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Sample records for spitzer 24mic cosmos

  1. New Results from the Spitzer-COSMOS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, David B.; COSMOS Team

    2009-05-01

    The Spitzer-COSMOS survey (S-COSMOS) is a Legacy program (Cycles 2+3) that was designed to carry out a uniform deep survey of the full 2-deg2 COSMOS field in all seven IRAC + MIPS bands. We present the final IRAC-1234 and MIPS24,70,160 catalogs and images, and compare our differential source counts for the COSMOS field with other deep fields observed by Spitzer. New results from a study of a complete 70micron-selected sample of 1200 sources are also presented, including the variation in spectral energy distributions, optical morphology, and spectral type of the host galaxies of these luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs). Our S-COSMOS results are compared with similar studies of the population of LIRGs in the local universe.

  2. Completing the Legacy of Spitzer/IRAC over COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labbe, Ivo; Caputi, Karina; McLeod, Derek; Cowley, Will; Dayal, Pratika; Behroozi, Peter; Ashby, Matt; Franx, Marijn; Dunlop, James; Le Fevre, Olivier; Fynbo, Johan; McCracken, Henry; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Ilbert, Olivier; Tasca, Lidia; de Barros, Stephane; Oesch, Pascal; Bouwens, Rychard; Muzzin, Adam; Illingworth, Garth; Stefanon, Mauro; Schreiber, Corentin; Hutter, Anne; van Dokkum, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    We propose to complete the legacy of Spitzer/IRAC over COSMOS by extending the deep coverage to the full 1.8 sq degree field, producing a nearly homogenous and contiguous map unparalleled in terms of area and depth. Ongoing and scheduled improvements in the supporting optical-to-NIR data down to ultradeep limits have reconfirmed COSMOS as a unique field for probing the bright end of the z=6-11 universe and the formation of large-scale structures. However, currently only one-third of the field has received sufficiently deep IRAC coverage to match the new optical/near-IR limits. Here we request deep matching IRAC data over the full 1.8 sq degree field to detect almost one million galaxies. The proposed observations will allow us to 1) constrain the galaxy stellar mass function during the epoch of reionization at z=6-8 with ~10,000 galaxies at these redshifts, 2) securely identify the brightest galaxies at 9 < z < 11, 3) trace the growth of stellar mass at 1 < z < 8 and the co-evolution of galaxies and their dark matter halos, 4) identify (proto)clusters and large scale structures, and 5) reveal dust enshrouded starbursts and the first quiescent galaxies at 3 < z < 6. The Spitzer Legacy over COSMOS will enable a wide range of discoveries beyond these science goals owing to the unique array of multiwavelength data from the X-ray to the radio. COSMOS is a key target for ongoing and future studies with ALMA and for spectroscopy from the ground, and with the timely addition of the Spitzer Legacy it will prove to be a crucial treasury for efficient planning and early follow-up with JWST.

  3. SPITZER 70 AND 160 {mu}m OBSERVATIONS OF THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Frayer, D. T.; Huynh, M. T.; Bhattacharya, B.; Fadda, D.; Helou, G.; Sanders, D. B.; Le Floc'h, E.; Ilbert, O.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Lee, N.; Surace, J. A.; Capak, P.; Murphy, E.; Aussel, H.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Fu, H.; Afonso-Luis, A.; Sargent, M. T.

    2009-11-15

    We present Spitzer 70 and 160 {mu}m observations of the COSMOS Spitzer survey (S-COSMOS). The data processing techniques are discussed for the publicly released products consisting of images and source catalogs. We present accurate 70 and 160 {mu}m source counts of the COSMOS field and find reasonable agreement with measurements in other fields and with model predictions. The previously reported counts for GOODS-North and the extragalactic First Look Survey are updated with the latest calibration, and counts are measured based on the large area SWIRE survey to constrain the bright source counts. We measure an extragalactic confusion noise level of {sigma} {sub c} = 9.4 {+-} 3.3 mJy (q = 5) for the MIPS 160 {mu}m band based on the deep S-COSMOS data and report an updated confusion noise level of {sigma} {sub c} = 0.35 {+-} 0.15 mJy (q = 5) for the MIPS 70 {mu}m band.

  4. DEEP SPITZER 24 {mu}m COSMOS IMAGING. I. THE EVOLUTION OF LUMINOUS DUSTY GALAXIES-CONFRONTING THE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floc'h, Emeric; Ilbert, Olivier; Riguccini, Laurie; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Sanders, David; Aussel, Herve; Feruglio, Chiara; Frayer, David T.; Salvato, Mara; Capak, Peter; Scoville, Nick; Arnouts, Stephane; Surace, Jason; Sheth, Kartik; Yan Lin; Rodighiero, Giulia; Heinis, Sebastien; McCracken, Henry Joy; Thompson, David; Koekemoer, Anton

    2009-09-20

    We present the first results obtained from the identification of {approx}30,000 sources in the Spitzer/24 {mu}m observations of the COSMOS field at S{sub 24{mu}m} {approx}> 80 {mu}Jy. Using accurate photometric redshifts ({sigma} {sub z} {approx} 0.12 at z {approx} 2 for 24 {mu}m sources with i {sup +} {approx}< 25 mag AB) and simple extrapolations of the number counts at faint fluxes, we resolve with unprecedented detail the buildup of the mid-infrared background across cosmic ages. We find that {approx}50% and {approx}80% of the 24 {mu}m background intensity originate from galaxies at z {approx}< 1 and z {approx}< 2, respectively, supporting the scenario where highly obscured sources at very high redshifts (z {approx}> 2) contribute only marginally to the cosmic infrared background. Assuming flux-limited selections at optical wavelengths, we also find that the fraction of i {sup +}-band sources with 24 {mu}m detection strongly increases up to z {approx} 2 as a consequence of the rapid evolution that star-forming galaxies have undergone with look-back time. Nonetheless, this rising trend shows a clear break at z {approx} 1.3, probably due to k-correction effects implied by the complexity of spectral energy distributions in the mid-infrared. Finally, we compare our results with the predictions from different models of galaxy formation. We note that semianalytical formalisms currently fail to reproduce the redshift distributions observed at 24 {mu}m. Furthermore, the simulated galaxies at S {sub 24{mu}m} > 80 {mu}Jy exhibit R-K colors much bluer than observed and the predicted K-band fluxes are systematically underestimated at z {approx}> 0.5. Unless these discrepancies mainly result from an incorrect treatment of extinction in the models they may reflect an underestimate of the predicted density of high-redshift massive sources with strong ongoing star formation, which would point to more fundamental processes and/or parameters (e.g., initial mass function

  5. THE OPTICAL SPECTRA OF SPITZER 24 mum GALAXIES IN THE COSMIC EVOLUTION SURVEY FIELD. II. FAINT INFRARED SOURCES IN THE zCOSMOS-BRIGHT 10k CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Caputi, K. I.; Lilly, S. J.; Maier, C.; Carollo, C. M.; Aussel, H.; Floc'h, E. Le; Frayer, D.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fevre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Scoville, N.; Zamorani, G.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Coppa, G.; Bongiorno, A.

    2009-12-20

    We have used the zCOSMOS-bright 10k sample to identify 3244 Spitzer/MIPS 24 mum-selected galaxies with 0.06 mJy < S{sub 24{sub m}}u{sub m} approx< 0.50 mJy and I{sub AB} < 22.5, over 1.5 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field, and studied different spectral properties, depending on redshift. At 0.2 < z < 0.3, we found that different reddening laws of common use in the literature explain the dust extinction properties of approx80% of our infrared (IR) sources, within the error bars. For up to 16% of objects, instead, the Halpha lambda6563/Hbeta lambda4861 ratios are too high for their IR/UV attenuations, which is probably a consequence of inhomogeneous dust distributions. In only a few of our galaxies at 0.2 < z < 0.3, the IR emission could be mainly produced by dust heated by old rather than young stars. Besides, the line ratios of approx22% of our galaxies suggest that they might be star-formation/nuclear-activity composite systems. At 0.5 < z < 0.7, we estimated galaxy metallicities for 301 galaxies: at least 12% of them are securely below the upper-branch mass-metallicity trend, which is consistent with the local relation. Finally, we performed a combined analysis of the H{sub d}elta equivalent width versus D{sub n} (4000) diagram for 1722 faint and bright 24 mum galaxies at 0.6 < z < 1.0, spanning two decades in mid-IR luminosity. We found that, while secondary bursts of star formation are necessary to explain the position of the most luminous IR galaxies in that diagram, quiescent, exponentially declining star formation histories can well reproduce the spectral properties of approx40% of the less luminous sources. Our results suggest a transition in the possible modes of star formation at total IR luminosities L{sub TIR} approx (3 +- 2) x 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}.

  6. Association between the AUC0-24/MIC Ratio of Vancomycin and Its Clinical Effectiveness: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Men, Peng; Li, Hui-Bo; Zhai, Suo-Di; Zhao, Rong-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background A target AUC0-24/MIC ratio of 400 has been associated with its clinical success when treating Staphylococcus aureus infections but is not currently supported by state-of-the-art evidence-based research. Objective This current systematic review aimed to evaluate the available evidence for the association between the AUC0-24/MIC ratio of vancomycin and its clinical effectiveness on hospitalized patients and to confirm the existing target value of 400. Methods PubMed, Embase, Web of Sciences, the Cochrane Library and two Chinese literature databases (CNKI, CBM) were systematically searched. Manual searching was also applied. Both RCTs and observational studies comparing the clinical outcomes of high AUC0-24/MIC groups versus low AUC0-24/MIC groups were eligible. Two reviewers independently extracted the data. The primary outcomes were mortality and infection treatment failure. Risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) were calculated. Results No RCTs were retrieved. Nine cohort studies were included in the meta-analysis. Mortality rates were significantly lower in high AUC0-24/MIC groups (RR = 0.47, 95%CI = 0.31–0.70, p<0.001). The rates of infection treatment failure were also significantly lower in high AUC/MIC groups and were consistent after correcting for heterogeneity (RR = 0.39, 95%CI = 0.28–0.55, p = 0.001). Subgroup analyses showed that results were consistent whether MIC values were determined by broth microdilution (BMD) method or Etest method. In studies using the BMD method, breakpoints of AUC0-24/MIC all fell within 85% to 115% of 400. Conclusions This meta-analysis demonstrated that achieving a high AUC0-24/MIC of vancomycin could significantly decrease mortality rates by 53% and rates of infection treatment failure by 61%, with 400 being a reasonable target. PMID:26731739

  7. First Results from the Spitzer Exploration Program Spitzer-CANDELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Matthew; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Willner, Steven P.

    2014-06-01

    In this contribution, we introduce the Spitzer-Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (S-CANDELS), a Cycle 8 Spitzer Exploration program. S-CANDELS has recently completed a very deep survey of five premier extragalactic survey fields: COSMOS, the EGS, the UDS, HDF-N, and ECDFS. S-CANDELS benefits from coextensive imaging in multiple near-infrared bands by the Multi-Cycle HST Treasury Program CANDELS. The S-CANDELS observations reach to 27 AB mag in both bands of warm Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). Here we present the S-CANDELS survey strategy and parameters, and describe the deepest source counts ever measured at these wavelengths, surpassing the SEDS counts by a full magnitude. Finally, we touch upon the implications for source confusion for upcoming planned and proposed missions such as JWST and WISH.

  8. The Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Filippenko, Alex

    2013-10-01

    Preface; About the authors; 1. A grand tour of the heavens; 2. Light, matter and energy: powering the Universe; 3. Light and telescopes: extending our senses; 4. Observing the stars and planets: clockwork of the Universe; 5. Gravitation and motion: the early history of astronomy; 6. The terrestrial planets: Earth, Moon, and their relatives; 7. The Jovian planets: windswept giants; 8. Pluto, comets, and space debris; 9. Our Solar System and others; 10. Our star: the Sun; 11. Stars: distant suns; 12. How the stars shine: cosmic furnaces; 13. The death of stars: recycling; 14. Black holes: the end of space and time; 15. The Milky Way: our home in the Universe; 16. A Universe of galaxies; 17. Quasars and active galaxies; 18. Cosmology: the birth and life of the cosmos; 19. In the beginning; 20. Life in the Universe; Epilogue; Appendices; Selected readings; Glossary; Index.

  9. Cosmos 2229

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. Reggie; Roy, Roland R.; Hodgson, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The 6 weeks preflight activities of the Cosmos project during 1993 included: modification of EMG connector to improve the reliability of EMG recording; 24 hour cage activity recording from all but two of the flight animals (monkeys); attempts to record from flight candidates during foot lever task; and force transducer calibrations on all flight candidate animals. The 4 week postflight recordings included: postflight recordings from flight animals; postflight recordings on 3 control (non-flight) animals; postflight recalibration of force transducers on 1 flight and 4 control (non-flight) animals; and attempts to record EMG and video data from the flight animals during postflight locomotion and postural activity. The flight EMG recordings suggest that significant changes in muscle control may occur in spaceflight. It is also clear from recordings that levels of EMG recorded during spaceflight can attain values similar to those measured on earth. Amplifier gain settings should therefore probably not be changed for spaceflight.

  10. Efficient Mosaicking of Spitzer Space Telescope Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Joseph; Makovoz, David; Eisenhardt, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A parallel version of the MOPEX software, which generates mosaics of infrared astronomical images acquired by the Spitzer Space Telescope, extends the capabilities of the prior serial version. In the parallel version, both the input image space and the output mosaic space are divided among the available parallel processors. This is the only software that performs the point-source detection and the rejection of spurious imaging effects of cosmic rays required by Spitzer scientists. This software includes components that implement outlier-detection algorithms that can be fine-tuned for a particular set of image data by use of a number of adjustable parameters. This software has been used to construct a mosaic of the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera Shallow Survey, which comprises more than 17,000 exposures in four wavelength bands from 3.6 to 8 m and spans a solid angle of about 9 square degrees. When this software was executed on 32 nodes of the 1,024-processor Cosmos cluster computer at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a speedup of 8.3 was achieved over the serial version of MOPEX. The performance is expected to improve dramatically once a true parallel file system is installed on Cosmos.

  11. COSMOS Launch Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnins, Indulis

    2002-01-01

    COSMOS-3M is a two stage launcher with liquid propellant rocket engines. Since 1960's COSMOS has launched satellites of up to 1.500kg in both circular low Earth and elliptical orbits with high inclination. The direct SSO ascent is available from Plesetsk launch site. The very high number of 759 launches and the achieved success rate of 97,4% makes this space transportation system one of the most reliable and successful launchers in the world. The German small satellite company OHB System co-operates since 1994 with the COSMOS manufacturer POLYOT, Omsk, in Russia. They have created the joint venture COSMOS International and successfully launched five German and Italian satellites in 1999 and 2000. The next commercial launches are contracted for 2002 and 2003. In 2005 -2007 COSMOS will be also used for the new German reconnaissance satellite launches. This paper provides an overview of COSMOS-3M launcher: its heritage and performance, examples of scientific and commercial primary and piggyback payload launches, the launch service organization and international cooperation. The COSMOS launch service business strategy main points are depicted. The current and future position of COSMOS in the worldwide market of launch services is outlined.

  12. First results from the Chandra COSMOS Legacy survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civano, Francesca M.; the Chandra COSMOS Legacy Team

    2014-01-01

    The equatorial 2 deg2 COSMOS area is the only large field for which a complete, deep, pan-chromatic data set exists, from an outstanding survey effort, and that all large telescopes can observe. During 2013, this pioneering and ambitious COSMOS survey had a major extension, pushing its frontiers via the newly approved Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey, the second largest Chandra proposal ever approved, plus new deep Spitzer, JVLA and NuSTAR surveys all aimed to study the formation of the structures in the high redshift Universe and the role of active super massive black holes. The Chandra COSMOS-Legacy survey uniformly covers the 1.7 deg2 COSMOS/HST field with 2.8 Ms of Chandra ACIS-I imaging at ~160 ksec depth. This project expands the deep C-COSMOS area by a factor of ~3 at ~3e-16 (1.45 vs 0.44 deg2). The survey consists of 56x50 ks tiles covering a total area of 2.2 deg2 yelding a sample of ~4000 X-ray sources. In this poster we present the first results on the survey and we concentrate on the high redshift z>3 sample.

  13. Signals from the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Jeffrey M.

    1991-01-01

    Introduces the basics of radio astronomy and describes how to assemble several simple systems for receiving radio signals from the cosmos. Includes schematics, parts lists, working drawings, and contact information for radio astronomy suppliers. (11 references) (Author/JJK)

  14. Carl Sagan Cosmos Voyager

    NASA Video Gallery

    Excerpt from "Cosmos", read by Carl Sagan, part of the NASA.gov multimedia piece celebrating NASA's 50th anniversary in 2008. Used by permission of Carl Sagan Associates. To see the whole interacti...

  15. Visualizing the cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Space, as Douglas Adams once wrote, is big. Really big. But just how big is it? And what else, aside from our own planet Earth, is out there in it? Cosmos: the Infographic Book of Space answers these questions in a stunning fashion, but to describe it as a beautiful book full of interesting facts does not do it justice.

  16. Engines for the Cosmos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, Stephen L.; Reisz, Al; Wyckoff, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Galactic forces spiral across the cosmos fueled by nuclear fission and fusion and atoms in plasmatic states with throes of constraints of gravitational forces and magnetic fields, In their wanderings these galaxies spew light, radiation, atomic and subatomic particles throughout the universe. Throughout the ages of man visions of journeying through the stars have been wondered. If humans and human devices from Earth are to go beyond the Moon and journey into deep space, it must be accomplished with like forces of the cosmos such as electrical fields, magnetic fields, ions, electrons and energies generated from the manipulation of subatomic and atomic particles. Forms of electromagnetic waves such as light, radio waves and lasers must control deep space engines. We won't get far on our Earth accustomed hydrocarbon fuels.

  17. Cosmos: 1989 immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1991-01-01

    The effects of flight on Cosmos mission 2044 on leukocyte subset distribution and the sensitivity of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factor-GM were determined. A parallel study with antiorthostatic suspension was also carried out. The study involved repetition and expansion of studies performed on Cosmos 1887. Spleen and bone marrow cells were obtained from flown, vivarium control, synchronous control, and suspended rats. The cells were stained with a series of monoclonal antibodies directed against rat leukocyte cell surface antigens. Control cells were stained with a monoclonal antibody directed against an irrelevant species or were unstained. Cells were then analyzed for fluorescence using a FACSCAN flow cytometer. Bone marrow cells were placed in culture with GM-CSF in McCoy's 5a medium and incubated for 5 days. Cultures were then evaluated for the number of colonies of 50 cells or greater.

  18. The Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey: A New Window to the Obscured and Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civano, Francesca M.; Elvis, M.; Hasinger, G.; Comastri, A.; Harrison, F.; Urry, C. M.; Brusa, M.; Zamorani, G.; Cappelluti, N.; Scoville, N.; Schinnerer, E.; Donley, J.; Allevato, V.; Silverman, J.; Treister, E.; Capak, P. L.; Aldcroft, T. L.; Alexander, D.; D'Abrusco, R.; Finoguenov, A.; Fruscione, A.; Glikman, E.; Hao, H.; Jahnke, K.; Karim, A.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Leauthaud, A.; Lanzuisi, G.; Miyaji, T.; Vignali, C.; Fiore, F.; Puccetti, S.; Ranalli, P.; Smolcic, V.; Riguccini, L.; Sargent, M.; Schawinski, K.; Stern, D.; Gilli, R.

    2013-01-01

    The equatorial 2 deg2 COSMOS area is the only large field for which a complete, deep, pan-chromatic data set exists, from an outstanding survey effort, and that all large telescopes can observe. Now, this pioneering and ambitious COSMOS survey is undergoing major extension, pushing its frontiers via the newly approved Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey, the second largest Chandra proposal ever approved.'COSMOS-Legacy' will uniformly cover the 1.7 deg2 COSMOS/HST field with 2.8 Ms of Chandra ACIS-I imaging at ~160 ksec depth. This project expands the current deep C-COSMOS area by a factor of ~3 at ~3e-16 (1.45 vs 0.44 deg2). This will be achieved with 56x50 ks tiles covering a total area of 2.2 deg2, which will be observed during Chandra Cycle 14. The area and depth of COSMOS Legacy are designed to detect ~40 z>4, and ~4 z>5 Large Scale Structures on >15 arcmin scales. These structures have proven to connect luminous AGN (over 200 at z>3 will be detected) and sub-mm galaxies. COSMOS Legacy will also probe mini-quasars at z>7, using anistotropies of the unresolved X-ray Background, and the masses of the Dark Matter halos hosting X-ray AGN up to 3, via autocorrelation functions on ~30arcmin scales. To fully achieve these goals, COSMOS Legacy is complemented by spectroscopic follow-up with DEIMOS and MOSFIRE at Keck and KMOS at the VLT and FMOS at Subaru, just approved observations with Spitzer and JVLA, and with harder (5-80 keV) X-ray imaging with NuSTAR. In the near future, observations with Subaru HyperSuprimeCam (grizY) to r(AB)=28.2 are planned.

  19. Spitzer Telemetry Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanboli, Alice; Martinez, Elmain M.; McAuley, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spitzer Telemetry Processing System (SirtfTlmProc) was designed to address objectives of JPL's Multi-mission Image Processing Lab (MIPL) in processing spacecraft telemetry and distributing the resulting data to the science community. To minimize costs and maximize operability, the software design focused on automated error recovery, performance, and information management. The system processes telemetry from the Spitzer spacecraft and delivers Level 0 products to the Spitzer Science Center. SirtfTlmProc is a unique system with automated error notification and recovery, with a real-time continuous service that can go quiescent after periods of inactivity. The software can process 2 GB of telemetry and deliver Level 0 science products to the end user in four hours. It provides analysis tools so the operator can manage the system and troubleshoot problems. It automates telemetry processing in order to reduce staffing costs.

  20. The New Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eicher, David J.; Filippenko, Alex

    2015-12-01

    Foreword Alex Filippenko; 1. The awakening of astronomy; 2. How the Sun will die; 3. The end of life on Earth; 4. How the moon formed; 5. Where has all the water gone?; 6. Why did Venus turn inside-out?; 7. Is Pluto a planet?; 8. Planets everywhere; 9. The Milky Way as barred spiral; 10. Here comes Milkomeda; 11. The Big Bang's cosmic echo; 12. How large is the universe?; 13. The mystery of dark matter; 14. The bigger mystery of dark energy; 15. Black holes are ubiquitous; 16. What is the universe's fate?; 17. The meaning of life in the cosmos; Glossary; Bibliography; Index.

  1. COSMOS 2044 Mission: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R. E.; Ballard, R. W.; Connol, J. P.; Vasques, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    The COSMOS 2044 spaceflight was the ninth Soviet-International joint mission dedicated to space biomedicine and the seventh in which the United States has participated. The unmanned Vostok vehicle carried 10 rats and two rhesus monkeys on its 14-day voyage. This spaceflight yielded an unprecedented bounty of data on physiological responses to the microgravity environment. The tissues studied and the numbers and types of studies performed by members of the international science community constituted a new record. Many of the results obtained by the approximately 80 American scientists who participated are reported in the series of COSMOS 2044 papers in this issue. Descriptions of the spaceflight and animal procedures are detailed elsewhere. The broad goals of the space biomedical program are threefold. The first is to characterize qualitatively and quantitatively the biological responses to the microgravity environment, be they adaptive or pathological. The second goal is to clarify the physiological-biochemical mechanisms mediating the responses to microgravity. The third goal of this program is to use the space environment as a tool to better understand adaptive and disease processes in terrestrial organisms.

  2. Cosmos-1989 immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1991-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. The number of flight experiments has been small, and the full breadth of immunological alterations occurring after space flight remains to be established. Among the major effects on immune responses after space flight that have been reported are: alterations in lymphocyte blastogenesis and natural killer cell activity, alterations in production of cytokines, changes in leukocyte sub-population distribution, and decreases in the ability in the ability of bone marrow cells to respond to colony stimulating factors. Changes have been reported in immunological parameters of both humans and rodents. The significance of these alterations in relation to resistance to infection remains to be established. The current study involved a determination of the effects of flight on Cosmos mission 2044 on leukocyte subset distribution and the sensitivity of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factor-GM. A parallel study with antiorthostatic suspension was also carried out. The study involved repetition and expansion of studies carried out on Cosmos 1887.

  3. Cosmos 1887 - Science overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty two groups of U.S. investigators participated in joint studies of ten male rats flown on the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite. A summary of these studies embracing skeletal muscle, bone, endocrine, neural, intestinal, metabolic, immunology, cardiac, and gonadal investigations is presented. Three general objectives of the rat experiments are outlined - verification of previous observations of the biological responses to microgravity; clarification of the effects of microgravity on both the tissues investigated and the measurements performed; and relation of biological responses to flight duration. It is concluded that the first objective is met fully and the second with a varying degree of success. The confounding effects of overshooting the designated landing site and delayed recovery of the animals largely precluded meeting the last objective. It is also noted that investigations were performed for the first time on brain and spinal cord enzymes, a neurotransmitter, transmitter receptors, hypothalamic regulatory factors, pineal metabolites, atrial granules, liver histology, and jejunal mitotic rate in spaceflight animals.

  4. Spitzer Spies Spectacular Sombrero

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2 NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope set its infrared eyes on one of the most famous objects in the sky, Messier 104, also called the Sombrero galaxy. In this striking infrared picture, Spitzer sees an exciting new view of a galaxy that in visible light has been likened to a 'sombrero,' but here looks more like a 'bulls-eye.'

    Recent observations using Spitzer's infrared array camera uncovered the bright, smooth ring of dust circling the galaxy, seen in red. In visible light, because this galaxy is seen nearly edge-on, only the near rim of dust can be clearly seen in silhouette. Spitzer's full view shows the disk is warped, which is often the result of a gravitational encounter with another galaxy, and clumpy areas spotted in the far edges of the ring indicate young star-forming regions.

    Spitzer's infrared view of the starlight from this galaxy, seen in blue, can pierce through obscuring murky dust that dominates in visible light. As a result, the full extent of the bulge of stars and an otherwise hidden disk of stars within the dust ring are easily seen.

    The Sombrero galaxy is located some 28 million light years away. Viewed from Earth, it is just six degrees south of its equatorial plane. Spitzer detected infrared emission not only from the ring, but from the center of the galaxy too, where there is a huge black hole, believed to be a billion times more massive than our Sun.

    This picture is composed of four images taken at 3.6 (blue), 4.5 (green), 5.8 (orange), and 8.0 (red) microns. The contribution from starlight (measured at 3.6 microns) has been subtracted from the 5.8 and 8-micron images to enhance the visibility of the dust features.

    In figure 1, the new picture of Messier 104 combines a recent infrared observation from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope with a well

  5. Spitzer Spies Spectacular Sombrero

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2 NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope set its infrared eyes on one of the most famous objects in the sky, Messier 104, also called the Sombrero galaxy. In this striking infrared picture, Spitzer sees an exciting new view of a galaxy that in visible light has been likened to a 'sombrero,' but here looks more like a 'bulls-eye.'

    Recent observations using Spitzer's infrared array camera uncovered the bright, smooth ring of dust circling the galaxy, seen in red. In visible light, because this galaxy is seen nearly edge-on, only the near rim of dust can be clearly seen in silhouette. Spitzer's full view shows the disk is warped, which is often the result of a gravitational encounter with another galaxy, and clumpy areas spotted in the far edges of the ring indicate young star-forming regions.

    Spitzer's infrared view of the starlight from this galaxy, seen in blue, can pierce through obscuring murky dust that dominates in visible light. As a result, the full extent of the bulge of stars and an otherwise hidden disk of stars within the dust ring are easily seen.

    The Sombrero galaxy is located some 28 million light years away. Viewed from Earth, it is just six degrees south of its equatorial plane. Spitzer detected infrared emission not only from the ring, but from the center of the galaxy too, where there is a huge black hole, believed to be a billion times more massive than our Sun.

    This picture is composed of four images taken at 3.6 (blue), 4.5 (green), 5.8 (orange), and 8.0 (red) microns. The contribution from starlight (measured at 3.6 microns) has been subtracted from the 5.8 and 8-micron images to enhance the visibility of the dust features.

    In figure 1, the new picture of Messier 104 combines a recent infrared observation from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope with a well

  6. SPLASH: Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capak, Peter; Aussel, Herve; Bundy, Kevin; Bethermin, Matthieu; Carollo, Marcella; Ram-Chary, Ranga; Civano, Francesca; Coupon, Jean; Diener, Catrina; Donley, Jennifer; Dunlop, Jim; Elvis, Martin; Faisst, Andreas; Foucaud, Sebastien; Green, Jenny; Gunn, Jim; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Hassinger, Gunther; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Huang, Lijin; Ilbert, Olivier; LeFloc'h, Emeric; LeFevre, Olivier; Lilly, Simon; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Yen-Ting; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Mobasher, Bahram; Moriya, Takashi; Nagao, Tohru; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Massami; Petric, Andrea; Pych, Wojtek; Quimby, Robert; Saito, Tomoki; Salvato, Mara; Sanders, Dave; Scarlata, Claudia; Schinnerer, Eva; Scoville, Nick; Sheth, Kartik; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Silverman, John; Smolcic, Vernesa; Steinhardt, Charles; Strauss, Michael; Surace, Jason; Tanaka, Masaomi; Tanaka, Massayuki; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Teplitz, Harry; Toshida, Naoki; Wang, Wei-Hao; Urata, Yuji

    2013-10-01

    We propose 1650h to complete SPLASH, building a foundation for comprehensive investigations of the earliest stages of galaxy, AGN and large-scale structure formation on cosmologically important scales, providing deep mid-IR imaging for two major 1.8deg^2 fields (COSMOS and SXDS). These two fields have been the target of, and are scheduled for, unparalleled deep imaging in the optical, sub-mm and radio. The Spitzer data are essential for immediate science goals and the legacy of these unique equatorial fields. The major science enabled by the proposed Spitzer observations includes: the co-evolution of cosmic large scale structure and the assembly and growth of galaxies and AGN; understanding the relative importance of smooth gas accretion vs. mergers for galaxy growth in the early universe; probing re-ionization through Infrared Background Fluctuations; constraining the Initial Mass Function at high redshift, AGN activity in the early universe, and the physics of supernova through transient studies. None of these are possible with existing Spitzer surveys. The two fields proposed here will have unique, Hyper-Suprime-Cam (HSC) imaging (to ~27-28 magAB for broad bands across the 0.4-1.0um wavelength range) and science will be immediately enabled by Spitzer using pre-existing deep X-ray to radio multi-wavelength data, including: UV (Galex), X-ray (Chandra/XMM), optical (HST), near-infrared, mid-Infrared (Spitzer/Herschel), sub-mm, and radio. The COSMOS field is the primary deep field for the Nu-Star mission and both fields have been ranked as high priority deep-field targets for Euclid. These fields also have extensive spectroscopy with Keck (>50nt), Subaru-FMOS (>30nt), VLT (>1000h), and are the primary targets for the future Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) surveys. The legacy impact of these data will be enormous, and will provide a treasure trove of targets for JWST. This is part 1 (SXDS) of the awarded time.

  7. SPLASH: Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capak, Peter; Aussel, Herve; Bundy, Kevin; Carollo, Marcella; Ram-Chary, Ranga; Civano, Francesca; Coupon, Jean; Diener, Catrina; Donley, Jenifer; Dunlop, Jim; Elvis, Martin; Foucaud, Sebastien; Green, Jenny; Gunn, Jim; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Hassinger, Gunther; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Huang, Lijin; Ilbert, Olivier; LeFloc'h, Emeric; LeFevre, Olivier; Lilly, Simon; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Yen-Ting; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Mobasher, Bahram; Moriya, Takashi; Nagao, Tohru; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Massami; Quimby, Robert; Saito, Tomoki; Salvato, Mara; Sanders, Dave; Schinnerer, Eva; Scoville, Nick; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Silverman, John; Smolcic, Vernesa; Strauss, Michael; Surace, Jason; Tanaka, Massayuki; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Teplitz, Harry; Wang, Wei-Hao; Urata, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We propose a 2475h survey to build the foundation for comprehensive investigations of the earliest stages of galaxy, AGN and large-scale structure formation on cosmologically important scales, providing deep mid-IR imaging for two major 1.8deg^2 fields (COSMOS and SXDS). These two fields have been the target of, and are scheduled for, unparalleled deep imaging in the optical, sub-mm and radio. The Spitzer data is essential for immediate science goals and the legacy of these unique equatorial fields. The major science enabled by the proposed Spitzer observations includes: the co-evolution of cosmic large scale structure and the assembly and growth of galaxies and AGN; understanding the relative importance of smooth gas accretion vs. mergers for galaxy growth in the early universe; probing re-ionization through Infrared Background Fluctuations; constraining the Initial Mass Function at high redshift, AGN activity in the early universe, and the physics of supernova through transient studies. None of these are possible with existing Spitzer surveys, which are limited by both insufficient contiguous area, insufficient depth of ancillary data and/or temporal cadence. The two fields proposed here will have unique, Hyper-Suprime-Cam (HSC) imaging (to ~27-28 magAB for broad bands across the 0.4?1.0um wavelength range) and science will be immediately enabled by Spitzer using pre-existing deep X-ray to radio multi-wavelength data, including: UV (Galex), X-ray (Chandra/XMM), optical (HST), near-infrared, mid-Infrared (Spitzer/Herschel), sub-mm, and radio. The COSMOS field is the primary deep field for the Nu-Star mission and both fields have been ranked as high priority deep-field targets for Euclid. These fields also have extensive spectroscopy with Keck (>50nt), Subaru-FMOS (>30nt), VLT (>1000h), and are the primary targets for the future Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) surveys. The legacy impact of these data will be enormous, and will provide a treasure trove of

  8. Featured Image: Spitzer Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    These three galaxies (click for a full view!) were imaged as a part of the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G), a recent survey of 2352 nearby galaxies with deep imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 m. The bottom panels show false-color near-UV and far-UV images previously obtained with GALEX. The top panels show the new images obtained with Spitzer as part of S4G. The three galaxies shown here represent three types of galaxies that have a high concentration of mass in their centers, yet still have a high specific star-formation rate (the star formation rate per unit stellar mass):Barred galaxies with a prominent ring around their nucleus, like NGC 7552Interacting systems, like NGC 2782Galaxies with compact bulges and smooth extended disks, like NGC 3642To learn why this is the case, and to see more results from S4G, see the original paper below.CitationJuan Carlos Muoz-Mateos et al 2015 ApJS 219 3. doi:10.1088/0067-0049/219/1/3

  9. Scheduling Spitzer: The SIRPASS Story

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittman, David S.; Hawkins, Robert

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was launched on August 25, 2003 from Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Base. Drifting in a unique Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, Spitzer sees an optically invisible universe dominated by dust and stars. Since 1997, the Spitzer Integrated Resource Planning and Scheduling System (SIRPASS) has helped produce spacecraft activity plans for the Spitzer Space Telescope. SIRPASS is used by members of the Observatory Planning and Scheduling Team to plan, schedule and sequence the Telescope from data made available to them from the science and engineering community. Because of the volume of data that needs to be scheduled, SIRPASS offers a variety of automated assistants to aid in this task. This paper will describe the functional elements of the SIRPASS software system -- emphasizing the role that automation plays in the system -- and will highlight lessons learned for the software developer from a decade of Spitzer Space Telescope operations experience.

  10. Cosmos, an international center for advanced studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryzhov, Iurii; Alifanov, Oleg; Sadin, Stanley; Coleman, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The concept of Cosmos, a Soviet operating center for aerospace activities, is presented. The main Cosmos participants are the Institute for Aerospace Education, the Institute for Research and Commercial Development, and the Department of Space Policy and Socio-Economic Studies. Cosmos sponsors a number of educational programs, basic research, and studies of the social impact of space-related technologies.

