Science.gov

Sample records for spixii rodentia caviomorpha

  1. Development and morphological changes in the vaginal closure membrane throughout gestation in Galea spixii (Rodentia: Caviidae).

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Amilton Cesar; Oliveira, Gleidson Benevides; Viana, Diego Carvalho; Oliveira, Franceliusa Delys; Silva, Renata Dos Santos; Rici, Rose Eli Grassi; de Oliveira, Moacir Franco; de Assis-Neto, Antônio Chaves

    2016-05-01

    Present research was carried out in order to perform the monitoring of development, recognizes the type of tissue and describes histological and cellular changes of the vaginal closure membrane (VCM) throughout pregnancy in Galea spixii. The results showed that at 20 days of gestation (DG), the VCM occludes completely the external vaginal ostium. Microscopically, the VCM presented juxtaposed cells, derived from the stratum germinative of the stratified epithelium of vaginal mucosa at 20 DG and areas with cell clusters with the presence of intercellular spaces in the final stages of pregnancy (40-50 DG). At 0 DG, the stratified epithelium of vaginal mucosa presented all strata but at 20 DG presented stratified epithelium without the stratum corneum and stratum granular and showed communicant junctions by desmosomes and interdigitations in the cell membrane compound the VCM. Gradually from 40 to 50 DG the stratum germinative became barely perceptible. Many cells showed apoptotic nuclei and emerged many intercellular spacing. So, the interdigitations and desmosomes were not observed. Here, it was demonstrated for the first time that the VCM is formed after the extinction of the stratum granular and corneum of the vaginal mucosa epithelium, with the proliferation of the cells of stratum germinative and communication and junction through desmosomes and interdigitations of these cells. At the end of pregnancy, cellular apoptosis; the spread of stratum germinative; and, absence of cellular communication and junction may be responsible for the weakening of the VCM and may assist the process of rupture of this membrane. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:359-364, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26873391

  2. Hematologic and plasma biochemical values of Spix's macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii).

    PubMed

    Foldenauer, Ulrike; Borjal, Raffy Jim; Deb, Amrita; Arif, Abdi; Taha, Abid Sharif; Watson, Ryan William; Steinmetz, Hanspeter; Bürkle, Marcellus; Hammer, Sven

    2007-12-01

    The Spix's macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii) is considered the world's most endangered parrot, with the last wild bird disappearing in 2001 and only 74 birds in captivity. To establish hematologic and plasma biochemical reference ranges and to look for differences relative to sex, age, and season, we obtained blood samples from 46 captive Spix's macaws (23 male, 23 female) housed in aviaries at the Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation in the State of Qatar. No significant differences in hematologic or plasma biochemical values were found between females and males. Adult and juvenile birds differed in mean concentrations of glucose, total protein, amylase, cholesterol, and phosphorus; in percentages of heterophils and lymphocytes; and in the absolute lymphocyte count. Total protein, cholesterol, and phosphorus concentrations; hematocrit; and heterophil and lymphocyte counts differed significantly by season. Baseline hematologic and plasma biochemical ranges were established, which may be useful as reference values for clinicians working with this highly endangered species. PMID:18351006

  3. Chromosomal evolution in Rodentia

    PubMed Central

    Romanenko, S A; Perelman, P L; Trifonov, V A; Graphodatsky, A S

    2012-01-01

    Rodentia is the most species-rich mammalian order and includes several important laboratory model species. The amount of new information on karyotypic and phylogenetic relations within and among rodent taxa is rapidly increasing, but a synthesis of these data is currently lacking. Here, we have integrated information drawn from conventional banding studies, recent comparative painting investigations and molecular phylogenetic reconstructions of different rodent taxa. This permitted a revision of several ancestral karyotypic reconstructions, and a more accurate depiction of rodent chromosomal evolution. PMID:22086076

  4. Radiographic measurement of internal organs in Spix's macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii).

    PubMed

    Rettmer, Helen; Deb, Amrita; Watson, Ryan; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Hammer, Sven

    2011-12-01

    Radiology is an important diagnostic instrument in avian medicine, but standard measurement ranges for the objective evaluation of radiographs of birds are rare. To establish radiographic reference ranges for the critically endangered Spix's macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii), we measured radiographic silhouettes of the heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, proventriculus, and keel of the sternum on 29 radiographs taken under standardized conditions in adult and juvenile, clinically healthy birds. Ratios were determined for the proventricular diameter-to-keel height, the width of the heart to the width of the thorax, and for the "hourglass shape" (ratio of the width of the heart to the width of the liver). No significant differences were found between the sexes among the adult birds. Compared with adult birds, juvenile females had a significantly larger heart width (19.8 +/- 1.4 mm versus 21.2 +/- 0.7 mm), ratio of the heart width to the thorax width (0.86 +/- 0.08 versus 0.94 +/- 0.09), and horizontal width of the spleen (7.7 +/- 0.6 mm versus 8.5 +/- 0.4 mm). Results of radiographic measurements in the Spix's macaws were comparable to those published from other psittacine species. These reference ranges will facilitate a more objective radiographic evaluation of captive Spix's macaws. PMID:22458180

  5. Biological characterization of the Amazon coral Micrurus spixii snake venom: Isolation of a new neurotoxic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Terra, Angelo L C; Moreira-Dill, Leandro S; Simões-Silva, Rodrigo; Monteiro, José Roniele N; Cavalcante, Walter L G; Gallacci, Márcia; Barros, Neuza B; Nicolete, Roberto; Teles, Carolina B G; Medeiros, Patrícia S M; Zanchi, Fernando B; Zuliani, Juliana P; Calderon, Leonardo A; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M

    2015-09-01

    The Micrurus genus is the American representative of Elapidae family. Micrurus spixii is endemic of South America and northern states of Brazil. Elapidic venoms contain neurotoxins that promote curare-mimetic neuromuscular blockage. In this study, biochemical and functional characterizations of M. spixii crude venom were performed and a new neurotoxic phospholipase A2 called MsPLA2-I was isolated. M. spixii crude venom caused severe swelling in the legs of tested mice and significant release of creatine kinase (CK) showing its myotoxic activity. Leishmanicidal activity against Leishmania amazonensis (IC50 1.24 μg/mL) was also observed, along with antiplasmodial activity against Plasmodium falciparum, which are unprecedented for Micrurus venoms. MsPLA2-I with a Mr 12,809.4 Da was isolated from the crude venom of M. spixii. The N-terminal sequencing of a fragment of 60 amino acids showed 80% similarity with another PLA2 from Micrurus altirostris. This toxin and the crude venom showed phospholipase activity. In a mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation, M. spixii venom and MsPLA2-I induced the blockage of both direct and indirect twitches. While the venom presented a pronounced myotoxic activity, MsPLA2-I expressed a summation of neurotoxic activity. The results of this study make M. spixii crude venom promising compounds in the exploration of molecules with microbicidal potential. PMID:26095535

  6. Molecular evidence of an African Phiomorpha-South American Caviomorpha clade and support for Hystricognathi based on the complete mitochondrial genome of the cane rat (Thryonomys swinderianus).

    PubMed

    Mouchaty, S K; Catzeflis, F; Janke, A; Arnason, U

    2001-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of an African cane rat, Thryonomys swinderianus (Rodentia, Hystricognathi), was included in a phylogenetic analysis along with 4 rodents, 14 additional eutherians, and 3 noneutherian outgroups. Monophyly of the suborder Hystricognathi, represented by the cane rat and the South American guinea pig, Cavia porcellus, was strongly supported by maximum-parsimony, neighbor-joining, and maximum-likelihood methods. The molecular-based estimate of the divergence time of Old and New World Hystricognathi (approximately 85 million years before present, MYBP) is consistent with an hypothesis of vicariance divergence due to the rifting of the African and South American continents 86-100 MYBP. Monophyly of Rodentia or the superordinal clade Glires (Rodentia and Lagomorpha) were not supported. PMID:11161749

  7. A longitudinal study on avian polyomavirus-specific antibodies in captive Spix's macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii).

    PubMed

    Deb, Amrita; Foldenauer, Ulrike; Borjal, Raffy Jim; Streich, W Jürgen; Lüken, Caroline; Johne, Reimar; Müller, Hermann; Hammer, Sven

    2010-09-01

    Avian polyomavirus (APV) causes a range of disease syndromes in psittacine birds, from acute fatal disease to subclinical infections, depending on age, species, and other unidentified risk factors. To determine the prevalence of APV-specific antibodies in a captive population of Spix's macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii) in Quatar, 54 birds were tested by blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A prevalence of 48.1% for APV antibodies, which indicates viral exposure, was found. Of 36 Spix's macaws that were serially tested over a period of 4 years, 50.0% were consistently positive, 36.1% were consistently negative, 5.5% had permanently declining antibody levels, and 2.8% showed variable results. By using polymerase chain reaction testing on whole blood samples, an apparent viremia was detected in 1 of 44 birds (2.3%), although contamination provides a likely explanation for this isolated positive result in a hand-reared chick. The white blood cell count was significantly higher in antibody-positive birds compared with antibody-negative birds (P < .05). Because antibody-positive and antibody-negative birds were housed together without a change in their respective antibody status, transmission of APV within the adult breeding population appeared to be a rare event. PMID:21046939

  8. Ultrastructure of spermatogenesis in Spix's yellow-toothed cavy (Galea spixii).

    PubMed

    Santos, P R S; Oliveira, M F; Arroyo, M A M; Silva, A R; Rici, R E G; Miglino, M A; Assis Neto, A C

    2014-01-01

    This was a pioneer study of the spermatogenic process from the onset of puberty in Spix's yellow-toothed cavies (SYC, Galea spixii) bred in captivity. The study aimed to characterize fine structure of spermatogenesis. Twelve testes from pubertal and post-pubertal SYC males were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Spermatogenesis can be divided into three phases: proliferation, meiosis, and spermiogenesis. In proliferation phase, three types of spermatogonia were identified and characterized as A(dark), A(pale), and B. In the second phase, spermatocytes (2n) undergo meiotic divisions that generate spermatids (n); the process begins in spermatocytes in the preleptotene stage when they increase their nuclear size, differentiating into spermatocytes in the leptotene stage when cell division is initiated. In addition, we found chromatin condensation, and formation of a structure composed of proteins that formed a central shaft and two lateral bars associated with pairing of homologous chromosomes. During spermiogenesis, the following main events occurred: condensation of nuclear chromatin, formation of acrosome with perfuratorium, elimination of residual cytoplasm, and development of the flagellum. The sperm head is different from that of other rodents. The endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex are the two main organelles demonstrated during this process. These organelles collaborate through synthesis of proteins and hormones for the development of germ cells during spermatogenesis in SYC. PMID:24101585

