensionless spin parameter χ=+0.85, +0.6, 0, -0.6, -0.85. We find that the scattering threshold becomes independent of spin at large center-of-mass energies, confirming previous conjectures that structure does not matter in ultrarelativistic collisions. It has further been argued that in this limit all of the kinetic energy of the system may be radiated by fine tuning the impact parameter to threshold. On the contrary, we find that only about 60% of the kinetic energy is radiated for γ=2.49. By monitoring apparent horizons before and after scattering events we show that the "missing energy" is absorbed by the individual black holes in the encounter, and moreover the individual black-hole spins change significantly. We support this conclusion with perturbative calculations. An extrapolation of our results to the limit γ→∞ suggests that about half of the center-of-mass energy of the system can be emitted in gravitational radiation, while the rest must be converted into rest-mass and spin energy. PMID:23931346

  6. Removal of dust particles from metal-mirror surfaces by excimer-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Klaus R.; Wolff-Rottke, B.; Mueller, F.

    1995-07-01

    The effect of particle desorption from Al mirror surfaces by the influence of pulsed UV laser radiation has been studied. The investigations are closely related to the demands of astronomers, who are looking for a more effective way of cleaning the Al coatings of future very large telescope mirrors. A systematic parameter study has been performed in order to determine the irradiation conditions which yield the highest dust removal efficiency (i.e. reflectivity increase) on contaminated samples, taking particularly into account laser-induced damage and degradation effects of coating and substrate. The particle removal rate increases with increasing laser fluence, being limited however by the damage threshold of the coating. Therefore, parameters influencing the damage threshold of metal coatings like wavelength, pulse width, and number of pulses have been studied in detail. Data indicate that on Al coated BK7 and Zerodur samples KrF laser radiation yields the optimum result, with cleaning efficiencies comparable to polymer film stripping. The initial reflectivity of the clean coating can nearly be reinstalled, in particular when an additional solvent film on the sample surface is applied. Hence, laser desorption seems to be a viable method of cleaning large Al mirrors for telescopes.

  7. Modeling the Spin Equilibrium of Neutron Stars in LMXBs Without Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, N.; Glampedakis, K.; Haskell, B.; Watts, A. L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the spin-equilibrium of accreting neutron stars in LMXBs. We demonstrate that, when combined with a naive spin-up torque, the observed data leads to inferred magnetic fields which are at variance with those of galactic millisecond radiopulsars. This indicates the need for either additional spin-down torques (eg. gravitational radiation) or an improved accretion model. We show that a simple consistent accretion model can be arrived at by accounting for radiation pressure in rapidly accreting systems (above a few percent of the Eddington accretion rate). In our model the inner disk region is thick and significantly sub-Keplerian, and the estimated equilibrium periods are such that the LMXB neutron stars have properties that accord well with the galactic millisecond radiopulsar sample. The implications for future gravitational-wave observations are also discussed briefly.

  8. Radiative recombination kinetics in electroluminescent spin cast pristine α-4T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Hamed, Zied; Kouki, Fayçal; Bouchriha, Habib; Mejatty, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Many experimental studies have established the substantial impact of the sound structure of the organic thin films on optoelectronic device performances. This study is a collection of experimental and theoretical investigation of the radiative recombination kinetics in an organic light emitting diode based on spin cast α-4T. The structural properties of the organic thin films (α-4T) deposited by the spin coating technique are discussed. The electrical characterization of the diode-like samples (ITO/α-4T/Al) have revealed a very low effective mobility of charge carriers in the spin cast α-4Tand the radiative recombination current was extracted. The luminescence-current characterization of the diode-like samples (ITO/α-4T/Al) was investigated and modeled.

  9. Composition of dust deposited to snow cover in the Wasatch Range (Utah, USA): Controls on radiative properties of snow cover and comparison to some dust-source sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Moskowitz, Bruce M.; Bryant, Ann C.; Skiles, S. McKenzie; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Flagg, Cody B.; Yauk, Kimberly; Berquó, Thelma; Breit, George; Ketterer, Michael; Fernandez, Daniel; Miller, Mark E.; Painter, Thomas H.

    2014-12-01

    Dust layers deposited to snow cover of the Wasatch Range (northern Utah) in 2009 and 2010 provide rare samples to determine the relations between their compositions and radiative properties. These studies are required to comprehend and model how such dust-on-snow (DOS) layers affect rates of snow melt through changes in the albedo of snow surfaces. We evaluated several constituents as potential contributors to the absorption of solar radiation indicated by values of absolute reflectance determined from bi-conical reflectance spectroscopy. Ferric oxide minerals and carbonaceous matter appear to be the primary influences on lowering snow-cover albedo. Techniques of reflectance and Mössbauer spectroscopy as well as rock magnetism provide information about the types, amounts, and grain sizes of ferric oxide minerals. Relatively high amounts of ferric oxide, indicated by hard isothermal remanent magnetization (HIRM), are associated with relatively low average reflectance (<0.25) across the visible wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. Mössbauer spectroscopy indicates roughly equal amounts of hematite and goethite, representing about 35% of the total Fe-bearing phases. Nevertheless, goethite (α-FeOOH) is the dominant ferric oxide found by reflectance spectroscopy and thus appears to be the main iron oxide control on absorption of solar radiation. At least some goethite occurs as nano-phase grain coatings less than about 50 nm thick. Relatively high amounts of organic carbon, indicating as much as about 10% organic matter, are also associated with lower reflectance values. The organic matter, although not fully characterized by type, correlates strongly with metals (e.g., Cu, Pb, As, Cd, Mo, Zn) derived from distal urban and industrial settings, probably including mining and smelting sites. This relation suggests anthropogenic sources for at least some of the carbonaceous matter, such as emissions from transportation and industrial activities. The composition of

  10. An assessment of the quality of aerosol retrievals over the Red Sea and evaluation of the climatological cloud-free dust direct radiative effect in the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindley, H.; Osipov, S.; Bantges, R.; Smirnov, A.; Banks, J.; Levy, R.; Jish Prakash, P.; Stenchikov, G.

    2015-10-01

    Ground-based and satellite observations are used in conjunction with the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM) to assess climatological aerosol loading and the associated cloud-free aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over the Red Sea. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) instruments are first evaluated via comparison with ship-based observations. Correlations are typically better than 0.9 with very small root-mean-square and bias differences. Calculations of the DRE along the ship cruises using RRTM also show good agreement with colocated estimates from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget instrument if the aerosol asymmetry parameter is adjusted to account for the presence of large particles. A monthly climatology of AOD over the Red Sea is then created from 5 years of SEVIRI retrievals. This shows enhanced aerosol loading and a distinct north to south gradient across the basin in the summer relative to the winter months. The climatology is used with RRTM to estimate the DRE at the top and bottom of the atmosphere and the atmospheric absorption due to dust aerosol. These climatological estimates indicate that although longwave effects can reach tens of W m-2, shortwave cooling typically dominates the net radiative effect over the Sea, being particularly pronounced in the summer, reaching 120 W m-2 at the surface. The spatial gradient in summertime AOD is reflected in the radiative effect at the surface and in associated differential heating by aerosol within the atmosphere above the Sea. This asymmetric effect is expected to exert a significant influence on the regional atmospheric and oceanic circulation.

  11. Black hole radiation of massive spin-2 particles in (3+1) dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Övgün, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of radiation of a massive spin-2 boson (graviton with a nonzero mass) through the event horizon of a generic static and spherically symmetric black hole in (3+1) dimensions. To this end, we consider the problem in the framework of the quantum tunneling phenomenon. We evaluate the tunneling rate of the massive gravitons by applying the semiclassical WKB approximation to the Fierz-Pauli equation. The temperature of the radiation is obtained with the aid of the Boltzmann expression. Our findings are in good agreement with the existing Hawking radiation studies in the current literature.

  12. Ejecta curtain radiative transfer modeling for probing its geometry and dust optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalima, P.; Wada, K.; Kimura, H.

    2015-10-01

    An ejecta curtain is produced as a result of impact cratering of celestial bodies that excavates and ejects their surface and underground material. Since ejecta particles are thought to reflect the interior materials and structures of celestial bodies, ejecta and ejecta curtains provide us with valuable information about the interior of the bodies. Following the Deep Impact mission, more and more in situ data on ejecta curtains are expected to become available in future space missions. To draw valuable information from such in situ measurements, a radiative-transfer model of the ejecta curtain plays an important role. This urges us to carefully assess the model parameters with experimental results as well as understand the contribution of each model parameter to the predicted intensities of the radiative calculations. In this work, we study the dependences of the projected intensity images of the ejecta on the scattering phase function and the geometry of an ejecta curtain produced by impact on an airless-body's surface, as a first step toward a correct interpretation of ejecta observations. Using the Monte-Carlo multiple scattering method, we have calculated the scattered intensities for three different orientations of the ejecta curtain. We have also computed the intensities for ejecta material using different phase functions. We find that the scattered intensities are highest for the isotropic phase function irrespective of the orientation of the ejecta cone for the scattering angles and geometry considered here. Observations from the other side could lead to higher intensities for forward scattering grains that are typical for asteroids. Therefore in situ observations of ejecta-curtains at different angles will enable us to use our model predictions to extract the phase functions as well as column densities of its component dust grains.

  13. Modeling the effects of the dust rings and plasma waves on the electron radiation belts of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nénon, Quentin; Sicard-Piet, Angélica; Girard, Julien N.; Zarka, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    ONERA has been modeling radiation belts since the 90's through the 3D physical model Salammbô. The model requires a good knowledge and modeling of the interactions between the trapped particles and the inner magnetosphere environment. Here we report on the investigations that have been performed about the roles of the dust rings and plasma waves around Jupiter on the electron radiation belts. Prior to this work, the surface potential of the dust grains have been argued to deflect the electrons, so that there are no collisions between electrons and dust grains. We dismiss the previous argument, the possible surface potentials being negligible compared to the relativistic kinetic energies of the trapped electrons. The dust grain size distribution was then constrained by the normal optical depth of "large" particles measured by the Galileo NIMS experiment. We will show that this constraint and the Pioneer 11 electron flux measurements indicate that "very large" grains (radius >10mm) are not likely to exist. It leads to the conclusion that electrons with energies higher than a few MeV are not influenced by the rings. The Galileo PWS data has been used to determine representative characteristics (localization and frequency spectrum) of the plasma waves that can be encountered between the orbit of Io (6 Rj) and the numerical box limit of Salammbô (9.5 Rj). We then benefited from the experience ONERA has in modeling the effects of waves on the Earth radiation belts. In particular, the WAPI (WAve-Particle Interaction) code, that uses the quasi-linear theory to compute the pitch angle and energy diffusion coefficients, has been adapted to the Jupiter environment. Finally, Salammbô has been used to investigate the influence of each process on observation data: electron fluxes measured by the Pioneer 10, 11 and Galileo missions and synchrotron radiation images obtained by the VLA (at 5000 and 1424 MHz in May 1997) and LOFAR (127-172 MHz in November 2011).

  14. The Impact of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning, Dust Storms, and Volcanoes Upon the Earth's Radiative Energy Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for detecting aerosols from biomass burning and dust is developed. The radiative forcing of aerosols is estimated over four major ecosystems in South America. A new smoke and fire detection scheme is developed for biomass burning aerosols over South America. Surface shortware irradiance calculations are developed in the presence of biomass burning aerosols during the SCAR-B experiment. This new approach utilizes ground based, aircraft, and satellite measurements.

  15. Interaction of dust and radiation in circumstellar envelopes. I. The expansion velocity gradient in the envelope of VX Sagittarii

    SciTech Connect

    Netzer, N. )

    1989-07-01

    The phenomenon of acceleration of mass outflows from red giants is discussed. IT is shown that radiation pressure on growing grains cannot explain the observed radial increase in the outflow velocity, at least in extreme cases such as VX Sagittarii. It is shown, however, that secondary IR emission by dust might account for the observed gradient, if we assume an appropriate temperature field, and hence such a gradient must be common to many red giants. 23 refs.

  16. Chemical compositions and radiative properties of dust and anthropogenic air masses study in Taipei Basin, Taiwan, during spring of 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shih-Yu; Fang, Guor-Cheng; Chou, Charles C.-K.; Chen, Wei-Nai

    Asia is one of the major sources of not only mineral dust but also anthropogenic aerosols. Continental air masses associated with the East Asian winter monsoon always contain high contents of mineral dust and anthropogenic species and transported southeastward to Taiwan, which have significant influences on global atmospheric radiation transfer directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation in each spring. However, few measurements for the long-range transported aerosol and its optical properties were announced in this area, between the Western Pacific and the southeastern coast of Mainland China. The overall objective of this work is to quantify the optical characteristics of different aerosol types in the Eastern Asian. In order to achieve this objective, meteorological parameters, concentrations of PM 10 and its soluble species, and optical property of atmospheric scattering coefficients were measured continuously with 1 h time-resolved from 11 February to 7 April 2004 in Taipei Basin (25°00'N, 121°32'E). In this work, the dramatic changes of meteorological parameters such as temperature and winds were used to determine the influenced period of each air mass. Continental, strong continental, marine, and stagnant air masses defined by the back-trajectory analysis and local meteorology were further characterized as long-range transport pollution, dust, clean marine, and local pollution aerosols, respectively, according to the diagnostic ratios. The aerosol mass scattering efficiency of continental pollution, dust, clean marine, and local pollution aerosols were ranged from 1.3 to 1.6, 0.7 to 1.0, 1.4 and 1.4 to 2.3 m 2 g -1, respectively. Overall, there are two distinct populations of aerosol mass scattering efficiencies, one for an aerosol chemical composition dominated by dust (<1.0 m 2 g -1) and the other for an aerosol chemical composition dominated by anthropogenic pollutants (1.3-2.3 m 2 g -1), which were similar to the previous measurements with

  17. Composition, size distribution, optical properties and radiative effects of re-suspended local mineral dust of Rome area by individual-particle microanalysis and radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrodangelo, A.; Salzano, R.; Bassani, C.; Pareti, S.; Perrino, C.

    2015-05-01

    New information on the PM10 mineral dust from site-specific (Rome area, Latium) outcropped rocks, and on the microphysics, optical properties and radiative effects of mineral dust at local level were gained in this work. A multi-disciplinary approach was used, based on individual-particle scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy-dispersive microanalysis (SEM XEDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of dust, size distribution of mineral particles, and radiative transfer modelling (RTM).The mineral composition of Rome lithogenic PM10 varies between an end-member dominated by silicate minerals and one exclusively composed of calcite. The first is obtained from volcanic lithotypes, the second from travertine or limestones; lithogenic PM10 with intermediate composition derives mainly from siliciclastic rocks or marlstones of Rome area. Size and mineral species of PM10 particles of silicate-dominated dust types are tuned mainly by weathering and, to lesser extent, by debris formation or crystallization; chemical precipitation of CaCO3 plays a major role in calcite-dominated types. These differences are evidenced by the diversity of volume distributions, within either dust types, or mineral species. Further differences are observed between volume distributions of calcite from travertine (natural source) and from road dust (anthropic source), specifically on the width, shape and enrichment of the fine fraction (unimodal at 5 μm a.d. for travertine, bimodal at 3.8 and 1.8 μm a.d. for road dust). Log-normal probability density functions of volcanics and travertine dusts affect differently the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the asymmetry parameter (g) in the VISible and Near Infrared (NIR) regions, depending also on the absorbing/non-absorbing character of volcanics and travertine, respectively. The downward component of the BOA solar irradiance simulated by RTM for a volcanics-rich or travertine-rich atmosphere shows that volcanics contribution to the solar

  18. Role of dust direct radiative effect on the tropical rain belt over Middle East and North Africa: A high-resolution AGCM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangalath, Hamza Kunhu; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the influence of direct radiative effect of dust on the tropical summer rain belt across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), the present study utilizes the high-resolution capability of an Atmospheric General Circulation Model, the High-Resolution Atmospheric Model. Ensembles of Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project style simulations have been conducted with and without dust radiative impacts, to differentiate the influence of dust on the tropical rain belt. The analysis focuses on summer season. The results highlight the role of dust-induced responses in global- and regional-scale circulations in determining the strength and the latitudinal extent of the tropical rain belt. A significant response in the strength and position of the local Hadley circulation is predicted in response to meridionally asymmetric distribution of dust and the corresponding radiative effects. Significant responses are also found in regional circulation features such as African Easterly Jet and West African Monsoon circulation. Consistent with these dynamic responses at various scales, the tropical rain belt across MENA strengthens and shifts northward. Importantly, the summer precipitation over the semiarid strip south of Sahara, including Sahel, increases up to 20%. As this region is characterized by the "Sahel drought," the predicted precipitation sensitivity to the dust loading over this region has a wide range of socioeconomic implications. Overall, the study demonstrates the extreme importance of incorporating dust radiative effects and the corresponding circulation responses at various scales, in the simulations and future projections of this region's climate.

  19. On the relativistic classical motion of a radiating spinning particle in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Arnab; Rajeev, S.G.

    2011-04-15

    Research Highlights: > We propose classical equations of motion for a charged particle with magnetic moment. > We account for radiation reaction as well. > Unlike previous proposals we do not have runaway solutions. > We find that the particle loses energy even in a constant magnetic field for a particular spin-polarized state. - Abstract: We propose classical equations of motion for a charged particle with magnetic moment, taking radiation reaction into account. This generalizes the Landau-Lifshitz equations for the spinless case. In the special case of spin-polarized motion in a constant magnetic field (synchrotron motion) we verify that the particle does lose energy. Previous proposals did not predict dissipation of energy and also suffered from runaway solutions analogous to those of the Lorentz-Dirac equations of motion.

  20. Accounting for particle non-sphericity in modeling of mineral dust radiative properties in the thermal infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, M.; Dubovik, O.; Lapyonok, T.; Derimian, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Spectral radiative parameters (extinction optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor) of spheroids of mineral dust composed of quartz and clays have been simulated at wavelengths between 7.0 and 10.2 μm using a T-matrix code. In spectral intervals with high values of complex index of refraction and for large particles, the parameters cannot be fully calculated with the code. Practically, the calculations are stopped at a truncation radius over which the particles contribution cannot thus be taken into account. To deal with this issue, we have developed and applied an accurate corrective technique of T-matrix Size Truncation Compensation (TSTC). For a mineral dust described by its AERONET standard aspect ratio (AR) distribution, the full error margin when applying the TSTC is within 0.3% (or ±0.15%), whatever the radiative parameter and the wavelength considered, for quartz (the most difficult case). Large AR values limit also the possibilities of calculation with the code. The TSTC has been able to complete the calculations of the T-matrix code for a modified AERONET AR distribution with a maximum AR of 4.7 instead of 3 for the standard distribution. Comparison between the simulated properties of spheroids and of spheres of same volume confirms, in agreement with the literature, that significant differences are observed in the vicinity of the mineral resonant peaks (λ ca. 8.3-8.7 μm for quartz, ca. 9.3-9.5 μm for clays) and that they are due to absorption by the small particles. This is a favorable circumstance for the TSTC, which is concerned with the contribution of the largest particles. This technique of numerical calculation improves the accuracy of the simulated radiative parameters of mineral dust, which must lead to a progress in view of applications such as remote sensing or determination of energy balance of dust in the thermal infrared (TIR), incompletely investigated so far.

  1. The impact of Dust Storms on both Solar Radiation and Sky temperature in Tabouk Saudi Arabia, theoretical Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrabi, Abdullrahman

    2016-04-01

    Dust particles affect both solar and terrestrial radiation by scattering and absorption and are therefore considered to be a significant climate-forcing factor. Dust storms are a very frequent phenomenon in Saudi Arabia. Several dust storm events occurred in Tabouk, northern region of Saudi Arabia, during the period between 2014-2015. In this study, simulations using the SMART model were conducted to investigate how the dusty conditions affected the solar irradiances during these events. Additionally, theoretical simulations were carried out using MODTRAN program to examine the changes in the infrared sky temperature during dusty conditions. The Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) measurements at (500 nm) were used as an input into both programs. The analysis showed that the dusty conditions significantly decrease the global and direct irradiances and increase the diffuse component compared with clear sky days. Also it was found that the dust storms increase the sky temperature in the atmospheric window (8-14 μm) such that the window emissions resembled those of a blackbody and the atmospheric window was almost closed.

  2. Positions of equilibrium points for dust particles in the circular restricted three-body problem with radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pástor, P.

    2014-11-01

    For a body with negligible mass moving in the gravitational field of a star with one planet in a circular orbit (the circular restricted three-body problem), five equilibrium points exist and are known as the Lagrangian points. The positions of the Lagrangian points are not valid for dust particles because in the derivation of the Lagrangian points it is assumed that no other forces besides the gravitation act on the body with negligible mass. Here, we determined positions of the equilibrium points for the dust particles in the circular restricted three-body problem with radiation. The equilibrium points are located on curves connecting the Lagrangian points in the circular restricted three-body problem. The equilibrium points for Jupiter are distributed in large interval of heliocentric distances due to its large mass. The equilibrium points for the Earth explain a cloud of dust particles trailing the Earth observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The dust particles moving in the equilibrium points are distributed in interplanetary space according to their properties.

  3. Hawking radiation of spin-1 particles from a three-dimensional rotating hairy black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Sakalli, I.; Ovgun, A.

    2015-09-15

    We study the Hawking radiation of spin-1 particles (so-called vector particles) from a three-dimensional rotating black hole with scalar hair using a Hamilton–Jacobi ansatz. Using the Proca equation in the WKB approximation, we obtain the tunneling spectrum of vector particles. We recover the standard Hawking temperature corresponding to the emission of these particles from a rotating black hole with scalar hair.

  4. Hawking radiation of spin-1 particles from a three-dimensional rotating hairy black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Ovgun, A.

    2015-09-01

    We study the Hawking radiation of spin-1 particles (so-called vector particles) from a three-dimensional rotating black hole with scalar hair using a Hamilton-Jacobi ansatz. Using the Proca equation in the WKB approximation, we obtain the tunneling spectrum of vector particles. We recover the standard Hawking temperature corresponding to the emission of these particles from a rotating black hole with scalar hair.

  5. Synchrotron radiation macromolecular crystallography: science and spin-offs

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, John R.; Mitchell, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    A current overview of synchrotron radiation (SR) in macromolecular crystallography (MX) instrumentation, methods and applications is presented. Automation has been and remains a central development in the last decade, as have the rise of remote access and of industrial service provision. Results include a high number of Protein Data Bank depositions, with an increasing emphasis on the successful use of microcrystals. One future emphasis involves pushing the frontiers of using higher and lower photon energies. With the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers, closely linked to SR developments, the use of ever smaller samples such as nanocrystals, nanoclusters and single molecules is anticipated, as well as the opening up of femtosecond time-resolved diffraction structural studies. At SR sources, a very high-throughput assessment for the best crystal samples and the ability to tackle just a few micron and sub-micron crystals will become widespread. With higher speeds and larger detectors, diffraction data volumes are becoming long-term storage and archiving issues; the implications for today and the future are discussed. Together with the rise of the storage ring to its current pre-eminence in MX data provision, the growing tendency of central facility sites to offer other centralized facilities complementary to crystallography, such as cryo-electron microscopy and NMR, is a welcome development. PMID:25866664

  6. Synchrotron radiation macromolecular crystallography: science and spin-offs.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, John R; Mitchell, Edward P

    2015-03-01

    A current overview of synchrotron radiation (SR) in macromolecular crystallography (MX) instrumentation, methods and applications is presented. Automation has been and remains a central development in the last decade, as have the rise of remote access and of industrial service provision. Results include a high number of Protein Data Bank depositions, with an increasing emphasis on the successful use of microcrystals. One future emphasis involves pushing the frontiers of using higher and lower photon energies. With the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers, closely linked to SR developments, the use of ever smaller samples such as nanocrystals, nanoclusters and single molecules is anticipated, as well as the opening up of femtosecond time-resolved diffraction structural studies. At SR sources, a very high-throughput assessment for the best crystal samples and the ability to tackle just a few micron and sub-micron crystals will become widespread. With higher speeds and larger detectors, diffraction data volumes are becoming long-term storage and archiving issues; the implications for today and the future are discussed. Together with the rise of the storage ring to its current pre-eminence in MX data provision, the growing tendency of central facility sites to offer other centralized facilities complementary to crystallography, such as cryo-electron microscopy and NMR, is a welcome development. PMID:25866664

  7. Iron oxide minerals in dust-source sediments from the Bodélé Depression, Chad: Implications for radiative properties and Fe bioavailability of dust plumes from the Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskowitz, Bruce M.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Berquó, Thelma S.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Bristow, Charlie S.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust can influence climate and biogeochemical cycles. An important component of mineral dust is ferric oxide minerals (hematite and goethite) which have been shown to influence strongly the optical properties of dust plumes and thus affect the radiative forcing of global dust. Here we report on the iron mineralogy of dust-source samples from the Bodélé Depression (Chad, north-central Africa), which is estimated to be Earth's most prolific dust producer and may be a key contributor to the global radiative budget of the atmosphere as well as to long-range nutrient transport to the Amazon Basin. By using a combination of magnetic property measurements, Mössbauer spectroscopy, reflectance spectroscopy, chemical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy, we document the abundance and relative amounts of goethite, hematite, and magnetite in dust-source samples from the Bodélé Depression. The partition between hematite and goethite is important to know to improve models for the radiative effects of ferric oxide minerals in mineral dust aerosols. The combination of methods shows (1) the dominance of goethite over hematite in the source sediments, (2) the abundance and occurrences of their nanosize components, and (3) the ubiquity of magnetite, albeit in small amounts. Dominant goethite and subordinate hematite together compose about 2% of yellow-reddish dust-source sediments from the Bodélé Depression and contribute strongly to diminution of reflectance in bulk samples. These observations imply that dust plumes from the Bodélé Depression that are derived from goethite-dominated sediments strongly absorb solar radiation. The presence of ubiquitous magnetite (0.002-0.57 wt%) is also noteworthy for its potentially higher solubility relative to ferric oxide and for its small sizes, including PM < 0.1 μm. For all examined samples, the average iron apportionment is estimated at about 33% in ferric oxide minerals, 1.4% in magnetite, and 65% in

  8. Spectroscopy of diffuse light in dust clouds. Scattered light and the solar neighbourhood radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, K.; Mattila, K.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The optical surface brightness of dark nebulae is mainly due to scattering of integrated starlight by classical dust grains. It contains information on the impinging interstellar radiation field, cloud structure, and grain scattering properties. We have obtained spectra of the scattered light from 3500 to 9000 Å in two globules, the Thumbprint Nebula and DC 303.8-14.2. Aims. We use observations of the scattered light to study the impinging integrated starlight spectrum as well as the scattered Hα and other line emissions from all over the sky. We search also for the presence of other than scattered light in the two globules. Methods. We obtained long-slit spectra encompassing the whole globule plus adjacent sky in a one-slit setting, thus enabling efficient elimination of airglow and other foreground sky components. We calculated synthetic integrated starlight spectra for the solar neighbourhood using HIPPARCOS-based stellar distributions and the spectral library of Pickles. Results. Spectra are presented separately for the bright rims and dark cores of the globules. The continuum spectral energy distributions and absorption line spectra can be well modelled with the synthetic integrated starlight spectra. Emission lines of Hα +[N II], Hβ, and [S II] are detected and are interpreted in terms of scattered light plus an in situ warm ionized medium component behind the globules. We detected an excess of emission over the wavelength range 5200-8000 Å in DC 303.8-14.2 but the nature of this emission remains open. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under programme ESO No. 073.C-0239(A). Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org.

  9. Experimental determination of short- and long-wave dust radiative effects in the Central Mediterranean and comparison with model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, S.; Burlizzi, P.; Perrone, M. R.

    2016-05-01

    Downward and upward irradiance measurements, in the short-wave (SW) and long-wave (LW) spectral range, have been used in combination with simultaneous aerosol optical depths (AODs) to experimentally determine the instantaneous and clear-sky aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing (DRF) at the surface, during a desert dust outbreak which affected the Central Mediterranean from 9 to 13 July 2012. AODs were retrieved from AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sun/sky photometer measurements collocated in space and time. The importance of downward and upward radiative flux measurements to properly account for both the surface albedo dependence on the solar zenith angle, and the land surface temperature (TLS) has been highlighted. Measured radiative fluxes were in reasonable agreement with the CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and AERONET corresponding ones collocated in space and time. SW and LW downward fluxes at the surface decreased up to 9% and increased up to 13%, respectively, as a consequence of a factor 5 increase of the AOD at 675 nm (AOD675). This is due to the cooling and warming effect of desert dust in the SW and LW spectral range, respectively. In fact, we have also found that the TLS increased at a rate of about 250 K per unit increase of the AOD675. The aerosol DRF at the surface varied from - 8 to - 74 W m- 2 and from + 1.2 to + 9.6 W m- 2 in the SW and LW spectral domains, respectively. In particular, we have found that the LW-DRF on average offsets 14% of the related SW component. It is shown that a two-stream radiative transfer model can reproduce the experimental findings at the surface by replacing the refractive indices typical of dust particles with the ones obtained for a mixture made of dust and soot particles. The dust contamination by anthropogenic particles during its transport to the monitoring site located several hundred kilometers away from the source region was responsible for this last result. We have also found by model

  10. The thermal structure of the atmospheric surface boundary layer on Mars as modified by the radiative effect of aeolian dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallmann, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    A computational simulation, based on Mariner 9 data, was performed for the thermal characteristics of the Martian atmospheric surface boundary layer in clear and dust-filled conditions. A radiative transfer model consisting of the atmospheric enthalpy rate equation, the radiative flux integrated over the 0.2-50 microns, the solid angle interval, and 0.50 km altitudes, broken into 52 levels. Mariner 9 IR data for CO2 absorption lines were included in the form of a temperture-dependent equation, while the line-widths were interpreted in terms of the pressure dependene as well as temperature. The lines covered the regions from 1-50 microns and varying conditions of dust content in the atmosphere. Attention was given to the thermal coupling between the ground and the atmosphere. It was found that convective heat exchange develops quickly due to radiative heating of the Martian desert surface, but does not cool the surface because of the attenuated atmosphere. The model predictd the 100 K temperature variations in the dusty atmosphere, as observed by the Viking thermal mapper. It is suggested that radiative flux convergence is as important as convection at equivalent efficiencies.

  11. Mineral composition of TALDICE aeolian ice core dust by means of synchrotron radiation XAS and XRF techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelli, A.; Cibin, G.; Sala, M.; Hampai, D.; Maggi, V.; Marino, F.; Delmonte, B.

    2009-04-01

    In this work we present the first accurate non-destructive comparison of the mineral composition of atmospheric dusts contained in a deep ice core from Antarctica using synchrotron radiation. Different mineral assemblages reaching glaciated areas could be correlated to sources areas starting from the knowledge of the dust composition. In this investigation we demonstrate the possibility to characterize with SR the mineral composition of the dust in order to perform its geochemical characterization and to understand the pattern of the transport and the trajectories of the aerosol. This study has been focused on the elemental characterization and the identification of the iron oxidation state of aeolian Antarctic dust by means of synchrotron radiation X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy. A set of twelve ice samples from the TALDICE (TD, 72˚ 46'S, 159˚ 04'E, 2316 m a.s.l., mean accumulation rate 80 kg*m-2*yr-1) ice core, corresponding to the warm climatic period, Holocene, and to the cold climatic period, Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (MIS 3) have been measured. To obtain both the elemental composition and the iron oxidation state of the mineral dust we performed experiments on specially prepared samples at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) laboratory in the framework of the Proposal N.3082B. Actually, melted ice samples were filtered and then mineral particles were deposited onto Nuclepore polycarbonate membranes in a 1000 class clean room under a 100 class laminar flow bench for both XRF and XAS experiments. A dedicated HV experimental chamber, that allows performing different type of experimental technique on very low absorber concentration samples was developed and tested in Italy. The original experimental setup, including an in-vacuum sample micromanipulator and a special alignment and docking sample system was installed at the beamline 10-2 at SSRL. For the x-ray detection a 7 mm2 high sensitive Silicon Drift Detector was

  12. Improvement in Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System/Surface and Atmosphere Radiation Budget Dust Aerosol Properties, Effects on Surface Validation of Clouds and Radiative Swath

    SciTech Connect

    Rutan, D.; Rose, F.; Charlock, T.P.

    2005-03-18

    Within the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) science team (Wielicki et al. 1996), the Surface and Atmospheric Radiation Budget (SARB) group is tasked with calculating vertical profiles of heating rates, globally, and continuously, beneath CERES footprint observations of Top of Atmosphere (TOA) fluxes. This is accomplished using a fast radiative transfer code originally developed by Qiang Fu and Kuo-Nan Liou (Fu and Liou 1993) and subsequently highly modified by the SARB team. Details on the code and its inputs can be found in Kato et al. (2005) and Rose and Charlock (2002). Among the many required inputs is characterization of the vertical column profile of aerosols beneath each footprint. To do this SARB combines aerosol optical depth information from the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument along with aerosol constituents specified by the Model for Atmosphere and Chemical Transport (MATCH) of Collins et al. (2001), and aerosol properties (e.g. single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter) from Tegen and Lacis (1996) and OPAC (Hess et al. 1998). The publicly available files that include these flux profiles, called the Clouds and Radiative Swath (CRS) data product, available from the Langley Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/). As various versions of the code are completed, publishable results are named ''Editions.'' After CRS Edition 2A was finalized it was found that dust aerosols were too absorptive. Dust aerosols have subsequently been modified using a new set of properties developed by Andy Lacis and results have been released in CRS Edition 2B. This paper discusses the effects of changing desert dust aerosol properties, which can be significant for the radiation budget in mid ocean, a few thousand kilometers from the source regions. Resulting changes are validated via comparison of surface observed fluxes from the Saudi Solar Village surface site (Myers et al. 1999), and the E13 site

  13. A GCM Study of Responses of the Atmospheric Water Cycle of West Africa and the Atlantic to Saharan Dust Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Kim, K. M.; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    2009-01-01

    The responses of the atmospheric water cycle and climate of West Africa and the Atlantic to radiative forcing of Saharan dust are studied using the NASA finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), coupled to a mixed layer ocean. We find evidence of an "elevated heat pump" (EHP) mechanism that underlines the responses of the atmospheric water cycle to dust forcing as follow. During the boreal summerr, as a result of large-scale atmospheric feedback triggered by absorbing dust aerosols, rainfall and cloudiness are ehanIed over the West Africa/Eastern Atlantic ITCZ, and suppressed over the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. Shortwave radiation absorption by dust warms the atmosphere and cools the surface, while longwave has the opposite response. The elevated dust layer warms the air over West Africa and the eastern Atlantic. As the warm air rises, it spawns a large-scale onshore flow carrying the moist air from the eastern Atlantic and the Gulf of Guinea. The onshore flow in turn enhances the deep convection over West Africa land, and the eastern Atlantic. The condensation heating associated with the ensuing deep convection drives and maintains an anomalous large-scale east-west overturning circulation with rising motion over West Africa/eastern Atlantic, and sinking motion over the Caribbean region. The response also includes a strengthening of the West African monsoon, manifested in a northward shift of the West Africa precipitation over land, increased low-level westerlies flow over West Africa at the southern edge of the dust layer, and a near surface westerly jet underneath the dust layer overr the Sahara. The dust radiative forcing also leads to significant changes in surface energy fluxes, resulting in cooling of the West African land and the eastern Atlantic, and warming in the West Atlantic and Caribbean. The EHP effect is most effective for moderate to highly absorbing dusts, and becomes minimized for reflecting dust with single scattering albedo at0

  14. Modeling the Transport and Radiative Forcing of Taklimakan Dust over the Tibetan Plateau: A case study in the summer of 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Siyu; Huang, J.; Zhao, Chun; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Ben

    2013-01-30

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to investigate an intense dust storm event during 26 to 30 July 2006 that originated over the Taklimakan Desert (TD) and transported to the northern slope of Tibetan Plateau (TP). The dust storm is initiated by the approach of a strong cold frontal system over the TD. In summer, the meridional transport of TD dust to the TP is favored by the thermal effect of the TP and the weakening of the East Asian westerly winds. During this dust storm, the transport of TD dust over the TP is further enhanced by the passage of the cold front. As a result, TD dust breaks through the planetary boundary layer and extends to the upper troposphere over the northern TP. TD dust flux arrived at the TP with a value of 6.6 Gg/day in this 5 day event but decays quickly during the southward migration over the TP due to dry deposition. The simulations show that TD dust cools the atmosphere near the surface and heats the atmosphere above with a maximum heating rate of 0.11 K day-1 at ~7 km over the TP. The event-averaged net radiative forcings of TD dust over the TP are -3.97, 1.61, and -5.58 Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), in the atmosphere, and at the surface, respectively. The promising performance of WRF-Chem in simulating dust and its radiative forcing provides confidence for use in further investigation of climatic impact of TD dust over the TP.