  11. The NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    Gehrz, R D; Roellig, T L; Werner, M W; Fazio, G G; Houck, J R; Low, F J; Rieke, G H; Soifer, B T; Levine, D A; Romana, E A

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Spitzer Space Telescope (formerly the Space Infrared Telescope Facility) is the fourth and final facility in the Great Observatories Program, joining Hubble Space Telescope (1990), the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (1991-2000), and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (1999). Spitzer, with a sensitivity that is almost three orders of magnitude greater than that of any previous ground-based and space-based infrared observatory, is expected to revolutionize our understanding of the creation of the universe, the formation and evolution of primitive galaxies, the origin of stars and planets, and the chemical evolution of the universe. This review presents a brief overview of the scientific objectives and history of infrared astronomy. We discuss Spitzer's expected role in infrared astronomy for the new millennium. We describe pertinent details of the design, construction, launch, in-orbit checkout, and operations of the observatory and summarize some science highlights from the first two and a half years of Spitzer operations. More information about Spitzer can be found at http://spitzer.caltech.edu/. PMID:17503900

  12. First Results from the Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey: A New Window on the High-z Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civano, Francesca M.; Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey Team

    2013-04-01

    The 2 sq.deg. COSMOS area is the only large field for which a complete, deep, pan-chromatic data set exists, thanks to an outstanding survey effort over nearly a decade. Now, the COSMOS survey is undergoing major extensions, via the newly approved Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey ('COSMOS-Legacy') and other programs. COSMOS-Legacy is the second largest Chandra proposal ever approved. COSMOS-Legacy will uniformly cover the 1.7 sq.deg. COSMOS/HST field with 2.8 Ms of Chandra ACIS-I imaging at ~160 ksec depth, expanding the deep C-COSMOS area by a factor of ~3 at ~3e-16 erg/cm2/s (1.45 vs 0.44 deg2). A total area of 2.2 deg2 will be covered. The first ten 50ks tiles (as of Jan 2013), out of 56 tiles, have been observed. At least other twenty are scheduled by the end of March 2013. At the same time NuSTAR is observing COSMOS for 3 Msec in the harder (5-80 keV) band to 5e-14 cgs (10-30 keV) complementing the Chandra observations. The area and depth of COSMOS Legacy are designed to detect ~40 z>4, and ~4 z>5 Large Scale Structures on >15 arcmin scales. These proto-structures have proven to connect luminous AGN and sub-mm galaxies in the early Universe. Over 200 z>3 X-ray AGN (below and above Lx=10^44) are expected, many of which should lie in these structures. To fully characterize the high-z X-ray sources in the structures, COSMOS Legacy is supported by spectroscopic follow-up observations (DEIMOS and MOSFIRE at Keck, KMOS at the VLT, FMOS at Subaru). New deep imaging surveys with Spitzer and JVLA are underway to define the properties of the galaxies in the structures up to 7. Extremely deep, r_{AB}=28.2, optical imaging in grizY are planned with the new HyperSuprimeCam on Subaru as well.

  13. Quasars in the COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, M. K. M.; Impey, C. D.; Cool, R. J.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2006-06-01

    We obtained medium-resolution spectra of 336 quasar candidates in the COSMOS HST Treasury field using the MMT 6.5 m telescope and the Hectospec multiobject spectrograph. Candidates were drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR1 catalog using quasar flags set by the SDSS multicolor quasar target selection algorithm. In this paper we present our discovery spectra from 1.39 deg2 (69.5% of the COSMOS field) and a discussion of the selection method and yields. We confirmed 95 quasars, including at least two BAL quasars; 80 of these are new quasars that do not appear in previous quasar confirmation follow-up studies. The candidates additionally included 184 compact emission-line galaxies, a third of which are likely type 2 AGNs, and 12 stars. The quasars span a range in magnitude of 18.3COSMOS field. This work is the first step toward the eventual goal of setting up a grid of quasar absorption line probes of the 2 deg2 field and of conducting a complete census of supermassive black holes in this well-studied survey region. The total quasar count at the conclusion of this study is 139, making COSMOS one of the most densely sampled regions of sky where a grid of quasar sight lines can be used to probe the intervening volume.

  14. The COSMOS2015 Catalog: Exploring the 1 < z < 6 Universe with Half a Million Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laigle, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Ilbert, O.; Hsieh, B. C.; Davidzon, I.; Capak, P.; Hasinger, G.; Silverman, J. D.; Pichon, C.; Coupon, J.; Aussel, H.; Le Borgne, D.; Caputi, K.; Cassata, P.; Chang, Y.-Y.; Civano, F.; Dunlop, J.; Fynbo, J.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Koekemoer, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Le Floc’h, E.; Leauthaud, A.; Lilly, S.; Lin, L.; Marchesi, S.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scoville, N.; Smolcic, V.; Stockmann, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tasca, L.; Toft, S.; Vaccari, Mattia; Zabl, J.

    2016-06-01

    We present the COSMOS201524 catalog, which contains precise photometric redshifts and stellar masses for more than half a million objects over the 2deg2 COSMOS field. Including new {{YJHK}}{{s}} images from the UltraVISTA-DR2 survey, Y-band images from Subaru/Hyper-Suprime-Cam, and infrared data from the Spitzer Large Area Survey with the Hyper-Suprime-Cam Spitzer legacy program, this near-infrared-selected catalog is highly optimized for the study of galaxy evolution and environments in the early universe. To maximize catalog completeness for bluer objects and at higher redshifts, objects have been detected on a χ 2 sum of the {{YJHK}}{{s}} and z ++ images. The catalog contains ∼ 6× {10}5 objects in the 1.5 deg2 UltraVISTA-DR2 region and ∼ 1.5× {10}5 objects are detected in the “ultra-deep stripes” (0.62 deg2) at {K}{{s}}≤slant 24.7 (3σ, 3″, AB magnitude). Through a comparison with the zCOSMOS-bright spectroscopic redshifts, we measure a photometric redshift precision of {σ }{{Δ }z/(1+{z}s)} = 0.007 and a catastrophic failure fraction of η = 0.5%. At 3\\lt z\\lt 6, using the unique database of spectroscopic redshifts in COSMOS, we find {σ }{{Δ }z/(1+{z}s)} = 0.021 and η = 13.2 % . The deepest regions reach a 90% completeness limit of {10}10{M}ȯ to z = 4. Detailed comparisons of the color distributions, number counts, and clustering show excellent agreement with the literature in the same mass ranges. COSMOS2015 represents a unique, publicly available, valuable resource with which to investigate the evolution of galaxies within their environment back to the earliest stages of the history of the universe. The COSMOS2015 catalog is distributed via anonymous ftp and through the usual astronomical archive systems (CDS, ESO Phase 3, IRSA).

  15. SACS: Spitzer Archival Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Daniel

    Emerging from the cosmic web, galaxy clusters are the most massive gravitationally bound structures in the universe. Thought to have begun their assembly at z > 2, clusters provide insights into the growth of large-scale structure as well as the physics that drives galaxy evolution. Understanding how and when the most massive galaxies assemble their stellar mass, stop forming stars, and acquire their observed morphologies in these environments remain outstanding questions. The redshift range 1.3 < z < 2 is a key epoch in this respect: elliptical galaxies start to become the dominant population in cluster cores, and star formation in spiral galaxies is being quenched. Until recently, however, this redshift range was essentially unreachable with available instrumentation, with clusters at these redshifts exceedingly challenging to identify from either ground-based optical/nearinfrared imaging or from X-ray surveys. Mid-infrared (MIR) imaging with the IRAC camera on board of the Spitzer Space Telescope has changed the landscape. High-redshift clusters are easily identified in the MIR due to a combination of the unique colors of distant galaxies and a negative k-correction in the 3-5 μm range which makes such galaxies bright. Even 90-sec observations with Spitzer/IRAC, a depth which essentially all extragalactic observations in the archive achieve, is sufficient to robustly detect overdensities of L* galaxies out to z~2. Here we request funding to embark on a ambitious scientific program, the “SACS: Spitzer Archival Cluster Survey”, a comprehensive search for the most distant galaxy clusters in all Spitzer/IRAC extragalactic pointings available in the archive. With the SACS we aim to discover ~2000 of 1.3 < z < 2.5 clusters, thus provide the ultimate catalog for high-redshift MIR selected clusters: a lasting legacy for Spitzer. The study we propose will increase by more than a factor of 10 the number of high-redshift clusters discovered by all previous surveys

  16. Spitzer Reveals Stellar 'Family Tree'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] High resolution poster version

    Generations of stars can be seen in this new infrared portrait from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. In this wispy star-forming region, called W5, the oldest stars can be seen as blue dots in the centers of the two hollow cavities (other blue dots are background and foreground stars not associated with the region). Younger stars line the rims of the cavities, and some can be seen as pink dots at the tips of the elephant-trunk-like pillars. The white knotty areas are where the youngest stars are forming. Red shows heated dust that pervades the region's cavities, while green highlights dense clouds.

    W5 spans an area of sky equivalent to four full moons and is about 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. The Spitzer picture was taken over a period of 24 hours.

    Like other massive star-forming regions, such as Orion and Carina, W5 contains large cavities that were carved out by radiation and winds from the region's most massive stars. According to the theory of triggered star-formation, the carving out of these cavities pushes gas together, causing it to ignite into successive generations of new stars.

    This image contains some of the best evidence yet for the triggered star-formation theory. Scientists analyzing the photo have been able to show that the ages of the stars become progressively and systematically younger with distance from the center of the cavities.

    This is a three-color composite showing infrared observations from two Spitzer instruments. Blue represents 3.6-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Red is 24-micron light detected by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer.

  17. Seven Wonders of the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narlikar, Jayant Vishnu

    1999-04-01

    Our cosmic tour begins here. As we leave the secure confines of the Earth and journey into space, we find a plethora of strange and unexpected phenomena. Little can we anticipate from the quiet, star-studded sky the violent events in the cosmos. Stars explode. Powerful radio sources eject matter in jets. The ever-changing Universe grows more beautiful and more complex the deeper into it we go. Professor Narlikar skillfully steers us through a cosmic journey of discovery, starting from the Earth and Solar System and stepping out to the farthest reaches of the Universe. Using simple analogies, humorous anecdotes, and a wealth of illustrations, he conveys the thrill of observing strange and surprising features of the Universe. The seven wonders represent a range of mysterious phenomena, a class of spectacular events, or remarkable cosmic objects that have challenged human curiosity and defied explanation. They concern the giants and dwarfs of the stellar world, the catastrophic explosion of massive stars, pulsars--the ultimate timekeepers of the cosmos, the strange effects of gravity, illusions of space, and the majestic expansion of the Universe as a whole. With lucid prose, the author weaves together a host of exciting recent discoveries in astronomy and shows us how these motivate astronomers to unravel the wonders of tomorrow.

  18. Q&A: Creations from the cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohn, Jennifer

    2008-10-01

    Artist Karel Nel works with astronomers from COSMOS, the global Cosmic Evolution Survey that is mapping galaxies and dark matter. Now exhibiting his work in London, he tells Nature how his view of the Universe has changed.

  19. Station Astronauts Do Experiment for 'Cosmos'

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 38 Commander Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA help 'Cosmos' host Neil deGrasse...

  20. Exoplanet Characterization With Spitzer Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph

    We will analyze our existing Spitzer eclipse data for 11 exoplanets (GJ 436b, WASP-8b, WASP-29b, WASP-11b, TrES-1, WASP-34b, WASP-43b, HD 209458b, HAT-P-30b, HAT-P-13b, and WASP-12b) along with all other Spitzer eclipse and transit data for these systems (723 hours of total data). In combination with transit results, these measurements reveal the surface fluxes emitted by the planets' atmospheres in the six Spitzer bandpasses (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 16, and 24 1-4m), as well as orbital eccentricity and in a few cases possibly even precession rate. The fluxes, in turn, can constrain atmospheric composition and thermal profiles. We propose here to analyze data for these planets using Monte Carlo-driven, radiative-transfer, model-fitting codes; to conduct aggregate analyses; and to develop and share statistical modeling tools. Secondary eclipses provide us with a unique way to characterize exoplanetary atmospheres. Since other techniques like spectroscopy divide the planetary signal into many channels, they require very high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and are only possible for a few planets. Broadband eclipse photometry is thus the only technique that can measure dozens of atmospheres and identify the mechanisms that cause planets at a given irradiation level to behave so differently from one another. Until JWST becomes available, the broad variety of Spitzer data that we already have in hand, along with observations from the Hubble Space Telescope and possibly SOFIA, are our best way to understand the wide diversity of exoplanetary atmospheres. Since 2010, the team has produced six papers from a new, highly modular pipeline that implements optimal methods for analysis of Spitzer photometric time series, and our efficiency is increasing. The sensitivity needed for these measurements is up to 100 times better than Spitzer's design criteria, so careful treatment of systematic error is critically important and first-order approximations rarely work. The new pipeline

  1. The Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Stefano; Civano, Francesca M.; Elvis, Martin; Urry, C. Megan; Comastri, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The COSMOS field is the only large (2 sq. deg.) field for which complete, deep, panchromatic data exist and which all large telescopes can observe due to its equatorial location. In 2013, the COSMOS survey was greatly extended, thanks to the Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey, the second largest extragalactic Chandra project ever approved. This survey is aimed at studying the formation of the structures in the high redshift Universe and understanding the role active super massive black holes played in their evolution. With 56 overlapping ACIS-I pointings of 50-ksec depth each, the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy survey uniformly covers the 1.7 sq. deg. COSMOS/HST field to ~160 ksec depth, with a total of 2.8 Ms exposure time. This triples the area of the earlier deep C-COSMOS survey (limiting flux ~3e-16 ergs/cm2/s in the 0.5-2 keV band), and together these two projects cover a total area of 2.2 sq. deg., yielding a sample of ~4200 X-ray sources. We present the survey properties, the procedure adopted to obtain our final catalog and the first scientific highlights, focusing on the high redshift (z>3) sample.

  2. Spitzer Digs Up Galactic Fossil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a globular cluster previously hidden in the dusty plane of our Milky Way galaxy. Globular clusters are compact bundles of old stars that date back to the birth of our galaxy, 13 or so billion years ago. Astronomers use these galactic 'fossils' as tools for studying the age and formation of the Milky Way.

    Most clusters orbit around the center of the galaxy well above its dust-enshrouded disc, or plane, while making brief, repeated passes through the plane that each last about a million years. Spitzer, with infrared eyes that can see into the dusty galactic plane, first spotted the newfound cluster during its current pass. A visible-light image (inset of Figure 1) shows only a dark patch of sky.

    The red streak behind the core of the cluster is a dust cloud, which may indicate the cluster's interaction with the Milky Way. Alternatively, this cloud may lie coincidentally along Spitzer's line of sight.

    Follow-up observations with the University of Wyoming Infrared Observatory helped set the distance of the new cluster at about 9,000 light-years from Earth - closer than most clusters - and set the mass at the equivalent of 300,000 Suns. The cluster's apparent size, as viewed from Earth, is comparable to a grain of rice held at arm's length. It is located in the constellation Aquila.

    Astronomers believe that this cluster may be one of the last in our galaxy to be uncovered.

    This image composite was taken on April 21, 2004, by Spitzer's infrared array camera. It is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

    Galactic Fossil Found Behind Curtain of Dust In Figure 2, the image mosaic shows the same patch of sky in various wavelengths of light. While the

  3. Spitzer Reveals Stellar 'Family Tree'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] High resolution poster version

    Generations of stars can be seen in this new infrared portrait from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. In this wispy star-forming region, called W5, the oldest stars can be seen as blue dots in the centers of the two hollow cavities (other blue dots are background and foreground stars not associated with the region). Younger stars line the rims of the cavities, and some can be seen as dots at the tips of the elephant-trunk-like pillars. The white knotty areas are where the youngest stars are forming.

    W5 spans an area of sky equivalent to four full moons and is about 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. The Spitzer picture was taken over a period of 24 hours.

    Like other massive star-forming regions, such as Orion and Carina, W5 contains large cavities that were carved out by radiation and winds from the region's most massive stars. According to the theory of triggered star-formation, the carving out of these cavities pushes gas together, causing it to ignite into successive generations of new stars.

    This image contains some of the best evidence yet for the triggered star-formation theory. Scientists analyzing the photo have been able to show that the ages of the stars become progressively and systematically younger with distance from the center of the cavities.

    This picture was taken with Spitzer's infrared array camera. It is a four-color composite, in which light with a wavelength of 3.6 microns is blue; 4.5-micron light is green; 5.8-micron light is orange; and 8-micron light is red.

  4. Searching for Distant Galaxies with HST and Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senchyna, Peter; Ashby, Matthew; Hora, Joseph L.; Candels, S.-Candels

    2015-01-01

    The recently completed Spitzer-Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (S-CANDELS) provides an extremely deep NIR view of five extragalactic fields: COSMOS, EGS, UDS, HDF-N, and ECDFS. The addition of this deep near-infrared photometry to the existing CANDELS HST imaging is expected to improve redshift and stellar population parameter estimation, and enable selection of galaxies to higher redshift by capturing the 4000 Angstrom break out to 3.6 microns. Here we present an isolated galaxy sample based upon IRAC detection that is free from the effects of source confusion. The sample includes both objects for which CANDELS HST photometry is available, and a small number of objects detected by S-CANDELS but not by WFC3/F160W. We derive photometric redshifts for the matched objects, and demonstrate the efficacy of an IRAC color cut in selecting high-redshift sources. In addition, we apply aperture photometry to the HST images of apparent F160W dropouts. We explore the properties of the high-significance dropouts at other wavelengths, and attempt to distinguish between heavily-shrouded AGN and sources at redshift greater than 7.This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  5. Muscle Feasibility for Cosmos Rhesus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. Reggie (Principal Investigator); Roland, Roy R.; Hodgson, John A.

    1994-01-01

    The following tasks were proposed for the Cosmos project: 1) Complete recordings of all preflight candidates during performance of a foot pedal motor control task while in the space capsule mock-up. 2) Complete recordings of all preflight candidates during locomotion and postural tasks. 3) Complete recordings of 24-hour spontaneous cage activity in the two flight monkeys before and after flight and of at least three control (non-flight) monkeys after the flight has been completed. 4) Complete recordings of the foot pedal and motor control tasks during flight and postflight as scheduled. 5) Complete recordings of the vertical drop test pre, during and postflight for the two flight and three control monkeys. 6) Complete recordings of locomotion and posture tests of the two flight monkeys postflight. 7) Complete recordings of locomotion and postural tests of at least three control (non-flight) monkeys during the postflight period. 8) Recalibrate buckles of the two flight and of at least three control monkeys postflight. 9) Complete analysis of the 24 hour EMG recordings of all monkeys. 10) Complete analysis of the foot pedal, locomotor and postural motor control tasks for the two flight and three control monkeys. It was proposed that efforts in the first postflight year be concentrated on the two flight animals and three postflight animals.

  6. Spitzer - Hot & Colorful Student Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, D.; Rebull, L. M.; DeWolf, C.; Guastella, P.; Johnson, C. H.; Schaefers, J.; Spuck, T.; McDonald, J. G., III; DeWolf, T.; Brock, S.; Boerma, J.; Bemis, G.; Paulsen, K.; Yueh, N.; Peter, A.; Wassmer, W.; Haber, R.; Scaramucci, A.; Butchart, J.; Holcomb, A.; Karns, B.; Kennedy, S.; Siegel, R.; Weiser, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this poster, we present the results of several activities developed for the general science student to explore infrared light. The first activity involved measuring infrared radiation using an updated version of Newton's experiment of splitting white light and finding IR radiation. The second used Leslie's cube to allow students to observe different radiators, while the third used a modern infrared thermometer to measure and identify IR sources in an enclosed box. The last activity involved students making false-color images from narrow-band filter images from data sets from Spitzer Space Telescope, STScI Digitized Sky Survey and other sources. Using computer programs like Adobe Photoshop and free software such as ds9, Spot and Leopard, poster-like images were created by the students. This research is funded by the Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Please see our companion poster, Johnson et al., on the science aspect of this program, and another poster on the educational aspects, Guastella et al.

  7. Spitzer observations of adolescent novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Aneurin; Gehrz, Robert; Helton, Andrew; Krautter, Joachim; Lyke, James; Polomsky, Elisha; Rushton, Mark; Salama, Alberto; Shore, Steven; Starrfield, Sumner; Truran, James; Wagner, R. Mark; Woodward, Charles

    2006-05-01

    Classical novae (CNe) offer the best opportunity to observe many astrophysical processes (such as dust formation and processing, shaping of nebulae, gas cooling by IR fine structure lines) in `fast forward'. The CN eruption arises following a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a white dwarf in a semi-detached binary system, following which some 10^-4 Msun of material, enriched in metals, is explosively ejected at ~1000km/s. Following the eruption, CNe vary rapidly, on a timescale ~months, and this necessitates continuous monitoring. Several novae were observed in GO1 as targets-of-opportunity (ToO). We propose to use the Spitzer IRS to observe a sample of novae, including GO1 ToO and several recent (<20years) CNe, to provide us with a well-populated CN parameter space. We aim to determine (i) the ejecta masses, (ii) abundances in the ejected material, (iii) evolution and processing of the CN dust.

  8. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF IC 2118

    SciTech Connect

    Guieu, S.; Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Cole, D. M.; Flagey, N.; Laher, R.; Stolovy, S.; Spuck, T.; Roelofsen Moody, T.; Sepulveda, B.; Weehler, C.; Maranto, A.; Penprase, B.; Ramirez, S.

    2010-09-01

    IC 2118, also known as the Witch Head Nebula, is a wispy, roughly cometary, {approx}5 degree long reflection nebula, and is thought to be a site of triggered star formation. In order to search for new young stellar objects (YSOs), we have observed this region in seven mid- and far-infrared bands using the Spitzer Space Telescope and in four bands in the optical using the U. S. Naval Observatory 40 inch telescope. We find infrared excesses in four of the six previously known T Tauri stars in our combined infrared maps, and we find six entirely new candidate YSOs, one of which may be an edge-on disk. Most of the YSOs seen in the infrared are Class II objects, and they are all in the 'head' of the nebula, within the most massive molecular cloud of the region.

  9. Spitzer Observations of IC 2118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guieu, S.; Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Vrba, F. J.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Spuck, T.; Roelofsen Moody, T.; Sepulveda, B.; Weehler, C.; Maranto, A.; Cole, D. M.; Flagey, N.; Laher, R.; Penprase, B.; Ramirez, S.; Stolovy, S.

    2010-09-01

    IC 2118, also known as the Witch Head Nebula, is a wispy, roughly cometary, ~5 degree long reflection nebula, and is thought to be a site of triggered star formation. In order to search for new young stellar objects (YSOs), we have observed this region in seven mid- and far-infrared bands using the Spitzer Space Telescope and in four bands in the optical using the U. S. Naval Observatory 40 inch telescope. We find infrared excesses in four of the six previously known T Tauri stars in our combined infrared maps, and we find six entirely new candidate YSOs, one of which may be an edge-on disk. Most of the YSOs seen in the infrared are Class II objects, and they are all in the "head" of the nebula, within the most massive molecular cloud of the region.

  10. Spitzer Digs Up Hidden Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 3-Panel Version Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible Light Figure 2 Infrared (IRAC) Figure 3 Combined Figure 4

    Two rambunctious young stars are destroying their natal dust cloud with powerful jets of radiation, in an infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The stars are located approximately 600 light-years away in a cosmic cloud called BHR 71. In visible light (left panel), BHR 71 is just a large black structure. The burst of yellow light toward the bottom of the cloud is the only indication that stars might be forming inside. In infrared light (center panel), the baby stars are shown as the bright yellow smudges toward the center. Both of these yellow spots have wisps of green shooting out of them. The green wisps reveal the beginning of a jet. Like a rainbow, the jet begins as green, then transitions to orange, and red toward the end. The combined visible-light and infrared composite (right panel) shows that a young star's powerful jet is responsible for the rupture at the bottom of the dense cloud in the visible-light image. Astronomers know this because burst of light in the visible-light image overlaps exactly with a jet spouting-out of the left star, in the infrared image.

    The jets' changing colors reveal a cooling effect, and may suggest that the young stars are spouting out radiation in regular bursts. The green tints at the beginning of the jet reveal really hot hydrogen gas, the orange shows warm gas, and the reddish wisps at the end represent the coolest gas. The fact that gas toward the beginning of the jet is hotter than gas near the middle suggests that the stars must give off regular bursts of energy -- and the material closest to the star is being heated by shockwaves from a recent stellar outburst. Meanwhile, the tints of orange reveal gas that is

  11. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope's operational mission experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert K.; Scott, Charles P.

    2006-06-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope, the fourth and final of NASA's Great Observatories, and the cornerstone to NASA's Origins Program, launched on 25 August 2003 into an Earth-trailing solar orbit to acquire infrared observations from space. Spitzer has an 85cm diameter beryllium telescope, which operates near absolute zero utilizing a liquid helium cryostat for cooling the telescope. The helium cryostat though designed for a 2.5 year lifetime, through creative usage now has an expected lifetime of 5.5 years. Spitzer has completed its in-orbit checkout/science verification phases and the first two years of nominal operations becoming the first mission to execute astronomical observations from a solar orbit. Spitzer was designed to probe and explore the universe in the infrared utilizing three state of the art detector arrays providing imaging, photometry, and spectroscopy over the 3-160 micron wavelength range. Spitzer is achieving major advances in the study of astrophysical phenomena across the expanses of our universe. Many technology areas critical to future infrared missions have been successfully demonstrated by Spitzer. These demonstrated technologies include lightweight cryogenic optics, sensitive detector arrays, and a high performance thermal system, combining radiation both passive and active cryogenic cooling of the telescope in space following its warm launch. This paper provides an overview of the Spitzer mission, telescope, cryostat, instruments, spacecraft, its orbit, operations and project management approach and related lessons learned.

  12. Spitzer Space Telescope : observatory desciption and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Keyur C.; Spath, Stuart R.

    2004-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope, the last of the four Great Observatories commissioned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, was successfully launched on August 25, 2003 from Kennedy Space Center. The engineering systems for Spitzer were developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, and Ball Aerospace & Technology Corp. This paper provides an overview of Spitzer, a technical description of all the engineering subsystems, and the associated challenges involved in developing them to satisfy the mission requirements. In addition, this paper describes the performance of the engineering subsystems during the In-Orbit Checkout phase, the Science Verification phase, and the early portions of the Nominal Mission.

  13. NASA Facts, American Experiments on Cosmos 782.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    Presented is a summary report of the American experiments conducted on the Soviet Cosmos 782 satellite in November and December, l975. Each of the four passive and seven cooperating experiments developed by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are reviewed. (SL)

  14. Cosmos: An Information Retrieval System that Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Katherine; Grossman, Alvin

    1980-01-01

    Briefly described is the County of San Mateo Online System (COSMOS) which was developed and is used by the San Mateo Educational Resources Center (SMERC) to access the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) and Fugitive Information Data Organizer (FIDO) databases as well as the curriculum guides housed at SMERC. (TG)

  15. Education with Infrared Astronomy and Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemphill, Rosa; Blackwell, J. A.; Herrold, A.; Petroff, E.

    2007-12-01

    We present education and outreach results using our experiences involving the Spitzer Space Telescope project, Star Formation in High Redshift Clusters with Spitzer. The project is a collaboration between the Spitzer Science Center and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we measured star formation rates in three galaxy clusters at intermediate redshifts. Six teachers were chosen for the program, each with an interest and involvement in astronomy education. From this project, lesson plans, public outreach, lectures and demonstrations were generated which better the understanding of infrared astronomy, multiwavelength astronomy, galaxy and star formation, and cosmology. The teacher mentors are Dr. Gregory Rudnick (NOAO), Dr. Rose Finn (Siena College), and Dr. Vandana Desai (Caltech). Please see the companion posters by Emily Petroff, Zak Schroeder, and Thomas Loughran, et al, for information concerning the science results.

  16. SPRITE: the Spitzer proposal review website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Megan K.; Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa J.; Silbermann, Nancy A.; Rebull, Luisa M.

    2008-07-01

    The Spitzer Science Center (SSC), located on the campus of the California Institute of Technology, supports the science operations of NASA's infrared Spitzer Space Telescope. The SSC issues an annual Call for Proposals inviting investigators worldwide to submit Spitzer Space Telescope proposals. The Spitzer Proposal Review Website (SPRITE) is a MySQL/PHP web database application designed to support the SSC proposal review process. Review panel members use the software to view, grade, and write comments about the proposals, and SSC support team members monitor the grading and ranking process and ultimately generate a ranked list of all the proposals. The software is also used to generate, edit, and email award letters to the proposers. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. History of the Spitzer Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George

    2006-12-01

    The Spitzer Telescope was launched more than 20 years after the original announcement of opportunity was released. During this long gestation period, the mission took a wide variety of forms and had to survive many political and managerial environments within NASA and in the US Government generally. Finally, approval to build the telescope was won at the height of the faster-better-cheaper era, but completing it extended beyond this phase. This poster shows the key steps in preserving the mission and why decision makers viewed it positively at critical points when it might have been killed. In the end, the scope of the mission was reduced by a factor of about five while still preserving much of its science capabilities. This reduction required a new way to streamline the science objectives by adopting a limited number of key programs and requiring that all features be justified in terms of those programs. This philosophy provided decision rules to carry out necessary descopes while preserving a coherent set of capabilities. In addition, the faster-better-cheaper guidelines requires use of a small launch vehicle, which was only possible by the invention of a new “warm launch” telescope concept, in which the telescope would cool primarily by radiation into space after launch. Both of these concepts are critical to the approach to future missions such as JWST. This work is partially supported by contract 1255094 from JPL/Caltech to the University of Arizona.

  18. 1.75 h {sup -1} kpc SEPARATION DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AT z = 0.36 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Comerford, Julia M.; Davis, Marc; Griffith, Roger L.; Stern, Daniel; Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.

    2009-09-01

    We present strong evidence for dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the z = 0.36 galaxy COSMOS J100043.15+020637.2. COSMOS Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of the galaxy shows a tidal tail, indicating that the galaxy recently underwent a merger, as well as two bright point sources near the galaxy's center. The luminosities of these sources (derived from the HST image) and their emission line flux ratios (derived from Keck/DEIMOS slit spectroscopy) suggest that both are AGNs and not star-forming regions or supernovae. Observations from zCOSMOS, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, XMM-Newton, Spitzer, and the Very Large Array fortify the evidence for AGN activity. With HST imaging we measure a projected spatial offset between the two AGNs of 1.75 {+-} 0.03 h {sup -1} kpc, and with DEIMOS we measure a 150 {+-} 40 km s{sup -1} line-of-sight velocity offset between the two AGNs. Combined, these observations provide substantial evidence that COSMOS J100043.15+020637.2 is a merger-remnant galaxy with dual AGNs.

  19. Neptune Variability with SpitzerNeptune Variability with Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, John; Krick, Jessica; Rebull, Luisa; Carey, Sean; Marley, Mark

    2015-12-01

    During Campaign 3 of the repurposed Kepler mission (dubbed K2), Kepler was used to obtain a long-duration, high-accuracy, fast cadence, optical light curve for Neptune. That light curve shows variability with peak-to-peak amplitude of order 2% and with remarkable structure due to the "beating" of several signals with similar periods. The data have been interpreted to be dominated by rotational modulation of discrete "clouds" in the planet's atmosphere, with the different periods corresponding to spots at different latitudes. Because approximately contemporaneous HST and Keck imaging of Neptune exists, it is possible to connect specific spots at specific latitudes to the specific periods identified in the periodogram. As a proof of concept for what could be a longer-duration observation that would be proposed in Cycle 13, we propose to obtain light curves for Neptune in both IRAC channels with the duration set equal to the planet's equatorial rate. Neptune has strong methane absorption bands that fall within Ch1 of IRAC; it also has strong emission lines from flourescently excited CO that fall in the Ch2 wavelength range. It is therefore possible that there could be rotational modulation of similar or larger amplitude in the IRAC channels as in the optical. If detected, the shape and amplitude of these variations could help constrain the vertical structure and composition of Neptune's atmosphere. Our proposed observation of Neptune is best done when Neptune shows as little apparent motion on the sky as possible. As seen from Spitzer, this next occurs on about Feb. 19 and Feb. 20, 2016.

  20. Parallax: The Race to Measure the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfeld, A. W.

    2001-05-01

    The new book "Parallax: The Race to Measure the Cosmos" chronicles the centuries-long struggle to secure the first distance to a star through detection of stellar parallax. Beginning with the naked-eye attempts of Tycho Brahe and proceeding through the telescopic studies of Robert Hooke, James Bradley, and William Herschel, all three of whom employed observational strategies suggested by Galileo, the effort to measure stellar parallax gained momentum in the early 19th century with dramatic improvements in telescope technology by German craftsmen such as Joseph Fraunhofer. Three near-contemporaneous announcements of stellar parallaxes were made in the late 1830s by Thomas Henderson (Alpha Centauri), Wilhelm Struve (Vega), and Friedrich Bessel (61 Cygni). By consensus of the astronomical community, Bessel was credited with the first successful measurement of a star's distance. With its biographical focus, "Parallax: The Race to Measure the Cosmos" highlights the human dimensions of scientific achievement.

  1. Spitzer v. K2: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Michael; Crossfield (Deputy PI), Ian; Akeson, Rachel; Beichman, Charles; Benneke, Bjoern; Christiansen, Jessie; Ciardi, David; Deck, Katherine; Dressing, Courtney; Howard, Andrew; Howell, Steve; Knutson, Heather; Krick, Jessica; Livingston, John; Morales, Farisa; Petigura, Erik; Schlieder, Joshua; Gorjian, Varoujan

    2016-08-01

    We propose to build on our Cycles 11-12 program of Spitzer photometry of planets from the K2 survey by enlarging our sample to interesting exoplanets from the continuing K2 mission. Our team has shown that we can carry out this program end to end, starting with finding interesting candidate stars/planets in the K2 data stream, validating them using both proven Kepler techniques and ground-based observations, selecting and executing the Spitzer observations, and analyzing the Spitzer data in conjunction with the K2 data. To date we have observed or scheduled 38 transits/eclipses of 27 exoplanets. We will observe stars in K2 fields 0 through 15 and foresee executing over 60 AOR's on over 40 exoplanets. In the end, we expect to have a greatly improved characterization of exoplanets and their orbits than would be possible from the K2 data alone. This will be vital for JWST follow-up. In addition to improvements in ephemerides, these Spitzer observations will look for transit timing variations, analyze exoplanet atmospheres, study young exoplanets, and provde early TESS follow-up. This work will add substantially to the extensive exoplanet legacy of the Spitzer mission. This is a Generic Target proposal: The fields to be studied and their visibility windows are known, but until the K2 data is analyzed and the targets vetted, we cannot specify exact AORs.

  2. Mining the Spitzer Legacy Science Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Storrie-Lombardi, L.; Squires, G.; Alexov, A.

    2005-12-01

    The original Spitzer Legacy Science Program is now approaching completion with the basic observations archived and the `enhanced' data products populating dedicated Spitzer and IRSA archives. To date the Legacy teams of C2D, FEPS, GLIMPSE, GOODS, SINGS and SWIRE have delivered more than half of the total planned `enhanced' data products to the public archives. The archives include fully reduced and calibrated imaging, spectra, and tabular data derived from the Spitzer IRAC, MIPS and IRS observations, as well as ancillary ground-based imaging and spectroscopy. Science results are now flowing from the Legacy teams, addressing the fundamental questions that the Spitzer observations where designed and optimized to answer. However, the data archives are mostly untapped in their science potential, offering a rich resource for astronomical data mining. We describe the archives in detail, spanning their structure, content and accessibility. User friendly resources for mining the data are showcased, including the Spitzer Science Center archive tool Leopard and the Infrared Science Archive services Atlas and RADAR.

  3. Cosmos 1129 - Spaceflight and bone changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wronski, T. J.; Morey-Holton, E.; Jee, W. S. S.

    1980-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were placed in orbit for an 18.5 day period aboard the Soviet Cosmos 1129 biological satellite. The skeletal changes which occurred during spaceflight were determined to be a reduced rate of periosteal bone formation in the tibial and humeral diaphyses, and a decreased trabecular bone volume and an increased fat content of the bone marrow in the proximal tibial metaphysis.

  4. Modelling mid-Pliocene climate with COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanek, C.; Lohmann, G.

    2012-10-01

    In this manuscript we describe the experimental procedure employed at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Germany in the preparation of the simulations for the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP). We present a description of the utilized Community Earth System Models (COSMOS, version: COSMOS-landveg r2413, 2009) and document the procedures that we applied to transfer the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) Project mid-Pliocene reconstruction into model forcing fields. The model setup and spin-up procedure are described for both the paleo- and preindustrial (PI) time slices of PlioMIP experiments 1 and 2, and general results that depict the performance of our model setup for mid-Pliocene conditions are presented. The mid-Pliocene, as simulated with our COSMOS setup and PRISM boundary conditions, is both warmer and wetter in the global mean than the PI. The globally averaged annual mean surface air temperature in the mid-Pliocene standalone atmosphere (fully coupled atmosphere-ocean) simulation is 17.35 °C (17.82 °C), which implies a warming of 2.23 °C (3.40 °C) relative to the respective PI control simulation.

  5. Spitzer Operations: Scheduling the Out Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, William A.; Effertz, Mark J.; Fisher, Mark E.; Garcia, Lisa J.; Hunt, Joseph C. Jr.; Mannings, Vincent; McElroy, Douglas B.; Scire, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Spitzer Warm Mission operations have remained robust and exceptionally efficient since the cryogenic mission ended in mid-2009. The distance to the now exceeds 1 AU, making telecommunications increasingly difficult; however, analysis has shown that two-way communication could be maintained through at least 2017 with minimal loss in observing efficiency. The science program continues to emphasize the characterization of exoplanets, time domain studies, and deep surveys, all of which can impose interesting scheduling constraints. Recent changes have significantly improved on-board data compression, which both enables certain high volume observations and reduces Spitzer's demand for competitive Deep Space Network resources.

