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1

Chorioallantoic placentation in Galea spixii (Rodentia, Caviomorpha, Caviidae)  

PubMed Central

Background Placentas of guinea pig-related rodents are appropriate animal models for human placentation because of their striking similarities to those of humans. To optimize the pool of potential models in this context, it is essential to identify the occurrence of characters in close relatives. Methods In this study we first analyzed chorioallantoic placentation in the prea, Galea spixii, as one of the guinea pig's closest relatives. Material was collected from a breeding group at the University of Mossoró, Brazil, including 18 individuals covering an ontogenetic sequence from initial pregnancy to term. Placentas were investigated by means of histology, electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry (vimentin, ?-smooth muscle actin, cytokeration) and proliferation activity (PCNA). Results Placentation in Galea is primarily characterized by an apparent regionalization into labyrinth, trophospongium and subplacenta. It also has associated growing processes with clusters of proliferating trophoblast cells at the placental margin, internally directed projections and a second centre of proliferation in the labyrinth. Finally, the subplacenta, which is temporarily supplied in parallel by the maternal and fetal blood systems, served as the center of origin for trophoblast invasion. Conclusion Placentation in Galea reveals major parallels to the guinea pig and other caviomorphs with respect to the regionalization of the placenta, the associated growing processes, as well as trophoblast invasion. A principal difference compared to the guinea pig occurred in the blood supply of the subplacenta. Characteristics of the invasion and expanding processes indicate that Galea may serve as an additional animal model that is much smaller than the guinea pig and where the subplacenta partly has access to both maternal and fetal blood systems.

Oliveira, Moacir F; Mess, Andrea; Ambrosio, Carlos E; Dantas, Carlos AG; Favaron, Phelipe O; Miglino, Maria A

2008-01-01

2

Chromosomal evolution in Rodentia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rodentia is the most species-rich mammalian order and includes several important laboratory model species. The amount of new information on karyotypic and phylogenetic relations within and among rodent taxa is rapidly increasing, but a synthesis of these data is currently lacking. Here, we have integrated information drawn from conventional banding studies, recent comparative painting investigations and molecular phylogenetic reconstructions of

S A Romanenko; P L Perelman; V A Trifonov; A S Graphodatsky

2012-01-01

3

Chromosomal evolution in Rodentia  

PubMed Central

Rodentia is the most species-rich mammalian order and includes several important laboratory model species. The amount of new information on karyotypic and phylogenetic relations within and among rodent taxa is rapidly increasing, but a synthesis of these data is currently lacking. Here, we have integrated information drawn from conventional banding studies, recent comparative painting investigations and molecular phylogenetic reconstructions of different rodent taxa. This permitted a revision of several ancestral karyotypic reconstructions, and a more accurate depiction of rodent chromosomal evolution.

Romanenko, S A; Perelman, P L; Trifonov, V A; Graphodatsky, A S

2012-01-01

4

Bioaccumulation of butyltins and liver damage in the demersal fish Cathorops spixii (Siluriformes, Ariidae).  

PubMed

The toxicity of butyltin compounds (BTs), mainly tributyltin (TBT), has been reported in different organisms. However, such an analysis in fish after field exposure with reference to the related biomarkers has not been commonly observed in the literature. This study presents the uptake of BTs in the liver of a neotropical marine catfish Cathorops spixii in Paranagua Bay, an important estuarine system located in southern Brazil. Two different areas, close to and distant from the harbor, were used for chemical analysis evaluation of hepatotoxicity through genetic, enzymatic, and histopathological biomarkers. The presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in bile was also considered as a biomarker. The results showed a significant relationship between TBT levels and the inhibition of biotransformation enzymes and high occurrence of melanomacrophages in fish collected close to the harbor site. These effects were linked to the absence of TBT metabolites in the liver. In the second site, the presence of DBT was associated with an increase in EROD and GST activity. The larger amount of DNA damage as well as the highest oxidative stress was noted in fish from the less TBT-polluted area, where DBT and bile PAHs occurred. These findings showed different impact levels due to or increased by the chronic exposure of biota to BTs. PMID:24217970

Dos Santos, Dayana Moscardi; Santos, Gustavo Souza; Cestari, Marta Margarete; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto; de Assis, Helena Cristina Silva; Yamamoto, Flavia; Guiloski, Izonete Cristina; de Marchi, Mary Rosa Rodrigues; Montone, Rosalinda Carmela

2014-02-01

5

Encephalitozoon infections in Rodentia and Soricomorpha in Japan.  

PubMed

Encephalitozoon is an obligate intracellular microsporidian parasite that infects a wide range of mammalian hosts. In this study, we used nested PCR to investigate the presence of Encephalitozoon infection in Rodentia and Soricomorpha in Japan. We attempted to amplify and sequence Encephalitozoon-specific DNA from brain and viscera samples of 180 animals collected between 2008 and 2010. Forty-three samples (23.9%) from the orders Rodentia and Soricomorpha were positive for Encephalitozoon. This study is the first report of Encephalitozoon infection in Rodentia and Soricomorpha in Japan, and our findings suggest that these hosts may play a role in the spread of microsporidian spores in the environment. PMID:24060383

Tsukada, Ryusuke; Tsuchiyama, Atsuko; Sasaki, Mizuki; Park, Chun-Ho; Fujii, Yoshito; Takesue, Masataka; Hatai, Hitoshi; Kudo, Noboru; Ikadai, Hiromi

2013-11-15

6

Population Dynamics and Diet of the Madamango Sea Catfish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz, 1829) (Siluriformes: Ariidae) in a Tropical Bight in Southeastern Brazil  

PubMed Central

The madamango sea catfish, Cathorops spixii (Siluriformes: Ariidae), is often among the most abundant fishes on the South American Atlantic coast. In the present study, conducted in shallow, non-estuarine coastal areas of Caraguatatuba Bight in southeastern Brazil, collections of this species, the most abundant member of the ichthyofauna, included primarily medium-sized individuals, indicating that the area may play a specific role in their development. Although studies of the local ichthyofauna have been much neglected, the area is economically important and its ecological significance is undervalued. This study primarily treats habitat use by C. spixii, assessing certain population parameters and the dietary composition. Monthly samples were taken from August 2003 through October 2004, with three trawls in two areas, corresponding to depths of about 1 to 4 m. The catfish showed two main peaks of abundance in the area, in April/May and July 2004. A mode around 9 cm SL persisted through time, and the entrance of younger recruits peaked from January to April. The low estimate for body-growth parameters (K?=?0.16) corroborates some K-strategist characteristics of the species. The asymptotic length was 27.3 cm SL and total mortality (Z) was 1.01 yr?1. Cathorops spixii showed an omnivorous feeding habit, preying mainly upon polychaetes, copepods and bivalves, with considerable seasonality in its diet.

Denadai, Marcia; Pombo, Maira; Santos, Flavia Borges; Bessa, Eduardo; Ferreira, Adriana; Turra, Alexander

2013-01-01

7

Enzyme polymorphism in a population of Calomys musculinus (Rodentia, Cricetidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

NAD-linked lactate, malate, glycerophosphate, alcohol and nonspecific dehydrogenases, aspartate aminotransferases, and soluble esterases from extracts of tissues of individuals from a wild population of Calomys musculinus (Rodentia, Cricetidae) have been analyzed by means of starch gel electrophoresis and specific staining. Allelic frequencies and heterozygosity have been determined. Mendelian inheritance of some of the variants detected was confirmed by breeding experiments.

Cristina N. Gardenal; Marta S. Sabattini; Antonio Blanco

1980-01-01

8

Molecular Phylogeny of Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Primates, Artiodactyla, and Carnivora and Molecular Clocks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences from primates, rodents, lagomorphs, artiodactyls, carnivores, and birds strongly suggests that the order Rodentia is an outgroup to the other four mammalian orders and that Artiodactyla and Carnivora belong to a superordinal clade. Further, there is strong evidence against the Glires concept, which unites Lagomorpha and Rodentia. The radiation among Lagomorpha, Primates, and Artiodactyla-Carnivora is

Wen-Hsiung Li; Manolo Gouy; Paul M. Sharp; Colm O'Huigin; Yau-Wen Yang

1990-01-01

9

MORPHOLOGY OF THE INNER SIDE OF THE MANDIBLE IN MICROMAMMALS (MAMMALIA: INSECTIVORA, CHIROPTERA, RODENTIA) OF ROMANIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the inner side of the mandible of 39 Romanian micromammal species (Mammalia: Insectivora, Chiroptera, Rodentia) is described and illustrated. The author proposed the name of some structures observed on the inner side of the mandible as: fossa ramus mandibulae (FRM), processus angulus mandibulae (PAM), incisura mandibulae superior (IMS), incisura mandibulae inferior (IMI), crista ramus mandibulae (CRM), processus

Grigore Antipa

2007-01-01

10

Codivergence in Heteromyid Rodents (Rodentia: Heteromyidae) and Their Sucking Lice of the Genus Fahrenholzia (Phthiraptera: Anoplura)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although most studies of codivergence rely primarily on topological comparisons of host and parasite phyloge- nies, temporal assessments are necessary to determine if divergence events in host and parasite trees occurred contempora- neously. A combination of cophylogenetic analyses and comparisons of branch lengths are used in this study to understand the host-parasite association between heteromyid rodents (Rodentia: Heteromyidae) and their

JESSICA E. LIGHT; MARK S. HAFNER

2008-01-01

11

[Molecular characterization of Sigmodon hirsutus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) populations in Venezuela].  

PubMed

Recent phylogenetic studies based on cytochrome b gene sequence, have determined that the species historically known as Sigmodon hispidus (Rodentia) from South America comprises a species S. hirsutus of paraphyletic origin. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that populations from Venezuela, represent the sensu strict form, ancestral haplotypes, and monophyletic subspecieS. For this, 12 individual sequences from three localities of different biogeographic regions in Venezuela were evaluated and sequenced based on cyto b. Additionally, the sequences were used to develop a cladistic analysis and genetic distance calculations, and to compare this information with two individual sequences of Sigmodon specimens available in Genbank. Phylogenetic analyses show that the three populations of S. hirsutus of Venezuela form an ancestral and monophyletic subclade supported by high bootstrap values and significant genetic distance between subclade within the S. hirsutus. Besides, the existence of two lineages suggests two subspecies, S. hirsutus hirsutus from Venezuela, and S. hirsutus mexicanus from Mexico-Central America, but, both species need formal description. PMID:21721239

Lessmann, Janeth; Arrivillaga, Jazzmín; Aguilera, Marisol

2011-06-01

12

Similarity of satellite DNA properties in the order Rodentia  

PubMed Central

We have characterized satellite DNAs from 9 species of kangaroo rat (Dipodomys) and have shown that the HS-? and HS-? satellites, where present, are nearly identical in all species as to melting transition midpoint (Tm), and density in neutral CsCl, alkaline CsCl, and Cs2SO4-Ag+ gradients. However, the MS satellites exist in two internally similar classes. The satellite DNAs from three other rodents were characterized (densities listed are in neutral CsCl). The pocket gopher, Thomomysbottae, contains Th-? (1.713 g/ml) and Th-? (1.703 g/ml). The guinea pig (Caviaporcellus) contains Ca-?, Ca-? and Ca-? at densities of 1.706 g/ml, 1.704 g/ml and 1.704 g/ml, respectively. The antelope ground squirrel (Ammospermophilusharrisi) contains Am-?, 1.708 g/ml, Am-?, 1.717 g/ml, and Am-?, 1.707 g/ml. The physical and chemical properties of the alpha-satellites from the above four rodents representing four different families in two suborders of Rodentia were compared. They show nearly identical Tm, nucleoside composition of single strands, and single strand densities in alkaline CsCl. Similar comparisons on the second or third satellite DNAs from these rodents also indicate a close relationship to each other. Thus the high degree of similarity of satellite sequences found in such a diverse group of rodents suggests a cellular function that is subject to natural selection, and implies that these sequences have been conserved over a considerable span of evolutionary time since the divergence of these rodents about 50 million years ago.

Mazrimas, J. A.; Hatch, F.T.

1977-01-01

13

Molecular systematics of dormice (Rodentia: Gliridae) and the radiation of Graphiurus in Africa.  

PubMed Central

The phylogenetic relationships among the Gliridae (order Rodentia) were assessed using 3430 nucleotides derived from three nuclear fragments (beta-spectrin non-erythrocytic 1, thyrotropin and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase) and one mitochondrial gene (12S rRNA). We included 14 glirid species, representative of seven genera of the three recognized subfamilies (Graphiurinae, Glirinae and Leithiinae) in our analysis. The molecular data identified three evolutionary lineages that broadly correspond to the three extant subfamilies. However, the data suggest that the genus Muscardinus, previously regarded as falling within the Glirinae, should be included in the Leithiinae. Molecular dating using local molecular clocks and partitioned datasets allowed an estimate of the timing of cladogenesis within the glirids. Graphiurus probably diverged early in the group's evolution (40-50 Myr ago) and the three subfamilies diverged contemporaneously, probably in Europe. The radiation within Graphiurus is more recent, with the colonization of Africa by this lineage estimated at ca. 8-10 Myr ago.

Montgelard, Claudine; Matthee, Conrad A; Robinson, Terence J

2003-01-01

14

Zegdoumyidae (Rodentia, Mammalia), stem anomaluroid rodents from the Early to Middle Eocene of Algeria (Gour Lazib, Western Sahara): new dental evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Palaeogene fossil record of rodents in Africa is very poor compared to that of North America or Eurasia. Despite this, Africa has long appeared to be a centre of adaptive radiation for two distinct groups of Rodentia: Hystricognathi and Anomaluroidea. The >45-million-year-old enigmatic Zegdoumyidae is the oldest and only rodent family known of this age from Africa (Algeria and

Laurent Marivaux; Mohammed Adaci; Mustapha Bensalah; Helder Gomes Rodrigues; Lionel Hautier; M’hammed Mahboubi; Fateh Mebrouk; Rodolphe Tabuce; Monique Vianey-Liaud

2011-01-01

15

Chromosomal characterization of Arvicanthis species (Rodentia, Murinae) from western and central Africa: implications for taxonomy.  

PubMed

A chromosome study of unstriped grass rats of the genus Arvicanthis (Rodentia, Murinae) in western and central Africa is presented. The observations extend the data available to 242 specimens from 59 localities. All individuals karyotyped belong to four karyotypic forms, or cytotypes, earlier described as ANI-1, ANI-2, ANI-3, and ANI-4 and are presumed to correspond to four distinct species. In order to provide diagnostic characters for these western and one central African Arvicanthis species, we standardized the chromosomal data available and developed a G- and C-banded chromosome nomenclature that allows easy species identification. Each form is characterized by a distinct geographical distribution, roughly following the biogeographical domains of western Africa, although their precise limits remain to be assessed. The sole area of sympatry detected is the region of the inner delta of the Niger River, where both ANI-1 and ANI-3 can be found. It is proposed that the three western African species ANI-1, ANI-3, and ANI-4 be renamed as A. niloticus, A. ansorgei, and A. rufinus, respectively. PMID:12438807

Volobouev, V T; Ducroz, J F; Aniskin, V M; Britton-Davidian, J; Castiglia, R; Dobigny, G; Granjon, L; Lombard, M; Corti, M; Sicard, B; Capanna, E

2002-01-01

16

Postnatal ontogeny of limb proportions and functional indices in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae).  

PubMed

Burrow construction in the subterranean Ctenomys talarum (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae) primarily occurs by scratch-digging. In this study, we compared the limbs of an ontogenetic series of C. talarum to identify variation in bony elements related to fossorial habits using a morphometrical and biomechanical approach. Diameters and functional lengths of long bones were measured and 10 functional indices were constructed. We found that limb proportions of C. talarum undergo significant changes throughout postnatal ontogeny, and no significant differences between sexes were observed. Five of six forelimb indices and two of four hindlimb indices showed differences between ages. According to discriminant analysis, the indices that contributed most to discrimination among age groups were robustness of the humerus and ulna, relative epicondylar width, crural and brachial indices, and index of fossorial ability (IFA). Particularly, pups could be differentiated from juveniles and adults by more robust humeri and ulnae, wider epicondyles, longer middle limb elements, and a proportionally shorter olecranon. Greater robustness indicated a possible compensation for lower bone stiffness while wider epicondyles may be associated to improved effective forces in those muscles that originate onto them, compensating the lower muscular development. The gradual increase in the IFA suggested a gradual enhancement in the scratch-digging performance due to an improvement in the mechanical advantage of forearm extensors. Middle limb indices were higher in pups than in juveniles-adults, reflecting relatively more gracile limbs in their middle segments, which is in accordance with their incipient fossorial ability. In sum, our results show that in C. talarum some scratch-digging adaptations are already present during early postnatal ontogeny, which suggests that they are prenatally shaped, and other traits develop progressively. The role of early digging behavior as a factor influencing on morphology development is discussed. J. Morphol. 275:902-913, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24643820

Echeverría, Alejandra Isabel; Becerra, Federico; Vassallo, Aldo Iván

2014-08-01

17

Dental microwear in relation to changes in the direction of mastication during the evolution of Myodonta (Rodentia, Mammalia)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations of dental microwear are used to analyse the correlation between changes in molar tooth crown morphology and the direction of masticatory movement during the evolution of Myodonta (Rodentia, Mammalia). The studied sample includes 36 specimens representing both superfamilies of Myodonta (Muroidea and Dipodoidea) spanning 16 dipodoid and 9 muroid species. Microscopic scratches on occlusal surfaces resulting from contact between opposite teeth during mastication are analysed. Using these features, we determine the direction of masticatory movements. Microwear patterns display diverse orientations among Dipodoidea: oblique in Sicistinae, Euchoreutinae and Zapodinae, propalinal in Dipodinae and intermediary in Allactaginae. Similarly, Muroidea exhibit the following orientations: oblique in Cricetinae and propalinal in Arvicolinae, Cricetomyinae, Gerbillinae and Murinae. These various chewing types illustrate different evolutionary grades within the superfamilies. Acquisition of the antero-posterior masticatory movement in Dipodoidea is related to flattening of the molar occlusal surface. However, in some muroid subfamilies, this direction of mastication is associated with low-crowned and cuspidate molars (Cricetomyinae, Murinae).

Charles, Cyril; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques; Michaux, Jacques; Viriot, Laurent

2007-01-01

18

A new genus and two new species of chigger mites (Acari: Trombiculidae) from the Laotian rock-rat Laonastes aenigmamus Jenkins, Kilpatrick, Robinson & Timmins (Rodentia: Diatomyidae).  

PubMed

A new chigger mite genus Laotrombicula n. g. and two new species, Laotrombicula khunboromi n. sp. (type-species) and L. fangumi n. sp., are described from the Laotian rock-rat Laonastes aenigmamus Jenkins, Kilpatrick, Robinson & Timmins (Rodentia: Diatomyidae). The new genus is most similar to Trombiculindus Radford, 1948 and Leptotrombidium Nagayo, Miyagawa, Mitamura & Imamura, 1916 and differs from these genera by having the scutum of subhexagonal or semicircular shape vs widely rectangular; pinnatifid dorsocentral idiosomal setae vs foliaceous in Trombiculindus and unexpanded in Leptotrombidium; and by the presence of serrated longitudinal crests in the middle part of scutum. PMID:24395573

Stekolnikov, Alexandr A

2014-01-01

19

Habitat use by Oryzomys subflavus (Rodentia) in an open shrubland formation in Restinga de Jurubatiba National Park, RJ, Brazil.  

PubMed

The Restinga de Jurubatiba has at least 10 plant formations, including open Clusia shrubland. This formation is composed of dense shrubs of many shapes and sizes, where Clusia hilariana is one of the most important plant species. Shrublands with Clusia (CC) are poorer in plant species and less dense than shrublands without Clusia (SC). Oryzomys subflavus (Rodentia) is the most abundant small mammal species in the open Clusia shrubland. We tested the hypothesis that the abundance of rodents would increase with the size of the patch and would be higher in SC shrublands. Rodents were captured, marked and released in three 780-m-long transects. At each capture site, we evaluated the shape of the shrubland patch, calculated the area and noted the category of the shrubland. Using ANCOVA, we ascertained whether the abundance of Oryzomys subflavus increased with the sampled area and used CC and SC shrublands differently. We also verified if the size of patches used by rodents varies in the same frequency as the size of available shrublands. Rodent abundance was found to increase significantly with the area. There were no differences in the size of the patches used by rodents and the frequency of the size of available patches. This finding indicates that O. subflavus, in the study area, is a generalist species that uses its habitat according to availability. PMID:16532181

Bergallo, H G; Luz, J L; Raíces, D S; Hatano, F H; Martins-Hatano, F

2005-11-01

20

Molecular phylogeny and taxonomic reconsideration of the subfamily Zapodinae (Rodentia: Dipodidae), with an emphasis on Chinese species.  

PubMed

Although the subfamily Zapodinae (Rodentia, Dipodidae) contains only five species, the phylogeny and taxonomy of these species are still being disputed. First, whether Eozapus and Napaeozapus should be treated as independent genera or subgenera of Zapus has been argued for a long period. Second, the subspecific genetic differentiation of Chinese jumping mouse (Eozapus setchuanus) has not been studied in detail, neither from morphological nor molecular aspects. In this study, the phylogenetic relationship among all the five species of Zapodinae was reconstructed using DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and the nuclear interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein gene. Bayesian inference, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses were conducted. The results showed that two major clades could be recognized within Zapodinae. Eozapus setchuanus, is the species endemic to China, strongly formed a monophyletic clade. In the other clade, genus Zapus received significant support in all analyses to be the sister group of the genus Napaeozapus. By comparing genetic distances among these three genera, we conclude that both Eozapus and Napaeozapus should be considered as valid genera rather than subgenera of Zapus. Furthermore, we observed that the two subspecies of E. setchuanus did not form reciprocally monophyletic groups, thus the traditional taxonomy which divided E. setchuanus into two subspecies based on only one morphological character was questionable. PMID:19303451

Fan, Zhenxin; Liu, Shaoying; Liu, Yang; Zeng, Bo; Zhang, Xiuyue; Guo, Cong; Yue, Bisong

2009-06-01

21

Meggittina numida n. sp. (Cyclophyllidea: Catenotaeniidae), a parasite of the Shaw's jird Meriones shawi (Duvernoy) (Rodentia: Gerbillinae) in Tunisia.  

PubMed

Meggittina numida n. sp. (Cyclophyllidea: Catenotaeniidae: Skrjabinotaeniinae) is described from the small intestine of the Shaw's jird Meriones shawi (Duvernoy) (Rodentia, Muridae, Gerbillinae) trapped in central Tunisia. The new species can be distinguished from the four other members of Meggittina Lynsdale, 1953 by the high number of proglottids (8-25 vs max. 6) and by the elongated strobila (8.2-60 mm in length vs max. 5.6 mm). M numida n. sp. further differs from M. cricetomydis (Hockley, 1961) in the direction of gravid proglottids; from M. baeri Lynsdale, 1953 in having narrower and much longer strobila; from M. aegyptiaca (Wolfgang, 1956) in the greater number of testes and the larger cirrus-sac; and from M. gerbilli in the position of the genital pore. The diagnosis of Meggittina is amended in order to include the most specific features of M. numida n. sp. as follows: strobila consisting of a small scolex, wide neck and one to twenty-five proglottids. This is the first species of Meggittina described from Tunisia. The taxonomic relationships of Meggittina spp. are discussed in the light of the description of the new species. PMID:24832187

Jrijer, Jamel; Neifar, Lassad

2014-06-01

22

Catalog of type specimens of recent mammals: Rodentia (Sciuromorpha and Castorimorpha) in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The type collection of Recent mammals in the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, contains 843 specimens bearing names of 820 species group taxa of Rodentia (Sciuromorpha and Castorimorpha) as of July 2011. This catalog presents a list of these holdings, which comprise 798 holotypes, 14 lectotypes, seven syntypes (30 specimens), and one neotype. In addition, we include three holotypes and 10 specimens that are part of syntype series that should be in the collection but cannot be found and three syntypes that were originally in this collection but are now known to be in other collections. One specimen that no longer has name-bearing status is included for the record. Forty-one of the names are new since the last type catalog. One new lectotype is designated. Suborders and families are listed as in Wilson and Reeder. Within families, currently recognized genera are arranged alphabetically. Within each currently recognized genus, accounts are arranged alphabetically by original published name. Information in each account includes original name and abbreviated citation thereto, current name if other than original, citation for first use of current name combination for the taxon (or new name combination if used herein for the first time), type designation, U.S. National Museum catalog number(s), preparation, age and sex, type locality, date of collection and name of collector, collector’s original number, and comments or additional information as appropriate. Digital photographs of each specimen serve as a condition report and will be linked to each electronic specimen record.

Fisher, Robert D.; Ludwig, Craig A.

2012-01-01

23

A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the dusky rice rat Melanomys caliginosus (Tomes) (Mammalia: Rodentia) in Costa Rica.  

PubMed

We collected faecal samples from 24 dusky rice rats, Melanomys caliginosus (Tomes) (Rodentia: Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae), in a Biological Reserve in Costa Rica, and found three (12.5%) to be infected with a species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875, which we describe here as new. Sporulated oöcysts of Eimeria caliginosa n. sp. are almost spheroidal and measure 16-21 × 17-20 (mean 19.6 × 18.2) ?m; micropyle, oöcyst residuum and polar granule are absent. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 9-13 × 6-8 (mean 11.2 × 6.7) ?m, with small Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies present, but a para-Stieda body is absent; the sporocyst residuum is a compact mass of c.11-15 granules, c.5 ?m wide. Sporozoites are crescent-shaped, 5-8 × 2-3 (mean 6.8 × 2.4) ?m. This is the third species of Eimeria described from the genus Melanomys Thomas. PMID:24832189

Chinchilla, Misael; Valerio, Idalia; Sánchez, Ronald; González, Antonieta; Duszynski, Donald W

2014-06-01

24

Biting performance and skull biomechanics of a chisel tooth digging rodent (Ctenomys tuconax; Caviomorpha; Octodontoidea).  

PubMed

Biting performance is a key factor in vertebrate groups possessing particular food habits. In subterranean rodents that use the incisors as a digging tool, apart from requirements related to gnawing abrasive diets, the force exerted at the incisors tips must be sufficient to break down soils that are often exceedingly compact. The subterranean genus Ctenomys diversified in the southern portion of South America closely associated with the relatively open environments that characterize that region. This genus is considered a "claw and chisel tooth digger," that is, during the excavation of their galleries, the animals break down the soil with both the fore-claws and the incisors. We report here measurements of in vivo bite force in one of the largest species of the genus, C. tuconax, which occupies highland grasslands with compacted soils. We document the combined use of claws and incisors observed under field conditions, also providing measurements of soil compaction in the habitat occupied by this species. We report estimates of bite force at the level of the incisors and cheek teeth calculated from the physiological cross-sectional area of jaw muscles. To this aim, anatomical and biomechanical analyses of the mandibular apparatus were performed in preserved specimens. We found that C. tuconax bites with a higher force than expected for a mammal of its size. To assess anatomical correlates of biting performance, the morphology of the skull and jaw, and incisor second moment of area were compared with those of other caviomorph rodents with different lifestyle. PMID:23203312

Becerra, Federico; Casinos, Adrià; Vassallo, Aldo Iván

2013-02-01

25

Neural BC1 RNA as an evolutionary marker: guinea pig remains a rodent.  

PubMed

The traditional morphologically grounded placement of South American guinea pig-like rodents (Caviomorpha) within one of the two rodent suborders, Hystricognathi, has been disputed by recent analysis of protein and nucleic acid sequence data. The Caviomorpha and possibly all Hystricognathi would be considered a separate order, distinct from the other rodent suborder, Sciurognathi, and thus of the order Rodentia, and would be placed closer phylogenetically to other mammals [Graur, D., Hide, W. A. & Li, W.-H. (1991) Nature (London) 351, 649-652]. To address the discrepancy between morphological comparisons and sequence analyses, we have applied an alternative form of molecular analysis. We demonstrate that BC1 RNA, a neural-specific small cytoplasmic RNA that is the product of a retropositionally generated gene (a gene derived by reverse transcription of RNA followed by insertion of the DNA copy into the genome), is present in Sciurognathi and guinea pig but not in other mammalian orders including Lagomorpha, Artiodactyla, and Primates. The species-confined, tissue-specific expression of a retroposed sequence therefore supports the morphological evidence for monophyly of Rodentia inclusive of guinea pig and demonstrates the usefulness of such molecular genetic markers. Furthermore, the conservation and tissue-specific expression of the BC1 RNA gene in the two divergent rodent suborders suggests that this macromolecule has been exapted into a functional role (i.e., coopted into a variant or novel function) in the rodent nervous system. PMID:7692450

Martignetti, J A; Brosius, J

1993-10-15

26

Catalog of type specimens of recent mammals: Rodentia (Myomorpha, Anomaluromorpha, and Hystricomorpha) in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The type collection of Recent mammals in the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, contains 945 specimens bearing names of 931 species-group taxa of Rodentia (Myomorpha, Anomaluromorpha, and Hystricomorpha) as of August 2013. This catalog presents an annotated list of these holdings comprised of 905 holotypes, 16 lectotypes, 8 syntypes (48 specimens), and 2 neotypes. In addition, we include 44 specimens that are part of syntype series that should be in the collection but cannot be found or are now known to be in other collections. One hundred and ten of the names are new since the last type catalog covering these suborders A lectotype for Mus peruvianus Peale, 1848, is newly designated herein. Nine specimens previously reported were subsequently sent to the vertebrate paleontology collection and are not included here. Suborders and families are ordered as in Carleton and Musser; within families, currently recognized genera are arranged alphabetically; within each currently recognized genus, accounts are arranged alphabetically by original published name. Information in each account includes original name and abbreviated citation thereto, current name if other than original, citation for first use of current name combination for the taxon (or new name combination if used herein for the first time), type designation, U.S. National Museum catalog number(s), preparation, age and sex, date of collection and collector, original collector number, type locality, and remarks as appropriate. Digital photographs of each specimen will serve as a condition report and will be attached to each electronic specimen record.

Fisher, Robert D.; Ludwig, Craig A.

2014-01-01

27

FISH with whole chromosome and telomeric probes demonstrates huge karyotypic reorganization with ITS between two species of Oryzomyini (Sigmodontinae, Rodentia): Hylaeamys megacephalus probes on Cerradomys langguthi karyotype.  

PubMed

Rodentia comprises 42 % of living mammalian species. The taxonomic identification can be difficult, the number of species currently known probably being underestimated, since many species show only slight morphological variations. Few studies surveyed the biodiversity of species, especially in the Amazon region. Cytogenetic studies show great chromosomal variability in rodents, with diploid numbers ranging from 10 to 102, making it difficult to find chromosomal homologies by comparative G banding. Chromosome painting is useful, but only a few species of rodents have been studied by this technique. In this study, we sorted whole chromosome probes by fluorescence-activated cell sorting from two Hylaeamys megacephalus individuals, an adult female (2n?=?54) and a fetus (2n?=?50). We made reciprocal chromosome painting between these karyotypes and cross-species hybridization on Cerradomys langguthi (2n?=?46). Both species belong to the tribe Oryzomyini (Sigmodontinae), which is restricted to South America and were collected in the Amazon region. Twenty-four chromosome-specific probes from the female and 25 from the fetus were sorted. Reciprocal chromosome painting shows that the karyotype of the fetus does not represent a new cytotype, but an unbalanced karyotype with multiple rearrangements. Cross-species hybridization of H. megacephalus probes on metaphases of C. langguthi shows that 11 chromosomes of H. megacephalus revealed conserved synteny, 10 H. megacephalus probes hybridized to two chromosomal regions and three hybridized to three regions. Associations were observed on chromosomes pairs 1-4 and 11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a telomeric probe revealed interstitial regions in three pairs (1, 3, and 4) of C. langguthi chromosomes. We discuss the genomic reorganization of the C. langguthi karyotype. PMID:23494775

Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; O'Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; Pinto, Jamilly Amaral; Malcher, Stella Miranda; Pereira, Adenilson Leão; Rissino, Jorge das Dores; Mendes-Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Rossi, Rogério Vieira; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew

2013-04-01

28

Chromosomes of Peromyscus (Rodentia, Cricetidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

All species in the genus Peromyscus possess a diploid number of 48, but the number of total chromosome arms varies from 56 (e.g., P. crinitus) to 96 (e.g., P. eremicus). Data are presented, using these two extreme cases, to illustrate that all short arms of biarmed chromosomes are made of constitutive heterochromatin. G-banding preparations revealed that the long arms (euchromatin)

S. Pathak; T. C. Hsu; Frances E. Arrighi

1973-01-01

29

Tetranucleotide microsatellite markers in Ctenomys torquatus (Rodentia)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eleven microsatellite markers were isolated from an enriched library developed specifically for the tuco-tuco Ctenomys torquatus, using tri and tetranucleotide probes. Ten of these were successfully amplified, and only one was monomorphic for the populations\\u000a that have so far been analyzed. Analysis of two different populations yielded a mean of 2.6 (Cachoeira do Sul—CAC) and 4.3\\u000a (Butiá—BUT) alleles per locus,

Paula A. Roratto; Marlise L. Bartholomei-Santos; Thales R. O. de Freitas

30

Ocular comparative anatomy of the family Rodentia.  

PubMed

There is little information regarding ocular anatomy and histology in many of the rodent species. Histological analyses for morphologic features were performed in 31 globes from 18 rodent species submitted to and archived at the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin. The following measurements were taken: thickness of the cornea, corneal epithelium, corneal stroma, Descemet's membrane, and retina. H&E sections were evaluated for the following anatomical features: presence of pigmented epithelial cells in the peripheral cornea, presence and location of Schlemm's canal, presence of iridal sphincter and dilator and ciliary body muscles, presence of pars plicata and plana, presence of retinal vessels, presence of lamina cribrosa, and presence of tapetum lucidum. The springhaas was the only rodent in our collection that presented a well-developed tapetum lucidum fibrosum. The presence of retinal vessels was variable: vessels were observed in all of the members of the mouse-related clade, except the springhaas and the beaver, in all of the squirrel-related clade members, and in none of the Ctenohystrica. In the flying squirrels, blood vessels extended to the outer limiting membrane in the photoreceptor layer. Beavers, chinchillas, capybara, and guinea pigs lacked vessels within the retina; however, they had vessels within the optic nerve head. Ground squirrels have an optic nerve head, which is linear in the horizontal plane and an asymmetric retina. The tree-dwelling squirrels have a rounded but still elongated optic nerve, and the flying squirrel has a round optic nerve head like all the other rodents. PMID:23734597

Rodriguez-Ramos Fernandez, Julia; Dubielzig, Richard R

2013-07-01

31

Phylogeographic Study of Apodemus ilex (Rodentia: Muridae) in Southwest China  

PubMed Central

Background The Mountains of southwest China have complex river systems and a profoundly complex topography and are among the most important biodiversity hotspots in the world. However, only a few studies have shed light on how the mountains and river valleys promote genetic diversity. Apodemus ilex is a fine model for investigating this subject. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess the genetic diversity and biogeographic patterns of Apodemus ilex, the complete cytochrome b gene sequences (1,140 bp) were determined from 203 samples of A. draco/ilex that were collected from southwest China. The results obtained suggested that A. ilex and A. draco are sistergroups and diverged from each other approximately 2.25 million years ago. A. ilex could be divided into Eastern and Western phylogroups, each containing two sub-groups and being widespread in different geographical regions of the southern Hengduan Mountains and the western Yunnan - Guizhou Plateau. The population expansions of A. ilex were roughly from 0.089 Mya to 0.023 Mya. Conclusions Our result suggested that A. ilex is a valid species rather than synonym of A. draco. As a middle-high elevation inhabitant, the phylogenetic pattern of A. ilex was strongly related to the complex geographical structures in southwest China, particularly the existence of deep river valley systems, such as the Mekong and Salween rivers. Also, it appears that the evolutionary history of A. ilex, such as lineage divergences and population expansions were strongly affected by climate fluctuation in the Late Pleistocene.

Kilpatrick, C. William; Liu, Shao-Ying; Yu, Fa-Hong; Jiang, Xue-Long

2012-01-01

32

Dietary Ecology of Murinae (Muridae, Rodentia): A Geometric Morphometric Approach  

PubMed Central

Murine rodents represent a highly diverse group, which displays great ecological versatility. In the present paper we analyse the relationship between dental morphology, on one hand, using geometric morphometrics based upon the outline of first upper molar and the dietary preference of extant murine genera, on the other. This ecomorphological study of extant murine rodents demonstrates that dietary groups can be distinguished with the use of a quantitative geometric morphometric approach based on first upper molar outline. A discriminant analysis of the geometric morphometric variables of the first upper molars enables us to infer the dietary preferences of extinct murine genera from the Iberian Peninsula. Most of the extinct genera were omnivore; only Stephanomys showed a pattern of dental morphology alike that of the herbivore genera.