  15. A model for absorption of solar radiation by mineral dust within liquid cloud drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Thompson, Jonathan E.

    2015-10-01

    Models of light scattering and absorption that consider the effect of insoluble inclusions present within liquid cloud droplets may assume the inclusion occupies random locations within the droplet. In certain cases, external forces can lead to certain orientations or alignments that are strongly preferred. Within this modeling study, we consider one such case in which an insoluble mineral dust inclusion (ρ=2.6 g/cm3) is placed within a liquid water drop (ρ=1.0 g/cm3). Such an instance mimics mineral dust aerosols being incorporated within cloud drops in Earth's atmosphere. Model results suggest super-micron mineral dust settles to the bottom of cloud droplets. However, Brownian motion largely randomizes the position of sub-micron mineral dust within the droplet. The inherent organization of the particles that result has important consequences for light absorption by mineral dust when present within a cloud drop. Modeled results suggest light absorption efficiency may be enhanced by as much as 4-6 fold for an isolated droplet experiencing direct solar illumination at solar zenith angles of <20°. For such an isolated droplet, the absorption efficiency enhancement falls rapidly with increasing solar zenith angle indicating a strong angle of incidence dependence. We also consider the more common case of droplets that contain dust inclusions deep within optically dense clouds. Absorption efficiency enhancements for these locales follow a dramatically different pattern compared to the optically isolated droplet due to the presence of diffuse rather than direct solar irradiation. In such cases, light absorption efficiency is decreased through including super-micron dust within water droplets. The study has important implications for modeling the absorption of sunlight by mineral dust aerosol within liquid water clouds. The angle of incidence dependence also reveals that experimental measurement of light absorption for cases in which particle alignment occurs may not

  16. Influence of the vertical absorption profile of mixed Asian dust plumes on aerosol direct radiative forcing over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young Min; Lee, Kwonho; Kim, Kwanchul; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Dong Ho

    2016-08-01

    We estimate the aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) and heating rate profiles of mixed East Asian dust plumes in the solar wavelength region ranging from 0.25 to 4.0 μm using the Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) code. Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients and single-scattering albedos (SSA) were derived from measurements with a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system. The data are used as input parameters for our radiative transfer calculations. We considered four cases of radiative forcing in SBDART: 1. dust, 2. pollution, 3. mixed dust plume and the use of vertical profiles of SSA, and 4. mixed dust plumes and the use of column-averaged values of SSA. In our sensitivity study we examined the influence of SSA and aerosol layer height on our results. The ADRF at the surface and in the atmosphere shows a small dependence on the specific shape of the aerosol extinction vertical profile and its light-absorption property for all four cases. In contrast, at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the ADRF is largely affected by the vertical distribution of the aerosols extinction. This effect increases if the light-absorption capacity (decrease of SSA) of the aerosols increases. We find different radiative effects in situations in which two layers of aerosols had different light-absorption properties. The largest difference was observed at the TOA for an absorbing aerosol layer at high altitude in which we considered in one case the vertical profile of SSA and in another case the column-averaged SSA only. The ADRF at the TOA increases when the light-absorbing aerosol layer is located above 3 km altitude. The differences between height-resolved SSA, which can be obtained from lidar data, and total layer-mean SSA indicates that the use of a layer-mean SSA can be rather misleading as it can induce a large error in the calculation of the ADRF at the TOA, which in turn may cause errors in the vertical profiles of heating rates.

  17. An Assessment of the Surface Longwave Direct Radiative Effect of Airborne Dust in Zhangye China During the Asian Monsoon Year Field Experiment (2008)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansell, Richard A.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsu, N. Christina; Ji, Qiang; Bell, Shaun W.; Holben, Brent N.; Ellsworth, Welton J.; Roush, Ted L.; Zhang, Wu; Huang, J.; Li, Zhanquing; Chen, Hongbin

    2012-01-01

    Tiny suspensions of solid particles or liquid droplets, called aerosols, hover in earth's atmosphere and can be found over just about anywhere including oceans, deserts, vegetated areas, and other global regions. Aerosols come in a variety of sizes, shapes, and compositions which depend on such factors as their origin and how long they have been in the atmosphere (i.e., their residence time). Some of the more common types of aerosols include mineral dust and sea salt which get lifted from the desert and ocean surfaces, respectively by mechanical forces such as strong winds. Depending on their size, aerosols will either fall out gravitationally, as in the case of larger particles, or will remain resident in the atmosphere where they can undergo further change through interactions with other aerosols and cloud particles. Not only do aerosols affect air quality where they pose a health risk, they can also perturb the distribution of radiation in the earth-atmosphere system which can inevitably lead to changes in our climate. One aerosol that has been in the forefront of many recent studies, particularly those examining its radiative effects, is mineral dust. The large spatial coverage of desert source regions and the fact that dust can radiatively interact with such a large part of the electromagnetic spectrum due to its range in particle size, makes it an important aerosol to study. Dust can directly scatter and absorb solar and infrared radiation which can subsequently alter the amount of radiation that would otherwise be present in the absence of dust at any level of the atmosphere like the surface. This is known as radiative forcing. At the surface dust can block incoming solar energy, however at infrared wavelengths, dust acts to partially compensate the solar losses. Evaluating the solar radiative effect of dust aerosols is relatively straightforward due in part to the relatively large signal-to-noise ratio in the measurements. At infrared wavelengths, on the

  18. Saharan Desert Dust Radiative Impact On The Evolution of The Vertical Thermal Characteristics of The Atmosphere Over The Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iori, C.; Liberti, G. L.

    The passage of Saharan dust over the Mediterranean basin, represents the most in- tense and relatively frequent event for what concerns the tropospheric aerosols in that region. Transport of the crustal dusts from the Saharan surface to the mean Mediter- ranean troposphere happens inside air volumes belonging to the superficial layers of the Sahara desert. As a consequence, it is associated with anomalies both in the verti- cal thermodynamic structure as well as in the composition. The first one is due to the avvection of air volumes geographically and vertically belonging to a different region. The second one is due to the composition of the air volumes (water vapour, ozone and aerosol) different from the one of the unperturbed status. Due to the occurence of such anomalies a perturbation in the radiative balance is also expected, because of the in- teraction of water vapour, ozone and aerosol with the atmospheric radiation field and hence with the radiative balance of earth-atmosphere system. This study examine the relative contribution of radiative processes in the evolution of the vertical structure of the atmosphere during the occurence of a desert dust transport event (18-5-1999). In order to do that radiosoundings from a set of stations around the Mediterranean Sea as well as in the source area have been analysed for the spring 1999 to define a mean sta- tus and succesively characterize quantitatively the anomaly associated with the event. In parallel detailed description of vertical properties of the aerosols as well as of the other parameters of interest, available from the PAUR II campaign [Kourtidis et al., 2000], has been employed for computing with the CLIRAD RTM [Chou and Suarez 1999; Chou and Suarez 2001] the heating/cooling rate profiles. Computation have been performed for a day in presence of aerosol as well as for a relatively clear day in order to evaluate the desert dust contribution on the overall radiative effects. A detailed analysis of the

  19. Dust Aerosol Optical Properties Retrieval and Radiative Forcing over Northwestern China during 2008 China-US Joint Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Su, J.; Ackerman, T. P.; Fu, Q.; Huang, J.; Shi, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Atmosphere Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program’s Ancillary Facility (AAF/SMART-COMMIT) was deployed to Zhangye (39.082° N, 100.276° E), which is located in a semi-desert area of Northwest China, during the period of late April to mid June in 2008. We selected 11 cases to retrieve dust aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent, size distribution, single-scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASY) from Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) measurements. These cases are dominated by large particles with Angstrom exponent values ranging from 0.34 to 0.93. The values of AOD at 0.67 µm range from 0.074 to 0.249. The mean SSA value increases with wavelength from 0.76±0.02 at 0.415 µm to 0.86±0.01 at 0.867 µm, while the mean ASY value decreases from 0.74±0.04 to 0.70±0.02. Before estimating dust aerosol direct radiative forcing, a radiative closure experiment was performed to verify that the retrieved aerosol optical properties and other input parameters to the radiative transfer model appropriately represent atmospheric conditions. The daytime-averaged differences between model simulations and ground observations are -8.5, -2.9, and -2.1 Wm-2 for the total, diffuse, and direct normal fluxes, respectively. The mean difference in the instantaneous reflected solar fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA) between the model and CERES observations is 8.0 Wm-2. The solar aerosol direct radiative forcing (ARF), averaged over a 24-hour period, at the surface is-22.4±8.9 Wm-2, while the TOA ARF is small and has an average value of only 0.52±1.69 Wm-2. The daily-average surface aerosol radiative forcing efficiency (ARFE) at 0.5 µm is -95.1±10.3 Wm-2τ-1. Our results illustrate that the primary role of dust aerosol is to alter the distribution of solar radiation within the climate system, rather than reflecting solar energy to space. We assess the satellite aerosol optical depth products from MISR and MODIS observations by comparing them

  20. Trichloroethylene radicals generated by ionizing radiation. An EPR/spin trapping study.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, A J; Steel-Goodwin, L

    1997-06-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was exposed in the presence of the spin trap N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenyl nitrone (PBN, 0.1 M) to ionizing radiation from two different sources in an attempt to determine the origin of the spin-trapped radicals generating the EPR spectra in precision cut liver slices. TCE samples were irradiated with 18 MeV electrons to a total dose of 1000 Gy in a linear accelerator (LINAC) or exposed to 60Co gamma-rays to total doses of 100 Gy and 1000 Gy. The results show that three PBN adducts were generated during the LINAC radiations. Two of these spin adducts correspond to the addition of carbon-centered radicals to PBN, and the third adduct is consistent with a decomposition product of PBN. The predominant carbon-entered radical yields a PBN adduct that is more stable, persists for over 24 h and has identical hyperfine coupling constants (aN = 1.61 mT, aH beta = 0.325 mT) to the PBN adduct obtained when precision-cut liver slices were exposed to TCE. Gamma radiation (100 Gy) of TCE yields PBN adducts with lower primary nitrogen hyperfine coupling constants (aN = 1.45 mT and aN = 1.54 mT). The results (gamma-radiation) suggest that the carbon-centered radical is formed on a single TCE carbon that is different than the predominant radical formed during LINAC radiations. This difference is confirmed by experiments using 13C-TCE. The results further suggest that, during gamma-radiation of TCE, the radicals are formed by dechlorination at the TCE carbon containing two chlorine atoms. The results obtained during LINAC radiations suggest that the predominant radical is formed by dechlorination at the TCE carbon containing a single chlorine and a single proton. In addition, it is possible that this radical is the initial TCE radical formed during exposure of liver slices to TCE. PMID:9219030

  1. Motion of dust in a planetary magnetosphere - Orbit-averaged equations for oblateness, electromagnetic, and radiation forces with application to Saturn's E ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    1993-01-01

    The orbital dynamics of micrometer-sized dust grains is explored numerically and analytically, treating the strongest perturbation forces acting on close circumplanetary dust grains: higher-order gravity, radiation pressure, and the electromagnetic force. The appropriate orbit-average equations are derived and applied to the E ring. Arguments are made for the existence of azimuthal and vertical asymmetries in the E ring. New understanding of the dynamics of E ring dust grains is applied to problems of the ring's breadth and height. The possibility for further ground-based and spacecraft observations is considered.

  2. Motion of dust in a planetary magnetosphere - Orbit-averaged equations for oblateness, electromagnetic, and radiation forces with application to Saturn's E ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    1993-02-01

    The orbital dynamics of micrometer-sized dust grains is explored numerically and analytically, treating the strongest perturbation forces acting on close circumplanetary dust grains: higher-order gravity, radiation pressure, and the electromagnetic force. The appropriate orbit-average equations are derived and applied to the E ring. Arguments are made for the existence of azimuthal and vertical asymmetries in the E ring. New understanding of the dynamics of E ring dust grains is applied to problems of the ring's breadth and height. The possibility for further ground-based and spacecraft observations is considered.

  3. Seasonal and Elevational Variations of Black Carbon and Dust in Snow and Ice in the Solu-Khumbu, Nepal and Estimated Radiative Forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspari, S.; Painter, T. H.; Gysel, M.; Skiles, M.; Schwikowski, M.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) and dust deposited on snow and glacier surfaces can reduce the surface albedo, accelerate melt, and trigger albedo feedback. Assessing BC and dust concentrations in snow and ice in the Himalaya is of interest because this region borders large BC and dust sources, and seasonal snow and glacier ice in this region are an important source of water resources. Snow and ice samples were collected from crevasse profiles and snowpits at elevations between 5400 and 6400 m asl from Mera glacier located in the Solu-Khumbu region of Nepal. The samples were measured for Fe concentrations (used as a dust proxy) via ICP-MS, total impurity content gravimetrically, and BC concentrations using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). BC and Fe concentrations are substantially higher at elevations < 6000 m due to post-depositional processes including melt and sublimation and greater loading in the lower troposphere. Because the largest areal extent of snow and ice resides at elevations < 6000 m, the higher BC and dust concentrations at these elevations can reduce the snow and glacier albedo over large areas, accelerating melt, affecting glacier mass-balance and water resources, and contributing to a positive climate forcing. Radiative transfer modeling constrained by measurements at 5400 m at Mera La indicates that BC concentrations in the winter-spring snow/ice horizons are sufficient to reduce albedo by 6-10% relative to clean snow, corresponding to localized instantaneous radiative forcings of 75-120 W m-2. The other bulk impurity concentrations, when treated separately as dust, reduce albedo by 40-42% relative to clean snow and give localized instantaneous radiative forcings of 488 to 525 W m-2. Adding the BC absorption to the other impurities results in additional radiative forcings of 3 W m-2. While these results suggest that the snow albedo and radiative forcing effect of dust is considerably greater than BC, there are several sources of uncertainty.

  4. Spin zero Hawking radiation for non-zero-angular momentum mode

    SciTech Connect

    Ngampitipan, Tritos; Bonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2015-05-15

    Black hole greybody factors carry some quantum black hole information. Studying greybody factors may lead to understanding the quantum nature of black holes. However, solving for exact greybody factors in many black hole systems is impossible. One way to deal with this problem is to place some rigorous analytic bounds on the greybody factors. In this paper, we calculate rigorous bounds on the greybody factors for spin zero hawking radiation for non-zero-angular momentum mode from the Kerr-Newman black holes.

  5. Earth radiation budget measurement from a spinning satellite: Conceptual design of detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Suomi, V. E.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual design, sensor characteristics, sensor performance and accuracy, and spacecraft and orbital requirements for a spinning wide-field-of-view earth energy budget detector were investigated. The scientific requirements for measurement of the earth's radiative energy budget are presented. Other topics discussed include the observing system concept, solar constant radiometer design, plane flux wide FOV sensor design, fast active cavity theory, fast active cavity design and error analysis, thermopile detectors as an alternative, pre-flight and in-flight calibration plane, system error summary, and interface requirements.

  6. Restoration and Reexamination of Data from the Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 Dust, Thermal and Radiation Engineering Measurements Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBride, Marie J.; Williams, David R.; Kent, H.; Turner, Niescja

    2012-01-01

    As part of an effort by the Lunar Data Node (LDN) we are restoring data returned by the Apollo Dust, Thermal, and Radiation Engineering Measurements (DTREM) packages emplaced on the lunar surface by the crews of Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15. Also commonly known as the Dust Detector experiments, the DTREM packages measured the outputs of exposed solar cells and thermistors over time. They operated on the surface for up to nearly 8 years, returning data every 54 seconds. The Apollo 11 DTREM was part of the Early Apollo Surface Experiments Package (EASEP), and operated for a few months as planned following emplacement in July 1969. The Apollo 12, 14, and 15 DTREMs were mounted on the central station as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) and operated from deployment until ALSEP shutdown in September 1977. The objective of the DTREM experiments was to determine the effects of lunar and meteoric dust, thermal stresses, and radiation exposure on solar cells. The LDN, part of the Geosciences Node of the Planetary Data System (PDS), operates out of the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) at Goddard Space Flight Center. The goal of the LDN is to extract lunar data stored on older media and/or in obsolete formats, restore the data into a usable digital format, and archive the data with PDS and NSSDC. For the DTREM data we plan to recover the raw telemetry, translate the raw counts into appropriate output units, and then apply calibrations. The final archived data will include the raw, translated, and calibrated data and the associated conversion tables produced from the microfilm, as well as ancillary supporting data (metadata) packaged in PDS format.

  7. Light Dust Devil Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 October 2004 Many Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images exhibit wild patterns of dark streaks thought to have formed by the passage of many dust devils. The dust devils disrupt the dust coating the martian surface, leaving behind a streak. However, not all dust devils make streaks, and not all dust devil streaks are dark. Some are light---it simply depends upon which is darker, the substrate or the dust that the spinning vortex disrupts. The example of light-toned dust devil streaks shown here is located in southern Schiaparelli Basin near 5.3oS, 343.3oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/upper left.

  8. Nonlinear radiation damping of nuclear spin waves and magnetoelastic waves in antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrienko, Alexander V.; Safonov, Vladimir L.

    2016-03-01

    Parallel pumping of nuclear spin waves in antiferromagnetic CsMnF3 at liquid helium temperatures and magnetoelastic waves in antiferromagnetic FeBO3 at liquid nitrogen temperature in a helical resonator was studied. It was found that the absorbed microwave power is approximately equal to the irradiated power from the sample and that the main restriction mechanism of absorption in both cases is defined by the nonlinear radiation damping predicted about two decades ago. Nonlinear radiation damping is sure to be a common feature of the parallel pumping technique for all normal magnetic excitations and it must be taken into account for interpretation of nonlinear phenomena in parametrically excited magnetic systems.

  9. Center of mass and spin for isolated sources of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozameh, Carlos N.; Quiroga, Gonzalo D.

    2016-03-01

    We define the center of mass and spin of an isolated system in general relativity. The resulting relationships between these variables and the total linear and angular momentum of the gravitational system are remarkably similar to their Newtonian counterparts, though only variables at the null boundary of an asymptotically flat spacetime are used for their definition. We also derive equations of motion linking their time evolution to the emitted gravitational radiation. The results are then compared to other approaches. In particular, one obtains unexpected similarities as well as some differences with results obtained in the post-Newtonian literature. These equations of motion should be useful when describing the radiation emitted by compact sources, such as coalescing binaries capable of producing gravitational kicks, supernovas, or scattering of compact objects.

  10. Maps of Dust Infrared Emission for Use in Estimation of Reddening and Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Foregrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Davis, Marc

    1998-06-01

    standard reddening law and use the colors of elliptical galaxies to measure the reddening per unit flux density of 100 μm emission. We find consistent calibration using the B-R color distribution of a sample of the 106 brightest cluster ellipticals, as well as a sample of 384 ellipticals with B-V and Mg line strength measurements. For the latter sample, we use the correlation of intrinsic B-V versus Mg2 index to tighten the power of the test greatly. We demonstrate that the new maps are twice as accurate as the older Burstein-Heiles reddening estimates in regions of low and moderate reddening. The maps are expected to be significantly more accurate in regions of high reddening. These dust maps will also be useful for estimating millimeter emission that contaminates cosmic microwave background radiation experiments and for estimating soft X-ray absorption. We describe how to access our maps readily for general use.

  11. Radiative Lifetime for Nuclear Spin Conversion of Water-Ion H_2O^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keiichi; Harada, Kensuke; Oka, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    Nuclear spin conversion interaction of the water ion, H_2O^+, has been studied to derive the spontaneous emission lifetime between the ortho- and para-levels. The H_2O^+ ion is a radical with ^2 B _1 electronic ground state and the off-diagonal electron spin-nuclear spin interaction term, T_{ab} (S_aΔ I_b + S_bΔ I_a), connects para and ortho levels, because Δ {I} = {I}_1 - {I}_2 has nonvanishing matrix elements between I = 0 and 1. The T_{ab} coupling constant, derived by an ab initio calculation in MRD-CI/Bk level to be 72 MHz, is larger than that of H_2O by 4 orders of magnitude, makes the ortho to para conversion of H_2O^+ faster than that of H_2O by 8 orders of magnitude and possibly competitive with other astrophysical processes. Last year we reported ortho and para coupling channels below 900 cm^{-1} caused by accidental near degeneracy of rotational levels. For example, hyperfine components of the 4_{2,2}(o) and 3_{3,0}(p) levels mix each other by 1.2 x 10^{-3} due to the near degeneracy (Δ E = 0.417 cm^{-1}), but the lower lying 1_{0,1}(p) and 1_{1,1}(o) levels mix only by 8.9 x 10^{-5} because of their large separation (Δ E = 16.27 cm^{-1}). In the present study, we solved the radiative rate equations including all the rotational levels below 900 cm^{-1} to give the o-p conversion lifetime to be 0.451, 3.27, 398 and 910 years for the equilibrium o/p ratio of 3.00, 3.00, 4.52, and 406 when the radiation temperature T_r is 100, 60, 20 and 5 K. These results qualitatively help to understand the observed high o/p ratio of 4.8 ± 0.5 (corresponding to the nuclear spin temperature of 21 K) toward Sgr B2, but they are too slow to compete with the reaction by collision unless the number of density of H_2 in the region is very low (n˜1 cm^{-3}) or the radiative temperature is very high (T_r > 50K). K. Tanaka, K. Harada, and T. Oka, the 67th OSU Symposium MG06, 2012. P. Schilke, et al., A&A 521, L11 (2010). K. Tanaka, K. Harada, and T. Oka, J. Phys. Chem. A

  12. Techniques for carrying out radiative transfer calculations for the Martian atmospheric dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronson, J. R.; Emslie, A. G.; Strong, P. F.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of the modification of a theory on the reflectance of particulate media so as to apply it to analysis of the infrared spectra obtained by the IRIS instrument on Mariner 9. With the aid of this theory and the optical constants of muscovite mica, quartz, andesite, anorthosite, diopside pyroxenite, and dunite, modeling calculations were made to refine previous estimates of the mineralogical composition of the Martian dust particles. These calculations suggest that a feldspar rich mixture is a very likely composition for the dust particles. The optical constants used for anorthosite and diopside pyroxenite were derived during this program from reflectance measurements. Those for the mica were derived from literature reflectance data. Finally, a computer program was written to invert the measured radiance data so as to obtain the absorption coefficient spectrum which should then be independent of the temperature profile and gaseous component effects.

  13. Mergers of Non-spinning Black-hole Binaries: Gravitational Radiation Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.; vanMeter, James R.

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from black-hole binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our primary goal is to present relatively complete information about the waveforms, including all the leading multipolar components, to interested researchers. In our analysis, we pursue the simplest physical description of the dominant features in the radiation, providing an interpretation of the waveforms in terms of an implicit rotating source. This interpretation applies uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We emphasize strong relationships among the l = m modes that persist through the full wavetrain. Exploring the structure of the waveforms in more detail, we conduct detailed analytic fitting of the late-time frequency evolution, identifying a key quantitative feature shared by the l = m modes among all mass-ratios. We identify relationships, with a simple interpretation in terms of the implicit rotating source, among the evolution of frequency and amplitude, which hold for the late-time radiation. These detailed relationships provide sufficient information about the late-time radiation to yield a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modeling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model.

  14. Mineral dust impact on snow radiative properties in the European Alps combining ground, UAV, and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, B.; Fava, F.; Ferrero, L.; Garzonio, R.; Baccolo, G.; Delmonte, B.; Colombo, R.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the impact of mineral dust (MD) on snow radiative properties in the European Alps at ground, aerial, and satellite scale. A field survey was conducted to acquire snow spectral reflectance measurements with an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) Field Spec Pro spectroradiometer. Surface snow samples were analyzed to determine the concentration and size distribution of MD in each sample. An overflight of a four-rotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) equipped with an RGB digital camera sensor was carried out during the field operations. Finally, Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) data covering the central European Alps were analyzed. Observed reflectance evidenced that MD strongly reduced the spectral reflectance of snow, in particular, from 350 to 600 nm. Reflectance was compared with that simulated by parameterizing the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation radiative transfer model. We defined a novel spectral index, the Snow Darkening Index (SDI), that combines different wavelengths showing nonlinear correlation with measured MD concentrations (R2 = 0.87, root-mean-square error = 0.037). We also estimated a positive instantaneous radiative forcing that reaches values up to 153 W/m2 for the most concentrated sampling area. SDI maps at local scale were produced using the UAV data, while regional SDI maps were generated with OLI data. These maps show the spatial distribution of MD in snow after a natural deposition from the Saharan desert. Such postdepositional experimental data are fundamental for validating radiative transfer models and global climate models that simulate the impact of MD on snow radiative properties.

  15. The radiative impact of desert dust on orographic rain in the Cevennes-Vivarais area: a case study from HyMeX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamant, C.; Chaboureau, J.-P.; Chazette, P.; Di Girolamo, P.; Bourrianne, T.; Totems, J.; Cacciani, M.

    2015-08-01

    The study is focused on Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 14 of the Hydrology Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment first Special Observing Period (HyMeX SOP 1) that took place from 17 to 19 October and was dedicated to the study of orographic rain in the Cevennes Vivarais (CV) target area. During this IOP a dense dust plume originating from North Africa (Maghreb and Sahara) was observed to be transported over the Balearic Islands towards the south of France. The plume was characterized by an aerosol optical depth between 0.2 and 0.8 at 550 nm, highly variable in time and space over the Western Mediterranean basin. The impact of this dust plume, the biggest event observed during the 2 month long HyMeX SOP 1, on the precipitation over the CV area has been analyzed using high resolution simulations from the convection permitting mesoscale model Meso-NH validated against measurements obtained from numerous instruments deployed specifically during SOP 1 (ground-based/airborne water vapor and aerosol lidars, airborne microphysics probes) as well as space-borne aerosol products. The 4 day simulation reproduced realistically the temporal and spatial variability (incl. vertical distribution) of the dust. The dust radiative impact led to an average 0.6 K heating at the altitude of the dust layer in the CV area (and up to +3 K locally) and an average 100 J kg-1 increase of most unstable convective available potential energy (and up to +900 J kg-1 locally) with respect to a simulation without prescribed dust aerosols. The rainfall amounts and location were only marginally affected by the dust radiative effect, even after 4 days of simulation. The transient nature of this radiative effect in dynamical environments such as those found in the vicinity of heavy precipitation events in the Mediterranean is not sufficient to impact 24 h accumulated rainfall in the dusty simulation.

  16. Seasonal and elevational variations of black carbon and dust in snow and ice in the Solu-Khumbu, Nepal and estimated radiative forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspari, S.; Painter, T. H.; Gysel, M.; Skiles, S. M.; Schwikowski, M.

    2014-08-01

    Black carbon (BC) and dust deposited on snow and glacier surfaces can reduce the surface albedo, accelerate snow and ice melt, and trigger albedo feedback. Assessing BC and dust concentrations in snow and ice in the Himalaya is of interest because this region borders large BC and dust sources, and seasonal snow and glacier ice in this region are an important source of water resources. Snow and ice samples were collected from crevasse profiles and snow pits at elevations between 5400 and 6400 m a.s.l. from Mera glacier located in the Solu-Khumbu region of Nepal during spring and fall 2009, providing the first observational data of BC concentrations in snow and ice from the southern slope of the Himalaya. The samples were measured for Fe concentrations (used as a dust proxy) via ICP-MS, total impurity content gravimetrically, and BC concentrations using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Measured BC concentrations underestimate actual BC concentrations due to changes to the sample during storage and loss of BC particles in the ultrasonic nebulizer; thus, we correct for the underestimated BC mass. BC and Fe concentrations are substantially higher at elevations < 6000 m due to post-depositional processes including melt and sublimation and greater loading in the lower troposphere. Because the largest areal extent of snow and ice resides at elevations < 6000 m, the higher BC and dust concentrations at these elevations can reduce the snow and glacier albedo over large areas, accelerating melt, affecting glacier mass balance and water resources, and contributing to a positive climate forcing. Radiative transfer modeling constrained by measurements at 5400 m at Mera La indicates that BC concentrations in the winter-spring snow/ice horizons are sufficient to reduce albedo by 6-10% relative to clean snow, corresponding to localized instantaneous radiative forcings of 75-120 W m-2. The other bulk impurity concentrations, when treated separately as dust, reduce albedo by

  17. Electric Dust Devils and Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, N. O.; Yana, C.

    2004-12-01

    Electrical fields measurements in terrestrial dust devils show that they maintain tremendous charge separation and that their electric fields exceeds the breakdown potential (~10 kV/m) of the Martian atmosphere (Farrell et al., 2002, 2003; Krauss et al., 2002; Renno et al., 2004). Typical Martian dust devils are be up to 100 times larger and much stronger than the small terrestrial analogues. Martian dust devils have higher dust content and may produce even stronger electrical fields. Indeed, the dust devils observed in the Pathfinder images have about 700 times the dust content of the local background atmosphere (Metzger et al., 1999). Thus, strong charge separations and electric-field breakdown are likely to occur on Martian dust devils and dust storms. Our theory (Renno et al., 2004) and laboratory experiments in a Mars chamber shows that collisions between sand and dust particles produce non-thermal microwave radiation. The non-thermal microwave emission allows not only the indirect detection of electric activity but also the determination of the physical properties of Martian sand and dust by remote sensing. Besides being geologically important, electrically charged Martian dust devils and dust storms are potential hazards to Landers and will be dangerous to future astronauts exploring its surface. Indeed, the design of adequate mechanical and electrical systems for these Landers cannot progress effectively without a better understanding of Martian dust devils and dust storms. Moreover, ancillary phenomena associated with electrically charged vortices can ionize atmospheric gases and might have important implications for atmosphere chemistry and even habitability.

  18. Quantum Čerenkov Radiation: Spectral Cutoffs and the Role of Spin and Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminer, Ido; Mutzafi, Maor; Levy, Amir; Harari, Gal; Herzig Sheinfux, Hanan; Skirlo, Scott; Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Joannopoulos, John D.; Segev, Mordechai; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-01-01

    We show that the well-known Čerenkov effect contains new phenomena arising from the quantum nature of charged particles. The Čerenkov transition amplitudes allow coupling between the charged particle and the emitted photon through their orbital angular momentum and spin, by scattering into preferred angles and polarizations. Importantly, the spectral response reveals a discontinuity immediately below a frequency cutoff that can occur in the optical region. Near this cutoff, the intensity of the conventional Čerenkov radiation (ČR) is very small but still finite, while our quantum calculation predicts exactly zero intensity above the cutoff. Below that cutoff, with proper shaping of electron beams (ebeams), we predict that the traditional ČR angle splits into two distinctive cones of photonic shockwaves. One of the shockwaves can move along a backward cone, otherwise considered impossible for conventional ČR in ordinary matter. Our findings are observable for ebeams with realistic parameters, offering new applications including novel quantum optics sources, and opening a new realm for Čerenkov detectors involving the spin and orbital angular momentum of charged particles.

  19. Angular Momentum Transport in Magnetized Stellar Radiative Zones. II. The Solar Spin-down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, P.; MacGregor, K. B.

    1993-11-01

    We present a large set of numerical calculations describing the rotational evolution of a solar-type star, in response to the torque exerted on it by a magnetically coupled wind emanating from its surface. We consider a situation where the internal redistribution of angular momentum in the radiative part of the envelope is dominated by magnetic stresses arising from the shearing of a preexisting, large-scale, poloidal magnetic field. By assuming a time-independent poloidal magnetic field, neglecting fluid motions in meridional planes, and restricting our attention to axisymmetric systems, we reduce the spin-down problem to solving the (coupled) ψ-components of the momentum and induction equations. Nevertheless, our computations remain dynamical, in that they take into account both the generation of a toroidal magnetic field by shearing of the preexisting poloidal field, and the back-reaction of the resulting Lorentz force on the differential rotation. It becomes possible to draw, for the first time, a reasonably realistic and quantitative picture of the effects of large-scale internal magnetic fields on the main-sequence rotational evolution of solar-type stars. We perform spin-down calculations for a standard solar model, starting from the ZAMS and extending all the way to the solar age. The wind-induced surface torque is computed using the axisymmetric formulation of Weber & Davis (1967). We consider a number of poloidal magnetic field configurations which differ both in the degree of magnetic coupling between the convective envelope and radiative core and in average strength. The rotational evolution can be divided into three more or less distinct phases: an initial phase of toroidal field buildup in the radiative zone, lasting from a few times 104 to a few times 106 yr; a second period in which oscillations set up in the radiative zone during the first phase are damped; and a third period, lasting from an age of about 107 yr onward, characterized by a state of

  20. Spin 1 /2 field and regularization in a de Sitter and radiation dominated universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Suman

    2016-02-01

    We construct a simple algorithm to derive number density of spin 1 /2 particles created in spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetimes and resulting renormalized energy-momentum tensor within the framework of adiabatic regularization. Physical quantities thus found are in agreement with the known results. This formalism can be considered as an appropriate extension of the techniques originally introduced for scalar fields, applicable to fermions in curved space. We apply this formalism to compute the particle number density and the renormalized energy density and pressure analytically (wherever possible) and numerically, in two interesting cosmological scenarios: a de Sitter spacetime and a radiation dominated universe. Results prove the efficiency of the methodology presented here.

  1. Case study of a dust storm over Hyderabad area, India: its impact on solar radiation using satellite data and ground measurements.

    PubMed

    Badarinath, K V S; Kharol, Shailesh Kumar; Kaskaoutis, D G; Kambezidis, H D

    2007-10-01

    According to the Earth Observatory dust outbreaks are considered as natural hazards, which affect the ecosystems and human life. The main objective of this study is to assess and monitor the movement of aerosols and pollutants from local or other sources, both natural and anthropogenic, using a combination of ground-based monitoring and satellite data. The turbid and polluted atmosphere in the densely-populated area of Hyderabad, India is further degradated from dust outbreaks originated from Thar desert. A dust event occurred during 10th to 11th April 2006 in the northwest region of India; its plume substantially spreaded across the downwind direction affecting the study region. Using both irradiance measurements and satellite data this dust event is investigated. The analysis shows a significant change in Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Aerosol Index (AI) and aerosol-particle size during the dust event. The Aerosol Optical Depth in the dusty day is about 0.2 higher than the previous non-dusty days, while the Angström exponent rapidly decreases when the dust plume affected the study area. The surface PM concentrations show enhanced values during the dusty day directly influenced by the dust deposition. There is also a remarkable decrease in ground-reaching global radiation, UV erythemal (UV(ery)) and other irradiance components. The analysis suggested that the use of the diffuse-to-direct-beam ratio is the most appropriate parameter for the dust monitoring since its values at the longer wavelengths are not affected by the solar zenith angle. PMID:17599393

  2. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Technology for Thermal Radiators Used in Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Hogue, Michael D.; Snyder, Sarah J.; Clements, Sidney J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Chen, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Two general types of thermal radiators are being considered for lunar missions: coated metallic surfaces and Second Surface Mirrors. Metallic surfaces are coated with a specially formulated white paint that withstands the space environment and adheres well to aluminium, the most common metal used in space hardware. AZ-93 White Thermal Control Paint, developed for the space program, is an electrically conductive inorganic coating that offers thermal control for spacecraft. It is currently in use on satellite surfaces (Fig 1). This paint withstands exposure to atomic oxygen, charged particle radiation, and vacuum ultraviolet radiation form 118 nm to 170 nm while reflecting 84 to 85% of the incident solar radiation and emitting 89-93% of the internal heat generated inside the spacecraft.

  3. Measurements of Dust Oscillations with Laser Heterodyne Receiver of Scattered Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Serozhkin, Yuriy; Venger, Yevgen

    2011-11-29

    We performed the experiments on measurement of vibration amplitudes for microparticles in gas and water with laser heterodyne receiver of scattered radiation. The measured vibration amplitude values are about 20 nm.