  6. The Ultimate Spitzer Phase Curve Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Kevin; Bean, Jacob; Deming, Drake; Desert, Jean-Michel; Feng, Y. Katherina; Fortney, Jonathan; Kataria, Tiffany; Kempton, Eliza; Lewis, Nikole; Line, Michael; Morley, Caroline; Rauscher, Emily; Showman, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Exoplanet phase curves are sure to be one of the main enduring legacies of Spitzer. They provide a wealth of information about exoplanet atmospheres, including longitudinal constraints on atmospheric composition, thermal structure, and energy transport, that will continue to open new doors of scientific inquiry and propel future investigations for years to come. The measured heat redistribution efficiency (or ability to transport energy from a planet's highly-irradiated dayside to its eternally-dark nightside) shows considerable variation between exoplanets. Theoretical models predict a correlation between heat redistribution efficiency and planet temperature; however, the latest results are inconsistent with current predictions. Instead, a new potential trend is emerging, one that connects heat redistribution efficiency with planet rotation rate. We will test this hypothesis by performing Spitzer phase curve observations of seven exoplanets with physical properties that span the parameter space. We have identified high-contrast targets with short orbital periods around bright host stars to ensure the observations reveal robust phase curve results. Spitzer is uniquely suited for this program because we can achieve our primary goals using broadband photometry. Part of the phase curve legacy will be to combine our archived Spitzer data with transmission and dayside emission spectra from HST and JWST. Adding energy transport and cloud coverage constraints to the measured dayside abundances and thermal profiles will yield a fundamental understanding of these exoplanets' atmospheres that can be leveraged into new avenues of investigation.

  7. COSMOS (County of San Mateo Online System). A Searcher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Mateo County Superintendent of Schools, Redwood City, CA. Educational Resources Center.

    Operating procedures are explained for COSMOS (County of San Mateo Online System), a computerized information retrieval system designed for the San Mateo Educational Resources Center (SMERC), which provides interactive access to both ERIC and a local file of fugitive documents. COSMOS hardware and modem compatibility requirements are reviewed,…

  8. Photometric Redshift and Classification for the XMM-COSMOS Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, M.; Hasinger, G.; Ilbert, O.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Rau, A.; Capak, P.; Arnouts, S.; Aussel, H.; Bolzonella, M.; Buongiorno, A.; Cappelluti, N.; Caputi, K.; Civano, F.; Cook, R.; Elvis, M.; Gilli, R.; Jahnke, K.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Impey, C. D.; Lamareille, F.; Le Floc'h, E.; Lilly, S.; Mainieri, V.; McCarthy, P.; McCracken, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Murayama, T.; Sasaki, S.; Sanders, D. B.; Schiminovich, D.; Shioya, Y.; Shopbell, P.; Silverman, J.; Smolčić, V.; Surace, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Thompson, D.; Trump, J. R.; Urry, M.; Zamojski, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present photometric redshifts and spectral energy distribution (SED) classifications for a sample of 1542 optically identified sources detected with XMM in the COSMOS field. Our template fitting classifies 46 sources as stars and 464 as nonactive galaxies, while the remaining 1032 require templates with an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution. High accuracy in the derived photometric redshifts was accomplished as the result of (1) photometry in up to 30 bands with high-significance detections, (2) a new set of SED templates, including 18 hybrids covering the far-UV to mid-infrared, which have been constructed by the combination of AGNs and nonactive galaxies templates, and (3) multiepoch observations that have been used to correct for variability (most important for type 1 AGNs). The reliability of the photometric redshifts is evaluated using the subsample of 442 sources with measured spectroscopic redshifts. We achieved an accuracy of σ _{Δ z/(1+z_spec)} = 0.014 for i* AB < 22.5 (σ _{Δ z/(1+z_spec)} ˜ 0.015 for i* AB < 24.5). The high accuracies were accomplished for both type 2 (where the SED is often dominated by the host galaxy) and type 1 AGNs and QSOs out to z = 4.5. The number of outliers is a large improvement over previous photometric redshift estimates for X-ray-selected sources (4.0% and 4.8% outliers for i* AB < 22.5 and i* AB < 24.5, respectively). We show that the intermediate band photometry is vital to achieving accurate photometric redshifts for AGNs, whereas the broad SED coverage provided by mid-infrared (Spitzer/IRAC) bands is important to reduce the number of outliers for normal galaxies. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion

  9. Adaptation of skeletal muscle to spaceflight: Cosmos rhesus project. Cosmos 2044 and 2229

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodine-Fowler, Sue

    1994-01-01

    The proposed experiments were designed to determine the effects of the absence of weight support on hindlimb muscles of the monkey: an ankle flexor (tibialis anterior, TA), two ankle extensors (medial gastrocnemius, MG and soleus, SOL), and a knee extensor (vastus lateralis, VL). These effects were assessed by examining the biochemical and morphological properties of muscle fibers obtained from biopsies in young Rhesus monkeys (3-4 Kg). Biopsies taken from ground base experiments were analyzed to determine: (1) the effects of chair restraint at 1 G on muscle properties and (2) the growth rate of flexor and extensor muscles in the Rhesus. In addition, two sets of biopsies were taken from monkeys which were in the flight pool and the four monkeys that flew on the Cosmos 2044 and 2229 biosatellite missions. Based on data collected in rats it is generally assumed that extensors atrophy to a greater extent than flexors in response to spaceflight or hindlimb suspension. Consequently, the finding that fibers in the TA (a fast flexor) of the flight monkeys atrophied, whereas fibers in the Sol (a predominantly slow extensor) and MG (a fast extensor) grew after a 14-day spaceflight (Cosmos 2044) and 12-day spaceflight (Cosmos 2229) was unexpected. In Cosmos 2044, the TA in both flight monkeys had a 21 percent decrease in fiber size, whereas the Sol and MG both had a 79 percent increase in fiber size. In Cosmos 2229, the TA in both flight monkeys showed significant atrophy, whereas the Sol and MG showed slight growth in one monkey (906) and slight atrophy in the other monkey (151).

  10. Sesquiterpene lactones and phenylpropanoids from Cosmos pringlei.

    PubMed

    Mata, Rachel; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Rivero-Cruz, Blanca; Bye, Robert; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2002-07-01

    Activity-directed fractionation of a phytotoxic extract from Cosmos pringlei led to the isolation of three new compounds, namely, 1'-isovaleroyloxy-4-O-isobutyryleugenol (1), zaluzanin C isobutyrate (2), and zaluzanin C isovalerate (3). In addition, mokko lactone, 1'-isobutiroyloxy-4-O-isobutyryleugenol (4), dehydrocostus lactone (5), costunolide (6), 15-isovaleroyloxycostunolide (7), 15-isobutiroyloxycostunolide (8), 1',2'-epoxy-3',4'-di-isobutyryl-Z-coniferyl alcohol, and 3beta-hydroxy-5alpha-pregn-16-en-20-one were obtained. The structures of the new compounds were established by spectral methods. Compounds 5-7 caused inhibition of radicle growth of seedlings of Amaranthus hypochondriacus. PMID:12141867

  11. Cosmos 1939 data processing for FIFE 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Kozoderov, V.V.; Vandysheva, N.M.; Maslov, A.V.; Panfilov, A.S.; Vedeshin, L.A. Research Center Agroresources, Moscow Research Center Planeta, Moscow Intercosmos Council, Moscow )

    1992-11-01

    Some examples of multispectral image processing for the high-resolution optical-electronic scanning radiometer (MSU-E) of the Soviet Cosmos 1939 satellite are given for the FIFE 1989 data. Data processing algorithms are outlined, including satellite radiometer calibration, atmospheric correction of space images, and phytomass content retrieval using ground-based biophysical measurements for test sites. Spatial distribution of the phytomass content retrieved from the MSU-E image for August 9, 1989, using the normalized difference vegetation index is shown. Results of image processing for April 14, 1989, displaying the discrimination between burnt and unburnt classes of vegetation are also shown. 12 refs.

  12. The concept of a hierarchical cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujić, P. V.

    2003-10-01

    The idea of a hierachically structured cosmos can be traced back to the Presocratic Hellada. In the fifth century BC Anaxagoras from Clazomenae developed an idea of a sort of fractal material world, by introducing the concept of seeds (spermata), or homoeomeries as Aristotle dubbed it later (Grujić 2001). Anaxagoras ideas have been grossly neglected during the Middle Ages, to be invoked by a number of post-Renaissance thinkers, like Leibniz, Kant, etc, though neither of them referred to their Greek predecessor. But the real resurrections of the hierarchical paradigm started at the beginning of the last century, with Fournier and Charlier (Grujić 2002). Second half of the 20th century witnessed an intensive development of the theoretical models based on the (multi)fractal paradigm, as well as a considerable body of the observational evidence in favour of the hierarchical cosmos (Saar 1988). We overview the state of the art of the cosmological fractal concept, both within the astrophysical (Sylos Labini et al 1998), methodological (Ribeiro 2001) and epistemological (Ribeiro and Videira 1998) context.

  13. Modelling mid-Pliocene climate with COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanek, C.; Lohmann, G.

    2012-04-01

    In this manuscript we describe the experimental procedure employed at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Germany in the preparation of the simulations for the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP). We present a description of the utilized community earth system models (COSMOS) and document the procedures which we applied to transfer the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping Project (PRISM) mid-Pliocene reconstruction into model forcing fields. The model setup and spin-up procedure are described for both the paleo and preindustrial (PI) time-slices of PlioMIP experiments 1 and 2, and general results that depict the performance of our model setup for mid-Pliocene conditions are presented. The mid-Pliocene as simulated with our COSMOS-setup and PRISM boundary conditions is both warmer and wetter than the PI. The globally averaged annual mean surface air temperature in the mid-Pliocene standalone atmosphere (fully coupled atmosphere-ocean) simulation is 17.35 °C (17.82 °C), which implies a warming of 2.23 °C (3.40 °C) relative to the respective PI control simulation.

  14. SPS Fabric of the Cosmos Cafe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Anish

    2012-02-01

    Hosted by Brian Greene and based on his best-selling book of the same title, The Fabric of the Cosmos is a new four- part NOVA series that explores the deepest mysteries of space and time. The program was kicked-off by 30 ``Cosmic Cafes'' being held around the country funded by an NSF grant which allows SPS-NOVA to fund SPS chapters for these events. During the summer I assisted in planning this kick-off, reviewing and suggesting revisions of resources related to the NOVA series to make them relevant to an SPS audience. I also got to organize and moderate the first ``Cosmic Cafe.'' The Cosmic cafe that I organized was discussion based, with our speaker Dr. James Gates starting with a short talk and then opening the floor up for questions. By organizing a ``Cosmic cafe,'' I got real hand experience about the challenges an SPS chapter would face while organizing a cafe themselves. Based on my experience I shall also discuss the effectiveness of the first ever themed science cafe blitz. A science caf'e is an informal discussion with an expert in a very casual location, usually a restaurant, coffee shop, or a bar. A science cafe is mostly discussion based, but has a lot of freedom for the format. A ``Cosmic'' cafe is a science cafe which is based around the topics discussed in the documentary ``The Fabric of the Cosmos.''

  15. Spitzer IRS Pipelines for General Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narron, B.; Fajardo-Acosta, S.; Ardila, D.; Laher, R. R.

    2008-08-01

    An effort is underway to make the Spitzer InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) data-processing pipelines available for use by astronomers worldwide. This will allow users to reprocess raw data downloaded from the Spitzer archive with customized calibration files, updated operational parameters, and/or a modified list of processing steps. The pipelines will create all standard BCD (basic calibrated data) and post-BCD products, plus additional intermediate products. The pipelines will be made up of newly developed Perl and C-shell ``executive'' scripts, plus the binary-executable modules currently used in operations (the modules' source code will not be distributed, however). The scripts are being designed for ease of use and will facilitate user-customization. The operating systems targeted for support are Mac OS X, Linux, Solaris, and possibly Windows.

  16. Lyman Spitzer: Astronomer, Physicist, Engineer, and Mountaineer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, D. C.

    2006-12-01

    NASA's naming of the Spitzer Space Telescope after Lyman Spitzer was a most appropriate choice, recognizing an outstanding scientist who also contributed extensively to space astronomy. As an astronomer he was a leading authority in the physics of both the interstellar medium and stellar dynamics, wrote textbooks for both fields, and guided many research students. As a physicist he conceived the Stellarator for magnetic confinement, managed a laboratory for controlled fusion, and wrote a textbook on plasma physics. As an engineer he led the development of the payload for the successful Copernicus satellite, which fulfilled his 1946 proposal for an extraterrestrial observatory. His mountaineering included first ascents on Baffin Island and in the Canadian Rockies as well as the summit of the challenging Mt Waddington in the Coast Range.

  17. Spitzer IRAC Detection of Protostellar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ybarra, Jason E.; Lada, E. A.; Balog, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We will discuss a method for detecting shocked H2 emission in IRAC band images and distinguishing H2 knots from stellar sources. Using this method we will present Spitzer IRAC imaging of a recently discovered parsec scale protostellar outflow. This outflow was detected in all four IRAC bands. The proposed source of the outflow is an embedded Class 0 object detected in the MIPS images. This work is based in part on archival data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by an award issued by JPL/Caltech and also a NASA LTSA Grant NNG05GD66G

  18. Spitzer Survey of the Karin Cluster Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Alan W.; Mueller, M.; Lisse, C.; Cheng, A.; Osip, D.

    2007-10-01

    The Karin cluster is one of the youngest known families of main-belt asteroids, dating back to a collisional event only 5.8 Myr ago. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope we have sampled the thermal continua of 17 Karin cluster asteroids, down to the smallest members discovered so far, in order to derive accurate sizes and study the physical properties of their surfaces. The albedos of the observed Karins appear to be very similar. The albedos, pv, have a mean of 0.17 and a standard deviation of 0.04, compared to pv = 0.15 ± 0.05 for 832 Karin itself (for H = 11.2 ± 0.3). The derived diameters range from 20 km for 832 Karin to 1.9 km for 93690, with uncertainties of 10%. The Karins data show no evidence of albedo dependence on size, and the small range of albedos is consistent with all program targets being S-type bodies. There is some evidence for higher values of thermal inertia amongst the smaller family members, which may be indicative of coarser regolith. These results are preliminary, pending outstanding Spitzer observations and further analysis. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  19. Stellar Jewels Shine in New Spitzer Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    One of the most prolific birthing grounds in our Milky Way galaxy, a nebula called RCW 49, is exposed in superb detail for the first time in this new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Located 13,700 light-years away in the southern constellation Centaurus, RCW 49 is a dark and dusty stellar nursery that houses more than 2,200 stars.

    Because many of the stars in RCW 49 are deeply embedded in plumes of dust, they cannot be seen at visible wavelengths. When viewed with Spitzer's infrared eyes, however, RCW 49 becomes transparent. Like cracking open a quartz rock to discover its jewels inside, the nebula's newborn stars have been dramatically exposed.

    This image taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera highlights the nebula's older stars (blue stars in center pocket), its gas filaments (green) and dusty tendrils (pink). Speckled throughout the murky clouds are more than 300 never-before-seen newborn stars.

    Astronomers are interested in further studying these newfound proto-stars because they offer a fresh look at star formation in our own galaxy.

    This image was taken on Dec. 23, 2003, and is composed of photographs obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  20. Software Architecture of the Spitzer Archive Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, J.; Wu, X.; Roby, W.; Hoac, A.; Goldina, T.; Hartley, B.

    2007-10-01

    The Spitzer Science Center (SSC) provides a set of user tools to support search and retrieval of Spitzer Archive (SA) data via the Internet. This presentation describes the software architecture and design principles that support the Archive Interface subsystem of the SA (Handley 2007). The Archive Interface is an extension of the core components of the Uplink subsystem and provides a set web services to allow open access to the SA data set. Web services technology provides a basis for searching the archive and retrieving data products. The archive interface provides three modes of access: a rich client, a Web browser, and scripts (via Web services). The rich client allows the user to perform complex queries and submit requests for data that are asynchronously down-loaded to the local workstation. Asynchronous down-load is a critical feature given the large volume of a typical data set (on the order of 40~GB). For basic queries and retrieval of data the Web browser interface is provided. For advanced users, scripting languages with web services capabilities (i.e. Perl) can used to query and down-load data from the SA. The archive interface subsystem is the primary means for searching and retrieving data from the SA and is critical to the success of the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  1. Genetic diversity of Cosmos species revealed by RAPD and ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Bernal, A; Piña-Escutia, J L; Vázquez-García, L M; Arzate-Fernández, A M

    2013-01-01

    The genus Cosmos is native of America and is constituted by 34 species; 28 of them are endemic of Mexico. The cosmos are used as a nematicide, antimalarial, and antioxidative agent. The aim of this study was to estimate the genetic diversity among 7 cosmos species based on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-simple sequences repeats (ISSR) markers. With RAPD markers, the obtained polymorphism was 91.7 % and the genetic diversity was 0.33, whereas these values were 65.6%, and 0.22 from ISSR markers, respectively, indicating the presence of high genetic diversity among the Cosmos species that were analyzed. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrograms that were obtained with both markers were notably similar, revealing 2 clusters and indicating a clear genetic differentiation among the Cosmos species that were assessed. The first cluster comprised the species Cosmos sulphureus, Cosmos pacificus, and Cosmos diversifolius, while the second cluster included the species Cosmos purpureus, Cosmos crithmifolius, Cosmos bipinnatus, and Cosmos parviflorus. Besides this, the Cosmos species were clustered according to their collection sites. The Mantel test corroborates the correlation between the genetic distance and the geographic altitude of each Cosmos species. The results suggest that it is necessary to preserve the Cosmos species in their natural habitat in addition to the germoplasm collection for ex situ conservation. PMID:24338421

  2. Antioxidative and antigenotoxic activity of extracts from cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus) flowers.

    PubMed

    Jang, In-Cheol; Park, Jae-Hee; Park, Eunju; Park, Hae-Ryong; Lee, Seung-Cheol

    2008-12-01

    The Cosmos bipinnatus has been used in a traditional herbal remedy for various diseases such as jaundice, intermittent fever, and splenomegaly. The present study describes the preliminary evaluation of antioxidant activities and antigenotoxic effect of Cosmos bipinnatus flowers according to four different colors (white, pink, orange, and violet). The antioxidants properties were evaluated by determining TPC, DPPH RSA, ABTS RSA, and RP. The highest TPC of methanolic CFE (at concentration of 1 mg/ml) showed in violet colored CF (1,013 microM), and IC(50) of DPPH RSA, ABTS RSA, and RP were also the lowest in violet colored CFE with values of 0.61, 1.48, and 0.82 mg/ml, respectively. The antigenotoxic effect of the CFE on DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) in human leukocytes was evaluated by Comet assay. Pretreatments with CFE produced significant reductions in oxidative DNA damage at the concentration of 500 microg/ml, except for violet colored CFE. The ED(50) value of white colored CFE has shown the highest inhibition (0.40 mg/ml) on H(2)O(2) induced DNA damage, followed by orange > pink > violet color. These results suggested that Cosmos bipinnatus has significant antioxidant activity and protective effect against oxidative DNA damage. PMID:18758962

  3. SERVS: the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Mark; Afonso, Jose; Alexander, Dave; Best, Philip; Bonfield, David; Castro, Nieves; Cava, Antonio; Chapman, Scott; Dunlop, James; Dyke, Eleanor; Edge, Alastair; Farrah, Duncan; Ferguson, Harry; Foucaud, Sebastian; Franceschini, Alberto; Geach, Jim; Gonzales, Eduardo; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Hickey, Samantha; Ivison, Rob; Jarvis, Matt; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Lonsdale, Carol; Maraston, Claudia; McLure, Ross; Mortier, Angela; Oliver, Seb; Ouchi, Masami; Parish, Glen; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petric, Andreea; Pierre, Mauguerite; Readhead, Tony; Ridgway, Susan; Romer, Katherine; Rottgering, Huub; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Sajina, Anna; Seymour, Nick; Smail, Ian; Surace, Jason; Thomas, Peter; Trichas, Markos; Vaccari, Mattia; Verma, Aprajita; Xu, Kevin; van Kampen, Eelco

    2008-12-01

    We will use warm Spitzer to image 18deg^2 of sky to microJy depth. This is deep enough to undertake a complete census of massive galaxies from z~6 to ~1 in a volume ~0.8Gpc^3, large enough to overcome the effects of cosmic variance, which place severe limitations on the conclusions that can be drawn from smaller fields. We will greatly enhance the diagnostic power of the Spitzer data by performing most of this survey in the region covered by the near-IR VISTA-VIDEO survey, and in other areas covered by near-IR, Herschel and SCUBA2 surveys. We will build complete near-infrared spectral energy distributions using the superb datasets from VIDEO, in conjunction with our Spitzer data, to derive accurate photometric redshifts and the key properties of stellar mass and star formation rates for a large sample of high-z galaxies. Obscured star formation rates and dust-shrouded BH growth phases will be uncovered by combining the Spitzer data with the Herschel and SCUBA2 surveys. We will thus build a complete picture of the formation of massive galaxies from z~6, where only about 1% of the stars in massive galaxies have formed, to z~1 where ~50% of them haveE Our large volume will allow us to also find examples of rare objects such as high-z quasars (~10-100 at z>6.5), high-z galaxy clusters (~20 at z>1.5 with dark halo masses >10^14 solar masses), and evaluate how quasar activity and galaxy environment affect star formation. This survey makes nearly optimal use of warm Spitzer; (a) all of the complementary data is either taken or will be taken in the very near future, and will be immediately publicly accessible, (b) the slew overheads are relatively small, (c) the observations are deep enough to detect high redshift galaxies but not so deep that source confusion reduces the effective survey area.

  4. COSMOS: Python library for massively parallel workflows

    PubMed Central

    Gafni, Erik; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Lancaster, Alex K.; Hawkins, Jared B.; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Souilmi, Yassine; Wall, Dennis P.; Tonellato, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Efficient workflows to shepherd clinically generated genomic data through the multiple stages of a next-generation sequencing pipeline are of critical importance in translational biomedical science. Here we present COSMOS, a Python library for workflow management that allows formal description of pipelines and partitioning of jobs. In addition, it includes a user interface for tracking the progress of jobs, abstraction of the queuing system and fine-grained control over the workflow. Workflows can be created on traditional computing clusters as well as cloud-based services. Availability and implementation: Source code is available for academic non-commercial research purposes. Links to code and documentation are provided at http://lpm.hms.harvard.edu and http://wall-lab.stanford.edu. Contact: dpwall@stanford.edu or peter_tonellato@hms.harvard.edu. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24982428

  5. Introduction to Particle Acceleration in the Cosmos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Horwitz, J. L.; Perez, J.; Quenby, J.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerated charged particles have been used on Earth since 1930 to explore the very essence of matter, for industrial applications, and for medical treatments. Throughout the universe nature employs a dizzying array of acceleration processes to produce particles spanning twenty orders of magnitude in energy range, while shaping our cosmic environment. Here, we introduce and review the basic physical processes causing particle acceleration, in astrophysical plasmas from geospace to the outer reaches of the cosmos. These processes are chiefly divided into four categories: adiabatic and other forms of non-stochastic acceleration, magnetic energy storage and stochastic acceleration, shock acceleration, and plasma wave and turbulent acceleration. The purpose of this introduction is to set the stage and context for the individual papers comprising this monograph.

  6. Biological investigations aboard the biosatellite Cosmos-1129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tairbekov, M. G.; Parfyonov, G. P.; Platonova, R. W.; Abramova, V. M.; Golov, V. K.; Rostopshina, A. V.; Lyubchenko, V. Yu.; Chuchkin, V. G.

    Experiments on insects, higher plants and lower fungi were carried out aboard the biological satellite Cosmos-1129, in Earth orbit, from 25 September to 14 October 1979. The main objective of these experiments was to gain more profound knowledge of the effect of weightlessness on living organisms and to study the mechanisms by which these various organisms with different life cycles can adjust and develop in weightlessness. Experiments on insects (Drosophila melanogaster) were made with a view towards understanding gravitational preference in flies, the life cycle of which took place on board the biosatellite under conditions of artificial gravity. Experiments on higher plants (Zea mays, Arabidopsis taliana, Lycopersicum esculentum) and lower fungi (Physarum polycephalum) were performed.

  7. Investigations onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-1667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazenko, O. G.; Ilyin, E. A.

    The program of the 7-day flight of the biosatellite Cosmos-1667 launched in July 1985 included experiments on two rhesus monkeys, ten Wistar SPF rats, ten newts, Drosophila flies, maize seedlings, lettuce sprouts, and unicellular organisms - Tetrahymena. The primate study demonstrated that transition to orbital flight was accompanied by a greater excitability of the vestibular apparatus and an increased linear blood flow velocity in the common carotid artery. The rat studies showed that atrophy of antigravity muscles and osteoporosis of limb bones developed even during short-term exposure to microgravity. The experiments on other living systems revealed no microgravity effects on the cell division rate, proliferative activity of cells of regenerating tissues and organs, energy metabolism of developing insects, structure or chemical composition of higher plant seedlings.

  8. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Topographic Survey of Cosmos Club, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Topographic Survey of Cosmos Club, 1950, by Bernard Locroft, Civil Engineer (Showing Grounds as They Were at End of Sumner Welles Era) SITE PLAN - Townsend House, 2121 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. SMUVS: Spitzer Matching survey of the UltraVISTA ultra-deep Stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputi, Karina; Ashby, Matthew; Fazio, Giovanni; Huang, Jiasheng; Dunlop, James; Franx, Marijn; Le Fevre, Olivier; Fynbo, Johan; McCracken, Henry; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Muzzin, Adam; Ilbert, Olivier; Somerville, Rachel; Wechsler, Risa; Behroozi, Peter; Lu, Yu

    2014-12-01

    We request 2026.5 hours to homogenize the matching ultra-deep IRAC data of the UltraVISTA ultra-deep stripes, producing a final area of ~0.6 square degrees with the deepest near- and mid-IR coverage existing in any such large area of the sky (H, Ks, [3.6], [4.5] ~ 25.3-26.1 AB mag; 5 sigma). The UltraVISTA ultra-deep stripes are contained within the larger COSMOS field, which has a rich collection of multi-wavelength, ancillary data, making it ideal to study different aspects of galaxy evolution with high statistical significance and excellent redshift accuracy. The UltraVISTA ultra-deep stripes are the region of the COSMOS field where these studies can be pushed to the highest redshifts, but securely identifying high-z galaxies, and determining their stellar masses, will only be possible if ultra-deep mid-IR data are available. Our IRAC observations will allow us to: 1) extend the galaxy stellar mass function at redshifts z=3 to z=5 to the intermediate mass regime (M~5x10^9-10^10 Msun), which is critical to constrain galaxy formation models; 2) gain a factor of six in the area where it is possible to effectively search for z>=6 galaxies and study their properties; 3) measure, for the first time, the large-scale structure traced by an unbiased galaxy sample at z=5 to z=7, and make the link to their host dark matter haloes. This cannot be done in any other field of the sky, as the UltraVISTA ultra-deep stripes form a quasi-contiguous, regular-shape field, which has a unique combination of large area and photometric depth. 4) provide a unique resource for the selection of secure z>5 targets for JWST and ALMA follow up. Our observations will have an enormous legacy value which amply justifies this new observing-time investment in the COSMOS field. Spitzer cannot miss this unique opportunity to open up a large 0.6 square-degree window to the early Universe.

  10. Fingerprints of the first black holes? Crosscorrelationg the Near-Infrared and X-ray background in COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasinger, Guenther

    Unresolved cosmic backgrounds carry information about the populations of stars and black holes not accessible by any other current observational technique. Studies using both Spitzer and AKARI have revealed large-scale fluctuations in the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) after subtracting resolved sources to faint levels. The signal, which is stronger than all foreground contributions, has been attributed to the earliest light in the universe. Other teams, by using Spitzer and CIBER, suggested that this signal could originate from stars tidally stripped from their parent galaxies at low redshift as a result of mergers. Only sensitive multi-wavelength observations can distinguish between these radically different interpretations. Recently our team discovered an intriguing cross-correlation signal between the unresolved CIB and X-ray background (CXB) suggesting significant black hole populations among the CIB sources (C13). The analysis used data from Spitzer and Chandra in an overlapping 8'x45' region of the All-Wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS), probing the clustering of the underlying sources to angular scales 20', but the experiment is limited by the size and the elongated configuration of the field. Here we propose to use the much more extended multiwavelength observations in the COSMOS field to obtain new constraints on this important debate. Spitzer has recently completed the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH), which observed the full 2 square degree COSMOS field to about half the depth of the AEGIS field, but a 20 times larger sky area. SPLASH, focusing on the COSMOS field with excellent multi-wavelength coverage from space and ground-based observatories, is ideally suited to study the CIB to better precision and at larger scales than available so far. We propose to cross-correlate the Spitzer unresolved CIB to the unresolved CXB observed by Chandra and XMM-Newton. Chandra has covered the full 2 deg2 COSMOS

  11. Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.; Spitzer Science Center

    2016-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope, launched on 2003 August 25, continues to produce new and exciting views of the Universe as seen in infrared light. Spitzer is the fourth and final space telescope in NASA's Great Observatory series. Originally it consisted of a liquid-helium-cooled 85-cm telescope and three imaging and spectroscopic instruments capable of observing infrared light (3-160 micron wavelength) from regions of space invisible to optical telescopes. In mid-2009 Spitzer's cryogen was exhausted, leaving the observatory with two operating imaging arrays at 3.6 and 4.5 micron wavelength. "Warm" Spitzer, as it is now called, continues to match the sensitivity achieved at these wavelengths during the cryogenic mission and remains very much in demand. The Spitzer Space Telescope has changed our view of the Universe. Spitzer's scientific results include the study of the formation and evolution of galaxies in the early Universe, star formation and evolution, exoplanets, the structure and evolution of planetary disks around nearby stars, the cosmic distance scale, clusters of galaxies, near-Earth asteroids, and comets. After a brief description of the Spitzer mission, achievements of Spitzer's extragalactic and galactic observational programs will be presented, including many of Spitzer's very spectacular images.

  12. Spitzer Observations of SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polomski, E.; Gehrz, R. D.; Woodward, C. E.; Boyer, M.; Roellig, T. L.

    2004-12-01

    We present new Spitzer observations of the well known supernova remnant, SN 1987A. Spitzer's milli-Jy spectroscopic sensitivity, paired with an imaging super-resolution of 0.3″ /pixel, offers a unique opportunity to study the thermal emission of SN 1987A across a large wavelength regime for the first time since its initial outburst. SN 1987A was the first supernova observed by naked eye in almost 400 years and has been intensely studied at all wavelengths with a wide array of telescopes and instrumentation. Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging of this object shows a triple-ringed structure spanning ≈5″ diameter (Burrows et al. 1995, ApJ 452, 680). These rings are believed to be material originating in an earlier stellar wind and mass-loss phase of the progenitor star and is now being heated by an expanding shock wave from the supernova remnant (SNR). Near-infrared imaging has shown that the remnant size is slowly increasing over time as the shock wave continues to expand outward. We present Spitzer IRAC imaging spanning the 3-8 μ m regime and IRS spectroscopy in the 5-25 μ m regime. Our observations are the first detections of the remnant in the 3-8 μ m regime since ISO observations in 1998 (Fischera et al. 2002, A&A 395, 189) and boad-band 10 μ m imaging in 2003 by Bouchet et al. (2004, ApJ 611, 394) and the first mid-IR spectroscopy since KAO measurements in 1988. We discuss the source of the IR emission and estimate a dust mass from our photometry. This work is suported in part by NASA (JPL/SSC-1256406, 1215746)

  13. Planetary system formation: The view from Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trilling, D. E.; Rieke, G. H.; Su, K. Y. L.; Stansberry, J. A.; Beichman, C. A.; Bryden, G.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Werner, M. W.

    2004-11-01

    In the past year, the Spitzer Space Telescope has returned thermal infrared (24, 70, 160 micron) images of unprecedented sensitivity, allowing searches for debris disks around stars. We will provide a brief overview of results from several ongoing Spitzer debris disk programs, highlighting results from three programs. First, we learn from our survey of more than 250 A stars that there is substantial variety in the intrinsic properties of debris disks, dating from their protoplanetary stages. We further argue that much of the dust we see today is generated from episodic planetesimal collisions. Second, our detailed study of Vega allows us to map a large debris disk and constrain particle size and dust dynamics. We find that very small dust grains are being blown out from the inner part of the Vega system, suggesting a recent dust-producing collision. Third, from a preliminary survey of nearby Sun-like stars, we find that the prevalence of debris disks around extrasolar planet-bearing stars is relatively high, implying the presence of dust-producing bodies (asteroids, comets) in those systems. The overall picture of planetary system formation from planetesimals is supported by all of these results. However, the observational signatures of dust disks (and consequently the late-stage evolution of those disks) may be alluding not to steady-state conditions but to large, individual, dust-producing events. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, operated by JPL/Caltech under NASA contract 1407. Support for this work was provided by NASA through contract number 960785 issued by JPL/Caltech.

  14. THE SPITZER ATLAS OF STELLAR SPECTRA (SASS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ardila, David R.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Makowiecki, Wojciech; Stauffer, John; Rho, Jeonghee; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Song, Inseok

    2010-12-15

    We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra, which includes 159 stellar spectra (5-32 {mu}m; R {approx} 100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, such as blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All of the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, the spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, characterized by the presence of hydrogen lines in A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstellar gas and/or dust. The sample includes five M supergiant spectra, which show strong dust excesses and in some cases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. Sequences of WR stars present the well-known pattern of lines of He I and He II, as well as forbidden lines of ionized metals. The characteristic flat-top shape of the [Ne III] line is evident even at these low spectral resolutions. Several Luminous Blue Variables and other transition stars are present in the Atlas and show very diverse spectra, dominated by circumstellar gas and dust features. We show that the [8]-[24] Spitzer colors (IRAC and MIPS) are poor predictors of spectral type for most luminosity classes.

  15. SPITZER SECONDARY ECLIPSES OF WASP-18b

    SciTech Connect

    Nymeyer, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Hardy, Ryan A.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Campo, Christopher J.; Blecic, Jasmina; Bowman, William C.; Britt, Christopher B. T.; Cubillos, Patricio; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Maxted, Pierre F. L.; Loredo, Thomas J.; Hellier, Coel; Anderson, David R.; Gillon, Michael; Hebb, Leslie; Wheatley, Peter J.; Pollacco, Don

    2011-11-20

    The transiting exoplanet WASP-18b was discovered in 2008 by the Wide Angle Search for Planets project. The Spitzer Exoplanet Target of Opportunity Program observed secondary eclipses of WASP-18b using Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera in the 3.6 {mu}m and 5.8 {mu}m bands on 2008 December 20, and in the 4.5 {mu}m and 8.0 {mu}m bands on 2008 December 24. We report eclipse depths of 0.30% {+-} 0.02%, 0.39% {+-} 0.02%, 0.37% {+-} 0.03%, 0.41% {+-} 0.02%, and brightness temperatures of 3100 {+-} 90, 3310 {+-} 130, 3080 {+-} 140, and 3120 {+-} 110 K in order of increasing wavelength. WASP-18b is one of the hottest planets yet discovered-as hot as an M-class star. The planet's pressure-temperature profile most likely features a thermal inversion. The observations also require WASP-18b to have near-zero albedo and almost no redistribution of energy from the day side to the night side of the planet.

  16. The Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauduit, Jean-Christophe; Lacy, M.; Farrah, D.; Surace, J.; Jarvis, M.; Oliver, S.; Maraston, C.; SERVS Team

    2012-01-01

    We present details of the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS), an 18 square degrees medium-deep survey at 3.6 and 4.5 μm with the post-cryogenic Spitzer Space Telescope to ≈ 2 μJy (AB=23.1) depth of five highly observed astronomical fields (Elais-N1, Elais-S1, Lockman Hole, Chandra-Deep Fied South and XMM). Data will be made available to the community in the Spring of 2012. SERVS is designed to enable the study of galaxy evolution as a function of environment from z ≈ 5 to the present day, and is the first extragalactic survey both large enough and deep enough to put rare objects such as luminous quasars and galaxy clusters at z ≥ 1 into their cosmological context. SERVS is designed to overlap with several key surveys at optical, near- through far-infrared, submillimeter and radio wavelengths to provide a coherent picture of the formation of massive galaxies.

  17. The Euclid/WFIRST Spitzer Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capak, Peter; Arendt, R.; Arnouts, S.; Bartlett, J.; Bouwens, R.; Brinchman, J.; Brodwin, M.; Carollo, M.; Castander, F.; Charlot, S.; Chary, R.-R.; Cohen, J.; Cooray, A.; Conselice, C.; Coupon, J.; Cuby, J.-G.; Culliandre, J.; Davidzon, I.; Dole, H.; Dunlop, J.; Eisenhardt, P.; Ferrara, A.; Gardner, J.; Hasinger, G.; Hildebrandt, H.; Ho, S.; Ilbert, O.; Jouvel, S.; Kashlinsky, A.; LeFevre, O.; LeFloc'h, E.; Maraston, C.; Masters, D.; McCracken, H. J.; Mei, S.; Mellier, Y.; Mitchell-Wynn, K.; Moustakas, L.; Nayyeri, H.; Paltani, S.; Rhodes, J.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scarlata, C.; Scoville, N.; Silverman, J.; Speagle, J.; Stanford, S.; Stern, D.; Teplitz, H.; Toft, S.