  9. Encephalitozoon infections in Rodentia and Soricomorpha in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Ryusuke; Tsuchiyama, Atsuko; Sasaki, Mizuki; Park, Chun-Ho; Fujii, Yoshito; Takesue, Masataka; Hatai, Hitoshi; Kudo, Noboru; Ikadai, Hiromi

    2013-11-15

    Encephalitozoon is an obligate intracellular microsporidian parasite that infects a wide range of mammalian hosts. In this study, we used nested PCR to investigate the presence of Encephalitozoon infection in Rodentia and Soricomorpha in Japan. We attempted to amplify and sequence Encephalitozoon-specific DNA from brain and viscera samples of 180 animals collected between 2008 and 2010. Forty-three samples (23.9%) from the orders Rodentia and Soricomorpha were positive for Encephalitozoon. This study is the first report of Encephalitozoon infection in Rodentia and Soricomorpha in Japan, and our findings suggest that these hosts may play a role in the spread of microsporidian spores in the environment. PMID:24060383

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Crassostrea rhizophorae and Cathorops spixii from the Caroni Swamp, Trinidad, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Kanhai, La Daana K; Gobin, Judith F; Beckles, Denise M; Lauckner, Bruce; Mohammed, Azad

    2015-01-01

    Dietary exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may pose serious threats to human health. However, within the Caribbean, quantitative assessments regarding the risks associated with dietary PAH exposure remain sparse. This study investigated PAH presence in edible biota from the Caroni Swamp and quantitatively assessed the potential health threat to human consumers. Mangrove oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) and Madamango sea catfish (Cathorops spixii) collected from seven sites in the Caroni Swamp were analysed for 16 priority PAHs. Total PAH levels ranged from 109 ± 18.4 to 362 ± 63.0 ng/g dry wt. in Crassostrea rhizophorae and 7.5 ± 0.9 to 43.5 ± 25.5 ng/g dry wt. in Cathorops spixii (average ± standard deviation). Benzo[a]pyrene levels in Crassostrea rhizophorae at all sites exceeded international guidelines from British Colombia (Canada) and the European Union (EU). Incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) values based on the ingestion of Crassostrea rhizophorae ranged from 8.4 × 10(-6) to 1.6 × 10(-5) and slightly exceeded the commonly used 1 × 10(-6) acceptable level of risk. Information from this study is important in understanding the potential health risks posed by PAHs, it is critical towards the protection of public health, and it serves as a useful baseline for comparison with future work. PMID:25142345

  11. Population Dynamics and Diet of the Madamango Sea Catfish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz, 1829) (Siluriformes: Ariidae) in a Tropical Bight in Southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Denadai, Márcia; Pombo, Maíra; Santos, Flávia Borges; Bessa, Eduardo; Ferreira, Adriana; Turra, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The madamango sea catfish, Cathorops spixii (Siluriformes: Ariidae), is often among the most abundant fishes on the South American Atlantic coast. In the present study, conducted in shallow, non-estuarine coastal areas of Caraguatatuba Bight in southeastern Brazil, collections of this species, the most abundant member of the ichthyofauna, included primarily medium-sized individuals, indicating that the area may play a specific role in their development. Although studies of the local ichthyofauna have been much neglected, the area is economically important and its ecological significance is undervalued. This study primarily treats habitat use by C. spixii, assessing certain population parameters and the dietary composition. Monthly samples were taken from August 2003 through October 2004, with three trawls in two areas, corresponding to depths of about 1 to 4 m. The catfish showed two main peaks of abundance in the area, in April/May and July 2004. A mode around 9 cm SL persisted through time, and the entrance of younger recruits peaked from January to April. The low estimate for body-growth parameters (K = 0.16) corroborates some K-strategist characteristics of the species. The asymptotic length was 27.3 cm SL and total mortality (Z) was 1.01 yr−1. Cathorops spixii showed an omnivorous feeding habit, preying mainly upon polychaetes, copepods and bivalves, with considerable seasonality in its diet. PMID:24282575

  12. Analysis of growth rate variables and postfeeding regurgitation in hand-reared Spix's macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii) chicks.

    PubMed

    Groffen, Heidi; Watson, Ryan; Hammer, Sven; Raidal, Shane R

    2008-09-01

    The Spix's macaw, or little blue macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii), is one of the most critically endangered bird species in the world. In 1990, the Brazilian Nature Conservation Authority established a permanent committee to oversee the captive breeding of about 20 individual Spix's macaws held in various locations throughout the world. Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation (AWWP) successfully bred 10 Spix's macaws in the 2005 and 2006 breeding seasons but intermittent episodes of postfeeding regurgitation in hand-raised chicks prompted the need to better understand and monitor the nutritional and physiologic requirements of growing nestlings. To ascertain and rank the possible causes of regurgitation in chicks, we undertook a critical analysis of the feeding, growth, and health data recorded for each individual hand-raised chick. Factors such as the total daily food intake (TDFI), growth curves, nursery room climate (temperature and humidity), and nutritional requirements were investigated as well as any health issues. Chicks attained a maximum body weight of 375 +/- 25 g at 45 days and then gradually lost weight until they reached a weaning weight of 300 +/- 30 g. The maximum daily volume of food that each chick received was 101 +/- 29 g at 42 days of age, which was also the age at which a peak in postfeeding regurgitation episodes occurred. The TDFI as a percentage of body weight peaked (83.1 +/- 12.3%) at day 3 of age and dropped to 30.1 +/- 2.3% by day 45 and then to 19.6 +/- 1.1% at day 92. Detailed analyses of the 2005 and 2006 records indicate that the regurgitation episodes may be primarily the result of overfeeding during the second trimester of hand-rearing. Our results indicate that smaller meals during the period when chicks are attaining their maximum body weights may contribute to a decrease in the occurrence of regurgitation episodes in hand-reared Spix's macaws. PMID:19014091

  13. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Marmota himalayana (Rodentia: Sciuridae) and phylogenetic analysis within Rodentia.

    PubMed

    Chao, Q J; Li, Y D; Geng, X X; Zhang, L; Dai, X; Zhang, X; Li, J; Zhang, H J

    2014-01-01

    This is the first report of a complete mitochondrial genome sequence from Himalayan marmot (Marmota himalayana, class Marmota). We determined the M. himalayana mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence by using long-PCR methods and a primer-walking sequencing strategy with genus-specific primers. The complete mt genome of M. himalayana was 16,443 bp in length and comprised 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and a typical control region (CR). Gene order and orientation were identical to those in mt genomes of most vertebrates. The heavy strand showed an overall A+T content of 63.49%. AT and GC skews for the mt genome of the M. himalayana were 0.012 and -0.300, respectively, indicating a nucleotide bias against T and G. The control region was 997 bp in size and displayed some unusual features, including absence of repeated motifs and two conserved sequence blocks (CSB2 and CSB3), which is consistent with observations from two other rodent species, Sciurus vulgaris and Myoxus glis. Phylogenetic analysis of complete mt DNA sequences without the control region including 30 taxa of Rodentia was performed with Maximum-Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian Inference (BI) methods and provided strong support for Sciurognathi polyphyly and Hystricognathi monophyly. This analysis also provided evidence that M. himalayana mt DNA was closely related to that from Sciurus vulgaris (Sciuridae) and was similar to mt DNA from Myoxus glis. PMID:24782088

  14. Acariform mites (Acariformes) - permanent symbionts of Hapalomysdelacouri Thomas (Rodentia, Muridae) in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bochkov, Andre V; Abramov, Alexei V

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of parasitic acariform mites (Acariformes) are described from the Delacour's marmoset rat Hapalomysdelacouri Thomas (Rodentia: Muridae) in Vietnam: Afrolistrophorus (Afrolistrophorus) hapalomyssp. n. (Listrophoridae) and Radfordia (Radfordia) mirabilissp. n. (Myobiidae). Based on morphological evidences, we show that species of both mite genera associated with Hapalomys Blyth do not demonstrate clear phylogenetic links with respective congeners from rodents of the closest genus Chiropodomys Peters (Rodentia: Muridae). PMID:25561857

  15. DNA barcoding of Murinae (Rodentia: Muridae) and Arvicolinae (Rodentia: Cricetidae) distributed in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zheng, Xin; Cai, Yansen; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yang, Min; Yue, Bisong; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Identification of rodents is very difficult mainly due to high similarities in morphology and controversial taxonomy. In this study, mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) was used as DNA barcode to identify the Murinae and Arvicolinae species distributed in China and to facilitate the systematics studies of Rodentia. In total, 242 sequences (31 species, 11 genera) from Murinae and 130 sequences (23 species, 6 genera) from Arvicolinae were investigated, of which 90 individuals were novel. Genetic distance, threshold method, tree-based method, online BLAST and BLOG were employed to analyse the data sets. There was no obvious barcode gap. The average K2P distance within species and genera was 2.10% and 12.61% in Murinae, and 2.86% and 11.80% in Arvicolinae, respectively. The optimal threshold was 5.62% for Murinae and 3.34% for Arvicolinae. All phylogenetic trees exhibited similar topology and could distinguish 90.32% of surveyed species in Murinae and 82.60% in Arvicolinae with high support values. BLAST analyses yielded similar results with identification success rates of 92.15% and 93.85% for Murinae and Arvicolinae, respectively. BLOG successfully authenticated 100% of detected species except Leopoldamys edwardsi based on the latest taxonomic revision. Our results support the species status of recently recognized Micromys erythrotis, Eothenomys tarquinius and E. hintoni and confirm the important roles of comprehensive taxonomy and accurate morphological identification in DNA barcoding studies. We believe that, when proper analytic methods are applied or combined, DNA barcoding could serve as an accurate and effective species identification approach for Murinae and Arvicolinae based on a proper taxonomic framework. PMID:24838015

  16. Gaudeamus lavocati sp. nov. (Rodentia, Hystricognathi) from the early Oligocene of Zallah, Libya: first African caviomorph?