  4. Observing gas and dust in simulations of star formation with Monte Carlo radiation transport on Voronoi meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubber, D. A.; Ercolano, B.; Dale, J.

    2016-02-01

    Ionizing feedback from massive stars dramatically affects the interstellar medium local to star-forming regions. Numerical simulations are now starting to include enough complexity to produce morphologies and gas properties that are not too dissimilar from observations. The comparison between the density fields produced by hydrodynamical simulations and observations at given wavelengths relies however on photoionization/chemistry and radiative transfer calculations. We present here an implementation of Monte Carlo radiation transport through a Voronoi tessellation in the photoionization and dust radiative transfer code MOCASSIN. We show for the first time a synthetic spectrum and synthetic emission line maps of a hydrodynamical simulation of a molecular cloud affected by massive stellar feedback. We show that the approach on which previous work is based, which remapped hydrodynamical density fields on to Cartesian grids before performing radiative transfer/photoionization calculations, results in significant errors in the temperature and ionization structure of the region. Furthermore, we describe the mathematical process of tracing photon energy packets through a Voronoi tessellation, including optimizations, treating problematic cases and boundary conditions. We perform various benchmarks using both the original version of MOCASSIN and the modified version using the Voronoi tessellation. We show that for uniform grids, or equivalently a cubic lattice of cell generating points, the new Voronoi version gives the same results as the original Cartesian grid version of MOCASSIN for all benchmarks. For non-uniform initial conditions, such as using snapshots from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, we show that the Voronoi version performs better than the Cartesian grid version, resulting in much better resolution in dense regions.

  5. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  6. Local geological dust in the area of Rome (Italy): linking mineral composition, size distribution and optical properties to radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrodangelo, Adriana; Salzano, Roberto; Bassani, Cristiana; Pareti, Salvatore; Perrino, Cinzia

    2015-04-01

    Airborne mineral dust plays a key role in the energy balance of the Earth - atmosphere coupled system. The microphysical and optical properties of dust drive the direct radiative effects and are in turn influenced by the dust mineralogical composition. The latter varies largely, depending on the geology of the source region. Knowledge gaps still exist about relationships between the scattering and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation by mineral dust and its mineralogical, size distribution and particle morphology features; this also affects the reliability of radiative transfer (RT) modelling estimates (Hansell et al., 2011). In this study, these relationships were investigated focusing on the crustal suspended PM10 dust, sourced from outcropping rocks of the local geological domains around Rome (Latium, Italy). The mineral composition variability of the Latium rocks ranges from the silicate-dominated (volcanics domain) to the calcite-dominated (travertine), through lithological materials composed in different proportions by silicates, silica and calcite, mainly (limestone series, siliciclastic series) (Cosentino et al., 2009). This peculiarity of the Latium region was thus exploited to investigate the behavior of the size distribution, optical properties and radiative transfer at BOA (Bottom Of Atmosphere) of the suspended dust PM10 fraction with the variability of mineral composition. Elemental source profiles of the same dust samples were previously determined (Pietrodangelo et al., 2013). A multi-faceted analysis was performed, and outcomes from the following approaches were merged: individual-particle scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray energy-dispersive microanalysis (SEM XEDS), bulk mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD), size distribution fit of the individual-particle data set and modelling of the dust optical and radiative properties. To this aim, the 6SV atmospheric radiative transfer code (Kotchenova et al., 2008

  7. Variability of the infrared complex refractive index of African mineral dust: experimental estimation and implications for radiative transfer and satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, C.; Boucher, H.; Caquineau, S.; Chevaillier, S.; Cuesta, J.; Formenti, P.

    2014-10-01

    radiative transfer (mass extinction efficiency, kext, single scattering albedo, ω, and asymmetry factor, g) have been calculated, by using the Mie theory, based on the estimated refractive index and measured particle size distribution. The optical properties show a large sample-to-sample variability, with kext, ω, and g varying in the range 0.05-0.35, 0.25-1.0, and 0.05-0.75. This variability is expected to significantly impact satellite retrievals of atmospheric and surface parameters (e.g. from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, IASI) and estimates of the dust radiative forcing.

  8. The radiative impact of desert dust on orographic rain in the Cévennes-Vivarais area: a case study from HyMeX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamant, C.; Chaboureau, J.-P.; Chazette, P.; Di Girolamo, P.; Bourrianne, T.; Totems, J.; Cacciani, M.

    2015-11-01

    The study is focused on Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 14 of the Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment first Special Observing Period (HyMeX SOP 1) that took place from 17 to 19 October 2012 and was dedicated to the study of orographic rain in the Cévennes-Vivarais (CV) target area. During this IOP a dense dust plume originating from northern Africa (the Maghreb and Sahara) was observed to be transported over the Balearic Islands towards the south of France. The plume was characterized by an aerosol optical depth between 0.2 and 0.8 at 550 nm, highly variable in time and space over the western Mediterranean Basin. The impact of this dust plume, the biggest event observed during the 2-month-long HyMeX SOP 1, on the precipitation over the CV area has been analyzed using high-resolution simulations from the convection permitting mesoscale model Meso-NH (mesoscale non-hydrostatic model) validated against measurements obtained from numerous instruments deployed specifically during SOP 1 (ground-based/airborne water vapor and aerosol lidars, airborne microphysics probes) as well as space-borne aerosol products. The 4-day simulation reproduced realistically the temporal and spatial variability (including the vertical distribution) of the dust. The dust radiative impact led to an average 0.6 K heating at the altitude of the dust layer in the CV area (and up to +3 K locally) and an average 100 J kg-1 increase of most unstable convective available potential energy (and up to +900 J kg-1 locally) with respect to a simulation without prescribed dust aerosols. The rainfall amounts and location were only marginally affected by the dust radiative effect, even after 4 days of simulation. The transient nature of this radiative effect in dynamical environments such as those found in the vicinity of heavy precipitation events in the Mediterranean is not sufficient to impact 24 h of accumulated rainfall in the dust simulation.

  9. The effect of UV radiation on survival of Salmonella enterica in dried manure dust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Animal manure has been shown to harbor Salmonella enterica, an enteric pathogen known to be resilient to environmental stresses such as desiccation and solar UV radiation. In farm settings, it has been observed that unintended aerosolization could occur when manure becomes dehydrated, ...

  10. Simulating black carbon and dust and their radiative forcing in seasonal snow: a case study over North China with field campaign measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Hu, Z.; Qian, Y.; Leung, L. Ruby; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Jin, J.; Flanner, M. G.; Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Yan, H.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2014-10-01

    A state-of-the-art regional model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model (Skamarock et al., 2008) coupled with a chemistry component (Chem) (Grell et al., 2005), is coupled with the snow, ice, and aerosol radiative (SNICAR) model that includes the most sophisticated representation of snow metamorphism processes available for climate study. The coupled model is used to simulate black carbon (BC) and dust concentrations and their radiative forcing in seasonal snow over North China in January-February of 2010, with extensive field measurements used to evaluate the model performance. In general, the model simulated spatial variability of BC and dust mass concentrations in the top snow layer (hereafter BCS and DSTS, respectively) are consistent with observations. The model generally moderately underestimates BCS in the clean regions but significantly overestimates BCS in some polluted regions. Most model results fall within the uncertainty ranges of observations. The simulated BCS and DSTS are highest with > 5000 ng g-1 and up to 5 mg g-1, respectively, over the source regions and reduce to < 50 ng g-1 and < 1 μg g-1, respectively, in the remote regions. BCS and DSTS introduce a similar magnitude of radiative warming (~ 10 W m-2) in the snowpack, which is comparable to the magnitude of surface radiative cooling due to BC and dust in the atmosphere. This study represents an effort in using a regional modeling framework to simulate BC and dust and their direct radiative forcing in snowpack. Although a variety of observational data sets have been used to attribute model biases, some uncertainties in the results remain, which highlights the need for more observations, particularly concurrent measurements of atmospheric and snow aerosols and the deposition fluxes of aerosols, in future campaigns.

  11. Remote sensing of snow cover and radiative forcing by dust in snow from MODIS toward distributed snowmelt modeling and water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T. H.; Bryant, A. C.

    2011-12-01

    Accelerated snowmelt runoff frequently contributes to flooding in snow-dominated basins. For example, extreme dust deposition to the mountains of the Upper Colorado River basin in 2009 accelerated snowmelt with albedos as low as 0.33 and created unprecedented runoff rates, particularly in rivers of southern Colorado. Operationally, seasonal forecasts of snowmelt-generated streamflow are leveraged through empirical relations based on past snowmelt periods. These historical data show that climate is changing, but the changes reduce the reliability of the empirical relations. Moreover, they lack the capacity to ingest information on albedo changes that dramatically alter melt rates. Therefore optimal future management of snowmelt derived water resources will require explicit physical models driven by remotely sensed data. The most critical snow properties for modeling the energy and mass balance of the snow cover are its spatial extent and albedo. In this talk, we will explore the snow cover properties in the Upper Colorado River during the extreme dust year of 2009. We will use the MODIS Snow Covered Area and Grain size (MODSCAG) model and the MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MOD-DRFS) model to determine the spatial distribution of fractional snow cover and the impact of dust on snow net solar radiation, respectively, and determine the hydrologic response in the Uncompahgre and Rio Grande River basins. This work provides fundamental insights into the migration to energy balance approaches for water research and management to mitigate natural hazards such as flooding.

  12. Dust Aerosol Impact on North Africa Climate: A GCM Investigation of Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions Using A-Train Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Jiang, Jonathan; Su, Hui; Liu, Xiaohong

    2012-02-15

    The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa have been investigated using the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) developed at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The model includes an efficient and physically based radiation parameterization scheme developed specifically for application to clouds and aerosols. Parameterization of the effective ice particle size in association with the aerosol indirect effect based on cloud and aerosol data retrieved from A-Train satellite observations have been employed in the climate model simulations. Offline simulations reveal that the direct solar, IR, and net forcings by dust aerosols generally increase with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD). When the dust semi-direct effect is included with the presence of ice clouds, positive IR radiative forcing is enhanced, since ice clouds trap substantial IR radiation, while the positive solar forcing with dust aerosols alone has been changed to negative values due to the strong reflection of solar radiation by clouds, indicating that cloud forcing could exceed aerosol forcing. With the aerosol indirect effect, the net cloud forcing is generally reduced for ice water path (IWP) larger than 20 g m-2. The magnitude of the reduction increases with IWP. AGCM simulations show that the reduced ice crystal mean effective size due to the aerosol first indirect effect result in less OLR and net solar flux at the top of the atmosphere over the cloudy area of the North Africa region because ice clouds with smaller size trap more IR radiation and reflect more solar radiation. The precipitation in the same area, however, increases due to the aerosol indirect effect on ice clouds, corresponding to the enhanced convection as indicated by reduced OLR. The increased precipitation seems to be associated with enhanced ice water contents in this region. The 200 mb radiative heating rate shows more cooling with the aerosol indirect effect since greater cooling is

  13. Reinterpretation of Mariner 9 IRIS data on the basis of a simulation of radiative-conductive convective transfer in the dust laden Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallman, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Time dependent vertical distributions of atmospheric temperature and static stability were determined by a radiative-convective-conductive heat transfer model attuned to Mariner 9 IRIS radiance data. Of particular interest were conditions of both the dust-laden and dust-free atmosphere in the middle latitudes on Mars during the late S.H. summer season. The numerical model simulates at high spatial and temporal resolution (52 atmospheric and 30 subsurface levels; with a time-step of 7.5 min.) the heat transports in the ground-atmosphere system. The algorithm is based on the solution of the appropriate heating rate equation which includes radiative, molecular-conductive and convective heat transfer terms. Ground and atmosphere are coupled by an internal thermal boundary condition.

  14. Variability of the infrared complex refractive index of African mineral dust: experimental estimation and implications for radiative transfer and satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, C.; Boucher, H.; Caquineau, S.; Chevaillier, S.; Cuesta, J.; Formenti, P.

    2014-04-01

    Experimental estimations of the infrared refractive index of African mineral dust have been retrieved from laboratory measurements of particle transmission spectra in the wavelength range 2.5-25 μm. Five dust samples collected at Banizoumbou (Niger) and Tamanrasset (Algeria) during dust events originated from different Western Saharan and Sahelian areas have been investigated. The obtained real (n) and imaginary (k) parts of the refractive index for the different dust cases vary in the range 1.1-2.7 and 0.05-1.0, respectively, and appear to be strongly sensitive to the mineralogical composition of the particles, especially in the 8-12 μm and 17-25 μm spectral intervals. Dust absorption is controlled mainly by clays, and, in minor fraction, by quartz and Ca-rich minerals. Size distribution, and the coarse fraction in particular, plays also a role in determining the refractive index. Significant differences are obtained when comparing our results with existing experimental estimations available in the literature, and with the values of the OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) database. The different datasets appear comparable in magnitude, with our values of n and k falling in the range of variability of past studies. However, literature data fail in accurately reproducing the spectral signatures of main minerals, in particular clays, and they significantly overestimate the contribution of quartz. We also found that the real and the imaginary parts of the refractive index from part of literature studies do not verify Kramers-Kronig relations, thus resulting theoretically incorrect. The comparison between our results, from Western Africa, and literature data, from different locations in Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean, nonetheless, confirms the expected large variability of the infrared refractive index of dust, thus highlighting the necessity for an extended systematic investigation. Aerosol intensive optical properties relevant to radiative transfer

  15. Fast radiative transfer of dust reprocessing in semi-analytic models with artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Laura; Fontanot, Fabio; Granato, Gian Luigi

    2012-06-01

    A serious concern for semi-analytical galaxy formation models, aiming to simulate multiwavelength surveys and to thoroughly explore the model parameter space, is the extremely time-consuming numerical solution of the radiative transfer of stellar radiation through dusty media. To overcome this problem, we have implemented an artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm in the radiative transfer code GRASIL, in order to significantly speed up the computation of the infrared (IR) spectral energy distribution (SED). The ANN we have implemented is of general use, in that its input neurons are defined as those quantities effectively determining the shape of the IR SED. Therefore, the training of the ANN can be performed with any model and then applied to other models. We made a blind test to check the algorithm, by applying a net trained with a standard chemical evolution model (i.e. CHE_EVO) to a mock catalogue extracted from the semi-analytic model MORGANA, and compared galaxy counts and evolution of the luminosity functions in several near-IR to sub-millimetre (sub-mm) bands, and also the spectral differences for a large subset of randomly extracted models. The ANN is able to excellently approximate the full computation, but with a gain in CPU time by ˜2 orders of magnitude. It is only advisable that the training covers reasonably well the range of values of the input neurons in the application. Indeed in the sub-mm at high redshift, a tiny fraction of models with some sensible input neurons out of the range of the trained net cause wrong answer by the ANN. These are extreme starbursting models with high optical depths, favourably selected by sub-mm observations, and are difficult to predict a priori.

  16. Simulating Black Carbon and Dust and their Radiative Forcing in Seasonal Snow: A Case Study over North China with Field Campaign Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Hu, Zhiyuan; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, J.; Huang, Maoyi; Jin, Jiming; Flanner, M. G.; Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Yan, Huiping; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, D. G.

    2014-10-30

    A state-of-the-art regional model, WRF-Chem, is coupled with the SNICAR model that includes the sophisticated representation of snow metamorphism processes available for climate study. The coupled model is used to simulate the black carbon (BC) and dust concentrations and their radiative forcing in seasonal snow over North China in January-February of 2010, with extensive field measurements used to evaluate the model performance. In general, the model simulated spatial variability of BC and dust mass concentrations in the top snow layer (hereafter BCS and DSTS, respectively) are quantitatively or qualitatively consistent with observations. The model generally moderately underestimates BCS in the clean regions but significantly overestimates BCS in some polluted regions. Most model results fall into the uncertainty ranges of observations. The simulated BCS and DSTS are highest with >5000 ng g-1 and up to 5 mg g-1, respectively, over the source regions and reduce to <50 ng g-1 and <1 μg g-1, respectively, in the remote regions. BCS and DSTS introduce similar magnitude of radiative warming (~10 W m-2) in snowpack, which is comparable to the magnitude of surface radiative cooling due to BC and dust in the atmosphere. This study represents the first effort in using a regional modeling framework to simulate BC and dust and their direct radiative forcing in snow. Although a variety of observational datasets have been used to attribute model biases, some uncertainties in the results remain, which highlights the need for more observations, particularly concurrent measurements of atmospheric and snow aerosols and the deposition fluxes of aerosols, in future campaigns.

  17. Low-mass protoplanetary disk of the herbig Ae star DDser: Thermal radiation of dust and possible presence of massive planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonyuk, K. A.; Shakhovskoy, D. N.; Belan, S. P.; Rostopchina, A. N.

    2015-07-01

    We detected thermal IR radiation from DDSer, a low-activity UXOri-type star, the source of which is a disk with a complex structure (an inner ring with the dust temperature of about 900 K and an outer disk with the temperature below 300 K). The 15.1-year period, which we estimated from our longterm photometric observations, indicates the perturbation of this ring by a low-mass companion (a planet perhaps) with an orbital radius of 8 a.u. In general, the detected characteristics of the DDSer disk (a dust ring with the densitymodulated with a 10-year scale period, the presence of compact dust clumps inside the ring's inner lobe) are almost identical to the characteristics of the RZ Psc disk, where an active asteroid belt inside the orbit of a planet or a similar low-mass companion is assumed. Although the suggestion about a collisional source of the dust in these systems is disputable, the complex structure of their disks,manifested in the IR spectrum shape and photometric variability, especially the long-period variability, gives evidence for massive planets already formed in these systems.

  18. THE MOST MASSIVE ACTIVE BLACK HOLES AT z ∼ 1.5-3.5 HAVE HIGH SPINS AND RADIATIVE EFFICIENCIES

    SciTech Connect

    Trakhtenbrot, Benny

    2014-07-01

    The radiative efficiencies (η) of 72 luminous unobscured active galactic nuclei at z ∼ 1.5-3.5, powered by some of the most massive black holes (BHs), are constrained. The analysis is based on accretion disk (AD) models, which link the continuum luminosity at rest-frame optical wavelengths and the BH mass (M {sub BH}) to the accretion rate through the AD, M-dot {sub AD}. The data are gathered from several literature samples with detailed measurements of the Hβ emission line complex, observed at near-infrared bands. When coupled with standard estimates of bolometric luminosities (L {sub bol}), the analysis suggests high radiative efficiencies, with most of the sources showing η > 0.2, that is, higher than the commonly assumed value of 0.1, and the expected value for non-spinning BHs (η = 0.057). Even under more conservative assumptions regarding L {sub bol} (i.e., L {sub bol} = 3 × L {sub 5100}), most of the extremely massive BHs in the sample (i.e., M {sub BH} ≳ 3 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}) show radiative efficiencies which correspond to very high BH spins (a {sub *}), with typical values well above a {sub *} ≅ 0.7. These results stand in contrast to the predictions of a ''spin-down'' scenario, in which a series of randomly oriented accretion episodes leads to a {sub *} ∼ 0. Instead, the analysis presented here strongly supports a ''spin-up'' scenario, which is driven by either prolonged accretion or a series of anisotropically oriented accretion episodes. Considering the fact that these extreme BHs require long-duration or continuous accretion to account for their high masses, it is argued that the most probable scenario for the super-massive black holes under study is that of an almost continuous sequence of randomly yet not isotropically oriented accretion episodes.

  19. Effective mie-scattering and CO2 absorption in the dust-laden Martian atmosphere and its impact on radiative-convective temperature changes in the lower scale heights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallmann, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    A time dependent computer model of radiative-convective-conductive heat transfer in the Martian ground-atmosphere system was refined by incorporating an intermediate line strength CO2 band absorption which together with the strong-and weak-line approximation closely simulated the radiative transmission through a vertically inhomogeneous stratification. About 33,000 CO2 lines were processed to cover the spectral range of solar and planetary radiation. Absorption by silicate dust particulates, was taken into consideration to study its impact on the ground-atmosphere temperature field as a function of time. This model was subsequently attuned to IRIS, IR-radiometric and S-band occultation data. Satisfactory simulations of the measured IRIS spectra were accomplished for the dust-free condition. In the case of variable dust loads, the simulations were sufficiently fair so that some inferences into the effect of dust on temperature were justified.

  20. Direct, Longwave Radiative Forcing of Mineral Dust: Improvement of its Estimation by Means of Tools Recently Developed by the EARLINET Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard, Michaël; Muñoz-Porcar, Constantino; Comerón, Adolfo; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Barragan, Ruben

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate how the knowledge of the vertically-resolved fine and coarse mode aerosol optical depth modifies the longwave radiative forcing. Since relatively little the EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) community has developed codes that combine sun-photometer and lidar data to retrieve a set of parameters vertically-resolved related to the size distribution (fine and coarse mode extinction coefficients, fine and coarse mode volumetric concentrations, etc.). We concentrate on the case of mineral dust whose size distribution is often dominated by the coarse mode. This work demonstrates that the knowledge of the vertically-resolved fine and coarse mode aerosol optical depth modifies the LW RF as compared to the classical approach with a unique profile of total aerosol optical depth. The results show that when the coarse mode predominates the classical approach underestimates the dust longwave radiative forcing by 10 to 20 % at the surface. The effect at the top of the atmosphere is not systematic because of the predominance of fine particles near the top of the dust layer.

  1. Satellite-based Dust Source Identification over North Africa: Diurnal Cycle, Meteorological Controls, and Interannual Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepanski, Kerstin; Tegen, Ina; Macke, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Mineral dust aerosol emitted from arid and semi-arid areas impacts on the weather and climate system by affecting e.g. radiation fluxes and nutrient cycles. To estimate the effect of dust aerosol, detailed knowledge on the spatio-temporal distribution of active dust sources is necessary. For a better representation of dust-related processes in numerical models and climate change projections the knowledge on the natural variability of dust source activity has to be improved. As dust sources are mostly located over remote areas satellite observations are suitable for identifying active dust sources. The accuracy of dust source identification using such an indirect method is limited by the temporal resolution and the ambiguities of the retrieval. Here, a data set on the spatial (1°x1°) and temporal (3-hourly) distribution of dust source activations (DSA) over North Africa is compiled by analyzing 15-minute Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) infra-red (IR) dust index images since March 2006. The index is designed using radiances measured by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infra-Red Imager (SEVIRI) on-board MSG at 8.7 µm, 10.8 µm and 12.0 µm which are converted to brightness temperatures (BTs). To strengthen the dust signal, differences of BTs are used to compute RGB-composite images. This newly data set providing information on the diurnal cycle of dust emission has been used (1) to identify most active dust source areas, and (2) to investigate on the temporal distribution of DSAs. Over the Sahara Desert 65% of dust sources become active during 06-09 UTC pointing towards an important role of the break-down of the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) for dust mobilization besides other meteorological features like density currents, haboobs, and cyclones. Furthermore the role of the nocturnal LLJs for dust mobilization over the Sahara is investigated by weather observations and a regional modeling study. Four years of DSA observations indicate an interannual variability in

  2. Dust torus around Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Antal; Horanyi, Mihaly

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the orbital dynamics of small dust particles generated via the continuous micrometeoroid bombardment of the Martian moons. In addition to Mar's oblateness, we also consider the radiation pressure perturbation that is complicated by the planet's eccentric orbit and tilted rotational axis. Considering the production rates and the lifetimes of dust grains, we show that particles from Deimos with radii of about 15 micrometers are expected to dominate the population of a permanently present and tilted dust torus. This torus has an estimated peak number density of approximately equals 5 x 10(exp -12)/cu cm and an optical depth of approximately equals 4 x 10(exp -8).

  3. Seasonal and elevational variations of black carbon and dust in snow and ice in the Solu-Khumbu, Nepal and estimated radiative forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspari, S.; Painter, T. H.; Gysel, M.; Schwikowski, M.

    2013-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) and dust deposited on snow and glacier surfaces can reduce the surface albedo, accelerate snow and ice melt, and trigger albedo feedback. Assessing BC concentrations in snow and ice in the Himalaya is of interest because this region borders large BC sources, and seasonal snow and glacier ice in this region are an important source of water resources. Snow and ice samples were collected from crevasse profiles and snowpits at elevations between 5400 and 6400 m a.s.l. from Mera glacier located in the Solu-Khumbu region of Nepal on the southern slope of the Himalaya during spring and fall 2009. The samples were measured for Fe concentrations (used as a dust proxy) via ICP-MS, total impurity content gravimetrically, and BC concentrations using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Measured BC concentrations underestimate actual BC concentrations due to changes to the sample during storage, and loss of BC particles in the ultrasonic nebulizer. BC and Fe concentrations peak during the winter-spring, and are substantially higher at elevations <6000 m due to post-depositional processes including melt and sublimation and greater loading in the lower troposphere. Because the largest areal extent of snow and ice resides at elevations <6000 m, the higher BC and dust concentrations at these elevations can reduce the snow and glacier albedo over large areas, accelerating melt, affecting glacier mass-balance and water resources, and contributing to a positive climate forcing. Radiative transfer modeling constrained by measurements indicates that BC concentrations in the winter-spring snow/ice horizons are sufficient to reduce albedo by 6-10% relative to clean snow, corresponding to instantaneous radiative forcings of 75-120 W m-2. The other bulk impurity concentrations, when treated separately as dust, reduce albedo by 40-42% relative to clean snow and give instantaneous radiative forcings of 490 to 520 W m-2. Adding the BC absorption to the other impurities

  4. Improved optical probe for monitoring dust explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, R. S.; Cashdollar, K. L.; Liebman, I.

    1982-03-01

    An improved optical probe was developed to monitor dust-cloud concentration in explosions even in the presence of dust flame radiation. Principal features of the probe include a pulsed light-emitting diode and a photodetector with optical interference filter to reduce flame radiation. The probe has a U-shaped configuration and air jets to keep the windows dust free. Experimental data are presented for a coal dust explosion.

  5. Electric Activity in Dust Devils and Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, R. O.; Yana, C.; Covert, A.; Renno, K.; Wilson, J.

    2005-12-01

    Terrestrial dust devils produce charge separation and electric fields that exceeds the breakdown potential of the thin Martian atmosphere (Farrell et al., 2002, 2003; Krauss et al., 2002; Renno et al., 2004). Typical Martian dust devils are wider, taller and have larger dust content than terrestrial vortices. Thus, charge separation and electric-field breakdown are likely to occur in Martian dust devils and dust storms. We show that theory, laboratory experiments, and field measurements in Arizona suggests that collisions between sand and dust particles at the bottom of dust devils produce non-thermal microwave radiation. The non-thermal microwave emission allows not only the indirect detection of electric activity but could also allow the determination of the physical properties of Martian sand and dust by remote sensing. Besides being geologically important, electrically charged Martian dust devils and dust storms are potential hazards to Landers and at minimum would be an annoyance to future astronauts exploring the planet. Indeed, the design of adequate mechanical and electrical systems for these Landers cannot progress effectively without a better understanding of Martian dust devils and dust storms. Moreover, ancillary phenomena associated with electrically charged vortices can ionize atmospheric gases and might have important implications for atmosphere chemistry and even habitability.

  6. Dust Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss a recent sounding rocket experiment which found charged dust in the Earth's tropical mesosphere. The dust detector was designed to measure small (5000 - 10000 amu.) charged dust particles, most likely of meteoric origin. A 5 km thick layer of positively charged dust was found at an altitude of 90 km, in the vicinity of an observed sporadic sodium layer and sporadic E layer. The observed dust was positively charged in the bulk of the dust layer, but was negatively charged near the bottom.

  7. The Martian Dust Cycle: Observations and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, Melinda A.

    2013-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for Mars' current climate system. Suspended atmospheric dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, and thus greatly influences the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Evidence for the presence of dust in the Martian atmosphere can be traced back to yellow clouds telescopically observed as early as the early 19th century. The Mariner 9 orbiter arrived at Mars in November of 1971 to find a planet completely enshrouded in airborne dust. Since that time, the exchange of dust between the planet's surface and atmosphere and the role of airborne dust on Mars' weather and climate has been studied using observations and numerical models. The goal of this talk is to give an overview of the observations and to discuss the successes and challenges associated with modeling the dust cycle. Dust raising events on Mars range in size from meters to hundreds of kilometers. During some years, regional storms merge to produce hemispheric or planet encircling dust clouds that obscure the surface and raise atmospheric temperatures by tens of kelvin. The interannual variability of planet encircling dust storms is poorly understood. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. A low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading are generally observed: one peak occurs before northern winter solstice and one peak occurs after northern winter solstice. Numerical modeling studies attempting to interactively simulate the Martian dust cycle with general circulation models (GCMs) include the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Two dust lifting processes are commonly represented in

  8. Mineral Dust Impacts on Organized Convection Anvils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seigel, R. B.; van den Heever, S. C.; Saleeby, S.

    2012-12-01

    Mineral dust in the atmosphere impacts both radiative and microphysical processes. As it is arguably the most abundant aerosol species in the world, dust plays a large role in the global energy budget. In order to understand its global distribution through transport, we must first understand how deep convective clouds microphysically process and subsequently vent mineral dust. This research utilizes a numerically simulated idealized squall line to (1) investigate the impact of mineral dust on convective anvils and aerosol venting, and (2) assess the aerosol indirect effect. To accomplish these tasks, we use the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) set up as a convection-resolving model (CRM). The CRM contains aerosol and microphysical schemes that allow radiatively active mineral dust particles to nucleate as cloud drops and ice crystals, replenish upon evaporation and sublimation, be tracked throughout hydrometeor transition, and scavenge by precipitation and dry sedimentation. Four simulations of the squall line are performed in order to directly assess the individual contributions of radiation and microphysics to the aerosol indirect effects from mineral dust. After three hours into the simulation of a squall line, the four sensitivity simulations are performed by toggling: (1) radiation off and dust not microphysically active; (2) radiation on and dust not microphysically active; (3) radiation off and dust microphysically active; and (4) radiation on and dust microphysically active. The systematic toggling between radiation on and dust being microphysically active allows for direct quantification of mineral dust impacts on various convective and radiative processes governing the squall line. As expansive organized convection anvils are greatly important for both regional and global radiation budgets, this research will highlight both mineral dusts impacts on the anvil region and the venting process of dust in the wake of deep convection.

  9. Impact of gravitational radiation higher order modes on single aligned-spin gravitational wave searches for binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón Bustillo, Juan; Husa, Sascha; Sintes, Alicia M.; Pürrer, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Current template-based gravitational wave searches for compact binary coalescences use waveform models that omit the higher order modes content of the gravitational radiation emitted, considering only the quadrupolar (ℓ,|m |)=(2 ,2 ) modes. We study the effect of such omission for the case of aligned-spin compact binary coalescence searches for equal-spin (and nonspinning) binary black holes in the context of two versions of Advanced LIGO: the upcoming 2015 version, known as early Advanced LIGO (eaLIGO) and its zero-detuned high-energy power version, which we will refer to as Advanced LIGO (AdvLIGO). In addition, we study the case of a nonspinning search for initial LIGO (iLIGO). We do this via computing the effectualness of the aligned-spin SEOBNRv1 reduced order model waveform family, which only considers quadrupolar modes, toward hybrid post-Newtonian/numerical relativity waveforms which contain higher order modes. We find that for all LIGO versions losses of more than 10% of events occur in the case of AdvLIGO for mass ratio q ≥6 and total mass M ≥100 M⊙ due to the omission of higher modes, this region of the parameter space being larger for eaLIGO and iLIGO. Moreover, while the maximum event loss observed over the explored parameter space for AdvLIGO is of 15% of events, for iLIGO and eaLIGO, this increases up to (39,23)%. We find that omission of higher modes leads to observation-averaged systematic parameter biases toward lower spin, total mass, and chirp mass. For completeness, we perform a preliminar, nonexhaustive comparison of systematic biases to statistical errors. We find that, for a given signal-to-noise ratio, systematic biases dominate over statistical errors at much lower total mass for eaLIGO than for AdvLIGO.

  10. Genomic analysis of lung cell lines exposures to space radiation and the effect of lunar dust on selected fibrosis gene using RT2 PCR Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit

    In the United States (U.S.), lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer death among men and women. Previous studies on human and animal epithelial lung cells showed that ionizing radiation and certain environmental pollutants are carcinogens. The surface area of the lungs and the slow turnover rate of the epithelial cells are suggested to play a role in the vulnerability of the cells, which lead to increase in the progenitor cell of the lung. It has been proposed that these progenitor cells, when exposed to radiation undergo multiple alterations that cause the cells to become cancerous. The current thought is that the lungs contain several facultative progenitor cells that are situated throughout the lung epithelium and are regionally restricted in their regenerative capacity. In this study, normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells (HBECs) were immortalized through the expression of Cdk4 and hTERT and evaluated for the effects radiation using in vitro study. The HBECs retained its novel multipotent capacity in vitro and represented unrestricted progenitor cells of the adult lungs, which resemble an embryonic progenitor. Analysis of the transformed clones of human bronchial epithelial cell line, HEBC3KT exposed to Fe ions and gamma rays revealed chromosomal abnormality, which was detected with the Multi-color Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (mFish). In Part two of this study the F344 rats exposed to lunar dust, for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk.) in nose-only inhalation chambers at concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 20.8, and 61 mg/m3 of lunar dust, were used to determine the lunar dust toxicity on the lung tissues and total RNA were prepared from the tissues and used for gene expression. Analysis of gene expression data using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool identified multiple pathways of which fibrosis was one of the pathways. The Rat Fibrosis RT 2 Profile PCR Array was used to profile the expression of 84 genes that are relevant to fibrosis in the lung

  11. Scientists Detect Radio Emission from Rapidly Rotating Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    Astronomers have made the first tentative observations of a long-speculated, but never before detected, source of natural radio waves in interstellar space. Data from the National Science Foundation's 140 Foot Radio Telescope at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, W.Va., show the faint, tell-tale signals of what appear to be dust grains spinning billions of times each second. This discovery eventually could yield a powerful new tool for understanding the interstellar medium - the immense clouds of gas and dust that populate interstellar space. The NRAO 140 Foot Radio Telescope The NRAO 140-Foot Radio Telescope "What we believe we have found," said Douglas P. Finkbeiner of Princeton University's Department of Astrophysics, "is the first hard evidence for electric dipole emission from rapidly rotating dust grains. If our studies are confirmed, it will be the first new source of continuum emission to be conclusively identified in the interstellar medium in nearly the past 20 years." Finkbeiner believes that these emissions have the potential in the future of revealing new and exciting information about the interstellar medium; they also may help to refine future studies of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. The results from this study, which took place in spring 1999, were accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal. Other contributors to this paper include David J. Schlegel, department of astrophysics, Princeton University; Curtis Frank, department of astronomy, University of Maryland; and Carl Heiles, department of astronomy, University of California at Berkeley. "The idea of dust grains emitting radiation by rotating is not new," comments Finkbeiner, "but to date it has been somewhat speculative." Scientists first proposed in 1957 that dust grains could emit radio signals, if they were caused to rotate rapidly enough. It was believed, however, that these radio emissions would be negligibly small - too weak to be of any impact to

  12. Cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, Donald E.; Sandford, Scott A.

    1992-01-01

    Dust is a ubiquitous component of our galaxy and the solar system. The collection and analysis of extraterrestrial dust particles is important to exobiology because it provides information about the sources of biogenically significant elements and compounds that accumulated in distant regions of the solar nebula and that were later accreted on the planets. The topics discussed include the following: general properties of interplanetary dust; the carbonaceous component of interplanetary dust particles; and the presence of an interstellar component.

  13. Cesium Speciation in Dust from Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge Incineration by Synchrotron Radiation Micro-X-ray Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Kenji; Takaoka, Masaki; Fujimori, Takashi; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Terada, Yasuko

    2015-11-17

    The chemical behavior of Cs in waste incineration processes is important to consider when disposing of radionuclide-contaminated waste from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan. To determine the speciation of Cs, we attempted the direct speciation of trace amounts of stable Cs in the dust from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and sewage sludge incineration (SSI) by micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (μ-XAFS) at the SPring-8 facility. The μ-XRF results revealed that locally produced Cs was present in MSWI and SSI dust within the cluster size range of 2-10 μm. The μ-XAFS analysis confirmed that the speciation of Cs in MSWI dust was similar to that of CsCl, while in SSI dusts it was similar to pollucite. The solubility of Cs was considered to be influenced by the exact Cs species present in incineration residue. PMID:26477930

  14. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Massive Dust Storm over Australia     View ... at JPL September 22, 2009 - Massive dust storm over Australia. project:  MISR category:  ... Sep 22, 2009 Images:  Dust Storm location:  Australia and New Zealand ...