    2016-08-01

    We propose 5286h of Spitzer Legacy Science Time to carry out a precursor survey for Euclid, WFIRST, and JWST. The primary goal is to enable definitive studies of reionization, z>7 galaxy formation, and the first massive black holes. The proposed data will also enhance the cosmological constraints provided by Euclid and WFIRST. The survey will cover 20 square degrees to 2h per pointing, split between the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) and the North Ecliptic Pole. These are some of the darkest and most observable fields on the sky and have existing multi-wavelength data that will enable immediate science. The survey parameters are designed to enable stellar mass measurement at 3Spitzer can probe this region of survey space at 3-5um, a wavelength range that uniquely enables stellar mass estimates at z>3 enabling a direct probe of galaxy growth during the epoch of re-ionization.

  18. Spitzer Sees Water Loud and Clear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This plot of infrared data, called a spectrum, shows the strong signature of water vapor deep within the core of an embryonic star system, called NGC 1333-IRAS 4B.

    The data were captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope using an instrument called a spectrograph. A spectrograph collects light and sorts it according to color, or wavelength. In this case, infrared light from NGC 1333-IRAS 4B was broken up into the wavelengths listed on the horizontal axis of the plot. The sharp spikes, called spectral lines, occur at wavelengths at which the stellar object is particularly bright. The signature of water vapor is revealed in the pattern of wavelengths at which the spikes appear.

    By comparing the observed data to a model (lower curve), astronomers can also determine the physical and chemical details of the region. For example, astronomers say these data suggest that ice in a cocoon surrounding the forming star is falling inward. The ice then smacks supersonically into a dusty planet-forming disk surrounding the stellar embryo, heats up and vaporizes quickly, releasing the infrared light that Spitzer collected.

  19. A Spitzer-based classification of TNOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. R.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Emery, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    The outer reaches of the Solar System are residence to the icy bodies known as trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). Implications such as low albedo and size have left this field relatively unexplored and in turn, encouraged the pursuit of these far-orbiting objects. A database of 48 objects was used by Fulchignoni et al. (2008) to cluster, model, and analyze the various spectra into classified taxa. The dataset adopted by Fulchignoni et al. (2008) was used as a baseline for visual colors to which Dalle Ore et al. (in prep) provided the significance of adding albedo measurements taken from Stansberry et al (2008). To further the classification accuracy, two near-infrared color bands from the Spitzer Space Telescope, centered at 3.55 and 4.50 microns, were supplemented with the previous 7-filter photometry. The 9-band compilation produced altered results from the previous studies; the addition of Spitzer data hopes to distinguish varying compositional properties of icy objects. We present a redefined taxonomy that may uncover clues to evolutionary trends of the TNO population.

  20. Optimal Calibration of the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David; Kang, Bryan; Brugarolas, Paul; Boussalis, Dhemetrio

    2007-01-01

    A document discusses the focal-plane calibration of the Spitzer Space Telescope by use of the instrument pointing frame (IPF) Kalman filter, which was described in Kalman Filter for Calibrating a Telescope Focal Plane (NPO-40798), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 9 (September 2006), page 62. To recapitulate: In the IPF Kalman filter, optimal estimates of both engineering and scientific focal-plane parameters are obtained simultaneously, using data taken in each focalplane survey activity. The IPF Kalman filter offers greater efficiency and economy, relative to prior calibration practice in which scientific and engineering parameters were estimated by separate teams of scientists and engineers and iterated upon each other. In the Spitzer Space Telescope application, the IPF Kalman filter was used to calibrate 56 frames for precise telescope pointing, estimate >1,500 parameters associated with focal-plane mapping, and process calibration runs involving as many as 1,338 scientific image centroids. The final typical survey calibration accuracy was found to be 0.09 arc second. The use of the IPF Kalman filter enabled a team of only four analysts to complete the calibration processing in three months. An unanticipated benefit afforded by the IPF Kalman filter was the ability to monitor health and diagnose performance of the entire end-to-end telescope-pointing system.

  1. How Accurate are SuperCOSMOS Positions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Adam; Hunstead, Richard; Johnston, Helen

    2014-02-01

    Optical positions from the SuperCOSMOS Sky Survey have been compared in detail with accurate radio positions that define the second realisation of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2). The comparison was limited to the IIIaJ plates from the UK/AAO and Oschin (Palomar) Schmidt telescopes. A total of 1 373 ICRF2 sources was used, with the sample restricted to stellar objects brighter than BJ = 20 and Galactic latitudes |b| > 10°. Position differences showed an rms scatter of 0.16 arcsec in right ascension and declination. While overall systematic offsets were < 0.1 arcsec in each hemisphere, both the systematics and scatter were greater in the north.

  2. Einstein's Cosmos (German Title: Einsteins Kosmos)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, Hilmar W.; Dick, Wolfgang R.

    The different contributions of the present volume illuminate the interaction between Einstein and his colleagues when the foundations of modern cosmology were laid: First, the relativistic effects in the solar system, the gravitational redshift in the solar spectrum, and Einstein's relations with Freundlich and Eddington. Second, the cosmological models of Einstein, de Sitter, Friedmann, and Lemaître, which were discussed controversely till the end of the 1920s. Other scientists have also widened or critically questioned Einstein's insight and knowledge: Schwarzschild, Selety, Silberstein, and Mandl, whose life and work is discussed in separate articles. In those days, politics more than ever in history had influenced the lifes of scientists. Therefore, some comments on the ``political cosmos'' that has influenced decisively Einstein's life are also given. A special role in popularizing Einstein's world view was played by Archenhold Observatory in Berlin. A list of Einstein memorial places and a bibliographic list conclude the present book. All papers are written in German, and have English abstracts.

  3. Panel Discussion: Life in the Cosmos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Water appears to be essential to all life on Earth. For this reason, "Follow the Water" has been adopted as a mantra for the search for Life in the Cosmos. Expeditions have helped to establish the limits and biodiversity of life in the most extreme environments on Earth. Microbial extremophiles inhabit acidic streams; hypersaline and hyperalkaline lakes and pools; the cold deep sea floor, permafrost, rocks, glaciers, and perennially ice-covered lakes of the polar environments; geysers, volcanic fumaroles, hydrothermal vents and hot rocks deep within the Earth's crust. The ESA Venus Express Spacecraft entered Venusian Orbit in 2006 and continues to produce exciting results. The Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) instrument made the first detection of hydroxyl in the atmosphere of Venus, indicating it is much more similar to Earth and Mars than previously thought. Huge hurricane-like vortices have been found above the poles of the planet and as yet unidentified UV absorbers that form mysterious dark bands in the upper atmosphere. At 70 km and below, water vapor and sulfur dioxide combine to form sulfuric acid droplets that create a haze above the cloud tops. Thermophilic acidophiles, such as have recently been discovered on Earth, could possibly survive in the hot sulfuric acid droplets that exist in the upper atmosphere of Venus. In order to understand how to search for life elsewhere in the Solar System, over 40 VIRTIS images of Earth from Venus have been obtained to search for evidence of life on Earth. The signatures of water and molecular Oxygen were detected in the Earth s atmosphere, but the atmosphere of Venus also exhibits these signatures. The water and water ice are far more abundant on comet, the polar caps and permafrost of Mars and the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. These "frozen worlds" of our Solar System, are much more promising regimes where extant or extinct microbial life may exist. The ESA Mars Advanced Radar for

  4. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Flower Pigments in Chocolate Cosmos, Cosmos atrosanguineus, and its Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Amamiya, Kotarou; Iwashina, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Two major anthocyanins, cyanidin 3-O-glucoside and 3-O-rutinoside, were isolated from the black flowers of Cosmos atrosanguineus cultivar 'Choco Mocha', together with three minor anthocyanins, cyanidin 3-O-malonylglucoside, pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside and 3-O-rutinoside. A chalcone, butein 4'-O-glucoside and three minor flavanones were isolated from the red flowers of C. atrosanguineis x C. sulphureus cultivar 'Rouge Rouge'. The anthocyanins and chalcone accumulation of cultivar 'Choco Mocha' and its hybrid cultivars 'Brown Rouge', 'Forte Rouge', 'Rouge Rouge' and 'Noel Rouge' was surveyed by quantitative HPLC. Total anthocyanins of black flower cultivars 'Choco Mocha' and 'Brown Rouge' were 3-4-folds higher than that of the red flower cultivar 'Noel Rouge'. On the other hand, total chalcone of 'Noel Rouge' was 10-77-folds higher compared with those of other cultivars, 'Brown Rouge', 'Forte Rouge' and 'Rouge Rouge'. It was shown that the flower color variations from red to black of Chocolate Cosmos and its hybrids are due to the difference in the relative amounts of anthocyanins and chalcone. PMID:26996024

  5. The Subaru COSMOS 20: Subaru optical imaging of the HST COSMOS field with 20 filters*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Kajisawa, Masaru; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Nagao, Tohru; Capak, Peter L.; Aussel, Herve; Ichikawa, Akie; Murayama, Takashi; Scoville, Nick Z.; Ilbert, Olivier; Salvato, Mara; Sanders, David B. B.; Mobasher, Bahram; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Tasca, Lidia; Lilly, Simon; Carollo, Marcella; Renzini, Alvio; Rich, Michael; Schinnerer, Eva; Kaifu, Norio; Karoji, Hiroshi; Arimoto, Nobuo; Okamura, Sadanori; Ohta, Kouji; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Hayashino, Tomoki

    2015-12-01

    We present both the observations and the data reduction procedures of the Subaru COSMOS 20 project, an optical imaging survey of the HST COSMOS field, carried out by using Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope with the following 20 optical filters: six broad-band (B, g', V, r', i', and z'), two narrow-band (NB711 and NB816), and 12 intermediate-band filters (IA427, IA464, IA484, IA505, IA527, IA574, IA624, IA679, IA709, IA738, IA767, and IA827). Part of this project is described in Taniguchi et al. (2007, ApJS, 172, 9) and Capak et al. (2007, ApJS, 172, 99) for the six broad-band and one narrow-band (NB816) filter data. In this paper, we present details of the observations and data reduction for the remaining 13 filters (the 12 IA filters and NB711). In particular, we describe the accuracy of both the photometry and astrometry in all the filter bands. We also present the optical properties of the Suprime-Cam IA filter system in appendices.

  6. 77 FR 23318 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “African Cosmos: Stellar Arts”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``African Cosmos: Stellar Arts... Cosmos: Stellar Arts,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States, is...

  7. The Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Mark; SERVS Team

    2009-05-01

    The Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS) will image a total of 18 deg2 of sky to micro-Jansky depth in the [3.6] and [4.5] micron bands split amongst the SWIRE ELAIS-S1, ELAIS-N1, XMM-LSS, Lockman and CDFS fields. SERVS will have substantial overlap with the VISTA/VIDEO and UKIDSS DXS near-infrared surveys, and the Hermes far-infrared survey with Herschel. Key science goals include: understanding stellar mass assembly in massive galaxies from z 5 to the present across a wide range of environments, studying the effects of AGN feedback on the formation of massive galaxies, and finding quasars at z>6.5. In this talk I shall describe the science possible with SERVS, the data taking and analysis schedule, plans for bandmerging with other surveys, and eventual public release.

  8. The Cosmos Portal and the IYA2009 Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, Bernard M.; Sims, M.; Lindblom, J.

    2009-01-01

    In 2007 the non-profit Digital Universe Foundation (DUF) launched the Earth Portal as a comprehensive resource for timely, objective, science-based information about the environment. There are currently over 1000 scholars from 60 countries engaged in this rapidly growing web-based collaboration. The Cosmos Portal is the second major DUF initiative (digitaluniverse.net/cosmos). In support of the IYA2009 effort, the Cosmos Portal is recruiting astronomy professionals to make use of easy online tools to publish articles, blogs, news items, image galleries, class notes, lectures, powerpoint presentations, links to other high quality websites or other educational material. In parallel we intend to bring hundreds of amateur astronomy organizations and thousands of amateur astronomers and telescope makers together in a community of portals (digitaluniverse.net/cosmoscommunity). This will allow vibrant online collaboration and information sharing. We encourage you to start a portal on your favorite topic or join an existing topic as a contributor.

  9. GREEN GALAXIES IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Zhizheng; Kong, Xu; Fan, Lulu E-mail: xkong@ustc.edu.cn

    2013-10-10

    We present research on the morphologies, spectra, and environments of ≈2350 'green valley' galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the COSMOS field. The bimodality of dust-corrected NUV–r {sup +} color is used to define 'green valley'; it removes dusty star-forming galaxies from galaxies that are truly transitioning between the blue cloud and the red sequence. Morphological parameters of green galaxies are intermediate between those of blue and red galaxy populations, both on the Gini-asymmetry and the Gini-M{sub 20} planes. Approximately 60%-70% of green disk galaxies have intermediate or big bulges, and only 5%-10% are pure disk systems, based on morphological classification using the Zurich Estimator of Structural Types. The obtained average spectra of green galaxies are intermediate between blue and red ones in terms of [O II], Hα, and Hβ emission lines. Stellar population synthesis on the average spectra shows that green galaxies are on average older than blue galaxies but younger than red galaxies. Green galaxies and blue galaxies have similar projected galaxy density (Σ{sub 10}) distributions at z > 0.7. At z < 0.7, the fractions of M{sub *} < 10{sup 10.0} M{sub ☉} green galaxies located in a dense environment are found to be significantly larger than those of blue galaxies. The morphological and spectral properties of green galaxies are consistent with the transitioning population between the blue cloud and the red sequence. The possible mechanisms for quenching star formation activities in green galaxies are discussed. The importance of active galactic nucleus feedback cannot be well constrained in our study. Finally, our findings suggest that environmental conditions, most likely starvation and harassment, significantly affect the transformation of M{sub *} < 10{sup 10.0} M{sub ☉} blue galaxies into red galaxies, especially at z < 0.5.

  10. Green Galaxies in the COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhizheng; Kong, Xu; Fan, Lulu

    2013-10-01

    We present research on the morphologies, spectra, and environments of ≈2350 "green valley" galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the COSMOS field. The bimodality of dust-corrected NUV-r + color is used to define "green valley"; it removes dusty star-forming galaxies from galaxies that are truly transitioning between the blue cloud and the red sequence. Morphological parameters of green galaxies are intermediate between those of blue and red galaxy populations, both on the Gini-asymmetry and the Gini-M 20 planes. Approximately 60%-70% of green disk galaxies have intermediate or big bulges, and only 5%-10% are pure disk systems, based on morphological classification using the Zurich Estimator of Structural Types. The obtained average spectra of green galaxies are intermediate between blue and red ones in terms of [O II], Hα, and Hβ emission lines. Stellar population synthesis on the average spectra shows that green galaxies are on average older than blue galaxies but younger than red galaxies. Green galaxies and blue galaxies have similar projected galaxy density (Σ10) distributions at z > 0.7. At z < 0.7, the fractions of M * < 1010.0 M ⊙ green galaxies located in a dense environment are found to be significantly larger than those of blue galaxies. The morphological and spectral properties of green galaxies are consistent with the transitioning population between the blue cloud and the red sequence. The possible mechanisms for quenching star formation activities in green galaxies are discussed. The importance of active galactic nucleus feedback cannot be well constrained in our study. Finally, our findings suggest that environmental conditions, most likely starvation and harassment, significantly affect the transformation of M * < 1010.0 M ⊙ blue galaxies into red galaxies, especially at z < 0.5.

  11. Fitness of the Cosmos for Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.; Conway Morris, Simon; Freeland, Stephen J.; Harper, Charles L., Jr.

    2012-08-01

    Foreword: The improbability of life George M. Whitesides; Part I. The Fitness of 'Fitness' - Henderson in Context: 1. Locating 'fitness' and Lawrence J. Henderson Everett Mendelsohn; 2. Revisiting The Fitness of the Environment Owen Gingerich; 3. Is fine-tuning remarkable? John F. Haught; 4. Complexity in context: the metaphysical implications of evolutionary theory Edward T. Oakes; 5. Tuning fine-tuning Ernan Mcmullin; Part II. The Fitness of the Cosmic Environment: 6. Fitness and the cosmic environment Paul C. W. Davies; 7. The interconnections between cosmology and life Mario Livio; 8. Chemistry and sensitivity John D. Barrow; 9. Fitness of the cosmos for the origin and evolution of life: from biochemical fine-tuning to the Anthropic Principle Julian Chela-Flores; Part III. The Fitness of the Terrestrial Environment: 10. How biofriendly is the universe? Christian de Duve; 11. Tuning into the frequencies of life: a roar of static or a precise signal? Simon Conway Morris; 12. Life on earth: the role of proteins Jayanth R. Banavar and Amos Maritan; 13. Protein-based life as an emergent property of matter: the nature and biological fitness of the protein folds Michael J. Denton; 14. Could an intelligent alien predict earth's biochemistry? Stephen J. Freeland; 15. Would Venus evolve on Mars? Bioenergetic constraints, allometric trends, and the evolution of life-history invariants Jeffrey P. Schloss; Part IV. The Fitness of the Chemical Environment: 16. Creating a perspective for comparing Albert Eschenmoser; 17. Fine-tuning and interstellar chemistry William Klemperer; 18. Framing the question of fine-tuning for intermediary metabolism Eric Smith and Harold J. Morowitz; 19. Coarse-tuning the origin of life? Guy Ourisson; 20. Plausible lipid-like peptides: prebiotic molecular self-assembly in water Shuguang Zhang; 21. Evolution revisited by inorganic chemists R. J. P. Williams and J. J. R. Fraústo da Silva; Index.

  12. Fitness of the Cosmos for Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.; Conway Morris, Simon; Freeland, Stephen J.; Harper, Charles L., Jr.

    2007-12-01

    Foreword: The improbability of life George M. Whitesides; Part I. The Fitness of 'Fitness' - Henderson in Context: 1. Locating 'fitness' and Lawrence J. Henderson Everett Mendelsohn; 2. Revisiting The Fitness of the Environment Owen Gingerich; 3. Is fine-tuning remarkable? John F. Haught; 4. Complexity in context: the metaphysical implications of evolutionary theory Edward T. Oakes; 5. Tuning fine-tuning Ernan Mcmullin; Part II. The Fitness of the Cosmic Environment: 6. Fitness and the cosmic environment Paul C. W. Davies; 7. The interconnections between cosmology and life Mario Livio; 8. Chemistry and sensitivity John D. Barrow; 9. Fitness of the cosmos for the origin and evolution of life: from biochemical fine-tuning to the Anthropic Principle Julian Chela-Flores; Part III. The Fitness of the Terrestrial Environment: 10. How biofriendly is the universe? Christian de Duve; 11. Tuning into the frequencies of life: a roar of static or a precise signal? Simon Conway Morris; 12. Life on earth: the role of proteins Jayanth R. Banavar and Amos Maritan; 13. Protein-based life as an emergent property of matter: the nature and biological fitness of the protein folds Michael J. Denton; 14. Could an intelligent alien predict earth's biochemistry? Stephen J. Freeland; 15. Would Venus evolve on Mars? Bioenergetic constraints, allometric trends, and the evolution of life-history invariants Jeffrey P. Schloss; Part IV. The Fitness of the Chemical Environment: 16. Creating a perspective for comparing Albert Eschenmoser; 17. Fine-tuning and interstellar chemistry William Klemperer; 18. Framing the question of fine-tuning for intermediary metabolism Eric Smith and Harold J. Morowitz; 19. Coarse-tuning the origin of life? Guy Ourisson; 20. Plausible lipid-like peptides: prebiotic molecular self-assembly in water Shuguang Zhang; 21. Evolution revisited by inorganic chemists R. J. P. Williams and J. J. R. Fraústo da Silva; Index.

  13. Compton Thick AGN in the COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Cosmos Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    I will present the results we published in a couple of recent papers (Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A&A 573A 137, Lanzuisi et al. 2015, arXiv 1505.01153) on the properties of X-ray selected Compton Thick (CT, NH>10^24 cm^-2) AGN, in the COSMOS survey. We exploited the rich multi-wavelength dataset available in this field, to show that CT AGN tend to harbor smaller, rapidly growing SMBH with respect to unobscured AGN, and have a higher chance of being hosted by star-forming, merging and post-merger systems.We also demonstrated the detectability of even more heavily obscured AGN (NH>10^25 cm^-2), thanks to a truly multi-wavelength approach in the same field. The extreme source detected in this way shows strong evidences of ongoing powerful AGN feedback, detected as blue-shifted wings of high ionization optical emission lines such as [NeV] and [FeVII], as well as of the [OIII] emission line.The results obtained from these works point toward a scenario in which highly obscured AGN occupy a peculiar place in the galaxy-AGN co-evolution process, in which both the host and the SMBH rapidly evolve toward the local relations.We will also present estimates on the detectability of such extreme sources up to redshift ~6-7 with Athena. Combining the most up to date models for the Luminosity Function of CT AGN at high z, aggressive data analysis techniques on faint sources, and the current Athena survey design, we demonstrate that we will detect, and recognize as such, a small (few to ten) but incredibly valuable sample of CT AGN at such high redshift.

  14. Caltrans Keeps the Spitzer Pipelines Moving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Wen; Laher, Russ; Fowler, John; Moshir, Mehrdad

    2004-01-01

    The computer pipelines used to process digital infrared astronomical images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope require various input calibration-data files for characterizing the attributes and behaviors of the onboard focal-plane-arrays and their detector pixels, such as operability, dark-current offset, linearity, non- uniformity, muxbleed, droop, and point-response functions. The telescope has three very different science instruments, each with three or four spectral-band-pass channels, depending on the instrument. Moreover, each instrument has various operating modes (e-g., full array or sub-array in one case) and parameters (e.g., integration time). Calibration data that depend on these considerations are needed by pipelines for generating both science products (production pipelines) and higher-level calibration products (calibration pipelines). The calibration files are created in various formats either 'off-line' or by the aforementioned calibration pipelines, depending on the above configuration details. Also, the calibration files are generally applicable to a certain time period and therefore must be selected accordingly for a given raw input image to be correctly processed. All of this complexity in selecting and retrieving calibration files for pipeline processing is handled by a procedural software-program called 'caltrans' . This software, which is implemented in C and interacts with an Informix database, was developed at the Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and is now deployed in SSC daily operations. The software is rule-based, very flexible, and, for efficiency, capable of retrieving multiple calibration files with a single software-execution command.

  15. Galactic Distribution of Planets Spitzer Microlens Parallaxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew; Carey, Sean; Yee, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    We will measure the Galactic distribution of planets by obtaining 'microlens parallaxes' of about 700 events, including 18 planetary events, from the comparison of microlens lightcurves observed from Spitzer and Earth, which are separated by 1 AU in projection. As we have demonstrated in two previous programs, the difference in these lightcurves yields both the 'microlens parallax' (ratio of the lens-source relative parallax) to the Einstein radius, and the direction of lens-source relative motion. For planetary events, this measurement directly yields the mass and distance of the planet. For non-planetary events it can be combined with a Galactic model to estimate these quantities with factor 1.4 precision. Hence, the cumulative distributions of planetary events and all events can be compared to determine the relative frequency of planets in the Galactic disk and bulge. The results will be combined with those of current/previous Spitzer campaigns and the current Kepler campaign. This proposal is significantly more sensitive to planets than previous work because it takes advantage of the new KMTNet observing strategy that covers 80 sq.deg at >0.4/hr cadence, 24/7 from 3 southern observatories. This same observing program also provides a unique probe of dark objects. It will yield the first mass-measurement based determination of the isolated-brown-dwarf mass function. Thirteen percent of the observations will specifically target binaries, which will probe systems with dark components (brown dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes) that are difficult or impossible to investigate by other methods. The observations and methods from this work are a test bed for WFIRST microlensing.

  16. The Chandra Cosmos Legacy Survey: Overview and Point Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civano, F.; Marchesi, S.; Comastri, A.; Urry, M. C.; Elvis, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Puccetti, S.; Brusa, M.; Zamorani, G.; Hasinger, G.; Aldcroft, T.; Alexander, D. M.; Allevato, V.; Brunner, H.; Capak, P.; Finoguenov, A.; Fiore, F.; Fruscione, A.; Gilli, R.; Glotfelty, K.; Griffiths, R. E.; Hao, H.; Harrison, F. A.; Jahnke, K.; Kartaltepe, J.; Karim, A.; LaMassa, S. M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Miyaji, T.; Ranalli, P.; Salvato, M.; Sargent, M.; Scoville, N. J.; Schawinski, K.; Schinnerer, E.; Silverman, J.; Smolcic, V.; Stern, D.; Toft, S.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Treister, E.; Vignali, C.

    2016-03-01

    The COSMOS-Legacy survey is a 4.6 Ms Chandra program that has imaged 2.2 deg2 of the COSMOS field with an effective exposure of ≃ 160 ks over the central 1.5 deg2 and of ≃ 80 ks in the remaining area. The survey is the combination of 56 new observations obtained as an X-ray Visionary Project with the previous C-COSMOS survey. We describe the reduction and analysis of the new observations and the properties of 2273 point sources detected above a spurious probability of 2 × 10-5. We also present the updated properties of the C-COSMOS sources detected in the new data. The whole survey includes 4016 point sources (3814, 2920 and 2440 in the full, soft, and hard band). The limiting depths are 2.2 × 10-16, 1.5 × 10-15, and 8.9 × 10-16 {\\text{erg cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1 in the 0.5-2, 2-10, and 0.5-10 keV bands, respectively. The observed fraction of obscured active galactic nuclei with a column density >1022 cm-2 from the hardness ratio (HR) is ˜50{}-16+17%. Given the large sample we compute source number counts in the hard and soft bands, significantly reducing the uncertainties of 5%-10%. For the first time we compute number counts for obscured (HR > -0.2) and unobscured (HR < -0.2) sources and find significant differences between the two populations in the soft band. Due to the unprecedent large exposure, COSMOS-Legacy area is three times larger than surveys at similar depths and its depth is three times fainter than surveys covering similar areas. The area-flux region occupied by COSMOS-Legacy is likely to remain unsurpassed for years to come.

  17. CANDIDATE CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AT z > 1.3 IDENTIFIED IN THE SPITZER SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE DEEP FIELD SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rettura, A.; Stern, D.; Martinez-Manso, J.; Gettings, D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Mei, S.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Bartlett, J. G.

    2014-12-20

    We present 279 galaxy cluster candidates at z > 1.3 selected from the 94 deg{sup 2} Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) survey. We use a simple algorithm to select candidate high-redshift clusters of galaxies based on Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data combined with shallow all-sky optical data. We identify distant cluster candidates adopting an overdensity threshold that results in a high purity (80%) cluster sample based on tests in the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey of the Boötes field. Our simple algorithm detects all three 1.4 < z ≤ 1.75 X-ray detected clusters in the Boötes field. The uniqueness of the SSDF survey resides not just in its area, one of the largest contiguous extragalactic fields observed with Spitzer, but also in its deep, multi-wavelength coverage by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), Herschel/SPIRE, and XMM-Newton. This rich data set will allow direct or stacked measurements of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect decrements or X-ray masses for many of the SSDF clusters presented here, and enable a systematic study of the most distant clusters on an unprecedented scale. We measure the angular correlation function of our sample and find that these candidates show strong clustering. Employing the COSMOS/UltraVista photometric catalog in order to infer the redshift distribution of our cluster selection, we find that these clusters have a comoving number density n{sub c}=(0.7{sub −0.6}{sup +6.3})×10{sup −7} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup −3} and a spatial clustering correlation scale length r {sub 0} = (32 ± 7) h {sup –1} Mpc. Assuming our sample is comprised of dark matter halos above a characteristic minimum mass, M {sub min}, we derive that at z = 1.5 these clusters reside in halos larger than M{sub min}=1.5{sub −0.7}{sup +0.9}×10{sup 14} h{sup −1} M{sub ⊙}. We find that the mean mass of our cluster sample is equal to M{sub mean}=1.9{sub −0.8}{sup +1.0}×10{sup 14} h{sup −1} M{sub ⊙}; thus, our sample contains the progenitors of

  18. Candidate Clusters of Galaxies at z > 1.3 Identified in the Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettura, A.; Martinez-Manso, J.; Stern, D.; Mei, S.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Brodwin, M.; Gettings, D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Stanford, S. A.; Bartlett, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    We present 279 galaxy cluster candidates at z > 1.3 selected from the 94 deg2 Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) survey. We use a simple algorithm to select candidate high-redshift clusters of galaxies based on Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data combined with shallow all-sky optical data. We identify distant cluster candidates adopting an overdensity threshold that results in a high purity (80%) cluster sample based on tests in the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey of the Boötes field. Our simple algorithm detects all three 1.4 < z <= 1.75 X-ray detected clusters in the Boötes field. The uniqueness of the SSDF survey resides not just in its area, one of the largest contiguous extragalactic fields observed with Spitzer, but also in its deep, multi-wavelength coverage by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), Herschel/SPIRE, and XMM-Newton. This rich data set will allow direct or stacked measurements of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect decrements or X-ray masses for many of the SSDF clusters presented here, and enable a systematic study of the most distant clusters on an unprecedented scale. We measure the angular correlation function of our sample and find that these candidates show strong clustering. Employing the COSMOS/UltraVista photometric catalog in order to infer the redshift distribution of our cluster selection, we find that these clusters have a comoving number density nc = (0.7+6.3-0.6) × 10-7 h3 {Mpc}-3 and a spatial clustering correlation scale length r 0 = (32 ± 7) h -1 Mpc. Assuming our sample is comprised of dark matter halos above a characteristic minimum mass, M min, we derive that at z = 1.5 these clusters reside in halos larger than Mmin = 1.5+0.9-0.7 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ . We find that the mean mass of our cluster sample is equal to Mmean = 1.9+1.0-0.8 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ ; thus, our sample contains the progenitors of present-day massive galaxy clusters.

  19. Astrobiology: traces of life in the cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Rozanov, Alexei Y.

    2002-07-01

    The discovery of traces of life in the ancient Mars meteorite triggered the development of the rapidly emerging field of Astrobiology. Astrobiologists are seeking to develop conclusive methods to recognize biosignatures and microfossils of bacteria and other microbiota as well as to understand the spatial, temporal, environmental and chemical limitations of microbial extremophiles. Recent discoveries have revealed the great distribution and diversity of microbial extremophiles on Earth and profoundly increased the probability that life may exist elsewhere in the Cosmos. The rapidly emerging science of Bacterial Paleontology has provided important new information critical to the recognition of fossil bacteria on Earth and in Astromaterials. We have recently conducted independent scanning electron microscopy and x-ray analysis investigations in the US and Russia in order to better understand the morphology and chemical composition of microfossils in ancient terrestrial rocks and carbonaceous meteorites. In this paper, we review some aspects of microbial extremophiles of Earth as modals for life on other bodies of the Solar System. We consider several of the important chemical, mineral and morphological biomarkers that provide definitive evidence of biogenic activity in ancient rocks and meteorites. We present Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope images of microfossils found in-situ in freshly fractured meteorite surfaces and describe Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy and Link microprobe analysis of the chemical elements in the mineralized and/or kerogenous microfossils and meteorite rock matrix. We also discuss technqiues and methods that may be used to help discriminate indigenous microfosils from recent terrestrial contaminants. We will also present new data from our in-situ investigations of living cyanobacteria and bacteria and freshly broken surfaces of terrestrial rocks and meteorites. Comparative analysis of these images are interpreted as providing

  20. MID-INFRARED SELECTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER. I. CHARACTERIZING WISE-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.; Eisenhardt, Peter; Benford, Dominic J.; Blain, Andrew; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger L.; Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, Frank; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Yan, Lin; Dey, Arjun; Lake, Sean; Petty, Sara; Wright, E. L.; Stanford, S. A.; Harrison, Fiona; Madsen, Kristin

    2012-07-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) is an extremely capable and efficient black hole finder. We present a simple mid-infrared color criterion, W1 - W2 {>=} 0.8 (i.e., [3.4]-[4.6] {>=}0.8, Vega), which identifies 61.9 {+-} 5.4 active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates per deg{sup 2} to a depth of W2 {approx} 15.0. This implies a much larger census of luminous AGNs than found by typical wide-area surveys, attributable to the fact that mid-infrared selection identifies both unobscured (type 1) and obscured (type 2) AGNs. Optical and soft X-ray surveys alone are highly biased toward only unobscured AGNs, while this simple WISE selection likely identifies even heavily obscured, Compton-thick AGNs. Using deep, public data in the COSMOS field, we explore the properties of WISE-selected AGN candidates. At the mid-infrared depth considered, 160 {mu}Jy at 4.6 {mu}m, this simple criterion identifies 78% of Spitzer mid-infrared AGN candidates according to the criteria of Stern et al. and the reliability is 95%. We explore the demographics, multiwavelength properties and redshift distribution of WISE-selected AGN candidates in the COSMOS field.

  1. The impact of the cosmos on the human race.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A. E.

    1986-11-01

    The proposition is discussed that throughout its history, the development of the human race, physically, mentally and spiritually, has been shaped by the cosmos, never more so than at the present time when it engages in a search for extraterrestrial intelligence.

  2. An Interactive Multimedia Learning Environment for VLSI Built with COSMOS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelides, Marios C.; Agius, Harry W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents Bigger Bits, an interactive multimedia learning environment that teaches students about VLSI within the context of computer electronics. The system was built with COSMOS (Content Oriented semantic Modelling Overlay Scheme), which is a modelling scheme that we developed for enabling the semantic content of multimedia to be used…

  3. Bijuralism in Law's Empire and in Law's Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasirer, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    Using the example of McGill University's bijural program, explores how teaching the common and civil law traditions together provides an opportunity to teach in law's "cosmos" rather than its "empire," so that a bijural legal education can plainly and confidently ally itself with the great university tradition of prizing knowledge over…

  4. Emerging Adolescence: Finding One's Place in the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    Discusses emerging characteristics of early adolescents from a Montessorian perspective. Considers adolescents' revelations related to cosmic education, their need to serve, their need to think and to feel, and their need to know the cosmos through finding one's place in it. Discusses samples from students' cosmic autobiographies. (KB)

  5. US experiment flown on the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos 1667

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, John W. (Editor); Skidmore, Michael G. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Two male young-adult rhesus monkeys were flown on the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 1667 for seven days from July 10-17, 1985. Both animals were instrumented to record neurophysiological parameters. One animal, Gordyy, was additionally instrumented to record cardiovascular changes. Space capsule and environmental parameters were very similar to those of previous missions. On Cosmos 1514, which flew for five days in 1983, one animal was fitted with a left carotid artery cuff to measure blood pressure and flow velocity. An additional feature of Cosmos 1667 was a postflight control study using the flight animal. Intermittent postural tilt tests were also conducted before and after spaceflight and synchronous control studies, to simulate the fluid shifts associated with spaceflight. The experiment results support the conclusion derived from Cosmos 1514 that significant cardiovascular changes occur with spaceflight. The changes most clearly seen were rapid initial decreases in heart rate and further decreases with continued exposure to microgravity. The triggering mechanism appeared to be a headward shift in blood and tissue fluid volume which, in turn, triggered adaptive cardiovascular changes. Adaptive changes took place rapidly and began to stabilize after the first two days of flight. However, these changes did not plateau in the animal by the last day of the mission.

  6. US experiments flown on the Soviet satellite COSMOS 936

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenzweig, S. N.; Souza, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of spaceborne experiments onboard the Cosmos 936 satellite are reported. Alterations in normal bone chemistry, muscle structure, and general physiology resulting from spaceflight are covered along with measurements of cosmic radiation and its potential hazard to man during prolonged spaceflights. Postflight activities involving the seven U.S. experiments are emphasized.

  7. Dissecting Photometric Redshift for Active Galactic Nucleus Using XMM- and Chandra-COSMOS Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, M.; Ilbert, O.; Hasinger, G.; Rau, A.; Civano, F.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Elvis, M.; Vignali, C.; Aussel, H.; Comastri, A.; Fiore, F.; Le Floc'h, E.; Mainieri, V.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Capak, P.; Caputi, K.; Cappelluti, N.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Fotopoulou, S.; Fruscione, A.; Gilli, R.; Halliday, C.; Kneib, J.-P.; Kakazu, Y.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Kovac, K.; Ideue, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Impey, C. D.; Le Fevre, O.; Lamareille, F.; Lanzuisi, G.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Lilly, S.; Maier, C.; Manohar, S.; Masters, D.; McCracken, H.; Messias, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Nagao, T.; Pello, R.; Puccetti, S.; Perez-Montero, E.; Renzini, A.; Sargent, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scodeggio, M.; Scoville, N.; Shopbell, P.; Silvermann, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Trump, J. R.; Zucca, E.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric redshifts comparable to the highest quality results presently available for normal galaxies. We demonstrate that morphologically extended, faint X-ray sources without optical variability are more accurately described by a library of normal galaxies (corrected for emission lines) than by active galactic nucleus (AGN) dominated templates, even if these sources have AGN-like X-ray luminosities. Preselecting the library on the bases of the source properties allowed us to reach an accuracy \\sigma _{\\Delta z/(1+z_{spec})}\\sim 0.015 with a fraction of outliers of 5.8% for the entire Chandra-COSMOS sample. In addition, we release revised photometric redshifts for the 1735 optical counterparts of the XMM-detected sources over the entire 2 deg2 of COSMOS. For 248 sources, our updated photometric redshift differs from the previous release by Δz > 0.2. These changes are predominantly due to the inclusion of newly available deep H-band photometry (H AB = 24 mag). We illustrate once again the importance of a spectroscopic training sample and how an assumption about the nature of a source together, with the number and the depth of the available bands, influences the accuracy of the photometric redshifts determined for AGN. These considerations should be kept in mind when defining the observational strategies of upcoming large surveys targeting AGNs, such as eROSITA at X-ray energies and the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder Evolutionary Map of the Universe in the radio band. Based on observations by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the National Aeronautics Space Administration under

  8. Spitzer Secondary Eclipses of Two Hubble-observed Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Benneke, Bjoern; Fraine, Jonathan; Knutson, Heather; Lewis, Nikole; Mandell, Avi; Sing, David; Todorov, Kamen

    2015-10-01

    We propose Spitzer secondary eclipse observations of two key exoplanets (WASP-76b and HAT-P-38b) that are approved for transmission spectroscopy by HST/WFC3 in our Large Cycle-23 program. Spitzer eclipse data will provide temperature information needed to determine their atmospheric scale heights, and thereby infer their atmospheric water abundances (proxy for metallicity) from the WFC3 spectra. Potential molecular absorption that falls within the Spitzer bandpasses will also help to measure the atmospheric metallicity of these planets, and will be minimally affected by clouds - that can often frustrate transmission spectroscopy. Beyond the utility to our Hubble analyses, both planets have high scientific value for Spitzer eclipse observations in their own right. WASP-76b is a strongly irradiated and very hot, large radius giant planet. Its combination of strong irradiation and large radius puts it in an atmospheric regime where few planets have been observed by Spitzer in eclipse. HAT-P-38b is a sub-Saturn mass planet in a relatively cool temperature regime (1080 Kelvins) where Kammer et al. recently found that the ratio of planetary brightness temperature in the two Spitzer bands is potentially correlated with planetary mass. The low mass of HAT-P-38b (0.27 Jupiters) gives it substantial leverage to test that correlation.

