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Sample records for spiral galaxy m83

  1. Compact radio sources in the spiral galaxy M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Roberto; Long, Knox S.; Winkler, P. Frank; Kuntz, Kip; Blair, William

    2011-04-01

    We are doing a multiband study of the stellar life cycle in the grand-design spiral galaxy M83, one of the most actively star-forming systems in the local Universe. We have already obtained exceptional optical coverage with HST and Magellan, and we have been awarded 750 ks of Chandra time this year. Now we propose an ATCA radio study, crucial for integrating the optical and X-ray studies. The radio study will allow us to achieve three main objectives: a) monitor the long-term evolution of three historical supernovae observed in M83 over the last 100 years, and hence constrain the late stages of evolution of their stellar progenitors; b) determine the distribution, radio spectral index and other physical properties of different types of young supernova remnants; c) resolve the morphology and search for variability of the nuclear sources: in particular, we will investigate the radio evidence for a double nucleus. In addition, we will study the aligned triple source just outside the nucleus: the traditional interpretation is that it is a background radio galaxy, but it has recently been suggested that it could be a recoiling nuclear black hole in M83.

  2. Magnetic and gaseous spiral arms in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, P.; Stepanov, R.; Beck, R.; Sokoloff, D.; Shukurov, A.; Ehle, M.; Lundgren, A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The magnetic field configurations in several nearby spiral galaxies contain magnetic arms that are sometimes located between the material arms. The nearby barred galaxy M83 provides an outstanding example of a spiral pattern seen in tracers of gas and magnetic field. Aims: We analyse the spatial distribution of magnetic fields in M83 and their relation to the material spiral arms. Methods: Isotropic and anisotropic wavelet transforms are used to decompose the images of M83 in various tracers to quantify structures in a range of scales from 0.2 to 10 kpc. We used radio polarization observations at λ6.2 cm and λ13 cm obtained with the VLA, Effelsberg and ATCA telescopes and APEX sub-mm observations at 870 μm, which are first published here, together with maps of the emission of warm dust, ionized gas, molecular gas, and atomic gas. Results: The spatial power spectra are similar for the tracers of dust, gas, and total magnetic field, while the spectra of the ordered magnetic field are significantly different. As a consequence, the wavelet cross-correlation between all material tracers and total magnetic field is high, while the structures of the ordered magnetic field are poorly correlated with those of other tracers. The magnetic field configuration in M83 contains pronounced magnetic arms. Some of them are displaced from the corresponding material arms, while others overlap with the material arms. The pitch angles of the magnetic and material spiral structures are generally similar. The magnetic field vectors at λ6.2 cm are aligned with the outer material arms, while significant deviations occur in the inner arms and, in particular, in the bar region, possibly due to non-axisymmetric gas flows. Outside the bar region, the typical pitch angles of the material and magnetic spiral arms are very close to each other at about 10°. The typical pitch angle of the magnetic field vectors is about 20° larger than that of the material spiral arms. Conclusions

  3. Emission of CO, CI, and CII in the spiral arms of M83 and M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, C.; Mookerjea, B.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Bayet, E.; Gerin, M.; Israel, F.; Stutzki, J.; Wouterloot, J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a detailed study of photon dominated regions at several spiral arm positions and the centers of the nearby spiral galaxies M51 and M83. For this, we combine all important cooling lines: [CI] 609μm taken at the JCMT with 12CO and 13CO 1-0 and 2-1 lines taken at the IRAM 30m MRT. These transitions are combined with data taken from the literature: ISO/LWS [CII] 158μm, [OI] 63μm, 146μm, and [NII] (122μm) data (Brauher, J., et al. 2004) and mid-J CO lines from (Bayet, E., et al., Dumke, M., et al. 2003, Israel, F., Baas, F., 2002).

  4. A molecular gas ridge offset from the dust lane in a spiral arm of M83

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Steven D.; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.

    1991-01-01

    A high-resolution interferometric map of the CO emission on the eastern spiral arm of M83 is presented. The detected emission originates in about five unresolved components located parallel but about 300 pc downstream from the dust lane which lies along the inner edge of the spiral arm. All the CO components in the map but one are located within 130 pc of an H II region and may represent emission from locally heated gas. The lack of CO emission on the dust lane indicates that the dense molecular gas does not pile up here in M83. Remarkable differences between the molecular gas distributions in M83 and the spiral arms or M51, where CO emission peaks on the dust lane, is attributed to the difference in the strength of their density waves. The observations of M83 are consistent with the model of Elmegreen in which diffuse gas is compressed at the shock front, producing the dust lane at the inner edge of the spiral arm while dense giant molecular clouds pass through the front and form a broad distribution on the arm.

  5. Superluminous Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Patrick M.; Lanz, Lauranne; Nader, Cyril; Helou, George

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of spiral galaxies that are as optically luminous as elliptical brightest cluster galaxies, with r-band monochromatic luminosity Lr = 8-14L* (4.3-7.5 × 1044 erg s-1). These super spiral galaxies are also giant and massive, with diameter D = 57-134 kpc and stellar mass Mstars = 0.3-3.4 × 1011M⊙. We find 53 super spirals out of a complete sample of 1616 SDSS galaxies with redshift z < 0.3 and Lr > 8L*. The closest example is found at z = 0.089. We use existing photometry to estimate their stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs). The SDSS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer colors are consistent with normal star-forming spirals on the blue sequence. However, the extreme masses and rapid SFRs of 5-65 M⊙ yr-1 place super spirals in a sparsely populated region of parameter space, above the star-forming main sequence of disk galaxies. Super spirals occupy a diverse range of environments, from isolation to cluster centers. We find four super spiral galaxy systems that are late-stage major mergers—a possible clue to their formation. We suggest that super spirals are a remnant population of unquenched, massive disk galaxies. They may eventually become massive lenticular galaxies after they are cut off from their gas supply and their disks fade.

  6. Are spiral galaxies heavy smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, J.; Disney, M.; Phillipps, S )

    1990-07-01

    The dustiness of spiral galaxies is discussed. Starburst galaxies and the shortage of truly bright spiral galaxies is cited as evidence that spiral galaxies are far dustier than has been thought. The possibility is considered that the dust may be hiding missing mass.

  7. Spiral Galaxies Stripped Bare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    Six spectacular spiral galaxies are seen in a clear new light in images from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The pictures were taken in infrared light, using the impressive power of the HAWK-I camera, and will help astronomers understand how the remarkable spiral patterns in galaxies form and evolve. HAWK-I [1] is one of the newest and most powerful cameras on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It is sensitive to infrared light, which means that much of the obscuring dust in the galaxies' spiral arms becomes transparent to its detectors. Compared to the earlier, and still much-used, VLT infrared camera ISAAC, HAWK-I has sixteen times as many pixels to cover a much larger area of sky in one shot and, by using newer technology than ISAAC, it has a greater sensitivity to faint infrared radiation [2]. Because HAWK-I can study galaxies stripped bare of the confusing effects of dust and glowing gas it is ideal for studying the vast numbers of stars that make up spiral arms. The six galaxies are part of a study of spiral structure led by Preben Grosbøl at ESO. These data were acquired to help understand the complex and subtle ways in which the stars in these systems form into such perfect spiral patterns. The first image shows NGC 5247, a spiral galaxy dominated by two huge arms, located 60-70 million light-years away. The galaxy lies face-on towards Earth, thus providing an excellent view of its pinwheel structure. It lies in the zodiacal constellation of Virgo (the Maiden). The galaxy in the second image is Messier 100, also known as NGC 4321, which was discovered in the 18th century. It is a fine example of a "grand design" spiral galaxy - a class of galaxies with very prominent and well-defined spiral arms. About 55 million light-years from Earth, Messier 100 is part of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies and lies in the constellation of Coma Berenices (Berenice's Hair, named after the ancient Egyptian queen Berenice II). The third

  8. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Masashi

    The magnetic-field characteristics in spiral galaxies are investigated, with emphasis on the Milky Way. The dynamo theory is considered, and axisymmetric spiral (ASS) and bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields are analyzed. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields are discussed.

  9. Backwards Spiral Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have found a spiral galaxy that may rotate in the opposite direction from what was expected.

    A picture of the oddball galaxy is available at http://heritage.stsci.edu or http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/03 or http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . It was taken in May 2001 by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The picture showed which side of galaxy NGC 4622 is closer to Earth; that information helped astronomers determine that the galaxy may be spinning clockwise. The image shows NGC 4622 and its outer pair of winding arms full of new stars, shown in blue.

    Astronomers are puzzled by the clockwise rotation because of the direction the outer spiral arms are pointing. Most spiral galaxies have arms of gas and stars that trail behind as they turn. But this galaxy has two 'leading' outer arms that point toward the direction of the galaxy's clockwise rotation. NGC 4622 also has a 'trailing' inner arm that is wrapped around the galaxy in the opposite direction. Based on galaxy simulations, a team of astronomers had expected that the galaxy was turning counterclockwise.

    NGC 4622 is a rare example of a spiral galaxy with arms pointing in opposite directions. Astronomers suspect this oddity was caused by the interaction of NGC 4622 with another galaxy. Its two outer arms are lopsided, meaning that something disturbed it. The new Hubble image suggests that NGC 4622 consumed a smaller companion galaxy.

    Galaxies, which consist of stars, gas, and dust, rotate very slowly. Our Sun, one of many stars in our Milky Way galaxy, completes a circuit around the Milky Way every 250 million years. NGC 4622 lies 111 million light-years away in the direction of the constellation Centaurus.

    The science team, consisting of Drs. Ron Buta and Gene Byrd from the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and Tarsh Freeman of Bevill State

  10. Rebuilding Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    Major Observing Programme Leads to New Theory of Galaxy Formation Summary Most present-day large galaxies are spirals, presenting a disc surrounding a central bulge. Famous examples are our own Milky Way or the Andromeda Galaxy. When and how did these spiral galaxies form? Why do a great majority of them present a massive central bulge? An international team of astronomers [1] presents new convincing answers to these fundamental questions. For this, they rely on an extensive dataset of observations of galaxies taken with several space- and ground-based telescopes. In particular, they used over a two-year period, several instruments on ESO's Very Large Telescope. Among others, their observations reveal that roughly half of the present-day stars were formed in the period between 8,000 million and 4,000 million years ago, mostly in episodic burst of intense star formation occurring in Luminous Infrared Galaxies. From this and other evidence, the astronomers devised an innovative scenario, dubbed the "spiral rebuilding". They claim that most present-day spiral galaxies are the results of one or several merger events. If confirmed, this new scenario could revolutionise the way astronomers think galaxies formed. PR Photo 02a/05: Luminosity - Oxygen Abundance Relation for Galaxies (VLT) PR Photo 02b/05: The Spiral Rebuilding Scenario A fleet of instruments How and when did galaxies form? How and when did stars form in these island universes? These questions are still posing a considerable challenge to present-day astronomers. Front-line observational results obtained with a fleet of ground- and space-based telescopes by an international team of astronomers [1] provide new insights into these fundamental issues. For this, they embarked on an ambitious long-term study at various wavelengths of 195 galaxies with a redshift [2] greater than 0.4, i.e. located more than 4000 million light-years away. These galaxies were studied using ESO's Very Large Telescope, as well as the

  11. A Hard X-Ray Study of the Normal Star-forming Galaxy M83 with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukita, M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Lehmer, B. D.; Ptak, A.; Wik, D. R.; Zezas, A.; Antoniou, V.; Maccarone, T. J.; Replicon, V.; Tyler, J. B.; Venters, T.; Argo, M. K.; Bechtol, K.; Boggs, S.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, C.; Harrison, F.; Krivonos, R.; Kuntz, K.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results from sensitive, multi-epoch NuSTAR observations of the late-type star-forming galaxy M83 (d = 4.6 Mpc). This is the first investigation to spatially resolve the hard (E\\gt 10 keV) X-ray emission of this galaxy. The nuclear region and ˜20 off-nuclear point sources, including a previously discovered ultraluminous X-ray source, are detected in our NuSTAR observations. The X-ray hardnesses and luminosities of the majority of the point sources are consistent with hard X-ray sources resolved in the starburst galaxy NGC 253. We infer that the hard X-ray emission is most likely dominated by intermediate accretion state black hole binaries and neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (Z-sources). We construct the X-ray binary luminosity function (XLF) in the NuSTAR band for an extragalactic environment for the first time. The M83 XLF has a steeper XLF than the X-ray binary XLF in NGC 253, which is consistent with previous measurements by Chandra at softer X-ray energies. The NuSTAR integrated galaxy spectrum of M83 drops quickly above 10 keV, which is also seen in the starburst galaxies NGC 253, NGC 3310, and NGC 3256. The NuSTAR observations constrain any active galactic nucleus (AGN) to be either highly obscured or to have an extremely low luminosity of ≲1038 erg s‑1 (10–30 keV), implying that it is emitting at a very low Eddington ratio. An X-ray point source that is consistent with the location of the nuclear star cluster with an X-ray luminosity of a few times 1038 erg s‑1 may be a low-luminosity AGN but is more consistent with being an X-ray binary.

  12. A Hard X-Ray Study of the Normal Star-forming Galaxy M83 with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukita, M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Lehmer, B. D.; Ptak, A.; Wik, D. R.; Zezas, A.; Antoniou, V.; Maccarone, T. J.; Replicon, V.; Tyler, J. B.; Venters, T.; Argo, M. K.; Bechtol, K.; Boggs, S.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, C.; Harrison, F.; Krivonos, R.; Kuntz, K.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results from sensitive, multi-epoch NuSTAR observations of the late-type star-forming galaxy M83 (d = 4.6 Mpc). This is the first investigation to spatially resolve the hard (E\\gt 10 keV) X-ray emission of this galaxy. The nuclear region and ∼20 off-nuclear point sources, including a previously discovered ultraluminous X-ray source, are detected in our NuSTAR observations. The X-ray hardnesses and luminosities of the majority of the point sources are consistent with hard X-ray sources resolved in the starburst galaxy NGC 253. We infer that the hard X-ray emission is most likely dominated by intermediate accretion state black hole binaries and neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (Z-sources). We construct the X-ray binary luminosity function (XLF) in the NuSTAR band for an extragalactic environment for the first time. The M83 XLF has a steeper XLF than the X-ray binary XLF in NGC 253, which is consistent with previous measurements by Chandra at softer X-ray energies. The NuSTAR integrated galaxy spectrum of M83 drops quickly above 10 keV, which is also seen in the starburst galaxies NGC 253, NGC 3310, and NGC 3256. The NuSTAR observations constrain any active galactic nucleus (AGN) to be either highly obscured or to have an extremely low luminosity of ≲1038 erg s‑1 (10–30 keV), implying that it is emitting at a very low Eddington ratio. An X-ray point source that is consistent with the location of the nuclear star cluster with an X-ray luminosity of a few times 1038 erg s‑1 may be a low-luminosity AGN but is more consistent with being an X-ray binary.

  13. Galaxy Zoo: passive red spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Karen L.; Mosleh, Moein; Romer, A. Kathy; Nichol, Robert C.; Bamford, Steven P.; Schawinski, Kevin; Lintott, Chris J.; Andreescu, Dan; Campbell, Heather C.; Crowcroft, Ben; Doyle, Isabelle; Edmondson, Edward M.; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alexander S.; Vandenberg, Jan

    2010-06-01

    We study the spectroscopic properties and environments of red (or passive) spiral galaxies found by the Galaxy Zoo project. By carefully selecting face-on disc-dominated spirals, we construct a sample of truly passive discs (i.e. they are not dust reddened spirals, nor are they dominated by old stellar populations in a bulge). As such, our red spirals represent an interesting set of possible transition objects between normal blue spiral galaxies and red early types, making up ~6 per cent of late-type spirals. We use optical images and spectra from Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the physical processes which could have turned these objects red without disturbing their morphology. We find red spirals preferentially in intermediate density regimes. However, there are no obvious correlations between red spiral properties and environment suggesting that environment alone is not sufficient to determine whether a galaxy will become a red spiral. Red spirals are a very small fraction of all spirals at low masses (M* < 1010 Msolar), but are a significant fraction of the spiral population at large stellar masses showing that massive galaxies are red independent of morphology. We confirm that as expected, red spirals have older stellar populations and less recent star formation than the main spiral population. While the presence of spiral arms suggests that a major star formation could not have ceased a long ago (not more than a few Gyr), we show that these are also not recent post-starburst objects (having had no significant star formation in the last Gyr), so star formation must have ceased gradually. Intriguingly, red spirals are roughly four times as likely than the normal spiral population to host optically identified Seyfert/low-ionization nuclear emission region (LINER; at a given stellar mass and even accounting for low-luminosity lines hidden by star formation), with most of the difference coming from the objects with LINER-like emission. We also find a

  14. HUBBLE REVEALS 'BACKWARDS' SPIRAL GALAXY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronomers have found a spiral galaxy that may be spinning to the beat of a different cosmic drummer. To the surprise of astronomers, the galaxy, called NGC 4622, appears to be rotating in the opposite direction to what they expected. Pictures by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope helped astronomers determine that the galaxy may be spinning clockwise by showing which side of the galaxy is closer to Earth. A Hubble telescope photo of the oddball galaxy is this month's Hubble Heritage offering. The image shows NGC 4622 and its outer pair of winding arms full of new stars [shown in blue]. Astronomers are puzzled by the clockwise rotation because of the direction the outer spiral arms are pointing. Most spiral galaxies have arms of gas and stars that trail behind as they turn. But this galaxy has two 'leading' outer arms that point toward the direction of the galaxy's clockwise rotation. To add to the conundrum, NGC 4622 also has a 'trailing' inner arm that is wrapped around the galaxy in the opposite direction it is rotating. Based on galaxy simulations, a team of astronomers had expected that the galaxy was turning counterclockwise. NGC 4622 is a rare example of a spiral galaxy with arms pointing in opposite directions. What caused this galaxy to behave differently from most galaxies? Astronomers suspect that NGC 4622 interacted with another galaxy. Its two outer arms are lopsided, meaning that something disturbed it. The new Hubble image suggests that NGC 4622 consumed a small companion galaxy. The galaxy's core provides new evidence for a merger between NGC 4622 and a smaller galaxy. This information could be the key to understanding the unusual leading arms. Galaxies, which consist of stars, gas, and dust, rotate very slowly. Our Sun, one of many stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, completes a circuit around the Milky Way every 250 million years. NGC 4622 resides 111 million light-years away in the constellation Centaurus. The pictures were taken in May 2001 with Hubble

  15. THE SPIRAL GALAXY M100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    An image of the grand design of spiral galaxy M100 obtained with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope resolves individual stars within the majestic spiral arms. (These stars typically appeared blurred together when viewed with ground-based telescopes.) Hubble has the ability to resolve individual stars in other galaxies and measure accurately the light from very faint stars. This makes space telescope invaluable for identifying a rare class of pulsating stars, called Cepheid Variable stars embedded within M100's spiral arms. Cepheids are reliable cosmic distance mileposts. The interval it takes for the Cepheid to complete one pulsation is a direct indication of the stars's intrinsic brightness. This value can be used to make a precise measurement of the galaxy's distance, which turns out to be 56 million light-years. M100 (100th object in the Messier catalog of non-stellar objects) is a majestic face-on spiral galaxy. It is a rotating system of gas and stars, similar to our own galaxy, the Milky Way. Hubble routinely can view M100 with a level of clarity and sensitivity previously possible only for the very few nearby galaxies that compose our 'Local Group.'' M100 is a member of the huge Virgo cluster of an estimated 2,500 galaxies. The galaxy can be seen by amateur astronomers as a faint, pinwheel-shaped object in the spring constellation Coma Berenices. Technical Information: The Hubble Space Telescope image was taken on December 31, 1993 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2). This color picture is a composite of several images taken in different colors of light. Blue corresponds to regions containing hot newborn stars. The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science. Credit: J. Trauger, JPL and NASA

  16. Slow bars in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, A. M.; Khoruzhii, O. V.

    2000-11-01

    Here we put forward some arguments in favour of the existence of slow bars. More then a half of spiral galaxies have in their central regions a bar - a structure in the form of triaxial ellipsoid. Historically two models of the bar were developed - those of the so called ``slow'' and ``fast'' bars. In both cases the bar is in some resonance with the galactic disc region near the bar ends - it is the corotation resonance for a fast bar and the inner Lindblad resonance for a slow bar. For the same angular velocity the fast bar would be larger then the slow bar. Alternatively, for the same size the fast bar would have much higher angular velocity, that being the reason for the terminology used. Up till now, the direct measurement of angular velocity of a bar has been an open problem. This is why all arguments on the nature of bar observed in some particular galaxy are inevitably indirect. Despite the fact that the model of slow bars was developed slightly earlier, the main part of attention was focused on the fast bars. Presently many researchers believe in the existence of the fast bars in real galaxies, while discussions on the existence of the slow bars continue so far. In this Letter we demonstrate that the bar detected in the grand design spiral galaxy NGC 157 is the slow bar.

  17. Stellar Populations in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacArthur, L. A.; Courteau, S.; Bell, E. F.; Holtzman, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate optical and near-IR color gradients in a sample of 172 low-inclination galaxies spanning Hubble types S0--Irr. The colors are compared to stellar population synthesis models from which luminosity-weighted average ages and metallicities are determined. We explore the effects of different underlying star formation histories and additional bursts of star formation. Because the observed gradients show radial structure, we measure ``inner'' and ``outer'' disk age and metallicity gradients. Relative trends in age and metallicity and their gradients are explored as a function of Hubble type, rotational velocity, total near-IR galaxy magnitude, central surface brightness, and scale length. We find strong correlations in age and metallicity with Hubble type, rotational velocity, total magnitude, and central surface brightness in the sense that earlier-type, faster rotating, more luminous, and higher surface brightness galaxies are older and more metal-rich, suggesting an early and more rapid star formation history for these galaxies. The increasing trends level off for T ⪉ 4 (Sbc and earlier), V {rot} ⪆ 120 km s-1, MK ⪉ -23 mag, and μ 0 ⪉ 18.5 mag arcsec-2. Outer disk gradients are weaker than the inner gradients as expected for a slower variation of the potential and surface brightness in the outer parts. We find that stronger age gradients are associated with weaker metallicity gradients. Relative trends in gradients with galaxy parameters do not agree with predictions of semi-analytic models of hierarchical galaxy formation, possibly as a result of bar-induced radial flows. However, the observed trends are in agreement with chemo-spectro photometric models of spiral galaxy evolution based on CDM-motivated scaling laws but including none of the hierarchical merging characteristics. This implies a strong dependence of the star formation history of spiral galaxies on the galaxy potential and halo spin parameter. L.A.M. and S.C acknowledge support

  18. Molecular gas in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casoli, F.; Sauty, S.; Gerin, M.; Boselli, A.; Fouque, P.; Braine, J.; Gavazzi, G.; Lequeux, J.; Dickey, J.

    1998-03-01

    The molecular hydrogen content of a galaxy is a key parameter for its activity and future evolution. Its variations with basic properties such as size, mass, morphological type, and environment, the ratio of molecular to atomic gas masses, should provide us with a better view of galaxy evolution. Such studies have been done in the past by Sage (1993a) or the FCRAO group (e.g. Young & Knezek 1989), and have led to controversial results, for example about the MHH /MHI ratio. While Sage (1993a), using a distance-limited sample of 65 galaxies and the \\COA line emission as a tracer of the HH mass, finds that most galaxies have MHH /MHI lower than 1, Young & Knezek (1989) and Young et al. (1995), from a different sample of 178 objects, claim equal amounts of gas in the molecular and atomic phase. Here we again tackle this problem, by gathering a much larger sample of 582 objects, not only from the literature but also from several \\COA surveys that we have completed and which are largely unpublished. Our sample is clearly not complete and contains a large number of cluster galaxies as well as many more massive objects than a distance-limited sample. Contrary to previous analyses, we have taken into account the non-detections by using the survival analysis method. Our sample includes 105 isolated galaxies, observed by us, that we use as a reference sample in order to determine whether cluster galaxies are CO-deficient. We find that the ratio of HH and HI masses is on the average lower than 1, with = log(0.20) +/- 0.04 (median = log(0.27) +/- 0.04). For spirals with types Sa to Sc, we have slightly higher values: log(0.28) and log(0.34) respectively. The actual HH masses and MHH /MHI ratios could be lower than given above if, as suggested by recent gamma -ray and 1.3 mm continuum data, the conversion factor between \\COA emissivities and HH masses for large spiral galaxies is lower than the value adopted here (X=2.310(20) cm(-2) /(Kkms(-1) )). The

  19. High spatial resolution 100 micron observations of the M83 bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. J.; Lester, Dan F.; Harvey, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    A program of high spatial resolution far-infrared observations of galaxies using the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), was conducted to better understand the role of star formation, the general interstellar radiation field, and non-thermal activity in powering the prodigious far-infrared luminosities seen in spiral and interacting galaxies. Here, researchers present observations of the central region of the well-known barred spiral M83 (NGC 5236). The resultant channel 3 scans for M83 and IRC + 10216, after co-addition and smoothing, are shown. These data show that M83 is extended at 100 microns compared to a point source. A simple Gaussian deconvolution of the M83 data with the point source profile from IRC+10216 gives a full width half maximum (FWHM) of about 19 seconds for M83. By comparison with IRC+10216, researchers obtain a flux for the unresolved component in M83 of about 110 Jy. This is about 1/6 the total flux for M83 (Rice et al. 1988) and about 1/2 the PSC flux. The M83 and IRC+10216 profiles in the cross-scan direction (SE-NW) were also compared, and show that M83 is extended in this direction as well, with a width of about 18 seconds. A comparison of the different channel profiles for M83 and IRC+10216 shows that there is an asymmetry in the M83 data, in that the maximum in the profiles shifts from southeast to northwest as channel number increases. This corresponds to the extension in the bar seen in the CO data. Thus the far-infrared emission in the central region of M83 tends to trace the CO bar. The new 100 micron data is also compared with previous H alpha observations from the literature, to determine how well the far-infrared traces the stellar structure, the star formation as measured by H alpha, and the optical colors.

  20. Ultraviolet Spectra of Normal Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Anne

    1997-01-01

    The data related to this grant on the Ultraviolet Spectra of Normal Spiral Galaxies have been entirely reduced and analyzed. It is incorporated into templates of Spiral galaxies used in the calculation of K corrections towards the understanding of high redshift galaxies. The main paper was published in the Astrophysical Journal, August 1996, Volume 467, page 38. The data was also used in another publication, The Spectral Energy Distribution of Normal Starburst and Active Galaxies, June 1997, preprint series No. 1158. Copies of both have been attached.

  1. Cinematique et dynamique des galaxies spirales barrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Olivier

    The total mass (luminous and dark) of galaxies is derived from their circular velocities. Spectroscopic Fabry-Perot observations of the ionized gas component of spiral galaxies allow one to derive their kinematics. In the case of purely axisymmetric velocity fields--as in non-active and unbarred spirals galaxies-- the circular velocities can be derived directly. However, the velocity fields of barred galaxies (which constitute two thirds of the spirals) exhibit strong non-circular motions and need a careful analysis to retrieve the circular component. This thesis proposes the necessary steps to recover the axisymmetric component of barred spiral galaxies. The first step was to develop the best instrumentation possible for this work. [Special characters omitted.] , which is the most sensitive photon counting camera ever developed, was coupled to a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The observations of a sample of barred spiral galaxies--the BH a BAR sample--was assembled in order to obtain the most rigourous velocity fields. Then, the Tremaine-Weinberg method, which can determine the bar pattern speed and is usually used with the observations of stellar component, has been tested on the ionised gas and gave satisfactory results. Finally, all the above techniques have been applied to the BH a BAR sample in order to study the key parameters of the galaxies' evolution--bar pattern speeds, multiple stationary waves, resonances etc.--which will allow one to use N-body+SPH simulations to model properly the non-circular motions and determine the true total mass of barred spiral galaxies.

  2. ON THE FRACTION OF BARRED SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Preethi B.; Abraham, Roberto G. E-mail: abraham@astro.utoronto.c

    2010-05-10

    We investigate the stellar masses of strongly barred spiral galaxies. Our analysis is based on a sample of {approx}14,000 visually classified nearby galaxies given by Nair and Abraham. The fraction of barred spiral galaxies is found to be a strong function of stellar mass and star formation history, with a minimum near the characteristic mass at which bimodality is seen in the stellar populations of galaxies. We also find that bar fractions are very sensitive to the central concentration of galaxies below the transition mass but not above it. This suggests that whatever process is causing the creation of the red and blue sequences is either influencing, or being influenced by, structural changes which manifest themselves in the absence of bars. As a consequence of strong bar fractions being sensitive to the mass range probed, our analysis helps resolve discrepant results on the reported evolution of bar fractions with redshift.

  3. Smoothing Rotation Curves in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrier, Joel C.; Sellwood, Jerry

    2014-05-01

    We present evidence that spiral activity is responsible for the creation of featureless rotation curves. We examine a variety of simulations of disk galaxies beginning in equilibrium and allow them to evolve while adding particles in annuli to the hot disk using a variety of rules. Two unstable spiral modes develop when this new material forms a ridge-like feature in the surface density profile of the disk. The extra material is redistributed radially by the spiral activity, and the associated angular momentum changes remove more particles from the ridge than are added to it. This process eventually removes the density feature from the galaxy and creates a locally flat rotation curve. We argue that the lack of a feature when transitioning from disk to halo dominance in the rotation curves of disk galaxies, the so called ``disk-halo conspiracy'', could also be accounted for by this mechanism.

  4. STAR CLUSTERS IN PSEUDOBULGES OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Di Nino, Daiana; Trenti, Michele; Stiavelli, Massimo; Carollo, C. Marcella; Scarlata, Claudia; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2009-11-15

    We present a study of the properties of the star-cluster systems around pseudobulges of late-type spiral galaxies using a sample of 11 galaxies with distances from 17 Mpc to 37 Mpc. Star clusters are identified from multiband Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFPC2 imaging data by combining detections in three bands (F435W and F814W with ACS and F606W with WFPC2). The photometric data are then compared to population synthesis models to infer the masses and ages of the star clusters. Photometric errors and completeness are estimated by means of artificial source Monte Carlo simulations. Dust extinction is estimated by considering F160W NICMOS observations of the central regions of the galaxies, augmenting our wavelength coverage. In all galaxies we identify star clusters with a wide range of ages, from young (age {approx}< 8 Myr) blue clusters, with typical mass of 10{sup 3} M {sub sun} to older (age >100-250 Myr), more massive, red clusters. Some of the latter might likely evolve into objects similar to the Milky Way's globular clusters. We compute the specific frequencies for the older clusters with respect to the galaxy and bulge luminosities. Specific frequencies relative to the galaxy light appear consistent with the globular cluster specific frequencies of early-type spirals. We compare the specific frequencies relative to the bulge light with the globular cluster specific frequencies of dwarf galaxies, which have a surface brightness profile that is similar to that of the pseudobulges in our sample. The specific frequencies we derive for our sample galaxies are higher than those of the dwarf galaxies, supporting an evolutionary scenario in which some of the dwarf galaxies might be the remnants of harassed late-type spiral galaxies that hosted a pseudobulge.

  5. Dark and visible matter in spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persic, M.; Salucci, P.

    1988-01-01

    Rotation-curve profiles are used to determine the dark-to-luminous mass ratio within the disk size for 43 spiral galaxies. It is noted that faint galaxies are halo-dominated and that bright galaxies are disk-dominated in the disk regions. The luminosity sequence is shown to be a dark-to-luminous sequence. By removing the dark-matter contribution from the velocity at the disk edge, the dispersion affecting the luminosity-kinematics relation is found to decrease in comparison with the conventional Tully-Fisher correlation.

  6. Spiral Galaxies in MKW/AWM Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Barbara A.

    1997-03-01

    Observations have been made of the neutral hydrogen content of more than 170 galaxies within MKW 4, MKW 7, MKW 8, MKW 9, MKW 11, AWM 1, AWM 3, AWM 4, and AWM 5. This sample of nine clusters is representative of the general class of poor clusters identified by MKW and AWM in that they all contain D-- or cD--like dominant galaxies at their dynamical centers. We examine the neutral hydrogen (HI) content of the spiral members in these systems as a function of the local and global properties of the cluster, i.e., galaxy density, x-ray intra cluster gas pressure, x-ray and optical luminosities, and compare our findings with the HI properties of similar galaxies in rich clusters and loose groups of galaxies.

  7. MAGNIFICENT DETAILS IN A DUSTY SPIRAL GALAXY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1995, the majestic spiral galaxy NGC 4414 was imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. An international team of astronomers, led by Dr. Wendy Freedman of the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, observed this galaxy on 13 different occasions over the course of two months. Images were obtained with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) through three different color filters. Based on their discovery and careful brightness measurements of variable stars in NGC 4414, the Key Project astronomers were able to make an accurate determination of the distance to the galaxy. The resulting distance to NGC 4414, 19.1 megaparsecs or about 60 million light-years, along with similarly determined distances to other nearby galaxies, contributes to astronomers' overall knowledge of the rate of expansion of the universe. The Hubble constant (H0) is the ratio of how fast galaxies are moving away from us to their distance from us. This astronomical value is used to determine distances, sizes, and the intrinsic luminosities for many objects in our universe, and the age of the universe itself. Due to the large size of the galaxy compared to the WFPC2 detectors, only half of the galaxy observed was visible in the datasets collected by the Key Project astronomers in 1995. In 1999, the Hubble Heritage Team revisited NGC 4414 and completed its portrait by observing the other half with the same filters as were used in 1995. The end result is a stunning full-color look at the entire dusty spiral galaxy. The new Hubble picture shows that the central regions of this galaxy, as is typical of most spirals, contain primarily older, yellow and red stars. The outer spiral arms are considerably bluer due to ongoing formation of young, blue stars, the brightest of which can be seen individually at the high resolution provided by the Hubble camera. The arms are also very rich in clouds of interstellar dust

  8. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Marita

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic field structure in edge-on galaxies observed so far shows a plane-parallel magnetic field component in the disk of the galaxy and an X-shaped field in its halo. The plane-parallel field is thought to be the projected axisymmetric (ASS) disk field as observed in face-on galaxies. Some galaxies addionionally exhibit strong vertical magnetic fields in the halo right above and below the central region of the disk. The mean-field dynamo theory in the disk cannot explain these observed fields without the action of a wind, which also probably plays an important role to keep the vertical scale heights constant in galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation activities, as has been observed in the radio continuum: At λ6 cm the vertical scale heights of the thin disk and the thick disk/halo in a sample of five edge-on galaxies are similar with a mean value of 300 +/- 50 pc for the thin disk and 1.8 +/- 0.2 kpc for the thick disk (a table and references are given in Krause 2011) with our sample including the brightest halo observed so far, NGC 253, with strong star formation, as well as one of the weakest halos, NGC 4565, with weak star formation. If synchrotron emission is the dominant loss process of the relativistic electrons the outer shape of the radio emission should be dumbbell-like as has been observed in several edge-on galaxies like e.g. NGC 253 (Heesen et al. 2009) and NGC 4565. As the synchrotron lifetime t syn at a single frequency is proportional to the total magnetic field strength B t -1.5, a cosmic ray bulk speed (velocity of a galactic wind) can be defined as v CR = h CR /t syn = 2 h z /t syn , where h CR and h z are the scale heights of the cosmic rays and the observed radio emission at this freqnency. Similar observed radio scale heights imply a self regulation mechanism between the galactic wind velocity, the total magnetic field strength and the star formation rate SFR in the disk: v CR ~ B t 1.5 ~ SFR ~ 0.5 (Niklas & Beck 1997).

  9. THE YOUNG OUTER DISK OF M83

    SciTech Connect

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    Deep near-infrared images recorded with NICI on Gemini South are used to investigate the evolved stellar content in the outer southeast quadrant of the spiral galaxy M83. A diffuse population of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is detected, indicating that there are stars outside of the previously identified young and intermediate age star clusters in the outer disk. The brightest AGB stars have M {sub K} {>=} -8, and the AGB luminosity function (LF) is well matched by model LFs that assume ages {<=}1 Gyr. The specific star formation rate (SFR) during the past few Gyr estimated from AGB star counts is consistent with that computed from mid-infrared observations of star clusters at similar radii, and it is concluded that the disruption timescale for star clusters in the outer disk is <<1 Gyr. The LF and specific frequency of AGB stars vary with galactocentric radius, in a manner that is indicative of lower luminosity-weighted ages at larger radii. Modest numbers of red supergiants are also found, indicating that there has been star formation during the past 100 Myr, while the ratio of C stars to M giants is consistent with that expected for a solar metallicity system that has experienced a constant SFR for the past few Gyr. The results drawn from the properties of resolved AGB stars are broadly consistent with those deduced from integrated light observations in the UV.

  10. Exploring spiral galaxy potentials with hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slyz, Adrianne D.; Kranz, Thilo; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2003-12-01

    We study how well the complex gas velocity fields induced by massive spiral arms are modelled by the hydrodynamical simulations that we used recently to constrain the dark matter fraction in nearby spiral galaxies. More specifically, we explore the dependence of the positions and amplitudes of features in the gas flow on the temperature of the interstellar medium (assumed to behave as a one-component isothermal fluid), the non-axisymmetric disc contribution to the galactic potential, the pattern speed Ωp, and finally the numerical resolution of the simulation. We argue that, after constraining the pattern speed reasonably well by matching the simulations to the observed spiral arm morphology, the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric perturbation (the disc fraction) is left as the primary parameter determining the gas dynamics. However, owing to the sensitivity of the positions of the shocks to modelling parameters, one has to be cautious when quantitatively comparing the simulations to observations. In particular, we show that a global least-squares analysis is not the optimal method for distinguishing different models, as it tends to slightly favour low disc fraction models. Nevertheless, we conclude that, given observational data of reasonably high spatial resolution and an accurate shock-resolving hydro-code, this method tightly constrains the dark matter content within spiral galaxies. We further argue that, even if the perturbations induced by spiral arms are weaker than those of strong bars, they are better suited for this kind of analysis because the spiral arms extend to larger radii where effects like inflows due to numerical viscosity and morphological dependence on gas sound speed are less of a concern than they are in the centres of discs.

  11. Molecular Gas Properties in M83 from PDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egusa, F.; Hirota, A.; Baba, J.; Muraoka, K.