    PubMed

    Coster, Pauline; Benammi, Mouloud; Lazzari, Vincent; Billet, Guillaume; Martin, Thomas; Salem, Mustafa; Bilal, Awad Abolhassan; Chaimanee, Yaowalak; Schuster, Mathieu; Valentin, Xavier; Brunet, Michel; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2010-08-01

    A new African species of hystricognathous rodent, Gaudeamus lavocati sp. nov., is described herein from the early Oligocene deposits of Zallah locality (Sirt basin, Central Libya). The dental morphology of this species is very close to that of some earliest South American caviomorphs. It allows a reinterpretation of molar crest homologies among earliest caviomorphs, pentalophodonty being confirmed as the plesiomorphic molar condition in Caviomorpha. This morphological resemblance argues for close affinities between Gaudeamus and earliest South American hystricognaths. Cladistic analysis supports Gaudeamus lavocati sp. nov. as the first known African representative of Caviomorpha, implying that its ancestors were part of the African phiomyid group that crossed the South Atlantic by a direct immigration route. Alternatively, the series of derived dental features of Gaudeamus could also be interpreted as evolutionary synchronous convergences of an African hystricognath lineage towards the specialized pattern of some caviomorphs. However, the high level of similarities concerning teeth morphology and enamel microstructure and the similar age of fossiliferous strata on both continents make this interpretation less probable. The phylogenetic position of this taxon is of considerable importance because it represents an enigmatic component of the phiomorph-caviomorph radiation in Africa and appears as a new clue toward the understanding of caviomorph origins. PMID:20549178

  17. A new karyotype for Rhipidomys (Rodentia, Cricetidae) from Southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Ana Heloisa; Lopes, Maria Olímpia Garcia; Svartman, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In this work we present a new karyotype for Rhipidomys Tschudi, 1845 (Cricetidae, Rodentia) from Brazil. Our chromosome analyses included GTG- and CBG-banding patterns, the localization of the nucleolus organizer regions after silver staining (Ag-NORs) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a telomere probe. The new karyotype is composed of 44 chromosomes and has a fundamental number (number of autosomal arms) of 48. Most Rhipidomys species already karyotyped presented similar complements with 2n=44, but their fundamental numbers varied from FN=46 to 80, a variation that has been mainly attributed to pericentric inversions. The comparison of this new karyotype to those of other Rhipidomys already reported allowed us to conclude that it is a distinctive chromosome complement, which can be of great use as a tool for the very complicated taxonomic identification in this genus. PMID:24260664

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of Ictidomys tridecemlineatus (Rodentia: Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leping; Storey, Kenneth B; Yu, Dan-Na; Hu, Yizhong; Zhang, Jia-Yong

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the thirteen-lined ground squirrel, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus (Rodentia: Sciuridae) was sequenced to analyze the gene arrangement. It is a circular molecule of 16,458 bp in length including 37 genes typically found in other squirrels. The AT content of the overall base composition is 63.7% and the length of the control region is 1016 bp with 63.0% AT content. In BI and ML phylogenetic trees, I. tridecemlineatus is a sister clade to the genus Cynomys, and Tamias sibiricus is a sister clade to (Marmota himalayana + (I. tridecemlineatus + (C. leucurus + C. ludovicianus))). Ratufinae is well supported as the basal clade of Sciuridae. The monophyly of the family Sciuridae and its subfamilies Callosciurinae, Xerinae and Sciurinae are well supported. PMID:26024127

  19. An assessment of acute biomarker responses in the demersal catfish Cathorops spixii after the Vicuña oil spill in a harbour estuarine area in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Katsumiti, A; Domingos, F X Valdez; Azevedo, M; da Silva, M D; Damian, R C; Almeida, M I M; de Assis, H C Silva; Cestari, M M; Randi, M A F; Ribeiro, C A Oliveira; Freire, C A

    2009-05-01

    The Vicuña oil tanker exploded in Paranaguá Bay (South of Brazil), during methanol unloading operations in front of Paranaguá Harbour, on November 15th, 2004, releasing a large amount of bunker oil and methanol. Two weeks after the accident, the acute effects of the Vicuña Oil Spill (VOS) were evaluated in the demersal catfish Cathorops spixii, comparing a contaminated (at the spill site) and a reference site inside the Bay. Data were compared to previous measurements, taken before the accident, in the same species, from the same sites. The physiological biomarkers were the ones that best reflected acute effects of the spill: plasma osmolality, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. Morphological (liver and gill histopathology) and genetic (piscine micronucleus and DNA strand breaks) biomarkers revealed that damage was already present in fishes from both reference and contaminated sites inside the Bay. Thus, the reference site is not devoid of contamination, as water circulation tends to spread the contaminants released into other areas of the Bay. Acute field surveys of oil spill effects in harbour areas with a long history of contamination should thus be viewed with caution, and whenever possible previous evaluations should be considered for proper appraisal of biomarker sensitivity, especially in mobile bioindicators such as fish. PMID:18478347

  20. A Transitional Gundi (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae) from the Miocene of Israel

    PubMed Central

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Gutkin, Vitaly; Rabinovich, Rivka; Calvo, Ran; Grossman, Aryeh

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new species of gundi (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae: Ctenodactylinae), Sayimys negevensis, on the basis of cheek teeth from the Early Miocene of the Rotem Basin, southern Israel. The Rotem ctenodactylid differs from all known ctenodactylid species, including Sayimys intermedius, which was first described from the Middle Miocene of Saudi Arabia. Instead, it most resembles Sayimys baskini from the Early Miocene of Pakistan in characters of the m1-2 (e.g., the mesoflexid shorter than the metaflexid, the obliquely orientated hypolophid, and the presence of a strong posterolabial ledge) and the upper molars (e.g., the paraflexus that is longer than the metaflexus). However, morphological (e.g., presence of a well-developed paraflexus on unworn upper molars) and dimensional (regarding, in particular, the DP4 and M1 or M2) differences between the Rotem gundi and Sayimys baskini distinguish them and testify to the novelty and endemicity of the former. In its dental morphology, Sayimys negevensis sp. nov. shows a combination of both the ultimate apparition of key-characters and incipient features that would be maintained and strengthened in latter ctenodactylines. Thus, it is a pivotal species that bridges the gap between an array of primitive ctenodactylines and the most derived, Early Miocene and later, gundis. PMID:27049960

  1. [Molecular characterization of Sigmodon hirsutus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) populations in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Lessmann, Janeth; Arrivillaga, Jazzmín; Aguilera, Marisol

    2011-06-01

    Recent phylogenetic studies based on cytochrome b gene sequence, have determined that the species historically known as Sigmodon hispidus (Rodentia) from South America comprises a species S. hirsutus of paraphyletic origin. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that populations from Venezuela, represent the sensu strict form, ancestral haplotypes, and monophyletic subspecieS. For this, 12 individual sequences from three localities of different biogeographic regions in Venezuela were evaluated and sequenced based on cyto b. Additionally, the sequences were used to develop a cladistic analysis and genetic distance calculations, and to compare this information with two individual sequences of Sigmodon specimens available in Genbank. Phylogenetic analyses show that the three populations of S. hirsutus of Venezuela form an ancestral and monophyletic subclade supported by high bootstrap values and significant genetic distance between subclade within the S. hirsutus. Besides, the existence of two lineages suggests two subspecies, S. hirsutus hirsutus from Venezuela, and S. hirsutus mexicanus from Mexico-Central America, but, both species need formal description. PMID:21721239

  2. The complete mitochondrial genomes of Cynomys leucurus and C. ludovicianus (Rodentia: Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Li, Bingfei; Yu, Danna; Cheng, Hongyi; Storey, Kenneth B; Zhang, Jiayong

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of the white - tailed praire dog Cynomys leucurus and black-tailed prairie dog C. ludovicianus (Rodentia: Sciuridae) are circular molecules of 16,454 bp and 16,466 bp in length, respectively, containing 37 genes as in other Rodentia species. The A + T content of the overall base composition of the H-strand is 63.0% and 62.6% for C. leucurus and C. ludovicianus, respectively. The control region of the C. leucurus and C. ludovicianus mt genome is 1012 bp in length, and the A + T content of this region is 63.5% and 62.0%, respectively. Nucleotide sequence divergence of the mt genome (p distance) between C. leucurus and C. ludovicianus was 4.0%. PMID:25693710

  3. Lung morphology in rodents (Mammalia, Rodentia) and its implications for systematics.

    PubMed

    Wallau, B R; Schmitz, A; Perry, S F

    2000-12-01

    A new nomenclature of the lung lobes and of the bronchial tree is presented, with which the lungs in 40 species of 11 rodent families are described. Whole, fixed lungs and silicone casts of the bronchial tree are tested for 23 characters, based on the distribution of lung lobes, the number and geometry of first order bronchi, the pulmonary blood supply, and lung symmetry. Ten lung morphotypes are recognized, seven of them representing one or more families: Castor type (Castoridae), Cryptomys type (Bathyergidae), Ctenodactylus type (Ctenodactylidae), Eliomys type (Gliridae), Myocastor type (Myocastoridae), Octodon type (Octodontidae and Echimyidae) and Rattus type (Sciuridae, Muridae pt. and Dipodidae). The Hydromys type is found only in Hydromys chrysogaster (Muridae), while Galea type A and B both appear in Galea musteloides (Caviidae). The data are phylogenetically analyzed by the program PAUP 4.0 using as outgroup Lagomorpha or Insectivora. On the species level, there are no well-resolved cladograms. On the family level, the cladograms do not contradict traditional rodent systematics with one exception: the Caviidae do not fall within Caviomorpha or even within the Hystricomorpha, but form a sister group to Dipodidae (Myomorpha). This appears to be a result of convergence. The lungs of Gliridae are more similar to those of Muridae than to those of Sciuridae. Included in the ingroup, Oryctolagus (Lagomorpha) forms a clade with Caviidae + Dipodidae. Thus, the "Glires hypothesis" is neither supported nor refuted. PMID:11077434

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of Dipus sagitta and Euchoreutes naso (Rodentia: Dipodidae) based on the mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guangjie; Liao, Jicheng

    2016-07-01

    Dipus sagitta and Euchoreutes naso are both monotypic genus, both of them belong to the family of Dipodidae, and E. naso is an Endangered species (EN) defined by the World Conservation Union. The length of its complete mitochondrial sequence of D. sagitta and E. naso is 16,664  bp and 16,705  bp, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis displayed that D. sagitta, Jaculus jaculus, and E. naso were classified into the same cluster. This result was consistent with that of primary morphological taxonomy. The mitochondrial genome of D. sagitta and E. naso would be a key supplement for the gene pool of Rodentia and the conclusion of phylogenetic analysis was an important molecular evidence for the taxonomic status of the two species. PMID:26029878

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of Meriones meridianus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) and its phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guangjie; Liao, Jicheng

    2016-07-01

    Meriones meridianus belongs to the genus Meriones in Gerbillinae. Total length of complete mitochondrial genome of M. meridianus is 16,376 bp and the heavy strand contains 32.8% A, 13.1% G, 25.3% C and 28.8% T. Sequences of protein-coding genes are 11,341 bp in length, accounting for 69.25%, approximately. Results of phylogenetic analysis shown that M. meridianus and Meriones unguiculatus were clustered in a single branch. This conclusion would be an important data for relevant studies about the genus Meriones, and mitochondrial genome would be an important supplement for the gene pool of Rodentia. It would play a pivotal role in researches about phylogeography and proteomics involving M. meridianus as well. PMID:26075483