  9. The Chandra COSMOS Legacy survey: optical/IR identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, S.; Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Salvato, M.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Hasinger, G.; Lanzuisi, G.; Miyaji, T.; Treister, E.; Urry, C. M.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.; Allevato, V.; Cappelluti, N.; Cardamone, C.; Finoguenov, A.; Griffiths, R. E.; Karim, A.; Laigle, C.; LaMassa, S. M.; Jahnke, K.; Ranalli, P.; Schawinski, K.; Schinnerer, E.; Silverman, J. D.; Smolcic, V.; Suh, H.; Trakhtenbrot, B.

    2016-01-01

    We present the catalog of optical and infrared counterparts of the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy Survey, a 4.6 Ms Chandra program on the 2.2 deg2 of the COSMOS field, combination of 56 new overlapping observations obtained in Cycle 14 with the previous C-COSMOS survey. In this Paper we report the i, K, and 3.6 μm identifications of the 2273 X-ray point sources detected in the new Cycle 14 observations. We use the likelihood ratio technique to derive the association of optical/infrared (IR) counterparts for 97% of the X-ray sources. We also update the information for the 1743 sources detected in C-COSMOS, using new K and 3.6 μm information not available when the C-COSMOS analysis was performed. The final catalog contains 4016 X-ray sources, 97% of which have an optical/IR counterpart and a photometric redshift, while ≃54% of the sources have a spectroscopic redshift. The full catalog, including spectroscopic and photometric redshifts and optical and X-ray properties described here in detail, is available online. We study several X-ray to optical (X/O) properties: with our large statistics we put better constraints on the X/O flux ratio locus, finding a shift toward faint optical magnitudes in both soft and hard X-ray band. We confirm the existence of a correlation between X/O and the the 2-10 keV luminosity for Type 2 sources. We extend to low luminosities the analysis of the correlation between the fraction of obscured AGNs and the hard band luminosity, finding a different behavior between the optically and X-ray classified obscured fraction.

  10. The Spitzer IRS Debris Disk Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.

    2014-04-01

    During the Spitzer Space Telescope cryogenic mission, Guaranteed Time Observers, Legacy Teams, and General Observers obtained Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of hundreds of debris disk candidates. We calibrated the spectra of 571 candidates, including 64 new IRAS and MIPS debris disks candidates, modeled their stellar photospheres, and produced a catalog of excess spectra for unresolved debris disks. We carried out two separate SED analyses. (1) For all targets, we modeled the IRS and MIPS 70 micron data (where available) assuming that the SEDs were well-described using, zero, one or two temperature black bodies. We calculated the probability for each model and computed the average probability to select among models. (2) For a subset of 120 targets with 10 and/or 20 micron silicate features, we modeled the data using spherical silicate (olivine, pyroxene, forsterite, and enstatite) grains located either in a continuous disk with power-law size and surface density distributions or two thin rings that are well-characterized using two separate dust grain temperatures. We present a demographic analysis of the disk properties. For example, we find that the majority of debris disks are better fit using two dust components, suggesting that planetary systems are common in debris disks and that the size distribution of dust grains is consistent with a collisional cascade.

  11. Spitzer IRS Observations of FU Orionis Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. D.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.; Watson, D. M.; Ibrahimov, M.; Furlan, E.; Sargent, B.; Forrest, W. J.

    2006-09-01

    We present 5-35 μm spectra, taken with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope, of five FU Orionis objects: FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, BBW 76, and V346 Nor. All but V346 Nor reveal amorphous silicate grains in emission at 10 and 20 μm, and show water-vapor absorption bands at 5.8 and 6.8 μm and SiO or possibly methane absorption at 8 μm. These absorption features closely match these bands in model stellar photospheres-signs of the gaseous photospheres of the inner regions of these objects' accretion disks. The continuum emission at 5-8 μm is also consistent with such disks, and, for FU Orionis and BBW 76, longer wavelength emission may be fit by a model that includes moderate disk flaring. V1057 Cyg and V1515 Cyg have much more emission at longer wavelengths than the others, perhaps evidence of a substantial remnant of their natal, infalling envelopes.

  12. Spitzer Meets K2: Spitzer Studies of Candidate Exoplanets Identified by K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Michael W.; Spitzer/K2 Study Team

    2016-01-01

    We are in the midst of a ~450 hr program of Spitzer photometry of candidate transiting planets orbiting M dwarf stars, identified in the K2 fields. Whereas the Kepler prime mission eschewed M stars, they have become a major focus of the community-driven target selection for K2. M stars are the most common stars in the galaxy, and planets orbiting M stars can be very attractive candidates for transit and eclipse atmospheric studies, including studies aimed at exploring potentially habitable exoplanets. We will review and show the results of the observations planned and executed to date, which total 21 transits of 16 planets orbiting 13 stars. Our results greatly improve on the characterization of the exoplanets and their orbits over what is possible from the K2 data alone. In addition, the improved ephemerides we generate will facilitate studies of interesting K2 targets from JWST. __________________________________________This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech.

  13. SEDS: The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Survey Design, Photometry, and Deep IRAC Source Counts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Arendt, A.; Barmby, P.; Barro, G; Bell, E. F.; Bouwens, R.; Cattaneo, A.; Croton, D.; Dave, R.; Dunlop, J. S.; Egami, E.; Faber, S.; Finlator, K.; Grogin, N. A.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hernquist, L.; Hora, J. L.; Illingworth, G.; Kashlinsky, A; Koekmoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.; Moseley, H.

    2013-01-01

    The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) is a very deep infrared survey within five well-known extragalactic science fields: the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, COSMOS, the Hubble Deep Field North, and the Extended Groth Strip. SEDS covers a total area of 1.46 deg(exp 2) to a depth of 26 AB mag (3sigma) in both of the warm Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands at 3.6 and 4.5 micron. Because of its uniform depth of coverage in so many widely-separated fields, SEDS is subject to roughly 25% smaller errors due to cosmic variance than a single-field survey of the same size. SEDS was designed to detect and characterize galaxies from intermediate to high redshifts (z = 2-7) with a built-in means of assessing the impact of cosmic variance on the individual fields. Because the full SEDS depth was accumulated in at least three separate visits to each field, typically with six-month intervals between visits, SEDS also furnishes an opportunity to assess the infrared variability of faint objects. This paper describes the SEDS survey design, processing, and publicly-available data products. Deep IRAC counts for the more than 300,000 galaxies detected by SEDS are consistent with models based on known galaxy populations. Discrete IRAC sources contribute 5.6 +/- 1.0 and 4.4 +/- 0.8 nW / square m/sr at 3.6 and 4.5 micron to the diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB). IRAC sources cannot contribute more than half of the total CIB flux estimated from DIRBE data. Barring an unexpected error in the DIRBE flux estimates, half the CIB flux must therefore come from a diffuse component.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spitzer-CANDELS catalog within 5 deep fields (Ashby+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Dunlop, J. S.; Egami, E.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Grogin, N. A.; Hora, J. L.; Huang, J.-S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Labbe, I.; Wang, Z.

    2015-08-01

    We chose to locate S-CANDELS inside the wider and shallower fields already covered by Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS), in regions that enjoy deep optical and NIR imaging from HST/CANDELS. These S-CANDELS fields are thus the Extended GOODS-south (aka the GEMS field, hereafter ECDFS; Rix et al. 2004ApJS..152..163R; Castellano et al. 2010A&A...511A..20C), the Extended GOODS-north (HDFN; Giavalisco et al. 2004, II/261; Wang et al. 2010, J/ApJS/187/251; Hathi et al. 2012ApJ...757...43H; Lin et al. 2012ApJ...756...71L), the UKIDSS UDS (aka the Subaru/XMM Deep Field, Ouchi et al. 2001ApJ...558L..83O; Lawrence et al. 2007, II/319), a narrow field within the EGS (Davis et al. 2007ApJ...660L...1D; Bielby et al. 2012A&A...545A..23B), and a strip within the UltraVista deep survey of the larger COSMOS field (Scoville et al. 2007ApJS..172...38S; McCracken et al. 2012, J/A+A/544/A156). The S-CANDELS observing strategy was designed to maximize the area covered to full depth within the CANDELS area. Each field was visited twice with six months separating the two visits. Table 1 lists the epochs for each field. All of the IRAC full-depth coverage is within the SEDS area (Ashby et al. 2013, J/ApJ/769/80), and almost all is within the area covered by HST for CANDELS. (6 data files).

  15. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG RED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, Tanya; Lacy, Mark; Spoon, Henrik; Glikman, Eilat; Petric, Andreea; Schulz, Bernhard E-mail: mlacy@nrao.edu E-mail: eilat.glikman@yale.edu E-mail: bschulz@ipac.caltech.edu

    2012-10-01

    We present mid-infrared spectra and photometry of 13 redshift 0.4 < z < 1 dust reddened quasars obtained with Spitzer IRS and MIPS. We compare properties derived from their infrared spectral energy distributions (intrinsic active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity and far-infrared luminosity from star formation) to the host luminosities and morphologies from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and black hole masses estimated from optical and/or near-infrared spectroscopy. Our results are broadly consistent with models in which most dust reddened quasars are an intermediate phase between a merger-driven starburst triggering a completely obscured AGN, and a normal, unreddened quasar. We find that many of our objects have high accretion rates, close to the Eddington limit. These objects tend to fall below the black hole mass-bulge luminosity relation as defined by local galaxies, whereas most of our low accretion rate objects are slightly above the local relation, as typical for normal quasars at these redshifts. Our observations are therefore most readily interpreted in a scenario in which galaxy stellar mass growth occurs first by about a factor of three in each merger/starburst event, followed sometime later by black hole growth by a similar amount. We do not, however, see any direct evidence for quasar feedback affecting star formation in our objects, for example, in the form of a relationship between accretion rate and star formation. Five of our objects, however, do show evidence for outflows in the [O III]5007 A emission line profile, suggesting that the quasar activity is driving thermal winds in at least some members of our sample.

  16. Spitzer Space Telescope Research Program for Teachers and Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, D.

    2005-12-01

    The Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) have designed a program for teacher and student research using observing time on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The participating teachers attended a fall, 2004 workshop to become familiar with the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST) archives, and to receive training in infrared astronomy and observational techniques. The teachers also attended a workshop offered by the SSC to learn about the observation planning process, and telescope and instrument capabilities. This program has as its goals the fundamental NASA goals of inspiring and motivating students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics as well as to engage the public in shaping and sharing the experience of exploration and discovery. Our educational plan addresses the NASA objectives of improving student proficiency in science and improving science instruction by providing a unique opportunity to a group of teachers and students to observe with the Spitzer Space Telescope and work on their data with SSC and NOAO scientists. This program allows a team of 12 teachers and their students to utilize up to 3.5 hours of Director's discretionary observing time on the Spitzer Space Telescope for educational observations. Leveraging on a well-established teacher professional development, the SSC is offering this program to teachers in the Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education (TLRRBSE), an ongoing program at the NOAO. This NSF-sponsored program touches the formal education community through a national audience of well-trained and supported middle and high school teachers.

  17. Panel Discussion: Life in the Cosmos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Water appears to be essential to all life on Earth. For this reason, "Follow the Water" has been adopted as a mantra for the search for Life in the Cosmos. Expeditions have helped to establish the limits and biodiversity of life in the most extreme environments on Earth. Microbial extremophiles inhabit acidic streams; hypersaline and hyperalkaline lakes and pools; the cold deep sea floor, permafrost, rocks, glaciers, and perennially ice-covered lakes of the polar environments; geysers, volcanic fumaroles, hydrothermal vents and hot rocks deep within the Earth's crust. The ESA Venus Express Spacecraft entered Venusian Orbit in 2006 and continues to produce exciting results. The Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) instrument made the first detection of hydroxyl in the atmosphere of Venus, indicating it is much more similar to Earth and Mars than previously thought. Huge hurricane-like vortices have been found above the poles of the planet and as yet unidentified UV absorbers that form mysterious dark bands in the upper atmosphere. At 70 km and below, water vapor and sulfur dioxide combine to form sulfuric acid droplets that create a haze above the cloud tops. Thermophilic acidophiles, such as have recently been discovered on Earth, could possibly survive in the hot sulfuric acid droplets that exist in the upper atmosphere of Venus. In order to understand how to search for life elsewhere in the Solar System, over 40 VIRTIS images of Earth from Venus have been obtained to search for evidence of life on Earth. The signatures of water and molecular Oxygen were detected in the Earth s atmosphere, but the atmosphere of Venus also exhibits these signatures. The water and water ice are far more abundant on comet, the polar caps and permafrost of Mars and the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. These "frozen worlds" of our Solar System, are much more promising regimes where extant or extinct microbial life may exist. The ESA Mars Advanced Radar for

  18. The US Experiments Flown on the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, James P. (Editor); Grindeland, Richard E. (Editor); Ballard, Rodney W. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Cosmos 1887, a biosatellite containing biological and radiation experiments from the Soviet Union, the United States and seven other countries, was launched on September 29, 1987. One Rhesus monkey's feeder stopped working two days into the flight and a decision was made to terminate the mission after 12 1/2 days. The biosatellite returned to Earth on October 12, 1987. A system malfunction, during the reentry procedure, caused the Cosmos 1887 spacecraft to land approximately 1800 miles beyond the intended landing site and delayed the start of the postflight procedures by approximately 44 hours. Further information on the conditions at landing and postflight activities is included in the Mission Operations portion of this document. U.S. and U.S.S.R. specialists jointly conducted 26 experiments on this mission, including the postflight transfer of data, hardware and biosamples to the U.S.

  19. Cardiac morphology after conditions of microgravity during Cosmos 2044

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Margaret A.; Edwards, Robert J.; Schroeter, John P.

    1992-01-01

    Light- and electron-microscopic studies were performed on cardiac muscle from rats flown on Cosmos 2044 and from four control groups. Average cross-sectional area of myofibers was measured by video analysis of the light-microscopic images of papillary and ventricular muscle samples from all animals. This cross-sectional area was significantly decreased in flight rats (P = 0.03) compared with synchronous controls. Additional findings at the electron microscopic level consistent with this atrophy were obtained by stereological analysis and optical diffraction analysis of papillary muscle samples. Slightly higher mitochondrial volume density values and mitochondria-to-myofibril ratios as well as normal A-band spacings (d1,0) and Z-band spacings of myofibrils were observed in the tail-suspension and flight groups. General morphological features similar to those in ventricular samples from the previous Cosmos 1887 flight were observed.

  20. 11th Symposium on Nuclei in the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuclei in the Cosmos is the most important international meeting in the field of nuclear astrophysics. It brings together nuclear experimentalists, nuclear theorists, astronomers, theoretical astrophysicists, cosmochemists, and others interested in the scientific questions at the interface of nuclear physics and astrophysics. These questions concern, for example, the origin of the elements in the cosmos and the nuclear reactions that occur in the big bang, in stars, and in stellar explosions. Past meetings have been held in Mackinac Island - USA (2008), Geneva - Switzerland (2006), Vancouver - Canada (2004), Fuji-Yoshida - Japan (2002), Aarhus - Denmark (2000), Volos - Greece (1998), Notre Dame - USA (1996), Gran Sasso - Italy (1994), Karlsruhe - Germany (1992), Baden bei Wien - Austria (1990).

  1. XII International Symposium on Nuclei in the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, John; Karakas, Amanda; Lugaro, Maria; Dracoulis, George

    Nuclei in the Cosmos is the most important international meeting in the field of nuclear astrophysics. It brings together nuclear experimentalists, nuclear theorists, astronomers, theoretical astrophysicists, cosmochemists, and others interested in the scientific questions at the interface of nuclear physics and astrophysics. These questions concern, for example, the origin of the elements in the cosmos and the nuclear reactions that occur in the big bang, in stars, and in stellar explosions. Past meetings have been held in Heidelberg - Germany (2010), Mackinac Island - USA (2008), Geneva - Switzerland (2006), Vancouver - Canada (2004), Fuji-Yoshida - Japan (2002), Aarhus - Denmark (2000), Volos - Greece (1998), Notre Dame - USA (1996), Gran Sasso - Italy (1994), Karlsruhe - Germany (1992), Baden bei Wien - Austria (1990).

  2. THE zCOSMOS 10k-BRIGHT SPECTROSCOPIC SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Lilly, Simon J.; Maier, Christian; Carollo, Marcella; Caputi, Karina; Le Brun, Vincent; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Le Fevre, Olivier; De la Torre, Sylvain; De Ravel, Loic; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Mignoli, Marco; Zamorani, Gianni; Bardelli, Sandro; Bolzonella, Micol; Coppa, Graziano; Scodeggio, Marco; Contini, Thierry; Bongiorno, Angela; Cucciati, Olga

    2009-10-01

    We present spectroscopic redshifts of a large sample of galaxies with I {sub AB} < 22.5 in the COSMOS field, measured from spectra of 10,644 objects that have been obtained in the first two years of observations in the zCOSMOS-bright redshift survey. These include a statistically complete subset of 10,109 objects. The average accuracy of individual redshifts is 110 km s{sup -1}, independent of redshift. The reliability of individual redshifts is described by a Confidence Class that has been empirically calibrated through repeat spectroscopic observations of over 600 galaxies. There is very good agreement between spectroscopic and photometric redshifts for the most secure Confidence Classes. For the less secure Confidence Classes, there is a good correspondence between the fraction of objects with a consistent photometric redshift and the spectroscopic repeatability, suggesting that the photometric redshifts can be used to indicate which of the less secure spectroscopic redshifts are likely right and which are probably wrong, and to give an indication of the nature of objects for which we failed to determine a redshift. Using this approach, we can construct a spectroscopic sample that is 99% reliable and which is 88% complete in the sample as a whole, and 95% complete in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 0.8. The luminosity and mass completeness levels of the zCOSMOS-bright sample of galaxies is also discussed.

  3. SPS 'Fabric of the Cosmos' Science Cafés

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, A.

    2011-12-01

    Hosted by Brian Greene and based on his best selling book of the same title, The Fabric of the Cosmos is a new four part NOVA series that explores the deepest mysteries of space and time. The program was kicked off by more than 30 'Cosmic Cafes' around the country, as part of a Society of Physics Students, NOVA outreach effort funded by an NSF grant. A Cosmic Café is a science café based on the topics discussed in The Fabric of the Cosmos. Science cafes are open events for non-scientists, where they can have an informal discussion with a scientist in a very casual location, usually a restaurant, coffee shop, or a bar. During the summer I assisted in planning this kick off, by reviewing science café and The Fabric of the Cosmos resources and suggesting revisions to make them more relevant for an SPS audience. I also organized and moderated the first Cosmic Café. The café that I organized was discussion based, with the speaker, Dr. James Gates, starting with a short talk and then opening up the floor for questions. Organizing a Cosmic Café gave me first-hand experience with the challenges an SPS chapter might face while organizing a café themselves. I will discuss lessons learned and the effectiveness of the first ever themed science café blitz.

  4. Analysis and Consequences of the Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Liou, Jer-Chi

    2010-01-01

    The collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251, on 10 February 2009, was the first known unintentional hypervelocity collision in space of intact satellites. Iridium 33 was an active commercial telecommunications satellite, while Cosmos 2251 was a derelict communication satellite of the Strela-2M class. The collision occurred at a relative velocity of 11.6 km/s at an altitude of approximately 790 km over the Great Siberian Plain and near the northern apex of Cosmos 2251 s orbit. This paper describes the physical and orbital characteristics of the relevant spacecraft classes and reports upon our analysis of the resulting debris clouds size, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and relative velocity/directionality distributions. We compare these distributions to those predicted by the NASA breakup model and notable recent fragmentation events; in particular, we compare the area-to-mass ratio distribution for each spacecraft to that exhibited by the FY-1C debris cloud for the purpose of assessing the relative contribution of modern aerospace materials to debris clouds resulting from energetic collisions. In addition, we examine the long-term consequences of this event for the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. Finally, we discuss "lessons learned", which may be incorporated into NASA s environmental models.

  5. Spitzer IRAC Photometry for Time Series in Crowded Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calchi Novati, S.; Gould, A.; Yee, J. C.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Wibking, B.; Zhu, W.; Spitzer Team; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Group

    2015-12-01

    We develop a new photometry algorithm that is optimized for the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Spitzer time series in crowded fields and that is particularly adapted to faint or heavily blended targets. We apply this to the 170 targets from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign and present the results of three variants of this algorithm in an online catalog. We present detailed accounts of the application of this algorithm to two difficult cases, one very faint and the other very crowded. Several of Spitzer's instrumental characteristics that drive the specific features of this algorithm are shared by Kepler and WFIRST, implying that these features may prove to be a useful starting point for algorithms designed for microlensing campaigns by these other missions.

  6. Investigating Space Weather Events Impacting the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Leo Y.; Hunt, Joseph C. Jr.; Stowers, Kennis; Lowrance, Patrick; Stewart, Andrzej; Travis, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the dynamical process in the space environment has increased dramatically. A relatively new field of study called "Space Weather" has emerged in the last few decades. Fundamental to the study of space weather is an understanding of how space weather events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections impact spacecraft in varying orbits and distances around the Sun. Specialized space weather satellite monitoring systems operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) allow scientists to predict space weather events affecting critical systems on and orbiting the Earth. However, the Spitzer Space Telescope is in an orbit far outside the areas covered by those space weather monitoring systems. This poses a challenge for the Spitzer's Mission Operations Team in determining whether space weather events affect Spitzer.

  7. Spitzer Orbit Determination During In-orbit Checkout Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Premkumar R.

    2004-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope was injected into heliocentric orbit on August 25, 2003 to observe and study astrophysical phenomena in the infrared range of frequencies. The initial 60 days was dedicated to Spitzer's "In-Orbit Checkout (IOC)" efforts. During this time high levels of Helium venting were used to cool down the telescope. Attitude control was done using reaction wheels, which in turn were de-saturated using cold gas Nitrogen thrusting. Dense tracking data (nearly continuous) by the Deep Space network (DSN) were used to perform orbit determination and to assess any possible venting imbalance. Only Doppler data were available for navigation. This paper deals with navigation efforts during the IOC phase. It includes Dust Cover Ejection (DCE) monitoring, orbit determination strategy validation and results and assessment of non-gravitational accelerations acting on Spitzer including that due to possible imbalance in Helium venting.

  8. Improving our understanding of the Spitzer Space Telescope's pointing drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillmair, Carl J.; Carey, Sean J.; Stauffer, John R.; Ingalls, James G.

    2014-08-01

    Spitzer observations of exoplanets routinely yield photometric accuracies of better than one part in 10,000. However, the attainable precision is limited in part by pointing drifts, which have the effect of moving the target to less stable or less-well characterized regions of Spitzer's IRAC detector arrays. Here we examine a large sample of observing sequences in an effort to identify the causes of these pointing drifts. We find that short term and higher order drifts are correlated on various time scales to the temperatures of components in and around the spacecraft bus, and are most likely due to very slight angular displacements of the star trackers. Despite the constraints imposed by a limited pool of targets, such pointing drifts are best mitigated by optimal scheduling, minimizing large and/or lengthy excursions in telescope pitch angle within 24 hours of a high-precision photometry sequence. Such an effort is currently being initiated by the Spitzer Science Center.

  9. Evolution of Galaxies and Their Environments at z = 0.1-3 in COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, N.; Arnouts, S.; Aussel, H.; Benson, A.; Bongiorno, A.; Bundy, K.; Calvo, M. A. A.; Capak, P.; Carollo, M.; Civano, F.; Dunlop, J.; Elvis, M.; Faisst, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Fu, Hai; Giavalisco, M.; Guo, Q.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Kajisawa, M.; Kartaltepe, J.; Leauthaud, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; LeFloch, E.; Lilly, S. J.; Liu, C. T.-C.; Manohar, S.; Massey, R.; Masters, D.; McCracken, H. J.; Mobasher, B.; Peng, Y.-J.; Renzini, A.; Rhodes, J.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Sarvestani, B. D.; Scarlata, C.; Schinnerer, E.; Sheth, K.; Shopbell, P. L.; Smolčić, V.; Taniguchi, Y.; Taylor, J. E.; White, S. D. M.; Yan, L.

    2013-05-01

    Large-scale structures (LSSs) out to z < 3.0 are measured in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) using extremely accurate photometric redshifts (photoz). The Ks -band-selected sample (from Ultra-Vista) is comprised of 155,954 galaxies. Two techniques—adaptive smoothing and Voronoi tessellation—are used to estimate the environmental densities within 127 redshift slices. Approximately 250 statistically significant overdense structures are identified out to z = 3.0 with shapes varying from elongated filamentary structures to more circularly symmetric concentrations. We also compare the densities derived for COSMOS with those based on semi-analytic predictions for a ΛCDM simulation and find excellent overall agreement between the mean densities as a function of redshift and the range of densities. The galaxy properties (stellar mass, spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and star formation rates (SFRs)) are strongly correlated with environmental density and redshift, particularly at z < 1.0-1.2. Classifying the spectral type of each galaxy using the rest-frame b - i color (from the photoz SED fitting), we find a strong correlation of early-type galaxies (E-Sa) with high-density environments, while the degree of environmental segregation varies systematically with redshift out to z ~ 1.3. In the highest density regions, 80% of the galaxies are early types at z = 0.2 compared to only 20% at z = 1.5. The SFRs and the star formation timescales exhibit clear environmental correlations. At z > 0.8, the SFR density is uniformly distributed over all environmental density percentiles, while at lower redshifts the dominant contribution is shifted to galaxies in lower density environments. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of

  10. Robert Spitzer and psychiatric classification: technical challenges and ethical dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Jacob, K S

    2016-01-01

    Dr Robert Leopold Spitzer (May 22, 1932-December 25, 2015), the architect of modern psychiatric diagnostic criteria and classification, died recently at the age of 83 in Seattle. Under his leadership, the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manuals (DSM) became the international standard. PMID:27260820

  11. Galactic Distribution of Planets from Spitzer Microlens Parallaxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew; Carey, Sean; Yee, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    We will measure the 'microlens parallaxes' of about 120 microlensing events that peak during Spitzer's 'bulge window' (2015 Jun 09 - Jul 19), by comparing simultaneous Spitzer and ground-based microlensing lightcurves, making use of Spitzer's location about 1 AU from Earth. These measurements will enable mass and distance measurements of about 4 microlensing planets. The ensemble of planet and non-planet distance measurements will yield the first probe of the Galactic distribution of planets Microlens planet mass measurements are very rare and have proved extremely interesting in every case. Microlensing identifies planets at and beyond the snowline, probing unique parameter space and providing vital information to constrain planet formation and migration theories. But the sample of ground-based microlens-parallax measurements is highly biased toward special systems. Spitzer would provide the first unbiased study. The same survey would provide a unique probe of brown dwarf binaries, and yield the first mass-based (not light-based) measurement of the stellar mass function (i.e., including dark objects such as black holes). A very successful 2014 'Pilot Program' demonstrates that this project is technically and scientifically viable. (As in the previous 'Pilot Program', we request zero day proprietary period.)

  12. Observing Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) With Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey M.; Vervack, R. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Bauer, J. M.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Kelley, M. S.; Knight, M. M.; Hines, D. C.; Li, J.; Reach, W. T.; Sitko, M. L.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Meech, K. J.; Rayner, J. T.

    2013-10-01

    In this talk we discuss the design, implementation, and reduction of observations of Comet ISON from space using the Spitzer Space Telescope on 13.00 - 13.96 Jun UT and from the ground at Lowell Observatory on Jun 11.16 UT and from APO on 14.13 Jun UT. The comet was at distance rh = 3.34 AU from the Sun, distance ΔSpitzer = 3.29 AU and 17.4o phase from SST, and distance ΔEarth = 4.25 AU and 6.8 - 7.3o phase at the time of observation. Preliminary analyses show ISON's Spitzer coma morphology was relatively compact and simple, with a linear anti-solar dust tail > 3x105 km in length and a 1/p profile gas coma extending > 105 km from the nucleus. Afp values in an 18,200 km radius aperture of 840, 890, and 840 ± 80 cm were found at VRI, and 650 ± 100 cm were found at 3.6 micron. Together, the ground-based and Spitzer photometry imply near-neutral dust scattering from the visual through the infrared. An excess at 4.5 µm due to emission from a neutral gas coma is clearly found both morphologically and photometrically. The gas coma total flux and spatial profile and ISON’s discovery distance imply a coma dominated by the stronger CO_2 line emission at 4.67 μm, but we cannot rule out a preponderance of CO emission at 4.26 μm. No variability in our Spitzer photometry at the 0.03 mag level over 24 hrs was seen. We present our imagery, spectrophotometry, and lightcurves, and discuss the physical implications of these measurements of the comet made well outside the ice line.

  13. A Spitzer Census of the IC 348 Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muench, August A.; Lada, Charles J.; Luhman, K. L.; Muzerolle, James; Young, Erick

    2007-07-01

    Spitzer mid-infrared surveys enable an accurate census of young stellar objects by sampling large spatial scales, revealing very embedded protostars, and detecting low-luminosity objects. Taking advantage of these capabilities, we present a Spitzer-based census of the IC 348 nebula and embedded star cluster, covering a 2.5 pc region and comparable in extent to the Orion Nebula. Our Spitzer census supplemented with ground-based spectra has added 42 Class II T Tauri sources to the cluster membership and identified ~20 Class 0/I protostars. The population of IC 348 likely exceeds 400 sources after accounting statistically for unidentified diskless members. Our Spitzer census of IC 348 reveals a population of Class I protostars that is anticorrelated spatially with the Class II/III T Tauri members, which comprise the centrally condensed cluster around a B star. The protostars are instead found mostly at the cluster periphery about ~1 pc from the B star and spread out along a filamentary ridge. We further find that the star formation rate in this protostellar ridge is consistent with that rate which built the older exposed cluster, while the presence of 15 cold, starless, millimeter cores intermingled with this protostellar population indicates that the IC 348 nebula has yet to finish forming stars. Moreover, we show that the IC 348 cluster is of order 3-5 crossing times old, and, as evidenced by its smooth radial profile and confirmed mass segregation, is likely relaxed. While it seems apparent that the current cluster configuration is the result of dynamical evolution and its primordial structure has been erased, our finding of a filamentary ridge of Class I protostars supports a model in which embedded clusters are built up from numerous smaller subclusters. Finally, the results of our Spitzer census indicate that the supposition that star formation must progress rapidly in a dark cloud should not preclude these observations that show it can be relatively long lived.

  14. Spitzer Space Telescope Sequencing Operations Software, Strategies, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, David A.

    2006-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was launched in August, 2003, and renamed to the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2004. Two years of observing the universe in the wavelength range from 3 to 180 microns has yielded enormous scientific discoveries. Since this magnificent observatory has a limited lifetime, maximizing science viewing efficiency (ie, maximizing time spent executing activities directly related to science observations) was the key operational objective. The strategy employed for maximizing science viewing efficiency was to optimize spacecraft flexibility, adaptability, and use of observation time. The selected approach involved implementation of a multi-engine sequencing architecture coupled with nondeterministic spacecraft and science execution times. This approach, though effective, added much complexity to uplink operations and sequence development. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) manages Spitzer s operations. As part of the uplink process, Spitzer s Mission Sequence Team (MST) was tasked with processing observatory inputs from the Spitzer Science Center (SSC) into efficiently integrated, constraint-checked, and modeled review and command products which accommodated the complexity of non-deterministic spacecraft and science event executions without increasing operations costs. The MST developed processes, scripts, and participated in the adaptation of multi-mission core software to enable rapid processing of complex sequences. The MST was also tasked with developing a Downlink Keyword File (DKF) which could instruct Deep Space Network (DSN) stations on how and when to configure themselves to receive Spitzer science data. As MST and uplink operations developed, important lessons were learned that should be applied to future missions, especially those missions which employ command-intensive operations via a multi-engine sequence architecture.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of the Usage of the COSMOS Science Education Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Bogner, Franz X.; Neofotistos, George

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative method of mapping the web usage of an innovative educational portal is applied to analyze the behaviour of users of the COSMOS Science Education Portal. The COSMOS Portal contains user-generated resources (that are uploaded by its users). It has been designed to support a science teacher's search, retrieval and access to both,…

  16. Experiment K-7-41: Radiation Experiments on Cosmos 2044

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Benton, E. R.; Frank, A. L.; Dudkin, V. E.; Marenny, A. M.; Kovalev, E. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Cosmos 2044 biosatellite mission offered the opportunity for radiation measurements under conditions which are seldom available (an inclination of 82.3 degrees and altitude of 294 x 216 km). Measurements were made on the outside of the spacecraft under near-zero shielding conditions. Also, this mission was the first in which active temperature recorders (the ATR-4) were flown to record the temperature profiles of detector stacks. Measurements made on this mission provide a comparison and test for modeling of depth doses and LET spectra for orbital parameters previously unavailable. Tissue absorbed doses from 3480 rad (252 rad/d) down to 0.115 rad (8.33 mrad/d) were measured at different depths (0.0146 and 3.20 g/sq. cm, respectively) with averaged TLD readings. The LET spectra yielded maximum and minimum values of integral flux of 27.3 x 10-4 and 3.05 x 10(exp -4) cm(exp -2).s(exp -1).sr(exp -4) of dose rate of 7.01 and 1.20 mrad/d, and of dose equivalent rate of 53.8 and 11.6 mrem/d, for LET(infinity).H2O is greater than or equal to 4 keV/micro-m. Neutron measurements yielded 0.018 mremld in the thermal region, 0.25 mrem/d in the resonance region and 3.3 mrem/d in the high energy region. The TLD depth dose and LET spectra have been compared with calculations from the modeling codes. The agreement is good but some further refinements are in order. In comparing measurements on Cosmos 2044 with those from previous Cosmos missions (orbital inclinations of 62.8 degrees) there is a greater spread (maximum to minimum) in depth doses and an increased contribution from GCR's, and higher LET particles, in the heavy particle fluxes.

  17. Occurrence of Leaf Blight on Cosmos Caused by Alternaria cosmosa in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jian Xin; Lee, Ji Hye; Paul, Narayan Chandra; Cho, Hye Sun; Lee, Hyang Burm; Yu, Seung Hun

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, a leaf blight disease was observed on cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus) leaves in Nonsan, Korea. The causal pathogen was isolated and identified based on morphological and molecular approaches. Morphological characteristics of the pathogen matched well with the Alternaria cosmosa and also easily distinguishable from Alternaria zinniae reported from cosmos seeds by producing branched beak. Phylogenetically, the pathogen could not be distinguished from A. passiflorae based on the sequence analysis of a combined data set of Alt a1 and gpd genes. However, A. passiflorae was distinguished from the present species by having conidiophores with 4 to 5 conidiogenous loci. The results indicate that the present Alternaria species is A. cosmosa. Pathogenicity tests revealed that the isolate was pathogenic to the leaves of Cosmos bipinnatus. This is the first report of Alternaria blight disease caused by A. cosmosa on cosmos in Korea. PMID:25774114

  18. COSMOS 2044: Lung morphology study, experiment K-7-28

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Ann R.; Mathieu-Costello, Odile; West, John B.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers examined the effect of microgravity during spaceflight on lung tissue. The ultrastructure of the left lungs of 5 Czechoslovakian Wister rats flown on the 13 day, 19+ hour Cosmos 2044 mission was examined and compared to 5 vivarium and 5 synchronous controls at 1-g conditions, and 5 rats exposed to 14 days of tail suspension. Pulmonary hemorrage and alveolar adema of unknown origin occurred to a greater extent in the flight, tail-suspended, and synchronous control animals, and in the dorsal regions of the lung when compared with the vivarium controls. The cause of these changes, which are possibly due to an increase in pulmonary vascular pressure, requires further investigation.