    2015-12-01

    We have obtained 12CO(1-0) data of the nearby barred spiral galaxy M83 from ALMA Cycle0 and Nobeyama 45m observations. Within the field of view, the galactic center and the bar regions are defined. A region outside the bar, called “other”, mostly consists of a spiral arm. We have created a probability distribution function (PDF) of the CO integrated intensity for each region and found that the PDF for the bar shows a bright-end tail while that for the “other” does not. Since the star formation efficiency is lower in the bar, this difference in the PDF shape is contrary to the trend in MW that the bright-end tail is found for star-forming molecular clouds. We deduce that this discrepancy is likely due to specific dynamical environments in the bar region.

  12. Variable Stars in a Distant Spiral Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) view of the magnificent spiral galaxy NGC 4603, the most distant galaxy in which a special class of pulsating stars called Cepheid variables have been found. It is associated with the Centaurus cluster, one of the most massive assemblages of galaxies in the nearby universe. The Local Group of galaxies, of which the Milky Way is a member, is moving in the direction of Centaurus at a speed of more than a million miles an hour under the influence of the gravitational pull of the matter in that direction. Clusters of young bright blue stars highlight the galaxy's spiral arms. In contrast, red giant stars in the process of dying are also found. Only the very brightest stars in NGC 4603 can be seen individually, even with the unmatched ability of the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain detailed images of distant objects. Much of the diffuse glow comes from fainter stars that cannot be individually distinguished by Hubble. The reddish filaments are regions where clouds of dust obscure blue light from the stars behind them. This galaxy was observed by a team affiliated with the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. Because NGC 4603 is much farther away than the other galaxies studied with Hubble by the Key Project team, 108 million light-years, its stars appear very faint from the Earth, and so accurately measuring their brightness, as is required for distinguishing the characteristic variations of Cepheids, is extremely difficult. Determining the distance to the galaxy required an unprecedented statistical analysis based on extensive computer simulations.

  13. STAR FORMATION IN TWO LUMINOUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Ashburn, Allison; Wright, Teresa; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Rubin, Vera C.; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; Struve, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We examined star formation in two very luminous (M{sub V} = –22 to –23) Sc-type spiral galaxies, NGC 801 and UGC 2885, using ultra-deep Hα images. We combine these Hα images with UBV and Two-Micron All-Sky Survey JHK images and H I maps to explore the star formation characteristics of disk galaxies at high luminosity. Hα traces star formation in these galaxies to 4-6 disk scale lengths, but the lack of detection of Hα further out is likely due to the loss of Lyman continuum photons. Considering gravitational instabilities alone, we find that the gas and stars in the outer regions are marginally stable in an average sense, but considering dissipative gas and radial and azimuthal forcing, the outer regions are marginally unstable to forming spiral arms. Star formation is taking place in spiral arms, which are regions of locally higher gas densities. Furthermore, we have traced smooth exponential stellar disks over four magnitudes in V-band surface brightness and 4-6 disk scale lengths, in spite of a highly variable gravitational instability parameter. Thus, gravitational instability thresholds do not seem relevant to the stellar disk. One possibility for creating an exponential disk is that the molecular cloud densities and star formation rates have exponential profiles and this fact forces the stellar disk to build up such a profile. Another possibility is that the stellar disk is continuously adjusted to an exponential shape regardless of the star formation profile, for example, through global dynamical processes that scatter stars. However, such scattering processes are only known to operate in spiral systems, in which case they cannot explain the same dilemma of smooth exponential disks observed in dwarf irregular galaxies.

  14. Tidal interaction of small satellite galaxies with spiral primaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, Gene G.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of the disks of spiral galaxies and small companions is discussed. The gravitational drag effects of the disk on small satellites are of particular interest. Studies of the Andromeda Galaxy and its satellites, M32 and NGC 205, reveal the usefulness of few-body test-particle simulations in explaining many features of spiral galaxies and their satellites.

  15. Star formation in the outer disks of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Kate Lynn

    I present results from a multi-wavelength study of star formation and the gaseous content in the outer disks of a sample of eight nearby spiral galaxies. In particular, the study focuses on galaxies with typical HI-to-optical sizes of ˜1--2, to provide a comparison to studies of galaxies with star formation occurring in extended gas disks. The study features new, ultra-deep ground-based H-alpha imaging and deep ultraviolet (UV) imaging from the GALEX space telescope to trace the recent star formation. I find that star formation typically extends through most (>85%) of the gas disk, with an outermost star forming regime characterized by low covering fractions and low star formation rate surface densities. The result that star formation extends through most of the gas disk regardless of the HI-to-optical size implies that it is important to further our understanding of the formation of extended gas disks to fully understand the implications of extended star forming disks. I find that the outer gaseous disks are gravitationally stable, which is in agreement with the lower level of star formation. I use ultraviolet and H-alpha colors to probe the recent star formation in the outer disks and find significant variations between colors of young stellar clusters. I run stellar population synthesis models to show how episodic star formation histories (SFHs) with periods of 100--250 Myr could cause similar color variations as are seen in outer disks. An episodic SFH would have implications for the gas depletion time and chemical evolution of spiral galaxies. In addition to an episodic SFH, the observed ultraviolet and H-alpha colors of young stellar clusters in the outer disks of galaxies in our sample are also in agreement with recently published models of a stochastically sampled initial mass function (IMF). Therefore, there remains some uncertainty for the possible cause of this observational result. Finally, we present a pilot study of deep, near infrared (NIR) imaging

  16. Internal Extinction in Spiral Galaxies. Inclination Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magris, G. C.; Bruzual, G. A.

    1987-05-01

    . Kent (1986) finds that the surface brightness profiles (r) of spiral galaxies have a weak dependence, if any, on the inclination e with respect to the line of sight. This author also finds a correlation between the MIL ratio and the inclination of a galaxy. The lack of dependence of (r) in , = cos 8 indicates that the disk of these galaxies is optically thick ( .>l), due to the presence of dust grains. For an optically thick system o(r) a + 2.5 log . The cosecant law : 1.086 (Holmberg, 1975) does not explain the observed behaviour of a(r) with . 8ru'ual, Magris and Calvet (1986) solved the radiative transfer equation for a mixture of stars and dispersive dust grains distributed homogeneously in a plane parallel configuration, taking into account the wavelenght dependence of the albedo and , as well as the redistribution in angle of photons scattered by dust grains. The transfer equation is solved for the dimensionless intensity ?( , ) I( , )/I*, where 1* is the intensity emerging from the dust free configuration. The solution, CA -2.5 log (r..=0, ) , includes the correction to the galaxy magnitude due to the excess number 0+ stellar sources along the line o+ sigth (cc -i) with respect to the =I case (face on galaxy). For optically thick systems, does not depend on . The luminosity of a disk galaxy observed with inclination ,q 1 given in our model by L cc , from which log(M/L) = const + (.4 8.N( )'. with G.N . ) = -2.5 log( ). The constant is determined from the mass- luminosity. ratio of a dust free system. In terms of the correction (3(N) we can explain Kent's observations with values of between .3 and 4. These values are consistent with the observation of . -independent surface brightness profiles mentioned above. From this analysis we conclude that the correction terms of Bruzual, Magris and Calvet (1986), which take into account the dispersive properties of interstellar dust, can explain the behaviour of ar) and MIL with galaxy inclination. These correction

  17. Mesoscale Magnetic Structures in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukurov, Anvar

    Virtually all spiral galaxies host magnetic fields ordered at scales comparable to the galactic size (Beck et al., 1996; Beck, 2000, 2001). Observations of polarized radio emission at improved resolution and sensitivity have revealed details of the global magnetic structures that can shed new light on the problem of their origin. Reversals of the regular magnetic field along radius and/or azimuth and magnetic arms are such features, whose scale exceeds significantly the correlation scale of interstellar turbulence but remains smaller than the overall galactic dimension. Despite a few decades of debate, there remains doubt as to what features of the observed field could have been inherited from the pre-galactic past, and which have been formed and maintained more recently in a relatively mature galaxy. In what follows, we briefly review the current understanding of the origin of the mesoscale magnetic structures and their implications for the origin of galactic magnetic fields.

  18. Double Nucleus in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, Damián; Díaz, Rubén J.; Agüero, M. Paz

    2006-03-01

    M83 is one of the nearest galaxies with enhanced nuclear star formation, and it presents one of the best opportunities to study the kinematics and physical properties of a circumnuclear starburst. Our three-dimensional spectroscopy data in the R band confirm the presence of a secondary nucleus or mass concentration (previously suggested by Thatte and coworkers). We determine the position of this hidden nucleus, which would be more massive than the visible one and was not detected in the optical Hubble Space Telescope images due, probably, to the strong dust extinction. Using a Keplerian approximation, we estimated for the optical nucleus a mass of (5.0+/-0.8)×106 Msolar/sini (r<1.5"), and for the hidden nucleus, located 4''+/-1'' to the northwest (position angle of 271deg+/-15deg) of the optical nucleus, a mass of (1.00+/-0.08)×107 Msolar/sini (r<1.5"). The emission-line ratio map also unveils the presence of a second circumnuclear ring structure, previously discovered by IR imaging (Elmegreen and coworkers). The data allow us to resolve the behavior of the interstellar medium inside the circumnuclear ring and around the binary mass concentration.

  19. The Young Outer Disk of M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    Deep near-infrared images recorded with NICI on Gemini South are used to investigate the evolved stellar content in the outer southeast quadrant of the spiral galaxy M83. A diffuse population of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is detected, indicating that there are stars outside of the previously identified young and intermediate age star clusters in the outer disk. The brightest AGB stars have M K >= -8, and the AGB luminosity function (LF) is well matched by model LFs that assume ages <=1 Gyr. The specific star formation rate (SFR) during the past few Gyr estimated from AGB star counts is consistent with that computed from mid-infrared observations of star clusters at similar radii, and it is concluded that the disruption timescale for star clusters in the outer disk is Lt1 Gyr. The LF and specific frequency of AGB stars vary with galactocentric radius, in a manner that is indicative of lower luminosity-weighted ages at larger radii. Modest numbers of red supergiants are also found, indicating that there has been star formation during the past 100 Myr, while the ratio of C stars to M giants is consistent with that expected for a solar metallicity system that has experienced a constant SFR for the past few Gyr. The results drawn from the properties of resolved AGB stars are broadly consistent with those deduced from integrated light observations in the UV. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a co-operative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council of Canada (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), the Ministerio da Ciencia e Technologia (Brazil), and the Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia e Innovacion Productiva (Argentina).

  20. Chemical evolution in spiral and irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Peimbert, S.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of models of chemical evolution of the interstellar medium in our galaxy and other galaxies is presented. These models predict the time variation and radial dependence of chemical composition in the gas as function of the input parameters; initial mass function, stellar birth rate, chemical composition of mass lost by stars during their evolution (yields), and the existence of large scale mass flows, like infall from the halo, outflow to the intergalactic medium or radial flows within a galaxy. At present there is a considerable wealth of observational data on the composition of HII regions in spiral and irregular galaxies to constrain the models. Comparisons are made between theory and the observed physical conditions. In particular, studies of helium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen abundances are reviewed. In many molecular clouds the information we have on the amount of H2 is derived from the observed CO column density, and a standard CO/H2 ratio derived for the solar neighborhood. Chemical evolution models and the observed variations in O/H and N/O values, point out the need to include these results in a CO/H2 relation that should be, at least, a function of the O/H ratio. This aspect is also discussed.

  1. A VLA Low Frequency Survey of the Supernova Remnant Population in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, Christopher; Pritchard, T. A.; Blair, W. P.; Cowan, J. J.; Godfrey, L.; Miller-Jones, J.; Kuntz, K. D.; Long, K. S.; Maddox, L. A.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Soria, R.; Whitmore, B. C.; Winkler, P. F.

    2014-01-01

    We present low frequency observations of the grand design spiral galaxy, M83, using the C and L bands of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). With recent optical (HST) and X-ray (Chandra) observations and utilizing the newly expanded bandwidth of the VLA, we are exploring the radio spectral properties of the more than 150 radio point sources in M83. These observations allow us to probe the evolution of supernova remnants (SNRs) and to find previously undiscovered SNRs. These observations represent the fourth epoch of deep VLA observations of M83. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities.

  2. A Grazing Encounter Between Two Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The larger and more massive galaxy is cataloged as NGC 2207 (on the left in the Hubble Heritage image), and the smaller one on the right is IC 2163. Strong tidal forces from NGC 2207 have distorted the shape of IC 2163, flinging out stars and gas into long streamers stretching out a hundred thousand light-years toward the right-hand edge of the image. Computer simulations, carried out by a team led by Bruce and Debra Elmegreen, demonstrate the leisurely timescale over which galactic collisions occur. In addition to the Hubble images, measurements made with the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array Radio Telescope in New Mexico reveal the motions of the galaxies and aid the reconstruction of the collision. The calculations indicate that IC 2163 is swinging past NGC 2207 in a counterclockwise direction, having made its closest approach 40 million years ago. However, IC 2163 does not have sufficient energy to escape from the gravitational pull of NGC 2207, and is destined to be pulled back and swing past the larger galaxy again in the future. The high resolution of the Hubble telescope image reveals dust lanes in the spiral arms of NGC 2207, clearly silhouetted against IC 2163, which is in the background. Hubble also reveals a series of parallel dust filaments extending like fine brush strokes along the tidally stretched material on the right-hand side. The large concentrations of gas and dust in both galaxies may well erupt into regions of active star formation in the near future. Trapped in their mutual orbit around each other, these two galaxies will continue to distort and disrupt each other. Eventually, billions of years from now, they will merge into a single, more massive galaxy. It is believed that many present-day galaxies, including the Milky Way, were assembled from a similar process of coalescence of smaller galaxies occurring over billions of years. This image was created from 3 separate pointings of Hubble. The Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 data

  3. The Primordial Origin Model of Magnetic Fields in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki; Machida, Mami; Kudoh, Takahiro

    2010-10-01

    We propose a primordial-origin model for composite configurations of global magnetic fields in spiral galaxies. We show that a uniform tilted magnetic field wound up into a rotating disk galaxy can evolve into composite magnetic configurations comprising bisymmetric spiral (S = BSS), axisymmetric spiral (A = ASS), plane-reversed spiral (PR), and/or ring (R) fields in the disk, and vertical (V) fields in the center. By MHD simulations we show that these composite galactic fields are indeed created from a weak primordial uniform field, and that different configurations can co-exist in the same galaxy. We show that spiral fields trigger the growth of two-armed gaseous arms. The centrally accumulated vertical fields are twisted and produce a jet toward the halo. We found that the more vertical was the initial uniform field, the stronger was the formed magnetic field in the galactic disk.

  4. The Globular Cluster System of the Spiral Galaxy NGC 7814

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhode, Katherine L.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    2003-11-01

    We present the results of a wide-field photometric study of the globular cluster (GC) system of the edge-on Sab spiral NGC 7814. This is the first spiral to be fully analyzed from our survey of the GC systems of a large sample of galaxies beyond the Local Group. NGC 7814 is of particular interest because a previous study estimated that it has 500-1000 GCs, giving it the largest specific frequency (SN) known for a spiral. Understanding this galaxy's GC system is important in terms of our understanding of the GC populations of spirals in general and has implications for the formation of massive galaxies. We observed the galaxy in BVR filters with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope and used image classification and three-color photometry to select GC candidates. We also analyzed archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images of NGC 7814, both to help quantify the contamination level of the WIYN GC candidate list and to detect GCs in the inner part of the galaxy halo. Combining HST data with high-quality ground-based images allows us to trace the entire radial extent of this galaxy's GC system and determine the total number of GCs directly through observation. We find that rather than being an especially high-SN spiral, NGC 7814 has <~200 GCs and SN~1, making it comparable to the two most well-studied spiral galaxies, the Milky Way and M31. We explore the implications of these results for models of the formation of galaxies and their GC systems. The initial results from our survey suggest that the GC systems of typical elliptical galaxies can be accounted for by the merger of two or more spirals, but that for highly luminous elliptical galaxies, additional physical processes may be needed.

  5. Near-infrared mapping of spiral barred galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallais, P.; Rouan, D.; Lacombe, F.

    1990-01-01

    In external galaxies, near-infrared emission originates from stellar populations, hot dust, free-free emission from H+ regions, gaseous emission, non-thermal nucleus if any. Because of the low extinction compared to the visible, infrared wavelengths are useful to probe regions obscured by dust such as central parts where starburst phenomena can occur because of the large quantity of matter. The results presented were obtained with a 32 x 32 InSb charge injection device (CID) array cooled at 4K, at the f/36 cassegrain focus of the 3m60 Canada-France-Hawaii telescope with a spatial resolution of 0.5 inches per pixel. The objects presented are spiral barred galaxies mapped at J(1.25 microns), H(1.65 microns) and K(2.2 microns). The non-axisymetric potential due to the presence of a bar induces dynamical processes leading to the confinement of matter and peculiar morphologies. Infrared imaging is used to study the link between various components. Correlations with other wavelengths ranges and 2-colors diagrams ((J-H), (H-K)) lead to the identification of star forming regions, nucleus. Maps show structures connected to the central core. The question is, are they flowing away or toward the nucleus. Observations of M83 lead to several conclusions. The star forming region, detected in the visible and the infrared cannot be very compact and must extend to the edge of the matter concentration. The general shape of the near-infrared emission and the location of radio and 10 micron peaks suggest the confinement of matter between the inner Linblad resonances localized from CO measurements about 100 and 400 pc. The distribution of color indices in the arc from southern part to the star forming region suggests an increasing amount of gas and a time evolution eventually triggered by supernova explosions. Close to the direction of the bar, a bridge-like structure connects the arc to the nucleus with peculiar color indices. Perhaps, this structure can be linked to a height velocity

  6. Face on Barred and Ringed Spiral Galaxy NGC 3351

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet image (left) and visual image (right) of the face on barred and ringed spiral galaxy NGC 3351 (M95). The morphological appearance of a galaxy can change dramatically between visual and ultraviolet wavelengths. In the case of M95, the nucleus and bar dominate the visual image. In the ultraviolet, the bar is not even visible and the ring and spiral arms dominate.

  7. An Optical Survey of Supernova Remnants in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.

    2004-11-01

    Observations of the face-on spiral galaxy M83 (NGC 5236) performed at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile have yielded a catalog of optical supernova remnant (SNR) candidates. These observations were performed with the 4 m Blanco telescope and a prime focus CCD imaging system using narrowband interference filters centered on the light of [S II], Hα, [O III], and red and blue continuum bands. Based on strong relative [S II]:Hα emission, 71 emission nebulae have been identified as SNR candidates. Positions and Hα fluxes of the candidates are presented. Follow-up spectra of 25 of the SNR candidates, also performed at CTIO, have confirmed many of the SNR identifications, although the spectra of a few objects are discrepant, perhaps because of inaccurate aperture placement. In addition, the low mean excitation of M83 H II regions has allowed a separate search for young oxygen-dominated (core collapse) SNRs similar to Cas A in our Galaxy, using [O III]:Hα. This search found a number of the same objects as the [S II]:Hα search, indicating that many of these SNRs have shock velocities in excess of 100 km s-1. However, no bona fide young core-collapse SNRs were detected with this technique, with the possible exception of the independent recovery of SN 1957D, which had been seen previously. We have also attempted to identify optical counterparts for the six historical supernovae that have occurred in M83. Except for SN 1957D, none of the historical supernovae have been detected by this survey. We compare our SNR candidate list against the Chandra X-ray source list of Soria and Wu and identify 15 X-ray sources as likely SNRs, based on positional coincidence within 1". The sources identified have hardness ratios that are soft compared to the general X-ray source population in M83. Based on observations made with the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, La Serena, Chile.

  8. Stellar Orbital Studies in Normal Spiral Galaxies: Effect of Spiral Arms on Disk Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Villegas, A.; Pichardo, B.; Moreno, E.

    2015-10-01

    We have built a family of non-axisymmetric potential models for normal non-barred spiral galaxies. For this purpose, a three-dimensional self-gravitating model of spiral arms (PERLAS) is used. We analyze the stellar dynamics on the disk plane, varying structural and dynamical parameters such as pitch angle, strength of spiral arms and angular speed. For the pitch angle, we found two limits. The first limit, based on ordered behavior, periodic orbit studies show that for pitch angles up to approximately 15{(°) }, 18{(°) }, and 20{(°) } for Sa, Sb and Sc galaxies, respectively, the spiral arms could be long-lasting structures. Beyond those limits, spiral arms may be explained as transient features rather than long-lasting large-scale structures. In a second limit, from a phase space orbital study based on chaotic behavior, we found that for pitch angles larger than ˜ 30{(°) }, ˜ 40{(°) } and ˜ 50{(°) } for Sa, Sb, and Sc galaxies, respectively, chaotic orbits dominate all the prograde phase space region that surrounds the periodic orbits sculpting the spiral arms, and can even destroy them. Finally, we studied orbital dynamics varying other parameters such as the pattern speed and the spiral arm mass; also we looked for restrictions for these parameters in different morphological types. In these studies we noticed that the effect of spiral arms on the disk dynamics, when we vary the pattern speed and mass, is strongly linked to the pitch angle.

  9. PLANETARY NEBULAE IN FACE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES. III. PLANETARY NEBULA KINEMATICS AND DISK MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin E-mail: rbc@astro.psu.ed

    2009-11-10

    Much of our understanding of dark matter halos comes from the assumption that the mass-to-light ratio (Y) of spiral disks is constant. The best way to test this hypothesis is to measure the disk surface mass density directly via the kinematics of old disk stars. To this end, we have used planetary nebulae (PNe) as test particles and have measured the vertical velocity dispersion (sigma{sub z}) throughout the disks of five nearby, low-inclination spiral galaxies: IC 342, M74 (NGC 628), M83 (NGC 5236), M94 (NGC 4736), and M101 (NGC 5457). By using H I to map galactic rotation and the epicyclic approximation to extract sigma{sub z} from the line-of-sight dispersion, we find that, with the lone exception of M101, our disks do have a constant Y out to approx3 optical scale lengths (h{sub R} ). However, once outside this radius, sigma{sub z} stops declining and becomes flat with radius. Possible explanations for this behavior include an increase in the disk mass-to-light ratio, an increase in the importance of the thick disk, and heating of the thin disk by halo substructure. We also find that the disks of early type spirals have higher values of Y and are closer to maximal than the disks of later-type spirals, and that the unseen inner halos of these systems are better fit by pseudo-isothermal laws than by NFW models.

  10. The Hot Gaseous Halos of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, J.

    2016-06-01

    In the Milky Way, absorption and emission line measurements of O VII and O VIII show that the halo environment is dominated by a nearly spherical halo of temperature 2 × 10^6 K, metallicity of 0.3-0.5 solar, and with a density decreasing as r^{-3/2}. The mass of the hot gas, estimated through extrapolation to the virial radius, is comparable to the stellar mass, but does not account for the missing mass. The Milky Way hot halo appears to be rotating at about 180 km/s, which is consistent with model expectations, depending on the time of infall. Around massive spiral galaxies, hot halos are seen in emission out to about 70 kpc in the best cases. These show similar gas density laws and metallicities in the range 0.1-0.5 solar. The gas mass is comparable to the stellar mass, but does not account for the missing baryons within the virial radius. If the density law can be extrapolated to about three virial radii, the missing baryons would be accounted for.

  11. CHARACTERISTICS OF SPIRAL ARMS IN LATE-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, Z. N.; Reid, M. J.

    2015-02-10

    We have measured the positions of large numbers of H II regions in four nearly face-on, late-type, spiral galaxies: NGC 628 (M74), NGC 1232, NGC 3184, and NGC 5194 (M51). Fitting log-periodic spiral models to segments of each arm yields local estimates of spiral pitch angle and arm width. While pitch angles vary considerably along individual arms, among arms within a galaxy, and among galaxies, we find no systematic trend with galactocentric distance. We estimate the widths of the arm segments from the scatter in the distances of the H II regions from the spiral model. All major arms in these galaxies show spiral arm width increasing with distance from the galactic center, similar to the trend seen in the Milky Way. However, in the outermost parts of the galaxies, where massive star formation declines, some arms reverse this trend and narrow. We find that spiral arms often appear to be composed of segments of ∼5 kpc length, which join to form kinks and abrupt changes in pitch angle and arm width; these characteristics are consistent with properties seen in the large N-body simulations of D'Onghia et al. and others.

  12. Hot Gaseous Coronae around Spiral Galaxies: Probing the Illustris Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdán, Ákos; Vogelsberger, Mark; Kraft, Ralph P.; Hernquist, Lars; Gilfanov, Marat; Torrey, Paul; Churazov, Eugene; Genel, Shy; Forman, William R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Jones, Christine; Böhringer, Hans

    2015-05-01

    The presence of hot gaseous coronae around present-day massive spiral galaxies is a fundamental prediction of galaxy formation models. However, our observational knowledge remains scarce, since to date only four gaseous coronae have been detected around spirals with massive stellar bodies (≳ 2× {{10}11} {{M}⊙ }). To explore the hot coronae around lower mass spiral galaxies, we utilized Chandra X-ray observations of a sample of eight normal spiral galaxies with stellar masses of (0.7-2.0)× {{10}11} {{M}⊙ }. Although statistically significant diffuse X-ray emission is not detected beyond the optical radii (˜20 kpc) of the galaxies, we derive 3σ limits on the characteristics of the coronae. These limits, complemented with previous detections of NGC 1961 and NGC 6753, are used to probe the Illustris Simulation. The observed 3σ upper limits on the X-ray luminosities and gas masses exceed or are at the upper end of the model predictions. For NGC 1961 and NGC 6753 the observed gas temperatures, metal abundances, and electron density profiles broadly agree with those predicted by Illustris. These results hint that the physics modules of Illustris are broadly consistent with the observed properties of hot coronae around spiral galaxies. However, one shortcoming of Illustris is that massive black holes, mostly residing in giant ellipticals, give rise to powerful radio-mode active galactic nucleus feedback, which results in under-luminous coronae for ellipticals.

  13. A Survey of nearby, nearly face-on spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    2014-09-01

    This is a continuation of a survey of nearby, nearly face-on spiral galaxies. The main purpose is to search for evidence of collisions with small galaxies that show up in X-rays by the generation of hot shocked gas from the collision. Secondary objectives include study of the spatial distribution point sources in the galaxy and to detect evidence for a central massive blackhole. These are alternate targets.

  14. A Survey of nearby, nearly face-on spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    2014-09-01

    This is a continuation of a survey of nearby, nearly face-on spiral galaxies. The main purpose is to search for evidence of collisions with small galaxies that show up in X-rays by the generation of hot shocked gas from the collision. Secondary objectives include study of the spatial distribution point sources in the galaxy and to detect evidence for a central massive blackhole.

  15. Can cluster environment modify the dynamical evolution of spiral galaxies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amram, P.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.; Marcelin, M.; Sullivan, W. T., III

    1993-01-01

    Over the past decade many effects of the cluster environment on member galaxies have been established. These effects are manifest in the amount and distribution of gas in cluster spirals, the luminosity and light distributions within galaxies, and the segregation of morphological types. All these effects could indicate a specific dynamical evolution for galaxies in clusters. Nevertheless, a more direct evidence, such as a different mass distribution for spiral galaxies in clusters and in the field, is not yet clearly established. Indeed, Rubin, Whitmore, and Ford (1988) and Whitmore, Forbes, and Rubin (1988) (referred to as RWF) presented evidence that inner cluster spirals have falling rotation curves, unlike those of outer cluster spirals or the great majority of field spirals. If falling rotation curves exist in centers of clusters, as argued by RWF, it would suggest that dark matter halos were absent from cluster spirals, either because the halos had become stripped by interactions with other galaxies or with an intracluster medium, or because the halos had never formed in the first place. Even if they didn't disagree with RWF, other researchers pointed out that the behaviour of the slope of the rotation curves of spiral galaxies (in Virgo) is not so clear. Amram, using a different sample of spiral galaxies in clusters, found only 10% of declining rotation curves (2 declining vs 17 flat or rising) in opposition to RWF who find about 40% of declining rotation curves in their sample (6 declining vs 10 flat or rising), we will hereafter briefly discuss the Amram data paper and compare it to the results of RWF. We have measured the rotation curves for a sample of 21 spiral galaxies in 5 nearby clusters. These rotation curves have been constructed from detailed two-dimensional maps of each galaxy's velocity field as traced by emission from the Ha line. This complete mapping, combined with the sensitivity of our CFHT 3.60 m. + Perot-Fabry + CCD observations, allows

  16. Dynamics of Non-steady Spiral Arms in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Junichi; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Wada, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms underlying non-steady stellar spiral arms in disk galaxies, we analyzed the growing and damping phases of their spiral arms using three-dimensional N-body simulations. We confirmed that the spiral arms are formed due to a swing amplification mechanism that reinforces density enhancement as a seeded wake. In the damping phase, the Coriolis force exerted on a portion of the arm surpasses the gravitational force that acts to shrink the portion. Consequently, the stars in the portion escape from the arm, and subsequently they form a new arm at a different location. The time-dependent nature of the spiral arms originates in the continual repetition of this nonlinear phenomenon. Since a spiral arm does not rigidly rotate, but follows the galactic differential rotation, the stars in the arm rotate at almost the same rate as the arm. In other words, every single position in the arm can be regarded as the corotation point. Due to interaction with their host arms, the energy and angular momentum of the stars change, thereby causing radial migration of the stars. During this process, the kinetic energy of random motion (random energy) of the stars does not significantly increase, and the disk remains dynamically cold. Owing to this low degree of disk heating, short-lived spiral arms can recurrently develop over many rotational periods. The resultant structure of the spiral arms in the N-body simulations is consistent with the observational nature of spiral galaxies. We conclude that the formation and structure of spiral arms in isolated disk galaxies can be reasonably understood by nonlinear interactions between a spiral arm and its constituent stars.

  17. DYNAMICS OF NON-STEADY SPIRAL ARMS IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Junichi; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Wada, Keiichi

    2013-01-20

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms underlying non-steady stellar spiral arms in disk galaxies, we analyzed the growing and damping phases of their spiral arms using three-dimensional N-body simulations. We confirmed that the spiral arms are formed due to a swing amplification mechanism that reinforces density enhancement as a seeded wake. In the damping phase, the Coriolis force exerted on a portion of the arm surpasses the gravitational force that acts to shrink the portion. Consequently, the stars in the portion escape from the arm, and subsequently they form a new arm at a different location. The time-dependent nature of the spiral arms originates in the continual repetition of this nonlinear phenomenon. Since a spiral arm does not rigidly rotate, but follows the galactic differential rotation, the stars in the arm rotate at almost the same rate as the arm. In other words, every single position in the arm can be regarded as the corotation point. Due to interaction with their host arms, the energy and angular momentum of the stars change, thereby causing radial migration of the stars. During this process, the kinetic energy of random motion (random energy) of the stars does not significantly increase, and the disk remains dynamically cold. Owing to this low degree of disk heating, short-lived spiral arms can recurrently develop over many rotational periods. The resultant structure of the spiral arms in the N-body simulations is consistent with the observational nature of spiral galaxies. We conclude that the formation and structure of spiral arms in isolated disk galaxies can be reasonably understood by nonlinear interactions between a spiral arm and its constituent stars.

  18. The gas/dust ratio in spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereux, Nicholas A.

    1990-01-01

    IRAS data are used here to calculate warm dust masses, which are then compared with the molecular and atomic gas masses for 58 spiral galaxies in order to constrain the fraction and the phase of the interstellar medium in spiral galaxies that contributes to the emission measured by IRAS. The dispersion in the ratio of dust mass to total gas mass is larger than expected on the basis of measurement errors. The dispersion in the ratio of dust mass to inner disk gas mass is less than the dispersion in the ratio of IR to radio emission. The inner gas to warm dust mass ratio for spiral galaxies is 1080 + or - 70, indicating that 80-90 percent of the dust mass in spiral galaxies is radiating at over 100 microns and has a temperature less than about 30 K. However, the bulk of the dust in spiral galaxies is less than about 15 K regardless of the phase of the ISM. Both H I and H2-associated dust contributes to the warm 30 K emission.

  19. Brackett Gamma Imaging of the Nucleus of M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosthwaite, L. P.; Turner, J. L.; Beck, S. C.; Meier, D. S.

    2004-12-01

    The gas-rich nucleus of barred spiral galaxy, M83, is a hotbed of star formation, with a total infrared luminosity of 4 X 109 Lo. We have observed the nucleus of M83 with the near infrared spectrometer, NIRSPEC, on Keck 2 to obtain high resolution Brγ recombination line spectra of the nucleus. Simultaneous imaging with the SCAM camera in a broadband K filter shows the position of the slit on the near-infrared galaxy. This allows us to map the nucleus with a continuum reference. The SCAM image shows a bright peak at the nucleus and a complex semi-circular arc of emission to the southwest. We stepped the 0.5'' X 24'' length slit in small declination increments to map a 20'' X 20'' region just west of the nucleus. Individual spectra were used to form a ra-dec-lambda cube and an integrated intensity map of Brγ . A total of 1.1 X 10-16 W m-2 of Brγ emission is detected in the map, in good agreement with previous low resolution observations (Turner, Ho, & Beck 1987, ApJ, 313, 644). This is not corrected for extinction within the molecular clouds in M83 or to the nebulae themselves and is therefore a lower limit to the true Brγ flux. Extinction is estimated to be at least a magnitude in the near-IR as measured in larger (4'') beams (Turner et al.) The bulk of the Brγ emission extends along the northern portion of the near-IR continuum semi-circle. Twenty percent of the total Brγ emission comes from single a 3'' (FWHM) source located 5'' west of the near-IR nucleus. The complementary NIRSPEC Brα data we have obtained will eventually allow us to evaluate the near-IR extinction on subarcsecond sizescales and obtain an extinction-corrected estimate of the Lyman continuum rate and therefore the number of ionizing stars.

  20. Taking the Radio Blinders Off of M83: A Wide Spectrum Analysis of the Historical Point Source Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, Christopher; Keefe, Clayton; Nichols, Michael; Rujevcan, Colton; Blair, William P.; Cowan, John J.; Godfrey, Leith; Miller-Jones, James; Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Maddox, Larry A.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Pritchard, Tyler A.; Soria, Roberto; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2015-01-01

    We present low frequency observations of the grand design spiral galaxy, M83, using the C and L bands of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). With recent optical (HST) and X-ray (Chandra) observations and utilizing the newly expanded bandwidth of the VLA, we are exploring the radio spectral properties of the historical radio point sources in M83. These observations allow us to probe the evolution of supernova remnants (SNRs) and to find previously undiscovered SNRs. These observations represent the fourth epoch of deep VLA observations of M83. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities.

  1. SELF-PERPETUATING SPIRAL ARMS IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    D'Onghia, Elena; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2013-03-20

    The causes of spiral structure in galaxies remain uncertain. Leaving aside the grand bisymmetric spirals with their own well-known complications, here we consider the possibility that multi-armed spiral features originate from density inhomogeneities orbiting within disks. Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we follow the motions of stars under the influence of gravity, and show that mass concentrations with properties similar to those of giant molecular clouds can induce the development of spiral arms through a process termed swing amplification. However, unlike in earlier work, we demonstrate that the eventual response of the disk can be highly non-linear, significantly modifying the formation and longevity of the resulting patterns. Contrary to expectations, ragged spiral structures can thus survive at least in a statistical sense long after the original perturbing influence has been removed.

  2. Turbulence and Star Formation in a Sample of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Erin R.; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Chien, Li-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate turbulent gas motions in spiral galaxies and their importance to star formation in far outer disks, where the column density is typically far below the critical value for spontaneous gravitational collapse. Following the methods of Burkhart et al. (2010) as applied to the Small Magellanic Cloud, we use the third and fourth statistical moments, skewness and kurtosis, which are indicators of structures caused by turbulence, to examine the integrated neutral hydrogen (Hι) column density of a sample of spiral galaxies selected from The Hι Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS, Walter et al. 2008). We examine the kurtosis and skewness values of each galaxy as a whole, as well as their variation as a function of radius and in discrete sub-regions defined by a square, moving 'kernel,' essentially splitting each galaxy into a grid. We then create individual grid maps of kurtosis and skewness for each galaxy. To investigate the relation between these moments and star formation, we compare these maps with maps of each galaxy's far-ultraviolet (FUV) image, taken by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite. We find that the moments are largely uniform across the galaxies: the variation does not appear to trace any star forming regions. This may, however, be due to the spatial resolution of our analysis, which could potentially limit the scale of turbulent motions to at most ~700 pc. From our analysis of the comparison between the two moments themselves, we find that the gas motions in our sample galaxies are largely supersonic. This analysis shows that Burkhart et al. (2010)'s methods may be applied not just to dwarf galaxies but normal spiral galaxies as well.We acknowledge the NSF for their funding of this work through their Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program (Grant No. AST-1461200).

  3. PLANETARY NEBULAE IN FACE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES. II. PLANETARY NEBULA SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin E-mail: rbc@astro.psu.ed

    2009-09-20

    As the second step in our investigation of the mass-to-light ratio of spiral disks, we present the results of a spectroscopic survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in five nearby, low-inclination galaxies: IC 342, M74 (NGC 628), M83 (NGC 5236), M94 (NGC 4736), and M101 (NGC 5457). Using 50 setups of the WIYN/Hydra and Blanco/Hydra spectrographs, and 25 observations with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope's Medium Resolution Spectrograph, we determine the radial velocities of 99, 102, 162, 127, and 48 PNe, respectively, to a precision better than 15 km s{sup -1}. Although the main purpose of this data set is to facilitate dynamical mass measurements throughout the inner and outer disks of large spiral galaxies, our spectroscopy has other uses as well. Here, we co-add these spectra to show that, to first order, the [O III] and Balmer line ratios of PNe vary little over the top {approx}1.5 mag of the PN luminosity function. The only obvious spectral change occurs with [N II], which increases in strength as one proceeds down the luminosity function. We also show that typical [O III]-bright planetaries have E(B - V) {approx} 0.2 of circumstellar extinction, and that this value is virtually independent of [O III] luminosity. We discuss the implications this has for understanding the population of PN progenitors.