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Meriones libycus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) and its phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guangjie; Liao, Jicheng

    2016-07-01

    Meriones libycus belongs to the genus Meriones in Gerbillinae, its complete mitochondrial genome is 16,341 bp in length. The heavy strand contains 32.8% A, 13.1% G, 25.3% C, 28.8% T, protein-coding genes approximately accounting for 69.54%. Results of phylogenetic analysis showed that M. libycus and Meriones unguiculatus were clustered together, and it was consistent with that of primary morphological taxonomy. This study verifies the evolutionary status of M. libycus in Meriones at the molecular level. The mitochondrial genome would be a significant supplement for the gene pool of Rodentia and the conclusion of phylogenetic analysis could be an important molecular evidence for the classification of Gerbillinae. PMID:26017047

  7. Diversification and biogeography of the Neotropical caviomorph lineage Octodontoidea (Rodentia: Hystricognathi).

    PubMed

    Upham, Nathan S; Patterson, Bruce D

    2012-05-01

    The rodent superfamily Octodontoidea comprises 6 families, 38 genera, and 193 living species of spiny rats, tuco-tucos, degus, hutias, and their relatives. All are endemic to the Neotropical Region where they represent roughly three-quarters of extant caviomorphs. Although caviomorph monophyly is well established and phylogenetic hypotheses exist for several families, understanding of octodontoid relationships is clouded by sparse taxon sampling and single-gene analyses. We examined sequence variation in one mitochondrial (12S rRNA) and three nuclear genes (vWF, GHR, and RAG1) across all caviomorph families (including 47 octodontoid species), all phiomorph families, and the sole remaining hystricognath family, using the gundi (Ctenodactylus) and springhaas (Pedetes) as outgroups. Our analyses support the monophyly of Phiomorpha, Caviomorpha, and the caviomorph superfamilies Cavioidea (Dasyproctidae, Cuniculidae, and Caviidae, the latter including Hydrochoerus), Erethizontoidea, Chinchilloidea (including Dinomyidae), and Octodontoidea. Cavioids and erethizontoids are strongly supported as sisters, whereas chinchilloids appear to be sister to octodontoids. Among octodontoids, Abrocomidae is consistently recovered as the basal element, sister to a pair of strongly supported clades; one includes Octodontidae and Ctenomyidae as reciprocally monophyletic lineages, whereas the other includes taxa currently allocated to Echimyidae, Capromyidae and Myocastoridae. Capromys appears near the base of this clade, in keeping with current classification, but Myocastor is nested securely inside a clade of Echimyidae that also contains eumysopines, echimyines and dactylomyines. Another, more weakly supported clade of Echimyidae contains fossorial and scansorial taxa from the Chaco-Cerrado-Caatinga and the Atlantic Forest. Biogeographic analyses robustly recover the Patagonia-Southern Andes complex as ancestral for the Octodontoidea, with three component lineages emerging by the Oligocene-Miocene boundary (∼23Ma): (1) stem abrocomids in the Central and Southern Andes; (2) a lineage leading to octodontids plus ctenomyids in Patagonia, later dispersing into the Chaco-Cerrado-Caatinga; and (3) a lineage leading to echimyids, capromyids, and myocastorids that subsequently radiated in more mesic biomes, including Amazonia, Atlantic Forest, and the Antilles. This reconstruction refutes earlier ideas that the diverse, generalized, mainly lowland family Echimyidae, which appears early in the fossil record, gave rise to the Andean lineages of octodontoids-instead, the reverse derivation appears to be true. We recommend formal synonymy of Myocastoridae with Echimyidae but defer a similar treatment of Capromyidae until additional hutia taxa and sequences can be analyzed. PMID:22327013

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of Microtus fortis calamorum (Arvicolinae, Rodentia) and its phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xianhuan; Gao, Jun; Ni, Liju; Hu, Jianhua; Li, Kai; Sun, Fengping; Xie, Jianyun; Bo, Xiong; Gao, Chen; Xiao, Junhua; Zhou, Yuxun

    2012-05-01

    Microtus fortis is a special resource of rodent in China. It is a promising experimental animal model for the study on the mechanism of Schistosome japonicum resistance. The first complete mitochondrial genome sequence for Microtus fortis calamorum, a subspecies of M. fortis (Arvicolinae, Rodentia), was reported in this study. The mitochondrial genome sequence of M. f. calamorum (Genbank: JF261175) showed a typical vertebrate pattern with 13 protein coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and one major noncoding region (CR region).The extended termination associated sequences (ETAS-1 and ETAS-2) and conserved sequence block 1 (CSB-1) were found in the CR region. The putative origin of replication for the light strand (O(L)) of M. f. calamorum was 35bp long and showed high conservation in stem and adjacent sequences, but the difference existed in the loop region among three species of genus Microtus. In order to investigate the phylogenetic position of M. f. calamorum, the phylogenetic trees (Maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods) were constructed based on 12 protein-coding genes (except for ND6 gene) on H strand from 16 rodent species. M. f. calamorum was classified into genus Microtus, Arvcicolinae for the highly phylogenetic relationship with Microtus kikuchii (Taiwan vole). Further phylogenetic analysis results based on the cytochrome b gene ranged from M. f. calamorum to one of the subspecies of M. fortis, which formed a sister group of Microtus middendorfii in the genus Microtus. PMID:22387301

  9. Nitric oxide production by Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia) infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Loría-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Sosa-Bibiano, Erika Ivett; Villanueva-Lizama, Liliana Estefanía; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole Raymonde; Canto-Lara, Silvia Beatriz; Batún-Cutz, José Luis; Andrade-Narváez, Fernando José

    2013-01-01

    Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) is a primary reservoir of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). Nitric oxide (NO) generally plays a crucial role in the containment and elimination of Leishmania. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of NO produced by P. yucatanicus infected with L. (L.) mexicana. Subclinical and clinical infections were established in P. yucatanicus through inoculation with 1 x 102 and 2.5 x 106 promastigotes, respectively. Peritoneal macrophages were cultured alone or co-cultured with lymphocytes with or without soluble Leishmania antigen. The level of NO production was determined using the Griess reaction. The amount of NO produced was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.0001) in co-cultured macrophages and lymphocytes than in macrophages cultured alone. No differences in NO production were found between P. yucatanicus with subclinical L. (L.) mexicana infections and animals with clinical infections. These results support the hypothesis that the immunological mechanisms of NO production in P. yucatanicus are similar to those described in mouse models of leishmaniasis and, despite NO production, P. yucatanicus is unable to clear the parasite infection. PMID:23579796

  10. Description of the karyotype of Rhagomys rufescens Thomas, 1886 (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae) from Southern Brazil Atlantic forest

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Rhagomys rufescens (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae) is an endemic species of the Atlantic forest from Southern and Southeastern Brazil. Some authors consider Rhagomys as part of the tribe Thomasomyini; but its phylogenetic relationships remain unclear. Chromosomal studies on eight specimens of Rhagomys rufescens revealed a diploid number of 2n = 36 and a number of autosome arms FN = 50. GTG, CBG and Ag-NOR banding and CMA3 /DAPI staining were performed on metaphase chromosomes. Eight biarmed and nine acrocentric pairs were found in the karyotype of this species. The X and Y chromosomes were both acrocentric. Most of the autosomes and the sex chromosomes showed positive C-bands in the pericentromeric region. The X chromosome showed an additional heterochromatic block in the proximal region of the long arm. Nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) were located in the pericentromeric region of three biarmed autosomes (pairs 4, 6 and 8) and in the telomeric region of the short arm of three acrocentrics (pairs 10, 12 and 17). CMA 3 /DAPI staining produced fluorescent signals in many autosomes, especially in pairs 4, 6, and 8. This study presents cytogenetic data of Rhagomys rufescens for the first time. PMID:21637420

  11. The puzzling character of repetitive DNA in Phodopus genomes (Cricetidae, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Paço, Ana; Adega, Filomena; Meštrović, Nevenka; Plohl, Miroslav; Chaves, Raquel

    2015-09-01

    Three novel repetitive DNA sequences are described, presenting a similar heterochromatic chromosomal location in two hamster species: Phodopus roborovskii and Phodopus sungorus (Cricetidae, Rodentia). Namely, two species-specific repetitive sequences (PROsat from P. roborovskii and PSUchr1sat from P. sungorus) surrounding a third one (PsatDNA), that is shared by both hamster genomes. Fiber-FISH analyses revealed that PROsat intermingles with PsatDNA in P. roborovskii and PSUchr1sat intermingles with PsatDNA in P. sungorus. A model explaining the evolution of this intricate chromosomal distribution is proposed, which can explain better the evolution of these very derivative genomes (in comparison to the ancestral Muroidea). The most plausible evolutionary scenario seems to be the expansion of a number of repeats into other's domain, most probably resulting in its intermingling, followed by the subsequent spread of these complex repeats from a single chromosomal location to other chromosomes. Evidences of an association between repetitive sequences and the chromosome evolution process were observed, namely for PROsat. Most probably, the evolutionary breakpoints that shaped PRO and PSU chromosomes (pericentric inversions and fusions) occurred within the boundaries of PROsat blocks in the ancestor. The repeats high diversity at the heterochromatic regions of Phodopus chromosomes, together with its complex organization, suggests that these species are important models for evolutionary studies, namely in the investigation of a possible relationship between repetitive sequences and the occurrence of chromosomal rearrangements and consequently, in genome evolution. PMID:26281779

  12. Histological and serological evidence of experimental paracoccidioidomycosis in Calomys callosus (Rodentia: Cricetidae)

    PubMed Central

    Berbert, Alceu LCV; Faria, Gabriele G; Gennari-Cardoso, Margareth L; Silva, Maria MMD; Mineo, José R; Loyola, Adriano M

