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Sample records for spinning spectroscopic technique

  1. Fast Hadamard Spectroscopic Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goelman, G.

    1994-07-01

    Fast Hadamard spectroscopic imaging (HSI) techniques are presented. These techniques combine transverse and longitudinal encoding to obtain multiple-volume localization. The fast techniques are optimized for nuclei with short T2 and long T1 relaxation times and are therefore suitable for in vivo31P spectroscopy. When volume coils are used in fast HSI techniques, the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time (SNRT) is equal to the SNRT in regular HSI techniques. When surface coils are used, fast HSI techniques give significant improvement of SNRT over conventional HSI. Several fast techniques which are different in total experimental time and pulse demands are presented. When the number of acquisitions in a single repetition time is not higher than two, fast HSI techniques can be used with surface coils and the B1 inhomogeneity does not affect the localization. Surface-coil experiments on phantoms and on human calf muscles in vivo are presented. In addition, it is shown that the localization obtained by the HSI techniques are independent of the repetition times.

  2. Spin state transitions in cobaltites: spectroscopic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao Tjeng, Liu

    2010-03-01

    The class of cobalt-oxide based materials has attracted increasing interest in the last decade. A key aspect of the cobaltites that distinguishes them clearly from the Cu, Ni, and Mn oxides is the spin state degree of freedom of the Co3+ and Co4+ ions: the ions can be low spin, high spin, and perhaps even intermediate spin. This aspect comes on top of the orbital and charge degrees of freedom that already make the Cu, Ni, Mn systems so exciting. It is, however, also precisely this aspect that causes considerable debate in the literature. In this presentation we would like to show how synchrotron based soft-x-ray spectroscopies can successfully resolve the local electronic structure of the Co ions and thus contribute to a better understanding of the physical properties of the cobaltites. In particular, we will address the issue of spin state transitions, metal insulator transitions and the newly proposed spin-blockade phenomenon in several layered cobalt materials. --- Work done in collaboration with Z. Hu, M.W. Haverkort, C.F. Chang, H. Wu, T. Burnus, Y.Y. Chin, N. Hollmann, C. Schussler- Langeheine, M. Benomar, T. Lorenz, D.I. Khomskii (Univ. Cologne), A. Tanaka (Univ. Hiroshima), S.N. Barilo (NAS, Minsk), J. Cezar, N.B. Brookes (ESRF-Grenoble), H.H. Hsieh, H.J. Lin, C.T. Chen (NSRRC-Hsinchu). Supported by the DFG through SFB 608.

  3. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopic Studies of Radical Cation Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Sheng

    1990-01-01

    A spin Hamiltonian suitable for theoretical analyses of ESR spectra in this work is derived by using the general effective Hamiltonian theory in the usual Schrodinger representation. The Permutation Indices method is extended to obtain the dynamic exchange equations used in ESR lineshape simulation. The correlation between beta-hydrogen coupling constants and their geometric orientations is derived through the use of a perturbation method. The three electron bond model is extended to rationalize unimolecular rearrangements of radical cations. The ring-closed radical cations of 9,10-octalin oxide and syn-sesquinorbornene oxide have been characterized by ESR spectroscopy in the CFCl_3 matrix at low temperature. The ESR spectra of the former radical cation exhibit a novel alternating linewidth effect arising from an internal relation between the coupling constants for the four equivalent pairs of hydrogens. The self-electron-transfer rate constants between the methyl viologen dication and cation have been determined by dynamic ESR lineshape simulations at room temperature in allyl alcohol, water, methanol and propargyl alcohol solvents. The radical cation formed by the radiolytic oxidation of allylamine in Freon matrices at 77 K is shown to be the 3-iminiopropyl distonic species(3-iminium-1-propyl radical) resulting from a symmetry-allowed 1,2-hydrogen shift in the parent radical cation. The nucleophilic endocyclization of the but-3-en-1-ol radical cation to the protonated tetrahydrofuran -3-yl radical was observed in the radiolytic oxidation of but-3-en-1-ol in Freon matrices. ESR studies of the radiolytic oxidation of 1,5-hexadiyne have resulted in the first spectroscopic characterization of the radical cation Cope rearrangement, the 1,5-hexadiyne radical cation isomerizing to the 1,2,4,5 -hexatetraene radical cation. ESR studies show that the symmetric(C_{rm 2v}) bicyclo (3.3.0) -octa-2,6-diene-4,8-diyl(a bridged 1,4 -bishomobenzene species) radical cation is

  4. MOLECULAR OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC TECHNIQUES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is interested in field screening hazardous waste sites for contaminants in the soil and surface and ground water. his study is an initial technical overview of the principal molecular spectroscopic techniques and instrumentation currently ...

  5. Time-resolved spectroscopic techniques in laser medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Martínez, Roberto; Román-Moreno, Carlos J.; Rodríguez-Rosales, Antonio A.

    2000-10-01

    Spectroscopic lasers techniques are very useful for the detection and treatment of cancer and removing atherosclerotic plaque. Photobiology and photochemical studies, with the new generation of lasers high resolution time-resolved optical tomography is mentioned. A brief review of some of these applications is discussed and a partial list of recent references is given.

  6. Spectroscopic Measurement Techniques for Aerospace Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Hurley, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    The conditions that characterize aerospace flows are so varied, that a single diagnostic technique is not sufficient for its measurement. Fluid dynamists use knowledge of similarity to help categorize and focus on different flow conditions. For example, the Reynolds number represents the ratio of inertial to viscous forces in a flow. When the velocity scales, length scales, and gas density are large and the magnitude of the molecular viscosity is low, the Reynolds number becomes large. This corresponds to large scale vehicles (e.g Airbus A380), fast moving objects (e.g. artillery projectiles), vehicles in dense fluids (e.g. submarine in water), or flows with low dynamic viscosity (e.g. skydiver in air). In each of these cases, the inertial forces dominate viscous forces, and unsteady turbulent fluctuations in the flow variables are observed. In contrast, flows with small length scales (e.g. dispersion of micro-particles in a solid rocket nozzle), slow moving objects (e.g. micro aerial vehicles), flows with low density gases (e.g. atmospheric re-entry), or fluids with a large magnitude of viscosity (e.g. engine coolant flow), all have low Reynolds numbers. In these cases, viscous forces become very important and often the flows can be steady and laminar. The Mach number, which is the ratio of the velocity to the speed of sound in the medium, also helps to differentiate types of flows. At very low Mach numbers, acoustic waves travel much faster than the object, and the flow can be assumed to be incompressible (e.g. Cessna 172 aircraft). As the object speed approaches the speed of sound, the gas density can become variable (e.g. flow over wing of Learjet 85). When the object speed is higher than the speed of sound (Ma > 1), the presences of shock waves and other gas dynamic features can become important to the vehicle performance (e.g. SR-71 Blackbird). In the hypersonic flow regime (Ma > 5), large changes in temperature begin to affect flow properties, causing real

  7. Atmospheric trace gases monitoring by UV-vis spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Pinhua; Li, Ang; Wu, Fengcheng; Qin, Min; Hu, Rezhi; Xu, Jin; Si, Fuqi; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-04-01

    Due to rapidly economic development, air pollution has become an important issue in China. Phenomena such as regional haze in winter and high O3 concentration in summer are strongly related to increasing trace species. For better understanding the air pollution formation, it is necessary to know spatial and temporal distribution of trace species in the atmosphere. UV-vis spectroscopic techniques are of great advantages for trace species monitoring to meet several requirements, e.g. versatility, high sensitivity, good temporal resolution and field applicability. We have studied and developed various trace gases monitoring techniques and instruments based on UV-vis spectroscopic technique for in-situ measurements and remote sensing, e.g. LP-DOAS, IBBCEAS, CRDS, MAX-DOAS and mobile DOAS for NO2, SO2, HCHO, HONO, NO3, and N2O5 etc. The principle, instrumentation and inversion algorithm are presented. As typical applications of these techniques, investigation of the evolution of HONO and NO3 radicals over Beijing area, measurements of regional pollution in NCP and YRD are discussed in the aspects of HONO and nocturnal NO3 radical characteristics, trace gases (NO2, SO2 etc.) temporal and spatial distribution, pollution transport pathway, emission sources.

  8. Evaluation of Her2 status using photoacoustic spectroscopic CT techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Michael; Kruger, Robert; Reinecke, Daniel; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Mendonca, Marc; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the feasibility of using photacoustic CT spectroscopy(PCT-s) to track a near infrared dye conjugated with trastuzumab in vivo. Materials and Methods: An animal model was developed which contained both high and low Her2 expression tumor xenografts on the same mouse. The tumors were imaged at multiple wavelengths (680- 950nm) in the PCT scanner one day prior to injection of the near infrared conjugated probe. Baseline optical imaging data was acquired and the probe was then injected via the tail vein. Fluorescence data was acquired over the next week, PCT spectroscopic data was also acquired during this timeframe. The mice were sacrificed and tumors were extirpated and sent to pathology for IHC staining to verify Her2 expression levels. The optical fluorescence images were analyzed to determine probe uptake dynamics. Reconstructed PCT spectroscopic data was analyzed using IDL routines to deconvolve the probe signal from endogenous background signals, and to determine oxygen saturation. Results: The location of the NIR conjugate was able to be identified within the tumor utilizing IDL fitting routines, in addition oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentrations were discernible from the spectroscopic data. Conclusion: Photacoustic spectroscopy allows for the determination of in vivo tumor drug delivery at greater depths than can be determined from optical imaging techniques.

  9. Application of optical spectroscopic techniques for disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Anushree

    Optical spectroscopy, a truly non-invasive tool for remote diagnostics, is capable of providing valuable information on the structure and function of molecules. However, most spectroscopic techniques suffer from drawbacks, which limit their application. As a part of my dissertation work, I have developed theoretical and experimental methods to address the above mentioned issues. I have successfully applied these methods for monitoring the physical, chemical and biochemical parameters of biomolecules involved in some specific life threatening diseases like lead poisoning and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). I presented optical studies of melanosomes, which are one of the vital organelles in the human eye, also known to be responsible for a disease called age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a condition of advanced degeneration which causes progressive blindness. I used Raman spectroscopy, to first chemically identify the composition of melanosome, and then monitor the changes in its functional and chemical behavior due to long term exposure to visible light. The above study, apart from explaining the role of melanosomes in AMD, also sets the threshold power for lasers used in surgeries and other clinical applications. In the second part of my dissertation, a battery of spectroscopic techniques was successfully applied to explore the different binding sites of lead ions with the most abundant carrier protein molecule in our circulatory system, human serum albumin. I applied optical spectroscopic tools for ultrasensitive detection of heavy metal ions in solution which can also be used for lead detection at a very early stage of lead poisoning. Apart from this, I used Raman microspectroscopy to study the chemical alteration occurring inside a prostate cancer cell as a result of a treatment with a low concentrated aqueous extract of a prospective drug, Nerium Oleander. The experimental methods used in this study has tremendous potential for clinical

  10. Employing Multiple Spectroscopic Techniques Simultaneously to Observe Protein Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, Michael; Kelty, Ben; Link, Justin

    2015-03-01

    A protein's function is directly related to its native, folded structure. In order to study the structure of proteins, the unfolding process may be characterized. In our study, by using the spectroscopic techniques of circular dichroism (CD), absorption, and fluorescence simultaneously, we examined the unfolding of horse heart cytochrome c, a well-studied, model protein by gradually increasing the concentration of the chemical denaturant, guanidine hydrochloride. The signal changes from these modalities over the course of the unfolding reaction provides some of the thermodynamic properties like Gibbs free energy for insight into the stability of the protein. This allows us to compare the three techniques under the exact same conditions. The objective of this session is to present recent work in developing a protocol to observe the unfolding of cytochrome c using fluorescence, absorbance, and CD simultaneously.

  11. New Developments of Broadband Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, A.; Zhao, D.; Linnartz, H.; Ubachs, W.

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, cavity enhanced spectroscopic techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), and broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS), have been widely employed as ultra-sensitive methods for the measurement of weak absorptions and in the real-time detection of trace species. In this contribution, we introduce two new cavity enhanced spectroscopic concepts: a) Optomechanical shutter modulated BBCEAS, a variant of BBCEAS capable of measuring optical absorption in pulsed systems with typically low duty cycles. In conventional BBCEAS applications, the latter substantially reduces the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), consequently also reducing the detection sensitivity. To overcome this, we incorporate a fast optomechanical shutter as a time gate, modulating the detection scheme of BBCEAS and increasing the effective duty cycle reaches a value close to unity. This extends the applications of BBCEAS into pulsed samples and also in time-resolved studies. b) Cavity enhanced self-absorption spectroscopy (CESAS), a new spectroscopic concept capable of studying light emitting matter (plasma, flames, combustion samples) simultaneously in absorption and emission. In CESAS, a sample (plasma, flame or combustion source) is located in an optically stable cavity consisting of two high reflectivity mirrors, and here it acts both as light source and absorbing medium. A high detection sensitivity of weak absorption is reached without the need of an external light source, such as a laser or broadband lamp. The performance is illustrated by the first CESAS result on a supersonically expanding hydrocarbon plasma. We expect CESAS to become a generally applicable analytical tool for real time and in situ diagnostics. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, W. Ubachs, H. Linnartz, J. Phys. Chem. A, {dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp310392n}, in press, 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, H. Linnartz Rev. Sci. Instrum. {84}(2), 021608 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao

  12. Rapid identification of single microbes by various Raman spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, Petra; Harz, Michaela; Schmitt, Michael; Peschke, Klaus-Dieter; Ronneberger, Olaf; Burkhardt, Hans; Motzkus, Hans-Walter; Lankers, Markus; Hofer, Stefan; Thiele, Hans; Popp, Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    A fast and unambiguous identification of microorganisms is necessary not only for medical purposes but also in technical processes such as the production of pharmaceuticals. Conventional microbiological identification methods are based on the morphology and the ability of microbes to grow under different conditions on various cultivation media depending on their biochemical properties. These methods require pure cultures which need cultivation of at least 6 h but normally much longer. Recently also additional methods to identify bacteria are established e.g. mass spectroscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry or fluorescence spectroscopy. Alternative approaches for the identification of microorganisms are vibrational spectroscopic techniques. With Raman spectroscopy a spectroscopic fingerprint of the microorganisms can be achieved. Using UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) macromolecules like DNA/RNA and proteins are resonantly enhanced. With an excitation wavelength of e.g. 244 nm it is possible to determine the ratio of guanine/cytosine to all DNA bases which allows a genotypic identification of microorganisms. The application of UVRR requires a large amount of microorganisms (> 10 6 cells) e.g. at least a micro colony. For the analysis of single cells micro-Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm can be used. Here, the obtained information is from all type of molecules inside the cells which lead to a chemotaxonomic identification. In this contribution we show how wavelength dependent Raman spectroscopy yields significant molecular information applicable for the identification of microorganisms on a single cell level.

  13. Spectroscopic evidence for spin-polarized silicon atoms on Si(553)-Au

    SciTech Connect

    Snijders, Paul C; Johnson, P.S.; Guisinger, Nathan; Erwin, S. C.; Himpsel, F.J.

    2012-01-01

    The stepped Si(553)-Au surface undergoes a $1\\times3$ reconstruction at low temperature which has recently been interpreted theoretically as the $\\times3$ ordering of spin-polarized silicon atoms along a step edge in each surface unit cell. This predicted magnetic ground state has a clear spectroscopic signature---a silicon step-edge state at $0.5$ eV above the Fermi level---that arises from strong exchange splitting and hence would not occur without spin polarization. Here we report spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy data for Si(553)-Au that reveal key differences in the unoccupied step-edge density of states between room temperature and $40$ K. At low temperature we find an unoccupied state at 0.55 eV above every third step-edge silicon atom, in excellent agreement with the spin-polarized ground state predicted theoretically.

  14. Application of Wavelet Unfolding Technique in Neutron Spectroscopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica; Barzilov, Alexander

    Nonproliferation of nuclear materials is important in nuclear power industry and fuel cycle facilities. It requires technologies capable of measuring and assessing the radiation signatures of fission events. Neutrons produced in spontaneous or induced fission reactions are mainly fast. The neutron energy information allows characterization of nuclear materials and neutron sources. It can also be applied in remote sensing and source search tasks. The plastic scintillator EJ-299-33A was studied as a fast neutron detector. The detector response to a polyenergetic flux was unfolded usingthe multiple linear regression method. It yields the intensities of neutron flux of particular energy, hence, enabling the spectroscopic analysis. The wavelet technique was evaluated for the unfolding of neutron spectrum using the scintillator's response functions between 1 MeV and 14 MeV computed with the MCNPX code. This paperpresents the computational results of the wavelet-based spectrum unfolding applied to a scintillator detector with neutron / photon pulse shape discrimination properties.

  15. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. XXI. Stellar spin rates of O-type spectroscopic binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Agudelo, O. H.; Sana, H.; de Mink, S. E.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; de Koter, A.; Langer, N.; Tramper, F.; Gräfener, G.; Evans, C. J.; Vink, J. S.; Dufton, P. L.; Taylor, W. D.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The initial distribution of spin rates of massive stars is a fingerprint of their elusive formation process. It also sets a key initial condition for stellar evolution and is thus an important ingredient in stellar population synthesis. So far, most studies have focused on single stars. Most O stars are, however, found in multiple systems. Aims: By establishing the spin-rate distribution of a sizeable sample of O-type spectroscopic binaries and by comparing the distributions of binary subpopulations with one another and with that of presumed-single stars in the same region, we aim to constrain the initial spin distribution of O stars in binaries, and to identify signatures of the physical mechanisms that affect the evolution of the spin rates of massive stars. Methods: We use ground-based optical spectroscopy obtained in the framework of the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey (VFTS) to establish the projected equatorial rotational velocities (νesini) for components of 114 spectroscopic binaries in 30 Doradus. The νesini values are derived from the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a set of spectral lines, using a FWHM vs. νesini calibration that we derive based on previous line analysis methods applied to single O-type stars in the VFTS sample. Results: The overall νesini distribution of the primary stars resembles that of single O-type stars in the VFTS, featuring a low-velocity peak (at νesini< 200 kms-1) and a shoulder at intermediate velocities (200 < νesini< 300 kms-1). The distributions of binaries and single stars, however, differ in two ways. First, the main peak at νesini ~ 100kms-1 is broader and slightly shifted towards higher spin rates in the binary distribution than that of the presumed-single stars. This shift is mostly due to short-period binaries (Porb~< 10 d). Second, the νesini distribution of primaries lacks a significant population of stars spinning faster than 300 kms-1, while such a population is clearly present in the single

  16. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopic techniques as applied to channelrhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Eglof; Puskar, Ljiljana; Bartl, Franz J.; Aziz, Emad F.; Hegemann, Peter; Schade, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Among optogenetic tools, channelrhodopsins, the light gated ion channels of the plasma membrane from green algae, play the most important role. Properties like channel selectivity, timing parameters or color can be influenced by the exchange of selected amino acids. Although widely used, in the field of neurosciences for example, there is still little known about their photocycles and the mechanism of ion channel gating and conductance. One of the preferred methods for these studies is infrared spectroscopy since it allows observation of proteins and their function at a molecular level and in near-native environment. The absorption of a photon in channelrhodopsin leads to retinal isomerization within femtoseconds, the conductive states are reached in the microsecond time scale and the return into the fully dark-adapted state may take more than minutes. To be able to cover all these time regimes, a range of different spectroscopical approaches are necessary. This mini-review focuses on time-resolved applications of the infrared technique to study channelrhodopsins and other light triggered proteins. We will discuss the approaches with respect to their suitability to the investigation of channelrhodopsin and related proteins. PMID:26217670

  17. Coupled cluster study of spectroscopic constants of ground states of heavy rare gas dimers with spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Zhe-Yan; Wang, Wen-Liang; Li, Ren-Zhong; Xia, Cai-Juan; Li, Lian-Bi

    2016-07-01

    The CCSD(T) approach based on two-component relativistic effective core potential with spin-orbit interaction just included in coupled cluster iteration is adopted to study the spectroscopic constants of ground states of Kr2, Xe2 and Rn2 dimers. The spectroscopic constants have significant basis set dependence. Extrapolation to the complete basis set limit provides the most accurate values. The spin-orbit interaction hardly affects the spectroscopic constants of Kr2 and Xe2. However, the equilibrium bond length is shortened about 0.013 Å and the dissociation energy is augmented about 18 cm-1 by the spin-orbit interaction for Rn2 in the complete basis set limit.

  18. New Techniques for the Next Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James C.; Wilkinson, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) has been a great success, and has addressed many critical scientific questions (Moos, et al, 2000). However, it has also highlighted the need for even more powerful instrumentation in the 900- 1200 A, regime. In particular, significantly increased effective area will permit the pursuit of additional scientific programs currently impractical or impossible with FUSE. It is unlikely that FUSE will last more than a few more years. Nor is it likely that any large scale UV-optical follow-on to HST (such as SUVO) will include the 900-1200 A, bandpass. However, FUSE remains well oversubscribed and continues to perform excellent science. Therefore, a MIDEX class mission in the next 4-6 years that could significantly improve on the FUSE capabilities would be a powerful scientific tool that would be of great utility to the astronomical community. It would open up new scientific programs if it can improve on the sensitivity of FUSE by an order of magnitude. We have identified a powerful technique for efficient, high-resolution spectroscopy in the FUV (and possibly the EUV) that may provide exactly what is needed for such a mission To achieve a factor of 10 improvement in effective area, we propose using a large (meter class), low-cost, grazing incidence metal optics. This would produced in a manner similar to the EUVE mirrors (Green, et al, 1986), using diamond turning to create the optical figure followed by uncontrolled polishing to achieve a high quality surface. This process will introduce significant figure errors that will degrade the image quality. However, if a holographic grating is employed, which has utilized the actual telescope in the recording geometry, all wavefront errors will be automatically corrected in the end-to-end spectrometer, and high quality spectroscopy will be possible with low quality (and low-cost) optics. In this way a MIDEX class FUSE can be proposed with 10 times the effective area of the

  19. Novel Coherent Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Minor Species Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Berenice Ann

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The aim of this thesis was to research novel coherent laser spectroscopic techniques with the application to combustion diagnostics as a long term objective. Two techniques, Picosecond Absorption Modulated Spectroscopy (PAMS) and Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing Spectroscopy (DFWM), have been experimentally investigated. PAMS is an optical pump-probe type experiment and offers the possibility of making direct, absolute in situ measurements of species concentrations. Results are presented of the PAMS signal against temporal delay for 10^{-6}M rhodamine B solution in methanol, gaseous sodium atoms and in iodine vapour. Iodine was detected at ambient room temperature and atmospheric pressure of air at a concentration of approximately 10ppm. A particular result was the observation of a negative absorption prior to the coherence spike, which has been identified as arising from a coherent transient effect. DFWM has been applied to the measurement of nitrogen dioxide spectra using the pulsed output of a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser and the tuneable output of an excimer -pumped dye laser DFWM signals have been obtained for the first time in NO_2. Initial characterisation experiments were performed in which DFWM spectra of NO _2 were obtained and identified in the region of 450-480nm. The DFWM signal was investigated as a function of laser intensity, concentration of NO _2 and buffer gas pressure. DFWM has also been demonstrated as a two-dimensional imaging diagnostic in a sodium-seeded premixed acetylene/air slot burner. Further experiments were performed in which single shot DFWM two dimensional images of the distribution of NO_2 in a cold air/NO _2 gas flow have been recorded. Additional images have been obtained of NO_2 doped into a propane-air flame at concentrations of 5000ppm with an estimated spatial resolution of 150 mu m. The images taken in the flame follow the disappearance of NO_2 molecules in the flame

  20. Mean field bipartite spin models treated with mechanical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barra, Adriano; Galluzzi, Andrea; Guerra, Francesco; Pizzoferrato, Andrea; Tantari, Daniele

    2014-03-01

    Inspired by a continuously increasing interest in modeling and framing complex systems in a thermodynamic rationale, in this paper we continue our investigation in adapting well-known techniques (originally stemmed in fields of physics and mathematics far from the present) for solving for the free energy of mean field spin models in a statistical mechanics scenario. Focusing on the test cases of bipartite spin systems embedded with all the possible interactions (self and reciprocal), we show that both the fully interacting bipartite ferromagnet, as well as the spin glass counterpart, at least at the replica symmetric level, can be solved via the fundamental theorem of calculus, trough an analogy with the Hamilton-Jacobi theory and lastly with a mapping to a Fourier diffusion problem. All these technologies are shown symmetrically for ferromagnets and spin-glasses in full details and contribute as powerful tools in the investigation of complex systems.

  1. Effects of spin-orbit coupling on the electronic states and spectroscopic properties of diatomic SeS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyaya, Surya; Nath, Abhijit; Das, Kalyan Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The electronic states and spectroscopic properties of selenium monosulfide (78Se32S) have been studied using relativistic configuration interaction methodology that includes effective core potentials of the constituent atoms. Potential energy curves of several spin-excluded (Λ-S) electronic states have been constructed and spectroscopic constants of low-lying bound Λ-S states within 5.1 eV are reported in the first stage of the calculations. In the next stage, the spin-orbit interaction has been incorporated and its effects on the potential energy curves and spectroscopic properties of the species have been investigated in detail. After the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling, the {{{{X}}}{{1}}}{{3}}{Σ }{0+}- is identified as the spin-orbit (Ω) ground state of the species. The transition moments of several important dipole-allowed and spin-forbidden transitions are calculated and the radiative lifetimes of the excited states involved in the respective transitions are computed. Electric dipole moments (μ z) for some low-lying bound Λ-S states as well as a few low-lying spin-orbit states (Ω-states) are also calculated in the present study.

  2. Laser Spinning: A New Technique for Nanofiber Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penide, J.; Quintero, F.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; Riveiro, A.; Pou, J.

    Laser Spinning is a new technique to produce ultralongnanofibers with tailored chemical compositions. In this method, a high power laser is employed to melt a small volume of the precursor material at high temperatures. At the same time, a supersonic gas jet is injected on this molten volume producing its rapid cooling and elongation by viscous friction with the high speed gas flow, hence forming the amorphous nanofibers. This paper collects the main results obtained since the introduction of this technique in 2007.

  3. Optimal and suboptimal control technique for aircraft spin recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    An analytic investigation has been made of procedures for effecting recovery from equilibrium spin conditions for three assumed aircraft configurations. Three approaches which utilize conventional aerodynamic controls are investigated. Included are a constant control recovery mode, optimal recoveries, and a suboptimal control logic patterned after optimal recovery results. The optimal and suboptimal techniques are shown to yield a significant improvement in recovery performance over that attained by using a constant control recovery procedure.

  4. Progress in laser-spectroscopic techniques for aerodynamic measurements - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities and recent progress in laser-spectroscopic measurement techniques for use in aerodynamic test facilities and flight research vehicles. It includes a survey of the literature which is centered on this application of laser spectroscopy. The intended reader is the specialist in experimental fluid dynamics who is not intimately familiar with the physics or applications of laser spectroscopy. Thus, some discussion is also included of the nature of each laser-spectroscopic technique and the practical aspects of its use for aerodynamic measurements. The specific techniques reviewed include laser absorption, laser-induced fluorescence, laser Rayleigh scattering, and laser Raman scattering including spontaneous and coherent processes.

  5. [Clinical applications of arterial spin labeling technique in brain diseases].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zheng, Gang; Zhao, Tiezhu; Guo, Chao; Li, Lin; Lu, Guangming

    2013-02-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique is a kind of perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging method that is based on endogenous contrast, and it can measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) noninvasively. The ASL technique has advantages of noninvasiveness, simplicity and relatively lower costs so that it is more suitable for longitudinal studies compared with previous perfusion methods, such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), CT and the contrast agent based magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. This paper mainly discusses the current clinical applications of ASL in brain diseases as cerebrovascular diseases, brain tumors, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy, etc. PMID:23488163

  6. Theory for the Spin State and Spectroscopic Modes of Multiferroic CaBaCo4O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Randy; Bordacs, Sandor; Kezmarki, Istvan; Kocsis, Vilmos; Nagel, Urmas; Room, Toomas; Tokunaga, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Taguchi, Y.; Tokura, Y.

    With alternating Kagome and triangular lattices, the type I multiferroic CaBaCo4O7 is highly frustrated. Magnetic frustration produces a non-collinear, ferrimagnetic spin state with a net magnetic moment of about 1 mB along the b axis below 60 K. Based on the the field dependence of the three observed spectroscopic modes between 0.8 and 2.7 THz and on the field dependence of the magnetization up to 14 T, we construct a microscopic model for this compound. Using the symmetry of the crystal, the model is constructed in terms of eight independent nearest-neighbor exchange interactions as well as both in-plane and easy-axis anisotropies. With three observed Co species (spins 1.45, 1.0, and 1.2), the magnetic unit cell contains 16 spins. Our results indicate that the easy-plane and hexagonal anisotropy in the triangular layers is far larger than the anisotropy in the kagome layers. The observed spin-induced polarization along the c axis is produced by magnetostriction. We also predict other spin-wave modes outside the window of the spectroscopic measurements. Research Sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Sciences, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  7. Microwave Amplitude Modulation Technique to Measure Spin-Lattice (T 1) and Spin-Spin (T 2) Relaxation Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sushil K.

    The measurement of very short spin-lattice, or longitudinal, relaxation (SLR) times (i.e., 10-10 < T 1 < 10-6 s) is of great importance today for the study of relaxation processes. Recent case studies include, for example, glasses doped with paramagnetic ions (Vergnoux et al., 1996; Zinsou et al., 1996), amorphous Si (dangling bonds) and copper-chromium-tin spinel (Cr3+) (Misra, 1998), and polymer resins doped with rare-earth ions (Pescia et al., 1999a; Pescia et al. 1999b). The ability to measure such fast SLR data on amorphous Si and copper-chromium-tin spinel led to an understanding of the role of exchange interaction in affecting spin-lattice relaxation, while the data on polymer resins doped with rare-earth ions provided evidence of spin-fracton relaxation (Pescia et al., 1999a, b). But such fast SLR times are not measurable by the most commonly used techniques of saturation- and inversion-recovery (Poole, 1982; Alger, 1968), which only measure spin-lattice relaxation times longer than 10-6 s. A summary of relevant experimental data is presented in Table 1.

  8. A spin-drying technique for lyopreservation of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Nilay; Chang, Anthony; Elmoazzen, Heidi; Menze, Michael A; Hand, Steven C; Toner, Mehmet

    2011-05-01

    Stabilization of cellular material in the presence of glass-forming sugars at ambient temperatures is a viable approach that has many potential advantages over current cryogenic strategies. Experimental evidence indicates the possibility to preserve biomolecules in glassy matrices of low-molecular mobility using "glass-forming" sugars like trehalose at ambient temperatures. However, when cells are desiccated in trehalose solution using passive drying techniques, a glassy skin is formed at the liquid/vapor interface of the sample. This glassy skin prevents desiccation of the sample beyond a certain level of dryness and induces non-uniformities in the final water content. Cells trapped underneath this glassy skin may degrade due to a relatively high molecular mobility in the sample. This undesirable result underscores the need for development of a uniform, fast drying technique. In the present study, we report a new technique based on the principles of "spin drying" that can effectively address these problems. Forced convective evaporation of water along with the loss of solution due to centrifugal force leads to rapid vitrification of a thin layer of trehalose containing medium that remains on top of cells attached to the spinning glass substrate. The glassy layer produced has a consistent thickness and a small "surface-area-to-volume" ratio that minimizes any non-homogeneity. Thus, the chance of entrapping cells in a high-mobility environment decreases substantially. We compared numerical predictions to experimental observations of the drying time of 0.2-0.6 M trehalose solutions at a variety of spinning speeds ranging from 1000 to 4000 rpm. The model developed here predicts the formation of sugar films with thicknesses of 200-1000 nm, which was in good agreement with experimental results. Preliminary data suggest that after spin drying cells to about 0.159 ± 0.09 gH₂O/gdw (n = 11, ±SE), more than 95% of cells were able to preserve their membrane integrity

  9. Investigation into Spectroscopic Techniques for Thermal Barrier Coating Spall Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim; Opila, Beth

    2001-01-01

    Spectroscopic methods are proposed for detection of thermal barrier coating (TBC) spallation from engine hot zone components. These methods include absorption and emission of airborne marker species originally embedded in the TBC bond coat. In this study, candidate marker materials for this application were evaluated. Thermochemical analysis of candidate marker materials combined with additional constraints such as toxicity and uniqueness to engine environment, provided a short list of four potential species: platinum, copper oxide, zinc oxide. and indium. The melting point of indium was considered to be too low for serious consideration. The other three candidate marker materials, platinum, copper oxide, and zinc oxide were placed in a high temperature furnace and emission and absorption properties were measured over a temperature range from 800-1400 C and a spectral range from 250 to 18000 nm. Platinum did not provide the desired response, likely due to the low vapor Pressure of the metallic species and the low absorption of the oxide species. It was also found, however. that platinum caused a broadening of the carbon dioxide absorption at 4300 nm. The nature of this effect is not known. Absorption and emission caused by sodium and potassium impurities in the platinum were found in the platinum tests. Zinc oxide did not provide the desired response, again, most likely due to the low vapor pressure of the metallic species and the low absorption of the oxide species. Copper oxide generated two strongly temperature dependent absorption peaks at 324.8 and 327.4 nm. The melting point of copper oxide was determined to be too low for serious consideration as marker material.

  10. Spectroscopic Technique for Measuring the Texture of Horticultural Products: Spatially Resolved Approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews the latest developments and applications of spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques for measuring the optical properties and texture or firmness of horticultural products. The chapter first provides a brief overview of the theory of light transfer in turbid biological m...

  11. Characterization of Sorolla's gouache pigments by means of spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, Clodoaldo; Juanes, David; Ferrazza, Livio; Carballo, Jorgelina

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the Joaquín Sorolla's gouache sketches for the oil on canvas series "Vision of Spain" commissioned by A. M. Huntington to decorate the library of the Hispanic Society of America in New York. The analyses were focused on the identification of the elemental composition of the gouache pigments by means of portable EDXRF spectrometry in a non-destructive mode. Additionally, SEM-EDX and FTIR analyses of a selected set of micro-samples were carried out to identify completely the pigments, the paint technique and the binding media. The obtained results have confirmed the identification of lead and zinc white, vermillion, earth pigments, ochre, zinc yellow, chrome yellow, ultramarine, Prussian blue, chromium based and copper-arsenic based green pigments, bone black and carbon based black pigments, and the use of gum arabic as binding media in the gouache pigments.

  12. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuji; Sahay, Peeyush

    2009-01-01

    Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC) disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS). Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis. PMID:22408503

  13. Understanding and controlling spin-systems using electron spin resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Mathew

    the frequency of this nutation. Experimental findings fit well the analytical model developed. This process could lead to the use of multi-level spin systems as tunable solid state qubits. Finally, if quantum computing technologies are to be commercially realized, an on-chip method to address qubits must be developed. One way to incorporate SMMs to an on-chip device is by way of a coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonator. Efforts to create a resonator of this type to be used to perform low-temperature ESR on-chip will be described. Our work is focused on implementing such on-chip techniques in high magnetic fields, which is desirable for ESR-type of experiments in (quasi-)isotropic spin systems. Considerable attention is given to the coupling of these devices and a geometry is presented for a superconducting CPW resonator that is critically coupled. The effect of the magnetic field on the resonance position and its quality factor is addressed as well. Our devices show robust performance in field upwards of 1 Tesla and their use in performing on-chip ESR measurements seem promising.

  14. Spectroscopic signatures of spin-charge separation in the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor TTF-TCNQ.

    PubMed

    Claessen, R; Sing, M; Schwingenschlögl, U; Blaha, P; Dressel, M; Jacobsen, C S

    2002-03-01

    The electronic structure of the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor TTF-TCNQ is studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The experimental spectra reveal significant discrepancies to band theory. We demonstrate that the measured dispersions can be consistently mapped onto the one-dimensional Hubbard model at finite doping. This interpretation is further supported by a remarkable transfer of spectral weight as a function of temperature. The ARPES data thus show spectroscopic signatures of spin-charge separation on an energy scale of the conduction bandwidth. PMID:11864036

  15. Spectroscopic Signatures of Spin-Charge Separation in the Quasi-One-Dimensional Organic Conductor TTF-TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claessen, R.; Sing, M.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Blaha, P.; Dressel, M.; Jacobsen, C. S.

    2002-03-01

    The electronic structure of the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor TTF-TCNQ is studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The experimental spectra reveal significant discrepancies to band theory. We demonstrate that the measured dispersions can be consistently mapped onto the one-dimensional Hubbard model at finite doping. This interpretation is further supported by a remarkable transfer of spectral weight as a function of temperature. The ARPES data thus show spectroscopic signatures of spin-charge separation on an energy scale of the conduction bandwidth.

  16. Site Directed Spin Labeling and EPR Spectroscopic Studies of Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Basak, Sandip; Chatterjee, Soumili; Chakrapani, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel gating is a stimulus-driven orchestration of protein motions that leads to transitions between closed, open, and desensitized states. Fundamental to these transitions is the intrinsic flexibility of the protein, which is critically modulated by membrane lipid-composition. To better understand the structural basis of channel function, it is necessary to study protein dynamics in a physiological membrane environment. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is an important tool to characterize conformational transitions between functional states. In comparison to NMR and X-ray crystallography, the information obtained from EPR is intrinsically of lower resolution. However, unlike in other techniques, in EPR there is no upper-limit to the molecular weight of the protein, the sample requirements are significantly lower, and more importantly the protein is not constrained by the crystal lattice forces. Therefore, EPR is uniquely suited for studying large protein complexes and proteins in reconstituted systems. In this article, we will discuss general protocols for site-directed spin labeling and membrane reconstitution using a prokaryotic proton-gated pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel (pLGIC) from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC) as an example. A combination of steady-state Continuous Wave (CW) and Pulsed (Double Electron Electron Resonance-DEER) EPR approaches will be described that will enable a complete quantitative characterization of channel dynamics. PMID:27403967

  17. Magnetic and spin transitions in wüstite: A synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Maki; Kamada, Seiji; Ohtani, Eiji; Mitsui, Takaya; Masuda, Ryo; Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Nanami; Maeda, Fumiya; Akasaka, Masahide

    2016-04-01

    This is a Mössbauer study of wüstite at pressures above 200 GPa using synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy. Synthetic F e0.96O -wüstite was investigated at 91(2), 95(4), 109(2), 114.5(3), 131.1(7), 133.2(2), 155(2), 167(2), 193(2) and 203(1) GPa at 300 K at the SPring-8 BL11XU beamline. The Mössbauer spectrum at 91 GPa consists of both magnetic and nonmagnetic components. The magnetic high-spin component decreases gradually with increasing pressure from 91 to 203 GPa, while the nonmagnetic low-spin component increases with pressure in the same pressure range. The result suggests that the spin state of Fe in the outer core at pressures above 203 GPa is the low-spin state. If oxygen exists in the core, the low-spin Fe-O bonding is shorter than high-spin Fe-O bonding, suggesting dense Fe-O liquid in the Earth's outer core. The gradual increase of the density of the metallic liquid with depth by the spin transition of Fe-O bonding in the shallow outer core region will stabilize the outer core against thermal convection.

  18. Mean field spin glasses treated with PDE techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barra, Adriano; Del Ferraro, Gino; Tantari, Daniele

    2013-07-01

    Following an original idea of Guerra, in these notes we analyze the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model from different perspectives, all sharing the underlying approach which consists in linking the resolution of the statistical mechanics of the model (e.g. solving for the free energy) to well-known partial differential equation (PDE) problems (in suitable spaces). The plan is then to solve the related PDE using techniques involved in their native field and lastly bringing back the solution in the proper statistical mechanics framework. Within this strand, after a streamlined test-case on the Curie-Weiss model to highlight the methods more than the physics behind, we solve the SK both at the replica symmetric and at the 1-RSB level, obtaining the correct expression for the free energy via an analogy to a Fourier equation and for the self-consistencies with an analogy to a Burger equation, whose shock wave develops exactly at critical noise level (triggering the phase transition). Our approach, beyond acting as a new alternative method (with respect to the standard routes) for tackling the complexity of spin glasses, links symmetries in PDE theory with constraints in statistical mechanics and, as a novel result from the theoretical physics perspective, we obtain a new class of polynomial identities (namely of Aizenman-Contucci type, but merged within the Guerra's broken replica measures), whose interest lies in understanding, via the recent Panchenko breakthroughs, how to force the overlap organization to the ultrametric tree predicted by Parisi.

  19. The role of simulation chambers in the development of spectroscopic techniques: campaigns at EUPHORE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ródenas, Milagros; Muñoz, Amalia; Euphore Team

    2016-04-01

    Simulation chambers represent a very useful tool for the study of chemical reactions and their products, but also to characterize instruments. The development of spectroscopic techniques throughout the last decades has benefited from tests and intercomparison exercises carried out in chambers. In fact, instruments can be exposed to various controlled atmospheric scenarios that account for different environmental conditions, eliminating the uncertainties associated to fluctuations of the air mass, which must be taken into account when extrapolating results to the real conditions. Hence, a given instrument can be characterized by assessing its precision, accuracy, detection limits, time response and potential interferences in the presence of other chemical compounds, aerosols, etc. This implies that the instrument can be calibrated and validated, which allows to enhance the features of the instrument. Moreover, chambers are also the scenario of intercomparison trials, permitting multiple instruments to sample from the same well-mixed air mass simultaneously. An overview of different campaigns to characterize and/or intercompare spectroscopic techniques that have taken place in simulation chambers will be given; in particular, those carried out at EUPHORE (two twin domes, 200 m3 each, Spain), where various intercomparison exercises have been deployed under the frame of European projects (e.g. TOXIC, FIONA, PSOA campaigns supported by EUROCHAMP-II). With the common aim of measuring given compounds (e.g. HONO, NO2, OH, glyoxal, m-glyoxal, etc), an important number of spectroscopic instruments and institutions have been involved in chamber experiments, having the chance to intercompare among them and also with other non-spectroscopic systems (e.g. monitors, cromatographs, etc) or model simulations.

  20. Accurate calculations on the 22 electronic states and 54 spin-orbit states of the O2 molecule: potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue; Shulin, Zhang

    2014-04-24

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 54 spin-orbit states generated from the 22 electronic states of O2 molecule are investigated for the first time for internuclear separations from about 0.1 to 1.0nm. Of the 22 electronic states, the X(3)Σg(-), A(')(3)Δu, A(3)Σu(+), B(3)Σu(-), C(3)Πg, a(1)Δg, b(1)Σg(+), c(1)Σu(-), d(1)Πg, f(1)Σu(+), 1(5)Πg, 1(3)Πu, 2(3)Σg(-), 1(5)Σu(-), 2(1)Σu(-) and 2(1)Δg are found to be bound, whereas the 1(5)Σg(+), 2(5)Σg(+), 1(1)Πu, 1(5)Δg, 1(5)Πu and 2(1)Πu are found to be repulsive ones. The B(3)Σu(-) and d(1)Πg states possess the double well. And the 1(3)Πu, C(3)Πg, A'(3)Δu, 1(5)Δg and 2(5)Σg(+) states are the inverted ones when the spin-orbit coupling is included. The PEC calculations are done by the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method, which is followed by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction (icMRCI) approach with the Davidson correction. Core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections are taken into account. The convergence of present calculations is evaluated with respect to the basis set and level of theory. The vibrational properties are discussed for the 1(5)Πg, 1(3)Πu, d(1)Πg and 1(5)Σu(-) states and for the second well of the B(3)Σu(-) state. The spin-orbit coupling effect is accounted for by the state interaction method with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The PECs of all the electronic states and spin-orbit states are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters are obtained, and compared with available experimental and other theoretical results. Analyses demonstrate that the spectroscopic parameters reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones. The conclusion is obtained that the effect of spin-orbit coupling on the spectroscopic parameters are small almost for all the electronic states involved in this paper except for the 1(5)Σu(-), 1(5)Πg and 1(3)Πu. PMID:24486866

  1. In situ electron spin resonance and Raman spectroscopic studies of the electrochemical process of conducting polypyrrole films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, C.J.; Tian, Z.Q.; Tian, Z.W. )

    1990-03-08

    The electrochemical redox properties of conducting polypyrrole (PPy) films coated on electrodes are investigated in aqueous solutions by use of the in situ techniques of electron spin resonance (ESR) and Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons between the experimental in situ ESR data and a theoretical kinetic prediction on the basis of the polaron-bipolaron model are presented.

  2. Dynamic neutron scattering on incoherent systems using efficient resonance spin flip techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Häussler, Wolfgang; Kredler, Lukas

    2014-05-15

    We have performed numerical ray-tracing Monte-Carlo-simulations of incoherent dynamic neutron scattering experiments. We intend to optimize the efficiency of incoherent measurements depending on the fraction of neutrons scattered without and with spin flip at the sample. In addition to conventional spin echo, we have numerically and experimentally studied oscillating intensity techniques. The results point out the advantages of these different spin echo variants and are an important prerequisite for neutron resonance spin echo instruments like RESEDA (FRM II, Munich), to choose the most efficient technique depending on the scattering vector range and the properties of the sample system under study.

  3. Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Czerwinski, Kenneth; Weck, Phil

    2013-09-13

    Ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–Visible) and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line analysis of actinide elements in a solvent extraction process in real time. These techniques have been used for measuring actinide speciation and concentration under laboratory conditions and are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques, researchers must determine the fundamental speciation of target actinides and the resulting influence on spectroscopic properties. Detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be established and utilized in a range of areas, particularly those related to materials accountability and process control. Through this project, researchers will develop tools and spectroscopic techniques to evaluate solution extraction conditions and concentrations of U, Pu, and Cm in extraction processes, addressing areas of process control and materials accountability. The team will evaluate UV– Visible and TRLFS for use in solvent extraction-based separations. Ongoing research is examining efficacy of UV-Visible spectroscopy to evaluate uranium and plutonium speciation under conditions found in the UREX process and using TRLFS to evaluate Cm speciation and concentration in the TALSPEAK process. A uranyl and plutonium nitrate UV–Visible spectroscopy study met with success, which supports the utility and continued exploration of spectroscopic methods for evaluation of actinide concentrations and solution conditions for other aspects of the UREX+ solvent extraction scheme. This project will examine U and Pu absorbance in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, perform detailed examination of Cm in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, study U laser fluorescence, and apply project data to contactors. The team will also determine peak ratios as a function of solution concentrations for the

  4. One- and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies of solution-phase homogeneous catalysis and spin-forbidden reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Karma Rae

    2008-12-01

    Understanding chemical reactions requires the knowledge of the elementary steps of breaking and making bonds, and often a variety of experimental techniques are needed to achieve this goal. The initial steps occur on the femto- through picosecond time-scales, requiring the use of ultrafast spectroscopic methods, while the rate-limiting steps often occur more slowly, requiring alternative techniques. Ultrafast one and two-dimensional infrared and step-scan FTIR spectroscopies are used to investigate the photochemical reactions of four organometallic complexes. The analysis leads to a detailed understanding of mechanisms that are general in nature and may be applicable to a variety of reactions.

  5. Optical detection of middle ear infection using spectroscopic techniques: phantom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Huang, Jing; Li, Tianqi; Svanberg, Sune; Svanberg, Katarina

    2015-05-01

    A noninvasive optical technique, which is based on a combination of reflectance spectroscopy and gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy, is demonstrated. It has the potential to improve diagnostics of middle ear infections. An ear phantom prepared with a tissue cavity, which was covered with scattering material, was used for spectroscopic measurements. Diffuse reflectance spectra of the phantom eardrum were measured with a reflectance probe. The presence of oxygen and water vapor as well as gas exchange in the phantom cavity were studied with a specially designed fiber-optic probe for backscattering detection geometry. The results suggest that this method can be developed for improved clinical detection of middle ear infection.

  6. A versatile setup using femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yujie; Voronine, Dmitri V.; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-08-01

    We report a versatile setup based on the femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The setup uses a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator source and a folded 4f pulse shaper, in which the pulse shaping is carried out through conventional optical elements and does not require a spatial light modulator. Our setup is simple in alignment, and can be easily switched between the collinear single-beam and the noncollinear two-beam configurations. We demonstrate the capability for investigating both transparent and highly scattering samples by detecting transmitted and reflected signals, respectively.

  7. A versatile setup using femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yujie; Voronine, Dmitri V.; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-08-15

    We report a versatile setup based on the femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The setup uses a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator source and a folded 4f pulse shaper, in which the pulse shaping is carried out through conventional optical elements and does not require a spatial light modulator. Our setup is simple in alignment, and can be easily switched between the collinear single-beam and the noncollinear two-beam configurations. We demonstrate the capability for investigating both transparent and highly scattering samples by detecting transmitted and reflected signals, respectively.

  8. FAST CARS: Engineering a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid identification of bacterial spores

    PubMed Central

    Scully, M. O.; Kattawar, G. W.; Lucht, R. P.; Opatrný, T.; Pilloff, H.; Rebane, A.; Sokolov, A. V.; Zubairy, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is challenging. In particular, the short dephasing times and rapid internal conversion rates are major obstacles. However, adiabatic fast passage techniques and the ability to generate combs of phase-coherent femtosecond pulses provide tools for the generation and utilization of maximal quantum coherence in large molecules and biopolymers. We call this technique FAST CARS (femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy), and the present article proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify preselected molecules in real time. PMID:12177405

  9. Local Spectroscopic Characterization of Spin and Layer Polarization in WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Devin; Yankowitz, Matthew; Leroy, Brian

    Semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, such as WSe2, exhibit very strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) at certain band extrema due to large in-plane dipole moments formed by their heavy constituent atoms. The strong SOC links the spin and valley degrees of freedom in monolayers. In bilayers, interlayer hopping is suppressed by this SOC, leading to a spontaneous layer polarization and a coupling of the layer pseudospin with the spin and valley degrees of freedom. We examine these effects by tracking allowed and forbidden electronic scattering pathways in monolayer and bilayer WSe2 using scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Specifically, we observe a strong suppression of intervalley scattering in both monolayer and bilayer WSe2 indicative of these band polarizations.

  10. Spin and Time-Reversal Symmetries of Superconducting Electron Pairs Probed by the Muon Spin Rotation and Relaxation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higemoto, Wataru; Aoki, Yuji; MacLaughlin, Douglas E.

    2016-09-01

    Unconventional superconductivity based on the strong correlation of electrons is one of the central issues of solid-state physics. Although many experimental techniques are appropriate for investigating unconventional superconductivity, a complete perspective has not been established yet. The symmetries of electron pairs are crucial properties for understanding the essential state of unconventional superconductivity. In this review, we discuss the investigation of the time-reversal and spin symmetries of superconducting electron pairs using the muon spin rotation and relaxation technique. By detecting a spontaneous magnetic field under zero field and/or the temperature dependence of the muon Knight shift in the superconducting phase, the time-reversal symmetry and spin parity of electron pairs have been determined for several unconventional superconductors.

  11. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials. PMID:27194379

  12. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials.

  13. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials. PMID:27194379

  14. Effects of spin diffusion on electron spin relaxation time measured with a time-resolved microscopic photoluminescence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2015-02-07

    We performed measurements at room temperature for a GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well grown on GaAs(110) using a time-resolved microscopic photoluminescence (micro-PL) technique to find what effects spin diffusion had on the measured electron spin relaxation time, τ{sub s}, and developed a method of estimating the spin diffusion coefficient, D{sub s}, using the measured data and the coupled drift-diffusion equations for spin polarized electrons. The spatial nonuniformities of τ{sub s} and the initial degree of electron spin polarization caused by the pump intensity distribution inside the focal spot were taken into account to explain the dependence of τ{sub s} on the measured spot size, i.e., a longer τ{sub s} for a smaller spot size. We estimated D{sub s} as ∼100 cm{sup 2}/s, which is similar to a value reported in the literature. We also provided a qualitative understanding on how spin diffusion lengthens τ{sub s} in micro-PL measurements.

  15. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  16. Studies on Nephrite and Jadeite Jades by Fourier Transform Infrared (ftir) and Raman Spectroscopic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T. L.; Ng, L. L.; Lim, L. C.

    2013-10-01

    The mineralogical properties of black nephrite jade from Western Australia are studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy using both transmission and specular reflectance techniques in the 4000-400 cm-1 wavenumber region. The infrared absorption peaks in the 3700-3600 cm-1 region which are due to the O-H stretching mode provides a quantitative analysis of the Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratio in the mineral composition of jade samples. The Fe/(Fe+Mg) percentage in black nephrite is found to be higher than that in green nephrite, but comparable to that of actinolite (iron-rich nephrite). This implies that the mineralogy of black nephrite is closer to actinolite than tremolite. The jade is also characterized using Raman spectroscopy in the 1200-200 cm-1 region. Results from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic data of black nephrite jade are compared with those of green nephrite jade from New Zealand and jadeite jade from Myanmar. Black nephrite appears to have a slightly different chemical composition from green nephrite. Spectra from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques were found to be useful in differentiating black nephrite, green nephrite, and green jadeite jades. Furthermore, data on refractive index, specific gravity, and hardness of black nephrite jade are measured and compared with those of green nephrite and of jadeite jade.

  17. How to Calculate Spin-Spin Coupling and Spin-Rotation Coupling Strengths and Their Uncertainties from Spectroscopic Data: Application to the c(1^3Σ_g^+) State of Diatomic Lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattani, Nikesh S.; Li, Xuan

    2013-06-01

    Recent high-resolution (± 0.00002 cm^{-1}) photo-association spectroscopy (PAS) data of seven previously unexplored vibrational levels of the 1^3Σ_g^+ state of Li_2 have allowed for the first ever experimental determination of the spin-spin (λ_v) and spin-rotation (γ_v) coupling constants in a diatomic lithium system. For triplet states of diatomic molecules such as the 1^3Σ_g^+ state of Li_2, the three spin-spin/spin-rotation resolved energies associated with a ro-vibrational state |v,N> were expressed explicity in terms of B_v, λ_v, and γ_v in 1929 by Kramer's first-order formulas and then in 1937 by Schlapp's more refined formulas. Given spectroscopic data, while it has never been difficult to extract λ_v and γ_v from Schlapp's formulas, it has been a challenge to reliably predict how accurate these extracted values are. This is for two reasons: (1) the lack of a rigorous method to estimate the uncertainty in B_v, (2) the non-linearity of Schlapp's coupled equations has meant that traditionally they have had to be solved numerically by Newton iterations which makes error propagation difficult. The former challenge has been this year solved by Le Roy with a modification of Hutson's perturbation theory of, and the latter problem has now been solved by symbolic computing software that solves Schlapp's coupled non-linear equations analytically for the first time since their introduction in 1937. M. Semczuk, X. Li, W. Gunton, M. Haw, N. Dattani, J. Witz, A. Mills, D. Jones, K. Madison, Physical Review A {87}, XX (2013) H. Kramers, Zeitschrift fur Physik {53}, 422 (1929) R. Schlapp, Physical Review {51}, 342 (1937) J. Hutson, J. Phys. B, {14}, 851 (1981)

  18. Rhodospirillum rubrum CO-dehydrogenase. Part 2: Spectroscopic investigation and assignment of spin-spin coupling signals

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, J.; Staples, C.R.; Telser, J.; Ludden, P.W.

    1999-12-08

    solely from the [Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}]{sup 1+} clusters. These resonances are attributed in fully reduced CODH to spin-spin coupling between [Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}]{sub C}{sup 1+} (S = 1/2) and [Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}]{sub B}{sup 1+} (S = 1/2). When CODH was poised at a calculated potential of {minus}326 mV, the UV-visible absorption spectrum indicated that only one of the [Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}] clusters was reduced. However, the EPR spectrum was much different than that observed at ca. {minus}295 mV. The EPR spectrum of CODH at {minus}326 mV exhibited resonances arising from a slow-relaxing [Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}]{sup 1+} (S = 1/2) cluster (g{sub z,y,x} = 2.04, 1.93, 1.89) and a very minor amount of a fast-relaxing [Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}]{sup 1+} (S = 1/2) cluster. None of the C{sub red1} coupling signal was present. The fast-relaxing cluster is assigned to [Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}]{sub C}{sup 1+}, while the slow-relaxing cluster is assigned to uncoupled [Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}]{sub C}{sup 1+}. The observation of uncoupled [Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}]{sub C}{sup 1+} at slightly lower potentials suggests the reduction of [(CO{sub L})Fe{sup 3+}-Ni{sup 2+}-H{minus}]{sup 4+} (S = 1/2) to [(CO{sub L})Fe{sup 2+}-Ni{sup 2+}-H{minus}]{sup 3+} (S = 0). Treatment of CODH with its physiological product (CO{sub 2}) while poised at {minus}326 mV with 99% reduced phenosafranin results in accumulation of oxidized dye, the production of CO, and the appearance of a new species with g{sub x} = 1.75. This species has relaxation properties unlike C{sub red2A}. Based upon the method of generation and the relaxation properties of the species, the g = 1.75 feature is assigned to [Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}]{sub C}{sup 1+} (S = 1/2) spin-coupling with [Fe{sup 2+}-Ni{sup 2+}]{sup 4+} (S = 1) (and is referred to as C{sub red2B}). Based on the data presented in this and Part 1, a mechanism for the oxidation of CO to CO{sub 2} by R.rubrum CODH is proposed.

  19. Progress towards Single Shot Spectroscopic Techniques for Time-Resolved Measurements in the Diamond Anvil Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Douglas Allen; McWilliams, R. Stewart; Mahmood, M. F.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2012-02-01

    We will discuss how we are bridging the gap between static diamond anvil cell and dynamic shock experiments using various spectroscopic techniques which utilize nonlinear optics. Using pulsed laser techniques, we can achieve extreme temperatures while probing optical and chemical changes on fast time scales. Recent developments incorporating broadband spectroscopy into the laser heated diamond anvil cell have indicated that probing phase transitions while measuring temperature is possible [1]. Various methods for incorporating nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy (such as CARS) into the diamond anvil cell will be discussed. The application of these optical diagnostics to pulsed laser heating and table-top shock experiments [2] will be presented. [4pt] [1] R.S. McWilliams et al., in preparation. [0pt] [2] M.R. Armstrong et al., J. Appl. Phys., 108, 023511, (2010).

  20. Implementation of Multiple Spectroscopic Techniques to Simultaneously Observe Native and Mutated Protein Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Brennan; Ben, Kelty; Link, Justin

    A protein's natural, correctly folded structure can determine the protein's ability to carry out its function. If the unfolding process of proteins can be observed, then the relative stability can be better understood between native and mutated proteins. A global picture of the unfolding process may be completed through the studies of strategically mutated proteins using tryptophan as a probe. Horse heart cytochrome c, a thoroughly studied, model protein was used in our investigation to explore this idea. Various spectroscopic techniques such as circular dichroism (CD), absorbance, and fluorescence were simultaneously applied while slowly unfolding our protein by increasing the concentration of a chemical denaturant, guanidine hydrochloride. This provided us information about the thermodynamic properties of the protein and several mutants which can then be interpreted to gain relative stability information among mutations. Efforts to utilize these techniques on native and mutated proteins in comparison to current scientific unfolding theories will be presented in this session.

  1. Spectroscopic Localization by Simultaneous Acquisition of the Double-Spin and Stimulated Echoes

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Assaf; Gonen, Oded

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To design a proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MRS) localization sequence that combines the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) benefits of Point Resolved Spectroscopy (PRESS) with the high pulse bandwidths, low chemical shift displacements (CSD), low specific absorption rates (SAR), short echo times (TE) and superior radio-frequency transmit field (B1+) immunity of Stimulated Echo Acquisition Mode (STEAM), by simultaneously refocusing and acquiring both the double-spin and stimulated echo coherence pathways from the volume of interest. Methods We propose a family of 1H-MRS sequences comprising three orthogonal spatially-selective pulses with flip angles 90°<α, β, γ<128°. The stimulated and double-spin echo are refocused in-phase simultaneously by altering the pulses’ phases, flip angles and timing, as well as the inter-pulse gradient spoiling moments. The ≈90° nutations of α, β, γ provide STEAM-like advantages (lower SAR, in-plane CSD and TE; greater B1+ immunity), but with SNRs comparable with PRESS. Results Phantom and in vivo brain experiments show that 83–100% of the PRESS SNR (metabolite-dependent) is achieved at under 75% of the SAR and 66% lower in-plane CSD. Conclusion The advantages of STEAM can be augmented with the higher SNR of PRESS by combining the spin and stimulated echoes. Quantification, especially of J-coupled resonances and intermediate and long TEs, must be carefully considered. PMID:24664399

  2. Positional cues in serial learning: the spin-list technique.

    PubMed

    Kahana, Michael J; Mollison, Matthew V; Addis, Kelly M

    2010-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that serial learning depends largely on the encoding and retrieval of position-to-item associations, we examined whether people can learn spin lists on which starting position is randomly varied across successive learning trials. By turning positional information from a reliable cue into a source of intertrial interference, we expected learning to be greatly impaired. Contrary to this hypothesis, we found that participants were only slightly worse at serial learning under spin conditions and that this impairment reflects a substantial increase in initiation errors coupled with a small increase in intertrial forgetting. These data show that participants can effectively use nonpositional cues when positional cues are unreliable. PMID:19966242

  3. Shape coexistence at low spin in the Z = 50 region and its spectroscopic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, P. E.

    2016-08-01

    Nuclei in the Z = 50 region provide excellent examples of shape coexistence, the establishment of which occurred through the use of detailed spectroscopy, based not only on γ-ray spectroscopy but also conversion electron, particle transfer, Coulomb excitation, and lifetime measurements. The evidence to date strongly suggests that the presence of coexisting shapes arises from the promotion of protons across the Z = 50 closed shell and the strong correlations arising from interplay of the pairing and quadrupole interactions. The evidence for the presence of shape coexistence in the Z = 50 region, at low spin and low excitation energies, will be presented and clues for the microscopic origin explored.

  4. Optical detection of middle ear infection using spectroscopic techniques: phantom experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Huang, Jing; Li, Tianqi; Svanberg, Sune; Svanberg, Katarina

    2015-05-01

    A noninvasive optical technique, which is based on a combination of reflectance spectroscopy and gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy, is demonstrated. It has the potential to improve diagnostics of middle ear infections. An ear phantom prepared with a tissue cavity, which was covered with scattering material, was used for spectroscopic measurements. Diffuse reflectance spectra of the phantom eardrum were measured with a reflectance probe. The presence of oxygen and water vapor as well as gas exchange in the phantom cavity were studied with a specially designed fiber-optic probe for backscattering detection geometry. The results suggest that this method can be developed for improved clinical detection of middle ear infection. PMID:25938207

  5. Dielectric studies of boron sub phthalocyanine chloride thin films by admittance spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalia, Sameer; Mahajan, Aman; Neerja, Sharma, Anshul Kumar; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bedi, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    The dielectric properties of Boron Sub Phthalocyanine Chloride (Cl-SubPc) thermally deposited on ITO substrate have been studied using admittance spectroscopic techniques. The I-V and capacitance -frequency (C-F) studies at various bias voltages reveal that the mobility of charge carriers decrease with bias voltage, however the conduction phenomenon still remain hopping in nature. From the differential susceptance curve, the contribution of the Schottky barrier contact in the charge carrier concentration was found to be absent. The mobility of charge carriers have been determined using differential susceptance variation and from the phase of admittance curve. The values obtained in two cases have been found to be in agreement with each other.