  15. Sahara Dust

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  Casting Light and Shadows on a Saharan Dust Storm     ... (nadir) camera. High-altitude cirrus clouds cast shadows on the underlying ocean and dust layer, which are visible in shades of ... was unable to retrieve elevation data. However, the edges of shadows cast by the cirrus clouds onto the dust (indicated by blue and cyan ...

  16. The effects of metallicity, radiation field and dust extinction on the charge state of PAHs in diffuse clouds: implications for the DIB carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N. L. J.; Spaans, M.

    2006-06-01

    Context.The unidentified diffuse interstellar bands (DIB) are observed throughout the Galaxy, the Local Group and beyond. Their carriers are possibly related to complex carbonaceous gas-phase molecules, such as (cationic) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fullerenes. Aims.In order to reveal the identity of the DIB carrier we investigate the effects of metallicity, radiation field and extinction curve on the PAH charge state distribution, and thus the theoretical emergent PAH spectrum, in diffuse interstellar clouds. This behaviour can then be linked to that of the DIB carrier, thus giving insight into its identity. Methods.We use radiative transfer and chemical models to compute the physical and chemical conditions in diffuse clouds with Galactic and Magellanic Cloud types of interstellar dust and gas. Subsequently, the PAH charge state distributions throughout these clouds are determined. Results.We find that the fraction of PAH cations is much higher in the Magellanic Cloud environments than in the Milky Way, caused predominantly by the respective lower metallicities, and mitigated by the steeper UV extinction curve. The fraction of anions is much lower in a low metallicity environment. The predicted DIB strength of cationic PAH carriers is similar to that of the Milk Way for the LMC and 40% for the SMC due to the overall metallicity. Stronger DIBs could be expected in the Magellanic Clouds if they emanate from clouds that are exposed to an average interstellar radiation field that is significantly stronger than in the Milky Way, although photo-destruction processes could possibly reduce this effect, especially for the smaller PAHs. Our results show that the presence and absence of DIB carriers in the Magellanic Cloud lines of sight can be tied to the PAH charge balance which is driven by metallicity, UV radiation and dust extinction effects.

  17. Estimate of the Saharan dust shortwave and photosynthetic radiative forcing efficiency at the surface during the propagation of a gravity wave in the central Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Sarra, Alcide; Fuà, Daniele; Meloni, Daniela

    2013-04-01

    This study is based on measurements made at ENEA Station for Climate Observations (35.52° N, 12.63° E, 50 m asl) on the island of Lampedusa, in the Southern part of the Central Mediterranean. A quasi periodic oscillation of aerosol optical depth, column water vapour, shortwave (SW) and photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) is observed to occur during the morning of 7 September 2005. The quasi-periodic wave is present from about 6 to 10 UT, with solar zenith angles (SZA) varying between 77.5° and 37.2° . In this period the aerosol optical depth at 500 nm, ?, varies between 0.29 and 0.41; the column water vapour, cwv, varies between 2.4 and 2.8 cm. The oscillations of ? and cwv are in phase, while the modulation of the downward surface irradiances is in opposition of phase with respect to ? and cwv. The period of the oscillation is about 13 min. The oscillation is attributed to the propagation of a gravity wave which modulates the structure of the planetary boundary layer. The measured aerosol optical properties are typical of cases dominated by Saharan dust, with the Ångström exponent comprised between 0.5 and 0.6. The backtrajectory analysis for that day shows that airmasses overpass Northern Libya (trajectories arriving below 2000 m), Tunisia and Northern Algeria (trajectories arriving above 2000 m), carrying Saharan dust particles to Lampedusa. The combined modulation of downward irradiance, water vapour column, and aerosol optical depth is used to estimate the aerosol effect on the irradiance. From the irradiance-optical depth relation, the aerosol surface direct forcing efficiency (FE) is derived, under the assumption that during the measurement interval the aerosol microphysical properties do not appreciably change. As a first step, all SW irradiances are reported to the same cwv content (2.6 cm), by using radiative transfer model calculations. Reference curves describing the downward SW and PAR irradiances are constructed by using measurements obtained

  18. Some Pharmacological Actions of Cotton Dust and Other Vegetable Dusts

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, P. J.

    1962-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of cotton and other vegetable dusts cause contraction of the isolated ileum and tracheal muscle of the guinea-pig, and of isolated human bronchial muscle. The levels of this contractor activity place the dusts of cotton, flax, and jute in the order of the probable incidence of byssinosis occurring in the mills spinning these fibres. Extracts of cotton dust possess a histamine-liberating activity and contain a permeability-increasing component. These actions are of plant origin and are found in the pericarp and bracts of the cotton boll. Histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine have also been found in some cotton dust samples. The formation of histamine by bacterial action in cotton dust does not take place under conditions found in cotton mills. The smooth muscle contractor substance is organic in nature, relatively heat-stable, and dialysable. The relevance of these results to the symptoms of byssinosis is discussed. PMID:14479451

  19. Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

    With plans for the United States to return to the moon, and establish a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface many issues must be successfully overcome. Lunar dust is one of a number of issues with the potential to create a myriad of problems if not adequately addressed. Samples of dust brought back from Apollo missions show it to be soft, yet sharp and abrasive. The dust consists of a variety of morphologies including spherical, angular blocks, shards, and a number of irregular shapes. One of the main issues with lunar dust is its attraction to stick to anything it comes in contact with (i.e. astronauts, equipment, habitats, etc.). Ionized radiation from the sun strikes the moon's surface and creates an electrostatic charge on the dust. Further, the dust harbors van der Waals forces making it especially difficult to separate once it sticks to a surface. During the Apollo missions, it was discovered that trying to brush the lunar dust from spacesuits was not effective, and rubbing it caused degradation of the suit material. Further, when entering the lunar module after moonwalks, the astronauts noted that the dust was so prolific inside the cabin that they inhaled and ingested it, causing at least one of them, Harrison "Jack" Schmidt, to report irritation of the throat and lungs. It is speculated that the dust could also harm an astronaut's nervous and cardiovascular systems, especially during an extended stay. In addition to health issues, the dust can also cause problems by scouring reflective coatings off of thermal blankets, and roughening surfaces of windows and optics. Further, panels on solar cells and photovoltaics can also be compromised due to dust sticking on the surfaces. Lunar dust has the capacity to penetrate seals, interfere with connectors, as well as mechanisms on digging machines, all of which can lead to problems and failure. To address lunar dust issues, development of electrostatic screens to mitigate dust on sur-faces is currently

  20. Circumstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    1986-01-01

    The presence of dust in the general interstellar medium is inferred from the extinction, polarization, and scattering of starlight; the presence of dark nebulae; interstellar depletions; the observed infrared emission around certain stars and various types of interstellar clouds. Interstellar grains are subject to various destruction mechanisms that reduce their size or even completely destroy them. A continuous source of newly formed dust must therefore be present for dust to exist in the various phases of the interstellar medium (ISM). The working group has the following goals: (1) review the evidences for the formation of dust in the various sources; (2) examine the clues to the nature and composition of the dust; (3) review the status of grain formation theories; (4) examine any evidence for the processing of the dust prior to its injection into the interstellar medium; and (5) estimate the relative contribution of the various sources to the interstellar dust population.

  1. Dust in circumstellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodmann, Jens

    2006-02-01

    This thesis presents observational and theoretical studies of the size and spatial distribution of dust particles in circumstellar disks. Using millimetre interferometric observations of optically thick disks around T Tauri stars, I provide conclusive evidence for the presence of millimetre- to centimetre-sized dust aggregates. These findings demonstrate that dust grain growth to pebble-sized dust particles is completed within less than 1 Myr in the outer disks around low-mass pre-main-sequence stars. The modelling of the infrared spectral energy distributions of several solar-type main-sequence stars and their associated circumstellar debris disks reveals the ubiquity of inner gaps devoid of substantial amounts of dust among Vega-type infrared excess sources. It is argued that the absence of circumstellar material in the inner disks is most likely the result of the gravitational influence of a large planet and/or a lack of dust-producing minor bodies in the dust-free region. Finally, I describe a numerical model to simulate the dynamical evolution of dust particles in debris disks, taking into account the gravitational perturbations by planets, photon radiation pressure, and dissipative drag forces due to the Poynting-Robertson effect and stellar wind. The validity of the code it established by several tests and comparison to semi-analytic approximations. The debris disk model is applied to simulate the main structural features of a ring of circumstellar material around the main-sequence star HD 181327. The best agreement between model and observation is achieved for dust grains a few tens of microns in size locked in the 1:1 resonance with a Jupiter-mass planet (or above) on a circular orbit.

  2. Climate Response to Soil Dust Aerosols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. L.; Tegen, I.

    1998-12-01

    The effect of radiative forcing by soil dust aerosols upon climate is calculated. Two atmospheric GCM (AGCM) simulations are compared, one containing a prescribed seasonally varying concentration of dust aerosols, and the other omitting dust. Each simulation includes a mixed layer ocean model, which allows SST to change in response to the reduction in surface net radiation by dust. Dust aerosols reduce the surface net radiation both by absorbing and reflecting sunlight. For the optical properties of the dust particles assumed here, the reflection of sunlight is largely offset by the trapping of upwelling longwave radiation, so that the perturbation by dust to the net radiation gain at the top of the atmosphere is small in comparison to the surface reduction. Consequently, the radiative effect of soil dust aerosols is to redistribute heating from the surface to within the dust layer.Beneath the dust layer, surface temperature is reduced on the order of 1 K, typically in regions where deep convection is absent. In contrast, surface temperature remains unperturbed over the Arabian Sea during Northern Hemisphere (NH) summer, even though the dust concentration is highest in this region. It is suggested that the absence of cooling results from the negligible radiative forcing by dust at the top of the atmosphere, along with the frequent occurrence of deep convection, which ties the surface temperature to the unperturbed value at the emitting level.Where convection is absent, cooling at the surface occurs because radiative heating by dust reduces the rate of subsidence (and the corresponding mass exchange with the convecting region). Thus, the temperature contrast between these two regions must increase to maintain the original transport of energy, which is unperturbed by dust. It is suggested that cooling over the Arabian Sea during NH winter, despite the much smaller dust loading, is permitted by the absence of convection during this season. Thus, the change in surface

  3. Saharan Dust Export towards the Caribbean: Dust Sources and Atmospheric Circulation over North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepanski, Kerstin; Heinold, Bernd; Groß, Silke; Schäfler, Andreas; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Sauer, Daniel; Walser, Adrian; Tegen, Ina

    2015-04-01

    Studies analysing satellite observations illustrate the spatial and temporal distribution of emitting dust sources. Results show that high surface wind speeds related to the break-down of the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) occurring during the morning hours are frequent driving mechanism for dust uplift in the Sahara desert. Here, we present a study investigating atmospheric circulation pattern over North Africa favouring (a) dust entrainment into the boundary layer and (b) dust export towards the Caribbean Sea. Satellite-based information on the spatio-temporal distribution of dust source activation (DSA) events inferred from 15-minute Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) dust observations are linked to atmospheric circulation regimes over North Africa. By means of air-mass trajectories, which map the dust export from North Africa toward the SALTRACE ground observation site at Barbados, cases are selected which link DSA regions with dust events observed at Barbados. These cases are then examined with regard to the atmospheric conditions during dust emission and geomorphologic dust source characteristic. Dust properties inferred from LIDAR observation using the POLIS system and measurements taken during Falcon research flights are compared to the different dust source locations and atmospheric conditions during dust emission. Altogether, the results from this study aim at illustrating the relevance of knowing the dust source locations in concert with the atmospheric circulation. Ultimately, this study addresses the question of what is finally transported across the Atlantic towards the Caribbean from which dust source region.

  4. Electron spin resonance of ultraviolet radiation induced defects in ZnO thermal control coating pigment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T.

    1972-01-01

    Electron spin resonance measurements on variously treated zinc oxide powders reveal that the resonance signal at g = 1.956 is due to one electron trapped oxygen ion vacancy level, at a depth of (0.31 plus or minus 0.02) eV below the conduction band. The electrons at this level are delocalized. Schottky barrier influences nearly the entire bulk of the powder sample, and the bending of the bands caused by chemisorbed oxygen puts the vacancy level above the Fermi level almost through the entire bulk.

  5. Coupling Mars' Dust and Water Cycles: Effects on Dust Lifting Vigor, Spatial Extent and Seasonality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, M. A.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is an important component of Mars' current climate system. Airborne dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, thus greatly influencing the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Dust raising events on Mars occur at spatial scales ranging from meters to planet-wide. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. Generally, a low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading were observed by MGS/TES: one peak occurred before northern winter solstice at Ls 200-240, and one peak occurred after northern winter solstice at L(sub s) 305-340. These maxima in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere, which has been observed to maximize pre- and post-solstice. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading. Interactive dust cycle studies typically have not included the formation of water ice clouds or their radiative effects. Water ice clouds can influence the dust cycle by scavenging dust from atmosphere and by interacting with solar and infrared radiation

  6. QED induced redshift and anomalous microwave emission from dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevenslik, Thomas V.

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite imaging of CMB polarizations at 353 GHz extrapolated to 160 GHz suggested the AME was caused by dust and not as a relic of gravity waves from Universe expansion. AME stands for anomalous microwave emisssion. Similarly, dust has also been implicated in questioning Universe expansion by exaggerating Hubble redshift measurements. In this regard, QED induced EM radiation in dust NPs may be the commonality by which an expanding Universe may be assessed. QED stands for quantum electrodynamics, EM for electromagnetic, and NPs for nanoparticles. QED radiation is a consequence of QM that denies the atoms in NPs under TIR confinement the heat capacity to allow increases in NP temperature upon absorbing galaxy light. QM stands for quantum mechanics and TIR for total internal reflection.In this paper, the only galaxy light considered are single Lyα photons absorbed in spherical dust NPs. Since NPs have high surface to volume ratios, an absorbed Lyα photon is induced by QED to be totally confined by TIR to the NP surface. Hence, the TIR wavelength λ of the QED photon moving at velocity c/n in the NP surface is λ = 2πa, where c is the speed of light, and n and a are the refractive index and radius of the NP. The boundary between QED induced spinning and redshift depends on the NP material. For amorphous silicate, small NPs with a < 0.040 microns conserve the Lyα photon energy by NP spinning; whereas, the larger NPs having a > 0.040 microns redshift the Lyα photon to produce VIS and near IR galaxy light.Since the TIR mode is tangential to the surface of the NP, the Lyα photon produces circularly polarized light during absorption thereby exerting a momentary torque on the NP. Conserving the Lyα photon energy hc/λ* with the rotational energy ½ Jω2 of the NP gives the spin ω = √ (2 hc/Jλ*). Here, h is Planck’s constant, λ* the Lyα wavelength, J the NP rotational moment of inertia, J = 2 ma2/5, m the NP mass, m = 4πρa3/3, and ρ the NP

  7. Spin-polarization effects in the processes of synchrotron radiation and electron-positron pair production by a photon in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, O. P.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2009-07-15

    Spin and polarization effects and correlations between them in the processes of pair production by a photon and synchrotron radiation in a magnetic field are considered. Expressions for the probabilities of the processes with arbitrary polarizations of the particles are obtained. These expressions are analyzed in detail in both the lowest Landau levels and ultrarelativistic approximations.

  8. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, Dániel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2010-01-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  9. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, D.´niel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2014-02-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  10. A radiation-transfer analysis of the effects of dust on the surface photometry of a sample of nearby spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastrav, Bogdan Adrian; Rushton, Mark T.; Popescu, Cristina C.; Tuffs, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic scale lengths, inclinations and bulge-to-disk ratios of galaxies are critical inputs for radiation-transfer modelling of the panchromatic (UV/optical-MIR/FIR/submm) broadband spectral energy distribution of spiral galaxies. Although these quantities can be derived from analysis of surface photometry of optical images of targets, the effect of the dust on the measured brightness distributions in the optical must be taken into account if a fully self-consistent analysis incorporating the panchromatic and surface photometry is to be achieved. Here we give results of a careful analysis of surface photometry for a benchmark sample ofwell resolved nearby spiral galaxies. We then show how the results can be used in conjunction with aradiation transfer analysis of the panchromatic output of the same objects and the library of morphological corrections for dust given by Pastrav et al.(2013a,b) to provide self-consistent corrections for the morphological and photometric parameters of the disk and bulge components of the target galaxies.

  11. Ultrafast spin switching in a canted antiferromagnetic YFeO3 driven by pulsed THz radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeheon; Hamh, Sun Young; Han, Jeong Woo; Kang, Chul; Kee, Chul-Sik; Jung, Seonghoon; Park, Jaehun; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Tokura, Yoshinori; Lee, Jong Seok

    2015-03-01

    We investigate a detailed process of the precessional motion of the magnetic moment in the canted antiferromagnetic YFeO3 which is excited by a linearly polarized terahertz (THz) pulse at room temperature. By tuning the spectral component of the input THz pulse around the quasi-ferromagnetic mode located near 0.3 THz, we have experimentally clarified the resonance effect in the THz control of the spin state. We could confirm this result also from the simulation based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with two sub-lattice model for the canted antiferromagnet. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the spin state can be switched all-optically on a picosecond time-scale using THz pulses of square and oscillating shapes. Whereas the oscillating THz pulse with a spectral component resonant with the magnetic excitations is necessary for an efficient magnetization switching, we check the possibility of a further reduction of the necessary THz field strength by examining influences of variations in the anisotropy energy and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction upon the switching behaviors.

  12. Analog of the spin-orbit-induced anomalous Hall effect with quantized radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Jonas

    2010-05-15

    We demonstrate how the term describing the interaction between a single two-level atom and two cavity field modes may attain a Rashba form. As an outcome, cavity QED provides a testbed for studies of phenomena reminiscent of the spin-orbit induced anomalous Hall effect. The effective magnetic field, deriving from the non-Abelian gauge potentials rendered by the Rashba coupling, induces a transverse force acting on the phase space distributions. Thereby, the phase space distributions build up a transverse motion manifesting itself in spiral trajectories, rather than circular ones obtained for a zero magnetic field as one would acquire for the corresponding Abelian gauge potentials. Utilizing realistic experimental parameters, the phenomenon is numerically verified, ascertain that it should be realizable with current techniques.

  13. A Mid-Summer's Dust Devil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    One objective for the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) in the Extended Mission is to continue looking for changes and dynamic events taking place on the red planet. The feature shown here elicited gasps of excitement among the MOC Operations Staff when it was received in early April 2001.

    The feature is a dust devil. Dust devils are spinning, columnar vortices of wind that move across the landscape, pick up dust, and look somewhat like miniature tornadoes. Dust devils are a common occurrence in dry and desert landscapes on Earth as well as Mars. When this dust devil was spied in Amazonis Planitia on April 10th, the MOC was looking straight down. Usually when the camera is looking down the dust devil will appear as a circular, fuzzy patch with a straight shadow indicating its columnar shape. In this case, however, the dust devil is somewhat curved and kinked--its shape is best seen in the shadow it casts to the right. A thin, light-toned track has been left by the dust devil as it moved eastward across the landscape. Usually, such tracks are darker than the surroundings, in this case the light tone might indicate that the dust being removed by the passing dust devil is darker than the surface underneath the thin veneer of dust.

    Dust devils most typically form when the ground heats up during the day, warming the air immediately above the surface. As the warmed air nearest the surface begins to rise, it spins. The spinning column begins to move across the surface and picks up loose dust (if any is present). The dust makes the vortex visible and gives it the 'dust devil' or tornado-like appearance. This dust devil occurred at an optimal time for dust devils whether on Earth or Mars--around 2 p.m. local time in the middle of Northern Hemisphere Summer. North is up, sunlight illuminates the scene from the left (west), and 500 meters is about 547 yards. The shadow cast by the dust devil goes off the edge of the image, but the length shown

  14. A Case Against Spinning PAHs as the Source of the Anomalous Microwave Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Brandon S.; Draine, B. T.; Meisner, Aaron M.

    2016-08-01

    We employ an all-sky map of the anomalous microwave emission (AME) produced by component separation of the microwave sky to study correlations between the AME and Galactic dust properties. We find that while the AME is highly correlated with all tracers of dust emission, the best predictor of the AME strength is the dust radiance. Fluctuations in the AME intensity per dust radiance are uncorrelated with fluctuations in the emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), casting doubt on the association between AME and PAHs. The PAH abundance is strongly correlated with the dust optical depth and dust radiance, consistent with PAH destruction in low density regions. We find that the AME intensity increases with increasing radiation field strength, at variance with predictions from the spinning dust hypothesis. Finally, the temperature dependence of the AME per dust radiance disfavors the interpretation of the AME as thermal emission. A reconsideration of other AME carriers, such as ultrasmall silicates, and other emission mechanisms, such as magnetic dipole emission, is warranted.

  15. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... contrast strongly with the dust storm that swept across Iraq and Saudi Arabia on May 13, 2004 (bottom panels). These data products from ... as yellowish ripples that obscure a large part of southern Iraq. The dust is easy to discern over the dark waters of the teardrop-shaped ...

  16. Andromeda's dust

    SciTech Connect

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G.; Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian; Braun, Robert; Leroy, Adam E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ≈ 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ≈ 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ≈ 0.026 at the center to ∼0.0027 at R ≈ 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ∼10, from Z/Z {sub ☉} ≈ 3 at R = 0 to ∼0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ≈ 35, declining to (U) ≈ 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ≈ 0.045 at R ≈ 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 μm emission at R ≈ 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with β ≈ 2.3 between 200 and 600 μm) than in the model.

  17. Inverse method predicting spinning modes radiated by a ducted fan from free-field measurements.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Serge

    2005-02-01

    In the study the inverse problem of deducing the modal structure of the acoustic field generated by a ducted turbofan is addressed using conventional farfield directivity measurements. The final objective is to make input data available for predicting noise radiation in other configurations that would not have been tested. The present paper is devoted to the analytical part of that study. The proposed method is based on the equations governing ducted sound propagation and free-field radiation. It leads to fast computations checked on Rolls-Royce tests made in the framework of previous European projects. Results seem to be reliable although the system of equations to be solved is generally underdetermined (more propagating modes than acoustic measurements). A limited number of modes are thus selected according to any a priori knowledge of the sources. A first guess of the source amplitudes is obtained by adjusting the calculated maximum of radiation of each mode to the measured sound pressure level at the same angle. A least squares fitting gives the final solution. A simple correction can be made to take account of the mean flow velocity inside the nacelle which shifts the directivity patterns. It consists of modifying the actual frequency to keep the cut-off ratios unchanged. PMID:15759694

  18. Inverse method predicting spinning modes radiated by a ducted fan from free-field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, Serge

    2005-02-01

    In the study the inverse problem of deducing the modal structure of the acoustic field generated by a ducted turbofan is addressed using conventional farfield directivity measurements. The final objective is to make input data available for predicting noise radiation in other configurations that would not have been tested. The present paper is devoted to the analytical part of that study. The proposed method is based on the equations governing ducted sound propagation and free-field radiation. It leads to fast computations checked on Rolls-Royce tests made in the framework of previous European projects. Results seem to be reliable although the system of equations to be solved is generally underdetermined (more propagating modes than acoustic measurements). A limited number of modes are thus selected according to any a priori knowledge of the sources. A first guess of the source amplitudes is obtained by adjusting the calculated maximum of radiation of each mode to the measured sound pressure level at the same angle. A least squares fitting gives the final solution. A simple correction can be made to take account of the mean flow velocity inside the nacelle which shifts the directivity patterns. It consists of modifying the actual frequency to keep the cut-off ratios unchanged. .

  19. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  20. Ultraviolet-B radiation applied to detached peach fruit: A study of free radical generation by EPR spin trapping.

    PubMed

    Sgherri, C; Scattino, C; Pinzino, C; Tonutti, P; Ranieri, A M

    2015-11-01

    In peaches, phenolic compounds are the major sources of antioxidants, and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside is the main anthocyanin present, above all in the skin. Anthocyanin content has been shown to increase after UV-B irradiation, which may be very harmful for all biological organisms due to the induction of the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Peach fruits (cv. 'Suncrest') were exposed during post-harvest to supplemental ultraviolet-B radiation. A spin-trapping technique was used to monitor the generation of free radicals under UV-B, and 5-(diethoxy-phosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) was used as the spin trap. The flesh of peaches was essentially unaffected by the treatment, whereas the skin was responsive at the end of the treatment, accumulating ascorbate, flavonoids, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, and showing a higher antioxidant activity. The levels of stable free radicals were also lower at the end of treatment. Carbon-centred radicals contributed the most to the total amounts of free radicals, whereas hydroxyl radicals and oxygen-centred free radicals contributed minimally. The carbon-centred free radical identified was the same as the one obtained after irradiation of authentic cyanidin-3-O-glucoside. During UV-B treatment cyanidin-3-O-glucoside increased and was capable of radicalization protecting the other organic molecules of the cell from oxidation. ROS, among which hydroxyl radicals, were thus maintained to minimal levels. This ability of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside displayed the mechanism underlined the tolerance to UV-B irradiation indicating that shelf life can be prolonged by the presence of anthocyanins. Thus, UV-B technique results a good approach to induce antioxidant production in peach fruits increasing their nutraceutical properties. PMID:26263515

  1. Molecular imprint of dust evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimkin, Vitaly; Zhukovska, Svitlana; Wiebe, Dmitri; Semenov, Dmitry; Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav; Vasyunin, Anton; Birnstiel, Til; Henning, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Evolution of sub-micron grains is an essential process during early stages of planet formation. The dust growth and sedimentation to the midplane affect a spectral energy distribution. At the same time dust evolution can alter significantly the distribution of gas that is a factor of 100 more massive than dust and can be traced with molecular line observations. We present simulations of protoplanetary disk structure with grain evolution using the ANDES code ("AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation"). ANDES comprises (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain chemical network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. Such a set of physical processes allows us to assess the impact of dust evolution on the gas component, which is primarily related to radiation field and total available surface for chemical reactions. Considering cases of (i) evolved dust (2 Myr of grain coagulation, fragmentation and sedimentation) and (ii) pristine dust (well- mixed 0.1 micron grains), we found a sufficient changes in disk physical and chemical structure caused by the dust evolution. Due to higher transparency of the evolved disk model UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the midplane. The presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO, while the depletion is still effective in adjacent upper layers. Molecular concentrations of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution (CO2, NH2CN, HNO, H2O, HCOOH, HCN, CO) which provides an opportunity to use these molecules as tracers of dust evolution.

  2. Experiments on Dust Grain Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. N.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.

    2004-01-01

    Dust particles in various astrophysical environments are charged by a variety of mechanisms generally involving collisional processes with other charged particles and photoelectric emission with UV radiation from nearby sources. The sign and the magnitude of the particle charge are determined by the competition between the charging processes by UV radiation and collisions with charged particles. Knowledge of the particle charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a number of physical processes. The charge of a dust grain is thus a fundamental parameter that influences the physics of dusty plasmas, processes in the interplanetary medium and interstellar medium, interstellar dust clouds, planetary rings, cometary and outer atmospheres of planets etc. In this paper we present some results of experiments on charging of dust grains carried out on a laboratory facility capable levitating micron size dust grains in an electrodynamic balance in simulated space environments. The charging/discharging experiments were carried out by exposing the dust grains to energetic electron beams and UV radiation. Photoelectric efficiencies and yields of micron size dust grains of SiO2, and lunar simulates obtained from NASA-JSC will be presented.

  3. Powerful radiative jets in supercritical accretion discs around non-spinning black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sądowski, Aleksander; Narayan, Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    We describe a set of simulations of supercritical accretion on to a non-rotating supermassive black hole (BH). The accretion flow takes the form of a geometrically thick disc with twin low-density funnels around the rotation axis. For accretion rates {gtrsim } 10 dot{M}_Edd, there is sufficient gas in the funnel to make this region optically thick. Radiation from the disc first flows into the funnel, after which it accelerates the optically thick funnel gas along the axis. The resulting jet is baryon loaded and has a terminal density-weighted velocity ≈0.3c. Much of the radiative luminosity is converted into kinetic energy by the time the escaping gas becomes optically thin. These jets are not powered by BHrotation or magnetic driving, but purely by radiation. Their characteristic beaming angle is ˜0.2 rad. For an observer viewing down the axis, the isotropic equivalent luminosity of total energy is as much as 1048 erg s- 1 for a 107 M⊙ BH accreting at 103 Eddington. Therefore, energetically, the simulated jets are consistent with observations of the most powerful tidal disruption events, e.g. Swift J1644. The jet velocity is, however, too low to match the Lorentz factor γ > 2 inferred in J1644. There is no such conflict in the case of other tidal disruption events. Since favourably oriented observers see isotropic equivalent luminosities that are highly super-Eddington, the simulated models can explain observations of ultraluminous X-ray sources, at least in terms of luminosity and energetics, without requiring intermediate-mass BHs.

  4. Laser-dust interaction and dust size distribution measurements on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, R. D.; West, W. P.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rosenberg, M.; Bray, B. D.

    2007-11-15

    The determination of dust radius distributions from the measurement of laser scattering intensity in tokamaks is presented. The analysis takes into account non-Rayleigh regimes of light scattering for different complex refractive indices of dust materials, as well as dust evaporation due to heating by laser radiation. The model is applied to calculate the dust particle radius distribution in tokamaks during normal plasma operation. It is shown that a relatively small amount of large dust particles in the distribution may play a significant role for estimation of the dust mass inventory in tokamaks.

  5. Dust transport into Martian polar latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of suspended dust in the Martian atmosphere, and its return to the planet's surface, is implicated in the formation of the polar layered terrain and the dichotomy in perennial CO2 polar cap retention in the two hemispheres. A three dimensional model was used to study Martian global dust storms. The model accounts for the interactive feedbacks between the atmospheric thermal and dynamical states and an evolving radiatively active suspended dust load. Results from dust storm experiments, as well as from simulations in which there is interest in identifying the conditions under which surface dust lifting occurs at various locations and times, indicate that dust transport due to atmospheric eddy motions is likely to be important in the arrival of suspended dust at polar latitudes. The layered terrain in both polar regions of Mars is interpreted as the reality of cyclical episodes of volatile (CO2, H2O) and dust deposition.

  6. Using cm observations to constrain the abundance of very small dust grains in Galactic cold cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbs, C. T.; Paladini, R.; Cleary, K.; Muchovej, S. J. C.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Stevenson, M. A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Ysard, N.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rumsey, C.; Villadsen, J.

    2016-03-01

    In this analysis, we illustrate how the relatively new emission mechanism, known as spinning dust, can be used to characterize dust grains in the interstellar medium. We demonstrate this by using spinning dust emission observations to constrain the abundance of very small dust grains (a ≲ 10 nm) in a sample of Galactic cold cores. Using the physical properties of the cores in our sample as inputs to a spinning dust model, we predict the expected level of emission at a wavelength of 1 cm for four different very small dust grain abundances, which we constrain by comparing to 1 cm CARMA observations. For all of our cores, we find a depletion of very small grains, which we suggest is due to the process of grain growth. This work represents the first time that spinning dust emission has been used to constrain the physical properties of interstellar dust grains.

  7. Exozodiacal dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchner, Marc Jason

    Besides the sun, the most luminous feature of the solar system is a cloud of "zodiacal" dust released by asteroids and comets that pervades the region interior to the asteroid belt. Similar clouds of dust around other stars---exozodiacal clouds---may be the best tracers of the habitable zones of extra-solar planetary systems. This thesis discusses three searches for exozodiacal dust: (1) We observed six nearby main-sequence stars with the Keck telescope at 11.6 microns, correcting for atmosphere-induced wavefront aberrations and deconvolving the point spread function via classical speckle analysis. We compare our data to a simple model of the zodiacal dust in our own system based on COBE DIRBE observations and place upper limits on the density of exozodiacal dust in these systems. (2) We observed Sirius, Altair, and Procyon with the NICMOS Coronagraph on the Hubble Space Telescope to look for scattered light from exozodiacal dust and faint companions within 10 AU from these stars. (3) The planned nulling capability of the Keck Interferometer should allow it to probe the region <200 milliarcsecond from a bright star and to suppress on-axis starlight by factors of 10 -3 to reveal faint circumstellar material. We model the response of the Keck Interferometer to hypothetical exozodiacal clouds to derive detection limits that account for the effects of stellar leakage, photon noise, noise from null depth fluctuations, and the fact that the cloud's shape is not known a priori. We also discuss the interaction of dust with planets. We used the COBE DIRBE Sky and Zodi Atlas and the IRAS Sky Survey Atlas to search for dynamical signatures of three different planets in the solar system dust complex: (1) We searched the COBE DIRBE Sky and Zodi Atlas for a wake of dust trailing Mars. We compare the DIRBE images to a model Mars wake based on the empirical model of the Earth's wake as seen by the DIRBE. (2) We searched the COBE DIRRE Sky and Zodi Atlas for Tiojan dust near

  8. Reduced radiative conductivity of low spin FeO6-octahedra in FeCO3 at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Sergey S.; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-09-01

    The ability of Earth's mantle to conduct heat by radiation is determined by optical properties of mantle phases. Optical properties of mantle minerals at high pressure are accessible through diamond anvil cell experiments, but because of the intense thermal radiation at T > 1000 K such studies are limited to lower temperatures. Accordingly, radiative thermal conductivity at mantle conditions has been evaluated with the assumption of the temperature-independent optical properties. Particularly uncertain is the temperature-dependence of optical properties of lower mantle minerals across the spin transition, as the spin state itself is a strong function of temperature. Here we use laser-heated diamond anvil cells combined with a pulsed ultra-bright supercontinuum laser probe and a synchronized time-gated detector to examine optical properties of high and low spin ferrous iron at 45-73 GPa up to 1600 K in an octahedral crystallographic unit (FeO6), one of the most abundant building blocks in the mantle. Siderite (FeCO3) is used as a model for FeO6-octahedra as it contains no ferric iron and exhibits a sharp optically apparent pressure-induced spin transition at 44 GPa, simplifying data interpretation. We find that the optical absorbance of low spin FeO6 increases with temperature due to the partially lifted Laporte selection rule. The temperature-induced low-to-high spin transition, however, results in a dramatic drop in absorbance of the FeO6 unit in siderite. The absorption edge (Fe-O charge transfer) red-shifts (∼1 cm-1/K) with increasing temperature and at T > 1600 K and P > 70 GPa becomes the dominant absorption mechanism in the visible range, suggesting its superior role in reducing the ability of mantle minerals to conduct heat by radiation. This implies that the radiative thermal conductivity of analogous FeO6-bearing minerals such as ferropericlase, the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle, is substantially reduced approaching the core

  9. Reduced radiative conductivity of low spin FeO6-octahedra in FeCO3 at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Sergey S.; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-09-01

    The ability of Earth's mantle to conduct heat by radiation is determined by optical properties of mantle phases. Optical properties of mantle minerals at high pressure are accessible through diamond anvil cell experiments, but because of the intense thermal radiation at T > 1000 K such studies are limited to lower temperatures. Accordingly, radiative thermal conductivity at mantle conditions has been evaluated with the assumption of the temperature-independent optical properties. Particularly uncertain is the temperature-dependence of optical properties of lower mantle minerals across the spin transition, as the spin state itself is a strong function of temperature. Here we use laser-heated diamond anvil cells combined with a pulsed ultra-bright supercontinuum laser probe and a synchronized time-gated detector to examine optical properties of high and low spin ferrous iron at 45-73 GPa up to 1600 K in an octahedral crystallographic unit (FeO6), one of the most abundant building blocks in the mantle. Siderite (FeCO3) is used as a model for FeO6-octahedra as it contains no ferric iron and exhibits a sharp optically apparent pressure-induced spin transition at 44 GPa, simplifying data interpretation. We find that the optical absorbance of low spin FeO6 increases with temperature due to the partially lifted Laporte selection rule. The temperature-induced low-to-high spin transition, however, results in a dramatic drop in absorbance of the FeO6 unit in siderite. The absorption edge (Fe-O charge transfer) red-shifts (∼1 cm-1/K) with increasing temperature and at T > 1600 K and P > 70 GPa becomes the dominant absorption mechanism in the visible range, suggesting its superior role in reducing the ability of mantle minerals to conduct heat by radiation. This implies that the radiative thermal conductivity of analogous FeO6-bearing minerals such as ferropericlase, the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle, is substantially reduced approaching the core

  10. Melatonin and a spin-trap compound block radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in rat brain cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, H; Singh, N P

    1997-01-01

    Effects of in vivo microwave exposure on DNA strand breaks, a form of DNA damage, were investigated in rat brain cells. In previous research, we have found that acute (2 hours) exposure to pulsed (2 microseconds pulses, 500 pps) 2450-MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RFR) (power density 2 mW/cm2, average whole body specific absorption rate 1.2 W/kg) caused an increase in DNA single- and double-strand breaks in brain cells of the rat when assayed 4 hours post exposure using a microgel electrophoresis assay. In the present study, we found that treatment of rats immediately before and after RFR exposure with either melatonin (1 mg/kg/injection, SC) or the spin-trap compound N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) (100 mg/kg/injection, i.p.) blocks this effects of RFR. Since both melatonin and PBN are efficient free radical scavengers it is hypothesized that free radicals are involved in RFR-induced DNA damage in the brain cells of rats. Since cumulated DNA strand breaks in brain cells can lead to neurodegenerative diseases and cancer and an excess of free radicals in cells has been suggested to be the cause of various human diseases, data from this study could have important implications for the health effects of RFR exposure. PMID:9261542

  11. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  12. Diagnostics for Dust Monitoring in Tokamak Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Rosanvallon, S.; Grisolia, C.; Hong, S. H.; Worms, J.