Gomez Cano, Ana Rosa; Hernandez Fernandez, Manuel; Alvarez-Sierra, M. Angeles

2013-01-01

33

Late Pleistocene voles (Arvicolinae, Rodentia) from the Baranica Cave (Serbia)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Baranica is a cave system situated in the south-eastern part of Serbia, four kilometers south to Knjaževac, on the right bank of the Trgovi\\vski Timok. The investigations in Baranica were conducted from 1994 to 1997 by the Faculty of Philosophy from Belgrade and the National Museum of Knjaževac. Four geological layers of Quaternary age were recovered. The abundance of remains of both large and small mammals was noticed in the early phase of the research. In this paper, the remains of eight vole species are described: Arvicola terrestris (Linnaeus, 1758), Chionomys nivalis (Martins, 1842), Microtus (Microtus) arvalis (Pallas, 1778) and Microtus (Microtus) agrestis (Linnaeus, 1761), Microtus (Stenocranius) gregalis (Pallas, 1779), Microtus (Terricola) subterraneus (de Sélys-Longchamps, 1836), Clethrionomys glareolus (Schreber, 1780) and Lagurus lagurus (Pallas, 1773). Among them, steppe and open area inhabitants prevail. Based on the evolutionary level and dimensions of the Arvicola terrestris molars, as well as the overall characteristics of the fauna, it was concluded that the deposits were formed in the last glacial period of the Late Pleistocene. These conclusions are rather consistent with the absolute dating of large mammal bones (23.520 ± 110 B.P. for Layer 2 and 35.780 ± 320 B.P. for Layer 4).

Bogi?evi?, Katarina; Nenadi?, Draženko; Mihailovi?, Dušan

2012-02-01

34

Molecular and karyologic variation in the genus Isothrix (Rodentia, Echimyidae).  

PubMed

Phylogenetic relationships among available samples of the genus Isothrix using mitocondrial gene cytochrome b were carried out and a new karyotype of Isothrix specimens referred to Isothrix negrensis from the mid course of Rio Negro, in the Brazilian Amazon, was described. Molecular, karyological and morphological data of Isothrix negrensis was compared to that of I. bistriata and I. pagurus. Cytochrome b DNA sequence analyses clearly separate I. negrensis from I. bistriata and genetic distances estimates between then are greater than between species of the related genus Mesomys. The median-joining analysis postulated the presence of two median vectors between I. bistriata haplotypes from adjacent localities, suggesting that genetic isolation between them is unrelated to geographic distance. These results confirm previous molecular differences suggesting that I.bistriata is a composite of several taxa. The karyotype of Isothrix negrensis also differs from those reported for I. bistriata and I. pagurus. In relation to the external morphology I. negrensis differs from I. bistriata by the overall darker dorsal coloration, head darker than dorsum, presence of a longitudinal line of blackish hairs in the proximal part of the tail extending until near to its base, dorsal surface of hind feet covered with yellowish hairs and stripe of light hairs in the head reduced to a small patch. PMID:15061802

Bonvicino, C R; de Menezes, A R E A N; Oliveira, J A

2003-01-01

35

Transcriptome sequencing and phylogenomic resolution within Spalacidae (Rodentia)  

PubMed Central

Background Subterranean mammals have been of great interest for evolutionary biologists because of their highly specialized traits for the life underground. Owing to the convergence of morphological traits and the incongruence of molecular evidence, the phylogenetic relationships among three subfamilies Myospalacinae (zokors), Spalacinae (blind mole rats) and Rhizomyinae (bamboo rats) within the family Spalacidae remain unresolved. Here, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing of four RNA-seq libraries prepared from brain and liver tissues of a plateau zokor (Eospalax baileyi) and a hoary bamboo rat (Rhizomys pruinosus), and analyzed the transcriptome sequences alongside a published transcriptome of the Middle East blind mole rat (Spalax galili). We characterize the transcriptome assemblies of the two spalacids, and recover the phylogeny of the three subfamilies using a phylogenomic approach. Results Approximately 50.3 million clean reads from the zokor and 140.8 million clean reads from the bamboo ratwere generated by Illumina paired-end RNA-seq technology. All clean reads were assembled into 138,872 (the zokor) and 157,167 (the bamboo rat) unigenes, which were annotated by the public databases: the Swiss-prot, Trembl, NCBI non-redundant protein (NR), NCBI nucleotide sequence (NT), Gene Ontology (GO), Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). A total of 5,116 nuclear orthologous genes were identified in the three spalacids and mouse, which was used as an outgroup. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a sister group relationship between the zokor and the bamboo rat, which is supported by the majority of gene trees inferred from individual orthologous genes, suggesting subfamily Myospalacinae is more closely related to subfamily Rhizomyinae. The same topology was recovered from concatenated sequences of 5,116 nuclear genes, fourfold degenerate sites of the 5,116 nuclear genes and concatenated sequences of 13 protein coding mitochondrial genes. Conclusions This is the first report of transcriptome sequencing in zokors and bamboo rats, representing a valuable resource for future studies of comparative genomics in subterranean mammals. Phylogenomic analysis provides a conclusive resolution of interrelationships of the three subfamilies within the family Spalacidae, and highlights the power of phylogenomic approach to dissect the evolutionary history of rapid radiations in the tree of life.

2014-01-01

36

Dental microwear patterns of extant and extinct Muridae (Rodentia, Mammalia): ecological implications.  

PubMed

Extant species of Muridae occupy a wide array of habitats and have diverse dietary habits. Consequently, their dental microwear patterns represent a potential clue to better understand the paleoecology of their extinct relatives, which are abundant in many Old World Neogene localities. In this study, dental microwear is investigated for specimens of 17 extant species of murine and deomyine rodents in order to test the reliability of this method and infer dietary preferences on the fossil species Saïdomys afarensis. This extinct form comes from a mid-Pliocene site (AL 327) located at the Hadar Formation (Ethiopia) known to have delivered many hominid specimens of Australopithecus afarensis. A significant correlation between microwear patterns and diet is detected. Thus, grass, fruit, and insect eaters display, respectively, high amounts of fine scratches, wide scratches, and large pits. Moreover, some aspects of the paleoecology of S. afarensis, including feeding habits, could be assessed in regard to its dental microwear pattern. Indeed, it probably had feeding habits similar to that of living grass eaters. These results concur with the presence of open to woodland areas covered by an herbaceous vegetal layer, including monocotyledons, in the vicinity of this mid-Pliocene locality. PMID:19127354

Rodrigues, Helder Gomes; Merceron, Gildas; Viriot, Laurent

2009-04-01

37

No differences in the Sry gene between males and XY females in Akodon (Rodentia, Cricetidae).  

PubMed

Several species of the South American genus Akodon present fully fertile XY females besides XX ones. To analyze the possibility of a Sry mutation as the cause of sex reversal in A. azarae and A. boliviensis, we determined the sequence of the Sry gene in 2 males and 3 XY females from each of these species. The Sry gene sequence was also studied in A. dolores, a species that does not have XY females. In inter-specific comparisons, the percentage identities with respect to the region analyzed varied between 96.8% and 97.9%. An ORF of 543 nucleotides was identified, and the predicted Sry proteins comprised 180 amino acids, with an HMG domain of 83 amino acids. Our results indicate that female sex reversal in A. azarae and A. boliviensis cannot be explained by sequence differences in the Sry region analyzed here, which includes the complete ORF and, together with previous results concerning the inheritance of the XY condition, show that Sry mutation is not the basis of sex reversal. PMID:20453479

Sánchez, A; Marchal, J A; Romero-Fernández, I; Pinna-Senn, E; Ortiz, M I; Bella, José L; Lisanti, J A

2010-01-01

38

Glaciation Effects on the Phylogeographic Structure of Oligoryzomys longicaudatus (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae) in the Southern Andes  

PubMed Central

The long-tailed pygmy rice rat Oligoryzomys longicaudatus (Sigmodontinae), the major reservoir of Hantavirus in Chile and Patagonian Argentina, is widely distributed in the Mediterranean, Temperate and Patagonian Forests of Chile, as well as in adjacent areas in southern Argentina. We used molecular data to evaluate the effects of the last glacial event on the phylogeographic structure of this species. We examined if historical Pleistocene events had affected genetic variation and spatial distribution of this species along its distributional range. We sampled 223 individuals representing 47 localities along the species range, and sequenced the hypervariable domain I of the mtDNA control region. Aligned sequences were analyzed using haplotype network, Bayesian population structure and demographic analyses. Analysis of population structure and the haplotype network inferred three genetic clusters along the distribution of O. longicaudatus that mostly agreed with the three major ecogeographic regions in Chile: Mediterranean, Temperate Forests and Patagonian Forests. Bayesian Skyline Plots showed constant population sizes through time in all three clusters followed by an increase after and during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; between 26,000–13,000 years ago). Neutrality tests and the “g” parameter also suggest that populations of O. longicaudatus experienced demographic expansion across the species entire range. Past climate shifts have influenced population structure and lineage variation of O. longicaudatus. This species remained in refugia areas during Pleistocene times in southern Temperate Forests (and adjacent areas in Patagonia). From these refugia, O. longicaudatus experienced demographic expansions into Patagonian Forests and central Mediterranean Chile using glacial retreats.

Palma, R. Eduardo; Boric-Bargetto, Dusan; Torres-Perez, Fernando; Hernandez, Cristian E.; Yates, Terry L.

2012-01-01

39

The origin of an unusual sex chromosome constitution in Acomys sp. (Rodentia, Muridae) from Tanzania.  

PubMed

This paper describes a case which presents an evident variation from the "standard" XX/XY sex chromosomal constitution in a rodent, Acomys sp. This species known to be found in three localities of East Africa has only recently been separated from A. spinosissimus, its closest relative. In our study, five specimens of Acomys sp. and eight specimens of A. spinosissimus were live-trapped in five localities. Comparisons between the two taxa assed by G-banding show a complete homology in the chromosomal shape and banding pattern for 29 pairs of chromosomes corresponding to the complete autosomal set of A. spinosissimus. However, while all the A. spinosissimus analysed have 2n = 60 and a XY-XX system, in Acomys sp. males and females constitute mosaics for sex chromosomes in the bone marrow cells. Females (2n = 59, 60) have an excess (97%) of aneuploid cells with one single giant X chromosome, and males (2n = 60, 61) show X0/XY cells occurring in somatic tissues and XY cells in the germinal lineage. In addition, an odd heterochromatic submetacentric chromosome was identified in all the cells examined in two males and a female of Acomys sp. Since this chromosome was not related to sex determination and it is not present in all the analysed specimens, it can be considered as a B chromosome. Finally, the in situ fluorescence hybridisation (FISH) with telomeric probes showed a very intense interstitial telomeric signal (ITS) at the medial part on the long heterochromatic arm of the X chromosome. This could be due to recent chromosomal rearrangement. PMID:17180438

Castiglia, Riccardo; Makundi, Rhodes; Corti, Marco

2007-10-01

40

B chromosomes of Korean field mouse Apodemus peninsulae (Rodentia, Murinae) analysed by microdissection and FISH  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organization of B chromosomes in the Korean field mouse Apodemus peninsulae was analyzed. We painted its metaphase chromosomes with whole and partial chromosome paints generated by microdissection and DOP-PCR. The results of the painting indicated that all B chromosomes contained a large amount of repeated DNA sequences. The repeats could be classified in terms of their homology and predominant location.

T. V. Karamysheva; O. V. Andreenkova; M. N. Bochkaerev; Y. M. Borissov; N. Bogdanchikova; P. M. Borodin; N. B. Rubtsov

2002-01-01

41

An unusual feature of yolk sac placentation in Necromys lasiurus (Rodentia, Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae).  

PubMed

We studied the development of the inverted yolk sac in a New World rodent, Necromys lasiurus during early placentation. Ten implantation sites were investigated by means of histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. The yolk sac was villous near its attachment to the placenta. Elsewhere it was non-villous and closely attached to the uterus. The uterine glands were shallow and wide mouthed. They were associated with vessels and filled with secretion, suggesting the release of histotroph. This feature was absent at later stages. The intimate association of the yolk sac with specialized glandular regions of the uterus may represent a derived character condition of Necromys and/or sigmodont rodents. PMID:22541609

Favaron, P O; Carter, A M; Mess, A M; de Oliveira, M F; Miglino, M A

2012-07-01

42

Cranial morphometric and fine scale genetic variability of two adjacent Mastomys natalensis (Rodentia: Muridae) populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this multidisciplinary project was to study the intra-specific morphometric and genetic variability between\\u000a two adjacent populations ofMastomys natalensis Smith, 1834 living in different environments. The study of micro-evolutionary processes at work by using geometrical morphometrics\\u000a allowed us to define two groups, characterized by different features of the skull shape. Using molecular microsatellites analysis,\\u000a we showed that the

Aude Lalis; Michel Baylac; Jean François Cosson; Rhodes H. Makundi; Robert S. Machang’u; Christiane Denys

2009-01-01

43

Molecular Diversity Within Melanomys caliginosus (Rodentia: Oryzomyini): Evidence for Multiple Species  

PubMed Central

Nucleotide sequences from the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b gene were used to infer phylogenetic relationships and estimate genetic distances from 10 individuals of Melanomys caliginosus and to explore the hypothesis that this taxon is comprised of multiple species. Individuals of four geographic populations of M. caliginosus from Central America (Nicaragua and Costa Rica), Panama, Venezuela, and Ecuador, respectively, were included in this analysis. Topologies obtained from maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference analyses were identical and produced clades referable to each of the geographic populations. Genetic distances between any pair-wise comparisons of the four groups (except between Panamanian and Venezuelan samples) were comparable to values estimated from comparisons of sister species in the closely related genus Nectomys. Distances between samples from Panama and Venezuela were greater than those of samples within the Ecuadorian and Central American clades, but less than that between species of Nectomys. Based on results from the sequence data, it appears that all four of the populations should be elevated to species level; however, additional data are needed to resolve the nomenclature of the Panamanian and Venezuelan populations.

Hanson, J. Delton; Bradley, Robert D.

2010-01-01

44

Seasonal changes in burrow geometry of the common mole rat (Rodentia: Bathyergidae).  

PubMed

Sociality in mole rats has been suggested to have evolved as a response to the widely dispersed food resources and the limited burrowing opportunities that result from sporadic rainfall events. In the most arid regions, individual foraging efficiency is reduced, and energetic constraints increase. In this study, we investigate seasonal differences in burrow architecture of the social Cryptomys hottentotus hottentotus in a mesic region. We describe burrow geometry in response to seasonal weather conditions for two seasons (wet and dry). Interactions occurred between seasons and colony size for the size of the burrow systems, but not the shape of the burrow systems. The fractal dimension values of the burrow systems did not differ between seasons. Thus, the burrow complexity was dependent upon the number of mole rats present in the social group. PMID:24132712

Thomas, H G; Scantlebury, M; Swanepoel, D; Bateman, P W; Bennett, N C

2013-11-01

45

Evolutionary and developmental dynamics of the dentition in Muroidea and Dipodoidea (Rodentia, Mammalia).  

PubMed

When it comes to mouse evo-devo, the fourth premolar-first molar (P4-M1) dental complex becomes a source of longstanding controversies among paleontologists and biologists. Muroidea possess only molar teeth but with additional mesial cusps on their M1. Developmental studies tend to demonstrate that the formation of such mesial cusps could result from the integration of a P4 germ into M1 during odontogenesis. Conversely, most Dipodoidea conserve their fourth upper premolars and those that lost these teeth can also bear additional mesial cusps on their first upper molars. The aim of this study is to assess this developmental model in both Muroidea and Dipodoidea by documenting the morphological evolution of the P4-M1 complex across 50?Ma. Fourteen extinct and extant species, including abnormal and mutant specimens were investigated. We found that, even if their dental evolutionary pathways strongly differ, Dipodoidea and Muroidea retain common developmental characteristics because some of them can present similar dental morphological trends. It also appears that the acquisition of a mesial cusp on M1 is independent from the loss of P4 in both superfamilies. Actually, the progressive decrease of the inhibitory effect of P4, consequent to its regression, could allow the M1 to lengthen and mesial cusps to grow in Muroidea. Apart from these developmental explanations, patternings of the mesial part of first molars are also deeply constrained by morpho-functional requirements. As there is no obvious evidence of such mechanisms in Dipodoidea given their more variable dental morphologies, further developmental investigations are needed. PMID:21740509

Rodrigues, Helder Gomes; Charles, Cyril; Marivaux, Laurent; Vianey-Liaud, Monique; Viriot, Laurent

2011-01-01

46

Isospora peromysci Davis, 1967 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in Peromyscus leucopus and P. maniculatus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) from Texas.  

PubMed

Oocysts of Isospora peromysci (Davis, 1967) (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) were recovered from the feces of 1/30 (3.3%) white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus, in Johnson County, Texas. This report represents a new host and geographic record for the parasite. The coccidium was also found in 1/20 (5.0%) deer mice, P. maniculatus, from the same locale. Morphological data are provided on the sporulated oocyst of I. peromysci and comparisons are made with previously published information on the species from other geographic localities. PMID:2724183

McAllister, C T; Upton, S J

1989-01-01

47

Affiliation in the social interactions in captivity of the torch tail rat, Trinomys yonenagae (Rodentia: Echimyidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a previous paper, we measured the affiliation between male individuals of Trinomys yonenagae and concluded that the intensity of affiliation was high and did not differ between animals from the same social group and\\u000a from different social groups. In this paper, we report the results obtained with the same experimental procedure with female\\u000a individuals. We also discuss sexual differences

Jorge Nei Silva de Freitas; Luciano Augusto da Silva Carvalho; Charbel Niño El-Hani; Pedro Luís Bernardo da Rocha

2010-01-01

48

Phenetic relationships among four Apodemus species (Rodentia, Muridae) inferred from skull variation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phenetic relationships among four Apodemus species (A. agrarius, A. epimelas, A. flavicollis and A. sylvaticus) inferred from skull (mandible and cranium) variation were explored using landmark-based geometric morphometrics. Analysis of size variation revealed that mandibles and crania of A. epimelas were the largest, followed by those of A. flavicollis, while A. agrarius and A. sylvaticus had the smallest ones. Phenetic

Vida Joji?; Jelisaveta Nenadovi?; Jelena Blagojevi?; Milan Paunovi?; Dragana Cvetkovi?; Mladen Vujoševi?

49

Two new species of Hymenolepis (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) from murid rodents (Rodentia: Muridae) in the Philippines.  

PubMed

Two previously unrecognized species of the genus Hymenolepis are described based on specimens obtained from murid rodent species Bullimus luzonicus , Apomys microdon , and Rattus everetti collected on Luzon Island, Philippines. Hymenolepis bicauda n. sp. differs from all known Hymenolepis spp. in relative position of the poral dorsal and ventral osmoregulatory canals, gravid uterus occupying less than half the length of proglottid, relatively few eggs, and the highly characteristic longitudinal split of proglottids at the end of the gravid strobila. Hymenolepis haukisalmii n. sp. differs from all known Hymenolepis spp. in the relative position of both poral and aporal dorsal and ventral osmoregulatory canals and uterus lacking dorsal and ventral diverticula. The shift in the relative position of the dorsal and ventral osmoregulatory canals was not known in Hymenolepis from rodents in other regions of the world and is reminiscent of the situation observed in Hymenolepis erinacei, parasitic in hedgehogs, and members of the genus Talpolepis, parasitic in moles. The cosmopolitan species Hymenolepis diminuta was the only member of the genus previously reported from the Philippines. PMID:23679835

Makarikov, Arseny A; Tkach, Vasyl V; Bush, Sarah E

2013-10-01

50

Late Cenozoic History of the Genus Micromys (Mammalia, Rodentia) in Central Europe  

PubMed Central

Molecular phylogeography suggests that Micromys minutus, the sole extant species of the genus, colonized its extensive range quite recently, during the Late Pleistocene-Holocene period. Rich Pliocene and Pleistocene fossil records both from Europe and China suggest rather continuous and gradual in situ phenotype rearrangements from the Pliocene to the Recent periods. To elucidate the discrepancy we reexamined a considerable part of the European fossil record of the genus (14 sites from MN15 to Q3, 0.4–4.2 Ma, including the type series of M. preaminutus from MN15 Csarnóta 2), analyzed them with the aid of detailed morphometric comparisons, and concluded that: (a) The European Pliocene form, M. praeminutus, differs significantly from the extant species; (b) it exhibits a broad phenotypic variation covering the presumptive diagnostic characters of MN16 M. caesaris; (c) despite having smaller dimensions, the Early and Middle Pleistocene forms (MN17-Q3, 2.6–0.4 Ma) seem to be closer to M. praeminutus than to the extant species; (d) the extinction of M. praeminutus during Q3 and the re-occupation of its niche by the recent expansion of M. minutus from E-European – C Asiatic sources (suggested by phylogeographic hypotheses) cannot be excluded. Discussing interpretations of the phylogenetic past of the genus we emphasize the distinct history of the West Palearctic clade (Late Miocene-Early Pleistocene) terminating with M. praeminutus and the East Asiatic clade (chalceus, tedfordi, minutus), and the possible identity of the Western clade with the Late Miocene genus Parapodemus.

Horacek, Ivan; Knitlova, Marketa; Wagner, Jan; Kordos, Laszlo; Nadachowski, Adam

2013-01-01

51

Karyological analysis of Proechimys cuvieri and Proechimys guyannensis (Rodentia, Echimyidae) from central Amazon.  

PubMed

The aim was to characterize the karyotype of rodents of the genus Proechimys from three localities in the central Brazilian Amazon, in the search for new markers that might shed light on our understanding of the taxonomy and evolutionary history of this taxon. Two karyotypes were found, viz., 2n = 28, FN = 46 in individuals from the NRSP (Cuieiras River) and REMAN (Manaus), and 2n = 46, FN = 50 in individuals from the Balbina Hydroelectric Plant. While individuals with the karyotype with 2n = 28 chromosomes were morphologically associated with Proechimys cuvieri, their karyotype shared similarities with those of the same diploid number in two other regions. Although three karyotypes are described for Proechimys cuvieri, no geographic distribution pattern that defined a cline could be identified. Based on the morphological examination of voucher specimens and additional results from molecular analysis, the karyotype with 2n = 46 and FN = 50 could be associated with P. guyannensis. PMID:22481879

E Silva, Carlos Eduardo Faresin; Eler, Eduardo Schmidt; da Silva, Maria Nazareth F; Feldberg, Eliana

2012-01-01

52

Innervation of propatagial musculature in a flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans (Rodentia, Sciuridae).  

PubMed

The propatagium of gliding and flying mammals is of both functional and phylogenetic interest. The innervation of the propatagial muscle, platysma II, was studied with the axonal tracer wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) in a flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans. Injections of WGA-HRP into the proximal third of platysma II labeled motoneurons in the lateral part of the medial subdivision of the ipsilateral facial nucleus and in the ipsilateral ventral horn of the brachial enlargement. Injections into distal regions of platysma II labeled motoneurons in the ipsilateral ventral horn of spinal segments C5-C8 but not in the facial nucleus. Injections along the whole length of the muscle labeled afferent axons in the ipsilateral dorsal horn of spinal segments C4-T1. These results demonstrate a mixed facial and spinal motor innervation of propatagial musculature in the flying squirrel and indicate that this pattern of mixed innervation is more widespread among flying and gliding mammals than previously reported. Mixed facial and cervical propatagial innervation, independently derived in different flying and gliding mammals, may represent a common solution in the design of the propatagium. These findings complicate the use of propatagial muscle innervation patterns for the establishment of phylogenetic relationships among flying and gliding mammals. PMID:8834780

Chickering, J G; Sokoloff, A J

1996-01-01

53

[Diet of the capybara Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris (Rodentia: Hydrocharidae) in Caño Limón, Arauca, Colombia].  

PubMed

We studied the composition and seasonal variation of the diet of the capybara (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris) in the flooded savannas of Caño Limón, Colombia. This was achieved by direct observation of the consumption patterns of these animals. The capybaras only consumed plants, and their diet included 89 species of 22 families. Sixty three percent of these plant species had not been reported before. The most commonly consumed plants (94% of the diet), belonged to the Poaceae, Cyperaceae, Leguminosae and Pontederiaceae. Only seven species represented 60% of the total diet: the grasses Hymenachne amplexicaulis (16.9%), Digitaria bicornis (4.5%) and Panicum maximum (4.4%) and the Cyperaceae Rynchospora corymbosa (4.4%). There was seasonal variation in the diet composition of capybaras. PMID:15162750

Forero-Montaña, Jimena; Betancur, Julio; Cavelier, Jaime

2003-06-01

54

Karyological analysis of Proechimys cuvieri and Proechimys guyannensis (Rodentia, Echimyidae) from central Amazon  

PubMed Central

The aim was to characterize the karyotype of rodents of the genus Proechimys from three localities in the central Brazilian Amazon, in the search for new markers that might shed light on our understanding of the taxonomy and evolutionary history of this taxon. Two karyotypes were found, viz., 2n = 28, FN = 46 in individuals from the NRSP (Cuieiras River) and REMAN (Manaus), and 2n = 46, FN = 50 in individuals from the Balbina Hydroelectric Plant. While individuals with the karyotype with 2n = 28 chromosomes were morphologically associated with Proechimys cuvieri, their karyotype shared similarities with those of the same diploid number in two other regions. Although three karyotypes are described for Proechimys cuvieri, no geographic distribution pattern that defined a cline could be identified. Based on the morphological examination of voucher specimens and additional results from molecular analysis, the karyotype with 2n = 46 and FN = 50 could be associated with P. guyannensis.

e Silva, Carlos Eduardo Faresin; Eler, Eduardo Schmidt; da Silva, Maria Nazareth F.; Feldberg, Eliana

2012-01-01

55

Dental microwear patterns of extant and extinct Muridae (Rodentia, Mammalia): ecological implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extant species of Muridae occupy a wide array of habitats and have diverse dietary habits. Consequently, their dental microwear patterns represent a potential clue to better understand the paleoecology of their extinct relatives, which are abundant in many Old World Neogene localities. In this study, dental microwear is investigated for specimens of 17 extant species of murine and deomyine rodents in order to test the reliability of this method and infer dietary preferences on the fossil species Saïdomys afarensis. This extinct form comes from a mid-Pliocene site (AL 327) located at the Hadar Formation (Ethiopia) known to have delivered many hominid specimens of Australopithecus afarensis. A significant correlation between microwear patterns and diet is detected. Thus, grass, fruit, and insect eaters display, respectively, high amounts of fine scratches, wide scratches, and large pits. Moreover, some aspects of the paleoecology of S. afarensis, including feeding habits, could be assessed in regard to its dental microwear pattern. Indeed, it probably had feeding habits similar to that of living grass eaters. These results concur with the presence of open to woodland areas covered by an herbaceous vegetal layer, including monocotyledons, in the vicinity of this mid-Pliocene locality.

Gomes Rodrigues, Helder; Merceron, Gildas; Viriot, Laurent

2009-04-01

56

Another one bites the dust: bite force and ecology in three caviomorph rodents (Rodentia, Hystricognathi).  

PubMed

Mammals have developed sophisticated strategies adapting to particular locomotor modes, feeding habits, and social interactions. Many rodent species have acquired a fossorial, semi-fossorial, or even subterranean life-style, converging on morphological, anatomical, and ecological features but diverging in the final arrangement. These ecological variations partially depend on the functional morphology of their digging tools. Muscular and mechanical features (e.g., lever arms relationship) of the bite force were analyzed in three caviomorph rodents with similar body size but different habits and ecological demands of the jaws. In vivo forces were measured at incisors' tip using a strain gauge load cell force transducer whereas theoretical maximal performance values, mechanical advantages, and particular contribution of each adductor muscle were estimated from dissections in specimens of Ctenomys australis (subterranean, solitary), Octodon degus (semi-fossorial, social), and Chinchilla laniger (ground-dweller, colonial). Our results showed that C. australis bites stronger than expected given its small size and C. laniger exhibited the opposite outcome, while O. degus is close to the expected value based on mammalian bite force versus body mass regressions; what might be associated to the chisel-tooth digging behavior and social interactions. Our key finding was that no matter how diverse these rodents' skulls were, no difference was found in the mechanical advantage of the main adductor muscles. Therefore, interspecific differences in the bite force might be primarily due to differences in the muscular development and force, as shown for the subterranean, solitary and territorial C. australis versus the more gracile, ground-dweller, and colonial C. laniger. PMID:24482421

Becerra, Federico; Echeverría, Alejandra Isabel; Casinos, Adrià; Vassallo, Aldo Iván

2014-04-01

57

Comparative cytogenetics of spiny rats of the genus Proechimys (Rodentia, Echimyidae) from the Amazon region.  

PubMed

We made a comparative analysis of the cytogenetics of spiny rat species of the genus Proechimys collected from several sites of the Madeira River basin (Amazonas State, Brazil) and Jari River valley (Pará State, Brazil). Individuals were assigned to three groups based on diploid and fundamental numbers: 2n = 28, FN = 46 (P. cuvieri and P. gr. longicaudatus); 2n = 38, FN = 52 (Proechimys gr. guyannensis), and 2n = 40, FN = 54 (P. gardneri). The nucleolar organizer region (NOR) was interstitial on the long arm of one submetacentric pair, as seen in all species of Proechimys analyzed thus far. However, its position in the karyotype was variable. A duplication of the NOR in one of the homologues was detected in P. gr. longicaudatus from the Aripuanã basin along the mid Madeira. The C-band pattern varied between species and, together with the NOR, allowed the identification of two evolutionary units in P. gr. longicaudatus in the region of the mid Madeira River (cytotypes A and B). The morphology and banding of the sex chromosomes were species specific. A range extension is suggested for the geographic distribution of P. gardneri and P. gr. longicaudatus. Moreover, we suggest that species of Proechimys with 2n = 38 chromosomes are restricted to east of the Negro River and north of the Amazon River. We also revised the published chromosome data available for Proechimys. PMID:22576911

Eler, E S; da Silva, M N F; Silva, C E F; Feldberg, E

2012-01-01

58

Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia: Muridae) Infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum (syn. Le. chagasi) in Brazil.  

PubMed

In the present study we surveyed the fauna of phlebotomine sand flies and small mammals in peridomestic areas from a Brazilian municipality where the American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) is endemic. A total of 608 female phlebotomine sand flies were captured during nine months in 2009 and 2010. Seven different species were represented with 60% of them being Lutzomyia intermedia and Lu. whitmani, both incriminated vectors of ACL. Lu. longipalpis, a proven vector of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) was also captured at high proportion (12.8%). Genomic DNA analysis of 136 species-specific pools of female sand flies followed by molecular genotyping showed the presence of Leishmania infantum DNA in two pools of Lu. longipalpis. The same Leishmania species was found in one blood sample from Rattus norvegicus among 119 blood and tissue samples analysed. This is the first report of Le. infantum in R. norvegicus in the Americas and suggests a possible role for this rodent species in the zoonotic cycle of VL. Our study coincided with the reemergence of VL in Governador Valadares. PMID:24707492

Lara-Silva, Fabiana de Oliveira; Barata, Ricardo Andrade; Michalsky, Erika Monteiro; Ferreira, Eduardo de Castro; Lopes, Maria Olímpia Garcia; Pinheiro, Aimara da Costa; Fortes-Dias, Consuelo Latorre; Dias, Edelberto Santos

2014-01-01

59

Phylogenetic relationships in genus Niviventer (Rodentia: Muridae) in China inferred from complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene.  

PubMed

Chinese species of the genus Niviventer, predominantly distributed in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau and in Taiwan, are a diverse group and have not yet received a thorough molecular phylogenetic analysis. Here, we reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships of 32 specimens representing nine Chinese species of Niviventer, based on sequences of the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analysis resulted in three consistent trees, each supported by high bootstrap values. The results showed that the Niviventer species included here are monophyletic. The nine species were classified into three distinct clades: clade A with Niviventer brahma, N. confucianus, N. coxingi, N. culturatus, N. eha and N. fulvescens; clade B with N. andersoni and N. excelsior; clade C with N. cremoriventer. Our results also suggested that N. culturatus should be a valid species rather than a subspecies of N. confucianus. Divergence times among species were calibrated according to the middle-late Pleistocene (1.2-0.13 Mya) fossil records of N. confucianus. The results demonstrated that the first radiation event of the genus Niviventer occurred in early Pleistocene (about 1.66 Mya), followed by the divergence of clades A and B at about 1.46 Mya. Most of the extant Niviventer species appeared during early to middle Pleistocene (about 1.29-0.67 Mya). These divergence times are coincidental with the last uplift events of the Tibetan Plateau, Kun-Huang movement, Pleistocene glaciations and the vicariant formation of Taiwan Strait. Consequently geographical events and Pleistocene glaciations have played a great role in the diversification of Niviventer. PMID:17531508

Jing, Meidong; Yu, Hon-Tsen; Wu, Sheng-Hai; Wang, Wen; Zheng, Xiaoguang

2007-08-01

60

A remarkable autosomal heteromorphism in Pseudoryzomys simplex 2n = 56; FN = 54-55 (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae)  

PubMed Central

Pseudoryzomys simplex, the false rice rat, is a monotypic genus of the Oryzomyini tribe (Sigmodontinae) distributed in part of Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina and Brazil. Its diploid number has been described as 56 acrocentric chromosomes decreasing in size and no karyotype figure has been depicted. Herein, we present karyotypic data on P. simplex, including chromosome banding and molecular fluorescent in situ hybridization using telomeric sequences and the whole X-chromosome of its sister clade Holochilus brasiliensis (HBR) as probes. A case of remarkable autosomal heteromorphism due to the presence of a whole heterochromatic arm leading to the variability of FN is reported, as well as the occurrence of regions of homology between the X and Y chromosomes (pseudoautosomal regions) after chromosome painting with the HBR X probe on P. simplex metaphases.

Moreira, Camila Nascimento; Di-Nizo, Camilla Bruno; de Jesus Silva, Maria Jose; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo; Ventura, Karen

2013-01-01

61

A new karyotype for the spiny rat Clyomys laticeps (Thomas, 1909) (Rodentia, Echimyidae) from Central Brazil.  

PubMed

Clyomys Thomas, 1916 is a semifossorial rodent genus of spiny rats represented by only one species, Clyomys laticeps, which inhabits the tropical savannas and grasslands of central Brazil and eastern Paraguay. Here we describe a new karyotype of Clyomys laticeps found in populations of Emas National Park, Goiás state, Brazil. The four analyzed specimens had a diploid number (2n) of 32 and a fundamental autosome number (FN) of 54. Cytogenetic data include conventional staining, CBG and GTG-banding. The karyotype presents 12 meta/submetacentric pairs (1 to 12) and 3 pairs of acrocentrics (13 to 15) with gradual decrease in size. The X chromosome is a medium submetacentric and the Y is a medium acrocentric. The semifossorial habits together with habitat specificity could have contributed to the karyological variations found on this genus. PMID:24260659

Bezerra, Alexandra M R; Pagnozzi, Juliana M; Carmignotto, Ana Paula; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo; Rodrigues, Flávio H G

2012-01-01

62

A new karyotype for the spiny rat Clyomys laticeps (Thomas, 1909) (Rodentia, Echimyidae) from Central Brazil  

PubMed Central

Abstract Clyomys Thomas, 1916 is a semifossorial rodent genus of spiny rats represented by only one species, Clyomys laticeps, which inhabits the tropical savannas and grasslands of central Brazil and eastern Paraguay. Here we describe a new karyotype of Clyomys laticeps found in populations of Emas National Park, Goiás state, Brazil. The four analyzed specimens had a diploid number (2n) of 32 and a fundamental autosome number (FN) of 54. Cytogenetic data include conventional staining, CBG and GTG-banding. The karyotype presents 12 meta/submetacentric pairs (1 to 12) and 3 pairs of acrocentrics (13 to 15) with gradual decrease in size. The X chromosome is a medium submetacentric and the Y is a medium acrocentric. The semifossorial habits together with habitat specificity could have contributed to the karyological variations found on this genus.

Bezerra, Alexandra M. R.; Pagnozzi, Juliana M.; Carmignotto, Ana Paula; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo; Rodrigues, Flavio H. G.