  6. Spectroscopic Evidence for Strong Quantum Spin Fluctuations with Itinerant Character in YFe2Ge2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sirica, N.; Bondino, F.; Nappini, S.; Piz, I.; Poudel, L.; Christianson, Andrew D.; Mandrus, D.; Singh, David J; Mannella, Norman

    2015-03-04

    We report x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy of the electronic structure in the normal state of metallic YFe2Ge2. The data reveal evidence for large fluctuating spin moments on the Fe sites, as indicated by exchange multiplets appearing in the Fe 3s core-level photoemission spectra, even though the compound does not show magnetic order. The magnitude of the multiplet splitting is comparable to that observed in the normal state of the Fe-pnictide superconductors. This shows a connection between YFe2Ge2 and the Fe-based superconductors even though it contains neither pnictogens nor chalcogens. Finally, the implication is that the chemical range of compoundsmore » showing at least one of the characteristic magnetic signatures of the Fe-based superconductors is broader than previously thought.« less

  7. Spin-echo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging at 7 T with frequency-modulated refocusing pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, He; Soher, Brian J; Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Schär, Michael; Barker, Peter B

    2013-05-01

    Two approaches to high-resolution SENSE-encoded magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of the human brain at 7 Tesla (T) with whole-slice coverage are described. Both sequences use high-bandwidth radiofrequency pulses to reduce chemical shift displacement artifacts, SENSE-encoding to reduce scan time, and dual-band water and lipid suppression optimized for 7 T. Simultaneous B0 and transmit B1 mapping was also used for both sequences to optimize field homogeneity using high-order shimming and determine optimum radiofrequency transmit level, respectively. One sequence ("Hahn-MRSI") used reduced flip angle (90°) refocusing pulses for lower radiofrequency power deposition, while the other sequence used adiabatic fast passage refocusing pulses for improved sensitivity and reduced signal dependence on the transmit-B1 level. In four normal subjects, adiabatic fast passage-MRSI showed a signal-to-noise ratio improvement of 3.2±0.5 compared to Hahn-MRSI at the same spatial resolution, pulse repetition time, echo time, and SENSE-acceleration factor. An interleaved two-slice Hahn-MRSI sequence is also demonstrated to be experimentally feasible. PMID:22692894

  8. Nondestructive spectroscopic and imaging techniques for quality evaluation and assessment of fish and fish products.

    PubMed

    He, Hong-Ju; Wu, Di; Sun, Da-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, people have increasingly realized the importance of acquiring high quality and nutritional values of fish and fish products in their daily diet. Quality evaluation and assessment are always expected and conducted by using rapid and nondestructive methods in order to satisfy both producers and consumers. During the past two decades, spectroscopic and imaging techniques have been developed to nondestructively estimate and measure quality attributes of fish and fish products. Among these noninvasive methods, visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) spectroscopy, computer/machine vision, and hyperspectral imaging have been regarded as powerful and effective analytical tools for fish quality analysis and control. VIS/NIR spectroscopy has been widely applied to determine intrinsic quality characteristics of fish samples, such as moisture, protein, fat, and salt. Computer/machine vision on the other hand mainly focuses on the estimation of external features like color, weight, size, and surface defects. Recently, by incorporating both spectroscopy and imaging techniques in one system, hyperspectral imaging cannot only measure the contents of different quality attributes simultaneously, but also obtain the spatial distribution of such attributes when the quality of fish samples are evaluated and measured. This paper systematically reviews the research advances of these three nondestructive optical techniques in the application of fish quality evaluation and determination and discuss future trends in the developments of nondestructive technologies for further quality characterization in fish and fish products. PMID:24915393

  9. Development of a low resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopic technique for the study of matrix mobility in fresh and freeze-thawed hen egg yolk.

    PubMed

    Au, Carmen; Wang, Tong; Acevedo, Nuria C

    2016-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted in developing a low resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopic technique to study matrix mobility in fresh and freeze-thawed gelled yolk. The Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence was used to measure spin-spin relaxation times of proton pools representing major yolk constituents. A component identification test distinguished 3-4 pools. The least mobile pool was assigned to proteins, protein-lipid and protein-water interactions, and the most mobile to unbound water. The remaining pools were assigned to lipids, lipid-protein and lipid-water interactions. A stability test indicated that yolk had varied matrix mobility within the same sample across five days of refrigeration storage. A reproducibility test demonstrated high repeatability of fresh yolk measurements, but significant differences (p<0.05) were found within gelled yolk samples. This research determined that (1)H NMR spectroscopy, a non-destructive technique, can identify yolk components and detect changes in the matrix. PMID:26988489

  10. Characterizing Si:P quantum dot qubits with spin resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chin-Yi; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots patterned by atomically precise placement of phosphorus donors in single crystal silicon have long spin lifetimes, advantages in addressability, large exchange tunability, and are readily available few-electron systems. To be utilized as quantum bits, it is important to non-invasively characterise these donor quantum dots post fabrication and extract the number of bound electron and nuclear spins as well as their locations. Here, we propose a metrology technique based on electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements with the on-chip circuitry already needed for qubit manipulation to obtain atomic scale information about donor quantum dots and their spin configurations. Using atomistic tight-binding technique and Hartree self-consistent field approximation, we show that the ESR transition frequencies are directly related to the number of donors, electrons, and their locations through the electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction. PMID:27550779

  11. Characterizing Si:P quantum dot qubits with spin resonance techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chin-Yi; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots patterned by atomically precise placement of phosphorus donors in single crystal silicon have long spin lifetimes, advantages in addressability, large exchange tunability, and are readily available few-electron systems. To be utilized as quantum bits, it is important to non-invasively characterise these donor quantum dots post fabrication and extract the number of bound electron and nuclear spins as well as their locations. Here, we propose a metrology technique based on electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements with the on-chip circuitry already needed for qubit manipulation to obtain atomic scale information about donor quantum dots and their spin configurations. Using atomistic tight-binding technique and Hartree self-consistent field approximation, we show that the ESR transition frequencies are directly related to the number of donors, electrons, and their locations through the electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction. PMID:27550779

  12. Novel techniques for detection and imaging of spin related phenomena: Towards sub-diffraction limited resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Christopher Stuart

    The idea that the spin degree of freedom of particles can be used to store and transport information has revolutionized the data storage industry and inspired a huge amount of research activity. Spin electronics, or spintronics, provides a plethora of potential improvements to conventional charge electronics that include increased functionality and energy efficiency. Scientists studying spintronics will need a multitude of characterization tools to sensitively detect spins in new materials and devices. There are already a handful of powerful techniques to image spin-related phenomena, but each has limitations. Magnetic resonance force microscopy, for example, offers sensitive detection of spin moments that are localized or nearly so but requires a high vacuum, cryogenic environment. Magnetometry based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond is a powerful approach, but requires the nitrogen vacancy center to be in very close contact to the spin system being studied to be able to measure the field generated by the system. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy provides perhaps the best demonstrated spatial resolution, but typically requires ultrahigh vacuum conditions and is limited to studying the surface of a sample. Traditional optical techniques such as Faraday or Kerr microscopy are limited in spatial resolution by the optical diffraction limit. In this dissertation I will present three new techniques we have developed to address some of these issues and to provide the community with new tools to help push forward spintronics and magnetism related research. I will start by presenting the first experimental demonstration of scanned spin-precession microscopy. This technique has the potential to turn any spin-sensitive detection technique into an imaging platform by providing the groundwork for incorporating a magnetic field gradient with that technique, akin to magnetic resonance imaging, and the mathematical tools to analyze the data and extract the local

  13. Study on the interaction of catechins with human serum albumin using spectroscopic and electrophoretic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trnková, Lucie; Boušová, Iva; Staňková, Veronika; Dršata, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between eight naturally occurring flavanols (catechin, epicatechin, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, catechin gallate, epicatechin gallate, gallocatechin gallate, and epigallocatechin gallate) and human serum albumin (HSA) has been investigated by spectroscopic (fluorescence quenching and UV-Vis absorption) and electrophoretic (native and SDS PAGE) techniques under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.40, 37 °C). The spectroscopic results confirmed the complex formation for the tested systems. The binding constants and the number of binding sites were obtained by analysis of fluorescence data. The strongest binding affinity to HSA was found for epicatechin gallate and decreased in the order epicatechin gallate ⩾ catechin gallate > epigallocatechin gallate > gallocatechin gallate ≫ epicatechin ⩾ catechin > gallocatechin ⩾ epigallocatechin. All free energy changes possessed negative sign indicating the spontaneity of catechin-HSA systems formation. The binding distances between the donor (HSA) and the acceptors (catechins) estimated by the Förster theory revealed that non-radiation energy transfer from HSA to catechins occurred with high possibility. According to results obtained by native PAGE, the galloylated catechins increased the electrophoretic mobility of HSA, which indicated the change in the molecular charge of HSA, whilst the non-galloylated catechins caused no changes. The ability of aggregation and cross-linking of tested catechins with HSA was not proved by SDS-PAGE. The relationship between the structure characteristics of all tested catechins (e.g. presence of the galloyl moiety on the C-ring, the number of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring, and the spatial arrangement of the substituents on the C-ring) and their binding properties to HSA is discussed. The presented study contributes to the current knowledge in the area of protein-ligand binding, particularly catechin-HSA interactions.

  14. Some flight data extraction techniques used on a general aviation spin research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    Some methods for obtaining flight data from a highly instrumented general aviation spin research aircraft are developed and illustrated. The required correction terms for the measurement of body accelerations, body velocities, and aircraft orientation are presented. In addition, the equations of motion are utilized to derive total aerodynamic coefficients for comparison with model tests and for analysis. Flight test experience is used to evaluate the utility of various instruments and calculation techniques for spin research.

  15. Infrared spectroscopic investigation of nuclear spin conversion in solid CH{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Takeru; Yamakawa, Koichiro Arakawa, Ichiro

    2015-12-14

    Infrared spectra of solid CH{sub 4} were studied in the ν{sub 3} and ν{sub 4} vibrational regions. The phase I crystal around 30 K showed broad absorption bands, whereas the phase II crystal at 6.9–10.3 K exhibited splitting of these bands after annealing above 20 K. The split peaks were assigned to the librating and almost freely rotating molecules in phase II on the basis of the peak spacings and time evolution of the peak intensities. From the quantitative analysis of the temporal changes of the R(0) and R(1) peak intensities, the relaxation rates of the numbers of molecules with J = 0 (I = 2) and J = 1 (I = 1) were determined in the temperature range of 6.9–10.3 K. We fitted the function resulting from a combination of direct and indirect relaxation processes mediated by phonons to the temperature dependence of these rates and obtained the activation energies of the indirect process: C ≃ 36 K. Since this value is higher than the energies of perturbed J = 2 states relative to the J = 1 state, we argue that the nuclear spin conversion through the J = 3 state also takes place.

  16. Infrared spectroscopic investigation of nuclear spin conversion in solid CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Takeru; Yamakawa, Koichiro; Arakawa, Ichiro

    2015-12-01

    Infrared spectra of solid CH4 were studied in the ν3 and ν4 vibrational regions. The phase I crystal around 30 K showed broad absorption bands, whereas the phase II crystal at 6.9-10.3 K exhibited splitting of these bands after annealing above 20 K. The split peaks were assigned to the librating and almost freely rotating molecules in phase II on the basis of the peak spacings and time evolution of the peak intensities. From the quantitative analysis of the temporal changes of the R(0) and R(1) peak intensities, the relaxation rates of the numbers of molecules with J = 0 (I = 2) and J = 1 (I = 1) were determined in the temperature range of 6.9-10.3 K. We fitted the function resulting from a combination of direct and indirect relaxation processes mediated by phonons to the temperature dependence of these rates and obtained the activation energies of the indirect process: C ≃ 36 K. Since this value is higher than the energies of perturbed J = 2 states relative to the J = 1 state, we argue that the nuclear spin conversion through the J = 3 state also takes place.

  17. Application of spectroscopic techniques for the analysis of kidney stones: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shameem, K. M., Muhammed; Chawla, Arun; Bankapur, Aseefhali; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Santhosh, C.

    2016-03-01

    Identification and characterization of kidney stone remains one of the important analytical tasks in the medical field. Kidney stone is a common health complication throughout the world, which may cause severe pain, obstruction and infection of urinary tract, and can lead to complete renal damage. It commonly occurs in both sexes regardless of age. Kidney stones have different composition, although each stones have a major single characteristic component. A complete understanding of a sample properties and their function can only be feasible by utilizing elemental and molecular information simultaneously. Two laser based analytical techniques; Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy have been used to study different types of kidney stones from different patients. LIBS and Raman spectroscopy are highly complementary spectroscopic techniques, which provide elemental and molecular information of a sample. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm laser having energy 17mJ per pulse at 10 Hz repetition rate was used for getting LIBS spectra. Raman measurements were carried out using a home assembled micro-Raman spectrometer. Using the recorded Raman spectra of kidney stones, we were able to differentiate different kinds of kidney stones. LIBS spectra of the same stones are showing the evidence of C, Ca, H, and O and also suggest the presence of certain pigments.

  18. Intratumoral Agreement of High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Profiles in the Metabolic Characterization of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Vivian Youngjean; Yoon, Dahye; Koo, Ja Seung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seung Il; Choi, Ji Soo; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Suhkmann; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy data may serve as a biomarker for breast cancer, with only a small volume of tissue sample required for assessment. However, previous studies utilized only a single tissue sample from each patient. The aim of this study was to investigate whether intratumoral location and biospecimen type affected the metabolic characterization of breast cancer assessed by HR-MAS MR spectroscopy This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was obtained. Preoperative core-needle biopsies (CNBs), central, and peripheral surgical tumor specimens were prospectively collected under ultrasound (US) guidance in 31 patients with invasive breast cancer. Specimens were assessed with HR-MAS MR spectroscopy. The reliability of metabolite concentrations was evaluated and multivariate analysis was performed according to intratumoral location and biospecimen type. There was a moderate or higher agreement between the relative concentrations of 94.3% (33 of 35) of metabolites in the center and periphery, 80.0% (28 of 35) of metabolites in the CNB and central surgical specimens, and 82.9% (29 of 35) of metabolites between all 3 specimen types. However, there was no significant agreement between the concentrations of phosphocholine (PC) and phosphoethanolamine (PE) in the center and periphery. The concentrations of several metabolites (adipate, arginine, fumarate, glutamate, PC, and PE) had no significant agreement between the CNB and central surgical specimens. In conclusion, most HR-MAS MR spectroscopic data do not differ based on intratumoral location or biospecimen type. However, some metabolites may be affected by specimen-related variables, and caution is recommended in decision-making based solely on metabolite concentrations, particularly PC and PE. Further validation through future studies is needed for the clinical implementation of these biomarkers based

  19. Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopic techniques for investigating membrane-bound ion channel activities.

    PubMed

    Székács, Inna; Kaszás, Nóra; Gróf, Pál; Erdélyi, Katalin; Szendrő, István; Mihalik, Balázs; Pataki, Agnes; Antoni, Ferenc A; Madarász, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopic (OWLS) techniques were probed for monitoring ion permeation through channels incorporated into artificial lipid environment. A novel sensor set-up was developed by depositing liposomes or cell-derived membrane fragments onto hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane. The fibrous material of PTFE membrane could entrap lipoid vesicles and the water-filled pores provided environment for the hydrophilic domains of lipid-embedded proteins. The sensor surface was kept clean from the lipid holder PTFE membrane by a water- and ion-permeable polyethylene terephthalate (PET) mesh. The sensor set-up was tested with egg yolk lecithin liposomes containing gramicidin ion channels and with cell-derived membrane fragments enriched in GABA-gated anion channels. The method allowed monitoring the move of Na(+) and organic cations through gramicidin channels and detecting the Cl(-)-channel functions of the (α5β2γ2) GABAA receptor in the presence or absence of GABA and the competitive GABA-blocker bicuculline. PMID:24339925

  20. Spectroscopic technique with wide range of wavelength information improves near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Hideo; Aoki, Hiromichi; Eura, Shigeru; Ebe, Kazutoshi

    2009-02-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) calculates hemoglobin parameters, such as oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxyHb) using the near-infrared light around the wavelength of 800nm. This is based on the modified-Lambert-Beer's law that changes in absorbance are proportional to changes in hemoglobin parameters. Many conventional measurement methods uses only a few wavelengths, however, in this research, basic examination of NIRS measurement was approached by acquiring wide range of wavelength information. Venous occlusion test was performed by using the blood pressure cuff around the upper arm. Pressure of 100mmHg was then applied for about 3 minutes. During the venous occlusion, the spectrum of the lower arm muscles was measured every 15 seconds, within the range of 600 to 1100nm. It was found that other wavelength bands hold information correlating to this venous occlusion task. Technique of improving the performance of NIRS measurement using the Spectroscopic Method is very important for Brain science.

  1. Soil examination for a forensic trace evidence laboratory--Part 1: Spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Woods, Brenda; Lennard, Chris; Kirkbride, K Paul; Robertson, James

    2014-12-01

    In the past, forensic soil examination was a routine aspect of trace evidence examination in forensic science. However, in Australia, the apparent need for soil examinations has diminished and with it the capability of forensic science laboratories to carry out soil examination has been eroded. In recent years, due to soil examinations contributing to some high profile investigations, interest in soil examinations has been renewed. Routine soil examinations conducted in a forensic science laboratory by trace evidence scientists can be facilitated if the examinations are conducted using the instrumentation routinely used by these examiners. Spectroscopic techniques such as visible microspectrophotometry (MSP) and Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are routinely used by trace evidence analysts for the colour and compositional analysis, respectively, of forensic items, including paints, fibres, inks and toners, tapes, adhesives and other miscellaneous examinations. This article presents an examination of the feasibility of using MSP and ATR-FTIR as a first step in the forensic comparison of soils with particular reference to Australian soil samples. This initial study demonstrates MSP and ATR-FTIR can effectively be used as a screening test for the discrimination of "forensic-sized" soil samples prior to submission for more detailed analyses by a soil expert. PMID:25205526

  2. Structural studies of E. coli ribosomes by spectroscopic techniques: A specialized review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonicontro, Adalberto; Risuleo, Gianfranco

    2005-12-01

    We present a review on our interdisciplinary line of research based on strategies of molecular biology and biophysics. These have been applied to the study of the prokaryotic ribosome of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Our investigations on this organelle have continued for more than a decade and we have adopted different spectroscopic biophysical techniques such as: dielectric and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as light scattering (photon correlation spectroscopy). Here we report studies on the whole 70S ribosomes and on the separated subunits 30S and 50S. Our results evidence intrinsic structural features of the subunits: the small shows a more "floppy" structure, while the large one appears to be more rigid. Also, an inner "kernel" formed by the RNA/protein association is found within the ribosome. This kernel is surrounded by a ribonucleoprotein complex more exposed to the solvent. Initial analyses were done on the so called Kaldtschmit-Wittmann ribosome: more recently we have extended the studies to the "tight couple" ribosome known for its better functional performance in vitro. Data evidence a phenomenological correlation between the differential biological activity and the intrinsic structural properties of the two-ribosome species. Finally, investigations were also conducted on particles treated at sub-denaturing temperatures and on ribosomes partially deproteinized by salt treatment (ribosomal cores). Results suggest that the thermal treatment and the selective removal of proteins cause analogous structural alterations.

  3. Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopic Techniques for Investigating Membrane-Bound Ion Channel Activities

    PubMed Central

    Székács, Inna; Kaszás, Nóra; Gróf, Pál; Erdélyi, Katalin; Szendrő, István; Mihalik, Balázs; Pataki, Ágnes; Antoni, Ferenc A.; Madarász, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopic (OWLS) techniques were probed for monitoring ion permeation through channels incorporated into artificial lipid environment. A novel sensor set-up was developed by depositing liposomes or cell-derived membrane fragments onto hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane. The fibrous material of PTFE membrane could entrap lipoid vesicles and the water-filled pores provided environment for the hydrophilic domains of lipid-embedded proteins. The sensor surface was kept clean from the lipid holder PTFE membrane by a water- and ion-permeable polyethylene terephthalate (PET) mesh. The sensor set-up was tested with egg yolk lecithin liposomes containing gramicidin ion channels and with cell-derived membrane fragments enriched in GABA-gated anion channels. The method allowed monitoring the move of Na+ and organic cations through gramicidin channels and detecting the Cl–-channel functions of the (α5β2γ2) GABAA receptor in the presence or absence of GABA and the competitive GABA-blocker bicuculline. PMID:24339925

  4. A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients in radio frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daksha, M.; Berger, B.; Schuengel, E.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Koepke, M.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-06-01

    A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients (γ-CAST) in capacitively-coupled radio-frequency plasmas is proposed. This non-intrusive, sensitive diagnostic is based on a combination of phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy and particle-based kinetic simulations. In such plasmas (under most conditions in electropositive gases) the spatio-temporally resolved electron-impact excitation/ionization rate features two distinct maxima adjacent to each electrode at different times within each RF period. While one maximum is the consequence of the energy gain of electrons due to sheath expansion, the second maximum is produced by secondary electrons accelerated towards the plasma bulk by the sheath electric field at the time of maximum voltage drop across the adjacent sheath. Due to these different excitation/ionization mechanisms, the ratio of the intensities of these maxima is very sensitive to the secondary electron emission coefficient γ. This sensitvity, in turn, allows γ to be determined by comparing experimental excitation profiles and simulation data obtained with various γ-coefficients. The diagnostic, tested here in a geometrically symmetric argon discharge, yields an effective secondary electron emission coefficient of γ =0.066+/- 0.01 for stainless steel electrodes.

  5. Integrated Analysis of the Wood Oil from Xanthocyparis vietnamensis Farjon & Hiep. by Chromatographic and Spectroscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Bazzali, Ophélie; Thai, Tran Huy; Hoi, Tran Minh; Khang, Nguyen Sinh; Hien, Nguyen Thi; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange; Tomi, Félix

    2016-01-01

    In order to get better knowledge about the volatiles produced by Xanthocyparis vietnamensis, a species recently discovered in Vietnam, its wood oil has been analyzed by a combination of chromatographic (GC, CC) and spectroscopic (GC-MS, (13)C-NMR) techniques. Forty components that accounted for 87.9% of the oil composition have been identified. The composition is dominated by nootkatene (20.7%), 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-7-one (17.2%), γ-eudesmol (5.1%), nootkatone (4.7%), valencene (3.5%) and 13-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-11-one (2.6%). The structure of two new compounds-10-epi-nor-γ-eudesmen-11-one and 12-hydroxy-isodihydroagarofuran-has been elucidated, while 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-7-ol is reported as a natural product for the first time. The composition of X. vietnamensis wood oil varied drastically from those of leaf oils, dominated by hedycaryol (34.4%), phyllocladene (37.8%) or by pimara-6(14)-15-diene (19.4%). PMID:27355937

  6. Investigation of fungal deterioration of synthetic paint binders using vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Cappitelli, Francesca; Vicini, Silvia; Piaggio, Paolo; Abbruscato, Pamela; Princi, Elisabetta; Casadevall, Arturo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Zanardini, Elisabetta

    2005-01-14

    The deterioration of synthetic polymers caused by biological process is usually evaluated by visual inspection and measuring physical effects. In contrast to this approach, we have applied vibrational spectroscopies to study the biodegradation of the synthetic resins. 29 synthetic resins used as paint binding media, including acrylic, alkyd and poly(vinyl acetate) polymers, were examined for potential susceptibility to fungal degradation using the standard method ASTM G21-96(2002). In addition, the degraded resins were analysed by Raman spectroscopy, FT-IR and FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy. Almost all the acrylic resins studied proved to be resistant to microbial attack, while all alkyd resins and some poly(vinyl acetates) turned out to be biodegradable. Within a few days of inoculation Aspergillus niger was the most copious fungus on the biodegraded resins. A comparison of the IR and Raman spectra of control and biodegraded resins did not show any differences, but photoacoustic spectroscopy revealed additional bands for the fungal-degraded resins, consistent with the presence of fungal-derived substances. The additional bands in the photoacoustic spectra were due to the presence of Aspergillus niger and melanin, a fungal pigment. Since IR photoacoustic spectroscopy can be also a suitable technique for the chemical characterisation of binding media, the same spectroscopic analysis can be employed to both characterise the material and obtain evidence for fungal colonization. Microbial growth on Sobral 1241ML (alkyd resin) after 28 d (growth rating 4) compared with the non-inoculated resin. PMID:15635715

  7. The Spin Move: A Reliable and Cost-Effective Gowning Technique for the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Derek H.; Adib, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Operating room efficiency (ORE) and utilization are considered one of the most crucial components of quality improvement in every hospital. We introduced a new gowning technique that could optimize ORE. The Spin Move quickly and efficiently wraps a surgical gown around the surgeon's body. This saves the operative time expended through the traditional gowning techniques. In the Spin Move, while the surgeon is approaching the scrub nurse, he or she uses the left heel as the fulcrum. The torque, which is generated by twisting the right leg around the left leg, helps the surgeon to close the gown as quickly and safely as possible. From 2003 to 2012, the Spin Move was performed in 1,725 consecutive procedures with no complication. The estimated average time was 5.3 and 7.8 seconds for the Spin Move and traditional gowning, respectively. The estimated time saving for the senior author during this period was 71.875 minutes. Approximately 20,000 orthopaedic surgeons practice in the United States. If this technique had been used, 23,958 hours could have been saved. The money saving could have been $14,374,800.00 (23,958 hours × $600/operating room hour) during the past 10 years. The Spin Move is easy to perform and reproducible. It saves operating room time and increases ORE. PMID:26052490

  8. A technique for measurement of vector and tensor polarization in solid spin one polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kielhorn, W.F.

    1991-06-01

    Vector and tensor polarizations are explicitly defined and used to characterize the polarization states of spin one polarized targets, and a technique for extracting these polarizations from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data is developed. This technique is independent of assumptions about spin temperature, but assumes the target's crystal structure induces a quadrupole interaction with the spin one particles. Analysis of the NMR signals involves a computer curve fitting algorithm implemented with a fast Fourier transform method which speeds and simplifies curve fitting algorithms used previously. For accurate curve fitting, the NMR electronic circuit must be modeled by the fitting algorithm. Details of a circuit, its model, and data collected from this circuit are given for a solid deuterated ammonia target. 37 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Understanding Thermodynamic and Spectroscopic Properties of Tetragonal Mn12 Single-Molecule Magnets from Combined Density Functional Theory/Spin-Hamiltonian Calculations.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi Tabrizi, Shadan; Arbuznikov, Alexei V; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-09-01

    We apply broken-symmetry density functional theory to determine isotropic exchange-coupling constants and local zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensors for the tetragonal Mn12(t)BuAc single-molecule magnet. The obtained parametrization of the many-spin Hamiltonian (MSH), taking into account all 12 spin centers, is assessed by comparing theoretical predictions for thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties with available experimental data. The magnetic susceptibility (calculated by the finite-temperature Lanczos method) is well approximated, and the intermultiplet excitation spectrum from inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments is correctly reproduced. In these respects, the present parametrization of the 12-spin model represents a significant improvement over previous theoretical estimates of exchange-coupling constants in Mn12, and additionally offers a refined interpretation of INS spectra. Treating anisotropic interactions at the third order of perturbation theory, the MSH is mapped onto the giant-spin Hamiltonian describing the S = 10 ground multiplet. Although the agreement with high-field EPR experiments is not perfect, the results clearly point in the right direction and for the first time rationalize the angular dependence of the transverse-field spectra from a fully microscopic viewpoint. Importantly, transverse anisotropy of the effective S = 10 manifold is explicitly shown to arise largely from the ZFS-induced mixing of exchange multiplets. This effect is given a thorough analysis in the approximate D2d spin-permutational symmetry group of the exchange Hamiltonian. PMID:27482933

  10. Spectroscopic Techniques in the Chemistry Laboratory: A Science Enrichment Course for High School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emert, Jack; Zeldin, Martel

    1980-01-01

    Describes a National Science Foundation sponsored enrichment program training high school teachers in modern innovative ideas. Specifically, the course described here was developed to present the uses and applications of spectroscopic methods. (CS)

  11. [Application of Raman spectroscopic technique to the identification and investigation of Chinese ancient jades and jade artifacts].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Xia; Gan, Fu-Xi

    2009-11-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopic technique is one of the essential methods in scientific archaeological research, which belongs to the nondestructive analysis. As a very good nondestructive analysis approach, it has not been widely applied in the research of the Chinese ancient jade artifacts. First of all in the present paper the fundamentals of laser Raman spectroscopic technique and the new research progress in this field were reviewed. Secondly, the Raman spectra of five familiar jades including nephrite (mainly composed of tremolite), Xiuyan Jade (mainly composed of serpentine), Dushan Jade (mainly composed of anorthite and Zoisite), turquoise and lapis lazuli were summarized respectively. As for an example, the Raman spectra of the four Chinese ancient jade artifacts excavated from Liangzhu Site of Zhejiang Province and Yinxu Site of Anyang in Henan Province were compared with that of the nephrite sample in Hetian of Xinjiang Province. It was shown that the Raman spectroscopic technique is a good nondestructive approach to the identification and investigation of the structures and mineral composition of Chinese ancient jade artifacts. Finally, the limitations and the foreground of this technique were discussed. PMID:20101970

  12. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  13. Investigation of Very Slowly Tumbling Spin Labels by Nonlinear Spin Response Techniques: Theory and Experiment for Stationary Electron Electron Double Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Smigel, Murray D.; Dalton, Larry R.; Hyde, James S.; Dalton, Lauraine A.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation of very slowly tumbling spin labels by nonlinear electron spin response techniques is discussed. Such techniques permit characterization of rotational processes with correlation times from 10-3 to 10-7 sec even though the linear spin response (ESR) technique is insensitive to motion in this region. Nonlinear techniques fall into two categories: (a) Techniques (referred to as passage techniques) in which the distribution of saturation throughout the spin system is determined both by the applied magnetic field modulation of the resonance condition and by the modulation of the resonance frequency induced by the molecular motion. The time dependence of this distribution produces phase and amplitude changes in the observed signals. (b) Techniques that measure the integral of the distribution function of the time required for saturated spin packets to move between pumped and observed portions of the spectrum [stationary and pulsed electron electron double resonance (ELDOR) techniques]. Quantitative analysis of passage ESR and stationary ELDOR techniques can be accomplished employing a density matrix treatment that explicitly includes the interaction of the spins with applied radiation and modulation fields. The effect of molecular motion inducing a random modulation of the anisotropic spin interactions can be calculated by describing the motion by the diffusion equation appropriate to the motional model assumed. For infinitesimal steps the eigen-functions of the diffusion operator are known analytically, while for random motion of arbitrary step size they are determined by diagonalizing the transition matrix appropriate for the step model used. The present communication reports investigation of the rotational diffusion of the spin label probes 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinol-1-oxyl and 17β-hydroxy-4′,4′-dimethylspiro-[5α-androstane-3,2′-oxazolidin]-3′-oxyl in sec-butylbenzene. Experimental spectra are compared with computer simulations of

  14. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; Tan, Li Huey

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed. PMID:25205057

  15. Determination of lipid content of oleaginous microalgal biomass by NMR spectroscopic and GC-MS techniques.

    PubMed

    Sarpal, Amarijt S; Teixeira, Claudia M L L; Silva, Paulo R M; Lima, Gustavo M; Silva, Samantha R; Monteiro, Thays V; Cunha, Valnei S; Daroda, Romeu J

    2015-05-01

    Direct methods based on (1)H NMR spectroscopic techniques have been developed for the determination of neutral lipids (triglycerides and free fatty acids) and polar lipids (glyceroglycolipids/phospholipids) in the solvent extracts of oleaginous microalgal biomasses cultivated on a laboratory scale with two species in different media. The chemical shift assignments observed in the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra corresponding to unsaturated (C18:N, N = 1-3, C20:3, C20:5, C22:6, epoxy) and saturated (C14-C18) fatty acid ester components in a complex matrix involving overlapped resonances have been unambiguously confirmed by the application of 2D NMR spectroscopy (total correlation spectroscopy and heteronuclear single quantum coherence-total correlation spectroscopy). The study of the effect of a polar lipid matrix on the determination of neutral lipids by an internal reference blending process by a systematic designed experimental protocol has provided absolute quantification. The fatty acid composition of algal extracts was found to be similar to that of vegetable oils containing saturated (C16-C18:0) and unsaturated (C18:N, N = 1-3, C20:N, N = 3-4, C22:6) fatty acids as confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. The NMR methods developed offer great potential for rapid screening of algal strains for generation of algal biomass with the desired lipid content, quality, and potential for biodiesel and value-added polyunsaturated fatty acids in view of the cost economics of the overall cost of generation of the biomass. PMID:25801382

  16. Control-system techniques for improved departure/spin resistance for fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L. T.; Gilbert, W. P.; Ogburn, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Some fundamental information on control system effects on controllability of highly maneuverable aircraft at high angles of attack are summarized as well as techniques for enhancing fighter aircraft departure/spin resistance using control system design. The discussion includes: (1) a brief review of pertinent high angle of attack phenomena including aerodynamics, inertia coupling, and kinematic coupling; (2) effects of conventional stability augmentation systems at high angles of attack; (3) high angle of attack control system concepts designed to enhance departure/spin resistance; and (4) the outlook for applications of these concepts to future fighters, particularly those designs which incorporate relaxed static stability.

  17. Analysis of state-of-the-art single-thruster attitude control techniques for spinning penetrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raus, Robin; Gao, Yang; Wu, Yunhua; Watt, Mark

    2012-07-01

    The attitude dynamics and manoeuvre survey in this paper is performed for a mission scenario involving a penetrator-type spacecraft: an axisymmetric prolate spacecraft spinning around its minor axis of inertia performing a 90° spin axis reorientation manoeuvre. In contrast to most existing spacecraft only one attitude control thruster is available, providing a control torque perpendicular to the spin axis. Having only one attitude thruster on a spinning spacecraft could be preferred for spacecraft simplicity (lower mass, lower power consumption etc.), or it could be imposed in the context of redundancy/contingency operations. This constraint does yield restrictions on the thruster timings, depending on the ratio of minor to major moments of inertia among other parameters. The Japanese Lunar-A penetrator spacecraft proposal is a good example of such a single-thruster spin-stabilised prolate spacecraft. The attitude dynamics of a spinning rigid body are first investigated analytically, then expanded for the specific case of a prolate and axisymmetric rigid body and finally a cursory exploration of non-rigid body dynamics is made. Next two well-known techniques for manoeuvring a spin-stabilised spacecraft, the Half-cone/Multiple Half-cone and the Rhumb line slew, are compared with two new techniques, the Sector-Arc Slew developed by Astrium Satellites and the Dual-cone developed at Surrey Space Centre. Each technique is introduced and characterised by means of simulation results and illustrations based on the penetrator mission scenario and a brief robustness analysis is performed against errors in moments of inertia and spin rate. Also, the relative benefits of each slew algorithm are discussed in terms of slew accuracy, energy (propellant) efficiency and time efficiency. For example, a sequence of half-cone manoeuvres (a Multi-half-cone manoeuvre) tends to be more energy-efficient than one half-cone for the same final slew angle, but more time-consuming. As another

  18. Electron spin echo envelope modulation studies of the Cu(II)-substituted derivative of isopenicillin N synthase: A structural and spectroscopic model

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Jiang; Peisach, J. ); Lijune Ming; Que, L. Jr. ); Chen, V.J. )

    1991-12-03

    Electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy (ESEEM) was used to study the active site structure of isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS) from Cephalosporium acremonium with Cu(II) as a spectroscopic probe. Fourier transform of the simulated electron spin-echo envelope for the Cu(II)-substituted enzyme, Cu(II)IPNS, revealed two nearly magnetically equivalent, equatorially coordinated His imidazoles. The superhyperfine coupling constant, A{sub iso}, for the remote {sup 14}N of each imidazole was 1.65 MHz. The binding of substrate to the enzyme altered the magnetic coupling so that A{sub iso} is 1.30 MHz for one nitrogen and 2.16 MHz for the other. From a comparison of the ESSEM of Cu(II)IPNS in D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O, it is suggested that water is a ligand of Cu(II) and this is displaced upon the addition of substrate.

  19. New technique for single-scan T1 measurements using solid echoes. [for spin-lattice relaxation time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W. K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple technique for single-scan T1 measurements in solids is proposed and analyzed for single exponential spin-lattice relaxation. In this technique, the direct spin heating caused by the sampling process is significantly reduced in comparison with conventional techniques by utilizing the 'solid echo' to refocus the magnetization. The applicability of this technique to both the solid and liquid phases is demonstrated.

  20. Electron spin-echo techniques for the study of protein motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Leela; Johnson, Michael E.; Bowman, Michael K.

    Electron spin-echo (ESE) spectroscopy has been used to make the first direct measurements of spin-spin relaxation times of a spin-labeled protein at physiological temperatures. Results from experiments using maleimide-labeled deoxygenated hemoglobin (dHb) from individuals homozygous for sickle cell anemia (dHbS) have been compared with those from control experiments using dHb from normal adults (dHbA). Hb "immobilized" by ammonium sulfate precipitation and by siloxane polymer entrapment have been studied for a suitable "rigid" reference. Two-dimensional ESE (2D-ESE) experiments have been performed using all of these systems. The 2D contour plots show that 2D-ESE is sensitive to the slow motion of dHbS polymers and can differentiate it from both that of immobilized Hb and of HbA molecules in solution at the same temperature and concentration. More importantly, the 2D-ESE technique enables one to select for slower motion and thereby extract the dHbS polymer signal from the total signal generated by the heterogeneous system containing dHbS molecules in solution as well as in the polymer. Computer simulations using current slow motional theories show that detailed motional and structural information may be obtained by such studies. The considerable potential of 2D-ESE spectroscopy in the study of macromolecular motion is illustrated by comparing 2D-ESE with the nonlinear technique of saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance.

  1. Accurate calculations on the 12 electronic states and 23 Ω states of the SiBr+ cation: potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, De-Heng; Liu, Qionglan; Yu, Wei; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2014-05-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 23 Ω states generated from the 12 electronic states (X1 Σ +, 21 Σ +, 11 Σ -, 11 Π, 21 Π, 11 Δ, 13 Σ +, 23 Σ +, 13 Σ -, a3 Π, 23 Π and 13 Δ) are studied for the first time. All the states correlate to the first dissociation channel of the SiBr+ cation. Of these electronic states, the 23 Σ + is the repulsive one without the spin-orbit coupling, whereas it becomes the bound one with the spin-orbit coupling added. On the one hand, without the spin-orbit coupling, the 11 Π, 21 Π and 23 Π are the rather weakly bound states, and only the 11 Π state possesses the double well; on the other hand, with the spin-orbit coupling included, the a3 Π and 11 Π states possess the double well, and the 13 Σ + and 13 Σ - are the inverted states. The PECs are calculated by the CASSCF method, which is followed by the internally contracted MRCI approach with the Davidson modification. Scalar relativistic correction is calculated by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation with a cc-pVTZ-DK basis set. Core-valence correlation correction is included with a cc-pCVTZ basis set. The spin-orbit coupling is accounted for by the state interaction method with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian using the all-electron aug-cc-pCVTZ basis set. All the PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The variation with internuclear separation of the spin-orbit coupling constant is discussed in brief. The spectroscopic parameters are evaluated for the 11 bound electronic states and the 23 bound Ω states, and are compared with available measurements. Excellent agreement has been found between the present results and the experimental data. It demonstrates that the spectroscopic parameters reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones. The Franck-Condon factors and radiative lifetimes of the transitions from the a3 Π 0 + and a3 Π 1 states to the X1 Σ + 0+ state are calculated for several low vibrational levels, and

  2. Microwave band on-chip coil technique for single electron spin resonance in a quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Obata, Toshiaki; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel; Kubo, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Katsuharu; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Tarucha, Seigo

    2007-10-01

    Microwave band on-chip microcoils are developed for the application to single electron spin resonance measurement with a single quantum dot. Basic properties such as characteristic impedance and electromagnetic field distribution are examined for various coil designs by means of experiment and simulation. The combined setup operates relevantly in the experiment at dilution temperature. The frequency responses of the return loss and Coulomb blockade current are examined. Capacitive coupling between a coil and a quantum dot causes photon assisted tunneling, whose signal can greatly overlap the electron spin resonance signal. To suppress the photon assisted tunneling effect, a technique for compensating for the microwave electric field is developed. Good performance of this technique is confirmed from measurement of Coulomb blockade oscillations. PMID:17979446

  3. Accurate spectroscopic calculations of the 17 Λ-S and 59 Ω states of the AsP molecule including the spin-orbit coupling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Deheng; Liu, Qionglan; Wang, Shuai; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2015-01-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 59 Ω states generated from the 17 Λ-S states (X1Σ+, a3Σ+, 15Σ+, b3Δ, c3Π, 15Π, 25Σ+, 23Δ, 23Π, 33Σ+, A1Π, 23Σ+, 35Σ+, 17Σ+, 15Δ, 25Δ, and 25Π) of AsP molecule are studied for the first time for internuclear separations from about 0.10 to 1.10 nm. All the Λ-S states are contributed to the first three dissociation channels of AsP molecule except for the A1Π. The 23Σ+, 35Σ+, 17Σ+, 15Δ, 25Δ, and 25Π are found to be the repulsive states. The a3Σ+, 15Π, b3Δ, 17Σ+, 15Δ, 25Δ, and 25Π are found to be the inverted states. Each of the 33Σ+, c3Π, 23Π, 15Π, and 15Σ+ states has one potential barrier. The PECs are calculated by the CASSCF method, which is followed by the internally contracted MRCI approach with Davidson correction. Core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections are included. The convergent behavior of present calculations is discussed with respect to the basis set and level of theory. The spin-orbit coupling effect is accounted for. All these PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters are evaluated for the bound states involved, and are compared with available measurements. Excellent agreement has been found between the present results and the measurements. It shows that the spectroscopic parameters reported in this paper can be expected to be reliably predicted ones. The conclusion is gained that the effect of spin-orbit coupling on the spectroscopic parameters is not obvious for all the Λ-S bound states except for few ones such as 15Σ+ and c3Π.

  4. Accurate calculations of spectroscopic properties for the 13 Λ-S states and the 23 Ω states of BO radical including the spin-orbit coupling effect.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zunlue; Yu, Wei; Wang, Shuai; Sun, Jinfeng; Shi, Deheng

    2014-10-15

    The spectroscopic properties of 23 Ω states generated from the 13 Λ-S states of BO radical are studied for the first time for internuclear separations from about 0.07 to 1.0nm. Of the 13 Λ-S states, each of the F(2)Π, 1(2)Φ and 1(2)Δ states is found to possess the double well. Each of the 1(4)Π, C(2)Π, 1(2)Σ(-) and 2(2)Σ(-) states possesses one well with one barrier. The A(2)Π, 1(4)Π and F(2)Π are the inverted states with the spin-orbit coupling effect taken into account. All the states possess the deep well except for the 1(2)Φ. The potential energy curves (PECs) are calculated by the complete active space self-consistent field method, which is followed by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson correction. Core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections are included into the calculations. The PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spin-orbit coupling effect is accounted for by the state interaction approach with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The spectroscopic parameters are evaluated, and compared with the available measurements and other theoretical results. The Franck-Condon factors and radiative lifetimes of the transitions from the B(2)Σ(+), C(2)Π, D(2)Σ(+), 1(2)Σ(-) and 1(4)Π Λ-S states to the ground state are calculated for several low vibrational levels, and some necessary discussion is made. Analyses show that the spectroscopic parameters reported in this paper can be expected to be reliably predicted ones. PMID:24820321

  5. Radio-controlled model design and testing techniques for stall/spin evaluation of general-aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, S. M., Jr.; Wilson, C. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A relatively inexpensive radio-controlled model stall/spin test technique was developed. Operational experiences using the technique are presented. A discussion of model construction techniques, spin-recovery parachute system, data recording system, and movie camera tracking system is included. Also discussed are a method of measuring moments of inertia, scaling of engine thrust, cost and time required to conduct a program, and examples of the results obtained from the flight tests.

  6. EPR techniques to probe insertion and conformation of spin-labeled proteins in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Bordignon, Enrica; Polyhach, Yevhen

    2013-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of spin-labeled membrane proteins is a valuable biophysical technique to study structural details and conformational transitions of proteins close to their physiological environment, e.g., in liposomes, membrane bilayers, and nanodiscs. Unlike in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, having only one or few specific side chains labeled at a time with paramagnetic probes makes the size of the object under investigation irrelevant in terms of technique sensitivity. As a drawback, extensive site-directed mutagenesis is required in order to analyze the properties of the protein under investigation. EPR can provide detailed information on side chain dynamics of large membrane proteins or protein complexes embedded in membranes with an exquisite sensitivity for flexible regions and on water accessibility profiles across the membrane bilayer. Moreover, distances between the two spin-labeled side chains in membrane proteins can be detected with high precision in the 1.5-6 nm range at cryogenic temperatures. The application of EPR to membrane proteins still presents some challenges in terms of sample preparation, sensitivity, and data interpretation; thus no ready-to-go methodological recipes can be given. However this chapter describes the state of the art in the application of nitroxide-based site-directed spin labeling EPR to membrane proteins, with specific focus on the different types of information which can be obtained with continuous wave and pulsed techniques and on the challenges in sample preparation and data analysis for functional and structural membrane protein studies. PMID:23404283

  7. Explicit demonstration of spinor character for a spin-1/2 nucleus via NMR interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, M. E.; Vaughan, R. W.; Vega, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a nuclear-magnetic-resonance experiment are presented which directly demonstrate the spinor character of a spin-1/2 nucleus, C-13. The interferometric spectroscopic technique used and its potential applications are discussed.

  8. Development and Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Czerwinski; Phil Weck; Frederic Poineau

    2010-12-29

    Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Visible) and Time Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line, real-time analysis of the actinide elements in a solvent extraction process. UV-Visible and TRLFS techniques have been used for measuring the speciation and concentration of the actinides under laboratory conditions. These methods are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques for GNEP applications, the fundamental speciation of the target actinides and the resulting influence on 3 spectroscopic properties must be determined. Through this effort detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be establish and utilized in a range of areas of interest to GNEP, especially in areas related to materials accountability and process control.

  9. Coupling spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques for evaluation of the depositional history of hydrocarbons in a subtropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Martins, César C; Doumer, Marta E; Gallice, Wellington C; Dauner, Ana Lúcia L; Cabral, Ana Caroline; Cardoso, Fernanda D; Dolci, Natiely N; Camargo, Luana M; Ferreira, Paulo A L; Figueira, Rubens C L; Mangrich, Antonio S

    2015-10-01

    Spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques can be used together to evaluate hydrocarbon inputs to coastal environments such as the Paranaguá estuarine system (PES), located in the SW Atlantic, Brazil. Historical inputs of aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed using two sediment cores from the PES. The AHs were related to the presence of biogenic organic matter and degraded oil residues. The PAHs were associated with mixed sources. The highest hydrocarbon concentrations were related to oil spills, while relatively low levels could be attributed to the decrease in oil usage during the global oil crisis. The results of electron paramagnetic resonance were in agreement with the absolute AHs and PAHs concentrations measured by chromatographic techniques, while near-infrared spectroscopy results were consistent with unresolved complex mixture (UCM)/total n-alkanes ratios. These findings suggest that the use of a combination of techniques can increase the accuracy of assessment of contamination in sediments. PMID:26210796

  10. Laser-spectroscopic measurement techniques for hypersonic, turbulent wind tunnel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.; Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of the nature, present status, and capabilities of two laser spectroscopic methods for the simultaneous measurement of temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence in high speed wind tunnel flows. One method is based on the two frequency excitation of nitric oxide seeded into a nitrogen flow, using tunable dye lasers. The second, more recent method relies on the excitation of oxygen in air flows using a tunable, ArF excimer laser. Signal are obtained from both the laser induced fluorescence and from Raman scattering of the same laser pulse. Measurements are demonstrated in the turbulent boundary layer of a Mach-2 channel flow.

  11. Transition metal quinone-thiosemicarbazone complexes 3: Spectroscopic characterizations of spin-mixed iron (III) of naphthoquinone-thiosemicarbazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikate, Rajeev C.; Padhye, Subhash B.

    2007-04-01

    An interesting series of iron (III) complexes with naphthoquinone-thiosemicarbazones are synthesized and physico-chemically characterized by elemental analysis, UV-vis, IR, EPR and magnetic susceptibility measurements. They possess a cationic octahedral [FeL 2] + species and a tetrahedral [FeCl 4] - anion and exhibit unusual spin-mixed states involving high-spin and low-spin ferric centers as revealed from magnetic behavior with significant amount of exchange interactions mediated by intermolecular associations. The magnetic susceptibility data is fitted with S=5/2 and S=1/2 Heisengberg's exchange coupled model; Hˆ=-2JSS and the magnetic exchange interactions are found to be of the order of -13.6 cm -1 indicating the moderate coupling between two paramagnetic centers present in different chemical and structural environment. The presence of spin-paired iron (III) cation having dxz2dxz2dxz1 ground state is revealed from the EPR spectra with three prominent peaks while the high-spin tetrahedral iron (III) anion exhibits characteristics g = 4 signal whose intensity increases with lowering the temperature suggesting its influence on the magnetic properties of the complex molecule. FTIR measurements indicate tridentate ONS donor systems involving quinone/hydroxyl oxygen, imine/hydrazinic nitrogen and thione/thiol sulfur atoms as binding sites for naphthoquinone-thiosemicarbazones.

  12. Variable flip angle imaging and fat suppression in combined gradient and spin-echo (GREASE) techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Vinitski, S.; Mitchell, D.G.; Szumowski, J.; Burk, D.L. Jr.; Rifkin, M.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Conventional proton density and T2-weighted spin-echo images are susceptible to motion induced artifact, which is exacerbated by lipid signals. Gradient moment nulling can reduce motion artifact but lengthens the minimum TE, degrading the proton density contrast. We designed a pulse sequence capable of optimizing proton density and T2-weighted contrast while suppressing lipid signals and motion induced artifacts. Proton density weighting was obtained by rapid readout gradient reversal immediately after the excitation RF pulse, within a conventional spin-echo sequence. By analyzing the behavior of the macroscopic magnetization and optimizing excitation flip angle, we suppressed T1 contribution to the image, thereby enhancing proton density and T2-weighted contrast with a two- to four-fold reduction of repetition time. This permitted an increased number of averages to be used, reducing motion induced artifacts. Fat suppression in the presence of motion was investigated in two groups of 8 volunteers each by (i) modified Dixon technique, (ii) selective excitation, and (iii) hybrid of both. Elimination of fat signal by the first technique was relatively uniform across the field of view, but it did not fully suppress the ghosts originating from fat motion. Selective excitation, while sensitive to the main field inhomogeneity, largely eliminated the ghosts (0.21 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.29 +/- 0.06, p less than 0.01). The hybrid of both techniques combined with bandwidth optimization, however, showed the best results (0.17 +/- 0.04, p less than 0.001). Variable flip-angle imaging allows optimization of image contrast which, along with averaging and effective fat suppression, significantly improves gradient- and spin-echo imaging, particularly in the presence of motion.

  13. Rapid determination of internal volumes of membrane vesicles with electron spin resonance-stopped flow technique.

    PubMed

    Anzai, K; Higashi, K; Kirino, Y

    1988-01-13

    We have developed an electron spin resonance (ESR)-stopped flow technique and employed it for the simple and rapid determination of internal volumes of biomembrane vesicles and liposomes. A vesicle suspension containing a neutral and membrane-permeable spin label, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPONE), was mixed in the stopped-flow apparatus with an isotonic solution of relatively impermeable line broadening agents, potassium tris(oxalato)chromate(III) or potassium ferricyanide, and an ESR spectrum was recorded. From the relative intensity of the sharp triplet signal due to TEMPONE in the aqueous space within vesicles, the determination of the internal aqueous volume was straightforward. Using this technique, it is possible to measure intravesicular volumes in 0.1 s. The internal volume of sonicated phospholipid vesicles was approximately 0.3 microliter/mg lipid. The light fraction of sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle was estimated to have an internal volume of 2.2-2.6 microliter/mg protein in its resting state. Activation of Ca2+ pumps in the membrane upon addition of ATP and Ca2+ ions decreased the internal volume by about 10%. This finding supports the hypothesis that the Ca2+ pump is electrogenic and that the efflux of potassium ions compensates for the influx of positive charges. The present technique is widely applicable to the simple and rapid determination of the internal volumes of membrane vesicles. PMID:2825810

  14. Effect of salt on the structure of middle phase microemulsions using the spin-label technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, C.; Vijayan, S.; Shah, D.O.

    1980-06-12

    The middle phases obtained by varying the sodium chloride concentration in surfactant formulations containing 5:3 (wt/wt) TRS 10-410 (a petroleum sulfonate)-isobutyl alcohol and equal volumes of aqueous and oil phases were studied by using spin-labeling techniques. Two different spin-labels, one partially water soluble (5-doxylstearic acid label) and the other water insoluble (3-doxylcholestane label), were used. Extensive measurements of electrical conductivity and phase volumes of the middle phases were also carried out. These physical property results corroborated the spin-label studies in that below 2.0 wt % NaCl the middle phase was essentially a microemulsion of the water external type. Beyond 2.3% NaCl the appearance of a signal component typical of a free label (ketostearic acid) in an oil environment and changes in correlation time characteristics (cholestane label) coupled with physical property data underlined a qualitative change in the microemulsion system. It is believed that these changes are consistent with a transition from a water-external type to an oil-external type microemulsion system. This transition is estimated to be around 2 to 2.3% NaCl. The results are further substantiated by ascorbic acid reduction rate studies. Possible mechanisms of this transition are discussed.

  15. New Spectroscopic Technique Based on Coaddition of Surface Brightness Fluctuations: NGC 4449 and its Stellar Tidal Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Arnold, Jacob A.; Ramachandran, Neel; Theakanath, Kuriakose

    2016-06-01

    We present a new spectroscopic technique based in part on targeting the upward fluctuations of the surface brightness for studying the internal stellar kinematics and metallicities of galaxies of low surface brightness effects both to galaxies and streams beyond the Local Group. The distance to these systems makes them unsuitable for targeting individual red giant branch (RGB) stars (tip of RGB at I≳ 24 mag) and their surface brightness is too low ({μ }r≳ 25 mag arcsec‑2) for integrated light spectroscopic measurements. This technique overcomes these two problems by targeting individual objects that are brighter than the tip of the RGB. We apply this technique to the star-forming dwarf galaxy NGC 4449 and its stellar stream. We use Keck/DEIMOS data to measure the line-of-sight radial velocity out to ∼7 kpc in the east side of the galaxy and ∼8 kpc along the stream. We find that the two systems are likely gravitationally bound to each other and have heliocentric radial velocities of 227.3 ± 10.7 km s‑1 and 225.8 ± 16.0 km s‑1, respectively. Neither the stream nor the near half of the galaxy shows a significant velocity gradient. We estimate the stellar metallicity of the stream based on the equivalent width of its calcium triplet lines and find [Fe/H] =\\quad -1.37+/- 0.41, which is consistent with the metallicity–luminosity relation for dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. Whether the stream's progenitor was moderately or severely stripped cannot be constrained with this uncertainty in metallicity. We demonstrate that this new technique can be used to measure the kinematics and (possibly) the metallicity of the numerous faint satellites and stellar streams in the halos of nearby (∼4 Mpc) galaxies.

  16. New Spectroscopic Technique Based on Coaddition of Surface Brightness Fluctuations: NGC 4449 and its Stellar Tidal Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Arnold, Jacob A.; Ramachandran, Neel; Theakanath, Kuriakose

    2016-06-01

    We present a new spectroscopic technique based in part on targeting the upward fluctuations of the surface brightness for studying the internal stellar kinematics and metallicities of galaxies of low surface brightness effects both to galaxies and streams beyond the Local Group. The distance to these systems makes them unsuitable for targeting individual red giant branch (RGB) stars (tip of RGB at I≳ 24 mag) and their surface brightness is too low ({μ }r≳ 25 mag arcsec‑2) for integrated light spectroscopic measurements. This technique overcomes these two problems by targeting individual objects that are brighter than the tip of the RGB. We apply this technique to the star-forming dwarf galaxy NGC 4449 and its stellar stream. We use Keck/DEIMOS data to measure the line-of-sight radial velocity out to ˜7 kpc in the east side of the galaxy and ˜8 kpc along the stream. We find that the two systems are likely gravitationally bound to each other and have heliocentric radial velocities of 227.3 ± 10.7 km s‑1 and 225.8 ± 16.0 km s‑1, respectively. Neither the stream nor the near half of the galaxy shows a significant velocity gradient. We estimate the stellar metallicity of the stream based on the equivalent width of its calcium triplet lines and find [Fe/H] =\\quad -1.37+/- 0.41, which is consistent with the metallicity–luminosity relation for dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. Whether the stream's progenitor was moderately or severely stripped cannot be constrained with this uncertainty in metallicity. We demonstrate that this new technique can be used to measure the kinematics and (possibly) the metallicity of the numerous faint satellites and stellar streams in the halos of nearby (˜4 Mpc) galaxies.

  17. Pressure Induced Amorphization in Garnets investigated by X-ray Diffraction and Spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Hong; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    1996-03-01

    We report the first direct observation of pressure induced amorphization in garnets GGG and GSGG at ambient temperature(both are Cr^3+, Nd^3+ doped). Laser spectroscopic studies show abrupt disappearance of fluorescent emission peaks at high pressure due to loss of the long range order. The amorphization was confirmed by the synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies at X-17C, NSLS. The amorphization pressure for GSGG is 58±3GPa and for GGG is 90±5GPa. The transformation pressures for the garnets are correlated to the strength of the crystal field. The amorphous phase can be quenched at ambient conditions. The amorphization phenomenon in garnets is explained on the basis of a three-level thermodynamic model. (Supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-9403832)

  18. Ultrawide band multifrequency high-field EMR technique: A methodology for increasing spectroscopic information.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A K; Pardi, L A; Krzystek, J; Sienkiewicz, A; Goy, P; Rohrer, M; Brunel, L C

    2000-02-01

    We report methodology that combines an ultrawide band multifrequency microwave system with technology of high magnetic fields for solving challenging problems in electron magnetic resonance (EMR) spectroscopy. This strategy has been made possible due to a novel EMR facility operating in an exceptionally wide range of microwave frequencies of 24 GHz to 3 THz, at magnetic fields up to 17 T, and in the temperature range of 1.6 to 330 K. The basic configuration of the multifrequency system works in a transmission mode and employs oversized cylindrical waveguides for routing the microwave power. A wide-band, low-noise, liquid helium cooled (4.2 K) InSb bolometer is used for signal detection. This approach results in an extremely wide-band performance, thus making it possible to employ a variety of solid-state millimeter and submillimeter microwave sources in combination with a far infrared laser microwave source for performing multifrequency EMR experiments. A complexity of resonant structures and related technical problems such as microphonics at high magnetic fields is virtually eliminated. The system is simple, yet sensitive, and has been revealed to be extremely advantageous while solving such problems as observation of AFMR transitions in spin-ordered systems, g-factor resolution enhancement in complex organic radicals, and resonance signal detection in EMR-silent spin systems having integer spin and large zero field splitting. A technical description of the multifrequency high-field EMR facility is presented and results of its performance tests are given. The potential utility of using the multifrequency high-field methodology in EMR studies is illustrated with selected examples of its recent applications. PMID:10648147

  19. Spectroscopy of composite solid-state spin environments for improved metrology with spin ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Gill, Nir; Pham, Linh; Belthangady, Chinmay; Lesage, David; Cappellaro, Paola; Maze, Jeronimo; Lukin, Mikhail; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald

    2012-02-01

    For precision coherent measurements with ensembles of quantum spins the relevant Figure-of-Merit (FOM) is the product of spin density and coherence lifetime, which is generally limited by the dynamics of spin coupling to the environment. Significant effort has been invested in understanding the causes of decoherence in a diverse range of spin systems in order to increase the FOM and improve measurement sensitivity. Here, we apply a coherent spectroscopic technique to characterize the dynamics of a composite solid-state spin environment consisting of Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) color centers in room temperature diamond coupled to baths of electronic spin (N) and nuclear spin (13C) impurities. For diamond samples with a wide range of NV densities and impurity spin concentrations we employ a dynamical decoupling technique to minimize coupling to the environment, and find similar values for the FOM, which is three orders of magnitude larger than previously achieved in any room-temperature solid-state spin system, and thus should enable greatly improved precision spin metrology. We also identify a suppression of electronic spin bath dynamics in the presence of a nuclear spin bath of sufficient nuclear spin concentration. This suppression could inform efforts to engineer samples with even larger FOM for solid-state spin ensemble metrology and collective quantum information processing.

  20. Accurate spectroscopic calculations of the 17 Λ-S and 59 Ω states of the AsP molecule including the spin-orbit coupling effect.

    PubMed

    Shi, Deheng; Liu, Qionglan; Wang, Shuai; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2015-01-25

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 59 Ω states generated from the 17 Λ-S states (X(1)Σ(+), a(3)Σ(+), 1(5)Σ(+), b(3)Δ, c(3)Π, 1(5)Π, 2(5)Σ(+), 2(3)Δ, 2(3)Π, 3(3)Σ(+), A(1)Π, 2(3)Σ(+), 3(5)Σ(+), 1(7)Σ(+), 1(5)Δ, 2(5)Δ, and 2(5)Π) of AsP molecule are studied for the first time for internuclear separations from about 0.10 to 1.10nm. All the Λ-S states are contributed to the first three dissociation channels of AsP molecule except for the A(1)Π. The 2(3)Σ(+), 3(5)Σ(+), 1(7)Σ(+), 1(5)Δ, 2(5)Δ, and 2(5)Π are found to be the repulsive states. The a(3)Σ(+), 1(5)Π, b(3)Δ, 1(7)Σ(+), 1(5)Δ, 2(5)Δ, and 2(5)Π are found to be the inverted states. Each of the 3(3)Σ(+), c(3)Π, 2(3)Π, 1(5)Π, and 1(5)Σ(+) states has one potential barrier. The PECs are calculated by the CASSCF method, which is followed by the internally contracted MRCI approach with Davidson correction. Core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections are included. The convergent behavior of present calculations is discussed with respect to the basis set and level of theory. The spin-orbit coupling effect is accounted for. All these PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters are evaluated for the bound states involved, and are compared with available measurements. Excellent agreement has been found between the present results and the measurements. It shows that the spectroscopic parameters reported in this paper can be expected to be reliably predicted ones. The conclusion is gained that the effect of spin-orbit coupling on the spectroscopic parameters is not obvious for all the Λ-S bound states except for few ones such as 1(5)Σ(+) and c(3)Π. PMID:25145917

  1. Accurate calculations on 12 Λ-S and 28 Ω states of BN+ cation: potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Deheng; Liu, Qionglan; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2014-03-25

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 28 Ω states generated from the 12 states (X(4)Σ(-), 1(2)Π, 1(2)Σ(-), 1(2)Δ, 1(2)Σ(+), 2(2)Π, A(4)Π, B(4)Σ(-), 3(2)Π, 1(6)Σ(-), 2(2)Σ(-) and 1(6)Π) of the BN(+) cation are studied for the first time for internuclear separations from about 0.1 to 1.0 nm using an ab initio quantum chemical method. All the Λ-S states correlate to the first four dissociation channels. The 1(6)Σ(-), 3(2)Π and A(4)Π states are found to be the inverted ones. The 1(2)Σ(+), 2(2)Π, 3(2)Π and 2(2)Σ(-) states are found to possess the double well. The PECs are calculated by the complete active space self-consistent field method, which is followed by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson correction. Core-valence correlation correction is included by a cc-pCV5Z basis set. Scalar relativistic correction is calculated by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of a cc-pV5Z basis set. The convergent behavior of present calculations is discussed with respect to the basis set and level of theory. The spin-orbit coupling is accounted for by the state interaction approach with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian using the all-electron cc-pCV5Z basis set. All the PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters are obtained, and the vibrational properties of 1(2)Σ(+), 2(2)Π, 3(2)Π and 2(2)Σ(-) states are evaluated. Analyses demonstrate that the spectroscopic parameters reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones. The conclusion is gained that the effect of spin-orbit coupling on the spectroscopic parameters are not obvious almost for all the Λ-S states involved in the present paper. PMID:24334021

  2. Accurate calculations on 9 Λ-S and 28 Ω states of NSe radical in the gas phase: potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit couplings.