    2008-03-12

    During ITER lifetime, dusts and flakes will be produced due to the interaction of plasmas with the in-vessel materials or due to maintenance. They will be made of carbon, beryllium and tungsten and will be activated, tritiated and chemically reactive and toxic. Safety limits have been set in order to reduce dust hazards. Thus dust diagnostics and removal methods need to be developed for ITER within the constraints linked to magnetic field, radiation, vacuum and temperature. This paper reviews potential diagnostics to monitor the dust content using techniques already used for erosion or deposition monitoring or techniques specially developed for measuring dust in suspension.

  13. Circumstellar dust in symbiotic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, Tomislav; Kotnik-Karuza, Dubravka

    2015-08-01

    Physical properties of the circumstellar dust and associated physical mechanisms play an important role in understanding evolution of symbiotic binaries. We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the two symbiotic novae, RR Tel and HM Sge, based on the long-term near-IR photometry, infrared ISO spectra and mid-IR interferometry. Pulsation properties and long-term variabilities were found from the near-IR light curves. The dust properties were determined using the DUSTY code which solves the radiative transfer. No changes in pulsational parameters were found, but a long-term variations with periods of 20-25 years have been detected which cannot be attributed to orbital motion.Circumstellar silicate dust shell with inner dust shell temperatures between 900 K and 1300 K and of moderate optical depth can explain all the observations. RR Tel showed the presence of an optically thin CS dust envelope and an optically thick dust region outside the line of sight, which was further supported by the detailed modelling using the 2D LELUYA code. Obscuration events in RR Tel were explained by an increase in optical depth caused by the newly condensed dust leading to the formation of a compact dust shell. HM Sge showed permanent obscuration and a presence of a compact dust shell with a variable optical depth. Scattering of the near-IR colours can be understood by a change in sublimation temperature caused by the Mira variability. Presence of large dust grains (up to 4 µm) suggests an increased grain growth in conditions of increased mass loss. The mass loss rates of up to 17·10-6 MSun/yr were significantly higher than in intermediate-period single Miras and in agreement with longer-period O-rich AGB stars.Despite the nova outburst, HM Sge remained enshrouded in dust with no significant dust destruction. The existence of unperturbed dust shell suggests a small influence of the hot component and strong dust shielding from the UV flux. By the use

  14. Mechanisms for Mars dust storms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leovy, C. B.; Zurek, R. W.; Pollack, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    Characteristics of the Mars global dust storm are reviewed. At the Mariner 9 encounter, the dust consisted of highly absorbing particles distributed rather uniformly up to great height (about 50 km). These observations together with temperature distributions inferred from the Mariner 9 IRIS by Hanel et al. (1972) are used to estimate global wind systems during the dust storm. The global distribution and direction of light surface streaks indicate that the axisymmetric circulation was a dominant part of flow during the dust storm. The axisymmetric winds may become strong enough to raise dust over wide areas of Mars' tropics under unusual conditions: the incoming solar radiation must be near its seasonal maximum, the static stability must be low, and the atmosphere must be able to absorb and re-emit a sizeable fraction of the incoming radiation. Strong winds around the periphery of the retreating south polar cap would be driven by the temperature gradient at the cap edge and by the mass outflow due to subliming CO2. These polar winds could generate local dust storms, raising the general level of dustiness, and providing the conditions necessary for onset of a global dust storm.

  15. MISR Browse Images: Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRiDE)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-02

    MISR Browse Images: Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRiDE) These MISR Browse images provide ... overview of the region observed during the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRiDE) field campaign. PRiDE was a study of the radiative, ...

  16. Experimental assessment of gold nanoparticle-mediated dose enhancement in radiation therapy beams using electron spin resonance dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, T; Guidelli, E J; Gómez, J A; Baffa, O; Nicolucci, P

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we aim to experimentally assess increments of dose due to nanoparticle-radiation interactions via electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry performed with a biological-equivalent sensitive material.We employed 2-Methyl-Alanine (2MA) in powder form to compose the radiation sensitive medium embedding gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) 5 nm in diameter. Dosimeters manufactured with 0.1% w/w of AuNPs or no nanoparticles were irradiated with clinically utilized 250 kVp orthovoltage or 6 MV linac x-rays in dosimetric conditions. Amplitude peak-to-peak (App) at the central ESR spectral line was used for dosimetry. Dose-response curves were obtained for samples with or without nanoparticles and each energy beam. Dose increments due to nanoparticles were analyzed in terms of absolute dose enhancements (DEs), calculated as App ratios for each dose/beam condition, or relative dose enhancement factors (DEFs) calculated as the slopes of the dose-response curves.Dose enhancements were observed to present an amplified behavior for small doses (between 0.1-0.5 Gy), with this effect being more prominent with the kV beam. For doses between 0.5-5 Gy, dose-independent trends were observed for both beams, stable around (2.1   ±   0.7) and (1.3   ±   0.4) for kV and MV beams, respectively. We found DEFs of (1.62   ±   0.04) or (1.27   ±   0.03) for the same beams. Additionally, we measured no interference between AuNPs and the ESR apparatus, including the excitation microwaves, the magnetic fields and the paramagnetic radicals.2MA was demonstrated to be a feasible paramagnetic radiation-sensitive material for dosimetry in the presence of AuNPs, and ESR dosimetry a powerful experimental method for further verifications of increments in nanoparticle-mediated doses of biological interest. Ultimately, gold nanoparticles can cause significant and detectable dose enhancements in biological-like samples irradiated at both kilo

  17. Possible influence of dust on hurricane genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretl, Sebastian; Reutter, Philipp; Raible, Christoph C.; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2014-05-01

    Tropical Cyclones (TCs) belong to the most extreme events in nature. In the past decade, the possible impact of dust on Atlantic hurricanes receives growing interest. As mineral dust is able to absorb incoming solar radiation and therefore warm the surrounding air, the presence of dust can lead to a reduction of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase in atmospheric stability. Furthermore, resulting baroclinic effects and the dry Saharan easterly jet lead to an enhanced vertical shear of the horizontal winds. SST, stability, moisture and vertical wind shear are known to potentially impact hurricane activity. But how Saharan dust influences these prerequisites for hurricane formation is not yet clear. Some dynamical mechanisms induced by the SAL might even strengthen hurricanes. An adequate framework for investigating the possible impact of dust on hurricanes is comparing high resolution simulations (~0.5°x0.5°, 31 vertical levels) with and without radiatively active dust aerosols. To accomplish this task, we are using the general circulation model ECHAM6 coupled to a modified version of the aerosol model HAM, ECHAM6-HAM-Dust. Instead of the five aerosol species HAM normally contains, the modified version takes only insoluble dust into account, but modifies the scavenging parameters in order to have a similar lifetime of dust as in the full ECHAM6-HAM. All remaining aerosols are prescribed. To evaluate the effects of dust on hurricanes, a TC detection and tracking method is applied on the results. ECHAM6-HAM-Dust was used in two configurations, one with radiatively active dust aerosols and one with dust being not radiatively active. For both set-ups, 10 Monte-Carlo simulations of the year 2005 were performed. A statistical method which identifies controlling parameters of hurricane genesis was applied on North Atlantic developing and non-developing disturbances in all simulations, comparing storms in the two sets of simulations. Hereby, dust can be assigned

  18. On the theory of dynamics of dust grain in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanenko, A. A.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2013-03-15

    The dynamics of rotationally symmetric dust grains in plasma embedded in a magnetic field are of concern. The general expressions for forces and torques acting on dust are found. It is shown that dust spinning is determined by torques related to both the Lorentz force (dominant for relatively small grains) and the gyro-motion of plasma particles impinging the grain (which prevails for large grains). The stability of grain spinning is analyzed and it is shown that, for some cases (e.g., oblate spheroid), there is no stable dynamic equilibrium of grain spinning.

  19. Properties of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, Kristin

    1988-01-01

    Observations of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae are the closest analog in the interstellar medium to studies of cometary dust in our solar system. The presence of a bright star near the reflection nebula dust provides the opportunity to study both the reflection and emission characteristics of interstellar dust. At 0.1 to 1 micrometer, the reflection nebula emission is due to starlight scattered by dust. The albedo and scattering phase function of the dust is determined from observations of the scattered light. At 50 to 200 micrometers, thermal emission from the dust in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field is observed. The derived dust temperature determines the relative values of the absorption coefficient of the dust at wavelengths where the stellar energy is absorbed and at far infrared wavelengths where the absorbed energy is reradiated. These emission mechanisms directly relate to those seen in the near and mid infrared spectra of comets. In a reflection nebula the dust is observed at much larger distances from the star than in our solar system, so that the equilibrium dust temperature is 50 K rather than 300 K. Thus, in reflection nebulae, thermal emission from dust is emitted at 50 to 200 micrometer.

  20. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic rhinitis - dust ... make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are said to have a dust allergy. ...

  1. Dust-regulated galaxy formation and evolution: a new chemodynamical model with live dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    Interstellar dust plays decisive roles in the conversion of neutral to molecular hydrogen (H2), the thermodynamical evolution of interstellar medium (ISM), and the modification of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies. These important roles of dust have not been self-consistently included in previous numerical simulations of galaxy formation and evolution. We have therefore developed a new model by which one can investigate whether and how galaxy formation and evolution can be influenced by dust-related physical processes such as photoelectric heating, H2 formation on dust, and stellar radiation pressure on dust in detail. A novel point of the model is that different dust species in a galaxy are represented by `live dust' particles (i.e. not test particles). Therefore, dust particles in a galaxy not only interact gravitationally with all four components of the galaxy (i.e. dark matter, stars, gas, and dust) but also are grown and destroyed through physical processes of ISM. First, we describe a way to include dust-related physical processes in N-body+hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy evolution in detail. Then, we show some preliminary results of dust-regulated galaxy evolution. The preliminary results suggest that the evolution of dust distributions driven by radiation pressure of stars is very important for the evolution of star formation rates, chemical abundances, H2 fractions, and gas distributions in galaxies.

  2. Attempt to measure magnetic hyperfine fields in metallic thin wires under spin Hall conditions using synchrotron-radiation Mössbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mibu, K. Tanaka, M. A.; Mitsui, T.; Masuda, R.; Kitao, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Seto, M.; Yoda, Y.

    2015-05-07

    Measurement of the magnetic hyperfine fields in metallic thin wires under spin Hall conditions was attempted using the emerging technique, synchrotron-radiation Mössbauer spectroscopy. A Mössbauer probe layer of {sup 57}Fe (0.2 nm), {sup 57}Fe (0.6 nm), or {sup 119}Sn (0.6 nm) was embedded as an electron spin detector near the surfaces of V, Au, Pt, and {sup 56}Fe wires. The magnitudes of the magnetic hyperfine fields at the {sup 57}Fe and {sup 119}Sn nuclear sites that could be enhanced by non-equilibrium conduction-electron spin polarization were measured both without and with the application of an electric current along the wire. Changes in the Mössbauer spectra were not clearly observed, indicating that the magnetic hyperfine field induced by non-equilibrium spin polarization is smaller than the detection limit at least for the measured systems and conditions.

  3. The retrieval of optical properties from terrestrial dust devil vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Jonathon P.; Patel, Manish R.; Lewis, Stephen R.

    2014-03-01

    The retrieval of the optical properties of desert aerosols in suspension within terrestrial dust devils is presented with possible future application for martian dust devils. The transmission of light through dust devil vortices was measured in situ to obtain the wavelength-dependent attenuation by the aerosols. A Monte Carlo model was applied to each dust devil with the retrieved optical properties corresponding to the set of parameters which lead to the best model representation of the observed transmission spectra. The retrieved optical properties agree well with single scattering theory and are consistent with previous studies of dust aerosols. The enhanced absorption observed for dust devils with a higher tangential wind speed, and in comparison to atmospheric aerosol studies, suggests that larger dust particles are lofted and suspended around dust devil vortices. This analysis has shown that the imaginary refractive indices (and thus the optical properties of the suspended dust) are generally overestimated when these larger dust grains entrained by dust devils are neglected. This will lead to an overestimation of the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the small particles that remain in suspension after the dust devil terminates. It is also demonstrated that a 10% uncertainty in the particle size distribution of the dust entrained in the dust devils can result in a 50% increase in the predicted amount of incident solar radiation absorbed by the dust particles once the dust devil has terminated. The method used here provides the capability to retrieve the optical properties of the dust entrained in martian dust devils by taking advantage of transits over surface spacecraft which are capable of making optical measurements at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. Our results suggest that we would observed higher absorption at all wavelengths for dust particles entrained in dust devil vortices compared to the ubiquitous dust haze.

  4. Gas and Dust in the Orion Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arab, H.; Compiègne, M.; Habart, E.; Abergel, A.

    2011-11-01

    We use the DustEM model coupled with a radiative transfer code to fit the Herschel and Spitzer emission of the Orion Bar. The thermal dust emission at the 250-μm peak position is well reproduced but we overestimate the stochastically heated grain emission. The dust model parameters are checked with the Meudon PDR code and are consistent with the spectroscopic data from the SPIRE FTS.

  5. Semidirect Dynamical and Radiative Impact of North African Dust Transport on Lower Tropospheric Clouds over the Subtropical North Atlantic in CESM 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    DeFlorio, Mike; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder; Miller, Arthur J.; Cayan, Dan; Russell, Lynn M.; Somerville, Richard C.

    2014-07-16

    This study uses a century length pre-industrial climate simulation by the Community Earth System Model (CESM 1.0) to explore statistical relationships between dust, clouds and atmospheric circulation, and to suggest a dynamical, rather than microphysical, mechanism linking subtropical North Atlantic lower tropospheric cloud cover with North African dust transport. The length of the run allows us to account for interannual variability of dust emissions and transport downstream of North Africa in the model. CESM’s mean climatology and probability distribution of aerosol optical depth in this region agrees well with available AERONET observations. In addition, CESM shows strong seasonal cycles of dust burden and lower tropospheric cloud fraction, with maximum values occurring during boreal summer, when a strong correlation between these two variables exists downstream of North Africa over the subtropical North Atlantic. Calculations of Estimated Inversion Strength (EIS) and composites of EIS on high and low downstream North Africa dust months during boreal summer reveal that dust is likely increasing inversion strength over this region due to both solar absorption and reflection. We find no evidence for a microphysical link between dust and lower tropospheric clouds in this region. These results yield new insight over an extensive period of time into the complex relationship between North African dust and lower tropospheric clouds over the open ocean, which has previously been hindered by spatiotemporal constraints of observations. Our findings lay a framework for future analyses using sub-monthly data over regions with different underlying dynamics.

  6. Numerical Prediction of Dust. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Benincasa, F.; Boucher, O.; Brooks, M.; Chen, J. P.; Colarco, P. R.; Gong, S.; Huneeus, N.; Jones, L; Lu, S.; Menut, L.; Mulcahy, J.; Nickovic, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Perez, C.; Reid, J. S.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Tanaka, T.; Terradellas, E.; Westphal, D. L.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Zhou, C.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Covers the whole breadth of mineral dust research, from a scientific perspective Presents interdisciplinary work including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies Explores the role of dust as a player and recorder of environmental change This volume presents state-of-the-art research about mineral dust, including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies. Dust research is a new, dynamic and fast-growing area of science and due to its multiple roles in the Earth system, dust has become a fascinating topic for many scientific disciplines. Aspects of dust research covered in this book reach from timescales of minutes (as with dust devils, cloud processes, and radiation) to millennia (as with loess formation and oceanic sediments), making dust both a player and recorder of environmental change. The book is structured in four main parts that explore characteristics of dust, the global dust cycle, impacts of dust on the Earth system, and dust as a climate indicator. The chapters in these parts provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of this highly interdisciplinary subject. The contributions presented here cover dust from source to sink and describe all the processes dust particles undergo while travelling through the atmosphere. Chapters explore how dust is lifted and transported, how it affects radiation, clouds, regional circulations, precipitation and chemical processes in the atmosphere, and how it deteriorates air quality. The book explores how dust is removed from the atmosphere by gravitational settling, turbulence or precipitation, how iron contained in dust fertilizes terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and about the role that dust plays in human health. We learn how dust is observed, simulated using computer models and forecast. The book also details the role of dust deposits for climate reconstructions

  7. Spin-orbit and rotational couplings in radiative association of C({sup 3}P) and N({sup 4}S) atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, Sergey V.; Gustafsson, Magnus; Nyman, Gunnar

    2011-11-14

    The role of spin-orbit and rotational couplings in radiative association of C({sup 3}P) and N({sup 4}S) atoms is investigated. Couplings among doublet electronic states of the CN radical are considered, giving rise to a 6-state model of the process. The solution of the dynamical problem is based on the L{sup 2} method, where a complex absorbing potential is added to the Hamiltonian operator in order to treat continuum and bound levels in the same manner. Comparison of the energy-dependent rate coefficients calculated with and without spin-orbit and rotational couplings shows that the couplings have a strong effect on the resonance structure and low-energy baseline of the rate coefficient.

  8. Precession of cylindrical dust particles in the plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Banu, N.; Ticoş, C. M.

    2015-10-15

    The vertical precession of cylindrical dust particles levitated in the sheath of an rf plasma is experimentally investigated. Typically, the dust particles have two equilibrium positions depending on the orientation of their longitudinal axis: horizontal and vertical. A transition between these two states is induced by rapidly increasing the neutral gas pressure in the plasma chamber. During this transition, the cylindrical dust particles make an angle with the horizontal and rotate about their center of mass. The rotation speed increases as the dust rods aligned with the vertical axis. All dust particles will eventually end up in the vertical state while spinning fast about their longitudinal axis. Dust-dust interaction and the attracting ion wakes are possible mechanisms for inducing the observed dust precession.

  9. Status and Future of Dust Storm Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    In recent years, increased attention has been given to the large amounts of airborne dust derived from the deserts and desertified areas of the world and transported over scales ranging from local to global. This dust can have positive and negative impacts on human activities and the environment, including modifying cloud formation, fertilizing the ocean, degrading air quality, reducing visibility, transporting pathogens, and inducing respiratory problems. The atmospheric radiative forcing by the dust has implications for global climate change and presently is one of the largest unknowns in climate models. These uncertainties have lead to much of the funding for research into the sources, properties, and fate of atmospheric dust. As a result of advances in numerical weather prediction over the past decades and the recent climate research, we are now in a position to produce operational dust storm forecasts. International organizations and national agencies are developing programs for dust forecasting. The approaches and applications of dust detection and forecasting are as varied as the nations that are developing the models. The basic components of a dust forecasting system include atmospheric forcing, dust production, and dust microphysics. The forecasting applications include air and auto traffic safety, shipping, health, national security, climate and weather. This presentation will summarize the methods of dust storm forecasting and illustrate the various applications. The major remaining uncertainties (e.g. sources and initialization) will be discussed as well as approaches for solving those problems.

  10. Dust and the Dust Bowl: Connections between 1930's drought and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, T. A.; Sloan, L. C.; Solmon, F.; Snyder, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    There have been a number of investigations into the causes and physical mechanisms of the 1930's Dust Bowl, and together they provide a reasonable explanation of the drought in terms of its length and severity. However no published investigations have considered the possible climatic effects caused by the considerable amount of airborne dust that was generated as a consequence of poor land use management in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In order to investigate the effects of airborne dust on North American climate during the 1930's, we have performed a climate model sensitivity study that isolates the effects of dust on climate in a regional climate model. The results of the study show that an essentially permanent dust cloud existed over North America through the duration of the drought. The dust cloud, which we show was quite thick over its center in the Midwest, blocked enough solar radiation to reduce surface temperatures by about 1 K. In addition, we show that a complex feedback between dust and drought caused a spatial redistribution of precipitation, in which various regions gained or lost an average of about 1 mm/day of precipitation.

  11. The electrodynamics of charged dust in the cometary environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Mendis, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Dust in the plasma and radiative environment of a comet is necessarily electrically charged. This charging has both physical and dynamical effects on the dust, being particularly important on the smallest particles observed in the dust size spectrum. In this paper, these dynamical effects are reviewed and the pertinent observations are discussed.

  12. Progress in our understanding of cometary dust tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.

    1976-01-01

    Various analytical techniques are employed to analyze observations on the character, composition, and size distribution of solid particles in cometary dust tails. Emphasized is the mechanical theory that includes solar gravitational attraction and solar radiation pressure to explain dust particle motions in cometary tails, as well as interactions between dust and plasma.

  13. Electron spin resonance analysis of tooth enamel does not indicate exposures to large radiation doses in a large proportion of distally-exposed A-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Yuko; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Cullings, Harry M; Miyazawa, Chuzo; Nakamura, Nori

    2011-01-01

    The atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki led to two different types of radiation exposure; one was direct and brief and the other was indirect and persistent. The latter (so-called exposure to residual radiation) resulted from the presence of neutron activation products in the soil, or from fission products present in the fallout. Compared with the doses from direct exposures, estimations of individual doses from residual radiation have been much more complicated, and estimates vary widely among researchers. The present report bases its conclusions on radiation doses recorded in tooth enamel from survivors in Hiroshima. Those survivors were present at distances of about 3 km or greater from the hypocenter at the time of the explosion, and have DS02 estimated doses (direct exposure doses) of less than 5 mGy (and are regarded as control subjects). Individual doses were estimated by measuring CO(2)(-) radicals in tooth enamel with the electron spin resonance (ESR; or electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR) method. The results from 56 molars donated by 49 survivors provided estimated doses which vary from -200 mGy to 500 mGy, and the median dose was 17 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles are -54 mGy and 137 mGy, respectively) for the buccal parts and 13 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles: -49 mGy and 87 mGy, respectively) for the lingual parts of the molars. Three molars had ESR-estimated doses of 300 to 400 mGy for both the buccal and lingual parts, which indicates possible exposures to excess doses of penetrating radiation, although the origin of such radiation remains to be determined. The results did not support claims that a large fraction of distally-exposed survivors received large doses (e.g. 1 Gy) of external penetrating radiation resulting from residual radiation. PMID:21768749

  14. Distribution of Dust from Kuiper Belt Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorkavyi, Nick N.; Ozernoy, Leonid; Taidakova, Tanya; Mather, John C.; Fisher, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Using an efficient computational approach, we have reconstructed the structure of the dust cloud in the Solar system between 0.5 and 100 AU produced by the Kuiper belt objects. Our simulations offer a 3-D physical model of the 'kuiperoidal' dust cloud based on the distribution of 280 dust particle trajectories produced by 100 known Kuiper belt objects; the resulting 3-D grid consists of 1.9 x 10' cells containing 1.2 x 10" particle positions. The following processes that influence the dust particle dynamics are taken into account: 1) gravitational scattering on the eight planets (neglecting Pluto); 2) planetary resonances; 3) radiation pressure; and 4) the Poynting-Robertson (P-R) and solar wind drags. We find the dust distribution highly non-uniform: there is a minimum in the kuiperoidal dust between Mars and Jupiter, after which both the column and number densities of kuiperoidal dust sharply increase with heliocentric distance between 5 and 10 AU, and then form a plateau between 10 and 50 AU. Between 25 and 45 AU, there is an appreciable concentration of kuiperoidal dust in the form of a broad belt of mostly resonant particles associated with Neptune. In fact, each giant planet possesses its own circumsolar dust belt consisting of both resonant and gravitationally scattered particles. As with the cometary belts simulated in our related papers, we reveal a rich and sophisticated resonant structure of the dust belts containing families of resonant peaks and gaps. An important result is that both the column and number dust density are more or less flat between 10 and 50 AU, which might explain the surprising data obtained by Pioneers 10 & 11 and Voyager that the dust number density remains approximately distance-independent in this region. The simulated kuiperoidal dust, in addition to asteroidal and cometary dust, might represent a third possible source of the zodiacal light in the Solar system.

  15. Dust-rainfall feedbacks in the West African Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Wanching Jacquie; Cook, Benjamin I.; Ravi, Sujith; Fuentes, José D.; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2008-05-01

    Dust aerosols can suppress rainfall by increasing the number of cloud condensation nuclei in warm clouds and affecting the surface radiation budget and boundary layer instability. The extent to which atmospheric dust may affect precipitation yields and the hydrologic cycle in semiarid regions remains poorly understood. We investigate the relationship between dust aerosols and rainfall in the West African Sahel where the dust-rainfall feedback has been speculated to contribute to sustained droughts. We find that the amount of dust loadings is negatively correlated with rainfall values, suggesting that dust entrained in the atmosphere can significantly inhibit rainfall in this region.

  16. Migration of Asteroidal Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    Using the Bulirsh Stoer method of integration, we investigated the migration of dust particles under the gravitational influence of all planets, radiation pressure, Poynting Robertson drag and solar wind drag for equal to 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, and 0.4. For silicate particles such values of correspond to diameters equal to about 40, 9, 4, 2, and 1 microns, respectively [1]. The relative error per integration step was taken to be less than 10sup-8. Initial orbits of the particles were close to the orbits of the first numbered mainbelt asteroids.

  17. Rocket dust storms and detached dust layers in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Faure, Julien; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Määttänen, Anni; Forget, François

    2013-04-01

    Airborne dust is the main climatic agent in the Martian environment. Local dust storms play a key role in the dust cycle; yet their life cycle is poorly known. Here we use mesoscale modeling that includes the transport of radiatively active dust to predict the evolution of a local dust storm monitored by OMEGA on board Mars Express. We show that the evolution of this dust storm is governed by deep convective motions. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, rather than by latent heating as in moist convection on Earth. We propose to use the terminology "rocket dust storm," or conio-cumulonimbus, to describe those storms in which rapid and efficient vertical transport takes place, injecting dust particles at high altitudes in the Martian troposphere (30-50 km). Combined to horizontal transport by large-scale winds, rocket dust storms produce detached layers of dust reminiscent of those observed with Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Since nighttime sedimentation is less efficient than daytime convective transport, and the detached dust layers can convect during the daytime, these layers can be stable for several days. The peak activity of rocket dust storms is expected in low-latitude regions at clear seasons (late northern winter to late northern summer), which accounts for the high-altitude tropical dust maxima unveiled by Mars Climate Sounder. Dust-driven deep convection has strong implications for the Martian dust cycle, thermal structure, atmospheric dynamics, cloud microphysics, chemistry, and robotic and human exploration.

  18. A Test of Dust Grain Alignment via Far-Infrared Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaillancourt, John E.; Andersson, B.-G.

    2015-01-01

    Interstellar dust grains are aligned with their physical and spin axes parallel to the ambient magnetic field. This fact is supported by polarization observations from ultraviolet to millimeter wavelengths. The radiative torque (RT) mechanism, by which the grains become aligned, has recently survived a number of specific observational tests. One such observation is the relation between the alignment efficiency and the angle between the magnetic field and the radiation responsible for the RTs. The interaction of light with irregularly shaped grains results in a net torque and spin-up of the grain, while magnetization arising within a spinning grain results in precession of the spin axis about the magnetic field. The combination of these two effects leads to alignment of the grain with the field and predicts a correlation between alignment efficiency and the angle between the radiation- and magnetic- field directions. Andersson et al. (2011, A&A, 534, A19) showed that the alignment efficiency, centered on the star HD 97300, varied with angle about the star with a 180-degree period, consistent with theory. While the geometry towards HD 97300 provides a strong test of the RT-vs.-angle prediction, finding such simple geometries for further tests is difficult. Here we identify a similar geometry towards the Becklin-Neugebauer/Kleinmann-Low (BNKL) object in the Orion molecular cloud. Using polarized emission at 100, 350, and 850 micron we find a clear periodic signal in polarization vs. azimuth centered on BNKL, again, in agreement with RT theory predictions. Additionally, the signal is stronger at shorter wavelengths, as would be expected if the same photons providing the RTs are also heating the dust grains.The authors acknowledge support for this work from the National Science Foundation grant AST 11-09469.

  19. Lunar Dust and Dusty Plasma Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    In the plasma and radiation environment of space, small dust grains from the Moon s surface can become charged. This has the consequence that their motion is determined by electromagnetic as well as gravitational forces. The result is a plasma-like condition known as "dusty plasmas" with the consequence that lunar dust can migrate and be transported by magnetic, electric, and gravitational fields into places where heavier, neutral debris cannot. Dust on the Moon can exhibit unusual behavior, being accelerated into orbit by electrostatic surface potentials as blow-off dust, or being swept away by moving magnetic fields like the solar wind as pick-up dust. Hence, lunar dust must necessarily be treated as a dusty plasma subject to the physics of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). A review of this subject has been given before [1], but a synopsis will be presented here to make it more readily available for lunar scientists.

  20. Optimal control of the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of a spin 1/2 particle: The crusher gradient and the radiation damping cases

    SciTech Connect

    Lapert, M.; Glaser, S. J.; Assémat, E.; Sugny, D.

    2015-01-28

    We show to which extent the signal to noise ratio per unit time of a spin 1/2 particle can be maximized. We consider a cyclic repetition of experiments made of a measurement followed by a radio-frequency magnetic field excitation of the system, in the case of unbounded amplitude. In the periodic regime, the objective of the control problem is to design the initial state of the system and the pulse sequence which leads to the best signal to noise performance. We focus on two specific issues relevant in nuclear magnetic resonance, the crusher gradient and the radiation damping cases. Optimal control techniques are used to solve this non-standard control problem. We discuss the optimality of the Ernst angle solution, which is commonly applied in spectroscopic and medical imaging applications. In the radiation damping situation, we show that in some cases, the optimal solution differs from the Ernst one.

  1. Possibility of retrospective dosimetry for persons accidentally exposed to ionizing radiation using electron spin resonance of sugar and mother-of-pearl.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T

    1989-02-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) dosemeter was used to measure ESR absorption spectra of sugar and shell buttons made of mother-of-pearl, for the purpose of evaluating the external dose to exposed inhibitants in the vicinity of a radiation accident. The ESR absorption intensity of sugar was proportional to dose in the range from about 30 mGy to 6 x 10(4) Gy. The lifetime of the free radical created in both sugar and shell buttons by radiation was stable for at least 6 months after irradiation. If sugar and shell goods left in or around houses since the occurrence of the Chernobyl reactor and the Brazilian accidents were obtained, it would be possible to estimate from them the integrated external dose to exposed people. PMID:2538196

  2. Radiation Pressure on Fluffy Submicron-sized Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silsbee, Kedron; Draine, Bruce T.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the claim that the ratio β of radiation pressure force to gravitational force on a dust grain in our solar system can substantially exceed unity for some grain sizes, provided that grain porosity is high enough. For model grains consisting of random aggregates of silicate spherules, we find that the maximum value of β is almost independent of grain porosity, but for small (\\lt 0.3 μ {{m}}) grains, β actually decreases with increasing porosity. We also investigate the effect of metallic iron and amorphous carbon inclusions in the dust grains and find that while these inclusions do increase the radiation pressure cross-section, β remains below unity for grains with 3 pg of silicate material. These results affect the interpretation of the grain trajectories estimated from the Stardust mission, which were modeled assuming β values exceeding one. We find that radiation pressure effects are not large enough for particles Orion and Hylabrook captured by Stardust to be of interstellar origin given their reported impact velocities. We also consider the effects of solar radiation on transverse velocities and grain spin, and show that radiation pressure introduces both transverse velocities and equatorial spin velocities of several hundred meters per second for incoming interstellar grains at 2 au. These transverse velocities are not important for modeling trajectories, but such spin rates may result in centrifugal disruption of aggregates.

  3. Dusty spin plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brodin, G.; Marklund, M.; Zamanian, J.

    2008-09-07

    A fluid model is derived, taking into account the effect of spin magnetization of electrons as well as of magnetized dust grains. The model is analyzed, and it is found that both the acoustic velocity and the Alfven velocity is decreased due to the magnetization effects. Furthermore, for low-temperature high density plasmas, it is found that the linear wave modes can be unstable, due to the magnetic attraction of individual fluid elements. The significance of our results are discussed.

  4. Detection of anthropogenic dust using CALIPSO lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Nasiri, S. L.

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic dusts are those produced by human activities on disturbed soils, which are mainly cropland, pasture, and urbanized regions and are a subset of the total dust load which includes natural sources from desert regions. Our knowledge of anthropogenic dusts is still very limited due to a lack of data on source distribution and magnitude, and on their effect on radiative forcing which may be comparable to other anthropogenic aerosols. To understand the contribution of anthropogenic dust to the total global dust load and its effect on radiative transfer and climate, it is important to identify them from total dust. In this study, a new technique for distinguishing anthropogenic dust from natural dust is proposed by using Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) dust and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height retrievals along with a land use dataset. Using this technique, the global distribution of dust is analyzed and the relative contribution of anthropogenic and natural dust sources to regional and global emissions are estimated. Results reveal that local anthropogenic dust aerosol due to human activity, such as agriculture, industrial activity, transportation, and overgrazing, accounts for about 25% of the global continental dust load. Of these anthropogenic dust aerosols, more than 53% come from semi-arid and semi-wet regions. Annual mean anthropogenic dust column burden (DCB) values range from 0.42 g m-2 with a maximum in India to 0.12 g m-2 with a minimum in North America. A better understanding of anthropogenic dust emission will enable us to focus on human activities in these critical regions and with such knowledge we will be better able to improve global dust models and to explore the effects of anthropogenic emission on radiative forcing, climate change and air quality in the future.

  5. Lunar Dust and Lunar Simulant Activation and Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, W. T.; Hammond, D. K.; Jeevarajan, A. S.