2012-01-01

63

Are ribosomal DNA clusters rearrangement hotspots? A case study in the genus Mus (Rodentia, Muridae)  

PubMed Central

Background Recent advances in comparative genomics have considerably improved our knowledge of the evolution of mammalian karyotype architecture. One of the breakthroughs was the preferential localization of evolutionary breakpoints in regions enriched in repetitive sequences (segmental duplications, telomeres and centromeres). In this context, we investigated the contribution of ribosomal genes to genome reshuffling since they are generally located in pericentromeric or subtelomeric regions, and form repeat clusters on different chromosomes. The target model was the genus Mus which exhibits a high rate of karyotypic change, a large fraction of which involves centromeres. Results The chromosomal distribution of rDNA clusters was determined by in situ hybridization of mouse probes in 19 species. Using a molecular-based reference tree, the phylogenetic distribution of clusters within the genus was reconstructed, and the temporal association between rDNA clusters, breakpoints and centromeres was tested by maximum likelihood analyses. Our results highlighted the following features of rDNA cluster dynamics in the genus Mus: i) rDNA clusters showed extensive diversity in number between species and an almost exclusive pericentromeric location, ii) a strong association between rDNA sites and centromeres was retrieved which may be related to their shared constraint of concerted evolution, iii) 24% of the observed breakpoints mapped near an rDNA cluster, and iv) a substantial rate of rDNA cluster change (insertion, deletion) also occurred in the absence of chromosomal rearrangements. Conclusions This study on the dynamics of rDNA clusters within the genus Mus has revealed a strong evolutionary relationship between rDNA clusters and centromeres. Both of these genomic structures coincide with breakpoints in the genus Mus, suggesting that the accumulation of a large number of repeats in the centromeric region may contribute to the high level of chromosome repatterning observed in this group. However, the elevated rate of rDNA change observed in the chromosomally invariant clade indicates that the presence of these sequences is insufficient to lead to genome instability. In agreement with recent studies, these results suggest that additional factors such as modifications of the epigenetic state of DNA may be required to trigger evolutionary plasticity.

2011-01-01

64

Innervation of Propatagial Musculature in a Flying Squirrel, Glaucomys volans (Rodentia, Sciuridae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The propatagium of gliding and flying mammals is of both functional and phylogenetic interest. The innervation of the propatagial muscle, platysma II, was studied with the axonal tracer wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) in a flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans. Injections of WGA-HRP into the proximal third of platysma II labeled motoneurons in the lateral part of the medial subdivision

J. Gray Chickering; Alan J. Sokoloff

1996-01-01

65

Evaluation of squirrels (Rodentia: Sciuridae) as ecologically significant hosts for Anaplasma phagocytophilum in California.  

PubMed

Granulocytic anaplasmosis (GA), caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum, is a potentially fatal, emerging rickettsial disease of humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. The purpose of this study was to determine whether sciurids from multiple areas of northern California were infested with ticks or exposed to or infected with A. phagocytophilum using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and indirect-fluorescent antibody (IFA) serology. Sciurids of nine different tree- and ground-dwelling species were assessed: arboreal squirrels (western and eastern gray squirrels, Sciurus griseus and S. carolinensis, and Douglas squirrels, Tamiasciurus douglasii) but not northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) had greater evidence of exposure and current infection than did semiarboreal or ground dwelling sciurids (California ground squirrels, Spermophilus beecheyi, and chipmunks, Tamias spp.). Western gray squirrels had the most extensive exposure (70.7% seroprevalence and 12.1% PCR prevalence). Positive squirrels were identified in all regions where squirrels were collected. A logistic regression identified being a western gray squirrel (OR = 20.5, P = 2.95 X 10(-8)) and from the north coastal region of California (OR = 9.052, P = 1.41 X 10(-6)) as having the highest risk of exposure to A. phagocytophilum. Five of nine sciurid species had evidence of infestation with Ixodes pacificus or I. spinipalpis that could vector A. phagocytophilum. Extensive exposure from multiple areas suggests sciurids may be important in the maintenance of GA in California and indicates that studies of reservoir competence of these species are warranted. PMID:18714881

Nieto, Nathan C; Foley, Janet E

2008-07-01

66

Studies on Rift Valley fever in some African murids (Rodentia: Muridae).  

PubMed

Brains, spleens and livers of 2214 murids, 27 shrews and 7 dormice, trapped at 7 sites in Rhodesia, were tested in 277 pools for the presence of Rift Valley Fever virus. There were no isolations of Rift Valley Fever, but 69 isolations of an unidentified virus were obtained. Sixteen out of 867 sera had low-titre haemagglutination-inhibition activity against Rift Valley Fever antigen, but only one out of 1260 sera had neutralizing antibody. The evidence suggests that murids fail to encounter infection in nature and are unlikely to play a role in circulation and dissemination of Rift Valley Fever virus. Four out of seven widely distributed species of muried, Rhabdomys pumilio, Saccostomys campestris, Aethomys chrysophilus and Lemniscomys griselda, were shown to be capable of circulating amounts of virus likely to be infective for mosquitoes. PMID:632561

Swanepoel, R; Blackburn, N K; Efstratiou, S; Condy, J B

1978-04-01

67

Multilocus systematics and non-punctuated evolution of Holarctic Myodini (Rodentia: Arvicolinae).  

PubMed

The tribe Myodini consists of five genera of forest and alpine voles (Alticola, Caryomys, Eothenomys, Hyperacrius and Myodes) distributed throughout the Holarctic. Because mitochondrial evidence has revealed paraphyly and polyphyly among genera, we apply the first multilocus tests to clarify taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships. Our analyses of 28 of 36 species within Myodini, including three not previously sequenced (A. montosa, A. albicaudus, and H. fertilis), identify four distinct clades and provide the first molecular evidence that Hyperacrius may not belong in Myodini. Myodes is paraphyletic, while polyphyly of Alticola reflects apparent ancient mitochondrial introgression. Diversification in this tribe was hypothesized to be tightly linked to Late Cenozoic climatic events, however, lineage through time analysis indicates diversification over the last 4 My was gradual and not strongly punctuated. PMID:24594062

Kohli, Brooks A; Speer, Kelly A; Kilpatrick, C William; Batsaikhan, Nyamsuren; Damdinbaza, Darmaa; Cook, Joseph A

2014-07-01

68

Accelerated molecular evolution in Microtus (Rodentia) as assessed via complete mitochondrial genome sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microtus is one of the most taxonomically diverse mammalian genera, including over 60 extant species. These rodents have evolved rapidly,\\u000a as the genus originated less than 2 million years ago. If these numbers are taken at face value, then an average of 30 microtine\\u000a speciation events have occurred every million years. One explanation for the rapid rate of cladogenesis in Microtus

Deborah A. Triant; J. Andrew DeWoody

2006-01-01

69

Blood parasites of mound-building mouse, Mus spicilegus Petényi, 1882 (Mammalia, Rodentia).  

PubMed

Mound-building mice, Mus spicilegus, were studied for the blood parasites in Eastern Slovakia, vicinity Kechnec village near Kosice town (Kosická kotlina basin, 21 degrees 14' E, 48 degrees 33' N) during years 2002-2005. Overall, 251 specimens were examined. The parasites were detected using microhematokrit centrifugation technique and on the Giemsa's method stained blood smears and light microscopy. The parasites were found in 3.57% of specimens; 1.20% of mice were infected with Bartonella sp., 2.39% were infected with Babesia piroplasms. No Hepatozoon hemogregarines and trypanosomes were observed. The intensity of infection with Bartonella was low, less than 0.01% of erythrocytes were invaded, the percent of the erythrocytes with Babesia sp. was less than 0.01%. The morphological description and measurements of parasites were made using the "Analysis" software combined with a video camera and a microscope. The mean size of Bartonella sp. bacteria's were 0.8 x 0.3 microm, range 0.4-1.5 x 0.1-0.9 microm, Babesia sp. occurred in pear-shaped and ring-like forms, 1.00-1.27 microm in diameter, and 0.98-1.27 microm in size, respectively. The regular form of four cells--"maltese cross" was not noticed. This is the first record infection of Mus spicilegus with blood parasites. PMID:20450010

Karbowiak, Grzegorz; Fricová, Jana; Stanko, Michal; Hapunik, Joanna; Várfalvyová, Denisa

2010-01-01

70

The evolution of fossoriality and the adaptive role of horns in the Mylagaulidae (Mammalia: Rodentia)  

PubMed Central

Ceratogaulus, a member of the extinct fossorial rodent clade Mylagaulidae, is the only known rodent with horns and the smallest known horned mammal. The function of the large, dorsally projecting nasal horns on this burrowing animal has been the subject of wide speculation among palaeontologists; suggested uses range from sexual combat to burrowing. Mammals have evolved adaptations for digging repeatedly; horns and other cranial appendages have also evolved numerous times. These two adaptations co-occur in mammals extremely rarely: only two fossil genera (Ceratogaulus and the xenarthran Peltephilus) and no extant mammals are both horned and fossorial. Tracing the evolution of fossoriality in aplodontoid rodents (the larger clade to which Ceratogaulus belongs) reveals that Ceratogaulus descended from ancestors who dug by head-lifting. Whereas this suggests an obvious explanation for the horns of this rodent, evidence from functional morphology, anatomy, phylogeny and geologic context indicates that the horns in Ceratogaulus were used for defence, rather than digging, and evolved to offset increased predation costs associated with spending more time foraging above ground as body size increased.

Hopkins, Samantha S.B

2005-01-01

71

A new heligmonellid species (Nematoda) from Oligoryzomys nigripes (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae) in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil.  

PubMed

Stilestrongylus lanfrediae n. sp. is described from the small intestine of Oligoryzomys nigripes (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) collected in the Atlantic Forest (Rio de Janeiro State, Teresópolis, Brazil). The new species shows some similarities to Stilestrongylus stilesi, Stilestrongylus freitasi, Stilestrongylus inexpectatus, Stilestrongylus moreli, and Stilestrongylus andalgala, but it can be distinguished from these species by the following combination of characters: 26 ridges in males and 25 in females at the mid-body, asymmetrical caudal bursa with a pattern of type 2-2-1, rays 6 markedly shorter than other lateral rays, rays 8 inserted asymmetrically on dorsal trunk and shorter than other species, and a proportion of spicule length in relation to body length (SpL/BL) of 25-29%. The new species is also distinguished from other species of Stilestrongylus by the asymmetry of the branches of the dorsal ray and by having the longest spicules. PMID:19642806

Souza, Joyce G R; Digiani, Maria C; Simões, Raquel O; Luque, José L; Rodrigues-Silva, Rosângela; Maldonado, Arnaldo

2009-06-01

72

Genetic diversity and relatedness within and between species of the genus Oligoryzomys (Rodentia; Sigmodontinae).  

PubMed

A RAPD analysis on six species of the rodent genus Oligoryzomys trapped in a wide area (ranging from 01 degrees N to 32 degrees S) of Brazilian territory was performed in order to determine the levels of genetic variability within and between its populations and species. One-hundred and ninety-three animals were collected in 13 different sites (corresponding to 17 samples) located at Pampas, Atlantic Rain Forest, Cerrado, and Amazon domains. Oligoryzomys sp., O. nigripes (8 populations), O. flavescens (4 populations), O. moojeni, O. stramineus, and O. fornesi were the taxa analyzed. Of the 20 primers tested, 4 generated a total of 75 polymorphic products simultaneously amplified in 151 specimens. Various diversity estimators analyzed showed considerable differences between species and populations, indicating a great genetic variation occurring in the Oligoryzomys taxa investigated. A cluster analysis was made using Nei's standard genetic distances, however, it did not correlate the genetic heterogeneity of the species and populations with the geographical areas. PMID:17505763

Trott, A; Callegari-Jacques, S M; Oliveira, L F B; Langguth, A; Mattevi, M S

2007-02-01

73

A new species of Syphacia (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Oligoryzomys nigripes (Rodentia: Cricetidae) in Argentina.  

PubMed

The aim of this paper is to describe Syphacia kinsellai n. sp. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from the cecum of Oligoryzomys nigripes (Olfers 1818) (Sigmodontinae: Oryzomyini) captured in Misiones Province, Argentina. The new species can be differentiated from other species of the genus principally by the shape of the cephalic plate; distribution of submedian papillae and amphids; development of porous badge; presence of derids in females; absence of cervical and lateral alae; shape and structure of accessory hook of gubernaculum; and distance of excretory pore and vulva from the anterior extremity. Until the present, only two species of Syphacia had been reported from Argentina in sigmodontine rodents, the first one parasitizes an Oryzomyini host and the second one an Akodontini host. This new species is the second record of Syphacia from the tribe Oryzomyini in Argentina; however, we propose that the first record, S. oryzomae, should be treated as a nomen dubium. PMID:17541641

Del Rosario Robles, María; Navone, Graciela Teresa

2007-09-01

74

Effect of tunnel inclination on digging energetics in the tuco-tuco, Ctenomys talarum (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Burrows play an important role for many species, providing them with shelter and access to food resources. For subterranean\\u000a rodents, living underground imposes constraints on morphology and physiology. The convergence in burrow architecture among\\u000a subterranean rodents has been related to the energy demands imposed by the cost of constructing an entire system. The low\\u000a frequency of tunnels with downward angles

Facundo Luna; C. Daniel Antinuchi

2007-01-01

75

Notocotylus loeiensis n. sp. (Trematoda: Notocotylidae) from Rattus losea (Rodentia: Muridae) in Thailand  

PubMed Central

Notocotylus loeiensis n. sp. (Trematoda: Notocotylidae) is described from the cecum of the lesser rice field rat (Rattus losea), from Loei Province in Thailand with a prevalence of 9.1% (eight of 88 rats infected). The new species differs from previously described Notocotylus species mainly by the extreme prebifurcal position of the genital pore and the number of ventral papillae. This is the first description at the species level of Notocotylus from mammals in Southeast Asia.

Chaisiri, K.; Morand, S.; Ribas, A.

2011-01-01

76

Cryptic speciation and chromosomal repatterning in the South African climbing mice Dendromus (Rodentia, Nesomyidae).  

PubMed

We evaluate the intra- and interspecific diversity in the four South African rodent species of the genus Dendromus. The molecular phylogenetic analysis on twenty-three individuals have been conducted on a combined dataset of nuclear and mitochondrial markers. Moreover, the extent and processes underlying chromosomal variation, have been investigated on three species by mean of G-, C-bands, NORs and Zoo-FISH analysis. The molecular analysis shows the presence of six monophyletic lineages corresponding to D. mesomelas, D. mystacalis and four lineages within D. cfr. melanotis with high divergence values (ranges: 10.6% - 18.3%) that raises the question of the possible presence of cryptic species. The first description of the karyotype for D. mesomelas and D. mystacalis and C- and G- banding for one lineage of D. cfr. melanotis are reported highlighting an extended karyotype reorganization in the genus. Furthermore, the G-banding and Zoo-FISH evidenced an autosome-sex chromosome translocation characterizing all the species and our timing estimates this mutation date back 7.4 mya (Late Miocene). Finally, the molecular clock suggests that cladogenesis took place since the end of Miocene to Plio-Pleistocene, probably due to ecological factors, isolation in refugia followed by differential adaptation to the mesic or dry habitat. PMID:24551165

Solano, Emanuela; Taylor, Peter J; Rautenbach, Anita; Ropiquet, Anne; Castiglia, Riccardo

2014-01-01

77

Two new species of Hymenolepis (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) from Spalacidae and Muridae (Rodentia) from eastern Palearctic.  

PubMed

Previously unrecognized species of the genus Hymenolepis are described based on specimens from spalacid and murid (Murinae) rodents. Hymenolepis rymzhanovi sp. nov. from the Siberian zokor, Myospalax myospalax (Laxmann), from East Kazakhstan, and H. apodemi sp. nov. from Eurasian field mice, Apodemus peninsulae (Thomas), A. uralensis (Pallas) and A. agrarius (Pallas), from the south of Russian Far East, western Siberia and south-eastern Kazakhstan are characterized. The new species differ from other species of the genus by the morphology of the scolex, the relative position and length of the cirrus-sac and the relative position and arrangement of the testes. Differential criteria of species of Hymenolepis (sensu stricto) are also discussed. PMID:23377911

Makarikov, Arseny A; Tkach, Vasyl V

2013-03-01

78

DNA–DNA Hybridization Evidence for the Recent Origin of Marmots and Ground Squirrels (Rodentia: Sciuridae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A molecular analysis, based on DNA\\/DNA hybridization experiments, examined seven species of the sciurid tribe Marmotini, in order to evaluate their evolutionary relationships. The branching pattern obtained from a neighbor-joining analysis and least-squares methods indicates that spermophiles and marmots are closely related. This result is in agreement with previous studies based on biochemical data which have suggested a Miospermophilus origin

Olivier Giboulet; Pascale Chevret; Raymond Ramousse; François Catzeflis

1997-01-01

79

First Castorid (Mammalia, Rodentia) from the Middle Miocene of Southeast Asia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Today and in the Tertiary, the geographical distribution of castorids is limited throughout all of the northern continents. Fossils of the Castoridae genus Steneofiber are abundant in many localities of Eurasia from the late Oligocene to Pliocene period. Recently, Steneofiber fossils were discovered in two localities of northern Thailand, Mae Moh and Chiang Muan coal mines, in layers of late middle Miocene age. These discoveries represent the first records of castorids from Southeast Asia and correspond to their southernmost known range. The focus of this study is to describe this new Thai species of Steneofiber and to define its wear stages from the molar occlusal surfaces by using micro-CT scan analysis. The CT scan technique permits the analysis of the virtual occlusal surface changes from wear, allowing easier comparison to related species of Steneofiber cheek teeth without destroying the teeth. The new species, Steneofiber siamensis n. sp., can be distinguished from the other species of Steneofiber by several distinct characters, longer mesostriid on p4, presence of premesostria and metastria on P4, which are smaller than most of the other known species. The occurrence of this new castorid also supports a subtropical to tropical paleoclimate for these two localities of northern Thailand.

Suraprasit, Kantapon; Chaimanee, Yaowalak; Martin, Thomas; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

2011-04-01

80

Digital dissection of the masticatory muscles of the naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber (Mammalia, Rodentia)  

PubMed Central

The naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber, of the family Bathyergidae is a subterranean rodent that feeds on underground roots and tubers and digs extensive tunnel systems with its incisors. It is a highly unusual mammal with regard to its social structure, longevity, pain insensitivity and cancer resistance, all of which have made it the subject of a great deal of research in recent years. Yet, much of the basic anatomy of this species remains undocumented. In this paper, we describe the morphology of the jaw-closing musculature of the naked mole-rat, as revealed by contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography. This technique uses an iodine stain to enable the imaging of soft tissues with microCT. The iodine-enhanced scans were used to create 3D reconstructions of the naked mole-rat masticatory muscles from which muscle masses were calculated. The jaw-closing musculature of Heterocephalus glaber is relatively very large compared to other rodents and is dominated by the superficial masseter, the deep masseter and the temporalis. The temporalis in particular is large for a rodent, covering the entirety of the braincase and much of the rear part of the orbit. The morphology of the masseter complex described here differs from two other published descriptions of bathyergid masticatory muscles, but is more similar to the arrangement seen in other rodent families. The zygomaticomandibularis (ZM) muscle does not protrude through the infraorbital foramen on to the rostrum and thus the naked mole-rat should be considered protrogomorphous rather than hystricomorphous, and the morphology is consistent with secondarily lost hystricomorphy as has been previously suggested for Bathyergidae. Overall, the morphology of the masticatory musculature indicates a species with a high bite force and a wide gape–both important adaptations for a life dominated by digging with the incisors.

Faulkes, Chris G.

2014-01-01

81

First cytogenetic information for Drymoreomys albimaculatus (Rodentia, Cricetidae), a recently described genus from Brazilian Atlantic Forest  

PubMed Central

Abstract The recently described taxon Drymoreomys albimaculatus is endemic to the Brazilian Atlantic Forest and its biology and genetics are still poorly known. Herein, we present, for the first time, the karyotype of the species using classical and molecular cytogenetics, which showed 2n=62, FN=62, and interstitial telomeric signals at the sex chromosomes. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences from the two karyotyped individuals verify the taxonomic identity as the recently described Drymoreomys albimaculatus and confirm the relationship of the species with other Oryzomyini. Additionally, external morphological information is provided.

Suarez-Villota, Elkin Y.; Di-Nizo, Camilla B.; Neves, Carolina L.; Silva, Maria Jose de Jesus

2013-01-01

82

Trans-species polymorphism and evidence of selection on class II MHC loci in tuco-tucos (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Balancing selection acting over the evolutionary history of a lineage can result in the retention of alleles among species\\u000a for longer than expected under neutral evolution. The associated pattern of trans-species polymorphism, in which similar or\\u000a even identical alleles are shared among species, is often used to infer that balancing selection has occurred. The genes of\\u000a the major histocompatibility complex

Ana Paula Cutrera; Eileen A. Lacey

2007-01-01

83

Establishment of Orientia tsutsugamushi Lc-1 (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae) infection in ICR outbred mice (Rodentia: Muridae) by needle challenge.  

PubMed

Orientia tsutsugamushi is a pathogen transmitted by Leptotrombidium that causes scrub typhus. To develop an infection mouse model, a mite-derived isolate of O. tsutsugamushi was established from a laboratory-maintained colony of Leptotrombidium chiangraiensis (O. tsutsugamushi Lc-1). This Lc-1 isolate was initially presented to ICR (CD-1) mice by feeding an infected Lc chigger on the ear of a mouse. Once the Lc-1 was adapted to the ICR mice, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate O. tsutsugamushi genomic equivalent copies in tissues and sera. Furthermore, times to onset of the signs of infection are reported in this study. This study provides information useful for future research on this host-pathogen interaction and the associated vaccine efficacy trials. PMID:24897859

Lurchachaiwong, Woradee; Chan, Teik-Chye; Richards, Allen L; McCardle, Wesley; Schuster, Anthony L

2014-05-01

84

Tandem and centric fusions in the chromosomal evolution of the South American phyllotines of the genus Auliscomys (Rodentia, cricetidae).  

PubMed

The karyotypes of three of the four extant species of the genus Auliscomys (A. micropus, living in central [2n = 32, NF = 34] and southern [2n = 34, NF = 36, 37] Chile; A. sublimis [2n = 28, NF = 32] and A. boliviensis [2n = 22, NF = 32], which inhabit the Andean Altiplano) were analyzed. Comparisons of G-, C-, and AgNOR-banded karyotypes showed that extensive conservation of entire chromosomes and chromosomal regions had occurred during the evolution of this genus, with centromeretelomere tandem fusions and centric fusions probably being the most frequent chromosome changes. A chromosomal phylogeny, based on the chromosome homoeologies detected and parsimonious analysis of the nature and distribution of the inferred chromosomal changes, is proposed. This hypothetical phylogeny assumes that the ancestral telocentric karyotype would have undergone three consecutive tandem fusions, first originating the 2n = 32 (NF = 34) karyomorph exhibited by present-day specimens of A. micropus captured in central Chile and then the 2n = 28 (NF = 32) karyotype of A. sublimis. Subsequent centric fusions involving the tandem-fusion products would presumably have generated the 2n = 22 (NF = 32) A. boliviensis karyotype. Assuming some conditions related to early geographic distribution, this chromosomal phylogeny is in agreement with a paleogeographic model, which explains the present distribution of living Auliscomys species mainly on the basis of geologic and climatic events.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1395723

Walker, L I; Spotorno, A E

1992-01-01

85

[Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of the Manchurian zokor Myospalax psilurus (Rodentia, Muridae) according to RAPD-PCR analysis].  

PubMed

The population structuring and low genetic diversity of the Manchurian zokor Myospalax psilurus Milne-Edwards, 1874, an East Asian endemic included in the Red List of Russia, were demonstrated. Two separate geographical groups differing in the level of their genetic diversity were found on the territory of the Primorskii krai. The subpopulation located closest to the main area of this species was determined as ancestral. A subspecies differentiation of the Primorskii krai and Transbaikal M. psilurus populations was shown, as was the monophyletic origin of M. psilurus and its high divergence from M. aspalax. The animals from northern localities are recommended for reintroduction in nature under species recovery programs in Primorskii krai. PMID:21789993

Chelomina, G N; Korablev, V P; Pavlenko, M V

2011-01-01

86

[Karyological and allozyme variability of far eastern voles Microtus fortis Büchner, 1889 (Cricetidae, Rodentia) from the Russian Far East].  

PubMed

Karyological (G-, C-, and NOR-banding) and allozyme analyses were carried out for island and continental populations of the vole Microtus fortis from the Far East of Russia. Variability of the autosome pair 7 was found. The presence of variation in the number of telomere heterochromatin blocks in the populations of Far Eastern voles was confirmed. NOR-staining of the Far Eastern vole chromosomes was carried out, showing stability of the number and the positions of the nucleolus organizer regions. Ten enzyme systems and three non-enzyme proteins (controlled in total by 25 interpretable loci) were examined in the Far Eastern vole from the island and continental populations. All of the loci were shown to be monomorphic, except for one esterase locus, which exhibited polymorphism at the intrapopulation and interpopulation levels. The issue of distribution of the Far Eastern vole subspecies is discussed. It is suggested that M. fortis pelliceus occurs not only in the Russian Far East, but also in Northern Transbaikalia. PMID:16871789

Sheremet'eva, I N; Kartavtseva, I V; Frisman, L V

2006-06-01

87

A New Genus of Aplodontid Rodent (Mammalia, Rodentia) from the Late Oligocene of Northern Junggar Basin, China  

PubMed Central

A new genus and species of aplodontid rodent, Proansomys dureensis, from the late Oligocene of the northern Junggar Basin of China is described. The new genus is referred to as Ansomyinae because the ectoloph on the upper cheek teeth, although not fully crested, has attained the same characteristic bucket-handle-shaped configuration as other members of the subfamily. It represents the earliest record of the subfamily yet discovered in Asia and is more plesiomorphic than species of the genus Ansomys in having a partly crested ectoloph, a lower degree of lophodonty, and less complex tooth basins (lacking accessory lophules). Proansomys has transitional features between Prosciurus and Ansomys, suggesting that the Ansomyinae derived from a group of aplodontids related to Prosciurus, as did other advanced aplodontid rodents. This provides new light on the paleobiogeography of the Ansomyinae.

Bi, Shundong; Meng, Jin; McLean, Sarah; Wu, Wenyu; Ni, Xijun; Ye, Jie

2013-01-01

88

A new genus of aplodontid rodent (Mammalia, Rodentia) from the late Oligocene of northern Junggar Basin, China.  

PubMed

A new genus and species of aplodontid rodent, Proansomys dureensis, from the late Oligocene of the northern Junggar Basin of China is described. The new genus is referred to as Ansomyinae because the ectoloph on the upper cheek teeth, although not fully crested, has attained the same characteristic bucket-handle-shaped configuration as other members of the subfamily. It represents the earliest record of the subfamily yet discovered in Asia and is more plesiomorphic than species of the genus Ansomys in having a partly crested ectoloph, a lower degree of lophodonty, and less complex tooth basins (lacking accessory lophules). Proansomys has transitional features between Prosciurus and Ansomys, suggesting that the Ansomyinae derived from a group of aplodontids related to Prosciurus, as did other advanced aplodontid rodents. This provides new light on the paleobiogeography of the Ansomyinae. PMID:23359629

Bi, Shundong; Meng, Jin; McLean, Sarah; Wu, Wenyu; Ni, Xijun; Ye, Jie

2013-01-01

89

Comparative chromosome painting map between two Ryukyu spiny rat species, Tokudaia osimensis and Tokudaia tokunoshimensis (Muridae, Rodentia).  

PubMed

Ryukyu spiny rats (genus Tokudaia) are indigenous species that are confined to three islands of the Nansei Shoto archipelago, Amami-Oshima, Tokunoshima and Okinawa-jima, Japan. Tokudaia tokunoshimensis from Tokunoshima Island and Tokudaia osimensis from Amami-Oshima Island are closely related taxonomically, although their karyotypes are quite different: the diploid chromosome numbers and sex chromosome constitution are 2n=45, X0/X0 for T. tokunoshimensis and 2n=25, X0/X0 for T. osimensis. We conducted comparative chromosome painting with chromosome-specific DNA probes of the laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) to molecularly examine the chromosome homology between T. tokunoshimensis and T. osimensis, and deduced a possible ancestral karyotype of Tokudaia species and the process of evolutionary chromosome rearrangements. The proposed ancestral karyotype with the diploid number of 2n=48, XX/XY was similar to the karyotype of T. tokunoshimensis, and the karyotype of T. osimensis would then have been established through at least 14 chromosomal changes, mainly centric fusion and tandem fusion, from the ancestral karyotype. The close karyological relationship between the ancestral karyotypes of Tokudaia and Apodemus also suggests that the chromosomal evolution in the Tokudaia-Apodemus lineage has been very slow and has accelerated only recently in the branch leading to T. osimensis. PMID:17874214

Nakamura, Taro; Kuroiwa, Asato; Nishida-Umehara, Chizuko; Matsubara, Kazumi; Yamada, Fumio; Matsuda, Yoichi

2007-01-01

90

Evolutionary and biological implications of dental mesial drift in rodents: the case of the Ctenodactylidae (Rodentia, Mammalia).  

PubMed

Dental characters are importantly used for reconstructing the evolutionary history of mammals, because teeth represent the most abundant material available for the fossil species. However, the characteristics of dental renewal are presently poorly used, probably because dental formulae are frequently not properly established, whereas they could be of high interest for evolutionary and developmental issues. One of the oldest rodent families, the Ctenodactylidae, is intriguing in having longstanding disputed dental formulae. Here, we investigated 70 skulls among all extant ctenodactylid genera (Ctenodactylus, Felovia, Massoutiera and Pectinator) by using X-ray conventional and synchrotron microtomography in order to solve and discuss these dental issues. Our study clearly indicates that Massoutiera, Felovia and Ctenodactylus differ from Pectinator not only by a more derived dentition, but also by a more derived eruptive sequence. In addition to molars, their dentition only includes the fourth deciduous premolars, and no longer bears permanent premolars, conversely to Pectinator. Moreover, we found that these premolars are lost during adulthood, because of mesial drift of molars. Mesial drift is a striking mechanism involving migration of teeth allowed by both bone remodeling and dental resorption. This dental innovation is to date poorly known in rodents, since it is only the second report described. Interestingly, we noted that dental drift in rodents is always associated with high-crowned teeth favoring molar size enlargement. It can thus represent another adaptation to withstand high wear, inasmuch as these rodents inhabit desert environments where dust is abundant. A more accurate study of mesial drift in rodents would be very promising from evolutionary, biological and orthodontic points of view. PMID:23185576

Gomes Rodrigues, Helder; Solé, Floréal; Charles, Cyril; Tafforeau, Paul; Vianey-Liaud, Monique; Viriot, Laurent

2012-01-01

91

Distribution of L1-retroposons on the giant sex chromosomes of Microtus cabrerae (Arvicolidae, Rodentia): functional and evolutionary implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long interspersed nuclear elements (L1 or LINE-1) are the most abundant and active retroposons in the mammalian genome. Traditionally,\\u000a the bulk of L1 sequences have been explained by the ‘selfish DNA’ hypothesis; however, recently it has been also argued that\\u000a L1s could play an important role in genome and gene organizations. The non-random chromosomal distribution of these retroelements\\u000a is a

J. A. Marchal; M. J. Acosta; M. Bullejos; E. Puerma; R. Díaz de la Guardia; A. Sánchez

2006-01-01

92

Germ cell differentiation and proliferation in the developing testis of the South American plains viscacha, Lagostomus maximus (Mammalia, Rodentia).  

PubMed

Cell proliferation and cell death are essential processes in the physiology of the developing testis that strongly influence the normal adult spermatogenesis. We analysed in this study the morphometry, the expression of the proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cell pluripotency marker OCT-4, germ cell marker VASA and apoptosis in the developing testes of Lagostomus maximus, a rodent in which female germ line develops through abolished apoptosis and unrestricted proliferation. Morphometry revealed an increment in the size of the seminiferous cords with increasing developmental age, arising from a significant increase of PCNA-positive germ cells and a stable proportion of PCNA-positive Sertoli cells. VASA showed a widespread cytoplasmic distribution in a great proportion of proliferating gonocytes that increased significantly at late development. In the somatic compartment, Leydig cells increased at mid-development, whereas peritubular cells showed a stable rate of proliferation. In contrast to other mammals, OCT-4 positive gonocytes increased throughout development reaching 90% of germ cells in late-developing testis, associated with a conspicuous increase in circulating FSH from mid- to late-gestation. TUNEL analysis was remarkable negative, and only a few positive cells were detected in the somatic compartment. These results show that the South American plains viscacha displays a distinctive pattern of testis development characterized by a sustained proliferation of germ cells throughout development, with no signs of apoptosis cell demise, in a peculiar endocrine in utero ambiance that seems to promote the increase of spermatogonial number as a primary direct effect of FSH. PMID:21554773

Gonzalez, C R; Muscarsel Isla, M L; Fraunhoffer, N A; Leopardo, N P; Vitullo, A D

2012-08-01

93

Thrichomys laurentius (Rodentia; Echimyidae) as a Putative Reservoir of Leishmania infantum and L. braziliensis: Patterns of Experimental Infection  

PubMed Central

The importance of the genus Thrichomys in the retention of infection and transmission of Leishmania species is supported by previous studies that describe an ancient interaction between caviomorphs and trypanosomatids and report the natural infection of Thrichomys spp. Moreover, these rodents are widely dispersed in Brazil and recognized as important hosts of other tripanosomatids. Our main purpose was to evaluate the putative role of Thrichomys laurentius in the retention of infection and amplification of the transmission cycle of Leishmania infantum and L. braziliensis. Male and female T. laurentius (n?=?24) born in captivity were evaluated for the retention of infection with these Leishmania species and followed up by parasitological, serological, hematological, biochemical, histological, and molecular assays for 3, 6, 9, or 12 months post infection (mpi). T. laurentius showed its competence as maintenance host for the two inoculated Leishmania species. Four aspects should be highlighted: (i) re-isolation of parasites 12 mpi; (ii) the low parasitic burden displayed by T. laurentius tissues; (iii) the early onset and maintenance of humoral response, and (iv) the similar pattern of infection by the two Leishmania species. Both Leishmania species demonstrated the ability to invade and maintain itself in viscera and skin of T. laurentius, and no rodent displayed any lesion, histological changes, or clinical evidence of infection. We also wish to point out the irrelevance of the adjective dermotropic or viscerotropic to qualify L. braziliensis and L. infantum, respectively, when these species are hosted by nonhuman hosts. Our data suggest that T. laurentius may act at least as a maintenance host of both tested Leishmania species since it maintained long-lasting infections. Moreover, it cannot be discarded that Leishmania spp. infection in free-ranging T. laurentius could result in higher parasite burden due the more stressing conditions in the wild. Therefore the tissular parasitism of the skin, infectiveness to the vector, and amplification of the transmission cycle of both Leishmania species could be expected.

Roque, Andre Luiz Rodrigues; Cupolillo, Elisa; Marchevsky, Renato Sergio; Jansen, Ana Maria

2010-01-01

94

Possible burrows of mylagaulids (Rodentia: Aplodontoidea: Mylagaulidae) from the late Miocene (Barstovian) Pawnee Creek Formation of northeastern Colorado  

Microsoft Academic Search

The massive siltstone beds of the late Miocene (Barstovian) Pawnee Creek Formation in Logan County, northeastern Colorado, contain abundant terrestrial vertebrate burrows. Among these are distinctive claw-marked burrows attributable to the extinct mylagaulid rodent Pterogaulus [= Mylagaulus] laevisKorth, 2000. These burrows differ in several respects from the spiraling Daemonelix burrows of fossorial beavers. The Pawnee Creek burrows are slightly ovate in

Katrina E. Gobetz

2006-01-01

95

Evolutionary and Biological Implications of Dental Mesial Drift in Rodents: The Case of the Ctenodactylidae (Rodentia, Mammalia)  

PubMed Central

Dental characters are importantly used for reconstructing the evolutionary history of mammals, because teeth represent the most abundant material available for the fossil species. However, the characteristics of dental renewal are presently poorly used, probably because dental formulae are frequently not properly established, whereas they could be of high interest for evolutionary and developmental issues. One of the oldest rodent families, the Ctenodactylidae, is intriguing in having longstanding disputed dental formulae. Here, we investigated 70 skulls among all extant ctenodactylid genera (Ctenodactylus, Felovia, Massoutiera and Pectinator) by using X-ray conventional and synchrotron microtomography in order to solve and discuss these dental issues. Our study clearly indicates that Massoutiera, Felovia and Ctenodactylus differ from Pectinator not only by a more derived dentition, but also by a more derived eruptive sequence. In addition to molars, their dentition only includes the fourth deciduous premolars, and no longer bears permanent premolars, conversely to Pectinator. Moreover, we found that these premolars are lost during adulthood, because of mesial drift of molars. Mesial drift is a striking mechanism involving migration of teeth allowed by both bone remodeling and dental resorption. This dental innovation is to date poorly known in rodents, since it is only the second report described. Interestingly, we noted that dental drift in rodents is always associated with high-crowned teeth favoring molar size enlargement. It can thus represent another adaptation to withstand high wear, inasmuch as these rodents inhabit desert environments where dust is abundant. A more accurate study of mesial drift in rodents would be very promising from evolutionary, biological and orthodontic points of view.