    PubMed

    Shi, Deheng; Li, Peiling; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2014-01-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 28 Ω states generated from 9 Λ-S states (X(2)Π, 1(4)Π, 1(6)Π, 1(2)Σ(+), 1(4)Σ(+), 1(6)Σ(+), 1(4)Σ(-), 2(4)Π and 1(4)Δ) are studied for the first time using an ab initio quantum chemical method. All the 9 Λ-S states correlate to the first two dissociation limits, N((4)Su)+Se((3)Pg) and N((4)Su)+Se((3)Dg), of NSe radical. Of these Λ-S states, the 1(6)Σ(+), 1(4)Σ(+), 1(6)Π, 2(4)Π and 1(4)Δ are found to be rather weakly bound states. The 1(2)Σ(+) is found to be unstable and has double wells. And the 1(6)Σ(+), 1(4)Σ(+), 1(4)Π and 1(6)Π are found to be the inverted ones with the SO coupling included. The PEC calculations are made by the complete active space self-consistent field method, which is followed by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson modification. The spin-orbit coupling is accounted for by the state interaction approach with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The convergence of the present calculations is discussed with respect to the basis set and the level of theory. Core-valence correlation corrections are included with a cc-pCVTZ basis set. Scalar relativistic corrections are calculated by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of a cc-pV5Z basis set. All the PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The variation with internuclear separation of spin-orbit coupling constants is discussed in brief for some Λ-S states with one shallow well on each PEC. The spectroscopic parameters of 9 Λ-S and 28 Ω states are determined by fitting the first ten vibrational levels whenever available, which are calculated by solving the rovibrational Schrödinger equation with Numerov's method. The splitting energy in the X(2)Π Λ-S state is determined to be about 864.92 cm(-1), which agrees favorably with the measurements of 891.80 cm(-1). Moreover, other spectroscopic parameters of Λ-S and Ω states involved here are

  3. Artificial tektites: an experimental technique for capturing the shapes of spinning drops.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kyle A; Butler, Samuel L; Hill, Richard J A

    2015-01-01

    Determining the shapes of a rotating liquid droplet bound by surface tension is an archetypal problem in the study of the equilibrium shapes of a spinning and charged droplet, a problem that unites models of the stability of the atomic nucleus with the shapes of astronomical-scale, gravitationally-bound masses. The shapes of highly deformed droplets and their stability must be calculated numerically. Although the accuracy of such models has increased with the use of progressively more sophisticated computational techniques and increases in computing power, direct experimental verification is still lacking. Here we present an experimental technique for making wax models of these shapes using diamagnetic levitation. The wax models resemble splash-form tektites, glassy stones formed from molten rock ejected from asteroid impacts. Many tektites have elongated or 'dumb-bell' shapes due to their rotation mid-flight before solidification, just as we observe here. Measurements of the dimensions of our wax 'artificial tektites' show good agreement with equilibrium shapes calculated by our numerical model, and with previous models. These wax models provide the first direct experimental validation for numerical models of the equilibrium shapes of spinning droplets, of importance to fundamental physics and also to studies of tektite formation. PMID:25564381

  4. Artificial tektites: an experimental technique for capturing the shapes of spinning drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Kyle A.; Butler, Samuel L.; Hill, Richard J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the shapes of a rotating liquid droplet bound by surface tension is an archetypal problem in the study of the equilibrium shapes of a spinning and charged droplet, a problem that unites models of the stability of the atomic nucleus with the shapes of astronomical-scale, gravitationally-bound masses. The shapes of highly deformed droplets and their stability must be calculated numerically. Although the accuracy of such models has increased with the use of progressively more sophisticated computational techniques and increases in computing power, direct experimental verification is still lacking. Here we present an experimental technique for making wax models of these shapes using diamagnetic levitation. The wax models resemble splash-form tektites, glassy stones formed from molten rock ejected from asteroid impacts. Many tektites have elongated or `dumb-bell' shapes due to their rotation mid-flight before solidification, just as we observe here. Measurements of the dimensions of our wax `artificial tektites' show good agreement with equilibrium shapes calculated by our numerical model, and with previous models. These wax models provide the first direct experimental validation for numerical models of the equilibrium shapes of spinning droplets, of importance to fundamental physics and also to studies of tektite formation.

  5. Artificial tektites: an experimental technique for capturing the shapes of spinning drops

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Kyle A.; Butler, Samuel L.; Hill, Richard J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the shapes of a rotating liquid droplet bound by surface tension is an archetypal problem in the study of the equilibrium shapes of a spinning and charged droplet, a problem that unites models of the stability of the atomic nucleus with the shapes of astronomical-scale, gravitationally-bound masses. The shapes of highly deformed droplets and their stability must be calculated numerically. Although the accuracy of such models has increased with the use of progressively more sophisticated computational techniques and increases in computing power, direct experimental verification is still lacking. Here we present an experimental technique for making wax models of these shapes using diamagnetic levitation. The wax models resemble splash-form tektites, glassy stones formed from molten rock ejected from asteroid impacts. Many tektites have elongated or ‘dumb-bell' shapes due to their rotation mid-flight before solidification, just as we observe here. Measurements of the dimensions of our wax ‘artificial tektites' show good agreement with equilibrium shapes calculated by our numerical model, and with previous models. These wax models provide the first direct experimental validation for numerical models of the equilibrium shapes of spinning droplets, of importance to fundamental physics and also to studies of tektite formation. PMID:25564381

  6. Application of a system modification technique to dynamic tuning of a spinning rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spain, C. V.

    1987-01-01

    An important consideration in the development of modern helicopters is the vibratory response of the main rotor blade. One way to minimize vibration levels is to ensure that natural frequencies of the spinning main rotor blade are well removed from integer multiples of the rotor speed. A technique for dynamically tuning a finite-element model of a rotor blade to accomplish that end is demonstrated. A brief overview is given of the general purpose finite element system known as Engineering Analysis Language (EAL) which was used in this work. A description of the EAL System Modification (SM) processor is then given along with an explanation of special algorithms developed to be used in conjunction with SM. Finally, this technique is demonstrated by dynamically tuning a model of an advanced composite rotor blade.

  7. Potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters, and spin-orbit coupling: a theoretical study on 24 Λ-S and 54 Ω states of C2(+) cation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Deheng; Niu, Xianghong; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2013-03-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 24 Λ-S states and 54 Ω states of the C2(+) cation are studied in detail using an ab initio quantum chemical method. All the PEC calculations are made for internuclear separations from 0.09 to 1.11 nm by the complete active space self-consistent field method, which is followed by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson modification (MRCI+Q). All the Λ-S states involved dissociate into the first dissociation limit, C((3)Pg) + C(+)((2)Pu), of C2(+) cation, of which only the 2(2)Σg(-) and 2(4)Σg(-) are repulsive. The spin-orbit (SO) coupling effect is accounted for by the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian with an aug-cc-pCVTZ basis set. To improve the quality of PECs, core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections are included. Core-valence correlation corrections are taken into account with an aug-cc-pCVTZ basis set. Scalar relativistic correction calculations are done by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation with the cc-pVQZ basis set. All the PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The convergence observations of present calculations are made, and the convergent behavior is discussed with respect to the basis set and level of theory. With the PECs obtained by the MRCI+Q/CV+DK+56 calculations, the spectroscopic parameters of 22 Λ-S bound states of C2(+) cation are evaluated by fitting the first ten vibrational levels, which are obtained by solving the rovibrational Schrödinger equation using Numerov's method. In addition, the spectroscopic parameters of 51 Ω bound states generated from these Λ-S bound states are also obtained. The spectroscopic parameters are compared with those reported in the literature. Excellent agreement with available measurements is found. It is expected that the spectroscopic parameters of Λ-S and Ω states reported here are reliable predicted ones. PMID:23391347

  8. Dichromated poly(vinyl alchohol)-xanthene dye systems: holographic characterization and electron spin resonance spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, Gurusamy; Changkakoti, Rupak; Lessard, Roger A.; Mailhot, Gilles; Bolte, Michel

    1994-01-01

    Dichromated poly(vinyl alcohol)-xanthene dye (DCPVA-XD) systems have been employed as real-time holographic recording materials. In this paper, holographic characterization of dichromated poly(vinyl alcohol) with fluorescein (Fl), eosin Y (EY) and Rose Bengal (RB) is presented. In addition, a systematic ESR spectroscopic investigation was also performed on these systems. The photochemical evolution of Cr(V), Cr(III), polymer radical and dye radical in these systems has been monitored and a comparison is made.

  9. Nonintrusive spectroscopic techniques for supersonic/hypersonic aerodynamics and combustion diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the primary nonintrusive diagnostic techniques being developed by the NASA Langley Research Center to address the validation needs of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes. The techniques include absorption in the UV and IR, Laser Induced Fluorescence, electron beam fluorescence, and a number of scattering techniques including Rayleigh, spontaneous Raman, and several coherent Raman spectroscopies. Most of the techniques are highly specialized, require complex data interpretation, and can satisfy only a few of the CFD needs. For these reasons, the evolving trend in flowfield diagnostics appears to favor a mode in which the diagnostic researcher, the experimental aerodynamicist, and the CFD community jointly define experiments based on the aeronautical requirements and on available diagnostic techniques.

  10. Molecular structure and spectroscopic characterization of Carbamazepine with experimental techniques and DFT quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Suhasini, M; Sailatha, E; Gunasekaran, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2015-04-15

    A systematic vibrational spectroscopic assignment and analysis of Carbamazepine has been carried out by using FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral data. The vibrational analysis were aided by electronic structure calculations - ab initio (RHF) and hybrid density functional methods (B3LYP) performed with standard basis set 6-31G(d,p). Molecular equilibrium geometries, electronic energies, natural bond order analysis, harmonic vibrational frequencies and IR intensities have been computed. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of the molecule has been made on the basis of the calculated Potential Energy Distribution (PED) by VEDA program. UV-visible spectrum of the compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies and λmax were determined by HF/6-311++G(d,p) Time-Dependent method. The thermodynamic functions of the title molecule were also performed using the RHF and DFT methods. The restricted Hartree-Fock and density functional theory-based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) calculation procedure was also performed, and it was used for assigning the (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts of Carbamazepine. PMID:25682215

  11. Molecular structure and spectroscopic characterization of Carbamazepine with experimental techniques and DFT quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhasini, M.; Sailatha, E.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2015-04-01

    A systematic vibrational spectroscopic assignment and analysis of Carbamazepine has been carried out by using FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral data. The vibrational analysis were aided by electronic structure calculations - ab initio (RHF) and hybrid density functional methods (B3LYP) performed with standard basis set 6-31G(d,p). Molecular equilibrium geometries, electronic energies, natural bond order analysis, harmonic vibrational frequencies and IR intensities have been computed. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of the molecule has been made on the basis of the calculated Potential Energy Distribution (PED) by VEDA program. UV-visible spectrum of the compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies and λmax were determined by HF/6-311++G(d,p) Time-Dependent method. The thermodynamic functions of the title molecule were also performed using the RHF and DFT methods. The restricted Hartree-Fock and density functional theory-based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) calculation procedure was also performed, and it was used for assigning the 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts of Carbamazepine.

  12. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-02-01

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Monitoring PDT effects in murine tumors by spectroscopic and imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprasad, Subbaraya; Rzepka, Elzbieta; Pi, Jiaxiong; Joshi, Shantaram S.; Dobhal, Mahabeer; Missert, Joseph; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2004-04-01

    The changes in the tumor that occur following photodynamic therapy (PDT) were studied using a small animal MR imager operating at 7Tesla. The animal model used in these studies was mice bearing radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumor on the foot dorsum. The mice were injected with 10μM/kg of one of the photosensitizers: (1) Photofrin, (2) Non-fluorinated porphyrin photosensitizer (DOD-1), (3) Fluorinated porphyrin photosensitizer (DOD-2) and, (4) Fluorinated chlorin photosensitizer (DOD-6). Laser light at 630 or 650 nm (150 mW/cm2, 270 joules/cm2) was delivered to the tumor at 2-24 hours of photosensitizer administration. The MR spectroscopic and imaging examination of the tumors involved both the 1H and 31P nuclei. The tumor bioenergetics was measured by 31P spectroscopy. The water proton relaxivity and diffusion measurements were used to obtain local changes in different regions of the tumor. Changes in 31P MR spectra were observed following PDT using Photofrin and fluorinated chlorin sensitizer (DOD-6). However, no significant changes were observed when the fluorinated porphyrin and its nonfluorinated analog were used. The PDT induced changes in tumor volumes showed significant tumor regression with Photofrin, fluorinated porphyrin and chlorin sensitizers. No tumor regression was observed with the non labeled porphyrin sensitizer and the growth profile followed the general pattern of unperturbed tumors. Serial noninvasive measurements of tumor response to PDT are measurable by both MRI and MRS. The MR derived parameters that are characteristic of the tumor status before and after the therapy are discussed here.

  14. An analytical technique for the analysis of airplane spin entry and recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. W., Jr.; Miller, G. K., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamic equations of motion for a spinning airplane are simplified to facilitate the analysis of spin entry and recovery maneuvers. Solutions of a nonlinear, first order equation for spin rate enable calculation of spin entry and recovery times and control required for recovery. The analysis is applied to a light airplane for which both aerodynamic data, rotory balance wind tunnel tests, and spin flight test data have been obtained. A comparison of predicted and actual transient spin responses is made which supports the validity of the analytical approach taken but which also illustrates the difficulty in obtaining accurate aerodynamic data for spinning airplanes. Certain normalized parameters of the reduced state spin equation suggest criteria for assessing the transient spin characteristics of light airplanes.

  15. Technique to determine location of radio sources from measurements taken on spinning spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.

    1979-01-01

    The procedure developed to extract average source direction and average source size from spin-modulated radio astronomy data measured on the IMP-6 spacecraft is described. Because all measurements are used, rather than just finding maxima or minima in the data, the method is very sensitive, even in the presence of large amounts of noise. The technique is applicable to all experiments with directivity characteristics. It is suitable for onboard processing on satellites to reduce the data flow to Earth. The application to spin-modulated nonpolarized radio astronomy data is made and includes the effects of noise, background, and second source interference. The analysis was tested with computer simulated data and the results agree with analytic predictions. Applications of this method with IMP-6 radio data have led to: (1) determination of source positions of traveling solar radio bursts at large distances from the Sun; (2) mapping of magnetospheric radio emissions by radio triangulation; and (3) detection of low frequency radio emissions from Jupiter and Saturn.

  16. Spectroscopic and Theoretical Study of Spin-Dependent Electron Transfer in an Iron(III) Superoxo Complex.

    PubMed

    Stout, Heather D; Kleespies, Scott T; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Lee, Way-Zen; Que, Lawrence; Münck, Eckard; Bominaar, Emile L

    2016-06-01

    It was shown previously (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 10846) that bubbling of O2 into a solution of Fe(II)(BDPP) (H2BDPP = 2,6-bis[[(S)-2-(diphenylhydroxymethyl)-1-pyrrolidinyl]methyl]pyridine) in tetrahydrofuran at -80 °C generates a high-spin (SFe = (5)/2) iron(III) superoxo adduct, 1. Mössbauer studies revealed that 1 is an exchange-coupled system, [Formula: see text], where SR = (1)/2 is the spin of the superoxo radical, of which the spectra were not well enough resolved to determine whether the coupling was ferromagnetic (S = 3 ground state) or antiferromagnetic (S = 2). The glass-forming 2-methyltetrahydrofuran solvent yields highly resolved Mössbauer spectra from which the following data have been extracted: (i) the ground state of 1 has S = 3 (J < 0); (ii) |J| > 15 cm(-1); (iii) the zero-field-splitting parameters are D = -1.1 cm(-1) and E/D = 0.02; (iv) the major component of the electric-field-gradient tensor is tilted ≈7° relative to the easy axis of magnetization determined by the MS = ±3 and ±2 doublets. The excited-state MS = ±2 doublet yields a narrow parallel-mode electron paramagnetic resonance signal at g = 8.03, which was used to probe the magnetic hyperfine splitting of (17)O-enriched O2. A theoretical model that considers spin-dependent electron transfer for the cases where the doubly occupied π* orbital of the superoxo ligand is either "in" or "out" of the plane defined by the bent Fe-OO moiety correctly predicts that 1 has an S = 3 ground state, in contrast to the density functional theory calculations for 1, which give a ground state with both the wrong spin and orbital configuration. This failure has been traced to a basis set superposition error in the interactions between the superoxo moiety and the adjacent five-membered rings of the BDPP ligand and signals a fundamental problem in the quantum chemistry of O2 activation. PMID:27159412

  17. Growth of ZnO thin films doped with (Mn & Co) by spin coating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhruvashi, Rawat, Kusum; Shishodia, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    ZnO thin films co-doped with Mn and Co have been deposited on glass substrates by spin coating technique. Structural, optical and magnetic properties have been investigated as a function of dopant concentration. X-ray diffraction has confirmed the growth of c-axis oriented polycrystalline thin films. No impurity phases have been detected corresponding to metal oxides within the limitation of x-ray diffraction. The optical bandgap has been evaluated from tauc's plots derived from the transmittance spectra in the wavelength range 350-900 nm. Surface morphology of the films has been observed by field emission scanning electron microscope. The field dependence of magnetization (M-H curve) measured by vibrating sample magnetometer shows the ferromagnetic behavior of the films at room temperature. The magnetization versus temperature (M-T) curve has also been measured under zero field cooled and field cooled conditions.

  18. One-step electro-spinning/netting technique for controllably preparing polyurethane nano-fiber/net.

    PubMed

    Hu, Juanping; Wang, Xianfeng; Ding, Bin; Lin, Jinyou; Yu, Jianyong; Sun, Gang

    2011-11-01

    Electro-spinning/netting (ESN) as a cutting-edge technique evokes much interest because of its ability in the one-step preparation of versatile nano-fiber/net (NFN) membranes. Here, a controllable fabrication of polyurethane (PU) NFN membranes with attractive structures, consisting of common electrospun nanofibers and two-dimensional (2D) soap bubble-like structured nano-nets via an ESN process is reported. The unique nanoscaled NFN architecture can be finely controlled by regulating the solution properties and several ESN process parameters. The versatile PU nano-nets comprising interlinked nanowires with ultrathin diameters (5-40 nm) mean that the NFN structured membranes possess several excellent characteristics, such as an extremely large specific surface area, high porosity and large stacking density, which would be particularly useful for applications in ultrafiltration, special protective clothing, ultrasensitive sensors, catalyst support and so on. PMID:21858891

  19. Spatial and vectorial characterization of thermal relaxation using the spin-stand imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, C.; Mircea, D. I.; Mayergoyz, I. D.; Andrei, P.; Krafft, C.

    2002-05-01

    The spatial and vectorial characterization of thermal relaxation of recorded magnetization patterns by using the spin-stand imaging technique [I. D. Mayergoyz et al., J. Appl. Phys. 87, 6824 (2000); 89, 6772 (2001)] is reported. In order to obtain such characterization, a recorded track is scanned at successive instants of time over periods of 70 hours. As a result, the spatial distributions of the read-back voltages (that constitute the "raw" images of the track) are consecutively collected. The images of the vectorial magnetization are then reconstructed and local magnetization relaxation rates are subsequently evaluated. It is demonstrated that the spatially inhomogeneous and vectorial nature of thermal relaxation of recorded patterns may result in temporal track broadening. It is found that this temporal track broadening is more pronounced for disks with higher coercivities.

  20. Spatially-resolved spectroscopic technique for measuring optical properties of food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantification of optical properties is important to understand light interaction with biological materials, and to develop effective optical sensing techniques for property characterization and quality measurement of food products. This chapter reviews spatially-resolved method, with the focus on f...

  1. Reflective and photoacoustic infrared spectroscopic techniques in assessment of binding media in paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łojewski, Tomasz; Bagniuk, Jacek; Kołodziej, Andrzej; Łojewska, Joanna

    2011-11-01

    This study proposes a method to estimate the lipid content in binding media in paintings that can be used at any laboratory equipped with an infrared spectrometer. The lipid content estimator, termed greasiness index (GI), is defined as a ratio of lipid ν(C=O) and protein amide I bands at 1743 and 1635 cm-1, respectively. Three Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) sampling techniques were evaluated for GI determination: reflective attenuated total reflection—ATR, specular reflection microscopy— μSR and photoacoustic—PAS. A set of model painting samples containing three tempera binding media (casein, egg, egg + oil), seven pigments and one varnish type were used in the study. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the resulting data. A good reproducibility of GI was obtained by ATR and PAS but not with μSR. The discriminative power of the technique is higher for unvarnished samples, but, generally, the GI estimator can be used for the categorisation of binding media in large populations of painting samples analysed with the same FTIR technique (sampling technique, detection, etc.).

  2. Calculations of 21 Λ-S and 42 Ω states of BC molecule: Potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit coupling effect.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wei; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2016-01-15

    The potential energy curves (PECs) were calculated for the 42 Ω states generated from the 21 Λ-S states (X(4)Σ(-), A(4)Π, B(4)Σ(-), a(2)Π, b(2)Σ(-), c(2)Δ, d(2)Σ(+), e(2)Π, 3(2)Π, 4(2)Π, 5(2)Π, 2(2)Σ(-), 3(2)Σ(-), 2(2)Σ(+), 3(2)Σ(+), 2(2)Δ, 3(2)Δ, 1(4)Σ(+), 2(4)Π, 1(4)Δ and 1(2)Φ), which originated from the lowest two dissociation channels, B((2)Pu)+C((3)Pg) and B((2)Pu)+C((1)Dg), of the BC molecule. The PECs were calculated for internuclear separations from 0.08 to 1.10 nm using the CASSCF method, which was followed by the icMRCI approach with the aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. Of these 21 Λ-S states, the e(2)Π, 2(2)Δ, 2(2)Σ(-), 4(2)Π, 1(2)Φ and 3(2)Δ possess the double wells. The A(4)Π, a(2)Π, c(2)Δ, 2(4)Π, 4(2)Π, 5(2)Π, 1(4)Δ and 1(2)Φ states are inverted with the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effect taken into account. The first well of e(2)Π state and the second well of 4(2)Π and 2(2)Δ states do not have any vibrational states whether with or without the SOC effect included. All the Λ-S and Ω states involved in this paper are bound states. Scalar relativistic correction was included by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of an aug-cc-pV5Z basis set. Core-valence correlation correction was included at the level of an aug-cc-pCV5Z basis set. The SOC effect was accounted for by the state interaction method with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian and the all-electron cc-pCV5Z basis set. The PECs of all the states were extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters were obtained. The vibrational properties of several Λ-S and Ω states with the relatively shallow wells were evaluated. The SOC effect on the spectroscopic parameters is not obvious for almost all the states. The spectroscopic properties reported in this paper can be expected to be reliably predicted ones. PMID:26476070

  3. Murillo's paintings revealed by spectroscopic techniques and dedicated laboratory-made micro X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Duran, A; Siguenza, M B; Franquelo, M L; Jimenez de Haro, M C; Justo, A; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2010-06-25

    This paper describes one of the first case studies using micro-diffraction laboratory-made systems to analyse painting cross-sections. Pigments, such as lead white, vermilion, red ochre, red lac, lapis lazuli, smalt, lead tin yellow type I, massicot, ivory black, lamp black and malachite, were detected in cross-sections prepared from six Bartolomé Esteban Murillo paintings by micro-Raman and micro-XRD combined with complementary techniques (optical microscopy, SEM-EDS, and FT-IR). The use of micro-XRD was necessary due to the poor results obtained with conventional XRD. In some cases, pigment identification was only possible by combining results from the different analytical techniques utilised in this study. PMID:20541637

  4. Photon-in/photon-out spectroscopic techniques for materials analysis: some recent developments.

    PubMed

    Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2014-12-10

    Third-generation synchrotron light source technology has greatly improved the capabilities for materials analysis using tunable X-rays. Two such capabilities developed recently are reported herein - inverse partial fluorescence yield (IPFY) XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and 2D XANES - XEOL (X-ray excited optical luminescence) in both the energy and time domain. These techniques take advantage of recent advances in soft X-ray solid state detector, optical spectrometer with a CCD detector and optical streak camera on a soft X-ray beamline as well as new data acquisition schemes. The studies of LiFePO4 materials for Li ion battery and solid solutions of GaN-ZnO nanostructures for water splitting are used to illustrate these capabilities. The prospects of these and related synchrotron photon-in photon-out techniques are also noted. PMID:24861360

  5. Microsampling techniques for infrared spectroscopic analysis of lunar and terrestrial minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, P. A.; Kovach, J. J.; Karr, C.

    1973-01-01

    Microsampling techniques have been developed for infrared analysis of single mineral grains from lunar rocks and dusts, allowing a detailed molecular structure characterization of these complex fine-grained samples. The methods include special devices for isolating single grains, preparing micropellets from the grains, and obtaining in situ microspecular reflectance spectra from grains in polished rock samples. Although specifically developed for the work on lunar samples, the special techniques for single grain infrared analysis were found to be equally useful in studies of complex terrestrial mineral samples. For example, infrared microanalysis has contributed substantially in solving problems concerned with our natural resources, such as the structural characterization of minerals from commercial iron ores, marine deposits, coal, and fly ash derived from coal.

  6. Innovative combination of spectroscopic techniques to reveal nanoparticle fate in a crop plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, Camille; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Stein, Ricardo J.; Fayard, Barbara; Pouyet, Emeline; Villanova, Julie; Magnin, Valérie; Pradas del Real, Ana-Elena; Trcera, Nicolas; Legros, Samuel; Sorieul, Stéphanie; Sarret, Géraldine

    2016-05-01

    Nanotechnology is the new industrial revolution of our century. Its development leads to an increasing use of nanoparticles and thus to their dissemination. Their fate in the environment is of great concern and especially their possible transfer in trophic chains might be an issue for food safety. However, so far our knowledge on this topic has been restricted by the lack of appropriate techniques to characterize their behavior in complex matrices. Here, we present in detail the use of cutting-edge beam-based techniques for nanoparticle in situ localization, quantification and speciation in a crop plant species (Lactuca sativa). Lettuce seedlings have been exposed to TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, micro-particle induced X-ray emission coupled to Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy on nuclear microprobe, micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The benefits and drawbacks of each technique are discussed, and the types of information that can be drawn, for example on the translocation to edible parts, change of speciation within the plant, detoxification mechanisms, or impact on the plant ionome, are highlighted. Such type of coupled approach would be an asset for nanoparticle risk assessment.

  7. Quantitative determination of copper in a glass matrix using double pulse laser induced breakdown and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ahmed A I; Morsy, Mohamed A

    2016-07-01

    A series of lithium-lead-borate glasses of a variable copper oxide loading were quantitatively analyzed in this work using two distinct spectroscopic techniques, namely double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). DP-LIBS results measured upon a combined nanosecond lasers irradiation running at 266nm and 1064nm pulses of a collinear configuration directed to the surface of borate glass samples with a known composition. This arrangement was employed to predict the electron's temperature (Te) and density (Ne) of the excited plasma from the recorded spectra. The intensity of elements' responses using this scheme is higher than that of single-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (SP-LIBS) setup under the same experimental conditions. On the other hand, the EPR data shows typical Cu (II) EPR-signals in the borate glass system that is networked at a distorted tetragonal Borate-arrangement. The signal intensity of the Cu (II) peak at g⊥=2.0596 has been used to quantify the Cu-content accurately in the glass matrix. Both techniques produced linear calibration curves of Cu-metals in glasses with excellent linear regression coefficient (R(2)) values. This study establishes a good correlation between DP-LIBS analysis of glass and the results obtained using EPR spectroscopy. The proposed protocols prove the great advantage of DP-LIBS system for the detection of a trace copper on the surface of glasses. PMID:27154655

  8. Development and applications of laser spectroscopic techniques related to combustion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldén, Marcus

    2006-07-01

    Thanks to features as non-intrusiveness combined with high spatial and temporal resolution, various laser diagnostic techniques have during the last decades become of utmost importance for characterization of combustion related phenomena. In the following presentation some further development of the techniques will be highlighted aiming at a) surface temperatures using Thermographic Phosphors, TP, b) species specific, spatially and temporally resolved detection of species absorbing in the IR spectral region using polarization spectroscopy and Laser-induced fluorescence, and finally c) high speed visualization using a special designed laser system in combination with a framing camera. In terms of surface thermometry, Thermographic Phosphors have been used for many years for temperature measurements on solid surfaces. We have during the last years further developed and applied this technique for temperature measurements on burning surfaces and on materials going through phase shifts, e.g. pyrolysis and droplets. The basic principle behind this technique is to apply micron size particles to the surface of interest. By exciting the TP with a short pulse UV laser (ns), the phosphorescence will exhibit a behaviour where the spectral emission as well as the temporal decay are dependent on the temperature. It is thus possible to measure the temperature both in one and two dimensions. The presentation will include basic description of the technique as well as various applications, e.g in fire science, IC engines and gasturbines. Several of the species of interest for combustion/flow diagnostics exhibit a molecular structure which inhibits the use of conventional laser-induced fluorescence for spatially and spectrally resolved measurements. We have during the last years investigated the use of excitation and detection in the infrared region of the spectrum. Here, it is possible to detect both carbonmono/dioxide, water as well as species specific hydrocarbons. The techniques

  9. Raman spectroscopic studies of thin film carbon nanostructures deposited using electro deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Saurabh; Sasi, Arshali; Jhariya, Sapna; Sasikumar, C.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work our focus is to synthesize carbon nanostructures (CNS) by electro deposition technique without using any surface pretreatment or catalyst preparation before CNS formation. The process were carried out at significantly low voltage and at low temperature as reported elsewhere. Further the samples were characterized using different characterization tools such as SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The SEM results showed the fibres or tubular like morphology. Raman spectra shows strong finger print at 1600 cm-1 (G peak), 1350 cm-1 (D peak) along with the radial breathing mode (RBM) between 150cm-1 to 300 cm-1. This confirms the formation of tubular carbon nanostructures.

  10. The analytical investigations of ancient pottery from Kaveripakkam, Vellore dist, Tamilnadu by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Ravisankar, R; Naseerutheen, A; Annamalai, G Raja; Chandrasekaran, A; Rajalakshmi, A; Kanagasabapathy, K V; Prasad, M V R; Satpathy, K K

    2014-01-01

    Analytical investigations using Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD), Thermal Analysis (TG-DTA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF) were carried out on ancient pottery fragments from Kaveripakkam, in order to outline manufacturing skills, technology information, firing condition and temperature of potteries. The whole set of data showed the firing temperature in the range of 800-900°C. The analytical characterization of the potsherds, by different complimentary techniques has allowed to identifying the raw materials and technology applied by the ancient artisans. PMID:24287055

  11. Chemical and morphological changes in hydrochars derived from microcrystalline cellulose and investigated by chromatographic, spectroscopic and adsorption techniques.

    PubMed

    Diakité, Mamadou; Paul, Andrea; Jäger, Christian; Pielert, Judith; Mumme, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) can be used for converting the biomass into a carbon-rich material, whose application as a fuel requires higher heating value, whereas soil amendment needs stable carbon. This work was focused on the characterization of hydrochars derived from microcrystalline cellulose. The chars were investigated using elemental analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller technique, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Raman, Fourier transform infrared, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Severity in temperature between 230 and 270°C with reaction times between 2 and 10 h only affect the carbon content moderately. The results show that aromatization of HTC chars correlates well with temperature, which was further supported by the increase of organic radicals with decreasing g values at higher temperatures. Based on these results, the energetic use of chars favors mild HTC (T<230°C and t≤6 h), while the soil amendement favors serve conditions (T≥230°C, and t>6 h). PMID:24157681

  12. Refining Techniques for the Spectroscopic Detection of Reflected Light from Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Bender, Chad; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2015-12-01

    The detection of reflected light from exoplanets provides a direct measure of planetary mass as well as a powerful probe of atmospheric composition and albedo. However, close-in giant planets which provide the largest planet-to-star flux ratios are dim in the optical. With contrasts at the level of 10^-5, the direct detection of these present a severe technical challenge to current instruments, and require both large aperture telescopes for high signal-to-noise ratio observations, and a stabilized spectrograph for stable instrument profiles. Leveraging the heritage and stability of the HARPS spectrograph, Martins et al (2015) recently published evidence of a direct detection of the historic exoplanet 51 Peg b, using the stellar mask cross-correlation technique. We attempt to expand upon their results with independent spectral and CCF reductions, using a two-template cross-correlation technique that can potentially be tuned to match the planetary signal and probe models of the albedo. By cross-correlating against a spectrum rather than a mask, we access the full information content in the lines, but must ensure proper telluric correction to mitigate the possibility of overwhelming the small planetary signal with terrestrial features. We are on the verge of confidently recovering planetary albedos for close-in giant planets, while also refining predictive and analytical tools that will come into their full capability with the arrival of the next generation of planet characterizing instruments, such as ESPRESSO on VLT and HIRES on E-ELT.

  13. Spectroscopic techniques applied to the characterization of decorated potteries from Caltagirone (Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barilaro, D.; Barone, G.; Crupi, V.; Donato, M. G.; Majolino, D.; Messina, G.; Ponterio, R.

    2005-06-01

    The aim of the present work is the characterization of decorated pottery samples from Caltagirone (Sicily, Italy), a renowned production centre of this kind of artwork. These fragments were found during archaeological excavations and were attributed to historical periods extremely far in time from each other (from XVIII century b.C. to XVI a.C.). Therefore, we expect that the manufacture techniques result rather different over so long time. The measurements, performed by Fourier Transform-InfraRed (FT-IR) absorbance and micro-Raman scattering, allowed us a non-destructive study of so precious artefacts. Some pigments were identified, various elements of ceramic paste and glazed layer were characterized.

  14. Artificial tektites: an experimental technique for capturing the shapes of spinning drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Tektites are small stones formed from rapidly cooling drops of molten rock ejected from high velocity asteroid impacts with the Earth, that freeze into a myriad of shapes during flight. Many splash-form tektites have an elongated or dumb-bell shape owing to their rotation prior to solidification[1]. Here we present a novel method for creating 'artificial tektites' from spinning drops of molten wax, using diamagnetic levitation to suspend the drops[2]. We find that the solid wax models produced this way are the stable equilibrium shapes of a spinning liquid droplet held together by surface tension. In addition to the geophysical interest in tektite formation, the stable equilibrium shapes of liquid drops have implications for many physical phenomena, covering a wide range of length scales, from nuclear physics (e.g. in studies of rapidly rotating atomic nuclei), to astrophysics (e.g. in studies of the shapes of astronomical bodies such as asteroids, rapidly rotating stars and event horizons of rotating black holes). For liquid drops bound by surface tension, analytical and numerical methods predict a series of stable equilibrium shapes with increasing angular momentum. Slowly spinning drops have an oblate-like shape. With increasing angular momentum these shapes become secularly unstable to a series of triaxial pseudo-ellipsoids that then evolve into a family of two-lobed 'dumb-bell' shapes as the angular momentum is increased still further. Our experimental method allows accurate measurements of the drops to be taken, which are useful to validate numerical models. This method has provided a means for observing tektite formation, and has additionally confirmed experimentally the stable equilibrium shapes of liquid drops, distinct from the equivalent shapes of rotating astronomical bodies. Potentially, this technique could be applied to observe the non-equilibrium dynamic processes that are also important in real tektite formation, involving, e.g. viscoelastic

  15. 3D GRASE PROPELLER: Improved Image Acquisition Technique for Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huan; Hoge, W. Scott; Hamilton, Craig A.; Günther, Matthias; Kraft, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive technique that can quantitatively measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). While traditionally ASL employs 2D EPI or spiral acquisition trajectories, single-shot 3D GRASE is gaining popularity in ASL due to inherent SNR advantage and spatial coverage. However, a major limitation of 3D GRASE is through-plane blurring caused by T2 decay. A novel technique combining 3D GRASE and a PROPELLER trajectory (3DGP) is presented to minimize through-plane blurring without sacrificing perfusion sensitivity or increasing total scan time. Full brain perfusion images were acquired at a 3×3×5mm3 nominal voxel size with Q2TIPS-FAIR as the ASL preparation sequence. Data from 5 healthy subjects was acquired on a GE 1.5T scanner in less than 4 minutes per subject. While showing good agreement in CBF quantification with 3D GRASE, 3DGP demonstrated reduced through-plane blurring, improved anatomical details, high repeatability and robustness against motion, making it suitable for routine clinical use. PMID:21254211

  16. Free radical scavenging actions of hippocampal metallothionein isoforms and of antimetallothioneins: an electron spin resonance spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kumari, M V; Hiramatsu, M; Ebadi, M

    2000-05-01

    The high concentration of zinc in the hippocampal mossy fiber axon boutons is localized in the vesicles and is mobilized by exocytosis of the zinc-laden vesicles. Furthermore, the mammalian hippocampi contain metallothionein (MT) isoforms which regulate the steady state concentration of zinc, an important antioxidant. Indeed, zinc deprivation leads to an increased lipid peroxidation, reduces the activity of Cu++-Zn++ superoxide dismutase, and protect against oxidative stress such as exposure to ultraviolet A irradiation. By employing electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we have demonstrated that rat hippocampal MT isoforms 1 and 2 were able to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals (DPPH), hydroxyl radicals (*OH) generated in a Fenton reaction, and superoxide anions (O2*-) generated by the hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase system. In addition, MT-1 isoform protected the isolated hepatocytes from lipid peroxidation as determined by thiobarbituric acid bound malondialdehyde. MT antibodies scavenged DPPH radicals, hydroxyl radicals and reactive oxygen species but not superoxide anions. The results of these studies suggest that although both isoforms of MT are able to scavenge free radicals, the MT-1 appears to be a superior scavenger of superoxide anions and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals. Moreover, antibodies formed against MT isoform retain some, but not all, free radical scavenging actions exhibited by MT-1 and MT-2. PMID:10872749

  17. In vitro DNA binding studies of anticancer drug idarubicin using spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Ozluer, Can; Kara, Hayriye Eda Satana

    2014-09-01

    The interaction between idarubicin and double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ds-DNA) was investigated by UV-VIS spectrophotometry, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The absorption spectra of idarubicin with ds-DNA showed a slight red shift and hypochromic effect. In the fluorescence experiments, emission peaks were decreased by adding ds-DNA. Using ethidium bromide (ETB) as a fluorescence probe, fluorescence quenching of the emission peak was observed in the ETB-DNA system when idarubicin was added. Moreover, similar results were obtained in Raman spectroscopy. Binding constants of idarubicin with ds-DNA were determined as 5.14×10(5) M(-1) and 5.8×10(5) M(-1) for UV-VIS spectrophotometry and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. The large binding constant indicated that idarubicin has a high affinity with ds-DNA. All the evidences indicated that the binding mode of idarubicin with DNA was an intercalative binding. Furthermore, quantitative determination of idarubicin in pharmaceutical formulation was done. PMID:24911270

  18. Rapid non-destructive assessment of pork edible quality by using VIS/NIR spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leilei; Peng, Yankun; Dhakal, Sagar; Song, Yulin; Zhao, Juan; Zhao, Songwei

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this research were to develop a rapid non-destructive method to evaluate the edible quality of chilled pork. A total of 42 samples were packed in seal plastic bags and stored at 4°C for 1 to 21 days. Reflectance spectra were collected from visible/near-infrared spectroscopy system in the range of 400nm to 1100nm. Microbiological, physicochemical and organoleptic characteristics such as the total viable counts (TVC), total volatile basic-nitrogen (TVB-N), pH value and color parameters L* were determined to appraise pork edible quality. Savitzky-Golay (SG) based on five and eleven smoothing points, Multiple Scattering Correlation (MSC) and first derivative pre-processing methods were employed to eliminate the spectra noise. The support vector machines (SVM) and partial least square regression (PLSR) were applied to establish prediction models using the de-noised spectra. A linear correlation was developed between the VIS/NIR spectroscopy and parameters such as TVC, TVB-N, pH and color parameter L* indexes, which could gain prediction results with Rv of 0.931, 0.844, 0.805 and 0.852, respectively. The results demonstrated that VIS/NIR spectroscopy technique combined with SVM possesses a powerful assessment capability. It can provide a potential tool for detecting pork edible quality rapidly and non-destructively.

  19. The Book of Kells: a non-invasive MOLAB investigation by complementary spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Doherty, B; Daveri, A; Clementi, C; Romani, A; Bioletti, S; Brunetti, B; Sgamellotti, A; Miliani, C

    2013-11-01

    This paper highlights the efficacy of non-invasive portable spectroscopy for assessing the execution technique and constituent materials in one of the most important medieval manuscripts, the Book of Kells. An aimed campaign of in situ measurements by the MObile LABoratory (MOLAB) has analyzed its elemental composition and vibrational and electronic molecular properties. The ample analytical toolbox has afforded complementary diagnostic information of the pigment palette permitting the characterization of both inorganic and organic materials as pigments and dyes in the white, purple, blue, red, orange, green and black areas. In particular, the novel widespread use of calcinated gypsum (anhydrite) as both a white pigment and in correlation to the organic dyes in this manuscript has been noted. The non-invasive identification of the organic dye orchil is significant considering its rare non invasive detection in medieval manuscripts. Finally the occurrence of particular alterations of the organic black areas giving rise to calcium carboxylate and calcium oxalate has been specifically highlighted. Importantly, this work elaborates complex aspects of the employed painting materials which have given rise to numerous significant points of interest for a more elaborate understanding of this Irish treasure. PMID:23850791

  20. The Book of Kells: A non-invasive MOLAB investigation by complementary spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, B.; Daveri, A.; Clementi, C.; Romani, A.; Bioletti, S.; Brunetti, B.; Sgamellotti, A.; Miliani, C.

    2013-11-01

    This paper highlights the efficacy of non-invasive portable spectroscopy for assessing the execution technique and constituent materials in one of the most important medieval manuscripts, the Book of Kells. An aimed campaign of in situ measurements by the MObile LABoratory (MOLAB) has analyzed its elemental composition and vibrational and electronic molecular properties. The ample analytical toolbox has afforded complementary diagnostic information of the pigment palette permitting the characterization of both inorganic and organic materials as pigments and dyes in the white, purple, blue, red, orange, green and black areas. In particular, the novel widespread use of calcinated gypsum (anhydrite) as both a white pigment and in correlation to the organic dyes in this manuscript has been noted. The non-invasive identification of the organic dye orchil is significant considering its rare non invasive detection in medieval manuscripts. Finally the occurrence of particular alterations of the organic black areas giving rise to calcium carboxylate and calcium oxalate has been specifically highlighted. Importantly, this work elaborates complex aspects of the employed painting materials which have given rise to numerous significant points of interest for a more elaborate understanding of this Irish treasure.

  1. Classical Raman spectroscopic studies of NADH and NAD+ bound to liver alcohol dehydrogenase by difference techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.; Yue, K.T.; Martin, C.; Rhee, K.W.; Sloan, D.; Callender, R.

    1987-07-28

    We report the Raman spectra of reduced and oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+, respectively) and adenosine 5'-diphosphate ribose (ADPR) when bound to the coenzyme site of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH). The bound NADH spectrum is calculated by taking the classical Raman difference spectrum of the binary complex, LADH/NADH, with that of LADH. We have investigated how the bound NADH spectrum is affected when the ternary complexes with inhibitors are formed with dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO) or isobutyramide (IBA), i.e., LADH/NADH/Me2SO or LADH/NADH/IBA. Similarly, the difference spectra of LADH/NAD+/pyrazole or LADH/ADPR with LADH are calculated. The magnitude of these difference spectra is on the order of a few percent of the protein Raman spectrum. We report and discuss the experimental configuration and control procedures we use in reliably calculating such small difference signals. These sensitive difference techniques could be applied to a large number of problems where the classical Raman spectrum of a ''small'' molecule, like adenine, bound to the active site of a protein is of interest. The spectrum of bound ADPR allows an assignment of the bands of the bound NADH and NAD+ spectra to normal coordinates located primarily on either the nicotinamide or the adenine moiety. By comparing the spectra of the bound coenzymes with model compound data and through the use of deuterated compounds, we confirm and characterize how the adenine moiety is involved in coenzyme binding and discuss the validity of the suggestion that the adenine ring is protonated upon binding. The nicotinamide moiety of NADH shows significant molecular changes upon binding.

  2. Development and Experimental Testing of an Optical Micro-Spectroscopic Technique Incorporating True Line-Scan Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Biener, Gabriel; Stoneman, Michael R.; Acbas, Gheorghe; Holz, Jessica D.; Orlova, Marianna; Komarova, Liudmila; Kuchin, Sergei; Raicu, Valerică

    2014-01-01

    Multiphoton micro-spectroscopy, employing diffraction optics and electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) cameras, is a suitable method for determining protein complex stoichiometry, quaternary structure, and spatial distribution in living cells using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging. The method provides highly resolved spectra of molecules or molecular complexes at each image pixel, and it does so on a timescale shorter than that of molecular diffusion, which scrambles the spectral information. Acquisition of an entire spectrally resolved image, however, is slower than that of broad-bandwidth microscopes because it takes longer times to collect the same number of photons at each emission wavelength as in a broad bandwidth. Here, we demonstrate an optical micro-spectroscopic scheme that employs a laser beam shaped into a line to excite in parallel multiple sample voxels. The method presents dramatically increased sensitivity and/or acquisition speed and, at the same time, has excellent spatial and spectral resolution, similar to point-scan configurations. When applied to FRET imaging using an oligomeric FRET construct expressed in living cells and consisting of a FRET acceptor linked to three donors, the technique based on line-shaped excitation provides higher accuracy compared to the point-scan approach, and it reduces artifacts caused by photobleaching and other undesired photophysical effects. PMID:24378851

  3. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilde, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-04-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterized by a less dense urbanization. We present here the results obtained in San Pietro Capofiume, which is located in a sparsely inhabited sector of the Po Valley, Italy. The experiment was carried out in summer 2009 in the framework of the EUCAARI project ("European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud Climate Aerosol Interaction"). For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art techniques were used in parallel: (1) on-line TSI aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), (2) on-line Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS), (3) soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), (4) on-line high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer-thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (HR-ToFMS-TAG), (5) off-line twelve-hour resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy, and (6) chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) for the analysis of gas-phase precursors of secondary aerosol. Data from each aerosol spectroscopic method were analysed individually following ad-hoc tools (i.e. PMF for AMS, Art-2a for ATOFMS). The results obtained from each techniques are herein presented and compared. This allows us to clearly link the modifications in aerosol chemical composition to transitions in air mass origin and meteorological regimes. Under stagnant conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC

  4. Arterial spin tagging fMRI in continuous overt speech production compared to BOLD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemeny, Stefan; Ye, Frank; Braun, Allen

    2003-05-01

    Conventional BOLD fMRI has limited use in overt speech paradigms, due to movement and susceptibility artifacts. Our study used an arterial spin-tagging (AST) sequence to quantify focal brain activation in a continuous speech task. Furthermore, we compared the results to conventional BOLD fMRI. The ASSIST sequence was used to obtain transverse perfusion images of the brain, acquired on a 1.5T GE-Signa scanner. Three conditions were alternated in a block design: generation of complete sentences, nonsense syllables and rest with continuous and overt speech production. For 4 normal volunteers, task-related perfusion maps with quantified rCBF and rCBV values were calculated and activations were mapped to the MNI brain. The same paradigm was scanned with BOLD contrast fMRI in separate, independent scans and data from 6 subjects were analyzed using SPM99. Using the AST sequence, we could reliably identify focal brain activation in an overt continuous speech paradigm, and the activations observed were consistent with previous PET studies. We found differential activation at increasing levels of speech production with a focus in the left insula and opercular IFG related to the production of sentences at a syntactic level as opposed to nonsense syllable production. The BOLD technique failed to identify some of these activation foci, possibly due to decreased SNR and artifacts.

  5. MOS solar cells with oxides deposited by sol-gel spin-coating techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chia-Hong; Chang, Chung-Cheng; Tsai, Jung-Hui

    2013-06-15

    The metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) solar cells with sol-gel derived silicon dioxides (SiO{sub 2}) deposited by spin coating are proposed in this study. The sol-gel derived SiO{sub 2} layer is prepared at low temperature of 450 Degree-Sign C. Such processes are simple and low-cost. These techniques are, therefore, useful for largescale and large-amount manufacturing in MOS solar cells. It is observed that the short-circuit current (I{sub sc}) of 2.48 mA, the open-circuit voltage (V{sub os}) of 0.44 V, the fill factor (FF) of 0.46 and the conversion efficiency ({eta}%) of 2.01% were obtained by means of the current-voltage (I-V) measurements under AM 1.5 (100 mW/cm{sup 2}) irradiance at 25 Degree-Sign C in the MOS solar cell with sol-gel derived SiO{sub 2}.

  6. New spectroscopic tools and techniques for characterizing M dwarfs and discovering their planets in the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrien, Ryan C.

    M dwarfs are the least massive and most common stars in the Galaxy. Due to their prevalence and long lifetimes, these diminutive stars play an outsize role in several fields of astronomical study. In particular, it is now known that they commonly host planetary systems, and may be the most common hosts of Earth-size, rocky planets in the habitable zone. A comprehensive understanding of M dwarfs is crucial for understanding the origins and conditions of their planetary systems, including their potential habitability. Such an understanding depends on methods for precisely and accurately measuring their properties. These tools have broader applicability as well, underlying the use of M dwarfs as fossils of Galactic evolution, and helping to constrain the structures and interiors of these stars. The measurement of the fundamental parameters of M dwarfs is encumbered by their spectral complexity. Unlike stars of spectral type F, G, or K that are similar to our G type Sun, whose spectra are dominated by continuum emission and atomic features, the cool atmospheres of M dwarfs are dominated by complex molecular absorption. Another challenge for studies of M dwarfs is that these stars are optically faint, emitting much of their radiation in the near-infrared (NIR). The availability and performance of NIR spectrographs have lagged behind those of optical spectrographs due to the challenges of producing low-noise, high-sensitivity NIR detector arrays, which have only recently become available. This thesis discusses two related lines of work that address these challenges, motivated by the development of the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF), a NIR radial velocity (RV) spectrograph under development at Penn State that will search for and confirm planets around nearby M dwarfs. This work includes the development and application of new NIR spectroscopic techniques for characterizing M dwarfs, and the development and optimization of new NIR instrumentation for HPF. The first line

  7. Determination of acetamiprid partial-intercalative binding to DNA by use of spectroscopic, chemometrics, and molecular docking techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Guowen; Zhou, Xiaoyue; Li, Yu

    2013-11-01

    Acetamiprid (ACT) is an insecticide widely used for controlling a variety of insect pests. The binding mode associated with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) upon interaction with ACT was determined using spectroscopic, chemometrics, and molecular docking techniques to clarify the interaction mechanism at the molecular level. Fluorescence titration suggested that the fluorescence quenching of ACT by ctDNA is a static procedure. The binding constants between ACT and ctDNA at different temperatures were calculated to be of the order 10(3)-10(4) L mol(-1). The positive values of enthalpy and entropy change suggested that the binding process is primarily driven by hydrophobic interactions. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS), a chemometrics approach, was used to resolve the expanded UV-visible spectral data matrix. The concentration profiles and the spectra for the three reaction components (ACT, ctDNA, and ACT-ctDNA complex) of the system, which formed a highly overlapping composite response, were then successfully obtained and used to evaluate the progress of ACT interacting with ctDNA. The results of the single-stranded ctDNA and iodide quenching experiments, ctDNA-melting investigations, and viscosity measurements indicated that ACT binds to ctDNA by means of a partial intercalation. Molecular docking studies showed that the specific binding site is mainly located between the ACT and G-C base pairs of ctDNA. This docking prediction was confirmed by use of Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectral analysis. Results from circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy revealed that ACT induced a conformational change from the B-ctDNA form to the A-ctDNA form. PMID:23975088

  8. A comparison investigation of DNP-binding effects to HSA and HTF by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Zolfagharzadeh, Mahboobeh; Pirouzi, Maliheh; Asoodeh, Ahmad; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Chamani, Jamshidkhan

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the interaction between 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) with the two drug carrier proteins - human serum albumin (HSA) and human holo transferrin (HTF). Hence, binding characteristics of DNP to HSA and HTF were analyzed by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques. Based on results obtained from fluorescence spectroscopy, DNP had a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA and HTF through a static quenching procedure. The binding constant and the number of binding sites were calculated as 2.3 × 10(11) M(-1) and .98 for HSA, and 1.7 × 10(11) M(-1) and 1.06 for HTF, respectively. In addition, synchronous fluorescence results showed that the microenvironment of Trp had a slight tendency of increasing its hydrophobicity, whereas the microenvironment of the Tyr residues of HSA did not change and that of HTF showed a significant trend (red shift of about 4 nm) of an increase in polarity. The distance between donor and acceptor was obtained by the Förster energy according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and was found to be 3.99 and 3.72 nm for HSA and HTF, respectively. The critical induced aggregation concentration (CCIAC) of the drug on both proteins was determined and confirmed by an inflection point of the zeta potential behavior. Circular dichroism data revealed that the presence of DNP caused a decrease of the α-helical content of HSA and HTF, and induced a remarkable mild denaturation of both proteins. The molecular modeling data confirmed our experimental results. This study is deemed useful for determining drug dosage. PMID:24125112

  9. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilge, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-11-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterised by a less dense urbanisation. We present here the results obtained at a background site in the Po Valley, Italy, in summer 2009. For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art spectrometric techniques were used in parallel: aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), two aerosol mass spectrometers (high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer - HR-ToF-AMS and soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer - SP-AMS), thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG), chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS) and (offline) proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicate that, under high-pressure conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC), secondary semivolatile compounds such as ammonium nitrate and amines and a class of monocarboxylic acids which correspond to the AMS cooking organic aerosol (COA) already identified in urban areas. In daytime, the entrainment of aged air masses in the mixing layer is responsible for the accumulation of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and also for the recycling of non-volatile primary species such as black carbon. According to organic aerosol source apportionment, anthropogenic aerosols accumulating in the lower layers overnight accounted for 38% of organic aerosol mass on average, another 21% was accounted for by aerosols recirculated in

  10. MnO spin-wave dispersion curves from neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Keen, David A.

    2007-02-15

    We describe a model-independent approach for the extraction of spin-wave dispersion curves from powder neutron total scattering data. Our approach is based on a statistical analysis of real-space spin configurations to calculate spin-dynamical quantities. The RMCPROFILE implementation of the reverse Monte Carlo refinement process is used to generate a large ensemble of supercell spin configurations from MnO powder diffraction data collected at 100 K. Our analysis of these configurations gives spin-wave dispersion curves for MnO that agree well with those determined independently using neutron triple-axis spectroscopic techniques.

  11. Study of anisotropy of spin cast and vapor deposited polyimide films using internal reflection techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, V.

    1996-11-01

    We have compared anisotropy of spin cast and vapor deposited polyimide (VDP) films, using internal reflection infrared spectroscopy. The films were deposited directly on the internal reflection element. We find that spin cast films are more anisotropic than their VDP counterparts, with the polyimide chains tending to align parallel to the substrate. Both films are found to contain more and less ordered regions. Within the ordered regions, the plane of the phenyl ring tends to align parallel to the substrate.

  12. Frequency-domain optical probing of coherent spins in nanocrystal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Frey, J A; Berezovsky, J

    2012-08-27

    Spin-photon interactions such as the Faraday effect provide techniques for measuring coherent spin dynamics in semiconductors. In contrast to typical ultrafast pulsed laser techniques, which measure spin dynamics in the time domain with an intense, spectrally broad probe pulse, we demonstrate a frequency-domain spin-photon resonance effect using modulated continuous-wave lasers which enables measurement of GHz-scale coherent spin dynamics in semiconductors with minimal spectral linewidth. This technique permits high-resolution spectroscopic measurements not possible with ultrafast methods. We have employed this effect to observe coherent spin dynamics in CdSe nanocrystals using standard diode lasers. By fitting the results to the expected model, we extract electron g-factors, and spin coherence and dephasing times in agreement with time-domain measurements. PMID:23037054

  13. Nondestructive and Rapid Concurrent Estimation of Paracetamol and Nimesulide in Their Combined Dosage Form Using Raman Spectroscopic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lakhwani, Gargi R.; Sherikar, O. D.; Mehta, Priti J.

    2013-01-01

    A rapid, nondestructive Raman spectroscopic method was developed for quantitative estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form. A Raman univariate calibration model was developed by measuring the peak intensities of paracetamol and nimesulide at 853 cm−1 and 1336 cm−1, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for in situ, concurrent estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage and method was also validated according to International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. Thus, the developed Raman spectroscopic method can be applied for simultaneous estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form as a process analytical technology tool by pharmaceutical industries for routine quality control. PMID:24019571

  14. Spectroscopic analysis of solar and cosmic X-ray spectra. 1: The nature of cosmic X-ray spectra and proposed analytical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, A. B. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for the study of the solar corona are reviewed as an introduction to a discussion of modifications required for the study of cosmic sources. Spectroscopic analysis of individual sources and the interstellar medium is considered. The latter was studied via analysis of its effect on the spectra of selected individual sources. The effects of various characteristics of the ISM, including the presence of grains, molecules, and ionization, are first discussed, and the development of ISM models is described. The expected spectral structure of individual cosmic sources is then reviewed with emphasis on supernovae remnants and binary X-ray sources. The observational and analytical requirements imposed by the characteristics of these sources are identified, and prospects for the analysis of abundances and the study of physical parameters within them are assessed. Prospects for the spectroscopic study of other classes of X-ray sources are also discussed.

  15. Spectroscopic data, spin-orbit functions, and revised analysis of strong perturbative interactions for the A {sup 1{Sigma}+} and b {sup 3{Pi}} states of RbCs

    SciTech Connect

    Docenko, O.; Tamanis, M.; Ferber, R.; Bergeman, T.; Kotochigova, S.; Stolyarov, A. V.

    2010-04-15

    The current interest in producing ultracold RbCs molecules by optical excitation from weakly bound Feshbach resonances and stimulated decay to the absolute ground state requires detailed analyses of the intermediate excited states. In this study, we present two sets of experimental Fourier-transform spectroscopic data of the A {sup 1{Sigma}+}-b {sup 3{Pi}} complex. The A-b mixed vibrational levels are the most likely candidates to be intermediates in the molecular formation. The more recent and more accurate data set is from mixed A-b{yields}X transitions, while the second is derived in large part from (4) {sup 1{Sigma}+{yields}}A-b emission and extends to higher A-b energy levels. From a detailed analysis of the spectroscopic data we obtain term values which allow one to construct potentials and spin-orbit functions. Vibrational numbering of the A state has been raised by one quantum over a previous report [T. Bergeman et al., Phys. Rev. A 67, 050501 (2003)] while the numbering of the b state is established with a considerable degree of certainty with help of data on the {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs and {sup 87}Rb{sup 133}Cs isotopomers. In addition, we have performed calculations of spin-orbit functions by two distinct methods. The fitted spin-orbit coupling matrix element between the two {Omega}{sup p}=0{sup +} states, A {sup 1{Sigma}+} and b {sup 3{Pi}}{sub 0+}, happens to agree rather well with the results from both of these methods, while for the diagonal b {sup 3{Pi}} state spin-orbit function, the fitted function agrees fairly well with that obtained by the other method.

  16. Spin wave study and optical properties in Fe-doped ZnO thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lmai, F.; Moubah, R.; El Amiri, A.; Abid, Y.; Soumahoro, I.; Hassanain, N.; Colis, S.; Schmerber, G.; Dinia, A.; Lassri, H.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the magnetic and optical properties of Zn1-xFexO (x = 0, 0.03, 0.05, and 0.07) thin films grown by spray pyrolysis technique. The magnetization as a function of temperature [M (T)] shows a prevailing paramagnetic contribution at low temperature. By using spin wave theory, we separate the M (T) curve in two contributions: one showing intrinsic ferromagnetism and one showing a purely paramagnetic behavior. Furthermore, it is shown that the spin wave theory is consistent with ab-initio calculations only when oxygen vacancies are considered, highlighting the key role played by structural defects in the mechanism driving the observed ferromagnetism. Using UV-visible measurements, the transmittance, reflectance, band gap energy, band tail, dielectric coefficient, refractive index, and optical conductivity were extracted and related to the variation of the Fe content.

  17. Study of Low Energy Electron Inelastic Scattering Mechanisms Using Spin Sensitive Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hongbing

    1995-01-01

    Spin sensitive electron spectroscopies were used to study low energy electron inelastic scattering from metal surfaces and thin films. In these experiments, a beam of spin polarized electrons from a GaAs source is directed on the sample surface, and the spin polarization and intensity are measured as a function of energy loss and scattering angle by a Mott electron polarimeter coupled with a concentric hemispherical energy analyzer. Systematic studies of the angular dependence of inelastically scattered electrons were conducted on a Cu(100) surface, and Mo/Cu(100), non-magnetized Fe/Cu(100), and Co/Cu(100) films. The polarization and intensity of scattered electrons were measured as function of energy loss and scattering angle. Further studies were also conducted on Ag(100) surface and amorphous Cu/Ag(100) films. From the experimental results, the angular distributions of dipole and impact scattered electrons can be determined individually and both are found to peak in the specular scattering direction. Preliminary studies were conducted on magnetized Co/Cu(100) films. The spin dependent scattering intensity asymmetry was measured, with a clearly observable peak at energy loss of ~1 eV, which coincides with the band splitting. The polarizations of secondary electrons produced by an unpolarized primary beam were also measured. The polarizations can be related to the band polarization of magnetized cobalt films.

  18. New Techniques to Test Spin-Gravity Coupling with Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in laser technology have produced the opportunity to realize more stable and accurate atomic clocks, by laser excitation, manipulation and cooling of atoms. In this paper we will describe a new scheme based on the use of lasers with atomic clocks to increase the sensitivity of experimental search for a spin-gravity coupling.

  19. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm- 1 and 1545 cm- 1, respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  20. Polycrystalline BiFeO3 thin film synthesized via sol-gel assisted spin coating technique for photosensitive application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogle, K. A.; Narwade, R. D.; Phatangare, A. B.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Mahabole, M. P.; Khairnar, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    We are reporting photosensitivity property of BiFeO3 thin film under optical illumination. The thin film used for photosensitivity work was fabricated via sol-gel assisted spin coating technique. I-V measurements on the Cu/BiFeO3/Al structure under dark condition show a good rectifying property and show dramatic blue shit in threshold voltage under optical illumination. The microstructure, morphology and elemental analysis of the films were characterized by using XRD, UV-Vis, FTIR, SEM and EDS.

  1. Structural and Spectroscopic Characterization of a High-Spin {FeNO}(6) Complex with an Iron(IV)-NO(-) Electronic Structure.

    PubMed

    Speelman, Amy L; Zhang, Bo; Krebs, Carsten; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2016-06-01

    Although the interaction of low-spin ferric complexes with nitric oxide has been well studied, examples of stable high-spin ferric nitrosyls (such as those that could be expected to form at typical non-heme iron sites in biology) are extremely rare. Using the TMG3 tren co-ligand, we have prepared a high-spin ferric NO adduct ({FeNO}(6) complex) via electrochemical or chemical oxidation of the corresponding high-spin ferrous NO {FeNO}(7) complex. The {FeNO}(6) compound is characterized by UV/Visible and IR spectroelectrochemistry, Mössbauer and NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and DFT calculations. The data show that its electronic structure is best described as a high-spin iron(IV) center bound to a triplet NO(-) ligand with a very covalent iron-NO bond. This finding demonstrates that this high-spin iron nitrosyl compound undergoes iron-centered redox chemistry, leading to fundamentally different properties than corresponding low-spin compounds, which undergo NO-centered redox transformations. PMID:27101151

  2. Assessment of natural radioactivity and function of minerals in soils of Yelagiri hills, Tamilnadu, India by Gamma Ray spectroscopic and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) techniques with statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, A.; Ravisankar, R.; Rajalakshmi, A.; Eswaran, P.; Vijayagopal, P.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-02-01

    Gamma Ray and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques were used to evaluate the natural radioactivity due to natural radionuclides and mineralogical characterization in soils of Yelagiri hills, Tamilnadu, India. Various radiological parameters were calculated to assess the radiation hazards associated with the soil. The distribution pattern of activity due to natural radionuclides is explained by Kriging method of mapping. Using FTIR spectroscopic technique the minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar, kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite, and organic carbon were identified and characterized. The extinction coefficient values were calculated to know the relative distribution of major minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar and kaolinite. The calculated values indicate that the amount of quartz is higher than orthoclase feldspar, microcline feldspar and much higher than kaolinite. Crystallinity index was calculated to know the crystalline nature of quartz. The result indicates that the presence of disordered crystalline quartz in soils. The relation between minerals and radioactivity was assessed by multivariate statistical analysis (Pearson's correlation and cluster analysis). The statistical analysis confirms that the clay mineral kaolinite and non-clay mineral quartz is the major factor than other major minerals to induce the important radioactivity variables and concentrations of uranium and thorium.