  4. The relation between infrared and radio emission in spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helou, George

    1991-01-01

    A remarkable correlation between the far infrared and the radio continuum emission of star forming galaxies was one of the early results based on IRAS data, and has remained one of the most intriguing. Recent work has extended the correlation to early type galaxies, revealing a slightly different ratio in lenticulars. When radio and infrared maps of disk galaxies are compared, the radio disks appear systematically more diffuse. This has been interpreted as a manifestation of the diffusion of cosmic-ray electrons, and has allowed a fresh look at the behavior of magnetic fields and cosmic rays in spiral galaxies, and at their relation to the rest of the interstellar medium.

  5. On the origin and history of stars in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, David M.; Macció, Andrea V.; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2010-10-01

    The formation of spiral galaxies is an important topic of debate in astrophysics. We use smooth-particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations to follow the formation, in a fully ΛCDM cosmological context, of two disk galaxies similar, in mass, to our Milky Way. Using the dynamics of the star particles we are able to identify three distinct components in the stellar budget of our galaxies: a thin disk, a thick disk and a spheroid. We make a detailed analysis of where and when stars in the three different components come about. Our study can help create a more consistent picture of how galaxies similar to our own form.

  6. Star formation rates of spiral galaxies in the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Marcum, Pamela M.; Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA)

    2016-01-01

    We look for shifts in stellar mass and star formation rate along filaments in the cosmic web by examining the stellar masses and UV-derived star formation rates of 1,799 ungrouped and unpaired spiral galaxies from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey that reside in filaments. We devise multiple distance metrics to characterise the complex geometry of filaments, and find that galaxies closer to the orthogonal core of a filament have higher stellar masses than their counterparts near the periphery of filaments, on the edges of voids. We also find that these peripheral galaxies have higher specific star formations at a given mass. Our results suggest a model in which gas accretion from voids onto filaments is primarily in an orthogonal direction. While the star formation rates of spiral galaxies in filaments are susceptible to their locations, we find that the global star formation rates of galaxies in different large scale environments are similar to each other. The primary discriminant in star formation rates is therefore the stellar mass of each spiral galaxy, as opposed to its large scale environment.

  7. Star Formation in Partially Gas-Depleted Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, James A.; Robertson, Paul; Miner, Jesse; Levy, Lorenza

    2010-02-01

    Broadband B and R and Hα images have been obtained with the 4.1 m SOAR telescope atop Cerro Pachon, Chile, for 29 spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I galaxy cluster and for 18 spirals in non-cluster environments. Pegasus I is a spiral-rich cluster with a low-density intracluster medium and a low galaxy velocity dispersion. When combined with neutral hydrogen (H I) data obtained with the Arecibo 305 m radio telescope, acquired by Levy et al. (2007) and by Springob et al. (2005b), we study the star formation rates in disk galaxies as a function of their H I deficiency. To quantify H I deficiency, we use the usual logarithmic deficiency parameter, DEF. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) is quantified by the logarithmic flux ratio of Hα flux to R-band flux, and thus roughly characterizes the logarithmic SFR per unit stellar mass. We find a clear correlation between the global SFR per unit stellar mass and DEF, such that the SFR is lower in more H I-deficient galaxies. This correlation appears to extend from the most gas-rich to the most gas-poor galaxies. We also find a correlation between the central SFR per unit mass relative to the global values, in the sense that the more H I-deficient galaxies have a higher central SFR per unit mass relative to their global SFR values than do gas-rich galaxies. In fact, approximately half of the H I-depleted galaxies have highly elevated SSFRs in their central regions, indicative of a transient evolutionary state. In addition, we find a correlation between gas depletion and the size of the Hα disk (relative to the R-band disk); H I-poor galaxies have truncated disks. Moreover, aside from the elevated central SSFR in many gas-poor spirals, the SSFR is otherwise lower in the Hα disks of gas-poor galaxies than in gas-rich spirals. Thus, both disk truncation and lowered SSFR levels within the star-forming part of the disks (aside from the enhanced nuclear SSFR) correlate with H I deficiency, and both phenomena are found to

  8. STAR FORMATION IN PARTIALLY GAS-DEPLETED SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, James A.; Miner, Jesse; Levy, Lorenza; Robertson, Paul E-mail: paul@astr.as.utexas.edu E-mail: lorenza.levy@yahoo.com

    2010-02-15

    Broadband B and R and H{alpha} images have been obtained with the 4.1 m SOAR telescope atop Cerro Pachon, Chile, for 29 spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I galaxy cluster and for 18 spirals in non-cluster environments. Pegasus I is a spiral-rich cluster with a low-density intracluster medium and a low galaxy velocity dispersion. When combined with neutral hydrogen (H I) data obtained with the Arecibo 305 m radio telescope, acquired by Levy et al. (2007) and by Springob et al. (2005b), we study the star formation rates in disk galaxies as a function of their H I deficiency. To quantify H I deficiency, we use the usual logarithmic deficiency parameter, DEF. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) is quantified by the logarithmic flux ratio of H{alpha} flux to R-band flux, and thus roughly characterizes the logarithmic SFR per unit stellar mass. We find a clear correlation between the global SFR per unit stellar mass and DEF, such that the SFR is lower in more H I-deficient galaxies. This correlation appears to extend from the most gas-rich to the most gas-poor galaxies. We also find a correlation between the central SFR per unit mass relative to the global values, in the sense that the more H I-deficient galaxies have a higher central SFR per unit mass relative to their global SFR values than do gas-rich galaxies. In fact, approximately half of the H I-depleted galaxies have highly elevated SSFRs in their central regions, indicative of a transient evolutionary state. In addition, we find a correlation between gas depletion and the size of the H{alpha} disk (relative to the R-band disk); H I-poor galaxies have truncated disks. Moreover, aside from the elevated central SSFR in many gas-poor spirals, the SSFR is otherwise lower in the H{alpha} disks of gas-poor galaxies than in gas-rich spirals. Thus, both disk truncation and lowered SSFR levels within the star-forming part of the disks (aside from the enhanced nuclear SSFR) correlate with H I deficiency, and both

  9. Enhanced Abundances in Spiral Galaxies of the Pegasus I Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Paul; Shields, Gregory A.; Blanc, Guillermo A.

    2012-03-01

    We study the influence of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster. We determine the gas-phase heavy element abundances of six galaxies in Pegasus derived from H II region spectra obtained from integral-field spectroscopy. These abundances are analyzed in the context of Virgo, whose spirals are known to show increasing interstellar metallicity as a function of H I deficiency. The galaxies in the Pegasus cluster, despite its lower density and velocity dispersion, also display gas loss due to interstellar-medium-intracluster-medium interaction, albeit to a lesser degree. Based on the abundances of three H I deficient spirals and two H I normal spirals, we observe a heavy element abundance offset of +0.13 ± 0.07 dex for the H I deficient galaxies. This abundance differential is consistent with the differential observed in Virgo for galaxies with a similar H I deficiency, and we observe a correlation between log (O/H) and the H I deficiency parameter DEF for the two clusters analyzed together. Our results suggest that similar environmental mechanisms are driving the heavy element enhancement in both clusters.

  10. ENHANCED ABUNDANCES IN SPIRAL GALAXIES OF THE PEGASUS I CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Paul; Shields, Gregory A.; Blanc, Guillermo A. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2012-03-20

    We study the influence of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster. We determine the gas-phase heavy element abundances of six galaxies in Pegasus derived from H II region spectra obtained from integral-field spectroscopy. These abundances are analyzed in the context of Virgo, whose spirals are known to show increasing interstellar metallicity as a function of H I deficiency. The galaxies in the Pegasus cluster, despite its lower density and velocity dispersion, also display gas loss due to interstellar-medium-intracluster-medium interaction, albeit to a lesser degree. Based on the abundances of three H I deficient spirals and two H I normal spirals, we observe a heavy element abundance offset of +0.13 {+-} 0.07 dex for the H I deficient galaxies. This abundance differential is consistent with the differential observed in Virgo for galaxies with a similar H I deficiency, and we observe a correlation between log (O/H) and the H I deficiency parameter DEF for the two clusters analyzed together. Our results suggest that similar environmental mechanisms are driving the heavy element enhancement in both clusters.

  11. Spiral galaxies in clusters. III. Gas-rich galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Bothun, G.D.; Schommer, R.A.; Sullivan, W.T. III

    1982-05-01

    We report the results of a 21-cm and optical survey of disk galaxies in the vicinity of the Pegasus I cluster of galaxies. The color--gas content relation (log(M/sub H//L/sub B/) vs (B-V)/sup T//sub 0/ ) for this particular cluster reveals the presence of a substantial number of blue, gas-rich galaxies. With few exceptions, the disk systems in Pegasus I retain large amounts of neutral hydrogen despite their presence in a cluster. This directly shows that environmental processes have not yet removed substantial amounts of gas from these disk galaxies. We conclude that the environment has had little or no observable effect upon the evolution of disk galaxies in Pegasus I. The overall properties of the Pegasus I spirals are consistent with the suggestion that this cluster is now at an early stage in its evolution.

  12. Photometric scaling relations of lenticular and spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Buta, R.; Knapen, J. H.; Comerón, S.

    2010-06-01

    Photometric scaling relations are studied for S0 galaxies and compared with those obtained for spirals. New two-dimensional multi-component decompositions are presented for 122 early-type disc galaxies, using deep Ks-band images. Combining them with our previous decompositions, the final sample consists of 175 galaxies (Near-Infrared Survey of S0s, NIRS0S: 117 S0s + 22 S0/a and 36 Sa galaxies). As a comparison sample we use the Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey (OSUBSGS) of nearly 200 spirals, for which similar multi-component decompositions have previously been made by us. The improved statistics, deep images and the homogeneous decomposition method used allow us to re-evaluate the parameters of the bulges and discs. For spirals we largely confirm previous results, which are compared with those obtained for S0s. Our main results are as follows. (1) Important scaling relations are present, indicating that the formative processes of bulges and discs in S0s are coupled [e.g. M0K(disc) = 0.63 M0K(bulge) -9.3], as has been found previously for spirals [for OSUBSGS spirals M0K (disc) = 0.38 M0K(bulge) -15.5 the rms deviation from these relations is 0.5 mag for S0s and spirals]. (2) We obtain median reff/h0r ~ 0.20, 0.15 and 0.10 for S0, S0/a-Sa and Sab-Sc galaxies, respectively: these values are smaller than predicted by simulation models in which bulges are formed by galaxy mergers. (3) The properties of bulges of S0s are different from the elliptical galaxies, which are manifested in the versus reff relation, in the photometric plane (μ0, n, reff), and to some extent also in the Kormendy relation (< μ >eff versus reff). The bulges of S0s are similar to bulges of spirals with M0K(bulge) < -20 mag. Some S0s have small bulges, but their properties are not compatible with the idea that they could evolve to dwarfs by galaxy harassment. (4) The relative bulge flux (B/T) for S0s covers the full range found in the Hubble sequence, even with 13 per cent

  13. Continuum observations of M 51 and M 83 at 1.1 mm with AzTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, W. F.; Puerari, I.; Tilanus, R.; Israel, F. P.; Austermann, J. E.; Aretxaga, I.; Wilson, G.; Yun, M.; Scott, K. S.; Perera, T. A.; Roberts, C. M.; Hughes, D. H.

    2016-06-01

    We observed the spiral galaxies M 51 and M 83 at 20 arscec spatial resolution with the bolometer array Aztronomical Thermal Emission Camera (AzTEC) on the JCMT in the 1.1 mm continuum, recovering the extended emission out to galactocentric radii of more than 12 kpc in both galaxies. The 1.1 mm-continuum fluxes are 5.6 ± 0.7 and 9.9 ± 1.4 Jy, with associated gas masses estimated at 9.4 × 109 M⊙ and 7.2 × 109 M⊙ for M 51 and M 83, respectively. In the interarm regions of both galaxies, the N(H2)/I(CO) (or X-factor) ratios exceed those in the arms by factors of ˜1.5-2. In the inner discs of both galaxies, the X-factor is about 1 × 1020 cm- 2 (K km s- 1)- 1. In the outer parts, the CO-dark molecular gas becomes more important. While the spiral density wave in M 51 appears to influence the interstellar medium and stars in a similar way, the bar potential in M 83 influences the interstellar medium and the stars differently. We confirm the result of Foyle et al. that the arms merely heighten the star formation rate (SFR) and the gas surface density in the same proportion. Our maps reveal a threshold gas surface density for an SFR increase by two or more orders of magnitude. In both galaxy centres, the molecular gas depletion time is about 1 Gyr climbing to 10-20 Gyr at radii of 6-8 kpc. This is consistent with an inside-out depletion of the molecular gas in the discs of spiral galaxies.

  14. THE MISSING GOLIATH'S SLINGSHOT: MASSIVE BLACK HOLE RECOIL AT M83

    SciTech Connect

    Dottori, Horacio; Diaz, Ruben J.; Facundo Albacete-Colombo, Juan

    2010-07-01

    The Fanaroff-Riley II radio source J133658.3-295105, which is also an X-ray source, appears to be projected onto the disk of the barred-spiral galaxy M83 at about 60'' from the galaxy's optical nucleus. J133658.3-295105 and its radio lobes are aligned with the optical nucleus of M 83 and two other radio sources, neither of which are supernova remnants or H II regions. Due to this peculiar on-the-sky projection, J133658.3-295105 was previously studied by Gemini+GMOS optical spectroscopy, which marginally revealed the presence of H{alpha} in emission receding at 130 km s{sup -1} with respect to the optical nucleus. In this Letter, we reanalyze the Chandra spectroscopy carried out in 2000. We show that J133658.3-295105 presents an Fe K{alpha} emission line at a redshift of z = 0.018. This redshift is compatible with a black hole at the distance of M 83. We discuss similarities to the recently reported micro-quasar in NGC 5408. This finding reinforces the kicked-off black hole scenario for J133658.3-295105.

  15. Rings and spirals in barred galaxies - II. Ring and spiral morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Bosma, A.; Masdemont, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    In this series of papers, we propose a theory to explain the formation and properties of rings and spirals in barred galaxies. The building blocks of these structures are orbits guided by the manifolds emanating from the unstable Lagrangian points located near the ends of the bar. In this paper, we focus on a comparison of the morphology of observed and of theoretical spirals and rings and we also give some predictions for further comparisons. Our theory can account for spirals as well as both inner and outer rings. The model outer rings have the observed R1, R'1, R2, R'2 and R1R2 morphologies, including the dimples near the direction of the bar major axis. We explain why the vast majority of spirals in barred galaxies are two armed and trailing, and discuss what it would take for higher multiplicity arms to form. We show that the shapes of observed and theoretical spirals agree and we predict that stronger non-axisymmetric forcings at and somewhat beyond corotation will drive more open spirals. We compare the ratio of ring diameters in theory and in observations and predict that more elliptical rings will correspond to stronger forcings. We find that the model potential may influence strongly the numerical values of these ratios.

  16. On wave dark matter in spiral and barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Medina, Luis A.; Bray, Hubert L.; Matos, Tonatiuh

    2015-12-01

    We recover spiral and barred spiral patterns in disk galaxy simulations with a Wave Dark Matter (WDM) background (also known as Scalar Field Dark Matter (SFDM), Ultra-Light Axion (ULA) dark matter, and Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) dark matter). Here we show how the interaction between a baryonic disk and its Dark Matter Halo triggers the formation of spiral structures when the halo is allowed to have a triaxial shape and angular momentum. This is a more realistic picture within the WDM model since a non-spherical rotating halo seems to be more natural. By performing hydrodynamic simulations, along with earlier test particles simulations, we demonstrate another important way in which wave dark matter is consistent with observations. The common existence of bars in these simulations is particularly noteworthy. This may have consequences when trying to obtain information about the dark matter distribution in a galaxy, the mere presence of spiral arms or a bar usually indicates that baryonic matter dominates the central region and therefore observations, like rotation curves, may not tell us what the DM distribution is at the halo center. But here we show that spiral arms and bars can develop in DM dominated galaxies with a central density core without supposing its origin on mechanisms intrinsic to the baryonic matter.

  17. Diffuse X-Ray Emission in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Krystal; Quillen, A. C.; LaPage, Amanda; Rieke, George H.

    2004-07-01

    We compare the soft diffuse X-ray emission from Chandra images of 12 nearby intermediate-inclination spiral galaxies to the morphology seen in Hα, molecular gas, and mid-infrared emission. We find that diffuse X-ray emission is often located along spiral arms in the outer parts of spiral galaxies but tends to be distributed in a more nearly radially symmetric morphology in the center. The X-ray morphology in the spiral arms matches that seen in the mid-infrared or Hα and thus implies that the X-ray emission is associated with recent active star formation. In the spiral arms there is a good correlation between the level of diffuse X-ray emission and that in the mid-infrared in different regions. The correlation between X-ray and mid-IR flux in the galaxy centers is less strong. We also find that the central X-ray emission tends to be more luminous in galaxies with brighter bulges, suggesting that more than one process is contributing to the level of central diffuse X-ray emission. We see no strong evidence for X-ray emission trailing the location of high-mass star formation in spiral arms. However, population synthesis models predict a high mechanical energy output rate from supernovae for a time period that is about 10 times longer than the lifetime of massive ionizing stars, conflicting with the narrow appearance of the arms in X-rays. The fraction of supernova energy that goes into heating the interstellar medium must depend on environment and is probably higher near sites of active star formation. The X-ray estimated emission measures suggest that the volume filling factors and scale heights are low in the outer parts of these galaxies but higher in the galaxy centers. The differences between the X-ray properties and morphology in the centers and outer parts of these galaxies suggest that galactic fountains operate in outer galaxy disks but that winds are primarily driven from galaxy centers.

  18. Star formation in bulgeless late type spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, M.; Ramya, S.; Sengupta, C.; Mishra, K.

    We present radio and follow-up optical observations of a sample of bulgeless late type spiral galaxies. We searched for signs of nuclear activity and disk star formation in the sample galaxies. Interaction induced star formation can often trigger bulge formation. We found significant radio emission associated with star formation in two sample galaxies, NGC3445 and NGC4027, both of which are tidally interacting with nearby companions. For the others, the star formation was either absent or limited to only localized regions in the disk. Both galaxies also have oval bars that are possibly pseudobulges that may later evolve into bulges. We did follow up optical Hα imaging and nuclear spectroscopy of NGC3445 and NGC4027 using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT). The Hα emission is mainly associated with strong spiral arms that have been triggered by the tidal interact1ions. The nuclear spectra of both galaxies indicate ongoing nuclear star formation but do not show signs of AGN activity. We thus conclude that star formation in bulgeless galaxies is generally low but is enhanced when the galaxies interact with nearby companions; this activity may ultimately lead to the formation of bulges in these galaxies.

  19. The Globular Cluster Systems of Five Nearby Spiral Galaxies: New Insights from Hubble Space Telescope Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandar, Rupali; Whitmore, Bradley; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2004-08-01

    We use available multifilter Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 imaging of five (M81, M83, NGC 6946, M101, and M51, in order of distance) low-inclination, nearby spiral galaxies to study ancient star cluster populations. Combining rigorous selection criteria to reject contaminants (individual stars, background galaxies, and blends) with optical photometry including the U bandpass, we unambiguously detect ancient globular cluster (GC) systems in each galaxy. We present luminosities, colors, and size (effective radius) measurements for our candidate GCs. These are used to estimate specific frequencies, to assess whether intrinsic color distributions are consistent with the presence of both metal-poor and metal-rich GCs, and to compare relative sizes of ancient clusters between different galaxy systems. M81 globulars have intrinsic color distributions that are very similar to those in the Milky Way and M31, with ~40% of sample clusters having colors expected for a metal-rich population. The GC system in M51 meanwhile, appears almost exclusively blue and metal-poor. This lack of metal-rich GCs associated with the M51 bulge indicates that the bulge formation history of this Sbc galaxy may have differed significantly from that of our own. Ancient clusters in M101 and possibly in NGC 6946, two of the three later type spirals in our sample, appear to have luminosity distributions that continue to rise to our detection limit (MV~-6.0), well beyond the expected turnover (MV~-7.4) in the luminosity function. This is reminiscent of the situation in M33, a Local Group galaxy of similar Hubble type. The faint ancient cluster candidates in M101 and NGC 6946 have properties (colors and reff) similar to their more luminous counterparts, and we suggest that these are either intermediate-age (3-9 Gyr) disk clusters or the low-mass end of the original GC population. Potentially, these lower mass clusters were not destroyed because of different dynamical conditions relative to those

  20. Far-infrared emission and star formation in spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinchieri, G.; Fabbiano, G.; Bandiera, R.

    1989-01-01

    The correlations between the emission in the far-IR, H-alpha, and blue in a sample of normal spiral galaxies are investigated. It is found that the luminosities in these three bands are all tightly correlated, although both the strength of the correlations and their functional dependencies are a function of the galaxies' morphological types. The best-fit power laws to these correlations are different for the comparison of different quantities and deviate significantly from linearity in some cases, implying the presence of additional emission mechanisms not related to the general increase of luminosity with galactic mass. Clear evidence is found of two independent effects in the incidence of warm far-IR emission in late-type spirals. One is a luminosity effect shown by the presence of excess far-IR relative to H-alpha or optical emission in the more luminous galaxies. The other is a dependence on widespread star-formation activity.

  1. On galaxy spiral arms' nature as revealed by rotation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Fàbrega, Santi; Valenzuela, Octavio; Figueras, Francesca; Romero-Gómez, Mercè; Velázquez, Héctor; Antoja, Teresa; Pichardo, Bárbara

    2013-07-01

    High-resolution N-body simulations using different codes and initial condition techniques reveal two different behaviours for the rotation frequency of transient spiral arms like structures. Whereas unbarred discs present spiral arms nearly corotating with disc particles, strong barred models (bulged or bulgeless) quickly develop a bar-spiral structure dominant in density, with a pattern speed almost constant in radius. As the bar strength decreases the arm departs from bar rigid rotation and behaves similar to the unbarred case. In strong barred models, we detect in the frequency space other subdominant and slower modes at large radii, in agreement with previous studies, however, we also detect them in the configuration space. We propose that the distinctive behaviour of the dominant spiral modes can be exploited in order to constraint the nature of Galactic spiral arms by the astrometric survey Gaia and by 2D spectroscopic surveys like Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA) and Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MANGA) in external galaxies.

  2. Gas and stellar spiral structures in tidally perturbed disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettitt, Alex R.; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Wadsley, James W.

    2016-06-01

    Tidal interactions between disc galaxies and low-mass companions are an established method for generating galactic spiral features. In this work, we present a study of the structure and dynamics of spiral arms driven in interactions between disc galaxies and perturbing companions in 3D N-body/smoothed hydrodynamical numerical simulations. Our specific aims are to characterize any differences between structures formed in the gas and stars from a purely hydrodynamical and gravitational perspective, and to find a limiting case for spiral structure generation. Through analysis of a number of different interacting cases, we find that there is very little difference between arm morphology, pitch angles and pattern speeds between the two media. The main differences are a minor offset between gas and stellar arms, clear spurring features in gaseous arms, and different radial migration of material in the stronger interacting cases. We investigate the minimum mass of a companion required to drive spiral structure in a galactic disc, finding the limiting spiral generation cases with companion masses of the order of 1 × 109 M⊙, equivalent to only 4 per cent of the stellar disc mass, or 0.5 per cent of the total galactic mass of a Milky Way analogue.

  3. New low surface brightness dwarf galaxies detected around nearby spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Riepe, P.; Zilch, T.; Blauensteiner, M.; Elvov, M.; Hochleitner, P.; Hubl, B.; Kerschhuber, G.; Küppers, S.; Neyer, F.; Pölzl, R.; Remmel, P.; Schneider, O.; Sparenberg, R.; Trulson, U.; Willems, G.; Ziegler, H.

    2015-10-01

    We conduct a survey of low surface brightness (LSB) satellite galaxies around the Local Volume massive spirals using long exposures with small amateur telescopes. We identified 27 low and very low surface brightness objects around the galaxies NGC672, 891, 1156, 2683, 3344, 4258, 4618, 4631, and 5457 situated within 10 Mpc from us, and found nothing new around NGC2903, 3239, 4214, and 5585. Assuming that the dwarf candidates are the satellites of the neighboring luminous galaxies, their absolute magnitudes are in the range of -8.6 > M B > -13.3, their effective diameters are 0.4-4.7 kpc, and the average surface brightness is 26ṃ1/□″. The mean linear projected separation of the satellite candidates from the host galaxies is 73 kpc. Our spectroscopic observations of two LSB dwarfs with the Russian 6-meter telescope confirm their physical connection to the host galaxies NGC891 and NGC2683.

  4. Dynamical effect of gas on spiral pattern speed in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soumavo; Jog, Chanda J.

    2016-07-01

    In the density wave theory of spiral structure, the grand-design two-armed spiral pattern is taken to rotate rigidly in a galactic disc with a constant, definite pattern speed. The observational measurement of the pattern speed of the spiral arms, though difficult, has been achieved in a few galaxies such as NGC 6946, NGC 2997, and M 51 which we consider here. We examine whether the theoretical dispersion relation permits a real solution for wavenumber corresponding to a stable wave, for the observed rotation curve and the pattern speed values. We find that the disc when modelled as a stars-alone case, as is usually done in literature, does not generally give a stable density wave solution for the observed pattern speed. Instead the inclusion of the low velocity dispersion component, namely, gas, is essential to obtain a stable density wave. Further, we obtain a theoretical range of allowed pattern speeds that correspond to a stable density wave at a certain radius, and check that for the three galaxies considered, the observed pattern speeds fall in the respective prescribed range. The inclusion of even a small amount (˜15 per cent) of gas by mass fraction in the galactic disc is shown to have a significant dynamical effect on the dispersion relation and hence on the pattern speed that is likely to be seen in a real, gas-rich spiral galaxy.

  5. Star formation and evolution in spiral galaxies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, W. J.; Tinsley, B. M.

    1973-01-01

    Evolutionary models for regions of M31 and M33 and the solar neighborhood are based on a stellar birthrate suggested by the dynamics of spiral structure: we assume that stars are formed very efficiently until the gas content reaches equilibrium at its present value, which takes about 1 b.y.; thereafter, the birthrate just equals the rate at which gas enters the system from stellar mass-loss or infall of intergalactic matter. Each model represents an average around a cylindrical-shell-shaped region, which is homogeneous and closed except for possible infall. The disk and spiral-arm populations only are considered. Each star is followed in the H-R diagram from the main sequence to death as an invisible remnant. Integrated magnitudes, colors, mass-to-light ratio (M/L), gas content, helium and metal abundance (Z), are computed in steps of 1 b.y.

  6. Computer experiments on the structure and dynamics of spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.

    1972-01-01

    The evolution of an initially balanced rotating disk of stars with an initial velocity dispersion given by Toomre's local criterion was investigated by means of a computer model for isolated disks of stars. It was found that the disk is unstable against very large scale modes. A stable axisymmetric disk with a velocity dispersion much larger than that given by Toomre's criterion was generated. The final mass distribution for the disk gives a high density central core and a disk population of stars that is closely approximated by an exponential variation. Various methods and rates of cooling the hot axisymmetric disks were investigated. It was found that the cooling resulted in the development of two-arm spiral structures which persisted as long as cooling continued. An experiment was performed to induce spiral structure in a galaxy by means of the close passage of a companion galaxy. Parameters similar to those expected for M51 and its companion were used. It was found that because of the high velocity dispersion of the disturbed disk galaxy, only a weak two-arm spiral structure appeared. The evolution of a uniformly rotating disk galaxy which is a stationary solution of the collisionless Boltzmann equation was investigated for various values of the initial rms velocity dispersion. It was found that the disk becomes stable at a value of the velocity dispersion predicted by theory.

  7. Infrared emission and tidal interactions of spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, Gene G.

    1987-01-01

    Computer simulations of tidal interactions of spiral galaxies are used to attempt to understand recent discoveries about infrared (IR) emitting galaxies. It is found that the stronger tidal perturbation by a companion the more disk gas clouds are thrown into nucleus crossing orbits and the greater the velocity jumps crossing spiral arms. Both these tidally created characteristics would create more IR emission by high speed cloud collisions and more IR via effects of recently formed stars. This expectation at greater tidal perturbation matches the observation of greater IR emission for spiral galaxies with closer and/or more massive companions. The greater collision velocities found at stronger perturbations on the models will also result in higher dust temperature in the colliding clouds. In the IR pairs examined, most have only one member, the larger, detected and when both are detected, the larger is always the more luminous. In simulations and in a simple analytic description of the strong distance dependence of the tidal force, it is found that the big galaxy of a pair is more strongly affected than the small.

  8. Multicolor CCD photometry of six lenticular and spiral galaxies. Stellar population of the galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. S.

    2006-03-01

    The results of multicolor surface photometry of the S0 galaxies NGC 524, NGC 1138, and NGC 7280 and the spiral galaxies NGC 532, NGC 783, and NGC 1589 are analyzed. UBVRI observations were acquired with the 1.5-m telescope of the Maidanak Observatory (Uzbekistan), while JHK data were taken from the 2MASS catalog. The brightness and color distributions in the galaxies are analyzed. Extinction in dust lanes in three spiral galaxies is estimated. The contributions of the radiation of the spherical and disk components in different photometric bands are estimated. Two-color diagrams are used to estimate the composition of the stellar populations in various galaxy components. The variations of the color characteristics in the S0 galaxies is due mostly to radial metallicity gradients.

  9. Multicolor CCD photometry of six lenticular and spiral galaxies. Structure of the galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. S.

    2006-03-01

    The results of multicolor surface photometry of the S0 galaxies NGC 524, NGC 1138, and NGC 7280 and the spiral galaxies NGC 532, NGC 783, and NGC 1589 are reported. U BV RI observations were acquired with the 1.5-m telescope of the Maidanak Observatory (Uzbekistan), while JHK data were taken from the 2MASS catalog. The overall structure of the galaxies is analyzed and the galaxy images decomposed into bulge and disk components. The parameters of the galaxy components—rings, bars, spiral arms, and dust lanes—are determined. The bulge/disk decompositions based on averaged one-dimensional photometric profiles yield incorrect parameters for the bulges of the S0-Sa galaxies with bars and/or rings, whose inner regions are dominated by the radiation of the bulge.

  10. Discovery of rare double-lobe radio galaxies hosted in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Veeresh; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Sievers, Jonathan; Wadadekar, Yogesh; Hilton, Matt; Beelen, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Double-lobe radio galaxies in the local Universe have traditionally been found to be hosted in elliptical or lenticular galaxies. We report the discovery of four spiral-host double-lobe radio galaxies (J0836+0532, J1159+5820, J1352+3126, and J1649+2635) that are discovered by cross-matching a large sample of 187 005 spiral galaxies from SDSS DR7 (Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7) to the full catalogues of FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm) and NVSS (NRAO VLA Sky Survey). J0836+0532 is reported for the first time. The host galaxies are forming stars at an average rate of 1.7-10 M⊙ yr-1 and possess supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with masses of a few times 108 M⊙. Their radio morphologies are similar to Fanaroff-Riley type II radio galaxies with total projected linear sizes ranging from 86 to 420 kpc, but their total 1.4-GHz radio luminosities are only in the range 1024-1025 W Hz-1. We propose that the formation of spiral-host double-lobe radio galaxies can be attributed to more than one factor, such as the occurrence of strong interactions, mergers, and the presence of unusually massive SMBHs, such that the spiral structures are not destroyed. Only one of our sources (J1649+2635) is found in a cluster environment, indicating that processes other than accretion through cooling flows e.g. galaxy-galaxy mergers or interactions could be plausible scenarios for triggering radio-loud active galactic nuclei activity in spiral galaxies.

  11. The black hole mass function derived from local spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Berrier, Joel C.; Shields, Douglas W.; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Seigar, Marc S.; Lacy, Claud H. S.; Hartley, Matthew T.

    2014-07-10

    We present our determination of the nuclear supermassive black hole (SMBH) mass function for spiral galaxies in the local universe, established from a volume-limited sample consisting of a statistically complete collection of the brightest spiral galaxies in the southern (δ < 0°) hemisphere. Our SMBH mass function agrees well at the high-mass end with previous values given in the literature. At the low-mass end, inconsistencies exist in previous works that still need to be resolved, but our work is more in line with expectations based on modeling of black hole evolution. This low-mass end of the spectrum is critical to our understanding of the mass function and evolution of black holes since the epoch of maximum quasar activity. The sample is defined by a limiting luminosity (redshift-independent) distance, D{sub L} = 25.4 Mpc (z = 0.00572) and a limiting absolute B-band magnitude, M{sub B}=−19.12. These limits define a sample of 140 spiral galaxies, with 128 measurable pitch angles to establish the pitch angle distribution for this sample. This pitch-angle distribution function may be useful in the study of the morphology of late-type galaxies. We then use an established relationship between the logarithmic spiral arm pitch angle and the mass of the central SMBH in a host galaxy in order to estimate the mass of the 128 respective SMBHs in this volume-limited sample. This result effectively gives us the distribution of mass for SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies over a lookback time, t{sub L} ≤ 82.1 h{sub 67.77}{sup −1} Myr and contained within a comoving volume, V{sub C} = 3.37 × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup −3} Mpc{sup 3}. We estimate that the density of SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies in the local universe is ρ=5.54{sub −2.73}{sup +6.55} × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup 3} M{sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3}. Thus, our derived cosmological SMBH mass density for spiral galaxies is Ω{sub BH}=4.35{sub −2.15}{sup +5.14} × 10{sup –7} h{sub 67.77}. Assuming that

  12. Evolution of Gas Across Spiral Arms in the Whirlpool Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, Melissa Nicole

    To investigate the dynamic evolution of gas across spiral arms, we conducted a detailed study of the gas and star formation along the spiral arms in the Whirlpool Galaxy, M51. This nearby, face-on spiral galaxy provides a unique laboratory to study the relationship between gas dynamics and star formation. The textbook picture of interstellar medium (ISM) evolution is rapidly changing. Molecular gas was once believed to form along spiral arms from the diffuse atomic gas in the inter-arm regions. Star formation occurs within giant molecular clouds during spiral arm passage. Lastly, the molecular gas is photo-dissociated back into atomic gas by massive stars on the downstream side of the spiral arm. Recent evidence, however, is revealing a new picture of the interstellar medium and the process of star formation. We seek development of a new picture by studying the development and evolution of molecular gas and the role of large scale galactic dynamics in organizing the interstellar medium. This thesis begins by presenting work measuring the geometrical offsets between interstellar gas and recent star formation. Interstellar gas is traced by atomic hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO). Star formation is traced by ionized hydrogen recombination lines and infrared emission from dust warmed by young bright stars. Measuring these offsets can help determine the underlying large scale galactic dynamics. Along the spiral arms in M51, offsets between CO and the star formation tracers suggest that gas is flowing through the spiral arms, but the offsets do not show the expected signature of a single pattern speed and imply a more complicated pattern. This thesis also examines the intermediate stages of gas evolution, by studying a denser component of the ISM closer to which stars will form. Only a small percent of the bulk molecular gas will become dense enough to form stars. HCN and HCO+ probe densities ˜104 cm-3, where as the bulk gas is 500 cm-3. This thesis looks at HCN and

  13. Metastudy of the Spiral Structure of Our Home Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallée, Jacques P.

    2002-02-01

    The current maps of the Milky Way disk still have large differences, much like early maps of the Earth's continents made in the 16th century had sizeable differences in the locations of continents and many areas labeled ``terra incognita.'' Exactly where are the spiral arms in our home Galaxy (in radius and longitude)? Here a meta-analysis is made of the recent (1995-2001) observational data on the pitch angle (p) and the number (m) of spiral arms in our home Galaxy. In order to clarify our image of the structure of the Milky Way, logarithmic model arms of the form ln(r/r0)=k(θ-θ0) are fitted to the observed tangents to the spiral arms and to the observed position angle (P.A.) of the Galaxy's central bar. The main results are that p=12deg inward and m=4, with logarithmic spiral arm parameters r0=2.3 kpc and θ0=0deg for the Norma arm. The value of θ0 for the other three arms is modeled by rotating the Norma arm in steps of 90°. These values are similar to those found by Ortiz & Lépine using earlier observational data, with some differences. The best model predicts an interarm distance near the Sun of S=2.5 kpc (from the Sagittarius to the Perseus arm) and a distance from the Sun to the Sagittarius arm of 0.9 kpc. These values are compared to our limited and uncertain data from the observed nearby spiral arms. These predicted values near the Sun differ substantially from the predictions of Ortiz & Lépine, as discussed in the text.

  14. Spitzer Observations of Extraplanar PAH Emission from Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, N.; Howk, J.

    We present Spitzer/IRAC observations of polycylic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission from interstellar material in the thick disks of normal spiral galaxies. These data show PAHs to be a common constituent of extraplanar material in spirals. The processes that displace this material from the interstellar disks of these systems do not destroy these very small grains. The dust emission features are present far above the galactic planes, extended up to about 2-4 kpc above the midplanes of the galaxies presented in this work. The total extent for which dust can be traced is about half the extent of the DIG. If it is not a sensitivity effect, this suggests that PAHs may be associated with a cold neutral medium that can not be supported at high z.