Gomes Rodrigues, Helder; Sole, Floreal; Charles, Cyril; Tafforeau, Paul; Vianey-Liaud, Monique; Viriot, Laurent

2012-01-01

96

The helminth parasites of two sympatric species of the genus Apodemus (Rodentia, Muridae) from south-eastern Slovakia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The helminths of two sympatric species of rodents, the striped field mouse Apodemus agrarius and the yellow-necked mouse, Apodemus flavicollis from Slovakia were studied to determine whether there are similarities in the composition of the helminth fauna of two closely\\u000a related host species living in the same area. A total of twelve species of helminths were identified in these rodent

Jarmila Ondríková; Dana Miklisová; Alexis Ribas; Michal Stanko

2010-01-01

97

Sexual size dimorphism in ground squirrels (Rodentia: Sciuridae: Marmotini) does not correlate with body size and sociality  

PubMed Central

Introduction Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is a widespread phenomenon in animals including mammals. It has been demonstrated that across species, the direction and magnitude of sexual dimorphism in body size often corresponds to social systems. Moreover, many animal lineages conform to “Rensch’s rule”, which states that male-biased SSD increases with body size. We tested whether considerable differences in sociality and large variation in body size were connected with the evolution of SSD in the structural body size of ground squirrels, an otherwise ecologically relatively homogenous group of terrestrial rodents. Results We found the general trend of male-biased SSD in ground squirrels, however, male size increases nearly perfectly isometrically with female size among species and sociality does not explain departures from this relationship. Species with different sociality grades significantly differ in body size, with the most social species tending to be the largest. Conclusions We suggest that lack of conformity with Rensch´s rule in ground squirrels may be attributed to their low variation in SSD, and briefly discuss three potential causes of small magnitude of SSD in the structural size in rodents: low selection on SSD in structural dimensions, ontogenetic and genetic constraints and the existence of ecological/selection factors preventing the evolution of extensive SSD.

2013-01-01

98

Mitochondrial DNA and karyotypic data confirm the presence of Mus indutus and Mus minutoides (Mammalia, Rodentia, Muridae, Nannomys) in Botswana  

PubMed Central

Abstract We use a combination of cytochrome b sequence data and karyological evidence to confirm the presence of Mus indutus and Mus minutoides in Botswana. Our data include sampling from five localities from across the country, including one site in northwestern Botswana where both species were captured in syntopy. Additionally, we find evidence for two mitochondrial lineages of M. minutoides in northwestern Botswana that differ by 5% in sequence variation. Also, we report that M. minutoides in Botswana have the 2n=34 karyotype with the presence of a (X.1) sex-autosome translocation.

McDonough, Molly M.; Sotero-Caio, Cibele G.; Ferguson, Adam W.; Lewis, Patrick J.; Tswiio, Matlhogonolo; Thies, Monte L.

2013-01-01

99

Anti-leishmanial antibodies during natural infection of Psammomys obesus and Meriones shawi (Rodentia, Gerbillinae) by Leishmania major.  

PubMed

Sera from 77 rodents (Psammomys obesus: 64; Meriones (M.) shawi: 10; M. libycus: 3) trapped in a focus of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) (Leishmania (L.) major) were examined for the presence of anti-leishmanial antibodies by the indirect fluorscence antibody technique (IFAT) (L. major antigens) using homologous antiglobulins and/or anti-Rattus conjugates. Sera from 21 animals were positive with titres that ranged from 1: 20 up to 1: 640. The investigation revealed that a good correlation existed between the occurrence of antileishmanial antibodies in the sera and amastigotes in the rodents' ears. The data also suggest the suitability of the IFAT as an epidemiological tool to estimate rates of infection by L. major in Psammomys obesus and Meriones Spp. in foci of ZCL. PMID:2658879

Ben-Ismail, R; Khaled, S; Makni, S; Ben Rachid, M S

1989-03-01

100

Penial morphology in three species of Brazilian tuco-tucos, Ctenomys torquatus, C. minutus, and C. flamarioni (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae).  

PubMed

The present study analyses the glans penis and baculum morphology of three Brazilian tuco-tucos, Ctenomys torquatus Lichtenstein, 1830, Ctenomys minutus Nehring, 1887 and Ctenomys flamarioni Travi, 1981, in order to identify possible variations and understand some more about this taxonomically complex group. We used fixed penis from 15 previously listed adult specimens. For a more detailed baculum analysis, the penis underwent dissection and diaphanisation, whereas to analyse the glans penis surface we used Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Results showed striking differences in baculum morphology among the three species. While C. minutus have a particular V-shaped proximal baculum tip, C. flamarioni baculum is thin throughout the shaft with rounded proximal and distal tips. Ctenomys torquatus have a shorter and larger baculum, similar to what has previously been described for the species. Glans penis surface microstructure analyses also revealed inter-specific differences, with penial spines varying in shape, size and, especially density. Although C. torquatus has a relatively small penis, it has the largest penial spine density, which suggests a more complex penial ornamentation in this species. PMID:23644803

Rocha-Barbosa, O; Bernardo, J S L; Loguercio, M F C; Freitas, T R O; Santos-Mallet, J R; Bidau, C J

2013-02-01

101

Explosive chromosome evolution and speciation in the gerbil genus Taterillus (Rodentia, Gerbillinae): a case of two new cryptic species.  

PubMed

The five morphologically sibling gerbil species of the genus Taterillus in West Africa were first identified from karyotypes. These species possess an XX/XY(1)Y(2) sex-chromosome system and are characterized by significant karyotypic reorganization, thus making them a suitable model for studying the role of chromosomal rearrangements in the speciation process. We present here a description of two new cytotypes, Taterillus sp. 1 and Taterillus sp. 2, from the Lake Chad area, the former having a 2n = 22/23, NFa = 40, and the latter 2n = 24/25, NFa = 44. Comparison of their G- and C- banding patterns with those of T. pygargus (2n = 22/23, NFa = 38/40), examined in an earlier paper, revealed that all three species differ from each other by 7 to 11 chromosomal rearrangements, comprising tandem translocations, pericentric inversions, and Robertsonian metacentrics displaying monobrachial homology. Meiotic configurations formed in potential hybrids among any of these three forms would consist of complex rings and chains, alone or in combination, resulting, as expected, in a significant disruption of gametogenesis. These results provide support for assigning Taterillus sp. 1 and Taterillus sp. 2 to two different biological species, which, as demonstrated by our preliminary molecular studies, would have emerged recently. Possible factors responsible for the rapid karyotypic evolution and speciation in this West African gerbil complex are discussed. PMID:12438787

Dobigny, G; Aniskin, V; Volobouev, V

2002-01-01

102

In the Wake of Invasion: Tracing the Historical Biogeography of the South American Cricetid Radiation (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae)  

PubMed Central

The Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI) was greatly influenced by the completion of the Isthmus of Panama and impacted the composition of modern faunal assemblages in the Americas. However, the contribution of preceding events has been comparatively less explored, even though early immigrants in the fossil records are evidence for waif dispersals. The cricetid rodents of the subfamily Sigmodontinae are a classic example of a species-rich South American radiation resulting from an early episode of North American invasion. Here, we provide a temporal and spatial framework to address key aspects of the historical biogeography and diversification of this diverse mammal group by using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA datasets coupled with methods of divergence time estimation, ancestral area reconstruction and comparative phylogenetics. Relaxed-clock time estimates indicate that divergence of the Sigmodontinae began in the middle–late Miocene (ca. 12–9 Ma). Dispersal-vicariance analyses point to the arrival of a single lineage of northern invaders with a widespread ancestral distribution and imply that the initial differentiation between Central and South America gave rise to the most basal groups within the subfamily. These two major clades diversified in the late Miocene followed by the radiation of main tribes until the early Pliocene. Within the Oryzomyalia, tribes diverged initially in eastern South America whereas multiple dispersals into the Andes promoted further diversification of the majority of modern genera. A comparatively uniform background tempo of diversification explains the species richness of sigmodontines across most nodes, except for two akodontine genera with recent increases in diversification rates. The bridging of the Central American seaway and episodes of low sea levels likely facilitated the invasion of South America long before the onset of the post-Isthmian phase of the GABI.

Leite, Rafael N.; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Almeida, Francisca C.; Werneck, Fernanda P.; Rogers, Duke S.; Weksler, Marcelo

2014-01-01

103

Molecular genetic typing of three forms of wood and field mice belonging to a transpalearctic genus (Apodemus, Muridae, Rodentia)  

SciTech Connect

The genomes of three species of wood mouse (Apodemus fulvipectus and A. ponticus from the Caucasus and A. argenteus from Japan) were compared by means of restriction analysis of nuclear DNA. The species are differentiated from each other and from previously studied species. Each species has its species-specific features. Within the genus Apodemus, A. ponticus is most closely related to the European species A. sylvaticus and A. flavicollis. A. fulvipectus has a peculiar type of restriction with EcoR I (specific for dispersed repeats) and Hind III (specific for satDNA). The genome of this species contains three families of EcoR I repeats previously found in various species (European and Asian) of wood mouse and Hind III components characteristic of both wood and field mice. A. argenteus differs from all other forms of Apodemus, the genome of which contains the 375-bp Hind III satellite, by the presence of an EcoR I satDNA fraction consisting of 240-bp repeating units. 22 refs., 2 figs.

Chelomina, G.N. [Institute of Biology and Soil Sciences, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Lyapunova, E.A.; Vorontsov, N.N. [Kol`tsov Institute of Developmental Biology, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

1995-06-01

104

Assessment of Three Mitochondrial Genes (16S, Cytb, CO1) for Identifying Species in the Praomyini Tribe (Rodentia: Muridae)  

PubMed Central

The Praomyini tribe is one of the most diverse and abundant groups of Old World rodents. Several species are known to be involved in crop damage and in the epidemiology of several human and cattle diseases. Due to the existence of sibling species their identification is often problematic. Thus an easy, fast and accurate species identification tool is needed for non-systematicians to correctly identify Praomyini species. In this study we compare the usefulness of three genes (16S, Cytb, CO1) for identifying species of this tribe. A total of 426 specimens representing 40 species (sampled across their geographical range) were sequenced for the three genes. Nearly all of the species included in our study are monophyletic in the neighbour joining trees. The degree of intra-specific variability tends to be lower than the divergence between species, but no barcoding gap is detected. The success rate of the statistical methods of species identification is excellent (up to 99% or 100% for statistical supervised classification methods as the k-Nearest Neighbour or Random Forest). The 16S gene is 2.5 less variable than the Cytb and CO1 genes. As a result its discriminatory power is smaller. To sum up, our results suggest that using DNA markers for identifying species in the Praomyini tribe is a largely valid approach, and that the CO1 and Cytb genes are better DNA markers than the 16S gene. Our results confirm the usefulness of statistical methods such as the Random Forest and the 1-NN methods to assign a sequence to a species, even when the number of species is relatively large. Based on our NJ trees and the distribution of all intraspecific and interspecific pairwise nucleotide distances, we highlight the presence of several potentially new species within the Praomyini tribe that should be subject to corroboration assessments.

Nicolas, Violaine; Schaeffer, Brigitte; Missoup, Alain Didier; Kennis, Jan; Colyn, Marc; Denys, Christiane; Tatard, Caroline; Cruaud, Corinne; Laredo, Catherine

2012-01-01

105

Karyotype evolution and phylogenetic relationships of hamsters (Cricetidae, Muroidea, Rodentia) inferred from chromosomal painting and banding comparison  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evolutionary success of rodents of the superfamily Muroidea makes this taxon the most interesting for evolution studies,\\u000a including study at the chromosomal level. Chromosome-specific painting probes from the Chinese hamster and the Syrian (golden)\\u000a hamster were used to delimit homologous chromosomal segments among 15 hamster species from eight genera: Allocricetulus, Calomyscus, Cricetulus, Cricetus, Mesocricetus, Peromyscus, Phodopus and Tscherskia (Cricetidae,

Svetlana A. Romanenko; Vitaly T. Volobouev; Polina L. Perelman; Vladimir S. Lebedev; Natalya A. Serdukova; Vladimir A. Trifonov; Larisa S. Biltueva; Wenhui Nie; Patricia C. M. O’Brien; Nina Sh. Bulatova; Malcolm A. Ferguson-Smith; Fengtang Yang; Alexander S. Graphodatsky

2007-01-01

106

Community Analysis of Muridae (Mammalia, Rodentia) Diversity in Guinea: A Special Emphasis on Mastomys Species and Lassa Fever Distributions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Murid rodent diversity has been sampled following the 9th Meridian in the east of Guinea from the forest region to Sudanian savannas of southern Mali. This represents the first small\\u000a mammals survey in North Guinea. Murid diversity patterns have been researched using correspondence analysis and faunal comparisons.\\u000a A difference between southern forest communities and northern ones is observed. Mastomys

E. Lecompte; E. Calvet; M. D. Camara; A. Doré; K. Koulémou; F. Kourouma; B. Soropogui; O. Sylla; B. Allali-Kouadio; S. Kouassi-Kan; C. Akoua-Koffi; J. Meulen; L. Koivogui

107

Masticatory muscle architecture in the Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus (Mammalia, Rodentia): new insights into the evolution of hystricognathy  

PubMed Central

We present the first descriptive comparison of the skull, mandible and jaw muscles of the recently recovered Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus. The gross anatomy of five specimens captured in Laos and internal architecture of the jaw musculature were studied using dissections. The following muscles are described: temporal, masseter, pterygoids, digastric, mylohyoid, geniohyoid and transverse mandibular. The description of the masticatory apparatus of L. aenigmamus offers a rare opportunity to assess the order of establishment of the morphological characters during the evolution of Ctenohystrica. Striking convergences have occurred during the evolution of Diatomyidae and L. aenigmamus presents a unique combination of myological features that corresponds to a mixture of sciurognathous and hystricognathous characters. If L. aenigmamus is a sciurognathous rodent, we have to assume that it independently acquired a pars reflexa of the superficial masseter. We show for the first time that the development of this pars reflexa has occurred several times during the evolution of Ctenohystrica and can no longer be considered a synapomorphic feature of ‘Hystricognathi’. These results bring new insights into the evolution of hystricognathy and have profound implications for the interpretation of the fossil record of early hystricognath rodents.

Hautier, Lionel; Saksiri, Soonchan

2009-01-01

108

Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of woolly flying squirrel (Rodentia: Sciuridae), inferred from mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequences.  

PubMed

To investigate the genetic diversity between the populations of woolly flying squirrels (Eupetaurus) from the eastern and western extremes of the Himalayas, partial mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequences (390-810 bp) that were determined from the museum specimens were analyzed using maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods. The molecular data reveal that the two specimens that were collected in northwestern Yunnan (China) are members of the genus Eupetaurus. Reconstructed phylogenetic relationships show that the populations of Eupetaurus in the eastern and western extremes of the Himalayas are two distinct species with significant genetic differences (12%) and diverged about 10.8 million years ago. Eupetaurus is significantly different from Petaurista and Pteromys. The level of estimated pairwise-sequence divergence observed between Eupetaurus and Petaurista or Pteromys is greater than that observed between Eupetaurus and Trogopterus, Belomys, Glaucomys, or Hylopetes. Considering the divergence time of the two Eupetaurus groups, the glaciations and the uplift of the Himalayas and Qinghai-Tibet plateau during the Pliocene-Pleistocene period might be the major factors affecting the present distribution of Eupetaurus along the Himalayas. PMID:15522800

Yu, Fahong; Yu, Farong; McGuire, Peter M; Kilpatrick, C William; Pang, Junfeng; Wang, Yingxiang; Lu, Shunqing; Woods, Charles A

2004-12-01

109

The complete mitochondrial genome of the Korean red-backed vole, Myodes regulus (Rodentia, Murinae) from Korea.  

PubMed

We have determined the complete mitochondrial genome (NC_016427) of the Korean red-backed vole, Myodes regulus, which is distributed in South Korea. The total length of the M. regulus mitogenome is 16,379 bp, with a base composition of 33.0% A, 26.7% T, 27.1% C, and 13.2% G. The total length of the 13 protein-coding genes is 11,396 bp long. PMID:22409761

Kim, Hye Ri; Park, Yung Chul

2012-04-01

110

Historical biogeography at the crossroads of the northern continents: molecular phylogenetics of red-backed voles (Rodentia: Arvicolinae).  

PubMed

Evolutionary relationships of red-backed voles and their relatives were examined and used to test biogeographic hypotheses. Sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene were obtained for 25 individuals representing Alticola macrotis, Clethrionomys californicus, C. gapperi, C. glareolus, C. rutilus, and C. rufocanus. These were combined with 21 partial sequences from GenBank for C. regulus, C. rex, C. rufocanus, C. rutilus, Eothenomys imaizumii, E. melanogaster, Phaulomys andersoni, and P. smithii. Complete sequences of three species of Microtus (M. montanus, M. oeconomus, and M. pennsylvanicus), representative species of other arvicoline genera (Myopus, Synaptomys, Arvicola, Ellobius, Ondatra, Lemmus, Dicrostonyx, and Phenacomys), and a sigmodontine representative (Peromyscus) were included as outgroups. We used maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, distance, and Bayesian based methods and conducted statistical tests on proposed hypotheses of phylogenetic relationships and biogeographic histories. A close relationship of species representing the genera Alticola, Clethrionomys, and Eothenomys was supported (Clethrionomyini); however, the genus Clethrionomys was paraphyletic with respect to both Alticola and Eothenomys. Three major clades were identified as Asian (Eothenomys andersoni, E. smithii, C. rex, C. regulus, and C. rufocanus), Trans-beringian (Alticola macrotis, C. californicus, C. gapperi, C. glarelolus, and C. rutilus), and Taiwanese (E. melanogaster). These results are consistent with the fossil record which indicates an initial diversification in Asia followed by colonization of the Nearctic on at least two occasions. The holarctic species, C. rutilus, appears to have either reinvaded Asia from North America or colonized North America more recently (late Pleistocene) than the two species of Clethrionomys (C. gapperi and C. californicus) that are endemic to North America (early to mid-Pleistocene). Finally, C. gapperi, appears to be comprised of an eastern and a western species, the former with affinities to the Asian C. glareolus and the latter more closely related to C. californicus. PMID:15012954

Cook, Joseph A; Runck, Amy M; Conroy, Chris J

2004-03-01

111

A remarkable case of micro-endemism in Laonastes aenigmamus (Diatomyidae, Rodentia) revealed by nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence data.  

PubMed

L. aenigmamus is endemic to the limestone formations of the Khammuan Province (Lao PDR), and is strongly specialized ecologically. From the survey of 137 individuals collected from 38 localities, we studied the phylogeography of this species using one mitochondrial (Cyt b) and two nuclear genes (BFIBR and GHR). Cyt b analyses reveal a strong mtDNA phylogeographical structure: 8 major geographical clades differing by 5-14% sequence divergence were identified, most of them corresponding to distinct karst areas. Nuclear markers display congruent results but with a less genetic structuring. Together, the data strongly suggest an inland insular model for Laonastes population structure. With 8 to 16 evolutionary significant units in a small area (about 200×50 km) this represents an exceptional example of micro-endemism. Our results suggest that L. aenigmamus may represent a complex of species and/or sub-species. The common ancestor of all Laonastes may have been widely distributed within the limestone formations of the Khammuan Province at the end of Miocene/beginning of the Pliocene. Parallel events of karst fragmentation and population isolation would have occurred during the Pleistocene or/and the end of the Pliocene. The limited gene flow detected between populations from different karst blocks restrains the likelihood of survival of Laonastes. This work increases the necessity for a strict protection of this rare animal and its habitat and provides exclusive information, essential to the organization of its protection. PMID:23155377

Nicolas, Violaine; Herbreteau, Vincent; Couloux, Arnaud; Keovichit, Kham; Douangboupha, Bounneuang; Hugot, Jean-Pierre

2012-01-01

112

Body size variability and water balance: a comparison between mainland and island populations of Mastomys huberti (Rodentia: Muridae) in Senegal.  

PubMed

Generally rodents are found to be larger on islands than on the mainland. However, there are some exceptions to this rule, and the aim of this paper is to examine one of them. On the mainland of Senegal, Mastomys huberti occupies humid habitats. However, it occurs also on dry and sandy islands (Saloum delta), where its representatives are dwarf. Since water availability appeared to be the limiting factor in these islands when compared to the mainland, we studied water turnover characteristics in relation to body size, in mainland and island populations at the end of the dry season, under both field and laboratory conditions. All populations were found to be water balanced in their natural habitats. They presented similar rates of water turnover, even though island animals were subjected to stronger constraints than mainland ones. Laboratory experiments suggested that the physiological plasticity of one of the island populations may be reduced. Island populations have a higher kidney size to body weight ratio than those from the mainland. We propose that smaller size in the islands allows the maintenance of water balance with a smaller amount of water, and that a higher ratio of kidney filtration surface to body size may help Mastomys huberti to survive in dry islands. We discuss the factors responsible for body size variability and variation in water exchange characteristics and conclude that different factors could explain body size variation among island populations, depending on the species considered and the ecological constraints met within the islands. PMID:7729506

Ganem, G; Granjon, L; Ba, K; Duplantier, J M

1995-04-15

113

Genetic Pool Information Reflects Highly Suitable Areas: The Case of Two Parapatric Endangered Species of Tuco-tucos (Rodentia: Ctenomiydae).  

PubMed

Conservation of small mammals requires knowledge of the genetically and ecologically meaningful spatial scales at which species respond to habitat modifications. Conservation strategies can be improved through the use of ecological niche models and genetic data to classify areas of high environmental suitability. In this study, we applied a Maxent model integrated with genetic information (nucleotide diversity, haplotype diversity and Fu's Fs neutrality tests) to evaluate potential genetic pool populations with highly suitable areas for two parapatric endangered species of tuco-tucos (Ctenomys minutus and C. lami). Our results demonstrated that both species were largely influenced by vegetation and soil variables at a landscape scale and inhabit a highly specific niche. Ctenomys minutus was also influenced by the variable altitude; the species was associated with low altitudes (sea level). Our model of genetic data associated with environmental suitability indicate that the genetic pool data were associated with highly suitable areas for C. minutus. This pattern was not evident for C. lami, but this outcome could be a consequence of the restricted range of the species. The preservation of species requires not only detailed knowledge of their natural history and genetic structure but also information on the availability of suitable areas where species can survive, and such knowledge can aid significantly in conservation planning. This finding reinforces the use of these two techniques for planning conservation actions. PMID:24819251

Galiano, Daniel; Bernardo-Silva, Jorge; Freitas, Thales R O de

2014-01-01

114

Convergent evolution of aquatic foraging in a new genus and species (Rodentia: Muridae) from Sulawesi Island, Indonesia.  

PubMed

The island of Sulawesi, in Indonesia, lies at the crossroads of the Indo-Australian Archipelago and has remained isolated from the Asian (Sunda) and Australian (Sahul) continental shelves for at least the last 10 million years. Of the 50 native species of rodents on Sulawesi, all are endemic and represent the evolution of a variety of ecological and morphological forms within the Muridae and Sciuridae. Carnivorous rodents have evolved, perhaps independently, in Muridae from the Philippines, Sulawesi, and Sahul, but semi-aquatic murids are only known from Sahul. Here we describe a new genus and species of insectivorous water rat from Sulawesi. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that it is related to the shrew rats of Sulawesi and represents an origin of aquatic carnivory that is independent from the evolution of water rats on Sahul. Many areas of Sulawesi have not been surveyed systematically and current lists of mammal species are likely to dramatically underestimate actual diversity. PMID:24943633

Rowe, Kevin C; Achmadi, Anang S; Esselstyn, Jacob A

2014-01-01

115

Phylogenomics of the genus Mus (Rodentia; Muridae): extensive genome repatterning is not restricted to the house mouse  

PubMed Central

The house mouse (Mus musculus) is universally adopted as the mammalian laboratory model, and it is involved in most studies of large-scale comparative genomics. Paradoxically, this taxon is rarely the index species for evolutionary analyses of genome architecture owing to its highly rearranged karyotype. To unravel the origin and nature of this extensive repatterning genome, we performed a multidirectional chromosome painting study of representative species within the genus Mus. However, the latter includes four extant subgenera (Mus, Coelomys, Nannomys and Pyromys) between which the phylogenetic relationships remain elusive despite the numerous molecular studies. Comparative genomic maps were established using chromosome-specific painting probes of the laboratory mouse and Nannomys minutoides. Hence, by integrating closely related species within Mus, this study allowed us to: (i) unambiguously resolve for the first time the long-standing controversial phylogeny, (ii) trace the evolution of genome organization in the house mouse, (iii) track rearrangements that necessitated new centromere locations, i.e. formation of neocentromere or reactivation of latent centromeres, (iv) reveal an extremely high rate of karyotypic evolution, with a 10- to 30-fold acceleration which was coincidental with subgeneric cladogenesis and (v) highlight genomic areas of interest for high-resolution studies on neocentromere formation and synteny breakpoints.

Veyrunes, Frederic; Dobigny, Gauthier; Yang, Fengtang; O'Brien, Patricia C.M; Catalan, Josette; Robinson, Terence J; Britton-Davidian, Janice

2006-01-01

116

Caamembecaia gratiosus n. gen., n. sp. (Acari: Trombiculidae), from Trinomys gratiosus (Gunter) (Rodentia: Echimydae), of Atlantic forest in southeastern Brazil.  

PubMed

From June 1999 to May 2001, small mammals were captured in three areas of the Atlantic Forest in Southeastern Brazil and examined for ectoparasites. Analysis of ectoparasites revealed the presence of a new chigger genus and species, Caamembecaia gratiosus, from Trinomys gratiosus. This is the first record of a chigger from T. gratiosus. PMID:16830704

Gazêta, Gilberto S; Amorim, Marinete; Bossi, David E P; Linhares, Arício X; Serra-Freire, Nicolau M

2006-03-01

117

Genetic Pool Information Reflects Highly Suitable Areas: The Case of Two Parapatric Endangered Species of Tuco-tucos (Rodentia: Ctenomiydae)  

PubMed Central

Conservation of small mammals requires knowledge of the genetically and ecologically meaningful spatial scales at which species respond to habitat modifications. Conservation strategies can be improved through the use of ecological niche models and genetic data to classify areas of high environmental suitability. In this study, we applied a Maxent model integrated with genetic information (nucleotide diversity, haplotype diversity and Fu's Fs neutrality tests) to evaluate potential genetic pool populations with highly suitable areas for two parapatric endangered species of tuco-tucos (Ctenomys minutus and C. lami). Our results demonstrated that both species were largely influenced by vegetation and soil variables at a landscape scale and inhabit a highly specific niche. Ctenomys minutus was also influenced by the variable altitude; the species was associated with low altitudes (sea level). Our model of genetic data associated with environmental suitability indicate that the genetic pool data were associated with highly suitable areas for C. minutus. This pattern was not evident for C. lami, but this outcome could be a consequence of the restricted range of the species. The preservation of species requires not only detailed knowledge of their natural history and genetic structure but also information on the availability of suitable areas where species can survive, and such knowledge can aid significantly in conservation planning. This finding reinforces the use of these two techniques for planning conservation actions.

Galiano, Daniel; Bernardo-Silva, Jorge; de Freitas, Thales R. O.

2014-01-01

118

Robertsonian polymorphism, B chromosomes variation and sex chromosomes heteromorphism in the african water rat Dasymys (Rodentia, Muridae).  

PubMed

Chromosome banding analysis (G- and C-bands) of Dasymys rufulus from Senegal, Mali and the Ivory Coast, and D. cf. incomtus from Eastern and South-western Ethiopia was carried out. The diploid numbers (2N) in the former species range between 36 and 39 due to the presence of 0-3 small biarmed heterochromatic B chromosomes, resulting in a corresponding variation of the number of autosomal arms (NFa) between 44 and 50. The basic autosomal set was, however, constant and identical in these specimens. The karyotypes of D. cf. incomtus from Eastern and Western Ethiopia were found to be different (2N = 40 and 38, respectively). Comparison of G-banding patterns of the species studied revealed that they differ from each others by 1-2 Rb fusions/fissions, one paracentric inversion and heteromorphous sex chromosomes resulting from addition/deletion of heterochromatic blocks (X) and pericentric inversion (Y). In the light of the available chromosome banding data, the significance of intraspecies karyotypic variability within D. cf. incomtus and its relevance to the systematics of the genus are discussed. PMID:11196132

Volobouev, V T; Sicard, B; Aniskin, V M; Gautun, J C; Granjon, L

2000-01-01

119

Dating an impressive Neotropical radiation: Molecular time estimates for the Sigmodontinae (Rodentia) provide insights into its historical biogeography.  

PubMed

With about 400 living species and 82 genera, rodents of the subfamily Sigmodontinae comprise one of the most diverse and more broadly distributed Neotropical mammalian clades. There has been much debate on the origin of the lineage or the lineages of sigmodontines that entered South America, the timing of entrance and different aspects of further diversification within South America. The ages of divergence of the main lineages and the crown age of the subfamily were estimated by using sequences of the interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein and cytochrome b genes for a dense sigmodontine and muroid sampling. Bayesian inference using three fossil calibration points and a relaxed molecular clock estimated a middle Miocene origin for Sigmodontinae (?12Ma), with most tribes diversifying throughout the Late Miocene (6.9-9.4Ma). These estimates together results of analyses of ancestral area reconstructions suggest a distribution for the most recent common ancestor of Sigmodontinae in Central-South America and a South American distribution for the most recent common ancestor of Oryzomyalia. PMID:23257216

Parada, Andrés; Pardiñas, Ulyses F J; Salazar-Bravo, Jorge; D'Elía, Guillermo; Palma, R Eduardo

2013-03-01

120

Revision of the Wind River faunas, early Eocene of central Wyoming. IX - The oldest known hystricomorphous rodent (Mammalia: Rodentia)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rostral portion of the skull of a new genus and species of rodent, Armintomys tullbergi, from the earliest middle Eocene of the Wind River Basin (Wyoming) provides the geologically oldest known record of the hystricomorphous zygomasseteric structure. Armintomys also preserves the oldest known occurrence of incisor enamel that is transitional from pauciserial to uniserial. Other dental characters include: anteriorly grooved incisor, small premolars, and relatively primitive sciuravidlike molars. Analysis of this unique combination of characters implies that Armintomys is the oldest known myomorph rodent and the only known representative of a new family. Armintomyidae, which is referred, with question, to the myomorph superfamily Dipodoidea. Armintomys is more primitive, especially in premolar retention and structure, than the Bridgerian zapodid Elymys from Nevada, but adds to evidence from the latter for an early origin and radiation of dipodoid rodents.

Dawson, Mary R.; Krishtalka, Leonard; Stucky, Richard K.

1990-01-01

121

Crop losses due to outbreaks of Mastomys natalensis (Smith, 1834) Muridae, Rodentia, in the Lindi Region of Tanzania  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1989, a widespread outbreak of the multimammate rat—Mastomys natalensis (Smith, 1834) occurred in the Lindi Region in southern Tanzania. Population densities of the rodent were estimated in some areas to be over 1400ratsha?1. Crop loss due to the outbreak was evaluated in the region. A total yield loss of 48% of maize, sorghum, paddy, and pulses that were in

Patrick S. Mwanjabe; Florid B. Sirima; Juma Lusingu

2002-01-01

122

Phylogeny and biogeography of the Petaurista philippensis complex (Rodentia: Sciuridae), inter- and intraspecific relationships inferred from molecular and morphometric analysis.  

PubMed

With modified DNA extraction and purification protocols, the complete cytochrome b gene sequences (1140 bp) were determined from degraded museum specimens. Molecular analysis and morphological examination of cranial characteristics of the giant flying squirrels of Petaurista philippensis complex (P. grandis, P. hainana, and P. yunanensis) and other Petaurista species yielded new insights into long-standing controversies in the Petaurista systematics. Patterns of genetic variations and morphological differences observed in this study indicate that P. hainana, P. albiventer, and P. yunanensis can be recognized as distinct species, and P. grandis and P. petaurista are conspecific populations. Phylogenetic relationships reconstructed by using parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian methods reveal that, with P. leucogenys as the basal branch, all Petaurista groups formed two distinct clades. Petaurista philippensis, P. hainana, P. yunanensis, and P. albiventer are clustered in the same clade, while P. grandis shows a close relationship to P. petaurista. Deduced divergence times based on Bayesian analysis and the transversional substitution at the third codon suggest that the retreating of glaciers and upheavals or movements of tectonic plates in the Pliocene-Pleistocene were the major factors responsible for the present geographical distributions of Petaurista groups. PMID:16414285

Yu, Farong; Yu, Fahong; Pang, Junfeng; Kilpatrick, C William; McGuire, Peter M; Wang, Yingxiang; Lu, Shunqing; Woods, Charles A

2006-03-01

123

Capybaras (Rodentia, Hydrochoeridae, Hydrochoerinae) and their bearing in the calibration of the late Miocene-Pliocene sequences of South America  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fossil capybaras were long regarded as composed of numerous taxa, each one endemic to a particular area, a scenario completely different from the one shown by the living species. The interpretation of the record according to new criteria of ontogenetic change has demonstrated that they are useful for biocorrelation because their members have short biochrons with wide geographic distribution. The levels with capybaras of each locality would represent a short lapse within the bearing lithostratigraphic units. In turn, they would also represent short intervals within the temporal extension proposed for each Stage/Age or SALMA. All the late Miocene-Pliocene records of capybaras were analyzed and a chronological scheme was built mainly for Argentina, where records are most abundant. Numerical ages and magnetostratigraphic studies contribute to correlate this scheme with the global time scale. The Chasicoan SALMA would be correlated with part of the Tortonian Stage/Age; the Huayquerian SALMA with the late Tortonian-Messinian, and it could even extend to the earliest Zanclean. The Montehermosan SALMA would be restricted to the Zanclean. The Chapadmalalan SALMA would be correlated with the late Zanclean-early Piacenzian.

Deschamps, Cecilia M.; Vucetich, María Guiomar; Montalvo, Claudia I.; Zárate, Marcelo A.

2013-12-01

124

Three new karyotypes extend a Robertsonian fan in Ethiopian spiny mice of the genus Acomys I. Geoffroy, 1838 (Mammalia, Rodentia)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Three new karyotypes (2n=40, 44, 52) are described revealing what are probably new cryptic species of Ethiopian spiny mice. Two other diploid numbers have already been reported for the country (2n=36 and 68) and, overall, the five known karyotypic forms constitute a common lineage differentiated by a Robertsonian process. Such arrays of karyotypic forms are known as a ‘Robertsonian fan’. This view of the situation in Ethiopian Acomys I. Geoffroy, 1838 is based on standard chromosomal morphology that reveals a constant FN (68) and needs further investigation of chromosome homology by differential staining and/or molecular cytogenetic techniques as well as further molecular phylogenetic analysis.

Lavrenchenko, L.A.; Nadjafova, R.S.; Bulatova, N.Sh.

2011-01-01

125

Descriptive morphometry and stereology of the tubular compartment in the wild rodent Hylaeamys megacephalus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) from Central Brazil.  

PubMed

Information on reproductive characteristics of wild rodents is scarce in the literature. This study aimed to assess the testis morphometry and stereology of Hylaeamys megacephalus. We used five animals in the study, captured in forest fragments in southwestern Goias State, between April and August 2009. The testes were fixed in Karnovsky solution, dehydrated, and embedded in methacrylate. Two-micrometer-thick sections from each sample were stained with toluidine blue/sodium borate 1%. Images of the testicular parenchyma were obtained from photomicroscope and morphometric and stereological analyses were carried out using the Image Pro-Plus software. The average body weight observed in the specimens of H. megacephalus in the study was 47.84g, of which, 0.40% is allocated to the gonads (GSI) and 0.36% to the seminiferous tubules (TSI). These parameters suggest promiscuous reproductive behavior, of the polyandrous type, favoring males with higher sperm production and consequently, larger testes. The volume density of the seminiferous tubules was 94.46%, which represented a volume of 0.18mL. The volume density and volume of the interstitium were 5.54% and 0.011mL, respectively. The diameter of the seminiferous tubules was 206.5?m and the height of seminiferous epithelium was 71.27?m. H. megacephalus presents 5.06m of seminiferous tubules and an average of 27.96m of seminiferous tubules per gram of testis. The mitotic and meiotic indexes showed losses of 85 and 42%, respectively and an overall loss of 90% over the full spermatogenic process. The number of Sertoli cells per testis and per gram of testis was 7.8×10(6) and 95.28×10(6), respectively. Most of the morphometric parameters evaluated in H. megacephalus in this study are within the range of values described for most mammals. PMID:23473695

de Melo, Fabiana Cristina Silveira Alves; de Sousa, Tatiane Pires; Costa, Kyvia Lugate C; da Matta, Sérgio Luis P; de Melo, Fabiano Rodrigues; Santa-Rita, Ricardo de Mattos

2013-02-13

126

Nematode parasites of Chelidae (Testudines) from southern Brazil.  