  3. Assessment of natural radioactivity and function of minerals in soils of Yelagiri hills, Tamilnadu, India by Gamma Ray spectroscopic and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) techniques with statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, A; Ravisankar, R; Rajalakshmi, A; Eswaran, P; Vijayagopal, P; Venkatraman, B

    2015-02-01

    Gamma Ray and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques were used to evaluate the natural radioactivity due to natural radionuclides and mineralogical characterization in soils of Yelagiri hills, Tamilnadu, India. Various radiological parameters were calculated to assess the radiation hazards associated with the soil. The distribution pattern of activity due to natural radionuclides is explained by Kriging method of mapping. Using FTIR spectroscopic technique the minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar, kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite, and organic carbon were identified and characterized. The extinction coefficient values were calculated to know the relative distribution of major minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar and kaolinite. The calculated values indicate that the amount of quartz is higher than orthoclase feldspar, microcline feldspar and much higher than kaolinite. Crystallinity index was calculated to know the crystalline nature of quartz. The result indicates that the presence of disordered crystalline quartz in soils. The relation between minerals and radioactivity was assessed by multivariate statistical analysis (Pearson's correlation and cluster analysis). The statistical analysis confirms that the clay mineral kaolinite and non-clay mineral quartz is the major factor than other major minerals to induce the important radioactivity variables and concentrations of uranium and thorium. PMID:25467664

  4. Note: Electrical detection and quantification of spin rectification effect enabled by shorted microstrip transmission line technique

    SciTech Connect

    Soh, Wee Tee; Ong, C. K.; Peng, Bin; State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 ; Chai, Guozhi

    2014-02-15

    We describe a shorted microstrip method for the sensitive quantification of Spin Rectification Effect (SRE). SRE for a Permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) thin film strip sputtered onto SiO{sub 2} substrate is demonstrated. Our method obviates the need for simultaneous lithographic patterning of the sample and transmission line, therefore greatly simplifying the SRE measurement process. Such a shorted microstrip method can allow different contributions to SRE (anisotropic magnetoresistance, Hall effect, and anomalous Hall effect) to be simultaneously determined. Furthermore, SRE signals from unpatterned 50 nm thick Permalloy films of area dimensions 5 mm × 10 mm can even be detected.

  5. Study of the effect of Cal-Red on the secondary structure of human serum albumin by spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lijun; Chen, Xingguo; Hu, Zhide

    2007-11-01

    The effect of Cal-Red on the structure of human serum albumin (HSA) was studied using Resonance light scattering (RLS), Fourier transformed Infrared (FT-IR) and Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic methods. The RLS spectroscopic results show that the RLS intensity of HSA was significantly increased in the presence of Cal-Red. The binding parameters of HSA with Cal-Red were studied at different temperatures of 289, 299, 309 and 319 K at pH 4.1. It is indicated by the Scatchard plots that the binding constant K decreased from 4.03 × 10 8 to 7.59 × 10 7 l/mol and the maximum binding number N decreased from 215 to 152 with increasing the temperature, respectively. The binding process was exothermic and spontaneous, as indicated by the thermodynamic analyses, and the major part of the binding energy is hydrophobic interaction. The enthalpy change Δ H0, the free energy change Δ G0 and the entropy change Δ S0 of 289 K were calculated to be -42.75 kJ/mol, -47.56 kJ/mol and 16.66 J/mol K, respectively. The alterations of protein secondary structure in the presence of Cal-Red in aqueous solution were quantitatively calculated from FT-IR and CD spectroscopy with reductions of α-helices content about 5%, β-turn from 10% to 2% and with increases of β-sheet from 38% to 51%.

  6. Osmotically induced removal of water from fungal cells as determined by a spin probe technique.

    PubMed

    Miller, R W

    1978-11-01

    Effects of physical environment on plasma membrane semipermeability and osmotic induction of changes in aqueous cytoplasmic volume were studied in vegetative and spore cells of a plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium sulphureum. A direct method, employing a spin probe molecule that partitioned between intracellular aqueous and hydrophobic phases, allowed measurement of reversible water movement out of macroconidial cells and chlamydospores exposed to solutions of high osmolarity. Equilibrium distribution of the spin probe between intracellular aqueous and lipid phases was more rapid than movement of water in and out of the cells. The extent of water removal was exponentially dependent on osmotic strength. Some cells became irreversibly permeable to divalent cations on treatment with sodium chloride above 1.5 osmolar but addition of sucrose to the suspension medium at equivalent osmolar concentrations caused water removal without adversely affecting the viability. Sucrose also protected the plasma membrane against damage during freeze-drying. Induction of plasma membrane damage by osmotic shock or freeze-drying permitted rapid permeation of nickel ions. Neither slow equilibration of intracellular components with divalent paramagnetic cations nor partial permeability of damaged plasma membranes to these ions was observed. PMID:16660597

  7. The origin, composition and history of cometary ices from spectroscopic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1989-01-01

    The spectroscopic analysis of pristine cometary material provides a very important probe of the chemical identity of the material as well as of the physical and chemical conditions which prevailed during the comet's history. Concerning classical spectroscopy, the spectral regions which will most likely prove most useful are the infrared, the visible and ultraviolet. Newer spectroscopic techniques which have the potential to provide equally important information include nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron spin resonance (ESR). Each technique is summarized with emphasis placed on the kind of information which can be obtained.

  8. Identification of vegetable oil botanical speciation in refined vegetable oil blends using an innovative combination of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Maria Teresa; Haughey, Simon A; Elliott, Christopher T; Koidis, Anastasios

    2015-12-15

    European Regulation 1169/2011 requires producers of foods that contain refined vegetable oils to label the oil types. A novel rapid and staged methodology has been developed for the first time to identify common oil species in oil blends. The qualitative method consists of a combination of a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to profile the oils and fatty acid chromatographic analysis to confirm the composition of the oils when required. Calibration models and specific classification criteria were developed and all data were fused into a simple decision-making system. The single lab validation of the method demonstrated the very good performance (96% correct classification, 100% specificity, 4% false positive rate). Only a small fraction of the samples needed to be confirmed with the majority of oils identified rapidly using only the spectroscopic procedure. The results demonstrate the huge potential of the methodology for a wide range of oil authenticity work. PMID:26190602

  9. Simple and highly sensitive measurement method for detection of glass transition temperatures of polymers: application of ESR power saturation phenomenon with conventional spin-probe technique.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Yohei; Yamamoto, Katsuhiro

    2012-08-01

    A combination of the microwave power saturation (MPS) method of electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin probing is proposed as a simple and practical technique for detecting the glass transition temperatures, T(g), of polymers with high sensitivity. Effects of the spin-probe size and concentration on the T(g) value of polystyrene (PS) determined by MPS, T(g,ESR), were first evaluated. Spin-probed PS with four types of nitroxides, namely, di-tert-butyl nitroxide (DBN), 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO), 4-benzoyloxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (BZONO), and 4',4'-dimethyl-spiro(5α-cholestane-3,2'-oxazolidin)-3'-yloxy free radical (CHOL), having molecular weights of 144, 156, 276, and 473, respectively, and spin-labeled PS with TEMPO were prepared. The T(g,ESR) values for the spin-probed PS with DBN, TEMPO, BZONO, and CHOL and spin-labeled PS were determined to 360, 363, 374, 374, and 375 K, respectively, within experimental uncertainties of 2 K, whereas the glass transition temperature determined by DSC, T(g,DSC), was 375 K for all samples. A significant decrease in T(g,ESR) for small spin probes was shown to be due to decoupling between the mobilities of small spin probes and PS segments. Concerning the concentration, a decrease in the saturation factor, S, induced by shortening of the spin-spin relaxation time was observed for the spin-probed PS with CHOL when the concentration of CHOL was more than 1.0 wt %. Furthermore, T(g,ESR) decreased slightly with increasing weight fraction of CHOL because of the "plasticizer effect" of CHOL. However, the T(g,ESR) and T(g,DSC) values corresponded for each concentration. Thus, large spin probes, such as CHOL and BZONO, are appropriate for the determination of T(g,ESR) values; the concentration of the spin probes does not affect the T(g,ESR) value unless the overall T(g) value is reduced by blending of excess spin probes. Finally, measurements of T(g,ESR) in PS/silica composites containing more than 95 wt

  10. Development of a 3He nuclear spin flip system on an in-situ SEOP 3He spin filter and demonstration for a neutron reflectometer and magnetic imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, H.; Oku, T.; Kira, H.; Sakai, K.; Hiroi, K.; Ino, T.; Shinohara, T.; Imagawa, T.; Ohkawara, M.; Ohoyama, K.; Kakurai, K.; Takeda, M.; Yamazaki, D.; Oikawa, K.; Harada, M.; Miyata, N.; Akutsu, K.; Mizusawa, M.; Parker, J. D.; Matsumoto, Y.; Zhang, S.; Suzuki, J.; Soyama, K.; Aizawa, K.; Arai, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have been developing a 3He neutron spin filter (NSF) using the spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) technique. The 3He NSF provides a high-energy polarized neutron beam with large beam size. Moreover the 3He NSF can work as a π-flipper for a polarized neutron beam by flipping the 3He nuclear spin using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. For NMR with the in-situ SEOP technique, the polarization of the laser must be reversed simultaneously because a non-reversed laser reduces the polarization of the spin-flipped 3He. To change the polarity of the laser, a half-wavelength plate was installed. The rotation angle of the half-wavelength plate was optimized, and a polarization of 97% was obtained for the circularly polarized laser. The 3He polarization reached 70% and was stable over one week. A demonstration of the 3He nuclear spin flip system was performed at the polarized neutron reflectometer SHARAKU (BL17) and NOBORU (BL10) at J-PARC. Off-specular measurement from a magnetic Fe/Cr thin film and magnetic imaging of a magnetic steel sheet were performed at BL17 and BL10, respectively.

  11. Characterization of fine particulate matter in ambient air by combining TEM and multiple spectroscopic techniques--NMR, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhurun; Dai, Rucheng; Zhang, Zengming

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports a systematic study of the microstructures and spectroscopic characteristics of PM2.5 and its potential sources in Beijing by combining transmission electron microscopy and multiple spectroscopic techniques: nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. TEM images showed that dominant components of PM2.5 are airborne organic substances with many trace metal elements which are associated with combustion sources. NMR spectra precisely determined the percentage of carbonaceous speciation in both PM2.5 (with spatial and temporal distribution) and its potential sources, and distinguished the similarities and differences among them. In FTIR spectra, a remarkable peak at 1390 cm(-1) that appeared only in PM2.5 samples was attributed to NH4NO3, representing the occurrence of secondary processes. Raman spectra revealed certain inorganic compounds including sulfate and nitrate ions. Based on the analysis of the decomposition of Raman spectra, spectral parameters provided structural information and helped to find potential sources of PM2.5. In the space of carbon aromaticity index and ID1/IG, PM2.5 points followed a linear distribution which may also be useful in source tracing. The result shows that the combined non-destructive methods are efficient to trace the sources of PM2.5. PMID:25597896

  12. A new membrane probing steroidal spin label: synthesis and applications.

    PubMed

    Katoch, R; Trivedi, G K; Phadke, R S

    2000-02-01

    The applicability of a new steroidal spin label, 3-oxo-androstan-17 beta-yl-(2",2",6",6"-tetramethyl-N-oxyl) piperidyl butan-1',4'-dioate, in studying the phase transition properties of model membrane L-alpha-dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) in the presence and absence of drugs has been explored. Its synthesis and characterization has been described herein. Besides, the localization of this spin label in lipid liposomes has been studied using electron spin resonance (ESR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopic techniques. The label has also been used to study the permeability of epinephrine into membrane. The results show that the spin label has a good potential as a spin probe in the study of biomembranes. PMID:10983412

  13. Interfacial spectroscopic characterization of organic/ferromagnet hetero-junction of 3,4,9,10-perylene-teracarboxylic dianhydride-based organic spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jhen-Yong; Ou Yang, Kui-Hon; Wang, Bo-Yao; Li, Kai-Shin; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Chan, Yuet-Loy; Wei, Der-Hsin; Chang, Fan-Hsiu; Lin, Hong-Ji; Chiang, Wen-Chung; Lin, Minn-Tsong

    2014-02-01

    We report interfacial characterization of 3,4,9,10-perylene-teracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA)-based organic spin valves (OSV) dusted with a thin layer of partially oxidized alumina at the organic semiconductor (OSC)/ferromagnet (FM) interfaces. Up to 13.5% magnetoresistance is achieved at room temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reveal interfacial electronic interaction between PTCDA and FM while the application of a thin alumina layer at the PTCDA/FM interfaces prevents the electronic hybridization and effectively preserves the spin injection into the OSC spacer. This finding demonstrates the critical effect of interfacial structure on magnetotransport behavior in OSV.

  14. A Non-Invasive Thermal Drift Compensation Technique Applied to a Spin-Valve Magnetoresistive Current Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Jaime Sánchez; Muñoz, Diego Ramírez; Cardoso, Susana; Berga, Silvia Casans; Antón, Asunción Edith Navarro; de Freitas, Paulo Jorge Peixeiro

    2011-01-01

    A compensation method for the sensitivity drift of a magnetoresistive (MR) Wheatstone bridge current sensor is proposed. The technique was carried out by placing a ruthenium temperature sensor and the MR sensor to be compensated inside a generalized impedance converter circuit (GIC). No internal modification of the sensor bridge arms is required so that the circuit is capable of compensating practical industrial sensors. The method is based on the temperature modulation of the current supplied to the bridge, which improves previous solutions based on constant current compensation. Experimental results are shown using a microfabricated spin-valve MR current sensor. The temperature compensation has been solved in the interval from 0 °C to 70 °C measuring currents from −10 A to +10 A. PMID:22163748

  15. Investigation on the interaction between isorhamnetin and bovine liver catalase by spectroscopic techniques under different pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yumin; Li, Daojin

    2016-08-01

    The binding of isorhamnetin to bovine liver catalase (BLC) was first investigated at 302, 310 and 318 K at pH 7.4 using spectroscopic methods including fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis absorption. Spectrophotometric observations are rationalized mainly in terms of a static quenching process. The binding constants and binding sites were evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. Enzymatic activity of BLC in the absence and presence of isorhamnetin was measured using a UV/vis spectrophotometer. The result revealed that the binding of isorhamnetin to BLC led to a reduction in the activity of BLC. The positive entropy change and enthalpy change indicated that the interaction of isorhamnetin with BLC was mainly driven by hydrophobic forces. The distance r between the donor (BLC) and acceptor (isorhamnetin) was estimated to be 2.99 nm according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, and CD spectra showed no obvious change in the conformation of BLC upon the binding of isorhamnetin. In addition, the influence of pH on the binding of isorhamnetin to BLC was investigated and the binding ability of the drug to BLC deceased under other pH conditions (pH 9.0, 6.5, 5.0, 3.5, or 2.0) as compared with that at pH 7.4. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26748824

  16. Ellipsometric and Raman spectroscopic study of nanocrystalline silicon thin films prepared by a rf magnetron sputtering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouizem, Y.; Abbes, C.; Sib, J. D.; Benlakehal, D.; Baghdad, R.; Chahed, L.; Zellama, K.; Charvet, S.

    2008-11-01

    The structure of nanocrystalline silicon thin films (nc-Si:H) deposited by rf magnetron sputtering of a high-purity crystalline silicon target using argon (30%) and hydrogen (70%) gas mixture, under different pressures (P = 2, 3 and 4 Pa) and different substrate temperature (Ts = 100, 150 and 200 °C), has been studied with spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE; 1.5-5 eV) complemented with Raman spectroscopy measurements. The ellipsometry data were carefully analyzed using the Brüggeman effective medium approximation and the Tauc-Lorentz model. The results of this investigation clearly show that the samples deposited at 2 Pa present a completely amorphous structure whatever the substrate temperature, while those deposited at 3 and 4 Pa exhibit a nanocrystalline structure. These results suggest the existence of a threshold pressure around 3 Pa for which crystallization occurs. The samples are well crystallized with a crystalline volume fraction ranging from about 60 to 90%, and exhibit a mixture of small and large crystallite sizes. The deposition temperature has practically no effect on the size of the crystallites and on the average crystalline volume fractions. These results are in good agreement with the Raman spectroscopy data, and suggest the formation of Si crystallites in the gas phase. The analysis of the ellipsometric spectra also shows that the bulk layer is initiated from an amorphous interface (a-Si:H) present in the first steps of the growth, and is followed by a less crystallized subsurface layer.

  17. Determination of photocarrier density under continuous photoirradiation using spectroscopic techniques as applied to polymer: Fullerene blend films

    SciTech Connect

    Kanemoto, Katsuichi Nakatani, Hitomi; Domoto, Shinya

    2014-10-28

    We propose a method to determine the density of photocarrier under continuous photoirradiation in conjugated polymers using spectroscopic signals obtained by photoinduced absorption (PIA) measurements. The bleaching signals in the PIA measurements of polymer films and the steady-state absorption signals of oxidized polymer solution are employed to determine the photocarrier density. The method is applied to photocarriers of poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in a blended film consisting of P3HT and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The photocarrier density under continuous photoirradiation of 580 mW/cm{sup 2} is determined to be 3.5 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3}. Using a trend of the carrier density increasing in proportion to the square root of photo-excitation intensity, we provide a general formula to estimate the photocarrier density under simulated 1 sun solar irradiation for the P3HT: PCBM film of an arbitrary thickness. We emphasize that the method proposed in this study enables an estimate of carrier density without measuring a current and can be applied to films with no electrodes as well as to devices.

  18. Anomaly Detection Techniques with Real Test Data from a Spinning Turbine Engine-Like Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Woike, Mark R.; Oza, Nikunj C.; Matthews, Bryan L.

    2012-01-01

    Online detection techniques to monitor the health of rotating engine components are becoming increasingly attractive to aircraft engine manufacturers in order to increase safety of operation and lower maintenance costs. Health monitoring remains a challenge to easily implement, especially in the presence of scattered loading conditions, crack size, component geometry, and materials properties. The current trend, however, is to utilize noninvasive types of health monitoring or nondestructive techniques to detect hidden flaws and mini-cracks before any catastrophic event occurs. These techniques go further to evaluate material discontinuities and other anomalies that have grown to the level of critical defects that can lead to failure. Generally, health monitoring is highly dependent on sensor systems capable of performing in various engine environmental conditions and able to transmit a signal upon a predetermined crack length, while acting in a neutral form upon the overall performance of the engine system.

  19. Structural analysis of complexes formed by ethyl 4-phenylthiocarbamoyl piperazine-1-carboxylate with Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) through spectroscopic and DFT techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Om; Gautam, Priyanka; Dani, R. K.; Nandi, Abhisikta; Singh, N. K.; Singh, Ranjan K.

    2014-04-01

    A piperazine derivative, ethyl 4-phenylthiocarbamoyl piperazine-1-carboxylate and its Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility measurement, UV-Visible, FTIR, Raman spectroscopic and DFT methods. The Ni(II) and Zn(II) bind through the N and S sites of the two ligand Heptpc and N site of two pyridine molecules. However, the Cd(II) binds through the only N sites of the two ligand Heptpc and N site of two pyridine molecules. On the basis of various techniques used for the characterizations of the complexes, we found that the most possible geometry of the Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes are distorted octahedral and of the Cd(II) complex is distorted tetrahedral.

  20. Multidisciplinary approach for the study of an Egyptian coffin (late 22nd/early 25th dynasty): combining imaging and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Bracci, S; Caruso, O; Galeotti, M; Iannaccone, R; Magrini, D; Picchi, D; Pinna, D; Porcinai, S

    2015-06-15

    This paper demonstrates that an educated methodology based on both non-invasive and micro invasive techniques in a two-step approach is a powerful tool to characterize the materials and stratigraphies of an Egyptian coffin, which was restored several times. This coffin, belonging to a certain Mesiset, is now located at the Museo Civico Archeologico of Bologna (inventory number MCABo EG 1963). Scholars attributed it to the late 22nd/early 25th dynasty by stylistic comparison. The first step of the diagnostic approach applied imaging techniques on the whole surface in order to select measurements spots and to unveil both original and restored areas. Images and close microscopic examination of the polychrome surface allowed selecting representative areas to be investigated in situ by portable spectroscopic techniques: X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Fiber Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). After the analysis of the results coming from the first step, very few selected samples were taken to clarify the stratigraphy of the polychrome layers. The first step, based on the combination of imaging and spectroscopic techniques in a totally non-invasive modality, is quite unique in the literature on Egyptian coffins and enabled us to reveal many differences in the ground layer's composition and to identify a remarkable number of pigments in the original and restored areas. This work offered also a chance to check the limitations of the non-invasive approach applied on a complex case, namely the right localization of different materials in the stratigraphy and the identification of binding media. Indeed, to dissolve any remaining doubts on superimposed layers belonging to different interventions, it was necessary to sample few micro-fragments in some selected areas and analyze them prepared as cross-sections. The original ground layer is made of calcite, while the restored areas show the presence of either a mixture of calcite

  1. Multidisciplinary approach for the study of an Egyptian coffin (late 22nd/early 25th dynasty): Combining imaging and spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracci, S.; Caruso, O.; Galeotti, M.; Iannaccone, R.; Magrini, D.; Picchi, D.; Pinna, D.; Porcinai, S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper demonstrates that an educated methodology based on both non-invasive and micro invasive techniques in a two-step approach is a powerful tool to characterize the materials and stratigraphies of an Egyptian coffin, which was restored several times. This coffin, belonging to a certain Mesiset, is now located at the Museo Civico Archeologico of Bologna (inventory number MCABo EG 1963). Scholars attributed it to the late 22nd/early 25th dynasty by stylistic comparison. The first step of the diagnostic approach applied imaging techniques on the whole surface in order to select measurements spots and to unveil both original and restored areas. Images and close microscopic examination of the polychrome surface allowed selecting representative areas to be investigated in situ by portable spectroscopic techniques: X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Fiber Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). After the analysis of the results coming from the first step, very few selected samples were taken to clarify the stratigraphy of the polychrome layers. The first step, based on the combination of imaging and spectroscopic techniques in a totally non-invasive modality, is quite unique in the literature on Egyptian coffins and enabled us to reveal many differences in the ground layer's composition and to identify a remarkable number of pigments in the original and restored areas. This work offered also a chance to check the limitations of the non-invasive approach applied on a complex case, namely the right localization of different materials in the stratigraphy and the identification of binding media. Indeed, to dissolve any remaining doubts on superimposed layers belonging to different interventions, it was necessary to sample few micro-fragments in some selected areas and analyze them prepared as cross-sections. The original ground layer is made of calcite, while the restored areas show the presence of either a mixture of calcite

  2. A homonuclear spin-pair filter for solid-state NMR based on adiabatic-passage techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verel, René; Baldus, Marc; Ernst, Matthias; Meier, Beat H.

    1998-05-01

    A filtering scheme for the selection of spin pairs (and larger spin clusters) under fast magic-angle spinning is proposed. The scheme exploits the avoided level crossing in spin pairs during an adiabatic amplitude sweep through the so-called HORROR recoupling condition. The advantages over presently used double-quantum filters are twofold. (i) The maximum theoretical filter efficiency is, due to the adiabatic variation, 100% instead of 73% as for transient methods. (ii) Since the filter does not rely on the phase-cycling properties of the double-quantum coherence, there is no need to obtain the full double-quantum intensity for all spins in the sample at one single point in time. The only important requirement is that all coupled spins pass through a two-spin state during the amplitude sweep. This makes the pulse scheme robust with respect to rf-amplitude missetting, rf-field inhomogeneity and chemical-shift offset.

  3. Study of the plasma surface interactions by the "spinning wall" technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Joydeep

    For the past few decades plasma etching has emerged as a dominant processing step in integrated-circuit (IC) device manufacturing. Due to the presence of reactive radicals and ions, plasmas are rich in chemistry and are widely used to etch sub-micron size features with complete fidelity. Radicals such as Cl, F, O etc. are the active species in the plasma that reacts with the material in the presence of ions forming volatile products, which leads to material removal. However, in these low pressure plasmas the radicals are lost to the reactor walls, which affect their number densities in the plasma. An important parameter to quantify radical loss at the surface is the recombination coefficient, gamma, defined as the probability per collision with the surface that an impinging radical will recombine. The surface in contact with the plasma interacts with the radicals, neutrals, ions, electrons, photons etc., which makes the measurement of kinetic parameter like the atom recombination probability a real challenge. A new technique has been developed to study the plasma-surface interactions in-situ. In this technique a cylindrical substrate is rapidly rotated between the plasma and differentially pumped diagnostic chambers, allowing portions of the surface to be periodically exposed to the plasma and then analyzed by desorption mass spectrometry and Auger electron spectroscopy. The time elapsed between the plasma exposure and subsequent analysis is controlled by varying the rotation frequency of the substrate. Using this technique Langmuir-Hinshelwood atom recombination probabilities have been measured in O2, Cl2, O2/Cl 2, Cl2/Ar and O2/Ar plasmas. A variety of diagnostic techniques have been used to analyze the plasmas. The gas temperature ( Tg) was measured by adding a trace amount of N2 (5%) to the plasma and measuring the emission of the N2 second positive system C 3piu, nu' → B 3pig, nu'' in the ultraviolet region. The electron densities (ne) were measured using a

  4. Structural aspects in self-assembled systems of polyoxyethylene surfactants, as studied by the spin probe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldararu, Horia

    1998-12-01

    Typical examples of structural characterization of self-assembled systems by the spin probes technique, selected from our representative results accumulated in the last years of systematic studies, are presented. The choice of the examples has aimed at emphasizing the potentiality of this technique in the study of self-assembled systems, in general, and of those of PEO surfactants, in particular. By using specific ESR parameters (the nitrogen hyperfine splitting (hfs), aN, the rotational correlation time, τc, the order parameter, S) of a variety of properly chosen nitroxides, problems such hydration degree and profile of the PEO chains, ordering and order profile along these chains, their penetrability by the oil solvent, role of the terminal OH in the micellization, as well as differences in these quantities vs . the nature of the aggregate (micelle, reverse micelle, lamellar phase, etc.), nature of the surfactants (conventional or triblock copolymer), solubilizates (water in reverse micelles or various alcohols in micelles) and temperature have been discussed.

  5. Combining spectroscopic data in the forensic analysis of paint: Application of a multiblock technique as chemometric tool.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Danny; Muehlethaler, Cyril; Esseiva, Pierre; Massonnet, Geneviève

    2016-06-01

    A study (Muehlethaler et al. [9]) has demonstrated the application of chemometrics for the analysis of domestic red paints. The paints have been analyzed with IR and Raman spectroscopies. As a result of these analyses, exploratory techniques, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clusters analysis (HCA) have been applied to both IR and Raman spectra. This allowed to observe the structure of the data among those red paints, and infer potential groups among them and to propose a classification model based on their chemical composition. IR spectroscopy showed group patterns related mainly to the binder and extender composition of the paints, whereas Raman spectroscopy data were mainly related to the pigment composition. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the potential of a Multiblock algorithm applied to the same data set. The concept of Multiblock, as a chemometric tool, is to combine data from several different analytical techniques in order to visualize most of the information at once. IR and Raman spectroscopy are then considered as "blocks" of data of the same dataset. One algorithm called common component and specific weight analysis (CCSWA) has been used in order to produce independent PCAs for each block, and the combined (common) information in a score plot. The results of this study showed group patterns of the analyzed paints, related to both binder and pigment compositions in one single score plot. Moreover, the number of groups observed with the multiblock representation (20 groups) is higher than independent PCAs projections (12 and 7 groups for IR and Raman respectively). This new application of chemometrics showed a great potential in forensic science, as practitioners often use a combination of several analytical techniques in order to characterize samples. This could be helpful when multiple and complementary analytical techniques are used in order to characterize and compare paint samples. PMID:27060443

  6. Evaluation of structure-reactivity descriptors and biological activity spectra of 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone using spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Megha; Deval, Vipin; Gupta, Archana; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Prabhu, S. S.

    2016-10-01

    The structure and several spectroscopic features along with reactivity parameters of the compound 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone (Nabumetone) have been studied using experimental techniques and tools derived from quantum chemical calculations. Structure optimization is followed by force field calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The vibrational spectra have been interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis. UV-visible spectrum and the effect of solvent have been discussed. The electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies have been determined by TD-DFT approach. In order to understand various aspects of pharmacological sciences several new chemical reactivity descriptors - chemical potential, global hardness and electrophilicity have been evaluated. Local reactivity descriptors - Fukui functions and local softnesses have also been calculated to find out the reactive sites within molecule. Aqueous solubility and lipophilicity have been calculated which are crucial for estimating transport properties of organic molecules in drug development. Estimation of biological effects, toxic/side effects has been made on the basis of prediction of activity spectra for substances (PASS) prediction results and their analysis by Pharma Expert software. Using the THz-TDS technique, the frequency-dependent absorptions of NBM have been measured in the frequency range up to 3 THz.

  7. Evaluation of structure-reactivity descriptors and biological activity spectra of 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone using spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Megha; Deval, Vipin; Gupta, Archana; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Prabhu, S S

    2016-10-01

    The structure and several spectroscopic features along with reactivity parameters of the compound 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone (Nabumetone) have been studied using experimental techniques and tools derived from quantum chemical calculations. Structure optimization is followed by force field calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The vibrational spectra have been interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis. UV-visible spectrum and the effect of solvent have been discussed. The electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies have been determined by TD-DFT approach. In order to understand various aspects of pharmacological sciences several new chemical reactivity descriptors - chemical potential, global hardness and electrophilicity have been evaluated. Local reactivity descriptors - Fukui functions and local softnesses have also been calculated to find out the reactive sites within molecule. Aqueous solubility and lipophilicity have been calculated which are crucial for estimating transport properties of organic molecules in drug development. Estimation of biological effects, toxic/side effects has been made on the basis of prediction of activity spectra for substances (PASS) prediction results and their analysis by Pharma Expert software. Using the THz-TDS technique, the frequency-dependent absorptions of NBM have been measured in the frequency range up to 3THz. PMID:27284764

  8. Optical monitoring of volcanic sulphur dioxide emissions—comparison between four different remote-sensing spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weibring, P.; Swartling, J.; Edner, H.; Svanberg, S.; Caltabiano, T.; Condarelli, D.; Cecchi, G.; Pantani, L.

    2002-02-01

    The emissions of sulphur dioxide from the Italian volcanoes Mt. Etna and Stromboli were studied in ship-borne underpasses of their plumes. Four different optical spectroscopy techniques were used and inter-compared. All techniques utilise the absorption signature of the gas in the wavelength region of around 300 nm. A differential absorption lidar was employed in active gas concentration assessment. In parallel, a differential optical absorption spectroscopy system (DOAS) provided spectrally resolved absorption spectra. In one configuration the DOAS used a vertically looking telescope and the absorption of the sky-light was studied, while a different DOAS implementation utilised the sun disc as the light source in slant-angle, long-path absorption measurements. Parallel measurements with the customary correlation spectroscopy method were also performed. Path length Monte Carlo simulations of the down-welling radiation through the volcanic plume at different sun altitude and azimuth angles have been performed taking into account also the effects of other geometric parameters as the plume height and extension. The results are discussed with special emphasis on systematic effects due to scattering.

  9. Potential of spectroscopic techniques and chemometric analysis for rapid measurement of docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid in algal oil.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; He, Yong

    2014-09-01

    Developing rapid methods for measuring long-chain ω-3 (n-3) poly-unsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) contents has been a crucial request from the algal oil industry. In this study, four spectroscopy techniques, namely visible and short-wave near infra-red (Vis-SNIR), long-wave near infra-red (LNIR), mid-infra-red (MIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, were exploited for determining the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) contents in algal oil. The best prediction for both DHA and EPA were achieved by NMR spectroscopy, in which the determination coefficients of cross-validation (rCV(2)) values were 0.963 and 0.967 for two LCPUFAs. The performances of Vis-SNIR and LNIR spectroscopy were also accepted. The variable selection was proved as an efficient and necessary step for the spectral analysis in this study. The results were promising and implied that spectroscopy techniques have a great potential for assessment of DHA and EPA in algal oil. PMID:24731319

  10. Intercomparison of HONO Measurements Made Using Wet-Chemical (NITROMAC) and Spectroscopic (IBBCEAS & LP/FAGE) Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusanter, S.; Lew, M.; Bottorff, B.; Bechara, J.; Mielke, L. H.; Berke, A.; Raff, J. D.; Stevens, P. S.; Afif, C.

    2013-12-01

    A good understanding of the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere is important to tackle fundamental issues related to climate change and air quality. The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the dominant oxidant in the daytime troposphere and an accurate description of its sources in atmospheric models is of utmost importance. Recent field studies indicate higher-than-expected concentrations of HONO during the daytime, suggesting that the photolysis of HONO may be an important underestimated source of OH. Understanding the tropospheric HONO budget requires confidence in analytical instrumentation capable of selectively measuring HONO. In this presentation, we discuss an intercomparison study of HONO measurements performed during summer 2013 at the edge of a hardwood forest in Southern Indiana. This exercise involved a wet chemical technique (NITROMAC), an Incoherent Broad-Band Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy instrument (IBBCEAS), and a Laser-Photofragmentation/Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion instrument (LP/FAGE). The agreement observed between the three techniques will be discussed for both ambient measurements and cross calibration experiments.

  11. Coupled micro-scale magnetic and spectroscopic techniques to understand the petrogenesis of iron sulfides in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotznick, S. P.; Webb, S. M.; Johnson, J. E.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Fischer, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Paleomagnetism in sedimentary rocks containing iron sulfide mineral phases is challenging due to questions about the timing of formation, the potential for multiple-stages of iron sulfide growth, and their metastabilty in nature and in the laboratory. Bulk rock magnetic techniques have been developed and applied to identify and characterize ferromagnetic iron sulfides in a wide array of rock types from the geologic record (including some containing stable ChRM), but petrographic textural observations are required to inform the timing of their mineralization in any given sample. The solid-solution of pyrite/pyrrhotite/troilite and intimate intergrowth patterns of iron sulfides is difficult to untangle with standard light and electron microscopy. Here we report the development and application of a complementary set of techniques designed to inform and untangle the history and processes involved in the mineralization of sulfur-bearing minerals in sedimentary rocks. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the S K-edge provides insight into the chemistry (such as valence state, electronic structure, type of neighbors) of sulfur-bearing solids. We used a new synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe developed at SSRL to measure, distinguish, and then image sulfur phases via multiple energy maps at micron scales. From these maps we can quantitatively differentiate a wide range of sulfur-bearing phases in polished thin sections, such as pyrrhotite, pyrite, and greigite, and ordinate them into a petrogenic scheme. At a similar scale, using SQUID microscopy allows us to identify and map the presence and field strength of ferromagnetic minerals within a sample. Combined with bulk rock magnetic techniques, these two micro-scale methods pair well to confirm textural observations, beyond those already noted using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Here we will present work from a study of middle Proterozoic age sedimentary rocks from the Belt Supergroup, MT. By collecting a wide array

  12. Observational and laboratory studies of optical properties of black and brown carbon particles in the atmosphere using spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoki; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    Light absorption and scattering by aerosols are as an important contributor to radiation balance in the atmosphere. Black carbon (BC) is considered to be the most potent light absorbing material in the visible region of the spectrum, although light absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon or BrC) and mineral dust may also act as sources of significant absorption, especially in the ultraviolet (UV) and shorter visible wavelength regions. The optical properties of such particles depend on wavelength, particle size and shape, morphology, coating, and complex refractive index (or chemical composition), and therefore accurate in situ measurements of the wavelength dependence of the optical properties of particles are needed. Recently, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) have been used for the direct measurements of extinction and absorption coefficients of particles suspended in air. We have applied these techniques to the observational studies of optical properties of BC and BrC in an urban site in Japan and to the laboratory studies of optical properties of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated from a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds and those of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). In the presentation, the basic principles of these techniques and the results obtained in our studies and in the recent literatures will be overviewed. References Guo, X. et al., Measurement of the light absorbing properties of diesel exhaust particles using a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer, Atmos. Environ., 94, 428-437 (2014). Nakayama, T. et al., Measurements of aerosol optical properties in central Tokyo during summertime using cavity ring-down spectroscopy: Comparison with conventional techniques, Atmos. Environ., 44, 3034-3042 (2010). Nakayama, T. et al., Laboratory studies on optical properties of secondary organic aerosols generated during the photooxidation of toluene and the ozonolysis of alpha

  13. Precise oxygen and hydrogen isotope determination in nanoliter quantities of speleothem inclusion water by cavity ring-down spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Ryu; Nakamoto, Masashi; Asami, Ryuji; Mishima, Satoru; Gibo, Masakazu; Masaka, Kosuke; Jin-Ping, Chen; Wu, Chung-Che; Chang, Yu-Wei; Shen, Chuan-Chou

    2016-01-01

    Speleothem inclusion-water isotope compositions are a promising new climatic proxy, but their applicability is limited by their low content in water and by analytical challenges. We have developed a precise and accurate isotopic technique that is based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). This method features a newly developed crushing apparatus, a refined sample extraction line, careful evaluation of the water/carbonate adsorption effect. After crushing chipped speleothem in a newly-developed crushing device, released inclusion water is purified and mixed with a limited amount of nitrogen gas in the extraction line for CRDS measurement. We have measured 50-260 nL of inclusion water from 77 to 286 mg of stalagmite deposits sampled from Gyokusen Cave, Okinawa Island, Japan. The small sample size requirement demonstrates that our analytical technique can offer high-resolution inclusion water-based paleoclimate reconstructions. The 1σ reproducibility for different stalagmites ranges from ±0.05 to 0.61‰ for δ18O and ±0.0 to 2.9‰ for δD. The δD vs. δ18O plot for inclusion water from modern stalagmites is consistent with the local meteoric water line. The 1000 ln α values based on calcite and fluid inclusion measurements from decades-old stalagmites are in agreement with the data from present-day farmed calcite experiment. Combination of coeval carbonate and fluid inclusion data suggests that past temperatures at 9-10 thousand years ago (ka) and 26 ka were 3.4 ± 0.7 °C and 8.2 ± 2.4 °C colder than at present, respectively.

  14. Development of synchrotron x-ray micro-spectroscopic techniques and application to problems in low temperature geochemistry. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The focus of the technical development effort has been the development of apparatus and techniques for the utilization of X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopies in a microprobe mode. The present XRM uses white synchrotron radiation (3 to 30 keV) from a bending magnet for trace element analyses using the x-ray fluorescence technique Two significant improvements to this device have been recently implemented. Focusing Mirror: An 8:1 ellipsoidal mirror was installed in the X26A beamline to focus the incident synchrotron radiation and thereby increase the flux on the sample by about a factor of 30. Incident Beam Monochromator: The monochromator has been successfully installed and commissioned in the X26A beamline upstream of the mirror to permit analyses with focused monochromatic radiation. The monochromator consists of a channel-cut silicon (111) crystal driven by a Klinger stepping motor translator. We have demonstrated the operating range of this instrument is 4 and 20 keV with 0.01 eV steps and produces a beam with a {approximately}10{sup {minus}4} energy bandwidth. The primary purpose of the monochromator is for x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements but it is also used for selective excitation in trace element microanalysis. To date, we have conducted XANES studies on Ti, Cr, Fe, Ce and U, spanning the entire accessible energy range and including both K and L edge spectra. Practical detection limits for microXANES are 10--100 ppM for 100 {mu}m spots.

  15. Traveling surface spin-wave resonance spectroscopy using surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowtham, P. G.; Moriyama, T.; Ralph, D. C.; Buhrman, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Coherent gigahertz-frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) traveling on the surface of a piezoelectric crystal can, via the magnetoelastic interaction, resonantly excite traveling surface spin waves in an adjacent thin-film ferromagnet. These excited surface spin waves, traveling with a definite in-plane wave-vector q ∥ enforced by the SAW, can be detected by measuring changes in the electro-acoustical transmission of a SAW delay line. Here, we provide a demonstration that such measurements constitute a precise and quantitative technique for spin-wave spectroscopy, providing a means to determine both isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the spin-wave dispersion and damping. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this spectroscopic technique by measuring the spin-wave properties of a Ni thin film for a large range of wave vectors, | q ∥ | = 2.5 × 104-8 × 104 cm-1, over which anisotropic dipolar interactions vary from being negligible to quite significant.

  16. Bi-nanoparticle (CdTe and CdSe) mixed polyaniline hybrid thin films prepared using spin coating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Deepak; Dutta, V.

    2009-02-01

    Polyaniline (Pani) films containing CdTe, CdSe, and both nanoparticles were deposited using spin coating technique. Pani was chemically synthesized by oxidation method, whereas surfactant free CdTe and CdSe nanoparticles were prepared using solvothermal method. Binanoparticle films showed an increase in the absorption from 350 nm to the near IR region. Absorption spectra also showed charge transfer complex formation for the binanoparticle hybrid thin films prepared with weight ratio of [Pani (camphor sulfonic acid, CSA):CdTe:CdSe] 200:100:75. Photoluminescence measurement for the bi-nanoparticle hybrid thin films confirmed that the required dissociation of excitons was taking place at the interface. Scanning electron microscopy images showed homogeneity and an interconnected network on the surface of the films prepared with Pani (CSA):CdTe:CdSe weight ratios of 200:100:50 and 200:100:75, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry confirmed better stability for the bi-nanoparticle hybrid films in comparison to Pani film. It also established the process of electrochemical charge transfer between the nanoparticles and the polymer matrix.

  17. Electrical and optical properties of p-type codoped ZnO thin films prepared by spin coating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Trilok Kumar; Kumar, Vinod; Swart, H. C.; Purohit, L. P.

    2016-03-01

    Undoped, doped and codoped ZnO thin films were synthesized on glass substrates using a spin coating technique. Zinc acetate dihydrate, ammonium acetate and aluminum nitrate were used as precursor for zinc, nitrogen and aluminum, respectively. X-ray diffraction shows that the thin films have a hexagonal wurtzite structure for the undoped, doped and co-doped ZnO. The transmittance of the films was above 80% and the band gap of the film varied from 3.20 eV to 3.24 eV for undoped and doped ZnO. An energy band diagram to describe the photoluminescence from the thin films was also constructed. This diagram includes the various defect levels and possible quasi-Fermi levels. A minimum resistivity of 0.0834 Ω-cm was obtained for the N and Al codoped ZnO thin films with p-type carrier conductivity. These ZnO films can be used as a window layer in solar cells and in UV lasers.

  18. Thermoelectric properties of Si/SiB3 sub-micro composite prepared by melt-spinning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jun; Ohishi, Yuji; Miyazaki, Yoshinobu; Yusufu, Aikebaier; Muta, Hiroaki; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2015-08-01

    This study presents a new self-assembly process to form a fine structure in bulk Si. We fabricated a semiconducting composite material consisting of sub-micro-sized (100-500 nm) SiB3 precipitates distributed in a Si matrix whose grain size was on the order of microns. The sub-micro-sized SiB3 particles were precipitated during the spark plasma sintering process of a metastable Si-B (Si:B = 92:8) supersaturated solid solution prepared by the melt-spinning technique. The composite was a heavily doped (5 × 1020 cm-3) p-type semiconductor. The SiB3 precipitates did not affect the Seebeck coefficient, slightly reduced the carrier mobility, and greatly reduced the lattice thermal conductivity. Specifically, the lattice thermal conductivity was reduced by 44% compared with that of p-type Si without precipitates at room temperature. The SiB3 precipitates improved the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT from 0.17 to 0.23 at 1073 K, which indicates that the formation of small precipitates effectively improves the thermoelectric performance of Si-based thermoelectric materials.

  19. Use of radiocarbon and spectroscopic analyses to characterise soil organic matter pools isolated using different fractionation techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Gemma; Cloy, Joanna; Garnett, Mark; Sohi, Saran; Rees, Robert; Griffiths, Bryan

    2015-04-01

    Experimental division of soil organic matter (SOM) into functional pools has the potential to improve soil C modelling. Soil physical fractionation techniques seek to quantify these pools, however the fractions isolated vary in number, size, ecological role and composition. The use of different techniques to quantify soil C fractions in different studies presents a question - do similar fractions isolated by different methods fit the same conceptual definition? This study examined a sandy loam from the south-west of Scotland, sampled in summer, which had been under grassland management for at least 20 years. We compared average 14C ages of SOM fractions isolated using three published and frequently applied physical fractionation methods (1) a density separation technique isolating three fractions - free light (FLF) < 1.8 cm 3, intra-aggregate light (IALF) < 1.8 cm-3 after aggregate disruption, and organo-mineral (O-min) > 1.8 g cm 3 (Sohi et al, 2001); (2) a combined physical and chemical separation isolating five fractions: sand and aggregates (S+A) > 63 µm and > 1.8 g cm-3, particulate organic matter (POM) > 63 µm and < 1.8 g cm 3, silt and clay (s+c) < 63 but > 45 µm, residual organic carbon (rSOC) the residue left after s+c is oxidised with NaOCl, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) < 45 µm (Zimmermann et al, 2007); and (3) a hot water extraction method isolating two fractions: water soluble C (WSC) at 20 °C and hot water extractable C (HWEC) at 80 °C (Ghani et al, 2003). The fractions from Method 1 had the most distinct average 14C ages with O-min, FLF and IALF assessed as 206, 1965 and 6172 years before present (BP) respectively. The fractions from Method 2 fell into two age groups, < ~1000 years BP for s+c, rSOC and S+A and > 4000 years BP for DOC and POM. Both Method 3 fractions were dominated by modern C. The average 14C ages of FLF, IALF, DOC and POM were surprisingly higher than the mineral bound fractions, although they made up a relatively small

  20. Study on the interaction of the epilepsy drug, zonisamide with human serum albumin (HSA) by spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khorshidi, Aref; Moghadam, Neda Hossinpour

    2013-10-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the interaction of zonisamide (ZNS) with the transport protein, human serum albumin (HSA) employing UV-Vis, fluorometric, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking techniques. The results indicated that binding of ZNS to HSA caused strong fluorescence quenching of HSA through static quenching mechanism, hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts are the major forces in the stability of protein ZNS complex and the process of the binding of ZNS with HSA was driven by enthalpy (ΔH = -193.442 kJ mol-1). The results of CD and UV-Vis spectroscopy showed that the binding of this drug to HSA induced conformational changes in HSA. Furthermore, the study of molecular docking also indicated that zonisamide could strongly bind to the site I (subdomain IIA) of HSA mainly by hydrophobic interaction and there were hydrogen bond interactions between this drug and HSA, also known as the warfarin binding site.

  1. X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tutt, T.E.

    1994-12-01

    When a solid target is irradiated by a laser beam, the material is locally heated to a high temperature and a plasma forms. The interaction of the laser with plasma can produce energetic electrons. By observing the behavior of these {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} electrons, we hope to obtain a better understanding of Laser/Plasma Interactions. In this work we employ a layered-fluorescer technique to study the transport, and therefore the energetics, of the electrons. The plasma forms on a thin foil of metallic Pd which is bonded to thin layer of metallic Sn. Electrons formed from the plasma penetrate first the Pd and then the Sn. In both layers the energetic electrons promote inner (K) shell ionization of the metallic atoms which leads to the emission of characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-rays of the fluorescers. By recording the x-ray spectrum emitted by the two foils, we can estimate the energy-dependent range of the electrons and their numbers.

  2. RHIC SPIN FLIPPER

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; ROSER, T.

    2007-06-25

    This paper proposes a new design of spin flipper for RHIC to obtain full spin flip with the spin tune staying at half integer. The traditional technique of using an rf dipole or solenoid as spin flipper to achieve full spin flip in the presence of full Siberian snake requires one to change the snake configuration to move the spin tune away from half integer. This is not practical for an operational high energy polarized proton collider like RHIC where beam lifetime is sensitive to small betatron tune change. The design of the new spin flipper as well as numerical simulations are presented.

  3. Studying Iron Mineralogy to Understand Redox Conditions in the Mesoproterozoic Belt Basin, USA Using Complementary Microscopic, Spectroscopic, and Magnetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotznick, S. P.; Webb, S.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Fischer, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of iron chemistry and mineralogy over time provide a valuable tool for studying paleoenvironments, but questions still remain as to the redox character of Proterozoic basins after the rise of oxygen. To evaluate the mechanisms of iron mineralization in Proterozoic samples, we developed an approach that pairs the microscale textural techniques of light microscopy, magnetic scanning microscopy, and (synchrotron-based) microprobe x-ray spectroscopy with sensitive bulk rock magnetic experiments. Samples were collected from stratigraphic sections across the ~1.4 Ga lower Belt Group, Belt Supergroup, MT and ID, USA with a focus on excellently preserved sedimentary rocks, but also including those altered by a variety of diagenetic, metamorphic, and metasomatic events. Results show that even in the best-preserved parts of the Belt Basin, late diagenetic and/or metasomatic fluids affected (in some cases very mildly) the primary iron phases as evidenced by prevalent post-depositional alterations such as rare base metal sulfides. In more heavily altered rocks, the appearance of pyrrhotite and other minerals signaled transformations in iron mineralogy through metamorphism and metasomatism. Despite these secondary phases crystallizing in an open fluid-rich system, primary records of redox chemistry were preserved in the recrystallized early diagenetic framboidal pyrite and (sub)micron-sized detrital magnetite grains. Detrital magnetite is not the most abundant iron-bearing phase in any of the samples (typically <0.01 wt%), but is widely observed in both proximal and deeper basin facies, illustrating an important detrital flux of iron to the basin and a highly reactive iron source for early diagenetic pyrite. Based on our analyses, we interpret the shallow waters of the Belt Basin to be oxic with sulfidic pore fluids and deeper waters in parts of the basin as likely euxinic, consistent with the results of some bulk geochemical proxies. This redox reconstruction also

  4. Segmental extracellular and intracellular water distribution and muscle glycogen after 72-h carbohydrate loading using spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Shiose, Keisuke; Yamada, Yosuke; Motonaga, Keiko; Sagayama, Hiroyuki; Higaki, Yasuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2016-07-01

    Body water content increases during carbohydrate loading because 2.7-4-g water binds each 1 g of glycogen. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) allows separate assessment of extracellular and intracellular water (ECW and ICW, respectively) in the whole body and each body segment. However, BIS has not been shown to detect changes in body water induced by carbohydrate loading. Here, we aimed to investigate whether BIS had sufficient sensitivity to detect changes in body water content and to determine segmental water distribution after carbohydrate loading. Eight subjects consumed a high-carbohydrate diet containing 12 g carbohydrates·kg body mass(-1)·day(-1) for 72 h after glycogen depletion cycling exercise. Changes in muscle glycogen concentration were measured by (13)C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and total body water (TBW) was measured by the deuterium dilution technique (TBWD2O). ICW and ECW in the whole body (wrist-to-ankle) and in each body segment (arm, trunk, and leg) were assessed by BIS. Muscle glycogen concentration [72.7 ± 10.0 (SD) to 169.4 ± 55.9 mmol/kg wet wt, P < 0.001] and TBWD2O (39.3 ± 3.2 to 40.2 ± 3.0 kg, P < 0.05) increased significantly 72 h after exercise compared with baseline, respectively. Whole-body BIS showed significant increases in ICW (P < 0.05), but not in ECW. Segmental BIS showed significant increases in ICW in the legs (P < 0.05), but not in the arms or trunk. Our results suggest that increase in body water after carbohydrate loading can be detected by BIS and is caused by segment-specific increases in ICW. PMID:27231310

  5. Use of spectroscopic and imaging techniques to evaluate pretreated sugarcane bagasse as a substrate for cellulase production under solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Zúñiga, Ursula Fabiola; Bertucci Neto, Victor; Couri, Sonia; Crestana, Silvio; Farinas, Cristiane Sanchez

    2014-03-01

    The enzymatic cocktail of cellulases is one of the most costly inputs affecting the economic viability of the biochemical route for biomass conversion into biofuels and other chemicals. Here, the influence of liquid hot water, dilute acid, alkali, and combined acid/alkali pretreatments on sugarcane bagasse (SCB) used for cellulase production was investigated by means of spectroscopic and imaging techniques. Chemical composition and structural characteristics, such as crystallinity (determined by X-ray diffraction), functional groups (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), and microstructure (scanning electron microscopy), were used to correlate SCB pretreatments with enzymatic biosynthesis by a strain of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger under solid-state fermentation. The combined acid/alkali pretreatment resulted in a SCB with higher cellulose content (86.7%). However, the high crystallinity (74%) of the resulting biomass was detrimental to microbial uptake and enzyme production. SCB pretreated with liquid hot water yielded the highest filter paper cellulase (FPase), carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase), and xylanase activities (0.4, 14.9, and 26.1 U g(-1), respectively). The results showed that a suitable pretreatment for SCB to be used as a substrate for cellulase production should avoid severe conditions in order to preserve amorphous cellulose and to enhance the physical properties that assist microbial access. PMID:24363237

  6. Structure and spectroscopic analysis of the graphene monolayer film directly grown on the quartz substrate via the HF-CVD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Waleed E.; Al-Hazmi, Farag S.; Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; Shokr, F. S.; Beall, Gary W.; Bronstein, Lyudmila M.

    2016-08-01

    Direct growth of a monolayer graphene film on a quartz substrate by a hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique is reported. The monolayer graphene film prepared was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The optical properties were studied by spectroscopic elliposmetry. The experimental data were fitted by the Forouhi-Bloomer model to estimate the extinction coefficient and the refractive index of the monolayer graphene film. The refractive index spectrum in the visible region was studied based on the harmonic oscillator model. The lattice dielectric constant, real and imaginary dielectric constants and the ratio of the charge carrier number to the effective mass were determined. The surface and volume energy loss parameters were also found and showed that the value of the surface energy loss is greater than the volume energy loss. The determination of these optical constants will open new avenue for novel applications of graphene films in the field of wave plates, light modulators, ultrahigh-frequency signal processing and LCDs.

  7. Studies on the interaction between promethazine and human serum albumin in the presence of flavonoids by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    He, Ling-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wang, Yong-Xia; Liu, Xian-Ping; Yang, Yan-Jie; Gao, Yan-Ping; Wang, Xin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence, absorption, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques as well as molecular modeling methods were used to study the binding characterization of promethazine (PMT) to human serum albumin (HSA) and the influence of flavonoids, rutin and baicalin, on their affinity. The results indicated that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of HSA by PMT is a static quenching due to the formation of complex. The reaction was spontaneous and mainly mediated by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The binding distance between the tryptophan residue of HSA and PMT is less than 8nm, which indicated that the energy transfer from the tryptophan residue of HSA to PMT occurred. The binding site of PMT on HSA was located in sites I and the presence of PMT can cause the conformational changes of HSA. There was the competitive binding to HSA between PMT and flavonoids because of the overlap of binding sites in HSA. The flavonoids could decrease the association constant and increase the binding distance. In addition, their synergistic effect can further change the conformation of HSA. The decrease in the affinities of PMT binding to HSA in the presence of flavonoids may lead to the increase of free drug in blood, which would affect the transportation or disposition of drug and evoke an adverse or toxic effect. Hence, rationalising dosage and diet regimens should be taken into account in clinical application of PMT. PMID:27315330

  8. Spectroscopic Evidence for Strong Quantum Spin Fluctuations with Itinerant Character in YFe2Ge2

    SciTech Connect

    Sirica, N.; Bondino, F.; Nappini, S.; Piz, I.; Poudel, L.; Christianson, Andrew D.; Mandrus, D.; Singh, David J; Mannella, Norman

    2015-03-04

    We report x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy of the electronic structure in the normal state of metallic YFe2Ge2. The data reveal evidence for large fluctuating spin moments on the Fe sites, as indicated by exchange multiplets appearing in the Fe 3s core-level photoemission spectra, even though the compound does not show magnetic order. The magnitude of the multiplet splitting is comparable to that observed in the normal state of the Fe-pnictide superconductors. This shows a connection between YFe2Ge2 and the Fe-based superconductors even though it contains neither pnictogens nor chalcogens. Finally, the implication is that the chemical range of compounds showing at least one of the characteristic magnetic signatures of the Fe-based superconductors is broader than previously thought.

  9. Integrated approaches of x-ray absorption spectroscopic and electron microscopic techniques on zinc speciation and characterization in a final sewage sludge product.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bojeong; Levard, Clément; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Brown, Gordon E; Hochella, Michael F

    2014-05-01

    Integration of complementary techniques can be powerful for the investigation of metal speciation and characterization in complex and heterogeneous environmental samples, such as sewage sludge products. In the present study, we combined analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-based techniques with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify and characterize nanocrystalline zinc sulfide (ZnS), considered to be the dominant Zn-containing phase in the final stage of sewage sludge material of a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant. We also developed sample preparation procedures to preserve the organic and sulfur-rich nature of sewage sludge matrices for microscopic and spectroscopic analyses. Analytical TEM results indicate individual ZnS nanocrystals to be in the size range of 2.5 to 7.5 nm in diameter, forming aggregates of a few hundred nanometers. Observed lattice spacings match sphalerite. The ratio of S to Zn for the ZnS nanocrystals is estimated to be 1.4, suggesting that S is present in excess. The XAS results on the Zn speciation in the bulk sludge material also support the TEM observation that approximately 80% of the total Zn has the local structure of a 3-nm ZnS nanoparticle reference material. Because sewage sludge is frequently used as a soil amendment on agricultural lands, future studies that investigate the oxidative dissolution rate of ZnS nanoparticles as a function of size and aggregation state and the change of Zn speciation during post sludge-processing and soil residency are warranted to help determine the bioavailability of sludge-born Zn in the soil environment. PMID:25602819

  10. Orbital lesions: proton spectroscopic phase-dependent contrast MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Atlas, S W; Grossman, R I; Axel, L; Hackney, D B; Bilaniuk, L T; Goldberg, H I; Zimmerman, R A

    1987-08-01

    Thirteen orbital lesions in 12 patients were evaluated with both conventional spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and phase-dependent proton spectroscopic imaging. This technique, which makes use of small differences in the resonant frequencies of water and fat protons, provides excellent high-resolution images with simultaneous chemical shift information. In this method, there is 180 degrees opposition of phase between fat protons and water protons at the time of the gradient echo, resulting in signal cancellation in voxels containing equal signals from fat and water. In this preliminary series, advantages of spectroscopic images in orbital lesions included better lesion delineation, with superior anatomic definition of orbital apex involvement; more specific characterization of high-intensity hemorrhage with a single pulse sequence; elimination of potential confusion from chemical shift misregistration artifact; further clarification of possible intravascular flow abnormalities; and improved apparent intralesional contrast. PMID:3602394

  11. J-Modulation in ID NMR 1H Spectrum of Taurine and Aspartate Using Spin-Echo Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oturak, Halil; Sağlam, Adnan; Bahçeli, Semiha

    1999-05-01

    This study reports on a theoretical calculation of Hahn's spin-echo experiment in case of a model A2B2 spin system with a strongly coupling character and gives the experimental results of one-dimension 1H high-resolution NMR spectra of taurine and aspartate. The calculated amplitudes of the spin-echoes for two different proton groups of taurine are given. Using results of our calculations for taurine, the computer simulations of J-modulation are implemented. It is shown that the agreement be-tween the experimental and simulated spectra is good.

  12. Mass and Spin Measurement Techniques (for the Large Hadron Collider):. Lectures Given at TASI 2011, Boulder, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Christopher G.

    2013-12-01

    For TASI 2011, I was asked to give a series of lectures on "Mass and Spin Measurement Techniques" with relevance to the Large Hadron Collider. This document provides a written record of those lectures - or more precisely of what I said while giving the lectures - warts and all. It is provided as my contribution to the proceedings primarily for the benefit of those who heard the lectures first hand and may wish to refer back to them. What it is not is a scientific paper or a teaching resource. Though lecture slides may be prepared in advance, what is actually said in a lecture is usually extemporaneous, may be partial, can be influenced by audience reaction, and may not even make sense without a visual record of the concomitant gesticulations of the lecturer. More worryingly, some of the statements made may be down-right false, if the lecturer's tongue is in a twist. Accordingly, these proceedings are provided without warranty of any kind - not least in respect of accuracy or impartiality. The lectures were intended to engage the audience and get them thinking about a number of topics that they had not seen before. They were not expected to be the sort of sombre or well-balanced overview of the field that one might hope to achive in a review. These proceedings are provided to jog the memory of those who saw the lectures first hand, and for little other purpose. Footnotes, where they appear, indicate text/thoughts I have added during the editing process that were not voiced during the lectures themselves. Copies of the lecture slides are inserted at approximately the locations they would have become visible in the lectures.

  13. Spectroscopic Evidence for a High-Spin Br-Fe(IV)-Oxo Intermediate in the -Ketoglutarate-Dependent Halogenase CyTc3 From Streptomyces

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimori, D.Galonic; Barr, E.W.; Matthews, M.L.; Koch, G.M.; Yonce, J.R.; Walsh, C.T.; Bollinger, J.M., Jr.; Krebs, C.; Riggs-Gelasco, P.J.

    2009-06-01

    The complex of the mononuclear non-heme halogenase CytC3 from Streptomyces, Fe(II), {alpha}-ketoglutarate, bromide, and the substrate l-2-aminobutyryl-S-CytC2 reacts with O{sub 2} to form a reaction intermediate. Variable-field, freeze-quench Moessbauer spectroscopy reveals this intermediate to be a mixture of two high-spin Fe(IV) complexes in an approximate 3.7/1 ratio. Freeze-quench Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy provides further insight into the structure of this intermediate. A short 1.62-{angstrom} interaction between the Fe and one of its ligands is attributed to the Fe(IV)-oxo group, and a 2.43-{angstrom} interaction is assigned to the Fe-Br interaction. A significantly longer Fe-Br separation (2.53 {angstrom}) is observed in the reactant complex, consistent with lower valency of the Fe in the reactant complex. This intermediate is the first example for a Br-Fe(IV)-oxo complex in a protein and provides evidence for a unifying mechanism for Fe(II) and {alpha}-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases and halogenases.

  14. Spectroscopic Evidence for a High-Spin Br-Fe(IV)-Oxo Intermediate in the alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Halogenase CytC3 from Streptomyces

    SciTech Connect

    Galonic Fujimori,D.; Barr, E.; Matthews, M.; Koch, G.; Yonce, J.; Walsh, C.; Bollinger, J.; Krebs, C.; Riggs-Gelasco, P.

    2007-01-01

    The complex of the mononuclear non-heme halogenase CytC3 from Streptomyces, Fe(II), {alpha}-ketoglutarate, bromide, and the substrate l-2-aminobutyryl-S-CytC2 reacts with O2 to form a reaction intermediate. Variable-field, freeze-quench Mossbauer spectroscopy reveals this intermediate to be a mixture of two high-spin Fe(IV) complexes in an approximate 3.7/1 ratio. Freeze-quench Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy provides further insight into the structure of this intermediate. A short 1.62-Angstroms interaction between the Fe and one of its ligands is attributed to the Fe(IV)-oxo group, and a 2.43-Angstroms interaction is assigned to the Fe-Br interaction. A significantly longer Fe-Br separation (2.53 Angstroms) is observed in the reactant complex, consistent with lower valency of the Fe in the reactant complex. This intermediate is the first example for a Br-Fe(IV)-oxo complex in a protein and provides evidence for a unifying mechanism for Fe(II) and {alpha}-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases and halogenases.

  15. The interaction of fructose-1,6-biphosphate aldolase with liposome membranes: a spin probe technique study.

    PubMed

    Komorowska, M; Langner, M; Gomułkiewicz, J

    1989-12-01

    Thermotropic properties of liposome membranes prepared of bulk bovine erythrocyte membrane lipids, native, or aldolase-modified, were investigated by the ESR method. Breaks were observed in the log 2T parallel vs 1/T plots for two spin labels: tempopalmitate and 5-doxyl-palmitate methyl ester. These phenomena have been interpreted as reflecting structural changes near the lipid bilayer polar heads region. Upon modification with aldolase, the temperature at which the breaks occurred was decreased for both spin probes. PMID:2558946

  16. Comparison of Y2O3:Bi3+ phosphor thin films fabricated by the spin coating and radio frequency magnetron techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafer, R. M.; Yousif, A.; Kumar, Vinod; Pathak, Trilok Kumar; Purohit, L. P.; Swart, H. C.; Coetsee, E.