  15. Unstable spiral modes in disk-shaped galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Y. Y.; Lin, C. C.; Mark, James W.-K.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanisms for the maintenance and the excitation of trailing spiral modes of density waves in diskshaped galaxies, as proposed by Lin in 1969 and by Mark recently, are substantiated by an analysis of the gas-dynamical model of the galaxy. The self-excitation of the unstable mode in caused by waves propagating outwards from the corotation circle, which carry away angular momentum of a sign opposite to that contained in the wave system inside that circle. Specifically, a simple dispersion relationship is given as a definite integral, which allows the immediate determination of the pattern frequency and the amplification rate, once the basic galactic model is known. PMID:16592313

  16. Stellar populations in spiral galaxies: broadband versus spectroscopic viewpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacArthur, Lauren Anne

    2006-06-01

    This thesis addresses the stellar population content in the bulges and disks of spiral galaxies using broad-band and spectroscopic data. The results can be used to constrain models of galaxy formation in addition to establishing a comprehensive, model-independent, picture of colour and line-index gradients in spiral galaxies. Building upon my Masters study of structural parameters in spiral galaxies, I use the largest collection of multi-band (optical and IR) surface brightness profiles for face-on and moderately-tilted galaxies to extract radial colour profiles. The colour gradients are then translated into age and metallicity gradients by comparison with stellar population synthesis (SPS) models considering a range of star formation histories, including recent bursts. Based on their integrated light, we find that high surface brightness (SB) regions of galaxies formed their stars earlier than lower SB ones, or at a similar epoch but on shorter timescale. At a given SB level, the star formation histories are modulated by the overall potential of the galaxy such that brighter/higher rotational velocity galaxies formed earlier. This formation "down-sizing" implied by our results is inconsistent with current implementations of semi-analytic structure formation models. In order to alleviate concerns that our colour gradients could be affected by dust reddening, we designed a similar spectroscopic investigation and explored the dust sensitivity of absorption-line indices. The latter test makes use of the latest SPS, models incorporating a multi-component model for the line and continuum attenuation due to dust. For quiescent stellar populations (e.g. spheroids and globular clusters), dust extinction effects are small for most indices with the exception of the 4000 Å break. For models with current star formation, many indices may suffer from dust reddening and any departures depend on age, dust distribution, and the effective optical depth. However, a number of useful

  17. Stellar populations in spiral galaxies: Broadband versus spectroscopic viewpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacArthur, Lauren Anne

    This thesis addresses the stellar population content in the bulges and disks of spiral galaxies using broad-band and spectroscopic data. The results can be used to constrain models of galaxy formation in addition to establishing a comprehensive, model-independent, picture of colour and line-index gradients in spiral galaxies. Building upon my Masters study of structural parameters in spiral galaxies, I use the largest collection of multi-band (optical and IR) surface brightness profiles for face-on and moderately-tilted galaxies to extract radial colour profiles. The colour gradients are then translated into age and metallicity gradients by comparison with stellar population synthesis (SPS) models considering a range of star formation histories, including recent bursts. Based on their integrated light, we find that high surface brightness (SB) regions of galaxies formed their stars earlier than lower SB ones, or at a similar epoch but on shorter timescale. At a given SB level, the star formation histories are modulated by the overall potential of the galaxy such that brighter/higher rotational velocity galaxies formed earlier. This formation "down-sizing" implied by our results is inconsistent with current implementations of semi-analytic structure formation models. In order to alleviate concerns that our colour gradients could be affected by dust reddening, we designed a similar spectroscopic investigation and explored the dust sensitivity of absorption-line indices. The latter test makes use of the latest SPS, models incorporating a multi-component model for the line and continuum attenuation due to dust. For quiescent stellar populations (e.g. spheroids and globular clusters), dust extinction effects are small for most indices with the exception of the 4000 Å break. For models with current star formation, many indices may suffer from dust reddening and any departures depend on age, dust distribution, and the effective optical depth. However, a number of useful

  18. Tidally Induced Offset Disks in Magellanic Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardy, Stephen A.; D’Onghia, Elena; Athanassoula, E.; Wilcots, Eric M.; Sheth, Kartik

    2016-08-01

    Magellanic spiral galaxies are a class of one-armed systems that often exhibit an offset stellar bar and are rarely found around massive spiral galaxies. Using a set of N-body and hydrodynamic simulations, we consider a dwarf–dwarf galaxy interaction as the driving mechanism for the formation of this peculiar class of systems. We investigate here the relation between the dynamical, stellar, and gaseous disk center and the bar. In all our simulations the bar center always coincides with the dynamical center, while the stellar disk becomes highly asymmetric during the encounter, causing the photometric center of the Magellanic galaxy disk to become mismatched with both the bar and the dynamical center. The disk asymmetries persist for almost 2 Gyr, the time that it takes for the disk to be recentered with the bar, and well after the companion has passed. This explains the nature of the offset bar found in many Magellanic-type galaxies, including the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and NGC 3906. In particular, these results, once applied to the LMC, suggest that the dynamical center should reside in the bar center instead of the H i center as previously assumed, pointing to a variation in the current estimate of the north component of the LMC proper motion.

  19. Origin of cosmic rays in the spiral galaxy NGC 3310

    SciTech Connect

    Duric, N.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of cosmic ray production in the spiral galaxy NGC 3310 is addressed by analyzing and comparing optical and radio continuum data. Tentative results indicate that on global scales relativistic electrons may be produced in the shock front associated with the density wave while on local scales extreme population I objects may be producing them. It is inferred that the same conclusions apply to all cosmic rays produced in the disk. 9 references.

  20. Fundamental Mass-Spin-Morphology Relation Of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreschkow, D.; Glazebrook, K.

    2014-03-01

    This work presents high-precision measurements of the specific baryon angular momentum j b contained in stars, atomic gas, and molecular gas, out to >~ 10 scale radii, in 16 nearby spiral galaxies of the THINGS sample. The accuracy of these measurements improves on existing studies by an order of magnitude, leading to the discovery of a strong correlation between the baryon mass M b, j b, and the bulge mass fraction β, fitted by \\beta =-(0.34+/- 0.03)\\,lg\\,(j_bM_b^{-1}/[10^{-7}\\, kpc\\,km\\,s^{-1}\\,{M}_{\\odot }^{-1}])-(0.04+/- 0.01) on the full sample range of 0 <= β <~ 0.3 and 109 M ⊙ < M b < 1011 M ⊙. The corresponding relation for the stellar quantities M * and j * is identical within the uncertainties. These M-j-β relations likely originate from the proportionality between jM -1 and the surface density of the disk that dictates its stability against (pseudo-)bulge formation. Using a cold dark matter model, we can approximately explain classical scaling relations, such as the fundamental plane of spiral galaxies, the Tully-Fisher relation, and the mass-size relation, in terms of the M-j(-β) relation. These results advocate the use of mass and angular momentum as the most fundamental quantities of spiral galaxies.

  1. Formation and destruction of clouds and spurs in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Rahul; Ostriker, E. C.

    We investigate the formation of clouds and substructure in spiral galaxies using high resolution global MHD simulations, including gas self gravity. Previously, local modeling by Kim and Ostriker (2002) has shown that self gravity and magnetic fields cause the growth of high density clumps in the spiral arms rather rapidly; subsequently, these clumps result in the formation of sheared, feather like structures in the interarms, known as spurs. Recently, Shetty and Ostriker (2006) performed global simulations and found that gas self gravity can cause the growth of sheared features regardless of the strength of the external spiral potential. However, a sufficiently strong spiral potential is required to produce arm clouds, as well as spurs, which are the filamentary structures distinctly associated with the spiral arms, having near-perpendicular intersections with the main dust lane. Here, we use higher resolution modeling to study the detailed properties of the clouds and spurs. We analyze the resulting masses, angular momenta, and magnetic fields of the clouds, and their relation to the background dynamics. We also include a feedback mechanism, representing turbulent forcing via supernovae, to destroy the clouds. We thus assess the role of turbulence on the clump properties. Further, we also follow how subsequent spur morphology evolves under quasi-steady conditions. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant AST-0507315.

  2. THE JAMES CLERK MAXWELL TELESCOPE NEARBY GALAXIES LEGACY SURVEY. II. WARM MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN THREE FIELD SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, B. E.; Wilson, C. D.; Sinukoff, E.; Israel, F. P.; Van der Werf, P. P.; Serjeant, S.; Bendo, G. J.; Clements, D. L.; Brinks, E.; Irwin, J. A.; Knapen, J. H.; Leech, J.; Tan, B. K.; Matthews, H. E.; Muehle, S.; Mortimer, A. M. J.; Petitpas, G.; Spekkens, K.; Tilanus, R. P. J.; Usero, A. E-mail: wilson@physics.mcmaster.c E-mail: israel@strw.leidenuniv.n

    2010-05-01

    We present the results of large-area {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 emission mapping of three nearby field galaxies, NGC 628, NGC 3521, and NGC 3627, completed at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope as part of the Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey. These galaxies all have moderate to strong {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 detections over large areas of the fields observed by the survey, showing resolved structure and dynamics in their warm/dense molecular gas disks. All three galaxies were part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey sample, and as such have excellent published multiwavelength ancillary data. These data sets allow us to examine the star formation properties, gas content, and dynamics of these galaxies on sub-kiloparsec scales. We find that the global gas depletion time for dense/warm molecular gas in these galaxies is consistent with other results for nearby spiral galaxies, indicating this may be independent of galaxy properties such as structures, gas compositions, and environments. Similar to the results from The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey, we do not see a correlation of the star formation efficiency with the gas surface density consistent with the Schmidt-Kennicutt law. Finally, we find that the star formation efficiency of the dense molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 is potentially flat or slightly declining as a function of molecular gas density, the {sup 12}CO J = 3-2/J = 1-0 ratio (in contrast to the correlation found in a previous study into the starburst galaxy M83), and the fraction of total gas in molecular form.

  3. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): stellar mass growth of spiral galaxies in the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Grootes, Meiert; Marcum, Pamela M.; Popescu, Cristina; Tuffs, Richard; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Davies, Luke J. M.; Driver, Simon P.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lara-López, Maritza A.; López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Loveday, Jon; Moffett, Amanda; Taylor, Edward N.; Owers, Matt; Robotham, Aaron S. G.

    2016-04-01

    We look for correlated changes in stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR) along filaments in the cosmic web by examining the stellar masses and UV-derived SFRs of 1799 ungrouped and unpaired spiral galaxies that reside in filaments. We devise multiple distance metrics to characterize the complex geometry of filaments, and find that galaxies closer to the cylindrical centre of a filament have higher stellar masses than their counterparts near the periphery of filaments, on the edges of voids. In addition, these peripheral spiral galaxies have higher SFRs at a given mass. Complementing our sample of filament spiral galaxies with spiral galaxies in tendrils and voids, we find that the average SFR of these objects in different large-scale environments are similar to each other with the primary discriminant in SFR being stellar mass, in line with previous works. However, the distributions of SFRs are found to vary with large-scale environment. Our results thus suggest a model in which in addition to stellar mass as the primary discriminant, the large-scale environment is imprinted in the SFR as a second-order effect. Furthermore, our detailed results for filament galaxies suggest a model in which gas accretion from voids on to filaments is primarily in an orthogonal direction. Overall, we find our results to be in line with theoretical expectations of the thermodynamic properties of the intergalactic medium in different large-scale environments.

  4. Galaxy Zoo: spiral galaxy morphologies and their relation to the star-forming main sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Kyle; Schawinski, Kevin; Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom; Skibba, Ramin A.; Nichol, Robert; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris; Simmons, Brooke D.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C.; Fortson, Lucy; Galaxy Zoo volunteers

    2015-01-01

    We examine the relationship between stellar mass and star formation rate in disk galaxies at z<0.085, measuring different populations of spirals as classified by their kiloparsec-scale structure. The morphologies of disk galaxies are obtained from the Galaxy Zoo 2 project, which includes the number of spiral arms, the arm pitch angle, and the presence of strong galactic bars. We show that both the slope and dispersion of the star-forming main sequence (SFMS) is constant no matter what the morphology of the spiral disk. We also show that mergers (both major and minor), which represent the strongest conditions for increases in star formation at a constant mass, only boost the SFR above the main relation by 0.3 dex; this is a significant reduction over the increase seen in merging systems at higher redshifts (z > 1). Of the galaxies that do lie significantly above the SFMS in the local Universe, more than 50% are mergers, with a large contribution from the compact green pea galaxies. We interpret our results as evidence that the number and pitch angle of spiral arms, which are imperfect reflections of the galaxy's current gravitational potential, are either fully independent of the various quenching mechanisms for star formation or are completely overwhelmed by the combination of outflows and feedback.

  5. The opacity of spiral disks from counts of distant galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Gonzalez, R. A.; Allen, R. J.; van der Kruit, P. C.

    2004-12-01

    The numbers of distant galaxies seen in an HST image of a spiral galaxy is an indication of the average extinction by dust in the disk. This number of distant galaxies has to be calibrated for crowding effects and for this the ``Synthetic Field Method'' (SFM, Gonzalez et al. 1998) was developed. Synthetic fields are the science field with a dimmed Hubble Deep Field added. From the relation between the dimming and the number of synthetic galaxies, the average extinction in the science field can be derived. 32 HST/WFPC2 fields were analysed and from the numbers of distant galaxies an average radial extinction profile for spiral disks was constructed, for the whole sample, arm and disk regions and different Hubble types. When the average radial extinction profile is compared to the HI surface density profile, an estimate of the average gas-to-dust ratio as a function of radius can be obtained. The effects of the phase of the hydrogen and metallicity gradient in disks are discussed. The average radial extinction profile is compared to the light distribution of spiral disks. The relation between typical radii of light and dust and the relation between surface brightness and extinction is also explored. Combining the detailed images of dust emission from the Spitzer space telescope with the extinction measurements from counts in HST images could offer insight into the relative prominence of cold dust and possibly the dust geometry in the disk. Future work on dust extinction using the wealth of new imaging in the HST archive is briefly discussed. This research was supported by funding from STSCI, the Director's Discretionary Research Fund and the Kapteyn Institute.

  6. Photometric Properties of Face-on Isolated Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Alexander; Epstein, P.; Durbala, A.

    2011-05-01

    We want to quantify the relative role of nature versus nurture in defining the observed properties of galaxies. In simpler terms we would like to disentangle the ``genetic'’ and the environmental influences in shaping the morphology of galaxies. In order to do that one needs to firstly define a zero-order baseline, i.e., a sample of galaxies that have been minimally perturbed by neighbors in the last few billion years of their existence. Such a sample has been produced and refined in different stages in the context of the AMIGA international project (www.iaa.es/AMIGA.html). The recent catalogue ``The All-Sky Catalog of Isolated Galaxies Selected from 2MASS'’ (Karachentseva, V. E. et al. 2010) allows us to complete and enrich the initial sample constructed within AMIGA with new objects, thus enhancing the statistical relevance of our study. Our focus is to define a subset of isolated disk spiral galaxies. We constrain the sample selection by: 1) orientation, restricting to almost face-on galaxies and 2) availability of good photometric images in SDSS. The goal is to ``dissect'’ (decompose) these galaxies in major components (disk, bulge, bars, etc.) and to study the properties of the components in a statistical context. Having a reasonable representation of all morphological types, we aim to test the bimodality of bulges and bars. We present a progress report of our work.

  7. The Pattern Speeds of M51, M83, and NGC 6946 Using CO and the Tremaine-Weinberg Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, P.; Rand, R. J.; McGraw, J. T.

    2004-05-01

    In spiral galaxies in which the molecular phase dominates the ISM, the molecular gas as traced by CO emission will approximately obey the continuity equation on orbital timescales. The Tremaine-Weinberg method can then be used to determine the pattern speed of such galaxies. We have applied the method to single-dish CO maps of three nearby spirals, M51, M83, and NGC 6946, to obtain estimates of their pattern speeds: 38+/-7, 45+/-8, and 39+/-8 km s-1 kpc-1, respectively, and we compare these results to previous measurements. We also analyze the major sources of systematic errors in applying the Tremaine-Weinberg method to maps of CO emission.

  8. IN-SPIRALING CLUMPS IN BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Zhang Hongxin; Hunter, Deidre A.

    2012-03-10

    Giant star formation clumps in dwarf irregular galaxies can have masses exceeding a few percent of the galaxy mass enclosed inside their orbital radii. They can produce sufficient torques on dark matter halo particles, halo stars, and the surrounding disk to lose their angular momentum and spiral into the central region in 1 Gyr. Pairs of giant clumps with similarly large relative masses can interact and exchange angular momentum to the same degree. The result of this angular momentum loss is a growing central concentration of old stars, gas, and star formation that can produce a long-lived starburst in the inner region, identified with the blue compact dwarf (BCD) phase. This central concentration is proposed to be analogous to the bulge in a young spiral galaxy. Observations of star complexes in five local BCDs confirm the relatively large clump masses that are expected for this process. The observed clumps also seem to contain old field stars, even after background light subtraction, in which case the clumps may be long-lived. The two examples with clumps closest to the center have the largest relative clump masses and the greatest contributions from old stars. An additional indication that the dense central regions of BCDs are like bulges is the high ratio of the inner disk scale height to the scale length, which is comparable to 1 for four of the galaxies.

  9. Most Massive Spiral Galaxy Known in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-12-01

    The VLT Observes Rapid Motion in Distant Object Summary The most massive spiral galaxy known so far in the Universe has been discovered by a team of astronomers from Garching, Padova, Leiden, ESO and London [1]. They base their conclusion on recent observations with ISAAC , an infrared-sensitive, multi-mode instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope at the Paranal Observatory. This galaxy has been designated ISOHDFS 27 and is located at a distance of approx. 6 billion light-years (the redshift is 0.58). Its measured mass is more than 1000 billion times that of the Sun [2]. It is thus about four times more massive than our own galaxy, the Milky Way, and twice as heavy as the heaviest spiral galaxy known so far. The determination of the mass of ISOHDFS 27 is based on a unique measurement of the motions of its stars and nebulae around the center. The faster the motion is, the greater is the mass. It is, in essence, the same method that allows determining the mass of the Earth from the orbital speed and distance of the Moon. This is the first time a "rotation curve" has been observed in such a distant galaxy by means of infrared observations, allowing a very detailed dynamical study. Other observations by the team concern a pair of distant, interacting galaxies that were also found to possess comparably high masses. They also have observations of a third galaxy at a distance of about 10 billion light-years, with a mass that approaches that of ISOHDFS 27 . The new result has important cosmological implications, as it demonstrates that very heavy structures had already been formed in the Universe at a comparatively early epoch . PR Photo 33a/00 : ISOHDFS 27 , the heaviest spiral galaxy known. PR Photo 33b/00 : The "raw" ISAAC spectrum of ISOHDFS 27 . PR Photo 33c/00 : H-alpha profile of ISOHDFS 27 . Star formation in young galaxies It is of fundamental importance to current cosmological studies to understand how stars evolve within galaxies and how the galaxies themselves

  10. The ultraviolet attenuation law in backlit spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Keel, William C.; Manning, Anna M.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Lintott, Chris J.; Schawinski, Kevin E-mail: ammanning@bama.ua.edu E-mail: Twitter@BenneHolwerda E-mail: Twitter@chrislintott E-mail: Twitter@kevinschawinski

    2014-02-01

    The effective extinction law (attenuation behavior) in galaxies in the emitted ultraviolet (UV) regime is well known only for actively star-forming objects and combines effects of the grain properties, fine structure in the dust distribution, and relative distributions of stars and dust. We use Galaxy Evolution Explorer, XMM Optical Monitor, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to explore the UV attenuation in the outer parts of spiral disks which are backlit by other UV-bright galaxies, starting with the candidate list of pairs provided by Galaxy Zoo participants. New optical images help to constrain the geometry and structure of the target galaxies. Our analysis incorporates galaxy symmetry, using non-overlapping regions of each galaxy to derive error estimates on the attenuation measurements. The entire sample has an attenuation law across the optical and UV that is close to the Calzetti et al. form; the UV slope for the overall sample is substantially shallower than found by Wild et al., which is a reasonable match to the more distant galaxies in our sample but not to the weighted combination including NGC 2207. The nearby, bright spiral NGC 2207 alone gives an accuracy almost equal to the rest of our sample, and its outer arms have a very low level of foreground starlight. Thus, this widespread, fairly 'gray' law can be produced from the distribution of dust alone, without a necessary contribution from differential escape of stars from dense clouds. Our results indicate that the extrapolation needed to compare attenuation between backlit galaxies at moderate redshifts from HST data, and local systems from Sloan Digital Sky Survey and similar data, is mild enough to allow the use of galaxy overlaps to trace the cosmic history of dust in galaxies. For NGC 2207, HST data in the near-UV F336W band show that the covering factor of clouds with small optical attenuation becomes a dominant factor farther into the UV, which opens the possibility that widespread

  11. Automated Quantification of Arbitrary Arm-Segment Structure in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Darren Robert

    This thesis describes a system that, given approximately-centered images of spiral galaxies, produces quantitative descriptions of spiral galaxy structure without the need for per-image human input. This structure information consists of a list of spiral arm segments, each associated with a fitted logarithmic spiral arc and a pixel region. This list-of-arcs representation allows description of arbitrary spiral galaxy structure: the arms do not need to be symmetric, may have forks or bends, and, more generally, may be arranged in any manner with a consistent spiral-pattern center (non-merging galaxies have a sufficiently well-defined center). Such flexibility is important in order to accommodate the myriad structure variations observed in spiral galaxies. From the arcs produced from our method it is possible to calculate measures of spiral galaxy structure such as winding direction, winding tightness, arm counts, asymmetry, or other values of interest (including user-defined measures). In addition to providing information about the spiral arm "skeleton" of each galaxy, our method can enable analyses of brightness within individual spiral arms, since we provide the pixel regions associated with each spiral arm segment. For winding direction, arm tightness, and arm count, comparable information is available (to various extents) from previous efforts; to the extent that such information is available, we find strong correspondence with our output. We also characterize the changes to (and invariances in) our output as a function of modifications to important algorithm parameters. By enabling generation of extensive data about spiral galaxy structure from large-scale sky surveys, our method will enable new discoveries and tests regarding the nature of galaxies and the universe, and will facilitate subsequent work to automatically fit detailed brightness models of spiral galaxies.

  12. The Red and Featureless Outer Disks of Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Aaron E.; Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul

    2016-07-01

    We present results from deep, wide-field surface photometry of three nearby (D = 4–7 Mpc) spiral galaxies: M94 (NGC 4736), M64 (NGC 4826), and M106 (NGC 4258). Our imaging reaches a limiting surface brightness of {μ }B ∼ 28–30 mag arcsec‑2 and probes colors down to {μ }B ∼ 27.5 mag arcsec‑2. We compare our broadband optical data to available ultraviolet and high column density H i data to better constrain the star-forming history and stellar populations of the outermost parts of each galaxy’s disk. Each galaxy has a well-defined radius beyond which little star formation occurs and the disk light appears both azimuthally smooth and red in color, suggestive of old, well-mixed stellar populations. Given the lack of ongoing star formation or blue stellar populations in these galaxies’ outer disks, the most likely mechanisms for their formation are dynamical processes such as disk heating or radial migration, rather than inside-out growth of the disks. This is also implied by the similarity in outer disk properties despite each galaxy showing distinct levels of environmental influence, from a purely isolated galaxy (M94) to one experiencing weak tidal perturbations from its satellite galaxies (M106) to a galaxy recovering from a recent merger (M64), suggesting that a variety of evolutionary histories can yield similar outer disk structure. While this suggests a common secular mechanism for outer disk formation, the large extent of these smooth, red stellar populations—which reach several disk scale lengths beyond the galaxies’ spiral structure—may challenge models of radial migration given the lack of any nonaxisymmetric forcing at such large radii.

  13. Energetic constraints to chemo-photometric evolution of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzoni, Alberto

    2011-08-01

    galaxies; (iii) although lower-mass galaxies tend more likely to take the look of later-type spirals, it is mass, not morphology, that drives galaxy chemical properties. Facing the relatively flat trend of ? versus galaxy type, the increasingly poorer gas metallicity, as traced by the [O/H] abundance of H II regions along the Sa → Im Hubble sequence, seems to be mainly the result of the softening process, that dilute enriched stellar mass within a larger fraction of residual gas. The problem of the residual lifetime for spiral galaxies as active star-forming systems has been investigated. If returned mass is left as the main (or unique) gas supplier to the ISM, as implied by the Roberts time-scale, then star formation might continue only at a maximum birthrate bmax≪f/(1 -f) ≲ 0.45, for a Salpeter IMF. As a result, only massive (Mgal≳ 1011 M⊙) Sa/Sb spirals may have some chance to survive ˜30 per cent or more beyond a Hubble time. Things may be worse, on the contrary, for dwarf systems, that seem currently on the verge of ceasing their star formation activity unless to drastically reduce their apparent birthrate below the bmax threshold.

  14. Short-term dynamical evolution of grand-design spirals in barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Junichi

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the short-term dynamical evolution of stellar grand-design spiral arms in barred spiral galaxiesusing a three-dimensional (3D) N-body/hydrodynamic simulation. Similar to previous numerical simulations of unbarred, multiple-arm spirals, we find that grand-design spiral arms in barred galaxies are not stationary, but rather dynamic. This means that the amplitudes, pitch angles, and rotational frequencies of the spiral arms are not constant, but change within a few hundred million years (i.e. the typical rotational period of a galaxy). We also find that the clear grand-design spirals in barred galaxies appear only when the spirals connect with the ends of the bar. Furthermore, we find that the short-term behaviour of spiral arms in the outer regions (R > 1.5-2 bar radius) can be explained by the swing amplification theory and that the effects of the bar are not negligible in the inner regions (R < 1.5-2 bar radius). These results suggest that although grand-design spiral arms in barred galaxies are affected by the stellar bar, the grand-design spiral arms essentially originate not as bar-driven stationary density waves, but rather as self-excited dynamic patterns. We imply that a rigidly rotating grand-design spiral could not be a reasonable dynamical model for investigating gas flows and cloud formation even in barred spiral galaxies.

  15. Analysis of the Spiral Properties in Prototype Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, William Stuart

    Numerical methods and algorithms are developed for analyzing the distribution of pitch angles of global and local spiral structure in disk-shaped galaxies. From the distribution of gas clouds and young stellar associations, "partitioning" methods based on nearest neighbor and Voronoi polyhedra calculations are applied to capture regions of high population density associated with local arm segments, spurs, feathers and secondary features. The pitch angle and length of each of these features are determined using least squares procedures applied in logarithmic spiral coordinates. The spectrum of pitch angles for both prototype and observed galaxies is analyzed and discussed. The evolution of prominent secondary features is examined over a 40 Myr period and characteristic behavior is interpreted in terms of competing mechanisms such as differential rotation and the gravitational force field induced by nearby features. A refined numerical method is also presented for modeling the self-gravity force field arising in prototype galaxy simulations. The loss of resolution from previous methods is compared to results obtained using high order finite differencing and modified bicubic interpolation. ftn*This work was supported in part under W. W. Roberts' grants from the National Science Foundation (Grant AST-87-12084) and NASA (Grant NAGW-929). The computational work was carried out on the CDC 855 and the AMSUN 3/260 cluster at the University of Virginia and the CRAY Y-MP at the Pittsburgh Superconducting Center (Grant AST880019P: W. W. Roberts, P.I.).

  16. Kinematic and Structural Evolution of Field and Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, B. L.; Kutdemir, E.; Da Rocha, C.; Böhm, A.; Peletier, R. F.; Verdugo, M.

    2010-10-01

    To understand the processes that build up galaxies we investigate the stellar structure and gas kinematics of spiral and irregular galaxies out to redshift 1. We target 92 galaxies in four cluster ( z = 0.3 & 0.5 ) fields to study the environmental influence. Their stellar masses derived from multiband VLT/FORS photometry are distributed around but mostly below the characteristic Schechter-fit mass. From HST/ACS images we determine morphologies and structural parameters like disk length, position angle and ellipticity. Combining the spectra of three slit positions per galaxy using the MXU mode of VLT/FORS2 we construct the two-dimensional velocity field from gas emission lines for 16 cluster members and 33 field galaxies. The kinematic position angle and flatness are derived by a Fourier expansion of elliptical velocity profiles. To trace possible interaction processes, we define three irregularity indicators based on an identical analysis of local galaxies from the SINGS project. Our distant sample displays a higher fraction of disturbed velocity fields with varying percentages (10%, 30% and 70%) because they trace different features. While we find far fewer candidates for major mergers than the SINS sample at z ˜ 2, our data are sensitive enough to trace less violent processes. Most irregular signatures are related to star formation events and less massive disks are affected more than Milky-Way type objects. We detect similarly high fractions of irregular objects both for the distant field and cluster galaxies with similar distributions. We conclude that we may witness the building-up of disk galaxies still at redshifts z ˜ 0.5 via minor mergers and gas accretion, while some cluster members may additionally experience stripping, evaporation or harassment interactions.

  17. The interstellar halo of spiral galaxies: NGC 891

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Rand, R. J.; Hester, J. Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Researchers have detected the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM) phase in the galaxy NGC 891. They found that the radial distribution of the WIM follows the molecular or young star distribution - an expected dependence. The amount of the WIM in this galaxy exceeds that in our Galaxy. The major surprize is the large thickness of the WIM phase - about 9 kpc instead 3 kpc as in our Galaxy. Clearly, this is the most significant result of the observations. The presence of low ionization gas at high z as well as at large galactocentric radii (where young stars are rare) is an important clue to the origin of the halo and observations such as the one reported here provide important data on this crucial question. In particular, the ionization of gas at high absolute z implies that either the UV photons manage to escape from the disk of the galaxy or that the extragalactic UV background plays an important role. The bulk of the WIM in spiral galaxies is a result of star-formation activity and thus these results can be understood by invoking a high star formation rate in NGC 891. Only the concerted action of supernovae can get the gas to the large z-heights as is observed in this galaxy. Support for this view comes from our detection of many worms i.e., bits and pieces of supershells in the form of kilo-parsec long vertical filaments. Researchers also saw a 600-pc size supershell located nearly one kpc above the plane of the galaxy.

  18. An Optical Search For Supernova Remnants in Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matonick, D. M.; Fesen, R. A.; Blair, W. P.; Long, K. S.

    1994-12-01

    Imaging with narrow-band Hα , [S II], and red continuum filters has been used to distinguish supernova remnant (SNR) candidates from photoionized nebulae in seven nearby spiral galaxies: NGC 2403, NGC 3031 (M81), NGC 5194 (M51), NGC 5204, NGC 5457 (M101), NGC 5585, and NGC 6946. Nebulae which show [S II]/Hα > 0.45, indicating shock-heated emission, are identified as SNR candidates. The number of SNRs found in each galaxy using this technique is 3 in NGC 5204, 5 in NGC 5585, 30 in NGC 2403, 32 in M81, 35 in NGC 6946, and 112 in M101. Spectra of some of the emission nebulae have also been obtained, and were used to confirm SNR identifications. Because of its comparatively high radial velocity, M51 could not be examined adequately with our filter set; however, one bright SNR was found and spectroscopically confirmed. In NGC 2403, we obtained spectra on remnant candidates 1 and 2 of D'Odorico et al. (1980, A&AS, 40, 67), and confirmed them to be SNRs. We also detect the optical SNR identified by Blair & Fesen (1994, ApJ, 424, L103) in NGC 6946, and find an optical SNR counterpart to the X-ray source S2 identified by Schlegel (1994, ApJ, 424, L99). Sizes of observed SNRs range from unresolved (< 50 pc) to over 300x150 pc for one object in NGC 5585. Although our search technique limits our detection of SNRs embedded in bright H II regions, in the galaxies with clearly defined spiral arms (i.e NGC 6946, M81, M101), most SNRs appear to trace the spiral arms. Analysis of luminosity functions, diameters, abundances, and distributions of the samples of SNRs will also be discussed.

  19. Fundamental mass-spin-morphology relation of spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Obreschkow, D.; Glazebrook, K.

    2014-03-20

    This work presents high-precision measurements of the specific baryon angular momentum j {sub b} contained in stars, atomic gas, and molecular gas, out to ≳ 10 scale radii, in 16 nearby spiral galaxies of the THINGS sample. The accuracy of these measurements improves on existing studies by an order of magnitude, leading to the discovery of a strong correlation between the baryon mass M {sub b}, j {sub b}, and the bulge mass fraction β, fitted by β=−(0.34±0.03) lg (j{sub b}M{sub b}{sup −1}/[10{sup −7} kpc km s{sup −1} M{sub ⊙}{sup −1}])−(0.04±0.01) on the full sample range of 0 ≤ β ≲ 0.3 and 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} < M {sub b} < 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The corresponding relation for the stellar quantities M {sub *} and j {sub *} is identical within the uncertainties. These M-j-β relations likely originate from the proportionality between jM {sup –1} and the surface density of the disk that dictates its stability against (pseudo-)bulge formation. Using a cold dark matter model, we can approximately explain classical scaling relations, such as the fundamental plane of spiral galaxies, the Tully-Fisher relation, and the mass-size relation, in terms of the M-j(-β) relation. These results advocate the use of mass and angular momentum as the most fundamental quantities of spiral galaxies.

  20. GMC evolution in a barred spiral galaxy with star formation and thermal feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yusuke; Bryan, Greg L.; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Habe, Asao; Simpson, Christine M.

    2016-09-01

    We explore the impact of star formation and thermal stellar feedback on the giant molecular cloud population forming in a M83-type barred spiral galaxy. We compare three high-resolution simulations (1.5 pc cell size) with different star formation/feedback models: one with no star formation, one with star formation but no feedback, and one with star formation and thermal energy injection. We analyse the resulting population of clouds, finding that we can identify the same population of massive, virialized clouds and transient, low-surface density clouds found in our previous work (that did not include star formation or feedback). Star formation and feedback can affect the mix of clouds we identify. In particular, star formation alone simply converts dense cloud gas into stars with only a small change to the cloud populations, principally resulting in a slight decrease in the transient population. Feedback, however, has a stronger impact: while it is not generally sufficient to entirely destroy the clouds, it does eject gas out of them, increasing the gas density in the intercloud region. This decreases the number of massive clouds, but substantially increases the transient cloud population. We also find that feedback tends to drive a net radial inflow of massive clouds, leading to an increase in the star formation rate in the bar region. We examine a number of possible reasons for this and conclude that it is possible that the drag force from the enhanced intercloud density could be responsible.

  1. The Spiral Wave of Our Galaxy Near Inner Lindblad Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Mark, James W-K.

    1971-01-01

    The dispersion relationship for short-wavelength spiral density waves in our Galaxy has been refined to remove the divergences that occurred in wave number and in amplitude as inner Lindblad resonance is approached. The wave is found to be evanescent in an annular region near 4 kpc. By 3 kpc, the inward propagating trailing wave is completely absorbed. The outgoing leading wave is suppressed compared to the trailing one because it begins in the evanescent state. Throughout this region of inner Lindblad resonance, a smooth wave amplitude has been obtained, and it has a sharp peak correlating well with the observed density of ionized hydrogen. PMID:16591941

  2. Iron emission line from the spiral galaxy M 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Shigeo

    2016-06-01

    Archival Suzaku data of the face-on spiral galaxy M 101 were analyzed. An intense emission line at 6.72^{+0.10}_{-0.12}keV was detected in the central region. This line is identified with a K-line from He-like iron, which indicates the existence of a thin thermal plasma with a temperature of several keV. The iron line luminosity within the central 5'-radius region is estimated to be (2-12) × 1037 erg s-1. The origin of the iron emission line is discussed.

  3. Evolution of Field Spiral Galaxies up to Redshifts z = 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Asmus; Ziegler, Bodo L.

    2007-10-01

    We have gained intermediate-resolution spectroscopy with the FORS instruments of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and high-resolution imaging with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard HST for a sample of 220 distant field spiral galaxies within the FORS Deep Field and William Herschel Deep Field. Spatially resolved rotation curves were extracted and fitted with synthetic velocity fields that take into account all geometric and observational effects, such as blurring due to the slit width and seeing influence. Using these fits, the maximum rotation velocity Vmax could be determined for 124 galaxies that cover the redshift range 0.1spirals to very late types and irregulars. The luminosity-rotation velocity distribution of this sample, which represents an average look-back time of ~5 Gyr, is offset from the Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) of local low-mass spirals, whereas the distant high-mass spirals are compatible with the local TFR. Taking the magnitude-limited character of our sample into account, we show that the slope of the local and the intermediate- z TFR would be in compliance if its scatter decreased by more than a factor of 3 between z~0.5 and 0. Accepting this large evolution of the TFR scatter, we hence find no strong evidence for a mass- or luminosity-dependent evolution of disk galaxies. On the other hand, we derive stellar mass-to-luminosity ratios (M/L) that indicate a luminosity-dependent evolution in the sense that distant low-luminosity disks have much lower M/L than their local counterparts, while high-luminosity disks barely evolved in M/L over the covered redshift range. This could be the manifestation of the ``downsizing'' effect, i.e., the successive shift of the peak of star formation from high-mass to low-mass galaxies toward lower redshifts. This trend might be canceled out in the TF diagram due to the simultaneous evolution of multiple parameters. We also estimate the ratios

  4. Kinematic classification of non-interacting spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Theresa; English, Jayanne

    2014-01-01

    Using neutral hydrogen (HI) rotation curves of 79 galaxies, culled from the literature, as well as measured from HI data, we present a method for classifying disk galaxies by their kinematics. In order to investigate fundamental kinematic properties we concentrate on non-interacting spiral galaxies. We employ a simple parameterized form for the rotation curve in order to derive the three parameters: the maximum rotational velocity, the turnover radius and a measure of the slope of the rotation curve beyond the turnover radius. Our approach uses the statistical Hierarchical Clustering method to guide our division of the resultant 3D distribution of galaxies into five classes. Comparing the kinematic classes in this preliminary classification scheme to a number of galaxy properties, we find that our class containing galaxies with the largest rotational velocities has a mean morphological type of Sb/Sbc while the other classes tend to later types. Other trends also generally agree with those described by previous researchers. In particular we confirm correlations between increasing maximum rotational velocity and the following observed properties: increasing brightness in B-band, increasing size of the optical disk (D25) and increasing star formation rate (as derived using radio continuum data). Our analysis also suggests that lower velocities are associated with a higher ratio of the HI mass over the dynamical mass. Additionally, three galaxies exhibit a drop in rotational velocity amplitude of ≳20% after the turnover radius. However recent investigations suggest that they have interacted with minor companions which is a common cause for declining rotation curves.

  5. Spiral galaxy HI models, rotation curves and kinematic classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Theresa B. V.