    2008-01-01

    Prior to returning to the moon, understanding the effects of lunar dust on both human physiology and mechanical equipment is a pressing concern, as problems related to lunar dust during the Apollo missions have been well documented (J.R. Gaier, The Effects of Lunar Dust on EVA Systems During the Apollo Missions. 2005, NASA-Glenn Research Center. p. 65). While efforts were made to remove the dust before reentering the lunar module, via brushing of the suits or vacuuming, a significant amount of dust was returned to the spacecraft, causing various problems. For instance, astronaut Harrison Schmitt complained of hay fever effects caused by the dust, and the abrasive nature of the material was found to cause problems with various joints and seals of the spacecraft and suits. It is clear that, in order to avoid potential health and performance problems while on the lunar surface, the reactive properties of lunar dust must be quenched. It is likely that soil on the lunar surface is in an activated form, i.e. capable of producing oxygen-based radicals in a humidified air environment, due to constant exposure to meteorite impacts, UV radiation, and elements of the solar wind. An activated silica surface serves as a good example. An oxygen-based radical species arises from the breaking of Si-OSi bonds. This system is comparable to that expected for the lunar dust system due to the large amounts of agglutinic glass and silicate vapor deposits present in lunar soil. Unfortunately, exposure to the Earth s atmosphere has passivated the active species on lunar dust, leading to efforts to reactivate the dust in order to understand the true effects that will be experienced by astronauts and equipment on the moon. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is commonly used for the study of radical species, and has been used previously to study silicon- and oxygen-based radicals, as well as the hydroxyl radicals produced by these species in solution (V. Vallyathan, et al., Am. Rev

  6. High sensitivity of Indian summer monsoon to Middle East dust absorptive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Qinjian; Yang, Zong-Liang; Wei, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    The absorptive properties of dust aerosols largely determine the magnitude of their radiative impacts on the climate system. Currently, climate models use globally constant values of dust imaginary refractive index (IRI), a parameter describing the dust absorption efficiency of solar radiation, although it is highly variable. Here we show with model experiments that the dust-induced Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall differences (with dust minus without dust) change from ‑9% to 23% of long-term climatology as the dust IRI is changed from zero to the highest values used in the current literature. A comparison of the model results with surface observations, satellite retrievals, and reanalysis data sets indicates that the dust IRI values used in most current climate models are too low, tending to significantly underestimate dust radiative impacts on the ISM system. This study highlights the necessity for developing a parameterization of dust IRI for climate studies.

  7. High sensitivity of Indian summer monsoon to Middle East dust absorptive properties

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qinjian; Yang, Zong-Liang; Wei, Jiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    The absorptive properties of dust aerosols largely determine the magnitude of their radiative impacts on the climate system. Currently, climate models use globally constant values of dust imaginary refractive index (IRI), a parameter describing the dust absorption efficiency of solar radiation, although it is highly variable. Here we show with model experiments that the dust-induced Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall differences (with dust minus without dust) change from −9% to 23% of long-term climatology as the dust IRI is changed from zero to the highest values used in the current literature. A comparison of the model results with surface observations, satellite retrievals, and reanalysis data sets indicates that the dust IRI values used in most current climate models are too low, tending to significantly underestimate dust radiative impacts on the ISM system. This study highlights the necessity for developing a parameterization of dust IRI for climate studies. PMID:27465689

  8. High sensitivity of Indian summer monsoon to Middle East dust absorptive properties.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qinjian; Yang, Zong-Liang; Wei, Jiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    The absorptive properties of dust aerosols largely determine the magnitude of their radiative impacts on the climate system. Currently, climate models use globally constant values of dust imaginary refractive index (IRI), a parameter describing the dust absorption efficiency of solar radiation, although it is highly variable. Here we show with model experiments that the dust-induced Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall differences (with dust minus without dust) change from -9% to 23% of long-term climatology as the dust IRI is changed from zero to the highest values used in the current literature. A comparison of the model results with surface observations, satellite retrievals, and reanalysis data sets indicates that the dust IRI values used in most current climate models are too low, tending to significantly underestimate dust radiative impacts on the ISM system. This study highlights the necessity for developing a parameterization of dust IRI for climate studies. PMID:27465689

  9. Dust agglomeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    John Marshall, an investigator at Ames Research Center and a principal investigator in the microgravity fluid physics program, is studying the adhesion and cohesion of particles in order to shed light on how granular systems behave. These systems include everything from giant dust clouds that form planets to tiny compressed pellets, such as the ones you swallow as tablets. This knowledge should help us control the grains, dust, and powders that we encounter or use on a daily basis. Marshall investigated electrostatic charge in microgravity on the first and second U.S. Microgravity Laboratory shuttle missions to see how grains aggregate, or stick together. With gravity's effects eliminated on orbit, Marshall found that the grains of sand that behaved ever so freely on Earth now behaved like flour. They would just glom together in clumps and were quite difficult to disperse. That led to an understanding of the prevalence of the electrostatic forces. The granules wanted to aggregate as little chains, like little hairs, and stack end to end. Some of the chains had 20 or 30 grains. This phenomenon indicated that another force, what Marshall believes to be an electrostatic dipole, was at work.(The diagram on the right emphasizes the aggregating particles in the photo on the left, taken during the USML-2 mission in 1995.)

  10. Canyon Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03682 Canyon Dust

    These dust slides are located on the wall of Thithonium Chasma.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -4.1N, Longitude 275.7E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Dust Slides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03677 Linear Clouds

    Dust slides are common in the dust covered region called Lycus Sulci. A large fracture is also visible in this image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 28.1N, Longitude 226.3E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Dust collector

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.T.

    1986-10-21

    This patent describes a dust collector comprising: (a) a housing having inlet means for receiving air to be cleaned; (b) a plurality of filter units within the housing; (c) a first centrifugal fan arranged for drawing air through the units for removing dust from the air; (d) a plurality of ducts each connected to a corresponding one of the units at one end and to the first fan at the other end to provide passages for air from the units to the first fan, the ducts through a portion of their length being arranged in side-by-side relationship; (e) a second centrifugal fan for providing reverse flow of air through the ducts to the units, the second fan providing a high volume of air at low pressure; (f) a transverse duct connected to the second fan and extending transversely of the portion of the plurality of ducts and adjacent thereto: (g) a plurality of openings providing communication between the transverse duct and each of the plurality of ducts; (i) rotatable means engaging the vanes for sequentially moving the vanes between the first and second positions.

  13. Interstellar Dust: Contributed Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. (Editor); Allamandola, Louis J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A coherent picture of the dust composition and its physical characteristics in the various phases of the interstellar medium was the central theme. Topics addressed included: dust in diffuse interstellar medium; overidentified infrared emission features; dust in dense clouds; dust in galaxies; optical properties of dust grains; interstellar dust models; interstellar dust and the solar system; dust formation and destruction; UV, visible, and IR observations of interstellar extinction; and quantum-statistical calculations of IR emission from highly vibrationally excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules.

  14. Deflagration to detonation transition fueled by dust layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.-C.; Harbaugh, A. S.; Alexander, C. G.; Kauffman, C. W.; Sichel, M.

    1995-12-01

    The roles which dust layers play in severe dust explosions were investigated in a 70 m long and 30 cm inside diameter horizontal Flame Acceleration Tube (FAT) with one end closed and the other end open to the atmosphere. A variety of dusts such as corn dust, cornstarch, Mira Gel starch, wheat dust, and wood flour were layered on the bottom half of the FAT. To initiate the combustion process, a detonation tube filled with a stoichiometric H2/O2 mixture at room temperature and 1 atm pressure was used to ignite a short presuspended dust cloud with a dust concentration of 500 600 g/m3. Combustion waves generated by this dust cloud travel toward the open end of the FAT and are continuously fueled by the dust/air mixtures. Flame propagation processes in the FAT were closely monitored by a variety of measuring instruments at different locations. The study demonstrates that stable quasi-detonation were reached in some runs, but self-sustained Chapman-Jouguet detonations were not observed possibly due to the limitation of the tube length. Attempts were made to determine the structure of dust detonations fueled by a dust layer. Preliminary evidence indicates that for Mira Gel starch the leading shock is essentially a triple shock configuration which involves a Mach stem and for wheat and wood dusts there possibly exists a multi-headed spin structure.

  15. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, P. J.; Johansen, M. R.; Olsen, R. C.; Raines, M. G.; Phillips, J. R., III; Pollard, J. R. S.; Calle, C. I.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) has chosen dust mitigation technology as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. NASA has also included Particulate Contamination Prevention and Mitigation as a cross-cutting technology to be developed for contamination prevention, cleaning and protection. This technology has been highlighted due to the detrimental effect of dust on both human and robotic missions. During manned Apollo missions, dust caused issues with both equipment and crew. Contamination of equipment caused many issues including incorrect instrument readings and increased temperatures due to masking of thermal radiators. The astronauts were directly affected by dust that covered space suits, obscured face shields and later propagated to the cabin and into the crew's eyes and lungs. Robotic missions on Mars were affected when solar panels were obscured by dust thereby reducing the effectiveness of the solar panels. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has been developing an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. This technology has been tested in lab environments and has evolved over several years. Tests of the technology include reduced gravity flights (one-sixth g) in which Apollo Lunar dust samples were successfully removed from glass shields while under vacuum (10(exp -6) kPa).

  16. Spin wave excitation patterns generated by spin torque oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macià, F.; Hoppensteadt, F. C.; Kent, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Spin torque nano-oscillators (STNO) are nanoscale devices that can convert a direct current into short wavelength spin wave excitations in a ferromagnetic layer. We show that arrays of STNO can be used to create directional spin wave radiation similarly to electromagnetic antennas. Combining STNO excitations with planar spin waves also creates interference patterns. We show that these interference patterns are static and have information on the wavelength and phase of the spin waves emitted from the STNO. We describe a means of actively controlling spin wave radiation patterns with the direct current flowing through STNO, which is useful in on-chip communication and information processing and could be a promising technique for studying short wavelength spin waves in different materials.

  17. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  18. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    Aerosols, tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, play an important role in modifying the Earth's energy balance and are essential for the formation of cloud droplets. Suspended dust particles lifted from the world's arid regions by strong winds contain essential minerals that can be transported great distances and deposited into the ocean or on other continents where productivity is limited by lack of usable minerals [1]. Dust can transport pathogens as well as minerals great distance, contributing to the spread of human and agricultural diseases, and a portion of dust can be attributed to human activity suggesting that dust radiative effects should be included in estimates of anthropogenic climate forcing. The greenish and brownish tints in figure 1 show the wide extent of monthly mean mineral dust transport, as viewed by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite Figure 1. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite. The brighter the color, the greater the aerosol loading. Red and reddish tints indicate aerosol dominated by small particles created primarily from combustion processes. Green and brownish tints indicate larger particles created from wind-driven processes, usually transported desert dust. Note the bright green band at the southern edge of the Saharan desert, the reddish band it must cross if transported to the southwest and the long brownish transport path as it crosses the Atlantic to South America. Image courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov). Even though qualitatively we recognize the extent and importance of dust transport and the role that it plays in fertilizing nutrient-limited regions, there is much that is still unknown. We are just now beginning to quantify the amount of dust that exits one continental region and the

  19. Feedbacks of dust and boundary layer meteorology during a dust storm in the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rémy, S.; Benedetti, A.; Bozzo, A.; Haiden, T.; Jones, L.; Razinger, M.; Flemming, J.; Engelen, R. J.; Peuch, V. H.; Thepaut, J. N.

    2015-11-01

    Aerosols affect the atmosphere through direct interaction with short-wave and long-wave radiation and the microphysical properties of clouds. In this paper we report in detail on several mechanisms by which the short-term impact of dust on surface radiative fluxes can affect the dust loading of the atmosphere via modification of boundary-layer meteorology. This in turn affects the aerosol radiative forcing itself. Examples of these feedbacks between dust and boundary layer meteorology were observed during a series of dust storms in the Sahara and the eastern Mediterranean in April 2012. These case studies have been analysed using the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate - Interim Implementation (MACC-II) system. The radiative fluxes in the short-wave and long-wave spectra were both significantly affected by the prognostic aerosol-radiation interaction, which in turn impacted the meteorological simulation. Reduced incoming solar radiation below the aerosol layers led to a decrease in maximum surface temperatures and to a more stable thermal stratification of the lower atmosphere. This in turn forced weaker surface wind speeds and eventually smaller dust emissions. Moreover, we also observed a secondary impact of the aerosol radiative forcing, whereby horizontal gradients of surface temperature were increased at the edge of the dust plume, which led to local increases of surface wind speeds due to the thermal wind effect. The differentiated impact of the aerosol layer on surface pressure also contributed to the increase in surface wind speed and dust production in the same area. Enhanced long-wave radiative fluxes by the dust mass were associated with opposite processes. Less stable thermal stratification at night, brought mainly by higher minimum temperatures at the surface, caused stronger surface winds. At the edge of the dust storm, weaker horizontal temperature and pressure gradients forced lower winds and reduced dust production. Regarding dust

  20. Dust near luminous ultraviolet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes research activities related to the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) sky survey. About 745 luminous stars were examined for the presence of interstellar dust heated by a nearby star. The 'cirrus' discovered by IRAS is thermal radiation from interstellar dust at moderate and high galactic latitudes. The IRAS locates the dust which must (at some level) scatter ultraviolet starlight, although it was expected that thermal emission would be found around virtually every star, most stars shown no detectable emission. And the emission found is not uniform. It is not that the star is embedded in 'an interstellar medium', but rather what is found are discrete clouds that are heated by starlight. An exception is the dearth of clouds near the very hottest stars, implying that the very hottest stars play an active role with respect to destroying or substantially modifying the dust clouds over time. The other possibility is simply that the hottest stars are located in regions lacking in dust, which is counter-intuitive. A bibliography of related journal articles is attached.

  1. Dust and sea surface temperature forcing of the 1930s ``Dust Bowl'' drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Miller, Ron L.; Seager, Richard

    2008-04-01

    Droughts over the central United States (US) are modulated by sea surface temperature (SST) variations in the eastern tropical Pacific. Many models, however, are unable to reproduce the severity and spatial pattern of the ``Dust Bowl'' drought of the 1930s with SST forcing alone. We force an atmosphere general circulation model with 1930s SSTs and model-generated dust emission from the Great Plains region. The SSTs alone force a drought over the US similar to observations, but with a weaker precipitation anomaly that is centered too far south. Inclusion of dust radiative forcing, centered over the area of observed wind erosion, increases the intensity of the drought and shifts its center northward. While our conclusions are tempered by limited quantitative observations of the dust aerosol load and soil erosion during this period, our study suggests that unprecedented atmospheric dust loading over the continental US exacerbated the ``Dust Bowl'' drought.

  2. Dust feed mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Milliman, Edward M.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a dust feed device for delivery of a uniform supply of dust for long periods of time to an aerosolizing means for production of a dust suspension. The device utilizes at least two tandem containers having spiral brushes within the containers which transport the dust from a supply to the aerosolizer means.

  3. Effects of dust on the heating of Mars' surface and atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis performed to determine the effect dust particles suspended in Mars' atmosphere have on the radiation reaching the surface both directly and scattered by the dust is described. Additionally, the fraction of incident sunlight directly absorbed by the atmospheric dust is computed. These calculations are done for ranges of dust opacity, incidence angle, surface albedo, and dust albedo, representative of the conditions on Mars. The effect of atmospheric dust on the Bond albedo is discussed. It is shown that direct heating of the atmosphere by dust absorption of solar radiation is adequate to explain Mars' south polar spring temperature inversion. Under most circumstances the presence of dust in Mars' atmosphere produces a lowering of the average surface temperature; this is probably the cause of the anomalously slow south polar cap retreat of 1977. Explicit forms for both the surface heating and the atmospheric heating as a function of the dust opacity, incidence angle, surface albedo and dust albedo are given.

  4. Dust in regions of massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    It is suggested that protostars increase mass by accreting the surrounding gas and dust. Grains are destroyed as they near the central protostar creating a dust shell or cocoon. Radiation pressure acting on the grains can halt the inflow of material thereby limiting the amount of mass accumulated by the protostar. General constraints were considered on the initial dust-to-gas ratio and mass accretion rates that permit inflow. These results were constrained further by constructing a numerical model, including radiative deceleration on grains and grain destruction processes. Also the constraints on dust properties were investigated which allow the formation of massive stars. The obtained results seem to suggest that massive star formation requires rather extreme preconditioning of the grain and gas environment.

  5. Space Environmental Testing of the Electrodynamic Dust Shield Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Mackey, P. J.; Hogue, M. D.; Johansen, M .R.; Yim, H.; Delaune, P. B.; Clements, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's exploration missions to Mars and the moon may be jeopardized by dust that will adhere to surfaces of (a) Optical systems, viewports and solar panels, (b) Thermal radiators, (c) Instrumentation, and (d) Spacesuits. We have developed an active dust mitigation technology, the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, a multilayer coating that can remove dust and also prevents its accumulation Extensive testing in simulated laboratory environments and on a reduced gravity flight shows that high dust removal performance can be achieved Long duration exposure to the space environment as part of the MISSE-X payload will validate the technology for lunar missions.

  6. Lunar Simulation in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2007-01-01

    The Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar has been assembled at the NASA Glenn Research Center to provide a high fidelity lunar simulation facility to test the interactions of lunar dust and lunar dust simulant with candidate aerospace materials and coatings. It has a sophisticated design which enables it to treat dust in a way that will remove adsorbed gases and create a chemically reactive surface. It can simulate the vacuum, thermal, and radiation environments of the Moon, including proximate areas of illuminated heat and extremely cold shadow. It is expected to be a valuable tool in the development of dust repellant and cleaning technologies for lunar surface systems.

  7. Infrared Extinction Spectra of Mineral Dust Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiber, P.; Laskina, O.; Alexander, J. M.; Young, M.; Grassian, V. H.

    2012-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosol affects the atmosphere by absorbing and scattering radiation and plays an important role in the Earth's radiative budget. The effect of atmospheric dust on climate is studied by various remote sensing techniques that use measurements from narrow band IR channels of satellites to determine key atmospheric properties. Therefore, it is essential to take radiative effects of mineral dust aerosol into account to correctly process remote sensing data. As aerosols are transported through the atmosphere they undergo aging and heterogeneous chemistry. This leads to changes in their optical properties and their effects on climate. In this study we carried out spectral simulations using both Mie theory and solutions derived in the Rayleigh regime for authentic dust samples and several processed components of mineral dust. Simulations of the extinction based on Mie theory shows that it does not accurately reproduce the peak position and band shape of the prominent IR resonance features. Errors in the simulated peak position and the line shape associated with Mie theory can adversely affect determination of mineral composition based on IR satellite data. Analytic solutions for various shapes derived from Rayleigh theory offer a better fit to the major band features of the spectra, therefore the accuracy of modeling atmospheric dust properties can be improved by using these analytic solutions. It is also important to take aging of mineral dust into account. We investigated the effect of chemical processing on the optical properties. It was shown that interactions of components of mineral dust (calcite, quartz and kaolinite) with humic and organic acids cause a shift of the IR resonance bands of these minerals. It may indicate changes in shape of the particles as well as changes in hygroscopicity and, as the result, the water content in these samples. Therefore, care should be taken when modeling optical properties of aged mineral dust.

  8. Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Crater wall dust avalanches in southern Arabia Terra.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 10.3, Longitude 24.5 East (335.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  9. Spin density matrix elements for radiative decays of the omega meson in photoproduction at 5 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokaya, Fridah

    2016-03-01

    The photoproduction of ω(782) meson on the nucleon at high energies is well described by a sum of t-channel exchanges. In the high energy limit of diffractive scattering, where Pomeron exchange dominates the total cross section, the helicity of the incident photon is transferred directly to the vector meson. At intermediate energies, other Regge exchanges compete with the Pomeron, leading to a complex energy dependence in the spin density matrix for vector mesons like the omega. High statistics measurements of the spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp ωp, ω π0 γ are presented based on data taken with the Radphi experiment at Jefferson Lab in the energy range 4.4 - 5.5 GeV. The results binned in Eγ and |t | are analysed in both the Gottfried Jackson and s-channel helicity frames and compared to a model with the Pomeron and other Regge exchanges contributing to the omega meson photoproduction amplitude.

  10. Numerical inverse method predicting acoustic spinning modes radiated by a ducted fan from free-field test data.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Serge

    2008-07-01

    Spinning modes generated by a ducted turbofan at a given frequency determine the acoustic free-field directivity. An inverse method starting from measured directivity patterns is interesting in providing information on the noise sources without requiring tedious spinning-mode experimental analyses. According to a previous article, equations are based on analytical modal splitting inside a cylindrical duct and on a Rayleigh or a Kirchhoff integral on the duct exit cross section to get far-field directivity. Equations are equal in number to free-field measurement locations and the unknowns are the propagating mode amplitudes (there are generally more unknowns than equations). A MATLAB procedure has been implemented by using either the pseudoinverse function or the backslash operator. A constraint comes from the fact that squared modal amplitudes must be positive which involves an iterative least squares fitting. Numerical simulations are discussed along with several examples based on tests performed by Rolls-Royce in the framework of a European project. It is assessed that computation is very fast and it well fits the measured directivities, but the solution depends on the method and is not unique. This means that the initial set of modes should be chosen according to any known physical property of the acoustic sources. PMID:18646973

  11. Dust particle dynamics in atmospheric dust devils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekova, Yulia; Popel, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Dust particle dynamics is modeled in the Dust Devils (DDs). DD is a strong, well-formed, and relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from small (half a meter wide and a few meters tall) to large (more than 100 meters wide and more than 1000 meters tall) in Earth's atmosphere. We develop methods for the description of dust particle charging in DDs, discuss the ionization processes in DDs, and model charged dust particle motion. Our conclusions are consistent with the fact that DD can lift a big amount of dust from the surface of a planet into its atmosphere. On the basis of the model we perform calculations and show that DDs are important mechanism for dust uplift in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Influence of DD electric field on dynamics of dust particles is investigated. It is shown that influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is significant near the ground. At some altitude (more then a quarter of the height of DD) influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is negligible. For the calculation of the dynamics of dust electric field can be approximated by effective dipole located at a half of the height of DD. This work was supported by the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2).

  12. Kuiper Belt Dust Grains as a Source of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Zook, Herbert A.; Dermott, Stanley F.

    1996-01-01

    The recent discovery of the so-called Kuiper belt objects has prompted the idea that these objects produce dust grains that may contribute significantly to the interplanetary dust population. In this paper, the orbital evolution of dust grains, of diameters 1 to 9 microns, that originate in the region of the Kuiper belt is studied by means of direct numerical integration. Gravitational forces of the Sun and planets, solar radiation pressure, as well as Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag are included. The interactions between charged dust grains and solar magnetic field are not considered in the model. Because of the effects of drag forces, small dust grains will spiral toward the Sun once they are released from their large parent bodies. This motion leads dust grains to pass by planets as well as encounter numerous mean motion resonances associated with planets. Our results show that about 80% of the Kuiper belt grains are ejected from the Solar System by the giant planets, while the remaining 20% of the grains evolve all the way to the Sun. Surprisingly, the latter dust grains have small orbital eccentricities and inclinations when they cross the orbit of the Earth. This makes them behave more like asteroidal than cometary-type dust particles. This also enhances their chances of being captured by the Earth and makes them a possible source of the collected interplanetary dust particles; in particular, they represent a possible source that brings primitive/organic materials from the outer Solar System to the Earth. When collisions with interstellar dust grains are considered, however, Kuiper belt dust grains around 9 microns appear likely to be collisionally shattered before they can evolve toward the inner part of the Solar System. The collision destruction can be applied to Kuiper belt grains up to about 50 microns. Therefore, Kuiper belt dust grains within this range may not be a significant part of the interplanetary dust complex in the inner Solar

  13. Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX): First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Gagnard, Sam; Gathright, David; Gruen, Eberhard; James, David; Kempf, Sascha; Lankton, Mark; Srama, Ralf; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Szalay, Jamey

    2014-05-01

    The lunar dust environment is expected to be dominated by submicron-sized dust particles released from the Moon due to the continual bombardment by micrometeoroids, and possibly due to UV radiation and plasma-induced near-surface intense electric fields. The Lunar Dust EXperiment (LDEX) instrument is designed to map the spatial and temporal variability of the dust size and density distributions in the lunar environment onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission [1, 2] orbiting the Moon since 10/6/2013. LDEX is an impact detector, capable of reliably detecting and measuring the mass of submicron and micron sized dust grains. LDEX also measures the collective currents from low-energy ions and from the impacts of dust grains that are below the detection threshold for single dust impacts; hence it can search for the putative population of grains with radii ~ 0.1 μm lofted over the terminator regions by plasma effects. This talk will summarize the preliminary analysis of the observations to date: 1) LDEX identified the dust ejecta cloud that is maintained by micrometeoroid bombardment. As predicted, the density of the dust ejecta cloud rapidly increases toward the surface, and it also shows strong temporal variability, most likely related to the stochastic nature of the meteoroid impacts. 2) LDEX, as of yet, has not confirmed the existence of levitated dust clouds. This puts strict new upper limits on the density of small lofted grains, especially during periods of low ion fluxes entering the instrument. [1] Elphic et al., Proc. Lunar. Sci. Conf. 44th, 1719 (2013) [2] Horanyi et al., Proc. Lunar. Sci. Conf. 43th, 1659 (2012).

  14. Mineral dust transport in the Arctic modelled with FLEXPART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groot Zwaaftink, Christine; Grythe, Henrik; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian transport of mineral dust is suggested to play an important role in many processes. For instance, mineral aerosols affect the radiation balance of the atmosphere, and mineral deposits influence ice sheet mass balances and terrestrial and ocean ecosystems. While many efforts have been done to model global dust transport, relatively little attention has been given to mineral dust in the Arctic. Even though this region is more remote from the world's major dust sources and dust concentrations may be lower than elsewhere, effects of mineral dust on for instance the radiation balance can be highly relevant. Furthermore, there are substantial local sources of dust in or close to the Arctic (e.g., in Iceland), whose impact on Arctic dust concentrations has not been studied in detail. We therefore aim to estimate contributions of different source regions to mineral dust in the Arctic. We have developed a dust mobilization routine in combination with the Lagrangian dispersion model FLEXPART to make such estimates. The lack of details on soil properties in many areas requires a simple routine for global simulations. However, we have paid special attention to the dust sources on Iceland. The mobilization routine does account for topography, snow cover and soil moisture effects, in addition to meteorological parameters. FLEXPART, driven with operational meteorological data from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, was used to do a three-year global dust simulation for the years 2010 to 2012. We assess the model performance in terms of surface concentration and deposition at several locations spread over the globe. We will discuss how deposition and dust load patterns in the Arctic change throughout seasons based on the source of the dust. Important source regions for mineral dust found in the Arctic are not only the major desert areas, such as the Sahara, but also local bare-soil regions. From our model results, it appears that total dust load in the

  15. Dust Studies in DIII-D and TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D L; Litnovsky, A; West, W P; Yu, J H; Boedo, J A; Bray, B D; Brezinsek, S; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Groth, M; Hollmann, E M; Huber, A; Hyatt, A W; Krasheninnikov, S I; Lasnier, C J; Moyer, R A; Pigarov, A Y; Philipps, V; Pospieszczyk, A; Smirnov, R D; Sharpe, J P; Solomon, W M; Watkins, J G; Wong, C C

    2009-02-17

    Studies of naturally occurring and artificially introduced carbon dust are conducted in DIII-D and TEXTOR. In DIII-D, dust does not present operational concerns except immediately after entry vents. Submicron sized dust is routinely observed using Mie scattering from a Nd:Yag laser. The source is strongly correlated with the presence of Type I edge localized modes (ELMs). Larger size (0.005-1 mm diameter) dust is observed by optical imaging, showing elevated dust levels after entry vents. Inverse dependence of the dust velocity on the inferred dust size is found from the imaging data. Direct heating of the dust particles by the neutral beam injection (NBI) and acceleration of dust particles by the plasma flows are observed. Energetic plasma disruptions produce significant amounts of dust. Large flakes or debris falling into the plasma may result in a disruption. Migration of pre-characterized carbon dust is studied in DIII-D and TEXTOR by introducing micron-size dust in plasma discharges. In DIII-D, a sample holder filled with {approx}30 mg of dust is introduced in the lower divertor and exposed to high-power ELMing H-mode discharges with strike points swept across the divertor floor. After a brief exposure ({approx}0.1 s) at the outer strike point, part of the dust is injected into the plasma, raising the core carbon density by a factor of 2-3 and resulting in a twofold increase of the radiated power. In TEXTOR, instrumented dust holders with 1-45 mg of dust are exposed in the scrape-off layer 0-2 cm radially outside of the last closed flux surface in discharges heated with neutral beam injection (NBI) power of 1.4 MW. At the given configuration of the launch, the dust did not penetrate the core plasma and only moderately perturbed the edge plasma, as evidenced by an increase of the edge carbon content.

  16. Detection of anthropogenic dust using CALIPSO lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. P.; Liu, J. J.; Chen, B.; Nasiri, S. L.

    2015-10-01

    Anthropogenic dusts are those produced by human activities on disturbed soils, which are mainly cropland, pastureland, and urbanized regions, and are a subset of the total dust load which includes natural sources from desert regions. Our knowledge of anthropogenic dusts is still very limited due to a lack of data. To understand the contribution of anthropogenic dust to the total global dust load, it is important to identify it apart from total dust. In this study, a new technique for distinguishing anthropogenic dust from natural dust is proposed by using Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) dust and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height retrievals along with a land use data set. Using this technique, the global distribution of dust is analyzed and the relative contribution of anthropogenic and natural dust sources to regional and global emissions are estimated. Results reveal that local anthropogenic dust aerosol due to human activity, such as agriculture, industrial activity, transportation, and overgrazing, accounts for about 25 % of the global continental dust load. Of these anthropogenic dust aerosols, more than 53 % come from semi-arid and semi-wet regions. Annual mean anthropogenic dust column burden (DCB) values range from 0.42 g m-2, with a maximum in India, to 0.12 g m-2, with a minimum in North America. A better understanding of anthropogenic dust emission will enable us to focus on human activities in these critical regions and with such knowledge we will be more able to improve global dust models and to explore the effects of anthropogenic emission on radiative forcing, climate change, and air quality in the future.

  17. Agglomeration of Dust

    SciTech Connect

    Annaratone, B. M.; Arnas, C.; Elskens, Y.

    2008-09-07

    The agglomeration of the matter in plasma, from the atomic level up to millimetre size particles, is here considered. In general we identify a continuous growth, due to deposition, and two agglomeration steps, the first at the level of tens of nanometres and the second above the micron. The agglomeration of nano-particles is attributed to electrostatic forces in presence of charge polarity fluctuations. Here we present a model based on discrete currents. With increasing grain size the positive charge permanence decreases, tending to zero. This effect is only important in the range of nanometre for dust of highly dispersed size. When the inter-particle distance is of the order of the screening length another agglomeration mechanism dominates. It is based on attractive forces, shadow forces or dipole-dipole interaction, overcoming the electrostatic repulsion. In bright plasma radiation pressure also plays a role.

  18. Hazards of explosives dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. For purposes of personnel safety, the spark ignitability of the explosives in the form of unconfined dust layers was also studied. The 20-L data show that most of the explosive dusts were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air and some dusts were even capable of sustaining explosions when dispersed in nitrogen. The finest sizes of explosive dusts were less reactive than the larger sizes; this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. The data for the explosive dusts were compared to those for pure fuel dusts.

  19. A critical evaluation of the ability of SEVIRI thermal IR RGB rendering to identify mineral dust outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindley, H.

    2011-12-01

    Imagery derived from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the Meteosat Second Generation series of geostationary satellites is routinely exploited for a wide variety of forecasting and hazard monitoring applications. By selectively combining the information from different wavelength channels, red-green-blue (RGB) composites can be produced which offer the potential to identify specific features, while the high temporal resolution of SEVIRI allows these features to be tracked forwards or backwards in time. Amongst the various rendering schemes is one designed to identify and monitor desert dust events using the information content within three thermal IR channels. Imagery produced using this rendering has been widely used by the scientific community as a tool to: identify dust sources and activation; assist with field campaign planning, including aircraft in-flight routing; as a visual tool to probe particular dust generation mechanisms and transport; and to qualitatively assess dust forecast model performance. Since the SEVIRI field of view extends across approximately 70°N to 70°S and 70°E to 70°W the instrument is ideally placed to monitor events originating from both African and Arabian dust sources. Nevertheless, interpretation of the imagery is subjective, and the rendering may fail to produce an unambiguous dust signal under certain conditions. Particular candidates which may confound the identification of a dust signature include high levels of atmospheric water vapour, a strong near-surface temperature inversion, the height of the dust layer, the characteristics of the underlying surface, variability in the dust mineralogical composition and in the size of the dust particles. In this paper a quantitative analysis of the ability of the SEVIRI dust RGB imagery to identify dust presence will be presented. This work is partly motivated by the findings of previous studies, but also by ongoing projects such as the UK-led Fennec

  20. Wind vs. Dust Devil Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    22 February 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image presents a fine illustration of the difference between streaks made by dust devils and streaks made by wind gusts. Dust devils are usually solitary, spinning vortices. They resemble a tornado, or the swirling motion of a familiar, Tasmanian cartoon character. Wind gusts, on the other hand, can cover a larger area and affect more terrain at the same time. The dark, straight, and parallel features resembling scrape marks near the right/center of this image are thought to have been formed by a singular gust of wind, whereas the more haphazard dark streaks that crisscross the scene were formed by dozens of individual dust devils, acting at different times. This southern summer image is located in Noachis Terra near 67.0oS, 316.2oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left; the picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  1. Applications of Electrified Dust and Dust Devil Electrodynamics to Martian Atmospheric Electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. G.; Barth, E.; Esposito, F.; Merrison, J.; Montmessin, F.; Aplin, K. L.; Borlina, C.; Berthelier, J. J.; Déprez, G.; Farrell, W. M.; Houghton, I. M. P.; Renno, N. O.; Nicoll, K. A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Zimmerman, M.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric transport and suspension of dust frequently brings electrification, which may be substantial. Electric fields of 10 kV m-1 to 100 kV m-1 have been observed at the surface beneath suspended dust in the terrestrial atmosphere, and some electrification has been observed to persist in dust at levels to 5 km, as well as in volcanic plumes. The interaction between individual particles which causes the electrification is incompletely understood, and multiple processes are thought to be acting. A variation in particle charge with particle size, and the effect of gravitational separation explains to, some extent, the charge structures observed in terrestrial dust storms. More extensive flow-based modelling demonstrates that bulk electric fields in excess of 10 kV m-1 can be obtained rapidly (in less than 10 s) from rotating dust systems (dust devils) and that terrestrial breakdown fields can be obtained. Modelled profiles of electrical conductivity in the Martian atmosphere suggest the possibility of dust electrification, and dust devils have been suggested as a mechanism of charge separation able to maintain current flow between one region of the atmosphere and another, through a global circuit. Fundamental new understanding of Martian atmospheric electricity will result from the ExoMars mission, which carries the DREAMS (Dust characterization, Risk Assessment, and Environment Analyser on the Martian Surface)—MicroARES (Atmospheric Radiation and Electricity Sensor) instrumentation to Mars in 2016 for the first in situ electrical measurements.

  2. Identifying sources of aeolian mineral dust: Present and past

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, Daniel R; Prospero, Joseph M; Baddock, Matthew C; Gill, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian mineral dust is an important component of the Earth’s environmental systems, playing roles in the planetary radiation balance, as a source of fertilizer for biota in both terrestrial and marine realms and as an archive for understanding atmospheric circulation and paleoclimate in the geologic past. Crucial to understanding all of these roles of dust is the identification of dust sources. Here we review the methods used to identify dust sources active at present and in the past. Contemporary dust sources, produced by both glaciogenic and non-glaciogenic processes, can be readily identified by the use of Earth-orbiting satellites. These data show that present dust sources are concentrated in a global dust belt that encompasses large topographic basins in low-latitude arid and semiarid regions. Geomorphic studies indicate that specific point sources for dust in this zone include dry or ephemeral lakes, intermittent stream courses, dune fields, and some bedrock surfaces. Back-trajectory analyses are also used to identify dust sources, through modeling of wind fields and the movement of air parcels over periods of several days. Identification of dust sources from the past requires novel approaches that are part of the geologic toolbox of provenance studies. Identification of most dust sources of the past requires the use of physical, mineralogical, geochemical, and isotopic analyses of dust deposits. Physical properties include systematic spatial changes in dust deposit thickness and particle size away from a source. Mineralogy and geochemistry can pinpoint dust sources by clay mineral ratios and Sc-Th-La abundances, respectively. The most commonly used isotopic methods utilize isotopes of Nd, Sr, and Pb and have been applied extensively in dust archives of deep-sea cores, ice cores, and loess. All these methods have shown that dust sources have changed over time, with far more abundant dust supplies existing during glacial periods. Greater dust supplies in

  3. Geometrical spin symmetry and spin

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, I. B.

    2011-07-15

    Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics leads to General Quantum Mechanics which includes into itself spindynamics as a theory of spin phenomena. The key concepts of spindynamics are geometrical spin symmetry and the spin field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). The essence of spin is the bipolar structure of geometrical spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potential. The bipolar structure provides a natural derivation of the equations of spindynamics. Spindynamics involves all phenomena connected with spin and provides new understanding of the strong interaction.