    2016-09-01

    The reactive radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering and spin coating fabrication techniques were used to fabricate Y2-xO3:Bix=0.5% phosphor thin films. The two techniques were analysed and compared as part of investigations being done on the application of down-conversion materials for a Si solar cell. The morphology, structural and optical properties of these thin films were investigated. The X-ray diffraction results of the thin films fabricated by both techniques showed cubic structures with different space groups. The optical properties showed different results because the Bi3+ ion is very sensitive towards its environment. The luminescence results for the thin film fabricated by the spin coating technique is very similar to the luminescence observed in the powder form. It showed three obvious emission bands in the blue and green regions centered at about 360, 410 and 495 nm. These emissions were related to the 3P1-1S0 transition of the Bi3+ ion situated in the two different sites of the Y2O3 matrix with I a-3(206) space group. Whereas the thin film fabricated by the radio frequency magnetron technique showed a broad single emission band in the blue region centered at about 416 nm. This was assigned to the 3P1-1S0 transition of the Bi3+ ion situated in one of the Y2O3 matrix's sites with a Fm-3 (225) space group. The spin coating fabrication technique is suggested to be the best technique to fabricate the Y2O3:Bi3+ phosphor thin films.

  17. High-resolution aluminum-27 solid-state magic-angle sample-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of AlCl sub 3 -tetrahydrofuran complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Oc Hee; Oldfield, E. )

    1990-09-19

    The authors have obtained {sup 27}Al solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of several AlCl{sub 3}-THF complexes, using magic-angle sample-spinning (MASS) NMR at high field. The authors results suggest that the isotropic chemical shifts ({delta}{sub i}) occur in relatively well defined regions for 4-, 5-, and 6-coordinate species (AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, {approximately} 103 ppm; AlCl{sub 3}{center dot}THF, {approximately} 99 ppm; trans-AlCl{sub 3}{center dot}2THF, {approximately} 60 ppM; trans-(AlCl{sub 2}(THF){sub 4}){sup +}, {approximately} 14 ppM), as found previously with aluminum oxo compounds. They also find that theoretically calculated average nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (e{sup 2}qQ/h) (trans-(AlCl{sub 2}(THF){sub 4}){sup +}, {approximately} 6.3 MHz; trans-AlCl{sub 3}{center dot}2THF, {approximately} 4.6 MHz; AlCl{sub 3}{center dot}THF, {approximately} 3.0 MHz; AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, 0 MHz) are in good accord with experimentally determined nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, determined from computer simulations of the MASS NMR spectra (trans-(AlCl{sub 2}(THF){sub 4}){sup +}, 6.4 MHz; trans-AlCl{sub 3}{center dot}2THF, 4.9 MHz; AlCl{sub 3}{center dot}THF, 4.7 MHz; AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, 0.3 MHz). Both {sup 27}Al {delta}{sub i} and e{sup 2}qQ/h determinations appear to be useful as probes of structure in these systems, and thus offer a facile means of monitoring various solid-state reactions. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  19. Spectroscopic ellipsometry of Zn(1-x)Cu(x)O thin films based on a modified sol-gel dip-coating technique.

    PubMed

    Al-Khanbashi, Hibah A; Shirbeeny, W; Al-Ghamdi, A A; Bronstein, Lyudmila M; Mahmoud, Waleed E

    2014-01-24

    Nanocrystalline Zn(1-x)Cu(x)O thin films (x=0, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05) were synthesized by sol-gel dip-coating technique on a quartz substrate. These films were annealed at 350°C for 2 h. The X-ray diffraction showed a hexagonal crystal structure with high intensity peak for the (002) reflection plane indicating preferential growth along the c-axis of the crystal lattice. The peak position related to the (002) peak was shifted as a result of the copper ion incorporation, confirming the interstitial substitution of the zinc ions by the copper ions. This interstitial substitution leads to a decrease of an average crystallite size and lattice constants and an increase of the micro-strain up to 2 at.% of the copper amount. The surface morphology was explored by scanning electron microscopy which confirmed the homogenous distribution of nanoparticles in the deposited films along the quartz substrates. The energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy revealed absence of impurities in the as-deposited films. The high resolution electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction depicted that the films have polycrystalline nature. The film thickness and optical constants of the Zn(1-x)Cu(x)O thin films were estimated by fitting the spectroscopic ellipsometric data (ψ and Δ) using three different models. The refractive index was fitted using harmonic oscillator model from which the oscillator and the dispersive energies were found. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss, energy loss functions were also determined. PMID:24157332

  20. (1)H NMR spectroscopic elucidation in solution of the kinetics and thermodynamics of spin crossover for an exceptionally robust Fe(2+) complex.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Holm; Djomgoue, Paul; Hörner, Gerald; Speck, J Matthäus; Rüffer, Tobias; Schaarschmidt, Dieter

    2016-09-21

    A series of Fe(2+) spin crossover (SCO) complexes [Fe(5/6)](2+) employing hexadentate ligands (5/6) with cis/trans-1,2-diamino cyclohexanes (4) as central building blocks were synthesised. The ligands were obtained by reductive amination of 4 with 2,2'-bipyridyl-6-carbaldehyde or 1,10-phenanthroline-2-carbaldehyde 3. The chelating effect and the rigid structure of the ligands 5/6 lead to exceptionally robust Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) complexes conserving their structure even in coordinating solvents like dmso at high temperatures. Their solution behavior was investigated using variable temperature (VT) (1)H NMR spectroscopy and VT Vis spectroscopy. SCO behavior was found for all Fe(2+) complexes in this series centred around and far above room temperature. For the first time we have demonstrated that the thermodynamics as well as kinetics for SCO can be deduced by using VT (1)H NMR spectroscopy. An alternative scheme using a linear correction term C(1) to model chemical shifts for Fe(2+) SCO complexes is presented. The rate constant for the SCO of [Fe(rac-trans-5)](2+) obtained by VT (1)H NMR was validated by Laser Flash Photolysis (LFP), with excellent agreement (1/(kHL + kLH) = 33.7/35.8 ns for NMR/LFP). The solvent dependence of the transition temperature T1/2 and the solvatochromism of complex [Fe(rac-trans-5)](2+) were ascribed to hydrogen bond formation of the secondary amine to the solvent. Enantiomerically pure complexes can be prepared starting with R,R- or S,S-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (R,R-trans-4 or S,S-trans-4). The high robustness of the complexes reduces a possible ligand scrambling and allows preparation of quasiracemic crystals of [Zn(R,R-5)][Fe(S,S-5)](ClO4)4·(CH3CN) composed of a 1 : 1 mixture of the Zn and Fe complexes with inverse chirality. PMID:27506162

  1. Spectroscopic Evidence for Covalent Binding of Sulfadiazine to Natural Soils via 1,4-nucleophilic addition (Michael Type Addition) studied by Spin Labeling ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Among different classes of veterinary pharmaceuticals, Sulfadiazine (SDZ) is widely used in animal husbandry. Its residues were detected in different environmental compartments. However, soil is a hot spot for SDZ as it receives a large portion of excreted compounds through the application of manure during soil fertilization. Ample studies on the fate of SDZ in soils showed that a large portion forms nonextractable residues (NER) along with transformation products and a low mineralization (Mueller et al., 2013). A common observation was an initially fast formation of NER up to 10% of the applied amount promptly after the application of SDZ to soil, and this portion increased up to 50% within a few days (Mueller et al., 2013; Nowak et al., 2011). A common finding for SDZ, as for other sulfonamides, was biphasic kinetics of the formation of NER, which was attributed to the occurrence of two reaction processes: a rapid, often reversible process and a slower, irreversible process (Weber et al., 1996). A single-phase reaction process was also established under anaerobic treatment (Gulkowska et al., 2014). A major focus of this work is to elucidate a reaction mechanism of covalent binding of SDZ to soil that is currently required to estimate a risk of NER formed by SDZ in soils for human health. Taking into account a key role of the amine functional groups of SDZ on its reactivity in soil, nitroxide radicals with the sewed aromatic or aliphatic amines labeled soil samples and then, were investigated by means of ESR spectroscopy. 2,5,5-Trimethyl-2-(3-aminophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yloxy and 4-amino-2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl modeled decomposition products of SDZ with the aromatic and aliphatic amines, respectively. The application of the defined combination of both spin labels (SL) to different soils well simulated a change of a paramagnetic signal of soil organic radicals interacted with SDZ. After their application to soil, SL were found in soil sites characterized

  2. Spectroscopic Evidence for Covalent Binding of Sulfadiazine to Natural Soils via 1,4-nucleophilic addition (Michael Type Addition) studied by Spin Labeling ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Among different classes of veterinary pharmaceuticals, Sulfadiazine (SDZ) is widely used in animal husbandry. Its residues were detected in different environmental compartments. However, soil is a hot spot for SDZ as it receives a large portion of excreted compounds through the application of manure during soil fertilization. Ample studies on the fate of SDZ in soils showed that a large portion forms nonextractable residues (NER) along with transformation products and a low mineralization (Mueller et al., 2013). A common observation was an initially fast formation of NER up to 10% of the applied amount promptly after the application of SDZ to soil, and this portion increased up to 50% within a few days (Mueller et al., 2013; Nowak et al., 2011). A common finding for SDZ, as for other sulfonamides, was biphasic kinetics of the formation of NER, which was attributed to the occurrence of two reaction processes: a rapid, often reversible process and a slower, irreversible process (Weber et al., 1996). A single-phase reaction process was also established under anaerobic treatment (Gulkowska et al., 2014). A major focus of this work is to elucidate a reaction mechanism of covalent binding of SDZ to soil that is currently required to estimate a risk of NER formed by SDZ in soils for human health. Taking into account a key role of the amine functional groups of SDZ on its reactivity in soil, nitroxide radicals with the sewed aromatic or aliphatic amines labeled soil samples and then, were investigated by means of ESR spectroscopy. 2,5,5-Trimethyl-2-(3-aminophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yloxy and 4-amino-2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl modeled decomposition products of SDZ with the aromatic and aliphatic amines, respectively. The application of the defined combination of both spin labels (SL) to different soils well simulated a change of a paramagnetic signal of soil organic radicals interacted with SDZ. After their application to soil, SL were found in soil sites characterized

  3. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy: A Versatile Technique for Structural and Dynamic Analysis of Solid-Phase Systems

    PubMed Central

    Polenova, Tatyana; Gupta, Rupal; Goldbourt, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analysis of a broad range of systems, including inorganic materials, pharmaceuticals, and biomacromolecules. The recent developments in MAS NMR instrumentation and methodologies opened new vistas to atomic-level characterization of a plethora of chemical environments previously inaccessible to analysis, with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. PMID:25794311

  4. An in-line micro-pyrolysis system to remove contaminating organic species for precise and accurate water isotope analysis by spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, R. J.; Hsiao, G.

    2011-12-01

    Trace levels of organic contaminants such as short alcohols and terpenoids have been shown to cause spectral interference in water isotope analysis by spectroscopic techniques. The result is degraded precision and accuracy in both δD and δ18O for samples such as beverages, plant extracts or slightly contaminated waters. An initial approach offered by manufacturers is post-processing software that analyzes spectral features to identify and flag contaminated samples. However, it is impossible for this software to accurately reconstruct the water isotope signature, thus it is primarily a metric for data quality. Here, we describe a novel in-line pyrolysis system (Micro-Pyrolysis Technology, MPT) placed just prior to the inlet of a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer that effectively removes interfering organic molecules without altering the isotope values of the water. Following injection of the water sample, N2 carrier gas passes the sample through a micro-pyrolysis tube heated with multiple high temperature elements in an oxygen-free environment. The temperature is maintained above the thermal decomposition threshold of most organic compounds (≤ 900 oC), but well below that of water (~2000 oC). The main products of the pyrolysis reaction are non-interfering species such as elemental carbon and H2 gas. To test the efficacy and applicability of the system, waters of known isotopic composition were spiked with varying amounts of common interfering alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, hexanol, trans-2-hexenol, cis-3-hexanol up to 5 % v/v) and common soluble plant terpenoids (carveol, linalool, geraniol, prenol). Spiked samples with no treatment to remove the organics show strong interfering absorption peaks that adversely affect the δD and δ18O values. However, with the MPT in place, all interfering absorption peaks are removed and the water absorption spectrum is fully restored. As a consequence, the δD and δ18O values also return to their original

  5. Oxygen vacancies induced Spin polarized current in Co-doped ZnO by Andreev reflection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kung-Shang; Chou, Hsiung; Chan, Wen Ling; Chen, Bo-Yu; Shang-Fan Lee Collaboration

    Dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMO) is a semiconducting system with spin-polarized carriers and magnetic properties. However, since most studies had been focused on existence of FM, the proportion of spin-polarized current (SPC) in DMO is far from being determined. We used Point-contact Andreev reflection measurements on various Zn0.95Co0.05O thin films, with controlled oxygen vacancies by sputtering in various H2 partial pressure with Ar atmosphere. We found that conductance versus voltage (G-V) spectra suppresses as oxygen vacancy concentration increases. It indicates oxygen vacancies play significant role in inducing the SPC. To understand the origin of spin polarized current at the interface of the superconducting tip/CZO system, we use modified Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (MBTK) model in ballistic and diffusive regime to interpret GV curve. The extracted SPC value were up to 70% in ballistic regime and 65% in diffusive regime. The results suggest tiny routes have been formed by oxygen vacancies which are extended throughout the whole films. This result confirmed that MBTK model in ballistic regime is more suitable for our GV spectra and this explains the observation of such a high SPC Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica Taiwan.

  6. Vessel-selective, non-contrast enhanced, time-resolved MR angiography with vessel-selective arterial spin labeling technique (CINEMA-SELECT) in intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masanobu; Yoneyama, Masami; Tabuchi, Takashi; Takemura, Atsushi; Obara, Makoto; Tatsuno, Satoshi; Sawano, Seishi

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the vessel-selective, non-contrast, time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) technique, "contrast inherent inflow enhanced multi-phase angiography combining vessel-selective arterial spin labeling technique (CINEMA-SELECT)". This sequence consists of two major techniques: pulsed star labeling of arterial regions (PULSAR) and Look-Locker sampling. We hypothesize that this technique allows selective labeling of single intracranial arteries, consisting of high-resolution four-dimensional data with a wide coverage of the brain. In this study, a new vessel-selective, time-resolved angiographic technique is demonstrated that can produce individual angiograms non-invasively by labeling the principal arterial vessels proximal to the circle of Willis. Clear vessel delineation is achieved, and the separation of the three vessels is evident in healthy volunteers. This technique could play an important role in the assessment of the structure and hemodynamics of intracranial arteries without the use of contrast agents. PMID:23475783

  7. The porous nature of ZnO thin films deposited by sol-gel Spin-Coating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyaoui, M.; Ben Jaballah, A.; Mechiak, R.; Chtourou, R.

    2012-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were deposited on silicon and quartz substrates, by sol-gel method, using zinc acetate dehydrate [Zn(CH3COO)2.2H2O] dissolved in isopropanol and glycerol. The structural, morphologic and optical properties of ZnO thin films subsequently annealed at 700°C in air for 30 min have leads to a porous nature of these films. To calculate, the refraction index and the extinction coefficient values, Cauchy formalism is used to evaluate the Spectroscopic Ellipsometry results. Two distinct configurations were proposed for each sample: in the first, the film is considered as mixture of randomly distributed voids and ZnO crystallites while in the second, the effect of porosity gradient is highlighted. This optical analysis gives a better agreement between experiment and theory for a wide range of wavelengths regarding the second configuration.

  8. Kinetic effects on double hysteresis in spin crossover molecular magnets analyzed with first order reversal curve diagram technique

    SciTech Connect

    Stan, Raluca-Maria; Gaina, Roxana; Enachescu, Cristian E-mail: radu.tanasa@uaic.ro; Stancu, Alexandru; Tanasa, Radu E-mail: radu.tanasa@uaic.ro; Bronisz, Robert

    2015-05-07

    In this paper, we analyze two types of hysteresis in spin crossover molecular magnets compounds in the framework of the First Order Reversal Curve (FORC) method. The switching between the two stable states in these compounds is accompanied by hysteresis phenomena if the intermolecular interactions are higher than a threshold. We have measured the static thermal hysteresis (TH) and the kinetic light induced thermal hysteresis (LITH) major loops and FORCs for the polycrystalline Fe(II) spin crossover compound [Fe{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}(bbtr){sub 3}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} (bbtr = 1,4-di(1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)butane), either in a pure state (x = 0) or doped with Zn ions (x = 0.33) considering different sweeping rates. Here, we use this method not only to infer the domains distribution but also to disentangle between kinetic and static components of the LITH and to estimate the changes in the intermolecular interactions introduced by dopants. We also determined the qualitative relationship between FORC distributions measured for TH and LITH.

  9. Spectroscopically Unlocking Exoplanet Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole

    2016-05-01

    Spectroscopy plays a critical role in a number of areas of exoplanet research. The first exoplanets were detected by precisely measuring Doppler shifts in high resolution (R ~ 100,000) stellar spectra, a technique that has become known as the Radial Velocity (RV) method. The RV method provides critical constraints on exoplanet masses, but is currently limited to some degree by robust line shape predictions. Beyond the RV method, spectroscopy plays a critical role in the characterization of exoplanets beyond their mass and radius. The Hubble Space Telescope has spectroscopically observed the atmospheres of exoplanets that transit their host stars as seen from Earth giving us key insights into atmospheric abundances of key atomic and molecular species as well as cloud optical properties. Similar spectroscopic characterization of exoplanet atmospheres will be carried out at higher resolution (R ~ 100-3000) and with broader wavelength coverage with the James Webb Space Telescope. Future missions such as WFIRST that seek to the pave the way toward the detection and characterization of potentially habitable planets will have the capability of directly measuring the spectra of exoplanet atmospheres and potentially surfaces. Our ability to plan for and interpret spectra from exoplanets relies heavily on the fidelity of the spectroscopic databases available and would greatly benefit from further laboratory and theoretical work aimed at optical properties of atomic, molecular, and cloud/haze species in the pressure and temperature regimes relevant to exoplanet atmospheres.

  10. Spin Transport in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2008-03-01

    Silicon has been broadly viewed as the ideal material for spintronics due to its low atomic weight, lattice inversion symmetry, and near lack of nuclear spin, resulting in exceptionally long spin lifetime. Despite this appeal, however, the experimental difficulties of achieving coherent spin transport in silicon were overcome for the first time only recently, by using unique spin-polarized hot-electron injection and detection techniques. [1] Our subsequent observations of very long spin lifetimes and transit lengths [2] have impact on prospects for Silicon spintronics as the basis for a new paradigm of information processing. [1] Ian Appelbaum, Biqin Huang, and Douwe J. Monsma, ``Electronic measurement and control of spin transport in silicon,'' Nature 447, 295 (2007). [2] Biqin Huang, Douwe J. Monsma, and Ian Appelbaum, ``Coherent spin transport through a 350-micron-thick silicon wafer,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 177209 (2007).

  11. 3D fast spin echo with out-of-slab cancellation: a technique for high-resolution structural imaging of trabecular bone at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Magland, Jeremy F; Rajapakse, Chamith S; Wright, Alexander C; Acciavatti, Raymond; Wehrli, Felix W

    2010-03-01

    Spin-echo-based pulse sequences are desirable for the application of high-resolution imaging of trabecular bone but tend to involve high-power deposition. Increased availability of ultrahigh field scanners has opened new possibilities for imaging with increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency, but many pulse sequences that are standard at 1.5 and 3 T exceed specific absorption rate limits at 7 T. A modified, reduced specific absorption rate, three-dimensional, fast spin-echo pulse sequence optimized specifically for in vivo trabecular bone imaging at 7 T is introduced. The sequence involves a slab-selective excitation pulse, low-power nonselective refocusing pulses, and phase cycling to cancel undesired out-of-slab signal. In vivo images of the distal tibia were acquired using the technique at 1.5, 3, and 7 T field strengths, and SNR was found to increase at least linearly using receive coils of identical geometry. Signal dependence on the choice of refocusing flip angles in the echo train was analyzed experimentally and theoretically by combining the signal from hundreds of coherence pathways, and it is shown that a significant specific absorption rate reduction can be achieved with negligible SNR loss. PMID:20187181

  12. Effect of Fe incorporation on the optical behavior of ZnO thin films prepared by sol-gel derived spin coating techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakkesh, R. Ajay; Malathi, R.; Balakumar, S.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, Fe doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin films were fabricated on the glass substrate by sol-gel derived spin coating technique. X-ray Diffraction studies revealed that the obtained pure and Fe doped ZnO thin films were in the wurtzite and spinel phase respectively. The three well defined Raman lines at 432, 543 and 1091 cm-1 also confirmed the lattice structure of the ZnO thin film has wurtzite symmetry. While doping Fe atoms in the ZnO, there was a significant change in the phase from wurtzite to spinel structure; owing to Fe (III) ions being incorporated into the lattice through substitution of Zn (II) ions. Room temperature PL spectra showed that the role of defect mediated red emissions at 612 nm was due to radial recombination of a photogenerated hole with an electron that belongs to the Fe atoms, which were discussed in detail.

  13. Multidimensional MR spectroscopic imaging of prostate cancer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M Albert; Nagarajan, Rajakumar; Huda, Amir; Margolis, Daniel; Sarma, Manoj K; Sheng, Ke; Reiter, Robert E; Raman, Steven S

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common type of cancer among men in the United States. A major limitation in the management of PCa is an inability to distinguish, early on, cancers that will progress and become life threatening. One-dimensional (1D) proton ((1)H) MRS of the prostate provides metabolic information such as levels of choline (Ch), creatine (Cr), citrate (Cit), and spermine (Spm) that can be used to detect and diagnose PCa. Ex vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) of PCa specimens has revealed detection of more metabolites such as myo-inositol (mI), glutamate (Glu), and glutamine (Gln). Due to the J-modulation and signal overlap, it is difficult to quantitate Spm and other resonances in the prostate clearly by single- and multivoxel-based 1D MR spectroscopy. This limitation can be minimized by adding at least one more spectral dimension by which resonances can be spread apart, thereby increasing the spectral dispersion. However, recording of multivoxel-based two-dimensional (2D) MRS such as J-resolved spectroscopy (JPRESS) and correlated spectroscopy (L-COSY) combined with 2D or three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) using conventional phase-encoding can be prohibitively long to be included in a clinical protocol. To reduce the long acquisition time required for spatial encoding, the echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) technique has been combined with correlated spectroscopy to give four-dimensional (4D) echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging (EP-COSI) as well as J-resolved spectroscopic imaging (EP-JRESI) and the multi-echo (ME) variants. Further acceleration can be achieved using non-uniform undersampling (NUS) and reconstruction using compressed sensing (CS). Earlier versions of 2D MRS, theory of 2D MRS, spectral apodization filters, newer developments and the potential role of multidimensional MRS in PCa detection and management will be reviewed here. PMID:23904127

  14. Spectroscopic characterization of polymers: report

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.L.

    1987-10-01

    Polymer characterization has presented major difficulties to the analytical chemist, who has had to develop techniques to cope with the challenge. Even the elementary problem of measuring molecular weight is not easy. Yet such measurements are essential, because the physical, mechanical, and flow properties depend on the length of the polymer chain. Because of the limited solubility and high viscosity of polymers, many classical techniques have been of little use or have had to be extensively modified to measure the molecular weight of polymers. Size-exclusion chromatographic techniques such as gel permeation have been developed to measure these molecular weight distributions. Special chromatographic instruments with a range of spectroscopic detectors (including infrared and laser-light scattering) have emerged commercially to aid the analytical chemist in the fundamental endeavor to measure the length of the polymer chain and its distribution. The author describes the advantages and disadvantages and disadvantages of various spectroscopic techniques.

  15. Optical spectroscopic instrumentation and techniques for the 1990s - Applications in astronomy, chemistry, and physics; Proceedings of the Meeting, Las Cruces, NM, June 4-6, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Mcnamara, B.J.; Lerner, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Fiber spectroscopy and a new generation of large ground-based telescopes are addressed, adaptive imaging spectrometers in astronomy are discussed along with two-dimensional spectroscopy with a universal birefringent filter and a Fabry-Perot interferometer, resonance-ionization mass spectrometry for material analysis and characterization, and time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and the measurement of vibrational spectra in shock-compressed molecular materials. Present and future roles of high-performance charge-transfer-device detectors in spectrochemical analysis are outlined as well as recent developments in near-infrared Hadamard transform Raman spectroscopy and special heterodyne spectroscopy. Influence of the laser characteristics on laser-sampling inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, high-precision measurements of stellar radial velocity variations, and the on-line spectroscopic monitoring of metal ions for environmental and space applications using photodiode-array spectroscopy are covered.

  16. Optical spectroscopic instrumentation and techniques for the 1990s - Applications in astronomy, chemistry, and physics; Proceedings of the Meeting, Las Cruces, NM, June 4-6, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Bernard J.; Lerner, Jeremy M.

    Fiber spectroscopy and a new generation of large ground-based telescopes are addressed, adaptive imaging spectrometers in astronomy are discussed along with two-dimensional spectroscopy with a universal birefringent filter and a Fabry-Perot interferometer, resonance-ionization mass spectrometry for material analysis and characterization, and time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and the measurement of vibrational spectra in shock-compressed molecular materials. Present and future roles of high-performance charge-transfer-device detectors in spectrochemical analysis are outlined as well as recent developments in near-infrared Hadamard transform Raman spectroscopy and special heterodyne spectroscopy. Influence of the laser characteristics on laser-sampling inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, high-precision measurements of stellar radial velocity variations, and the on-line spectroscopic monitoring of metal ions for environmental and space applications using photodiode-array spectroscopy are covered.

  17. The application of thermodynamic and spectroscopic techniques to adhesion in the polyimide/Ti 6-4 and polyphenylquinoxaline/Ti 6-4 systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, S.; Wightman, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of calorimetric measurements of Ti adherend surfaces are presented. The measurements were carried out after several chemical pretreatments and after fracture of several lap shear samples aged at high temperature. The exact composition of the Ti samples was Ti(6 percent Al-4 percent V). The adhesives used were polyimides and polyphenylquinoxalines (PPQ). Each chemical pretreatment was accompanied by a unique spectroscopic feature which was characterized by XPS, SEM, and specular reflectance infrared spectroscopy. The energetics of the interaction between primer solutions and the Ti adherend were evaluated by microcalorimetry. Changes in the structure of the surface oxide layer upon heating of the adherend were deduced from immersion temperatures of the PI and PPQ solutions. The XPS and SEM data are given is a table.

  18. A new technique of depositing phospholipid bilayers on quartz surfaces: its use in membrane spin-label studies.

    PubMed

    Kawano, I; Floyd, R A; Sridhar, R

    1981-03-01

    We have developed a new improved technique termed the parallel-beam spattering (PBS) method for depositing phospholipid bilayers on quartz surfaces. This technique involves atomizing the phospholipid mixture with a stream of nitrogen gas and passing this atomized mixture through two orifices separated by a distance to achieve a parallel beam of atomized particles before deposition on the quartz plate. A static electric field can easily be applied to the quartz surface. Also a goniometer of new design has been constructed to allow precise positioning of the deposited phospholipid bilayers with reference to the magnetic field. We have utilized the PBS method to deposit phosphatidylcholine/nitroxyl labeled cholestane mixtures on quartz plates and have found that hydrated bilayers of these mixtures yield ESR spectra with essentially the same characteristics as those obtained using more conventional techniques. The distinct advantage of the new technique for depositing bilayers is that there is no spectral anomaly present which usually is present when the more conventional method of depositing bilayers is used. The spectral anomaly is apparently caused by a portion of the bilayers aligned in directions not directly parallel to the quartz surface. For precision work the spectral anomaly is unacceptable. It is not observed with the new PBS method which has yielded highly reproducible results. PMID:6263962

  19. Drift transport of helical spin coherence with tailored spin-orbit interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunihashi, Y.; Sanada, H.; Gotoh, H.; Onomitsu, K.; Kohda, M.; Nitta, J.; Sogawa, T.

    2016-03-01

    Most future information processing techniques using electron spins in non-magnetic semiconductors will require both the manipulation and transfer of spins without their coherence being lost. The spin-orbit effective magnetic field induced by drifting electrons enables us to rotate the electron spins in the absence of an external magnetic field. However, the fluctuations in the effective magnetic field originating from the random scattering of electrons also cause undesirable spin decoherence, which limits the length scale of the spin transport. Here we demonstrate the drift transport of electron spins adjusted to a robust spin structure, namely a persistent spin helix. We find that the persistent spin helix enhances the spatial coherence of drifting spins, resulting in maximized spin decay length near the persistent spin helix condition. Within the enhanced distance of the spin transport, the transport path of electron spins can be modulated by employing time-varying in-plane voltages.

  20. Quantitative analysis of the breath-holding half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo technique in abdominal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    A consecutive series of 50 patients (28 males and 22 females) who underwent hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from August to December 2011 were enrolled in this study. The appropriate parameters for abdominal MRI scans were determined by comparing the images (TE = 90 and 128 msec) produced using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) technique at different signal acquisition times. The patients consisted of 15 normal patients, 25 patients with a hepatoma and 10 patients with a hemangioma. The TE in a single patient was set to either 90 msec or 128 msec. This was followed by measurements using the four normal rendering methods of the biliary tract system and the background signal intensity using the maximal signal intensity techniques in the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, fat, muscles and hemangioma. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were obtained. The image quality was assessed subjectively, and the results were compared. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly higher at TE = 128 msec than at TE = 90 when diseases of the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, and fat and muscles, hepatocellular carcinomas and hemangiomas, and rendering the hepatobiliary tract system based on the maximum signal intensity technique were involved (p < 0.05). In addition, the presence of artifacts, the image clarity and the overall image quality were excellent at TE = 128 msec (p < 0.05). In abdominal MRI, the breath-hold half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) was found to be effective in illustrating the abdominal organs for TE = 128 msec. Overall, the image quality at TE = 128 msec was better than that at TE = 90 msec due to the improved signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Overall, the HASTE technique for abdominal MRI based on a high-magnetic field (3.0 T) at a TE of 128 msec can provide useful data.

  1. Amplification of Spin Waves by Thermal Spin-Transfer Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Hernández, E.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2011-11-01

    We observe amplification of spin-wave packets propagating along a film of single-crystal yttrium iron garnet subject to a transverse temperature gradient. The spin waves are excited and detected with standard techniques used in magnetostatic microwave delay lines in the 1-2 GHz frequency range. The amplification is attributed to the action of a thermal spin-transfer torque acting on the magnetization that opposes the relaxation and which is created by spin currents generated through the spin-Seebeck effect. The experimental data are interpreted with a spin-wave model that gives an amplification gain in very good agreement with the data.

  2. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-07

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  3. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  4. Visualizing Improved Spin Coupling in Large Magnetic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Judith; Broschinski, Jan-Philipp; Feldscher, Bastian; Glaser, Thorsten; Khajetoorians, Alexander Ako; Wegner, Daniel

    In an attempt to combine a high spin ground state and a large magnetic anisotropy in one molecule, triplesalen-based complexes are promising building blocks for a new generation of single molecule magnets (SMMs). The spin coupling in these molecules is based on the spin polarization effect, which requires a delocalized aromatic π-system in the central carbon ring of the complex. Unfortunately, chemical analysis indicates that this ring can change its configuration to [6]radialene, therefore causing a loss of aromaticity and weakening the magnetic coupling. We have employed a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) to investigate single Cu3-triplesalen and Cu3-triplesalalen molecules, the latter being designed to show an enhanced intramolecular spin coupling. The large molecules were deposited in situ using the unconventional techniques pulse injection and rapid heating. A thorough structural and spectroscopic analysis allows us to discuss the electronic properties of the two complexes, with a special focus on the state of the central carbon ring. We find that even small changes in the ligand structure have a drastic influence on the intramolecular spin coupling, which opens the way for an improved rational design of future SMMs.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of a paramagnetic DNA-drug complex with high spin cobalt; assignment of the 1H and 31P NMR spectra, and determination of electronic, spectroscopic and molecular properties.

    PubMed

    Gochin, M

    1998-08-01

    The proton NMR spectrum of the ternary complex between the octamer duplex d(TTGGCCAA)2, two molecules of the drug chromomycin-A3, and a divalent cobalt ion has been assigned. Assignment procedures used standard two-dimensional techniques and relied upon the expected NOE contacts observed in the equivalent diamagnetic complex containing zinc. The magnetic susceptibility tensor for the cobalt was determined and used to calculate shifts for all nuclei, aiding in the assignment process and verification. Relaxation, susceptibility, temperature and field dependence studies of the paramagnetic spectrum enabled determination of electronic properties of the octahedral cobalt complex. The electronic relaxation tau(s) was determined to be 2.5 +/- 1.5 ps; the effective isotropic g value was found to be 2.6 +/- 0.2, indicating strong spin-orbit coupling. The magnetic susceptibility tensor was determined to be chi(xx) = 8.9 x 10(-3) cm3/mol, chi(yy) = 9.5 x 10(-3) cm3/mol, chi(zz) = 12.8 * 10(-3) cm3/mol. A tentative rotational correlation time of 8 ns was obtained for the complex. Both macroscopic and microscopic susceptibility measurements revealed deviations from Curie behavior over the temperature range accessible in the study. Non-selective relaxation rates were found to be inaccurate for defining distances from the metal center. However, pseudocontact shifts could be calculated with high accuracy using the dipolar shift equation. Isotropic hyperfine shifts were factored into contact and dipolar terms, revealing that the dipolar shift predominates and that contact shifts are relatively small. PMID:9751997

  6. Spectroscopic survey of LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongheng

    2014-07-01

    LAMOST is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST breaks through the bottleneck of the large scale spectroscopic survey observation with both large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 - 4.9m) and wide field of view (5 degrees). It is an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration achieved by changing mirror surface continuously to achieve a series different reflecting Schmidt system in different moments. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 meters in diameter accommodates 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST is the telescope of the highest spectrum acquiring rate. As a national large scientific project, LAMOST project was proposed formally in 1996. The construction was started in 2001 and completed in 2008. After commission period, LAMOST pilot survey was started in October 2011 and spectroscopic survey began in September 2012. From October 2011 to June 2013, LAMOST has obtained more than 2 million spectra of celestial objects. There are 1.7 million spectra of stars, in which the stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, metalicitiy and radial velocity) of more than 1 million stars was obtained. In the first period of spectroscopic survey of LAMOST, 5 million of stellar spectra will be obtained and will make substantial contribution to the study of the stellar astrophysics and the structure of the Galaxy, such as the spheroid substructure of the Galaxy, the galactic gravitational potential and the distribution of the dark matter in the Galaxy, the extremely metal poor stars and hypervelocity stars, the 3D extinction in the Galaxy, the structure of thin and thick disks of the Galaxy, and so on.

  7. Structure analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid with experimental (FT-IR, Raman, NMR and XRD) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Özgür; Dikmen, Gökhan

    2016-03-01

    Possible stable conformers, geometrical molecular structures, vibrational properties as well as band assignments, nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid (2F3MP5BA) were studied experimentally and theoretically using FT-IR, Raman, (CP/MAS) NMR and XRD spectroscopic methods. FT-IR and Raman spectra were evaluated in the region of 3500-400 cm-1, and 3200-400 cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometric structures, vibrational wavenumbers and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors were examined using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional theory method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. 1H, 13C, APT and HETCOR NMR experiments of title molecule were carried out in DMSO solution. 13C CP/MAS NMR measurement was done with 4 mm zirconium rotor and glycine was used as an external standard. Single crystal of 2F3MP5BA was also prepared for XRD measurements. Assignments of vibrational wavenumbers were also strengthened by calculating the total energy distribution (TED) values using scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method.

  8. Analysis of the Interaction of Dp44mT with Human Serum Albumin and Calf Thymus DNA Using Molecular Docking and Spectroscopic Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhongjie; Liu, Youxun; Zhou, Sufeng; Fu, Yun; Li, Changzheng

    2016-01-01

    Di-2-pyridylketone-4,4,-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT) exhibits significant antitumor activity. However, the mechanism of its pharmacological interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) and DNA remains poorly understood. Here, we aimed to elucidate the interactions of Dp44mT with HSA and DNA using MTT assays, spectroscopic methods, and molecular docking analysis. Our results indicated that addition of HSA at a ratio of 1:1 did not alter the cytotoxicity of Dp44mT, but did affect the cytotoxicity of the Dp44mT-Cu complex. Data from fluorescence quenching and UV-VIS absorbance measurements demonstrated that Dp44mT could bind to HSA with a moderate affinity (Ka = approximately 104 M−1). CD spectra revealed that Dp44mT could slightly disrupt the secondary structure of HSA. Dp44mT could also interact with Ct-DNA, but had a moderate binding constant (KEB = approximately 104 M−1). Docking studies indicated that the IB site of HSA, but not the IIA and IIIA sites, could be favorable for Dp44mT and that binding of Dp44mT to HSA involved hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic force, consistent with thermodynamic results from spectral investigations. Thus, the moderate binding affinity of Dp44mT with HSA and DNA partially contributed to its antitumor activity and may be preferable in drug design approaches. PMID:27376275

  9. Computer-aided classification of patients with dementia of Alzheimer's type based on cerebral blood flow determined with arterial spin labeling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yasuo; Arimura, Hidetaka; Yoshiura, Takashi; Tokunaga, Chiaki; Magome, Taiki; Monji, Akira; Noguchi, Tomoyuki; Toyofuku, Fukai; Oki, Masafumi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Honda, Hiroshi

    2010-03-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is one of promising non-invasive magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF). The aim of this study was to develop a computer-aided classification system for AD patients based on CBFs measured by the ASL technique. The average CBFs in cortical regions were determined as functional image features based on the CBF map image, which was non-linearly transformed to a Talairach brain atlas by using a free-form deformation. An artificial neural network (ANN) was trained with the CBF functional features in 10 cortical regions, and was employed for distinguishing patients with AD from control subjects. For evaluation of the method, we applied the proposed method to 20 cases including ten AD patients and ten control subjects, who were scanned a 3.0-Tesla MR unit. As a result, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve obtained by the proposed method was 0.893 based on a leave-one-out-by-case test in identification of AD cases among 20 cases. The proposed method would be feasible for classification of patients with AD.

  10. Synthesis, structural, and spectroscopic (FT-IR, NMR, and UV) Characterization of 1-(Cyclohexylmethyl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-benzo[ d]imidazole by experimental techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Namık; Dayan, Osman; Demirmen, Selin

    2016-05-01

    The title compound ( II), 1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-benzo[ d]imidazole (C19H21N3), was synthesized via N-alkylation of 2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-benzo[ d]imidazole ( I). Both compounds I and II were characterized by IR, NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy. Solid-state structure of compound II was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction technique. Furthermore, quantum chemical calculations employing density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-311++ G( d, p) basis set were performed for the theoretical characterization of the molecular and spectroscopic features of the compounds. Using the TD-DFT method, electronic absorption spectra of the compounds have been predicted at same level. When the obtained results were compared with the experimental findings, it is seen that theoretical results support the experimental data and a good agreement exists between them.

  11. Spectroscopic survey of LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    LAMOST is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST breaks through the bottleneck of the large scale spectroscopic survey observation with both large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 - 4.9m) and wide field of view (5 degrees). It is an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration achieved by changing mirror surface continuously to achieve a series different reflecting Schmidt system in different moments. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 meters in diameter accommodates 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST is the telescope of the highest spectrum acquiring rate.In the spectroscopic survey of LAMOST from October 2011 to June 2014, LAMOST has obtained more than 4.13 million spectra of celestial objects. There are 3.27 million spectra of stars, in which the stellar parameters of 2.16 million stars were obtained.In the five-year regular survey upto 2017, LAMOST will obtaine 5 million stellar spectra, which would make substantial contribution to the study of the stellar astrophysics and the structure of the Galaxy, such as the spheroid substructure of the Galaxy, the galactic gravitational potential and the distribution of the dark matter in the Galaxy, the extremely metal poor stars and hypervelocity stars, the 3D extinction in the Galaxy, the structure of thin and thick disks of the Galaxy, and so on.

  12. Structural studies of SrFeO{sub 3} and SrFe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} by employing XRD and XANES spectroscopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, M. Javed Khan, R. Tahir Ali

    2011-10-15

    The perovskite based SrFeO{sub 3} and SrFe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} materials have been synthesized by solid state reaction methods. The structural properties are investigated using a combination of X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic techniques. From the Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction data it has been observed that SrFeO{sub 3} has a simple cubic perovskite structure, which is consistent with the previous literature results; whereas SrFe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} shows a tetragonal structure within P4mm space group. X-ray absorption results demonstrate that the valence state of Fe in SrFeO{sub 3} is (IV); however, it changes to (III) when 50% Nb{sup 5+} is substituted at the Fe sites. - Highlights: {yields} Structural studies by employing XRD and XANES spectroscopic techniques. {yields} Rietveld refinement confirmed SrFeO{sub 3} has cubic structure, space group Pm-3m. {yields} It is revealed that SrFe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} has tetragonal structure, in P4mm space group. {yields} From XANES results it is observed that Fe has valence state of (IV) in SrFeO{sub 3}. {yields} Doping of 50% Nb{sup 5+} at Fe sites, changes Fe valence to (III) in SrFe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}.

  13. Study on the interaction between pelargonidin-3-O-glucoside and bovine serum albumin using spectroscopic, transmission electron microscopy and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Tang, Lin; Bi, Hongna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the binding behavior between pelargonidin-3-O-glucoside (P3G) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) using multi-spectroscopic, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and molecular docking methods under physiological conditions. Fluorescence spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence showed that the fluorescence of BSA could be quenched remarkably by P3G via a static quenching mechanism, and there is a single class of binding site on BSA. In addition, the thermodynamic functions ΔH and ΔS were -21.69 kJ/mol and 24.46 J/mol/K, indicating that an electrostatic interaction was a main acting force. The distance between BSA and P3G was 2.74 nm according to Förster's theory, illustrating that energy transfer occurred. In addition, the secondary structure of BSA changed with a decrease in the α-helix content from 66.2% to 64.0% as seen using synchronous fluorescence, UV/vis, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies, whereas TEM images showed that P3G led to BSA aggregation and fibrillation. Furthermore, site marker competitive experiments and molecular docking indicated that P3G could bind with subdomain IIA of BSA. The calculated results of the equilibrium fraction showed that the concentration of free P3G in plasma was high enough to be stored and transported from the circulatory system to its target sites to provide therapeutic effects. PMID:26249529

  14. Measurement of the magnetic moment of the positive muon by a stroboscopic muon-spin-rotation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Klempt, E.; Schulze, R.; Wolf, H.; Camani, M.; Gygax, F.N.; Rueegg, W.; Schenck, A.; Schilling, H.

    1982-02-01

    A new determination of the magnetic moment of the positive muon in units of the magnetic moment of the proton is presented. The Larmor precession of positive muons in liquid bromine was observed by a stroboscopic technique in a field of 0.75 T and combined with concomitant proton NMR measurements in the same chemical environment. The stroboscopic method allows use of the full muon stopping rate available at the Schweizerisches Institut fuer Nuklearforschung (SIN) muon channel. Moreover, it permits an intrinsically precise determination of muon Larmor frequency and proton NMR frequency measuring the magnetic field by comparison with the stable reference frequency of the SIN accelerator (..delta cap omega../..cap omega..roughly-equal10/sup -8/). Two different bromine targets were used which allowed an unambiguous determination of the chemical field shift experienced by the muons. One target contained pure and water-free liquid bromine (Br/sub 2/), where stopped muons form (..mu../sup +/e/sup -/)Br molecules. The other target was slightly contaminated with water; there a chemical reaction chain places the muons into (..mu../sup +/e/sup -/)HO molecules. The diamagnetic shielding of protons in the analogous molecules HBr and H/sub 2/O in liquid bromine was measured by high-resolution NMR. Values for the isotopic shift of the diamagnetic shielding, when protons are replaced by muons, are available from quantum chemical calculations. After application of the chemical-shift corrections, the results from the two different bromine targets are consistent. The final result is ..mu../sub ..mu..//..mu../sub p/ = 3.183 344 1(17) (or +- 0.53 ppm). This value agrees with other recent precision determinations of ..mu../sub ..mu..//..mu../sub p/. For the muon mass the present result implies m/sub ..mu..//m/sub e/ = 206.768 35(11) ( +- 0.53 ppm).

  15. Spectroscopic and computational characterization of the base-off forms of cob(II)alamin.

    PubMed

    Liptak, Matthew D; Fleischhacker, Angela S; Matthews, Rowena G; Telser, Joshua; Brunold, Thomas C

    2009-04-16

    The one-electron-reduced form of vitamin B(12), cob(II)alamin (Co(2+)Cbl), is found in several essential human enzymes, including the cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH). In this work, experimentally validated electronic structure descriptions for two "base-off" Co(2+)Cbl species have been generated using a combined spectroscopic and computational approach, so as to obtain definitive clues as to how these and related enzymes catalyze the thermodynamically challenging reduction of Co(2+)Cbl to cob(I)alamin (Co(1+)Cbl). Specifically, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electronic absorption (Abs), and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopic techniques have been employed as complementary tools to characterize the two distinct forms of base-off Co(2+)Cbl that can be trapped in the H759G variant of MetH, one containing a five-coordinate and the other containing a four-coordinate, square-planar Co(2+) center. Accurate spin Hamiltonian parameters for these low-spin Co(2+) centers have been determined by collecting EPR data using both X- and Q-band microwave frequencies, and Abs and MCD spectroscopic techniques have been employed to probe the corrin-centered pi --> pi* and Co-based d --> d excitations, respectively. By using these spectroscopic data to evaluate electronic structure calculations, we found that density functional theory provides a reasonable electronic structure description for the five-coordinate form of base-off Co(2+)Cbl. However, it was necessary to resort to a multireference ab initio treatment to generate a more realistic description of the electronic structure of the four-coordinate form. Consistent with this finding, our computational data indicate that, in the five-coordinate Co(2+)Cbl species, the unpaired spin density is primarily localized in the Co 3d(z(2))-based molecular orbital, as expected, whereas in the four-coordinate form, extensive Co 3d orbital mixing, configuration interaction, and spin-orbit coupling cause the

  16. Application of Spectroscopic Techniques (FT-IR, 13C NMR) to the analysis of humic substances in volcanic soils along an environmental gradient (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Rodriguez, Antonio; María Armas Herrera, Cecilia; González Pérez, José Antonio; González-Vila, Francisco Javier; Arbelo Rodríguez, Carmen Dolores; Mora Hernández, Juan Luis; Polvillo Polo, Oliva

    2010-05-01

    Andosols and andic soils are considered as efficient C-sinks in terms of C sequestration. These soils are usually developed from volcanic materials, and are characterized by a predominance of short-range ordered minerals like allophanes, imogolite and other Fe and Al oxyhydroxides. Such materials occur commonly associated with organic compounds, thus generating highly stable organo-mineral complexes and leading to the accumulation of a high amount of organic carbon. Spectroscopic methods like FT-IR and 13C NMR are suitable for the analysis of the chemical structure of soil humic substances, and allow identifying distinct functional groups and protein, lipids, lignin, carbohydrate-derived fragments. In this work we study the structural features of four soils developed on Pleistocene basaltic lavae in Tenerife (Canary Island, Spain), distributed along an altitudinal climatic gradient. The soil sequence comprises soils with different degree of geochemical evolution and andic character, including a mineral ‘Hypersalic Solonchak' (Tabaibal de Rasca), a slightly vitric ‘Luvic Phaeozem' (Los Frailes), a degraded and shallow ‘Endoleptic, fulvic, silandic Andosol' (Siete Lomas), and a well-developed and deep ‘Fulvic, silandic, Andosol' (Ravelo). Samples of the raw soil and humic and fulvic acids isolated from the surface horizons were analyzed. The results show a low content of organic carbon in the mineral soil, the inherited humin predominating, and a very high content of humic and fulvic acids in Andosols. The FT-IR and 13C NMR spectra of the raw soil samples show a low resolution, related to interferences from mineral complexes signals, particularly in soils with lower organic carbon content. 13C NMR shows a predominance of O-alkyl carbon (derived of carbohydrates) in andic soils, whereas O-alkyl and aromatic fractions are most evident in the mineral soil. The humic acids spectra are characterized by a dominance of alkyl and aromatic fractions with a high degree

  17. Isolation and Control of Spins in Silicon Carbide with Millisecond-Coherence Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christle, David J.; Falk, Abram L.; Andrich, Paolo; Klimov, Paul V.; Awschalom, David D.; Hassan, Jawad Ul; Son, Nguyen T.; Janzén, Erik; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    The elimination of defects from silicon carbide (SiC) has facilitated its move to the forefront of the optoelectronics and power-electronics industries. Nonetheless, because the electronic states of SiC defects can have sharp optical and spin transitions, they are increasingly recognized as a valuable resource for quantum-information and nanoscale-sensing applications. We demonstrate that individual electronic spin states of the divacancy defect in highly purified monocrystalline 4H-SiC can be isolated and coherently controlled. This defect has analogous behavior to the prominent nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, yet exists in a material amenable to modern growth and microfabrication techniques. We spectroscopically identify the different forms of divacancies, and show that divacancy spins exhibit an exceptionally long ensemble Hahn-echo coherence time that exceeds one millisecond. Funding by NSF, AFOSR MURI, and the Knut & Alice Wallenberg Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Geometrical spin symmetry and spin

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, I. B.

    2011-07-15

    Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics leads to General Quantum Mechanics which includes into itself spindynamics as a theory of spin phenomena. The key concepts of spindynamics are geometrical spin symmetry and the spin field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). The essence of spin is the bipolar structure of geometrical spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potential. The bipolar structure provides a natural derivation of the equations of spindynamics. Spindynamics involves all phenomena connected with spin and provides new understanding of the strong interaction.

  19. Monomeric and dimeric structures analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid with experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR, UV) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Kose, Etem; Atac, Ahmet; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Kurt, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid (3,5-DFPBA, C6H3F2B(OH)2) were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques. FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-10 cm-1) in the solid phase and 1H and 13C NMR spectra in DMSO solution were recorded. The UV spectra that dissolved in ethanol and water were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm for each solution. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule have been obtained for possible three conformers from DFT (B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Hydrogen-bonded dimer of title molecule, optimized by counterpoise correction, was also studied B3LYP at the 6-311++G(d,p) level and the effects of molecular association through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding have been discussed. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. The effects due to the substitutions of boric acid group and halogen were investigated. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), nonlinear optical properties (NLO) and thermodynamic features were performed.

  20. Recoupling of native homonuclear dipolar couplings in magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR by the double-oscillating field technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2010-08-01

    A new solid-state NMR method, the double-oscillating field technique (DUO), that under magic-angle-spinning conditions produces an effective Hamiltonian proportional to the native high-field homonuclear dipole-dipole coupling operator is presented. The method exploits one part of the radio frequency (rf) field to recouple the dipolar coupling interaction with a relatively high scaling factor and to eliminate offset effects over a reasonable bandwidth while in the recoupling frame, the other part gives rise to a sufficiently large longitudinal component of the residual rf field that averages nonsecular terms and in addition ensures stability toward rf inhomogeneity and rf miscalibration. The capability of the DUO experiment to mediate transfer of polarization is described theoretically and compared numerically and experimentally with finite pulse rf driven recoupling and experimentally with dipolar-assisted rotational resonance. Two-dimensional recoupling experiments were performed on antiparallel amyloid fibrils of the decapeptide SNNFGAILSS with the FGAIL fragment uniformly labeled with C13 and N15.

  1. A Comparison of FTNMR and FTIR Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Myong-Ku

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared are two spectroscopic methods that commonly use the Fourier transform technique. Discussed are the similarities and differences in the use of the Fourier transform in these two spectroscopic techniques. (CW)

  2. XRF, μ-XRD and μ-spectroscopic techniques for revealing the composition and structure of paint layers on polychrome sculptures after multiple restorations.

    PubMed

    Franquelo, M L; Duran, A; Castaing, J; Arquillo, D; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2012-01-30

    This paper presents the novel application of recently developed analytical techniques to the study of paint layers on sculptures that have been restored/repainted several times across centuries. Analyses were performed using portable XRF, μ-XRD and μ-Raman instruments. Other techniques, such as optical microscopy, SEM-EDX and μ-FTIR, were also used. Pigments and other materials including vermilion, minium, red lac, ivory black, lead white, barium white, zinc white (zincite), titanium white (rutile and anatase), lithopone, gold and brass were detected. Pigments from both ancient and modern times were found due to the different restorations/repaintings carried out. μ-Raman was very useful to characterise some pigments that were difficult to determine by μ-XRD. In some cases, pigments identification was only possible by combining results from the different analytical techniques used in this work. This work is the first article devoted to the study of sculpture cross-section samples using laboratory-made μ-XRD systems. PMID:22284518

  3. Novel, near-infrared spectroscopic, label-free, techniques to assess bone abnormalities such as Paget's disease, osteoporosis and bone fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Diana C.; Sordillo, Laura A.; Shi, Lingyan; Budansky, Yury; Sordillo, Peter P.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-02-01

    Near- infrared (NIR) light with wavelengths from 650 nm to 950 nm (known as the first NIR window) has conventionally been used as a non-invasive technique that can reach deeper penetration depths through media than light at shorter wavelengths. Recently, several novel, NIR, label-free, techniques have been developed to assess Paget's disease of bone, osteoporosis and bone microfractures. We designed a Bone Optical Analyzer (BOA) which utilizes the first window to measure changes of Hb and HbO2. Paget's disease is marked by an increase in vascularization in bones, and this device can enable easy diagnosis and more frequent monitoring of the patient's condition, without exposing him to a high cumulative dose of radiation. We have also used inverse imaging algorithms to reconstruct 2D and 3D maps of the bone's structure. This device could be used to assess diseases such as osteoporosis. Using 800 nm femtosecond excitation with two-photon (2P) microscopy, we acquired 2PM images of the periosteum and spatial frequency spectra (based on emission of collagen) from the periosteal regions. This technique can provide information on the structure of the periosteum and can detect abnormalities which may be an indication of disease. Most recently, we showed that longer NIR wavelengths in the second and third NIR windows (1100 nm-1350 nm, 1600 nm-1870 nm), could be used to image bone microfractures. Use of NIR light could allow for repeated studies in patients with diseases such as Paget's and osteoporosis quickly and non-invasively, and could impact the current management for these diseases.

  4. Towards a Compositional SPIN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses our initial experience with introducing automated assume-guarantee verification based on learning in the SPIN tool. We believe that compositional verification techniques such as assume-guarantee reasoning could complement the state-reduction techniques that SPIN already supports, thus increasing the size of systems that SPIN can handle. We present a "light-weight" approach to evaluating the benefits of learning-based assume-guarantee reasoning in the context of SPIN: we turn our previous implementation of learning for the LTSA tool into a main program that externally invokes SPIN to provide the model checking-related answers. Despite its performance overheads (which mandate a future implementation within SPIN itself), this approach provides accurate information about the savings in memory. We have experimented with several versions of learning-based assume guarantee reasoning, including a novel heuristic introduced here for generating component assumptions when their environment is unavailable. We illustrate the benefits of learning-based assume-guarantee reasoning in SPIN through the example of a resource arbiter for a spacecraft. Keywords: assume-guarantee reasoning, model checking, learning.

  5. Single spin magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  6. Single spin magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution. PMID:27378060

  7. Distinctive Reaction Pathways at Base Metals in High-Spin Organometallic Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Holland, Patrick L

    2015-06-16

    Inexpensive "base" metals are more affordable and sustainable than precious metals and also offer opportunities to discover new mechanisms for selective catalytic reactions. Base metal complexes can have high-spin electronic configurations that are rare in precious metal complexes. This Account describes some concepts relevant to high-spin organometallic complexes, focusing on our recent work with β-diketiminate complexes of iron and cobalt. Even though high-spin organometallic complexes have some unfamiliar spectroscopic properties, they can be studied using NMR spectroscopy as well as techniques that focus on the magnetism brought about by the unpaired electrons. Understanding the mechanisms of reactions using these complexes can be complicated, because complexes with a high-spin electronic configuration may need to change spin states to avoid high barriers for reaction. These spin-state changes can be rapid, and the ability of an excited spin state to "cut through" the barrier for a reaction can lead to spin acceleration. These concepts, originally developed by Poli, Shaik, Schwarz, and Harvey, are applied here to the fundamental organometallic reaction of β-hydride elimination (BHE). Experimentally validated density-functional calculations show spin acceleration in BHE using three-coordinate iron(II) and cobalt(II) complexes. A square-planar transition state is particularly beneficial for accelerating BHE when a high-spin iron(II) complex goes from an S = 2 ground state to an S = 1 transition state or when a high-spin cobalt(II) complex goes from an S = 3/2 ground state to an S = 1/2 transition state. The relative energies of the spin states can be controlled with the choice of the supporting ligand. Using an appropriate ligand, isomerization of 1-alkenes to their Z-2 isomers can be catalyzed in high yields using the cobalt(II) alkyl complexes as catalysts. Though an earlier paper attributed the regioselectivity and stereoselectivity to the preferred geometry

  8. An investigation of the chemical and physical properties of pristine, electrochromically damaged, and photochromically damaged KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) using surface analytical and optical spectroscopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Quagliano, J.R.; Petrin, R.R.; Trujillo, T.C.; Cockroft, N.J.; Paffett, M.T.; Maggiore, C.J.; Jacco, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    A variety of experimental techniques were employed to study the properties of electrochromically (EC) damaged, photochromically (PC) damaged, and pristine KTiOP0{sub 4} (KTP). Additionally, nonlinear optical calculations were performed to complement the experimental work in an effort to elucidate the respective mechanisms operative in producing EC and PC damage to KTP. Several independent experiments indicate that there is Ti deficiency in the EC damaged material, which is due to migration of these ions to the electrode surface. The laser experiments indicate that UV radiation can produce reversible PC damage. UV-producing SFG processes accidentally occurring in SHG cut KTP may lead to macroscopic damage. It must be emphasized that a fundamentally different mechanism is responsible for EC damaged versus PC damaged KTP.

  9. Elemental and spectroscopic characterization of plasters from Fatih Mosque-Istanbul (Turkey) by combined micro-Raman, FTIR and EDXRF techniques.

    PubMed

    Akyuz, Tanil; Akyuz, Sevim; Gulec, Ahmet

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of the plasters and coloring agents of the wall paintings of Fatih Mosque have been performed using combined micro-Raman, FTIR and EDXRF techniques. The investigations show that the plaster used on the walls has mixed gypsum-lime binders. Cinnabar {HgS}, lead red {Pb3O4} and hematite {α-Fe2O3} were identified in the red surfaces. Blue color is attributed to ultramarine blue {Na8-10Al6Si6O24S2-4}. Green color is assigned to mixtures of green earth, copper phthalocyanine {Cu(C32Cl16N8)} and brochantite {CuSO4·3Cu(OH)2}. Strontium yellow {SrCrO4} and zinc white {ZnO} were also used to ensure the color tone. The results provide a basis for future restoration of wall paints. PMID:25989612

  10. Exploiting biogeochemical and spectroscopic techniques to assess the geochemical distribution and release dynamics of chromium and lead in a contaminated floodplain soil.

    PubMed

    Rinklebe, Jörg; Shaheen, Sabry M; Schröter, Felix; Rennert, Thilo

    2016-05-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) combined with a seven steps sequential extraction technique were used to assess the geochemical distribution of chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) in a contaminated floodplain soil. Total contents of Cr and Pb were 490.3 and 402.1 mg kg(-1), respectively. The residual fraction was 59.5 and 56.3% of total Cr and Pb. The crystalline iron (Fe) oxide was the dominant non-residual fraction of Cr (35.9% of total Cr). Considerable amounts of Pb were found in the organic fraction (35.4%). Using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the soil organic matter was identified as 48.9% aromatic carbon, which indicated that a certain portion of Pb and Cr might be associated with aromatic compounds. The SEM-EDX images demonstrate a concomitant occurrence of Pb, manganese (Mn), Fe, and aluminum (Al) as well as a coexistence of Cr and Fe. The release dynamics of dissolved Cr and Pb as affected by redox potential (EH), pH, Fe, Mn, dissolved organic carbon, and sulfate was quantified using an automated biogeochemical microcosm apparatus. Soil pH decreased under oxic conditions. The release of Cr, Pb, Fe, and Mn increased under acidic oxic (pH = 3.7, EH = 521 mV) conditions due to the associated decrease of pH (7.1-3.7). The mobilization of Cr and Pb was affected by the Fe and Mn. In conclusion, our multi-technique approach identified the geochemical distribution of Cr and Pb and verified major factors that explain mobilization of Cr and Pb in floodplain soils. PMID:26921591

  11. Spin current swapping and spin hall effect in disordered metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidaoui, Hamed; Pauyac, Christian; Manchon, Aurelien

    2015-03-01

    The conversion of charge currents into spin currents via the spin Hall effect has attracted intense experimental and theoretical efforts lately, providing an efficient means to generate electric signals and manipulate the magnetization of single layers. More recently, it was proposed that spin-dependent scattering induced by spin-orbit coupled impurities also produces a so-called spin swapping, i.e. an exchange between the spin angular momentum and linear momentum of itinerant electrons. In this work, we investigate the nature of spin swapping and its interplay with extrinsic spin Hall effect and spin relaxation in finite size normal metals. We use two complementary methods based on non-equilibrium Green's function technique. The first method consists in rigorously deriving the drift-diffusion equation of the spin accumulation in the presence of spin-orbit coupled impurities from quantum kinetics using Wigner expansion. The second method is the real-space tight binding modeling of a finite system in the presence of spin-orbit coupled disorder.

  12. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography

    PubMed Central

    Adie, Steven G.; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F.; John, Renu; Sampson, David D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  13. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Adie, Steven G; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F; John, Renu; Sampson, David D; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-12-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  14. A novel steroidal spin label for membrane structure studies: synthesis and applications.

    PubMed

    Katoch, R; Trivedi, G K; Phadke, R S

    1999-12-01

    2,2,6,6-Tetramethyl piperidine-N-oxyl nitroxyls are known to partition between aqueous and lipid phases, thus serving as probes to study membrane dynamics. The synthesis of a novel steroidal spin label, 3alpha-hydroxycholan-24-yl-(2",2",6",6"-tetramethyl-N-oxyl)p iperidyl butan-1',4'-dioate, containing 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl moiety covalently bonded to the side chain in 3,24-caprostan-diol has been described. The localization of this spin label in model biomembranes has been studied by using electron spin resonance, differential scanning calorimetry, and 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopic techniques. Its applicability in studying the phase transition properties of model membrane L-alpha-dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline in the presence and absence of drugs has been described by using electron spin resonance. The label has also been used to study the permeability of epinephrine into membrane. The results have shown the applicability of the spin label as a potential spin probe in the study of biomembranes. PMID:10576220

  15. Spin wave excitation patterns generated by spin torque oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macià, F.; Hoppensteadt, F. C.; Kent, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Spin torque nano-oscillators (STNO) are nanoscale devices that can convert a direct current into short wavelength spin wave excitations in a ferromagnetic layer. We show that arrays of STNO can be used to create directional spin wave radiation similarly to electromagnetic antennas. Combining STNO excitations with planar spin waves also creates interference patterns. We show that these interference patterns are static and have information on the wavelength and phase of the spin waves emitted from the STNO. We describe a means of actively controlling spin wave radiation patterns with the direct current flowing through STNO, which is useful in on-chip communication and information processing and could be a promising technique for studying short wavelength spin waves in different materials.