    Although galaxy interactions cause dramatic changes, galaxies also continue to form stars and evolve when they are isolated. The dark matter (DM) halo may influence this evolution since it generates the rotational behaviour of galactic disks which could affect local conditions in the gas. Therefore we study neutral hydrogen kinematics of non-interacting, nearby spiral galaxies, characterising their rotation curves (RC) which probe the DM halo; delineating kinematic classes of galaxies; and investigating relations between these classes and galaxy properties such as disk size and star formation rate (SFR). To generate the RCs, we use GalAPAGOS (by J. Fiege). My role was to test and help drive the development of this software, which employs a powerful genetic algorithm, constraining 23 parameters while using the full 3D data cube as input. The RC is here simply described by a tanh-based function which adequately traces the global RC behaviour. Extensive testing on artificial galaxies show that the kinematic properties of galaxies with inclination >40 degrees, including edge-on galaxies, are found reliably. Using a hierarchical clustering algorithm on parametrised RCs from 79 galaxies culled from literature generates a preliminary scheme consisting of five classes. These are based on three parameters: maximum rotational velocity, turnover radius and outer slope of the RC. To assess the relationship between DM content and the kinematic classes, we generate mass models for 10 galaxies from the THINGS and WHISP surveys, and J. Irwin's sample. In most cases mass models using GalAPAGOS RCs were similar to those using traditional "tilted-ring'' method RCs. The kinematic classes are mainly distinguished by their rotational velocity. We confirm correlations between increasing velocity and B-magnitude, optical disk size, and find earlier type galaxies among the strong rotators. SFR also increases with maximum rotational velocity. Given our limited subsample, we cannot discern a

  6. The environmental dependence of neutral hydrogen content in spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Miner, Jesse; Rose, Jim; Kannappan, Sheila

    2008-08-01

    We present a study of the relationship between the deficiency of neutral hydrogen and the local three-dimensional number density of spiral galaxies in the Arecibo catalog [1] of global HI measurements. We find that the dependence on density of the HI content is weak at low densities, but increases sharply at high densities where interactions between galaxies and the intra-cluster medium become important. This behavior is reminiscent of the morphology-density relation [2] in that the effect manifests itself only at cluster-type densities, and indeed when we plot both the HI deficiency-density and morphology-density relations, we see that the densities at which they 'turn up' are similar. This suggests that the physical mechanisms responsible for the increase in early types in clusters are also responsible for the decrease in HI content.

  7. H II Regions in the Disks of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozas, M.

    1997-06-01

    The objective of the research presented in the thesis is to use photometrically calibrated high quality images in \\ha\\ of the disks of spiral galaxies to study their global star forming properties. In the first part of the study we catalog and study statistically the \\hii\\ regions in a set of spirals, imaged in \\ha\\ . The observed parameters of each region are its fluxes and diameters, from which we can also derive the mean surface brightness and its internal radial gradient (the latter for the largest most luminous regions). Plotting the luminosity function (LF) for a given galaxy (the number of regions versus \\ha\\ flux) we find a characteristic discontinuity: a peak accompanied by a change in gradient of the function, at a luminosity of 10$^{38.6}$ erg s$^{-1}$ per region. We attribute this to the change from ionization-bounded \\hii\\ regions, at luminosities below the transition, to density-bounded regions above the transition, and explain with a quantitative model based on this assumption why the transition takes place at a well-defined luminosity, and one which varies very little from galaxy to galaxy. In the six galaxies observed and analyzed in this way, the variance is 0.07 mag., making the transition a good prima facie candidate to be a powerful standard candle for accurate extragalactic distance measurements. Confirmation of the nature of the transition is provided by measurements of the internal brightness gradients, which show a jump from a constant value (predicted for ionization bounded regions) below the transition to a larger and increasing value above the transition. The theoretical model which can account for the transition was used to show how the gradients of the LF in the ionization bounded and the density bounded regimes can be used to derive the mass function of the ionizing stars in regions close to the transition luminosity, yielding a mean value for the slope of the MF in the galaxies observed of -2.4; the brightest stars in these

  8. Hot coronae around spiral galaxies: Probing the first principles of galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdán, Ákos; Forman, William; Volgelsberger, Mark; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Kraft, Ralph; Joes, Christine; Churazov, Eugene; Bourdin, Hervé

    2015-10-01

    The presence of hot gaseous coronae in the dark matter halos of massive spiral galaxies is a fundamental prediction of all structure formation models. Yet these coronae remained unexplored for several decades, thereby posing a serious challenge to observers and theorists. Although several X-ray coronae have been detected around nearby massive spiral galaxies in the past few years, we still lack a comprehensive picture. X-ray Surveyor will provide the much needed breakthrough. Specifically, X-ray Surveyor will characterize the hot coronae in unprecedented details, explore their evolution as a function of redshift, which in turn will constrain the physical processes that play an essential role in galaxy formation from the early Universe to the present epoch.

  9. Effects of spiral arms on star formation in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-09-01

    We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the effect of spiral arms on the star formation rate (SFR) in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies. We find that spiral arms can be an efficient means of gas transport from the outskirts to the central parts, provided that the arms are rotating slower than the bar. While the ring star formation in models with no arms or corotating arms is active only during around the bar growth phase, arm-driven gas accretion both significantly enhances and prolongs the ring star formation in models with slow-rotating arms. The arm-enhanced SFR is larger by a factor of ∼3-20 than in the no-arm model, with larger values corresponding to stronger and slower arms. Arm-induced mass inflows also make dust lanes stronger. Nuclear rings in slow-arm models are ∼45% larger than in the no-arm counterparts. Star clusters that form in a nuclear ring exhibit an age gradient in the azimuthal direction only when the SFR is small, whereas no notable age gradient is found in the radial direction for models with arm-induced star formation.

  10. Warp Characteristics of Spiral Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyun-Jin; Chung, A.; Kim, S. S.; Jozsa, G. I. G.; Yoon, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the warp characteristics of 22 spiral galaxies in the Virgo cluster based on their VLA HI datacubes with unprecedented precision. The tilted-ring modeling method is used to examine kinematic properties of the HI disks including the inclination and position angle. The main results are as follows. First, 17 out of the 19 (89.5 %) successfully-modeled galaxies exhibit either weak or strong warps, indicating that the warps are very common not only galaxies in isolation but ones in dense environments. Second, the warp strength decreases with increasing dynamical mass, supporting the notion that the warps are primarily controlled by dark matter halos. Last, the warp characteristics in our sample are distinct from those of isolated galaxies, in that the warps in our sample varies a great deal in inclination, but little in position angle. This implies that in dense environments, the main driver of the disk warps is most likely the galactic tidal interaction, rather than other explanations such as the cosmic infall scenario.

  11. HYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATIONS OF THE BARRED SPIRAL GALAXY NGC 1097

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lien-Hsuan; Wang, Hsiang-Hsu; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Taam, Ronald E.; Yang, Chao-Chin; Yen, David C. C.

    2013-07-01

    NGC 1097 is a nearby barred spiral galaxy believed to be interacting with the elliptical galaxy NGC 1097A located to its northwest. It hosts a Seyfert 1 nucleus surrounded by a circumnuclear starburst ring. Two straight dust lanes connected to the ring extend almost continuously out to the bar. The other ends of the dust lanes attach to two main spiral arms. To provide a physical understanding of its structural and kinematical properties, two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations have been carried out. Numerical calculations reveal that many features of the gas morphology and kinematics can be reproduced provided that the gas flow is governed by a gravitational potential associated with a slowly rotating strong bar. By including the self-gravity of the gas disk in our calculation, we have found the starburst ring to be gravitationally unstable, which is consistent with the observation in Hsieh et al. Our simulations show that the gas inflow rate is 0.17 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} into the region within the starburst ring even after its formation, leading to the coexistence of both a nuclear ring and a circumnuclear disk.

  12. Distribution of Spiral Galaxies in the Virgo and Fornax Clusters and Their Dynamic Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogoshvili, N. G.; Borchkhadze, T. M.; Kalloghlian, A. T.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamic characteristics of spiral galaxies with absolute magnitudes M ≥ -20m.6 in the Virgo and Fornax clusters are studied using data from the Merged Catalog of Galaxies MERCG. The galactic diameters from MERCG are used to determine the radius RD that defines the region of possible concentration of dark matter, and the dynamic parameters Mdyn and Mdyn/LB of the spiral galaxies are calculated based on the centrifugal equilibrium condition. Results from the theory of angular momentum transfer are used to estimate the central surface density m0 and angular momentum K of stars in these galaxies. A comparison of the dynamic parameters of the spiral galaxies with M ≥ -20.6 and M ≤ -20.6 reveals a statistically significant higher fraction of dark matter in the spiral galaxies with M ≤ -20.6, at 26.3% in Virgo and 27% in Fornax.

  13. Big Fish in Small Ponds: massive stars in the low-mass clusters of M83

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J. E.; Calzetti, D.; McElwee, Sean; Chandar, R.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Kim, Hwihyun; Krumholz, Mark R.; Lee, J. C.; Whitmore, B.; O'Connell, R. W. E-mail: callzetti@astro.umass.edu

    2014-09-20

    We have used multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 data of the starbursting spiral galaxy M83 in order to measure variations in the upper end of the stellar initial mass function (uIMF) using the production rate of ionizing photons in unresolved clusters with ages ≤ 8 Myr. As in earlier papers on M51 and NGC 4214, the uIMF in M83 is consistent with a universal IMF, and stochastic sampling of the stellar populations in the ∼<10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} clusters are responsible for any deviations in this universality. The ensemble cluster population, as well as individual clusters, also imply that the most massive star in a cluster does not depend on the cluster mass. In fact, we have found that these small clusters seem to have an over-abundance of ionizing photons when compared to an expected universal or truncated IMF. This also suggests that the presence of massive stars in these clusters does not affect the star formation in a destructive way.

  14. The nuclear region of the spiral galaxy M81.

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, N; Bietenholz, M F; Rupen, M P

    1995-01-01

    Very-long-baseline radio interferometry images of the nuclear region of the nearby spiral galaxy M81 reveal the most compact galactic core outside the Galaxy of which the size has been determined: 700 x 300 astronomical units (AU). The observations exclude a starburst or supernova interpretation for the core. Instead they favor an active galactic nucleus. There is evidence for a northeastern jet bent by approximately 35 degrees over a length scale from 700 to 4000 AU. The jet is, on average, directed toward an extended emission region, probably a radio lobe, about 1 kiloparsec (kpc) away from the core. A corresponding emission region was found in the southwest at a distance of only 30 pc from the core. The observed jet is extremely stable and likely to be associated with a steady-state channel. There is no detectable motion along the jet beyond the nominal value of -60 +/- 60 km.s-1. The level of activities in the core region of M81 is intermediate between that of SgrA* and that of powerful radio galaxies and quasars. Images Fig. 1 PMID:11607601

  15. New insights on the formation and assembly of M83 from deep near-infrared imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Dale, Daniel A.; Staudaher, Shawn; Bullock, James S.; Calzetti, Daniela; Chandar, Rupali; Dalcanton, Julianne J.

    2014-07-10

    We present results from new near-infrared (NIR) imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope that trace the low surface brightness features of the outer disk and stellar stream in the nearby spiral galaxy, M83. Previous observations have shown that M83 hosts a faint stellar stream to the northwest and a star-forming disk that extends to ∼3 times the optical radius (R{sub 25}). By combining the NIR imaging with archival far-ultraviolet (FUV) and H I imaging, we study the star formation history of the system. The NIR surface brightness profile has a break at ∼5.'8 (equivalent to 8.1 kpc and 0.9 R{sub 25}) with a shallower slope beyond this radius, which may result from the recent accretion of gas onto the outer disk and subsequent star formation. Additionally, the ratio of FUV to NIR flux increases with increasing radius in several arms throughout the extended star forming disk, indicating an increase in the ratio of the present to past star formation rate with increasing radius. This sort of inside-out disk formation is consistent with observations of gas infall onto the outer disk of M83. Finally, the flux, size, and shape of the stellar stream are measured and the origin of the stream is explored. The stream has a total NIR flux of 11.6 mJy, which implies a stellar mass of 1 × 10{sup 8} M{sub ☉} in an area subtending ∼80°. No FUV emission is detected in the stream at a level greater than the noise, confirming an intermediate-age or old stellar population in the stream.

  16. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISK OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Cote, Stephanie; Schade, David E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: David.Schade@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2012-09-20

    We combine new deep and wide field of view H{alpha} imaging of a sample of eight nearby (d Almost-Equal-To 17 Mpc) spiral galaxies with new and archival H I and CO imaging to study the star formation and the star formation regulation in the outer disk. We find that, in agreement with previous studies, star formation in the outer disk has low covering fractions, and star formation is typically organized into spiral arms. The star formation in the outer disk is at extremely low levels, with typical star formation rate surface densities of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We find that the ratio of the radial extent of detected H II regions to the radius of the H I disk is typically {approx}>85%. This implies that in order to further our understanding of the implications of extended star formation, we must further our understanding of the formation of extended H I disks. We measure the gravitational stability of the gas disk, and find that the outer gaseous disk is typically a factor of {approx}2 times more stable than the inner star-forming disk. We measure the surface density of outer disk H I arms, and find that the disk is closer to gravitational instability along these arms. Therefore, it seems that spiral arms are a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for star formation in the outer disk. We use an estimation of the flaring of the outer gas disk to illustrate the effect of flaring on the Schmidt power-law index; we find that including flaring increases the agreement between the power-law indices of the inner and outer disks.

  17. The Resolved Stellar Population in 50 Regions of M83 from HST/WFC3 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwihyun

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric study of ˜15,000 resolved stars in the nearby spiral galaxy M83 (D=4.61Mpc) based on Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) observations using four filters: F336W, F438W, F555W, and F814W. We select 50 regions in the spiral arm and inter-arm areas of M83, and determine the age distribution of the luminous stellar population in each region by combining its color-magnitude diagram (CMD) and color-color diagram with the stellar isochrones. To improve stellar age estimates from isochrone fitting on CMDs, we correct for extinction towards each individual star by comparing its colors with predictions from stellar isochrones. We compare the resulting ages of the 50 regions with those determined from several independent methods, including the number ratio of red-to-blue supergiants, the morphological appearance of the regions, and surface brightness fluctuations, and find fairly good agreement between these methods. We find that young stars are much more likely to be found in concentrated aggregates, while older stars are more dispersed. We also compare the typical ages of stars with those of the clusters within the 50 regions. These results are both consistent with a picture where stars form in star clusters and then disperse on short timescales to form the field population. The locations of Wolf-Rayet star candidates are found to correlate with the positions of many of the youngest regions, providing additional support for our ability to accurately estimate ages. This work is based on Early Release Science observations made by the WFC3 Scientific Oversight Committee. We are grateful to the Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute for awarding Director's Discretionary time for this program.

  18. Gas velocity patterns in simulated galaxies: observational diagnostics of spiral structure theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, J.; Morokuma-Matsui, K.; Miyamoto, Y.; Egusa, F.; Kuno, N.

    2016-08-01

    There are two theories of stellar spiral arms in isolated disc galaxies that model stellar spiral arms with different longevities: quasi-stationary density wave theory, which characterizes spirals as rigidly rotating, long-lived patterns (i.e. steady spirals), and dynamic spiral theory, which characterizes spirals as differentially rotating, transient, recurrent patterns (i.e. dynamic spirals). In order to discriminate between these two spiral models observationally, we investigated the differences between the gas velocity patterns predicted by these two spiral models in hydrodynamic simulations. We found that the azimuthal phases of the velocity patterns relative to the gas density peaks (i.e. gaseous arms) differ between the two models, as do the gas flows; nevertheless, the velocity patterns themselves are similar for both models. Such similarity suggests that the mere existence of streaming motions does not conclusively confirm the steady spiral model. However, we found that the steady spiral model shows that the gaseous arms have radial streaming motions well inside the co-rotation radius, whereas the dynamic spiral model predicts that the gaseous arms tend to have tangential streaming motions. These differences suggest that the gas velocity patterns around spiral arms will enable distinction between the spiral theories.

  19. Gas velocity patterns in simulated galaxies: Observational diagnostics of spiral structure theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, J.; Morokuma-Matsui, K.; Miyamoto, Y.; Egusa, F.; Kuno, N.

    2016-04-01

    There are two theories of stellar spiral arms in isolated disc galaxies that model stellar spiral arms with different longevities: quasi-stationary density wave theory, which characterises spirals as rigidly rotating, long-lived patterns (i.e. steady spirals), and dynamic spiral theory, which characterises spirals as differentially rotating, transient, recurrent patterns (i.e. dynamic spirals). In order to discriminate between these two spiral models observationally, we investigated the differences between the gas velocity patterns predicted by these two spiral models in hydrodynamic simulations. We found that the azimuthal phases of the velocity patterns relative to the gas density peaks (i.e. gaseous arms) differ between the two models, as do the gas flows; nevertheless, the velocity patterns themselves are similar for both models. Such similarity suggests that the mere existence of streaming motions does not conclusively confirm the steady spiral model. However, we found that the steady spiral model shows that the gaseous arms have radial streaming motions well inside the co-rotation radius, whereas the dynamic spiral model predicts that the gaseous arms tend to have tangential streaming motions. These differences suggest that the gas velocity patterns around spiral arms will enable distinction between the spiral theories.

  20. The co-evolution of spiral structure and mass distribution in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seigar, Marc

    2005-07-01

    We propose to use a new diagnostic tool to study the mass buildup in disk galaxies as a function of look-back time out to z 1. The tight correlation between spiral arm pitch angle and rotation curve shear rate {Seigar et al. 2005} demonstrates that the tightness of spiral structure in disk galaxies depends on the central mass concentration {including dark matter}, as this determines the shear rate. Galaxies with high central mass concentration have a higher shear rate and more tightly wound spiral structure than those with low mass concentration. As a result, the evolution of spiral structure over time can be used to search for evolution in the mass distribution in spiral galaxies. The main goal of this project is to determine evolution in the mass distribution of disk galaxies, using spiral arm pitch angles as a quanitative indicator. In order to do this we will use nearly face-on disk galaxies with measurable spiral structure, observed in the GOODS fields.

  1. A statistical analysis of the Einstein normal galaxy sample. I - Spiral and irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Trinchieri, G.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a statistical analysis of 48 spiral and irregular galaxies observed with the Einstein Observatory are reported. It is found that the X-ray luminosity is not directly correlated with the mass of the galaxies, but is strongly correlated with the blue luminosity. This suggests that most X-ray sources, including low-mass binaries, are binary systems belonging to both old disk and young arm Population I components. A real bulge population of X-ray sources exists that can contribute significantly to the X-ray luminosity of early-type spirals. The X-ray emission from a sample of 29 relatively isolated, normal elliptical and S0 galaxies is also studied, and the results are compared to those for the above sample to investigate the origin of the X-ray emission in early-type galaxies and the possible emission mechanisms. The influence of a powerful radio source and the onset of nuclear activity are also examined.

  2. Numerical simulations of spiral galaxy formation and recoiling black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, Javiera M.

    expected to be common. Part 2 is dedicated to the formation of massive disk galaxies through N-body + SPH simulations. There, I describe the properties of Eris, the highest resolution cosmological simulation to date of the formation of a Milky Way-like galaxy from z = 90 to z = 0. Eris appears to solve the long-standing problems of mass concentration, which traditionally lead to the formation galaxies with large spheroidal components and small disks. A combination of high-resolution and high star formation threshold was the key to the success of Eris, because stars are only allowed to form at the highest density peaks and therefore feedback is more efficient in removing preferentially low angular momentum gas. Previous simulations tended to over-produce stars in low-density regions, where feedback is ineffective. Eris is in agreement with the Tully-Fischer, and M* - Mhalo relations, matches the observed surface brightness breaks in nearby spirals, is consistent with Sigma SFR - SigmaHI observations in spirals, and agrees with constraints on the hot gas mass abundance in the Galaxy. In addition, Eris' baryon fraction is 30% lower than the universal value, due to star formation driven outflows.

  3. Spiral Galaxy Mass Models and the Distance Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palunas, P.; Williams, T. B.

    1993-12-01

    We present mass models for a sample of Freeman Type I spiral galaxies taken from the southern sky Fabry-Perot Tully-Fisher survey(Schommer \\etal 1993, Bothun \\etal 1992). We fit two component, bulge and disk, photometric models directly to I- and R-band images. The bulge model is a series expansion of Gaussians (a Gabor expansion): each Gaussian in the series has a common center, ellipticity and position angle. The position angle is fixed to be the same as that of the disk. We have found that a deVaucouleurs law does not give a good fit to the bulges of many disk galaxies. The disk model is an exponential with the same center as the bulge. Small-scale radial structure is included in the disk mass model by azimuthally averaging the residuals of the analytic fit in annuli with the same ellipticity and position angle of the disk. Fitting to the full 2-d images helps constrain the disk-bulge deconvolution by using the information in the different ellipticities well as the different radial profiles of the disk and bulge. The photometric model is fitted to the rotation curve assuming a maximum disk and constant mass-to-light ratios for disk and bulge components. The small scale structure in the photometric models is found to reproduce the structure in the rotation curve in many galaxies. We find approximately 15 percent rms scatter in the I-band mass-to-light ratios, as well as correlations to the detailed properties of the kinematics indicating that mass-to-light ratios may be useful in reducing the scatter in the Tully-Fisher relation. Bothun, G.D., Schommer, R.A., Williams, T.B., Mould J.R., Huchra, J.P. 1992, Ap.J., 388, 253. Schommer, R.A., Bothun, G.D., Williams, T.B., Mould J.R. 1993, A.J., 105, 97.

  4. Gravitational torques in spiral galaxies: Gas accretion as a driving mechanism of galactic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, D. L.; Bournaud, F.; Combes, F.; Puerari, I.; Buta, R.

    2002-11-01

    The distribution of gravitational torques and bar strengths in the local Universe is derived from a detailed study of 163 galaxies observed in the near-infrared. The results are compared with numerical models for spiral galaxy evolution. It is found that the observed distribution of torques can be accounted for only with external accretion of gas onto spiral disks. Accretion is responsible for bar renewal - after the dissolution of primordial bars - as well as the maintenance of spiral structures. Models of isolated, non-accreting galaxies are ruled out. Moderate accretion rates do not explain the observational results: it is shown that galactic disks should double their mass in less than the Hubble time. The best fit is obtained if spiral galaxies are open systems, still forming today by continuous gas accretion, doubling their mass every 10 billion years.

  5. Spectrophotometry of H II regions in the spiral galaxy M101

    PubMed Central

    Sedwick, K. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    Spectral line intensity data are presented for ionized hydrogen regions in the giant spiral galaxy M101. The influence of interstellar extinction is assessed and electron temperatures of the gas clouds are derived. Images PMID:16592999

  6. STELLAR ORBITAL STUDIES IN NORMAL SPIRAL GALAXIES. I. RESTRICTIONS TO THE PITCH ANGLE

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Villegas, A.; Pichardo, B.; Moreno, E.

    2013-08-01

    We built a family of non-axisymmetric potential models for normal non-barred or weakly barred spiral galaxies as defined in the simplest classification of galaxies: the Hubble sequence. For this purpose, a three-dimensional self-gravitating model for the spiral arm PERLAS is superimposed on the galactic axisymmetric potentials. We analyze the stellar dynamics varying only the pitch angle of the spiral arms, from 4 Degree-Sign to 40 Degree-Sign for an Sa galaxy, from 8 Degree-Sign to 45 Degree-Sign for an Sb galaxy, and from 10 Degree-Sign to 60 Degree-Sign for an Sc galaxy. Self-consistency is indirectly tested through periodic orbital analysis and through density response studies for each morphological type. Based on ordered behavior, periodic orbit studies show that, for pitch angles up to approximately 15 Degree-Sign , 18 Degree-Sign , and 20 Degree-Sign for Sa, Sb, and Sc galaxies, respectively, the density response supports the spiral arms' potential, a requisite for the existence of a long-lasting large-scale spiral structure. Beyond those limits, the density response tends to ''avoid'' the potential imposed by maintaining lower pitch angles in the density response; in that case, the spiral arms may be explained as transient features rather than long-lasting large-scale structures. In a second limit, from a phase-space orbital study based on chaotic behavior, we found that for pitch angles larger than {approx}30 Degree-Sign , {approx}40 Degree-Sign , and {approx}50 Degree-Sign for Sa, Sb, and Sc galaxies, respectively, chaotic orbits dominate the all phase-space prograde region that surrounds the periodic orbits sculpting the spiral arms and even destroying them. This result seems to be in good agreement with observations of pitch angles in typical isolated normal spiral galaxies.

  7. Stellar Orbital Studies in Normal Spiral Galaxies. I. Restrictions to the Pitch Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Villegas, A.; Pichardo, B.; Moreno, E.

    2013-08-01

    We built a family of non-axisymmetric potential models for normal non-barred or weakly barred spiral galaxies as defined in the simplest classification of galaxies: the Hubble sequence. For this purpose, a three-dimensional self-gravitating model for the spiral arm PERLAS is superimposed on the galactic axisymmetric potentials. We analyze the stellar dynamics varying only the pitch angle of the spiral arms, from 4° to 40° for an Sa galaxy, from 8° to 45° for an Sb galaxy, and from 10° to 60° for an Sc galaxy. Self-consistency is indirectly tested through periodic orbital analysis and through density response studies for each morphological type. Based on ordered behavior, periodic orbit studies show that, for pitch angles up to approximately 15°, 18°, and 20° for Sa, Sb, and Sc galaxies, respectively, the density response supports the spiral arms' potential, a requisite for the existence of a long-lasting large-scale spiral structure. Beyond those limits, the density response tends to "avoid" the potential imposed by maintaining lower pitch angles in the density response; in that case, the spiral arms may be explained as transient features rather than long-lasting large-scale structures. In a second limit, from a phase-space orbital study based on chaotic behavior, we found that for pitch angles larger than ~30°, ~40°, and ~50° for Sa, Sb, and Sc galaxies, respectively, chaotic orbits dominate the all phase-space prograde region that surrounds the periodic orbits sculpting the spiral arms and even destroying them. This result seems to be in good agreement with observations of pitch angles in typical isolated normal spiral galaxies.

  8. A Newly Recognized Very Young Supernova Remnant in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Kim, Hwihyun; Soria, Roberto; Kuntz, K. D.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Dopita, Michael A.; Stockdale, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    As part of a spectroscopic survey of supernova remnant candidates in M83 using the Gemini-South telescope and GMOS, we have discovered one object whose spectrum shows very broad lines at Halpha, [O I] 6300, and [O III] 5007, similar to those from other objects classified as `late time supernovae.' Although six historical supernovae have been observed in M83 since 1923, none were seen at the location of this object. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images show a nearly unresolved emission source, while Chandra and ATCA data reveal a bright X-ray source and nonthermal radio source at the position. Objects in other galaxies showing similar spectra are only decades post-supernova, which raises the possibility that the supernova that created this object occurred during the last century but was not observed. Using photometry of nearby stars from the HST data, we suggest the precursor was at least 17 M(sun), and the presence of broad Halpha in the spectrum makes a type II supernova likely. The supernova must predate the 1983 VLA radio detection of the object. We suggest examination of archival images of M83 to search for evidence of the supernova event that gave rise to this object, and thus provide a precise time since the explosion.We acknowledge STScI grants under the umbrella program ID GO-12513 to Johns Hopkins University, STScI, and Middlebury College. PFW acknowledges additional support from the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0908566.

  9. SpArcFiRe: Scalable automated detection of spiral galaxy arm segments

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Darren R.; Hayes, Wayne B. E-mail: whayes@uci.edu

    2014-08-01

    Given an approximately centered image of a spiral galaxy, we describe an entirely automated method that finds, centers, and sizes the galaxy (possibly masking nearby stars and other objects if necessary in order to isolate the galaxy itself) and then automatically extracts structural information about the spiral arms. For each arm segment found, we list the pixels in that segment, allowing image analysis on a per-arm-segment basis. We also perform a least-squares fit of a logarithmic spiral arc to the pixels in that segment, giving per-arc parameters, such as the pitch angle, arm segment length, location, etc. The algorithm takes about one minute per galaxies, and can easily be scaled using parallelism. We have run it on all ∼644,000 Sloan objects that are larger than 40 pixels across and classified as 'galaxies'. We find a very good correlation between our quantitative description of a spiral structure and the qualitative description provided by Galaxy Zoo humans. Our objective, quantitative measures of structure demonstrate the difficulty in defining exactly what constitutes a spiral 'arm', leading us to prefer the term 'arm segment'. We find that pitch angle often varies significantly segment-to-segment in a single spiral galaxy, making it difficult to define the pitch angle for a single galaxy. We demonstrate how our new database of arm segments can be queried to find galaxies satisfying specific quantitative visual criteria. For example, even though our code does not explicitly find rings, a good surrogate is to look for galaxies having one long, low-pitch-angle arm—which is how our code views ring galaxies. SpArcFiRe is available at http://sparcfire.ics.uci.edu.

  10. SpArcFiRe: Scalable Automated Detection of Spiral Galaxy Arm Segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Darren R.; Hayes, Wayne B.

    2014-08-01

    Given an approximately centered image of a spiral galaxy, we describe an entirely automated method that finds, centers, and sizes the galaxy (possibly masking nearby stars and other objects if necessary in order to isolate the galaxy itself) and then automatically extracts structural information about the spiral arms. For each arm segment found, we list the pixels in that segment, allowing image analysis on a per-arm-segment basis. We also perform a least-squares fit of a logarithmic spiral arc to the pixels in that segment, giving per-arc parameters, such as the pitch angle, arm segment length, location, etc. The algorithm takes about one minute per galaxies, and can easily be scaled using parallelism. We have run it on all ~644,000 Sloan objects that are larger than 40 pixels across and classified as "galaxies." We find a very good correlation between our quantitative description of a spiral structure and the qualitative description provided by Galaxy Zoo humans. Our objective, quantitative measures of structure demonstrate the difficulty in defining exactly what constitutes a spiral "arm," leading us to prefer the term "arm segment." We find that pitch angle often varies significantly segment-to-segment in a single spiral galaxy, making it difficult to define the pitch angle for a single galaxy. We demonstrate how our new database of arm segments can be queried to find galaxies satisfying specific quantitative visual criteria. For example, even though our code does not explicitly find rings, a good surrogate is to look for galaxies having one long, low-pitch-angle arm—which is how our code views ring galaxies. SpArcFiRe is available at http://sparcfire.ics.uci.edu.

  11. The Resolved Stellar Population in 50 Regions of M83 from HST/WFC3 Early Release Science Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hwihyun; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Chandar, Rupali; Saha, Abhijit; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Mutchler, Max; Cohen, Seth H.; Calzetti, Daniela; O’Connell, Robert W.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E.; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Paresce, Francesco; Silk, Joe I; Trauger, John T.; Walker, Alistair R.; Young, Erick T.

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric study of approximately 15,000 resolved stars in the nearby spiral galaxy M83 (NGC 5236, D = 4.61 Mpc) based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 observations using four filters: F336W, F438W, F555W, and F814W. We select 50 regions (an average size of 260 pc by 280 pc) in the spiral arm and inter-arm areas of M83 and determine the age distribution of the luminous stellar populations in each region. This is accomplished by correcting for extinction toward each individual star by comparing its colors with predictions from stellar isochrones.We compare the resulting luminosity-weighted mean ages of the luminous stars in the 50 regions with those determined from several independent methods, including the number ratio of red-to-blue supergiants, morphological appearance of the regions, surface brightness fluctuations, and the ages of clusters in the regions. We find reasonably good agreement between these methods. We also find that young stars are much more likely to be found in concentrated aggregates along spiral arms, while older stars are more dispersed. These results are consistent with the scenario that star formation is associated with the spiral arms, and stars form primarily in star clusters and then disperse on short timescales to form the field population. The locations ofWolf-Rayet stars are found to correlate with the positions of many of the youngest regions, providing additional support for our ability to accurately estimate ages. We address the effects of spatial resolution on the measured colors, magnitudes, and age estimates. While individual stars can occasionally show measurable differences in the colors and magnitudes, the age estimates for entire regions are only slightly affected.

  12. The Resolved Stellar Population in 50 Regions of M83 from HST/WFC3 Early Release Science Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwihyun; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Chandar, Rupali; Saha, Abhijit; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Mutchler, Max; Cohen, Seth H.; Calzetti, Daniela; O'Connell, Robert W.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E.; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Paresce, Francesco; Silk, Joe I.; Trauger, John T.; Walker, Alistair R.; Young, Erick T.

    2012-07-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric study of ~15,000 resolved stars in the nearby spiral galaxy M83 (NGC 5236, D = 4.61 Mpc) based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 observations using four filters: F336W, F438W, F555W, and F814W. We select 50 regions (an average size of 260 pc by 280 pc) in the spiral arm and inter-arm areas of M83 and determine the age distribution of the luminous stellar populations in each region. This is accomplished by correcting for extinction toward each individual star by comparing its colors with predictions from stellar isochrones. We compare the resulting luminosity-weighted mean ages of the luminous stars in the 50 regions with those determined from several independent methods, including the number ratio of red-to-blue supergiants, morphological appearance of the regions, surface brightness fluctuations, and the ages of clusters in the regions. We find reasonably good agreement between these methods. We also find that young stars are much more likely to be found in concentrated aggregates along spiral arms, while older stars are more dispersed. These results are consistent with the scenario that star formation is associated with the spiral arms, and stars form primarily in star clusters and then disperse on short timescales to form the field population. The locations of Wolf-Rayet stars are found to correlate with the positions of many of the youngest regions, providing additional support for our ability to accurately estimate ages. We address the effects of spatial resolution on the measured colors, magnitudes, and age estimates. While individual stars can occasionally show measurable differences in the colors and magnitudes, the age estimates for entire regions are only slightly affected.

  13. THE RESOLVED STELLAR POPULATION IN 50 REGIONS OF M83 FROM HST/WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hwihyun; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Mutchler, Max; Bond, Howard E.; Chandar, Rupali; Saha, Abhijit; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Calzetti, Daniela; O'Connell, Robert W.; Balick, Bruce; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; and others

    2012-07-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric study of {approx}15,000 resolved stars in the nearby spiral galaxy M83 (NGC 5236, D = 4.61 Mpc) based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 observations using four filters: F336W, F438W, F555W, and F814W. We select 50 regions (an average size of 260 pc by 280 pc) in the spiral arm and inter-arm areas of M83 and determine the age distribution of the luminous stellar populations in each region. This is accomplished by correcting for extinction toward each individual star by comparing its colors with predictions from stellar isochrones. We compare the resulting luminosity-weighted mean ages of the luminous stars in the 50 regions with those determined from several independent methods, including the number ratio of red-to-blue supergiants, morphological appearance of the regions, surface brightness fluctuations, and the ages of clusters in the regions. We find reasonably good agreement between these methods. We also find that young stars are much more likely to be found in concentrated aggregates along spiral arms, while older stars are more dispersed. These results are consistent with the scenario that star formation is associated with the spiral arms, and stars form primarily in star clusters and then disperse on short timescales to form the field population. The locations of Wolf-Rayet stars are found to correlate with the positions of many of the youngest regions, providing additional support for our ability to accurately estimate ages. We address the effects of spatial resolution on the measured colors, magnitudes, and age estimates. While individual stars can occasionally show measurable differences in the colors and magnitudes, the age estimates for entire regions are only slightly affected.

  14. Kinematics of the nuclear region of M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, I.; Díaz, R. J.; Dottori, H.; Mediavilla, E.; Agüero, M. P.; Mast, D.

    2006-06-01

    The enormous energy output detected in many cores of galaxies is one of the key issues in the studies of galaxies and their evolution, notwithstanding several questions remain unsolved: Are accretion onto super-massive black holes and violent star formation just coevolving phenomena or necessary partners of the activity? How is the detailed physics of the mechanisms triggering the nuclear extended violent star formation? Which is the relationship of the triggering mechanisms with galaxy evolution? The main drawback to face these issues is that developed stages of large star formation events at galactic centres do not provide enough clues about their origin, since the morphological signatures of the triggering mechanism are smeared out in the time scale of a few orbital revolutions of the galaxy core. Here we present the onset of such an event undergone by M83, a galaxy nearby enough to allow detailed spatial cinematic and morphological studies. High resolution 3D near-IR spectroscopy sugests the capture of a satellite galaxy, whose spur left behind a giant nuclear arc of violent star formation. The age gradient within the arc supports that this structure traces the orbital path of the intruder. Our numerical modelling indicates that the two nuclei would coalesce in less than 50 Myr.

  15. A MOLECULAR SPIRAL ARM IN THE FAR OUTER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Dame, T. M.; Thaddeus, P. E-mail: pthaddeus@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-06-10

    We have identified a spiral arm lying beyond the Outer Arm in the first Galactic quadrant {approx}15 kpc from the Galactic center. After tracing the arm in existing 21 cm surveys, we searched for molecular gas using the CfA 1.2 m telescope and detected CO at 10 of 220 positions. The detections are distributed along the arm from l = 13{sup 0}, v = -21 km s{sup -1} to l = 55{sup 0}, v = -84 km s{sup -1} and coincide with most of the main H I concentrations. One of the detections was fully mapped to reveal a large molecular cloud with a radius of 47 pc and a molecular mass of {approx}50,000 M{sub sun}. At a mean distance of 21 kpc, the molecular gas in this arm is the most distant yet detected in the Milky Way. The new arm appears to be the continuation of the Scutum-Centaurus Arm in the outer Galaxy, as a symmetric counterpart of the nearby Perseus Arm.

  16. Spiral Galaxy Central Bulge Tangential Speed of Revolution Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taff, Laurence

    2013-03-01

    The objective was to, for the first time in a century, scientifically analyze the ``rotation curves'' (sic) of the central bulges of scores of spiral galaxies. I commenced with a methodological, rational, geometrical, arithmetic, and statistical examination--none of them carried through before--of the radial velocity data. The requirement for such a thorough treatment is the paucity of data typically available for the central bulge: fewer than 10 observations and frequently only five. The most must be made of these. A consequence of this logical handling is the discovery of a unique model for the central bulge volume mass density resting on the positive slope, linear, rise of its tangential speed of revolution curve and hence--for the first time--a reliable mass estimate. The deduction comes from a known physics-based, mathematically valid, derivation (not assertion). It rests on the full (not partial) equations of motion plus Poisson's equation. Following that is a prediction for the gravitational potential energy and thence the gravitational force. From this comes a forecast for the tangential speed of revolution curve. It was analyzed in a fashion identical to that of the data thereby closing the circle and demonstrating internal self-consistency. This is a hallmark of a scientific method-informed approach to an experimental problem. Multiple plots of the relevant quantities and measures of goodness of fit will be shown. Astronomy related

  17. Scaling Relations in Dissipationless Spiral-Like Galaxy Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceves, H.; Velázquez, H.; Cruz, F.