PubMed

The presence of helminths associated with freshwater turtles is rarely reported. There are no records of nematodes parasitizing Acanthochelys spixii, and for Hydromedusa tectifera, there is only the report of unidentified nematodes found in this species in Argentina. This is the first report of nematodes (Spiroxys contortus and Camallanus sp.) in A. spixii and the first record of Spiroxys contortus and Camallanus sp. in H. tectifera. This is the southernmost record of S . contortus because this nematode was previously recorded only in Mexico. PMID:23812643

Mascarenhas, Carolina S; Souza, Jéssica D; Coimbra, Marco Antônio A; Müller, Gertrud

2013-09-01

127

Chromosomal evolution of Arvicolinae (Cricetidae, Rodentia). I. The genome homology of tundra vole, field vole, mouse and golden hamster revealed by comparative chromosome painting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cross-species chromosome painting has become the mainstay of comparative cytogenetic and chromosome evolution studies. Here\\u000a we have made a set of chromosomal painting probes for the field vole (Microtus agrestis) by DOP-PCR amplification of flow-sorted chromosomes. Together with painting probes of golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) and mouse (Mus musculus), the field vole probes have been hybridized onto the metaphases of

Natalia A. Sitnikova; Svetlana A. Romanenko; Patricia C. M. O’Brien; Polina L. Perelman; Beiyuan Fu; Nadezhda V. Rubtsova; Natalya A. Serdukova; Feodor N. Golenishchev; Vladimir A. Trifonov; Malcolm A. Ferguson-Smith; Fengtang Yang; Alexander S. Graphodatsky

2007-01-01

128

Comparative analysis of micro and macro B chromosomes in the Korean field mouse Apodemus peninsulae (Rodentia, Murinae) performed by chromosome microdissection and FISH  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comparative analysis of micro B and macro B chromosomes of the Korean field mouse Apodemus peninsulae, collected in populations from Siberia and the Russian Far East, was performed with Giemsa, DAPI, Ag-NOR staining and chromosome painting with whole and partial chromosome probes generated by microdissection and DOP-PCR. DNA composition of micro B chromosomes was different from that of macro B

N. B. Rubtsov; T. V. Karamysheva; O. V. Andreenkova; M. N. Bochkaerev; I. V. Kartavtseva; G. V. Roslik; Y. M. Borissov

2004-01-01

129

The Mammalian 2?-5? Oligoadenylate Synthetase Gene Family: Evidence for Concerted Evolution of Paralogous Oas1 Genes in Rodentia and Artiodactyla  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiple 2?-5? oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetases are important components of innate immunity in mammals. Gene families encoding\\u000a these proteins have previously been studied mainly in humans and mice. To reconstruct the evolution of this gene family in\\u000a mammals, a search for additional 2-5A synthetase genes was performed in rat, cattle, pig, and dog. Twelve 2?-5? oligoadenylate\\u000a synthetase (Oas) genes were identified

Andrey A. Perelygin; Andrey A. Zharkikh; Svetlana V. Scherbik; Margo A. Brinton

2006-01-01

130

Morphometric analysis of the placenta in the New World mouse Necromys lasiurus (Rodentia, Cricetidae): a comparison of placental development in cricetids and murids  

PubMed Central

Background Stereology is an established method to extrapolate three-dimensional quantities from two-dimensional images. It was applied to placentation in the mouse, but not yet for other rodents. Herein, we provide the first study on quantitative placental development in a sigmodontine rodent species with relatively similar gestational time. Placental structure was also compared to the mouse, in order to evaluate similarities and differences in developmental patterns at the end of gestation. Methods Fetal and placental tissues of Necromys lasiurus were collected and weighed at 3 different stages of gestation (early, mid and late gestation) for placental stereology. The total and relative volumes of placenta and of its main layers were investigated. Volume fractions of labyrinth components were quantified by the One Stop method in 31 placentae collected from different individuals, using the Mercator® software. Data generated at the end of gestation from N. lasiurus placentae were compared to those of Mus musculus domesticus obtained at the same stage. Results A significant increase in the total absolute volumes of the placenta and its main layers occurred from early to mid-gestation, followed by a reduction near term, with the labyrinth layer becoming the most prominent area. Moreover, at the end of gestation, the total volume of the mouse placenta was significantly increased compared to that of N. lasiurus although the proportions of the labyrinth layer and junctional zones were similar. Analysis of the volume fractions of the components in the labyrinth indicated a significant increase in fetal vessels and sinusoidal giant cells, a decrease in labyrinthine trophoblast whereas the proportion of maternal blood space remained stable in the course of gestation. On the other hand, in the mouse, volume fractions of fetal vessels and sinusoidal giant cells decreased whereas the volume fraction of labyrinthine trophoblast increased compared to N. lasiurus placenta. Conclusions Placental development differed between N. lasiurus and M. musculus domesticus. In particular, the low placental efficiency in N. lasiurus seemed to induce morphological optimization of fetomaternal exchanges. In conclusion, despite similar structural aspects of placentation in these species, the quantitative dynamics showed important differences.

2013-01-01

131

Thaptomys Thomas 1915 (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae, Akodontini) with karyotypes 2n = 50, FN = 48, and 2n = 52, FN = 52: Two monophyletic lineages recovered by molecular phylogeny  

PubMed Central

A novel karyotype with 2n = 50, FN = 48, was described for specimens of Thaptomys collected at Una, State of Bahia, Brazil, which are morphologically indistinguishable from Thaptomys nigrita, 2n = 52, FN = 52, found in other localities. It was hence proposed that the 2n = 50 karyotype could belong to a distinct species, cryptic of Thaptomys nigrita, once chromosomal rearrangements observed, along with the geographic distance, might represent a reproductive barrier between both forms. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood based on partial cytochrome b sequences with 1077 bp were performed, attempting to establish the relationships among the individuals with distinct karyotypes along the geographic distribution of the genus; the sample comprised 18 karyotyped specimens of Thaptomys, encompassing 15 haplotypes, from eight different localities of the Atlantic Rainforest. The intra-generic relationships corroborated the distinct diploid numbers, once both phylogenetic reconstructions recovered two monophyletic lineages, a northeastern clade grouping the 2n = 50 and a southeastern clade with three subclades, grouping the 2n = 52 karyotype. The sequence divergence observed between their individuals ranged from 1.9% to 3.5%.

2010-01-01

132

Cadmium and lead concentrations in Skrjabinotaenia lobata (Cestoda: Catenotaeniidae) and in its host, Apodemus sylvaticus (Rodentia: Muridae) in the urban dumping site of Garraf (Spain).  

PubMed

The present study evaluates the parasitological model constituted by the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) and its intestinal cestode (Skrjabinotaenia lobata) as a potential bioindicator of Cd and Pb in the urban dumping site of Garraf near the city of Barcelona (Spain) and in Begues (reference site). Tissues and respective S. lobata specimens of 38 wood mice captured in Garraf and Begues were analyzed for Cd and Pb by means of ICP-MS. Higher cadmium levels in S. lobata were found only in respect to the muscular levels of their hosts. Nevertheless, lead levels were 8.5-, 53.2- and 81.4-fold higher in S. lobata than kidney, liver and muscle levels of A. sylvaticus from Garraf, respectively. Thus, the proposed model seems to be a promising bioindicator to evaluate environmental lead exposure in terrestrial habitats. In addition, all available data on lead bioaccumulation by cestode parasites of terrestrial mammals are generally discussed. PMID:16376469

Torres, Jordi; Peig, Jordi; Eira, Catarina; Borrás, Miquel

2006-09-01

133

Extensive mtDNA variation within the yellow-pine chipmunk, Tamias amoenus (Rodentia: Sciuridae), and phylogeographic inferences for northwest North America  

Microsoft Academic Search

The yellow-pine chipmunk, Tamias amoenus, is common in xerophytic forests throughout much of northwest North America. We analyzed cytochrome b sequence variation from 155 individuals representing 57 localities across the distribution of T. amoenus including 10 additional species of Tamias. Maximum likelihood and parsimony tree estimation methods were used in conjunction with nested clade analysis to infer both deep and

John R. Demboski; Jack Sullivan

2003-01-01

134

A new species of Anomiopsyllus Baker, 1904 (Insecta: Siphonaptera), and noteworthy records of fleas from Nelson's woodrat, Neotoma nelsoni (Rodentia: Cricetidae), in the Oriental Basin, Mexico.  

PubMed

We report the first record of ectoparasites from Nelson's woodrat, Neotoma nelsoni, a rare, endemic mammal of east-central Mexico. We also describe a new flea species of Anomiopsyllus (A. perontesis n. sp.), which presents a complete row of bristles on sternum IX and 3 blunt spines on movable process; provide a new country record for the flea Stenistomera alpina (Baker, 1985); and report a new host record for the flea Echidnophaga gallinacea (Westwood, 1875). A taxonomic key for the new species is included. PMID:20050053

Acosta, Roxana; Fernández, Jesús A

2009-06-01

135

MtDNA CytB Structure of Rhombomys opimus (Rodentia: Gerbellidae), the Main Reservoir of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in the Borderline of Iran-Turkmenistan  

PubMed Central

Background: Great gerbils, Rhombomys opimus, are the main reservoir host of zoonootic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in Iran and neighboring countries. Based on morphological traits two subspecies R. opimus sodalis and R. opimus sargadensis have reported in the country. However, variation in infection rate and signs to Leishmania parasites, phenotype, size, and sexual polymorphisms demand more details to elucidate clearly the role of great gerbils in ZCL epidemiology. Methods: PCR-RFLP and PCR-direct sequencing were used to analyze mitochondrial DNA cytochrome B (mtDNA-cytB) gene structure of R. opimus collected from Golestan and Khorasan-e-Razavi Provinces in 2011 that are neighbor to Turkmenistan Country where ZCL is endemic in both sides of the borderline. Results: All of the specimens (n= 61) were morphologically or genetically similar to the typical R. opimus sodalis. However, there were 9 (1.5%) DNA substitutions throughout the 583 bp of the Cyt b gene of the samples sequenced comprising six DNA haplotypes. Maximum likelihood or neighbor joining phylogenetic trees inferred from the sequences could resolve the populations according to their subspecies as well as geographical origins. Discussion: The DNA polymorphisms in the great gerbils may correspond to the signs and infection rate in the animal. However, further studies are needed to match these six haplotypes with different signs and parasite sustaining following infection with L. major in the great gerbils.

Bakhshi, Hasan; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Rassi, Yavar; Akhavan, Amir Ahmad; Mohebali, Mehdi; Hajaran, Homa; Mohtarami, Fatemeh; Mirzajani, Hossein; Maleki-Ravasan, Naseh

2013-01-01

136

A Comparative Analysis of the Mole Vole Sibling Species Ellobius tancrei and E. talpinus (Cricetidae, Rodentia) through Chromosome Painting and Examination of Synaptonemal Complex Structures in Hybrids  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparative genomic analysis was carried out in the mole vole sibling species Ellobius tancrei and E. talpinus. Performing fluorescent in situ hybridisation (Zoo-FISH) using chromosome paints from the field vole Microtus agrestis showed no differences in the allocation of syntenic groups in the karyotypes of these sibling species. The only difference between their karyotypes was the position of the

I. Yu. Bakloushinskaya; S. N. Matveevsky; S. A. Romanenko; N. A. Serdukova; O. L. Kolomiets; V. E. Spangenberg; E. A. Lyapunova; A. S. Graphodatsky

2012-01-01

137

Biochronological implications of the Arvicolidae (Rodentia, Mammalia) from the Lower Pleistocene hominid-bearing level of Trinchera Dolina 6 (TD6, Atapuerca, Spain)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Level TD6 of the Trinchera Dolina Section in the railway cutting of the Sierre de Atapuerca (Trinchera del Ferrocarril) has yielded a rich small mammal assemblage (26 species) in association with fossil human remains of Homo antecessor. The arvicolids of TD6 are identified as: Mimomys savini, Microtus seseae, Stenocranius gregaloides, Terricola arvalidens, Iberomys huescarensis, Allophaiomys chalinei, and Pliomys episcopalis. The

Gloria Cuenca-Bescós; César Laplana; Jose Ignacio Canudo

1999-01-01

138

Observations and larval descriptions of fleas (Siphonaptera: Ceratophyllidae, Ctenophthalmidae, Ishnopsyllidae) of the southern flying squirrel, little brown bat, and Brazilian free-tailed bat (Mammalia: Rodentia, Chiroptera).  

PubMed

Larvae of the four fleas infesting nests of the southern flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans colans (L.) [Conorhinopsylla stanfordi Stewart, Epitedia faceta (Rothschild), Opisodasys pseudarctomys (Baker), and Orchopeas howardi (Baker)], and of the bat fleas Myodopsylla insignis (Rothschild) and Sternopsylla distincta texana (C. Fox), associated with the bats Myotis lcifuigus (Le Conte) and Tadarida brasiliensis (I. Geof. St. Hilaire), respectively, are described. C. stanfordi has the second posterior-row seta on abdominal segments 1-5 at most one fourth the length of the first and third setae, but it is unique among the Leptopsyllini with five short setae in abdominal segment 9 anterior row. E. faceta has the straight line of anterior-row setae 2-5 on abdominal segment 1, which is diagnostic for Phalacropsyllini. O. howardi and O. pseudarctomys have three anterior-row setae on the anal comb, three ventrolateral setae on the anal segment (abdominal segment 10), and a narrow mandible with five or more teeth as other Ceratopyllinae, but O. pseudarctomys is distinguishable from O. howardi because the first setae on the posterior row of the head is long (greater than one half the length of the third posterior-row setae), the ventral setae on abdominal segment 7 are different sizes, and the third anterior-row setae on abdominal segment 8 does not extend past the spiracle posterior to it. Bat flea larvae have six posterior-row setae on abdominal segments 1-9 with the anal comb anterior row with two or more setae; M. insignis has eight mandible teeth and S. distincta texana three to four. PMID:18047188

Elbel, Robert E; Bossard, Robert L

2007-11-01

139

Comparative chromosome mapping of the rRNA genes and telomeric repeats in three Italian pine voles of the Microtus savii s.l. complex (Rodentia, Cricetidae)  

PubMed Central

Abstract The Microtus (Terricola) savii s. l. complex is a group of five species/subspecies of the Italian pine voles, which diverged at different times either with or without chromosomal differentiation. The evidence of chromosomal diversification has so far concerned the shape of the sex chromosomes, especially the X chromosome. Three taxa of the group, Microtus savii savii, Microtus savii nebrodensis, and Microtus savii tolfetanus have identical karyotypes with metacentric X chromosomes. The X chromosomes of Microtus brachycercus and Microtus brachycercus niethammericus are, respectively, subtelocentric and acrocentric in shape. The Microtus savii complex has been long an object of conventional karyological studies, but comparative molecular cytogenetic data were completely missing. Therefore, we conducted a comparative chromosomal mapping of rRNA genes (rDNA) and telomeric repeats in three of the five taxa of the group: Microtus savii savii, Microtus savii nebrodensis, and Microtus brachycercus niethammericus, each of which belongs to a distinct mitochondrial clade.The survey revealed that differentiation of the clades was accompanied by remarkable changes with regard to the number and locations of the rDNA sites. Thus, Microtus savii savii and Microtus savii nebrodensis have especially high numbers of rDNA sites, which are located in the centromeric regions of, correspondingly, 18 and 13 chromosome pairs, whereas Microtus brachycercus niethammericus shows variable (8–10) and heteromorphic rDNA sites on both centromeric and telomeric regions. Interstitial telomeric sites (ITS), which are believed to indicate possible breakpoints of recurring chromosomal rearrangements, are present on the largest biarmed chromosomes and on the metacentric X chromosomes in Microtus savii savii and Microtus savii nebrodensis. These preliminary results are discussed in the context of recent advances in phylogeny of the group, as well as the rDNA genomic organization and X chromosome rearrangements in the genus Microtus.

Gornung, Ekaterina; Bezerra, Alexandra M. R.; Castiglia, Riccardo

2011-01-01

140

A new species of Demodex (Acari: Demodecidae) with data on topical specificity and topography of demodectic mites in the striped field mouse Apodemus agrarius (Rodentia: Muridae).  

PubMed

This article describes morphological characteristics and the occurrence of Demodex gracilentus sp. nov., which was found in the striped field mouse Apodemus agrarius (Pallas, 1771) in the skin of vibrissae area. D. gracilentus occurred in 36.7% of the rodents examined. D. gracilentus is a relatively large representative of the genus (adult stages on average 292 microm in length), a slender, elongated body; characteristic feature of these mites are conical supracoxal spines on dorsal side of gnathosoma, palps with asymmetric, forked triple spines on palptarsus, and the presence of rhomboidal opisthosomal organ. So far, the occurrence of three specific representatives of the family Demodecidae has been demonstrated in A. agrarius: Demodex apodemi (Hirst, 1918) (= Demodex arvicolae apodemi Hirst, 1918), Demodex agrarii Bukva, 1994, and Demodex huttereri Mertens, Lukoschus et Nutting, 1983. The first one is related to common hair follicles, especially in the skin of the head, while the next one inhabits the external auditory meatus, and the last one occurs in the meibomian glands of the eyelids. PMID:24843923

Izdebska, Joanna N; Rolbiecki, Leszek

2013-11-01

141

Demodex microti n. sp. (Acari: Demodecidae) in Microtus arvalis (Pallas) (Rodentia, Cricetidae) with a checklist of the demodecid mites of cricetids.  

PubMed

Demodex microti n. sp. (Acari, Demodecidae) is described from the skin of the genital area of the common vole Microtus arvalis (Pallas) in Poland based on the morphology of the adult and immature stages. The new species appears most similar to D. cricetuli Hurley & Desch, 1994 from the gray dwarf hamster, Cricetulus migratorius (Pallas), but differs in the following features: the supracoxal spines are conical and located at the edge of the gnathosoma, the spines of the terminal segment of palp are three, single-tined, the opisthosomal organ is narrow and elongated in males and bubble-shaped in females, the vulva is located below the incision of the fourth pair of epimeral plates, eggs are oval. The differences also relate to body size and proportions, D. microti n. sp. being smaller and slender. The new species occurred in all of the rodents examined. A checklist of demodecid mites in cricetids world-wide is also provided. PMID:24048750

Izdebska, Joanna N; Rolbiecki, Leszek

2013-10-01

142

The occurrence of Demodex spp. (Acari, Demodecidae) in the bank vole Myodes glareolus (Rodentia, Cricetidae) with data on its topographical preferences.  

PubMed

An examination of 16 bank voles from Poland (Pomerania) revealed the presence of two species of the family Demodecidae (Acari, Prostigmata), specific to the host. Demodex buccalis Bukva, Vitovec et Vlcek, 1985 was noted only in one bank vole, where 18 specimens were found: the prevalence of infestation being 6.3%. D. glareoli Hirst, 1919 was observed in 75% of the examined bank voles, in which were on average 5.1 specimens. Additionally, mites of the both species exhibited topical specificity--representatives of D. buccalis were found in the tissues of the tongue and oral cavity of the host, while D. glareoli, being a species associated with hair follicles, was noted in skin specimens from different body areas, particularly the head area. Infestations with demodecids were not accompanied by disease symptoms. D. buccalis and D. glareoli are a new species for the fauna of Poland. PMID:24881283

Izdebska, Joanna N; Kozina, Paulina; Gólcz, Aleksandra

2013-01-01

143

A new Demodecidae species (Acari) from the yellow-necked mouse Apodemus flavicollis (Rodentia: Muridae)-description with data on parasitism.  

PubMed

This paper describes morphological characteristics and the occurrence of Demodex corniculatus n. sp., which was found on Apodemus flavicollis in Poland. The yellow-necked murid mouse is a common European rodent; until now, it was parasitized by a single demodectic mite species, Demodex rosus, which occurs in the oral cavity and esophagus. The new species was found in hair follicles, particularly within hairy regions of the head and genital-anal area. Demodex corniculatus occurred in 33% of the yellow-necked mice examined. The new species is small (adult stages 140 ?m in length); characteristic features of these mites are massive supracoxal spines (ca. 5-6 ?m long) on the dorsal side of the gnathosoma and palps with thick-set, bifurcated terminal spines. This paper also contains a checklist of demodecids in European and cosmopolitan murids. PMID:22694339

Izdebska, Joanna N

2012-12-01

144

An integrative appraisal of the diversification in the Atlantic forest genus Delomys (Rodentia: Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) with the description of a new species.  

PubMed

Recent taxonomic studies on Neotropical mammals have benefited from the use of genetic data to unravel and recognize species diversity in a number of genera, including the Atlantic forest endemic genus Delomys. However, the success of this approach depends on ability to link genetically identified lineages to species names based on voucher specimens that lack genetic data. Cytogenetic studies in the Atlantic forest endemic rodent genus Delomys have revealed two widespread karyotypes, 2n=72/FN=90 and 2n=82/FN=80, which have been respectively ascribed to Delomys sublineatus (Thomas, 1903) and D. dorsalis (Hensel, 1872). More recently, a third karyotype, 2n=82/FN=86, reported from specimens collected on two montaintops in southeastern Brazil, was interpreted as evidence for a third species, D. collinus Thomas, 1917. This nominal form had originally been described as a subspecies of D. dorsalis from Itatiaia, one of the mountain ranges where the third karyotype was later detected. The detection of two sympatric karyotypes at the type locality of D. collinus in the Itatiaia mountain range, Southeastern Brazil, prompted a reevaluation of the association of karyomorphs and species names. In this paper, we assessed the congruence of molecular (cytochrome b), cytogenetic and morphological characters, to diagnose the species in the genus, including data from recently collected series and type specimens. Our results indicate that the genetic and morphological patterns are largely congruent with the recognition of three species, each of which is karyotypically and morphologically diagnosable. Our morphological analyses of sympatric samples from Itatiaia refute the former association of the 2n=82/FN=86 karyotype with the holotype of D. dorsalis collinus (which is more similar to D. dorsalis with 2n=82/FN=80). Instead, we recognize and describe a new species for the 2n=82/FN=86 populations from the highest altitudinal zones of the Itatiaia and Caparaó mountains. The geographical variation in D. dorsalis is also explored and the status of D. d. collinus is discussed in the light of the molecular and morphological evidence. Finally, we discuss biogeographic hypotheses concerning the disjunct distributions of D. dorsalis and the new species. PMID:24870069

Gonçalves, Pablo Rodrigues; Oliveira, João Alves De

2014-01-01

145

Effects of pyriproxyfen spray, powder, and oral bait treatments on the relative abundance of nontarget arthropods of black-tailed prairie dog (Rodentia: Sciuridae) towns.  

PubMed

Separate black-tailed prairie dog, Cynomys ludovicianus (Ord), towns on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge, Colorado, were treated with technical pyriproxyfen (Nylar) spray, powder, and oral bait. The treatments were applied to reduce relative abundance of the plague vector Oropsylla hirsuta (Baker). Because pyriproxyfen is a juvenile hormone analog, we were also concerned with the effects of the treatments on nontarget arthropods, which is the focus of this study. Pitfall traps and sweep net sampling were used to measure relative abundance of arthropod populations pre- and posttreatment. Nontarget arthropod sampling produced a large number of statistical comparisons that indicated significant declines (P < 0.05) in relative arthropod abundance. Many of the significant declines were probably because of natural fluctuations in arthropod populations rather than treatment effects. Because arthropod populations appeared to fluctuate randomly, we only made inferences about highly significant (P < 0.001) declines. In doing so, we hoped to abate some of the confusion created by the natural fluctuation in arthropod abundance and increase our chance of correctly attributing a population reduction to a treatment effect. Only Homoptera at the pyriproxyfen powder site exhibited highly significant reductions that appeared to be attributed to the treatments. Pyriproxyfen spray treatments did not significantly reduce relative arthropod abundance. PMID:10916304

Karhu, R R; Anderson, S H

2000-07-01

146

The role of chromosomal rearrangements and geographical barriers in the divergence of lineages in a South American subterranean rodent (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae: Ctenomys minutus).  

PubMed

Identifying factors and the extent of their roles in the differentiation of populations is of great importance for understanding the evolutionary process in which a species is involved. Ctenomys minutus is a highly karyotype-polymorphic subterranean rodent, with diploid numbers ranging from 42 to 50 and autosomal arm numbers (ANs) ranging from 68 to 80, comprising a total of 45 karyotypes described so far. This species inhabits the southern Brazilian coastal plain, which has a complex geological history, with several potential geographical barriers acting on different time scales. We assessed the geographical genetic structure of C. minutus, examining 340 individuals over the entire distributional range and using information from chromosomal rearrangements, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences and 14 microsatellite loci. The mtDNA results revealed seven main haplogroups, with the most recent common ancestors dating from the Pleistocene, whereas clustering methods defined 12 populations. Some boundaries of mtDNA haplogroups and population clusters can be associated with potential geographical barriers to gene flow. The isolation-by-distance pattern also has an important role in fine-scale genetic differentiation, which is strengthened by the narrowness of the coastal plain and by common features of subterranean rodents (that is, small fragmented populations and low dispersal rates), which limit gene flow among populations. A step-by-step mechanism of chromosomal evolution can be suggested for this species, mainly associated with the metapopulation structure, genetic drift and the geographical features of the southern Brazilian coastal plain. However, chromosomal variations have no or very little role in the diversification of C. minutus populations. PMID:23759727

Lopes, C M; Ximenes, S S F; Gava, A; de Freitas, T R O

2013-10-01

147

Allelic diversity at the Mhc-DQA locus in cotton rats ( Sigmodon hispidus ) and a comparison of DQA sequences within the family Muridae (Mammalia: Rodentia)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is a common murid rodent of the southern United States, Mexico, and Central America. Using single-stranded conformation\\u000a polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing techniques, 11 DQA exon 2 alleles were detected among 180 S. hispidus from Caddo County, Oklahoma, USA. The alleles represent a single locus exhibiting a high level of polymorphism. Nucleotide\\u000a and amino acid

Russell S. Pfau; Ronald A. Van Den Bussche; Karen McBee; Robert L. Lochmiller

1999-01-01

148

Stratigraphic context and paleoenvironmental significance of minor taxa (Pisces, Reptilia, Aves, Rodentia) from the late Early Pleistocene paleoanthropological site of Buia (Eritrea).  

PubMed

The Buia Homo site, also known as Wadi Aalad, is an East African paleoanthropological site near the village of Buia that, due to its very rich yield from the late Early Pleistocene, has been intensively investigated since 1994. In this paper, which reports on the finds of the 2010-2011 excavations, we include new fossil evidence on previously identified taxa (i.e., reptiles), as well as the very first description of the small mammal, fish and bird remains discovered. In particular, this study documents the discovery of the first African fossil of the genus Burhinus (Aves, Charadriiformes) and of the first rodent from the site. This latter is identified as a thryonomyid rodent (cane rat), a relatively common taxon in African paleoanthropological faunal assemblages. On the whole, the new occurrences documented within the Buia vertebrate assemblage confirm the occurrence of taxa characterized by strong water dependence. The paleoenvironmental characteristics of the fauna are confirmed as fully compatible with the evidence obtained through sedimentology and facies analysis, documenting the sedimentary evolution of fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine systems. PMID:23159190

Rook, L; Ghinassi, M; Carnevale, G; Delfino, M; Pavia, M; Bondioli, L; Candilio, F; Coppa, A; Martínez-Navarro, B; Medin, T; Papini, M; Zanolli, C; Libsekal, Y

2013-01-01

149

Some Bio-Ecological Notes on 'Rattus rattus frugivorus' (Muridae: Rodentia) in Mixed Citrus-Date Palm Orchards of Central Iraq.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study was carried out in Al-Huwaish, Diyala province for the period from April 1986 to Mar 1987. It was found that Rattus rattus frugivorus is moulting twice a year (srping -summer and autumn-winter moulting). No food of animal source in genral was fo...

A. H. Kadhim A. M. Mustafa M. M. Al-Nakash

1988-01-01

150

Allelic diversity at the Mhc-DQA locus in cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) and a comparison of DQA sequences within the family muridae (Mammalia: Rodentia).  

PubMed

The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is a common murid rodent of the southern United States, Mexico, and Central America. Using single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing techniques, 11 DQA exon 2 alleles were detected among 180 S. hispidus from Caddo County, Oklahoma, USA. The alleles represent a single locus exhibiting a high level of polymorphism. Nucleotide and amino acid distance values among DQA alleles of S. hispidus were higher than those within Mus musculus and species of Rattus. Although the distribution of polymorphic amino acid residues among alleles of S. hispidus was similiar to that of Mus and Rattus, some residues of the alpha-helix region were more variable in S. hispidus. Comparisons of nonsynonymous and synonymous substitutions indicated a trend toward higher numbers of nonsynonymous substitutions; however, this difference was not significant statistically among S. hispidus alleles. To examine evolution of DQA alleles within Muridae, we performed a phylogenetic analysis that included DQA alleles from S. hispidus, Peromyscus leucopus, M. musculus, R. norvegicus, and six Australian species of Rattus. Results depicted monophyly for each genus, and this concordance between species and gene trees represents a lack of evidence for trans-species persistence of alleles among these genera. PMID:10436183

Pfau, R S; Van Den Bussche, R A; McBee, K; Lochmiller, R L

1999-09-01

151

Differences in richness and composition of gastrointestinal parasites of small rodents (Cricetidae, Rodentia) in a continental and insular area of the Atlantic Forest in Santa Catarina state, Brazil.  

PubMed

The first and only study on gastrointestinal parasites of wild rodents in the Island of Santa Catarina was done in 1987. The aim of this study was to identify intestinal parasites from wild rodents in Santo Amaro da Imperatriz and Santa Catariana Island, and to compare the richness and composition of the gastrointestinal parasite community of both areas. Rodents were captured with live traps, and feces were screened using the sedimentation method and optical microscopy. The following species of rodents were captured in the two areas: Akodon montensis, Euryoryzomys russatus, Oligoryzomys nigripes and Nectomys squamipes. In Santo Amaro da Impetratriz, prevalent parasites were: A. montensis (51%), E. russatus (62%), O. nigripes (53%) and N. squamipes (20%). From the Island of Santa Catarina the rodent prevalence rates were: A. montensis (43%), E. russatus (59%), O. nigripes (30%) and N. squamipes (33%) and the collected parasites were: Hymenolepis sp., Longistriata sp., Strongyloides sp., Hassalstrongylus sp., Syphacia sp., Trichomonas sp., Ancylostomidae, Trichuridae, Oxyuridae and Eucoccidiorida. The species richness (10.6 ± 0.7) of the endoparasite comunity in the area located on the continent was higher (p < 0.01) and different (p = 0.001) from that of the area located on the island (6.9 ± 0.5). PMID:22990827

Kuhnen, V V; Graipel, M E; Pinto, C J C

2012-08-01

152

Boltimys broomi gen. nov., sp. nov. (Rodentia, Mammalia), nouveau Muridae d'affinité incertaine du Pliocène inférieur d'Afrique du Sud  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boltimys broomi gen. nov., sp. nov., a Muridae of uncertain affinity in the Early Pliocene of South Africa. Boltimys broomi gen. nov., sp. nov. is reported from the Early Pliocene fauna of Waypoint 160, a fossiliferous locality in the area of Bolt's Farm (Province of Gauteng) near Krugersdorp in South Africa. The occlusal surface of the jugal teeth is characterized by a basin-shaped aspect due to the coalescence of the cusps which make the lobes of the molars. An accessory inner cusp is present on the first and second upper molars. A faint longitudinal crest is present only in the first lower molar. The new rodent is tentatively referred to the subfamily Myocricetodontinae.

Sénégas, Frank; Michaux, Jacques

2000-04-01

153

Succinate Dehydrogenase Distribution in Structures of the Mammalian Hypothalamus.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The object of this investigation was to determine what differences, if any, occur in the level of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity in cells of individual hypothalamic nuclei in members of various orders of mammals: Insectivora (hedgehog), Rodentia (...

O. V. Fidelina

1969-01-01

154

Phylogeny and chronology of the major lineages of New World hystricognath rodents: insights on the biogeography of the Eocene/Oligocene arrival of mammals in South America  

PubMed Central

Background The hystricognath rodents of the New World, the Caviomorpha, are a diverse lineage with a long evolutionary history, and their representation in South American fossil record begins with their occurrence in Eocene deposits from Peru. Debates regarding the origin and diversification of this group represent longstanding issues in mammalian evolution because early hystricognaths, as well as Platyrrhini primates, appeared when South American was an isolated landmass, which raised the possibility of a synchronous arrival of these mammalian groups. Thus, an immediate biogeographic problem is posed by the study of caviomorph origins. This problem has motivated the analysis of hystricognath evolution with molecular dating techniques that relied essentially on nuclear data. However, questions remain about the phylogeny and chronology of the major caviomorph lineages. To enhance the understanding of the evolution of the Hystricognathi in the New World, we sequenced new mitochondrial genomes of caviomorphs and performed a combined analysis with nuclear genes. Results Our analysis supports the existence of two major caviomorph lineages: the (Chinchilloidea?+?Octodontoidea) and the (Cavioidea?+?Erethizontoidea), which diverged in the late Eocene. The Caviomorpha/phiomorph divergence also occurred at approximately 43 Ma. We inferred that all family-level divergences of New World hystricognaths occurred in the early Miocene. Conclusion The molecular estimates presented in this study, inferred from the combined analysis of mitochondrial genomes and nuclear data, are in complete agreement with the recently proposed paleontological scenario of Caviomorpha evolution. A comparison with recent studies on New World primate diversification indicate that although the hypothesis that both lineages arrived synchronously in the Neotropics cannot be discarded, the times elapsed since the most recent common ancestor of the extant representatives of both groups are different.

2013-01-01

155

Fossil and molecular evidence constrain scenarios for the early evolutionary and biogeographic history of hystricognathous rodents.  

PubMed

The early evolutionary and paleobiogeographic history of the diverse rodent clade Hystricognathi, which contains Hystricidae (Old World porcupines), Caviomorpha (the endemic South American rodents), and African Phiomorpha (cane rats, dassie rats, and blesmols) is of great interest to students of mammalian evolution, but remains poorly understood because of a poor early fossil record. Here we describe the oldest well-dated hystricognathous rodents from an earliest late Eocene (approximately 37 Ma) fossil locality in the Fayum Depression of northern Egypt. These taxa exhibit a combination of primitive and derived features, the former shared with Asian "baluchimyine" rodents, and the latter shared with Oligocene phiomorphs and caviomorphs. Phylogenetic analysis incorporating morphological, temporal, geographic, and molecular information places the new taxa as successive sister groups of crown Hystricognathi, and supports an Asian origin for stem Hystricognathi and an Afro-Arabian origin for crown Hystricognathi, stem Hystricidae, and stem Caviomorpha. Molecular dating of early divergences within Hystricognathi, using a Bayesian "relaxed clock" approach and multiple fossil calibrations, suggests that the split between Hystricidae and the phiomorph-caviomorph clade occurred approximately 39 Ma, and that phiomorphs and caviomorphs diverged approximately 36 Ma. These results are remarkably congruent with our phylogenetic results and the fossil record of hystricognathous rodent evolution in Afro-Arabia and South America. PMID:19805363

Sallam, Hesham M; Seiffert, Erik R; Steiper, Michael E; Simons, Elwyn L

2009-09-29

156

Fossil and molecular evidence constrain scenarios for the early evolutionary and biogeographic history of hystricognathous rodents  

PubMed Central

The early evolutionary and paleobiogeographic history of the diverse rodent clade Hystricognathi, which contains Hystricidae (Old World porcupines), Caviomorpha (the endemic South American rodents), and African Phiomorpha (cane rats, dassie rats, and blesmols) is of great interest to students of mammalian evolution, but remains poorly understood because of a poor early fossil record. Here we describe the oldest well-dated hystricognathous rodents from an earliest late Eocene (?37 Ma) fossil locality in the Fayum Depression of northern Egypt. These taxa exhibit a combination of primitive and derived features, the former shared with Asian “baluchimyine” rodents, and the latter shared with Oligocene phiomorphs and caviomorphs. Phylogenetic analysis incorporating morphological, temporal, geographic, and molecular information places the new taxa as successive sister groups of crown Hystricognathi, and supports an Asian origin for stem Hystricognathi and an Afro-Arabian origin for crown Hystricognathi, stem Hystricidae, and stem Caviomorpha. Molecular dating of early divergences within Hystricognathi, using a Bayesian “relaxed clock” approach and multiple fossil calibrations, suggests that the split between Hystricidae and the phiomorph-caviomorph clade occurred ?39 Ma, and that phiomorphs and caviomorphs diverged ?36 Ma. These results are remarkably congruent with our phylogenetic results and the fossil record of hystricognathous rodent evolution in Afro-Arabia and South America.

Sallam, Hesham M.; Seiffert, Erik R.; Steiper, Michael E.; Simons, Elwyn L.