  16. Structural and spectroscopic characterization of 2,3-difluorobenzoic acid and 2,4-difluorobenzoic acid with experimental techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Cinar, Zeliha; Cinar, Mehmet

    2011-09-01

    In this study, the molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic transition analysis of 2,3-difluorobenzoic acid and 2,4-difluorobenzoic acid (C 7H 4F 2O 2) were presented using experimental techniques (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV) and quantum chemical calculations. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra in solid state were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm -1 and 4000-5 cm -1, respectively. The UV absorption spectra of the compounds that dissolved in ethanol were recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The structural properties of the molecules in the ground state were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) employing 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Optimized structure of compounds was interpreted and compared with the earlier reported experimental values. The scaled vibrational wavenumbers were compared with experimental results. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental data and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. A study on the electronic properties, such as absorption wavelength, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energy, were performed by time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. Based on the UV spectra and TD-DFT calculations, the electronic structure and the assignments of the absorption bands of steady compounds were discussed. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecules.

  17. In vitro studies on the behavior of salmeterol xinafoate and its interaction with calf thymus DNA by multi-spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tingting; Bi, Shuyun; Wang, Yu; Wang, Tianjiao; Pang, Bo; Gu, Tingting

    2014-11-01

    The salmeterol xinafoate (SX) binding to calf thymus DNA in vitro was explored by fluorescence, resonance light scattering (RLS), UV-vis absorption, as well as viscometry, ionic strength effect and DNA melting techniques. It was found that SX could bind to DNA weakly, and the binding constants (Ka) were determined as 8.52 × 103, 8.31 × 103 and 6.14 × 103 L mol-1 at 18, 28 and 38 °C respectively. When bound to DNA, SX showed fluorescence quenching in the fluorescence spectra and hyperchromic effect in the absorption spectra. Stern-Volmer plots revealed that the quenching of fluorescence of SX by DNA was a static quenching. Furthermore, the relative viscosity and melting temperature of DNA solution were hardly influenced by SX, while the fluorescence intensity of SX-DNA was observed to decrease with the increasing ionic strength of system. Also, the binding constant between SX and double stranded DNA (dsDNA) was much weaker than that between SX and single stranded DNA (ssDNA). All these results suggested that the binding mode of SX to DNA should be groove binding. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that electrostatic force might play a predominant role in SX binding to DNA. The quantum yield (φ) of SX was measured as 0.13 using comparative method. Based on the Förster resonance energy transfer theory (FRET), the binding distance (r0) between the acceptor and donor was calculated as 4.10 nm.

  18. NMR in rotating magnetic fields: Magic angle field spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Sakellariou, D.; Meriles, C.; Martin, R.; Pines, A.

    2004-09-10

    Magic angle sample spinning has been one of the cornerstones in high-resolution solid state NMR. Spinning frequencies nowadays have increased by at least one order of magnitude over the ones used in the first experiments and the technique has gained tremendous popularity. It is currently a routine procedure in solid-state NMR, high-resolution liquid-state NMR and solid-state MRI. The technique enhances the spectral resolution by averaging away rank 2 anisotropic spin interactions thereby producing isotropic-like spectra with resolved chemical shifts and scalar couplings. Andrew proposed that it should be possible to induce similar effects in a static sample if the direction of the magnetic field is varied, e.g., magic-angle rotation of the B0 field (B0-MAS) and this has been recently demonstrated using electromagnetic field rotation. Here we discuss on the possibilities to perform field rotation using alternative hardware, together with spectroscopic methods to recover isotropic resolution even in cases where the field is not rotating at the magic angle. Extension to higher magnetic fields would be beneficial in situations where the physical manipulation of the sample is inconvenient or impossible. Such situations occur often in materials or biomedical samples where ''ex-situ'' NMR spectroscopy and imaging analysis is needed.

  19. Magnetic and spectroscopic properties of mixed valence manganese(III,IV) dimers: a systematic study using broken symmetry density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Orio, Maylis; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Petrenko, Taras; Neese, Frank

    2009-08-01

    Exchange coupling parameters and isotropic (55)Mn hyperfine couplings of fourteen mixed-valence Mn(III)-Mn(IV) dimers are determined using broken-symmetry density functional theory (DFT) and spin projection techniques. A systematic evaluation of density functional approaches shows that the TPSSh functional yields the best exchange coupling constants among all investigated methods, with deviations from experiment of the order of approximately 10-15%. For the prediction of (55)Mn hyperfine couplings the deficiencies of DFT in the description of core-level spin-polarization and the neglect of scalar relativistic effects lead to systematic deviations between theory and experiment that can be compensated through the use of a universal scaling factor. We determine this scaling factor to be 1.49 and demonstrate that the (55)Mn hyperfine couplings in mixed-valence Mn(III,IV) dimers can be successfully and systematically predicted with the TPSSh functional and the proposed spin projection techniques. The dependence of isotropic (55)Mn hyperfine couplings on the Mn(III) zero-field splitting values is studied in detail using a dimer for which the strong exchange approximation breaks down. In this case we apply a rigorous form of our spin projection technique that incorporates zero-field splitting contributions to the site spin expectation values. These results form the basis for future studies that aim at deducing unknown structures on the basis of computed spectroscopic parameters. PMID:19722694

  20. Optical Spectroscopic Monitoring of Parachute Yarn Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Garcia, M.J.; Simpson, R.L.; Behr, V.L.; Whinery, L.D.; Peng, L.W.

    1999-04-01

    Optical spectroscopic techniques were evaluated as nondestructive monitors of the aging of parachutes in nuclear weapons. We analyzed thermally aged samples of nylon and Kevlar webbing by photoluminescence spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy. Infrared analysis was also performed to help understand the degradation mechanisms of the polymer materials in the webbing. The photoluminescence and reflection spectra were analyzed by chemometric data treatment techniques to see if aged-induced changes in the spectra correlated to changes in measured tensile strength. A correlation was found between the shapes of the photoluminescent bands and the measured tensile strengths. Photoluminescent spectra can be used to predict the tensile strengths of nylon and Kevlar webbing with sufficient accuracy to categorize the webbing sample as above rated tensile strength, marginal or below rated tensile strength. The instrumentation required to perform the optical spectroscopic measurement can be made rugged, compact and portable. Thus, optical spectroscopic techniques offer a means for nondestructive field monitoring of parachutes in the enduring stockpile/

  1. Spin forming development

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.G.

    1982-05-01

    Bendix product applications require the capability of fabricating heavy gage, high strength materials. Five commercial sources have been identified that have the capability of spin forming metal thicknesses greater than 9.5 mm and four equiment manufacturers produce machines with this capability. Twelve assemblies selected as candidates for spin forming applications require spin forming of titanium, 250 maraging steel, 17-4 pH stainless steel, Nitronic 40 steel, 304 L stainless steel, and 6061 aluminum. Twelve parts have been cold spin formed from a 250 maraging steel 8.1 mm wall thickness machine preform, and six have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick flat plate. Thirty-three Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy parts and 26 17-4 pH stainless steel parts have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick plate. Hot spin forming directly from plate has demonstrated the feasibility and favorable economics of this fabrication technique for Bendix applications.

  2. Reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopic study on a CuO X/SiO 2 model catalyst prepared by spin-coating on a SiO 2/W/Si(100) buried metal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Ken-ichi; Oshima, Itaru; Oosterbeek, Heiko; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    1999-01-01

    CuO X particles were deposited by spin-coating on a SiO 2(50 nm)/W(70 nm)/Si(100) buried metal substrate using 2-propanol solution of a Cu precursor followed by oxidation. The CuO X/SiO 2/W/Si model catalyst was used to detect vibrational modes of submonolayer adsorbates by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). During methanol reaction on CuO X/SiO 2/W/Si, RAIR spectra showed that methoxy species was formed on CuO X particles and spilt over to the SiO 2 substrate, replacing hydroxyl species.

  3. SURF_ER—surface electron spin resonance (ESR) of the surface domain of large objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrling, Th.; Rehberg, J.; Jung, K.; Groth, N.

    2002-04-01

    SURF_ER is a method for spectral and spatial electron spin resonance measurements on the surface of large objects which extension is only restricted by the width of the pole gap of the magnet and the homogeneity of the magnetic field and not by the cavity dimensions. The application of several techniques like SURF_ER for spectroscopic measurements, SURF_ERM for spatial scanning and SURF_ERI for spatial measurements of the depth of the surface region are discussed and represented for the skin of a human being as an example.

  4. A new combined nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopic probe applied to in situ investigations of catalysts and catalytic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, Jules C. J.; Mantle, Michael D.; York, Andrew P. E.; McGregor, James

    2014-06-15

    Both Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies are valuable analytical techniques capable of providing mechanistic information and thereby providing insights into chemical processes, including catalytic reactions. Since both techniques are chemically sensitive, they yield not only structural information but also quantitative analysis. In this work, for the first time, the combination of the two techniques in a single experimental apparatus is reported. This entailed the design of a new experimental probe capable of recording simultaneous measurements on the same sample and/or system of interest. The individual datasets acquired by each spectroscopic method are compared to their unmodified, stand-alone equivalents on a single sample as a means to benchmark this novel piece of equipment. The application towards monitoring reaction progress is demonstrated through the evolution of the homogeneous catalysed metathesis of 1‑hexene, with both experimental techniques able to detect reactant consumption and product evolution. This is extended by inclusion of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capabilities with a custom made MAS 7 mm rotor capable of spinning speeds up to 1600 Hz, quantified by analysis of the spinning sidebands of a sample of KBr. The value of this is demonstrated through an application involving heterogeneous catalysis, namely the metathesis of 2-pentene and ethene. This provides the added benefit of being able to monitor both the reaction progress (by NMR spectroscopy) and also the structure of the catalyst (by Raman spectroscopy) on the very same sample, facilitating the development of structure-performance relationships.

  5. Magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments for structural characterization of proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lichi; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) has become a prominent method in biology and is suitable for the characterization of insoluble proteins and protein aggregates such as amyloid fibrils, membrane-lipid complexes, and precipitated proteins. Often, the initial and the most critical step is to obtain spectroscopic assignments, that is, to determine chemical shifts of individual atoms. The procedures for SSNMR spectroscopic assignments are now well established for small microcrystalline proteins, where high signal-to-noise can be obtained. The sensitivity of the experiments and spectral resolution decrease with the increasing molecular weight, which makes setting SSNMR experiments in large proteins a much more challenging and demanding procedure. Here, we describe the protocol for the most common set of 3D magic angle spinning (MAS) SSNMR experiments. While the procedures described in the text are well known to SSNMR practitioners, we hope they will be of interest to scientists interested in extending their repertoire of biophysical techniques. PMID:22760319

  6. A Spectroscopic-Based Laboratory Experiment for Protein Conformational Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Carlos Henrique I.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a practical experiment for teaching basic spectroscopic techniques to introduce the topic of protein conformational change to students in the field of molecular biology, biochemistry, or structural biology. The spectroscopic methods employed in the experiment are absorbance, for protein concentration measurements, and…

  7. Amplification of spin waves by the spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Hernández, E.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2012-04-01

    We observe amplification of spin-wave packets propagating along a film of single-crystal yttrium iron garnet (YIG) subject to a transverse temperature gradient. The spin waves are excited and detected with standard techniques used to study volume or surface magnetostatic waves in the 1-2 GHz frequency range. Amplification gains larger than 20 are observed in a YIG film heated by a current of 20 mA in a Pt layer in a simple YIG/Pt bilayer. The amplification is attributed to the action of a spin-transfer thermal torque acting on the magnetization that opposes the relaxation and which is created by spin currents generated through the spin Seebeck effect. The experimental data are interpreted with a spin-wave model.

  8. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets.

  9. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.

    1998-11-17

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

  10. Laser Spectroscopic Measurement Of Temperature And Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.; Laufer, Gabriel

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses research on use of laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen and Raman scattering in air for simultaneous measurement of temperature and density of air. Major application of laser spectroscopic techniques, measurement of fluctuations of temperature and density in hypersonic flows in wind tunnels.

  11. Spectroscopic study in Z-pinch discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Garamoon, A.A.; Saudy, A.H.; Shark, W.

    1995-12-31

    The temporal variation of the emitted line intensity has been investigated, and thus an important information about the dynamic ionization stages in the Z-pinch discharge has been studied. Also the electron temperature Te, has been deduced by using a spectroscopic technique.

  12. Coherent Imaging Spectroscopy of a Quantum Many-Body Spin System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Senko, Crystal; Richerme, Phil; Lee, Aaron; Campbell, Wes; Monroe, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Trapped-ion quantum simulators are a promising candidate for exploring quantum-many-body physics, such as quantum magnetism, that are difficult to examine in condensed-matter experiments or using classical simulation. We demonstrate a coherent imaging spectroscopic technique to validate a quantum simulation. In this work, we study fully-connected transverse Ising models with a chain of up to 18 171Yb+ ions. Here, We resolve the state of each spin by collecting the spin-dependent fluorescence on a camera in order to map the complete energy spectrum and fully characterize the spin-spin couplings, while also engineering entangled states and measuring the critical gap near a quantum phase transition. We expect this general technique to become an important verification tool for quantum simulators. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE program, IARPA, and the MURI program; and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  13. Kepler Photometry Of HAT-P-11: Starspots And Spin-orbit Misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, J.

    2011-09-01

    I will present the analysis of 26 light curves of HAT-P-11 obtained with the Kepler satellite over 4 months. The light curves show spot-crossing anomalies, which are used to demonstrate that the stellar rotation and planetary orbit are misaligned by 90 +/- 23 degrees. This method of measuring spin-orbit alignment is purely photometric and is therefore complementary to the spectroscopic Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. Furthermore this new technique delivers the three-dimensional spin-orbit angle rather than the sky projection. For HAT-P-11 the analysis also shows that star spots occur at certain preferred latitudes on the star, as is the case for the Sun. We expect that these preferred latitudes will migrate toward the stellar equator over the years, in analogy with the "butterfly diagram" observed for sunspots. Thus, data from an extended Kepler mission will allow for a new and powerful probe of starspot activity cycles.

  14. γ-ray decay from neutron-bound and unbound states in 95Mo and a novel technique for spin determination

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wiedeking, M.; Krticka, M.; Bernstein, L. A.; Allmond, James M.; Basunia, M. S.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Daub, B. H.; Fallon, P.; Firestone, R. B.; et al

    2016-02-01

    The emission of γ rays from neutron-bound and neutron-unbound states in 95Mo, populated in the 94Mo(d,p) reaction, has been investigated. Charged particles and γ radiation were detected with arrays of annular silicon and Clover-type high-purity Germanium detectors, respectively. Utilizing p-γ and p-γ-γ coincidences, the 95Mo level scheme was greatly enhanced with 102 new transitions and 43 new states. It agrees well with shell model calculations for excitation energies below ≈2 MeV. From p-γ coincidence data, a new method for the determination of spins of discrete levels is proposed. The method exploits the suppression of high-angular momentum neutron emission from levelsmore » with high spins populated in the (d,p) reaction above the neutron separation energy. As a result, spins for almost all 95Mo levels below 2 MeV (and for a few levels above) have been determined with this method.« less

  15. NMR and EPR spectroscopic and structural studies of low-spin, (d(xz),d(y)(z))(4)(d(x)(y))(1) ground state Fe(III) bis-tert-butylisocyanide complexes of dodecasubstituted porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Yatsunyk, Liliya A; Walker, F Ann

    2004-07-12

    The bis-(1,1-dimethylethylisocyanide) (tert-butylisocyanide) complexes of three iron porphyrinates (2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin, OETPP; 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octamethyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin, OMTPP; and 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-tetra-beta,beta'-tetramethylene-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin, TC(6)TPP) have been prepared and studied by EPR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. From EPR and NMR spectroscopic results it has been found that the ground states of the bis-(t-BuNC) complexes of OETPP, OMTPP, and TC(6)TPP are represented mainly (99.1-99.4%) as (d(xz,)d(yz))(4)(d(xy))(1) electron configurations, with an excited state lying 700 cm(-)(1) to higher energy for the OMTPP complex, and probably at lower and higher energies, respectively, for the OETPP and TC(6)TPP complexes. In the (1)H NMR spectra the (d(xz,)d(yz))(4)(d(xy))(1) electron configurations of all three complexes are indicated by the large and positive meso-phenyl-H shift differences, delta(m)-delta(o) and delta(m)-delta(p), and close to the diamagnetic shifts of groups (CH(3) or CH(2)) directly attached to the beta-carbons. However, in comparison to meso-only substituted porphyrinates such as [FeTPP(t-BuNC)(2)]ClO(4), the meso-phenyl shift differences are much smaller, especially for the OETPP complex. 2D NOESY spectra show that the flexibility of the porphyrin core decreases with increasing nonplanar distortion in the order TC(6)TPP > OMTPP > OETPP and in the same order the stability of the binding to t-BuNC ligands decreases. In addition, the structures of two crystalline forms of [FeOMTPP(t-BuNC)(2)]ClO(4) have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both structures showed purely saddled porphyrin cores and somewhat off-axis binding of the isocyanide ligands. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a porphyrin complex with a purely saddled conformation that adopts the (d(xz,)d(yz))(4)(d(xy))(1) ground state. All structurally-characterized complexes of this electron

  16. Spin labeling EPR.

    PubMed

    Klare, Johann P; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has emerged as an efficient tool to elucidate the structure and conformational dynamics of biomolecules under native-like conditions. This article summarizes the basics as well as recent progress of site-directed spin labeling. Continuous wave EPR spectra analyses and pulse EPR techniques are reviewed with special emphasis on applications to the sensory rhodopsin-transducer complex mediating the photophobic response of the halophilic archaeum Natronomonas pharaonis and the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. PMID:19728138

  17. Counting spins with a new spin echo double resonance

    PubMed

    Cull; Joers; Gullion; Norberg; Conradi

    1998-08-01

    In traditional spin echo double resonance (SEDOR), the echo amplitude M is decreased when the observed spins S are flipped by pi together with the pi refocusing pulse on the observed spins I; the dependence on tau is then determined. In the new version of SEDOR, the echo amplitude is measured as a function of the S spin flip angle theta at a constant pulse spacing tau. The analysis is simple and powerful for long tau, where the strong collision limit applies. There, the variation of M with theta can be fit, yielding the number n of spins S to which each spin I is coupled. Data from amorphous silicon with 1H and 2D show the described effect. A MAS version of the new method is used on multiply labeled alanine and urea, with results in good agreement with the predictions for n = 2, as expected. By Fourier transforming M with respect to the flip angle theta, a stick spectrum results; the largest numbered non-vanishing stick yields the number n of spins S coupled to each spin I. Simulations are presented for an n = 2 system. The present technique is compared to the multiple-quantum spin-counting method. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9716478

  18. Magnetic tunnel spin injectors for spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Roger

    Research in spin-based electronics, or "spintronics", has a universal goal to develop applications for electron spin in a broad range of electronics and strives to produce low power nanoscale devices. Spin injection into semiconductors is an important initial step in the development of spintronic devices, with the goal to create a highly spin polarized population of electrons inside a semiconductor at room temperature for study, characterization, and manipulation. This dissertation investigates magnetic tunnel spin injectors that aim to meet the spin injection requirements needed for potential spintronic devices. Magnetism and spin are inherently related, and chapter 1 provides an introduction on magnetic tunneling and spintronics. Chapter 2 then describes the fabrication of the spin injector structures studied in this dissertation, and also illustrates the optical spin detection technique that correlates the measured electroluminescence polarization from quantum wells to the electron spin polarization inside the semiconductor. Chapter 3 reports the spin injection from the magnetic tunnel transistor (MTT) spin injector, which is capable of producing highly spin polarized tunneling currents by spin selective scattering in its multilayer structure. The MTT achieves ˜10% lower bound injected spin polarization in GaAs at 1.4 K. Chapter 4 reports the spin injection from CoFe-MgO(100) tunnel spin injectors, where spin dependent tunneling through MgO(100) produces highly spin polarized tunneling currents. These structures achieve lower bound spin polarizations exceeding 50% at 100 K and 30% in GaAs at 290 K. The CoFe-MgO spin injectors also demonstrate excellent thermal stability, maintaining high injection efficiencies even after exposure to temperatures of up to 400 C. Bias voltage and temperature dependent studies on these structures indicate a significant dependence of the electroluminescence polarization on the spin and carrier recombination lifetimes inside the

  19. Ultrasonic separation of a suspension for in situ spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogo, Kosuke; Qi, Wei; Mori, Keita; Ogawa, Satoshi; Inohara, Daichi; Hosono, Satsuki; Kawashima, Natsumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Application of spectroscopic techniques to suspensions is difficult because optical scattering caused by solid particles reduces the accuracy. At the extreme, dense suspensions like blood cannot be analyzed by spectroscopic techniques. In the present study, an ultrasonic standing wave was used to agglomerate fluorescent particles in an aqueous ethanol suspension at the nodes of the standing wave. Relatively clear liquid regions, which contained few particles that could cause optical scattering, appeared around the anti-nodes and were used for spectroscopic imaging. This produced a spectrum that was similar to that of clear aqueous ethanol without any fluorescent particles.

  20. Multislice 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging: assessment of epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Michael W.; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Schuff, Norbert; Soher, Brian J.; Vermathen, Peter P.; Fein, George; Laxer, Kenneth D.

    1998-07-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H MRSI) with volume pre-selection (i.e. by PRESS) or multislice 1H MRSI was used to investigate changes in brain metabolites in Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Examples of results from several ongoing clinical studies are provided. Multislice 1H MRSI of the human brain, without volume pre-selection offers considerable advantages over previously available techniques. Furthermore, MRI tissue segmentation and completely automated spectra curve fitting greatly facilitate quantitative data analysis. Future efforts will be devoted to obtaining full brain coverage and data acquisition at short spin echo times (TE less than 30 ms) for the detection of metabolites with short T2 relaxation times.

  1. Spectroscopic and theoretical studies of the low-lying states of BaO{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Joshua H.; VanGundy, Robert A.; Heaven, Michael C.

    2015-07-28

    The BaO{sup +} cation is of interest from the perspectives of electronic structure and the potential for cooling to ultra-cold temperatures. Spectroscopic data for the ion have been obtained using a two-color photoionization technique. The ionization energy for BaO was found to be 6.8123(3) eV. The ground state of BaO{sup +} was identified as X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}, and both vibrational and rotational constants were determined. Vibrationally resolved spectra were recorded for A{sup 2}Π, the first electronically excited state. These data yielded the term energy, vibrational frequency, and the spin-orbit interaction constant. Relativistic electronic structure calculations were carried out using multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI), coupled cluster and density functional theory methods. Transition moments for the pure vibrational and A{sup 2}Π-X{sup 2}Σ{sup +} transitions were predicted using the MRCI method.

  2. Overview of spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1992-12-23

    Spin physics activities at medium and high energies became significantly active when polarized targets and polarized beams became accessible for hadron-hadron scattering experiments. My overview of spin physics will be inclined to the study of strong interaction using facilities at Argonne ZGS, Brookhaven AGS (including RHIC), CERN, Fermilab, LAMPF, an SATURNE. In 1960 accelerator physicists had already been convinced that the ZGS could be unique in accelerating a polarized beam; polarized beams were being accelerated through linear accelerators elsewhere at that time. However, there was much concern about going ahead with the construction of a polarized beam because (i) the source intensity was not high enough to accelerate in the accelerator, (ii) the use of the accelerator would be limited to only polarized-beam physics, that is, proton-proton interaction, and (iii) p-p elastic scattering was not the most popular topic in high-energy physics. In fact, within spin physics, [pi]-nucleon physics looked attractive, since the determination of spin and parity of possible [pi]p resonances attracted much attention. To proceed we needed more data beside total cross sections and elastic differential cross sections; measurements of polarization and other parameters were urgently needed. Polarization measurements had traditionally been performed by analyzing the spin of recoil protons. The drawbacks of this technique are: (i) it involves double scattering, resulting in poor accuracy of the data, and (ii) a carbon analyzer can only be used for a limited region of energy.

  3. Raman and nuclear inelastic scattering study of the lattice dynamics of the [Fe(H2B(pz)2)2(phen)] spin crossover complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rat, Sylvain; Mikolasek, Mirko; Costá, José Sánchez; Chumakov, Aleksandr I.; Nicolazzi, William; Molnár, Gábor; Salmon, Lionel; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2016-06-01

    We report on a combined nuclear inelastic scattering and metal isotope substitution based Raman spectroscopic investigation of lattice dynamics changes associated with the spin transition in the ferrous complex [Fe(H2B(pz)2)2(phen)] (pz = pyrazolyl, phen = 1,10-phenantroline). These techniques allowed us to identify Raman active metal - ligand stretching vibrations in the high spin (vHS = 232 cm-1) and low spin (vLS = 390 cm-1) states as well as to calculate associated changes of the Debye temperature (ΘDHS = 140 K, ΘDLS = 146 K), Debye sound velocity (vHS = 1282 m/s, vLS = 1300 m/s) and Young's modulus (EHS = 4.7 GPa, ELS = 5.2 GPa).

  4. Endo- and exohedral carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation and spectroscopic characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambre, Sofie

    One of the most fascinating properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is that their external surface as well as their inner hollow space can be used to adsorb or encapsulate various molecules, thereby creating so-called exo- and endohedral nanohybrids that combine the properties of the individual components with new functionalities which originate from the interaction between both materials. In this thesis, different endo- and exohedral CNT-hybrids are investigated by means of a range of spectroscopic techniques, in particular UV/Vis absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence, resonant Raman scattering (RRS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The solubilisation of the CNTs with bile salt surfactants, yielding highly concentrated solutions of individually isolated CNTs in water, is investigated with spin-probe EPR. The spin-probe is incorporated inside the micellar layer wrapping the CNTs and the dynamics and orientation of this spin-probe is studied by EPR. In this thesis it is demonstrated that the encapsulation of water in pre-opened CNTs can be probed by resonant Raman scattering of the radial breathing modes of the CNTs. The frequencies of these modes, as well as the electronic resonances of the CNTs are shifted upon water-filling. Therefore it was possible to set up a technique to quantitatively monitor the opening/closing and water-filling of CNTs after different chemical and mechanical treatments. Exohedral porphyrin/CNT hybrids were prepared and investigated by EPR. It was found that metallic CNTs are stronger pi-acceptors than semiconducting CNTs. After solubilising the nanohybrids using bile salts, we obtained, for the first time, the isolated nanohybrids in solution in the pure form. The absorption spectrum of these porphyrins in the nanohybrids is strongly red shifted compared to the free porphyrin absorption. In addition also a quasi-complete quenching of the porphyrin fluorescence is observed. Finally endohedral CNT hybrids, using

  5. Proton spectroscopic imaging of human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moonen, Chrit T. W.; Sobering, Geoffrey; Van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Gillen, Joe; Von Kienlin, Markus; Bizzi, Alberto

    Signals from water and fat can cause artifacts in proton spectroscopic imaging in the human brain. The major problem is variation of the B0 field over a range of several ppm within the sensitive volume of the standard whole-head coil. Here, the coherence-pathway formalism is used to describe and evaluate the origin of artifacts in a double spin-echo (PRESS) sequence. The attenuation of unwanted coherences using pulsed field gradients is described for homogeneous and inhomogeneous B0 fields. The effect of the following parameters on the quality of the spectroscopic images is analyzed: (a) directional order of plane selection, (b) positioning of phase-encode gradients in the sequence, (c) postprocessing spatial windowing, and (d) motion. It is shown that, for a typical echo time of 272 ms, it is not necessary to first select a region of interest within the brain borders when sufficient phase-encode steps are used. Examples of 2D proton spectroscopic images with a nominal voxel volume of 0.85 ml are given for a healthy volunteer and a patient with a low-grade glioma.

  6. Induction-detection electron spin resonance with spin sensitivity of a few tens of spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artzi, Yaron; Twig, Ygal; Blank, Aharon

    2015-02-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a spectroscopic method that addresses electrons in paramagnetic materials directly through their spin properties. ESR has many applications, ranging from semiconductor characterization to structural biology and even quantum computing. Although it is very powerful and informative, ESR traditionally suffers from low sensitivity, requiring many millions of spins to get a measureable signal with commercial systems using the Faraday induction-detection principle. In view of this disadvantage, significant efforts were made recently to develop alternative detection schemes based, for example, on force, optical, or electrical detection of spins, all of which can reach single electron spin sensitivity. This sensitivity, however, comes at the price of limited applicability and usefulness with regard to real scientific and technological issues facing modern ESR which are currently dealt with conventional induction-detection ESR on a daily basis. Here, we present the most sensitive experimental induction-detection ESR setup and results ever recorded that can detect the signal from just a few tens of spins. They were achieved thanks to the development of an ultra-miniature micrometer-sized microwave resonator that was operated at ˜34 GHz at cryogenic temperatures in conjunction with a unique cryogenically cooled low noise amplifier. The test sample used was isotopically enriched phosphorus-doped silicon, which is of significant relevance to spin-based quantum computing. The sensitivity was experimentally verified with the aid of a unique high-resolution ESR imaging approach. These results represent a paradigm shift with respect to the capabilities and possible applications of induction-detection-based ESR spectroscopy and imaging.

  7. Induction-detection electron spin resonance with spin sensitivity of a few tens of spins

    SciTech Connect

    Artzi, Yaron; Twig, Ygal; Blank, Aharon

    2015-02-23

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a spectroscopic method that addresses electrons in paramagnetic materials directly through their spin properties. ESR has many applications, ranging from semiconductor characterization to structural biology and even quantum computing. Although it is very powerful and informative, ESR traditionally suffers from low sensitivity, requiring many millions of spins to get a measureable signal with commercial systems using the Faraday induction-detection principle. In view of this disadvantage, significant efforts were made recently to develop alternative detection schemes based, for example, on force, optical, or electrical detection of spins, all of which can reach single electron spin sensitivity. This sensitivity, however, comes at the price of limited applicability and usefulness with regard to real scientific and technological issues facing modern ESR which are currently dealt with conventional induction-detection ESR on a daily basis. Here, we present the most sensitive experimental induction-detection ESR setup and results ever recorded that can detect the signal from just a few tens of spins. They were achieved thanks to the development of an ultra-miniature micrometer-sized microwave resonator that was operated at ∼34 GHz at cryogenic temperatures in conjunction with a unique cryogenically cooled low noise amplifier. The test sample used was isotopically enriched phosphorus-doped silicon, which is of significant relevance to spin-based quantum computing. The sensitivity was experimentally verified with the aid of a unique high-resolution ESR imaging approach. These results represent a paradigm shift with respect to the capabilities and possible applications of induction-detection-based ESR spectroscopy and imaging.

  8. Identification of pH-sensitive regions in the mouse prion by the cysteine-scanning spin-labeling ESR technique

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yasuko; Inanami, Osamu . E-mail: inanami@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp; Horiuchi, Motohiro; Hiraoka, Wakako; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Kuwabara, Mikinori

    2006-11-24

    We analyzed the pH-induced mobility changes in moPrP{sup C} {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheets by cysteine-scanning site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) with ESR. Nine amino acid residues of {alpha}-helix1 (H1, codon 143-151), four amino acid residues of {beta}-sheet1 (S1, codon 127-130), and four amino acid residues of {beta}-sheet2 (S2, codon 160-163) were substituted for by cysteine residues. These recombinant mouse PrP{sup C} (moPrP{sup C}) mutants were reacted with a methane thiosulfonate sulfhydryl-specific spin labeling reagent (MTSSL). The 1/{delta}H of the central ({sup 14}N hyperfine) component (M{sub I} = 0) in the ESR spectrum of spin-labeled moPrP{sup C} was measured as a mobility parameter of nitroxide residues (R1). The mobilities of E145R1 and Y149R1 at pH 7.4, which was identified as a tertiary contact site by a previous NMR study of moPrP, were lower than those of D143R1, R147R1, and R150R1 reported on the helix surface. Thus, the mobility in the H1 region in the neutral solution was observed with the periodicity associated with a helical structure. On the other hand, the values in the S2 region, known to be located in the buried side, were lower than those in the S1 region located in the surface side. These results indicated that the mobility parameter of the nitroxide label was well correlated with the 3D structure of moPrP. Furthermore, the present study clearly demonstrated three pH-sensitive sites in moPrP, i.e. (1) the N-terminal tertiary contact site of H1 (2) the C-terminal end of H1, and (3) the S2 region. In particular, among these pH-sensitive sites, the N-terminal tertiary contact region of H1 was found to be the most pH-sensitive one and was easily converted to a flexible structure by a slight decrease of pH in the solution. These data provided molecular evidence to explain the cellular mechanism for conversion from PrP{sup C} to PrP{sup Sc} in acidic organelles such as the endosome.

  9. Spectroscopic infrared ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseler, A.

    1992-03-01

    The spectroscopic infrared ellipsometry (SIRE) by means of the combination of a photometric ellipsometer with a Fourier transform spectrometer is used to measure optical properties in the infrared. From the observed four Stokes parameters, the spectrum of the degree of polarization after the reflection at the sample is calculated and discussed.

  10. Spectroscopic wear detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The elemental composition of a material exposed to hot gases and subjected to wear is determined. Atoms of an elemental species not appearing in this material are implanted in a surface at a depth based on the maximum allowable wear. The exhaust gases are spectroscopically monitored to determine the exposure of these atoms when the maximum allowable wear is reached.

  11. Neutron phase spin echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegsa, Florian M.; Hautle, Patrick; Schanzer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A novel neutron spin resonance technique is presented based on the well-known neutron spin echo method. In a first proof-of-principle measurement using a monochromatic neutron beam, it is demonstrated that relative velocity changes of down to a precision of 4 ×10-7 can be resolved, corresponding to an energy resolution of better than 3 neV. Currently, the sensitivity is only limited by counting statistics and not by systematic effects. An improvement by another two orders of magnitude can be achieved with a dedicated setup, allowing energy resolutions in the 10 peV regime. The new technique is ideally suited for investigations in the field of precision fundamental neutron physics, but will also be beneficial in scattering applications.

  12. Spin ejector

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A.; Flanigan, John J.; Kindley, Robert J.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus for spin ejecting a body having a flat plate base containing bosses. The apparatus has a base plate and a main ejection shaft extending perpendicularly from the base plate. A compressible cylindrical spring is disposed about the shaft. Bearings are located between the shaft and the spring. A housing containing a helical aperture releasably engages the base plate and surrounds the shaft bearings and the spring. A piston having an aperture follower disposed in the housing aperture is seated on the spring and is guided by the shaft and the aperture. The spring is compressed and when released causes the piston to spin eject the body.

  13. Spin blockade qubit in a superconducting junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padurariu, C.; Nazarov, Yu. V.

    2012-12-01

    We interpret a recent pioneering experiment (Zgirski M. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011) 257003) on quasiparticle manipulation in a superconducting break junction in terms of spin blockade drawing analogy with spin qubits. We propose a novel qubit design that exploits the spin state of two trapped quasiparticles. We detail the coherent control of all four spin states by resonant quantum manipulation and compute the corresponding Rabi frequencies. The read-out technique is based on the spin blockade that inhibits quasiparticle recombination in triplet states. We provide extensive microscopic estimations of the parameters of our model.

  14. Microfabricated Spin Polarized Atomic Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez Martinez, Ricardo

    Spin polarized atomic magnetometers involve the preparation of atomic spins and their detection for monitoring magnetic fields. Due to the fact that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our world, spin polarized atomic magnetometers are used in a wide range of applications from the detection of magnetic fields generated by the human heart and brain to the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance. In this thesis we developed microfabricated spin polarized atomic magnetometers. These sensors are based on optical pumping and spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms and noble gases contained in microfabricated millimeter-scale vapor cells. In the first part of the thesis, we improved different features of current microfabricated optical magnetometers. Specifically, we improved the bandwidth of these devices, without degrading their magnetic field sensitivity, by broadening their magnetic resonance through spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms. We also implemented all-optical excitation techniques to avoid problems, such as the magnetic perturbation of the environment, induced by the radio-frequency fields used in some of these sensors. In the second part of the thesis we demonstrated a microfluidic chip for the optical production and detection of hyperpolarized Xe gas through spin-exchange collisions with optically pumped Rb atoms. These devices are critical for the widespread use of spin polarized atomic magnetometers in applications requiring simple, compact, low-cost, and portable instrumentation.

  15. Recovery of spinning satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppey, J. M.; Mahaffey, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of a space tug and a spinning satellite in a coupled configuration was simulated and analyzed. A docking concept was developed to investigate the requirements pertaining to the design of a docking interface. Sensing techniques and control requirements for the chase vehicle were studied to assess the feasibility of an automatic docking. The effects of nutation dampers and liquid propellant slosh motion upon the docking transient were investigated.

  16. Addressing spectroscopic quality of covariant density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasjev, A. V.

    2015-03-01

    The spectroscopic quality of covariant density functional theory has been accessed by analyzing the accuracy and theoretical uncertainties in the description of spectroscopic observables. Such analysis is first presented for the energies of the single-particle states in spherical and deformed nuclei. It is also shown that the inclusion of particle-vibration coupling improves the description of the energies of predominantly single-particle states in medium and heavy-mass spherical nuclei. However, the remaining differences between theory and experiment clearly indicate missing physics and missing terms in covariant energy density functionals. The uncertainties in the predictions of the position of two-neutron drip line sensitively depend on the uncertainties in the prediction of the energies of the single-particle states. On the other hand, many spectroscopic observables in well deformed nuclei at ground state and finite spin only weakly depend on the choice of covariant energy density functional.

  17. Muon spin rotation in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stronach, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The muon spin rotation (MuSR) technique is used to probe the microscopic electron density in materials. High temperature MuSR and magnetization measurements in nickel are in progress to allow an unambiguous determination of the muon impurity interaction and the impurity induced change in local spin density. The first results on uniaxial stress induced frequency shifts in an Fe single crystal are also reported.

  18. Spectroscopic Studies of Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, Michael Joseph

    The objectives of this work are to use spectroscopic techniques to accurately categorize galaxies as either HII region star forming galaxies or as Active Galactic Nuclei powered via a black hole, and to use radial velocities and projected positions of galaxies in clusters to obtain the total cluster mass and its distribution. The masses and distributions compare well to X-ray mass measurements. The commonly used Dressler, A., Thompson, I. & Shectman, S. 1985, ApJ, 288, 481 technique for discriminating between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies uses the measurement of the equivalent width of the emission lines (OII) 3727 A, H/beta, and (OIII) 5007 A. High quality spectra from 42 galaxies were taken and it is shown that their method is not capable of distinguishing between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. The emission line flux from H/beta, (OIII) 5007 A, (OI) 6300 A, Hα, (NII) 6583 A, and (SII) 6716+6731 A in combination with the method of Veilleux, S. & Osterbrock, D. E. 1987, ApJS, 63, 295 must be used to accurately distinguish between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. Galaxy radial velocities from spectroscopic data and their projected 2-D positions in clusters are used to obtain robust estimates of the total mass and mass distribution in two clusters. The total mass is calculated using the Virial theorem after removing substructure. The mass distribution is estimated via several robust statistical tests for 1-D, 2-D and 3-D structure. It is shown that the derived mass estimates agree well with those found independently from hot X-ray gas emission in clusters.

  19. The kinematic differences between off-spin and leg-spin bowling in cricket.

    PubMed

    Beach, Aaron J; Ferdinands, René E D; Sinclair, Peter J

    2016-09-01

    Spin bowling is generally coached using a standard technical framework, but this practice has not been based upon a comparative biomechanical analysis of leg-spin and off-spin bowling. This study analysed the three-dimensional (3D) kinematics of 23 off-spin and 20 leg-spin bowlers using a Cortex motion analysis system to identify how aspects of the respective techniques differed. A multivariate ANOVA found that certain data tended to validate some of the stated differences in the coaching literature. Off-spin bowlers had a significantly shorter stride length (p = 0.006) and spin rate (p = 0.001), but a greater release height than leg-spinners (p = 0.007). In addition, a number of other kinematic differences were identified that were not previously documented in coaching literature. These included a larger rear knee flexion (p = 0.007), faster approach speed (p < 0.001), and flexing elbow action during the arm acceleration compared with an extension action used by most of the off-spin bowlers. Off-spin and leg-spin bowlers also deviated from the standard coaching model for the shoulder alignment, front knee angle at release, and forearm mechanics. This study suggests that off-spin and leg-spin are distinct bowling techniques, supporting the development of two different coaching models in spin bowling. PMID:27126895

  20. Direct measurements of spin propagation in organic spin valves by low-energy muon spin rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, Alan

    2013-03-01

    Organic semiconductors fall into a class of materials that shows significant potential for future applications, but many of the fundamental mechanisms of spin relaxation and transport are not understood. As a result, the field is becoming extremely topical, but there is a need for suitable techniques that can yield information on intrinsic spin dynamics and transport in organic materials. I will present Low Energy Muon Spin Rotation measurements and demonstrate that this technique can directly measure the depth resolved spin polarisation of charge carriers in organic spin injection devices. I will then go on to show that it is possible to separate out the various contributions to spin decoherence, differentiating between interface and bulk effects. By correlating macroscopic measurements with these separated interfacial and bulk effects, I will present evidence that it is possible to engineer interfaces in organic spintronic devices. Finally, I will present some of the latest results on how spin injection and transport depend on bias voltage. Research funded by the EU 7th Framework NMP Program (``HINTS'' NMP3-SL-2011-263104) and the European Research Council (``MuSES'' 307593).

  1. Spin structure of the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1995-08-01

    In these lectures the author argues that their response to the spin crisis should not be to abandon the naive quark model baby, but rather to allow it to mature. He begin by recalling what a beautiful baby the quark model is via an overview of its successes in spectroscopy, dynamics, and valence spin structure. He also introduces the conservative hypothesis that dynamical q{anti q} pairs are its key missing ingredient. He then discusses dressing the baby. He first shows that it can be clothed in glue without changing its spectroscopic successes. In the process, several dynamical mysteries associated with quark model spectroscopy are potentially explained. Next, he dresses the baby in q{anti q} pairs, first showing that this can be done without compromising the naive quark model's success with either spectroscopy or the OZI rule. Finally, he shows that despite their near invisibility elsewhere, pairs do play an important role in the proton's spin structure by creating an antipolarized q{anti q} sea. In the context of an explicit calculation he demonstrate that it is plausible that the entire ''spin crisis'' arises from this effect.

  2. On the utility of spectroscopic imaging as a tool for generating geometrically accurate MR images and parameter maps in the presence of field inhomogeneities and chemical shift effects.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Chris J G; de Leeuw, Hendrik; van de Maat, Gerrit H; van Gorp, Jetse S; Bouwman, Job G; Seevinck, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Lack of spatial accuracy is a recognized problem in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which severely detracts from its value as a stand-alone modality for applications that put high demands on geometric fidelity, such as radiotherapy treatment planning and stereotactic neurosurgery. In this paper, we illustrate the potential and discuss the limitations of spectroscopic imaging as a tool for generating purely phase-encoded MR images and parameter maps that preserve the geometry of an object and allow localization of object features in world coordinates. Experiments were done on a clinical system with standard facilities for imaging and spectroscopy. Images were acquired with a regular spin echo sequence and a corresponding spectroscopic imaging sequence. In the latter, successive samples of the acquired echo were used for the reconstruction of a series of evenly spaced images in the time and frequency domain. Experiments were done with a spatial linearity phantom and a series of test objects representing a wide range of susceptibility- and chemical-shift-induced off-resonance conditions. In contrast to regular spin echo imaging, spectroscopic imaging was shown to be immune to off-resonance effects, such as those caused by field inhomogeneity, susceptibility, chemical shift, f(0) offset and field drift, and to yield geometrically accurate images and parameter maps that allowed object structures to be localized in world coordinates. From these illustrative examples and a discussion of the limitations of purely phase-encoded imaging techniques, it is concluded that spectroscopic imaging offers a fundamental solution to the geometric deficiencies of MRI which may evolve toward a practical solution when full advantage will be taken of current developments with regard to scan time reduction. This perspective is backed up by a demonstration of the significant scan time reduction that may be achieved by the use of compressed sensing for a simple phantom. PMID:22898694

  3. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  4. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  5. Spin pumping and spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Eiji

    2012-02-01

    Utilization of a spin current, a flow of electrons' spins in a solid, is the key technology in spintronics that will allow the achievement of efficient magnetic memories and computing devices. In this technology, generation and detection of spin currents are necessary. Here, we review inverse spin-Hall effect and spin-current-generation phenomena recently discovered both in metals and insulators: inverse spin-Hall effect, spin pumping, and spin Seebeck effect. (1)Spin pumping and spin torque in a Mott insulator system We found that spin pumping and spin torque effects appear also at an interface between Pt and an insulator YIG.. This means that we can connect a spin current carried by conduction electrons and a spin-wave spin current flowing in insulators. We demonstrate electric signal transmission by using these effects and interconversion of the spin currents [1]. (2) Spin Seebeck effect We have observed, by using the inverse spin-Hall effect [2], spin voltage generation from a heat current in a NiFe, named the spin-Seebeck effect [3]. Surprisingly, spin-Seebeck effect was found to appear even in insulators [4], a situation completely different from conventional charge Seebeck effect. The result implies an important role of elementary excitation in solids beside charge in the spin Seebeck effect. In the talk, we review the recent progress of the research on this effect. This research is collaboration with K. Ando, K. Uchida, Y. Kajiwara, S. Maekawa, G. E. W. Bauer, S. Takahashi, and J. Ieda. [4pt] [1] Y. Kajiwara and E. Saitoh et al. Nature 464 (2010) 262. [0pt] [2] E. Saitoh et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 (2006) 182509. [0pt] [3] K. Uchida and E. Saitoh et al., Nature 455 (2008)778. [0pt] [4] K. Uchida and E. Saitoh et al.,Nature materials 9 (2010) 894 - 897.

  6. NV magnetic imaging of topological spin patterns in magnetic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casola, Francesco; Dovzhenko, Yuliya; Zhou, Xu; Warner, Marc; Schlotter, Sarah; Beach, Geoffrey; Walsworth, Ronald; Yacoby, Amir

    2015-05-01

    Scanning diamond microscopes with an atom-like nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center near the probe tip have recently emerged as a leading tool for the study of nanoscale magnetism in a broad range of systems. We report on the development of a new approach for positiong a single NV centre at a few nanometres from the sample of interest. This is achieved by fabricating our magnetic device at the top of a polished quartz fiber, whose distance from a diamond nanopillar containing NV centers is then controlled via an atomic force microscope feedback. We employ this method for the investigation of thin ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayers, where interfacial spin-orbit coupling is expected to stabilize complex topologically protected spin textures. The few-nanometers real-space extension of an isolated skyrmion structure in thin magnetic films makes its detection via standard spectroscopic techniques challenging, suggesting how NV magnetometry can be a unique candidate for the study of novel mesoscopic magnetism.

  7. Enhanced Atomic-Scale Spin Contrast due to Spin Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouazi, S.; Kubetzka, A.; von Bergmann, K.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2014-02-01

    Atom manipulation with the magnetic tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is a versatile technique to construct and investigate well-defined atomic spin arrangements. Here we explore the possibility of using a magnetic adatom as a local probe to image surface spin textures. As a model system we choose a Néel state with 120° between neighboring magnetic moments. Close to the threshold of manipulation, the adatom resides in the threefold, magnetically frustrated hollow sites, and consequently no magnetic signal is detected in manipulation images. At smaller tip-adatom distances, however, the adatom is moved towards the magnetically active bridge sites and due to the exchange force of the tip the manipulation process becomes spin dependent. In this way the adatom can be used as an amplifying probe for the surface spin texture.

  8. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp → Φp

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; Williams, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Goetz, J. T.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacGregor, I. J.D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moriya, K.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rizzo, A.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-05-27

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γ p → Φp have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (√s) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the Φ production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the Φ natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (Φ → K⁺K⁻) and neutral- (Φ → K0SK0L) KK̄ decay modes of the Φ. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K⁻ track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed Φ mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide √s bins for the charged- and the neutral-mode, respectively. Possible effects from K⁺Λ* channels with pKK̄ final-states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive Φ photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ω photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction.

  9. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp → Φp

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; Williams, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; et al

    2014-05-27

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γ p → Φp have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (√s) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the Φ production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the Φ natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (Φ → K⁺K⁻) and neutral- (Φ → K0SK0L) KK̄ decay modes of themore » Φ. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K⁻ track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed Φ mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide √s bins for the charged- and the neutral-mode, respectively. Possible effects from K⁺Λ* channels with pKK̄ final-states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive Φ photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ω photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction.« less

  10. Emergent spin

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, Michael

    2014-03-15

    Quantum mechanics and relativity in the continuum imply the well known spin–statistics connection. However for particles hopping on a lattice, there is no such constraint. If a lattice model yields a relativistic field theory in a continuum limit, this constraint must “emerge” for physical excitations. We discuss a few models where a spin-less fermion hopping on a lattice gives excitations which satisfy the continuum Dirac equation. This includes such well known systems such as graphene and staggered fermions. -- Highlights: •The spin–statistics theorem is not required for particles on a lattice. •Spin emerges dynamically when spinless fermions have a relativistic continuum limit. •Graphene and staggered fermions are examples of this phenomenon. •The phenomenon is intimately tied to chiral symmetry and fermion doubling. •Anomaly cancellation is a crucial feature of any valid lattice fermion action.

  11. Measurement of spin coherence using Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Delteil, A.; Faelt, S.; Imamoǧlu, A.

    2016-06-01

    Ramsey interferometry provides a natural way to determine the coherence time of most qubit systems. Recent experiments on quantum dots, however, demonstrated that dynamical nuclear spin polarization can strongly influence the measurement process, making it difficult to extract the T2* coherence time using standard optical Ramsey pulses. Here, we demonstrate an alternative method for spin coherence measurement that is based on first-order coherence of photons generated in spin-flip Raman scattering. We show that if a quantum emitter is driven by a weak monochromatic laser, Raman coherence is determined exclusively by spin coherence, allowing for a direct determination of spin T2* time. When combined with coherence measurements on Rayleigh scattered photons, our technique enables us to identify coherent and incoherent contributions to resonance fluorescence, and to minimize the latter. We verify the validity of our technique by comparing our results to those determined from Ramsey interferometry for electron and heavy-hole spins.

  12. Spin noise spectroscopy in semiconductors: from a billion down to single spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, J.; Dahbashi, R.; Berski, F.; Wiegand, J.; Kuhn, H.; Lonnemann, J.; Oestreich, M.

    2014-08-01

    Spin noise spectroscopy in semiconductors has matured during the past nine years into a versatile and well developed technique being capable to unveil the intrinsic and unaltered spin dynamics in a wide range of semiconductor systems. Originating from atom and quantum optics as a potential true quantum non-demolition measurement technique, SNS is capable of unearthing the intricate dynamics of free or localized electron and hole spins in semiconductors being eventually coupled to the nuclear spin bath as well. In this contribution, we review shortly the major steps which inspired the success of spin noise spectroscopy in semiconductors and present the most recent extensions into the low-invasive detection regime of the spin dynamics for the two extreme limits of very high and extremely low rates of spin decoherence, respectively. On the one hand, merging ultrafast laser spectroscopy with spin noise spectroscopy enables the detection of spin noise with picosecond resolution, i.e., with THz bandwidths yielding access to otherwise concealed microscopic electronic processes. On the other hand, we present very high sensitivity SNS being capable to measure the extremely long spin coherence of single holes enclosed in individual quantum dots venturing a step forward towards true optical quantum non-demolition experiments in semiconductors. In addition, higher-order spin noise statistics of, e.g., single charges can give information beyond the linear response regime governed by the fundamental fluctuationdissipation theorem and thereby possibly shed some light on the nested coupling between electronic and nuclear spins.

  13. A Spectroscopic Investigation on the Structural Evolution of Soy Based Polyurethane Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthanparambil, Deepa; Kimball, Casey; Hsu, Shaw L.

    2009-03-01

    Our current research deals with an economical and renewable soy based polyol for use in polyurethane foams. Infrared spectroscopic studies have revealed that the amount of polyurea segments formed and the kinetics of their formation in soy based polyurethane foam systems are considerably different from traditional systems employing ethylene oxide -- propylene oxide based polyols. The most crucial aspect of this research deals with the miscibility of water in the reactive mixtures involving extremely hydrophobic soy-based polyols. High Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR) with D2O as the probing agent was employed to determine the miscibility behavior at the molecular level. This technique was able to establish the structure and location of dispersed water, which can be extremely different based on the polyols used, thus affecting the morphology of the foam. The length and amount of polyureas directly impact the kinetics of the phase separation process to form the hard-segment rich domains and associated physical properties. The aggregation of these polyurea hard domains were characterized by the hydrogen bonds formed. This structural transformation as a function of reaction is also reflected in the segmental relaxation kinetics characterized by spin-spin diffusion, measured using a low field NMR instrument.

  14. Directional spin wave emission by the spin transfer torque oscillator into a nanomagnonic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Vladislav; Demokritov, Sergej; Urazhdin, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Magnonics is based on signal transmission and processing by spin waves in a magnetic medium. Spin-torque nanooscillators (STNO) driven by dc electrical current can provide a local source of spin waves for nanomagnonics, but their spectral mismatch with the magnetic medium limits the spin wave emission efficiency. We have developed a nanomagnonic structure that combines a point-contact STNO with a dipolar field-induced nanowaveguide. We will describe our microfocus Brillouin light scattering microscopy measurements demonstrating efficient excitation of spin waves by the STNO and their directional propagation in the waveguide. Spectroscopic measurements and micromagnetic simulations indicate that efficient spectral matching between the waveguide and the STNO is achieved due the internal dipolar field of the nanopatterned waveguide. We show that the spin wave propagation length is increased compared to the extended films, due to their larger group velocity and the lack of wavefront spreading. Our results provide a simple and efficient route for the implementation of magnonic structures that integrate spin torque-based sources of spin waves and their processing via waveguiding structures. Supported by NSF ECCS-1305586.

  15. LIBS spectroscopic classification relative to compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Steven T.; Jacobs, Eddie; Furxhi, Orges

    2011-05-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) utilizes a diversity of standard spectroscopic techniques for classification of materials present in the sample. Pre-excitation processing sometimes limits the analyte to a short list of candidates. Prior art demonstrates that sparsity is present in the data. This is sometimes characterized as identification by components. Traditionally, spectroscopic identification has been accomplished by an expert reader in a manner typical for MRI images in the medicine. In an effort to automate this process, more recent art has emphasized the use of customized variations to standard classification algorithms. In addition, formal mathematical proofs for compressive sensing have been advanced. Recently the University of Memphis has been contracted by the Spectroscopic Materials Identification Center to advance and characterize the sensor research and development related to LIBS. Applications include portable standoff sensing for improvised explosive device detection and related law enforcement and military applications. Reduction of the mass, power consumption and other portability parameters is seen as dependent on classification choices for a LIBS system. This paper presents results for the comparison of standard LIBS classification techniques to those implied by Compressive Sensing mathematics. Optimization results and implications for portable LIBS design are presented.

  16. Flux measurements using the BATSE spectroscopic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Among the Compton Gama-Ray Observatory instruments, the BATSE Spectroscopic Detectors (SD) have the distinction of being able to detect photons of energies less than about 20 keV. This is an interesting energy range for the examination of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's). In fact, Sco X-1, the prototype LMXB, is easily seen even in the raw BATSE spectroscopic data. The all-sky coverage afforded by these detectors offers a unique opportunity to monitor this source over time periods never before possible. The aim of this investigation was to test a number of ways in which both continous and discrete flux measurements can be obtained using the BATSE spectroscopic datasets. A instrumental description of a SD can be found in the Compton Workshop of Apr. 1989, this report will deal only with methods which can be used to analyze its datasets. Many of the items discussed below, particularly in regard to the earth occultation technique, have been developed, refined, and applied by the BATSE team to the reduction of BATSE LAD data. Code written as part of this project utilizes portions of that work. The following discussions will first address issues related to the reduction of SD datasets using the earth occultation technique. It will then discuss methods for the recovery of the flux history of strong sources while they are above the earth's limb. The report will conclude with recommended reduction procedures.

  17. Drift transport of helical spin coherence with tailored spin–orbit interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kunihashi, Y.; Sanada, H.; Gotoh, H.; Onomitsu, K.; Kohda, M.; Nitta, J.; Sogawa, T.

    2016-01-01

    Most future information processing techniques using electron spins in non-magnetic semiconductors will require both the manipulation and transfer of spins without their coherence being lost. The spin–orbit effective magnetic field induced by drifting electrons enables us to rotate the electron spins in the absence of an external magnetic field. However, the fluctuations in the effective magnetic field originating from the random scattering of electrons also cause undesirable spin decoherence, which limits the length scale of the spin transport. Here we demonstrate the drift transport of electron spins adjusted to a robust spin structure, namely a persistent spin helix. We find that the persistent spin helix enhances the spatial coherence of drifting spins, resulting in maximized spin decay length near the persistent spin helix condition. Within the enhanced distance of the spin transport, the transport path of electron spins can be modulated by employing time-varying in-plane voltages. PMID:26952129

  18. THIRTY NEW LOW-MASS SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Hebb, Leslie; Cameron, Andrew C.; Liu, Michael C.; Neill Reid, I. E-mail: Andrew.Cameron@st-and.ac.u E-mail: mliu@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-06-20

    As part of our search for young M dwarfs within 25 pc, we acquired high-resolution spectra of 185 low-mass stars compiled by the NStars project that have strong X-ray emission. By cross-correlating these spectra with radial velocity standard stars, we are sensitive to finding multi-lined spectroscopic binaries. We find a low-mass spectroscopic binary fraction of 16% consisting of 27 SB2s, 2 SB3s, and 1 SB4, increasing the number of known low-mass spectroscopic binaries (SBs) by 50% and proving that strong X-ray emission is an extremely efficient way to find M-dwarf SBs. WASP photometry of 23 of these systems revealed two low-mass eclipsing binaries (EBs), bringing the count of known M-dwarf EBs to 15. BD-22 5866, the ESB4, was fully described in 2008 by Shkolnik et al. and CCDM J04404+3127 B consists of two mid-M stars orbiting each other every 2.048 days. WASP also provided rotation periods for 12 systems, and in the cases where the synchronization time scales are short, we used P{sub rot} to determine the true orbital parameters. For those with no P{sub rot}, we used differential radial velocities to set upper limits on orbital periods and semimajor axes. More than half of our sample has near-equal-mass components (q > 0.8). This is expected since our sample is biased toward tight orbits where saturated X-ray emission is due to tidal spin-up rather than stellar youth. Increasing the samples of M-dwarf SBs and EBs is extremely valuable in setting constraints on current theories of stellar multiplicity and evolution scenarios for low-mass multiple systems.

  19. Spin injection into semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestreich, M.; Hübner, J.; Hägele, D.; Klar, P. J.; Heimbrodt, W.; Rühle, W. W.; Ashenford, D. E.; Lunn, B.

    1999-03-01

    The injection of spin-polarized electrons is presently one of the major challenges in semiconductor spin electronics. We propose and demonstrate a most efficient spin injection using diluted magnetic semiconductors as spin aligners. Time-resolved photoluminescence with a Cd0.98Mn0.02Te/CdTe structure proves the feasibility of the spin-alignment mechanism.

  20. Universality in bipartite mean field spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we give a proof of universality with respect to the choice of the statistical distribution of the quenched noise, for mean field bipartite spin glasses. We use mainly techniques of spin glasses theory, as Guerra's interpolation and the cavity approach.

  1. Properties of nuclei at very high spin

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.

    1980-09-01

    Nuclear structure at very high spins involves an interplay between collective (often rotational) and noncollective (individual particle alignment) behavior. The new techniques for studying ..gamma..-ray energy correlations promise to give detailed information about both of these aspects of nuclear behavior up to the very highest spins that can be populated. 17 figures.

  2. Paramagnetic and Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Stephen

    We report on the observation of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic insulators. By using a microscale on-chip local heater, it is possible to generate a large thermal gradient confined to the chip surface without a large increase in the total sample temperature. This technique allows us to easily access low temperatures (200 mK) and high magnetic fields (14 T) through conventional dilution refrigeration and superconducting magnet setups. By exploring this regime, we detect the spin Seebeck effect through the spin-flop transition in antiferromagnetic MnF2 when a large magnetic field (>9 T) is applied along the easy axis direction. Using the same technique, we are also able to resolve a spin Seebeck effect from the paramagnetic phase of geometrically frustrated antiferromagnet Gd3Ga5O12 (gadolinium gallium garnet) and antiferromagnetic DyScO3 (DSO). Since these measurements occur above the ordering temperatures of these two materials, short-range magnetic order is implicated as the cause of the spin Seebeck effect in these systems. The discovery of the spin Seebeck effect in these two materials classes suggest that both antiferromagnetic spin waves and spin excitations from short range magnetic order may be used to generate spin current from insulators and that the spin wave spectra of individual materials are highly important to the specifics of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect. Since insulating antiferromagnets and paramagnets are far more common than the typical insulating ferrimagnetic materials used in spin Seebeck experiments, this discovery opens up a large new class of materials for use in spin caloritronic devices. All authors acknowledge support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Materials Sciences and Engineering Division. The use of facilities at the Center for Nanoscale Materials, was supported by the U.S. DOE, BES under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  3. Electrical detection of coherent spin precession using the ballistic intrinsic spin Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Young; Kim, Hyung-jun; Chang, Joonyeon; Han, Suk Hee; Koo, Hyun Cheol; Johnson, Mark

    2015-08-01

    The spin-orbit interaction in two-dimensional electron systems provides an exceptionally rich area of research. Coherent spin precession in a Rashba effective magnetic field in the channel of a spin field-effect transistor and the spin Hall effect are the two most compelling topics in this area. Here, we combine these effects to provide a direct demonstration of the ballistic intrinsic spin Hall effect and to demonstrate a technique for an all-electric measurement of the Datta-Das conductance oscillation, that is, the oscillation in the source-drain conductance due to spin precession. Our hybrid device has a ferromagnet electrode as a spin injector and a spin Hall detector. Results from multiple devices with different channel lengths map out two full wavelengths of the Datta-Das oscillation. We also use the original Datta-Das technique with a single device of fixed length and measure the channel conductance as the gate voltage is varied. Our experiments show that the ballistic spin Hall effect can be used for efficient injection or detection of spin polarized electrons, thereby enabling the development of an integrated spin transistor. PMID:26005997

  4. Coherent electron-spin-resonance manipulation of three individual spins in a triple quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noiri, A.; Yoneda, J.; Nakajima, T.; Otsuka, T.; Delbecq, M. R.; Takeda, K.; Amaha, S.; Allison, G.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Tarucha, S.

    2016-04-01

    Quantum dot arrays provide a promising platform for quantum information processing. For universal quantum simulation and computation, one central issue is to demonstrate the exhaustive controllability of quantum states. Here, we report the addressable manipulation of three single electron spins in a triple quantum dot using a technique combining electron-spin-resonance and a micro-magnet. The micro-magnet makes the local Zeeman field difference between neighboring spins much larger than the nuclear field fluctuation, which ensures the addressable driving of electron-spin-resonance by shifting the resonance condition for each spin. We observe distinct coherent Rabi oscillations for three spins in a semiconductor triple quantum dot with up to 25 MHz spin rotation frequencies. This individual manipulation over three spins enables us to arbitrarily change the magnetic spin quantum number of the three spin system, and thus to operate a triple-dot device as a three-qubit system in combination with the existing technique of exchange operations among three spins.

  5. Random SU(2)-symmetric spin-S chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quito, V. L.; Hoyos, José A.; Miranda, E.

    2016-08-01

    We study the low-energy physics of a broad class of time-reversal invariant and SU(2)-symmetric one-dimensional spin-S systems in the presence of quenched disorder via a strong-disorder renormalization-group technique. We show that, in general, there is an antiferromagnetic phase with an emergent SU (2 S +1 ) symmetry. The ground state of this phase is a random singlet state in which the singlets are formed by pairs of spins. For integer spins, there is an additional antiferromagnetic phase which does not exhibit any emergent symmetry (except for S =1 ). The corresponding ground state is a random singlet one but the singlets are formed mostly by trios of spins. In each case the corresponding low-energy dynamics is activated, i.e., with a formally infinite dynamical exponent, and related to distinct infinite-randomness fixed points. The phase diagram has two other phases with ferromagnetic tendencies: a disordered ferromagnetic phase and a large spin phase in which the effective disorder is asymptotically finite. In the latter case, the dynamical scaling is governed by a conventional power law with a finite dynamical exponent.