    2009-06-01

    We determine both representations of the Fundamental Plane [FP; R e vprop σ a 0langIrang-b e and R e vprop (σ2 0langIrang-1 e)λ] and the luminosity-effective phase-space density (L vprop f -γ e ) scaling relation for N-body remnants of binary mergers of spiral-like galaxies. The main set of merger simulations involves a mass ratio of the progenitors in the range of about 1:1 to 1:5, harboring or not a bulge-like component, and are constructed using a cosmological motivated model. Equal-mass mergers are also considered. Remnants lead to average values for the scaling indices of langarang ≈ 1.6, langbrang ≈ 0.6, langλrang ≈ 0.7, and langγrang ≈ 0.65. These values are consistent with those of K-band observations of ellipticals: langarang ≈ 1.5, langbrang ≈ 0.8, langλrang ≈ 0.7, and langγrang ≈ 0.60. The b index is, however, not well reproduced. This study does not allow us to establish a conclusive preference for models with or without a bulge as progenitors. Our results indicate that the L-f e and FP scalings might be determined to a large extent by dissipationless processes, a result that appears to be in contradiction to other dissipationless results.

  18. The Effect of the Transformation of Spiral Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster on Broadband Color Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowl, Hugh H.; Chung, A.; Blanton, M. R.; Kenney, J. D. P.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Schiminovich, D.

    2009-01-01

    Galaxy evolution and the effect of environment on that evolution is one of the central questions of modern extragalactic astronomy. The nearby Virgo Cluster provides us with an ideal laboratory to study galaxy-galaxy and galaxy-cluster interactions at a level of detail impossible at higher redshift. In detailed, pan-chromatic surveys of Virgo, we have seen galaxies transformed by their interaction with the intra-cluster medium, with star-forming gas stripped from spiral galaxies. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we present the results of a study of the global broadband optical properties of 44 Virgo Cluster spiral galaxies from the VIVA galaxy survey. These results show that spiral galaxies actively being stripped maintain blue colors while stripping is ongoing. However, a comparison between the colors of stripped spirals and their HI content suggests that more completely stripped galaxies are, indeed, redder than those that are only modestly HI deficient. This suggests that, as galaxies become more completely stripped, their global colors become redder and that in a cluster more massive than Virgo, such stripping could effectively transform galaxies from blue to red. By comparing broadband colors to the stripping timescales derived from optical spectroscopy and stellar population synthesis, we determine that the broadband color evolution is complex, with dust and the age of the stellar population both playing a role. By comparing detailed studies of a nearby cluster with statistical results from the much larger SDSS sample, we are able to gain insights into the details of how environmentally-driven galaxy evolution affects global broadband colors.

  19. Spirality: Spiral arm pitch angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Pfountz, Casey; Davis, Benjamin L.; Hartley, Matthew; Pour Imani, Hamed; Slade, Zac; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Spirality measures spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. Written in MATLAB, the code package also includes GenSpiral, which produces FITS images of synthetic spirals, and SpiralArmCount, which uses a one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform to count the spiral arms of a galaxy after its pitch is determined.

  20. Galactic Scale Flows and the Triggering of Star Formation in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramón-Fox, F. G.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    Galactic scale gas flows feed the growth of molecular clouds where stars form in high-density cores. Large scale flows also play a role in injecting the energy that drives the internal dynamics of these clouds, which affects their overall stability and star formation activity. The triggering of star formation involves a connection between large and small-scale dynamical processes in galaxies, which can be explored using high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations. We present results of current work in high-resolution N-body and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations of a model spiral galaxy with a realistic spiral arm morphology. These simulations allow to study gas flows in a self-consistent galaxy and their role on molecular cloud formation and growth. They also provide a ground for studying molecular cloud properties in different environments of a galaxy, the effects of spiral arms on large scale flows and for understanding global star formation relations.

  1. Dependence of Nebular Heavy-element Abundance on H I Content for Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Paul; Shields, Gregory A.; Davé, Romeel; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Wright, Audrey

    2013-08-01

    We analyze the galactic H I content and nebular log (O/H) for 60 spiral galaxies in the Moustakas et al. (2006a) spectral catalog. After correcting for the mass-metallicity relationship, we show that the spirals in cluster environments show a positive correlation for log (O/H) on DEF, the galactic H I deficiency parameter, extending the results of previous analyses of the Virgo and Pegasus I clusters. Additionally, we show for the first time that galaxies in the field obey a similar dependence. The observed relationship between H I deficiency and galactic metallicity resembles similar trends shown by cosmological simulations of galaxy formation including inflows and outflows. These results indicate the previously observed metallicity-DEF correlation has a more universal interpretation than simply a cluster's effects on its member galaxies. Rather, we observe in all environments the stochastic effects of metal-poor infall as minor mergers and accretion help to build giant spirals.

  2. DEPENDENCE OF NEBULAR HEAVY-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE ON H I CONTENT FOR SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Paul; Shields, Gregory A.; Wright, Audrey; Dave, Romeel; Blanc, Guillermo A.

    2013-08-10

    We analyze the galactic H I content and nebular log (O/H) for 60 spiral galaxies in the Moustakas et al. (2006a) spectral catalog. After correcting for the mass-metallicity relationship, we show that the spirals in cluster environments show a positive correlation for log (O/H) on DEF, the galactic H I deficiency parameter, extending the results of previous analyses of the Virgo and Pegasus I clusters. Additionally, we show for the first time that galaxies in the field obey a similar dependence. The observed relationship between H I deficiency and galactic metallicity resembles similar trends shown by cosmological simulations of galaxy formation including inflows and outflows. These results indicate the previously observed metallicity-DEF correlation has a more universal interpretation than simply a cluster's effects on its member galaxies. Rather, we observe in all environments the stochastic effects of metal-poor infall as minor mergers and accretion help to build giant spirals.

  3. Statistics of young starforming complexes in spiral galaxies using NIR photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosbøl, P.; Dottori, H.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: Very young stellar clusters and cluster complexes may be embedded in dust lanes along spiral arms in disk galaxies and escape detection in visual bands. Observations in the near-infrared K-band offer an almost unbiased view of such clusters or complexes due to the small attenuation by dust at this wavelength. The objective is to determine their population size, absolute K-band magnitude distribution above the limiting magnitude imposed by the data, and location relative to the spiral pattern in disk galaxies. Methods: All slightly extended sources were identified on deep K-band maps of 46 spiral galaxies reaching at least K=20.3 mag arcsec-2 at a signal-to-noise level of 3. The galaxies had inclination angles <65° and linear resolutions <100 pc with seeing better than 1 arcsec. The sample includes both barred and normal spirals with a wide spread in types. We also analyzed J- and H-band colors for 4 galaxies for which such images were available. An apparent magnitude limit of K = 19 mag was used for the sources analyzed in order to avoid marginal detections. Furthermore, we derived the source distributions of magnitudes and relative locations with respect to the spiral patterns. Results: Almost 70% (15/22) of the grand-design spiral galaxies show significant concentration of bright K-band knots in their arm regions corresponding to 30% (15/46) of the full sample. Color-color diagrams for the 4 spirals with JHK photometry suggest that a significant fraction of the diffuse sources found in the arms are complexes of young stellar clusters with ages <10 Myr and reddened with several magnitudes of visual extinction. The brightest knots reach an absolute K-band magnitude MK of -15.5 mag corresponding to stellar clusters or complexes with total masses up to at least 105 M⊙. Brightest magnitude and number of knots correlate with the total absolute magnitude of the host galaxy. More knots are seen in galaxies with high far-infrared flux and strong two-armed spiral

  4. Structure and Dynamics of Normal Spiral Galaxies: Stellar Orbital Order and Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Villegas, Maria de Los Angeles; Pichardo, B.

    2013-01-01

    We built a family of non-axisymmetric potential models for normal spiral galaxies as defined in the simplest classification of galaxies: the Hubble sequence. For this purpose a three-dimensional self-gravitating model for spiral arms (PERLAS) is superimposed to galactic axisymmetric potentials. We analyze the orbital dynamics as a function of pitch angle, ranging from 4° to 40°, for an Sa galaxy, from 8° to 45°, for an Sb galaxy, and from 10° to 60°, for an Sc galaxy. Self-consistency is indirectly tested through periodic orbital analysis, and through density response studies for each morphological type. Based on ordered behavior, periodic orbits studies show that for pitch angles up to approximately 15°, 18°, and 20° for Sa, Sb and Sc galaxies, respectively, the density response closely supports the imposed potential likely allowing the existence of a long-lasting spiral structure. Beyond those limits, the density response tends to ``avoid'' the potential imposed by keeping smaller pitch angles in the density response, in these cases the spiral arms could not be explained as long-lasting structures, but they would rather be explained as transient features. On the other hand, from an extensive orbital study in phase space based on chaotic behavior, we also find that for Sa galaxies with pitch angles lager than ˜30°, for Sb galaxies with pitch angles lager than ˜40°, and for Sc galaxies with pitch angles larger than ˜50°, chaos becomes pervasive, destroying the ordered phase space prograde region surrounding the main periodic orbits and even destroying them. This result seems to be in good agreement with observations of pitch angles in typical isolated normal spiral galaxies.

  5. Herschel-ATLAS/GAMA: dusty early-type galaxies and passive spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, K.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S.; Bourne, N.; Gomez, H. L.; Kaviraj, S.; Bamford, S. P.; Brough, S.; Charlot, S.; da Cunha, E.; Driver, S. P.; Eales, S. A.; Hopkins, A. M.; Kelvin, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Sansom, A. E.; Sharp, R.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; van der Werf, P.; Baes, M.; Cava, A.; Cooray, A.; Croom, S. M.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Fritz, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Madore, B.; Norberg, P.; Popescu, C. C.; Rigby, E. E.; Robotham, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Seibert, M.; Tuffs, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the dust properties and star formation histories of local submillimetre-selected galaxies, classified by optical morphology. Most of the galaxies are late types and very few are early types. The early-type galaxies (ETGs) that are detected contain as much dust as typical spirals, and form a unique sample that has been blindly selected at submillimetre wavelengths. Additionally, we investigate the properties of the most passive, dusty spirals. We morphologically classify 1087 galaxies detected in the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) Science Demonstration Phase data. Comparing to a control sample of optically selected galaxies, we find 5.5 per cent of luminous ETGs are detected in H-ATLAS. The H-ATLAS ETGs contain a significant mass of cold dust: the mean dust mass is 5.5 × 107 M⊙, with individual galaxies ranging from 9 × 105 to 4 × 108 M⊙. This is comparable to that of spiral galaxies in our sample, and is an order of magnitude more dust than that found for the control early-types, which have a median dust mass inferred from stacking of (0.8-4.0) × 106 M⊙ for a cold dust temperature of 25-15 K. The early-types detected in H-ATLAS tend to have bluer NUV - r colours, higher specific star formation rates and younger stellar populations than early-types which are optically selected, and may be transitioning from the blue cloud to the red sequence. We also find that H-ATLAS and control early-types inhabit similar low-density environments. We investigate whether the observed dust in H-ATLAS early-types is from evolved stars, or has been acquired from external sources through interactions and mergers. We conclude that the dust in H-ATLAS and control ETGs cannot be solely from stellar sources, and a large contribution from dust formed in the interstellar medium or external sources is required. Alternatively, dust destruction may not be as efficient as predicted. We also explore the properties of the most passive spiral

  6. A spiral galaxy's mass distribution uncovered through lensing and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trick, Wilma H.; van de Ven, Glenn; Dutton, Aaron A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the matter distribution of a spiral galaxy with a counter-rotating stellar core, SDSS J1331+3628 (J1331), independently with gravitational lensing and stellar dynamical modelling. By fitting a gravitational potential model to a quadruplet of lensing images around J1331's bulge, we tightly constrain the mass inside the Einstein radius Rein = (0.91 ± 0.02)″( ≃ 1.83 ± 0.04~kpc) to within 4%: Mein = (7.8 ± 0.3) × 1010M⊙. We model observed long-slit major axis stellar kinematics in J1331's central regions by finding Multi-Gaussian Expansion (MGE) models for the stellar and dark matter distribution that solve the axisymmetric Jeans equations. The lens and dynamical model are independently derived, but in very good agreement with each other around ˜Rein. We find that J1331's center requires a steep total mass-to-light ratio gradient. A dynamical model including a NFW halo (with virial velocity v200 ≃ 240 ± 40~kms-1 and concentration c200 ≃ 8 ± 2) and moderate tangential velocity anisotropy (βz ≃ -0.4 ± 0.1) can reproduce the signatures of J1331's counter-rotating core and predict the stellar and gas rotation curve at larger radii. However, our models do not agree with the observed velocity dispersion at large radii. We speculate that the reason could be a non-trivial change in structure and kinematics due to a possible merger event in J1331's recent past.

  7. Supernovae and their host galaxies - IV. The distribution of supernovae relative to spiral arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramyan, L. S.; Hakobyan, A. A.; Petrosian, A. R.; de Lapparent, V.; Bertin, E.; Mamon, G. A.; Kunth, D.; Nazaryan, T. A.; Adibekyan, V.; Turatto, M.

    2016-07-01

    Using a sample of 215 supernovae (SNe), we analyse their positions relative to the spiral arms of their host galaxies, distinguishing grand-design (GD) spirals from non-GD (NGD) galaxies. We find that: (1) in GD galaxies, an offset exists between the positions of Ia and core-collapse (CC) SNe relative to the peaks of arms, while in NGD galaxies the positions show no such shifts; (2) in GD galaxies, the positions of CC SNe relative to the peaks of arms are correlated with the radial distance from the galaxy nucleus. Inside (outside) the corotation radius, CC SNe are found closer to the inner (outer) edge. No such correlation is observed for SNe in NGD galaxies nor for SNe Ia in either galaxy class; (3) in GD galaxies, SNe Ibc occur closer to the leading edges of the arms than do SNe II, while in NGD galaxies they are more concentrated towards the peaks of arms. In both samples of hosts, the distributions of SNe Ia relative to the arms have broader wings. These observations suggest that shocks in spiral arms of GD galaxies trigger star formation in the leading edges of arms affecting the distributions of CC SNe (known to have short-lived progenitors). The closer locations of SNe Ibc versus SNe II relative to the leading edges of the arms supports the belief that SNe Ibc have more massive progenitors. SNe Ia having less massive and older progenitors, have more time to drift away from the leading edge of the spiral arms.

  8. A Newly Recognized Very Young Supernova Remnant in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Kim, Hwihyun; Soria, Roberto; Kuntz, K. D.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Dopita, Michael A.; Stockdale, Christopher

    2015-02-01

    As part of a spectroscopic survey of supernova remnant candidates in M83 using the Gemini-South telescope and Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph, we have discovered one object whose spectrum shows very broad lines at Hα, [O I] λλ6300, 6363, and [O III] λλ4959, 5007, similar to those from other objects classified as "late time supernovae". Although six historical supernovae have been observed in M83 since 1923, none were seen at the location of this object. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 images show a nearly unresolved emission source, while Chandra and ATCA data reveal a bright X-ray source and nonthermal radio source at the position. Objects in other galaxies showing similar spectra are only decades post-supernova, which raises the possibility that the supernova that created this object occurred during the last century but was missed. Using photometry of nearby stars from the HST data, we suggest the precursor was at least 17 M ⊙, and the presence of broad Hα in the spectrum makes a type II supernova likely. The supernova must predate the 1983 Very Large Array radio detection of the object. We suggest examination of archival images of M83 to search for evidence of the supernova event that gave rise to this object, and thus provide a precise age. Based on observations made with NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under contract # NAS83060, with data obtained through program GO1-12115.

  9. Synthetic HI observations of spiral structure in the outer disk in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoperskov, Sergey A.; Bertin, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    > By means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations, in a separate paper we have discussed the properties of non-axisymmetric density wave trains in the outermost regions of galaxy disks, based on the picture that self-excited global spiral modes in the bright optical stellar disk are accompanied by low-amplitude short trailing wave signals outside corotation; in the gas, such wave trains can penetrate through the outer Lindblad resonance and propagate outwards, forming prominent spiral patterns. In this paper we present the synthetic 21 cm velocity maps expected from simulated models of the outer gaseous disk, focusing on the case when the disk is dominated by a two-armed spiral pattern, but considering also other more complex situations. We discuss some aspects of the spiral pattern in the gaseous periphery of galaxy disks noted in our simulations that might be interesting to compare with specific observed cases.

  10. Variations in Metallicity and Gas Content in Spiral Galaxies: Accidents of Infall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Gregory A.; Robertson, P.; Dave, R.; Blanc, G. A.; Wright, A.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen abundances are elevated in hydrogen deficient spirals in the Virgo and Pegasus clusters (Robertson et al. 2012, ApJ 748:48, and references therein). We confirm the relationship between O/H and H I deficiency "DEF" for an additional set of cluster spirals. In addition, we find that field spirals show a similar increase in O/H with DEF. Thus, the relationship is not uniquely the result of environmental processes in clusters. Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation predict a qualitatively similar trend of O/H with DEF for field spirals. This reflects excursions of gas content and metallicity above and below the mean mass-metallicity relationship as galaxies evolve. These excursions result from the stochastic effects of mergers and merger-free periods during the evolution.

  11. Using Hα Morphology and Surface Brightness Fluctuations to Age-date Star Clusters in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Chandar, Rupali; Kim, Hwihyun; Kaleida, Catherine; Mutchler, Max; Stankiewicz, Matt; Calzetti, Daniela; Saha, Abhijit; O'Connell, Robert; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E.; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Paresce, Francesco; Silk, Joseph I.; Trauger, John T.; Walker, Alistair R.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Young, Erick T.

    2011-03-01

    We use new WFC3 observations of the nearby grand-design spiral galaxy M83 to develop two independent methods for estimating the ages of young star clusters. The first method uses the physical extent and morphology of Hα emission to estimate the ages of clusters younger than τ ≈ 10 Myr. It is based on the simple premise that the gas in very young (τ< a few Myr) clusters is largely coincident with the cluster stars, is in a small, ring-like structure surrounding the stars in slightly older clusters since massive star winds and supernovae have had time to push out the natal gas (e.g., τ ≈ 5 Myr), and is in a larger ring-like bubble for still older clusters (i.e., ≈5-10 Myr). If no Hα is associated with a cluster it is generally older than ≈10 Myr. The second method is based on an observed relation between pixel-to-pixel flux variations within clusters and their ages. This method relies on the fact that the brightest individual stars in a cluster are most prominent at ages around 10 Myr, and fall below the detection limit (i.e., M V < -3.5) for ages older than about 100 Myr. Older clusters therefore have a smoother appearance and smaller pixel-to-pixel variations. The youngest clusters also have lower flux variations, hence the relationship is double valued. This degeneracy in age can be broken using other age indicators such as Hα morphology. These two methods are the basis for a new morphological classification system which can be used to estimate the ages of star clusters based on their appearance. We compare previous age estimates of clusters in M83 determined from fitting UBVIHα measurements using predictions from stellar evolutionary models with our new morphological categories and find good agreement, at the ≈95% level. The scatter within categories is ≈0.1 dex in log τ for young clusters (<10 Myr) and ≈0.5 dex for older (>10 Myr) clusters. A by-product of this study is the identification of 22 "single-star" H II regions in M83, with

  12. Deep UV Imaging of Stripped Spiral Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowl, Hugh

    We propose moderately deep GALEX observations (6 ksec) of eighteen gas-stripped Virgo Cluster spiral galaxies. These observations will give a complete sample of strongly stripped, highly inclined (i>70 degrees) Virgo spirals brighter than magnitude 16. Optical imaging and HI mapping show that these spirals all lack dust and gas in their outer disks, presumably due to ICM-ISM interactions. GALEX UV observations will provide critical information on how these interactions have affected recent star formation in the galaxies. The GALEX FUV and NUV data, particularly when combined with our existing multi-wavelength data set including broadband optical, H-alpha, and Spitzer IR imaging, and optical spectroscopy, will strongly constrain when a galaxy was stripped, how rapidly it was stripped, and the strength of any starburst at the time of stripping. The UV light changes dramatically over timescales of 0-500 Myr, which are the same timescales over which ICM-ISM interactions take place, making it possible to constrain the most recent effects of the cluster environment on galaxy evolution and if these effects can effectively drive the transformation of spirals into S0s. The deep imaging we propose will enable us to detect age gradients in the stellar populations of the outer disks, which will tell us how rapidly the galaxies are stripped. The cluster locations of recently stripped galaxies and the timescales over which the galaxies are stripped will allow us to constrain the relative importance of stripping that occurs during cluster core passages and stripping which occurs when galaxies encounter an ICM shock outside the core. Ten of these galaxies have already been imaged with GALEX, and we are requesting deep observations of these galaxies, in addition to time to image the remaining eight to the same depth.

  13. A new model for gravitational potential perturbations in disks of spiral galaxies. An application to our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira, T. C.; Lépine, J. R. D.; Braga, C. A. S.; Barros, D. A.

    2013-02-01

    Aims: We propose a new, more realistic description of the perturbed gravitational potential of spiral galaxies, with spiral arms having Gaussian-shaped groove profiles. The aim is to reach a self-consistent description of the spiral structure, that is, one in which an initial potential perturbation generates, by means of the stellar orbits, spiral arms with a profile similar to that of the imposed perturbation. Self-consistency is a condition for having long-lived structures. Methods: Using the new perturbed potential, we investigate the stable stellar orbits in galactic disks for galaxies with no bar or with only a weak bar. The model is applied to our Galaxy by making use of the axisymmetric component of the potential computed from the Galactic rotation curve, in addition to other input parameters similar to those of our Galaxy. The influence of the bulge mass on the stellar orbits in the inner regions of a disk is also investigated. Results: The new description offers the advantage of easy control of the parameters of the Gaussian profile of its potential. We compute the density contrast between arm and inter-arm regions. We find a range of values for the perturbation amplitude from 400 to 800 km2 s-2 kpc-1, which implies an approximate maximum ratio of the tangential force to the axisymmetric force between 3% and 6%. Good self-consistency of arm shapes is obtained between the Inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) and the 4:1 resonance. Near the 4:1 resonance the response density starts to deviate from the imposed logarithmic spiral form. This creates bifurcations that appear as short arms. Therefore the deviation from a perfect logarithmic spiral in galaxies can be understood as a natural effect of the 4:1 resonance. Beyond the 4:1 resonance we find closed orbits that have similarities with the arms observed in our Galaxy. In regions near the center, elongated stellar orbits appear naturally, in the presence of a massive bulge, without imposing any bar

  14. Axial Ratio of Edge-On Spiral Galaxies as a Test for Bright Radio Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, J.; Kogut, A.; Jones, E.; Dunlap, H.

    2015-01-01

    We use surface brightness contour maps of nearby edge-on spiral galaxies to determine whether extended bright radio halos are common. In particular, we test a recent model of the spatial structure of the diffuse radio continuum by Subrahmanyan & Cowsik which posits that a substantial fraction of the observed high-latitude surface brightness originates from an extended Galactic halo of uniform emissivity. Measurements of the axial ratio of emission contours within a sample of normal spiral galaxies at 1500 MHz and below show no evidence for such a bright, extended radio halo. Either the Galaxy is atypical compared to nearby quiescent spirals or the bulk of the observed high-latitude emission does not originate from this type of extended halo.

  15. AXIAL RATIO OF EDGE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES AS A TEST FOR BRIGHT RADIO HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Jones, E.; Dunlap, H.; Kogut, A.

    2015-01-20

    We use surface brightness contour maps of nearby edge-on spiral galaxies to determine whether extended bright radio halos are common. In particular, we test a recent model of the spatial structure of the diffuse radio continuum by Subrahmanyan and Cowsik which posits that a substantial fraction of the observed high-latitude surface brightness originates from an extended Galactic halo of uniform emissivity. Measurements of the axial ratio of emission contours within a sample of normal spiral galaxies at 1500 MHz and below show no evidence for such a bright, extended radio halo. Either the Galaxy is atypical compared to nearby quiescent spirals or the bulk of the observed high-latitude emission does not originate from this type of extended halo. (letters)

  16. Characterizing Dw1335-29, a Recently Discovered Dwarf Satellite of M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Andreia Jessica; Bell, Eric F.; Bailin, Jeremy; Monachesi, Antonela

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of galaxy formation in a cosmological context predict that galaxies should be surrounded by hundreds of relatively massive dark matter subhalos, each of which was expected to host a dwarf satellite galaxy. Large numbers of luminous dwarf galaxies do not exist around the Milky Way or M31 - this has been termed the missing satellite problem. There are a number of possible physical drivers of this discrepancy, some of which might predict significant differences from galaxy to galaxy. Accordingly, there are a number of efforts whose goal is to solidify and augment the census of dwarf satellites of external galaxies, outside the Local Group. Recently, Mueller, Jergen & Bingelli (2015; arXiv.1509.04931) presented 16 dwarf galaxy candidates in the vicinity of M83 using the Dark Energy CAMera (DECAM). With a field from the HST/GHOSTS survey that partly covers dw1335-29 (Radburn-Smith et al. 2011; ApJS, 195, 18) in conjunction with complementary ground-based images from VIMOS that cover the whole dwarf, we confirm that one of the candidates dw1335-29 is a dwarf satellite of M83, at a projected distance from M83 of 26 kpc and a with distance modulus of m-M = 28.5-0.1+0.3, placing it in the M83 group. From our VIMOS imaging that covers the entire dwarf, we estimate an absolute magnitude of MV = -9.8-0.1+0.3, show that it is elongated with an ellipticity of 0.35+/-0.15, and has a half light radius of 500+/-50pc. Dw1335-29 has both a somewhat irregular shape and has superimposed young stars in the resolved stellar population maps, leading us to classify this galaxy as a faint dwarf irregular or transition dwarf. This is especially curious, as with a projected distance of only 26kpc from M83, our prior expectation from study of the Local Group (following e.g., Grebel et al. 2003; AJ, 125, 1926, Slater & Bell 2013; ApJ, 772, 15) would be that dw1335-29 would lack recent star formation. Further study of M83's dwarf population will reveal if star formation in its dwarfs

  17. Is the cluster environment quenching the Seyfert activity in elliptical and spiral galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, R. S.; Dantas, M. L. L.; Krone-Martins, A.; Cameron, E.; Coelho, P.; Hattab, M. W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Hilbe, J. M.; Elliott, J.; Hagen, A.; COIN Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We developed a hierarchical Bayesian model (HBM) to investigate how the presence of Seyfert activity relates to their environment, herein represented by the galaxy cluster mass, M200, and the normalized cluster centric distance, r/r200. We achieved this by constructing an unbiased sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with morphological classifications provided by the Galaxy Zoo Project. A propensity score matching approach is introduced to control the effects of confounding variables: stellar mass, galaxy colour, and star formation rate. The connection between Seyfert-activity and environmental properties in the de-biased sample is modelled within an HBM framework using the so-called logistic regression technique, suitable for the analysis of binary data (e.g. whether or not a galaxy hosts an AGN). Unlike standard ordinary least square fitting methods, our methodology naturally allows modelling the probability of Seyfert-AGN activity in galaxies on their natural scale, i.e. as a binary variable. Furthermore, we demonstrate how an HBM can incorporate information of each particular galaxy morphological type in an unified framework. In elliptical galaxies our analysis indicates a strong correlation of Seyfert-AGN activity with r/r200, and a weaker correlation with the mass of the host cluster. In spiral galaxies these trends do not appear, suggesting that the link between Seyfert activity and the properties of spiral galaxies are independent of the environment.

  18. The relation between the gas, dust and total mass in edge-on spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaert, Flor

    2015-02-01

    Each component of a galaxy plays its own unique role in regulating the galaxy's evolution. In order to understand how galaxies form and evolve, it is therefore crucial to study the distribution and properties of each of the various components, and the links between them, both radially and vertically. The latter is only possible in edge-on systems. We present the HEROES project, which aims to investigate the 3D structure of the interstellar gas, dust, stars and dark matter in a sample of 7 massive early-type spiral galaxies based on a multi-wavelength data set including optical, NIR, FIR and radio data.

  19. Low-mass spiral galaxies with little molecular gas and prodigious star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, Jeffrey D.; Young, Judith S.

    1988-01-01

    A comparison of CO and H I properties is used here to demonstrate that many CO-poor low-mass Virgo spiral galaxies are rich in atomic gas, which implies that the lack of CO emission from them is due, at least partly, to a lack of molecular gas. Despite the paucity of molecular gas, these H I-rich, CO-poor, low-mass spiral galaxies are undergoing extensive massive star formation. A column density of 10 to the 21st nuclei/sq cm is a necessary but insufficient condition for the creation of an H2-dominated interstellar medium.

  20. Origin of cosmic rays. I. Observations of the spiral galaxy NGC 3310

    SciTech Connect

    Duric, N.; Seaquist, E.R.; Crane, P.C.; Davis, L.E.

    1986-05-01

    An observational technique is presented for addressing the problem of the origin of cosmic rays in galaxies by determining and comparing the distributions of cosmic rays, stars, and thermal gas. It is argued that optical continuum, emission line, and radio continuum imaging can be used to determine the distributions of the major stellar populations, the ionized gas, and the cosmic rays in galactic disks. An application of the technique is demonstrated by presenting and discussing observations of the spiral galaxy, NGC 3310. A preliminary analysis points to a possible spiral arm origin but argues against conventional models of cosmic-ray production such as supernova remnants. 38 references.

  1. A Comparative Study of Knots of Star Formation in Interacting versus Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Beverly J.; Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Struck, Curtis; Olmsted, Susan; Jones, Keith

    2016-03-01

    Interacting galaxies are known to have higher global rates of star formation on average than normal galaxies, relative to their stellar masses. Using UV and IR photometry combined with new and published Hα images, we have compared the star formation rates (SFRs) of ∼700 star forming complexes in 46 nearby interacting galaxy pairs with those of regions in 39 normal spiral galaxies. The interacting galaxies have proportionally more regions with high SFRs than the spirals. The most extreme regions in the interacting systems lie at the intersections of spiral/tidal structures, where gas is expected to pile up and trigger star formation. Published Hubble Space Telescope images show unusually large and luminous star clusters in the highest luminosity regions. The SFRs of the clumps correlate with measures of the dust attenuation, consistent with the idea that regions with more interstellar gas have more star formation. For the clumps with the highest SFRs, the apparent dust attenuation is consistent with the Calzetti starburst dust attenuation law. This suggests that the high luminosity regions are dominated by a central group of young stars surrounded by a shell of clumpy interstellar gas. In contrast, the lower luminosity clumps are bright in the UV relative to Hα, suggesting either a high differential attenuation between the ionized gas and the stars, or a post-starburst population bright in the UV but faded in Hα. The fraction of the global light of the galaxies in the clumps is higher on average for the interacting galaxies than for the spirals. Thus either star formation in interacting galaxies is “clumpier” on average, or the star forming regions in interacting galaxies are more luminous, dustier, or younger on average.

  2. Ultraviolet photometry from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory. XL - The energy distributions of spiral and irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Code, A. D.; Welch, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the total light of 40 spiral and irregular galaxies are presented. The photometry covers the wavelength range 1550-4250 A and is calibrated on an absolute basis. On the average later-type galaxies are not only bluer at short wavelengths than ellipticals but significantly bluer than visual colors would imply. This reflects a recent history of more vigorous formation of massive stars. The shape of the upper part of the initial mass function apparently varies more among early-type galaxies, producing a wide scatter in their energy distributions. In at least some galaxies interstellar dust appears to have little influence upon the emerging radiation. The local volume luminosity spectrum due to galaxies turns up steeply at short wavelengths, and is shaped largely by contributions from late-type galaxies. The observed ultraviolet background cannot be produced by normal galaxies, although the large corrections implied by theoretical evolutionary models may account for the measurements.

  3. Supernovae and their host galaxies - II. The relative frequencies of supernovae types in spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakobyan, A. A.; Nazaryan, T. A.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Petrosian, A. R.; Aramyan, L. S.; Kunth, D.; Mamon, G. A.; de Lapparent, V.; Bertin, E.; Gomes, J. M.; Turatto, M.

    2014-11-01

    We present an analysis of the relative frequencies of different supernova (SN) types in spirals with various morphologies and in barred or unbarred galaxies. We use a well-defined and homogeneous sample of spiral host galaxies of 692 SNe from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in different stages of galaxy-galaxy interaction and activity classes of nucleus. We propose that the underlying mechanisms shaping the number ratios of SNe types can be interpreted within the framework of interaction-induced star formation, in addition to the known relations between morphologies and stellar populations. We find a strong trend in behaviour of the NIa/NCC ratio depending on host morphology, such that early spirals include more Type Ia SNe. The NIbc/NII ratio is higher in a broad bin of early-type hosts. The NIa/NCC ratio is nearly constant when changing from normal, perturbed to interacting galaxies, then declines in merging galaxies, whereas it jumps to the highest value in post-merging/remnant galaxies. In contrast, the NIbc/NII ratio jumps to the highest value in merging galaxies and slightly declines in post-merging/remnant subsample. The interpretation is that the star formation rates and morphologies of galaxies, which are strongly affected in the final stages of interaction, have an impact on the number ratios of SNe types. The NIa/NCC (NIbc/NII) ratio increases (decreases) from star-forming to active galactic nuclei (AGN) classes of galaxies. These variations are consistent with the scenario of an interaction-triggered starburst evolving into AGN during the later stages of interaction, accompanied with the change of star formation and transformation of the galaxy morphology into an earlier type.

  4. SPIN ALIGNMENTS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES WITHIN THE LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE FROM SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youcai; Yang, Xiaohu; Luo, Wentao; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Lei; Mo, H. J.; Van den Bosch, Frank C. E-mail: xyang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of spiral galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 and Galaxy Zoo 2, we investigate the alignment of spin axes of spiral galaxies with their surrounding large-scale structure, which is characterized by the large-scale tidal field reconstructed from the data using galaxy groups above a certain mass threshold. We find that the spin axes only have weak tendencies to be aligned with (or perpendicular to) the intermediate (or minor) axis of the local tidal tensor. The signal is the strongest in a cluster environment where all three eigenvalues of the local tidal tensor are positive. Compared to the alignments between halo spins and the local tidal field obtained in N-body simulations, the above observational results are in best agreement with those for the spins of inner regions of halos, suggesting that the disk material traces the angular momentum of dark matter halos in the inner regions.

  5. Non-circular motion estimation of the grand-design spiral galaxy NGC 628

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, D.

    2013-09-01

    I present a harmonic decomposition analysis of the grand-design spiral galaxy NGC 628 using the H I data from The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS), Walter et al., Astron. J. 136, 2563 (2008). The harmonic decomposition analysis allows the estimation of the peculiar motion magnitude of the galaxy not counted in the rotation of the disk. The rotation curve is obtained through a tilted ring analysis and reaches a maximum velocity not higher than 200 km s-1. The residual from the velocity field shows a morphology shift from a m = 1 to a m = 3 feature at R = 120", typical of two spiral arms perturbation of the potential. The non-circular motion have a magnitude of ~10 km s-1, in agreement with previous studies of similar Hubble type galaxies.

  6. Spin Alignments of Spiral Galaxies within the Large-scale Structure from SDSS DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youcai; Yang, Xiaohu; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Lei; Luo, Wentao; Mo, H. J.; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of spiral galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 and Galaxy Zoo 2, we investigate the alignment of spin axes of spiral galaxies with their surrounding large-scale structure, which is characterized by the large-scale tidal field reconstructed from the data using galaxy groups above a certain mass threshold. We find that the spin axes only have weak tendencies to be aligned with (or perpendicular to) the intermediate (or minor) axis of the local tidal tensor. The signal is the strongest in a cluster environment where all three eigenvalues of the local tidal tensor are positive. Compared to the alignments between halo spins and the local tidal field obtained in N-body simulations, the above observational results are in best agreement with those for the spins of inner regions of halos, suggesting that the disk material traces the angular momentum of dark matter halos in the inner regions.

  7. The role of interactions in triggering bars, spiral arms and AGN in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Preethi; Ellison, Sara L.; Patton, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The role of secular structures like bars, rings and spiral arms in triggering star formation and AGN activity in disk galaxies are not well understood. In addition, the mechanisms which create and destroy these structures are not well characterized. Mergers are considered to be one of the main mechanisms which can trigger bars in massive disk galaxies. Using a sample of ~8000 close pair galaxies at 0.02 < z < 0.06 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, I will present results illustrating the role of mergers in triggering bars, rings, spiral arms and AGN as a function of close pair separation and merger ratios as well as their dependence on morphology and other physical properties of the galaxies. Time permitting, I will show how resolved IFU observations from SDSS MaNGA will help to place stronger constraints on the role of these structures in triggering star formation and AGN.

  8. DGSAT: Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes. I. Discovery of low surface brightness systems around nearby spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanmardi, B.; Martinez-Delgado, D.; Kroupa, P.; Henkel, C.; Crawford, K.; Teuwen, K.; Gabany, R. J.; Hanson, M.; Chonis, T. S.; Neyer, F.

    2016-04-01

    Context. We introduce the Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes (DGSAT) project and report the discovery of eleven low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in the fields of the nearby galaxies NGC 2683, NGC 3628, NGC 4594 (M 104), NGC 4631, NGC 5457 (M 101), and NGC 7814. Aims: The DGSAT project aims to use the potential of small-sized telescopes to probe LSB features around large galaxies and to increase the sample size of the dwarf satellite galaxies in the Local Volume. Methods: Using long exposure images, fields of the target spiral galaxies are explored for extended LSB objects. After identifying dwarf galaxy candidates, their observed properties are extracted by fitting models to their light profiles. Results: We find three, one, three, one, one, and two new LSB galaxies in the fields of NGC 2683, 3628, 4594, 4631, 5457, and 7814, respectively. In addition to the newly found galaxies, we analyse the structural properties of nine already known galaxies. All of these 20 dwarf galaxy candidates have effective surface brightnesses in the range 25.3 ≲ μe ≲ 28.8 mag arcsec-2 and are fit with Sersic profiles with indices n ≲ 1. Assuming that they are in the vicinity of the above mentioned massive galaxies, their r-band absolute magnitudes, their effective radii, and their luminosities are in the ranges -15.6 ≲ Mr ≲ -7.8, 160 pc ≲ Re ≲ 4.1 kpc, and 0.1 × 106 ≲ (L/L⊙)r ≲ 127 × 106, respectively. To determine whether these LSB galaxies are indeed satellites of the above mentioned massive galaxies, their distances need to be determined via further observations. Conclusions: Using small telescopes, we are readily able to detect LSB galaxies with similar properties to the known dwarf galaxies of the Local Group.