  19. THE CHANDRA COSMOS SURVEY. I. OVERVIEW AND POINT SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Elvis, Martin; Civano, Francesca; Aldcroft, T. L.; Fruscione, Antonella; Vignali, Cristian; Puccetti, Simonetta; Fiore, Fabrizio; Cappelluti, Nico; Brusa, Marcella; Finoguenov, Alexis; Brunner, Hermann; Zamorani, G.; Comastri, Andrea; Gilli, Roberto; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Damiani, Francesco; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Urry, C.M.; Silverman, John; Mainieri, Vincenzo

    2009-09-01

    The Chandra COSMOS Survey (C-COSMOS) is a large, 1.8 Ms, Chandra program that has imaged the central 0.5 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field (centered at 10 {sup h}, +02 deg.) with an effective exposure of {approx}160 ks, and an outer 0.4 deg{sup 2} area with an effective exposure of {approx}80 ks. The limiting source detection depths are 1.9 x 10{sup -16} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} in the soft (0.5-2 keV) band, 7.3 x 10{sup -16} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} in the hard (2-10 keV) band, and 5.7 x 10{sup -16} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} in the full (0.5-10 keV) band. Here we describe the strategy, design, and execution of the C-COSMOS survey, and present the catalog of 1761 point sources detected at a probability of being spurious of <2 x 10{sup -5} (1655 in the full, 1340 in the soft, and 1017 in the hard bands). By using a grid of 36 heavily ({approx}50%) overlapping pointing positions with the ACIS-I imager, a remarkably uniform ({+-}12%) exposure across the inner 0.5 deg{sup 2} field was obtained, leading to a sharply defined lower flux limit. The widely different point-spread functions obtained in each exposure at each point in the field required a novel source detection method, because of the overlapping tiling strategy, which is described in a companion paper. This method produced reliable sources down to a 7-12 counts, as verified by the resulting logN-logS curve, with subarcsecond positions, enabling optical and infrared identifications of virtually all sources, as reported in a second companion paper. The full catalog is described here in detail and is available online.

  20. Planets, Stars, and Orbs, The Medieval Cosmos, 1200-1687

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Edward

    Medieval cosmology was a fusion of pagan Greek ideas and biblical descriptions of the world, especially the creation account in Genesis. Planets, Stars, and Orbs describes medieval conceptions of the cosmos as understood by scholastic theologians and natural philosophers in the universities of western Europe from the thirteenth to the seventeenth centuries. Not only are the major ideas and arguments of medieval cosmology described and analysed, but much attention is paid to the responses of scholastic natural philosophers of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries to the challenges posed by the new science and astronomy as represented by Copernicus, Tycho Brahe, Galileo and Kepler.

  1. Islet in weightlessness: Biological experiments on board COSMOS 1129 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhuk, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Biological experiments planned as an international venture for COSMOS 1129 satellite include tests of: (1) adaptation of rats to conditions of weightlessness, and readaption to Earth's gravity; (2) possibility of fertilization and embryonic development in weightlessness; (3) heat exchange processes; (4) amount of gravity force preferred by fruit flies for laying eggs (given a choice of three centrifugal zones); (5) growth of higher plants from seeds; (6) effects of weightlessness on cells in culture and (7) radiation danger from heavy nuclei, and electrostatic protection from charged particles.

  2. Islet in weightlessness: biological experiments on board COSMOS 1129 satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuk, Y.

    1980-09-01

    Biological experiments planned as an international venture for COSMOS 1129 satellite include tests of: (1) adaptation of rats to conditions of weightlessness, and readaption to Earth's gravity, (2) possibility of fertilization and embryonic development in weightlessness, (3) heat exchange processes, (4) amount of gravity force preferred by fruit flies for laying eggs (given a choice of three centrifugal zones), (5) growth of higher plants from seeds, (6) effects of weightlessness on cells in culture, and (7) radiation danger from heavy nuclei, and electrostatic protection from charged particles.

  3. Spitzer Finds Clarity in the Inner Milky Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    More than 800,000 frames from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope were stitched together to create this infrared portrait of dust and stars radiating in the inner Milky Way.

    As inhabitants of a flat galactic disk, Earth and its solar system have an edge-on view of their host galaxy, like looking at a glass dish from its edge. From our perspective, most of the galaxy is condensed into a blurry narrow band of light that stretches completely around the sky, also known as the galactic plane.

    In this mosaic the galactic plane is broken up into five components: the far-left side of the plane (top image); the area just left of the galactic center (second to top); galactic center (middle); the area to the right of galactic center (second to bottom); and the far-right side of the plane (bottom). From Earth, the top two panels are visible to the northern hemisphere, and the bottom two images to the southern hemisphere. Together, these panels represent more than 50 percent of our entire Milky Way galaxy.

    The swaths of green represent organic molecules, called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are illuminated by light from nearby star formation, while the thermal emission, or heat, from warm dust is rendered in red. Star-forming regions appear as swirls of red and yellow, where the warm dust overlaps with the glowing organic molecules. The blue specks sprinkled throughout the photograph are Milky Way stars. The bluish-white haze that hovers heavily in the middle panel is starlight from the older stellar population towards the center of the galaxy.

    This is a three-color composite that shows infrared observations from two Spitzer instruments. Blue represents 3.6-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Red is 24-micron light detected by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer.

    The Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire team (GLIMPSE) used the telescope's infrared array

  4. Spitzer and DIRBE Studies of the Infrared Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Michael; Gorjian, Varoujan; Hauser, Michael; Wright, Edward; Arendt, Rick; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Levenson, Louis

    2011-05-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL), defined as the sky surface brightness of all radiation arising from outside the Milky Way, carries in the 1-5um region the imprint of the nearby Universe, of red-shifted light from the first galaxies, and of any possible pre-galactic contributions. The DIRBE instrument on the COBE satellite has measured the total sky brightness, the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIRB), over the entire sky at 3.6um. The CIRB is the sum of the zodiacal light, galactic starlight, radiation from the ISM, and the EBL. Although the determinations of the EBL are presently limited by uncertainties in the zodiacal light model, experiments now under way can reduce those uncertainties. This Spitzer proposal prepares for that reduction by eliminating other uncertainties. We will use Spitzer to determine the point source components of CIRB at 3.6um, the wavelength of the minimum in the bright foreground from interplanetary dust. We will measure essentially all of the stellar contribution, and more than 80% of the integrated light from resolved galaxies; this can be extrapolated using other Spitzer data to determine IGL. The ultimate objective of this type of study is to search for a currently unknown diffuse component of EBL, DEBL. Symbolically, DEBL = EBL-IGL. In this program, we will execute the following steps aimed at reducing the uncertainties in DEBL once the zodiacal uncertainty in CIRB is minimized and a correction for ISM emission is applied: 1. Cross calibrating DIRBE and Spitzer so that EBL and IGL are on the same flux scale; 2. Reducing the uncertainties in EBL by measuring stars as faint as 19th mag at 3.6um. 3. Determining EBL and IGL at six widely separated positions so that the isotropy - and hence the cosmological significance - of any detection of DEBL can be assessed. We emphasize that this important investigation can be carried out only with Spitzer, and this scientific opportunity is perishable due to Spitzer's finite lifetime.

  5. Electro-Magnetic Fields and Plasma in the Cosmos

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Donald E.

    2006-03-21

    It is becoming widely recognized that a majority of baryons in the cosmos are in the plasma state. But, fundamental disagreements about the properties and behavior of electro-magnetic fields in these plasmas exist between the science of modern astronomy and the experimentally verified laws of electrical engineering and physics. Some astronomers claim that magnetic fields can be open-ended - that they begin on or beneath the Sun's surface and extend outward to infinity. Astrophysicists have claimed that galactic magnetic fields begin and end on molecular clouds. Electrical engineers, most physicists, and the pioneers in electromagnetic field theory disagree - magnetic fields have no beginning or end. Since these two viewpoints are mutually exclusive, both cannot be correct; one must be completely false. Many astrophysicists claim that magnetic fields are 'frozen into' electric plasma. We also examine the basis for this claim. It has been shown to be incorrect in the laboratory. The hypothetical 'magnetic merging' mechanism is also reviewed in light of both theoretical and experimental investigations. The cause of large-scale filamentation in the cosmos is also simply revealed by experimental results obtained in plasma laboratories.

  6. The Cosmos Portal and the IYA2009 Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, Bernard M.; Sims, M.; Lindblom, J.

    2009-05-01

    In 2007 the non-profit Digital Universe Foundation (DUF) launched the Earth Portal (earthportal.org) as a comprehensive resource for timely, objective, science-based information about the environment. There are currently over 1000 scholars from 60 countries engaged in this rapidly growing web-based collaboration. The Cosmos Portal is the second major DUF initiative (cosmosportal.org). In support of the IYA2009 effort, the Cosmos Portal is recruiting astronomy professionals to make use of easy online tools to publish articles, blogs, news items, image galleries, class notes, lectures, powerpoint presentations, links to other high quality websites or other educational material. A major difference between the Digital Universe and Wikipedia is that educational material is produced by identified experts, not anonymous contributors with unknown qualifications. The Digital Universe is a 501(c)(3) public charity whose goal is to evolve into a worldwide online community (a social network) whose centerpiece is an ever growing Asimov-Sagan Encyclopedia Galactica created by experts. We encourage you to write an encylopedia article or start a portal on your favorite topic or join an existing topic as an expert contributor.

  7. OBSCURED STAR FORMATION AND ENVIRONMENT IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Feruglio, C.; Aussel, H.; Ilbert, O.; Salvato, M.; Capak, P.; Scoville, N.; Fiore, F.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Ideue, Y.

    2010-09-20

    We investigate the effects of the environment on star formation in a sample of massive luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) with S(24 {mu}m) >80 {mu}Jy and i {sup +} < 24 in the COSMOS field. We exploit the accurate photometric redshifts in COSMOS to characterize the galaxy environment and study the evolution of the fraction of LIRGs and ULIRGs in different environments in the redshift range z = 0.3-1.2 and in bins of stellar mass. We find that the environment plays a role in the star formation processes and evolution of LIRGs and ULIRGs. We find an overall increase of the ULIRG+LIRG fraction in an optically selected sample with increasing redshift, as expected from the evolution of the star formation rate (SFR) density. We find that the ULIRG+LIRG fraction decreases with increasing density up to z {approx} 1, and that the dependence on density flattens with increasing redshift. We do not observe the reversal of the SFR density relation up to z = 1 in massive LIRGs and ULIRGs, suggesting that such reversal might occur at higher redshift in this infrared luminosity range.

  8. Spitzer Space Telescope Spectroscopy of the Kepler Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T. L.; Onaka, T.

    2004-01-01

    The Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope was used for observations of the Kepler supernova remnant, with all four instrument modules targeted on the bright infrared knot located at 17h30m35.80s,-21d28m54.0s (J2000). The low spectral resolution modules data show a dust continuum spectrum consistent with dust grains heated by high-energy electrons, while the high resolution modules data show atomic emission line ratios consistent with excitation by a high velocity shock of greater than 100 kilometers per second and electron densities of approximately 1,000 per centimeter. The abundance ratios for the six detected elements show signs of heavy-element enhancement. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Support for this work was provided by NASA's Office of Space Science.

  9. TRACSSS-2: Tracing More Cold Stellar Streams with Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillmair, Carl; Kupper, Andreas; Sesar, Branimir; Pearson, Sarah; Rich, Jeffrey; Scowcroft, Vicky; Price-Whelan, Adrian; Johnston, Kathryn

    2016-08-01

    Stellar debris streams may be the most sensitive probes we have of the size and shape of the Milky Way's dark matter distribution. Using the remarkably precise infrared period-luminosity relation for RR Lyrae, Spitzer has already demonstrated the ability to measure distances to better than 2% over nearly the entire volume of the Galaxy. By measuring very accurate mean magnitudes for RR Lyrae in the Anticenter and Styx streams, we will immediately be able to put tighter constrains on the mass and shape of the Galactic halo. These measurements will become still more important in coming years, when they can be used to turn Gaia proper motion measurements into accurate transverse space velocities. These measurements are unlikely to be improved upon in the foreseeable future and may ultimately rank among Spitzer's most enduring legacies.

  10. THE SPITZER-WISE SURVEY OF THE ECLIPTIC POLES

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Cutri, R. M.; Marsh, K.; Padgett, D.; Tsai, C. W.; Cohen, M.; Wright, E.; Petty, S.; Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P.; Mainzer, A.; Ressler, M.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Carey, S.; Surace, J.; Lonsdale, C.; Skrutskie, M.; Stanford, S.

    2011-07-10

    We have carried out a survey of the north and south ecliptic poles, EP-N and EP-S, respectively, with the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The primary objective was to cross-calibrate WISE with the Spitzer and Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) photometric systems by developing a set of calibration stars that are common to these infrared missions. The ecliptic poles were continuous viewing zones for WISE due to its polar-crossing orbit, making these areas ideal for both absolute and internal calibrations. The Spitzer IRAC and MIPS imaging survey covers a complete area of 0.40 deg{sup 2} for the EP-N and 1.28 deg{sup 2} for the EP-S. WISE observed the whole sky in four mid-infrared bands, 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 {mu}m, during its eight-month cryogenic mission, including several hundred ecliptic polar passages; here we report on the highest coverage depths achieved by WISE, an area of {approx}1.5 deg{sup 2} for both poles. Located close to the center of the EP-N, the Sy-2 galaxy NGC 6552 conveniently functions as a standard calibrator to measure the red response of the 22 {mu}m channel of WISE. Observations from Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS/IRS-LL and WISE show that the galaxy has a strong red color in the mid-infrared due to star-formation and the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN), while over a baseline >1 year the mid-IR photometry of NGC 6552 is shown to vary at a level less than 2%. Combining NGC 6552 with the standard calibrator stars, the achieved photometric accuracy of the WISE calibration, relative to the Spitzer and MSX systems, is 2.4%, 2.8%, 4.5%, and 5.7% for W1 (3.4 {mu}m), W2 (4.6 {mu}m), W3 (12 {mu}m), and W4 (22 {mu}m), respectively. The WISE photometry is internally stable to better than 0.1% over the cryogenic lifetime of the mission. The secondary objective of the Spitzer-WISE Survey was to explore the poles at greater flux-level depths, exploiting the higher angular resolution Spitzer observations and the

  11. SPIRITS: SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Mansi; Lau, Ryan; Cao, Yi; Masci, Frank; Helou, George; Williams, Robert; Bally, John; Bond, Howard; Whitelock, Patricia; Cody, Ann Marie; Gehrz, Robert; Jencson, Jacob; Tinyanont, Samaporn; Smith, Nathan; Surace, Jason; Armus, Lee; Cantiello, Matteo; Langer, Norbert; Levesque, Emily; Mohamed, Shazrene; Ofek, Eran; Mudumba, Parthasarathy; van Dyk, Schuyler; Boyer, Martha; Phillips, Mark; Hsiao, Eric; Morrell, Nidia; Perley, Dan; Gonzalez, Consuelo; Contreras, Carlos; Jones, Olivia; Ressler, Michael; Adams, Scott; Moore, Anna; Cook, David; Fox, Ori; Johansson, Joel; Khan, Rubab; Monson, Andy

    2016-08-01

    Spitzer is pioneering a systematic exploration of the dynamic infrared sky. Our SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey (SPIRITS) has already discovered 147 explosive transients and 1948 eruptive variables. Of these 147 infrared transients, 35 are so red that they are devoid of optical counterparts and we call them SPRITEs (eSPecially Red Intermediate-luminosity Transient Events). The nature of SPRITEs is unknown and progress on deciphering the explosion physics depends on mid-IR spectroscopy. Multiple physical origins have been proposed including stellar merger, birth of a massive binary, electron capture supernova and stellar black-hole formation. Hence, we propose a modest continuation of SPIRITS, focusing on discovering and monitoring SPRITEs, in preparation for follow-up with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). As the SPRITEs evolve and cool, the bulk of the emission shifts to longer wavelengths. MIRI aboard JWST will be the only available platform in the near future capable of characterizing SPRITEs out to 28um. Specifically, the low resolution spectrometer would determine dust mass, grain chemistry, ice abundance and energetics to disentangle the proposed origins. The re-focused SPIRITS program consists of continued Spitzer monitoring of only those 104 luminous galaxies that are known SPRITE hosts or are most likely to host new SPRITEa. Scaling from the SPIRITS discovery rate, we estimate finding 22 new SPRITEs and 6 new supernovae over the next two years. The SPIRITS team remains committed to extensive ground-based follow-up. The Spitzer observations proposed here are essential for determining the final fates of active SPRITEs as well as bridging the time lag between the current SPIRITS survey and JWST launch.

  12. Spitzer, Gaia and the Potential of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Kathryn

    Recent work has demonstrated how Spitzer observations can be used to make distance estimates accurate to 2% for individual RR Lyraes stars. This unprecedented precision surpasses even the most optimistic astrometric measurements (e.g. from ESA's upcoming Gaia mission) for the vast majority of our Galaxy (beyond 2kpc from the Sun). When combined with Gaia's promised proper motions, Spitzer can effectively extend the horizon where we might hope to obtain useful six-dimensional phase-space co-ordinates by more than an order of magnitude in distance (and three orders of magnitude in volume) compared to Gaia's own "horizon". In the proposed work we will examine what we might learn about our Galaxy using such accurate co-ordinates over such a large volume. In particular, we will develop and test an algorithm that maximizes the information from small, accurate samples (i.e. which might be observed with Spitzer on a feasible timescale) by using debris from satellite disruption to measure the Galactic potential. Mock observational samples will be generated by observing the end point of simulations of satellite destruction and the success of our algorithm in recovering the potential in which the simulation was actually run will be assessed. Preliminary tests suggest that we should be able to look at the 3-dimensional structure of the Galaxy's dark matter halo, constraining its shape, orientation and depth as a function of radius. The opportunity to examine a dark matter halo in such great detail is truly unique. It is enabled by the combination of Spitzer and Gaia with our intimate perspective on our own Galaxy, and possible for no other galaxy in the Universe.

  13. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-05-01

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis. PMID:26833260

  14. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-01-01

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis. PMID:26833260

  15. A PUBLIC K{sub s} -SELECTED CATALOG IN THE COSMOS/ULTRAVISTA FIELD: PHOTOMETRY, PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, AND STELLAR POPULATION PARAMETERS {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Marchesini, Danilo; Stefanon, Mauro; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Dunlop, James S.; Brammer, Gabriel; Van Dokkum, Pieter

    2013-05-01

    We present a catalog covering 1.62 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field with point-spread function (PSF) matched photometry in 30 photometric bands. The catalog covers the wavelength range 0.15-24 {mu}m including the available GALEX, Subaru, Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, VISTA, and Spitzer data. Catalog sources have been selected from the DR1 UltraVISTA K{sub s} band imaging that reaches a depth of K {sub s,tot} = 23.4 AB (90% completeness). The PSF-matched catalog is generated using position-dependent PSFs ensuring accurate colors across the entire field. Also included is a catalog of photometric redshifts (z {sub phot}) for all galaxies computed with the EAZY code. Comparison with spectroscopy from the zCOSMOS 10k bright sample shows that up to z {approx} 1.5 the z {sub phot} are accurate to {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.013, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of only 1.6%. The z {sub phot} also show good agreement with the z {sub phot} from the NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey out to z {approx} 3. A catalog of stellar masses and stellar population parameters for galaxies determined using the FAST spectral energy distribution fitting code is provided for all galaxies. Also included are rest-frame U - V and V - J colors, L {sub 2800} and L {sub IR}. The UVJ color-color diagram confirms that the galaxy bi-modality is well-established out to z {approx} 2. Star-forming galaxies also obey a star-forming 'main sequence' out to z {approx} 2.5, and this sequence evolves in a manner consistent with previous measurements. The COSMOS/UltraVISTA K{sub s} -selected catalog covers a unique parameter space in both depth, area, and multi-wavelength coverage and promises to be a useful tool for studying the growth of the galaxy population out to z {approx} 3-4.

  16. SSGSS: THE SPITZER-SDSS-GALEX SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dowd, Matthew J.; Schiminovich, David; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Treyer, Marie A.; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted K.; Charlot, Stephane; Heckman, Timothy M.; Martins, Lucimara P.; Seibert, Mark; Van der Hulst, J. M.

    2011-11-10

    The Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey (SSGSS) provides a new sample of 101 star-forming galaxies at z < 0.2 with unprecedented multi-wavelength coverage. New mid- to far-infrared spectroscopy from the Spitzer Space Telescope is added to a rich suite of previous imaging and spectroscopy, including ROSAT, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and Spitzer/SWIRE. Sample selection ensures an even coverage of the full range of normal galaxy properties, spanning two orders of magnitude in stellar mass, color, and dust attenuation. In this paper we present the SSGSS data set, describe the science drivers, and detail the sample selection, observations, data reduction, and quality assessment. Also in this paper, we compare the shape of the thermal continuum and the degree of silicate absorption of these typical, star-forming galaxies to those of starburst galaxies. We investigate the link between star formation rate, infrared luminosity, and total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon luminosity, with a view to calibrating the latter for spectral energy distribution models in photometric samples and at high redshift. Last, we take advantage of the 5-40 {mu}m spectroscopic and far-infrared photometric coverage of this sample to perform detailed fitting of the Draine et al. dust models, and investigate the link between dust mass and star formation history and active galactic nucleus properties.

  17. SpIES: The Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timlin, John; Ross, Nicholas; Richards, Gordon T.; Lacy, Mark; Bauer, Franz E.; Brandt, W. Niel; Fan, Xiaohui; Haggard, Daryl; Makler, Martin; Myers, Adam D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.; Urry, C. Megan; Zakamska, Nadia L.; SpIES Team

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first data release from the Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES); a large-area survey of the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field using Warm Spitzer. SpIES was designed to probe enough volume to perform measurements of the z>3 quasar clustering and luminosity function in order to test various "AGN feedback'' models. Additionally, the wide range of multi-wavelength, multi-epoch ancillary data makes SpIES a prime location to identify both high-redshift (z>6) quasars as well as obscured quasars missed by optical surveys. SpIES maps ~115deg2 of Stripe 82 to depths of 6.3 uJy (21.9 AB Magnitudes) and 5.75 uJy (22.0 AB Magnitudes) at [3.6] and [4.5] microns respectively; depths significantly greater than WISE. Here we define the SpIES survey parameters and describe the image processing, source extraction, and catalog production methods used to analyze the SpIES data. Amongst our preliminary science results, we show high significance detections of spectroscopically confirmed, z~5 quasars in the SpIES data. This work is based [in part] on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech.

  18. ALBEDOS OF SMALL HILDA GROUP ASTEROIDS AS REVEALED BY SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Erin Lee; Woodward, Charles E. E-mail: chelsea@astro.umn.edu

    2011-06-15

    We present thermal 24 {mu}m observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope of 62 Hilda asteroid group members with diameters ranging from 3 to 12 km. Measurements of the thermal emission, when combined with reported absolute magnitudes, allow us to constrain the albedo and diameter of each object. From our Spitzer sample, we find the mean geometric albedo, p{sub V} = 0.07 {+-} 0.05, for small (D < 10 km) Hilda group asteroids. This Spitzer-derived value of p{sub V} is greater than and spans a larger range in albedo space than the mean albedo of large (D {approx}> 10 km) Hilda group asteroids which is p{sub V} = 0.04 {+-} 0.01. Though this difference may be attributed to space weathering, the small Hilda group population reportedly displays greater taxonomic range from C-, D-, and X-type whose albedo distributions are commensurate with the range of determined albedos. We discuss the derived Hilda size-frequency distribution, color-color space, and geometric albedo for our survey sample in the context of the expected migration induced 'seeding' of the Hilda asteroid group with outer solar system proto-planetesimals as outlined in the 'Nice' formalism.

  19. Spitzer Pre Launch Mission Operations System - The Road to Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Charles P.; Wilson, Robert K.

    2006-01-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope was launched on 25 August 2003 into an Earth-trailing solar orbit to acquire infrared observations from space. Development of the Mission Operations System (MOS) portion prior to launch was very different from planetary missions from the stand point that the MOS teams and Ground Data System had to be ready to support all aspects of the mission at launch (i.e., no cruise period for finalizing the implementation). For Spitzer, all mission-critical events post launch happen in hours or days rather than months or years, as is traditional with deep space missions. At the end of 2000 the Project was dealt a major blow when the Mission Operations System (MOS) had an unsuccessful Critical Design Review (CDR). The project made major changes at the beginning of 2001 in an effort to get the MOS (and Project) back on track. The result for the Spitzer Space Telescope was a successful launch of the observatory followed by an extremely successful In Orbit Checkout (IOC) and operations phase. This paper describes how the project was able to recover the MOS to a successful Delta (CDR) by mid 2001, and what changes in philosophies, experiences, and lessons learned followed. It describes how projects must invest early or else invest heavily later in the development phase to achieve a successful operations phase.

  20. The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Matthew; Stern, D.; Brodwin, M.; Griffith, R.; Eisenhardt, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Bock, J.; Borys, C.; Brand, K.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cool, R.; Cooray, A.; Croft, S.; Dey, A.; Eisenstein, D.; Gonzalez, A.; Gorjian, V.; Grogin, N.; Ivison, R.; Jacob, J.; Jannuzi, B.; Mainzer, A.; Moustakas, L.; Rottgering, H.; Seymour, N.; Smith, H.; Stanford, A.; Stauffer, J. R.; Sullivan, I.; van Breugel, W.; Wright, E. L.; Willner, S. P.

    2009-05-01

    The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is four-epoch infrared survey of ten square degrees in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The four epochs, which span the interval from 2003 to 2008, make it possible to identify nearby, high-proper-motion targets, as well as infrared-variable objects. SDWFS is a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy program (PID 40839). The SDWFS catalogs are publicly available, and contain roughly 7e5, 5e5, 1e5, and 1e5 distinct sources brighter than the 5-sigma survey limits of 19.8, 18.8, 16.5, and 15.8 Vega magnitudes at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 microns, respectively. In this contribution we describe the SDWFS survey and some initial findings. This work was supported by NASA grant number 1314516, administered by JPL.

  1. Teacher-Student Education and Public Outreach Using Spitzer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeton, Adam; Mehta, S.; Butler, M.; Spuck, T.; Heller, M.; Sixel, W.; Cook, C.; Hutchinson, P.; Butler, M.; Abajian, M.; Gorjian, V.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the NASA-IPAC Teacher Archival Research Program (NITARP) astronomers, teachers, and students collaborated in using archival data from the Spitzer Space Telescope to identify galaxy clusters around Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) at a high redshift of z≈1. The team analyzed 168 fields around AGN to determine if an over density of sources existed. The team, including members from across the US, initially explored the idea at the 2011 Winter AAS Meeting. The initial meeting followed up with regular conference calls, and a 4-day face to face meeting at the Spitzer Science Center in Pasadena, CA. Throughout the process teachers and students gained a great deal of knowledge and experiences conducting authentic science research, and scientists gained a deeper understanding of education issues. The poster will present the processes used to engage students in this real-world experience, and the many benefits to all. In addition our team will present inquiry based activities using archival data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, APT photometry software, and an Excel spreadsheet template, to enrich their understanding of the structure of the universe. NITARP is a NASA funded program.

  2. Pointing History Engine for the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David; Ahmed, Asif; Brugarolas, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The Pointing History Engine (PHE) is a computer program that provides mathematical transformations needed to reconstruct, from downlinked telemetry data, the attitude of the Spitzer Space Telescope (formerly known as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility) as a function of time. The PHE also serves as an example for development of similar pointing reconstruction software for future space telescopes. The transformations implemented in the PHE take account of the unique geometry of the Spitzer telescope-pointing chain, including all data on relative alignments of components, and all information available from attitude-determination instruments. The PHE makes it possible to coordinate attitude data with observational data acquired at the same time, so that any observed astronomical object can be located for future reference and re-observation. The PHE is implemented as a subroutine used in conjunction with telemetry-formatting services of the Mission Image Processing Laboratory of NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory to generate the Boresight Pointing History File (BPHF). The BPHF is an archival database designed to serve as Spitzer s primary astronomical reference documenting where the telescope was pointed at any time during its mission.

  3. From Spitzer Galaxy photometry to Tully-Fisher distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, J. G.; Tully, R. B.; Courtois, H. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Neill, J. D.; Shaya, E. J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper involves a data release of the observational campaign: Cosmicflows with Spitzer (CFS). Surface photometry of the 1270 galaxies constituting the survey is presented. An additional ˜400 galaxies from various other Spitzer surveys are also analysed. CFS complements the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies, that provides photometry for an additional 2352 galaxies, by extending observations to low galactic latitudes (|b| < 30°). Among these galaxies are calibrators, selected in the K band, of the Tully-Fisher relation. The addition of new calibrators demonstrates the robustness of the previously released calibration. Our estimate of the Hubble constant using supernova host galaxies is unchanged, H0 = 75.2 ± 3.3 km s-1 Mpc-1. Distance-derived radial peculiar velocities, for the 1935 galaxies with all the available parameters, will be incorporated into a new data release of the Cosmicflows project. The size of the previous catalogue will be increased by 20 per cent, including spatial regions close to the Zone of Avoidance.

  4. Investigations on-board the biosatellite Cosmos-83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazenko, O. G.; Ilyin, Eu. A.

    The program of the 5day flight of the biosatellite Cosmos-1514 (December 1983) envisaged experimental investigations the purpose of which was to ascertain the effect of short-term microgravity on the physiology, growth and development of various animal and plant species. The study of Rhesus-monkeys has shown that they are an adequate model for exploring the mechanisms of physiological adaptation to weightlessness of the vestibular apparatus and the cardiovascular system. The rat experiment has demonstrated that mammalian embryos, at least during the last term of pregnancy, can develop in microgravity. This finding has been confirmed by fish studies. The experiment on germinating seeds and adult plants has given evidence that microgravity produces no effect on the metabolism of seedlings and on the flowering stage.

  5. MHD Simulations of Core Collapse Supernovae with Cosmos++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Shizuka; Salmonson, Jay

    2010-10-01

    We performed 2D, axisymmetric, MHD simulations with Cosmos++ in order to examine the growth of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in core-collapse supernovae. We have initialized a non-rotating 15 Msolar progenitor, infused with differential rotation and poloidal magnetic fields. The collapse of the iron core is simulated with the Shen EOS, and the parametric Ye and entropy evolution. The wavelength of the unstable mode in the post-collapse environment is expected to be only ~200 m. In order to achieve the fine spatial resolution requirement, we employed remapping technique after the iron core has collapsed and bounced. The MRI unstable region appears near the equator and angular momentum and entropy are transported outward. Higher resolution remap run display more vigorous overturns and stronger transport of angular momentum and entropy. Our results are in agreement with the earlier work by Akiyama et al. [1] and Obergaulinger et al. [2].

  6. ENVIRONMENT OF MAMBO GALAXIES IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Aravena, M.; Bertoldi, F.; Carilli, C.; Schinnerer, E.; McCracken, H. J.; Salvato, M.; Riechers, D.; Smolcic, V.; Sheth, K.; Capak, P.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Menten, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    Submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) represent a dust-obscured high-redshift population undergoing massive star formation activity. Their properties and space density have suggested that they may evolve into spheroidal galaxies residing in galaxy clusters. In this Letter, we report the discovery of compact ({approx}10''-20'') galaxy overdensities centered at the position of three SMGs detected with the Max-Planck millimeter bolometer camera in the COSMOS field. These associations are statistically significant. The photometric redshifts of galaxies in these structures are consistent with their associated SMGs; all of them are between z = 1.4and2.5, implying projected physical sizes of {approx}170 kpc for the overdensities. Our results suggest that about 30% of the radio-identified bright SMGs in that redshift range form in galaxy density peaks in the crucial epoch when most stars formed.

  7. Starbursts and Galaxy Evolution: results from COSMOS survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Hinojosa Goñi, R.; Jairo Méndez Abreu, J.; Sánchez Alméida, J.

    2016-06-01

    The search for starbursts galaxies in COSMOS database by a tailored procedure that uses the photometry from SUBARU, results in 220 targets at z<0.5. The typical mass of the starburst is 10^8 and its distribution is similar to that of the quiescent galaxies in the survey at the same redshift range. From the detailed analysis of the galaxies images using the HST, the star forming clumps are characterized. The galaxies are of three different kinds, Snot, Snot and diffuse light and multiple knots. The mass of the knots are typically one order of magnitude below that of the host galaxy and the clumps in multiple knot galaxies are bigger the closer they are to the center. The sSFR however does not change with the particular position of the burst in their host galaxy, which suggests a similar process independently of their location. This result applies also to the galaxies at the largest z range (0.9). Our interpretation is that the star formation is happening at all possible locations on the galaxy discs, possibly from gas accreted from the halo or the IGM, with clumps which grow as they spiral and get to the centermost regions. Our previous work on nearby SF -tadpole galaxies of similar mass reported metallicity drops coinciding with the location of the burst what we have interpreted as SF driven by cold flows. Our results in COSMOS would be consistent with a similar interpretation and a scenario in which medium mass disks are growing by gas accretion that show up as scattered starbursts knots.

  8. The most obscured AGN in the COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Perna, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Gruppioni, C.; Mignoli, M.; Pozzi, F.; Vietri, G.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2015-06-01

    Highly obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN) are common in nearby galaxies, but are difficult to observe beyond the local Universe, where they are expected to significantly contribute to the black hole accretion rate density. Furthermore, Compton-thick (CT) absorbers (NH ≳ 1024 cm-2) suppress even the hard X-ray (2-10 keV) AGN nuclear emission, and therefore the column density distribution above 1024 cm-2 is largely unknown. We present the identification and multi-wavelength properties of a heavily obscured (NH ≳ 1025 cm-2), intrinsically luminous (L2-10 > 1044 erg s-1) AGN at z = 0.353 in the COSMOS field. Several independent indicators, such as the shape of the X-ray spectrum, the decomposition of the spectral energy distribution and X-ray/[NeV] and X-ray/6 μm luminosity ratios, agree on the fact that the nuclear emission must be suppressed by a ≳1025 cm-2 column density. The host galaxy properties show that this highly obscured AGN is hosted in a massive star-forming galaxy, showing a barred morphology, which is known to correlate with the presence of CT absorbers. Finally, asymmetric and blueshifted components in several optical high-ionization emission lines indicate the presence of a galactic outflow, possibly driven by the intense AGN activity (LBol/LEdd = 0.3-0.5). Such highly obscured, highly accreting AGN are intrinsically very rare at low redshift, whereas they are expected to be much more common at the peak of the star formation and BH accretion history, at z ~ 2-3. We demonstrate that a fully multi-wavelength approach can recover a sizable sample of such peculiar sources in large and deep surveys such as COSMOS.

  9. Stellar mass assembly and star formation history from z=0.2 out to z=6 in the COSMOS and VIPERS fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbert, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    A clear and comprehensive picture describing the physical processes which regulate the stellar mass assembly is still missing in galaxy formation scenario. I will present a measurement of the galaxy stellar mass function and stellar mass density from z=0.2 out to z=6. Our study relies on deep near-infrared imaging over wide fields: the WIRCAM/CFHT coverage of the 20 sq-deg VIPERS fields combined with the new IRAC/Spitzer coverage (the SPLASH survey) of the 2 sq-deg COSMOS field. Our analysis is based on photometric redshifts of 1,5 million of galaxies reaching a precision around 4% at 4

  10. NEOLegacy: The ultimate Spitzer survey of Near Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trilling, David; Mommert, Michael; Hora, Joseph; Chesley, Steve; Emery, Joshua; Fazio, Giovanni; Harris, Alan; Mueller, Michael; Smith, Howard

    2016-08-01

    Near Earth Objects (NEOs) are bodies whose orbits bring them close to the Earth's orbit. NEOs are valuable tracers of the evolution of our Solar System, and are also key components of current and future space exploration. Finally, the study of NEOs is relevant for civil defense through understanding the impact threat. We propose here an efficient and comprehensive survey to measure the diameters, albedos, and lightcurves of 1154 NEOs. We include only targets that are too faint to be detected by NEOWISE. This catalog will complete a database of diameters and albedos for nearly 3000 NEOs -- more than 20% of all known objects. Our primary goal, in line with the planetary science priorities for Spitzer Cycle 13, is to create a large and uniform catalog of NEO properties. From this catalog we will calculate an independent estimate of the NEO size distribution, addressing a current controversy, and measure the compositional distribution of NEOs as a function of size. We will increase by up to a factor of five the number of NEO lightcurves with relatively well known periods and amplitudes. The legacy value of this project is most evident in the fact that there will not ever in the foreseeable future be another opportunity to measure thousands of NEO diameters and carry out the type of science described above. Our online database will be the single most valuable resource of NEO diameters and albedos for years to come. Only Spitzer is sensitive and efficient enough to create such an important catalog of this scale. Our team has unmatched experience observing NEOs with Spitzer.

  11. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF BOW SHOCKS AND OUTFLOWS IN RCW 38

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, E.; Wolk, S. J.; Bourke, T. L.; Spitzbart, B.; Megeath, S. T.; Gutermuth, R.