    2007-01-01

    The responses of animal experimental models related to the infectivity, virulence and pathogenicity of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is constantly used to develop new perspectives of investigation. The rodent Calomys callosus, Rengger 1830 (Rodentia: Cricetidae) is an indigenous inhabitant of the savannah environment found in the central regions of Brazil. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the histopathological and serological features of C. callosus after inoculation with the Pb18 strain of P. brasiliensis. Furthermore, A/Sn and B10.A mice strains were also tested to compare the results obtained in C. callosus to these well-established experimental models of resistance and susceptibility respectively. In every instance, survival analysis was performed, and histopathological study of the lungs, liver and spleen was employed to investigate tissue involvement, degree of inflammation and fungal presence. Levels of antibodies to P. brasiliensis were measured by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after 4 weeks and at the advanced stage of infection. The mortality rate was proportional to inoculation dose in all groups, but overall it was much superior in C. callosus than in the B10.A-susceptible mice. Macroscopical and microscopical pathological alterations were also more extensive and remarkable for C. callosus, once again proportional to inoculation dose, but more noticeable differences among the studied groups were found with 0.6 × 105 inoculum. In addition, the serological profile of C. callosus was similar to that found for B10.A-susceptible mice. Infection of C. callosus with 0.6 × 108 Pb18 inoculum resulted in more serious illness, and it decreased in severity in proportion to the inoculum dose. This difference was more pronounced in C. callosus, and the clinical, serological and pathological findings in this animal were more intense and precocious compared with the B10.A-susceptible mice. The present results suggest that C. callosus is a potentially alternative experimental animal model for paracoccidioidomycosis infection. PMID:17244339

  13. First description of the nymph and larva of Dermacentor compactus Neumann, 1901 (Acari: Ixodidae), parasites of squirrels (Rodentia: Sciuridae) in southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Apanaskevich, Dmitry A

    2016-05-01

    Recent reexamination of collection lots stored in the United States National Tick Collection revealed adult specimens of Dermacentor compactus Neumann, 1901 (Acari: Ixodidae) reared from field-collected nymphs, which allowed us to associate field-collected unidentified nymphs and larvae with this species. Nymphs of D. compactus can be easily distinguished from those of other congeneric species by the shape of the scutum and spiracular plate, the hypostome dentition, and the size of the spurs on the coxae. Larvae of this species can be distinguished by the shape and sculpture of the scutum, the shape of basis capituli, the absence of auriculae, and the size of the spurs on coxae II and III. Both nymphs and larvae feed mostly on various species of squirrels (Rodentia: Sciuridae). Considerably fewer nymphs and larvae were found on murid rodents (Rodentia: Muridae), domestic dogs (Carnivora: Canidae), and a snake (Squamata: Colubridae). PMID:27095664

  14. Dental microwear in relation to changes in the direction of mastication during the evolution of Myodonta (Rodentia, Mammalia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Cyril; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques; Michaux, Jacques; Viriot, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Observations of dental microwear are used to analyse the correlation between changes in molar tooth crown morphology and the direction of masticatory movement during the evolution of Myodonta (Rodentia, Mammalia). The studied sample includes 36 specimens representing both superfamilies of Myodonta (Muroidea and Dipodoidea) spanning 16 dipodoid and 9 muroid species. Microscopic scratches on occlusal surfaces resulting from contact between opposite teeth during mastication are analysed. Using these features, we determine the direction of masticatory movements. Microwear patterns display diverse orientations among Dipodoidea: oblique in Sicistinae, Euchoreutinae and Zapodinae, propalinal in Dipodinae and intermediary in Allactaginae. Similarly, Muroidea exhibit the following orientations: oblique in Cricetinae and propalinal in Arvicolinae, Cricetomyinae, Gerbillinae and Murinae. These various chewing types illustrate different evolutionary grades within the superfamilies. Acquisition of the antero-posterior masticatory movement in Dipodoidea is related to flattening of the molar occlusal surface. However, in some muroid subfamilies, this direction of mastication is associated with low-crowned and cuspidate molars (Cricetomyinae, Murinae).

  15. Comparative cytogenetic study of two sister species of Iberian ground voles, Microtus (Terricola) duodecimcostatus and M. (T.) lusitanicus (rodentia, cricetidae).

    PubMed

    Gornung, E; Castiglia, R; Rovatsos, M; Marchal, J A; Díaz de la Guardia-Quiles, R; Sanchez, A

    2011-01-01

    The two Iberian species of pine voles, Microtus (Terricola) duodecimcostatus and M. (T.) lusitanicus of the subfamily Arvicolinae (Cricetidae, Rodentia), were compared after G- and C-banding and chromosomal mapping of ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA), telomeric repeats, and satellite DNA Msat-160. Notwithstanding their close relationship (one sister group in phylogenetic analyses) and sharing of the diploid and fundamental chromosome numbers, the 2 species show notable differences in the sex chromosome morphology, the number and distribution of rDNA sites, constitutive heterochromatin and satDNA patterns. The only telomeric repeats showed normal, all-telomeric, distribution in karyotypes of both species. The data are discussed with regard to interspecific and intrageneric variation of the analyzed characters and the chromosomal evolution in the genus Microtus. PMID:21042006

  16. Squamasnema amazonica n. gen. n. sp. (Heligmonellinae): A new parasite of Proechimys roberti (Rodentia: Echimyidae) in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Helrik da Costa; Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Furtado, Adriano Penha; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Maldonado, Arnaldo; dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento

    2015-08-01

    A new species of nematode, Squamasnema amazonica n. gen. n. sp., is described based on specimens found parasitizing the small intestine of Proechimys roberti (Rodentia: Echimyidae) collected during a survey of the fauna of Tapirap-Aquir National Forest (Brazil, Eastern Brazilian Amazon). The nematodes were fixed and processed for light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These nematodes were classified under the family Heligmonellidae and the subfamily Heligmonellinae. Although several species in the family Heligmonellidae exhibit discontinuous ridges, Squamasnema n. gen. and Trichotravassosia are the only genera with columns of scales along their entire body, as an apomorphy of the synlophe. Squamasnema n. gen. has columns of cuticular cells along its body, except for on the left flank, and exhibits a synlophe with no size gradient or inclination and does not present chitinized structures supporting the synlophe. Therefore, due to these morphological differences of Squamasnema n. gen., the creation of a new genus was necessary. PMID:25910627

  17. A new genus and two new species of chigger mites (Acari: Trombiculidae) from the Laotian rock-rat Laonastes aenigmamus Jenkins, Kilpatrick, Robinson & Timmins (Rodentia: Diatomyidae).

    PubMed

    Stekolnikov, Alexandr A

    2014-01-01

    A new chigger mite genus Laotrombicula n. g. and two new species, Laotrombicula khunboromi n. sp. (type-species) and L. fangumi n. sp., are described from the Laotian rock-rat Laonastes aenigmamus Jenkins, Kilpatrick, Robinson & Timmins (Rodentia: Diatomyidae). The new genus is most similar to Trombiculindus Radford, 1948 and Leptotrombidium Nagayo, Miyagawa, Mitamura & Imamura, 1916 and differs from these genera by having the scutum of subhexagonal or semicircular shape vs widely rectangular; pinnatifid dorsocentral idiosomal setae vs foliaceous in Trombiculindus and unexpanded in Leptotrombidium; and by the presence of serrated longitudinal crests in the middle part of scutum. PMID:24395573

  18. Habitat use by Oryzomys subflavus (Rodentia) in an open shrubland formation in Restinga de Jurubatiba National Park, RJ, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bergallo, H G; Luz, J L; Raíces, D S; Hatano, F H; Martins-Hatano, F

    2005-11-01

    The Restinga de Jurubatiba has at least 10 plant formations, including open Clusia shrubland. This formation is composed of dense shrubs of many shapes and sizes, where Clusia hilariana is one of the most important plant species. Shrublands with Clusia (CC) are poorer in plant species and less dense than shrublands without Clusia (SC). Oryzomys subflavus (Rodentia) is the most abundant small mammal species in the open Clusia shrubland. We tested the hypothesis that the abundance of rodents would increase with the size of the patch and would be higher in SC shrublands. Rodents were captured, marked and released in three 780-m-long transects. At each capture site, we evaluated the shape of the shrubland patch, calculated the area and noted the category of the shrubland. Using ANCOVA, we ascertained whether the abundance of Oryzomys subflavus increased with the sampled area and used CC and SC shrublands differently. We also verified if the size of patches used by rodents varies in the same frequency as the size of available shrublands. Rodent abundance was found to increase significantly with the area. There were no differences in the size of the patches used by rodents and the frequency of the size of available patches. This finding indicates that O. subflavus, in the study area, is a generalist species that uses its habitat according to availability. PMID:16532181

  19. Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) lainsoni n. sp. from Mesomys hispidus (Rodentia: Echimyidae) in Brazil: trypomastigotes described from experimentally infected laboratory mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection, isolation and description of Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) lainsoni n. sp. from a caviomorph rodent, Mesomys hispidus (Rodentia: Echimyidae), obtained in the Rio Negro region of the state of Amazonas, in northern Brazil. Laboratory-bred white mice (Mus musculus) and rats (Rattus rattus) were inoculated with large numbers of culture forms by intraperitoneal route, and trypomastigotes appeared in their blood 3–8 days post-inoculation. One single epimastigote was also found in Mus musculus. Similar attempts to infect Rattus norvegicus, hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), the opossum Didelphis marsupialis, the anteater Tamandua tetradactyla and triatomine bugs were unsuccessful, following six months of observations and microscopic examinations of blood films and blood cultures. As we have found no previous record of a Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) species naturally infecting a member of the family Echimyidae, or any other caviomorph rodent, we conclude that this is the first time such an infection has been reported. The new species is unusual in the subgenus for its infectivity to laboratory mice. PMID:24309069

  20. Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) lainsoni n. sp. from Mesomys hispidus (Rodentia: Echimyidae) in Brazil: trypomastigotes described from experimentally infected laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Naiff, Roberto Daibes; Barrett, Toby Vincent

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection, isolation and description of Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) lainsoni n. sp. from a caviomorph rodent, Mesomys hispidus (Rodentia: Echimyidae), obtained in the Rio Negro region of the state of Amazonas, in northern Brazil. Laboratory-bred white mice (Mus musculus) and rats (Rattus rattus) were inoculated with large numbers of culture forms by intraperitoneal route, and trypomastigotes appeared in their blood 3-8 days post-inoculation. One single epimastigote was also found in Mus musculus. Similar attempts to infect Rattus norvegicus, hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), the opossum Didelphis marsupialis, the anteater Tamandua tetradactyla and triatomine bugs were unsuccessful, following six months of observations and microscopic examinations of blood films and blood cultures. As we have found no previous record of a Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) species naturally infecting a member of the family Echimyidae, or any other caviomorph rodent, we conclude that this is the first time such an infection has been reported. The new species is unusual in the subgenus for its infectivity to laboratory mice. PMID:24309069

  1. Catalog of type specimens of recent mammals: Rodentia (Sciuromorpha and Castorimorpha) in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert D.; Ludwig, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    The type collection of Recent mammals in the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, contains 843 specimens bearing names of 820 species group taxa of Rodentia (Sciuromorpha and Castorimorpha) as of July 2011. This catalog presents a list of these holdings, which comprise 798 holotypes, 14 lectotypes, seven syntypes (30 specimens), and one neotype. In addition, we include three holotypes and 10 specimens that are part of syntype series that should be in the collection but cannot be found and three syntypes that were originally in this collection but are now known to be in other collections. One specimen that no longer has name-bearing status is included for the record. Forty-one of the names are new since the last type catalog. One new lectotype is designated. Suborders and families are listed as in Wilson and Reeder. Within families, currently recognized genera are arranged alphabetically. Within each currently recognized genus, accounts are arranged alphabetically by original published name. Information in each account includes original name and abbreviated citation thereto, current name if other than original, citation for first use of current name combination for the taxon (or new name combination if used herein for the first time), type designation, U.S. National Museum catalog number(s), preparation, age and sex, type locality, date of collection and name of collector, collector’s original number, and comments or additional information as appropriate. Digital photographs of each specimen serve as a condition report and will be linked to each electronic specimen record.