2009-01-01

157

Genetic variation and phylogeography of the bank vole ( Clethrionomys glareolus , Arvicolinae, Rodentia) in Russia with special reference to the introgression of the mtDNA of a closely related species, red-backed vole ( Cl. rutilus )  

Microsoft Academic Search

Totally, 294 bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) and 18 red-backed voles (Cl. rutilus) from 62 sites of European Russia were studied. Incomplete sequences (967 bp) of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene were determined for 93 Cl. glareolus individuals from 56 sites and 18 Cl. rutilus individuals from the same habitats. Analysis of the cytochrome b gene variation has demonstrated that practically

N. I. Abramson; E. N. Rodchenkova; A. Yu. Kostygov

2009-01-01

158

Coccidia of Brazilian mammals: Eimeria corticulata n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the anteater Tamandua tetradactyla (Xenarthra: Myrmecophagidae) and Eimeria zygodontomyis n. sp. from the cane mouse Zygodontomys lasiurus (Rodentia: Cricetidae).  

PubMed

Feces from a specimen of Tamandua tetradactyla (Linn.) from Portel, Pará State, north Brazil, contained two different coccidial oocysts; one identified as Eimeria tamanduae Lainson 1968, and the other as a new species, described here as Eimeria corticulata n. sp. Oocysts of E. corticulata are ellipsoidal, 37.4 x 30.4 (31.2-43.7 x 23.7-35.0) microns, shape index (length/width) 1.2 (1.0-1.5). Oocyst wall 2.5-3.7 microns thick and composed of two layers; an outer thick, brown-yellow one with radial striations, and a thin inner smooth one: no visible micropyle. Oocyst residuum a large globule of about 10.7 x 10.3 microns, usually accompanied by a number of smaller attached globules. Sporocysts ellipsoidal, 21.0 x 11.0 (20.0-22.5 x 10.0-12.5) microns, with a conspicuous Stieda body; shape index 1.9 (1.6-2.2). Sporocyst residuum a small number of scattered granules: sporozoites 18.7 x 5.0 microns, with a large posterior refractile body. Eimeria zygodontomyis n. sp. is described in feces from Zygodontomys lasiurus (Lund) from the Serra dos Carajás, Pará. Oocysts ellipsoidal to cylindrical, 16.5 x 12.0 (13.7-18.7 x 11.2-12.3) microns, shape index 1.4 (1.2-1.5). Wall colorless, smooth, single-layered and about 0.6 micron thick: no micropyle. No oocyst residuum, but a polar granule of about 1.8 x 1.0 microns is sometimes present. Sporocysts ellipsoidal, 8.4 x 5.5 (7.5-8.7 x 5.0-6.2) microns, shape index 1.5 (1.4-1.7), with a thin colorless wall and a delicate Stieda body. Sporozoites enclose a compact residuum of about 2.5 x 3.7 microns. PMID:2406431

Lainson, R; Shaw, J J

1990-01-01

159

THE FLUCTUATING ASYMMETRY OF SOME MORPHOMETRIC CHARACTERS OF THE SKULL IN A POPULATION OF MUS SPICIL EGUS, PETENY, 1882 (MAMMALIA: RODENTIA) FROM A CROP OF WHEAT IN THE COUNTY OF BOTO?ANI  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of our paper is to emphasize the asymmetry of some cranial characters in the Mus spicilegus species due to the stress provoked by the agricultural workings. The statistical analysis has been realized on the measurements of three bilateral cranial characters: the coronoid, condylar and angular processes. The results of the statistical tests applied have shown different levels of

MARIANA POPOVICI; R. ZAMFIRESCU

160

[Leishmania major Yakimoff et Schokhor, 1914 (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) in Meriones shawi Duvernoy, 1842 (Rodentia: Gerbillidae): persistence of the infection in meriones and its infectivity for the sand fly vector (Phlebotomus) papatasi Scopoli, 1786 (Diptera: Psychodidae)].  

PubMed

The ability of the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi to transmit Leishmania major, the etiologic agent of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis, to Meriones shawi, the natural reservoir host of this parasite, was studied under laboratory conditions. Sand flies became infected with L. major after feeding on a lesion of needle-inoculated M. shawi. Moreover, P. papatasi, previously infected with L. major, transmitted the parasite to M. shawi by bite during a second bloodmeal. Two months after the blood-meal, the animal developed a lesion on its ears. Xenodiagnosis was performed on the infected animal. The infectivity of M. shawi to P. papatasi lasted for five months, period corresponding to winter season in North Africa. We have thus demonstrated the transmission of L. major by P. papatasi to M. shawi under laboratory conditions. Our results show that reservoir hosts surviving winter time are the main source of infection for P. papatasi during the following season, and subsequently they play a major role in the persistence and transmission of L. major between transmission cycles. PMID:23055379

Derbali, M; Chelbi, I; Ben Hadj Ahmed, S; Zhioua, E

2012-12-01

161

Historical diversification of a terra-firme forest bird superspecies: a phylogeographic perspective on the role of different hypotheses of Amazonian diversification.  

PubMed

Among those few hypotheses of Amazonian diversification amenable to falsification by phylogenetic and population genetics methods, three can be singled out because of their general application to vertebrates: the riverine barrier, the refuge, and the Miocene marine incursion hypotheses. I used phylogenetic and population genetics methods to reconstruct the diversification history of the upland (terra-firme) forest superspecies Xiphorhynchus spixii/elegans (Aves: Dendrocolaptidae) in Amazonia, and to evaluate predictions of the riverine barrier, refuge, and Miocene marine incursion hypotheses. Phylogeographic and population genetics analyses of the X. spixiilelegans superspecies indicated that the main prediction of the riverine barrier hypothesis (that sister lineages occur across major rivers) hold only for populations separated by "clear-water" rivers located on the Brazilian shield, in central and eastern Amazonia; in contrast, "white-water" rivers located in western Amazonia did not represent areas of primary divergence for populations of this superspecies. The main prediction derived from the refuge hypothesis (that populations of the X. spixii/elegans superspecies would show signs of past population bottlenecks and recent demographic expansions) was supported only for populations found in western Amazonia, where paleoecological data have failed to support past rainforest fragmentation and expansion of open vegetation types; conversely, populations from the eastern and central parts of Amazonia, where paleoecological data are consistent with an historical interplay between rainforest and open vegetation types, did not show population genetics attributes expected under the refuge hypothesis. Phylogeographic and population genetics data were consistent with the prediction made by the Miocene marine incursion hypothesis that populations of the X. spixii/elegans superspecies found on the Brazilian shield were older than populations from other parts of Amazonia. In contrast, the phylogeny obtained for lineages of this superspecies falsified the predicted monophyly of Brazilian shield populations, as postulated by the Miocene marine incursion hypothesis. In general, important predictions of both riverine barrier and Miocene marine incursion hypotheses were supported, indicating that they are not mutually exclusive; in fact, the data presented herein suggest that an interaction among geology, sea level changes, and hydrography created opportunities for cladogenesis in the X. spixii/elegans superspecies at different temporal and geographical scales. PMID:15266979

Aleixo, Alexandre

2004-06-01

162

Rabbits, if anything, are likely Glires  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rodentia (e.g., mice, rats, dormice, squirrels, and guinea pigs) and Lagomorpha (e.g., rabbits, hares, and pikas) are usually grouped into the Glires. Status of this controversial superorder has been evaluated using morphology, paleontology, and mitochondrial plus nuclear DNA sequences. This growing corpus of data has been favoring the monophyly of Glires. Recently, Misawa and Janke [Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 28 (2003)

Emmanuel J. P. Douzery; Dorothée Huchon

2004-01-01

163

Light Perception in Two Strictly Subterranean Rodents: Life in the Dark or Blue?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia) are strictly subterranean, congenitally microphthalmic rodents that are hardly ever exposed to environmental light. Because of the lack of an overt behavioural reaction to light, they have long been considered to be blind. However, recent anatomical studies have suggested retention of basic visual capabilities. In this study, we employed behavioural tests to find out if

Ondrej Kott; Radim Sumbera; Pavel Nemec; Andrew Iwaniuk

2010-01-01

164

Phylogenetic analyses of complete mitochondrial genome sequences suggest a basal divergence of the enigmatic rodent Anomalurus  

PubMed Central

Background Phylogenetic relationships between Lagomorpha, Rodentia and Primates and their allies (Euarchontoglires) have long been debated. While it is now generally agreed that Rodentia constitutes a monophyletic sister-group of Lagomorpha and that this clade (Glires) is sister to Primates and Dermoptera, higher-level relationships within Rodentia remain contentious. Results We have sequenced and performed extensive evolutionary analyses on the mitochondrial genome of the scaly-tailed flying squirrel Anomalurus sp., an enigmatic rodent whose phylogenetic affinities have been obscure and extensively debated. Our phylogenetic analyses of the coding regions of available complete mitochondrial genome sequences from Euarchontoglires suggest that Anomalurus is a sister taxon to the Hystricognathi, and that this clade represents the most basal divergence among sampled Rodentia. Bayesian dating methods incorporating a relaxed molecular clock provide divergence-time estimates which are consistently in agreement with the fossil record and which indicate a rapid radiation within Glires around 60 million years ago. Conclusion Taken together, the data presented provide a working hypothesis as to the phylogenetic placement of Anomalurus, underline the utility of mitochondrial sequences in the resolution of even relatively deep divergences and go some way to explaining the difficulty of conclusively resolving higher-level relationships within Glires with available data and methodologies.

Horner, David S; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Reyes, Aurelio; Gissi, Carmela; Saccone, Cecilia; Pesole, Graziano

2007-01-01

165

Geographical distributions of spiny pocket mice in South America: insights from predictive models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim Predictive models of species' distributions use occurrence records and environmental data to produce a model of the species' requirements and a map of its potential distribution. To determine regions of suitable environmental conditions and assess biogeographical questions regarding their ranges, we modelled the potential geographical distributions of two spiny pocket mice (Rodentia: Heteromyidae) in north- western South America.

Robert P. Anderson; Marcela Gomez-Laverde; A. Townsend Peterson

2002-01-01

166

Genome Sizes in Afrotheria, Xenarthra, Euarchontoglires, and Laurasiatheria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Topical literature and Web site databases provide genome sizes for ;4,000 animal species, invertebrates and vertebrates, 330 of which are mammals. We provide the genome size for 67 mammalian species, including 51 never reported before. Knowledge of genome size facilitates sequencing projects. The data presented here encompassed 5 Metatheria (order Didelphimorphia) and 62 Eutheria: 15 Xenarthra, 24 Euarchontoglires (Rodentia), as

C. A. Redi; H. ZACHARIAS; S. MERANI; M. OLIVEIRA-MIRANDA; M. AGUILERA; M. ZUCCOTTI; S. GARAGNA; E. CAPANNA

2005-01-01

167

Unexpected primitive rodents in the Quaternary of Argentina  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the first fossils recorded in the Hernandarias Formation (Pleistocene) in Entre Ríos province (eastern Argentina). They are represented by three teeth assigned to the caviomorph rodents (Rodentia, Mammalia) Aenigmys diamantensis gen. et sp. nov. and Eumysops. To establish the phylogenetic affinities of the two most enigmatic teeth, their enamel microstructure was studied. Aenigmys diamantensis is considered the

María G. Vucetich; Emma C. Vieytes; Diego H. Verzi; Jorge I. Noriega; Eduardo P. Tonni

2005-01-01

168

Individual recognition and incest avoidance in eusocial common mole-rats rather than reproductive suppression by parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Non-reproductive females in families of eusocial common mole-rats (Cryptomys sp., Rodentia) are not suppressed by their mother, (either behaviourally or pheromonally) as is generally assumed. They do not mate with their father and brothers simply because they are not sexually attractive for them (and vice versa). The incest avoidance is based on the capability to recognize (and keep in memory

H. Burda

1995-01-01

169

Social Structure Predicts Genital Morphology in African Mole-Rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAfrican mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia) exhibit a wide range of social structures, from solitary to eusocial. We previously found a lack of sex differences in the external genitalia and morphology of the perineal muscles associated with the phallus in the eusocial naked mole-rat. This was quite surprising, as the external genitalia and perineal muscles are sexually dimorphic in all other mammals

Marianne L. Seney; Diane A. Kelly; Bruce D. Goldman; Radim Sumbera; Nancy G. Forger; Anna Dornhaus

2009-01-01

170

Conservation of placentation during the tertiary radiation of mammals in South America.  

PubMed

The eutherian placenta is considered to possess great plasticity, but it is not clear how this variation reflects adaptation to different ecological niches. Because South America was isolated for most of the Tertiary, it represents a natural laboratory to examine this question. We here describe placentation in three South American groups: Xenarthra have been part of the fauna from at least the mid-Paleocene whereas caviomorph rodents and Neotropical primates are each derived from a single founder that reached South America in the Eocene and Oligocene, respectively. The common ancestor of Xenarthra had a villous, haemochorial placenta, from which the labyrinthine, endotheliochorial placenta of sloths later evolved. Placentation in Caviomorpha follows an extraordinary stable pattern, characterized by a haemomonochorial, labyrinthine and highly lobed structure with specialized growing areas. This pattern was present before arrival of these rodents in South America and enabled a successful radiation especially during the spread of grasslands. Neotropical primates have haemochorial, trabecular placentas with a specialized maternal blood supply; a pattern that contrasts with that of Old World monkeys and may have been present in the founder generation on arrival in South America. In conclusion, there is a dichotomy within Xenarthra but otherwise the ancient South American mammals do not show much variation in principal placental characters. Thus, the successful radiation of these three groups, and their adaptation to diverse ecological niches, did not require substantial alterations in placentation. PMID:23355381

Carter, Anthony Michael; Mess, Andrea Maria

2013-05-01

171

[Analysis of genetic diversity of the Roborovski hamster (Phodopus roborovskii) in the northern part of its habitat].  

PubMed

An analysis of sequences of the cytochrome b gene and control region of mitochondrial DNA of 30 Roborovski hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii; Rodentia: Cricetinae) captured at ten geographical points from Zaisanskaya Depression (Kazakhstan) in the northwest to the Shilin-Gol area (China) in the southeast was conducted. The absence of a connection between the similarity of the discovered haplotypes and their geographical distribution allows us to assume that the modern genetic diversity of the species on the studied territory formed owing to migration waves from more southern areas. PMID:21442911

Meshcherski?, I G; Feoktistova, N Iu

2011-01-01

172

A stereotaxic atlas of the brain of the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber).  

PubMed

The naked mole-rat (Rodentia, Bathyergidae: Heterocephalus glaber) is a strictly subterranean eusocial mammal. These rodents show a suite of morphological and physiological adaptations, including brain specializations, to this underground milieu that they have inhabited since the early Miocene. Recently, naked mole-rats have received considerable attention as the longest living rodent known, and some of these brain specializations may be potentially important to their exceptional longevity. To serve as a basis for future brain studies, we have constructed a stereotaxic atlas of the brain of this species, labeling all major brain structures. PMID:16793211

Xiao, J; Levitt, J B; Buffenstein, R

2006-09-01

173

Cytogenetics of the South American akodont rodents (Cricetidae). IX. Chiasmatic sex bivalent in male meiosis of Akodon mollis.  

PubMed

Akodon mollis (Rodentia, Cricetidae) has a large subterminal Y chromosome measuring 5.24 percent of the haploid set. The long arm of the Y has a pattern of homology with the short arm of the X, as indicated by the similar distribution of G bands and by the formation of a chiasma in diakinesis and metaphase I of teste cells. Conversely, the short arm of the Y and the long arm of the X are nonhomologous and do not pair at meiosis. PMID:7047636

Semino, C; Oliveira, D; Bianchi, N O; Lobato, L

1982-01-01

174

New species and new records of mites of the genus Stigmaeus(Acari: Prostigmata: Stigmaeidae) from Crimea.  

PubMed

Three new species of the genus Stigmaeus Koch, 1836 (Acari: Stigmaeidae) are described from various habitats in Crimea: Stigmaeus kuznetsovi sp. nov. from nests of Microtus socialis (Rodentia: Cricetidae); S. mitrofanovi sp. nov. from galleries of Pityogenes bistridentatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) under the bark of Pinus pallasiana, and S. silvestris sp. nov. from rotten log of Pinus pallasiana. Stigmaeus corticeus Kuznetsov and Wainstein, 1977 and S. maraghehiensis Bagheri and Ueckermann, 2012 are recorded for the first time in Crimea. A key to species of the genus Stigmaeus of Crimea is provided. PMID:24870321

Khaustov, Alexander A

2014-01-01

175

Institute of Applied Ecology: African Mammals Databank  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This impressive GIS-based databank focuses on the conservation and distribution of African mammals; and was developed collaboratively by the Geographic Information Systems Laboratory of the Animal and Human Biology Department at the University of Rome La Sapienza and the Institute of Applied Ecology. The databank covers the entire African continent, except Madagascar, âÂÂand includes a total of 281 species, belonging to 12 orders and 28 families.â Covered orders include Insectivora, Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Sirenia, Rodentia, Macroscelidae, and more. In addition to viewing information online, site visitors can download data, and information about project methodology.

176

Comparative genetics of longevity and cancer: insights from long-lived rodents.  

PubMed

Mammals have evolved a remarkable diversity of ageing rates. Within the single order of Rodentia, maximum lifespans range from 4 years in mice to 32 years in naked mole rats. Cancer rates also differ substantially between cancer-prone mice and almost cancer-proof naked mole rats and blind mole rats. Recent progress in rodent comparative biology, together with the emergence of whole-genome sequence information, has opened opportunities for the discovery of genetic factors that control longevity and cancer susceptibility. PMID:24981598

Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei; Zhang, Zhengdong; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Vijg, Jan

2014-08-01

177

Species identification key of korean mammal hair.  

PubMed

The hair microstructures of Korean terrestrial mammals from 23 species (22 wild and one domestic) were analyzed using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to construct a hair identification key. The hairs were examined using the medulla structures and cuticular scales of guard hairs from the dorsal regions of mature adult animals. All cuticular scale structures in the hair of Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Carnivora and Insectivora showed the petal pattern, and those of Artiodactyla and Chiroptera showed the wave pattern and coronal pattern, respectively. Rodentia, Lagomorpha and Carnivora showed multicellular, and Insectivora and Artiodactyla showed unicellular regular, mesh or columnar in the medulla structures, respectively. Chiroptera did not show the medulla structures in their hair. We found that it is possible to distinguish between species and order based on general appearance, medulla structures and cuticular scales. Thus, we constructed a hair identification key with morphological characteristics from each species. This study suggests that hair identification keys could be useful in fields, such as forensic science, food safety and foraging ecology. PMID:24451929

Lee, Eunok; Choi, Tae-Young; Woo, Donggul; Min, Mi-Sook; Sugita, Shoei; Lee, Hang

2014-06-01

178

Karyotype composition of some rodents and marsupials from Chapada Diamantina (Bahia, Brasil).  

PubMed

The Chapada Diamantina (CD) is located in Bahia State, between 11-14 degrees S and 41-43 degrees W, being part of the Serra do Espinhaço. The occurrence of different habitats and transition areas permits an interesting mammal fauna composition, with species from different biomes living in sympatry. Species of Didelphimorphia and Rodentia are important members of mammal communities in almost all different habitats, and morphological and cytogenetic characters are important for a correct identification of most of these species. In this work 258 specimens of small mammals from the orders Didelphimorphia (six genera and six species) and Rodentia (two families, five Sigmodontinae tribes, nine genera and 11 species) were collected during the whole field work (44 nights with traps). Chromosome preparations were obtained from 145 specimens from the species: Marmosops incanus, Gracilinanus microtarsus, Monodelphis domestica, Akodon aff. cursor, Necromys lasiurus, Cerradomys sp., Oligoryzomys fornesi, O. nigripes, O. rupestris, Calomys expulsus, Rhipidomys macrurus, Wiedomys pyrrhorhinus and Thrichomys inermis. Didelphis albiventris, Micoureus demerarae, Thylamys karymii and Nectomys sp. were identified by morphological characters. Most analyzed specimens do not show karyotype variation. However, numerical chromosomic variation was found in two individuals of Akodon aff. cursor (2n = 15) and in one individual of Cerradomys sp. (2n = 51). Structural variation in karyotype was observed in seven individuals of Cerradomys sp., showing one additional pair of metacentric chromosomes. PMID:18094834

Pereira, L G; Geise, L

2007-08-01

179

Variance of molecular datings, evolution of rodents and the phylogenetic affinities between Ctenodactylidae and Hystricognathi.  

PubMed Central

The von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene has been used to understand the origin and timing of Rodentia evolution in the context of placental phylogeny vWF exon 28 sequences of 15 rodent families and eight non-rodent eutherian clades are analysed with two different molecular dating methods (uniform clock on a linearized tree; quartet dating). Three main conclusions are drawn from the study of this nuclear exon. First, Ctenodactylidae (gundis) and Hystricognathi (e.g. porcupines, guinea-pigs, chinchillas) robustly cluster together in a newly recognized clade, named 'Ctenohystrica'. The Sciurognathi monophyly is subsequently rejected. Pedetidae (springhares) is an independent and early diverging rodent lineage, suggesting a convergent evolution of the multiserial enamel of rodent incisors. Second, molecular date estimates are here more influenced by accuracy and choice of the palaeontological temporal references used to calibrate the molecular clock than by either characters analysed (nucleotides versus amino acids) or species sampling. The caviomorph radiation at 31 million years (Myr) and the pig porpoise split at 63 Myr appear to be reciprocally compatible dates. Third, during the radiation of Rodentia, at least three lineages (Gliridae, Sciuroidea and Ctenohystrica) emerged close to the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, and their common ancestor separated from other placental orders in the Late Cretaceous.

Huchon, D; Catzeflis, F M; Douzery, E J

2000-01-01

180

Species Identification Key of Korean Mammal Hair  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT The hair microstructures of Korean terrestrial mammals from 23 species (22 wild and one domestic) were analyzed using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to construct a hair identification key. The hairs were examined using the medulla structures and cuticular scales of guard hairs from the dorsal regions of mature adult animals. All cuticular scale structures in the hair of Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Carnivora and Insectivora showed the petal pattern, and those of Artiodactyla and Chiroptera showed the wave pattern and coronal pattern, respectively. Rodentia, Lagomorpha and Carnivora showed multicellular, and Insectivora and Artiodactyla showed unicellular regular, mesh or columnar in the medulla structures, respectively. Chiroptera did not show the medulla structures in their hair. We found that it is possible to distinguish between species and order based on general appearance, medulla structures and cuticular scales. Thus, we constructed a hair identification key with morphological characteristics from each species. This study suggests that hair identification keys could be useful in fields, such as forensic science, food safety and foraging ecology.

LEE, Eunok; CHOI, Tae-Young; WOO, Donggul; MIN, Mi-Sook; SUGITA, Shoei; LEE, Hang

2014-01-01

181

Light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy study of fish cerebellar capillaries.  

PubMed

Samples of teleost cerebellar cortex (Arius Spixii and Salmo Trout) fixed by immersion and vascular perfusion techniques were processed for light microscopy, SEM and TEM. SEM fractographs of endothelial cell nuclear, organelle and peripheral cytoplasmic zones have been compared with their corresponding TEM images. A simultaneous three-dimensional view of the luminal surface of endothelial cells at the nuclear zone, and inner details of heterochromatin structure was obtained. Chained micropinocytotic vesicles and deep cytoplasmic invaginations were observed. Surface connected micropinocytotic vesicles or vacuoles show stomas open to the luminal surface. Clear and dense endothelial micropinocytotic vesicles and vacuoles were observed at TEM level. The dense plasma substance can be used as an endogenous electron dense tracer for permeability studies. At SEM level the rough endoplasmic reticulum appears as a trabecular continuous system. The endothelial cytosol exhibits a smooth, glass surface appearance. The endothelial luminal surface changes its aspect according to the fixation procedure. The SEM and TEM aspect of endothelial junctions further supports their role as the morphological counterpart of blood-brain barrier. The basement membrane exhibited a homogeneous matrix and short or long neuropilar projections. Clear perivascular astrocytes with anastomotic processes form the main framework of perivascular neuropile. Like the peripheral endothelial cytoplasm, they exhibited dense and clear micropinocytotic vesicles and vacuoles, providing evidence for their transport function between capillaries and neighbouring brain parenchyma. The SEM appearance of their outer surface further supports their barrier function. PMID:6635543

Castejón, O J

1983-01-01

182

Low resolution scanning electron microscopy of cerebellar neurons and neuroglial cells of the granular layer.  

PubMed

Teleost fishes, Arius Spixii and Salmo trout and adult Swiss albino mice have been processed with the freeze-fracture technique for SEM to explore the inner cytoplasmic and nuclear surface details of neurons and neuroglial cells. The specimens were fixed by vascular perfusion with Karnovsky fixative and 2-3 mm thick cerebellar slices were subsequently fixed by immersion in the same fixative. They were postfixed in osmium tetroxide, dehydrated in ethanol, frozen in Freon 22, cooled by liquid nitrogen and fractured. After thawing in ethanol, they were critically point dried, coated with gold-palladium and viewed by SEM. The surface features of perikaryon were examined at low resolution and magnifications. The image of endoplasmic reticulum, GERL complex and chromatin were described in fractured cerebellar neurons (granule and Golgi cells). The fractured protoplasmic astrocytes displayed a characteristic glass surface appearance of cytoplasmic body and processes, which facilitated their recognition at the neuropile and perivascular region. The oligodendrocytes appeared as fusiform cells depicting a thin rim of perinuclear cytoplasm. The surface view of endoplasmic reticulum was well studied at the nuclear poles. Fine cytoplasmic beaded canaliculi appeared connecting the outer surface of nuclear envelope with the plasma membrane inner surface. The nucleus exhibited well developed peripheral heterochromatin masses forming anastomotic bands separated by vacuolar spaces. The SEM nerve and neuroglial cell fractographs were compared with similar images obtained by conventional transmission electron microscopy and freeze etching technique. PMID:6505621

Castejón, O J

1984-01-01

183

Hepatitis B virus lineages in mammalian hosts: Potential for bidirectional cross-species transmission  

PubMed Central

The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a cosmopolitan infectious agent currently affecting over 350 million people worldwide, presently accounting for more than two billion infections. In addition to man, other hepatitis virus strains infect species of several mammalian families of the Primates, Rodentia and Chiroptera orders, in addition to birds. The mounting evidence of HBV infection in African, Asian and neotropical primates draws attention to the potential cross-species, zoonotic transmission of these viruses to man. Moreover, recent evidence also suggests the humans may also function as a source of viral infection to other mammals, particularly to domestic animals like poultry and swine. In this review, we list all evidence of HBV and HBV-like infection of nonhuman mammals and discuss their potential roles as donors or recipients of these viruses to humans and to other closely-related species.

Bonvicino, Cibele R; Moreira, Miguel A; Soares, Marcelo A

2014-01-01

184

Ectoparasites of Chevrier's field mouse, Apodemus chevrieri, in a focus of plague in southwest China.  

PubMed

Chevrier's field mouse, Apodemus chevrieri Milne-Edwards (Rodentia: Muridae), has been identified as the main wild reservoir of plague in the sylvatic plague focus of Yunnan Province, southwest China. Here, the ectoparasite communities of A. chevrieri and the potential medical and veterinary importance of these ectoparasites are described. A high proportion (66%) of 321 mice were found to be infested with ectoparasites. A total of 81 species of ectoparasite, including 48 species of chigger mite, 25 species of mesostigmatid (gamasid) mite, six species of flea and two species of sucking louse were collected. Most species of ectoparasite were relatively uncommon, but a few were abundant. Within this ectoparasite complex, 16 species have previously been reported to be vectors of human disease agents. Apodemus chevrieri would appear therefore to be a natural reservoir for plague bacilli and epidemic haemorrhagic fever (Korean haemorrhagic fever) viruses. PMID:17897372

Xing-Yuan, M; Xian-Guo, G; Wen-Ge, D; Ai-Qin, N; Ti-Jun, Q; Dian, W

2007-09-01

185

Chigger mites (Acari, Trombiculidae) parasitizing small mammals in the Eastern Hindu Kush and some other Afghan areas.  

PubMed

Chigger mites of Afghanistan were studied on the base of collections made in Eastern and Central Hindu Kush, Kabul, and some other localities. Fifteen chigger species parasitizing nine species of Rodentia, two species of Lagomorpha, and one species of Soricomorpha were found, including 13 species which were not previously recorded in Afghanistan. Eco-geographical variability is observed in Shunsennia oudemansi: Individuals of this species from high-mountain localities of Eastern Hindu Kush are characterized by larger values of most morphometric characters than the specimens collected in Kabul. Vertical and horizontal distribution of chiggers and chigger-host relationships in Eastern Hindu Kush is discussed. Comparison of our data with that on chigger fauna in the region of Tirich Mir clearly demonstrates the role of the Eastern Hindu Kush main ridge as a border between different chigger faunas. PMID:20737277

Daniel, Milan; Stekolnikov, Alexandr A; Hakimitabar, Masoud; Saboori, Alireza

2010-10-01

186

Unexpected primitive rodents in the Quaternary of Argentina  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article describes the first fossils recorded in the Hernandarias Formation (Pleistocene) in Entre Ríos province (eastern Argentina). They are represented by three teeth assigned to the caviomorph rodents (Rodentia, Mammalia) Aenigmys diamantensis gen. et sp. nov. and Eumysops. To establish the phylogenetic affinities of the two most enigmatic teeth, their enamel microstructure was studied. Aenigmys diamantensis is considered the most primitive taxon of a clade formed by Dinomyidae-Neoepiblemidae-Heptaxodontidae. Evidence of the close relationships among these families also is presented herein. The new fossils reinforce previous hypotheses about the survival of primitive Brazilian taxa after their extinction in the Pampas and Patagonia of southern South America. They also show that the diversity of caviomorph rodents during the Quaternary was greater than supposed and that an important Quaternary extinction, not previously detected, affected several lineages. With the available evidence, it is not possible to determine if these rodents indicate a warm pulse or a particular biogeographic situation in Entre Ríos.

Vucetich, María G.; Vieytes, Emma C.; Verzi, Diego H.; Noriega, Jorge I.; Tonni, Eduardo P.

2005-10-01

187

Rodents for comparative aging studies: from mice to beavers.  

PubMed

After humans, mice are the best-studied mammalian species in terms of their biology and genetics. Gerontological research has used mice and rats extensively to generate short- and long-lived mutants, study caloric restriction and more. Mice and rats are valuable model organisms thanks to their small size, short lifespans and fast reproduction. However, when the goal is to further extend the already long human lifespan, studying fast aging species may not provide all the answers. Remarkably, in addition to the fast-aging species, the order Rodentia contains multiple long-lived species with lifespans exceeding 20 years (naked mole-rat, beavers, porcupines, and some squirrels). This diversity opens great opportunities for comparative aging studies. Here we discuss the evolution of lifespan in rodents, review the biology of slow-aging rodents, and show an example of how the use of a comparative approach revealed that telomerase activity coevolved with body mass in rodents. PMID:19424861

Gorbunova, Vera; Bozzella, Michael J; Seluanov, Andrei

2008-09-01

188

Flying lemurs - The 'flying tree shrews'? Molecular cytogenetic evidence for a Scandentia-Dermoptera sister clade  

PubMed Central

Background Flying lemurs or Colugos (order Dermoptera) represent an ancient mammalian lineage that contains only two extant species. Although molecular evidence strongly supports that the orders Dermoptera, Scandentia, Lagomorpha, Rodentia and Primates form a superordinal clade called Supraprimates (or Euarchontoglires), the phylogenetic placement of Dermoptera within Supraprimates remains ambiguous. Results To search for cytogenetic signatures that could help to clarify the evolutionary affinities within this superordinal group, we have established a genome-wide comparative map between human and the Malayan flying lemur (Galeopterus variegatus) by reciprocal chromosome painting using both human and G. variegatus chromosome-specific probes. The 22 human autosomal paints and the X chromosome paint defined 44 homologous segments in the G. variegatus genome. A putative inversion on GVA 11 was revealed by the hybridization patterns of human chromosome probes 16 and 19. Fifteen associations of human chromosome segments (HSA) were detected in the G. variegatus genome: HSA1/3, 1/10, 2/21, 3/21, 4/8, 4/18, 7/15, 7/16, 7/19, 10/16, 12/22 (twice), 14/15, 16/19 (twice). Reverse painting of G. variegatus chromosome-specific paints onto human chromosomes confirmed the above results, and defined the origin of the homologous human chromosomal segments in these associations. In total, G. variegatus paints revealed 49 homologous chromosomal segments in the HSA genome. Conclusion Comparative analysis of our map with published maps from representative species of other placental orders, including Scandentia, Primates, Lagomorpha and Rodentia, suggests a signature rearrangement (HSA2q/21 association) that links Scandentia and Dermoptera to one sister clade. Our results thus provide new evidence for the hypothesis that Scandentia and Dermoptera have a closer phylogenetic relationship to each other than either of them has to Primates.

Nie, Wenhui; Fu, Beiyuan; O'Brien, Patricia CM; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Tanomtong, Alongkoad; Volobouev, Vitaly; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang

2008-01-01

189

Linking fishery management and conservation in a tropical estuarine lagoon: biological and physical effects of an artisanal fishing gear  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information coming from fishery monitoring, surveys and experimental fishing with participation of fishers was employed to determine the impact of an artisanal gear, 'boliche', on the biodiversity of the Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta (CGSM), an estuarine lagoon on the Caribbean coast of Colombia. Fishery monitoring (catch data) included landings before (1968 and 1978) and after (1994-1996) the introduction of the boliche in the CGSM (1985), whereas surveys were conducted seasonally during 1993-1994. Fishing experiments involved evaluating different mesh sizes and the short-term effect of physical disturbance by the boliche. Monitoring suggested potential trophic effects of this fishing gear: the catch of large, long-lived, carnivorous species declined after the introduction of the boliche in the CGSM, whereas catch rates of smaller, shorter-lived, and lower trophic level species increased. Surveys revealed that the boliche retained 41 species. The by-catch made up 62% of the total catch and the remaining 38% involved the three target species Eugerres plumieri, Mugil incilis and Cathorops spixii. Selectivity experiments showed that 2.5 in. stretched mesh size gill nets caught more species than the 3.0-in. mesh. The smaller mesh also increased the risk of a critical reduction in the spawning stock of target species (notably E. plumieri); a situation that could affect the fish community if mesh sizes lower than 2.5 in. were intensively used. Suspended particulate matter significantly increased after fishing activity, with higher resuspension on mud-shells and mud substrata, whereas dissolved oxygen showed no appreciable changes after fishing operations. Notwithstanding, the activity of the boliche would generate sediment resuspension between 382 and 470 t day -1, which could lead to potential cascade impacts on water quality. We propose a framework of redundancy in management measures in order to simultaneously reach management and conservation goals.

Rueda, M.; Defeo, O.

2003-04-01

190

A Newly Emerged Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Focus in Northern Israel and Two New Reservoir Hosts of Leishmania major  

PubMed Central

In 2006/7, 18 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) were reported for the first time from Sde Eliyahu (pop. 650), a village in the Beit She'an valley of Israel. Between 2007–2011, a further 88 CL cases were diagnosed bringing the total to 106 (16.3% of the population of Sde Eliyahu). The majority of cases resided in the south-western part of the village along the perimeter fence. The causative parasite was identified as Leishmania major Yakimoff & Schokhor, 1914 (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli), 1786 (Diptera: Psychodidae) was found to be the most abundant phlebotomine species comprising 97% of the sand flies trapped inside the village, and an average of 7.9% of the females were positive for Leishmania ITS1 DNA. Parasite isolates from CL cases and a sand fly were characterized using several methods and shown to be L. major. During a comprehensive survey of rodents 164 Levant voles Microtus guentheri Danford & Alston, 1880 (Rodentia: Cricetidae) were captured in alfalfa fields bordering the village. Of these 27 (16.5%) tested positive for Leishmania ITS1 DNA and shown to be L. major by reverse line blotting. A very high percentage (58.3% - 21/36) of Tristram's jirds Meriones tristrami Thomas, 1892 (Rodentia: Muridae), found further away from the village also tested positive for ITS1 by PCR. Isolates of L. major were successfully cultured from the ear of a wild jird found positive by ITS1 PCR. Although none of the wild PCR-positive voles exhibited external pathology, laboratory-reared voles that were infected by intradermal L. major inoculation, developed patent lesions and sand flies became infected by feeding on the ears of these laboratory-infected voles. This is the first report implicating M. guentheri and M. tristrami as reservoirs of Leishmania. The widespread co-distribution of M. guentheri and P. papatasi, suggests a significant threat from the spread of CL caused by L. major in the Middle East, central Asia and southern Europe.

Faiman, Roy; Abbasi, Ibrahim; Jaffe, Charles; Motro, Yoav; Nasereddin, Abdelmagid; Schnur, Lionel F.; Torem, Moshe; Pratlong, Francine; Dedet, Jean-Pierre; Warburg, Alon

2013-01-01

191

A newly emerged cutaneous leishmaniasis focus in northern Israel and two new reservoir hosts of Leishmania major.  