    2012-01-10

    We report Spitzer observations of five newly identified bow shocks in the massive star-forming region RCW 38. Four are visible at Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) wavelengths, the fifth is only visible at 24 {mu}m. Chandra X-ray emission indicates that winds from the central O5.5 binary, IRS 2, have caused an outflow to the northeast and southwest of the central subcluster. The southern lobe of hot ionized gas is detected in X-rays; shocked gas and heated dust from the shock front are detected with Spitzer at 4.5 and 24 {mu}m. The northern outflow may have initiated the present generation of star formation, based on the filamentary distribution of the protostars in the central subcluster. Further, the bow-shock driving star, YSO 129, is photo-evaporating a pillar of gas and dust. No point sources are identified within this pillar at near- to mid-IR wavelengths. We also report on IRAC 3.6 and 5.8 {mu}m observations of the cluster DBS2003-124, northeast of RCW 38, where 33 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) are identified. One star associated with the cluster drives a parsec-scale jet. Two Herbig-Haro objects associated with the jet are visible at IRAC and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) wavelengths. The jet extends over a distance of {approx}3 pc. Assuming a velocity of 100 km s{sup -1} for the jet material gives an age of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} yr, indicating that the star (and cluster) are likely to be very young, with a similar or possibly younger age than RCW 38, and that star formation is ongoing in the extended RCW 38 region.

  12. A Spitzer Survey for Dust in Type IIn Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Ori D.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Nathan; Steele, Thea N

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) may exhibit late-time (>100 days) infrared (IR) emission from warm dust more than other types of core-collapse SNe. Mid-IR observations, which span the peak of the thermal spectral energy distribution, provide useful constraints on the properties of the dust and, ultimately, the circumstellar environment, explosion mechanism, and progenitor system. Due to the low Type IIn rate (<10% of all core-collapse SNe), few IR observations exist for this subclass. The handful of isolated studies, however, show late-time IR emission from warm dust that, in some cases, extends for five or six years post-discovery. vVhile previous Spitzer/IRAC surveys have searched for dust in SNe, none have targeted the Type IIn subclass. This article presents results from a warm Spitzer/IRAC survey of the positions of all 68 known SNe IIn within a distance of 250 Mpc between 1999 and 2008 that have remained unobserved by Spitzer more than 100 days post-discovery. The detection of late-time emission from ten targets (approx. 15 %) nearly doubles the database of existing mid-IR observations of SNe IIn. Although optical spectra show evidence for new dust formation in some cases, the data show that in most cases the likely origin of the mid-IR emission is pre-existing dust, which is continuously heated by optical emission generated by ongoing circumstellar interaction between the forward shock and circumstellar medium. Furthermore, an emerging trend suggests these SNe "turn off" at " approx. 1000-2000 days post-discovery once the forward shock overruns the dust shell. The mass-loss rates associated with these dust shells are consistent with luminous blue variable (LBV) progenitors having similar mass-loss histories.

  13. A Spitzer Survey for Dust in Type IIn Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Ori D.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Nathan; Steele, Thea N.

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) may exhibit late-time (greater than 100 days) infrared (IR) emission from warm dust more than other types of core-collapse SNe. Mid-IR observations, which span the peak of the thermal spectral energy distribution, provide useful constraints on the properties of the dust and, ultimately, the circumstellar environment, explosion mechanism, and progenitor system. Due to the low SN IIn rate (less than 10% of all core-collapse SNe), few IR observations exist for this subclass. The handful of isolated studies, however, show late-time IR emission from warm dust that, in some cases, extends for five or six years post-discovery. While previous Spitzer/IRAC surveys have searched for dust in SNe, none have targeted the Type IIn subclass. This article presents results from a warm Spitzer/IRAC survey of the positions of all 68 known SNe IIn within a distance of 250 Mpc between 1999 and 2008 that have remained unobserved by Spitzer more than 100 days postdiscovery. The detection of late-time emission from ten targets (approximately 15%) nearly doubles the database of existing mid-IR observations of SNe IIn. Although optical spectra show evidence for new dust formation in some cases, the data show that in most cases the likely origin of the mid-IR emission is pre-existing dust, which is continuously heated by optical emission generated by ongoing circumstellar interaction between the forward shock and circumstellar medium. Furthermore, an emerging trend suggests that these SNe decline at approximately 1000-2000 days post-discovery once the forward shock overruns the dust shell. The mass-loss rates associated with these dust shells are consistent with luminous blue variable (LBV) progenitors.

  14. THE SPITZER LOCAL VOLUME LEGACY: SURVEY DESCRIPTION AND INFRARED PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, D. A.; Cohen, S. A.; Johnson, L. C.; Schuster, M. D.; Calzetti, D.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Block, M.; Marble, A. R.; Gil de Paz, A.; Lee, J. C.; Begum, A.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Funes, J. G.; Gordon, K. D.; Johnson, B. D.; Sakai, S.; Skillman, E. D.; Van Zee, L.; Walter, F.

    2009-09-20

    The survey description and the near-, mid-, and far-infrared flux properties are presented for the 258 galaxies in the Local Volume Legacy (LVL). LVL is a Spitzer Space Telescope legacy program that surveys the local universe out to 11 Mpc, built upon a foundation of ultraviolet, Halpha, and Hubble Space Telescope imaging from 11HUGS (11 Mpc Halpha and Ultraviolet Galaxy Survey) and ANGST (ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury). LVL covers an unbiased, representative, and statistically robust sample of nearby star-forming galaxies, exploiting the highest extragalactic spatial resolution achievable with Spitzer. As a result of its approximately volume-limited nature, LVL augments previous Spitzer observations of present-day galaxies with improved sampling of the low-luminosity galaxy population. The collection of LVL galaxies shows a large spread in mid-infrared colors, likely due to the conspicuous deficiency of 8 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission from low-metallicity, low-luminosity galaxies. Conversely, the far-infrared emission tightly tracks the total infrared emission, with a dispersion in their flux ratio of only 0.1 dex. In terms of the relation between the infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio and the ultraviolet spectral slope, the LVL sample shows redder colors and/or lower infrared-to-ultraviolet ratios than starburst galaxies, suggesting that reprocessing by dust is less important in the lower mass systems that dominate the LVL sample. Comparisons with theoretical models suggest that the amplitude of deviations from the relation found for starburst galaxies correlates with the age of the stellar populations that dominate the ultraviolet/optical luminosities.

  15. The Spitzer-HETDEX Exploratory Large-area Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papovich, C.; Shipley, H. V.; Mehrtens, N.; Lanham, C.; Lacy, M.; Ciardullo, R.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Bassett, R.; Behroozi, P.; Blanc, G. A.; de Jong, R. S.; DePoy, D. L.; Drory, N.; Gawiser, E.; Gebhardt, K.; Gronwall, C.; Hill, G. J.; Hopp, U.; Jogee, S.; Kawinwanichakij, L.; Marshall, J. L.; McLinden, E.; Mentuch Cooper, E.; Somerville, R. S.; Steinmetz, M.; Tran, K.-V.; Tuttle, S.; Viero, M.; Wechsler, R.; Zeimann, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present post-cryogenic Spitzer imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 μm with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) of the Spitzer/HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey. SHELA covers ≈24 deg2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey “Stripe 82” region, and falls within the footprints of the Hobby–Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and the Dark Energy Survey. The HETDEX blind R ∼ 800 spectroscopy will produce ∼200,000 redshifts from the Lyα emission for galaxies in the range 1.9 < z < 3.5, and an additional ∼200,000 redshifts from the [O ii] emission for galaxies at z < 0.5. When combined with deep ugriz images from the Dark Energy Camera, K-band images from NEWFIRM, and other ancillary data, the IRAC photometry from Spitzer will enable a broad range of scientific studies of the relationship between structure formation, galaxy stellar mass, halo mass, the presence of active galactic nuclei, and environment over a co-moving volume of ∼0.5 Gpc3 at 1.9 < z < 3.5. Here, we discuss the properties of the SHELA IRAC data set, including the data acquisition, reduction, validation, and source catalogs. Our tests show that the images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1 μJy at both 3.6 and 4.5 μm (1σ, for R = 2″ circular apertures). As a demonstration of the science, we present IRAC number counts, examples of highly temporally variable sources, and galaxy surface density profiles of rich galaxy clusters. In the spirit of the Spitzer Exploratory programs, we provide all of the images and catalogs as part of the publication.

  16. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Infrared Astrophysics with Spitzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Hudgins, D. M.

    2004-01-01

    PAH spectral features are now being used as new probes of the ISM. PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. This paper will focus on recent applications of the NASA Ames PAH IR spectral Database to interpret astronomical observations made by the Spitzer Space telescope and other space based infrared instruments. Examples will be given showing how changes in the spectral characteristics of different objects reveal interstellar PAH characteristics such as structure, size and composition, as well as provide insight into the chemical history and physical nature of the emission zones.

  17. Spitzer ultra faint survey program (surfs up). I. An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bradač, Maruša; Huang, Kuang-Han; Cain, Benjamin; Hall, Nicholas; Lubin, Lori; Ryan, Russell; Casertano, Stefano; Lemaux, Brian C.; Schrabback, Tim; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Allen, Steve; Von der Linden, Anja; Gladders, Mike; Hinz, Joannah; Zaritsky, Dennis; Treu, Tommaso

    2014-04-20

    Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program is a joint Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope Exploration Science program using 10 galaxy clusters as cosmic telescopes to study z ≳ 7 galaxies at intrinsically lower luminosities, enabled by gravitational lensing, than blank field surveys of the same exposure time. Our main goal is to measure stellar masses and ages of these galaxies, which are the most likely sources of the ionizing photons that drive reionization. Accurate knowledge of the star formation density and star formation history at this epoch is necessary to determine whether these galaxies indeed reionized the universe. Determination of the stellar masses and ages requires measuring rest-frame optical light, which only Spitzer can probe for sources at z ≳ 7, for a large enough sample of typical galaxies. Our program consists of 550 hr of Spitzer/IRAC imaging covering 10 galaxy clusters with very well-known mass distributions, making them extremely precise cosmic telescopes. We combine our data with archival observations to obtain mosaics with ∼30 hr exposure time in both 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm in the central 4' × 4' field and ∼15 hr in the flanking fields. This results in 3σ sensitivity limits of ∼26.6 and ∼26.2 AB magnitudes for the central field in the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, respectively. To illustrate the survey strategy and characteristics we introduce the sample, present the details of the data reduction and demonstrate that these data are sufficient for in-depth studies of z ≳ 7 sources (using a z = 9.5 galaxy behind MACS J1149.5+2223 as an example). For the first cluster of the survey (the Bullet Cluster) we have released all high-level data mosaics and IRAC empirical point-spread function models. In the future we plan to release these data products for the entire survey.

  18. Spitzer Science operations: the good, the bad, and the ugly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Deborah A.

    2008-07-01

    We review the Spitzer Space Telescope Science Center operations teams and processes and their interfaces with other Project elements -- what we planned early in the development of the science center, what we had at a launch and what we have now and why. We also explore the checks and balances behind building an organizational structure that supports constructive airing of conflicts and a timely resolution that balances the inputs and provides for very efficient on-orbit operations. For example, what organizational roles are involved in reviewing observing schedules, what constituency do they represent and who has authority to approve or disapprove the schedule.

  19. The Spitzer-HETDEX Exploratory Large-area Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papovich, C.; Shipley, H. V.; Mehrtens, N.; Lanham, C.; Lacy, M.; Ciardullo, R.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Bassett, R.; Behroozi, P.; Blanc, G. A.; de Jong, R. S.; DePoy, D. L.; Drory, N.; Gawiser, E.; Gebhardt, K.; Gronwall, C.; Hill, G. J.; Hopp, U.; Jogee, S.; Kawinwanichakij, L.; Marshall, J. L.; McLinden, E.; Mentuch Cooper, E.; Somerville, R. S.; Steinmetz, M.; Tran, K.-V.; Tuttle, S.; Viero, M.; Wechsler, R.; Zeimann, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present post-cryogenic Spitzer imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 μm with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) of the Spitzer/HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey. SHELA covers ≈24 deg2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey “Stripe 82” region, and falls within the footprints of the Hobby–Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and the Dark Energy Survey. The HETDEX blind R ˜ 800 spectroscopy will produce ˜200,000 redshifts from the Lyα emission for galaxies in the range 1.9 < z < 3.5, and an additional ˜200,000 redshifts from the [O ii] emission for galaxies at z < 0.5. When combined with deep ugriz images from the Dark Energy Camera, K-band images from NEWFIRM, and other ancillary data, the IRAC photometry from Spitzer will enable a broad range of scientific studies of the relationship between structure formation, galaxy stellar mass, halo mass, the presence of active galactic nuclei, and environment over a co-moving volume of ˜0.5 Gpc3 at 1.9 < z < 3.5. Here, we discuss the properties of the SHELA IRAC data set, including the data acquisition, reduction, validation, and source catalogs. Our tests show that the images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1 μJy at both 3.6 and 4.5 μm (1σ, for R = 2″ circular apertures). As a demonstration of the science, we present IRAC number counts, examples of highly temporally variable sources, and galaxy surface density profiles of rich galaxy clusters. In the spirit of the Spitzer Exploratory programs, we provide all of the images and catalogs as part of the publication.

  20. Spitzer Observations Of HD 149026b, the Hottest Planet, and the Spitzer Exoplanet ToO Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph; Luszcz, S.; Seager, S.; Deming, D.; Richardson, L. J.; Horning, K.; Navarro, S.; Bowman, W.

    2007-10-01

    We observed a secondary eclipse of the transiting exoplanet HD 149026b using the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera at 8 µm. Previous reports of secondary eclipse brightness temperatures are roughly consistent with predictions based on thermal equilibrium with received radiation, assuming uniform, blackbody re-emission and a Bond albedo of 0.3. However, our study derives a brightness temperature of 2,300 ± 200 K, the hottest ever measured for a planet. This is well above the prediction of 1,741 K for even zero albedo. As models with non-zero albedo are cooler, this essentially eliminates uniform blackbody models, and may also require an albedo lower than any measured for a planet, very strong 8-µm emission, strong temporal variability, or a heat source other than stellar radiation. On the other hand, an instantaneous re-emission blackbody model, in which each patch of surface area instantly re-emits all received light, matches the data. This planet is known to be enriched in heavy elements, which may give rise to novel atmospheric properties yet to be investigated. The eclipse time is consistent with a circular orbit. We will also introduce our Spitzer Target of Opportunity program for observing new transiting planets, in which we invite planet hunters to participate. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA. This material is based upon work supported by the US National Science Foundation and by the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration through an award issued by JPL/Caltech.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of the Usage of the COSMOS Science Education Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Bogner, Franz X.; Neofotistos, George

    2011-08-01

    A quantitative method of mapping the web usage of an innovative educational portal is applied to analyze the behaviour of users of the COSMOS Science Education Portal. The COSMOS Portal contains user-generated resources (that are uploaded by its users). It has been designed to support a science teacher's search, retrieval and access to both, scientific and educational resources. It also aims to introduce in and familiarize teachers with an innovative methodology for designing, expressing and representing educational practices in a commonly understandable way through the use of user-friendly authoring tools that are available through the portal. As a new science education portal that includes user-generated content, the COSMOS Portal encounters the well-known "new product/service challenge": to convince the users to use its tools, which facilitate quite fast lesson planning and lesson preparation activities. To respond to this challenge, the COSMOS Portal operators implemented a validation process by analyzing the usage data of the portal in a 10 month time-period. The data analyzed comprised: (a) the temporal evolution of the number of contributors and the amount of content uploaded to the COSMOS Portal; (b) the number of portal visitors (categorized as all-visitors, new-visitors, and returning-visitors) and (c) visitor loyalty parameters (such as page-views; pages/visit; average time on site; depth of visit; length of visit). The data is augmented with data associated with the usage context (e.g. the time of day when most of the activities in the portal take place). The quantitative results indicate that the exponential growth of the contributors to the COSMOS Portal is followed by an exponential growth of the uploaded content. Furthermore, the web usage statistics demonstrate significant changes in users' behaviour during the period under study, with returning visitors using the COSMOS Portal more frequently, mainly for lesson planning and preparation (in the

  2. Galaxy Stellar Mass Assembly Between 0.2 < z < 2 from the S-COSMOS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbert, O.; Salvato, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Aussel, H.; Capak, P.; McCracken, H. J.; Mobasher, B.; Kartaltepe, J.; Scoville, N.; Sanders, D. B.; Arnouts, S.; Bundy, K.; Cassata, P.; Kneib, J.-P.; Koekemoer, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Lilly, S.; Surace, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tasca, L.; Thompson, D.; Tresse, L.; Zamojski, M.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.

    2010-02-01

    We follow the galaxy stellar mass assembly by morphological and spectral type in the COSMOS 2 deg2 field. We derive the stellar mass functions and stellar mass densities from z = 2 to z = 0.2 using 196,000 galaxies selected at F 3.6 μm > 1 μJy with accurate photometric redshifts (σ_{(z_phot-z_spec)/(1+z_spec)}=0.008 at i + < 22.5). Using a spectral classification, we find that z ~ 1 is an epoch of transition in the stellar mass assembly of quiescent galaxies. Their stellar mass density increases by 1.1 dex between z = 1.5-2 and z = 0.8-1 (Δt ~ 2.5 Gyr), but only by 0.3 dex between z = 0.8-1 and z ~ 0.1 (Δt ~ 6 Gyr). Then, we add the morphological information and find that 80%-90% of the massive quiescent galaxies (log M ˜ 11) have an elliptical morphology at z < 0.8. Therefore, a dominant mechanism links the shutdown of star formation and the acquisition of an elliptical morphology in massive galaxies. Still, a significant fraction of quiescent galaxies present a Spi/Irr morphology at low mass (40%-60% at log M˜ 9.5), but this fraction is smaller than predicted by semi-analytical models using a "halo quenching" recipe. We also analyze the evolution of star-forming galaxies and split them into "intermediate activity" and "high activity" galaxies. We find that the most massive "high activity" galaxies end their high star formation rate phase first. Finally, the space density of massive star-forming galaxies becomes lower than the space density of massive elliptical galaxies at z < 1. As a consequence, the rate of "wet mergers" involved in the formation of the most massive ellipticals must decline very rapidly at z < 1, which could explain the observed slow down in the assembly of these quiescent and massive sources. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Spitzer Interacting Galaxies Survey (SIGS) (Brassington+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassington, N. J.; Zezas, A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Lanz, L.; Smith, H. A.; Willner, S. P.; Klein, C.

    2015-07-01

    All 103 galaxies in the Spitzer Interacting Galaxies Survey (SIGS) sample were observed with the IRAC and the Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST). These observations were obtained through both the archive and our observing program (PID 20140; PI A. Zezas). A log of all observations (between 2003 Nov and 2008 Aug) is presented in Table 2. (4 data files).

  4. SPIRITS Discoveries of Recent Infrared Transients with Spitzer Early Release Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jencson, J. E.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Tinyanont, S.; Cao, Y.; Prince, T.; Perley, D.; Masci, F.; Helou, G.; Armus, L.; Surace, J.; van Dyk, S.; Cody, A.; Boyer, M.; Khan, R.; Bond, H.; Monson, A.; Bally, J.; Levesque, E.; Williams, R.; Whitelock, P. A.; Mohamed, S.; Gehrz, R.; Amodeo, S.; Shenoy, D.; Carlon, R.; Cass, A.; Corgan, D.; Dykhoff, D.; Faella, J.; Gburek, T.; Smith, N.; Cantiello, M.; Langer, N.; Ofek, E.; Johansson, J.; Parthasarathy, M.; Fox, O.; Phillips, M.; Hsiao, E.; Morrell, N.; Gonzalez, C.; Contreras, C.

    2015-08-01

    The Spitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey (SPIRITS; ATel #6644) is a systematic search of 194 nearby galaxies for infrared transients with the IRAC camera on the warm Spitzer telescope to a depth of 20th mag (Vega) with varying cadences between a week to a year.

  5. Spitzer IRS Spectra of Basaltic Asteroids: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Emery, Joshua P.; Moskovitz, Nick; Stewart, Heather; Marchis, Frank

    2008-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a Spitzer program to observe the 5.2--38 micron spectra of small basaltic asteroids using the Spitzer IRS (Infrared Spectrograph). Our targets include members of the dynamical family of the unique large differentiated asteroid 4 Vesta ("Vestoids"), four outer-main-belt basaltic asteroids whose orbits exclude them from originating on 4 Vesta, and the basaltic near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 4055 Magellan. We will compare the compositions and thermophysical properties of the non-Vestoid objects with those of the dynamical vestoids to provide insight on the extent of metal-silicate differentiation on planetsimals during the epoch of planet formation in the early Solar System. As of this writing, spectra of asteroids 10537 (1991 RY16) and 2763 Jeans have been returned. Analysis of these data are ongolng. Observations of 956 Elisa, 2653 Principia, 4215 Kamo, 7472 Kumakiri, and 1459 Magnya have been scheduled and are expected to be available by the time of the DPS meeting. NIR spectra and lightcurves o f the target asteroids are also being observed in support of this program.

  6. Structure of the zodiacal emission by Spitzer archive data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verebelyi, E.; Kiss, C.; Balog, Z.; Stansberry, J.

    2014-07-01

    Dust in the interplanetary dust cloud not just reflects the sunlight (known as zodiacal light) but also has its own thermal emission. At the heliocentric distance of the Earth, the peak of this emission (with particle size ˜ 100 μ m) is close to 20 μ m. In this study, we used the data of four programs completed with the MIPS camera of the Spitzer Space Telescope at 24 μ m to probe the large-scale brightness distribution as well as the small-scale (sub-arcmin) structure of the zodiacal cloud. The four programs were: - The Production of Zodiacal Dust by Asteroids and Comets (ID: 2317) - High Latitude Dust Bands in the Main Asteroid Belt: Fingerprints of Recent Breakup Events (ID: 20539) - A New Source of Interplanetary Dust: Type II Dust Trails (ID: 30545) - First Look Survey - Ecliptic Plane Component (ID: 98) We take into account that, when the Spitzer Space Telescope carried out the measurements, it was orbiting the Sun at an Earth-trailing orbit and looking at different parts of the zodiacal cloud, in many cases looking through the same parts of the cloud from different locations. This gives us the chance to investigate the 3D distribution of zodiacal dust in addition to large- and small-scale structure of the cloud.

  7. Structure of the Zodiacal Emission by Spitzer Archive Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verebélyi, Erika

    2015-08-01

    Dust in the Interplanetary Dust Cloud not just reflects the sunlight (known as zodiacal light) but also has its own thermal emission. At the heliocentric distance of Earth the peak of this emission (with particle size 100 μm) is close to 20 μm. In this study we used the data of four programs completed with the MIPS camera of the Spitzer Space Telescope at 24 μm to probe the large scale brightness distribution as well as the small-scale (subarcmin) structure of the Zodiacal Could. The four programs were:1. The Production of Zodiacal Dust by Asteroids and Comets (ID: 2317)2. High Latitude Dust Bands in the Main Asteroid Belt: Fingerprints of Recent Breakup Events (ID: 20539)3. A New Source of Interplanetary Dust: Type II Dust Trails (ID: 30545)4. First Look Survey - Ecliptic Plane Component (ID: 98)We take into account that while the Spitzer Space Telescope carried out the measurements it was orbiting the Sun at an Earth-trailing orbit and looked at different parts of the Zodiacal Cloud, in many cases looking through the same parts of the cloud from different locations. This gives us the chance to investigate the 3D distribution of zodiacal dust in addition to its large and small scale structure.

  8. SMASH: Spitzer Merger History and Shape of the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Kathryn; Scowcroft, Vicky; Madore, Barry; Freedman, Wendy; Scowcroft, Victoria; Clementini, Gisella; Cioni, Maria-Rosa; van der Marel, Roeland; Udalski, Andrzej; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Soszynski, Igor; Nidever, David; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Besla, Gurtina; Majewski, Steve; Monson, Andy; Seibert, Mark; Smith, Horace; Preston, George; Kollmeier, Juna; Bono, Giuseppe; Marengo, Massimo; Persson, Eric; Law, David; Grillmair, Carl; Cohen, Judy; Sesar, Branimir; Price-Whelan, Adrian; Fabrizio, Michele

    2013-10-01

    The existence of a period-luminosity relation for RR Lyrae variables as measured at IRAC mid-infrared wavelengths allows Spitzer to estimate distances to individual stars with 2% errors. The SMASH program will exploit this unprecedented opportunity to precisely map structures throughout the halo of our Galaxy. SMASH will construct the first 3-D map of one of the larger satellites of the Milky Way (Sagittarius), it will determine precise distances to four more satellites (Ursa Minor, Carina, Sculptor & Bootes) and make the only measurements of stars in tidal streams accurate enough to determine their individual positions within the debris. This proposal describes some of the ground-breaking science enabled by this program, from increased accuracy in determining the orbits of satellite galaxies, to revolutionary constraints on the mass, shape and orientation of our Milky Way's dark matter halo. The foundational importance of these data sets cannot be overstated. These Milky Way structures lie far beyond the reach of any current or proposed future direct parallax measurements. Moreover, the combination of the SMASH results with proper motions from ESA's upcoming astrometric mission, Gaia, can effectively stretch Gaia's horizon for full 6D phase-space maps of our Galaxy by nearly four orders of magnitude in volume! These data and the resulting distance measurements will become Spitzer's legacy to the Galactic Astronomy community for years to come.

  9. HiRes Deconvolution of Outflow Cavities Imaged by Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velusamy, Thangasamy; Langer, W. D.; Marsh, K. A.

    2007-05-01

    Circumstellar outflows are believed to play a central role in the dispersal of the envelope and the ejection of angular momentum from protostars and their associated disks. The opening angle of the outflow is an important indicator of the time evolution of the outflow and its effects on infall and accretion. The scattered light emission escaping out the outflow cavities can be observed in the deep Spitzer images in the IRAC bands. We present examples of HiRes deconvolved Spitzer IRAC images of outflow cavities. HiRes achieves sub-arcsec resolution (< 0.8") for IRAC channels at 3.6 and 4.5 microns and 1" at 5.8 and 8 microns. Furthermore, HiRes deconvolution removes all the diffraction lobes producing cleaner looking narrow image of the protostar and nearby bright stars. Thus HiRes analysis improves our ability to trace the outflow cavities. We also present geometric models of the outflow (inclination and deprojected opening angles) derived by fitting SEDs and images of the outflow cavities. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  10. Spitzer Instrument Pointing Frame (IPF) Kalman Filter Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Kang, Bryan H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the Spitzer Instrument Pointing Frame (IPF) Kalman Filter algorithm. The IPF Kalman filter is a high-order square-root iterated linearized Kalman filter, which is parametrized for calibrating the Spitzer Space Telescope focal plane and aligning the science instrument arrays with respect to the telescope boresight. The most stringent calibration requirement specifies knowledge of certain instrument pointing frames to an accuracy of 0.1 arcseconds, per-axis, 1-sigma relative to the Telescope Pointing Frame. In order to achieve this level of accuracy, the filter carries 37 states to estimate desired parameters while also correcting for expected systematic errors due to: (1) optical distortions, (2) scanning mirror scale-factor and misalignment, (3) frame alignment variations due to thermomechanical distortion, and (4) gyro bias and bias-drift in all axes. The resulting estimated pointing frames and calibration parameters are essential for supporting on-board precision pointing capability, in addition to end-to-end 'pixels on the sky' ground pointing reconstruction efforts.

  11. Using The Cornell Atlas of Spitzer/IRS Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonyan, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    I summarize my research studying details of the emission line profiles of the mid infrared [NeII] 12.8 microns and [NeIII] 15.6 microns emission lines. Observations are from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) (Houck et al. 2004), so I illustrate use of the archive of these spectra. The IRS team developed the Cornell Atlas of Spitzer IRS Sources (CASSIS) found at cassis.sirtf.com. At present, all low resolution (Lebouteiller et al. 2011) and high resolution (Lebouteiller et al. 2015) staring observations with the IRS are available (more than 20,000 spectra of about 15,000 distinct sources). Spectra are provided in various formats to enable easy viewing or measurements. Spectra cover 5 microns to 37 microns in low resolution (R ˜ 60 to 125) and 10 microns to 37 microns in high resolution (R ˜ 600) modes. CASSIS is intended as a long term resource for the astronomical community so that this fundamental data base of mid-infrared spectra will be easily usable perpetually, and I demonstrate some examples of its use.

  12. Modeling IR SED of AGN with Spitzer and Herschel data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltre, A.

    2012-12-01

    One of the remaining open issues in the context of the analysis of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is the evidence that nuclear gravitational accretion is often accompanied by a concurrent starburst (SB) activity. What is, in this picture, the role played by the obscur- ing dust around the nucleus and what do the state of the art AGN torus models have to say? Can the IR data provided by Spitzer and Herschel help us in extensively investigate both phenomena and, if so, how and with what limitations? In this paper we present our contribution to the efforts of answering these questions. We show some of the main results coming from a comparative study of various AGN SED modeling approaches, focusing mostly on the much-debated issue about the morphology of the dust distribution in the toroidal structure surrounding the AGN. We found that the properties of dust in AGN as measured by matching observations (be it broad band IR photometry or IR spectra) with models, strongly depend on the choice of the dust distribution. Then, we present the spec- tral energy distribution (SED) fitting procedure we developed, making make the best use of Spitzer and Herschel SPIRE mid- and far-IR observations, to dig into the role played by the possible presence of an AGN on the host galaxy's properties.

  13. SURVEY OF NEARBY FGK STARS AT 160 mum WITH SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Angelle; Beichman, Charles; Bryden, Geoff; Lisse, Carey

    2009-10-10

    The Spitzer Space Telescope has advanced debris disk science tremendously with a wealth of information on debris disks around nearby A, F, G, K, and M stars at 24 and 70 mum with the MIPS photometer and at 8-34 mum with IRS. Here we present 160 mum observations of a small subset of these stars. At this wavelength, the stellar photospheric emission is negligible and any detected emission corresponds to cold dust in extended Kuiper Belt analogs. However, the Spitzer 160 mum observations are limited in sensitivity by the large beam size which results in significant 'noise' due to cirrus and extragalactic confusion. In addition, the 160 mum measurements suffer from the added complication of a light leak next to the star's position whose flux is proportional to the near-infrared flux of the star. We are able to remove the contamination from the leak and report 160 mum measurements or upper limits for 24 stars. Three stars (HD 10647, HD 207129, and HD 115617) have excesses at 160 mum that we use to constrain the properties of the debris disks around them. A more detailed model of the spectral energy distribution of HD 10647 reveals that the 70 and 160 mum emission could be due to small water ice particles at a distance of 100 AU, consistent with Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging of circumstellar material in the system.

  14. Spitzer, Gaia, and the Potential of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Johnston, Kathryn V.

    2013-11-01

    Near-future data from ESA's Gaia mission will provide precise, full phase-space information for hundreds of millions of stars out to heliocentric distances of ~10 kpc. This "horizon" for full phase-space measurements is imposed by the Gaia parallax errors degrading to worse than 10%, and could be significantly extended by an accurate distance indicator. Recent work has demonstrated how Spitzer observations of RR Lyrae stars can be used to make distance estimates accurate to 2%, effectively extending the Gaia, precise-data horizon by a factor of 10 in distance and a factor of 1000 in volume. This Letter presents one approach to exploit data of such accuracy to measure the Galactic potential using small samples of stars associated with debris from satellite destruction. The method is tested with synthetic observations of 100 stars from the end point of a simulation of satellite destruction: the shape, orientation, and depth of the potential used in the simulation are recovered to within a few percent. The success of this simple test with such a small sample in a single debris stream suggests that constraints from multiple streams could be combined to examine the Galaxy's dark matter halo in even more detail—a truly unique opportunity that is enabled by the combination of Spitzer and Gaia with our intimate perspective on our own Galaxy.

  15. SPITZER, GAIA, AND THE POTENTIAL OF THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Johnston, Kathryn V.

    2013-11-20

    Near-future data from ESA's Gaia mission will provide precise, full phase-space information for hundreds of millions of stars out to heliocentric distances of ∼10 kpc. This ''horizon'' for full phase-space measurements is imposed by the Gaia parallax errors degrading to worse than 10%, and could be significantly extended by an accurate distance indicator. Recent work has demonstrated how Spitzer observations of RR Lyrae stars can be used to make distance estimates accurate to 2%, effectively extending the Gaia, precise-data horizon by a factor of 10 in distance and a factor of 1000 in volume. This Letter presents one approach to exploit data of such accuracy to measure the Galactic potential using small samples of stars associated with debris from satellite destruction. The method is tested with synthetic observations of 100 stars from the end point of a simulation of satellite destruction: the shape, orientation, and depth of the potential used in the simulation are recovered to within a few percent. The success of this simple test with such a small sample in a single debris stream suggests that constraints from multiple streams could be combined to examine the Galaxy's dark matter halo in even more detail—a truly unique opportunity that is enabled by the combination of Spitzer and Gaia with our intimate perspective on our own Galaxy.

  16. Spitzer, Gaia, and the Potential of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Johnston, K. V.; Hogg, D. W.; Madore, B. F.; Majewski, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Near-future data from ESA's Gaia mission will provide precise, full phase-space information for hundreds of millions of stars out to heliocentric distances of ~10 kpc. This "horizon" for full phase-space measurements is imposed by the Gaia parallax errors degrading to worse than 10%, and could be significantly extended by an accurate distance indicator. Recent work has demonstrated how Spitzer observations of RR Lyrae stars can be used to make distance estimates accurate to 2%, effectively extending the Gaia, precise-data horizon by a factor of ten in distance and a factor of 1000 in volume. This Letter presents one approach to exploit data of such accuracy to measure the Galactic potential using small samples of stars associated with debris from satellite destruction. The method is tested with synthetic observations of 100 stars from the end point of a simulation of satellite destruction: the shape, orientation, and depth of the potential used in the simulation are recovered to within a few percent. The success of this simple test with such a small sample in a single debris stream suggests that constraints from multiple streams could be combined to examine the Galaxy's dark matter halo in even more detail --- a truly unique opportunity that is enabled by the combination of Spitzer and Gaia with our intimate perspective on the Galaxy.

  17. Spitzer mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, H.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Guerrero, M. A.; Nigoche-Netro, A.; Toalá, J. A.; Fang, X.; Rubio, G.; Kemp, S. N.; Navarro, S. G.; Corral, L. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope archival mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectroscopy of a sample of 11 planetary nebulae (PNe). The observations, acquired with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), cover the spectral range 5.2-14.5 μm that includes the H2 0-0 S(2) to S(7) rotational emission lines. This wavelength coverage has allowed us to derive the Boltzmann distribution and calculate the H2 rotational excitation temperature (Tex). The derived excitation temperatures have consistent values ≃900 ± 70 K for different sources despite their different structural components. We also report the detection of mid-IR ionic lines of [Ar III], [S IV], and [Ne II] in most objects, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features in a few cases. The decline of the [Ar III]/[Ne II] line ratio with the stellar effective temperature can be explained either by a true neon enrichment or by high density circumstellar regions of PNe that presumably descend from higher mass progenitor stars.

  18. Early-type galaxies in the Chandra cosmos survey

    SciTech Connect

    Civano, F.; Fabbiano, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Paggi, A.; Elvis, M.; Pellegrini, S.; Feder, R.

    2014-07-20

    We study a sample of 69 X-ray detected early-type galaxies (ETGs), selected from the Chandra COSMOS survey, to explore the relation between the X-ray luminosity of hot gaseous halos (L{sub X,{sub gas}}) and the integrated stellar luminosity (L{sub K} ) of the galaxies, in a range of redshift extending out to z = 1.5. In the local universe, a tight, steep relationship has been established between these two quantities (L{sub X,gas}∼L{sub K}{sup 4.5}), suggesting the presence of largely virialized halos in X-ray luminous systems. We use well-established relations from the study of local universe ETGs, together with the expected evolution of the X-ray emission, to subtract the contribution of low-mass X-ray binary populations from the X-ray luminosity of our sample. Our selection minimizes the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), yielding a sample representative of normal passive COSMOS ETGs; therefore, the resulting luminosity should be representative of gaseous halos, although we cannot exclude other sources such as obscured AGNs or enhanced X-ray emission connected with embedded star formation in the higher-z galaxies. We find that most of the galaxies with estimated L{sub X} < 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1} and z < 0.55 follow the L{sub X,{sub gas}}-L{sub K} relation of local universe ETGs. For these galaxies, the gravitational mass can be estimated with a certain degree of confidence from the local virial relation. However, the more luminous (10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}

  19. Early-type Galaxies in the Chandra COSMOS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civano, F.; Fabbiano, G.; Pellegrini, S.; Kim, D.-W.; Paggi, A.; Feder, R.; Elvis, M.