  2. Suprafamilial relationships among Rodentia and the phylogenetic effect of removing fast-evolving nucleotides in mitochondrial, exon and intron fragments

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The number of rodent clades identified above the family level is contentious, and to date, no consensus has been reached on the basal evolutionary relationships among all rodent families. Rodent suprafamilial phylogenetic relationships are investigated in the present study using ~7600 nucleotide characters derived from two mitochondrial genes (Cytochrome b and 12S rRNA), two nuclear exons (IRBP and vWF) and four nuclear introns (MGF, PRKC, SPTBN, THY). Because increasing the number of nucleotides does not necessarily increase phylogenetic signal (especially if the data is saturated), we assess the potential impact of saturation for each dataset by removing the fastest-evolving positions that have been recognized as sources of inconsistencies in phylogenetics. Results Taxonomic sampling included multiple representatives of all five rodent suborders described. Fast-evolving positions for each dataset were identified individually using a discrete gamma rate category and sites belonging to the most rapidly evolving eighth gamma category were removed. Phylogenetic tree reconstructions were performed on individual and combined datasets using Parsimony, Bayesian, and partitioned Maximum Likelihood criteria. Removal of fast-evolving positions enhanced the phylogenetic signal to noise ratio but the improvement in resolution was not consistent across different data types. The results suggested that elimination of fastest sites only improved the support for nodes moderately affected by homoplasy (the deepest nodes for introns and more recent nodes for exons and mitochondrial genes). Conclusion The present study based on eight DNA fragments supports a fully resolved higher level rodent phylogeny with moderate to significant nodal support. Two inter-suprafamilial associations emerged. The first comprised a monophyletic assemblage containing the Anomaluromorpha (Anomaluridae + Pedetidae) + Myomorpha (Muridae + Dipodidae) as sister clade to the Castorimorpha (Castoridae + Geomyoidea). The second suprafamilial clustering identified a novel association between the Sciuromorpha (Gliridae + (Sciuridae + Aplodontidae)) and the Hystricomorpha (Ctenodactylidae + Hystricognathi) which together represents the earliest dichotomy among Rodentia. Molecular time estimates using a relaxed Bayesian molecular clock dates the appearance of the five suborders nearly contemporaniously at the KT boundary and this is congruent with suggestions of an early explosion of rodent diversity. Based on these newly proposed phylogenetic relationships, the evolution of the zygomasseteric pattern that has been used for a long time in rodent systematics is evaluated. PMID:19036132

  3. Body Shape and Life Style of the Extinct Balearic Dormouse Hypnomys (Rodentia, Gliridae): New Evidence from the Study of Associated Skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Bover, Pere; Alcover, Josep A.; Michaux, Jacques J.; Hautier, Lionel; Hutterer, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Hypnomys is a genus of Gliridae (Rodentia) that occurred in the Balearic Islands until Late Holocene. Recent finding of a complete skeleton of the chronospecies H. morpheus (Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene) and two articulated skeletons of H. cf. onicensis (Late Pliocene) allowed the inference of body size and the calculation of several postcranial indexes. We also performed a Factorial Discriminant Analysis (FDA) in order to evaluate locomotory behaviour and body shape of the taxa. Using allometric models based on skull and tooth measurements, we calculated a body weight between 173 and 284 g for H. morpheus, and direct measurements of articulated skeletons yielded a Head and Body Length (HBL) of 179 mm and a Total Body Length of 295 mm for this species. In addition to the generally higher robustness of postcranial bones already recorded by previous authors, H. morpheus, similar to Canariomys tamarani, another extinct island species, displayed elongated zygopodium bones of the limbs and a wider distal humerus and femur than in an extant related taxon, Eliomys quercinus. Indexes indicated that Hypnomys was more terrestrial and had greater fossorial abilities than E. quercinus. This was also corroborated by a Discriminant Analysis, although no clear additional inference of locomotory abilities could be calculated. PMID:21209820

  4. Rediscovery and New Morphological Data on Two Hassalstrongylus (Nematoda: Heligmonellidae) Coparasitic in the Marsh Rat Holochilus chacarius (Rodentia: Cricetidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Digiani, Mara Celina; Notarnicola, Juliana; Navone, Graciela T

    2015-10-01

    Two species of Hassalstrongylus Durette-Desset, 1971, coparasitic in Holochilus chacarius Thomas (Rodentia, Cricetidae) and not recorded since their original description in 1937, were newly found in their type host and locality. Hassalstrongylus mazzai (Freitas, Lent and Almeida, 1937) and Hassalstrongylus argentinus (Freitas, Lent and Almeida, 1937) were obtained from Ho. chacarius from 2 different populations: one from Salta Province (northwest Argentina) and another from Chaco Province (northeast Argentina). The species described as Heligmonoides mazzai Freitas, Lent and Almeida, 1937 had been transferred to Hassalstrongylus even though its synlophe had never been studied. We provide the first descriptions and illustrations of the synlophe of males and females of Hassalstrongylus mazzai and the female of H. argentinus and account for morphological and metrical variability. We confirm, through the study of the synlophe, the placement of Hassalstrongylus mazzai in the genus Hassalstrongylus and designate neotypes for the species because the type material deposited by the authors could not be found. Females of both species were morphologically very similar, and a principal components analysis (PCA) performed on some morphometrical characters showed that the body length, uterus length, and an unexpected character as the number of eggs were useful characters in the discrimination of both species. PMID:26193068

  5. Catalog of type specimens of recent mammals: orders Didelphimorpha through Chiroptera (Excluding Rodentia) in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert D.; Ludwig, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    The type collection of Recent Mammals in the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, contains 820 specimens bearing names of 809 species-group taxa of Didelphimorphia through Chiroptera, excluding Rodentia, as of June 2014. This catalog presents an annotated list of these holdings comprised of 788 holotypes, 26 lectotypes, 11 syntypes (22 specimens), and 4 neotypes. Included are several specimens that should be in the collection but cannot be found or are now known to be in other collections. One hundred and twenty-seven of the names are new since the last type catalog covering these orders, Poole and Schantz (1942). Five specimens reported in Poole and Schantz (1942) were subsequently sent to the Vertebrate Paleontology collection and are not included here. Orders and families are ordered as in Wilson and Reeder (2005); within families, currently recognized genera are arranged alphabetically; within each currently recognized genus, accounts are arranged alphabetically by original published name. Information in each account includes original name and abbreviated citation thereto, current name if other than original, citation for first use of current name combination for the taxon (or new name combination if used herein for the first time), type designation, U.S. National Museum catalog number(s), preparation, age and sex, date of collection and collector, original collector number, type locality, and remarks as appropriate. Digital photographs of each specimen will serve as a condition report and will be attached to each electronic specimen record.

  6. Catalog of type specimens of recent mammals: Rodentia (Myomorpha, Anomaluromorpha, and Hystricomorpha) in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert D.; Ludwig, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    The type collection of Recent mammals in the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, contains 945 specimens bearing names of 931 species-group taxa of Rodentia (Myomorpha, Anomaluromorpha, and Hystricomorpha) as of August 2013. This catalog presents an annotated list of these holdings comprised of 905 holotypes, 16 lectotypes, 8 syntypes (48 specimens), and 2 neotypes. In addition, we include 44 specimens that are part of syntype series that should be in the collection but cannot be found or are now known to be in other collections. One hundred and ten of the names are new since the last type catalog covering these suborders A lectotype for Mus peruvianus Peale, 1848, is newly designated herein. Nine specimens previously reported were subsequently sent to the vertebrate paleontology collection and are not included here. Suborders and families are ordered as in Carleton and Musser; within families, currently recognized genera are arranged alphabetically; within each currently recognized genus, accounts are arranged alphabetically by original published name. Information in each account includes original name and abbreviated citation thereto, current name if other than original, citation for first use of current name combination for the taxon (or new name combination if used herein for the first time), type designation, U.S. National Museum catalog number(s), preparation, age and sex, date of collection and collector, original collector number, type locality, and remarks as appropriate. Digital photographs of each specimen will serve as a condition report and will be attached to each electronic specimen record.

  7. Adaptive diversity of incisor enamel microstructure in South American burrowing rodents (family Ctenomyidae, Caviomorpha)

    PubMed Central

    Vieytes, Emma C; Morgan, Cecilia C; Verzi, Diego H

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the morphofunctional and adaptive significance of variation in the upper incisor enamel microstructure of South American burrowing ctenomyids and other octodontoid taxa. We studied the specialized subterranean tooth-digger †Eucelophorus chapalmalensis (Pliocene – Middle Pleistocene), and compared it with other fossil and living ctenomyids with disparate digging adaptations, two fossorial octodontids and one arboreal echimyid. Morphofunctionally significant enamel traits were quite similar among the species studied despite their marked differences in habits, digging behaviour and substrates occupied, suggesting a possible phylogenetic constraint for the Octodontoidea. In this context of relative similarity, the inclination of Hunter–Schreger bands, relative thickness of external index (EI) and prismless enamel zone were highest in †Eucelophorus, in agreement with its outstanding craniomandibular tooth-digging specialization. Higher inclination of Hunter–Schreger bands reinforces enamel to withstand high tension forces, while high external index provides greater resistance to wear. Results suggest increased frequency of incisor use for digging in †Eucelophorus, which could be related to a more extreme tooth-digging strategy and/or occupancy of hard soils. Higher external index values as recurring patterns in distant clades of tooth-digging rodents support an adaptive significance of this enamel trait. PMID:17584181

  8. Biting performance and skull biomechanics of a chisel tooth digging rodent (Ctenomys tuconax; Caviomorpha; Octodontoidea).