PubMed

In 2006/7, 18 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) were reported for the first time from Sde Eliyahu (pop. 650), a village in the Beit She'an valley of Israel. Between 2007-2011, a further 88 CL cases were diagnosed bringing the total to 106 (16.3% of the population of Sde Eliyahu). The majority of cases resided in the south-western part of the village along the perimeter fence. The causative parasite was identified as Leishmania major Yakimoff & Schokhor, 1914 (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli), 1786 (Diptera: Psychodidae) was found to be the most abundant phlebotomine species comprising 97% of the sand flies trapped inside the village, and an average of 7.9% of the females were positive for Leishmania ITS1 DNA. Parasite isolates from CL cases and a sand fly were characterized using several methods and shown to be L. major. During a comprehensive survey of rodents 164 Levant voles Microtus guentheri Danford & Alston, 1880 (Rodentia: Cricetidae) were captured in alfalfa fields bordering the village. Of these 27 (16.5%) tested positive for Leishmania ITS1 DNA and shown to be L. major by reverse line blotting. A very high percentage (58.3%-21/36) of Tristram's jirds Meriones tristrami Thomas, 1892 (Rodentia: Muridae), found further away from the village also tested positive for ITS1 by PCR. Isolates of L. major were successfully cultured from the ear of a wild jird found positive by ITS1 PCR. Although none of the wild PCR-positive voles exhibited external pathology, laboratory-reared voles that were infected by intradermal L. major inoculation, developed patent lesions and sand flies became infected by feeding on the ears of these laboratory-infected voles. This is the first report implicating M. guentheri and M. tristrami as reservoirs of Leishmania. The widespread co-distribution of M. guentheri and P. papatasi, suggests a significant threat from the spread of CL caused by L. major in the Middle East, central Asia and southern Europe. PMID:23437408

Faiman, Roy; Abbasi, Ibrahim; Jaffe, Charles; Motro, Yoav; Nasereddin, Abdelmagid; Schnur, Lionel F; Torem, Moshe; Pratlong, Francine; Dedet, Jean-Pierre; Warburg, Alon

2013-01-01

192

Hystricognathy vs Sciurognathy in the Rodent Jaw: A New Morphometric Assessment of Hystricognathy Applied to the Living Fossil Laonastes (Diatomyidae)  

PubMed Central

While exceptional for an intense diversification of lineages, the evolutionary history of the order Rodentia comprises only a limited number of morphological morphotypes for the mandible. This situation could partly explain the intense debates about the taxonomic position of the latest described member of this clade, the Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus (Diatomyidae). This discovery has re-launched the debate on the definition of the Hystricognathi suborder identified using the angle of the jaw relative to the plane of the incisors. Our study aims to end this ambiguity. For clarity, it became necessary to revisit the entire morphological diversity of the mandible in extant and extinct rodents. However, current and past rodent diversity brings out the limitations of the qualitative descriptive approach and highlights the need for a quantitative approach. Here, we present the first descriptive comparison of the masticatory apparatus within the Ctenohystrica clade, in combining classic comparative anatomy with morphometrical methods. First, we quantified the shape of the mandible in rodents using 3D landmarks. Then, the analysis of osteological features was compared to myological features in order to understand the biomechanical origin of this morphological diversity. Among the morphological variation observed, the mandible of Laonastes aenigmamus displays an intermediate association of features that could be considered neither as sciurognathous nor as hystricognathous.

Hautier, Lionel; Lebrun, Renaud; Saksiri, Soonchan; Michaux, Jacques; Vianey-Liaud, Monique; Marivaux, Laurent

2011-01-01

193

DNA-based and geometric morphometric analysis to validate species designation: a case study of the subterranean rodent Ctenomys bicolor.  

PubMed

The genus Ctenomys (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae) shows several taxonomic inconsistencies. In this study, we used an integrative approach including DNA sequences, karyotypes, and geometric morphometrics to evaluate the taxonomic validity of a nominal species, Ctenomys bicolor, which was described based on only one specimen in 1912 by Miranda Ribeiro, and since then neglected. We sampled near the type locality assigned to this species and collected 10 specimens. A total of 820 base pairs of the cytochrome b gene were sequenced and analyzed together with nine other species and four morphotypes obtained from GenBank. Bayesian analyses showed that C. bicolor is monophyletic and related to the Bolivian-Matogrossense group, a clade that originated about 3 mya. We compared the cranial shape through morphometric geometrics of C. bicolor, including the specimen originally sampled in 1912, with other species representative of the same phylogenetic group (C. boliviensis and C. steinbachi). C. bicolor shows unique skull traits that distinguish it from all other currently known taxa. Our findings confirm that the specimen collected by Miranda Ribeiro is a valid species, and improve the knowledge about Ctenomys in the Amazon region. PMID:24301764

Stolz, J F B; Gonçalves, G L; Leipnitz, L; Freitas, T R O

2013-01-01

194

Rickettsial infections of fleas collected from small mammals on four islands in Indonesia.  

PubMed

Ectoparasites were sampled from small mammals collected in West Java, West Sumatra, North Sulawesi, and East Kalimantan, Indonesia, in 2007-2008 and were screened for evidence of infection from bacteria in the Rickettsaceae family. During eight trap nights at eight sites, 208 fleas were collected from 96 of 507 small mammals trapped from four orders (379 Rodentia; 123 Soricomorpha; two Carnivora; three Scandentia). Two species of fleas were collected: Xenopsylla cheopis (n = 204) and Nosopsyllus spp. (n = 4). Among the 208 fleas collected, 171 X. cheopis were removed from rats (Rattus spp.) and 33 X. cheopis from shrews (Suncus murinus). X. cheopis were pooled and tested for DNA from rickettsial agents Rickettsia typhi, Rickettsia felis, and spotted fever group rickettsiae. R. typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was detected in X. cheopis collected from small mammals in West Java and East Kalimantan. R. felis was detected in X. cheopis collected from small mammals in Manado, North Sulawesi. R. felis and spotted fever group rickettsiae were detected in a pool of X. cheopis collected from an animal in East Kalimantan. Sixteen percent of the X. cheopis pools were found positive for Rickettsia spp.; four (10.8%) R. typhi, one (2.7%) R. felis, and one (2.7%) codetection of R. felis and a spotted fever group rickettsia. These data suggest that rickettsial infections remain a threat to human health across Indonesia. PMID:21175069

Barbara, Kathryn A; Farzeli, Arik; Ibrahim, Ima N; Antonjaya, Ungke; Yunianto, Andre; Winoto, Imelda; Ester; Perwitasari, Dian; Widjaya, Susana; Richards, Allen L; Williams, Maya; Blair, Patrick J

2010-11-01

195

Spontaneous expression of magnetic compass orientation in an epigeic rodent: the bank vole, Clethrionomys glareolus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetoreception has been convincingly demonstrated in only a few mammalian species. Among rodents, magnetic compass orientation has been documented in four species of subterranean mole rats and two epigeic (i.e. active above ground) species—the Siberian hamster and the C57BL/6J mouse. The mole rats use the magnetic field azimuth to determine compass heading; their directional preference is spontaneous and unimodal, and their magnetic compass is magnetite-mediated. By contrast, the primary component of orientation response is learned in the hamster and the mouse, but both species also exhibit a weak spontaneous bimodal preference in the natural magnetic field. To determine whether the magnetic compass of wild epigeic rodents features the same functional properties as that of laboratory rodents, we investigated magnetic compass orientation in the bank vole Clethrionomys glareolus (Cricetidae, Rodentia). The voles exhibited a robust spontaneous bimodal directional preference, i.e. built nests and slept preferentially along the north-south axis, and deflected their directional preference according to a shift in the direction of magnetic north, clearly indicating that they were deriving directional information from the magnetic field. Thus, bimodal, axially symmetrical directional choice seems to be a common feature shared by epigeic rodents. However, spontaneous directional preference in the bank vole appeared to be more pronounced than that reported in the hamster and the mouse. These findings suggest that bank voles are well suited for future studies investigating the adaptive significance and mechanisms of magnetic orientation in epigeic rodents.

Oliveriusová, Ludmila; N?mec, Pavel; Pavelková, Zuzana; Sedlá?ek, František

2014-06-01

196

Physiologic Reference Ranges for Captive Black-Tailed Prairie Dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus)  

PubMed Central

The black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) is a member of the order Rodentia and the family Sciuridae. Ecologically, prairie dogs are a keystone species in prairie ecology. This species is used as an animal model for human gallbladder disease and diseases caused by infection with Clostridium difficile, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, and most recently, Orthopoxvirus. Despite increasing numbers of prairie dogs used in research and kept as pets, few data are available on their baseline physiology in animal facility housing conditions. To establish baseline physiologic reference ranges, we designed a study using 18 wild-caught black-tailed prairie dogs. Telemetry data were analyzed to establish circadian rhythms for activity and temperature. In addition, hematologic and serum chemistry analyses were performed. Baseline measurements were used to establish the mean for each animal, which then were compiled and analyzed to determine the reference ranges. Here we present physiologic data on serum chemistry and hematology profiles, as well as weight, core body temperature, and daily activity patterns for black-tailed prairie dogs. These results reflect the use of multiple measurements from species- and age-matched prairie dogs and likely will be useful to ecologists, scientists interested in using this animal model in research, and veterinarians caring for pet prairie dogs.

Keckler, M Shannon; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia F; Langham, Gregory L; Damon, Inger K; Karem, Kevin L; Carroll, Darin S

2010-01-01

197

Cellular scaling rules for rodent brains  

PubMed Central

How do cell number and size determine brain size? Here, we show that, in the order Rodentia, increased size of the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and remaining areas across six species is achieved through greater numbers of neurons of larger size, and much greater numbers of nonneuronal cells of roughly invariant size, such that the ratio between total neuronal and nonneuronal mass remains constant across species. Although relative cerebellar size remains stable among rodents, the number of cerebellar neurons increases with brain size more rapidly than in the cortex, such that the cerebellar fraction of total brain neurons increases with brain size. In contrast, although the relative cortical size increases with total brain size, the cortical fraction of total brain neurons remains constant. We propose that the faster increase in average neuronal size in the cerebral cortex than in the cerebellum as these structures gain neurons and the rapidly increasing glial numbers that generate glial mass to match total neuronal mass at a fixed glia/neuron total mass ratio are fundamental cellular constraints that lead to the relative expansion of cerebral cortical volume across species.

Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Mota, Bruno; Lent, Roberto

2006-01-01

198

Microsatellite-encoded domain in rodent Sry functions as a genetic capacitor to enable the rapid evolution of biological novelty  

PubMed Central

The male program of therian mammals is determined by Sry, a transcription factor encoded by the Y chromosome. Specific DNA binding is mediated by a high mobility group (HMG) box. Expression of Sry in the gonadal ridge activates a Sox9-dependent gene regulatory network leading to testis formation. A subset of Sry alleles in superfamily Muroidea (order Rodentia) is remarkable for insertion of an unstable DNA microsatellite, most commonly encoding (as in mice) a CAG repeat–associated glutamine-rich domain. We provide evidence, based on an embryonic pre-Sertoli cell line, that this domain functions at a threshold length as a genetic capacitor to facilitate accumulation of variation elsewhere in the protein, including the HMG box. The glutamine-rich domain compensates for otherwise deleterious substitutions in the box and absence of nonbox phosphorylation sites to ensure occupancy of DNA target sites. Such compensation enables activation of a male transcriptional program despite perturbations to the box. Whereas human SRY requires nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and coupled phosphorylation, mouse Sry contains a defective nuclear export signal analogous to a variant human SRY associated with inherited sex reversal. We propose that the rodent glutamine-rich domain has (i) fostered accumulation of cryptic intragenic variation and (ii) enabled unmasking of such variation due to DNA replicative slippage. This model highlights genomic contingency as a source of protein novelty at the edge of developmental ambiguity and may underlie emergence of non–Sry-dependent sex determination in the radiation of Muroidea.

Chen, Yen-Shan; Racca, Joseph D.; Sequeira, Paul W.; Phillips, Nelson B.; Weiss, Michael A.

2013-01-01

199

More Novel Hantaviruses and Diversifying Reservoir Hosts -- Time for Development of Reservoir-Derived Cell Culture Models?  

PubMed Central

Due to novel, improved and high-throughput detection methods, there is a plethora of newly identified viruses within the genus Hantavirus. Furthermore, reservoir host species are increasingly recognized besides representatives of the order Rodentia, now including members of the mammalian orders Soricomorpha/Eulipotyphla and Chiroptera. Despite the great interest created by emerging zoonotic viruses, there is still a gross lack of in vitro models, which reflect the exclusive host adaptation of most zoonotic viruses. The usually narrow host range and genetic diversity of hantaviruses make them an exciting candidate for studying virus-host interactions on a cellular level. To do so, well-characterized reservoir cell lines covering a wide range of bat, insectivore and rodent species are essential. Most currently available cell culture models display a heterologous virus-host relationship and are therefore only of limited value. Here, we review the recently established approaches to generate reservoir-derived cell culture models for the in vitro study of virus-host interactions. These successfully used model systems almost exclusively originate from bats and bat-borne viruses other than hantaviruses. Therefore we propose a parallel approach for research on rodent- and insectivore-borne hantaviruses, taking the generation of novel rodent and insectivore cell lines from wildlife species into account. These cell lines would be also valuable for studies on further rodent-borne viruses, such as orthopox- and arenaviruses.

Eckerle, Isabella; Lenk, Matthias; Ulrich, Rainer G.

2014-01-01

200

Prevalence and molecular typing of Giardia spp. in captive mammals at the zoo of Zagreb, Croatia.  

PubMed

A total of 131 faecal samples from 57 mammalian species housed at the zoo of Zagreb, Croatia, were tested for the presence of Giardia spp. cysts using epifluorescence microscopy. The overall prevalence (29%) was high, yet all animals were asymptomatic at the time of sampling. Positive samples were characterized by PCR and sequence analysis of both conserved and variable loci, for the identification of Giardia species and G. duodenalis assemblages and genotypes. Assemblages A and C were identified in Artiodactyla, assemblage B in Primates, Rodentia and Hyracoidea, and assemblages A, B, C and D, as well as Giardia microti, in Carnivora. Genotyping at the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region, at the triose phosphate isomerase, glutamate dehydrogenase and beta-giardin genes revealed extensive polymorphisms, particularly among assemblage B isolates. A phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences showed that isolates from captive mammals housed at the zoo are genetically different from isolates of human and domestic animal origin. This is the first survey in a zoological garden to include a molecular characterization of the parasite, and provides novel sequence data of G. duodenalis from many previously uncharacterized hosts. PMID:20970259

Beck, Relja; Sprong, Hein; Bata, Ingeborg; Lucinger, Snjezana; Pozio, Edoardo; Cacciò, Simone M

2011-01-10

201

Intestinal parasitism in the animals of the zoological garden "Peña Escrita" (Almuñecar, Spain).  

PubMed

Gastrointestinal parasites cause serious diarrhoea in captive animals. Therefore, we have undertaken this study to establish programmes to prevent, control, and treat intestinal parasitism in the animals of the zoological garden "Peña Escrita" of Almuñecar (Granada). An annual survey was conduced to estimate the occurrence of gastrointestinal parasites and the seasonality of this parasitism. Between June 2006 and May 2007, 432 samples were collected from primates, carnivores, perissoodactyla, artiodactyla, rodentia, diprotodontia, galliformes, anseriformes and struthioniformes. One or more intestinal parasites were identified in 72.5% of the animals. The most frequent pathogenic endoparasites were Eimeria spp. (17.3%), Trichuris spp. (5.1%), Strongyloides spp. (4.5%), Cyclospora spp. (4.5%), Cryptosporidium spp. (3.2%) and Isospora spp. (2.6%). Iodamoeba butschlii, Parascaris equorum and Trichuris spp. did not vary with season and Cryptosporidium spp., Dicrocoelium dendriticum, Metastrongylus spp. and Cylicospirura spp. appeared exclusively in Artiodactyla. Multiple parasitic infections were common, 70% of animals presented with at least two parasites (maximum=6). The most frequent cases of multiple parasitism were Eimeria spp. plus Blastocystis spp. and Eimeria spp. plus Nematodirus spp., in the last case the animals presented explosive diarrhoea. In accord with our results, after each sampling, some of the affected animals were treated and the corresponding programmes of prevention and control were designed. PMID:18639383

Pérez Cordón, G; Hitos Prados, A; Romero, D; Sánchez Moreno, M; Pontes, A; Osuna, A; Rosales, M J

2008-10-01

202

Social Structure Predicts Genital Morphology in African Mole-Rats  

PubMed Central

Background African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia) exhibit a wide range of social structures, from solitary to eusocial. We previously found a lack of sex differences in the external genitalia and morphology of the perineal muscles associated with the phallus in the eusocial naked mole-rat. This was quite surprising, as the external genitalia and perineal muscles are sexually dimorphic in all other mammals examined. We hypothesized that the lack of sex differences in naked mole-rats might be related to their unusual social structure. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the genitalia and perineal muscles in three African mole-rat species: the naked mole-rat, the solitary silvery mole-rat, and the Damaraland mole-rat, a species considered to be eusocial, but with less reproductive skew than naked mole-rats. Our findings support a relationship between social structure, mating system, and sexual differentiation. Naked mole-rats lack sex differences in genitalia and perineal morphology, silvery mole-rats exhibit sex differences, and Damaraland mole-rats are intermediate. Conclusions/Significance The lack of sex differences in naked mole-rats is not an attribute of all African mole-rats, but appears to have evolved in relation to their unusual social structure and reproductive biology.

Seney, Marianne L.; Kelly, Diane A.; Goldman, Bruce D.; Sumbera, Radim; Forger, Nancy G.

2009-01-01

203

Distinct patterns of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Leontopithecus rosalia in distinct Atlantic coastal rainforest fragments in Rio de Janeiro--Brazil.  

PubMed

Previous studies on infection of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Poço das Antas Biological Reserve population of wild free-ranging Leontopithecus rosalia have shown the presence of genotype T. cruzi II, associated in Brazil with human disease. Herein, this study has been extended, the infection being evaluated in L. rosalia of 3 different tamarin populations, inhabiting distinct forest areas located in the same Atlantic Coastal Rainforest. Edentata, Marsupialia, Rodentia and Chiroptera were examined exclusively in the Poço das Antas Biological Reserve. Excluding Chiroptera, T. cruzi infection was found in all orders. Biochemical and molecular characterization demonstrated that golden lion tamarins maintained stable infections by T. cruzi II. The isolates from the other mammals corresponded to T. cruzi I, suggesting independent transmission cycles occurring among the sylvatic mammals inside Poço das Antas Biological Reserve. Significant differences in the infection patterns presented by the 3 populations of wild and captive-born golden lion tamarins were noticed. In Poço das Antas a considerably higher number of positive haemocultures from tamarins with positive serological titres was observed in comparison to those obtained from other areas. The implications for conservation and public health of an active sylvatic cycle in the Atlantic Coastal Rainforest of Rio de Janeiro are discussed. PMID:15648693

Lisboa, C V; Mangia, R H; De Lima, N R C; Martins, A; Dietz, J; Baker, A J; Ramon-Miranda, C R; Ferreira, L F; Fernandes, O; Jansen, A M

2004-12-01

204

The ecology of the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycle: Dispersion of zymodeme 3 (Z3) in wild hosts from Brazilian biomes.  

PubMed

Two main genotypes in Trypanosoma cruzi subpopulations can be distinguished by PCR amplification of sequences from the mini-exon gene non-transcribed spacer, respectively, T. cruzi I (TCI) and T. cruzi II (TCII). This technique is also capable of distinguishing a third assemblage of subpopulations that do not fit in these genotypes and that remain known as zymodeme Z3 (Z3). The distribution pattern as well as the mammalian host range of this latter T. cruzi sublineage still remains unclear. Thus, the intention of our study was to increase the information regarding these aspects. The mini-exon analysis of T. cruzi isolates obtained from sylvatic animals in the Amazon Forest, Atlantic Rainforest, Caatinga and Pantanal showed that prevalence of the Z3 subpopulation in nature was low (15 out of 225 isolates, corresponding to 7%). A higher prevalence of Z3 was observed in the Caatinga (15%) and the Pantanal (12%). Infection by Z3 was observed in mammalian hosts included in Carnivora, Chiroptera, Didelphimorphia, Rodentia and Xernathra. The T. cruzi Z3 subpopulation was observed also in mixed infections (33%) with TCI (n=2) and TCII (n=3). These results demonstrate that T. cruzi Z3 displays a wider distribution and host range than formerly understood as it has been demonstrated to be able infect species included in five orders of mammalian host species dispersed through all forest strata of the four Brazilian biomes evaluated. PMID:19643545

Lisboa, Cristiane Varella; Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Jansen, Ana Maria

2009-10-28

205

Evolution of spatial cognition: sex-specific patterns of spatial behavior predict hippocampal size.  

PubMed Central

In a study of two congeneric rodent species, sex differences in hippocampal size were predicted by sex-specific patterns of spatial cognition. Hippocampal size is known to correlate positively with maze performance in laboratory mouse strains and with selective pressure for spatial memory among passerine bird species. In polygamous vole species (Rodentia: Microtus), males range more widely than females in the field and perform better on laboratory measures of spatial ability; both of these differences are absent in monogamous vole species. Ten females and males were taken from natural populations of two vole species, the polygamous meadow vole, M. pennsylvanicus, and the monogamous pine vole, M. pinetorum. Only in the polygamous species do males have larger hippocampi relative to the entire brain than do females. Two-way analysis of variance shows that the ratio of hippocampal volume to brain volume is differently related to sex in these two species. To our knowledge, no previous studies of hippocampal size have linked both evolutionary and psychometric data to hippocampal dimensions. Our controlled comparison suggests that evolution can produce adaptive sex differences in behavior and its neural substrate.

Jacobs, L F; Gaulin, S J; Sherry, D F; Hoffman, G E

1990-01-01

206

Development of the chorioallantoic placenta in Octodon degus--a model for growth processes in caviomorph rodents?  

PubMed

The degu Octodon degus is one of the very few members of caviomorph or hystricognath Rodentia that possesses a simply arranged chorioallantoic placenta without advanced lobulation. Therefore this species was used as a model to study regional development and growth processes of the placenta, based on the examination of 20 individuals by light and electron microscopy as well as by using markers for proliferation, trophoblast and endometrial stroma. The results were interpreted by comparison with other hystricognaths in the light of their evolutionary history. It was found that trophoblast derived from the trophospongium is essential for extension of the placenta including the labyrinth: extensive proliferation is restricted to trophoblast cells at the outer margin of the placenta and along internally directed, finger-tip like protrusions of fetal mesenchyme towards the labyrinth. This kind of placental development is regarded as part of the stem species pattern of hystricognaths, evolved more than 40 million years ago. It is indicated for the first time that the replenishment of the syncytiotrophoblast is similar to corresponding processes in the human placenta. In conclusion, the degu is a useful model for placental growth dynamics, particularly because of its simply arranged placental architecture, and may also serve as an animal model in comparison to human pregnancies. PMID:17607703

Mess, Andrea

2007-07-15

207

Trichuris spp. (Nematoda: Trichuridae) from two rodents, Mastomys natalensis and Gerbilliscus vicinus in Tanzania.  

PubMed

During a survey of the helminth community of several rodent species in the Morogoro region (Tanzania), Trichuris whipworms (Nematoda: Trichuridae) were found in the ceca of the Natal multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis and a gerbil, Gerbilliscus vicinus (both Rodentia: Muridae). The taxonomic literature regarding Trichuris from African native rodents describes 10 species, but includes few metric and morphologic characters that discriminate between some of the pairs. The whipworms we sampled in Tanzanian Natal multimammate mice and gerbils were morphologically identified, respectively, as Trichuris mastomysi Verster, 1960 and Trichuris carlieri Gedoelst, 1916 sensu lato, but with characters that overlap or partially overlap with the cosmopolitan Murinae whipworm, Trichuris muris , already reported from several rodents in Africa. To clarify our identification, we sequenced the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 ribosomal DNA region of the worms' nuclear genome. The genetic analyses clearly distinguish the whipworms we found in M. natalensis from those found in the gerbil, and both of these from T. muris whipworm reference sequences. The overlap of morphological characters between rodent whipworms suggests that reports of T. muris from rodent species not closely related to Murinae in other parts of Africa should be treated with caution. PMID:23560615

Ribas, Alexis; López, Sergi; Makundi, Rhodes H; Leirs, Herwig; de Bellocq, Joëlle Goüy

2013-10-01

208

Frequent Expansions of the Bitter Taste Receptor Gene Repertoire during Evolution of Mammals in the Euarchontoglires Clade.  

PubMed

Genome studies of mammals in the superorder Euarchontoglires (a clade that comprises the orders Primates, Dermoptera, Scandentia, Rodentia, and Lagomorpha) are important for understanding the biological features of humans, particularly studies of medical model animals such as macaques and mice. Furthermore, the dynamic ecoevolutionary signatures of Euarchontoglires genomes may be discovered because many species in this clade are characterized by their successful adaptive radiation to various ecological niches. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary trajectory of bitter taste receptor genes (TAS2Rs) in 28 Euarchontoglires species based on homology searches of 39 whole-genome assemblies. The Euarchontoglires species possessed variable numbers of intact TAS2Rs, which ranged from 16 to 40, and their last common ancestor had at least 26 intact TAS2Rs. The gene tree showed that there have been at least seven lineage-specific events involving massive gene duplications. Gene duplications were particularly evident in the ancestral branches of anthropoids (the anthropoid cluster), which may have promoted the adaptive evolution of anthropoid characteristics, such as a trade-off between olfaction and other senses and the development of herbivorous characteristics. Subsequent whole-gene deletions of anthropoid cluster TAS2Rs in hominoid species suggest ongoing ectopic homologous recombination in the anthropoid cluster. These findings provide insights into the roles of adaptive sensory evolution in various ecological niches and important clues related to the molecular mechanisms that underlie taste diversity in Euarchontoglires mammalian species, including humans. PMID:24758778

Hayakawa, Takashi; Suzuki-Hashido, Nami; Matsui, Atsushi; Go, Yasuhiro

2014-08-01

209

Positive Selection and the Evolution of izumo Genes in Mammals  

PubMed Central

Most genes linked to male reproductive function have been known to evolve rapidly among species and to show signatures of positive selection. Different male species-specific reproductive strategies have been proposed to underlie positive selection, such as sperm competitive advantage and control over females postmating physiology. However, an underexplored aspect potentially affecting male reproductive gene evolution in mammals is the effect of gene duplications. Here we analyze the molecular evolution of members of the izumo gene family in mammals, a family of four genes mostly expressed in the sperm with known and potential roles in sperm-egg fusion. We confirm a previously reported bout of selection for izumo1 and establish that the bout of selection is restricted to the diversification of species of the superorder Laurasiatheria. None of the izumo genes showed evidence of positive selection in Glires (Rodentia and Lagomorpha), and in the case of the non-testes-specific izumo4, rapid evolution was driven by relaxed selection. We detected evidence of positive selection for izumo3 among Primates. Interestingly, positively selected sites include several serine residues suggesting modifications in protein function and/or localization among Primates. Our results suggest that positive selection is driven by aspects related to species-specific adaptations to fertilization rather than sexual selection.

Grayson, Phil; Civetta, Alberto

2012-01-01

210

Jumping and gliding rodents: mitogenomic affinities of Pedetidae and Anomaluridae deduced from an RNA-Seq approach.  

PubMed

An RNA-Seq strategy was used to obtain the complete set of protein-coding mitochondrial genes from two rodent taxa. Thanks to the next generation sequencing (NGS) 454 approach, we determined the complete mitochondrial DNA genome from Graphiurus kelleni (Mammalia: Rodentia: Gliridae) and partial mitogenome from Pedetes capensis (Pedetidae), and compared them with published rodent and outgroup mitogenomes. We finished the mitogenome sequencing by a series of amplicons using conserved PCR primers to fill the gaps corresponding to tRNA, rRNA and control regions. Phylogenetic analyses of the mitogenomes suggest a well-supported rodent phylogeny in agreement with nuclear gene trees. Pedetes groups with Anomalurus into the clade Anomaluromorpha, while Graphiurus branches within the squirrel-related clade. Moreover, Pedetes+Anomalurus branch with Castor into the mouse-related clade. Our study demonstrates the utility of NGS for obtaining new mitochondrial genomes as well as the importance of choosing adequate models of sequence evolution to infer the phylogeny of rodents. PMID:23973722

Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Jønsson, Knud A; Douzery, Emmanuel J P

2013-12-01

211

Evolution of hantaviruses: Co-speciation with reservoir hosts for more than 100MYR.  

PubMed

The most recent (9th) Report of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) lists 23 established and 30 provisional species in the genus Hantavirus (family Bunyaviridae) (Plyusnin et al., 2012). These virus species are harbored by altogether 51 species of rodents, shrews and moles and thus in most cases it is a relationship of "one hantavirus-one host". Such a tight bond between the two, in combination with the observed association between whole groups of hantaviruses and (sub)families of rodents, helped to develop the widely accepted view of a long-term co-evolution (co-speciation) of these viruses with their hosts. Accumulating evidence of host-switching events, both recent and ancient, however challenged some of the earlier views on hantavirus evolution. In this paper we discuss the concept of hantavirus-host co-speciation and propose a scenario of hantavirus evolution based on the currently available genetic information. This scenario is based on the hypothesis that hantaviruses are very ancient viruses which already existed at the estimated diversification point of major placental clades, of which one includes the ancestors of the order Rodentia and another the ancestors of both orders Eulipotyphla and Chiroptera; the diversification occurred approximately at 90-100MYA. We also speculate that the evolutionary history of hantaviruses extents even deeper in the past, beyond this time-point, and included the transmission of a (pre)bunyavirus from an insect host to a mammal host. PMID:24463501

Plyusnin, Alexander; Sironen, Tarja

2014-07-17

212

Expensive Brains: "Brainy" Rodents have Higher Metabolic Rate  

PubMed Central

Brains are the centers of the nervous system of animals, controlling the organ systems of the body and coordinating responses to changes in the ecological and social environment. The evolution of traits that correlate with cognitive ability, such as relative brain size is thus of broad interest. Brain mass relative to body mass (BM) varies among mammals, and diverse factors have been proposed to explain this variation. A recent study provided evidence that energetics play an important role in brain evolution (Isler and van Schaik, 2006). Using composite phylogenies and data drawn from multiple sources, these authors showed that basal metabolic rate (BMR) correlates with brain mass across mammals. However, no such relationship was found within rodents. Here we re-examined the relationship between BMR and brain mass within Rodentia using a novel species-level phylogeny. Our results are sensitive to parameter evaluation; in particular how species mass is estimated. We detect no pattern when applying an approach used by previous studies, where each species BM is represented by two different numbers, one being the individual that happened to be used for BMR estimates of that species. However, this approach may compromise the analysis. When using a single value of BM for each species, whether representing a single individual, or available species mean, our findings provide evidence that brain mass (independent of BM) and BMR are correlated. These findings are thus consistent with the hypothesis that large brains evolve when the payoff for increased brain mass is greater than the energetic cost they incur.

Sobrero, Raul; May-Collado, Laura J.; Agnarsson, Ingi; Hernandez, Cristian E.

2011-01-01

213

[Laboratory and field evaluation of an imidacloprid treated rodent oral bait for a systemic control of Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli, 1786 (Dipetra: Psychodidae)].  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to evaluate the systemic insecticidal activity of an imidacloprid-treated rodent oral bait, against Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli, 1786 vector of Leishmania major Yakimoff & Schokhor, 1914 (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae), etiologic agent of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL). Shaw's gerbil Meriones shawi Duvernoy, 1842 (Rodentia, Gerbillidae) were treated with imidacloprid-treated bait (0.05%). In the laboratory, effects on adult and larval of Phlebotomus papatasi fed on treated M. shawi and on its faeces were studied. The effectiveness of this approach was tested under field conditions. In the laboratory, 100% of P. papatasi were killed within 24 hours after blood feeding on Meriones shawi treated up to four weeks prior with a single application of imidacloprid (0.05%) bait. In addition, none of the P. papatasi larvae that consumed feces from M. shawi treated with the imidacloprid bait survived to pupation. In the field, application of the imidacloprid bait resulted in a 90% reduction in the P. papatasi population up to four weeks prior with a single application of imidacloprid (0.05%) bait. This is the first study to demonstrate field efficacy of insecticide-treated rodent baits for P. papatasi control and the first study to evaluate this approach in M. shawi, a principal ZCL reservoir host. These results suggest that insecticide-treated rodent baits could be used to effectively reduce the populations of P. papatasi associated with M. shawi in ZCL endemic areas. PMID:23299949

Derbali, M; Chelbi, I; Cherni, S; Barhoumi, W; Boujaâma, A; Raban, R; Poché, R; Zhioua, E

2013-02-01

214

Chlamydiaceae and Chlamydia-like organisms in free-living small mammals in Europe and Afghanistan.  

PubMed

Few data are available on the occurrence of chlamydial infections in wild small mammals. We investigated the significance of free-living small mammals as reservoirs or transmission hosts for microorganisms of the phylum/class Chlamydiae. We obtained 3,664 tissue samples from 911 animals in Switzerland, Germany, Austria, the Czech Republic, and Afghanistan. Samples included internal organs (n = 3,652) and feces (n = 12) from 679 rodents (order Rodentia) and 232 insectivores (order Soricomorpha) and were tested by three TaqMan® real-time PCRs specific for members of the family Chlamydiaceae and selected Chlamydia-like organisms such as Parachlamydia spp. and Waddlia spp. Only one of 911 (0.11%) animals exhibited a questionable positive result by Chlamydiaceae-specific real-time PCR. Five of 911 animals were positive by specific real-time PCR for Parachlamydia spp. but could not be confirmed by quantitative PCR targeting the Parachlamydia acanthamoebae secY gene (secY qPCR). One of 746 animals (0.13%) was positive by real-time PCR for Waddlia chondrophila. This result was confirmed by Waddlia secY qPCR. This is the first detection of Chlamydia-like organisms in small wildlife in Switzerland. Considering previous negative results for Chlamydiaceae in wild ruminant species from Switzerland, these data suggest that wild small mammals are unlikely to be important carriers or transport hosts for Chamydiaceae and Chlamydia-like organisms. PMID:24484495

Stephan, Sarah; Guerra, Diogo; Pospischil, Andreas; Hilbe, Monika; Weissenböck, Herbert; Novotný, Ladislav; Greub, Gilbert; Croxatto, Antony; Teifke, Jens Peter; Ulrich, Rainer G; Schlegel, Mathias; Ruhl, Silke; Schotte, Ulrich; Binder, Alfred; Sauer, Sabine; Borel, Nicole

2014-04-01

215

Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) associated with small terrestrial mammals in the state of Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil.  

PubMed

From June 2005 to November 2010, 43 small mammals encompassing 6 species of Didelphimorphia, 8 species of Rodentia, and 1 species of Lagomorpha were found parasitized by ticks in the state of Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil. Nine tick species, in total 186 specimens, were identified as follows: Amblyomma cajennense (larvae and nymphs) on opossums and rodents; Amblyomma ovale (nymphs) on rodents; Amblyomma parvum (nymphs) on rodents; Amblyomma coelebs (nymphs) on opossums; Amblyomma dubitatum (nymph) on opossums; Ixodes amarali (females, nymphs, and larvae) on opossums and rodents; Ixodes loricatus (male, females, nymph) on opossums; Ixodes schulzei (female) on rodents; and Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (female) on rabbits. Most of the tick-host associations found in the present study have never been recorded in the literature; those include three new host records for I. amarali, four for A. cajennense, one for A. dubitatum, two for A. ovale, and one for A. coelebs. In addition, we provide the first record of A. coelebs in the state of Minas Gerais. PMID:22585005

Saraiva, Danilo G; Fournier, Gislene F S R; Martins, Thiago F; Leal, Karla P G; Vieira, Flávia N; Câmara, Edeltrudes M V C; Costa, Claudia G; Onofrio, Valéria C; Barros-Battesti, Darci M; Guglielmone, Alberto A; Labruna, Marcelo B

2012-10-01

216

Fur mites of the family Listrophoridae (Acariformes: Sarcoptoidea) associated with South American sigmodontine rodents (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae).  