  6. Spin-spin correlations of magnetic adatoms on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güçlü, A. D.; Bulut, Nejat

    2015-03-01

    We study the interaction between two magnetic adatom impurities in graphene using the Anderson model. The two-impurity Anderson Hamiltonian is solved numerically by using the quantum Monte Carlo technique. We find that the interimpurity spin susceptibility is strongly enhanced at low temperatures, significantly diverging from the well-known Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida result which decays as R-3.

  7. Spin noise in mixed Spin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Erik; Junghyun, Paul; Singh, Swati; Devakul, Trithep; Feguin, Adrian; Hart, Connor; Walsworth, Ronald

    2016-05-01

    The spin noise due to interaction of multiple spin species in mixed spin systems provides a fundamental limit to ultra-sensitive ensemble sensing and quantum information applications. In our work, we investigate the interaction of dense nuclear 13C spins with electronic nitrogen spins using Nitrogen-Vacancy centers in diamond. Our work shows experimentally and theoretically, that under certain conditions, spin noise is greatly suppressed and the coherence time of NV centers improved by order of magnitudes, providing a pathway to engineering high density ensemble samples with long coherence times at room temperature.

  8. Nuclear spin circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Vaara, Juha; Rizzo, Antonio; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia

    2014-04-07

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in magneto-optic spectroscopy techniques that use nuclear magnetization as the source of the magnetic field. Here we present a formulation of magnetic circular dichroism (CD) due to magnetically polarized nuclei, nuclear spin-induced CD (NSCD), in molecules. The NSCD ellipticity and nuclear spin-induced optical rotation (NSOR) angle correspond to the real and imaginary parts, respectively, of (complex) quadratic response functions involving the dynamic second-order interaction of the electron system with the linearly polarized light beam, as well as the static magnetic hyperfine interaction. Using the complex polarization propagator framework, NSCD and NSOR signals are obtained at frequencies in the vicinity of optical excitations. Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory calculations on relatively small model systems, ethene, benzene, and 1,4-benzoquinone, demonstrate the feasibility of the method for obtaining relatively strong nuclear spin-induced ellipticity and optical rotation signals. Comparison of the proton and carbon-13 signals of ethanol reveals that these resonant phenomena facilitate chemical resolution between non-equivalent nuclei in magneto-optic spectra.

  9. Generation and Detection of Spin Currents in Semiconductor Nanostructures with Strong Spin-Orbit Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichele, Fabrizio; Hennel, Szymon; Pietsch, Patrick; Wegscheider, Werner; Stano, Peter; Jacquod, Philippe; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Storing, transmitting, and manipulating information using the electron spin resides at the heart of spintronics. Fundamental for future spintronics applications is the ability to control spin currents in solid state systems. Among the different platforms proposed so far, semiconductors with strong spin-orbit interaction are especially attractive as they promise fast and scalable spin control with all-electrical protocols. Here we demonstrate both the generation and measurement of pure spin currents in semiconductor nanostructures. Generation is purely electrical and mediated by the spin dynamics in materials with a strong spin-orbit field. Measurement is accomplished using a spin-to-charge conversion technique, based on the magnetic field symmetry of easily measurable electrical quantities. Calibrating the spin-to-charge conversion via the conductance of a quantum point contact, we quantitatively measure the mesoscopic spin Hall effect in a multiterminal GaAs dot. We report spin currents of 174 pA, corresponding to a spin Hall angle of 34%.

  10. The Art of Neutron Spin Flipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieffers, Justin; Holley, Adam; Snow, W. M.

    2014-09-01

    Low energy precision measurements complement high energy collider results in the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Neutron spin rotation is a sensitive technique to search for possible exotic velocity and spin-dependent interactions involving the neutron from the exchange of light (~ meV) spin 1 bosons. We plan to conduct such searches using beams of cold neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). To change the spin state of the neutrons in the apparatus we have developed an Adiabatic Fast Passage (AFP) neutron spin flipper. I will present the mechanical design, static and RF magnetic field modeling and measurements, and spin flip efficiency optimization of the constructed device. I would like to acknowledge the NSF REU program (NSF-REU grant PHY-1156540) and the Indiana University nuclear physics group (NSF grant PHY-1306942) for this opportunity.

  11. Memory of spin polarization in triplet-doublet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, T.; Onitsuka, O.; Obi, K.

    1986-12-18

    The interaction between triplet molecules and nitroxide radicals is studied in solution by the time-resolved ESR technique. Spin polarization induced in the radical reflects that of the triplet molecule which is an encounter partner. The spin-polarized ESR signals observed in nitroxide radicals are interpreted in terms of electron and/or spin exchange mechanisms.

  12. Long-range spin-triplet correlations and edge spin currents in diffusive spin-orbit coupled SNS hybrids with a single spin-active interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidoust, Mohammad; Halterman, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Utilizing a SU(2) gauge symmetry technique in the quasiclassical diffusive regime, we theoretically study finite-sized two-dimensional intrinsic spin-orbit coupled superconductor/normal-metal/superconductor (S/N/S) hybrid structures with a single spin-active interface. We consider intrinsic spin-orbit interactions (ISOIs) that are confined within the N wire and absent in the s-wave superconducting electrodes (S). Using experimentally feasible parameters, we demonstrate that the coupling of the ISOIs and spin moment of the spin-active interface results in maximum singlet-triplet conversion and accumulation of spin current density at the corners of the N wire nearest the spin-active interface. By solely modulating the superconducting phase difference, we show how the opposing parities of the charge and spin currents provide an effective venue to experimentally examine pure edge spin currents not accompanied by charge currents. These effects occur in the absence of externally imposed fields and moreover are insensitive to the arbitrary orientations of the interface spin moment. The experimental implementation of these robust edge phenomena are also discussed.

  13. Long-range spin-triplet correlations and edge spin currents in diffusive spin-orbit coupled SNS hybrids with a single spin-active interface.

    PubMed

    Alidoust, Mohammad; Halterman, Klaus

    2015-06-17

    Utilizing a SU(2) gauge symmetry technique in the quasiclassical diffusive regime, we theoretically study finite-sized two-dimensional intrinsic spin-orbit coupled superconductor/normal-metal/superconductor (S/N/S) hybrid structures with a single spin-active interface. We consider intrinsic spin-orbit interactions (ISOIs) that are confined within the N wire and absent in the s-wave superconducting electrodes (S). Using experimentally feasible parameters, we demonstrate that the coupling of the ISOIs and spin moment of the spin-active interface results in maximum singlet-triplet conversion and accumulation of spin current density at the corners of the N wire nearest the spin-active interface. By solely modulating the superconducting phase difference, we show how the opposing parities of the charge and spin currents provide an effective venue to experimentally examine pure edge spin currents not accompanied by charge currents. These effects occur in the absence of externally imposed fields and moreover are insensitive to the arbitrary orientations of the interface spin moment. The experimental implementation of these robust edge phenomena are also discussed. PMID:25996592

  14. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of fluoroquinolones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, U.; Szeghalmi, A.; Schmitt, M.; Kiefer, W.; Popp, J.; Holzgrabe, U.

    2005-05-01

    Quinolones are important gyrase inhibitors. Even though they are used as active agents in many antibiotics, the detailed mechanism of action on a molecular level is so far not known. It is of greatest interest to shed light on this drug-target interaction to provide useful information in the fight against growing resistances and obtain new insights for the development of new powerful drugs. To reach this goal, on a first step it is essential to understand the structural characteristics of the drugs and the effects that are caused by the environment in detail. In this work we report on Raman spectroscopical investigations of a variety of gyrase inhibitors (nalidixic acid, oxolinic acid, cinoxacin, flumequine, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, enoxacin, sarafloxacin and moxifloxacin) by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy excited with various excitation wavelengths, both in the off-resonance region (532, 633, 830 and 1064 nm) and in the resonance region (resonance Raman spectroscopy at 244, 257 and 275 nm). Furthermore DFT calculations were performed to assign the vibrational modes, as well as for an identification of intramolecular hydrogen bonding motifs. The effect of small changes in the drug environment was studied by adding successively small amounts of water until physiological low concentrations of the drugs in aqueous solution were obtained. At these low concentrations resonance Raman spectroscopy proved to be a useful and sensitive technique. Supplementary information was obtained from IR and UV/vis spectroscopy.

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of visbreaking tars

    SciTech Connect

    Scotti, R.; Clericuzio, M.; Pirovano, C.

    1995-12-31

    Visbreaking (VB) is a thermal cracking process, widely used in the refineries of Western Europe to obtain distillates (gasoil, naphtha) from a petroleum residue (feedstock). The visbroken residue (tar) is used to produce fuel oil, after addition of the appropriate amounts of cutter-stock. Even if the highest conversion of feedstock would be desirable, the severity of the VB process is limited by the stability of the resulting VB tars. The stability index (SI) here employed is: SI = I + V{sub cet}, where V{sub cet} is the maximum amount of n-cetane, expressed as ml of cetane for g of sample, that can be added before the flocculation of asphaltenes starts. VB tars having SI<1.1 are considered to be unstable and cannot be used in the preparation of fuel oils with the appropriate specifications. Several papers can be found in the literature dealing with the molecular changes occuring during the VB process. The present paper is aimed at verifying the amount of information that can be extracted from optical spectroscopies and, in particular, the possibility of directly monitoring the physico-chemical modifications caused by VB process. To this purpose a series of VB tars, produced from a single feedstock at different severities, were investigated by a number of spectroscopic techniques, viz.: NIR; UV-Vis; Fluorescence; {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NUR, EPR.

  16. A Review of Nucleon Spin Calculations in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-08-01

    We review recent progress on lattice calculations of nucleon spin structure, including the parton distribution functions, form factors, generalization parton distributions, and recent developments in lattice techniques.

  17. Quasiparticle spin resonance and coherence in superconducting aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quay, C. H. L.; Weideneder, M.; Chiffaudel, Y.; Strunk, C.; Aprili, M.

    2015-10-01

    Conventional superconductors were long thought to be spin inert; however, there is now increasing interest in both (the manipulation of) the internal spin structure of the ground-state condensate, as well as recently observed long-lived, spin-polarized excitations (quasiparticles). We demonstrate spin resonance in the quasiparticle population of a mesoscopic superconductor (aluminium) using novel on-chip microwave detection techniques. The spin decoherence time obtained (~100 ps), and its dependence on the sample thickness are consistent with Elliott-Yafet spin-orbit scattering as the main decoherence mechanism. The striking divergence between the spin coherence time and the previously measured spin imbalance relaxation time (~10 ns) suggests that the latter is limited instead by inelastic processes. This work stakes out new ground for the nascent field of spin-based electronics with superconductors or superconducting spintronics.

  18. Time-of-flight spectroscopy via spin precession: The Larmor clock and anomalous spin dephasing in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biqin; Appelbaum, Ian

    2010-12-01

    Drift-diffusion theory—which fully describes charge transport in semiconductors—is also universally used to model transport of spin-polarized electrons in the presence of longitudinal electric fields. By transforming spin transit time into spin orientation with precession (a technique called the “Larmor clock”) in current-sensing vertical-transport intrinsic Si devices, we show that spin diffusion (and concomitant spin dephasing) can be greatly enhanced with respect to charge diffusion, in direct contrast to predictions of spin Coulomb-drag diffusion suppression.

  19. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    There are numerous methods of investigating intervertebral disc. Visualization methods are widely used in clinical practice. Histological, imunohistochemical and biochemical methods are more used in scientific research. We propose that a new spectroscopic investigation would be useful in determining intervertebral disc material, especially when no histological specimens are available. Purpose: to determine spectroscopic parameters of intervertebral disc material; to determine emission spectra common for all intervertebral discs; to create a background for further spectroscopic investigation where no histological specimen will be available. Material and Methods: 20 patients, 68 frozen sections of 20 μm thickness from operatively removed intervertebral disc hernia were excited by Nd:YAG microlaser STA-01-TH third harmonic 355 nm light throw 0, 1 mm fiber. Spectrophotometer OceanOptics USB2000 was used for spectra collection. Mathematical analysis of spectra was performed by ORIGIN multiple Gaussian peaks analysis. Results: In each specimen of disc hernia were found distinct maximal spectral peaks of 4 types supporting the histological evaluation of mixture content of the hernia. Fluorescence in the spectral regions 370-700 nm was detected in the disc hernias. The main spectral component was at 494 nm and the contribution of the components with the peak wavelength values at 388 nm, 412 nm and 435±5 nm were varying in the different groups of samples. In comparison to average spectrum of all cases, there are 4 groups of different spectral signatures in the region 400-500 nm in the patient groups, supporting a clinical data on different clinical features of the patients. Discussion and Conclusion: besides the classical open discectomy, new minimally invasive techniques of treating intervertebral disc emerge (PLDD). Intervertebral disc in these techniques is assessed by needle, no histological specimen is taken. Spectroscopic investigation via fiber optics through the

  20. Spectroscopic ellipsometer for ultra thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashika, Kumiko; Shiota, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Shinji; Horie, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2008-03-01

    As semiconductor technology has advanced, the films have become thinner and changed to multi-layer films, such as gate dielectric construction. To deal with these trends, we are continuing development of our spectroscopic ellipsometer with elliptical polarization. We chose a Rotating-Analyzer Ellipsometer (RAE) configuration. The incident light in this type of device is usually polarized linearly, because polarizers do not disperse the light. But the incident light in the ellipsometer described in this paper is elliptical, which has a nearly circular polarization. In this paper, we introduce a technique for solving the dispersion problem.

  1. Spectroscopic methods in gas hydrate research.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Florian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline structures comprising a guest molecule surrounded by a water cage, and are particularly relevant due to their natural occurrence in the deep sea and in permafrost areas. Low molecular weight molecules such as methane and carbon dioxide can be sequestered into that cage at suitable temperatures and pressures, facilitating the transition to the solid phase. While the composition and structure of gas hydrates appear to be well understood, their formation and dissociation mechanisms, along with the dynamics and kinetics associated with those processes, remain ambiguous. In order to take advantage of gas hydrates as an energy resource (e.g., methane hydrate), as a sequestration matrix in (for example) CO(2) storage, or for chemical energy conservation/storage, a more detailed molecular level understanding of their formation and dissociation processes, as well as the chemical, physical, and biological parameters that affect these processes, is required. Spectroscopic techniques appear to be most suitable for analyzing the structures of gas hydrates (sometimes in situ), thus providing access to such information across the electromagnetic spectrum. A variety of spectroscopic methods are currently used in gas hydrate research to determine the composition, structure, cage occupancy, guest molecule position, and binding/formation/dissociation mechanisms of the hydrate. To date, the most commonly applied techniques are Raman spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Diffraction methods such as neutron and X-ray diffraction are used to determine gas hydrate structures, and to study lattice expansions. Furthermore, UV-vis spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have assisted in structural studies of gas hydrates. Most recently, waveguide-coupled mid-infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral range has demonstrated its value for in situ studies on the formation and dissociation of gas

  2. Identification of high-spin states in the stable nucleus {sup 195}Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Y. D.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhou, X. H.; Liu, M. L.; Wang, J. G.; Guo, Y. X.; Lei, X. G.; Hua, W.; Ma, F.; Fang, F.; Wang, S. C.; Gao, B. S.; Li, S. C.; Yan, X. L.; He, L.; Wang, Z. G.; Wu, X. G.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Wang, Z. M.

    2011-07-15

    Excited states of the stable nucleus {sup 195}Pt have been studied using an in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopic technique following the incomplete fusion of {sup 7}Li on an {sup 192}Os target at 44 MeV. A level scheme built on the I{sup {pi}=}13/2{sup +} isomer has been established up to I{sup {pi}=}33/2{sup -} at an excitation energy of about 2.6 MeV. Spin and parity values of these states have been assigned from an analysis of anisotropy ratios of {gamma} rays and by analogy with the neighboring nuclei. A comparison of the observed structures with the yrast states in the neighboring even-even {sup 196}Pt core indicates that the identified levels may be regarded as arising from the weak coupling of a {nu}i{sub 13/2} neutron hole to the core states.

  3. Cross-correlation spin noise spectroscopy of heterogeneous interacting spin systems

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Dibyendu; Yang, Luyi; Crooker, Scott A.; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2015-04-30

    Interacting multi-component spin systems are ubiquitous in nature and in the laboratory. As such, investigations of inter-species spin interactions are of vital importance. Traditionally, they are studied by experimental methods that are necessarily perturbative: e.g., by intentionally polarizing or depolarizing one spin species while detecting the response of the other(s). Here, we describe and demonstrate an alternative approach based on multi-probe spin noise spectroscopy, which can reveal inter-species spin interactions - under conditions of strict thermal equilibrium - by detecting and cross-correlating the stochastic fluctuation signals exhibited by each of the constituent spin species. Specifically, we consider a two-component spin ensemble that interacts via exchange coupling, and we determine cross-correlations between their intrinsic spin fluctuations. The model is experimentally confirmed using “two-color” optical spin noise spectroscopy on a mixture of interacting Rb and Cs vapors. Noise correlations directly reveal the presence of inter-species spin exchange, without ever perturbing the system away from thermal equilibrium. These non-invasive and noise-based techniques should be generally applicable to any heterogeneous spin system in which the fluctuations of the constituent components are detectable.

  4. Cross-correlation spin noise spectroscopy of heterogeneous interacting spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Dibyendu; Yang, Luyi; Crooker, Scott A.; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2015-04-01

    Interacting multi-component spin systems are ubiquitous in nature and in the laboratory. As such, investigations of inter-species spin interactions are of vital importance. Traditionally, they are studied by experimental methods that are necessarily perturbative: e.g., by intentionally polarizing or depolarizing one spin species while detecting the response of the other(s). Here, we describe and demonstrate an alternative approach based on multi-probe spin noise spectroscopy, which can reveal inter-species spin interactions - under conditions of strict thermal equilibrium - by detecting and cross-correlating the stochastic fluctuation signals exhibited by each of the constituent spin species. Specifically, we consider a two-component spin ensemble that interacts via exchange coupling, and we determine cross-correlations between their intrinsic spin fluctuations. The model is experimentally confirmed using ``two-color'' optical spin noise spectroscopy on a mixture of interacting Rb and Cs vapors. Noise correlations directly reveal the presence of inter-species spin exchange, without ever perturbing the system away from thermal equilibrium. These non-invasive and noise-based techniques should be generally applicable to any heterogeneous spin system in which the fluctuations of the constituent components are detectable.

  5. Mobile Spectroscopic Instrumentation in Archaeometry Research.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Donais, Mary Kate

    2016-01-01

    Mobile instrumentation is of growing importance to archaeometry research. Equipment is utilized in the field or at museums, thus avoiding transportation or risk of damage to valuable artifacts. Many spectroscopic techniques are nondestructive and micro-destructive in nature, which preserves the cultural heritage objects themselves. This review includes over 160 references pertaining to the use of mobile spectroscopy for archaeometry. Following a discussion of terminology related to mobile instrumental methods, results of a literature survey on their applications for cultural heritage objects is presented. Sections devoted to specific techniques are then provided: Raman spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and less frequently used techniques. The review closes with a discussion of combined instrumental approaches. PMID:26767631

  6. Spin-Spin Coupling in Asteroidal Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Gravitationally bound binaries constitute a substantial fraction of the small body population of the solar system, and characterization of their rotational states is instrumental to understanding their formation and dynamical evolution. Unlike planets, numerous small bodies can maintain a perpetual aspheroidal shape, giving rise to a richer array of non-trivial gravitational dynamics. In this work, we explore the rotational evolution of triaxial satellites that orbit permanently deformed central objects, with specific emphasis on quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. Our analysis shows that in addition to conventional spin-orbit resonances, both prograde and retrograde spin-spin resonances naturally arise for closely orbiting, highly deformed bodies. Application of our results to the illustrative examples of (87) Sylvia and (216) Kleopatra multi-asteroid systems implies capture probabilities slightly below ~10% for leading-order spin-spin resonances. Cumulatively, our results suggest that spin-spin coupling may be consequential for highly elongated, tightly orbiting binary objects.

  7. Spin-liquid condensate of spinful bosons.

    PubMed

    Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shoucheng

    2014-08-22

    We introduce the concept of a bosonic spin liquid condensate (SLC), where spinful bosons in a lattice form a zero-temperature spin disordered charge condensate that preserves the spin rotation symmetry, but breaks the U(1) symmetry due to a spinless order parameter with charge one. It has an energy gap to all the spin excitations. We show that such SLC states can be realized in a system of spin S ≥ 2 bosons. In particular, we analyze the SLC phase diagram in the spin 2 case using a mean-field variational wave function method. We show there is a direct analogy between the SLC and the resonating-valence-bond state. PMID:25192078

  8. Fast method for brain image segmentation: application to proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Bonekamp, David; Horská, Alena; Jacobs, Michael A; Arslanoglu, Atilla; Barker, Peter B

    2005-11-01

    The interpretation of brain metabolite concentrations measured by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is assisted by knowledge of the percentage of gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within each MRSI voxel. Usually, this information is determined from T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) that have a much higher spatial resolution than the MRSI data. While this approach works well, it is time-consuming. In this article, a rapid data acquisition and analysis procedure for image segmentation is described, which is based on collection of several, thick slice, fast spin echo images (FSE) of different contrast. Tissue segmentation is performed with linear "Eigenimage" filtering and normalization. The method was compared to standard segmentation techniques using high-resolution 3D T(1)-weighted MRI in five subjects. Excellent correlation between the two techniques was obtained, with voxel-wise regression analysis giving GM: R2 = 0.893 +/- 0.098, WM: R2 = 0.892 +/- 0.089, ln(CSF): R2 = 0.831 +/- 0.082). Test-retest analysis in one individual yielded an excellent agreement of measurements with R2 higher than 0.926 in all three tissue classes. Application of FSE/EI segmentation to a sample proton MRSI dataset yielded results similar to prior publications. It is concluded that FSE imaging in conjunction with Eigenimage analysis is a rapid and reliable way of segmenting brain tissue for application to proton MRSI. PMID:16187272

  9. Surface coil spectroscopic imaging: Time and spatial evolution of lactate production following fluid percussion brain injury

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Y.; Sanada, T.; Pitts, L.H.; Chang, L.H.; Nishimura, M.C.; Weinstein, P.R.; Litt, L.; James, T.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Detailed temporal and spatial distributions of lactate production are presented for graded fluid-percussion brain injury in the rat. A one-dimensional proton spin-echo spectroscopic imaging (1D SESI) technique, performed with a surface coil, is presented and evaluated. This technique, which represents a practical compromise, provides spatially localized proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) brain spectra from a series of small voxels (less than 0.15 cm3) in less than 10 min, thus enabling both spatial and temporal monitoring of lactate production. These high-resolution lactate maps are correlated with hyperintense regions observed in T2-weighted images taken 10 h after impact, which, in turn, correlate with histology. The data demonstrate that, following severe trauma there is delayed production and propagation of lactate to regions of the brain that are remote from the trauma site. The extent of lactate production depends on the severity of impact. More significantly, the data show that following severe trauma, local lactate concentrations exceed 15 mumol/g, the concentration that has been claimed as the threshold for brain injury. Therefore high lactate levels cannot be ruled out a priori as a possible factor in brain injury following severe head trauma.

  10. Squeezed light spin noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Kong, Jia; Mitchell, Morgan

    2016-05-01

    Spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for determining physical properties of an unperturbed spin system from its power noise spectrum both in atomic and solid state physics. In the presence of a transverse magnetic field, we detect spontaneous spin fluctuations of a dense Rb vapor via Faraday rotation of an off-resonance probe beam, resulting in the excess of spectral noise at the Larmor frequency over a white photon shot-noise background. We report quantum enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio via polarization squeezing of the probe beam up to 3dB over the full density range up to n = 1013 atoms cm-3, covering practical conditions used in optimized SNS experiments. Furthermore, we show that squeezing improves the trade-off between statistical sensitivity and systematic errors due to line broadening, a previously unobserved quantum advantage.

  11. Spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkin, S. T.; Hall, A.; Fraser, M.; Campbell, H.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Pietro, N.

    2014-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of four supernovae at the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph and the R300V grating (3500-8000 Ang; ~6 Ang resolution).

  12. Electrical control of quantum dot spin qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Edward Alexander

    This thesis presents experiments exploring the interactions of electron spins with electric fields in devices of up to four quantum dots. These experiments are particularly motivated by the prospect of using electric fields to control spin qubits. A novel hyperfine effect on a single spin in a quantum dot is presented in Chapter 2. Fluctuations of the nuclear polarization allow single-spin resonance to be driven by an oscillating electric field. Spin resonance spectroscopy revealed a nuclear polarization built up inside the quantum dot device by driving the resonance. The evolution of two coupled spins is controlled by the combination of hyperfine interaction, which tends to cause spin dephasing, and exchange, which tends to prevent it. In Chapter 3, dephasing is studied in a device with tunable exchange, probing the crossover between exchange-dominated and hyperfine-dominated regimes. In agreement with theoretical predictions, oscillations of the spin conversion probability and saturation of dephasing are observed. Chapter 4 deals with a three-dot device, suggested as a potential qubit controlled entirely by exchange. Preparation and readout of the qubit state are demonstrated, together with one out of two coherent exchange operations needed for arbitrary manipulations. A new readout technique allowing rapid device measurement is described. In Chapter 5, an attempt to make a two-qubit gate using a four-dot device is presented. Although spin qubit operation has not yet been possible, the electrostatic interaction between pairs of dots was measured to be sufficient in principle for coherent qubit coupling.

  13. Spin projection chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, E. P.; Pastawski, H. M.; Levstein, P. R.

    2004-01-01

    We formulate the many-body spin dynamics at high temperature within the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism. For the simplest XY interaction, analytical expressions in terms of the one particle solutions are obtained for linear and ring configurations. For small rings of even spin number, the group velocities of excitations depend on the parity of the total spin projection. This should enable a dynamical filtering of spin projections with a given parity i.e., a spin projection chromatography.

  14. Spectroscopic study of the extremely fast rotating star 44 Geminorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, L.; Vennes, S.; Kawka, A.; Kubat, J.; Nemeth, P.; Borisov, G.; KRaus, M.

    Stars with extremely fast rotation represent interesting challenge to modern understanding of the stellar evolution. The reasons why such a spin-up process should occur during the evolution to otherwise normal star are still not well understood. Already in the beginning of the XX century Otto Struve proposed that fast rotation of the group of stars spectroscopically classified as Be could be the main reason for the formation of observed disks of circumstellar material around them. This circumstellar material is responsible for the emission lines observed in the spectrum of Be-stars as well as for the whole complex of spectral and photometrical patterns called in general Be-phenomenon.

  15. Spectroscopic factors within the dinuclear-system model

    SciTech Connect

    Kuklin, S. N.; Adamian, G. G. Antonenko, N. V.

    2008-10-15

    A model of the cluster radioactivity of even-even nuclei is presented. In this model, zero-point vibrations in the charge-asymmetry coordinate determine spectroscopic factors, while tunneling in the coordinate of the relative separation of the centers of mass of the cluster and the daughter nucleus determine the penetrability of the barrier of the nucleus-nucleus potential. The conservation of the total spin and energy in the decay process is taken into account. The potential of the model for describing experimental half-lives is demonstrated. A number of predictions for possible cluster-emission reactions in the regions of lead and tin radioactivities are made.

  16. Ultraminiature one-shot Fourier-spectroscopic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shun; Qi, Wei; Kawashima, Natsumi; Nogo, Kosuke; Hosono, Satsuki; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    We propose one-shot Fourier-spectroscopic tomography as a method of ultraminiature spectroscopic imaging. The apparatus used in this technique consists solely of a glass slab with a portion of its surface polished at a certain inclination angle-a device we term a relative-inclination phase shifter-simply mounted on an infinite-distance-corrected optical imaging system. For this reason, the system may be ultraminiaturized to sizes on the order of a few tens of millimeters. Moreover, because our technique uses a near-common-path wavefront-division phase-shift interferometer and has absolutely no need for a mechanical drive unit, it is highly robust against mechanical vibrations. In addition, because the proposed technique uses Fourier-transform spectroscopy, it offers highly efficient light utilization and an outstanding signal-to-noise ratio compared to devices that incorporate distributed or hyperspectral acousto-optical tunable filters. The interferogram, which is a pattern formed by interference of waves at all wavelengths, reflects the spatial variation in the intensity of the interference depending on the magnitude of the phase shift. We first discuss the design of the phase shifter and the results of tests to validate the principles underlying one-shot Fourier-spectroscopic tomography. We then report the results of one-dimensional spectroscopic imaging using this technique.

  17. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.R.

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the application of multiple-resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigating energy transfer and dissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. Two major goals of this work are: (1) to provide information on potential energy surfaces of combustion related molecules at chemically significant energies, and (2) to test theoretical modes of unimolecular dissociation rates critically via quantum-state resolved measurements.

  18. Magnons, Spin Current and Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2012-02-01

    When metals and semiconductors are placed in a temperature gradient, the electric voltage is generated. This mechanism to convert heat into electricity, the so-called Seebeck effect, has attracted much attention recently as the mechanism for utilizing wasted heat energy. [1]. Ferromagnetic insulators are good conductors of spin current, i.e., the flow of electron spins [2]. When they are placed in a temperature gradient, generated are magnons, spin current and the spin voltage [3], i.e., spin accumulation. Once the spin voltage is converted into the electric voltage by inverse spin Hall effect in attached metal films such as Pt, the electric voltage is obtained from heat energy [4-5]. This is called the spin Seebeck effect. Here, we present the linear-response theory of spin Seebeck effect based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem [6-8] and discuss a variety of the devices. [4pt] [1] S. Maekawa et al, Physics of Transition Metal Oxides (Springer, 2004). [0pt] [2] S. Maekawa: Nature Materials 8, 777 (2009). [0pt] [3] Concept in Spin Electronics, eds. S. Maekawa (Oxford University Press, 2006). [0pt] [4] K. Uchida et al., Nature 455, 778 (2008). [0pt] [5] K. Uchida et al., Nature Materials 9, 894 (2010) [0pt] [6] H. Adachi et al., APL 97, 252506 (2010) and Phys. Rev. B 83, 094410 (2011). [0pt] [7] J. Ohe et al., Phys. Rev. B (2011) [0pt] [8] K. Uchida et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 104419 (2010).

  19. Spin state switching in iron coordination compounds

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Ana B; Garcia, Yann

    2013-01-01

    Summary The article deals with coordination compounds of iron(II) that may exhibit thermally induced spin transition, known as spin crossover, depending on the nature of the coordinating ligand sphere. Spin transition in such compounds also occurs under pressure and irradiation with light. The spin states involved have different magnetic and optical properties suitable for their detection and characterization. Spin crossover compounds, though known for more than eight decades, have become most attractive in recent years and are extensively studied by chemists and physicists. The switching properties make such materials potential candidates for practical applications in thermal and pressure sensors as well as optical devices. The article begins with a brief description of the principle of molecular spin state switching using simple concepts of ligand field theory. Conditions to be fulfilled in order to observe spin crossover will be explained and general remarks regarding the chemical nature that is important for the occurrence of spin crossover will be made. A subsequent section describes the molecular consequences of spin crossover and the variety of physical techniques usually applied for their characterization. The effects of light irradiation (LIESST) and application of pressure are subjects of two separate sections. The major part of this account concentrates on selected spin crossover compounds of iron(II), with particular emphasis on the chemical and physical influences on the spin crossover behavior. The vast variety of compounds exhibiting this fascinating switching phenomenon encompasses mono-, oligo- and polynuclear iron(II) complexes and cages, polymeric 1D, 2D and 3D systems, nanomaterials, and polyfunctional materials that combine spin crossover with another physical or chemical property. PMID:23504535

  20. Spin-orbit coupling in tungsten by spin-polarized two-electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarin, S.; Artamonov, O. M.; Sergeant, A. D.; Kirschner, J.; Morozov, A.; Williams, J. F.

    2004-08-01

    We present experimental results on low-energy spin-polarized two-electron spectroscopy of W(100) and W(110). A combination of a coincidence technique with the time-of-flight energy analysis was used to record angular and energy distributions of correlated electron pairs excited by spin-polarized low-energy primary electrons from a single crystal of tungsten. These distributions depend strongly on the polarization and the angle of incidence of the incident electron beam. Experimental data are discussed in terms of the symmetry properties, spin-dependent scattering dynamics, and spin-resolved electronic structure of the sample.

  1. In-situ spectroscopic studies of electrochromic tungsten oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Nilgun; Demirbas, Muharrem; Ozyurt, Secuk

    2001-11-01

    Tungsten oxide thin films were prepared using an ethanolic solution of tungsten hexachloride (WCl6) by sol-gel spin coating. The films were spin coated on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate at temperatures in the range of 100 to 450 degree(s)C. The films were characterized by x-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) UV- visible spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry (CV). XRD showed that they had a polycrystalline WO3 structure for heat treatment temperatures at above 350 degree(s)C. The SEM examinations showed that the surface texture was very uniform and homogeneous. In situ electrochemical reduction of WO3/ITO (2M HCl) produced a blue color in less than a second. Coloration efficiency (CE) was found to be 21 cm2/mC. In situ spectroscopic investigations showed that these films could be used as a working electrode in electrochromic devices.

  2. Spectroscopic investigations of heme proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Jennifer Pauline

    Using several novel spectroscopic techniques, we investigate the dynamics of heme proteins over the full range of time scales relevant to their function. With ˜10 femtosecond time resolution we use ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy to gain insight into the earliest dynamics initiated by the photodissociation of the carbon monoxide ligand from myoglobin. Coherent oscillations that are driven by the bond-breaking event reveal several vibrational modes of the heme that provide the driving force for the initial motions along the pathway to protein function. Much later along this pathway we address the question of ligand escape from myoglobin. With this purpose we develop heterodyne-detected diffractive-optics-based phase-grating spectroscopy, which provides more than 2 orders of magnitude increase in sensitivity for the measurement of volume changes and energetics. The improved sensitivity allows us to directly observe the ligand escape, which occurs via a number of discrete routes through the protein. Following the escape process, we observe the full cycle of dynamics that is complete when the carbon monoxide ligand rebinds to the protein. Using a resonant probe we re-examine the dynamics of ligand escape from myoglobin using transient absorption and transient-grating spectroscopy. This study confirms the findings of the previous off-resonant work, and allows us to explore the relationship between the observables in the phase-grating experiment and other resonant spectroscopies. The various dynamical processes of myoglobin provide a basis for understanding the structure/function relationship at the single protein level. This lays the foundation for a description of protein-protein interactions such as cooperativity in hemoglobin.

  3. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Applications in Advanced Lithography Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synowicki, R. A.; Pribil, Greg K.; Hilfiker, James N.; Edwards, Kevin

    2005-09-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is an optical metrology technique widely used in the semiconductor industry. For lithography applications SE is routinely used for measurement of film thickness and refractive index of polymer photoresist and antireflective coatings. While this remains a primary use of SE, applications are now expanding into other areas of advanced lithography research. New applications include immersion lithography, phase-shift photomasks, transparent pellicles, 193 and 157 nm lithography, stepper optical coatings, imprint lithography, and even real-time monitoring of etch development rate in liquid ambients. Of recent interest are studies of immersion fluids where knowledge of the fluid refractive index and absorption are critical to their use in immersion lithography. Phase-shift photomasks are also of interest as the thickness and index of the phase-shift and absorber layers must be critically controlled for accurate intensity and phase transmission. Thin transparent pellicles to protect these masks must be also characterized for thickness and refractive index. Infrared ellipsometry is sensitive to chemical composition, film thickness, and how film chemistry changes with processing. Real-time monitoring of polymer film thickness during etching in a liquid developer allows etch rate and endpoint determination with monolayer sensitivity. This work considers these emerging applications to survey the current status of spectroscopic ellipsometry as a characterization technique in advanced lithography applications.

  4. Forensic age estimation via 3-T magnetic resonance imaging of ossification of the proximal tibial and distal femoral epiphyses: Use of a T2-weighted fast spin-echo technique.

    PubMed

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Inci, Ercan; Can, Ismail Ozgur; Aksoy, Sema; Kazimoglu, Cemal

    2016-03-01

    Radiation exposure during forensic age estimation is associated with ethical implications. It is important to prevent repetitive radiation exposure when conducting advanced ultrasonography (USG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of 3.0-T MRI in determining the degree of ossification of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses in a group of Turkish population. We retrospectively evaluated coronal T2-weighted and turbo spin-echo sequences taken upon MRI of 503 patients (305 males, 198 females; age 10-30 years) using a five-stage method. Intra- and interobserver variations were very low. (Intraobserver reliability was κ=0.919 for the distal femoral epiphysis and κ=0.961 for the proximal tibial epiphysis, and interobserver reliability was κ=0.836 for the distal femoral epiphysis and κ=0.885 for the proximal tibial epiphysis.) Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated a significant positive relationship between age and the extent of ossification of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses (p<0.001). Comparison of male and female data revealed significant between-gender differences in the ages at first attainment of stages 2, 3, and 4 ossifications of the distal femoral epiphysis and stage 1 and 4 ossifications of the proximal tibial epiphysis (p<0.05). The earliest ages at which ossification of stages 3, 4, and 5 was evident in the distal femoral epiphysis were 14, 17, and 22 years in males and 13, 16, and 21 years in females, respectively. Proximal tibial epiphysis of stages 3, 4, and 5 ossification was first noted at ages 14, 17, and 18 years in males and 13, 15, and 16 years in females, respectively. MRI of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses is an alternative, noninvasive, and reliable technique to estimate age. PMID:26797254

  5. Study of lignification by noninvasive techniques in growing maize internodes. An investigation by Fourier transform infrared cross-polarization-magic angle spinning 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and immunocytochemical transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Joseleau, J P; Ruel, K

    1997-07-01

    Noninvasive techniques were used for the study in situ of lignification in the maturing cell walls of the maize (Zea mays L.) stem. Within the longitudinal axis of a developing internode all of the stages of lignification can be found. The synthesis of the three types of lignins, p-hydroxyphenylpropane (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S), was investigated in situ by cross-polarization-magic angle spinning 13C-solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and immunocytochemical electron microscopy. The first lignin appearing in the parenchyma is of the G-type preceeding the incorporation of S nuclei in the later stages. However, in vascular bundles, typical absorption bands of S nuclei are visible in the Fourier transform infrared spectra at the earliest stage of lignification. Immunocytochemical determination of the three types of lignin in transmission electron microscopy was possible thanks to the use of antisera prepared against synthetic H, G, and the mixed GS dehydrogenative polymers (K. Ruel, O. Faix, J.P. Joseleau [1994] J Trace Microprobe Tech 12: 247-265). The specificity of the immunological probes demonstrated that there are differences in the relative temporal synthesis of the H, G, and GS lignins in the different tissues undergoing lignification. Considering the intermonomeric linkages predominating in the antigens used for the preparation of the immunological probes, the relative intensities of the labeling obtained provided, for the first time to our knowledge, information about the macromolecular nature of lignins (condensed versus noncondensed) in relation to their ultrastructural localization and development stage. PMID:9232887

  6. Noncommutativity due to spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, M.; Kupriyanov, V. G.; da Silva, A. J.

    2010-04-01

    Using the Berezin-Marinov pseudoclassical formulation of the spin particle we propose a classical model of spin noncommutativity. In the nonrelativistic case, the Poisson brackets between the coordinates are proportional to the spin angular momentum. The quantization of the model leads to the noncommutativity with mixed spatial and spin degrees of freedom. A modified Pauli equation, describing a spin half particle in an external electromagnetic field is obtained. We show that nonlocality caused by the spin noncommutativity depends on the spin of the particle; for spin zero, nonlocality does not appear, for spin half, ΔxΔy≥θ2/2, etc. In the relativistic case the noncommutative Dirac equation was derived. For that we introduce a new star product. The advantage of our model is that in spite of the presence of noncommutativity and nonlocality, it is Lorentz invariant. Also, in the quasiclassical approximation it gives noncommutativity with a nilpotent parameter.

  7. Spin Rotation of Formalism for Spin Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio,A.

    2008-02-01

    The problem of which coefficients are adequate to correctly represent the spin rotation in vector spin tracking for polarized proton and deuteron beams in synchrotrons is here re-examined in the light of recent discussions. The main aim of this note is to show where some previous erroneous results originated and how to code spin rotation in a tracking code. Some analysis of a recent experiment is presented that confirm the correctness of the assumptions.

  8. Cross-correlation spin noise spectroscopy of heterogeneous interacting spin systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Roy, Dibyendu; Yang, Luyi; Crooker, Scott A.; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2015-04-30

    Interacting multi-component spin systems are ubiquitous in nature and in the laboratory. As such, investigations of inter-species spin interactions are of vital importance. Traditionally, they are studied by experimental methods that are necessarily perturbative: e.g., by intentionally polarizing or depolarizing one spin species while detecting the response of the other(s). Here, we describe and demonstrate an alternative approach based on multi-probe spin noise spectroscopy, which can reveal inter-species spin interactions - under conditions of strict thermal equilibrium - by detecting and cross-correlating the stochastic fluctuation signals exhibited by each of the constituent spin species. Specifically, we consider a two-component spinmore » ensemble that interacts via exchange coupling, and we determine cross-correlations between their intrinsic spin fluctuations. The model is experimentally confirmed using “two-color” optical spin noise spectroscopy on a mixture of interacting Rb and Cs vapors. Noise correlations directly reveal the presence of inter-species spin exchange, without ever perturbing the system away from thermal equilibrium. These non-invasive and noise-based techniques should be generally applicable to any heterogeneous spin system in which the fluctuations of the constituent components are detectable.« less

  9. Thirty New Low-mass Spectroscopic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Hebb, Leslie; Liu, Michael C.; Reid, I. Neill; Collier Cameron, Andrew

    2010-06-01

    As part of our search for young M dwarfs within 25 pc, we acquired high-resolution spectra of 185 low-mass stars compiled by the NStars project that have strong X-ray emission. By cross-correlating these spectra with radial velocity standard stars, we are sensitive to finding multi-lined spectroscopic binaries. We find a low-mass spectroscopic binary fraction of 16% consisting of 27 SB2s, 2 SB3s, and 1 SB4, increasing the number of known low-mass spectroscopic binaries (SBs) by 50% and proving that strong X-ray emission is an extremely efficient way to find M-dwarf SBs. WASP photometry of 23 of these systems revealed two low-mass eclipsing binaries (EBs), bringing the count of known M-dwarf EBs to 15. BD-22 5866, the ESB4, was fully described in 2008 by Shkolnik et al. and CCDM J04404+3127 B consists of two mid-M stars orbiting each other every 2.048 days. WASP also provided rotation periods for 12 systems, and in the cases where the synchronization time scales are short, we used P rot to determine the true orbital parameters. For those with no P rot, we used differential radial velocities to set upper limits on orbital periods and semimajor axes. More than half of our sample has near-equal-mass components (q > 0.8). This is expected since our sample is biased toward tight orbits where saturated X-ray emission is due to tidal spin-up rather than stellar youth. Increasing the samples of M-dwarf SBs and EBs is extremely valuable in setting constraints on current theories of stellar multiplicity and evolution scenarios for low-mass multiple systems. Based on observations collected at the W. M. Keck Observatory, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and by the WASP Consortium. The Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership between the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The CFHT is operated by the National Research Council of Canada

  10. Frustrated spin Hamiltonians with binary input vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, D.

    1986-04-01

    Structures of composite spin operators are analyzed which appear in models of neural networks of the type which Amit et al. have recently investigated. A binary basis of size N=2M is introduced to study a problem of N quantum-mechanical spin operators. The [Z(2)]M group structure of the binary basis allows for many decompositions of the [SU(2)]N spin algebra. These become useful in studying and solving generalized frustrated Heisenberg as well as Ising models. Using these techniques for quantum-mechanical generalized spin operators, we derive an explicit representation of the partition function of classical statistical-mechanics models, in terms of a series summation over components of collective spin variables.

  11. Quantum Interference between Three Spin Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachrajda, Andrew; Poulin-Lamarre, Gabriel; Thorgrimson, Joelle; Studenikin, Sergei; Aers, Geof; Kam, Alicia; Zawadzki, Piotr; Wasilewski, Zbigniew

    2014-03-01

    Recently both hyperfine and exchange based qubits based on three spin states in triple quantum dot circuits have been individually demonstrated. The effective targeting of a specific qubit species required a carefully designed pulse shape and measurement sequence. We discuss results where pulses are chosen to activate both three spin qubit species simultaneously. In our results two novel coherent behaviors have been identified which are related to quantum interference effects involving an interplay between the two qubits types. Such experiments are important to gain an understanding of critical leakage paths which drive the system away from the intended qubit states. Certain features of the data are analyzed in terms of a breakdown of the usual spin blockade spin to charge conversion technique for three spin experiments and the consequences of charge noise on the measurements.

  12. PROCESSING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE: SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF REDOX REACTIONS IN SUPERCRITICAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current efforts are focused on the oxidative dissolution of chromium compounds found in Hanford tank waste sludge. Samples of chromium oxides and hydroxides with varying degrees of hydration are being characterized using Raman, FTIR, and XPS spectroscopic techniques. Kinetics of ...

  13. Quantum dynamics of interacting spins mediated by phonons and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senko, Crystal

    2015-03-01

    Techniques that enable robust, controllable interactions among quantum particles are now being actively explored. They constitute a key ingredient for quantum information processing and quantum simulations. We describe two atom-based platforms to experimentally realize and study quantum dynamics with controllable, long-range spin-spin interactions. Using trapped atomic ions, we implemented tunable spin-spin interactions mediated by optical dipole forces, which represent a new approach to study quantum magnetism. This platform has enabled sophisticated manipulations of more than 10 spins, and realization of quantum simulations of integer-spin chains. In a separate set of experiments we realized a hybrid system in which single photons, confined to sub-wavelength dimensions with a photonic crystal cavity, are coupled to single trapped neutral atoms. Extending this architecture to multiple atoms enables photon-induced quantum gates, and tunable spin-spin interactions, between distant atoms.

  14. Quasiparticle spin resonance and coherence in superconducting aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Quay, C. H. L.; Weideneder, M.; Chiffaudel, Y.; Strunk, C.; Aprili, M.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional superconductors were long thought to be spin inert; however, there is now increasing interest in both (the manipulation of) the internal spin structure of the ground-state condensate, as well as recently observed long-lived, spin-polarized excitations (quasiparticles). We demonstrate spin resonance in the quasiparticle population of a mesoscopic superconductor (aluminium) using novel on-chip microwave detection techniques. The spin decoherence time obtained (∼100 ps), and its dependence on the sample thickness are consistent with Elliott–Yafet spin–orbit scattering as the main decoherence mechanism. The striking divergence between the spin coherence time and the previously measured spin imbalance relaxation time (∼10 ns) suggests that the latter is limited instead by inelastic processes. This work stakes out new ground for the nascent field of spin-based electronics with superconductors or superconducting spintronics. PMID:26497744

  15. Spin Circuit Representation for Spin Pumping Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kuntal; Datta, Supriyo

    2015-03-01

    There has been enormous progress in the field of spintronics and nanomagnetics in recent years with the discovery of many new materials and phenomena and it remains a formidable challenge to integrate these phenomena into functional devices and evaluate their potential. To facilitate this process a modular approach has been proposed whereby different phenomena are represented by spin circuit components. Unlike ordinary circuit components, these spin circuit components are characterized by 4-component voltages and currents (one for charge and three for spin). In this talk we will (1) present a spin circuit representation for spin pumping phenomena, (2) combine it with a spin circuit representation for the spin Hall effect to show that it reproduces established results obtained earlier by other means, and finally (3) use it to propose a possible method for enhancing the spin pumping efficiency by an order of magnitude through the addition of a spin sink layer. This work was supported by FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  16. Spin Electronics in Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, Felipe Tijiwa

    2011-12-01

    The work described in this thesis reflects a through investigation of spin-dependent transport through metallic nanoparticles, via tunnel junctions. Our devices consist of metallic nanoparticles embedded in an insulating matrix tunnel coupled to two metallic electrodes. At low temperatures, the small dimensions of the particles provide the necessary conditions to study the role played by discrete energy levels in the transport properties of these devices. In Chapter 1, a brief introduction to some of the relevant background topics related to this work, will be presented. Chapter 2 gives a detailed description of measurement procedures used on the experiments, and the adopted techniques for sample fabrication. In some of the devices presented here, the electrodes are made of ferromagnetic materials, which are used as source of spin-polarized current. The case where both electrodes are ferromagnetic, in a spin-valve configuration, will be discussed in Chapter 3, showing that spin accumulation mechanisms are responsible for the observed spin-polarized current. It will also be shown that the effect of an applied perpendicular magnetic field, relative to the magnetization orientation of the electrodes, indicates the suppression of spin precession in such small particles. Moreover, in the presence of an external non-collinear magnetic field, it is the local field "felt" by the particle that determines the character of the tunnel current. Even in samples where only one of the electrodes is ferromagnetic, spin-polarization of the tunnel current due to spin accumulation in the particle is observed. Asymmetries in the current-voltage (IV) characteristics as well as in the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of these devices will be presented in Chapter 4. Another type of device, which will be addressed in Chapter 5, consists of ferromagnetic nanoparticles coupled to normal-metal electrodes. The rich electronic structure as well as a complex set of relaxation mechanisms in these

  17. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  18. Acoustic detection of electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coufal, H.

    1981-07-01

    The ESR-signal of DPPH was recorded by detecting the modulation of the absorbed microwave power with a gas-coupled microphone. This photo-acoustic detection scheme is compared with conventional ESR-detection. Applications of the acoustical detection method to other modulation spectroscopic techniques, particularly NMR, are discussed.

  19. Spin Seebeck power generators

    SciTech Connect

    Cahaya, Adam B.; Tretiakov, O. A.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2014-01-27

    We derive expressions for the efficiency and figure of merit of two spin caloritronic devices based on the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), i.e., the generation of spin currents by a temperature gradient. The inverse spin Hall effect is conventionally used to detect the SSE and offers advantages for large area applications. We also propose a device that converts spin current into electric one by means of a spin-valve detector, which scales favorably to small sizes and approaches a figure of merit of 0.5 at room temperature.

  20. Optical coherence tomography contrast enhancement using spectroscopic analysis with spectral autocorrelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Desmond C.; Ko, Tony H.; Herz, Paul R.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2004-11-01

    Enhanced tissue contrast in developmental biology specimens is demonstrated in vivo using a new type of spectroscopic optical coherence tomography analysis that is insensitive to spectroscopic noise sources. The technique is based on a statistical analysis of spectral modulation at each image pixel, and provides contrast based on both the intensity of the backscattered light and the distribution of scattering particle sizes. Since the technique does not analyze optical power at absolute wavelengths, it is insensitive to all spectroscopic noise that appears as local Doppler shifts. No exogenous contrast agents or dyes are required, and no additional components are needed to correct for reference arm motion.

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of nanocrystalline chromium nitride (CrN).

    PubMed

    Mangamma, G; Sairam, T N; Dash, S; Rajalakshmi, M; Kamruddin, M; Mittal, V K; Narasimhan, S V; Arora, A K; Sundar, C S; Tyagi, A K; Raj, Baldev

    2007-03-01

    Nanocrystalline chromiuim nitride has been synthesised by direct gas phase nitridation of nanocrystalline chromia at 1100 degrees C in ammonia-atmosphere. XRD of this material showed formation of single phase CrN with particle size around 20 nm. AFM studies showed particle distribution along with some soft agglomerated nanostructures. Nanocrystalline Cr2O3 and partially-as well as fully--converted nanocrystalline CrN were also investigated using various spectroscopic techniques like XPS, FT-IR, and Raman for gaining insight into the conversion pathways. Spectroscopic investigations of these materials clearly indicate that complete conversion of CrN occurs by nitriding at 1100 degrees C for 4 hrs. The salient spectroscopic features of these nanocrystalline materials with respect to their microcrystalline counterparts are discussed. PMID:17450861

  2. Ultrafast laser driven spin generation in metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Gyung-Min

    This dissertation presents experimental studies of spin generation in metallic ferromagnets (FM) driven by ultrafast laser light using a pump-probe technique. The pump light gives a driving force for spin generation by depositing energy or spin angular momentum on FM. The probe light measures spin responses by magneto-optical Kerr effect or temperature responses by time-domain thermoreflectance. I find that ultrafast laser light generates spins in FM in three distinct mechanisms: (i) demagnetization; (ii) spin-dependent Seebeck effect (SDSE); (iii) optical helicity. The demagnetization-driven spin generation is due to energy transport between electrons and magnons of FM and conservation of angular momentum for electron-magnon coupling. Ultrafast laser light deposits its energy in electrons of metallic layers and leads to a sharp increase of the electron temperature. The excited electrons transport energy to magnons of FM by the electron-magnon coupling. The magnon excitation results in ultrafast demagnetization of FM. I find that the spin loss by magnon excitations during the demagnetization process is converted to the spin generation in electrons of FM by the conservation of angular momentum for electron-magnon coupling. The generated spins diffuse to other layers and leads to spin accumulation in nonmagnetic metals (NM) or spin transfer torque on other FMs. I measure the demagnetization-driven spin accumulation in a NM/FM1/NM structure and spin transfer torque in a NM/FM1/NM/FM2 structure. The SDSE-driven spin generation is due to a heat current at FM/NM interfaces and spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of FM. Ultrafast laser light deposits its energy in a heat absorbing layer of a multilayer structure and leads to a heat current from the heat absorbing layer to heat sinking layer. When an FM is incorporated in the multilayer structure, the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of FM converts the heat current to spin generation at interfaces between FM and NM. The

  3. Using a non-invasive technique in nutrition: synchrotron radiation infrared microspectroscopy spectroscopic characterization of oil seeds treated with different processing conditions on molecular spectral factors influencing nutrient delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-07-01

    Non-invasive techniques are a key to study nutrition and structure interaction. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy coupled with a synchrotron radiation source (SR-IMS) is a rapid, non-invasive, and non-destructive bioanalytical technique. To understand internal structure changes in relation to nutrient availability in oil seed processing is vital to find optimal processing conditions. The objective of this study was to use a synchrotron-based bioanalytical technique SR-IMS as a non-invasive and non-destructive tool to study the effects of heat-processing methods and oil seed canola type on modeled protein structure based on spectral data within intact tissue that were randomly selected and quantify the relationship between the modeled protein structure and protein nutrient supply to ruminants. The results showed that the moisture heat-related processing significantly changed (p<0.05) modeled protein structures compared to the raw canola (control) and those processing by dry heating. The moisture heating increased (p<0.05) spectral intensities of amide I, amide II, α-helices, and β-sheets but decreased (p<0.05) the ratio of modeled α-helices to β-sheet spectral intensity. There was no difference (p>0.05) in the protein spectral profile between the raw and dry-heated canola tissue and between yellow- and brown-type canola tissue. The results indicated that different heat processing methods have different impacts on the protein inherent structure. The protein intrinsic structure in canola seed tissue was more sensitive and more response to the moisture heating in comparison to the dry heating. These changes are expected to be related to the nutritive value. However, the current study is based on limited samples, and more large-scale studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:24920208

  4. Spectroscopic charge pumping investigation of the amphoteric nature of Si/SiO2 interface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J. T.; Yu, L. C.; Han, J. H.; Kopanski, J. J.; Cheung, K. P.; Zhang, F.; Wang, C.; Campbell, J. P.; Suehle, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    The amphoteric nature of Si/SiO2 interface states in submicron sized metal-oxide-silicon-field-effect-transistors is observed using an enhanced spectroscopic charge pumping method. The method's simplicity and high sensitivity makes it a powerful tool for interrogating the true nature of electrically measured interface states in samples which exhibit extremely low defect densities. The spectroscopic results obtained clearly illustrate a signature "double peak" density of states consistent with amphoteric Pb center data obtained from electron spin resonance measurements. Since the method is a hybrid of the commonly used charge pumping methodology, it should find widespread use in electronic device characterization.

  5. Editorial commentary revisited and the spin move refined.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H; Provencher, Matthew T; Brand, Jefferson C; Rossi, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    First, editorial commentary: editorial commentary may be educational and may be controversial, but above all else, authors come first. Second, The Spin Move: The Spin Move is effective, cost-effective, and ubiquitous because, while many techniques are specific to a single joint, The Spin Move can be performed as a part of any arthroscopic and related procedure. However, like many advanced procedures, The Spin Move, when poorly executed, entails substantial risk. Preoperative planning is essential, and The Spin Move must be reviewed by inexperienced practitioners, in detailed text, figures tables, and video, at www.arthroscopytechniques.org. Practice makes perfect. PMID:25842226

  6. Spectroscopic Identification of an FeIII Center, not FeIV, in the Crystalline Sc–O–Fe Adduct Derived from [FeIV(O)(TMC)]2+

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jai; Rohde, Gregory T.; Meier, Katlyn K.; Jasniewski, Andrew J.; Van Heuvelen, Katherine M.

    2016-01-01

    The apparent Sc3+ adduct of [FeIV(O)-(TMC)]2+ (1, TMC = 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) has been synthesized in amounts sufficient to allow its characterization by various spectroscopic techniques. Contrary to the earlier assignment of a +4 oxidation state for the iron center of 1, we establish that 1 has a high-spin iron(III) center based on its Mössbauer and EPR spectra and its quantitative reduction by 1 equiv of ferrocene to [FeII(TMC)]2+. Thus, 1 is best described as a ScIII–O–FeIII complex, in agreement with previous DFT calculations (Swart, M. Chem. Commun. 2013, 49, 6650.). These results shed light on the interaction of Lewis acids with high-valent metal-oxo species. PMID:25743366

  7. Tidal deformations of a spinning compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Paolo; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2015-07-01

    The deformability of a compact object induced by a perturbing tidal field is encoded in the tidal Love numbers, which depend sensibly on the object's internal structure. These numbers are known only for static, spherically-symmetric objects. As a first step to compute the tidal Love numbers of a spinning compact star, here we extend powerful perturbative techniques to compute the exterior geometry of a spinning object distorted by an axisymmetric tidal field to second order in the angular momentum. The spin of the object introduces couplings between electric and magnetic deformations and new classes of induced Love numbers emerge. For example, a spinning object immersed in a quadrupolar, electric tidal field can acquire some induced mass, spin, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole moments to second order in the spin. The deformations are encoded in a set of inhomogeneous differential equations which, remarkably, can be solved analytically in vacuum. We discuss certain subtleties in defining the tidal Love numbers in general relativity, which are due to the difficulty in separating the tidal field from the linear response of the object in the solution, even in the static case. By extending the standard procedure to identify the linear response in the static case, we prove analytically that the Love numbers of a Kerr black hole remain zero to second order in the spin. As a by-product, we provide the explicit form for a slowly-rotating, tidally-deformed Kerr black hole to quadratic order in the spin, and discuss its geodesic and geometrical properties.

  8. Lateral spin transport through bulk silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2012-04-01

    Using ballistic hot electron techniques, we demonstrate lateral spin transport through a bulk Si wafer. Despite a wide spin transport time distribution caused by transport path variation in the 400 μm-thick Si channel, the absence of a buried interface in close proximity increases the observed spin lifetime to approximately 100 ns at 61 K. The relative insensitivity of this lifetime to temperature variation (and its absolute magnitude) indicates a contribution from an extrinsic depolarization mechanism such as disorder and defects at the exposed air/Si interface in the transport region between injector and detector.

  9. Current heating induced spin Seebeck effect

    SciTech Connect

    Schreier, Michael Roschewsky, Niklas; Dobler, Erich; Meyer, Sibylle; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2013-12-09

    A measurement technique for the spin Seebeck effect is presented, wherein the normal metal layer used for its detection is exploited simultaneously as a resistive heater and thermometer. We show how the various contributions to the measured total signal can be disentangled, allowing to extract the voltage signal solely caused by the spin Seebeck effect. To this end, we performed measurements as a function of the external magnetic field strength and its orientation. We find that the effect scales linearly with the induced rise in temperature, as expected for the spin Seebeck effect.

  10. Cooperative spin decoherence in finite spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Fernando; Fernandez-Rossier, Joaquin

    2014-03-01

    Overcoming the problem of relaxation and decoherence of magnetic nanostructures is one of the mayor goals in magnetic data storage. Although spin chains with as few as 12 magnetic atoms have revealed stability in cryogenic conditions, understanding the mechanism leading to these effects is essential for the engineered of stable structures. Here we consider the problem of spin decoherence and relaxation of finite size quantum spin chains due to elastic and spin conserving interactions with an electron gas. Specifically, we consider how the decoherence (T2) and relaxation (T1) times between the two degenerate ground states of a chain of N coupled spins compares with the one of an isolated spin in the same environment. We find that the spin decoherence time of Ising chains can be either enhanced or suppressed depending on the matching between the Fermi wavelength 2 π /kF and the inter-spin distance a. In particular, we find that depending on the values of kF a , it can show, for certain values that depends on the dimensionality of the electron gas, a cooperative enhancement proportional to N2 of the decoherence, analogous to super radiance decay of atom ensembles, or a suppression.

  11. Enhancing forensic science with spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Camilla; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2006-09-01

    This presentation outlines the research we are developing in the area of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging with the focus on materials of forensic interest. FTIR spectroscopic imaging has recently emerged as a powerful tool for characterisation of heterogeneous materials. FTIR imaging relies on the ability of the military-developed infrared array detector to simultaneously measure spectra from thousands of different locations in a sample. Recently developed application of FTIR imaging using an ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) mode has demonstrated the ability of this method to achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit of infrared light in air. Chemical visualisation with enhanced spatial resolution in micro-ATR mode broadens the range of materials studied with FTIR imaging with applications to pharmaceutical formulations or biological samples. Macro-ATR imaging has also been developed for chemical imaging analysis of large surface area samples and was applied to analyse the surface of human skin (e.g. finger), counterfeit tablets, textile materials (clothing), etc. This approach demonstrated the ability of this imaging method to detect trace materials attached to the surface of the skin. This may also prove as a valuable tool in detection of traces of explosives left or trapped on the surfaces of different materials. This FTIR imaging method is substantially superior to many of the other imaging methods due to inherent chemical specificity of infrared spectroscopy and fast acquisition times of this technique. Our preliminary data demonstrated that this methodology will provide the means to non-destructive detection method that could relate evidence to its source. This will be important in a wider crime prevention programme. In summary, intrinsic chemical specificity and enhanced visualising capability of FTIR spectroscopic imaging open a window of opportunities for counter-terrorism and crime-fighting, with applications ranging

  12. On estimating the Venus spin vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argentiero, P. D.

    1972-01-01

    The improvement in spin vector and probe position estimates one may reasonably expect from the processing of such data is indicated. This was done by duplicating the ensemble calculations associated with a weighed least squares with a priori estimation technique applied to range rate data that were assumed to be unbiased and uncorrelated. The weighting matrix was assumed to be the inverse of the covariance matrix of the noise on the data. Attention is focused primarily on the spin vector estimation.

  13. Spin structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-ping Chen, Alexandre Deur, Sebastian Kuhn, Zein-eddine Meziani

    2011-06-01

    Spin-dependent observables have been a powerful tool to probe the internal structure of the nucleon and to understand the dynamics of the strong interaction. Experiments involving spin degrees of freedom have often brought out surprises and puzzles. The so-called "spin crisis" in the 1980s revealed the limitation of naive quark-parton models and led to intensive worldwide efforts, both experimental and theoretical, to understand the nucleon spin structure. With high intensity and high polarization of both the electron beam and targets, Jefferson Lab has the world's highest polarized luminosity and the best figure-of-merit for precision spin structure measurements. It has made a strong impact in this subfield of research. This chapter will highlight Jefferson Lab's unique contributions in the measurements of valence quark spin distributions, in the moments of spin structure functions at low to intermediate Q2, and in the transverse spin structure.

  14. Nanoparticles of [Fe(NH2-trz)3]Br2.3H2O (NH2-trz=2-amino-1,2,4-triazole) prepared by the reverse micelle technique: influence of particle and coherent domain sizes on spin-crossover properties.