  9. CO(J = 3-2) on-the-fly mapping of the nearby spiral galaxies NGC 628 and NGC 7793: Spatially resolved CO(J = 3-2) star-formation law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Takeda, Miho; Yanagitani, Kazuki; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kuno, Nario; Sorai, Kazuo; Tosaki, Tomoka; Kohno, Kotaro

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of CO(J = 3-2) on-the-fly mappings of two nearby non-barred spiral galaxies, NGC 628 and NGC 7793, with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment at an effective angular resolution of 25″. We successfully obtained global distributions of CO(J = 3-2) emission over the entire disks at a sub-kpc resolution for both galaxies. We examined the spatially resolved (sub-kpc) relationship between CO(J = 3-2) luminosities (L^' }_CO(3-2)) and infrared (IR) luminosities (LIR) for NGC 628, NGC 7793, and M 83, and compared it with global luminosities of a JCMT (James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) Nearby Galaxy Legacy Survey sample. We found a striking linear L^' }_CO(3-2)-LIR correlation over the four orders of magnitude, and the correlation is consistent even with that for ultraluminous IR galaxies and submillimeter-selected galaxies. In addition, we examined the spatially resolved relationship between CO(J = 3-2) intensities (ICO(3-2)) and extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs) for NGC 628, NGC 7793, and M 83, and compared it with that for Giant Molecular Clouds in M 33 and 14 nearby galaxy centers. We found a linear ICO(3-2)-SFR correlation with ˜1 dex scatter. We conclude that the CO(J = 3-2) star-formation law (i.e., linear L^' }_CO(3-2)-LIR and ICO(3-2)-SFR correlations) is universally applicable to various types and spatial scales of galaxies; from spatially resolved nearby galaxy disks to distant IR-luminous galaxies, within ˜1 dex scatter.

  10. XMM-NEWTON DETECTS A HOT GASEOUS HALO IN THE FASTEST ROTATING SPIRAL GALAXY UGC 12591

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Xinyu; Anderson, Michael E.; Bregman, Joel N.; Miller, Jon M.

    2012-08-20

    We present our XMM-Newton observation of the fastest rotating spiral galaxy UGC 12591. We detect hot gas halo emission out to 80 kpc from the galaxy center, and constrain the halo gas mass to be smaller than 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }. We also measure the temperature of the hot gas as T = 0.64 {+-} 0.03 keV. Combining our x-ray constraints and the near-infrared and radio measurements in the literature, we find a baryon mass fraction of 0.03-0.05 in UGC 12591, suggesting a missing baryon mass of 70% compared with the cosmological mean value. Combined with another recent measurement in NGC 1961, the result strongly argues that the majority of missing baryons in spiral galaxies do not reside in their hot halos. We also find that UGC 12591 lies significantly below the baryonic Tully-Fisher relationship. Finally, we find that the baryon fractions of massive spiral galaxies are similar to those of galaxy groups with similar masses, indicating that the baryon loss is ultimately controlled by the gravitational potential well. The cooling radius of this gas halo is small, similar to NGC 1961, which argues that the majority of the stellar mass of this galaxy is not assembled as a result of cooling of this gas halo.

  11. Circumnuclear Regions In Barred Spiral Galaxies. 1; Near-Infrared Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Ramirez, D.; Knapen, J. H.; Peletier, R. F.; Laine, S.; Doyon, R.; Nadeau, D.

    2000-01-01

    We present sub-arcsecond resolution ground-based near-infrared images of the central regions of a sample of twelve barred galaxies with circumnuclear star formation activity, which is organized in ring-like regions typically one kiloparsec in diameter. We also present Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared images of ten of our sample galaxies, and compare them with our ground-based data. Although our sample galaxies were selected for the presence of circumnuclear star formation activity, our broad-band near-infrared images are heterogeneous, showing a substantial amount of small-scale structure in some galaxies, and practically none in others. We argue that, where it exists, this structure is caused by young stars, which also cause the characteristic bumps or changes in slope in the radial profiles of ellipticity, major axis position angle, surface brightness and colour at the radius of the circumnuclear ring in most of our sample galaxies. In 7 out of 10 HST images, star formation in the nuclear ring is clearly visible as a large number of small emitting regions, organised into spiral arm fragments, which are accompanied by dust lanes. NIR colour index maps show much more clearly the location of dust lanes and, in certain cases, regions of star formation than single broad-band images. Circumnuclear spiral structure thus outlined appears to be common in barred spiral galaxies with circumnuclear star formation.

  12. ARM AND INTERARM STAR FORMATION IN SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Foyle, K.; Rix, H.-W.; Walter, F.; Leroy, A. K.

    2010-12-10

    We investigate the relationship between spiral arms and star formation in the grand-design spirals NGC 5194 and NGC 628 and in the flocculent spiral NGC 6946. Filtered maps of near-IR (3.6 {mu}m) emission allow us to identify 'arm regions' that should correspond to regions of stellar mass density enhancements. The two grand-design spirals show a clear two-armed structure, while NGC 6946 is more complex. We examine these arm and interarm regions, looking at maps that trace recent star formation-far-ultraviolet (GALEX NGS) and 24 {mu}m emission (Spitzer SINGS)-and cold gas-CO (HERACLES) and H I (THINGS). We find the star formation tracers and CO more concentrated in the spiral arms than the stellar 3.6 {mu}m flux. If we define the spiral arms as the 25% highest pixels in the filtered 3.6 {mu}m images, we find that the majority (60%) of star formation tracers occur in the interarm regions; this result persists qualitatively even when considering the potential impact of finite data resolution and diffuse interarm 24 {mu}m emission. Even with a generous definition of the arms (45% highest pixels), interarm regions still contribute at least 30% to the integrated star formation rate (SFR) tracers. We look for evidence that spiral arms trigger star or cloud formation using the ratios of SFR (traced by a combination of FUV and 24 {mu}m emission) to H{sub 2} (traced by CO) and H{sub 2} to H I. Any enhancement of SFR/M(H{sub 2}) in the arm region is very small (less than 10%) and the grand-design spirals show no enhancement compared to the flocculent target. Arm regions do show a weak enhancement in H{sub 2}/H I compared to the interarm regions, but at a fixed gas surface density there is little clear enhancement in the H{sub 2}/H I ratio in the arm regions. Thus, it seems that spiral arms may only act to concentrate the gas to higher densities in the arms.

  13. The impact of dark matter cusps and cores on the satellite galaxy population around spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñarrubia, Jorge; Benson, Andrew J.; Walker, Matthew G.; Gilmore, Gerard; McConnachie, Alan W.; Mayer, Lucio

    2010-08-01

    We use N-body simulations to study the effects that a divergent (i.e. `cuspy') dark matter profile introduces on the tidal evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Our models assume cosmologically motivated initial conditions where dSphs are dark-matter-dominated systems on eccentric orbits about a host galaxy composed of a dark halo and a baryonic disc. We find that the resilience of dSphs to tidal stripping is extremely sensitive to the cuspiness of the inner halo profile; whereas dwarfs with a cored profile can be easily destroyed by the disc component, those with cusps always retain a bound remnant, even after losing more than 99.99 per cent of the original mass. For a given halo profile, the evolution of the structural parameters as driven by tides is controlled solely by the total amount of mass lost. This information is used to construct a semi-analytic code that follows the tidal evolution of individual satellites as they fall into a more massive host, which allows us to simulate the hierarchical build-up of spiral galaxies assuming different halo profiles and disc masses. We find that tidal encounters with discs tend to decrease the average mass of satellite galaxies at all galactocentric radii. Of all satellites, those accreted before re-ionization (z >~ 6), which may be singled out by anomalous metallicity patterns, provide the strongest constraints on the inner profile of dark haloes. These galaxies move on orbits that penetrate the disc repeatedly and survive to the present day only if haloes have an inner density cusp. We show that the size-mass relationship established from Milky Way (MW) dwarfs strongly supports the presence of cusps in the majority of these systems, as cored models systematically underestimate the masses of the known ultra-faint dSphs. Our models also indicate that a massive M31 disc may explain why many of its dSphs with suitable kinematic data fall below the size-mass relationship derived from MW dSphs. We also examine

  14. Magnetic Fields in Barred Spiral Galaxies: NGC 2442 & NGC 7552

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehle, M.; Harnett, J. I.; Beck, R.; Haynes, R. F.; Gray, A.

    2002-12-01

    We report on the total and polarised radio continuum emission of the southern barred galaxies NGC 2442 and NGC 7552 observed with the ATCA at λ6 cm (cf. Harnett et al. 2002). These galaxies form part of a sample of 20 barred galaxies mapped at several wavelengths with the ATCA and VLA (Beck et al. 2002) to study the role of magnetic fields in the bar with respect to the gas flow and star formation.

  15. Hα kinematics of S4G spiral galaxies - II. Data description and non-circular motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H.; Leaman, Ryan; Cisternas, Mauricio; Font, Joan; Beckman, John E.; Sheth, Kartik; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Díaz-García, Simón; Bosma, Albert; Athanassoula, E.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Ho, Luis C.; Kim, Taehyun; Laurikainen, Eija; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Meidt, Sharon E.; Salo, Heikki

    2015-07-01

    We present a kinematical study of 29 spiral galaxies included in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies, using Hα Fabry-Perot (FP) data obtained with the Galaxy Hα Fabry-Perot System instrument at the William Herschel Telescope in La Palma, complemented with images in the R band and in Hα. The primary goal is to study the evolution and properties of the main structural components of galaxies through the kinematical analysis of the FP data, complemented with studies of morphology, star formation and mass distribution. In this paper we describe how the FP data have been obtained, processed and analysed. We present the resulting moment maps, rotation curves, velocity model maps and residual maps. Images are available in FITS format through the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database and the Centre de Données Stellaires. With these data products we study the non-circular motions, in particular those found along the bars and spiral arms. The data indicate that the amplitude of the non-circular motions created by the bar does not correlate with the bar strength indicators. The amplitude of those non-circular motions in the spiral arms does not correlate with either arm class or star formation rate along the spiral arms. This implies that the presence and the magnitude of the streaming motions in the arms is a local phenomenon.

  16. What is the number of spiral galaxies in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tikhonov, N. A.

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of morphological types of galaxies in compact groups is studied on plates from the 6 m telescope. In compact groups there are 57 percent galaxies of late morphological types (S + Irr), 23 percent lenticulars (SO) and 20 percent elliptical galaxies. The morphological content of compact groups is very nearly the same as in loose groups. There is no dependence of galaxy morphology on density in all compact groups (and possibly in loose groups). Genuine compact groups form only 60 percent of Hickson's list.

  17. Long-lived Spiral Structure for Galaxies with Intermediate-size Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Kanak; Elmegreen, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Spiral structure in disk galaxies is modeled with nine collisionless N-body simulations including live disks, halos, and bulges with a range of masses. Two of these simulations make long-lasting and strong two-arm spiral wave modes that last for ˜5 Gyr with constant pattern speed. These two had a light stellar disk and the largest values of the Toomre Q parameter in the inner region at the time the spirals formed, suggesting the presence of a Q-barrier to wave propagation resulting from the bulge. The relative bulge mass in these cases is about 10%. Models with weak two-arm spirals had pattern speeds that followed the radial dependence of the Inner Lindblad Resonance.

  18. Long-lived Spiral Structure for Galaxies with Intermediate-size Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Kanak; Elmegreen, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Spiral structure in disk galaxies is modeled with nine collisionless N-body simulations including live disks, halos, and bulges with a range of masses. Two of these simulations make long-lasting and strong two-arm spiral wave modes that last for ∼5 Gyr with constant pattern speed. These two had a light stellar disk and the largest values of the Toomre Q parameter in the inner region at the time the spirals formed, suggesting the presence of a Q-barrier to wave propagation resulting from the bulge. The relative bulge mass in these cases is about 10%. Models with weak two-arm spirals had pattern speeds that followed the radial dependence of the Inner Lindblad Resonance.

  19. A close nuclear black-hole pair in the spiral galaxy NGC 3393.

    PubMed

    Fabbiano, G; Wang, Junfeng; Elvis, M; Risaliti, G

    2011-09-22

    The current picture of galaxy evolution advocates co-evolution of galaxies and their nuclear massive black holes, through accretion and galactic merging. Pairs of quasars, each with a massive black hole at the centre of its galaxy, have separations of 6,000 to 300,000 light years (refs 2 and 3; 1 parsec = 3.26 light years) and exemplify the first stages of this gravitational interaction. The final stages of the black-hole merging process, through binary black holes and final collapse into a single black hole with gravitational wave emission, are consistent with the sub-light-year separation inferred from the optical spectra and light-variability of two such quasars. The double active nuclei of a few nearby galaxies with disrupted morphology and intense star formation (such as NGC 6240 with a separation of about 2,600 light years and Mrk 463 with a separation of about 13,000 light years between the nuclei) demonstrate the importance of major mergers of equal-mass spiral galaxies in this evolution; such mergers lead to an elliptical galaxy, as in the case of the double-radio-nucleus elliptical galaxy 0402+379 (with a separation of about 24 light years between the nuclei). Minor mergers of a spiral galaxy with a smaller companion should be a more common occurrence, evolving into spiral galaxies with active massive black-hole pairs, but have hitherto not been seen. Here we report the presence of two active massive black holes, separated by about 490 light years, in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 3393 (50 Mpc, about 160 million light years). The regular spiral morphology and predominantly old circum-nuclear stellar population of this galaxy, and the closeness of the black holes embedded in the bulge, provide a hitherto missing observational point to the study of galaxy/black hole evolution. Comparison of our observations with current theoretical models of mergers suggests that they are the result of minor merger evolution. PMID:21881560

  20. New Portraits of Spiral Galaxies NGC 613, NGC 1792 and NGC 3627

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    Not so long ago, the real nature of the "spiral nebulae", spiral-shaped objects observed in the sky through telescopes, was still unknown. This long-standing issue was finally settled in 1924 when the famous American astronomer Edwin Hubble provided conclusive evidence that they are located outside our own galaxy and are in fact "island universes" of their own. Nowadays, we know that the Milky Way is just one of billions of galaxies in the Universe. They come in vastly different shapes - spiral, elliptical, irregular - and many of them are simply beautiful, especially the spiral ones. Astronomers Mark Neeser from the Universitäts-Sternwarte München (Germany) and Peter Barthel from the Kapteyn Institute in Groningen (The Netherlands) were clearly not insensitive to this when they obtained images of three beautiful spiral galaxies with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). They did this in twilight during the early morning when they had to stop their normal observing programme, searching for very distant and faint quasars. The resulting colour images ( ESO PR Photos 33a-c/03 ) were produced by combining several CCD images in three different wavebands from the FORS multi-mode instruments. The three galaxies are known as NGC 613, NGC 1792 and NGC 3627 . They are characterized by strong far-infrared, as well as radio emission, indicative of substantial ongoing star-formation activity. Indeed, these images all display prominent dust as well as features related to young stars, clear signs of intensive star-formation. NGC 613 ESO PR Photo 33a/03 ESO PR Photo 33a/03 [Preview - JPEG: 470 x 400 pix - 25k] [Normal - JPEG: 939 x 800 pix - 416k] [Full Res - JPEG: 2702 x 2301 pix - 3.4M] PR Photo 33a/03 of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 613 was obtained with the FORS1 and FORS2 multi-mode instruments (at VLT MELIPAL and YEPUN, respectively) on December 16-18, 2001. It is a composite of three exposures in different wavebands, cf. the technical note below. The full-resolution version

  1. The Near-Infrared Ca II Triplet-σ Relation for Bulges of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Peletier, Reynier F.; Vazdekis, Alexandre; Balcells, Marc

    2003-05-01

    We present measurements of the near-infrared Ca II triplet (CaT, CaT*), Paschen (PaT), and magnesium (Mg I) indices for a well-studied sample of 19 bulges of early to intermediate spiral galaxies. We find that both the CaT* and CaT indices decrease with central velocity dispersion σ with small scatter. This dependence is similar to that recently found by Cenarro for elliptical galaxies, implying a uniform CaT*-σ relation that applies to galaxies from ellipticals to intermediate-type spirals. The decrease of CaT and CaT* with σ contrasts with the well-known increase of another α-element index, Mg2, with σ. We discuss the role of Ca underabundance ([Ca/Fe]<0) and initial mass function variations in the onset of the observed relations.

  2. Gravitationally induced spurs in spiral galaxies - An example in M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, G. G.

    1983-01-01

    Radio and optical morphological data are consistent with a gravitational mechanism for the anomalous structure between the S4 and SS arms of M31, with the large complex of H I and H II in and around NGC 206 being implicated in the creation of the anomalous spur. Computer models of the gravitational effects of the spur show that its gravitational induction explains the observed velocity distortions. It is speculated that spurs in more distant galaxies, for which high resolution data as complete as that presented are not yet available, are also gravitational. This implicitly applies not only to spurs in galaxies with well defined spiral structure, but also for galaxies with more chaotic spiral arm patterns.

  3. The Discovery of Seven Extremely Low Surface Brightness Galaxies in the Field of the Nearby Spiral Galaxy M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Allison; van Dokkum, Pieter; Abraham, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    Dwarf satellite galaxies are a key probe of dark matter and of galaxy formation on small scales and of the dark matter halo masses of their central galaxies. They have very low surface brightness, which makes it difficult to identify and study them outside of the Local Group. We used a low surface brightness-optimized telescope, the Dragonfly Telephoto Array, to search for dwarf galaxies in the field of the massive spiral galaxy M101. We identify seven large, low surface brightness objects in this field, with effective radii of 10-30 arcseconds and central surface brightnesses of μ g ~ 25.5-27.5 mag arcsec-2. Given their large apparent sizes and low surface brightnesses, these objects would likely be missed by standard galaxy searches in deep fields. Assuming the galaxies are dwarf satellites of M101, their absolute magnitudes are in the range -11.6 <~ MV <~ -9.3 and their effective radii are 350 pc-1.3 kpc. Their radial surface brightness profiles are well fit by Sersic profiles with a very low Sersic index (n ~ 0.3-0.7). The properties of the sample are similar to those of well-studied dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, such as Sextans I and Phoenix. Distance measurements are required to determine whether these galaxies are in fact associated with M101 or are in its foreground or background.

  4. THE DISCOVERY OF SEVEN EXTREMELY LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES IN THE FIELD OF THE NEARBY SPIRAL GALAXY M101

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, Allison; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Abraham, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    Dwarf satellite galaxies are a key probe of dark matter and of galaxy formation on small scales and of the dark matter halo masses of their central galaxies. They have very low surface brightness, which makes it difficult to identify and study them outside of the Local Group. We used a low surface brightness-optimized telescope, the Dragonfly Telephoto Array, to search for dwarf galaxies in the field of the massive spiral galaxy M101. We identify seven large, low surface brightness objects in this field, with effective radii of 10-30 arcseconds and central surface brightnesses of μ {sub g} ∼ 25.5-27.5 mag arcsec{sup –2}. Given their large apparent sizes and low surface brightnesses, these objects would likely be missed by standard galaxy searches in deep fields. Assuming the galaxies are dwarf satellites of M101, their absolute magnitudes are in the range –11.6 ≲ M{sub V} ≲ –9.3 and their effective radii are 350 pc-1.3 kpc. Their radial surface brightness profiles are well fit by Sersic profiles with a very low Sersic index (n ∼ 0.3-0.7). The properties of the sample are similar to those of well-studied dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, such as Sextans I and Phoenix. Distance measurements are required to determine whether these galaxies are in fact associated with M101 or are in its foreground or background.

  5. Megamaser Disks Reveal a Broad Distribution of Black Hole Mass in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, J. E.; Seth, A.; Kim, M.; Läsker, R.; Goulding, A.; Gao, F.; Braatz, J. A.; Henkel, C.; Condon, J.; Lo, K. Y.; Zhao, W.

    2016-08-01

    We use new precision measurements of black hole (BH) masses from water megamaser disks to investigate scaling relations between macroscopic galaxy properties and supermassive BH mass. The megamaser-derived BH masses span 106–108 {M}ȯ , while all the galaxy properties that we examine (including total stellar mass, central mass density, and central velocity dispersion) lie within a narrower range. Thus, no galaxy property correlates tightly with {M}{BH} in ∼L* spiral galaxies as traced by megamaser disks. Of them all, stellar velocity dispersion provides the tightest relation, but at fixed {σ }* the mean megamaser {M}{BH} are offset by ‑0.6 ± 0.1 dex relative to early-type galaxies. Spiral galaxies with non-maser dynamical BH masses do not appear to show this offset. At low mass, we do not yet know the full distribution of BH mass at fixed galaxy property; the non-maser dynamical measurements may miss the low-mass end of the BH distribution due to an inability to resolve their spheres of influence and/or megamasers may preferentially occur in lower-mass BHs.

  6. LIFTING THE VEIL OF DUST TO REVEAL THE SECRETS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronomers have combined information from the NASA Hubble Space Telescope's visible- and infrared-light cameras to show the hearts of four spiral galaxies peppered with ancient populations of stars. The top row of pictures, taken by a ground-based telescope, represents complete views of each galaxy. The blue boxes outline the regions observed by the Hubble telescope. The bottom row represents composite pictures from Hubble's visible- and infrared-light cameras, the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). Astronomers combined views from both cameras to obtain the true ages of the stars surrounding each galaxy's bulge. The Hubble telescope's sharper resolution allows astronomers to study the intricate structure of a galaxy's core. The galaxies are ordered by the size of their bulges. NGC 5838, an 'S0' galaxy, is dominated by a large bulge and has no visible spiral arms; NGC 7537, an 'Sbc' galaxy, has a small bulge and loosely wound spiral arms. Astronomers think that the structure of NGC 7537 is very similar to our Milky Way. The galaxy images are composites made from WFPC2 images taken with blue (4445 Angstroms) and red (8269 Angstroms) filters, and NICMOS images taken in the infrared (16,000 Angstroms). They were taken in June, July, and August of 1997. Credits for the ground-based images: Allan Sandage (The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington) and John Bedke (Computer Sciences Corporation and the Space Telescope Science Institute) Credits for WFPC2 and NICMOS composites: NASA, ESA, and Reynier Peletier (University of Nottingham, United Kingdom)

  7. Optical features associated with the extended HI envelope of M83

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wamsteker, W.; Lorre, J. J.; Schuster, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    Deep red Schmidt plates (127-04 + RG630) of the galaxy M83 show the presence of extensive faint optical structure well beyond the Holmberg radius of the galaxy. Digital processing has been used to bring these features out in detail. They consist of arc-like structures and clumps of H II regions, which seem to follow the H I distribution and thus are likely to participate in the warping of the H I disk.

  8. AN H{alpha} NUCLEAR SPIRAL STRUCTURE IN THE E0 ACTIVE GALAXY Arp 102B

    SciTech Connect

    Fathi, Kambiz; Axon, David J.; Kharb, Preeti; Robinson, Andrew; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Marconi, Alessandro; Maciejewski, Witold; Capetti, Alessandro E-mail: djasps@rit.edu E-mail: pxksps@cis.rit.edu E-mail: marconi@arcetri.astro.it E-mail: capetti@to.astro.it

    2011-08-01

    We report the discovery of a two-armed mini-spiral structure within the inner kiloparsec of the E0 LINER/Seyfert 1 galaxy Arp 102B. The arms are observed in H{alpha} emission and located east and west of the nucleus, extending up to {approx}1 kpc from it. We use narrow-band imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys, in combination with archival Very Large Array radio images at 3.6 and 6 cm to investigate the origin of the nuclear spiral. From the H{alpha} luminosity of the spiral, we obtain an ionized gas mass of the order of 10{sup 6} solar masses. One possibility is that the nuclear spiral represents a gas inflow triggered by a recent accretion event which has replenished the accretion disk, giving rise to the double-peaked emission-line profiles characteristic of Arp 102B. However, the radio images show a one-sided curved jet which correlates with the eastern spiral arm observed in the H{alpha} image. A published milliarcsecond radio image also shows a one-sided structure at position angle {approx}40{sup 0}, approximately aligned with the inner part of the eastern spiral arm. The absence of a radio counterpart to the western spiral arm is tentatively interpreted as indicating that the jet is relativistic, with an estimated speed of 0.45c. Estimates of the jet kinetic energy and the ionizing luminosity of the active nucleus indicate that both are capable of ionizing the gas along the spiral arms. We conclude that, although the gas in the nuclear region may have originated in an accretion event, the mini spiral is most likely the result of a jet-cloud interaction rather than an inflowing stream.

  9. The Soft X-Ray Emission Component of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, Giuseppina

    1998-01-01

    Work included the analysis of the HRJ observations of the Sombrero galaxy (Fabbiano and Juda) published in Ap.J. This paper discussed the discovery of a point-like x-ray source at the nucleus of the galaxy, which is suspected to host a massive black hole. More work was done on the analysis of the Observation of M94 in support of an AXAF proposal. We have also analyzed the M81 data by adding to our observation the entire set of the archival ROSAT data. We plan to write up the results for publication. Both galaxies have nuclei optically similar to that of the Sombrero galaxy. The nucleus of M81 is a known x-ray source. The M94 data has revealed a point-like nuclear source superposed on more diffuse emission.

  10. Spiral eigenmodes triggered by grooves in the phase space of disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rijcke, S.; Voulis, I.

    2016-02-01

    We use linear perturbation theory to investigate how a groove in the phase space of a disc galaxy changes the stellar disc's stability properties. Such a groove is a narrow trough around a fixed angular momentum from which most stars have been removed, rendering part of the disc unresponsive to spiral waves. We find that a groove can dramatically alter a disc's eigenmode spectrum by giving rise to a set of vigorously growing eigenmodes. These eigenmodes are particular to the grooved disc and are absent from the original ungrooved disc's mode spectrum. We discuss the properties and possible origin of the different families of new modes. By the very nature of our technique, we prove that a narrow phase-space groove can be a source of rapidly growing spiral patterns that are true eigenmodes of the grooved disc and that no non-linear processes need to be invoked to explain their presence in N-body simulations of disc galaxies. Our results lend support to the idea that spiral structure can be a recurrent phenomenon, in which one generation of spiral modes alters a disc galaxy's phase space in such a way that a following generation of modes is destabilized.

  11. Gas Clouds in Whirlpool Galaxy Yield Important Clues Supporting Theory on Spiral Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    Astronomers studying gas clouds in the famous Whirlpool Galaxy have found important clues supporting a theory that seeks to explain how the spectacular spiral arms of galaxies can persist for billions of years. The astronomers applied techniques used to study similar gas clouds in our own Milky Way to those in the spiral arms of a neighbor galaxy for the first time, and their results bolster a theory first proposed in 1964. M51 The spiral galaxy M51: Left, as seen with the Hubble Space Telescope; Right, radio image showing location of Carbon Monoxide gas. CREDIT: STScI, OVRO, IRAM (Click on image for larger version) Image Files Optical and Radio (CO) Views (above image) HST Optical Image with CO Contours Overlaid Radio/Optical Composite Image of M51 VLA/Effelsberg Radio Image of M51, With Panel Showing Magnetic Field Lines The Whirlpool Galaxy, about 31 million light-years distant, is a beautiful spiral in the constellation Canes Venatici. Also known as M51, it is seen nearly face-on from Earth and is familiar to amateur astronomers and has been featured in countless posters, books and magazine articles. "This galaxy made a great target for our study of spiral arms and how star formation works along them," said Eva Schinnerer, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. "It was ideal for us because it's one of the closest face-on spirals in the sky," she added. Schinnerer worked with Axel Weiss of the Institute for Millimeter Radio Astronomy (IRAM) in Spain, Susanne Aalto of the Onsala Space Observatory in Sweden, and Nick Scoville of Caltech. The astronomers presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Denver, Colorado. The scientists analyzed radio emission from Carbon Monoxide (CO) molecules in giant gas clouds along M51's spiral arms. Using telescopes at Caltech's Owens Valley Radio Observatory and the 30-meter radio telescope of IRAM, they were able to determine the temperatures and amounts of turbulence within the

  12. High-Resolution Hα Velocity Fields of Nearby Spiral Galaxies with the Southern African Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl; Williams, Ted; Spekkens, Kristine; Lee-Waddell, Karen; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Sellwood, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to test ΛCDM predictions of galaxy mass distributions, we have obtained spectrophotometric observations of several nearby spiral galaxies with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometer as part of the RSS Imaging spectroscopy Nearby Galaxy Survey. Utilizing the SALT FP's 8 arcmin field of view and 2 arcsec angular resolution, we have derived 2D velocity fields of the Hα emission line to high spatial resolution at large radii. We have modeled these velocity fields with the DiskFit software package and found them to be in good agreement with lower-resolution velocity fields of the HI 21 cm line for the same galaxies. Here we present our Hα kinematic map of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 578. At the distance to this galaxy (22 Mpc), our kinematic data has a spatial resolution of 185 pc and extends to galactocentric radii of 13 kpc. The high spatial resolution of this data allows us to resolve the inner rising part of the rotation curves, which is compromised by beam smearing in lower-resolution observations. We are using these Hα kinematic data, combined with HI 21 cm kinematics and broadband photometric observations, to place constraints on NGC 578's mass distribution.

  13. The relationship between the carbon monoxide intensity and the radio continuum emission in spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, David S.; Lo, K. Y.; Allen, Ronald J.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between the velocity-integrated CO emission and the nonthermal radio continuum brightness in the disks of normal spiral galaxies is examined on a variety of length scales. On a global scale, the total CO intensity correlates strongly with the total radio continuum flux density for a sample of 31 galaxies. On scales of about 2 kpc or more in the disk of individual galaxies, it is found that the ratio I(CO)/T(20) remains fairly constant over the entire disk as well as from galaxy to galaxy. For the eight spirals in the sample, the disk-averaged values of I(CO)/T(20) range from 0.6-2.4, with the average over all eight galaxies being 1.3 +/- 0.6. It is concluded that what these various length scales actually trace are differences in the primary heating mechanism of the gas in the beam. The observed relationship between CO and nonthermal radio continuum emission can be explained by assuming that molecular gas in galactic disks is heated primarily by cosmic rays. The observed relationship is used to show that the brightness of synchrotron emission is proportional to n(cr) exp 0.4 - 0.9 in galactic disks.

  14. Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of the star formation-stellar mass relation on spiral disc morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Kyle W.; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Masters, Karen L.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Melvin, Thomas; Wong, O. Ivy; Nichol, Robert C.; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris J.; Fortson, Lucy

    2015-05-01

    We measure the stellar mass-star formation rate (SFR) relation in star-forming disc galaxies at z ≤ 0.085, using Galaxy Zoo morphologies to examine different populations of spirals as classified by their kiloparsec-scale structure. We examine the number of spiral arms, their relative pitch angle, and the presence of a galactic bar in the disc, and show that both the slope and dispersion of the M⋆-SFR relation is constant when varying all the above parameters. We also show that mergers (both major and minor), which represent the strongest conditions for increases in star formation at a constant mass, only boost the SFR above the main relation by ˜0.3 dex; this is significantly smaller than the increase seen in merging systems at z > 1. Of the galaxies lying significantly above the M⋆-SFR relation in the local Universe, more than 50 per cent are mergers. We interpret this as evidence that the spiral arms, which are imperfect reflections of the galaxy's current gravitational potential, are either fully independent of the various quenching mechanisms or are completely overwhelmed by the combination of outflows and feedback. The arrangement of the star formation can be changed, but the system as a whole regulates itself even in the presence of strong dynamical forcing.

  15. GAMA/H-ATLAS: THE DUST OPACITY-STELLAR MASS SURFACE DENSITY RELATION FOR SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Grootes, M. W.; Tuffs, R. J.; Andrae, E.; Popescu, C. C.; Pastrav, B.; Gunawardhana, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Kelvin, L. S.; Driver, S. P.; Liske, J.; Seibert, M.; Graham, Alister W.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bourne, N.; Brough, S.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; and others

    2013-03-20

    We report the discovery of a well-defined correlation between B-band face-on central optical depth due to dust, {tau}{sup f}{sub B}, and the stellar mass surface density, {mu}{sub *}, of nearby (z {<=} 0.13) spiral galaxies. This relation was derived from a sample of spiral galaxies taken from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, which were detected in the FIR/submillimeter (submm) in the Herschel-ATLAS science demonstration phase field. Using a quantitative analysis of the NUV attenuation-inclination relation for complete samples of GAMA spirals categorized according to stellar mass surface density, we demonstrate that this correlation can be used to statistically correct for dust attenuation purely on the basis of optical photometry and Sersic-profile morphological fits. Considered together with previously established empirical relationships of stellar mass to metallicity and gas mass, the near linearity and high constant of proportionality of the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation disfavors a stellar origin for the bulk of refractory grains in spiral galaxies, instead being consistent with the existence of a ubiquitous and very rapid mechanism for the growth of dust in the interstellar medium. We use the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation in conjunction with the radiation transfer model for spiral galaxies of Popescu and Tuffs to derive intrinsic scaling relations between specific star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, and stellar surface density, in which attenuation of the UV light used for the measurement of SFR is corrected on an object-to-object basis. A marked reduction in scatter in these relations is achieved which we demonstrate is due to correction of both the inclination-dependent and face-on components of attenuation. Our results are consistent with a general picture of spiral galaxies in which most of the submm emission originates from grains residing in translucent structures, exposed to UV in the diffuse interstellar

  16. Environmental Effects on the ISM and Star Formation Properties of Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Angus; Wilson, Christine

    2015-08-01

    We present the results from a sample of HI flux-selected spiral galaxies within 25 Mpc from the JCMT Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey (NGLS), subdivided into isolated, group, and Virgo cluster samples. The CO J=3-2 line was observed with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), a tracer for the dense molecular gas linked to star formation. We combine the CO data with integrated star formation rates using H-alpha measurements and stellar masses from the S4G Survey in order to study the link between the gas and stars inside these galaxies. We find that while the mean atomic gas mass is lower for the Virgo galaxies compared to the isolated galaxies, the distributions of molecular gas masses are not significantly different between the three samples. The specific star formation rate is also lower for the Virgo sample, followed by the group and isolated galaxies. Finally, the molecular gas depletion time is longer for the Virgo galaxies compared to the group and isolated galaxies, which suggests the possible effects of environment on the galaxy's star formation properties.

  17. Reconstructing magnetic fields of spiral galaxies from radiopolarimetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, C.

    2015-12-01

    We live in a magnetic universe with magnetic fields spanning an enormous range of spatial and temporal scales. In particular, magnetic fields at the scale of a galaxy are known as galactic magnetic fields and are the focus of this PhD thesis. These galactic magnetic fields are very important since they affect the dynamics of the interstellar gas as well as the gas distribution. The presence of these magnetic fields induces a certain type of radiation to occur at radio frequencies known as synchrotron radiation. The observed polarization properties of this synchrotron radiation then serves to record the imprint of these magnetic fields. The goal of this thesis has been to infer the structure of the magnetic field across various spatial scales in our own Galaxy as well as the strength and structure of the magnetic field in other galaxies using radiopolarimetric observations.

  18. New detections of CO emission from four spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, David S.; Liszt, Harvey S.

    1989-01-01

    A CO survey of external galaxies was conducted to compare observations with computational models of the evolution of the neutral interstellar medium. The paper presents preliminary results of CO detections and mapping in the following systems: NGC 628, 1637, 4258, and 5055. The variation of the velocity dispersion along the major axis versus the radius for NGC 628 is described.

  19. On the local standard of rest. [comoving with young objects in gravitational field of spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, C.

    1983-01-01

    Under the influence of a spiral gravitational field, there should be differences among the mean motions of different types of objects with different dispersion velocities in a spiral galaxy. The old stars with high dispersion velocity should have essentially no mean motion normal to the galactic rotation. On the other hand, young objects and interstellar gas may be moving relative to the old stars at a velocity of a few kilometer per second in both the radial (galacto-centric), and circular directions, depending on the spiral model adopted. Such a velocity is usually referred as the systematic motion or the streaming motion. The conventionally adopted local standard of rest is indeed co-moving with the young objects of the solar vicinity. Therefore, it has a net systematic motion with respect to the circular motion of an equilibrium galactic model, defined by the old stars. Previously announced in STAR as N83-24443

  20. Generation and maintenance of bisymmetric spiral magnetic fields in disk galaxies in differential rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawa, Takeyasu; Fujimoto, M.

    1993-05-01

    The approximate dynamo equation, which yields asymptotic solutions for the large scale bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields rotating rigidly over a large area of the galactic disk, is derived. The vertical thickness and the dynamo strength of the gaseous disk which are necessary to generate and sustain the BSS magnetic fields is determined. The globally BSS magnetic fields which propagate over the disk as a wave without being twisted more tightly are reproduced. A poloidal field configuration is theoretically predicted in the halo around the disk, and is observed in the edge-on galaxy NGC4631. Mathematical methods for the galactic dynamo are shown to be equivalent. Those methods give different growth rates between the BSS and the axisymmetric spiral (ASS) magnetic fields in the disk. Magnetohydrodynamical excitation is discussed between the BSS magnetic fields and the two armed spiral density waves.

  1. The JCMT nearby galaxies legacy survey - X. Environmental effects on the molecular gas and star formation properties of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Angus; Wilson, C. D.; Golding, J.; Warren, B. E.; Israel, F. P.; Serjeant, S.; Knapen, J. H.; Sánchez-Gallego, J. R.; Barmby, P.; Bendo, G. J.; Rosolowsky, E.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study of the molecular gas properties in a sample of 98 H I - flux selected spiral galaxies within ˜25 Mpc, using the CO J = 3 - 2 line observed with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. We use the technique of survival analysis to incorporate galaxies with CO upper limits into our results. Comparing the group and Virgo samples, we find a larger mean H2 mass in the Virgo galaxies, despite their lower mean H I mass. This leads to a significantly higher H2 to H I ratio for Virgo galaxies. Combining our data with complementary Hα star formation rate measurements, Virgo galaxies have longer molecular gas depletion times compared to group galaxies, due to their higher H2 masses and lower star formation rates. We suggest that the longer depletion times may be a result of heating processes in the cluster environment or differences in the turbulent pressure. From the full sample, we find that the molecular gas depletion time has a positive correlation with the stellar mass, indicative of differences in the star formation process between low- and high-mass galaxies, and a negative correlation between the molecular gas depletion time and the specific star formation rate.