PubMed

Six species of 3 genera belonging to the fur mite family Listrophoridae were recorded on skins of South American rodents of the cricetid subfamily Sigmodontinae housed in the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology (Munich, Germany). Among them, Amlistrophorus geoxus sp. nov. from Geoxus valdivianus from Chile is described as a new for science, and males of Prolistrophorus amazonicus amazonicus Fain, 1971 are recorded for the first time. The full generic status for the subgenus Amlistrophorus of the genus Prolistrophorus proposed by Fain et al. (1996) is not supported, and Prolistrophorus musculinus Fain, 1973 stat. nov. (formerly a subspecies of P. amazonicus) from Mus musculus (Rodentia: Muridae) from Suriname is raised to species status. New hosts are recorded for the following species: Prolistrophorus argentinus (Hirst, 1921) from Holochilus brasiliensis and H. chacarius from Argentina, P. amazonicus from Calomys callosus from Argentina and Bolivia, C. laucha and C. musculinus from Argentina, P. akodon Fain and Lukoschus, 1982 from Akodon montensis from Argentina, P. nectomys Fain, 1971 from Nectomys palmipes from Peru and Melanomys caliginosus from Panama, and Sclerolistrophorus oxymycteris Fain, 1976 from Oryzomys laticeps from Brazil. PMID:23129199

Sikora, Bo?ena; Bochkov, Andre V

2012-12-01

217

Biostratigraphy and biochronology of the Monte Hermoso Formation (early Pliocene) at its type locality, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Monte Hermoso Formation, cropping out at its type locality of Farola Monte Hermoso (Buenos Aires Province), is a classical fossiliferous unit of the South American Neogene, highlighted by the abundance and diversity of its vertebrate remains. However, its biostratigraphy and age have been largely debated, and numerous discrepancies and controversies have been stated. In this regard, the result of the analysis of new materials recovered from the different levels of this formation, following a strict control of stratigraphic provenance, is here reported. As well, the provenance of specimens of previous collections has been evaluated. The studied assemblage consists of Osteichthyes, Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves and Mammalia. These latter are the most numerous and belong to the Didelphimorphia, Polydolopimorphia, Rodentia, Notoungulata, Litopterna and Xenarthra. The recorded taxa suggest no important faunistic variations among the different levels of the Monte Hermoso Formation that would imply significant chronological differences, and hence, justify the recognition of two biostratigraphic units. The analysis of the first and last records as well as the taxa considered as exclusive, does not support the validity of the biozones of Trigodon gaudryi and Neocavia depressidens previously proposed. On this basis, a new scheme for the Monte Hermoso Formation at its type locality is proposed, including a new single biostratigraphic unit. This unit is the Eumysops laeviplicatus Range Zone, which represents the biostratigraphic base for the Montehermosan Stage/Age of the early Pliocene.

Tomassini, Rodrigo L.; Montalvo, Claudia I.; Deschamps, Cecilia M.; Manera, Teresa

2013-12-01

218

Adaptive evolution of the matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein in mammals  

PubMed Central

Background Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) belongs to a family of small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs) that play a key role in skeleton development, particularly in mineralization, phosphate regulation and osteogenesis. MEPE associated disorders cause various physiological effects, such as loss of bone mass, tumors and disruption of renal function (hypophosphatemia). The study of this developmental gene from an evolutionary perspective could provide valuable insights on the adaptive diversification of morphological phenotypes in vertebrates. Results Here we studied the adaptive evolution of the MEPE gene in 26 Eutherian mammals and three birds. The comparative genomic analyses revealed a high degree of evolutionary conservation of some coding and non-coding regions of the MEPE gene across mammals indicating a possible regulatory or functional role likely related with mineralization and/or phosphate regulation. However, the majority of the coding region had a fast evolutionary rate, particularly within the largest exon (1467 bp). Rodentia and Scandentia had distinct substitution rates with an increased accumulation of both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations compared with other mammalian lineages. Characteristics of the gene (e.g. biochemical, evolutionary rate, and intronic conservation) differed greatly among lineages of the eight mammalian orders. We identified 20 sites with significant positive selection signatures (codon and protein level) outside the main regulatory motifs (dentonin and ASARM) suggestive of an adaptive role. Conversely, we find three sites under selection in the signal peptide and one in the ASARM motif that were supported by at least one selection model. The MEPE protein tends to accumulate amino acids promoting disorder and potential phosphorylation targets. Conclusion MEPE shows a high number of selection signatures, revealing the crucial role of positive selection in the evolution of this SIBLING member. The selection signatures were found mainly outside the functional motifs, reinforcing the idea that other regions outside the dentonin and the ASARM might be crucial for the function of the protein and future studies should be undertaken to understand its importance.

2011-01-01

219

Spatial and Temporal Activity Patterns of the Free-Living Giant Mole-Rat (Fukomys mechowii), the Largest Social Bathyergid  

PubMed Central

Despite the considerable attention devoted to the biology of social species of African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia), knowledge is lacking about their behaviour under natural conditions. We studied activity of the largest social bathyergid, the giant mole-rat Fukomys mechowii, in its natural habitat in Zambia using radio-telemetry. We radio-tracked six individuals during three continuous 72-h sessions. Five of these individuals, including a breeding male, belonged to a single family group; the remaining female was probably a solitary disperser. The non-breeders of the family were active (i.e. outside the nest) 5.8 hours per 24h-day with the activity split into 6.5 short bouts. The activity was more concentrated in the night hours, when the animals also travelled longer distances from the nest. The breeding male spent only 3.2 hours per day outside the nest, utilizing less than 20% of the whole family home range. The dispersing female displayed a much different activity pattern than the family members. Her 8.0 hours of outside-nest activity per day were split into 4.6 bouts which were twice as long as in the family non-breeders. Her activity peak in the late afternoon coincided with the temperature maximum in the depth of 10 cm (roughly the depth of the foraging tunnels). Our results suggest that the breeding individuals (at least males) contribute very little to the work of the family group. Nevertheless, the amount of an individual's activity and its daily pattern are probably flexible in this species and can be modified in response to actual environmental and social conditions.

Lovy, Matej; Skliba, Jan; Sumbera, Radim

2013-01-01

220

Light Perception in Two Strictly Subterranean Rodents: Life in the Dark or Blue?  

PubMed Central

Background The African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia) are strictly subterranean, congenitally microphthalmic rodents that are hardly ever exposed to environmental light. Because of the lack of an overt behavioural reaction to light, they have long been considered to be blind. However, recent anatomical studies have suggested retention of basic visual capabilities. In this study, we employed behavioural tests to find out if two mole-rat species are able to discriminate between light and dark, if they are able to discriminate colours and, finally, if the presence of light in burrows provokes plugging behaviour, which is assumed to have a primarily anti-predatory function. Methodology/Principal Finding We used a binary choice test to show that the silvery mole-rat Heliophobius argenteocinereus and the giant mole-rat Fukomys mechowii exhibit a clear photoavoidance response to full-spectrum (“white”), blue and green-yellow light, but no significant reaction to ultraviolet or red light during nest building. The mole-rats thus retain dark/light discrimination capabilities and a capacity to perceive short to medium-wavelength light in the photopic range of intensities. These findings further suggest that the mole-rat S opsin has its absorption maximum in the violet/blue part of the spectrum. The assay did not yield conclusive evidence regarding colour discrimination. To test the putative role of vision in bathyergid anti-predatory behaviour, we examined the reaction of mole-rats to the incidence of light in an artificial burrow system. The presence of light in the burrow effectively induced plugging of the illuminated tunnel. Conclusion/Significance Our findings suggest that the photopic vision is conserved and that low acuity residual vision plays an important role in predator avoidance and tunnel maintenance in the African mole-rats.

Kott, Ondrej; Sumbera, Radim; Nemec, Pavel

2010-01-01

221

Faster speciation and reduced extinction in the tropics contribute to the Mammalian latitudinal diversity gradient.  

PubMed

The increase in species richness from the poles to the tropics, referred to as the latitudinal diversity gradient, is one of the most ubiquitous biodiversity patterns in the natural world. Although understanding how rates of speciation and extinction vary with latitude is central to explaining this pattern, such analyses have been impeded by the difficulty of estimating diversification rates associated with specific geographic locations. Here, we use a powerful phylogenetic approach and a nearly complete phylogeny of mammals to estimate speciation, extinction, and dispersal rates associated with the tropical and temperate biomes. Overall, speciation rates are higher, and extinction rates lower, in the tropics than in temperate regions. The diversity of the eight most species-rich mammalian orders (covering 92% of all mammals) peaks in the tropics, except that of the Lagomorpha (hares, rabbits, and pikas) reaching a maxima in northern-temperate regions. Latitudinal patterns in diversification rates are strikingly consistent with these diversity patterns, with peaks in species richness associated with low extinction rates (Primates and Lagomorpha), high speciation rates (Diprotodontia, Artiodactyla, and Soricomorpha), or both (Chiroptera and Rodentia). Rates of range expansion were typically higher from the tropics to the temperate regions than in the other direction, supporting the "out of the tropics" hypothesis whereby species originate in the tropics and disperse into higher latitudes. Overall, these results suggest that differences in diversification rates have played a major role in shaping the modern latitudinal diversity gradient in mammals, and illustrate the usefulness of recently developed phylogenetic approaches for understanding this famous yet mysterious pattern. PMID:24492316

Rolland, Jonathan; Condamine, Fabien L; Jiguet, Frederic; Morlon, Hélène

2014-01-01

222

Coalescent-based genome analyses resolve the early branches of the euarchontoglires.  

PubMed

Despite numerous large-scale phylogenomic studies, certain parts of the mammalian tree are extraordinarily difficult to resolve. We used the coding regions from 19 completely sequenced genomes to study the relationships within the super-clade Euarchontoglires (Primates, Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Dermoptera and Scandentia) because the placement of Scandentia within this clade is controversial. The difficulty in resolving this issue is due to the short time spans between the early divergences of Euarchontoglires, which may cause incongruent gene trees. The conflict in the data can be depicted by network analyses and the contentious relationships are best reconstructed by coalescent-based analyses. This method is expected to be superior to analyses of concatenated data in reconstructing a species tree from numerous gene trees. The total concatenated dataset used to study the relationships in this group comprises 5,875 protein-coding genes (9,799,170 nucleotides) from all orders except Dermoptera (flying lemurs). Reconstruction of the species tree from 1,006 gene trees using coalescent models placed Scandentia as sister group to the primates, which is in agreement with maximum likelihood analyses of concatenated nucleotide sequence data. Additionally, both analytical approaches favoured the Tarsier to be sister taxon to Anthropoidea, thus belonging to the Haplorrhine clade. When divergence times are short such as in radiations over periods of a few million years, even genome scale analyses struggle to resolve phylogenetic relationships. On these short branches processes such as incomplete lineage sorting and possibly hybridization occur and make it preferable to base phylogenomic analyses on coalescent methods. PMID:23560065

Kumar, Vikas; Hallström, Björn M; Janke, Axel

2013-01-01

223

Development of Rapidly Evolving Intron Markers to Estimate Multilocus Species Trees of Rodents  

PubMed Central

One of the major challenges in the analysis of closely related species, speciation and phylogeography is the identification of variable sequence markers that allow the determination of genealogical relationships in multiple genomic regions using coalescent and species tree approaches. Rodent species represent nearly half of the mammalian diversity, but so far no systematic study has been carried out to detect suitable informative markers for this group. Here, we used a bioinformatic pipeline to extract intron sequences from rodent genomes available in databases and applied a series of filters that allowed the identification of 208 introns that adequately fulfilled several criteria for these studies. The main required characteristics of the introns were that they had the maximum possible mutation rates, that they were part of single-copy genes, that they had an appropriate sequence length for amplification, and that they were flanked by exons with suitable regions for primer design. In addition, in order to determine the validity of this approach, we chose ten of these introns for primer design and tested them in a panel of eleven rodent species belonging to different representative families. We show that all these introns can be amplified in the majority of species and that, overall, 79% of the amplifications worked with minimum optimization of the annealing temperature. In addition, we confirmed for a pair of sister species the relatively high level of sequence divergence of these introns. Therefore, we provide here a set of adequate intron markers that can be applied to different species of Rodentia for their use in studies that require significant sequence variability.

Rodriguez-Prieto, Ana; Igea, Javier; Castresana, Jose

2014-01-01

224

Thermal energetics of the New-Guinean moss-forest rat (Rattus niobe) in comparison with other tropical murid rodents.  

PubMed

The thermal energetics of rodents from cool, wet tropical highlands are poorly known. Metabolic rate, body temperature and thermal conductance were measured in the moss-forest rat, Rattus niobe (Rodentia), a small murid endemic to the highlands of New Guinea. These data were evaluated in the context of the variation observed in the genus Rattus and among tropical murids. In 7 adult R. niobe, basal metabolic rate (BMR) averaged 53.6±6.6mLO2h(-1), or 103% of the value predicted for a body mass of 42.3±5.8g. Compared to other species of Rattus, R. niobe combines a low body temperature (35.5±0.6°C) and a moderately low minimal wet thermal conductance cmin (5.88±0.7mLO2h(-1)°C(-1), 95% of predicted) with a small size, all of which lead to reduced energy expenditure in a constantly cool environment. The correlations of mean annual rainfall and temperature, altitude and body mass with BMR, body temperature and cmin were analyzed comparatively among tropical Muridae. Neither BMR, nor cmin or body temperature correlated with ambient temperature or altitude. Some of the factors which promote high BMR in higher latitude habitats, such as seasonal exposure to very low temperature and short reproductive season, are lacking in wet montane tropical forests. BMR increased with rainfall, confirming a pattern observed among other assemblages of mammals. This correlation was due to the low BMR of several desert adapted murids, while R. niobe and other species from wet habitats had a moderate BMR. PMID:24679978

Genoud, Michel

2014-04-01

225

Threat Diversity Will Erode Mammalian Phylogenetic Diversity in the Near Future  

PubMed Central

To reduce the accelerating rate of phylogenetic diversity loss, many studies have searched for mechanisms that could explain why certain species are at risk, whereas others are not. In particular, it has been demonstrated that species might be affected by both extrinsic threat factors as well as intrinsic biological traits that could render a species more sensitive to extinction; here, we focus on extrinsic factors. Recently, the International Union for Conservation of Nature developed a new classification of threat types, including climate change, urbanization, pollution, agriculture and aquaculture, and harvesting/hunting. We have used this new classification to analyze two main factors that could explain the expected future loss of mammalian phylogenetic diversity: 1. differences in the type of threats that affect mammals and 2. differences in the number of major threats that accumulate for a single species. Our results showed that Cetartiodactyla, Diprotodontia, Monotremata, Perissodactyla, Primates, and Proboscidea could lose a high proportion of their current phylogenetic diversity in the coming decades. In contrast, Chiroptera, Didelphimorphia, and Rodentia could lose less phylogenetic diversity than expected if extinctions were random. Some mammalian clades, including Marsupiala, Chiroptera, and a subclade of Primates, are affected by particular threat types, most likely due solely to their geographic locations and associations with particular habitats. However, regardless of the geography, habitat, and taxon considered, it is not the threat type, but the threat diversity that determines the extinction risk for species and clades. Thus, some mammals might be randomly located in areas subjected to a large diversity of threats; they might also accumulate detrimental traits that render them sensitive to different threats, which is a characteristic that could be associated with large body size. Any action reducing threat diversity is expected to have a significant impact on future mammalian phylogeny.

Jono, Clementine M. A.; Pavoine, Sandrine

2012-01-01

226

A survey of hemoparasite infections in free-ranging mammals and reptiles in French Guiana.  

PubMed

Blood smears of 1,353 free-ranging mammals (35 species) and 112 reptiles (31 species) from French Guiana were examined for hemoparasites. Parasites from 3 major groups were recorded: Apicomplexa (including hemogregarines, piroplasms, and Plasmodium spp.), Trypanosomatidae, and Filaroidea. Fifty percent of the individuals (86% of the species) were infected by parasites from at least 1 group. Hemogregarines, identified as Hepatozoon sp., infected numerous snakes with high prevalences (30-100%); infection is reported for the first time in 5 host genera of snakes: Clelia, Oxybelis, Pseustes, Rhinobotryum, and Bothriopsis. Infections were also observed in 4 marsupial species and 1 rodent. Hepatozoon spp. recorded in Didelphis albiventris (Marsupialia) and Coendou prehensilis (Rodentia) may be new species. Plasmodium sp. were observed in 2 snake species, Dipsas indica (Colubridae) and Bothrops atrox (Viperidae). Plasmodium brasilianum was recorded in all 5 primate species examined. Piroplasms were observed in all mammal orders except primates. Large terrestrial rodents were the main hosts of members of the Babesidae; 42% of Myoprocta acouchy, 36% of Dasyprocta agouti, and 44% of Agouti paca were infected. Trypanosomes were common in mammals and were recorded in 70% of the examined genera. Trypanosoma cruzi-like infections were reported in 21 mammal species, including sloths, rodents, carnivores, and primates. Microfilariae were also widespread, with higher prevalences in sloths, anteaters, and porcupines (>40% of the individuals infected) and in tamarins (95% infected). This survey highlights some potential anthropozoonotic risks due to the recent further evidence of Plasmodium brasilianum and P. malariae as a single species and to the increased diversity of hosts for Trypanosoma cruzi. PMID:11128476

de Thoisy, B; Michel, J C; Vogel, I; Vié, J C

2000-10-01

227

Abundances and host relationships of chigger mites in Yunnan Province, China.  

PubMed

This paper reports on ectoparasitic chigger mites found on small mammals in Yunnan Province, southwest China. Data were accumulated from 19 investigation sites (counties) between 2001 and 2009. A total of 10 222 small mammal hosts were captured and identified; these represented 62 species, 34 genera and 11 families in five orders. From the body surfaces of these 10 222 hosts, a total of 92 990 chigger mites were collected and identified microscopically. These represented 224 species, 22 genera and three subfamilies in the family Trombiculidae (Trombidiformes). Small mammals were commonly found to be infested by chigger mites and most host species harboured several species of mite. The species diversity of chigger mites in Yunnan was much higher than diversities reported previously in other provinces of China and in other countries. A single species of rodent, Eothenomys miletus (Rodentia: Cricetidae), carried 111 species of chigger mite, thus demonstrating the highest species diversity and heaviest mite infestation of all recorded hosts. This diversity is exceptional compared with that of other ectoparasites. Of the total 224 mite species, 21 species accounted for 82.2% of all mites counted. Two species acting as major vectors for scrub typhus (tsutsugamushi disease), Leptotrombidium scutellare and Leptotrombidium deliense, were identified as the dominant mite species in this sample. In addition to these two major vectors, 12 potential or suspected vector species were found. Most species of chigger mite had a wide range of hosts and low host specificity. For example, L. scutellare parasitized 30 species of host. The low host specificity of chigger mites may increase their probability of encountering humans, as well as their transmission of scrub typhus among different hosts. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed that similarities between different chigger mite communities on the 18 main species of small mammal host did not accord with the taxonomic affinity of the hosts. This suggests that the distribution of chigger mites may be strongly influenced by the environment in which hosts live. PMID:23167491

Zhan, Y-Z; Guo, X-G; Speakman, J R; Zuo, X-H; Wu, D; Wang, Q-H; Yang, Z-H

2013-06-01

228

Faster Speciation and Reduced Extinction in the Tropics Contribute to the Mammalian Latitudinal Diversity Gradient  

PubMed Central

The increase in species richness from the poles to the tropics, referred to as the latitudinal diversity gradient, is one of the most ubiquitous biodiversity patterns in the natural world. Although understanding how rates of speciation and extinction vary with latitude is central to explaining this pattern, such analyses have been impeded by the difficulty of estimating diversification rates associated with specific geographic locations. Here, we use a powerful phylogenetic approach and a nearly complete phylogeny of mammals to estimate speciation, extinction, and dispersal rates associated with the tropical and temperate biomes. Overall, speciation rates are higher, and extinction rates lower, in the tropics than in temperate regions. The diversity of the eight most species-rich mammalian orders (covering 92% of all mammals) peaks in the tropics, except that of the Lagomorpha (hares, rabbits, and pikas) reaching a maxima in northern-temperate regions. Latitudinal patterns in diversification rates are strikingly consistent with these diversity patterns, with peaks in species richness associated with low extinction rates (Primates and Lagomorpha), high speciation rates (Diprotodontia, Artiodactyla, and Soricomorpha), or both (Chiroptera and Rodentia). Rates of range expansion were typically higher from the tropics to the temperate regions than in the other direction, supporting the “out of the tropics” hypothesis whereby species originate in the tropics and disperse into higher latitudes. Overall, these results suggest that differences in diversification rates have played a major role in shaping the modern latitudinal diversity gradient in mammals, and illustrate the usefulness of recently developed phylogenetic approaches for understanding this famous yet mysterious pattern.

Rolland, Jonathan; Condamine, Fabien L.; Jiguet, Frederic; Morlon, Helene

2014-01-01

229

Updated neuronal scaling rules for the brains of Glires (rodents/lagomorphs).  

PubMed

Brain size scales as different functions of its number of neurons across mammalian orders such as rodents, primates, and insectivores. In rodents, we have previously shown that, across a sample of 6 species, from mouse to capybara, the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and the remaining brain structures increase in size faster than they gain neurons, with an accompanying decrease in neuronal density in these structures [Herculano-Houzel et al.: Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2006;103:12138-12143]. Important remaining questions are whether such neuronal scaling rules within an order apply equally to all pertaining species, and whether they extend to closely related taxa. Here, we examine whether 4 other species of Rodentia, as well as the closely related rabbit (Lagomorpha), conform to the scaling rules identified previously for rodents. We report the updated neuronal scaling rules obtained for the average values of each species in a way that is directly comparable to the scaling rules that apply to primates [Gabi et al.: Brain Behav Evol 2010;76:32-44], and examine whether the scaling relationships are affected when phylogenetic relatedness in the dataset is accounted for. We have found that the brains of the spiny rat, squirrel, prairie dog and rabbit conform to the neuronal scaling rules that apply to the previous sample of rodents. The conformity to the previous rules of the new set of species, which includes the rabbit, suggests that the cellular scaling rules we have identified apply to rodents in general, and probably to Glires as a whole (rodents/lagomorphs), with one notable exception: the naked mole-rat brain is apparently an outlier, with only about half of the neurons expected from its brain size in its cerebral cortex and cerebellum. PMID:21985803

Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Ribeiro, Pedro; Campos, Leandro; Valotta da Silva, Alexandre; Torres, Laila B; Catania, Kenneth C; Kaas, Jon H

2011-01-01

230

Deterioration of the G?o Vomeronasal Pathway in Sexually Dimorphic Mammals  

PubMed Central

In mammals, social and sexual behaviours are largely mediated by the vomeronasal system (VNS). The accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) is the first synaptic locus of the VNS and ranges from very large in Caviomorph rodents, small in carnivores and ungulates, to its complete absence in apes, elephants, most bats and aquatic species. Two pathways have been described in the VNS of mammals. In mice, vomeronasal neurons expressing G?i2 protein project to the rostral portion of the AOB and respond mostly to small volatile molecules, whereas neurons expressing G?o project to the caudal AOB and respond mostly to large non-volatile molecules. However, the G?o-expressing pathway is absent in several species (horses, dogs, musk shrews, goats and marmosets) but no hypotheses have been proposed to date to explain the loss of that pathway. We noted that the species that lost the G?o pathway belong to Laurasiatheria and Primates lineages, both clades with ubiquitous sexual dimorphisms across species. To assess whether similar events of G?o pathway loss could have occurred convergently in dimorphic species we studied G-protein expression in the AOB of two species that independently evolved sexually dimorphic traits: the California ground squirrel Spermophilus beecheyi (Rodentia; Sciurognathi) and the cape hyrax Procavia capensis (Afrotheria; Hyracoidea). We found that both species show uniform expression of G?i2-protein throughout AOB glomeruli, while G?o expression is restricted to main olfactory glomeruli only. Our results suggest that the degeneration of the G?o-expressing vomeronasal pathway has occurred independently at least four times in Eutheria, possibly related to the emergence of sexual dimorphisms and the ability of detecting the gender of conspecifics at distance.

Suarez, Rodrigo; Fernandez-Aburto, Pedro; Manger, Paul R.; Mpodozis, Jorge

2011-01-01

231

Amblyomma tigrinum (Acari: Ixodidae): new data on hosts and biology of immature stages and on DNA composition.  

PubMed

Biological data of immature stages of Amblyomma tigrinum were obtained from larvae and nymphs both fed on rats and rabbits. Data from nymphs recovered from a wild rodent (Galea musteloides) are also reported. Additional results in DNA composition of males moulted from nymphs fed on laboratory and wild hosts are presented. The ticks were maintained in darkness at 27 +/- 1 degrees C and 83-86% RH. The mean recovery rates were 49.1% and 43.6% with a moulting success of 96.2% and 90.8% in larvae fed on rats and rabbits, respectively. The engorgement weights were almost identical in larvae recovered from both hosts. The mean recovery rates of nymphs were 37.3% and 69.9% in specimens fed on rats and rabbits, respectively. The moulting success was 94.5%, 100% and 98.1% in nymphs fed on rats, rabbits and G. musteloides, respectively. Nymphs from all hosts moulting to females were significantly heavier (P < 0.01) than those moulting to males despite their range of engorgement weight showed overlap. A higher proportion (>or=61.5%) of nymphs from all hosts moulted to females. Present results suggest that members of Rodentia and Lagomorpha are suitable hosts for the immature stages of A. tigrinum, contrasting with previous results from Brazilian colonies of this tick. The DNA sequence from ticks fed on G. musteloides showed 99.7% identity with that from ticks fed on rabbits and also with the DNA sequence already available (GenBank AY498562 ) for A. tigrinum. PMID:16143451

Aguirre, D H; Mangold, A J; Cafrune, M M; Guglielmone, A A

2005-12-10

232

The evolutionary radiation of Arvicolinae rodents (voles and lemmings): relative contribution of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA phylogenies  

PubMed Central

Background Mitochondrial and nuclear genes have generally been employed for different purposes in molecular systematics, the former to resolve relationships within recently evolved groups and the latter to investigate phylogenies at a deeper level. In the case of rapid and recent evolutionary radiations, mitochondrial genes like cytochrome b (CYB) are often inefficient for resolving phylogenetic relationships. One of the best examples is illustrated by Arvicolinae rodents (Rodentia; Muridae), the most impressive mammalian radiation of the Northern Hemisphere which produced voles, lemmings and muskrats. Here, we compare the relative contribution of a nuclear marker – the exon 10 of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene – to the one of the mitochondrial CYB for inferring phylogenetic relationships among the major lineages of arvicoline rodents. Results The analysis of GHR sequences improves the overall resolution of the Arvicolinae phylogeny. Our results show that the Caucasian long-clawed vole (Prometheomys schaposnikowi) is one of the basalmost arvicolines, and confirm that true lemmings (Lemmus) and collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx) are not closely related as suggested by morphology. Red-backed voles (Myodini) are found as the sister-group of a clade encompassing water vole (Arvicola), snow vole (Chionomys), and meadow voles (Microtus and allies). Within the latter, no support is recovered for the generic recognition of Blanfordimys, Lasiopodomys, Neodon, and Phaiomys as suggested by morphology. Comparisons of parameter estimates for branch lengths, base composition, among sites rate heterogeneity, and GTR relative substitution rates indicate that CYB sequences consistently exhibit more heterogeneity among codon positions than GHR. By analyzing the contribution of each codon position to node resolution, we show that the apparent higher efficiency of GHR is due to their third positions. Although we focus on speciation events spanning the last 10 million years (Myr), CYB sequences display highly saturated codon positions contrary to the nuclear exon. Lastly, variable length bootstrap predicts a significant increase in resolution of arvicoline phylogeny through the sequencing of nuclear data in an order of magnitude three to five times greater than the size of GHR exon 10. Conclusion Our survey provides a first resolved gene tree for Arvicolinae. The comparison of CYB and GHR phylogenetic efficiency supports recent assertions that nuclear genes are useful for resolving relationships of recently evolved animals. The superiority of nuclear exons may reside both in (i) less heterogeneity among sites, and (ii) the presence of highly informative sites in third codon positions, that evolve rapidly enough to accumulate synapomorphies, but slow enough to avoid substitutional saturation.

Galewski, Thomas; Tilak, Marie-ka; Sanchez, Sophie; Chevret, Pascale; Paradis, Emmanuel; Douzery, Emmanuel JP

2006-01-01

233

Chagas disease: control, elimination and eradication. Is it possible?  

PubMed

From an epidemiological point of view, Chagas disease and its reservoirs and vectors can present the following characteristics: (i) enzooty, maintained by wild animals and vectors, with broad occurrence from southern United States of America (USA) to southern Argentina and Chile (42ºN 49ºS), (ii) anthropozoonosis, when man invades the wild ecotope and becomes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from wild animals or vectors or when the vectors and wild animals, especially marsupials, invade the human domicile and infect man, (iii) zoonosis-amphixenosis and exchanged infection between animals and humans by domestic vectors in endemic areas and (iv) zooanthroponosis, infection that is transmitted from man to animals, by means of domestic vectors, which is the rarest situation in areas endemic for Chagas disease. The characteristics of Chagas disease as an enzooty of wild animals and as an anthropozoonosis are seen most frequently in the Brazilian Amazon and in the Pan-Amazon region as a whole, where there are 33 species of six genera of wild animals: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Edentata (Xenarthra), Carnivora and Primata and 27 species of triatomines, most of which infected with T. cruzi . These conditions place the resident populations of this area or its visitors - tourists, hunters, fishermen and especially the people whose livelihood involves plant extraction - at risk of being affected by Chagas disease. On the other hand, there has been an exponential increase in the acute cases of Chagas disease in that region through oral transmission of T. cruzi , causing outbreaks of the disease. In four seroepidemiological surveys that were carried out in areas of the microregion of the Negro River, state of Amazonas, in 1991, 1993, 1997 and 2010, we found large numbers of people who were serologically positive for T. cruzi infection. The majority of them and/or their relatives worked in piassava extraction and had come into contact with and were stung by wild triatomines in that area. Finally, a characteristic that is greatly in evidence currently is the migration of people with Chagas disease from endemic areas of Latin America to non-endemic countries. This has created a new dilemma for these countries: the risk of transmission through blood transfusion and the onus of controlling donors and treating migrants with the disease. As an enzooty of wild animals and vectors, and as an anthropozoonosis, Chagas disease cannot be eradicated, but it must be controlled by transmission elimination to man. PMID:24402148

Coura, José Rodrigues

2013-12-01

234

Chagas disease: control, elimination and eradication. Is it possible?  

PubMed Central

From an epidemiological point of view, Chagas disease and its reservoirs and vectors can present the following characteristics: (i) enzooty, maintained by wild animals and vectors, with broad occurrence from southern United States of America (USA) to southern Argentina and Chile (42ºN 49ºS), (ii) anthropozoonosis, when man invades the wild ecotope and becomes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from wild animals or vectors or when the vectors and wild animals, especially marsupials, invade the human domicile and infect man, (iii) zoonosis-amphixenosis and exchanged infection between animals and humans by domestic vectors in endemic areas and (iv) zooanthroponosis, infection that is transmitted from man to animals, by means of domestic vectors, which is the rarest situation in areas endemic for Chagas disease. The characteristics of Chagas disease as an enzooty of wild animals and as an anthropozoonosis are seen most frequently in the Brazilian Amazon and in the Pan-Amazon region as a whole, where there are 33 species of six genera of wild animals: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Edentata (Xenarthra), Carnivora and Primata and 27 species of triatomines, most of which infected with T. cruzi . These conditions place the resident populations of this area or its visitors - tourists, hunters, fishermen and especially the people whose livelihood involves plant extraction - at risk of being affected by Chagas disease. On the other hand, there has been an exponential increase in the acute cases of Chagas disease in that region through oral transmission of T. cruzi , causing outbreaks of the disease. In four seroepidemiological surveys that were carried out in areas of the microregion of the Negro River, state of Amazonas, in 1991, 1993, 1997 and 2010, we found large numbers of people who were serologically positive for T. cruzi infection. The majority of them and/or their relatives worked in piassava extraction and had come into contact with and were stung by wild triatomines in that area. Finally, a characteristic that is greatly in evidence currently is the migration of people with Chagas disease from endemic areas of Latin America to non-endemic countries. This has created a new dilemma for these countries: the risk of transmission through blood transfusion and the onus of controlling donors and treating migrants with the disease. As an enzooty of wild animals and vectors, and as an anthropozoonosis, Chagas disease cannot be eradicated, but it must be controlled by transmission elimination to man.

Coura, Jose Rodrigues

2013-01-01

235

A New Approach to Testing the Fossorial Rodent Hypothesis of Mima Mound Formation Using Airborne-Based LIDAR and a Diffusive Sediment Transport Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mima mounds are nearly circular soil mounds, found in grassland landscapes. In California, Mima mounds are often associated with vernal pools, seasonal wetlands that harbor rare and endemic plants and animals. The processes that form and maintain the mound-pool complexes have not yet been conclusively identified, even though such information is necessary to understand the effects that land use and climate change may have on the resilience and longevity of these landscapes. One hypothesis for the origin and persistence of Mima mound- vernal pool systems (termed the Fossorial Rodent Hypothesis) proposes that burrowing organisms such as pocket gophers (Rodentia: Geomyidae) maintain and possibly create the mounds by preferentially translocating soils towards mound centers as an adaptive response to high water tables. In order to investigate this hypothesis, the topographic characteristics and aboveground gopher activity of one of the largest remaining Mima mound-vernal pool systems in California were studied. Detailed topographic information for the mound-pool systems was obtained via an airborne-based LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) survey of a 25km2 region near Merced, CA. An object-oriented classification scheme, which combined different scale, shape, and spectral parameters, was employed in order to characterize the mounds. Based on the initial classification results, roughly 275,000 mounds were identified, indicating a mound density of 11,000km-2. Within the larger study area, gopher sediment transport was monitored on a 3507m2 site by conducting periodic surveys of sediment mounds created by gopher activity using a Global Positioning System and mass measurements. Downslope erosion rates (off Mima mounds) were estimated using a mass balance model which incorporates a diffusive sediment transport law. The median calculated net downslope erosion rate was 15 cm of soil per 1000 years, while the measured rate of aboveground gopher sediment movement was approximately 57cm of soil per 1000 years. Assuming that some portion of the gopher sediment movement is in an upslope direction, these results suggest that gopher soil transport may be large enough to compensate for erosion, and this activity may play a dominant role in maintaining Mima mound-vernal pool systems. The results of this study were used to guide the development of a quantitative model of gopher-driven sediment transport on Mima mound-vernal pool landscapes. This model will be used to infer the origin of the landscapes and the rates of processes critical to their continued functioning and will also help to determine, quantitatively, the role of burrowing animals as a "keystone" species on these landscapes.

Reed, S. E.; Amundson, R.

2007-12-01

236

The Late Pleistocene Duoi U'Oi cave in northern Vietnam: palaeontology, sedimentology, taphonomy and palaeoenvironments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes new fossil materials recovered at the Duoi U'Oi site, in December 2003, by a Vietnamese-French-Japanese team. The Duoi U'Oi cave is located in Man Duc village, 25 km of Hoà Binh city in northern Vietnam. It belongs to a karstic network developed in a dark grey micritic marine limestone dated from the Lower to the Middle Triassic. The sedimentary fill produced a rich mammalian fauna, essentially composed of isolated teeth of middle- to large-sized mammals (Artiodactyla, Perissodactyla, Proboscidea, Carnivora, Rodentia, Primates), and characteristic of Late Pleistocene. The results of the Duoi U'Oi fieldwork are of great interest for the following reasons: (1) the biochronological age of the fauna is consistent with 230Th/ 234U/ 238U dating from the calcitic floors (66±3 ka). The Duoi U'Oi fauna is thus the oldest well-dated modern fauna known for the Southeast Asian mainland; (2) in terms of sedimentology, the analysis of the formation of the fossiliferous breccia and that of the processes of deposits shows a close relation between the karstic deposits inside the cave and the deposits in the alluvial terraces. The observation of three levels of alluvial terraces associated with three caves situated at 62, 10 and 3 m above the present alluvial plain suggests that exokarstic and endokarstic sediments evolved together; (3) in terms of palaeobiogeography, Duoi U'Oi is the continental fauna showing the strongest resemblance with the Late Pleistocene faunas from Indonesian islands (Punung, Gunung Dawung, Lida Ajer, Sibrambang and Djambu caves); this implies that, at the time of Duoi U'Oi, ca 70 ka, the Sundaland was mainly characterised by faunas of modern aspect; (4) the analysis of major taphonomic factors that led to the mammal assemblage reveals a combination of selective agents (selective role of predators and porcupines, selective destruction of age classes for some species, selective preservation of fossils due to the deposition processes in the karstic network), which contribute to the poor representation of the diversity of the fauna; no arguments show that humans, present at Duoi U'Oi, might have a possible role in the taphonomic process; (5) the palaeoenvironmental reconstruction based on the composition of the faunal assemblage suggests a forested area and some open habitats, under warm and humid conditions.

Bacon, Anne-Marie; Demeter, F.; Duringer, P.; Helm, C.; Bano, M.; Vu, The Long; Kim Thuy, Nguyen Thi; Antoine, P.-O.; Thi Mai, Bui; Huong, Nguyen Thi Mai; Dodo, Y.; Chabaux, F.; Rihs, S.

2008-08-01