    2014-07-01

    We study a sample of 69 X-ray detected early-type galaxies (ETGs), selected from the Chandra COSMOS survey, to explore the relation between the X-ray luminosity of hot gaseous halos (L X, gas) and the integrated stellar luminosity (LK ) of the galaxies, in a range of redshift extending out to z = 1.5. In the local universe, a tight, steep relationship has been established between these two quantities (L_{X,gas}\\sim L_K^{4.5}), suggesting the presence of largely virialized halos in X-ray luminous systems. We use well-established relations from the study of local universe ETGs, together with the expected evolution of the X-ray emission, to subtract the contribution of low-mass X-ray binary populations from the X-ray luminosity of our sample. Our selection minimizes the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), yielding a sample representative of normal passive COSMOS ETGs; therefore, the resulting luminosity should be representative of gaseous halos, although we cannot exclude other sources such as obscured AGNs or enhanced X-ray emission connected with embedded star formation in the higher-z galaxies. We find that most of the galaxies with estimated LX < 1042 erg s-1 and z < 0.55 follow the L X, gas-LK relation of local universe ETGs. For these galaxies, the gravitational mass can be estimated with a certain degree of confidence from the local virial relation. However, the more luminous (1042 erg s-1

  20. Compton Thick AGN in the XMM-COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Perna, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Brusa, M.; Gruppioni, C.; Comastri, A.

    2016-06-01

    I will present results we published in two recent papers (Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A&A 573A 137, Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A&A 578A 120) on the properties of X-ray selected Compton Thick (CT, NH>10^{24} cm^{-2}) AGN, in the XMM-COSMOS survey. We exploited the rich multi-wavelength dataset available in this field, to show that CT AGN tend to harbor smaller, rapidly growing SMBH with respect to unobscured AGN, and have a higher chance of being hosted by star-forming, merging and post-merger systems. We also demonstrated the detectability of even more heavily obscured AGN (NH>10^{25} cm^{-2}), thanks to a truly multi-wavelength approach in the same field, and to the unrivaled XMM sensitivity. The extreme source detected in this way shows strong evidences of ongoing powerful AGN feedback, detected as blue-shifted wings of high ionization optical emission lines such as [NeV] and [FeVII], as well as of the [OIII] emission line. The results obtained from these works point toward a scenario in which highly obscured AGN occupy a peculiar place in the galaxy-AGN co-evolution process, in which both the host and the SMBH rapidly evolve toward the local relations.

  1. Compton Thick AGN in the XMM-COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Perna, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Brusa, M.; Gruppioni, C.; Comastri, A.

    2016-06-01

    I will present results we published in two recent papers (Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A&A 573A 137, Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A≈A 578A 120) on the properties of X-ray selected Compton Thick (CT, NH>10^{24} cm^{-2}) AGN, in the XMM-COSMOS survey. We exploited the rich multi-wavelength dataset available in this field, to show that CT AGN tend to harbor smaller, rapidly growing SMBH with respect to unobscured AGN, and have a higher chance of being hosted by star-forming, merging and post-merger systems. We also demonstrated the detectability of even more heavily obscured AGN (NH>10^{25} cm^{-2}), thanks to a truly multi-wavelength approach in the same field, and to the unrivaled XMM sensitivity. The extreme source detected in this way shows strong evidences of ongoing powerful AGN feedback, detected as blue-shifted wings of high ionization optical emission lines such as [NeV] and [FeVII], as well as of the [OIII] emission line. The results obtained from these works point toward a scenario in which highly obscured AGN occupy a peculiar place in the galaxy-AGN co-evolution process, in which both the host and the SMBH rapidly evolve toward the local relations.

  2. Cosmos 2229 immunology study (Experiment K-8-07)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to further validate use of the rhesus monkey as a model for humans in future space flight testing. The areas of immunological importance examined in the Cosmos 2229 flight were represented by two sets of studies. The first set of studies determined the effect of space flight on the ability of bone marrow cells to respond to granulocyte/monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF is an important regulator in the differentiation of bone marrow cells of both monocyte/macrophage and granulocyte lineages and any change in the ability of these cells to respond to GM-CSF can result in altered immune function. A second set of studies determined space flight effects on the expression of cell surface markers on both spleen and bone marrow cells. Immune cell markers included in this study were those for T-cell, B-cell, natural killer cell, and interleukin-2 populations. Variations from a normal cell population percentage, as represented by these markers, can be correlated with alterations in immunological function. Cells were stained with fluorescein-labelled antibodies directed against the appropriate antigens, and then analyzed using a flow cytometer.

  3. THE NATURE OF OPTICALLY DULL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Impey, Chris D.; Gabor, Jared M.; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Nagao, Tohru; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Brusa, Marcella; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Kelly, Brandon C.; Huchra, John P.; Jahnke, Knud; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salvato, Mara; Capak, Peter; Scoville, Nick Z.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Maineri, Vincenzo

    2009-11-20

    We present infrared, optical, and X-ray data of 48 X-ray bright, optically dull active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the COSMOS field. These objects exhibit the X-ray luminosity of an AGN but lack broad and narrow emission lines in their optical spectrum. We show that despite the lack of optical emission lines, most of these optically dull AGNs are not well described by a typical passive red galaxy spectrum: instead they exhibit weak but significant blue emission like an unobscured AGN. Photometric observations over several years additionally show significant variability in the blue emission of four optically dull AGNs. The nature of the blue and infrared emission suggest that the optically inactive appearance of these AGNs cannot be caused by obscuration intrinsic to the AGNs. Instead, up to approx70% of optically dull AGNs are diluted by their hosts, with bright or simply edge-on hosts lying preferentially within the spectroscopic aperture. The remaining approx30% of optically dull AGNs have anomalously high f{sub X} /f{sub O} ratios and are intrinsically weak, not obscured, in the optical. These optically dull AGNs are best described as a weakly accreting AGN with a truncated accretion disk from a radiatively inefficient accretion flow.

  4. Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Technology Development Program Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, B. Thai; Clampin, M.; Werneth, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Office was established in FY11 and resides at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The office serves as the implementation arm for the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters for PCOS Program related matters. We present an overview of the Program’s technology management activities and the Program’s technology development portfolio. We discuss the process for addressing community-provided technology needs and the Technology Management Board (TMB)-vetted prioritization and investment recommendations. This process improves the transparency and relevance of technology investments, provides the community a voice in the process, and leverages the technology investments of external organizations by defining a need and a customer. Goals for the PCOS Program envisioned by the National Research Council’s (NRC) “New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics” (NWNH) Decadal Survey report include science missions and technology development for dark energy, gravitational waves, X-ray, and inflation probe science.

  5. Weak Lensing : Ground vs. Space in the Cosmos Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Massey, R. J.; Ellis, R. S.; Rhodes, J.

    2006-12-01

    Weak lensing statistics are best for large numbers wide surveys with greater number of galaxies and deep surveys with a higher number density of galaxies. Although space-based surveys are unparalleled in their depth, ground-based surveys are the more cost-effective way to survey wide regions of the sky. We assess the relative merits of the two observing platforms, by using premier, multi-band, ground-based Subaru SuprimeCam data and space-based Hubble ACS data, in the 2 sq. degree COSMOS field in three ways. First, we compare shear measurements of individual galaxies and identify the relative calibration of the two datasets in terms of the largest subset in magnitude and size that is consistent. Second, we compare spaceand ground-based mass maps to quantify the relative completeness and contamination of the resulting cluster catalogs. We find that more clusters with XMM catalog counterparts are detected from space than ground and some ground-based clusters are possibly spurious detections. Third, we perform a detailed comparison of the precision with which it is possible to reconstruct the mass and size of four clusters at various redshifts identified from both ground and space. We find that the noise is much lower from space in all three investigations, but find no evidence for systematic overestimation or underestimation of the individual cluster properties by either survey.

  6. The Infrared Database of Extragalactic Observables from Spitzer (IDEOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoon, Henrik

    During the cryogenic phase of the successful Spitzer mission the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) performed approximately 15,000 observations of galactic and extragalactic sources. Among these are low-resolution spectra of more than 4200 galaxies beyond the Local Group. Results have been published in a great number of papers, led not only by hardcore infrared observers but increasingly also by non-native infrared astronomers. As the PI team of the IRS instrument, we are especially proud of the achievements of the IRS spectrograph, and we feel a special obligation to enhance the legacy value of its many observations. Last Summer we completed the Cornell Atlas of Spitzer-IRS Sources (CASSIS), containing homogeneously, expert-reduced low-resolution IRS spectra for over 11,000 observations. The spectra are available for download from our newly created CASSIS web portal. Here we propose to continue these efforts by fitting the low-resolution extragalactic spectra in the CASSIS atlas and create an Infrared Database of Extragalactic Observables from Spitzer (IDEOS) of homogeneously measured mid-infrared spectroscopic observables of more than 4200 galaxies beyond the Local Group. IDEOS will provide astronomers with widely varying scientific interests access to diagnostics that were previously available only for limited samples, or available on-the- fly only to expert users. The completion of IDEOS will coincide with the completion of ALMA. By their nature, CASSIS galaxies are attractive targets for high S/N ALMA observations. IDEOS will provide easily-accessible mid-IR selection criteria for compilation of ALMA target lists for probing significant questions on the AGN environment, the nature of starburst activity, or the AGN/starburst connection. The virtual observatory accessibility will also greatly automate the collation of synoptic results, particularly in the compilation of SEDs and in the cross-matching of targets for trend plots of spectroscopic observables. IDEOS will

  7. HST AND SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF THE HD 207129 DEBRIS RING

    SciTech Connect

    Krist, John E.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Rieke, George H.; Su, K. Y. L.; Gaspar, Andras; Chen, Christine C.; Beichman, Charles A.; Hines, Dean C.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Tanner, Angelle; Trilling, David E.; Clampin, Mark

    2010-10-15

    A debris ring around the star HD 207129 (G0V; d = 16.0 pc) has been imaged in scattered visible light with the ACS coronagraph on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and in thermal emission using MIPS on the Spitzer Space Telescope at {lambda} = 70 {mu}m (resolved) and 160 {mu}m (unresolved). Spitzer IRS ({lambda} = 7-35 {mu}m) and MIPS ({lambda} = 55-90 {mu}m) spectrographs measured disk emission at {lambda}> 28 {mu}m. In the HST image the disk appears as a {approx}30 AU wide ring with a mean radius of {approx}163 AU and is inclined by 60{sup 0} from pole-on. At 70 {mu}m, it appears partially resolved and is elongated in the same direction and with nearly the same size as seen with HST in scattered light. At 0.6 {mu}m, the ring shows no significant brightness asymmetry, implying little or no forward scattering by its constituent dust. With a mean surface brightness of V = 23.7 mag arcsec{sup -2}, it is the faintest disk imaged to date in scattered light. We model the ring's infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) using a dust population fixed at the location where HST detects the scattered light. The observed SED is well fit by this model, with no requirement for additional unseen debris zones. The firm constraint on the dust radial distance breaks the usual grain size-distance degeneracy that exists in modeling of spatially unresolved disks, and allows us to infer a minimum grain size of {approx}2.8 {mu}m and a dust size distribution power-law spectral index of -3.9. An albedo of {approx}5% is inferred from the integrated brightness of the ring in scattered light. The low-albedo and isotropic scattering properties are inconsistent with Mie theory for astronomical silicates with the inferred grain size and show the need for further modeling using more complex grain shapes or compositions. Brightness limits are also presented for six other main-sequence stars with strong Spitzer excess around which HST detects no circumstellar nebulosity (HD 10472, HD 21997, HD

  8. THE CHANDRA SURVEY OF THE COSMOS FIELD. II. SOURCE DETECTION AND PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Puccetti, S.; Vignali, C.; Cappelluti, N.; Brunner, H.; Brusa, M.; Fruscione, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Fiore, F.; Zamorani, G.; Gilli, R.; Comastri, A.; Aldcroft, T. L.; Elvis, M.; Civano, F.; Miyaji, T.; Damiani, F.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Mainieri, V.

    2009-12-01

    The Chandra COSMOS Survey (C-COSMOS) is a large, 1.8 Ms, Chandra program that covers the central contiguous {approx}0.92 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field. C-COSMOS is the result of a complex tiling, with every position being observed in up to six overlapping pointings (four overlapping pointings in most of the central {approx}0.45 deg{sup 2} area with the best exposure, and two overlapping pointings in most of the surrounding area, covering an additional {approx}0.47 deg{sup 2}). Therefore, the full exploitation of the C-COSMOS data requires a dedicated and accurate analysis focused on three main issues: (1) maximizing the sensitivity when the point-spread function (PSF) changes strongly among different observations of the same source (from {approx}1 arcsec up to {approx}10 arcsec half-power radius); (2) resolving close pairs; and (3) obtaining the best source localization and count rate. We present here our treatment of four key analysis items: source detection, localization, photometry, and survey sensitivity. Our final procedure consists of a two step procedure: (1) a wavelet detection algorithm to find source candidates and (2) a maximum likelihood PSF fitting algorithm to evaluate the source count rates and the probability that each source candidate is a fluctuation of the background. We discuss the main characteristics of this procedure, which was the result of detailed comparisons between different detection algorithms and photometry tools, calibrated with extensive and dedicated simulations.

  9. A 6 GHz Synoptic Survey of the COSMOS Deep Field with the JVLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sink, Joseph R.; Myers, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) covers two square degrees, and is observed over a large portion of the electromagnetic spectrum from X-ray to Radio. Key science goals of COSMOS include probing the evolution of galaxies, AGN, and large scale structures of the Universe. As well as constraining cosmological models and the star and structure formation history of the Universe. The wide range of frequencies and deep surveys are suitable for many astrophysical studies.Beginning in 2013, observations of the COSMOS field in C-band (4 - 8 GHz) using the JVLA have been carried out in every configuration spanning 21 months (April 2013 - Jan 2015) for a total of 13 observations. The observations are comprised of 1 hour time blocks using a technique called On-The-Fly Mosaicking (OTFM). Using OTFM we see an increased efficiency for an allotted observation block by collecting data as the array scans across the field, rather than a pointed mosaic which requires settle down time after each new pointing. Each observation consists of 2160 1-second integrations on 432 phase centers that require calibration and image processing before they can be mosaicked to create the final image of the entire COSMOS field.The primary science goal of this survey is to identify, catalog, and study the variable and transient radio sources in the COSMOS field, comparing these to other radio, optical, IR, and X-ray observations. The main class of variables we are interested in Active Galactic Nuclei.

  10. SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE COSMOS SURVEY. I. THE XMM-COSMOS SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Elvis, M.; Hao, H.; Civano, F.; Brusa, M.; Salvato, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Cappelluti, N.; Capak, P.; Zamorani, G.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Jahnke, K.; Lusso, E.; Cisternas, M.; Mainieri, V.; Trump, J. R.; Ho, L. C.; Aussel, H.; Frayer, D.; Hasinger, G. E-mail: hhao@cfa.harvard.edu; and others

    2012-11-01

    The 'Cosmic Evolution Survey' (COSMOS) enables the study of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) because of the deep coverage and rich sampling of frequencies from X-ray to radio. Here we present an SED catalog of 413 X-ray (XMM-Newton)-selected type 1 (emission line FWHM > 2000 km s{sup -1}) AGNs with Magellan, SDSS, or VLT spectrum. The SEDs are corrected for Galactic extinction, broad emission line contributions, constrained variability, and host galaxy contribution. We present the mean SED and the dispersion SEDs after the above corrections in the rest-frame 1.4 GHz to 40 keV, and show examples of the variety of SEDs encountered. In the near-infrared to optical (rest frame {approx}8 {mu}m-4000 A), the photometry is complete for the whole sample and the mean SED is derived from detections only. Reddening and host galaxy contamination could account for a large fraction of the observed SED variety. The SEDs are all available online.

  11. Spitzer's View of NGC2264's Circumstellar Disk Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Paula S.; Lada, Charles J.; Marengo, Massimo; Lada, Elizabeth

    We present a Spitzer study of the pre-main sequence population of the young cluster NGC 2264. The disk population is divided into three classes, based on individual spectral energy distributions: optically thick disks, in a homologous manner depleted or anemic disks, and radially depleted transition disks. Our analysis indicated that there may be two distinct evolutionary paths; disks evolve from optically thick to anemic via the first path, and from optically thick to transition in the second. Most of the disks seem to follow the first path. It is yet unknown what physical mechanism triggers this evolutionary differentiation - it could be directly connected to the nature of planet formation within the disk.

  12. Spitzer IRAC Sparsely Sampled Phase Curve of WASP-14b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, Jessica; Ingalls, James G.; Carey, Sean; von Braun, Kaspar; Ciardi, David; Kane, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    We present a new technique of sparsely sampling phase curves of hot jupiters with Spitzer IRAC. Snapshot phase curves are enabled by technical advances of precision pointing as well as careful characterization of a portion of the central pixel on the array. This method allows for observations which are a factor of ~2 more efficient than full phase curve observations, and are easy to schedule. We present the first results from this program using the exoplanet WASP-14b. As our pilot study, this planet has data taken both as a sparsely sampled phase curve as well as a staring mode phase curve as proof of technique. We successfully recover physical parameters for the transit and eclipse depths as well as phase curve shape of this slightly eccentric hot jupiter.

  13. Spitzer Observatory Operations -- Increasing Efficiency in Mission Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Charles P.; Kahr, Bolinda E.; Sarrel, Marc A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the how's and why's of the Spitzer Mission Operations System's (MOS) success, efficiency, and affordability in comparison to other observatory-class missions. MOS exploits today's flight, ground, and operations capabilities, embraces automation, and balances both risk and cost. With operational efficiency as the primary goal, MOS maintains a strong control process by translating lessons learned into efficiency improvements, thereby enabling the MOS processes, teams, and procedures to rapidly evolve from concept (through thorough validation) into in-flight implementation. Operational teaming, planning, and execution are designed to enable re-use. Mission changes, unforeseen events, and continuous improvement have often times forced us to learn to fly anew. Collaborative spacecraft operations and remote science and instrument teams have become well integrated, and worked together to improve and optimize each human, machine, and software-system element.

  14. Warm Spitzer: Effects of Major Operational Changes on Publication Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scire, E.

    2014-05-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope transitioned from the cryogenic mission to the warm mission in 2009. The transition involved changes to observatory operations in order to run the mission on a budget totaling less than 1/3 that of the cryogenic mission. These changes included decreasing the number of approved programs and funding to the community while removing the cap in hours for any one program. This increased the maximum program size to encourage observers to think in terms of ambitious experiments that require > 500 hours to accomplish (Exploration Science (ES) Programs). After 4 years of warm operations, this paper will discuss the how these changes have affected the way observers are publishing data in refereed journal articles.

  15. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Infrared Astrophysics with Spitzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, thanks to significant, parallel advancements in observational, experimental, and theoretical techniques, tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of the role that carbon-rich plays in the interstellar medium (ISM). Twenty years ago, the possible existence of an abundant population of large, carbon-rich molecules in the ISM was unthinkable. Today, the unmistakable spectroscopic signatures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) - shockingly large molecules by the standards of traditional interstellar chemistry -are recognized throughout the Universe. In this presentation, we will examine the current state of the interstellar PAH model and explore how this data, in conjunction with the unparalleled observational data provided by the Spitzer Space Telescope, can be used to draw ever-deeper insights into the physical and chemical natures of a wide range of astrophysical environments.

  16. Spitzer Space Telescope's View of Galaxy Messier 101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for larger version

    The galaxy Messier 101 is a swirling spiral of stars, gas, and dust. Messier 101 is nearly twice as wide as our Milky Way galaxy. Spitzer's view, taken in infrared light, reveals the galaxy's delicate dust lanes as yellow-green filaments. Such dense dust clouds are where new stars can form. In this image, dust warmed by the light of hot, young stars glows red. The rest of the galaxy's hundreds of billions of stars are less prominent and form a blue haze. Astronomers can use infrared light to examine the dust clouds where stars are born.

  17. Spitzer spectral observations of the deep impact ejecta.

    PubMed

    Lisse, C M; Vancleve, J; Adams, A C; A'hearn, M F; Fernández, Y R; Farnham, T L; Armus, L; Grillmair, C J; Ingalls, J; Belton, M J S; Groussin, O; McFadden, L A; Meech, K J; Schultz, P H; Clark, B C; Feaga, L M; Sunshine, J M

    2006-08-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope imaging spectrometer observations of comet 9P/Tempel 1 during the Deep Impact encounter returned detailed, highly structured, 5- to 35-micrometer spectra of the ejecta. Emission signatures due to amorphous and crystalline silicates, amorphous carbon, carbonates, phyllosilicates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, water gas and ice, and sulfides were found. Good agreement is seen between the ejecta spectra and the material emitted from comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and the circumstellar material around the young stellar object HD100546. The atomic abundance of the observed material is consistent with solar and C1 chondritic abundances, and the dust-to-gas ratio was determined to be greater than or equal to 1.3. The presence of the observed mix of materials requires efficient methods of annealing amorphous silicates and mixing of high- and low-temperature phases over large distances in the early protosolar nebula. PMID:16840662

  18. On-Orbit Performance of the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, Thomas; Werner, Michael; Gallagher, David; Irace, William; Fazio, Giovanni; Houck, James; Rieke, George; Wilson, Robert; Soifer, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope (formally known as SIRTF) was successfully launched on August 25, 2003, and has completed its initial in-orbit checkout and science validation and calibration period. The measured performance of the observatory has met or exceeded all of its high-level requirements, it has entered normal operations, and is beginning to return high-quality science data. A superfluid-helium cooled 85 cm diameter telescope provides extremely low infrared backgrounds and feeds three science instruments covering wavelengths ranging from 3.2 to 180 microns. The telescope optical quality is excellent, providing diffraction-limited performance down to wavelengths below 6.5 microns. Based on the first helium mass and boil-off rate measurements, a cryogenic lifetime in excess of 5 years is expected. This presentation will provide a summary of the overall performance of the observatory, with an emphasis on those performance parameters that have the greatest impact on its ultimate science return.

  19. Ultradeep Spitzer IRS Spectroscopy in the GOODS Southern Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplitz, H. I.; Armus, L.; Chary, R.; Colbert, J. W.; Frayer, D.; Desai, V.; Blain, A.; Spoon, H.; Charmandaris, V.; Pope, A.; Scott, D.

    2005-12-01

    We present the deepest spectra taken to date by the Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We targeted two faint ( ˜ 0.15 mJy) sources in the Southern GOODS field, at z=1.09 and z=2.69, as likely star-forming galaxies. Spectra of the lower redshift target were taken in 8-21 micron range (short-low first order and long-low second order), while the higher redshift target was observed from 21-37 microns (long-low first order). Observing times were 3 and 9 hours on-source for SL-1 and LL-2, respectively, and 12 hours for LL-1. We detect strong PAH emission in both targets. We compare the spectra to those of local galaxies observed by the IRS.

  20. Spitzer Observations of Extraplanar PAH Emission from Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, N.; Howk, J.

    We present Spitzer/IRAC observations of polycylic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission from interstellar material in the thick disks of normal spiral galaxies. These data show PAHs to be a common constituent of extraplanar material in spirals. The processes that displace this material from the interstellar disks of these systems do not destroy these very small grains. The dust emission features are present far above the galactic planes, extended up to about 2-4 kpc above the midplanes of the galaxies presented in this work. The total extent for which dust can be traced is about half the extent of the DIG. If it is not a sensitivity effect, this suggests that PAHs may be associated with a cold neutral medium that can not be supported at high z.

  1. SpIES: The Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timlin, John D.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Lacy, Mark; Ryan, Erin L.; Stone, Robert B.; Bauer, Franz E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fan, Xiaohui; Glikman, Eilat; Haggard, Daryl; Jiang, Linhua; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Lin, Yen-Ting; Makler, Martin; McGehee, Peregrine; Myers, Adam D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Urry, C. Megan; Wollack, Edward J.; Zakamska, Nadia L.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the first data release from the Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES); a large-area survey of ∼115 deg2 in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field using Spitzer during its “warm” mission phase. SpIES was designed to probe sufficient volume to perform measurements of quasar clustering and the luminosity function at z ≥slant 3 to test various models for “feedback” from active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Additionally, the wide range of available multi-wavelength, multi-epoch ancillary data enables SpIES to identify both high-redshift (z ≥slant 5) quasars as well as obscured quasars missed by optical surveys. SpIES achieves 5σ depths of 6.13 μJy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 μJy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, respectively—depths significantly fainter than the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We show that the SpIES survey recovers a much larger fraction of spectroscopically confirmed quasars (∼98%) in Stripe 82 than are recovered by WISE (∼55%). This depth is especially powerful at high-redshift (z ≥slant 3.5), where SpIES recovers 94% of confirmed quasars, whereas WISE only recovers 25%. Here we define the SpIES survey parameters and describe the image processing, source extraction, and catalog production methods used to analyze the SpIES data. In addition to this survey paper, we release 234 images created by the SpIES team and three detection catalogs: a 3.6 μm only detection catalog containing ∼6.1 million sources, a 4.5 μm only detection catalog containing ∼6.5 million sources, and a dual-band detection catalog containing ∼5.4 million sources.

  2. SpIES: The Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timlin, John D.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Richards, Gordon, T.; Lacy, Mark; Ryan, Erin L.; Stone, Robert B.; Bauer, Franz, E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fan, Xiaohui; Glikman, Eilat; Lamassa, Stephanie M.; Urry, C. Megan; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first data release from the Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES); a large-area survey of approx.115 sq deg in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field using Spitzer during its "warm" mission phase. SpIES was designed to probe sufficient volume to perform measurements of quasar clustering and the luminosity function at z > or = 3 to test various models for "feedback" from active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Additionally, the wide range of available multi-wavelength, multi-epoch ancillary data enables SpIES to identify both high-redshift (z > or = 5) quasars as well as obscured quasars missed by optical surveys. SpIES achieves 5 sigma depths of 6.13 µJy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 µJy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, respectively-depths significantly fainter than the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We show that the SpIES survey recovers a much larger fraction of spectroscopically confirmed quasars (approx.98%) in Stripe 82 than are recovered by WISE (55%). This depth is especially powerful at high-redshift (z > or = 3.5), where SpIES recovers 94% of confirmed quasars, whereas WISE only recovers 25%. Here we define the SpIES survey parameters and describe the image processing, source extraction, and catalog production methods used to analyze the SpIES data. In addition to this survey paper, we release 234 images created by the SpIES team and three detection catalogs: a 3.6 microns only detection catalog containing approx. 6.1 million sources, a 4.5 microns only detection catalog containing approx. 6.5 million sources, and a dual-band detection catalog containing approx. 5.4 million sources.

  3. GLIMPSE360: Completing the Spitzer Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Barbara; GLIMPSE360 Team

    2009-05-01

    GLIMPSE360 will map the remaining 187 degrees of the Galactic Plane that have not been previously observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Thus the survey will cover longitude l=65-265.5 degrees excluding l 102-109 and l 76-82. The latitude range will be 3.1 degrees, wider than the previous GLIMPSE surveys (2 degrees) because the disk flares more in the Outer Galaxy. The latitude center will follow the CO/HI warp at a Galactocentric radius of 13 kpc. Three visits on each sky position with 0.6&12s HDR frames will provide a high dynamic range of sensitivity that exceeds GLIMPSE at both ends. This will allow us to determine the edge of the Galactic stellar disk, study low- and high-mass star formation in both the nearby Perseus arm and the Far Outer Galaxy, and study evolved stars throughout the Galaxy. Following the tradition of the previous GLIMPSE Legacy programs, we will deliver enhanced data products for the survey --- source lists and cleaned mosaics --- to the community. The science goals are as encompassing as the survey and include: determining the star formation rate of the Galaxy, the stellar disk scale heights and lengths across the Galaxy, how the dust extinction law varies with location in the disk; and cataloging stars, star clusters, PAH bubbles, supernova remnants, infrared dark clouds, outflows from massive protostars, planetary nebulae, external galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance, and many other types of objects. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech

  4. SECONDARY ECLIPSE PHOTOMETRY OF WASP-4b WITH WARM SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Beerer, Ingrid M.; Knutson, Heather A.; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Deming, Drake; Langton, Jonathan; Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.

    2011-01-20

    We present photometry of the giant extrasolar planet WASP-4b at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m taken with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of Spitzer's extended warm mission. We find secondary eclipse depths of 0.319% {+-} 0.031% and 0.343% {+-} 0.027% for the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands, respectively, and show model emission spectra and pressure-temperature profiles for the planetary atmosphere. These eclipse depths are well fit by model emission spectra with water and other molecules in absorption, similar to those used for TrES-3 and HD 189733b. Depending on our choice of model, these results indicate that this planet has either a weak dayside temperature inversion or no inversion at all. The absence of a strong thermal inversion on this highly irradiated planet is contrary to the idea that highly irradiated planets are expected to have inversions, perhaps due the presence of an unknown absorber in the upper atmosphere. This result might be explained by the modestly enhanced activity level of WASP-4b's G7V host star, which could increase the amount of UV flux received by the planet, therefore reducing the abundance of the unknown stratospheric absorber in the planetary atmosphere as suggested in Knutson et al. We also find no evidence for an offset in the timing of the secondary eclipse and place a 2{sigma} upper limit on |ecos {omega}| of 0.0024, which constrains the range of tidal heating models that could explain this planet's inflated radius.

  5. Thermal Phase Variations of WASP-12b with Warm Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, N. B.

    2011-12-01

    The short-period planet WASP-12b is among the hottest known transiting planets. Space- and ground-based secondary eclipse depths imply that this planet has a C/O ratio greater than 1 (Madhusudhan et al. 2011), in stark contrast to the chemistry in the Solar System and the assumed chemistry of other planets. These same eclipse data put the planet's day-side effective temperature at ~3000 K. This indicates a low albedo and poor recirculation of heat to the night-side, as has been found for all of the hottest transiting giant planets (Cowan & Agol 2011). But these trends were based solely on day-side observations (eclipse depths) rather than full phase variations, which directly probe night-side temperature. The short period (1.1 day) and inflated radius (1.8 R_J) of WASP-12b has led to speculation that the planet is severely prolate in shape, and undergoing Roche-lobe overflow (Li et al. 2010, Lai et al. 2010). UV observations by Fossati et al. (2010) seem to support this idea. We have recently obtained thermal phase curves of this planet with Warm Spitzer (PI:Machalek; PID 70060). Our data include two eclipses, a transit, and full phase coverage at each of 3.6 and 4.5 micron. Because of the planet's high temperature and large size, this is one of the highest S/N phase curves yet obtained with Spitzer. These data allow us to directly measure the planet's night-side temperature and the longitudinal offset of its day-side hot-spot, as well as constrain the planet's shape. Since the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands probe different depths in the atmosphere, we will strongly constrain climate models for the hottest gas giants.

  6. SpIES: The Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timlin, John D.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Lacy, Mark; Ryan, Erin L.; Stone, Robert B.; Bauer, Franz E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fan, Xiaohui; Glikman, Eilat; Haggard, Daryl; Jiang, Linhua; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Lin, Yen-Ting; Makler, Martin; McGehee, Peregrine; Myers, Adam D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Urry, C. Megan; Wollack, Edward J.; Zakamska, Nadia L.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the first data release from the Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES); a large-area survey of ˜115 deg2 in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field using Spitzer during its “warm” mission phase. SpIES was designed to probe sufficient volume to perform measurements of quasar clustering and the luminosity function at z ≥slant 3 to test various models for “feedback” from active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Additionally, the wide range of available multi-wavelength, multi-epoch ancillary data enables SpIES to identify both high-redshift (z ≥slant 5) quasars as well as obscured quasars missed by optical surveys. SpIES achieves 5σ depths of 6.13 μJy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 μJy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, respectively—depths significantly fainter than the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We show that the SpIES survey recovers a much larger fraction of spectroscopically confirmed quasars (˜98%) in Stripe 82 than are recovered by WISE (˜55%). This depth is especially powerful at high-redshift (z ≥slant 3.5), where SpIES recovers 94% of confirmed quasars, whereas WISE only recovers 25%. Here we define the SpIES survey parameters and describe the image processing, source extraction, and catalog production methods used to analyze the SpIES data. In addition to this survey paper, we release 234 images created by the SpIES team and three detection catalogs: a 3.6 μm only detection catalog containing ˜6.1 million sources, a 4.5 μm only detection catalog containing ˜6.5 million sources, and a dual-band detection catalog containing ˜5.4 million sources.

  7. The Spitzer Space Telescope's performance: getting the most out of a great observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Suzanne R.; Levine, Deborah A.

    2006-06-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope was launched on August 25 th, 2003, and has been operating virtually flawlessly for over two years. The projected cryogenic lifetime for Spitzer is currently 5.5 years, substantially exceeding the required lifetime of 2.5 years and the pre-launch prediction of 5 years. The Spitzer Project has made a singular effort to extend Spitzer's lifetime through operational changes to conserve helium. Additionally, many updates to calibration and scheduling activities have been made in order to maximum the scientific return from Spitzer. Spitzer has met its level one science time requirement of 90%, and routinely exceeds it today. All this has been achieved with an operating budget that is substantially smaller than that of NASA's other Great Observatories. This paper will describe the overall performance of the Spitzer Space Telescope Science Operations System and detail the modifications made to increase both the helium lifetime and the science data return. It will also discuss trades made between performance improvements and cost. Lessons learned which can be applied to future observatory operations will be included in the paper. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. ExploreNEOs. II. THE ACCURACY OF THE WARM SPITZER NEAR-EARTH OBJECT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, A. W.; Mommert, M.; Hora, J. L.; Fazio, G.; Smith, H. A.; Spahr, T. B.; Mueller, M.; Delbo, M.; Trilling, D. E.; Thomas, C. A.; Bhattacharya, B.; Chesley, S.; Mainzer, A.; Emery, J. P.; Penprase, B.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2011-03-15

    We report on results of observations of near-Earth objects (NEOs) performed with the NASA Spitzer Space Telescope as part of our ongoing (2009-2011) Warm Spitzer NEO survey ('ExploreNEOs'), the primary aim of which is to provide sizes and albedos of some 700 NEOs. The emphasis of the work described here is an assessment of the overall accuracy of our survey results, which are based on a semi-empirical generalized model of asteroid thermal emission. The NASA Spitzer Space Telescope has been operated in the so-called Warm Spitzer mission phase since the cryogen was depleted in 2009 May, with the two shortest-wavelength channels, centered at 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m, of the Infrared Array Camera continuing to provide valuable data. The set of some 170 NEOs in our current Warm Spitzer results catalog contains 28 for which published taxonomic classifications are available, and 14 for which relatively reliable published diameters and albedos are available. A comparison of the Warm Spitzer results with previously published results ('ground truth'), complemented by a Monte Carlo error analysis, indicates that the rms Warm Spitzer diameter and albedo errors are {+-}20% and {+-}50%, respectively. Cases in which agreement with results from the literature is worse than expected are highlighted and discussed; these include the potential spacecraft target 138911 2001 AE{sub 2}. We confirm that 1.4 appears to be an appropriate overall default value for the relative reflectance between the V band and the Warm Spitzer wavelengths, for use in correction of the Warm Spitzer fluxes for reflected solar radiation.

  9. Differences in glycogen, lipids, and enzymes in livers from rats flown on Cosmos 2044

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Alfred H., Jr.; Wang, Elaine; Laroque, Regina; Mullins, Richard E.; Morgan, Edward T.; Hargrove, James L.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Popova, Irina A.

    1992-01-01

    Livers from rats flown aboard Cosmos 2044 were analyzed for protein, carbohydrate (glycogen), and lipids as well as the activities of a number of key enzymes involved in metabolism of these compounds and xenobiotics. The major differences between the flight group and the synchronous control were elevations in microsomal protein, liver glycogen content, tyrosine aminotransferase, and tryptophan oxygenase and reductions in sphingolipids and the rate-limiting enzyme of heme biosynthesis delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase. These results provide further evidence that spaceflight has pronounced and diverse effects on liver function; however, some of the results with samples from Cosmos 2044 differed notably from those from previous spaceflights. This may be due to conditions of spaceflight and/or the postflight recovery period for Cosmos 2044.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The COSMOS-Legacy Survey (CLS) catalog (Civano+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civano, F.; Marchesi, S.; Comastri, A.; Urry, M. C.; Elvis, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Puccetti, S.; Brusa, M.; Zamorani, G.; Hasinger, G.; Aldcroft, T.; Alexander, D. M.; Allevato, V.; Brunner, H.; Capak, P.; Finoguenov, A.; Fiore, F.; Fruscione, A.; Gilli, R.; Glotfelty, K.; Griffiths, R. E.; Hao, H.; Harrison, F. A.; Jahnke, K.; Kartaltepe, J.; Karim, A.; Lamassa, S. M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Miyaji, T.; Ranalli, P.; Salvato, M.; Sargent, M.; Scoville, N. J.; Schawinski, K.; Schinnerer, E.; Silverman, J.; Smolcic, V.; Stern, D.; Toft, S.; Trakhenbrot, B.; Treister, E.; Vignali, C.

    2016-05-01

    The half-a-field shift tiling strategy was designed to uniformly cover the COSMOS Hubble area in depth and point-spread function (PSF) size by combining the old C-COSMOS (Elvis+, 2009, J/ApJS/184/158) observations with the new Chandra ones (see Figure 1). We summarize the main properties of the new ACIS-I Chandra COSMOS-Legacy observations in Table 1. The observations took place in four blocks: 2012 November to 2013 January; 2013 March to July; 2013 October to 2014 January; and 2014 March. The mean net effective exposure time per field was 48.8ks after all the cleaning and reduction operations. (2 data files).