    PubMed

    Becerra, Federico; Casinos, Adrià; Vassallo, Aldo Iván

    2013-02-01

    Biting performance is a key factor in vertebrate groups possessing particular food habits. In subterranean rodents that use the incisors as a digging tool, apart from requirements related to gnawing abrasive diets, the force exerted at the incisors tips must be sufficient to break down soils that are often exceedingly compact. The subterranean genus Ctenomys diversified in the southern portion of South America closely associated with the relatively open environments that characterize that region. This genus is considered a "claw and chisel tooth digger," that is, during the excavation of their galleries, the animals break down the soil with both the fore-claws and the incisors. We report here measurements of in vivo bite force in one of the largest species of the genus, C. tuconax, which occupies highland grasslands with compacted soils. We document the combined use of claws and incisors observed under field conditions, also providing measurements of soil compaction in the habitat occupied by this species. We report estimates of bite force at the level of the incisors and cheek teeth calculated from the physiological cross-sectional area of jaw muscles. To this aim, anatomical and biomechanical analyses of the mandibular apparatus were performed in preserved specimens. We found that C. tuconax bites with a higher force than expected for a mammal of its size. To assess anatomical correlates of biting performance, the morphology of the skull and jaw, and incisor second moment of area were compared with those of other caviomorph rodents with different lifestyle. PMID:23203312

  9. Molecular Identification of Food Sources in Triatomines in the Brazilian Northeast: Roles of Goats and Rodents in Chagas Disease Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Valença-Barbosa, Carolina; Fernandes, Fabiano Araújo; Santos, Helena Lucia Carneiro; Sarquis, Otília; Harry, Myriam; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Lima, Marli Maria

    2015-11-01

    We used the gut contents of triatomines collected from rural areas of Ceará State, northeastern Brazil, to identify their putative hosts via vertebrate cytb gene sequencing. Successful direct sequencing was obtained for 48% of insects, comprising 50 Triatoma brasiliensis, 7 Triatoma pseudomaculata, and 1 Rhodnius nasutus. Basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) procedure revealed that domestic animals, such as chickens (Gallus gallus) and goats (Capra hircus), are the main food source, including in sylvatic environment. Native hosts were also detected in peridomestic environment such as reptiles (Tropidurus sp. and Iguana iguana) and the Galea spixii (Rodentia: Caviidae). The role of goats and Galea spixii in Chagas disease epidemiology calls for further studies, because these mammals likely link the sylvatic and domestic Trypanosoma cruzi cycles. PMID:26350453

  10. Capture of syncytin-Mar1, a fusogenic endogenous retroviral envelope gene involved in placentation in the Rodentia squirrel-related clade.

    PubMed

    Redelsperger, François; Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Tennant, Bud C; Catzeflis, François; Mulot, Baptiste; Heidmann, Odile; Heidmann, Thierry; Dupressoir, Anne

    2014-07-01

    Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope protein (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes have previously been identified in the mouse-related clade, allowing a demonstration of their essential role via knockout mice. Here, we searched for similar genes in a second major clade of the Rodentia order, the squirrel-related clade, taking advantage of the complete sequencing of the ground squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus genome. In silico search for env genes with full coding capacity identified several candidate genes with one displaying placenta-specific expression, as revealed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of a large panel of tissues. This gene belongs to a degenerate endogenous retroviral element, with recognizable hallmarks of an integrated provirus. Cloning of the gene in an expression vector for ex vivo cell-cell fusion and pseudotype assays demonstrated fusogenicity on a large panel of mammalian cells. In situ hybridization on placenta sections showed specific expression in domains where trophoblast cells fuse into a syncytiotrophoblast at the fetomaternal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. Finally, we show that the gene is conserved among the tribe Marmotini, thus dating its capture back to about at least 25 million years ago, with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. This gene that we named syncytin-Mar1 is distinct from all seven Syncytin genes identified to date in eutherian mammals and is likely to be a major effector of placentation in its related clade. Importance: Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope genes of retroviral origin, ancestrally captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes had been previously identified in the mouse-related clade. Here, in the squirrel-related rodent clade, we identified the envelope gene of an endogenous retrovirus with all the features of a Syncytin: it is specifically expressed in the placenta of the woodchuck Marmota monax, at the level of cells fusing into a syncytium; it can trigger cell-cell and virus-cell fusion ex vivo; and it has been conserved for >25 million years of evolution, suggesting an essential role in its host physiology. Remarkably, syncytin-Mar1 is unrelated to all other Syncytin genes identified thus far in mammals (primates, muroids, carnivores, and ruminants). These results extend the range of retroviral envelope gene "domestication" in mammals and show that these events occurred independently, on multiple occasions during evolution to improve placental development in a process of convergent evolution. PMID:24789792

  11. Hindlimb musculature of the largest living rodent Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris (Caviomorpha): Adaptations to semiaquatic and terrestrial styles of life.

    PubMed

    García-Esponda, César M; Candela, Adriana M

    2016-03-01

    The caviomorph species Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris (Cavioidea), or capybara, is the largest living rodent. This species is widely distributed, from northern South America to Uruguay and eastern Argentina, inhabiting in a wide variety of densely vegetated lowlands habitats in the proximity of water. Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris not only runs with agility, like other members of the Cavioidea, but it can also swim and dive easily. For these reasons, it has been classified as a cursorial as well as semiaquatic species. However, comprehensive anatomical descriptions of the osteology and myology of the capybara are not available in the literature and analyses on its swimming abilities are still required. We hypothesize that some of the characters of the hindlimb of H. hydrochaeris could reveal a unique morphological arrangement associated with swimming abilities. In this study, an anatomical description of the hindlimb musculature of H. hydrochaeris, and a discussion of the possible functional significance of the main muscles is provided. In addition, we explore the evolution of some myological and osteological characters of the capybara in the context of the cavioids. We concluded that most of the muscular and osteological features of the hindlimb of H. hydrochaeris are neither adaptations to a specialized cursoriality, nor major modifications for an aquatic mode of life. Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris share several features with other cavioids, being a generalized cursorial species in the context of this clade. However, it shows some adaptations of the hindlimb for enhancing propulsion through water, of which the most notable seems to be the shortening of the leg, short tendons of most muscles of the leg, and a well-developed soleus muscle. These adaptations to a semiaquatic mode of life could have been acquired during the most recent evolutionary history of the hydrochoerids. J. Morphol. 277:286-305, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26626863

  12. Spermatogenesis in the grasscutter, Thryonomis swinderianus (Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Werner, G; Moutairou, K

    2000-10-01

    Spermatogenesis in the grasscutter, Thryonomis swinderianus, is characterized by remarkable diversification of the endoplasmic reticulum. In spermatocytes, besides the usual form with flat cisternae and vesicles, this membrane system forms unusually wide cisternae and vacuoles containing moderately electron dense material near the Golgi apparatus and the cell membrane. In spermatids a whorl of smooth cisternae enclosing aggregates of granular electron dense material appears as another specialization. Although all parts of the endoplasmic reticulum are in connection with each other, their distinct structural differences suggest functionally different subcompartments. Once established, the structures persist even after cytoplasm has been discarded from the nearly mature sperm. In the elongating spermatid a thin plica of the Sertoli cell begins to separate the developing structures from the remainder of the cytoplasm containing the endomembrane systems, part of which is further ensheathed when this fold enroles to form an incomplete tube. Occasionally, in late spermatids a spindle-shaped body of paracrystalline structure occurs temporarily around the flagellum at the beginning of the main piece. PMID:11297381

  13. New Pudicinae (Trichostrongylina, Heligmosomoidea) coparasites of Proechimys longicaudatus (Caviomorpha) from Bolivia. I--Description of Pudica ginsburgi n. sp. and Heligmostrongylus chiarae n. sp.

    PubMed

    Durette-Desset, M C; Deharo, E; Santivañez-Galarza, J L; Chabaud, A G

    2001-09-01

    Two new Pudicinae (Trichostrongylina, Heligmosomoidea, Heligmonellidae) coparasites of Proechimys longicaudatus (Caviomorph rodent) from Bolivia are described: Pudica ginsburgi n. sp. is differentiated from all the other species of the genus by the great length of the spicules and of the vestibule and by a different ratio of the length of the spicules on the length of the body. Heligmostrongylus chiarae n. sp. has very developed rays 4, strongly divergent from rays 5 as occurs in three other species, H. almeidai (Durette-Desset & Tcheprakoff, 1969), a parasite of Trichomys apereoides (= Cercomys cunicularius) from Brazil, H. squamastrongylus (Travassos, 1937), a parasite of Proechimys oris from Brazil and H. proechimysi Durette-Desset, 1970, a parasite of Proechimys semispinosus from Columbia. The specimens from Bolivia are differentiated from the three species by the division of the dorsal ray (anterior half versus posterior half) and by a different ratio of the length of the spicules on the length of the body. PMID:11584752

  14. Molecular Individual-Based Approach on Triatoma brasiliensis: Inferences on Triatomine Foci, Trypanosoma cruzi Natural Infection Prevalence, Parasite Diversity and Feeding Sources.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Faucher, Leslie; Lavina, Morgane; Costa, Jane; Harry, Myriam

    2016-02-01

    We used an individual-based molecular multisource approach to assess the epidemiological importance of Triatoma brasiliensis collected in distinct sites and ecotopes in Rio Grande do Norte State, Brazil. In the semi-arid zones of Brazil, this blood sucking bug is the most important vector of Trypanosoma cruzi-the parasite that causes Chagas disease. First, cytochrome b (cytb) and microsatellite markers were used for inferences on the genetic structure of five populations (108 bugs). Second, we determined the natural T. cruzi infection prevalence and parasite diversity in 126 bugs by amplifying a mini-exon gene from triatomine gut contents. Third, we identified the natural feeding sources of 60 T. brasiliensis by using the blood meal content via vertebrate cytb analysis. Demographic inferences based on cytb variation indicated expansion events in some sylvatic and domiciliary populations. Microsatellite results indicated gene flow between sylvatic and anthropic (domiciliary and peridomiciliary) populations, which threatens vector control efforts because sylvatic population are uncontrollable. A high natural T. cruzi infection prevalence (52-71%) and two parasite lineages were found for the sylvatic foci, in which 68% of bugs had fed on Kerodon rupestris (Rodentia: Caviidae), highlighting it as a potential reservoir. For peridomiciliary bugs, Galea spixii (Rodentia: Caviidae) was the main mammal feeding source, which may reinforce previous concerns about the potential of this animal to link the sylvatic and domiciliary T. cruzi cycles. PMID:26891047

  15. Molecular Individual-Based Approach on Triatoma brasiliensis: Inferences on Triatomine Foci, Trypanosoma cruzi Natural Infection Prevalence, Parasite Diversity and Feeding Sources