  2. Megaparsec relativistic jets launched from an accreting supermassive black hole in an extreme spiral galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Vivek, M.; Srianand, Raghunathan; Gopal-Krishna; Vikram, Vinu; Hota, Ananda; Biju, K. G.; Sirothia, S. K.; Jacob, Joe

    2014-06-20

    The radio galaxy phenomenon is directly connected to mass-accreting, spinning supermassive black holes found in the active galactic nuclei. It is still unclear how the collimated jets of relativistic plasma on hundreds to thousands of kiloparsec scales form and why they are nearly always launched from the nuclei of bulge-dominated elliptical galaxies and not flat spirals. Here we present the discovery of the giant radio source J2345–0449 (z = 0.0755), a clear and extremely rare counterexample where relativistic jets are ejected from a luminous and massive spiral galaxy on a scale of ∼1.6 Mpc, the largest known so far. Extreme physical properties observed for this bulgeless spiral host, such as its high optical and infrared luminosity, large dynamical mass, rapid disk rotation, and episodic jet activity, are possibly the results of its unusual formation history, which has also assembled, via gas accretion from a disk, its central black hole of mass >2 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}. The very high mid-IR luminosity of the galaxy suggests that it is actively forming stars and still building a massive disk. We argue that the launch of these powerful jets is facilitated by an advection-dominated, magnetized accretion flow at a low Eddington rate onto this unusually massive (for a bulgeless disk galaxy) and possibly fast spinning central black hole. Therefore, J2345–0449 is an extremely rare, unusual galactic system whose properties challenge the standard paradigms for black hole growth and the formation of relativistic jets in disk galaxies. Thus, it provides fundamental insight into accretion disk-relativistic jet coupling processes.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Parameters of Spiral galaxies from SDSS 7 (Hall+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M.; Courteau, S.; Dutton, A. A.; McDonald, M.; Zhu, Y.

    2013-08-01

    We have compiled a sample of 3041 spiral galaxies with multiband gri imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7; Abazajian et al., 2009ApJS..182..543A) and available galaxy rotational velocities, V, derived from HI linewidths. We compare the data products provided through the SDSS imaging pipeline with our own photometry of the SDSS images, and use the velocities, V, as an independent metric to determine ideal galaxy sizes (R) and luminosities (L). Our radial and luminosity parameters improve upon the SDSS DR7 Petrosian radii and luminosities through the use of isophotal fits to the galaxy images. This improvement is gauged via VL (Vmag-Luminosity) and RV relations whose respective scatters are reduced by ~8 and ~30% with our parameters compared to similar relations built with SDSS parameters. (1 data file).

  4. Old Star Clusters in Spiral Galaxies: M101 as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanton, Lesley Ann

    2015-01-01

    Most stars form in groups and clusters, at least a small fraction of which can be extremely long-lived. However, many details of how star clusters form and how they disrupt are still unclear. We present and examine a catalog of old star clusters in the nearby spiral galaxy M101, and compare with the known properties of old star clusters in other spiral galaxies. Data include multi-band Hubble Space Telescope images and Gemini-GMOS spectra. Among the properties examined are luminosity distributions, colors, sizes, spatial distributions, and velocities. We highlight the somewhat surprising result of a population of old, disk clusters in M101, which are unlike populations found in the Milky Way and M31.

  5. NGC 7217: A Spheroid-dominated, Early-Type Resonance Ring Spiral Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buta, R.; van Driel, W.; Braine, J.; Combes, F.; Wakamatsu, K.; Sofue, Y.; Tomita, A.

    1995-09-01

    NGC 7217 is a well-known northern spiral galaxy which is characterized by flocculent spiral structure and a series of three optical ringlike zones: a nuclear ring 21" in diameter, a weak inner ring 63" in diameter, and a striking outer ring 2'.6 in diameter. The rings all have nearly the same shape and position angle in projection. The appearance of the galaxy suggests that it may be more axisymmetric than the typical spiral galaxy, since there is little evidence for the presence of a bar, oval, or stellar density wave. This makes the origin of the ring features uncertain. In an effort to understand this kind of ringed galaxy, which is by no means typical, we have obtained multicolor CCD BVRI images, accurate surface photometry, mappings of the CO and H I gas distributions, and rotational velocities from Hα and H I spectral line data. Our deep surface photometry has revealed an important feature of NGC 7217 that was missed in previous studies: The region occupied by the rings of the galaxy is surrounded by an extensive, nearly circular luminous halo. This halo cannot be merely an extension of the disk component because it is much rounder than the inner regions. Instead, we believe the light represents either the outer regions of the bulge or a separate stellar halo component. We are able to successfully model the luminosity profile in terms of an r114 "spheroid" and an exponential disk with a spheroid-to-total disk (including rings) luminosity ratio of 2.3-2.4. This makes NGC 7217 one of the most spheroid-dominated spirals known, and the finding has important implications for the recent discovery by Merrifield and Kuijken of a significant population of counter-rotating stars in the galaxy. Although the spiral structure of NGC 7217 is flocculent in blue light, there is a definite two-armed stellar spiral in the region of the outer ring. This ring includes about 4.4% of the total blue luminosity and is the locus of most of the recent star formation in the galaxy

  6. Satellites as probes of the masses of spiral galaxies.

    PubMed

    Erickson, L K; Gottesman, S T; Hunter, J H

    1998-12-30

    We present atomic hydrogen (HI) observations and analyses of the kinematics of satellite-primary galaxy pairs. Two estimates for the masses of the primaries are available, one from their rotation curves and one from the orbital properties of the satellites. Defining chi as the ratio of these two mass estimates, it is a measure of the presence, or absence, of a significant halo. The chi distribution is presented and the selection effects are discussed. We show that our data, compared with the more numerous pairs identified by Zaritsky et al., have similar distributions for projected separations of less than 200 kpc, even though the selection criteria employed were quite different. Observational biases have a negligible effect; the biased and unbiased distributions are essentially identical. N-body calculations were executed to simulate the dynamical behavior of relatively low mass satellites orbiting primary disk galaxies with and without extended halos. In addition, we made a partially analytical analysis of the behavior of orbits in a logarithmic potential. We find that a "generic" model, characterized by a single disk-halo combination, cannot reproduce the observed P(chi) distribution. However, a simple two-component population of galaxies, composed of not more than 60% with halos and 40% without halos, is successful, if galaxies have dimensions of order 200 kpc. If galaxies are considerably larger with sizes extending to 400 kpc or more, no generic model can describe the full range of the observed P(chi), particularly if the distribution for r(p) < 200 kpc is compared with that for r(p) > 200 kpc. Regardless of the mix of orbital eccentricities, neither pure halo, nor canonical models (disk and halo masses are comparable within the disk radius) will work. A multicomponent approximation can be constructed; the canonical model must be mixed with a small fraction of systems essentially devoid of a massive dark halo. Only by including these complexities can the full

  7. The Importance of Radial Migration to the Evolution of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Kathryne J.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2016-01-01

    Spiral galaxy evolution is frequently considered in the context of environment, but internal processes may also play an important role. Radial migration is one such internal process, wherein a transient spiral arm rearranges the angular momentum distribution of the disk around corotation without causing kinematic heating. The efficiency of radial migration depends on both the duty cycle for transient patterns and the RMS change in orbital angular momentum induced by each pattern. Should radial migration be efficient, it could cause a substantial fraction of disk stars to move large radial distances over the lifetime of the disk, thus having significant impact on its kinematic, structural and chemical evolution.In this talk, I will summarize a subset of work focusing on the physics that determines the magnitude of the RMS change in orbital angular momentum from each spiral pattern. I have derived an analytic "capture criterion" that predicts whether or not a disk star with finite random orbital energy is in a "trapped orbit" (i.e. the orbital family induced by the spiral pattern that can lead to radial migration). I will present this criterion and show that it is primarily a star's orbital angular momentum that determines whether or not it is in a trapped orbit. The capture criterion could be used to better understand the role of radial migration in N-body simulations as well as applied to models of galaxy evolution. I will describe an example study wherein I applied the capture criterion, in a series of disk galaxy models, to find the fraction of an ensemble of stars that is in trapped orbits. I found that this fraction decreases linearly with increasing radial velocity dispersion and conclude that radial migration may play a role in the evolution of disk galaxies, but it is insignificant to the evolution of high velocity dispersion populations.

  8. Radio continuum and far-infrared emission of spiral galaxies: Implications of correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, T. N.; Iyengar, K. V. K.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers present a study extending the correlation seen between radio continuum and far-infrared emissions from spiral galaxies to a lower frequency of 408 MHz and also as a function of radio spectral index. The tight correlation seen between the two luminosities is then used to constrain several parameters governing the emissions such as the changes in star formation rate and mass function, frequency of supernovae that are parents of the interstellar electrons and factors governing synchrotron radio emission.

  9. The influence of the cluster environment on the star formation efficiency of 12 Virgo spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, B.; Wong, O. I.; Braine, J.; Chung, A.; Kenney, J. D. P.

    2012-07-01

    The influence of the environment on gas surface density and star formation efficiency of cluster spiral galaxies is investigated. We extend previous work on radial profiles by a pixel-to pixel analysis looking for asymmetries due to environmental interactions. The star formation rate is derived from GALEX UV and Spitzer total infrared data based on the 8, 24, 70, and 160 μm data. As in field galaxies, the star formation rate for most Virgo galaxies is approximately proportional to the molecular gas mass. Except for NGC 4438, the cluster environment does not affect the star formation efficiency with respect to the molecular gas. Gas truncation is not associated with major changes in the total gas surface density distribution of the inner disk of Virgo spiral galaxies. In three galaxies (NGC 4430, NGC 4501, and NGC 4522), possible increases in the molecular fraction and the star formation efficiency with respect to the total gas, of factors of 1.5 to 2, are observed on the windward side of the galactic disk. A significant increase of the star formation efficiency with respect to the molecular gas content on the windward side of ram pressure-stripped galaxies is not observed. The ram-pressure stripped extraplanar gas of 3 highly inclined spiral galaxies (NGC 4330, NGC 4438, and NGC 4522) shows a depressed star formation efficiency with respect to the total gas, and one of them (NGC 4438) shows a depressed rate even with respect to the molecular gas. The interpretation is that stripped gas loses the gravitational confinement and associated pressure of the galactic disk, and the gas flow is diverging, so the gas density decreases and the star formation rate drops. We found two such regions of low star formation efficiency in the more face-on galaxies NGC 4501 and NGC 4654 which are both undergoing ram pressure stripping. These regions show low radio continuum emission or unusually steep radio spectral index. However, the stripped extraplanar gas in one highly inclined

  10. Magnetic fields in nearby spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Lenc, Emil

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in star formation process and dynamic evolution of galaxies. Previous studies of magnetic fields relied on narrow band polarisation observations and difficult to disentangle magnetised structures along line of sight. Thanks to the broad bandwidth and multi-channels of CABB we are now able to recover the 3D structures of magnetic fields using RM synthesis and QU-fitting. We propose to observe two nearby spirals M83 and NGC 4945 to build clear pictures of their magnetic fields.

  11. Global-, local-, and intermediate-scale structures in prototype spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, William W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between galactic spiral structure and the matter in the underlying disk constitutes one of the central problems in galactic dynamics. In Bertin et al. (1989), disk matter characterized by a low-dispersive speed is shown to be capable of playing a key role in the generation of large-scale spiral structure. In Roberts et al. (1992), this self-gravitating, low-dispersion disk matter is shown to be capable of playing an essential role in the formation of structure on local and intermediate scales. Both in computed cases where large-scale spiral structure is present and in those where it is not, the same dominant physical processes and fundamental dynamical mechanisms are active on local scales. The new perception, in which large-scale and small-scale phenomena operate somewhat independently as evidenced in the computational studies, permits a range of flocculent, multiarmed, and grand design spiral types to be simulated. In particular, grand design galaxies with ragged appearances exhibiting spurs, arm branchings, and interarm bridges in addition to the major spiral arms, similar to those often observed, can be generated.

  12. SUSTAINING STAR FORMATION RATES IN SPIRAL GALAXIES: SUPERNOVA-DRIVEN TURBULENT ACCRETION DISK MODELS APPLIED TO THINGS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, Bernd; Leroy, Adam K.

    2011-01-15

    Gas disks of spiral galaxies can be described as clumpy accretion disks without a coupling of viscosity to the actual thermal state of the gas. The model description of a turbulent disk consisting of emerging and spreading clumps contains free parameters, which can be constrained by observations of molecular gas, atomic gas, and the star formation rate for individual galaxies. Radial profiles of 18 nearby spiral galaxies from THINGS, HERACLES, SINGS, and GALEX data are used to compare the observed star formation efficiency, molecular fraction, and velocity dispersion to the model. The observed radially decreasing velocity dispersion can be reproduced by the model. In the framework of this model, the decrease in the inner disk is due to the stellar mass distribution which dominates the gravitational potential. Introducing a radial break in the star formation efficiency into the model improves the fits significantly. This change in the star formation regime is realized by replacing the free-fall time in the prescription of the star formation rate with the molecule formation timescale. Depending on the star formation prescription, the break radius is located near the transition region between the molecular-gas-dominated and atomic-gas-dominated parts of the galactic disk or closer to the optical radius. It is found that only less massive galaxies (log M(M{sub sun}) {approx}< 10) can balance gas loss via star formation by radial gas accretion within the disk. These galaxies can thus access their gas reservoirs with large angular momentum. On the other hand, the star formation of massive galaxies is determined by the external gas mass accretion rate from a putative spherical halo of ionized gas or from satellite accretion. In the absence of this external accretion, star formation slowly exhausts the gas within the optical disk within the star formation timescale.

  13. Giant Molecular Clouds and Star Formation in the Non-Grand Design Spiral Galaxy NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo, David; Wong, Tony; Leroy, Adam

    2011-10-01

    Although the internal physical properties of molecular clouds have been extensively studied (Solomon et al. 1987), a more detailed understanding of their origin and evolution in different types of galaxies is needed. In order to disentangle the details of this process, we performed CO(1→0) CARMA observations of the eastern part of the multi-armed galaxy NGC 6946. Our goal was to determine if azimuthal segregation of various gas and star formation tracers occurs in this kind of spiral galaxy (Tamburro et al. 2008). Although we found no evidence of an angular offset between molecular gas, atomic gas and star formation regions in our observations, we observe a clear radial progression from regions where molecular gas dominates over atomic gas (for r ≤ 2.8 kpc) to regions where the gas becomes mainly atomic (5.6 kpc ≤ r ≤ 7.6 kpc) when azimuthally averaged. In addition, we found that the densest concentrations of molecular gas are located on arms, particularly where they appear to intersect. This result is in concordance with the behavior predicted by simulations of the spiral galaxies with an active potential (Clarke & Gittins 2006; Dobbs & Bonnell 2008). Since NGC 6946 is located at a distance of 5.5 Mpc, the linear resolution of the map corresponds to 140 pc. At such resolution, we were able to find CO emitting complexes with masses greater than those of typical Giant Molecular Clouds (105-106 M⊙). To identify GMCs individually and make a more detailed study of their physical properties, we made D array observations of CO(2→1) toward the densest concentrations of gas located in the prominent spiral arms. We achieved a linear resolution of 50 pc at 1 mm in D array, similar to GMCs sizes found in other galaxies (Bolatto et al. 2008). We present first results about possible differences in the properties of the on-arm clouds and the inter-arm clouds. While inter-arm GMAs in grand-design galaxies are thought to be formed by fragmentation of more massive on

  14. The role of the corotation resonance in the secular evolution of disks of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine, J. R. D.; Scarano, S., Jr.; Barros, D. A.; Junqueira, T. C.; Dias, W. S.; Andrievsky, S.

    2014-10-01

    The corotation resonance plays an important role in the evolution of the disks of spiral galaxies, and in particular, of our Galaxy. Its effect on the chemical abundance gradients is even a tool to estimate the age of the present spiral arm structure, which we find to be long-lived, contrary to a recent common belief. The metallicity gradients usually decrease in the inner regions and become flat or rising at larger radii. In several galaxies, including the Milky Way, one observes not only a change in the slope of the abundance gradient, but also an abrupt step in metallicity at corotation. This step is because the corotation resonance separates the disk of a galaxy in two regions (inside corotation and outside corotation) which are isolated one from the other, so that the two sides evolve in an independent way. The barrier between the two regions is the result of the flow of gas in opposite directions on the two sides and by the ring-shaped void of gas observed at corotation. We investigated a sample of galaxies, which have a known corotation radius, and for which there are measurements of abundance gradients of Oxygen available in the literature. A very good correlation is found between corotation radii and the radii at which there is a break in the slope of the gradients. Besides this, an independent effect of corotation is a minimum of star formation associated with the minimum velocity at which the interstellar gas feeds the spiral arms (seen as potential wells and star-formation machines). Still another effect is the scattering of stars by the resonance, which causes their migration to different galactic radii.

  15. Kinematic properties of superbubbles in the Antennae, M83 and Arp 270

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps-Fariña, A.; Beckman, J.; Zaragoza-Cardiel, J.; Font, J.; Fathi, K.; Velázquez, P. Fabian; Rodríguez-González, A.

    2015-02-01

    Superbubbles and large scale expansion in galaxies are important indicators of activity in galaxies: they are formed in starbursts and around active nuclei. Superbubbles can be used to give information about the star-forming region which produced them. We present in-depth results of our study of kinematically detected superbubbles using a method based on Fabry-Perot spectroscopy, which allows us to map regions of expansion across the entire disk of a galaxy. Three objects have been selected for this poster based on the interest of the results they show: two interacting galaxies, the Antennae and Arp270, at different stages of galaxy interaction, and the more isolated galaxy M83. We present the kinematic expansion maps, as well as a census of detected superbubbles and a dynamical study of their properties.

  16. An expanded HST/WFC3 survey of M83: Project overview and targeted supernova remnant search

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, William P.; Kuntz, K. D.; Chandar, Rupali; Dopita, Michael A.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Hammer, Derek; Long, Knox S.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Soria, Roberto; Frank Winkler, P. E-mail: kuntz@pha.jhu.edu E-mail: Michael.Dopita@anu.edu.au E-mail: long@stsci.edu E-mail: whitmore@stsci.edu E-mail: winkler@middlebury.edu

    2014-06-10

    We present an optical/NIR imaging survey of the face-on spiral galaxy M83, using data from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Seven fields are used to cover a large fraction of the inner disk, with observations in nine broadband and narrowband filters. In conjunction with a deep Chandra survey and other new radio and optical ground-based work, these data enable a broad range of science projects to be pursued. We provide an overview of the WFC3 data and processing and then delve into one topic, the population of young supernova remnants (SNRs). We used a search method targeted toward soft X-ray sources to identify 26 new SNRs. Many compact emission nebulae detected in [Fe II] 1.644 μm align with known remnants and this diagnostic has also been used to identify many new remnants, some of which are hard to find with optical images. We include 37 previously identified SNRs that the data reveal to be <0.''5 in angular size and thus are difficult to characterize from ground-based data. The emission line ratios seen in most of these objects are consistent with shocks in dense interstellar material rather than showing evidence of ejecta. We suggest that the overall high elemental abundances in combination with high interstellar medium pressures in M83 are responsible for this result. Future papers will expand on different aspects of the these data including a more comprehensive analysis of the overall SNR population.

  17. Using H-Alpha Morphology and Surface Brightness Fluctuations to Age-Date Star Clusters in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Chandar, R.; Kim, H.; Kaleida, C.; Stankiewicz, M.; O'Connell, R.; SOC, WFC3

    2011-01-01

    We use WFC3 observations of the nearby grand design spiral galaxy M83 to develop two independent methods for estimating the ages of young star clusters. The first method uses the physical extent and morphology of H-alpha emission to estimate the ages of clusters younger than 10 Myr. It is based on the simple premise that the gas in very young (< few Myr) clusters is largely coincident with the cluster stars, is in a small, ring-like structure surrounding the stars in slightly older clusters (i.e., 5 Myr), and is in larger ring-like bubbles for older clusters (i.e., 5 - 10 Myr). The second method is based on an observed relation between pixel-to-pixel flux variations within clusters and their ages. This method relies on the fact that the brightest individual stars in a cluster are most prominent at ages around 3 - 10 Myr, and fall below the detection limit (i.e., Mv < -3.5) for ages older than 100 Myr old. The older clusters therefore have a smoother appearance and smaller pixel-to-pixel variations. We compare age estimates of clusters in M83 derived from these two techniques with estimates determined from fitting UBVIHalpha observations with model predictions, and find good agreement at the 90 % level, with an scatter of 0.2 dex in log age for young clusters (< 10 Myr) and 0.5 dex for older (> 10 Myr) clusters. This project is based on Early Release Science observations made by the WFC3 Scientific Oversight Committee. We are grateful to the Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute for awarding Director's Discretionary time for this program. Support for program #11360 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  18. An Expanded HST/WFC3 Survey of M83: Project Overview and Targeted Supernova Remnant Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Chandar, Rupali; Dopita, Michael A.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Hammer, Derek; Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Soria, Roberto; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2014-06-01

    We present an optical/NIR imaging survey of the face-on spiral galaxy M83, using data from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Seven fields are used to cover a large fraction of the inner disk, with observations in nine broadband and narrowband filters. In conjunction with a deep Chandra survey and other new radio and optical ground-based work, these data enable a broad range of science projects to be pursued. We provide an overview of the WFC3 data and processing and then delve into one topic, the population of young supernova remnants (SNRs). We used a search method targeted toward soft X-ray sources to identify 26 new SNRs. Many compact emission nebulae detected in [Fe II] 1.644 μm align with known remnants and this diagnostic has also been used to identify many new remnants, some of which are hard to find with optical images. We include 37 previously identified SNRs that the data reveal to be <0.''5 in angular size and thus are difficult to characterize from ground-based data. The emission line ratios seen in most of these objects are consistent with shocks in dense interstellar material rather than showing evidence of ejecta. We suggest that the overall high elemental abundances in combination with high interstellar medium pressures in M83 are responsible for this result. Future papers will expand on different aspects of the these data including a more comprehensive analysis of the overall SNR population. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  19. METALLICITY GRADIENT OF A LENSED FACE-ON SPIRAL GALAXY AT REDSHIFT 1.49

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, T.-T.; Kewley, L. J.; Swinbank, A. M.; Richard, J.; Livermore, R. C.

    2011-05-01

    We present the first metallicity gradient measurement for a grand-design face-on spiral galaxy at z {approx} 1.5. This galaxy has been magnified by a factor of 22x by a massive, X-ray luminous galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+2223 at z = 0.544. Using the Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics aided integral field spectrograph OSIRIS on KECK II, we target the H{alpha} emission and achieve a spatial resolution of 0.''1, corresponding to a source-plane resolution of 170 pc. The galaxy has well-developed spiral arms and the nebular emission line dynamics clearly indicate a rotationally supported disk with V{sub rot}/{sigma} {approx} 4. The best-fit disk velocity field model yields a maximum rotation of V{sub rot}sin i = 150 {+-} 15 km s{sup -1}, and a dynamical mass of M{sub dyn} = (1.3 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup 10} cosec{sup 2}(i) M{sub sun} (within 2.5 kpc), where the inclination angle i = 45{sup 0} {+-} 10{sup 0}. Based on the [N II] and H{alpha} ratios, we measured the radial chemical abundance gradient from the inner hundreds of parsecs out to {approx}5 kpc. The slope of the gradient is -0.16 {+-} 0.02 dex kpc{sup -1}, significantly steeper than the gradient of late-type or early-type galaxies in the local universe. If representative of disk galaxies at z {approx} 1.5, our results support an 'inside-out' disk formation scenario in which early infall/collapse in the galaxy center builds a chemically enriched nucleus, followed by slow enrichment of the disk over the next 9 Gyr.

  20. Unveiling the sources of disk heating in spiral galaxies with the CALIFA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, F.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Martig, M.; van de Ven, G.; Lyubenova, M.; Leaman, R.

    2016-06-01

    The stellar velocity ellipsoid (SVE) quantifies the amount of velocity dispersion in the vertical, radial and azimuthal directions. Since different disk heating mechanisms (e.g. spiral arms, giant molecular clouds, mergers, etc) affect these components differently, the SVE can constrain the sources of heating in disk galaxies. At present the 3D nature of the SVE can only be directly measured in the Milky Way but, thanks to integral-field surveys like CALIFA, we are now in position to carry out the same kind of analysis in external galaxies. For this purpose, we have gathered a sample of ~30 intermediate inclined spiral galaxies along the Hubble sequence (S0 to Scd types) with high quality stellar kinematic maps. This allows us to probe the SVE for each galaxy from different line-of-sights in different regions, and thus provide strong constraints on its shape. In this presentation we relate our preliminary findings to realistic numerical simulations of disks with different formation histories (quiescent vs mergers), and to results of previous works.

  1. Bulge-disc decompositions and structural bimodality of Ursa Major cluster spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael; Courteau, Stéphane; Tully, R. Brent

    2009-02-01

    We present bulge and disc (B/D) decompositions of existing K' surface brightness profiles for 65 Ursa Major (UMa) cluster spiral galaxies. This improves upon the disc-only fits of Tully et al. The 1996 disc fits were used by Tully & Verheijen for their discovery of the bimodality of structural parameters in the UMa cluster galaxies. It is shown that our new one-dimensional B/D decompositions yield disc structural parameters that differ only slightly from the basic fits of Tully et al. and evidence for structural bimodality of UMa galaxies is maintained. Our B/D software for the decomposition of one-dimensional surface brightness profiles of galaxies uses a non-linear minimization scheme to recover the best-fitting Sérsic bulge and the exponential disc while accounting for the possible presence of a compact nucleus and spiral arms and for the effects of seeing and disc truncations. In agreement with Tully & Verheijen, we find that the distribution of near-infrared disc central surface brightnesses is bimodal with an F-test confidence of 80 per cent. There is also strong evidence for a local minimum in the luminosity function at . A connection between the brightness bimodality and a dynamical bimodality, based on new HI linewidths, is identified. The B/D parameters are presented in Table 1.

  2. Are passive red spirals truly passive?. The current star formation activity of optically red disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.

    2012-07-01

    We used GALEX ultraviolet and WISE 22 μm observations to investigate the current star formation activity of the optically red spirals recently identified as part of the Galaxy Zoo project. These galaxies were accurately selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as pure discs with low or no current star formation activity, representing one of the best optically selected samples of candidate passive spirals. However, we show that these galaxies are not only still forming stars at a significant rate (≳1 M⊙ yr-1) but, more importantly, their star formation activity is not different from that of normal star-forming discs of the same stellar mass (M∗ ≳ 1010.2 M⊙). Indeed, these systems lie on the UV-optical blue sequence, even without any corrections for internal dust attenuation, and they follow the same specific star formation rate vs. stellar mass relation of star-forming galaxies. Our findings clearly show that at high stellar masses, optical colours do not allow to distinguish between actively star-forming and truly quiescent systems.

  3. A new method to estimate local pitch angles in spiral galaxies: Application to spiral arms and feathers in M81 and M51

    SciTech Connect

    Puerari, Ivânio; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Block, David L.

    2014-12-01

    We examine 8 μm IRAC images of the grand design two-arm spiral galaxies M81 and M51 using a new method whereby pitch angles are locally determined as a function of scale and position, in contrast to traditional Fourier transform spectral analyses which fit to average pitch angles for whole galaxies. The new analysis is based on a correlation between pieces of a galaxy in circular windows of (lnR,θ) space and logarithmic spirals with various pitch angles. The diameter of the windows is varied to study different scales. The result is a best-fit pitch angle to the spiral structure as a function of position and scale, or a distribution function of pitch angles as a function of scale for a given galactic region or area. We apply the method to determine the distribution of pitch angles in the arm and interarm regions of these two galaxies. In the arms, the method reproduces the known pitch angles for the main spirals on a large scale, but also shows higher pitch angles on smaller scales resulting from dust feathers. For the interarms, there is a broad distribution of pitch angles representing the continuation and evolution of the spiral arm feathers as the flow moves into the interarm regions. Our method shows a multiplicity of spiral structures on different scales, as expected from gas flow processes in a gravitating, turbulent and shearing interstellar medium. We also present results for M81 using classical 1D and 2D Fourier transforms, together with a new correlation method, which shows good agreement with conventional 2D Fourier transforms.

  4. A New Method to Estimate Local Pitch Angles in Spiral Galaxies: Application to Spiral Arms and Feathers in M81 and M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puerari, Ivânio; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Block, David L.

    2014-12-01

    We examine 8 μ m IRAC images of the grand design two-arm spiral galaxies M81 and M51 using a new method whereby pitch angles are locally determined as a function of scale and position, in contrast to traditional Fourier transform spectral analyses which fit to average pitch angles for whole galaxies. The new analysis is based on a correlation between pieces of a galaxy in circular windows of (ln R,θ ) space and logarithmic spirals with various pitch angles. The diameter of the windows is varied to study different scales. The result is a best-fit pitch angle to the spiral structure as a function of position and scale, or a distribution function of pitch angles as a function of scale for a given galactic region or area. We apply the method to determine the distribution of pitch angles in the arm and interarm regions of these two galaxies. In the arms, the method reproduces the known pitch angles for the main spirals on a large scale, but also shows higher pitch angles on smaller scales resulting from dust feathers. For the interarms, there is a broad distribution of pitch angles representing the continuation and evolution of the spiral arm feathers as the flow moves into the interarm regions. Our method shows a multiplicity of spiral structures on different scales, as expected from gas flow processes in a gravitating, turbulent and shearing interstellar medium. We also present results for M81 using classical 1D and 2D Fourier transforms, together with a new correlation method, which shows good agreement with conventional 2D Fourier transforms.

  5. Magnetic fields in the nearby spiral galaxy IC 342: A multi-frequency radio polarization study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    2015-06-01

    Context. Magnetic fields play an important role in the formation and stabilization of spiral structures in galaxies, but the interaction between interstellar gas and magnetic fields has not yet been understood. In particular, the phenomenon of "magnetic arms" located between material arms is a mystery. Aims: The strength and structure of interstellar magnetic fields and their relation to spiral arms in gas and dust are investigated in the nearby and almost face-on spiral galaxy IC 342. Methods: The total and polarized radio continuum emission of IC 342 was observed with high spatial resolution in four wavelength bands with the Effelsberg and VLA telescopes. At λ6.2 cm the data from both telescopes were combined. I separated thermal and nonthermal (synchrotron) emission components with the help of the spectral index distribution and derived maps of the magnetic field strength, degree of magnetic field order, magnetic pitch angle, Faraday rotation measure, and Faraday depolarization. Results: IC 342 hosts a diffuse radio disk with an intensity that decreases exponentially with increasing radius. The frequency dependence of the scalelength of synchrotron emission indicates energy-dependent propagation of the cosmic-ray electrons, probably via the streaming instability. The equipartition strength of the total field in the main spiral arms is typically 15 μG, that of the ordered field about 5 μG. The total radio emission, observed with the VLA's high resolution, closely follows the dust emission in the infrared at 8 μm (Spitzer telescope) and 22 μm (WISE telescope). The polarized emission is not diffuse, but concentrated in spiral arms of various types: (1) a narrow arm of about 300 pc width, displaced inwards with respect to the eastern arm by about 200 pc, indicating magnetic fields compressed by a density wave; (2) a broad arm of 300-500 pc width around the northern arm with systematic variations in polarized emission, polarization angles, and Faraday rotation

  6. 2MASS photometry of edge-on spiral galaxies - I. Sample and general results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosenkov, A. V.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Reshetnikov, V. P.

    2010-01-01

    A sample of edge-on spiral galaxies aimed at a thorough study of the main structural and photometric parameters of edge-on galaxies, both of early- and late-types, is presented. The data were taken from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) in the J, H and Ks filters. The sources were selected according to their angular size mainly on the basis of the 2MASS-selected Flat Galaxy Catalog (2MFGC). The sample consists of 175 galaxies in the Ks filter, 169 galaxies in the H filter and 165 galaxies in the J filter. We present bulge and disc decompositions of each galaxy image. All galaxies have been modelled with a Sérsic bulge and exponential disc with the BUDDA v2.1 package. Bulge and disc sizes, profile shapes, surface brightnesses are provided. Our sample is the biggest up-to-date sample of edge-on galaxies with derived structural parameters for discs and bulges. In this paper, we present the general results of the study of this sample. We determine several scaling relations for bulges and discs which indicate a tight link between their formation and evolution. We show that galaxies with bulges fitted by the Sérsic index n <~ 2 have quite different distributions of their structural parameters than galaxies with n >~ 2 bulges. At a first approximation the Sérsic index threshold n ~= 2 can be used to identify pseudobulges and classical bulges. Thus, the difference in parameter distributions and scaling relations for these subsamples suggests that two or more processes are responsible for disc galaxy formation. The main conclusions of our general statistical analysis of the sample are as follows. (i) The distribution of the apparent bulge axis ratio qb for the subsample with n <~ 2 can be attributed to triaxial, nearly prolate bulges that are seen from different projections, while n >~ 2 bulges seem to be oblate spheroids with moderate flattening. Triaxiality of late-type bulges may be due to the presence of a bar that thickened in the vertical direction during its

  7. Properties of the giant H II regions and bar in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brière, É.; Cantin, S.; Spekkens, K.

    2012-09-01

    In order to better understand the impact of the bar on the evolution of spiral galaxies, we measure the properties of giant H II regions and the bar in the SB(s)b galaxy NGC 5430. We use two complementary data sets, both obtained at the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic: a hyperspectral data cube from the imaging Fourier transform spectrograph SpIOMM (Spectromètre-Imageur à transformée de Fourier de l-Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic) and high-resolution spectra across the bar from a long-slit spectrograph. We flux-calibrate SpIOMM spectra for the first time, and produce Hα and [N II]λ6584 Å intensity maps from which we identify 51 giant H II regions in the spiral arms and bar. We evaluate the type of activity, the oxygen abundance and the age of the young populations contained in these giant H II regions and in the bar. Thus, we confirm that NGC 5430 does not harbour a strong active galactic nucleus, and that its Wolf-Rayet knot shows a pure H II region nature. We find no variation in abundance or age between the bar and spiral arms, nor as a function of galactocentric radius. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a chemical mixing mechanism is at work in the galaxy's disc to flatten the oxygen abundance gradient. Using the STARBURST99 model, we estimate the ages of the young populations, and again find no variations in age between the bar and the arms or as a function of radius. Instead, we find evidence for two galaxy-wide waves of star formation, about 7.1 and 10.5 Myr ago. While the bar in NGC 5430 is an obvious candidate to trigger these two episodes, it is not clear how the bar could induce widespread star formation on such a short time-scale.

  8. Investigating the Nuclear Activity of Barred Spiral Galaxies: The Case of NGC 1672

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, L. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Colbert, E. J.; Koribalski, B.; Kuntz, K. D.; Levan, A. J.; Ojha, R.; Roberts, T. P.; Ward, M. J.; Zezas, A.

    2011-01-01

    We have performed an X-ray study of the nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672, primarily to ascertain the effect of the bar on its nuclear activity. We use both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations to investigate its X-ray properties, together with supporting high-resolution optical imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and Australia Telescope Compact Array ground-based radio data. We detect 28 X-ray sources within the D25 area of the galaxy; many are spatially correlated with star formation in the bar and spiral arms, and two are identified as background galaxies in the HST images. Nine of the X-ray sources are ultraluminous X-ray sources, with the three brightest (LX 5 * 10(exp 39) erg s(exp -1)) located at the ends of the bar. With the spatial resolution of Chandra, we are able to show for the first time that NGC 1672 possesses a hard (1.5) nuclear X-ray source with a 2-10 keV luminosity of 4 * 10(exp 38) erg s(exp -1). This is surrounded by an X-ray-bright circumnuclear star-forming ring, comprised of point sources and hot gas, which dominates the 2-10 keV emission in the central region of the galaxy. The spatially resolved multiwavelength photometry indicates that the nuclear source is a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN), but with star formation activity close to the central black hole. A high-resolution multiwavelength survey is required to fully assess the impact of both large-scale bars and smaller-scale phenomena such as nuclear bars, rings, and nuclear spirals on the fueling of LLAGN.

  9. OT2_bsmith_3: Spirals, Bridges, and Tails: The Herschel View of Dust in Interacting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B.

    2011-09-01

    The tidal features produced by gravitational interactions between galaxies may contribute significantly to the enrichment of the intergalactic medium in dust and heavy elements. However, at the present time little is known about the dust content and properties of tidal structures. To address this lack, we propose to use the PACS and SPIRE instruments on Herschel to image a sample of nine nearby interacting galaxies in six far-infrared/submm broadband filters. We will map the dust column density and temperature in the main bodies and tidal features of these galaxies, and compare the far-infrared/submm properties of these features with those of normal spirals and dwarf galaxies. We will compare the Herschel maps with already acquired GALEX UV, Spitzer IR, and ground-based optical data, and with population synthesis and radiative transfer codes, to investigate dust heating mechanisms and extinction in these galaxies. We will compare with available radio maps to investigate dust/gas ratios and star formation triggering mechanisms, and compare with numerical simulations of the interactions. Our sample includes the closest and best-studied examples of tidal dwarf galaxies and accretion-driven star formation. These will provide a good testbed for interpreting high redshift systems.

  10. Star formation histories across the interacting galaxy NGC 6872, the largest-known spiral

    SciTech Connect

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; De Mello, Duilia F.; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.; Benford, Dominic J.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Urrutia-Viscarra, Fernanda; De Oliveira, Claudia Mendes

    2014-11-01

    NGC 6872, hereafter the Condor, is a large spiral galaxy that is interacting with its closest companion, the S0 galaxy IC 4970. The extent of the Condor provides an opportunity for detailed investigation of the impact of the interaction on the current star formation rate and its history across the galaxy, on the age and spatial distribution of its stellar population, and on the mechanism that drives the star formation activity. To address these issues we analyzed the far-ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (near-IR) spectral energy distribution of seventeen 10 kpc diameter regions across the galaxy, and derived their star formation history, current star formation rate, and stellar population and mass. We find that most of the star formation takes place in the extended arms, with very little star formation in the central 5 kpc of the galaxy, in contrast to what was predicted from previous numerical simulations. There is a trend of increasing star formation activity with distance from the nucleus of the galaxy, and no evidence for a recent increase in the current star formation rate due to the interaction. The nucleus itself shows no significant current star formation activity. The extent of the Condor also provides an opportunity to test the applicability of a single standard prescription for conversion of the FUV + IR (22 μm) intensities to a star formation rate for all regions. We find that the conversion factor differs from region to region, arising from regional differences in the stellar populations.