    PubMed

    Forestier, Thibaut; Kaiba, Abdellah; Pechev, Stanislav; Denux, Dominique; Guionneau, Philippe; Etrillard, Céline; Daro, Nathalie; Freysz, Eric; Létard, Jean-François

    2009-06-15

    This paper describes the synthesis of iron(II) spin-crossover nanoparticles prepared by the reverse micelle technique by using the non-ionic surfactant Lauropal (Ifralan D0205) from the polyoxyethylenic family. By changing the surfactant/water ratio, the size of the particles of [Fe(NH2-trz)3]Br2.3H2O (with NH2trz=4-amino-1,2,4-triazole) can be controlled. On the macroscopic scale this complex exhibits cooperative thermal spin crossovers at 305 and 320 K. We find that when the size is reduced down to 50 nm, the spin transition becomes gradual and no hysteresis can be detected. For our data it seems that the critical size, for which the existence of a thermal hysteresis can be detected, is around 50 nm. Interestingly, the change of the particle size induces almost no change in the temperature of the thermal spin transition. A systematic determination of coherent domain size carried out on the nanoparticles by powder X-ray diffraction indicates that at approximately 30 nm individual particles consist of one coherent domain. PMID:19504472

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopic study of the E ⊗ e Jahn-Teller effect in the presence of a tunable spin-orbit interaction. III. Two-state excitonic model accounting for observed trends in the X~ 2E ground state of CH3X+ (X=F, Cl, Br, I) and CH3Y (Y=O, S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grütter, M.; Qian, X.; Merkt, F.

    2012-08-01

    Open-shell molecules in doubly degenerate 2E electronic states are subject to the E ⊗ e Jahn-Teller effect and spin-orbit interactions. The rotational structure of the ground vibrational level of the tildeX^+ 2E ground state of CH3F+ has been observed by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy. In contrast to what is observed in other members of the isoelectronic families {CH}_3{X}^+ ({X}={Cl, Br, I}) and {CH}_3{Y} ({Y}={O, S}), the spin-orbit interaction does not lead to a splitting of the ground state of CH3F+. Observed trends in the spectra of the tildeX 2E ground states of these molecules are summarized. Whereas certain trends, such as the reduction of the observable effects of the Jahn-Teller interactions and the increase of the spin-orbit splitting with increasing nuclear charge of X and Y are easily understood, other trends are more difficult to explain, such as the much reduced spin-orbit splitting in {CH}_3{F}^+ compared to {CH}_3{O}. A simple two-state excitonic model is used to account for the trends observed within the series of the methyl-halide radical cations and also the similarities and differences between {CH}_3{F}^+ and the isoelectronic {CH}_3{O} radical. Within this model, the electron hole in the 2E ground states of {CH}_3{X}^+ and {CH}_3{Y} is described in terms of contributions from the halogenic (or chalcogenic) px, y orbitals and the pyramidal-methylic (e) orbitals. This model enables a global, semi-quantitative description of the combined effects of the Jahn-Teller and spin-orbit interactions in these molecules and also a simple interpretation of the spin-orbit-coupling reduction factor ζe.

  16. Spinning eggs and ballerinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    Measurements are presented on the rise of a spinning egg. It was found that the spin, the angular momentum and the kinetic energy all decrease as the egg rises, unlike the case of a ballerina who can increase her spin and kinetic energy by reducing her moment of inertia. The observed effects can be explained, in part, in terms of rolling friction between the egg and the surface on which it spins.

  17. Characterization of semicrystalline polymers after nanoimprint by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Si; Rond, Johannes; Steinberg, Christian; Papenheim, Marc; Scheer, Hella-Christin

    2016-02-01

    Semicrystalline Reg-P3HT (regio-regular poly-3-hexylthiophene) is a promising material for organic electronics. It features relatively high charge mobility and enables easy preparation because of its solubility. Due to its high optical and electrical anisotropy, the size, number and orientation of the ordered domains are important for applications. To control these properties without limitation from crystalline domains existing after spin coating, thermal nanoimprint is performed beyond the melting point. The state of the art of measurement to analyze the complex morphology is X-ray diffraction (XRD). We address an alternative measurement method to characterize the material by its optical properties, spectroscopic ellipsometry. It provides information on the degree of order from the typical fingerprint absorption spectrum. In addition, when the material is modeled as a uniaxial layer, an anisotropy factor can be derived. The results obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry are in accordance with those from XRD. In particular, spectroscopic ellipsometry is able to distinguish between order along the backbone and order in π- π stacking direction, which is important with respect to conductivity.

  18. Spinning Eggs and Ballerinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    Measurements are presented on the rise of a spinning egg. It was found that the spin, the angular momentum and the kinetic energy all decrease as the egg rises, unlike the case of a ballerina who can increase her spin and kinetic energy by reducing her moment of inertia. The observed effects can be explained, in part, in terms of rolling friction…

  19. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  20. Current MRI Techniques for the Assessment of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Takamune; Wang, Feng; Quarles, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Over the past decade a variety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods have been developed and applied to many kidney diseases. These MRI techniques show great promise, enabling the noninvasive assessment of renal structure, function, and injury in individual subjects. This review will highlight current applications of functional MRI techniques for the assessment of renal disease and discuss future directions. Recent findings Many pathological (functional and structural) changes or factors in renal disease can be assessed by advanced MRI techniques. These include renal vascular structure and function (contrast-enhanced MRI, arterial spin labeling), tissue oxygenation (blood oxygen level-dependent MRI), renal tissue injury and fibrosis (diffusion or magnetization transfer imaging, MR elastography), renal metabolism (chemical exchange saturation transfer, spectroscopic imaging), nephron endowment (cationic-contrast imaging), sodium concentration (23Na-MRI), and molecular events (targeted-contrast imaging). Summary Current advances in MRI techniques have enabled the non-invasive investigation of renal disease. Further development, evaluation, and application of the MRI techniques should facilitate better understanding and assessment of renal disease and the development of new imaging biomarkers, enabling the intensified treatment to high-risk populations and a more rapid interrogation of novel therapeutic agents and protocols. PMID:26066472

  1. Optimized Electron-spin-cavity coupling in a double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xuedong; Liu, Yu-Xi; Nori, Franco

    2011-03-01

    We search for the optimal regime to couple an electron spin in a semiconductor double quantum dot to a superconducting stripline resonator via the electrically driven spin resonance technique. In particular, we calculate the spin relaxation rate in the regime when spin-photon coupling is strong, so that we can identify system parameters that allow the electron spin to reach the strong coupling limit. We thank support by NSA/LPS through ARO.

  2. Spin-orbit interactions in free lanthanide (3+) ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Dimitar N.

    2016-07-01

    The effective nuclear charges of free Ln3+ ions (Ln IV in spectroscopic notation) with Ln=Pr, Nd, Er, Tm, and Yb, have been determined semiempirically from the dependence between calculated or empirical expectation values 4f and spin-orbit radial integrals ζ4f known from experimental free-ion spectra. The variation with 4f of the matrix elements of spin-orbit interactions for the ground levels of the same free ions has been also discussed.

  3. HFEPR and Computational Studies on the Electronic Structure of a High-Spin Oxidoiron(IV) Complex in Solution.

    PubMed

    Bucinsky, Lukas; Rohde, Gregory T; Que, Lawrence; Ozarowski, Andrew; Krzystek, J; Breza, Martin; Telser, Joshua

    2016-04-18

    Nonheme iron enzymes perform diverse and important functions in biochemistry. The active form of these enzymes comprises the ferryl, oxidoiron(IV), [FeO](2+) unit. In enzymes, this unit is in the high-spin, quintet, S = 2, ground state, while many synthetic model compounds exist in the spin triplet, S = 1, ground state. Recently, however, Que and co-workers reported an oxidoiron(IV) complex with a quintet ground state, [FeO(TMG3tren)](OTf)2, where TMG3tren = 1,1,1-tris{2-[N2-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidino)]ethyl}amine and OTf = CF3SO3(-). The trigonal geometry imposed by this ligand, as opposed to the tetragonal geometry of earlier model complexes, favors the high-spin ground state. Although [FeO(TMG3tren)](2+) has been earlier probed by magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and Mössbauer spectroscopies, the technique of high-frequency and -field electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) is superior for describing the electronic structure of the iron(IV) center because of its ability to establish directly the spin-Hamiltonian parameters of high-spin metal centers with high precision. Herein we describe HFEPR studies on [FeO(TMG3tren)](OTf)2 generated in situ and confirm the S = 2 ground state with the following parameters: D = +4.940(5) cm(-1), E = 0.000(5), B4(0) = -14(1) × 10(-4) cm(-1), g⊥ = 2.006(2), and g∥ = 2.03(2). Extraction of a fourth-order spin-Hamiltonian parameter is unusual for HFEPR and impossible by other techniques. These experimental results are combined with state-of-the-art computational studies along with previous structural and spectroscopic results to provide a complete picture of the electronic structure of this biomimetic complex. Specifically, the calculations reproduce well the spin-Hamiltonian parameters of the complex, provide a satisfying geometrical picture of the S = 2 oxidoiron(IV) moiety, and demonstrate that the TMG3tren is an "innocent" ligand. PMID:27031000

  4. Nanocrystals of Fe(phen)2(NCS)2 and the size-dependent spin-crossover characteristics.

    PubMed

    Laisney, J; Tissot, A; Molnár, G; Rechignat, L; Rivière, E; Brisset, F; Bousseksou, A; Boillot, M-L

    2015-10-21

    We report on the size reduction of the neutral Fe(phen)2(NCS)2 prototypical compound exhibiting a cooperative spin-crossover associated with a first-order phase transition (at ca. 176 K). We use the [Fe(phen)3](NCS)2 ionic precursor and the solvent-assisted precipitation technique to prepare an array of crystalline objects with sizes varying over two orders of magnitude (from 15 up to 1400 nm). TEM, X-ray diffraction and IR measurements provide evidences for the formation of particles of neutral and ionic species, which results from the interplay between the relevant chemical equilibrium and the reaction kinetics (ligand extraction, complex precipitation), and the modulation of the latter by physico-chemical parameters. A thermal transformation of diamagnetic nanocrystals of [Fe(phen)3](NCS)2 leads to spin-crossover particles of Fe(phen)2(NCS)2 of a comparable size. Powders of nano-, micro- and polycrystals of Fe(phen)2(NCS)2 present X-ray diffractograms typical of the so-called polymorph II. The importance of size effects on the cooperative spin-crossover process was probed with magnetic, Mössbauer, Raman and IR spectroscopic measurements. Each sample exhibits spin-state switching of the Fe(ii) ions. The salient features are: a cooperativity preserved at the micrometric scale, a very limited downshift of the transition temperature and an asymmetric spreading of the thermal process (over ca. 100 K) with the size reduction. At temperatures close to room temperature, the process appears to be quasi complete whatever the size of the samples. This result, extracted from Raman data, was confirmed by Mössbauer measurements in the case of the largest objects (LS residue <5-10% for bulk and microparticles). Below 150 K, a very efficient low-spin to high-spin photoexcitation was induced by the Raman laser beam in all the samples which prevents the extraction of the high-spin fraction in this temperature range. However variable temperature IR spectra of the 29 nm particles

  5. Room temperature electrical spin injection into GaAs by an oxide spin injector

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Shwetha G.; Kumar, P. S. Anil

    2014-01-01

    Spin injection, manipulation and detection are the integral parts of spintronics devices and have attracted tremendous attention in the last decade. It is necessary to judiciously choose the right combination of materials to have compatibility with the existing semiconductor technology. Conventional metallic magnets were the first choice for injecting spins into semiconductors in the past. So far there is no success in using a magnetic oxide material for spin injection, which is very important for the development of oxide based spintronics devices. Here we demonstrate the electrical spin injection from an oxide magnetic material Fe3O4, into GaAs with the help of tunnel barrier MgO at room temperature using 3-terminal Hanle measurement technique. A spin relaxation time τ ~ 0.9 ns for n-GaAs at 300 K is observed along with expected temperature dependence of τ. Spin injection using Fe3O4/MgO system is further established by injecting spins into p-GaAs and a τ of ~0.32 ns is obtained at 300 K. Enhancement of spin injection efficiency is seen with barrier thickness. In the field of spin injection and detection, our work using an oxide magnetic material establishes a good platform for the development of room temperature oxide based spintronics devices. PMID:24998440

  6. Spin polarized tunneling study on spin Hall effect metals and topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Luqiao

    2015-03-01

    Spin orbit interactions give rise to interesting physics phenomena in solid state materials such as the spin Hall effect (SHE) and topological insulator surface states. Those effects have been extensively studied using electrical detection techniques so far. However, to date most experiments focus only on characterizing electrons near Fermi surface, while the spin-orbit interaction is expected to be dependent on electrons' energies. Here we develop a tunneling spectroscopy technique to measure spin Hall materials and topological insulators under finite bias voltages. By electrically injecting spin polarized current into spin Hall metals or topological insulators through nonmagnetic material/oxide/ferromagnet (FM) junctions and measuring the induced transverse voltage, we are able to quantify the magnitude of the SHE in typical 5d transition metals and the spin momentum locking in topological insulators. The obtained spin Hall angles in Ta, Pt, W and Ir at zero bias are consistent with the results from spin torque experiments, verifying the SHE origin of those earlier observations. At finite biases, the transverse signals provide important information in determining the mechanisms of the observed effects, such as intrinsic vs extrinsic, surface vs bulk. Because of the impedance matching capability of tunnel junctions, the spin polarized tunneling spectroscopy technique is expected to be a powerful tool to measure a wide group of matters including the various newly discovered or proposed topological materials. with Ching-tzu Chen, Y. Zhu, J. Z. Sun, A. Richardella, N. Samarth and I. Garate. The work is partially supported by the DARPA MESO program (N66001-11-1-4110).

  7. sick: The Spectroscopic Inference Crank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Andrew R.

    2016-03-01

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives that remain severely under-utilized. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analyzing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick is agnostic to the wavelength coverage, resolving power, or general data format, allowing any user to easily construct a generative model for their data, regardless of its source. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbor estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimized point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalize on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-dimensional interpolation, or a Cannon-based model. Additional phenomena that transform the data (e.g., redshift, rotational broadening, continuum, spectral resolution) are incorporated as free parameters and can be marginalized away. Outlier pixels (e.g., cosmic rays or poorly modeled regimes) can be treated with a Gaussian mixture model, and a noise model is included to account for systematically underestimated variance. Combining these phenomena into a scalar-justified, quantitative model permits precise inferences with credible uncertainties on noisy data. I describe the common model features, the implementation details, and the default behavior, which is balanced to be suitable for most astronomical applications. Using a forward model on low-resolution, high signal

  8. Spectroscopic Characterization of Metallofullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethune, D. S.; de Vries, M. S.; Macfarlane, R.; Wittman, G.; Grannan, S.; Birmingham, J.; Richards, P.; Stevenson, S.; Glass, T.; Burbank, P.; Sun, Z.; Dorn, H. C.

    1996-03-01

    Scandium and Erbium metallofullerenes have been isolated using HPLC techniques and characterized by NMR, optical and far IR spectroscopy. In particular, Sc NMR spectra of Sc_2@C_2n species for several n have been obtained, and far infrared spectra of both discandium and and dierbium metallofullerenes have been measured. These show structure in the 20-200 cm-2 where vibrations of the encapsulated metal atoms are expected. Fluorescence spectra from dierbium metallofullerenes in the 1.5 μm region have been obtained at He and room temperatures.

  9. Gaussian approximation and single-spin measurement in magnetic resonance force microscopy with spin noise

    SciTech Connect

    Raghunathan, Shesha; Brun, Todd A.; Goan, Hsi-Sheng

    2010-11-15

    A promising technique for measuring single electron spins is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), in which a microcantilever with a permanent magnetic tip is resonantly driven by a single oscillating spin. The most effective experimental technique is the oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals (OSCAR) protocol, in which the signal takes the form of a frequency shift. If the quality factor of the cantilever is high enough, this signal will be amplified over time to the point where it can be detected by optical or other techniques. An important requirement, however, is that this measurement process occurs on a time scale that is short compared to any noise which disturbs the orientation of the measured spin. We describe a model of spin noise for the MRFM system and show how this noise is transformed to become time dependent in going to the usual rotating frame. We simplify the description of the cantilever-spin system by approximating the cantilever wave function as a Gaussian wave packet and show that the resulting approximation closely matches the full quantum behavior. We then examine the problem of detecting the signal for a cantilever with thermal noise and spin with spin noise, deriving a condition for this to be a useful measurement.

  10. The Steady Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, Richard; Schmidt, Wilhelm

    1931-01-01

    With the object of further clarifying the problem of spinning, the equilibrium of the forces and moments acting on an airplane is discussed in light of the most recent test data. Convinced that in a spin the flight attitude by only small angles of yaw is more or less completely steady, the study is primarily devoted to an investigation of steady spin with no side slip. At small angles, wholly arbitrary and perfectly steady spins may be forced, depending on the type of control displacements. But at large angles only very steep and only "approaching steady" spins are possible, no matter what the control displacements.

  11. Spin transport and precession in graphene measured by nonlocal and three-terminal methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dankert, André Kamalakar, Mutta Venkata; Bergsten, Johan; Dash, Saroj P.

    2014-05-12

    We investigate the spin transport and precession in graphene by using the Hanle effect in nonlocal and three-terminal measurement geometries. Identical spin lifetimes, spin diffusion lengths, and spin polarizations are observed in graphene devices for both techniques over a wide range of temperatures. The magnitude of the spin signals is well explained by spin transport models. These observations rules out any signal enhancements or additional scattering mechanisms at the interfaces for both geometries. This validates the applicability of both the measurement methods for graphene based spintronics devices and their reliable extractions of spin parameters.

  12. Experimental evidences of a large extrinsic spin Hall effect in AuW alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Laczkowski, P.; Rojas-Sánchez, J.-C.

    2014-04-07

    We report an experimental study of a gold-tungsten alloy (7 at. % W concentration in Au host) displaying remarkable properties for spintronics applications using both magneto-transport in lateral spin valve devices and spin-pumping with inverse spin Hall effect experiments. A very large spin Hall angle of about 10% is consistently found using both techniques with the reliable spin diffusion length of 2 nm estimated by the spin sink experiments in the lateral spin valves. With its chemical stability, high resistivity, and small induced damping, this AuW alloy may find applications in the nearest future.

  13. Microwave Manipulation of Electrically Injected Spin-Polarized Electrons in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C.; Li, J.; Appelbaum, I.; Morton, J. J. L.

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate microwave manipulation of the spin states of electrically injected spin-polarized electrons in silicon. Although the silicon channel is bounded by ferromagnetic metal films, we show that moderate microwave power can be applied to the devices without altering the device operation significantly. Resonant microwave irradiation is used to induce spin rotation of spin-polarized electrons as they travel across a silicon channel, and the resultant spin polarization is subsequently detected by a ferromagnetic Schottky barrier spin detector. These results demonstrate the potential for combining advanced electron spin resonance techniques to complement the study of semiconductor spintronic devices beyond standard magnetotransport measurements.

  14. Inverse spin Hall effect by spin injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. Y.; Horing, Norman J. M.; Lei, X. L.

    2007-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [S. O. Valenzuela and M. Tinkham, Nature (London) 442, 176 (2006)], the authors present a quantitative microscopic theory to investigate the inverse spin-Hall effect with spin injection into aluminum considering both intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit couplings using the orthogonalized-plane-wave method. Their theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. It is also clear that the magnitude of the anomalous Hall resistivity is mainly due to contributions from extrinsic skew scattering.

  15. Spin Doublet Point Defects in Graphenes: Predictions for ESR and NMR Spectral Parameters.

    PubMed

    Vähäkangas, Jarkko; Lantto, Perttu; Mareš, Jiří; Vaara, Juha

    2015-08-11

    An adatom on a graphene surface may carry a magnetic moment causing spin-half paramagnetism. This theoretically predicted phenomenon has recently also been experimentally verified. The measurements of defect-induced magnetism are mainly based on magnetometric techniques where artifacts such as environmental magnetic impurities are hard to rule out. Spectroscopic methods such as electron spin resonance (ESR) and paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) are conventionally used in the development of magnetic materials, e.g., to study paramagnetic centers. The present density functional theory study demonstrates with calculations of the ESR g-tensor and the hyperfine coupling tensors, as well as the pNMR shielding tensor, that these spectroscopies can be used to identify the paramagnetic centers in graphenes. The studied defects are hydrogen and fluorine adatoms on sp(2)-hybridized graphene, as well as hydrogen and fluorine vacancies in the sp(3)-hybridized graphane and fluorographene, respectively. The directly measurable ESR and pNMR parameters give insight into the electronic and atomic structures of these defects and may contribute to understanding carbon-based magnetism via the characterization of the defect centers. We show that missing hydrogen and fluorine atoms in the functionalized graphane and fluorographene, respectively, constitute sp(2)-defect centers, in which the magnetic resonance parameters are greatly enhanced. Slowly decaying adatom-induced magnetic resonance parameters with the distance from the sp(3)-defect, are found in pure graphene. PMID:26574457

  16. Pauli blocking in the low-lying, low-spin states of {sup 141}Pr

    SciTech Connect

    Scheck, M.; Choudry, S. N.; Elhami, E.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Orce, J. N.; Yates, S. W.

    2008-09-15

    The low-lying, low-spin levels of {sup 141}Pr were investigated using (n,n{sup '}{gamma}) techniques. Level energies, branching ratios, and tentative spin assignments for more than 100 states, linked by nearly 300 transitions, were obtained from two angular distributions (E{sub n}=2.0 and 3.0 MeV) and an excitation function measurement (E{sub n}=1.5-3.2 MeV). The application of the Doppler-shift attenuation method led to the determination of lifetimes. The obtained spectroscopic data provide insight into the wave functions of the states observed. A detailed analysis of the [2{sub 1}{sup +} x d{sub 5/2}] and [2{sub 1}{sup +} x g{sub 7/2}] multiplets provides the first quantitative evidence for Pauli blocking in a spherical odd-mass nucleus. The unpaired particle is used to probe the microscopic structure of the first 2{sup +} state of the adjacent core nuclei {sup 140}Ce and {sup 142}Nd.

  17. Spin Seebeck devices using local on-chip heating

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Stephen M. Fradin, Frank Y.; Hoffman, Jason; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2015-05-07

    A micro-patterned spin Seebeck device is fabricated using an on-chip heater. Current is driven through a Au heater layer electrically isolated from a bilayer consisting of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (insulating ferrimagnet) and a spin detector layer. It is shown that through this method it is possible to measure the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (SSE) for small area magnetic devices, equivalent to traditional macroscopic SSE experiments. Using a lock-in detection technique, it is possible to more sensitively characterize both the SSE and the anomalous Nernst effect (ANE), as well as the inverse spin Hall effect in various spin detector materials. By using the spin detector layer as a thermometer, we can obtain a value for the temperature gradient across the device. These results are well matched to values obtained through electromagnetic/thermal modeling of the device structure and with large area spin Seebeck measurements.

  18. Electrically induced ambipolar spin vanishments in carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, D.; Yanagi, K.; Takenobu, T.; Okada, S.; Marumoto, K.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit various excellent properties, such as ballistic transport. However, their electrically induced charge carriers and the relation between their spin states and the ballistic transport have not yet been microscopically investigated because of experimental difficulties. Here we show an electron spin resonance (ESR) study of semiconducting single-walled CNT thin films to investigate their spin states and electrically induced charge carriers using transistor structures under device operation. The field-induced ESR technique is suitable for microscopic investigation because it can directly observe spins in the CNTs. We observed a clear correlation between the ESR decrease and the current increase under high charge density conditions, which directly demonstrated electrically induced ambipolar spin vanishments in the CNTs. The result provides a first clear evidence of antimagnetic interactions between spins of electrically induced charge carriers and vacancies in the CNTs. The ambipolar spin vanishments would contribute the improvement of transport properties of CNTs because of greatly reduced carrier scatterings. PMID:26148487

  19. Measurement of the dielectric function spectra of low dielectric constant using the spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horie, Masahiro; Postava, Kamil; Yamaguchi, Tomuo; Akashika, Kumiko; Hayashi, Hideki; Kitamura, Fujikazu

    2003-05-01

    The dielectric function spectra of low dielectric constants (low-k) materials have been determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry, normal incidence spectroscopic reflectometry, and Fourier transform infrared transmission spectrometry over a wide spectral range from 0.03 to 5.4 eV (230nm to 40.5um wavelength region). The electric and ionic contributions to the overall static dielectric constants were determined for representative materials used in the semiconductor industry for interlayer dielectrics: (1) FLARE - organic spin-on polymer, (2) HOSP - spin-on hybrid organic-siloxane polymer from the Honeywell Electric Materials Company, and (3) SiLK- organic dielectric resin from the Dow Chemical Company. The main contributions to the static dielectric constant of the low-k materials studied were found to be the electric and ionic absorption.

  20. High-resolution J-resolved NMR spectra of dilute spins in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, T.; Miura, H.; Saika, A.

    1981-08-01

    A technique for obtaining J-resolved NMR spectra of dilute spins in solids has been developed. It is based on the observation that a combination of magic-angle irradiation and magic-angle spinning removes dipolar broadening, but leaves indirect spin-spin coupling. A preliminary application of this technique to adamantane clearly reveals the AX (J = 121 Hz) and AX (J = 135 Hz) multiplets in the methylene and methyne 13C spectrum, respectively.

  1. Multiple-quantum NMR studies of spin clusters in liquid crystals and zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, J. . Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1991-07-01

    This work will describe the use of MQ NMR to study spin clusters in anisotropic materials. A technique known as multiple-quantum spin counting was used to determine average spin cluster sizes liquid crystalline materials and in faujacitic zeolites containing aromatic hydrocarbons. The first half of the thesis will describe MQ NMR and the MQ spin counting technique, and the second half of the thesis will describe the actual experiments and their results.

  2. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Origin of Magnetic Bistability in Molecular Nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Slageren, Joris

    Molecular nanomagnets (MNMs) are coordination complexes consisting of one of more transition metal and/or f-element ions bridged and surrounded by organic ligands. Some of these can be magnetized in a magnetic field, and remain magnetized after the field is switched off. Because of this, MNMs have been proposed for magnetic data storage applications, where up to 1000 times higher data densities than currently possible can be obtained. Other MNMs were shown to display quantum coherence, and, as a consequence, are suitable as quantum bits. Quantum bits are the building blocks of a quantum computer, which will be able to carry out calculations that will never be possible with a conventional computer. The magnetic bistability of MNMs originates from the magnetic anisotropy of the magnetic ions, which creates an energy barrier between up and down orientations of the magnetic moment. Currently, most work in the area focuses on complexes of either lanthanide ions or low-coordinate transition metal ions. Synthetic chemical efforts have led to a large number of novel materials, but the rate of improvement has been slow. Therefore a better understanding of the origin of the magnetic anisotropy is clearly necessary. To this end we have applied a wide range of advanced spectroscopic techniques, ranging from different electron spin resonance techniques at frequencies up to the terahertz domain to optical techniques, including luminescence and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy. We will discuss two examples, one from the area of lanthanide MNMs, one a transition metal MNM (unpublished). This work was financially supported by DFG, DAAD and COST CM1006 EUFEN.

  3. NASA general aviation stall/spin flight testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patton, J. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive program incorporating spin tunnel, static and rotary balance wind tunnel, full scale wind tunnel, free flight radio control model, flight simulation, and full scale flight testing was undertaken. Work includes aerodynamic definition of various configurations at high angles of attack, testing of stall and spin prevention concepts, definition of spin and spin recovery characteristics, and development of test techniques and emergency spin recovery systems. Some of the more interesting results to date are presented for the first airplane in the program in the areas of tail design, wind leading edge design, mass distribution, center of gravity location, and small airframe changes, with associated pilot observations. Design philosophy of the spin recovery parachute system is discussed, in addition to test techniques.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of gas-phase molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Chi-Kin

    Spectroscopic investigations of hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals' interactions in molecular clusters were studied by the techniques of infrared predissociation and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopies (REMPI). Ab initio calculations were applied in conjunction for data interpretation. The infrared predissociation spectroscopy of CN-·(H 2O)n (n = 2--6) clusters was reported in the region of 2950--3850 cm-1. The hydrogen bondings for the C-site and N-site binding, and among the water molecules were identified for n = 2 to 4. A spectral transition was observed for n = 5 and 6, implying that the anion was surface-bound onto the water aggregates in larger clusters. The infrared predissociation spectroscopy of Br-·(NH 3) and I-·(NH3) n (n = 1--3) clusters was reported in the region of 3050--3450 cm-1. For the Br -·(NH3) complex, a dominating ionic NH stretch appeared at 3175 cm-1, and the weaker free NH stretch appeared at 3348 cm-1. The observed spectrum was consistent to the structure in which there was one nearly linear hydrogen bond between Br- and the NH3 moiety. For the I- ·(NH3) complex, five distinct IR absorption bands were observed in the spectrum. The spectrum was not consistent with basic frequency patterns of three geometries considered in the ab initio calculations---complex with one, two and three hydrogen bondings between I- and the NH3 moiety. Substantial inhomogenous broadening were displayed in the spectra for I- ·(NH3)n (n = 2--3), suggesting the presence of multiple isomers. The REMPI spectroscopy of the bound 4p 2pi 1/2 and 2pi3/2 states, and the dissociative 3d 2Sigma+1/2 state in the Al·Ar complex was reported. The dissociative spectrum at Al+ channel suggested the coupling of the 4p 2pi 1/2,3/2 states to the repulsive 3d 2Sigma+1/2 state. The spin-electronic coupling was further manifested in the dissociative Al+ spectrum of the 3d 2Sigma+1/2 state. Using the potential energy curves obtained from ab initio

  5. Spin-Spin Effects in Models of Binary Black Hole Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Scott; Matzner, Richard; Thompson, Lindsey

    2012-03-01

    We have implemented a parallel multigrid solver, to solve the initial data problem for 3 + 1 General Relativity. This involves solution of elliptic equations derived from the Hamiltonian and the momentum constraints. We use the conformal transverse-traceless method of York and collaborators which consists of a conformal decomposition with a scalar that adjusts the metric, and a vector potential that adjusts the longitudinal components of the extrinsic curvature. The constraint equations are then solved for these quantities such that the complete solution fully satisfies the constraints. We apply this technique to compare with theoretical expectations for the spin-orientation- and separation-dependence in the case of spinning interacting (but not orbiting) black holes. We write out a formula for the effect of the spin-spin interaction which includes a result of Wald as well as additional effect due to the rotation of the mass quadrupole moment of a spinning black hole.

  6. Localization and spin transport in honeycomb structures with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Queiroz, S. L. A.

    2015-11-01

    Transfer-matrix methods are used for a tight-binding description of electron transport in graphenelike geometries in the presence of spin-orbit couplings. Application of finite-size scaling and phenomenological renormalization techniques shows that, for strong enough spin-orbit interactions and increasing on-site disorder, this system undergoes a metal-insulator transition characterized by the exponents ν =2.71 (8 ) , η =0.174 (2 ) . We show how one can extract information regarding spin polarization decay with distance from an injection edge, from the evolution of wave-function amplitudes in the transfer-matrix approach. For (relatively weak) spin-orbit coupling intensity μ , we obtain that the characteristic length Λs for spin-polarization decay behaves as Λs∝μ-2 .

  7. Scaling behavior of spin gap of the bond alternating anisotropic spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Susobhan; Ghosh, Asim Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Scaling behavior of spin gap of a bond alternating spin-1/2 anisotropic Heisenberg chain has been studied both in ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) cases. Spin gap has been estimated by using exact diagonalization technique. All those quantities have been obtained for a region of anisotropic parameter Δ defined by 0≤Δ≤1. Spin gap is found to develop as soon as the non-uniformity in the alternating bond strength is introduced in the AFM regime which furthermore sustains in the FM regime as well. Scaling behavior of the spin gap has been studied by introducing scaling exponent. The variation of scaling exponents with Δ is fitted with a regular function.

  8. Search for planets by spectroscopic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serkowski, K.

    1980-01-01

    Spectroscopic means of detecting the motion of a star around a star-planet barycenter are considered. The precision of such an observation, which requires a radial velocity error of not more than 5 m/sec, is discussed in relation to the spectral resolutions of the detectors utilized. The University of Arizona radial velocity spectrometer is then presented, with particular attention given to the location of the absorption cell in a beam of light from an incandescent bulb, high-accuracy wavelength calibration involving the use of a Fabry-Perot interferometer in front of an echelle spectrograph, and future plans for the use of light reflected from a Fabry-Perot etalon to improve transmittance. On the basis of these techniques, it is expected that radial velocities with accuracies sufficient for the detection of extrasolar planets will be obtained.

  9. Spectroscopic behavior of bioconjugated quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chornokur, G.; Ostapenko, S.; Emirov, Yu; Korsunska, N. E.; Sellers, T.; Phelan, C.

    2008-07-01

    We report on a short-wavelength, 'blue' spectral shift of the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum in CdSeTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) caused by bioconjugation with several monoclonal cancer-related antibodies (ABs). Scanning PL spectroscopy was performed on samples dried on solid substrates at various temperatures. The influence of the AB chemical origin on the PL spectral shift was observed. The QD-AB conjugation reaction was confirmed using the agarose gel electrophoresis technique. The spectral shift was strongly increased and the process facilitated when the samples were dried above room temperature. The PL spectroscopic mapping revealed a profile of the PL spectral shift across the dried QD-AB spot. A mechanism of the blue shift is attributed to changes in the QD electronic energy levels caused by a local stress applied to the bioconjugated QD.

  10. Quadrupolar Spin Orders in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentao; Nevidomskyy, Andriy

    Motivated by the absence of long-range magnetic order and the strong spin fluctuations observed in the Fe-based superconductor FeSe, we study spin-1 model on a square lattice up to next-nearest neighbor Heisenberg and biquadratic spin exchanges. The zero-temperature variational phase diagram gives the conventional antiferromagnetic order and also more exotic quadrupolar spin phases. These quadrupolar phases do not host long-range magnetic order and preserve time-reversal symmetry, but break the spin SU(2) symmetry. In particular, we observe a robust ferroquadrupolar order (FQ) in immediate proximity to the columnar AFM phase. We envision that FeSe may be positioned within the FQ phase close to the phase boundary. Using the flavor-wave technique, we calculate the structure factor inside the FQ phase and find a Goldstone mode emerging from Q = (0 , 0) , which however bears zero spectral weight at ω = 0 due to time reversal symmetry. At the same time, we observe strong spin fluctuations near (π , 0) / (0 , π) , which agrees with the recent neutron scattering experiments. Further, we calculate the higher order interactions between the (π , 0) and (0 , π) spin fluctuations inside the FQ phase, which may shed light on the C4 symmetry breaking in the nematic phase of FeSe.

  11. Honeycomb artificial spin ice at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeissler, Katharina; Chadha, Megha; Cohen, Lesley; Branford, Will

    2015-03-01

    Artificial spin ice is a macroscopic playground for magnetically frustrated systems. It consists of a geometrically ordered but magnetically frustrated arrangement of ferromagnetic macros spins, e.g. an arrangement of single domain ferromagnetic nanowires on a honeycomb lattice. Permalloy and cobalt which have critical temperature scales far above 290 K, are commonly used in the construction of such systems. Previous measurements have shown unusual features in the magnetotransport signature of cobalt honeycomb artificial spin ice at temperatures below 50 K which are due to changes in the artificial spin ice's magnetic reversal. In that case, the artificial spin ice bars were 1 micron long, 100 nm wide and 20 nm thick. Here we explore the low temperature magnetic behavior of honeycomb artificial spin ice structures with a variety of bar dimensions, indirectly via electrical transport, as well as, directly using low temperature magnetic imaging techniques. We discuss the extent to which this change in the magnetic reversal at low temperatures is generic to the honeycomb artificial spin ice geometry and whether the bar dimensions have an influence on its onset temperature. The EPSRC (Grant No. EP/G004765/1; Grant No. EP/L504786/1) and the Leverhulme Trust (Grant No. RPG 2012-692) funded this scientific work.

  12. Correlations between metal spin states and vibrational spectra of a trinuclear Fe(II) complex exhibiting spin crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimova, Tatiana P.; Katsyuba, Sergey A.; Lavrenova, Ludmila G.; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Kaupp, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Combined IR spectroscopic/quantum-chemical analysis of a 4-propyl-1,2,4-triazole trinuclear Fe(II) complex capable of reversible thermal spin crossover has revealed mid-IR bands of the ligand sensitive to the Fe(II) spin state. The character of the correlations found between the intensity and peak position of the triazole bands and the spin state of the metal center depends neither on the identity of the metal nor on the nuclearity of the complex. The found spectral correlations therefore allow analysis of various similar complexes. This is illustrated by the example of experimental IR spectra reported earlier for Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with triazole ligands. Quantum-chemical IR spectral simulations further suggest that certain ligand bands vary between the states with the same total molecular spin, but different distribution of the spin density between the metal centers. However these variations are too subtle to discriminate between the spin transitions of the central and peripheral Fe(II) ions. The experimentally revealed mid-IR markers are therefore conclusive only for the total molecular spin.

  13. Nanoscale imaging of paramagnetic spin labels using a single spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Myers, Bryan; Pelliccione, Matthew; Jayich, Ania

    Spin-labeling molecules with paramagnetic species is a powerful technique for probing molecular structure. However, current techniques are ensemble measurements, inherently lacking the sensitivity to detect a single spin or the conformational properties of a single biomolecule. In this talk, we demonstrate an imaging technique that has the promise of single-spin imaging and ultimately molecular structure imaging. We present two-dimensional nanoscale imaging of a monolayer of gadolinium (Gd) atomic spin labels at ambient conditions. The sensing element is a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond. A patterned monolayer of Gd atoms self-assembled on a Si atomic force microscopy tip is controllably interacted with and detected by the NV center. The fluctuating magnetic field generated by GHz-scale Gd spin flips relaxes the NV center in a manner that depends strongly on the Gd-NV separation. Using this technique, we demonstrate a Gd-induced reduction of the T1 relaxation time of the NV center with nm spatial resolution. Our results indicate that nanometer-scale imaging of individual electronic spins at ambient conditions is within reach. This will ultimately enable the study of structural and functional studies of single biomolecules in their native, folded state.

  14. Neutron spectroscopic factors of 55Ni hole-states from (p,d) transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanetullaev, A.; Tsang, M. B.; Lynch, W. G.; Lee, Jenny; Bazin, D.; Chan, K. P.; Coupland, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Sun, Z. Y.; Youngs, M.; Charity, R. J.; Sobotka, L. G.; Famiano, M.; Hudan, S.; Shapira, D.; Peters, W. A.; Barbieri, C.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Horoi, M.; Otsuka, T.; Suzuki, T.; Utsuno, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Spectroscopic information has been extracted on the hole-states of 55Ni, the least known of the quartet of nuclei (55Ni, 57Ni, 55Co and 57Cu), one nucleon away from 56Ni, the N=Z=28 double magic nucleus. Using the H1(Ni56,d)Ni55 transfer reaction in inverse kinematics, neutron spectroscopic factors, spins and parities have been extracted for the f7/2, p3/2 and the s1/2 hole-states of 55Ni. These new data provide a benchmark for large basis calculations that include nucleonic orbits in both the sd and pf shells. State of the art calculations have been performed to describe the excitation energies and spectroscopic factors of the s1/2 hole-state below Fermi energy.

  15. Spectroscopic detection of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Ines; Grüner, Roman; Matthäus, Christian; Dietzek, Benjamin; Werncke, W.; Lademann, Jürgen; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    The hand-foot-syndrome presents a severe dermal side-effect of chemotherapeutic cancer treatment. The cause of this side-effect is the elimination of systemically administered chemotherapeutics with the sweat. Transported to the skin surface, the drugs subsequently penetrate into the skin in the manner of topically applied substances. Upon accumulation of the chemotherapeutics in the skin the drugs destroy cells and tissue - in the same way as they are supposed to act in cancer cells. Aiming at the development of strategies to illuminate the molecular mechanism underlying the handfoot- syndrome (and, in a second step, strategies to prevent this severe side-effect), it might be important to evaluate the concentration and distribution of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants in the human skin. The latter can be estimated by the carotenoid concentration, as carotenoids serve as marker substances for the dermal antioxidative status.Following the objectives outlined above, this contribution presents a spectroscopic study aiming at the detection and quantification of carotenoids and selected chemotherapeutics in human skin. To this end, spontaneous Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy are combined with two-photon excited fluorescence. While the latter technique is Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to your MySPIE To Do List at http://myspie.org and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval.restricted to the detection of fluorescent chemotherapeutics, e.g., doxorubicin, the vibrational spectroscopic techniques can - in principle - be applied to any type of analyte molecules. Furthermore, we will present the

  16. Propagation of spinning acoustic modes in partially choked converging ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Kelly, J. J.; Watson, L. T.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model based on the wave-envelope technique is used to study the propagation of spinning acoustic modes in converging hard-walled and lined circular ducts carrying near sonic mean flows. The results show that with increasing spinning mode number the intensification of the acoustic signal at the throat decreases for upstream propagation. The influence of the throat Mach number, frequency, boundary-layer thickness, and liner admittance on the propagation of spinning modes is considered.

  17. Spin Exchange in Rydberg EIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Travis; Thompson, Jeff; Liang, Qiyu; Cantu, Sergio; Venkatramani, Aditya; Pohl, Thomas; Choi, Soonwon; Lukin, Mikhail; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    The realization of strong optical nonlinearities between two photons has been a longstanding goal in quantum science. We achieve large single-photon-level nonlinearities with Rydberg EIT, which combines slow light techniques with strongly interacting Rydberg states. For two Rydberg atoms in the same state, a Van der Waals interaction is the dominant coupling mechanism. Inherently stronger dipole-dipole interactions are also possible between atoms in different Rydberg states. Using light storage and microwave resonances, we study the effect of dipole-dipole interactions in Rydberg EIT. We observe a coherent spin exchange effect for pairs of states dominated by dipole-dipole interactions. Spin exchange manifests as an increase in optical transmission through a cold Rubidium gas that is highly dissipative in the presence of Van der Waals interactions. We also observe a controlled π / 2 phase shift due to this effect, which paves the way for robust, universal all-optical quantum gates.

  18. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of tungsten carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K.

    2000-05-01

    Spectroscopic constants (R{sub e},{omega}{sub e},T{sub e},{mu}{sub e}) and potential energy curves for 40 low-lying electronic states of the diatomic tungsten carbide (WC) were obtained using the complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field followed by the multireference singles+doubles configuration interaction and full first- and second-order configuration interaction calculations that included up to 6.4 mil configurations. Spin-orbit effects were included through the enhanced relativistic configuration interaction method described here for 28 electronic states of WC lying below {approx}20 000 cm-1. The spin-orbit splitting of the ground state of WC was found to be very large (4394 cm-1). The ground and excited electronic states of the W atom were also computed and were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The nature of bonding was analyzed through the composition of orbitals, leading configurations, Mulliken populations, and dipole moments. The dissociation energy of WC was computed including spin-orbit and electron correlation effects. The recent photoelectron spectra of WC{sup -} were assigned on the basis of our computed results. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  19. 3He Spin Filter for Neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Batz, M.; Baeßler, S.; Heil, W.; Otten, E. W.; Rudersdorf, D.; Schmiedeskamp, J.; Sobolev, Y.; Wolf, M.

    2005-01-01

    The strongly spin-dependent absorption of neutrons in nuclear spin-polarized 3He opens up the possibility of polarizing neutrons from reactors and spallation sources over the full kinematical range of cold, thermal and hot neutrons. This paper gives a report on the neutron spin filter (NSF) development program at Mainz. The polarization technique is based on direct optical pumping of metastable 3He atoms combined with a polarization preserving mechanical compression of the gas up to a pressure of several bar, necessary to run a NSF. The concept of a remote type of operation using detachable NSF cells is presented which requires long nuclear spin relaxation times of order 100 hours. A short survey of their use under experimental conditions, e.g. large solid-angle polarization analysis, is given. In neutron particle physics NSFs are used in precision measurements to test fundamental symmetry concepts. PMID:27308139

  20. Integral dependent spin couplings in CI calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iberle, K.; Davidson, E. R.

    1982-06-01

    Although the number of ways to combine Slater determinants to form spin eigenfunctions increases rapidly with the number of open shells, most of these spin couplings will make only a small contribution to a given state, provided the spin coupling is chosen judiciously. The technique of limiting calculations to the interacting subspace pioneered by Bunge (1970) was employed by Munch and Davidson (1975) to the vanadium atom. The use of an interacting space looses its advantage in more complex cases. However, the problem can always be reduced to only one interacting spin coupling by making the coefficients integral dependent. The present investigation is concerned with the performance of integral dependent interacting couplings, taking into account the results of three test calculations.

  1. Spin supercurrents and torquing with Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtengel, Kirill; Kovalev, Alexey; de, Amrit

    2014-03-01

    We show that resonant coupling and entanglement between a mechanical resonator and majorana bound states can be achieved via spin supercurrents in a 1D quantum wire with strong spin-orbit interactions in the proximity of s-wave superconductor. The bound states induced by vibrating and stationary magnets can hybridize thus resulting in spin-current induced 4 π -periodic torque, as a function of the relative field angle, acting on the resonator. We propose a realization based on spin transistor like architecture in which a heterostructure nanowire consists of semiconductors with large and small g-factors in order to form the topological and non-topological regions. We also study the feasibility of detecting and manipulating majorana bound states with the use of magnetic resonance force microscopy techniques. U.S. Army Research Office under Grant No. W911NF-11-1-0027, NSF under Grant No. 1018935, DARPA-QuEST program, NSF under Grant DMR-0748925.

  2. Integral dependent spin couplings in CI calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iberle, K.; Davidson, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    Although the number of ways to combine Slater determinants to form spin eigenfunctions increases rapidly with the number of open shells, most of these spin couplings will make only a small contribution to a given state, provided the spin coupling is chosen judiciously. The technique of limiting calculations to the interacting subspace pioneered by Bunge (1970) was employed by Munch and Davidson (1975) to the vanadium atom. The use of an interacting space looses its advantage in more complex cases. However, the problem can always be reduced to only one interacting spin coupling by making the coefficients integral dependent. The present investigation is concerned with the performance of integral dependent interacting couplings, taking into account the results of three test calculations.

  3. Spectroscopic studies of protein folding: Linear and nonlinear methods

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Arnaldo L; Waegele, Matthias M; Gai, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Although protein folding is a simple outcome of the underlying thermodynamics, arriving at a quantitative and predictive understanding of how proteins fold nevertheless poses huge challenges. Therefore, both advanced experimental and computational methods are continuously being developed and refined to probe and reveal the atomistic details of protein folding dynamics and mechanisms. Herein, we provide a concise review of recent developments in spectroscopic studies of protein folding, with a focus on new triggering and probing methods. In particular, we describe several laser-based techniques for triggering protein folding/unfolding on the picosecond and/or nanosecond timescales and various linear and nonlinear spectroscopic techniques for interrogating protein conformations, conformational transitions, and dynamics. PMID:22109973

  4. Role of Optical Spectroscopic Methods in Neuro-Oncological Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Bahreini, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    In the surgical treatment of malignant tumors, it is crucial to characterize the tumor as precisely as possible. The determination of the exact tumor location as well as the analysis of its properties is very important in order to obtain an accurate diagnosis as early as possible. In neurosurgical applications, the optical, non-invasive and in situ techniques allow for the label-free analysis of tissue, which is helpful in neuropathology. In the past decades, optical spectroscopic methods have been investigated drastically in the management of cancer. In the optical spectroscopic techniques, tissue interrogate with sources of light which are ranged from the ultraviolet to the infrared wavelength in the spectrum. The information accumulation of light can be in a reflection which is named reflectance spectroscopy; or interactions with tissue at different wavelengths which are called fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. This review paper introduces the optical spectroscopic methods which are used to characterize brain tumors (neuro-oncology). Based on biochemical information obtained from these spectroscopic methods, it is possible to identify tumor from normal brain tissues, to indicate tumor margins, the borders towards normal brain tissue and infiltrating gliomas, to distinguish radiation damage of tissues, to detect particular central nervous system (CNS) structures to identify cell types using particular neurotransmitters, to detect cells or drugs which are optically labeled within therapeutic intermediations and to estimate the viability of tissue and the prediction of apoptosis beginning in vitro and in vivo. The label-free, optical biochemical spectroscopic methods can provide clinically relevant information and need to be further exploited to develop a safe and easy-to-use technology for in situ diagnosis of malignant tumors. PMID:25987969

  5. Role of optical spectroscopic methods in neuro-oncological sciences.

    PubMed

    Bahreini, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    In the surgical treatment of malignant tumors, it is crucial to characterize the tumor as precisely as possible. The determination of the exact tumor location as well as the analysis of its properties is very important in order to obtain an accurate diagnosis as early as possible. In neurosurgical applications, the optical, non-invasive and in situ techniques allow for the label-free analysis of tissue, which is helpful in neuropathology. In the past decades, optical spectroscopic methods have been investigated drastically in the management of cancer. In the optical spectroscopic techniques, tissue interrogate with sources of light which are ranged from the ultraviolet to the infrared wavelength in the spectrum. The information accumulation of light can be in a reflection which is named reflectance spectroscopy; or interactions with tissue at different wavelengths which are called fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. This review paper introduces the optical spectroscopic methods which are used to characterize brain tumors (neuro-oncology). Based on biochemical information obtained from these spectroscopic methods, it is possible to identify tumor from normal brain tissues, to indicate tumor margins, the borders towards normal brain tissue and infiltrating gliomas, to distinguish radiation damage of tissues, to detect particular central nervous system (CNS) structures to identify cell types using particular neurotransmitters, to detect cells or drugs which are optically labeled within therapeutic intermediations and to estimate the viability of tissue and the prediction of apoptosis beginning in vitro and in vivo. The label-free, optical biochemical spectroscopic methods can provide clinically relevant information and need to be further exploited to develop a safe and easy-to-use technology for in situ diagnosis of malignant tumors. PMID:25987969

  6. Designer spin systems via inverse statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiStasio, Robert A., Jr.; Marcotte, Étienne; Car, Roberto; Stillinger, Frank H.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-10-01

    nature of the target radial spin-spin correlation function. In the future, it will be interesting to explore whether such inverse statistical-mechanical techniques could be employed to design materials with desired spin properties.

  7. Microscopic understanding of spin current probed by shot noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Tomonori

    The spin currents is one of key issue in the spintronics field and the generation and detection of those have been intensively studied by using various materials. The analysis of experiments, however, relies on phenomenological parameters such as spin relaxation length and spin flip time. The microscopic nature of the spin current such as energy distribution and energy relaxation mechanism, has not yet well understood. To establish a better microscopic understanding of spin currents, I focused on the shot noise measurement which is well established technique in the field of mesoscopic physics [Y. M. Blanter and M. B üttiker, Phys. Rep. 336, 1 (2000).]. Although there are many theoretically works about shot noise in the presence of spin currents, for example detection of spin accumulation [J. Meair, P. Stano, and P. Jacquod, Phys. Rev. B 84 (2011).], estimation of spin flip currents, and so on, these predictions have never been experimentally confirmed. In this context, we reported the first experimental detention of shot noise in the presence of the spin accumulation in a (Ga,Mn)As/tunnel barrier/n-GaAs based lateral spin valve device [T. Arakawa et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 016601 (2015).]. Together with this result, we found however that the effective temperature of the spin current drastically increases due to the spin injection process. This heating of electron system could be a big problem to realize future spin current devices by using quantum coherence, because the effective temperature rise directly related to the destruction of the coherence of the spin current. Therefore, then we focused on the mechanism of this heating and the energy relaxation in a diffusive channel. By measuring current noise and the DC offset voltage in the usual non-local spin valve signal as a function of the spin diffusion channel length, we clarified that the electron-electron interaction length, which is the characteristic length for the relaxation of the electron system, is

  8. Spin Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  9. Spin polarization effect for Fe2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shi-Ying; Zhu, Zheng-He

    2006-07-01

    This paper uses the density functional theory (DFT)(B3p86) of Gaussian03 to optimize the structure of Fe2 molecule. The result shows that the ground state for Fe2 molecule is a 9-multiple state, which shows spin polarization effect of Fe2 molecule of transition metal elements for the first time. Meanwhile, we have not found any spin pollution because the wavefunction of the ground state does not mingle with wavefunctions with higher energy states. So, that the ground state for Fe2 molecule is a 9-multiple state is indicative of the spin polarization effect of Fe2 molecule of transition metal elements. That is, there exist 8 parallel spin electrons. The non-conjugated electron is greatest in number. These electrons occupy different spacious tracks, so that the energy of the Fe2 molecule is minimized. It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin of the Fe2 molecule is larger than the effect of the conjugated molecule, which is obviously related to the effect of electron d delocalization. In addition, the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with the parameters for the ground state and other states of Fe2 molecule are derived. Dissociation energy De for the ground state of Fe2 molecule is 2.8586ev, equilibrium bond length Re is 0.2124nm, vibration frequency ωe is 336.38 cm-1. Its force constants f2, f3, and f4 are 1.8615aJ.nm-2, -8.6704aJ.nm-3, 29.1676aJ.nm-4 respectively. The other spectroscopic data for the ground state of Fe2 molecule ωeχe,Be, αe are 1.5461 cm-1, 0.1339 cm-1, 7.3428×10-4 cm-1 respectively.

  10. Decoherence of a single spin coupled to an interacting spin bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ning; Fröhling, Nina; Xing, Xi; Hackmann, Johannes; Nanduri, Arun; Anders, Frithjof B.; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-01-01

    Decoherence of a central spin coupled to an interacting spin bath via inhomogeneous Heisenberg coupling is studied by two different approaches, namely an exact equations of motion (EOMs) method and a Chebyshev expansion technique (CET). By assuming a wheel topology of the bath spins with uniform nearest-neighbor X X -type intrabath coupling, we examine the central spin dynamics with the bath prepared in two different types of bath initial conditions. For fully polarized baths in strong magnetic fields, the polarization dynamics of the central spin exhibits a collapse-revival behavior in the intermediate-time regime. Under an antiferromagnetic bath initial condition, the two methods give excellently consistent central spin decoherence dynamics for finite-size baths of N ≤14 bath spins. The decoherence factor is found to drop off abruptly on a short time scale and approach a finite plateau value which depends on the intrabath coupling strength nonmonotonically. In the ultrastrong intrabath coupling regime, the plateau values show an oscillatory behavior depending on whether N /2 is even or odd. The observed results are interpreted qualitatively within the framework of the EOM and perturbation analysis. The effects of anisotropic spin-bath coupling and inhomogeneous intrabath bath couplings are briefly discussed. Possible experimental realization of the model in a modified quantum corral setup is suggested.

  11. Room temperature electrical spin injection into GaAs by an oxide spin injector.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Shwetha G; Kumar, P S Anil

    2014-01-01

    Spin injection, manipulation and detection are the integral parts of spintronics devices and have attracted tremendous attention in the last decade. It is necessary to judiciously choose the right combination of materials to have compatibility with the existing semiconductor technology. Conventional metallic magnets were the first choice for injecting spins into semiconductors in the past. Here we demonstrate the electrical spin injection from an oxide magnetic material Fe3O4, into GaAs with the help of tunnel barrier MgO at room temperature using 3-terminal Hanle measurement technique. A spin relaxation time τ ~ 0.9 ns for n-GaAs at 300 K is observed along with expected temperature dependence of τ. Spin injection using Fe3O4/MgO system is further established by injecting spins into p-GaAs and a τ of ~0.32 ns is obtained at 300 K. Enhancement of spin injection efficiency is seen with barrier thickness. In the field of spin injection and detection, our work using an oxide magnetic material establishes a good platform for the development of room temperature oxide based spintronics devices [corrected]. PMID:24998440

  12. Terahertz spectroscopic imaging of a rabbit VX2 hepatoma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Yeon; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Cho, Kyoung-Sik; Kim, Kyu-Rae; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2011-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopic imaging technique was applied to classify the tumor region in the rabbit liver with VX2 hepatocellular carcinoma. Within the measurement range of 0.1-2 THz, the average reflectance values for all tumor samples were more than 4% higher than those for healthy cells, and the terahertz measurements correlated well with histological analysis results. This study on paraffin-embedded tissues showed the alteration of cell density and protein content in tumors, excluding the effect of water.

  13. Spin caloritronics in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Angsula; Frota, H. O.

    2015-06-14

    Spin caloritronics, the combination of spintronics with thermoelectrics, exploiting both the intrinsic spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment in addition to its fundamental electronic charge and temperature, is an emerging technology mainly in the development of low-power-consumption technology. In this work, we study the thermoelectric properties of a Rashba dot attached to two single layer/bilayer graphene sheets as leads. The temperature difference on the two graphene leads induces a spin current, which depends on the temperature and chemical potential. We demonstrate that the Rashba dot behaves as a spin filter for selected values of the chemical potential and is able to filter electrons by their spin orientation. The spin thermopower has also been studied where the effects of the chemical potential, temperature, and also the Rashba term have been observed.

  14. Spin-Orbit Caloritronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchon, Aurelien; Ndiaye, Papa Birame; Moon, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2014-03-01

    Utilizing spin-orbit coupling to enable the electrical manipulation of ferromagnets has recently attracted a considerable amount of interest. This spin-orbit torque appears in magnetic systems displaying inversion symmetry breaking. Another adjacent emerging topic, spin caloritronics, aims at exploiting magnonic spin currents driven by temperature gradients, allowing for the transmission of information and the control of magnetic domain walls. In this work, we demonstrate that a magnon flow generates torques on the local magnetization when subjected to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) just as an electron flow generates torques when submitted to Rashba interaction. A direct consequence is the capability to control the magnetization direction of a homogeneous ferromagnet by applying a temperature gradient or local RF excitations. Merging the spin-orbit torques with spin caloritronics is rendered possible by the emergence of DMI in magnetic materials and opens promising avenues in the development of chargeless information technology.

  15. Dynamics of nuclear spin polarization induced and detected by coherently precessing electron spins in fluorine-doped ZnSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisterkamp, F.; Kirstein, E.; Greilich, A.; Zhukov, E. A.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Pawlis, A.; Bayer, M.

    2016-02-01

    We study the dynamics of optically induced nuclear spin polarization in a fluorine-doped ZnSe epilayer via time-resolved Kerr rotation. The nuclear polarization in the vicinity of a fluorine donor is induced by interaction with coherently precessing electron spins in a magnetic field applied in the Voigt geometry. It is detected by nuclei-induced changes in the electron spin coherence signal. This all-optical technique allows us to measure the longitudinal spin relaxation time T1 of the 77Se isotope in a magnetic field range from 10 to 130 mT under illumination. We combine the optical technique with radio frequency methods to address the coherent spin dynamics of the nuclei and measure Rabi oscillations, Ramsey fringes, and the nuclear spin echo. The inhomogeneous spin dephasing time T2* and the spin coherence time T2 of the 77Se isotope are measured. While the T1 time is on the order of several milliseconds, the T2 time is several hundred microseconds. The experimentally determined condition T1≫T2 verifies the validity of the classical model of nuclear spin cooling for describing the optically induced nuclear spin polarization.

  16. Electron spin resonance of spin-labeled lipid assemblies and proteins.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Rita; Bartucci, Rosa

    2015-08-15

    Spin-label electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is a valuable means to study molecular mobility and interactions in biological systems. This paper deals with conventional, continuous wave ESR of nitroxide spin-labels at 9-GHz providing an introduction to the basic principles of the technique and applications to self-assembled lipid aggregates and proteins. Emphasis is given to segmental lipid chain order and rotational dynamics of lipid structures, environmental polarity of membranes and proteins, structure and conformational dynamics of proteins. PMID:26116378

  17. Control of propagating spin waves via spin transfer torque in a metallic bilayer waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kyongmo; Birt, Daniel R.; Pai, Chi-Feng; Olsson, Kevin; Ralph, Daniel C.; Buhrman, Robert A.; Li, Xiaoqin

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the effect of a direct current on propagating spin waves in a CoFeB/Ta bilayer structure. Using the micro-Brillouin light scattering technique, we observe that the spin-wave damping and amplitude may be attenuated or amplified depending on the direction of the current and the applied magnetic field. Our work suggests an effective approach for electrically controlling the propagation of spin waves in a magnetic waveguide and may be useful in a number of applications such as phase-locked nano-oscillators and hybrid information-processing devices.

  18. Single-spin stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Waldherr, Gerald; Neumann, Philipp; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate precision addressing of single-quantum emitters by combined optical microscopy and spin resonance techniques. To this end, we use nitrogen vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond confined within a few ten nanometers as individually resolvable quantum systems. By developing a stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) technique for NV centers, we are able to simultaneously perform sub–diffraction-limit imaging and optically detected spin resonance (ODMR) measurements on NV spins. This allows the assignment of spin resonance spectra to individual NV center locations with nanometer-scale resolution and thus further improves spatial discrimination. For example, we resolved formerly indistinguishable emitters by their spectra. Furthermore, ODMR spectra contain metrology information allowing for sub–diffraction-limit sensing of, for instance, magnetic or electric fields with inherently parallel data acquisition. As an example, we have detected nuclear spins with nanometer-scale precision. Finally, we give prospects of how this technique can evolve into a fully parallel quantum sensor for nanometer resolution imaging of delocalized quantum correlations. PMID:25267655

  19. Neutron electric dipole moment and dressed spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Ping-Han

    The neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) experiment has played a unique role in examining the violation of fundamental symmetries and understanding the nature of electroweak and strong interaction. A non-zero neutron EDM is one of direct evidence for CP and T violation and has the potential to reveal the origin of CP violation and to explore physics beyond the Standard Model. A new neutron EDM experiment will be built to improve a factor of 100 by using a novel technique of ultra-cold neutrons(UCN) in superfluid 4He at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In the experiment, 3He in the measurement cell will be used as a neutron spin analyzer and a comagnetometer. The absorption between UCN and 3He atoms will emit scintillation light in the superfluid 4He depending on the angle between nuclear spins of two particles. Consequently, the neutron precession frequency can be derived by the scintillation light amplitude. Furthermore, the 3He precession frequency can be measured by the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). A dressed-spin technique will also be applied to measure the small precession frequency change due to a non-zero neutron EDM. The dressed-spin technique is used to modify the effective precession frequencies of neutrons and 3He atoms to make them equal by applying an oscillatory field (dressing field) that is perpendicular to the static magnetic field. The phenomenon of the dressed spin for 3He in a cell should be demonstrated before the proposed neutron EDM experiment. A successful measurement over a broad range of the amplitude and frequency of the dressing field was done at the University of Illinois. The observed effects can be explained by using quantum optics formalism. The formalism is diagonalized to solve the solution and confirms the data. In addition, the application of the dressed-spin technique was investigated. The modulation and the feedback loop technique should be considered with

  20. Picosecond Spin Caloritronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David G.

    The coupling of spin and heat, i.e., spin caloritronics, gives rise to new physical phenomena in nanoscale spin devices and new ways to manipulate local magnetization. Our work in this field takes advantage of recent advances in the measurement and understanding of heat transport at the nanoscale using ultrafast lasers. We use a picosecond duration pump laser pulses as a source of heat and picosecond duration probe laser pulses to detect changes in temperature, spin accumulation, and spin transfer torque using a combination of time-domain thermoreflectance and time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect Our pump-probe optical methods enable us to change the temperature of ferromagnetic layers on a picosecond time-scale and generate enormous heat fluxes on the order of 100 GW m-2 that persist for ~ 30 ps. Thermally-driven ultrafast demagnetization of a perpendicular ferromagnet leads to spin accumulation in a normal metal and spin transfer torque in an in-plane ferromagnet. The data are well described by models of spin generation and transport based on differences and gradients of thermodynamic parameters. The spin-dependent Seebeck effect of a perpendicular ferromagnetic layer converts a heat current into spin current, which in turn can be used to exert a spin transfer torque (STT) on a second ferromagnetic layer with in-plane magnetization. Using a [Co,Ni] multilayer as the source of spin, an energy fluence of ~ 4 J m-2 creates thermal STT sufficient to induce ~ 1 % tilting of the magnetization of a 2 nm-thick CoFeB layer.