  4. Dust emission: small-scale processes with global consequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okin, Gregory S.; Bullard, Joanna E.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Ballantine, John-Andrew C.; Schepanski, Kerstin; Todd, Martin C.; Belnap, Jayne; Baddock, Matthew C.; Gill, Thomas E.; Miller, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Desert dust, both modern and ancient, is a critical component of the Earth system. Atmospheric dust has important effects on climate by changing the atmospheric radiation budget, while deposited dust influences biogeochemical cycles in the oceans and on land. Dust deposited on snow and ice decreases its albedo, allowing more light to be trapped at the surface, thus increasing the rate of melt and influencing energy budgets and river discharge. In the human realm, dust contributes to the transport of allergens and pathogens and when inhaled can cause or aggravate respiratory diseases. Dust storms also represent a significant hazard to road and air travel. Because it affects so many Earth processes, dust is studied from a variety of perspectives and at multiple scales, with various disciplines examining emissions for different purposes using disparate strategies. Thus, the range of objectives in studying dust, as well as experimental approaches and results, has not yet been systematically integrated. Key research questions surrounding the production and sources of dust could benefit from improved collaboration among different research communities. These questions involve the origins of dust, factors that influence dust production and emission, and methods through which dust can be monitored.

  5. Dust: Small-scale processes with global consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okin, Gregory S.; Bullard, Joanna E.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Ballantine, John-Andrew C.; Schepanski, Kerstin; Todd, Martin C.; Belnap, Jayne; Baddock, Matthew C.; Gill, Thomas E.; Miller, Mark E.

    2011-07-01

    Desert dust, both modern and ancient, is a critical component of the Earth system. Atmospheric dust has important effects on climate by changing the atmospheric radiation budget, while deposited dust influences biogeochemical cycles in the oceans and on land. Dust deposited on snow and ice decreases its albedo, allowing more light to be trapped at the surface, thus increasing the rate of melt and influencing energy budgets and river discharge. In the human realm, dust contributes to the transport of allergens and pathogens and when inhaled can cause or aggravate respiratory diseases. Dust storms also represent a significant hazard to road and air travel. Because it affects so many Earth processes, dust is studied from a variety of perspectives and at multiple scales, with various disciplines examining emissions for different purposes using disparate strategies. Thus, the range of objectives in studying dust, as well as experimental approaches and results, has not yet been systematically integrated. Key research questions surrounding the production and sources of dust could benefit from improved collaboration among different research communities. These questions involve the origins of dust, factors that influence dust production and emission, and methods through which dust can be monitored.

  6. Dust: Small-scale processes with global consequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okin, G.S.; Bullard, J.E.; Reynolds, R.L.; Ballantine, J.-A.C.; Schepanski, K.; Todd, M.C.; Belnap, J.; Baddock, M.C.; Gill, T.E.; Miller, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Desert dust, both modern and ancient, is a critical component of the Earth system. Atmospheric dust has important effects on climate by changing the atmospheric radiation budget, while deposited dust influences biogeochemical cycles in the oceans and on land. Dust deposited on snow and ice decreases its albedo, allowing more light to be trapped at the surface, thus increasing the rate of melt and influencing energy budgets and river discharge. In the human realm, dust contributes to the transport of allergens and pathogens and when inhaled can cause or aggravate respiratory diseases. Dust storms also represent a significant hazard to road and air travel. Because it affects so many Earth processes, dust is studied from a variety of perspectives and at multiple scales, with various disciplines examining emissions for different purposes using disparate strategies. Thus, the range of objectives in studying dust, as well as experimental approaches and results, has not yet been systematically integrated. Key research questions surrounding the production and sources of dust could benefit from improved collaboration among different research communities. These questions involve the origins of dust, factors that influence dust production and emission, and methods through which dust can be monitored. ?? Author(s) 2011.

  7. Lunar Dust Charging by Photoelectric Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.

    2007-01-01

    The lunar surface is covered with a thick layer of sub-micron/micron size dust grains formed by meteoritic impact over billions of years. The fine dust grains are levitated and transported on the lunar surface, as indicated by the transient dust clouds observed over the lunar horizon during the Apollo 17 mission. Theoretical models suggest that the dust grains on the lunar surface are charged by the solar UV radiation as well as the solar wind. Even without any physical activity, the dust grains are levitated by electrostatic fields and transported away from the surface in the near vacuum environment of the Moon. The current dust charging and levitation models, however, do not fully explain the observed phenomena. Since the abundance of dust on the Moon s surface with its observed adhesive characteristics has the potential of severe impact on human habitat and operations and lifetime of a variety of equipment, it is necessary to investigate the charging properties and the lunar dust phenomena in order to develop appropriate mitigating strategies. Photoelectric emission induced by the solar UV radiation with photon energies higher than the work function of the grain materials is recognized to be the dominant process for charging of the lunar dust, and requires measurements of the photoelectric yields to determine the charging and equilibrium potentials of individual dust grains. In this paper, we present the first laboratory measurements of the photoelectric efficiencies and yields of individual sub-micron/micron size dust grains selected from sample returns of Apollo 17, and Luna 24 missions, as well as similar size dust grains from the JSC-1 simulants. The measurements were made on a laboratory facility based on an electrodynamic balance that permits a variety of experiments to be conducted on individual sub-micron/micron size dust grains in simulated space environments. The photoelectric emission measurements indicate grain size dependence with the yield

  8. Asian dust events of April 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, R. B.; Tratt, D. M.; Schichtel, B. A.; Falke, S. R.; Li, F.; Jaffe, D.; Gassó, S.; Gill, T.; Laulainen, N. S.; Lu, F.; Reheis, M. C.; Chun, Y.; Westphal, D.; Holben, B. N.; Gueymard, C.; McKendry, I.; Kuring, N.; Feldman, G. C.; McClain, C.; Frouin, R. J.; Merrill, J.; Dubois, D.; Vignola, F.; Murayama, T.; Nickovic, S.; Wilson, W. E.; Sassen, K.; Sugimoto, N.; Malm, W. C.

    2001-08-01

    On April 15 and 19, 1998, two intense dust storms were generated over the Gobi desert by springtime low-pressure systems descending from the northwest. The windblown dust was detected and its evolution followed by its yellow color on SeaWiFS satellite images, routine surface-based monitoring, and through serendipitous observations. The April 15 dust cloud was recirculating, and it was removed by a precipitating weather system over east Asia. The April 19 dust cloud crossed the Pacific Ocean in 5 days, subsided to the surface along the mountain ranges between British Columbia and California, and impacted severely the optical and the concentration environments of the region. In east Asia the dust clouds increased the albedo over the cloudless ocean and land by up to 10-20%, but it reduced the near-UV cloud reflectance, causing a yellow coloration of all surfaces. The yellow colored backscattering by the dust eludes a plausible explanation using simple Mie theory with constant refractive index. Over the West Coast the dust layer has increased the spectrally uniform optical depth to about 0.4, reduced the direct solar radiation by 30-40%, doubled the diffuse radiation, and caused a whitish discoloration of the blue sky. On April 29 the average excess surface-level dust aerosol concentration over the valleys of the West Coast was about 20-50 μg/m3 with local peaks >100 μg/m3. The dust mass mean diameter was 2-3 μm, and the dust chemical fingerprints were evident throughout the West Coast and extended to Minnesota. The April 1998 dust event has impacted the surface aerosol concentration 2-4 times more than any other dust event since 1988. The dust events were observed and interpreted by an ad hoc international web-based virtual community. It would be useful to set up a community-supported web-based infrastructure to monitor the global aerosol pattern for such extreme aerosol events, to alert and to inform the interested communities, and to facilitate collaborative

  9. Asian dust events of April 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Husar, R.B.; Tratt, D.M.; Schichtel, B.A.; Falke, S.R.; Li, F.; Jaffe, D.; Gasso, S.; Gill, T.; Laulainen, N.S.; Lu, F.; Reheis, M.C.; Chun, Y.; Westphal, D.; Holben, B.N.; Gueymard, C.; McKendry, I.; Kuring, N.; Feldman, G.C.; McClain, C.; Frouin, R.J.; Merrill, J.; DuBois, D.; Vignola, F.; Murayama, T.; Nickovic, S.; Wilson, W.E.; Sassen, K.; Sugimoto, N.; Malm, W.C.

    2001-01-01

    On April 15 and 19, 1998, two intense dust storms were generated over the Gobi desert by springtime low-pressure systems descending from the northwest. The windblown dust was detected and its evolution followed by its yellow color on SeaWiFS satellite images, routine surface-based monitoring, and through serendipitous observations. The April 15 dust cloud was recirculating, and it was removed by a precipitating weather system over east Asia. The April 19 dust cloud crossed the Pacific Ocean in 5 days, subsided to the surface along the mountain ranges between British Columbia and California, and impacted severely the optical and the concentration environments of the region. In east Asia the dust clouds increased the albedo over the cloudless ocean and land by up to 10-20%, but it reduced the near-UV cloud reflectance, causing a yellow coloration of all surfaces. The yellow colored backscattering by the dust eludes a plausible explanation using simple Mie theory with constant refractive index. Over the West Coast the dust layer has increased the spectrally uniform optical depth to about 0.4, reduced the direct solar radiation by 30-40%, doubled the diffuse radiation, and caused a whitish discoloration of the blue sky. On April 29 the average excess surface-level dust aerosol concentration over the valleys of the West Coast was about 20-50 ??g/m3 with local peaks >100 ??g/m3. The dust mass mean diameter was 2-3 ??m, and the dust chemical fingerprints were evident throughout the West Coast and extended to Minnesota. The April 1998 dust event has impacted the surface aerosol concentration 2-4 times more than any other dust event since 1988. The dust events were observed and interpreted by an ad hoc international web-based virtual community. It would be useful to set up a community-supported web-based infrastructure to monitor the global aerosol pattern for such extreme aerosol events, to alert and to inform the interested communities, and to facilitate collaborative

  10. The slow flow model of dust efflux in local star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid, H. J.; Torrey, P.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Kewley, L. J.; Davé, R.; Geller, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    We develop a dust efflux model of radiation pressure acting on dust grains which successfully reproduces the relation between stellar mass, dust opacity and star formation rate observed in local star-forming galaxies. The dust content of local star-forming galaxies is set by the competition between the physical processes of dust production and dust loss in our model. The dust loss rate is proportional to the dust opacity and star formation rate. Observations of the relation between stellar mass and star formation rate at several epochs imply that the majority of local star-forming galaxies are best characterized as having continuous star formation histories. Dust loss is a consequence of sustained interaction of dust with the radiation field generated by continuous star formation. Dust efflux driven by radiation pressure rather than dust destruction offers a more consistent physical interpretation of the dust loss mechanism. By comparing our model results with the observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction and star formation rate in local star-forming galaxies, we are able to constrain the time-scale and magnitude of dust loss. The time-scale of dust loss is long and therefore dust is effluxed in a `slow flow'. Dust loss is modest in low-mass galaxies but massive galaxies may lose up to 70-80 per cent of their dust over their lifetime. Our slow flow model shows that mass-loss driven by dust opacity and star formation may be an important physical process for understanding normal star-forming galaxy evolution.

  11. On Limiting Values of Dust Charges in Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, S. I.; Morozova, T. I.; Popel, S. I.

    2011-11-29

    We investigate limiting values of charges of microparticles for two possibilities of complex (dusty) plasmas in the presence of electromagnetic radiation. The first possibility assumes solid dust grains contained in the plasma while the second one implies the liquid droplets. We obtain analytical expression describing dust particle charging as a result of intensive photoelectric effect. We show that the electrostatic pressure on the surface of charged solid dust particles can affect the strength characteristics of these particles. We obtain the limiting values of the charges of solid dusts, the dusts exceeding this charge value are subjected to total or partial destruction. Necessary conditions and parameters for X-ray sources of electromagnetic radiation are defined to reach these limiting values of dust charges.

  12. NMMB/BSC-DUST: model validation at regional scale in Northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, Karsten; Pérez, Carlos; Jorba, Oriol; María Baldasano, José; Janjic, Zavisa; Black, Tom; Slobodan, Nickovic; Prigent, Catherine; Laurent, Benoit

    2010-05-01

    While mineral dust distribution and effects are important at global scales, they strongly depend on dust emissions that are controlled on small spatial and temporal scales. Indeed, the accuracy of surface wind speed used in dust models is crucial. Due to the cubic higher-order power dependency on wind friction velocity and the threshold behaviour of dust emissions, small errors on surface wind speed lead to large dust emission errors. Most global dust models use prescribed wind fields provided by meteorological centres (e.g., NCEP and ECMWF) and their spatial resolution is currently never better than about 1°×1°. Such wind speeds tend to be strongly underestimated over large arid and semi-arid areas and do not account for reflect mesoscale character of systems responsible for a significant fraction of dust emissions regionally and globally. Other Another strong uncertainties in dust emissions from such approaches are related to the missrepresentation originates from of coarse representation of high subgrid-scale spatial heterogeneity in soil and vegetation boundary conditions, mainly in semi-arid areas. With the development of the new model NMMB-BSC/DUST [Pérez et al., 2008], we are now focusing on the evalution of the model sensitivity to several processes related to dust emissions. The results presented here are an intermediate step to provide global dust forecasts up to 7 days at sub-synoptic resolutions in the near future. NMMB-BSC/DUST is coupled online with the NOAA/NCEP/EMC global/regional NMMB atmospheric model [Janjic, 2005] extending from meso to global scales an being fully embedded into the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). We performed regional simulations for the Northern African domain, including the Arabian peninsula and southern/central Europe (0 to 65°N and 25°W to 55°E) at 1/3°x1/3° and 1/6x1/6° horizontal resolution with 64 vertical layers. The model is initialized with 6-hourly updated NCEP 1x1° analysis data with a dust spin

  13. Rocket dust storms and detached layers in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, A.; Faure, J.; Madeleine, J.; Maattanen, A. E.; Forget, F.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne dust is the main climatic agent in the Martian environment. Local dust storms play a key role in the dust cycle; yet their life cycle is poorly known. Here we use mesoscale modeling with radiatively-active transported dust to predict the evolution of a local dust storm monitored by OMEGA onboard Mars Express. We show that the evolution of this dust storm is governed by deep convective motions. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, in lieu of latent heating in moist convection on Earth. We propose to use the terminology "rocket dust storm", or conio-cumulonimbus, to describe those storms in which rapid and efficient vertical transport takes place, injecting dust particles at high altitudes in the Martian troposphere (30 to 50 km). Combined to horizontal transport by large-scale winds, rocket dust storms form detached layers of dust reminiscent of those observed with instruments onboard Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Detached layers are stable over several days owing to nighttime sedimentation being unable to counteract daytime convective transport, and to the resupply of convective energy at sunrise. The peak activity of rocket dust storms is expected in low-latitude regions at clear season, which accounts for the high-altitude tropical dust maximum unveiled by Mars Climate Sounder. Our findings on dust-driven deep convection have strong implications for the Martian dust cycle, thermal structure, atmospheric dynamics, cloud microphysics, chemistry, and robotic and human exploration.ensity-scaled dust optical depth at local times 1400 1600 and 1800 (lat 2.5°S, Ls 135°) hortwave heating rate at local time 1500 and latitude 2.5°S.

  14. Dust studies in DIII-D and TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D.L.; Litnovsky, A; West, W. P.; Yu, J.H.; Boedo, J.A.; McLean, Adam G

    2009-01-01

    Studies of naturally occurring and artificially introduced carbon dust are conducted in DIII-D and TEXTOR. In DIII-D, dust does not present operational concerns except immediately after entry vents. Submicrometre sized dust is routinely observed using Mie scattering from a Nd: Yag laser. The source is strongly correlated with the presence of type I edge localized modes (ELMs). Larger size (0.005-1 mm diameter) dust is observed by optical imaging, showing elevated dust levels after entry vents. Inverse dependence of the dust velocity on the inferred dust size is found from the imaging data. Heating of the dust particles by the neutral beam injection (NBI) and acceleration of dust particles by the plasma flows are observed. Energetic plasma disruptions produce significant amounts of dust; on the other hand, large flakes or debris falling into the plasma may induce a disruption. Migration of pre-characterized carbon dust is studied in DIII-D and TEXTOR by introducing micrometre-size particles into plasma discharges. In DIII-D, a sample holder filled with 30-40 mg of dust is inserted in the lower divertor and exposed, via sweeping of the strike points, to the diverted plasma flux of high-power ELMing H-mode discharges. After a brief dwell (similar to 0.1 s) of the outer strike point on the sample holder, part of the dust penetrates into the core plasma, raising the core carbon density by a factor of 2-3 and resulting in a twofold increase in the radiated power. In TEXTOR, instrumented dust holders with 1-45 mg of dust are exposed in the scrape-off-layer 0-2 cm radially outside of the last closed flux surface in discharges heated with 1.4 MW of NBI. Launched in this configuration, the dust perturbed the edge plasma, as evidenced by a moderate increase in the edge carbon content, but did not penetrate into the core plasma.

  15. Dust Plume off Mauritania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A thick plume of dust blew off the coast of Mauritania in western Africa on October 2, 2007. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite observed the dust plume as it headed toward the southwest over the Atlantic Ocean. In this image, the dust varies in color from nearly white to medium tan. The dust plume is easier to see over the dark background of the ocean, but the plume stretches across the land surface to the east, as well. The dust plume's structure is clearest along the coastline, where relatively clear air pockets separate distinct puffs of dust. West of that, individual pillows of dust push together to form a more homogeneous plume. Near its southwest tip, the plume takes on yet another shape, with stripes of pale dust fanning out toward the northwest. Occasional tiny white clouds dot the sky overhead, but skies are otherwise clear.

  16. Oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for spin-changing S-P transitions in helium: finite nuclear mass effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Donald C.; Schulhoff, Eva E.; Drake, G. W. F.

    2015-12-01

    We have calculated the electric dipole (E1) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) oscillator strengths and spontaneous decay rates for 24 spin-changing transitions of atomic helium. We included the effects of the finite nuclear mass and the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron augmented by the recently derived Pachucki term. The specific transitions for 4He are n{ }1{{{S}}}0-{n}\\prime { }3{{{P}}}{1,2} and n{ }3{{{S}}}1-{n}\\prime { }1{{{P}}}1 with n,{n}\\prime ≤slant 3 and n≤slant 10 for {n}\\prime =n. For the E1 calculations we used the Breit approximation and pseudostate expansions to perform the perturbation sums over intermediate states in both the length and velocity gauge as a check on both numerical accuracy and validity of the transition operators. The corrections for the nuclear mass and the electron anomaly tend to cancel, indicating that if one is included, then so should be the other. The tables give mass- and anomaly-dependent coefficients permitting the easy generation of results for the other isotopes of helium.

  17. Intergalactic dust

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnicki, K.

    1984-08-01

    In the 1970s, through theoretical work related to the 3 deg cosmic background radiation spectrum, investigations involving the search for intergalactic dark matter were conducted. The origin and distribution of the matter, and the intergalactic medium's effect on light and on cosmology were general topics of interest. Data collected in 1974 for 15,000 galaxies located in the Jagiellonian Field may confirm that the spectral characteristics of the reddening of extragalactic objects may be similar to those of interstellar matter. The invisibility of some extragalactic nebulae in the plane of the Milky Way might have several possible explanations: the Galaxy may be in a special position in the universe, the nebulae may be associated with the Galaxy, or obscuring material in the galactic plane may hide the nebulae located in the Zone of Avoidance.

  18. House-Dust Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    House-dust allergy is a common cause of perennial allergic rhinitis and extrinsic asthma. Symptoms tend to be worse when the patient is in bed. A positive skin test properly performed and interpreted confirms the diagnosis. The house-dust mite is the most important antigenic component of house-dust. Treatment consists of environmental control directed at reducing the mite content of bedroom dust, plus control of symptoms with drugs. Immunotherapy is controversial. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:21286201

  19. Dust as a Working Fluid for Heat Transfer Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantovani, James G.

    2015-01-01

    The project known as "Dust as a Working Fluid" demonstrates the feasibility of a dust-based system for transferring heat radiatively into space for those space applications requiring higher efficiency, lower mass, and the need to operate in extreme vacuum and thermal environments - including operating in low or zero gravity conditions in which the dust can be conveyed much more easily than on Earth.

  20. China Dust and Sand

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... article title:  Dust and Sand Sweep Over Northeast China     View Larger Image ... these views of the dust and sand that swept over northeast China on March 10, 2004. Information on the height of the dust and an ...

  1. Middle East Dust

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... only some of the dust over eastern Syria and southeastern Turkey can be discerned. The dust is much more obvious in the center panel, ... 18, 2002 - A large dust plume extends across Syria and Turkey. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  2. Dust in the Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Armosky, Brad J.

    2004-01-01

    Space is seeming less and less like empty space as new discoveries and reexaminations fill in the gaps. And, ingenuity and technology, like the Spitzer Space Telescope, is allowing examination of the far reaches of the Milky Way and beyond. Even dust is getting its due, but not the dust everyone is familiar with. People seldom consider the dust in…

  3. Niamey Dust Observations

    DOE Data Explorer

    Flynn, Connor

    2008-10-01

    Niamey aerosol are composed of two main components: dust due to the proximity of the Sahara Desert, and soot from local and regional biomass burning. The purpose of this data product is to identify when the local conditions are dominated by the dust component so that the properties of the dust events can be further studied.

  4. DIFFUSE EXTRAPLANAR DUST IN NGC 891

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, Kwang-il; Shinn, Jong-ho; Kim, Il-joong; Witt, Adolf N.

    2014-04-10

    We report the detection of vertically extended far-ultraviolet and near-UV emissions in an edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 891, which we interpret as being due to dust-scattered starlight. Three-dimensional radiative transfer models are used to investigate the content of the extraplanar dust that is required to explain the UV emission. The UV halos are well reproduced by a radiative transfer model with two exponential dust disks, one with a scale height of ≈0.2-0.25 kpc and the other with a scale height of ≈1.2-2.0 kpc. The central face-on optical depth of the geometrically thick disk is found to be τ{sub B}{sup thick}≈0.3--0.5 at the B band. The results indicate that the dust mass at |z| > 2 kpc is ≈3%-5% of the total dust mass, which is in good accordance with the recent Herschel submillimeter observation. Our results, together with the recent discovery of the UV halos in other edge-on galaxies, suggest the widespread existence of a geometrically thick dust layer above the galactic plane in spirals.

  5. Lunar dust transport and potential interactions with power system components

    SciTech Connect

    Katzan, C.M.; Edwards, J.L.

    1991-11-01

    The lunar surface is covered by a thick blanket of fine dust. This dust may be readily suspended from the surface and transported by a variety of mechanisms. As a consequence, lunar dust can accumulate on sensitive power components, such as photovoltaic arrays and radiator surfaces, reducing their performance. In addition to natural mechanisms, human activities on the Moon will disturb significant amounts of lunar dust. Of all the mechanisms identified, the most serious is rocket launch and landing. The return of components from the Surveyor III provided a rare opportunity to observe the effects of the nearby landing of the Apollo 12 lunar module. The evidence proved that significant dust accumulation occurred on the Surveyor at a distance of 155 m. From available information on particle suspension and transport mechanisms, a series of models was developed to predict dust accumulation as a function of distance from the lunar module. The accumulation distribution was extrapolated to a future lunar lander scenario. These models indicate that accumulation is expected to be substantial even as far as 2 km from the landing site. Estimates of the performance penalties associated with lunar dust coverage on radiators and photovoltaic arrays are presented. Because of the lunar dust adhesive and cohesive properties, the most practical dust defensive strategy appears to be the protection of sensitive components from the arrival of lunar dust by location, orientation, or barriers.

  6. Turbulence Modeling in Dust Forming Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helling, Ch.; Lüttke, M.; Sedlmayr, E.; Oeverman, M.; Klein, R.

    The process of dust formation is considered in a turbulent medium. The modeling for hydro- and thermodynamics follows the classical approach for an inviscid, compressible fluid and the dust formation process is described as a two step process, nucleation and growth, including element conservation. Our approach is to combine asymptotic techniques and multi-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS). The turbulence modeling will be performed by the simulation of regime-wise increased scales allowing for a detailed study of the corresponding behavior of the dust forming gas flow. Our investigations have been started in the microscopic scale regime (Kolmogoroff scale << lref << density scale height) where acoustic waves are continuously generated by turbulent motions caused by large-scale convection. We show that the local gas temperature can fall below a temperature threshold for efficient dust nucleation by the superposition of acoustic expansion waves. As the formed seed particles subsequently grow, radiation cooling is intensified causing new dust to form and a runaway effect sets in. An asymptotic model serves as an independent test of our DNS results and allows an investigation of the long term behavior of our dust forming system. Adopting the example of a brown dwarf atmosphere, intermittent dust distributions in space and time (clouds) are predicted by asymptotic calculations of stochastic acoustic interaction and have been studied further by 1D and 2D DNS.

  7. Modelling ice nucleation due to dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Petkovic, Slavko; Pejanovic, Goran; Madonna, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Formation of cold clouds is enhanced if ice nuclei (IN) are available. Cold clouds contribute at global scale with 60% in average in precipitation and their presence significantly affects the atmospheric radiation properties. It is expected that better description of the IN process should substantially improve cloud parameterization in climate and numerical weather prediction models. Observations show that mineral dust particles are the dominant residuals found in cloud ice. In this study we employ the regional dust DREAM model based on high horizontal and vertical grid resolution to parameterize IN caused by mineral dust. DREAM has been already deployed in a study related to IN process (Klein et al, 2010), also in model experiments using several IN parameterization schemes in support of the IN field experiment CALIMA over Canaries. The model has been also extended by adding the major dust mineral fractions as tracers in order to facilitate staying a role of dust mineralogy in ice nucleation. This study will present parameterization of IN using the simulated dust concentration, water moisture and temperature. Preliminary results of simulated IN will be shown, as well as IN validation against lidar aerosol profiles and ice cloud water profiles observed by cloud radar in the Potenza EARLINET site. This study is an initial step in improving a cloud physics parameterization using IN as an input variable in an integrated dust-atmospheric modelling system.

  8. Mixing of Dust and NH3 Observed Globally over Anthropogenic Dust Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginoux, P.; Clarisse, L.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P.-F.; Dubovik, O.; Hsu, N. C.; Van Damme, M.

    2012-01-01

    The global distribution of dust column burden derived from MODIS Deep Blue aerosol products is compared to NH3 column burden retrieved from IASI infrared spectra. We found similarities in their spatial distributions, in particular their hot spots are often collocated over croplands and to a lesser extent pastures. Globally, we found 22% of dust burden collocated with NH3, with only 1% difference between land-use databases. This confirms the importance of anthropogenic dust from agriculture. Regionally, the Indian subcontinent has the highest amount of dust mixed with NH3 (26 %), mostly over cropland and during the pre-monsoon season. North Africa represents 50% of total dust burden but accounts for only 4% of mixed dust, which is found over croplands and pastures in Sahel and the coastal region of the Mediterranean. In order to evaluate the radiative effect of this mixing on dust optical properties, we derive the mass extinction efficiency for various mixtures of dust and NH3, using AERONET sunphotometers data. We found that for dusty days the coarse mode mass extinction efficiency decreases from 0.62 to 0.48 square meters per gram as NH3 burden increases from 0 to 40 milligrams per square meter. The fine mode extinction efficiency, ranging from 4 to 16 square mters per gram, does not appear to depend on NH3 concentration or relative humidity but rather on mineralogical composition and mixing with other aerosols. Our results imply that a significant amount of dust is already mixed with ammonium salt before its long range transport. This in turn will affect dust lifetime, and its interactions with radiation and cloud properties

  9. Interstellar Dust Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Drake, K.; Collette, A.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Postberg, F.; Krueger, H.; Auer, S.

    2010-10-01

    Interstellar grains traversing the inner planetary system have been identified by the Ulysses dust detector. Space dust detectors on other missions confirmed this finding. Analysis of the Stardust collectors is under way to search for and analyze such exotic grains. Interstellar dust particles can be detected and analyzed in the near-Earth space environment. New instrumentation has been developed to determine the origin of dust particles and their elemental composition. A Dust Telescope is a combination of a Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 084501, 2008) together with a high mass resolution mass analyzer for the chemical composition of dust particles in space. Dust particles' trajectories are determined by the measurement of induced electric signals when a charged grain flies through a position sensitive electrode system. A modern DTS can measure dust particles as small as 0.2 micron in radius and dust speeds up to 100 km/s. Large area chemical analyzers of 0.1 m2 sensitive area have been tested at a dust accelerator and it was demonstrated that they have sufficient mass resolution to resolve ions with atomic mass number up to >100 (Earth, Moon and Planets, DOI: 10.1007/s11038-005-9040-z, 2005; Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 014501, 2007). The advanced Dust Telescope is capable of identifying interstellar and interplanetary grains, and measuring their mass, velocity vector, charge, elemental and isotopic compositions. An Active Dust Collector combines a DTS with an aerogel or other dust collector materials, e.g. like the ones used on the Stardust mission. The combination of a DTS with a dust collector provides not only individual trajectories of the collected particles but also their impact time and position on the collector which proves essential in finding collected sub-micron sized grains on the collector.

  10. Photoluminescence by Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijh, U. P.

    2005-12-01

    In this dissertation talk, I will report on our study of interstellar dust through the process of photoluminescence (PL). We present the discovery of a new band of dust PL, blue luminescence (BL) with λ peak ˜ 370 nm in the proto-planetary nebula known as the Red Rectangle (RR). We attribute this to fluorescence by small, 3-4-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. Further analysis reveals additional independent evidence for the presence of small PAHs in this nebula. Detection of BL using long-slit spectroscopic observations in other ordinary reflection nebulae suggests that the BL carrier is an ubiquitous component of the ISM and is not restricted to the particular environment of the RR. We present the spatial distribution of the BL in these nebulae and find that the BL is spatially correlated with IR emission structures attributed to aromatic emission features (AEFs), attributed to PAHs. The carrier of the dust-associated photoluminescence process causing the extended red emission (ERE), known now for over twenty five years, remains unidentified. We constrain the character of the ERE carrier by determining the wavelengths of the radiation that initiates the ERE -- λ < 118 nm. We note that under interstellar conditions most PAH molecules are ionized to the di-cation stage by photons with E > 10.5 eV and that the electronic energy level structure of PAH di-cations is consistent with fluorescence in the wavelength band of the ERE. I will also present first results from ongoing work: Using narrow-band imaging, we present the optical detection of the circum-binary disk of the RR in the light of the BL, and show that the morphology of the BL and ERE emissions in the RR nebula are almost mutually exclusive. It is very suggestive to attribute them to different ionization stages of the same family of carriers such as PAH molecules. Financial support for this study was provided through NSF Grant AST0307307 to The University of Toledo.

  11. Photoluminescence by Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijh, U. P.

    2005-08-01

    In this dissertation, we report on our study of interstellar dust through the process of photoluminescence (PL). We present the discovery of a new band of dust PL, blue luminescence (BL) with λpeak˜370 nm in the proto-planetary nebula known as the Red Rectangle (RR). We attribute this to fluorescence by small, 3-4-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. Further analysis reveals additional independent evidence for the presence of small PAHs in this nebula. Detection of BL using long-slit spectroscopic observations in other ordinary reflection nebulae suggests that the BL carrier is an ubiquitous component of the ISM and is not restricted to the particular environment of the RR. We present the spatial distribution of the BL in these nebulae and find that the BL is spatially correlated with IR emission structures attributed to aromatic emission features (AEFs), attributed to PAHs. The carrier of the dust-associated photoluminescence process causing the extended red emission (ERE), known now for over twenty five years, remains unidentified. We constrain the character of the ERE carrier by determining the wavelengths of the radiation that initiates the ERE -- λ < 118 nm. We note that under interstellar conditions most PAH molecules are ionized to the di-cation stage by photons with E > 10.5 eV and that the electronic energy level structure of PAH di-cations is consistent with fluorescence in the wavelength band of the ERE. In the last few chapters of the dissertation we present first results from ongoing work: i) Using narrow-band imaging, we present the optical detection of the circum-binary disk of the RR in the light of the BL, and show that the morphology of the BL and ERE emissions in the RR nebula are almost mutually exclusive. It is very suggestive to attribute them to different ionization stages of the same family of carriers such as PAH molecules. ii) We also present a pure spectrum of the BL free of scattered light, resolved into seven

  12. A consideration of the effects of dust aerosol and surface dust on Snowball Earth deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.; Halevy, I.; Pierrehumbert, R.

    2009-12-01

    Most previous global climate model simulations could only produce the termination of Snowball Earth episodes at CO2 partial pressures of several tenths of a bar, which is roughly an order of magnitude higher than recent estimates of CO2 levels during and shortly after Snowball events. These simulations have neglected the impact of surface dust on the ice albedo and dust aerosols on radiative transfer, which is an assumption of potentially grave importance. We argue, using the Dust Entrainment and Deposition (DEAD) box model driven by GCM results, that increased dust source and decreased dust sink during Snowball Earth events would have combined to produce atmospheric dust aerosol concentrations one to two orders of magnitude higher than today. We perform calculations using NCAR's Single Column Atmospheric Model (SCAM), a radiative-convective model with sophisticated aerosol, cloud, and radiative parameterizations, that show that when the surface albedo is high, increases of roughly one order of magnitude in dust aerosol loading can produce several times more surface warming than an increase in pCO2 from 10^-4 to 10^-1 bar. Additionally, we argue that over the lifetime of a Snowball event, ice dynamics should lead to the development of a layer of continental and volcanic dust at the ice surface in the tropics that would significantly lower the tropical surface albedo and encourage deglaciation. We test this idea by running the FOAM and CAM GCMs with an added tropical dust layer of different sizes and albedos and find that the tropical dust layer causes Snowball deglaciation at pCO2 values consistent with observations in a reasonable regime of these parameters. Therefore we conclude that including dust processes in simulations can reconcile the CO2 levels required for Snowball termination in climate models with observations. Surface air temperature as a function of the surface albedo, pCO2 and dust loading. The dust profile is either the modern tropical average

  13. Dust shatters like glass: Implications for the climate forcing of mineral dust aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, Jasper

    2013-03-01

    Soil-derived mineral dust aerosols impact climate through interactions with clouds, ecosystems, and radiation, which contributes substantially to uncertainties in understanding past and future climate changes. One of the causes of this large uncertainty is that the size distribution of emitted dust aerosols is poorly understood. In fact, a compilation of measurements indicates that regional and global circulation models overestimate the emitted fraction of clay dust aerosols (< 2 μm diameter) by a factor of ~ 2 - 8. I resolve this discrepancy by deriving a simple theoretical expression for the emitted dust size distribution that is in excellent agreement with measurements. This expression is based on the analogy of dust emission with the scale-invariant fragmentation of brittle materials such as glass. Since regional and global circulation models are usually tuned to the shortwave radiative effect of dust, which is dominated by clay aerosols, these findings suggest that models have substantially underestimated the emission of larger silt (> 2 μm diameter) aerosols, which tend to produce a net warming effect. I show that this underestimation of silt aerosol emission has implications for the effect of dust on regional and global climate.

  14. The impact of surface dust source exhaustion on the martian dust cycle, dust storms and interannual variability, as simulated by the MarsWRF General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Claire E.; Richardson, Mark I.

    2015-09-01

    Observations of albedo on Mars suggest a largely invariant long-term mean surface dust distribution, but also reveal variations on shorter (seasonal to annual) timescales, particularly associated with major dust storms. We study the impact of finite surface dust availability on the dust cycle in the MarsWRF General Circulation Model (GCM), which uses radiatively active dust with parameterized 'dust devil' and wind stress dust lifting to enable the spontaneous production of dust storms, and tracks budgets of dust lifting, deposition, and total surface dust inventory. We seek a self-consistent, long-term 'steady state' dust cycle for present day Mars, consisting of (a) a surface dust distribution that varies from year to year but is constant longer-term and in balance with current dust redistribution processes, and (b) a fixed set of dust lifting parameters that continue to produce major storms for this distribution of surface dust. We relax the GCM's surface dust inventory toward this steady state using an iterative process, in which dust lifting rate parameters are increased as progressively more surface sites are exhausted of dust. Late in the equilibration process, the GCM exhibits quasi-steady state behavior in which few new surface grid points are exhausted during a 60 year period with constant dust lifting parameters. Complex regional-scale dust redistribution occurs on time-scales from less than seasonal to decadal, and the GCM generates regional to global dust storms with many realistic features. These include merging regional storms, cross-equatorial storms, and the timing and location of several storm types, though very early major storms and large amounts of late storm activity are not reproduced. Surface dust availability in key onset and growth source regions appears vital for 'early' major storms, with replenishment of these regions required before another large storm can occur, whereas 'late' major storms appear primarily dependent on atmospheric

  15. Dust at the Martian moons and in the circummartian space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander; Horanyi, Mihály; Lee, Pascal; Witasse, Olivier; Cipriani, Fabrice

    2014-11-01

    The paper provides the current understanding of the dust particle dynamics near the surface and in the circummatrian space of the Martian moons based on existing models developed for airless and non-magnetized bodies. In particular we discuss the response of the regolith of the Martian moons to exposure to radiation, the dynamics of charged dust on their surfaces, their plasma environments, the models and indirect observations of their putative dust tori. It is concluded that there is a good theoretical understanding of the behavior of the dynamics of dust particles near the moons Phobos and Deimos. Current models predict dust rings near orbits of the Martian moons based on detailed estimates for the sources and sinks of the dust particles as well as their lifetimes. However, there is no compelling observational evidence for the predicted dust torus around Phobos or Deimos orbits, and there are no observations yet of dust dynamics near their surfaces. Naturally, in order to detect the motion of dust near the surfaces of these moons, and their dust tori we need measurements using a complementary set of sensitive instruments, including impart dust detectors, electric field sensors, and optical cameras in future missions to Mars and its moons.

  16. Interactions Between Mineral Dust, Climate, and Ocean Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, Santiago; Grassian, Vicki H.; Miller, Ron L.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, technological improvements in the chemical and physical characterization of dust have provided insights into a number of phenomena that were previously unknown or poorly understood. In addition, models are now incorporating a wider range of physical processes, which will allow us to better quantify the climatic and ecological impacts of dust. For example, some models include the effect of dust on oceanic photosynthesis and thus on atmospheric CO 2 (Friedlingstein et al. 2006). The impact of long-range dust transport, with its multiple forcings and feedbacks, is a relatively new and complex area of research, where input from several disciplines is needed. So far, many of these effects have only been parameterized in models in very simple terms. For example, the representation of dust sources remains a major uncertainty in dust modeling and estimates of the global mass of airborne dust. This is a problem where Earth scientists could make an important contribution, by working with climate scientists to determine the type of environments in which easily erodible soil particles might have accumulated over time. Geologists could also help to identify the predominant mineralogical composition of dust sources, which is crucial for calculating the radiative and chemical effects of dust but is currently known for only a few regions. Understanding how climate and geological processes control source extent and characterizing the mineral content of airborne dust are two of the fascinating challenges in future dust research.

  17. Interstellar Dust - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2012-01-01

    The study of the formation and the destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic materials. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar physics and chemistry and in the formation of organic materials, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of carbonaceous dust. Laboratory experiments that are performed under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments to provide information on the nature, the size and the structure of interstellar dust particles, the growth and the destruction processes of interstellar dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. A review of the properties of dust and of the laboratory experiments that are conducted to study the formation processes of dust grains from molecular precursors will be given.

  18. Interstellar dust on the eve of Herschel and Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.

    2008-11-01

    In this contribution I review some of the key scientific questions that animate the interstellar dust community a few months before the launch of Herschel and Planck. Great progress have been made in the past 25 years on the subject of interstellar dust using infrared observations from space. With the advent of sub-millimeter and millimeter observations with Herschel and Planck, new scientific challenges are coming and exciting discoveries are to be expected. In particular Herschel and Planck will bring key information 1) on the growth process of dust grains, the first step toward the formation of planetesimals, 2) on the structure of the interstellar medium and its link with interstellar turbulence, 3) on the physical conditions of the Galactic halo clouds which are thought to have some cold dust, 4) on the properties of the interstellar magnetic field and 5) on the interstellar PAHs using their spinning dust emission in the millimeter.

  19. The flow of interstellar dust through the solar system: the role of dust charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, V. J.; Altobelli, N.; Kempf, S.; Schwehm, G.; Srama, R.; Strub, P.; Grün, E.

    2011-11-01

    Interstellar dust can enter the solar system through the relative motion of the Sun with respect to the Local Interstellar Cloud. The trajectories of the dust through the solar system are not only influenced by gravitation and solar radiation pressure forces, but also by the Lorentz forces due to the interaction of the interplanetary magnetic field with the charged dust particles. The interplanetary magnetic field changes on two major time scales: 25 days (solar rotation frequency) and 22 years (solar cycle). The short-term variability averages out for regions that are not too close (>~2 AU) to the Sun. This interplanetary magnetic field variability causes a time-variability in the interstellar dust densities, that is correlated to the solar cycle. In this work we characterize the flow of interstellar dust through the solar system using simulations of the dust trajectories. We start from the simple case without Lorentz forces, and expand to the full simulation. We pay attention to the different ways of modeling the interplanetary magnetic field, and discuss the influence of the dust parameters on the resulting flow patterns. We also discuss the possibilities of using this modeling for prediction of dust fluxes for different space missions or planets, and we pay attention to where simplified models are justified, and where or when a full simulation, including all forces is necessary. One of the aims of this work is to understand measurements of spacecraft like Ulysses, Cassini and Stardust.

  20. The flow of interstellar dust through the solar system: the role of dust charging

    SciTech Connect

    Sterken, V. J.; Altobelli, N.; Schwehm, G.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Strub, P.; Gruen, E.

    2011-11-29

    Interstellar dust can enter the solar system through the relative motion of the Sun with respect to the Local Interstellar Cloud. The trajectories of the dust through the solar system are not only influenced by gravitation and solar radiation pressure forces, but also by the Lorentz forces due to the interaction of the interplanetary magnetic field with the charged dust particles. The interplanetary magnetic field changes on two major time scales: 25 days (solar rotation frequency) and 22 years (solar cycle). The short-term variability averages out for regions that are not too close (>{approx}2 AU) to the Sun. This interplanetary magnetic field variability causes a time-variability in the interstellar dust densities, that is correlated to the solar cycle.In this work we characterize the flow of interstellar dust through the solar system using simulations of the dust trajectories. We start from the simple case without Lorentz forces, and expand to the full simulation. We pay attention to the different ways of modeling the interplanetary magnetic field, and discuss the influence of the dust parameters on the resulting flow patterns. We also discuss the possibilities of using this modeling for prediction of dust fluxes for different space missions or planets, and we pay attention to where simplified models are justified, and where or when a full simulation, including all forces is necessary. One of the aims of this work is to understand measurements of spacecraft like Ulysses, Cassini and Stardust.

  1. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Powell, B J

    2015-01-01

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated d(6) (t(2g)(6)) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and Ir(ppy)3, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, T1, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of T1 and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state. PMID:26123864

  2. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling

    PubMed Central

    Powell, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated d6 () transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)3]2+ and Ir(ppy)3, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, T1, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of T1 and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state. PMID:26123864

  3. Using thermal infrared (TIR) data to characterize dust sources, dust fall and the linkage to climate in the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, R.; Ramsey, M.; Scheidt, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    Prior to mineral dust deposition affecting albedo, aerosols can have direct and indirect effects on local to regional scale climate by changing both the shortwave and longwave radiative forcing. In addition, mineral dust causes health hazards, such as respiratory-related illnesses and deaths, loss of agricultural soil, and safety hazards to aviation and motorists due to reduced visibility. Previous work utilized satellite and ground-based TIR data to describe the direct longwave radiative effect of the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) over the Atlantic Ocean originating from dust storms in the Western Sahara. TIR emission spectroscopy was used to identify the spectral absorption features of that dust. The current research focuses on Kuwait and utilizes a comprehensive set of spatial, analytical and geological tools to characterize dust emissions and its radiative effects. Surface mineral composition maps for the Kuwait region were created using ASTER images and GIS datasets in order to identify the possible sources of wind-blown dust. Backward trajectory analysis using the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model suggests the dust source areas were located in Iraq, Syria, Jordan and Saudi Arabia. Samples collected from two dust storms (May and July 2010) were analyzed for their mineral composition and to validate the dust source areas identified by the modeling and remote sensing analysis. These air fall dust samples were collected in glass containers on a 13 meter high rooftop in the suburb of Rumaithiya in Kuwait. Additional samples will be collected to expand the analysis and their chemical compositions will be characterized by a combination of laboratory X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and TIR emission spectroscopy. The overarching objective of this ongoing research is to both characterize the effects of mineral dust on climate as well as establish a predictive tool that can identify dust storm sources and

  4. Twelve thousand years of dust: the Holocene global dust cycle constrained by natural archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Winckler, G.; Anderson, R. F.; Bradtmiller, L. I.; Delmonte, B.; François, R.; Goman, M.; Heavens, N. G.; Hesse, P. P.; Hovan, S. A.; Kang, S. G.; Kohfeld, K. E.; Lu, H.; Maggi, V.; Mason, J. A.; Mayewski, P. A.; McGee, D.; Miao, X.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Perry, A. T.; Pourmand, A.; Roberts, H. M.; Rosenbloom, N.; Stevens, T.; Sun, J.

    2015-06-01

    Mineral dust plays an important role in the climate system by interacting with radiation, clouds, and biogeochemical cycles. In addition, natural archives show that the dust cycle experienced variability in the past in response to global and local climate change. The compilation of the DIRTMAP (Dust Indicators and Records from Terrestrial and MArine Palaeoenvironments) paleodust data sets in the last 2 decades provided a benchmark for paleoclimate models that include the dust cycle, following a time slice approach. We propose an innovative framework to organize a paleodust data set that builds on the positive experience of DIRTMAP and takes into account new scientific challenges by providing a concise and accessible data set of temporally resolved records of dust mass accumulation rates and particle grain size distributions. We consider data from ice cores, marine sediments, loess-paleosol sequences, lake sediments, and peat bogs for this compilation, with a temporal focus on the Holocene period. This global compilation allows the investigation of the potential, uncertainties, and confidence level of dust mass accumulation rate reconstructions and highlights the importance of dust particle size information for accurate and quantitative reconstructions of the dust cycle. After applying criteria that help to establish that the data considered represent changes in dust deposition, 45 paleodust records have been identified, with the highest density of dust deposition data occurring in the North Atlantic region. Although the temporal evolution of dust in the North Atlantic appears consistent across several cores and suggests that minimum dust fluxes are likely observed during the early to mid-Holocene period (6000-8000 years ago), the magnitude of dust fluxes in these observations is not fully consistent, suggesting that more work needs to be done to synthesize data sets for the Holocene. Based on the data compilation, we used the Community Earth System Model to

  5. Classifying and Tracking Dust Plumes from Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachl, Fabian E.; Garbe, Christoph S.

    2012-03-01

    Recent studies emphasize the role mineral dust aerosols play in terms of the earth's climate system, its radiation budget and microbial nutrition cycles. In order to gain further insight into the genesis and long term characteristics of dust events, processing setellite imagery is inevitable. We propose a fully Bayesian multispectral classification method that significantly facilitates this task. Using MSG-SEVIRI imagery we show that our technique allows to extract dust activity well enough to pave the way for a tracking scheme. Based on this procedure we derive an approach to identify regions that are likely to be the origin of emerging dust plumes.

  6. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Lunar/ISS Experiment Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Carlos; Hogue, Michael; Johansen, Michael; Mackey, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center is developing a dust mitigation experiment and testing it on the lunar surface and on the International Space Station (ISS). The Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) clears dust off surfaces and prevents accumulation by using a pattern of electrodes to generate a non-uniform electric field over the surface being protected. The EDS experiment will repel dust off materials such as painted Kapton and glass to demonstrate applications for thermal radiators, camera lenses, solar panels, and other hardware and equipment.

  7. Cosmic dust or other similar outer-space particles location detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aver, S.

    1973-01-01

    Cosmic dust may be serious radiation hazard to man and electronic equipment caught in its path. Dust detector uses two operational amplifiers and offers narrower areas for collection of cosmic dust. Detector provides excellent resolution as result of which recording of particle velocities as well as positions of their impact are more accurately determined.

  8. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF DUST IN GALAXIES: METHODS AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the redshift (z) evolution of dust mass and abundance, their dependences on initial conditions of galaxy formation, and physical correlations between dust, gas, and stellar contents at different z based on our original chemodynamical simulations of galaxy formation with dust growth and destruction. In this preliminary investigation, we first determine the reasonable ranges of the most important two parameters for dust evolution, i.e., the timescales of dust growth and destruction, by comparing the observed and simulated dust mass and abundances and molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) content of the Galaxy. We then investigate the z-evolution of dust-to-gas ratios (D), H{sub 2} gas fraction (f{sub H{sub 2}}), and gas-phase chemical abundances (e.g., A {sub O} = 12 + log (O/H)) in the simulated disk and dwarf galaxies. The principal results are as follows. Both D and f{sub H{sub 2}} can rapidly increase during the early dissipative formation of galactic disks (z ∼ 2-3), and the z-evolution of these depends on initial mass densities, spin parameters, and masses of galaxies. The observed A {sub O}-D relation can be qualitatively reproduced, but the simulated dispersion of D at a given A {sub O} is smaller. The simulated galaxies with larger total dust masses show larger H{sub 2} and stellar masses and higher f{sub H{sub 2}}. Disk galaxies show negative radial gradients of D and the gradients are steeper for more massive galaxies. The observed evolution of dust masses and dust-to-stellar-mass ratios between z = 0 and 0.4 cannot be reproduced so well by the simulated disks. Very extended dusty gaseous halos can be formed during hierarchical buildup of disk galaxies. Dust-to-metal ratios (i.e., dust-depletion levels) are different within a single galaxy and between different galaxies at different z.

  9. Haul road dust control

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, W.R.; Organiscak, J.A.

    2007-10-15

    A field study was conducted to measure dust from haul trucks at a limestone quarry and a coal preparation plant waste hauling operation. The study found that primarily wind, distance and road treatment conditions notably affected the dust concentrations at locations next to, 50 ft from, and 100 ft away from the unpaved haulage road. Airborne dust measured along the unpaved haul road showed that high concentrations of fugitive dust can be generated with these concentrations rapidly decreasing to nearly background levels within 100 ft of the road. Instantaneous respirable dust measurements illustrated that the trucks generate a real-time dust cloud that has a peak concentration with a time-related decay rate as the dust moves past the sampling locations. The respirable dust concentrations and peak levels were notably diminished as the dust cloud was transported, diluted, and diffused by the wind over the 100 ft distance from the road. Individual truck concentrations and peak levels measured next to the dry road surface test section were quite variable and dependent on wind conditions, particularly wind direction, with respect to reaching the sampling location. The vast majority of the fugitive airborne dust generated from unpaved and untreated haulage roads was non-respirable. 6 figs.

  10. Dust Studies in DIII-D and TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D; Litnovsky, A; West, W; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Bray, B; Brezinsek, S; Brooks, N; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Hollmann, E; Huber, A; Hyatt, A; Krasheninnikov, S; Lasnier, C; Moyer, R; Pigarov, A; Philipps, V; Pospieszezyk, A; Smirnov, R; Sharpe, J; Solomon, W; Watkins, J; Wong, C

    2008-10-14

    Studies of naturally occurring and artificially introduced carbon dust are conducted in DIII-D and TEXTOR. In DIII-D, dust does not present operational concerns except immediately after entry vents. Energetic plasma disruptions produce significant amounts of dust. However, dust production by disruptions alone is insufficient to account for the estimated in-vessel dust inventory in DIII-D. Submicron sized dust is routinely observed using Mie scattering from a Nd:Yag laser. The source is strongly correlated with the presence of Type I edge localized modes (ELMs). Larger size (0.005-1 mm diameter) dust is observed by optical imaging, showing elevated dust levels after entry vents. Inverse dependence of the dust velocity on the inferred dust size is found from the imaging data. Migration of pre-characterized carbon dust is studied in DIII-D and TEXTOR by injecting micron-size dust in plasma discharges. In DIII-D, a sample holder filled with {approx}30 mg of dust is introduced in the lower divertor and exposed to high-power ELMing H-mode discharges with strike points swept across the divertor floor. After a brief exposure ({approx}0.1 s) at the outer strike point, part of the dust is injected into the plasma, raising the core carbon density by a factor of 2-3 and resulting in a twofold increase of the radiated power. Individual dust particles are observed moving at velocities of 10-100 m/s, predominantly in the toroidal direction, consistent with the drag force from the deuteron flow and in agreement with modeling by the 3D DustT code. In TEXTOR, instrumented dust holders with 1-45 mg of dust are exposed in the scrape-off layer 0-2 cm radially outside of the last closed flux surface in discharges heated with neutral beam injection (NBI) power of 1.4 MW. Dust is launched either in the beginning of a discharge or at the initiation of NBI, preferentially in a direction perpendicular to the toroidal magnetic field. At the given configuration of the launch, the dust did not

  11. Isothermal Circumstellar Dust Shell Model for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, G.; Towers, I. N.; Jovanoski, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model of radiative transfer in circumstellar dust shells. By assuming that the shell is both isothermal and its thickness is small compared to its radius, the model is simple enough for students to grasp and yet still provides a quantitative description of the relevant physical features. The isothermal model can be used in a…

  12. Heliotropic dust rings for Earth climate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewick, R.; Lücking, C.; Colombo, C.; Sanchez, J. P.; McInnes, C. R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper examines the concept of a Sun-pointing elliptical Earth ring comprised of dust grains to offset global warming. A new family of non-Keplerian periodic orbits, under the effects of solar radiation pressure and the Earth's J2 oblateness perturbation, is used to increase the lifetime of the passive cloud of particles and, thus, increase the efficiency of this geoengineering strategy. An analytical model is used to predict the orbit evolution of the dust ring due to solar-radiation pressure and the J2 effect. The attenuation of the solar radiation can then be calculated from the ring model. In comparison to circular orbits, eccentric orbits yield a more stable environment for small grain sizes and therefore achieve higher efficiencies when the orbit decay of the material is considered. Moreover, the novel orbital dynamics experienced by high area-to-mass ratio objects, influenced by solar radiation pressure and the J2 effect, ensure the ring will maintain a permanent heliotropic shape, with dust spending the largest portion of time on the Sun facing side of the orbit. It is envisaged that small dust grains can be released from a circular generator orbit with an initial impulse to enter an eccentric orbit with Sun-facing apogee. Finally, a lowest estimate of 1 × 1012 kg of material is computed as the total mass required to offset the effects of global warming.

  13. Consistent dust and gas models for protoplanetary disks. I. Disk shape, dust settling, opacities, and PAHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woitke, P.; Min, M.; Pinte, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Kamp, I.; Rab, C.; Anthonioz, F.; Antonellini, S.; Baldovin-Saavedra, C.; Carmona, A.; Dominik, C.; Dionatos, O.; Greaves, J.; Güdel, M.; Ilee, J. D.; Liebhart, A.; Ménard, F.; Rigon, L.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a set of standard assumptions for the modelling of Class II and III protoplanetary disks, which includes detailed continuum radiative transfer, thermo-chemical modelling of gas and ice, and line radiative transfer from optical to cm wavelengths. The first paper of this series focuses on the assumptions about the shape of the disk, the dust opacities, dust settling, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In particular, we propose new standard dust opacities for disk models, we present a simplified treatment of PAHs in radiative equilibrium which is sufficient to reproduce the PAH emission features, and we suggest using a simple yet physically justified treatment of dust settling. We roughly adjust parameters to obtain a model that predicts continuum and line observations that resemble typical multi-wavelength continuum and line observations of Class II T Tauri stars. We systematically study the impact of each model parameter (disk mass, disk extension and shape, dust settling, dust size and opacity, gas/dust ratio, etc.) on all mainstream continuum and line observables, in particular on the SED, mm-slope, continuum visibilities, and emission lines including [OI] 63 μm, high-J CO lines, (sub-)mm CO isotopologue lines, and CO fundamental ro-vibrational lines. We find that evolved dust properties, i.e. large grains, often needed to fit the SED, have important consequences for disk chemistry and heating/cooling balance, leading to stronger near- to far-IR emission lines in general. Strong dust settling and missing disk flaring have similar effects on continuum observations, but opposite effects on far-IR gas emission lines. PAH molecules can efficiently shield the gas from stellar UV radiation because of their strong absorption and negligible scattering opacities in comparison to evolved dust. The observable millimetre-slope of the SED can become significantly more gentle in the case of cold disk midplanes, which we find regularly in our T Tauri models

  14. The impacts of Middle East dust on Indian summer rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Q.; Yang, Z. L.; Wei, J.

    2014-12-01

    Using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with online chemistry (WRF-Chem), the impact of Middle East dust aerosols on the Indian summer monsoon rainfall was studied. Eight numerical experiments were conducted to take into account uncertainties related to dust-absorbing properties, various assumptions used in calculating aerosol optical depth (AOD), and various radiation schemes. In order to obtain reasonable dust emission, model-simulated AOD and radiation forcing at the top of the atmosphere were compared with multiple satellite- and surface-based observations. Consistent with observations, modeled results show heavy dust loadings in the Arabian Peninsula and Pakistan, which can be transported through long distance to the Arabian Sea and the Indian Peninsula. By heating the atmosphere in the lower troposphere over the Iranian Plateau, these dust aerosols result in strengthened Indian summer monsoon circulations, which in turn transport more water vapor to the Indian Peninsula. The model shows that northern India becomes wetter during the monsoon season in dust cases than non-dust cases. Further observational analyses show an increasing trend in AOD over the Arabian Peninsula, which corresponds to an increasing trend of rainfall in northern India during summer monsoon seasons from 2000 to 2013. These observed trends of AOD and rainfall are consistent with the model-simulated positive relationship between Middle East dust and Indian summer monsoon rainfall. Our results highlight long-term (decadal) impacts of Middle East dust aerosols on the Indian summer rainfall.

  15. Cooling the Martian atmosphere: The spectral overlap of the C02 15 micrometers band and dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1994-01-01

    Careful consideration must be given to the simultaneous treatment of the radiative transfer of the CO2 15 micron band and dust calculations for the Martian winter polar region show that a simple sum of separately calculated CO2 cooling rates and dust cooling rates can easily result a 30 percent error in the net cooling particularly near the surface. CO2 and dust hinder each others ability to cool the atmosphere. Even during periods of low dust opacity, dust still reduces the efficacy of CO2 at cooling the atmosphere. At the other extreme, when dust storms occur, CO2 still significantly impedes the ability of dust to cool the atmosphere. Hence, both CO2 and dust must be considered in radiative transfer models.

  16. Observations of Saharan dust in the Caribbean and Implications for Regional Climate Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L.; Einaudi, Franco

    2001-01-01

    Massive quantities of dust aerosol, originating at source locations in the Saharan desert are frequently transported westward across the Atlantic. Saharan dust has been frequently identified at ground-based stations in South America, on Barbados, in Florida and in Texas. Recently, in July of 2000, the Puerto Rican Dust Experiment (PRiDE), consisting of researchers from the U.S. Navy, NASA, the University of Miami and the University of Puerto Rico joined together to study this important phenomenon. Numerical forecast models tracked each dust event as the dust left the African continent and transversed the Atlantic. Ground-based, ship-based, airborne and satellite sensors were used to characterize the physical and radiative properties of the dust aerosol. The dust plays an important role in terms of radiative forcing of regional climate. Satellite sensors such as NASA's EOS-MODIS aboard the Terra satellite will provide important continuing information on the dust aerosol and its climatic effects.

  17. DUST FORMATION IN MACRONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Hajime; Ioka, Kunihito; Nozawa, Takaya E-mail: kunihito.ioka@kek.jp

    2014-07-01

    We examine dust formation in macronovae (as known as kilonovae), which are the bright ejecta of neutron star binary mergers and one of the leading sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. In light of information about the first macronova candidate associated with GRB 130603B, we find that dust grains of r-process elements have difficulty forming because of the low number density of the r-process atoms, while carbon or elements lighter than iron can condense into dust if they are abundant. Dust grains absorb emission from ejecta with an opacity even greater than that of the r-process elements, and re-emit photons at infrared wavelengths. Such dust emission can potentially account for macronovae without r-process nucleosynthesis as an alternative model. This dust scenario predicts a spectrum with fewer features than the r-process model and day-scale optical-to-ultraviolet emission.

  18. Bright Dust Devil Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    9 June 2004 Martian dust devils sometimes disrupt thin coatings of surface dust to create dark streak patterns on the surface. However, not all dust devils make streaks, and not all dust devil streaks are dark. In Syria Planum, the streaks are lighter than the surrounding plains. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows an example from Syria near 8.8oS, 103.6oW. The thin coating of surface dust in this region is darker than the substrate beneath it. This is fairly unusual for Mars, because most dust is bright. This image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the left/lower left.

  19. Dust Removal Technology Demonstration for a Lunar Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Chen, A.; Immer, C. D.; Csonka, M.; Hogue, M. D.; Snyder, S. J.; Rogriquez, M.; Margiotta, D. V.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS), an active dust mitigation technology with applications to solar panels, thermal radiators, optical systems, visors, seals and connectors. This active technology is capable of removing dust and granular material with diameters as large as several hundred microns. In this paper, we report on the development of three types of EDS systems for NASA's Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU). A transparent EDS 20 cm in diameter with indium tin oxide electrodes on a 0.1 mm-thick polyethylene terephtalate (PET) film was constructed for viewport dust protection. Two opaque EDS systems with copper electrodes on 0.1 mm-thick Kapton were also built to demonstrate dust removal on the doors of the HDU. A lotus coating that minimizes dust adhesion was added to one of the last two EDS systems to demonstrate the effectiveness of the combined systems.

  20. Survey of Dust Production in Pebble Bed Reactors Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderafi M. Ougouag; Javier Ortensi

    2011-06-01

    Graphite dust produced via mechanical wear from the pebbles in a pebble bed reactor is an area of concern for licensing. Both the German pebble bed reactors produced graphite dust that contained activated elements. These activation products constitute an additional source term of radiation and must be taken under consideration during the conduct of accident analysis of the design. This paper discusses the available literature on graphite dust production and measurements in pebble bed reactors. Limited data is available on the graphite dust produced from the AVR and THTR-300 pebble bed reactors. Experiments that have been performed on wear of graphite in pebble-bed-like conditions are reviewed. The calculation of contact forces, which are a key driving mechanism for dust in the reactor, are also included. In addition, prior graphite dust predictions are examined, and future areas of research are identified.

  1. Simulating Mars' Dust Cycle with a Mars General Circulation Model: Effects of Water Ice Cloud Formation on Dust Lifting Strength and Seasonality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for the current climate of Mars. The radiative effects of dust impact the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere [1,2,3]. Although dust is present in the Martian atmosphere throughout the year, the level of dustiness varies with season. The atmosphere is generally the dustiest during northern fall and winter and the least dusty during northern spring and summer [4]. Dust particles are lifted into the atmosphere by dust storms that range in size from meters to thousands of kilometers across [5]. Regional storm activity is enhanced before northern winter solstice (Ls200 degrees - 240 degrees), and after northern solstice (Ls305 degrees - 340 degrees ), which produces elevated atmospheric dust loadings during these periods [5,6,7]. These pre- and post- solstice increases in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere with cross-equatorial transport of dust leading to enhanced dust lifting in the southern hemisphere [6]. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles [8,9,10]. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading.

  2. Cooling of the North Atlantic by Saharan Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Kim, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    Using aerosol optical depth, sea surface temperature, top-of-the-atmosphere solar radiation flux, and oceanic mixed-layer depth from diverse data sources that include NASA satellites, NCEP reanalysis, in situ observations, as well as long-term dust records from Barbados, we examine the possible relationships between Saharan dust and Atlantic sea surface temperature. Results show that the estimated anomalous cooling pattern of the Atlantic during June 2006 relative to June 2005 due to attenuation of surface solar radiation by Saharan dust remarkably resemble observations, accounting for approximately 30-40% of the observed change in sea surface temperature. Historical data analysis show that there is a robust negative correlation between atmospheric dust loading and Atlantic SST consistent with the notion that increased (decreased) Saharan dust is associated with cooling (warming) of the Atlantic during the early hurricane season (July- August-September).

  3. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  4. Dust mobilization on airless planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, M.

    2013-12-01

    There are a number of observations indicating that small dust grains can be mobilized and transported on the surfaces of airless bodies. While not a single measurement to date can unambiguously identify the responsible process, the entire body of existing observations as a whole suggests that electrodynamics remains the most likely candidate. If this is the case, our models have to be able to account for the electrostatic charging and subsequent dynamics of the grains sculpted by surface electric fields. The Colorado Center for Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) of the former NASA Lunar Science Institute conducted a series of small-scale laboratory experiments to address dust charging and mobilization issues, including the effects of flowing plasmas and UV radiation. This talk will draw conclusions based on these series of experiments and use them to guide the analysis and interpretation of the data from the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Mission (LADEE). By the time of this talk, LADEE is expected to collect its initial science measurements. The combination of laboratory and in situ space measurements provides a unique opportunity to advance our theoretical models on the transport of charged dust particles on the lunar surface, and apply these arguments to all other airless planetary bodies.

  5. Modeling the mineralogy of atmospheric dust sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claquin, T.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y. J.

    1999-09-01

    The variability of atmospheric dust mineralogy influences the impact of desert dust on the Earth's radiative budget and biogeochemical cycles. Until now, atmospheric transport models have assumed that dust was a constant homogeneous mixture, hence neglecting this variability. The lack of mineralogical data in arid areas prevented a better description of the atmospheric dust composition, and we propose here a new formulation to estimate the mineral content of arid surfaces on a global scale. First, we collect a Database of Arid Soil Surface Mineralogy for eight major minerals: quartz, feldspar, calcite, gypsum, illite, kaolinite, smectite, and hematite, both for the clay and silt fraction. On the basis of this, we formulate a Mean Mineralogical Table that relates classical soil types to surface mineralogy. We use this table and the geographical distribution of soil types given in the Food and Agriculture Organization Soil Map of the World to obtain the mineralogy of arid surfaces globally. In order to validate these results, we present a compilation of measured mineralogical composition of dust samples with identified sources. The correlation between observed dust mineralogy and those inferred from soil types in corresponding areas is between 0.70 and 0.94. We then calculate the maps of the single scattering albedo and of the ratio of infrared extinction to visible extinction for the erodible fraction of arid areas. Mineralogical maps presented here will be used in future studies with an emission scheme in a global transport model.

  6. Lunar dust transport and potential interactions with power system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzan, Cynthia M.; Edwards, Jonathan L.

    1991-01-01

    The lunar surface is covered by a thick blanket of fine dust. This dust may be readily suspended from the surface and transported by a variety of mechanisms. As a consequence, lunar dust can accumulate on sensitive power components, such as photovoltaic arrays and radiator surfaces, reducing their performance. In addition to natural mechanisms, human activities on the Moon will disturb significant amounts of lunar dust. Of all the mechanisms identified, the most serious is rocket launch and landing. The return of components from the Surveyor 3 provided a rare opportunity to observe the effects of the nearby landing of the Apollo 12 Lunar Module. The evidence proved that significant dust accumulation occurred on the Surveyor at a distance of 155 m. From available information on particle suspension and transport mechanisms, a series of models was developed to predict dust accumulation as a function of distance from the lunar module. The accumulation distribution was extrapolated to a future Lunar Lander scenario. These models indicate that accumulation is expected to be substantial even as far as 2 km from the landing site. Estimates of the performance penalties associated with lunar dust coverage and photovoltaic arrays are presented. Because of the lunar dust adhesive and cohesive properties, the most practical dust defensive strategy appears to be the protection of sensitive components from the arrival of lunar dust by location, orientation, or barriers.

  7. Continuous Dust Formation in SNe 2010jl and 2011ja

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafton, Kelsie; Clayton, Geoffrey; Andrews, Jennifer; Barlow, Michael; De Looze, Ilse

    2016-08-01

    Studies in the last 10 years of dust formation in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) have found only small amounts, ~0.001 solar masses. This is far less than the amount needed to account for the large masses of dust seen in some high redshift galaxies. However, the recent discovery of ~1 solar mass of cold dust in the ejecta of SN 1987A has has caused a complete re-evaluation of dust formation in CCSNe. It has been suggested that the CCSNe are continuously forming dust so that by the time they are about 25 years old they will have dust masses similar to SN 1987A. However, there is a wide time gap between the CCSNe that have been studied recently and SN 1987A. We plan to use the sensitivity of Spitzer to detect dust emission from CCSNe 5 or more years after explosion. Radiative transfer models will be used to estimate the dust masses. This proposal is to continue our study of two interesting SNe 2010jl and 2011ja. These observations are part of a long term study requiring multiple epochs of Spitzer observations to look for evidence of continuous dust formation. These observations will help shed light on the mystery of dust in SN 1987A.

  8. Dust Devil Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 8 May 2002) The Science This image, centered near 50.0 S and 17.7 W displays dust devil tracks on the surface. Most of the lighter portions of the image likely have a thin veneer of dust settled on the surface. As a dust devil passes over the surface, it acts as a vacuum and picks up the dust, leaving the darker substrate exposed. In this image there is a general trend of many of the tracks running from east to west or west to east, indicating the general wind direction. There is often no general trend present in dust devil tracks seen in other images. The track patterns are quite ephemeral and can completely change or even disappear over the course of a few months. Dust devils are one of the mechanisms that Mars uses to constantly pump dust into the ubiquitously dusty atmosphere. This atmospheric dust is one of the main driving forces of the present Martian climate. The Story Vrrrrooooooooom. Think of a tornado, the cartoon Tasmanian devil, or any number of vacuum commercials that powerfully suck up swirls of dust and dirt. That's pretty much what it's like on the surface of Mars a lot of the time. Whirlpools of wind called

  9. Cometary dust composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Hanner, M. S.

    1988-01-01

    The earth based measurements and in situ sampling of Comet Halley have provided new data about the chemical composition of cometary grains. Recent progress in laboratory studies of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) complement the comet data, allowing inferences about the mineralogy and physical structure of the comet dust to be drawn from the observed elemental composition and infrared spectra. The in situ dust composition measurements at Halley, the composition of IDPs and their relation to comet dust, and the origin of the 3.4 micron hydrocarbon feature is discussed. Related discussion is also presented on aromatic components in comets and the 3.4 micron feature. These topics are briefly summarized.

  10. Operational Dust Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, Jose M.; Basart, Sara; Benincasa, Francesco; Boucher, Olivier; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Colarco, Peter R.; Gong, Sunlin; Huneeus, Nicolas; Jones, Luke; Lu, Sarah; Menut, Laurent; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Mulcahy, Jane; Nickovic, Slobodan; Garcia-Pando, Carlos P.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Sekiyama, Thomas T.; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Terradellas, Enric; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Xiao-Ye; Zhou, Chun-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, numerical prediction of dust aerosol concentration has become prominent at several research and operational weather centres due to growing interest from diverse stakeholders, such as solar energy plant managers, health professionals, aviation and military authorities and policymakers. Dust prediction in numerical weather prediction-type models faces a number of challenges owing to the complexity of the system. At the centre of the problem is the vast range of scales required to fully account for all of the physical processes related to dust. Another limiting factor is the paucity of suitable dust observations available for model, evaluation and assimilation. This chapter discusses in detail numerical prediction of dust with examples from systems that are currently providing dust forecasts in near real-time or are part of international efforts to establish daily provision of dust forecasts based on multi-model ensembles. The various models are introduced and described along with an overview on the importance of dust prediction activities and a historical perspective. Assimilation and evaluation aspects in dust prediction are also discussed.

  11. Influence of Ultraviolet Light on the Coulomb Coupling between Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Misawa, Tatsuya; Fujita, Hiroharu

    2005-10-31

    The influence of ultraviolet light on the Coulomb coupling between dust particles was experimentally investigated in Radio-Frequency (RF, 13.56MHz) inductively coupled plasma. Flask shape dust cloud and the filamentary structure of dust particles were observed by adopting two turn ring far from the RF antenna. The ultraviolet radiation seemed to be not easy to pick up the polarization of the