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Faucher, Leslie; Lavina, Morgane; Costa, Jane; Harry, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    We used an individual-based molecular multisource approach to assess the epidemiological importance of Triatoma brasiliensis collected in distinct sites and ecotopes in Rio Grande do Norte State, Brazil. In the semi-arid zones of Brazil, this blood sucking bug is the most important vector of Trypanosoma cruzi—the parasite that causes Chagas disease. First, cytochrome b (cytb) and microsatellite markers were used for inferences on the genetic structure of five populations (108 bugs). Second, we determined the natural T. cruzi infection prevalence and parasite diversity in 126 bugs by amplifying a mini-exon gene from triatomine gut contents. Third, we identified the natural feeding sources of 60 T. brasiliensis by using the blood meal content via vertebrate cytb analysis. Demographic inferences based on cytb variation indicated expansion events in some sylvatic and domiciliary populations. Microsatellite results indicated gene flow between sylvatic and anthropic (domiciliary and peridomiciliary) populations, which threatens vector control efforts because sylvatic population are uncontrollable. A high natural T. cruzi infection prevalence (52–71%) and two parasite lineages were found for the sylvatic foci, in which 68% of bugs had fed on Kerodon rupestris (Rodentia: Caviidae), highlighting it as a potential reservoir. For peridomiciliary bugs, Galea spixii (Rodentia: Caviidae) was the main mammal feeding source, which may reinforce previous concerns about the potential of this animal to link the sylvatic and domiciliary T. cruzi cycles. PMID:26891047

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Leopoldamys edwardsi (Rodentia: Muridae).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Huang, Jie; Kang, Chunlan; Song, Xuhao; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of L. edwardsi was first sequenced and characterized. The genome was 16,284 bases in length and the composition and arrangement of its genes are analogous to most other rodents. The nucleotide sequence date of 12 heavy-strand protein-coding genes of L. edwardsi and other 26 Muridae species were used for phylogenetic analyses. Trees constructed using Maximum Likelihood, Neighbor Joining and Minimum Evolution demonstrated that L. edwardsi was closer to the genus Niviventer than Rattus. Combing previous research, it suggests that Edward's long-tailed rat is more suitable to be classified into genus Leopoldamys and named as Leopoldamys edwardsi. This study suggested that R. edwardsi is inappropriate for the other name of L. edwardsi. PMID:25329279

  17. Children's Attitudes towards Animals: Evidence from the RODENTIA Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, Maria Joao; Franco, Nuno H.; Brosseron, Francis; Tavares, Fernando; Olsson, I. Anna S.; Borlido-Santos, Julio

    2011-01-01

    The instructional use of animals is a popular strategy to engage students with science, enhance their motivation, and promote values such as respect, tolerance, and empathy for all living beings. Although these beneficial outcomes are widely acknowledged, research has not provided reliable indicators of their efficiency. Therefore, it is essential…

  18. Phylogeographic Study of Apodemus ilex (Rodentia: Muridae) in Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, C. William; Liu, Shao-Ying; Yu, Fa-Hong; Jiang, Xue-Long

    2012-01-01

    Background The Mountains of southwest China have complex river systems and a profoundly complex topography and are among the most important biodiversity hotspots in the world. However, only a few studies have shed light on how the mountains and river valleys promote genetic diversity. Apodemus ilex is a fine model for investigating this subject. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess the genetic diversity and biogeographic patterns of Apodemus ilex, the complete cytochrome b gene sequences (1,140 bp) were determined from 203 samples of A. draco/ilex that were collected from southwest China. The results obtained suggested that A. ilex and A. draco are sistergroups and diverged from each other approximately 2.25 million years ago. A. ilex could be divided into Eastern and Western phylogroups, each containing two sub-groups and being widespread in different geographical regions of the southern Hengduan Mountains and the western Yunnan - Guizhou Plateau. The population expansions of A. ilex were roughly from 0.089 Mya to 0.023 Mya. Conclusions Our result suggested that A. ilex is a valid species rather than synonym of A. draco. As a middle-high elevation inhabitant, the phylogenetic pattern of A. ilex was strongly related to the complex geographical structures in southwest China, particularly the existence of deep river valley systems, such as the Mekong and Salween rivers. Also, it appears that the evolutionary history of A. ilex, such as lineage divergences and population expansions were strongly affected by climate fluctuation in the Late Pleistocene. PMID:22347481

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Tamiops swinhoei (Rodentia: Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Li, Yankuo; Guo, Yingrong; Cheng, Songlin; Lei, Ping

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Tamiops swinhoei has been determined in this study. It is 16,513 bp in size and consists of 2 rRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes and one non-coding region (D-loop). The overall base composition of the heavy strand of the T. swinhoei mitochondrial genome is A: 32.63%, T: 28.67%, C: 26.33% and G: 12.37%. The alignment of the Tamiops species control regions exhibited high genetic variability and rich A + T content (63.42%). PMID:25427814

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of Allocricetulus eversmanni (Rodentia: Cricetidae).

    PubMed

    Luo, Guangjie; Liao, Jicheng

    2016-09-01

    Allocricetulus eversmanni is a unique species in the Allocricetulus, belonging to the Cricetinae group. Its complete mitochondrial genome was first obtained and the total length was 16,282 bp. Protein-coding genes approximately accounted for 69.6% of the complete genome. The heavy strand contained 30% A, 14.4% G, 27.9% C, 27.7% T. Compared with most other mammals, it had the same arrangement and similar length of vary genes or regions. The complete mitochondrial genome of A. eversmanni was conducive to more accurately locate its taxonomic status in Cricetinae and its evolutionary history. At the same time, it provided significant information about consummation of A. eversmanni gene pool. PMID:25765085

  1. Children's Attitudes towards Animals: Evidence from the RODENTIA Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, Maria Joao; Franco, Nuno H.; Brosseron, Francis; Tavares, Fernando; Olsson, I. Anna S.; Borlido-Santos, Julio

    2011-01-01

    The instructional use of animals is a popular strategy to engage students with science, enhance their motivation, and promote values such as respect, tolerance, and empathy for all living beings. Although these beneficial outcomes are widely acknowledged, research has not provided reliable indicators of their efficiency. Therefore, it is essential

  2. Dietary ecology of Murinae (Muridae, Rodentia): a geometric morphometric approach.

    PubMed

    Gómez Cano, Ana Rosa; Hernández Fernández, Manuel; Alvarez-Sierra, M Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Murine rodents represent a highly diverse group, which displays great ecological versatility. In the present paper we analyse the relationship between dental morphology, on one hand, using geometric morphometrics based upon the outline of first upper molar and the dietary preference of extant murine genera, on the other. This ecomorphological study of extant murine rodents demonstrates that dietary groups can be distinguished with the use of a quantitative geometric morphometric approach based on first upper molar outline. A discriminant analysis of the geometric morphometric variables of the first upper molars enables us to infer the dietary preferences of extinct murine genera from the Iberian Peninsula. Most of the extinct genera were omnivore; only Stephanomys showed a pattern of dental morphology alike that of the herbivore genera. PMID:24236090

  3. Diversity and Karyotypic Evolution in the Genus Neacomys (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Willam O; Pieczarka, Julio C; Rossi, Rogério V; Schneider, Horacio; Sampaio, Iracilda; Miranda, Cleuton L; da Silva, Cláudia R; Cardoso, Elizandra M; Nagamachi, Cleusa Y

    2015-01-01

    Neacomys (Sigmodontinae) comprises 8 species mainly found in the Amazonian region. We describe 5 new karyotypes from Brazilian Amazonia: 2 cytotypes for N. paracou (2n = 56/FNa = 62-66), 1 for N. dubosti (2n = 64/FNa = 68), and 2 for Neacomys sp. (2n = 58/FNa = 64-70), with differences in the 18S rDNA. Telomeric probes did not show ITS. We provide a phylogeny using Cytb, and the analysis suggests that 2n = 56 with a high FNa is ancestral for the genus, as found in N. paracou, being retained by the ancestral forms of the other species, with an increase in 2n occurring independently in N. spinosus and N. dubosti. Alternatively, an increase in 2n may have occurred in the ancestral taxon of the other species, followed by independent 2n-reduction events in Neacomys sp. and in the ancestral species of N. tenuipes, N. guianae, N. musseri, and N. minutus. Finally, a drastic reduction event in the diploid number occurred in the ancestral species of N. musseri and N. minutus which exhibit the lowest 2n of the genus. The karyotypic variations found in both intra- and interspecific samples, associated with the molecular phylogeny, suggest a chromosomal evolution with amplification/deletion of constitutive heterochromatin and rearrangements including fusions, fissions, and pericentric inversions. PMID:26587770

  4. Chromosome Polymorphism in Microtus (Alexandromys) mujanensis (Arvicolinae, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Lemskaya, Natalya A; Kartavtseva, Irina V; Rubtsova, Nadezhda V; Golenishchev, Fedor N; Sheremetyeva, Irina N; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    The Muya Valley vole (Microtus mujanensis) has a constant diploid chromosome number of 2n = 38, but an unstable karyotype with polymorphic chromosome pairs. Here, we describe 4 karyotypic variants involving 2 polymorphic chromosome pairs, MMUJ8 and MMUJ14, in 6 animals from Buryatia using a combination of GTG-banding and chromosome painting with M. agrestis probes. We suggest that the polymorphic pairs MMUJ8 and MMUJ14 were formed through pericentric inversions that played a major role during karyotype evolution of the species. We also propose that the stable diploid number with some ongoing polymorphism in the number of chromosome arms indicates that this evolutionarily young endemic species of Russian Far East is on the way to karyotype and likely species stabilization. PMID:26314555

  5. The gallbladder of the Capivara Hydrochoerus hydrochoeris (Mammalia: Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Lopes, R A; Dos Santos, H S; Petenusci, S O; Miglino, M A; de Souza, W M; Boccaletti, D

    1983-01-01

    The authors studied morphological and histochemically the mucopolysaccharides and proteins in the gallbladder tubular glands and epithelial cells of the capivara Hydrochoerus hydrochoeris. Based on the results the authors concluded: 1. the gallbladder single columnar epithelium consists of secretory, migrating, and goblet cells; 2. in the lamina propria are single coiled tubular glands; 3. goblet and tubular gland cells show neutral and sulphated mucopolysaccharides and sialic acid; 4. columnar cells show neutral mucopolysaccharides and protein radicals; 5. migrating cells show only protein radicals. PMID:6642189

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Cricetulus kamensis (Rodentia: Cricetidae).

    PubMed

    Kang, Chunlan; Yue, Hao; Liu, Mengyao; Huang, Ting; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong; Zeng, Tao; Liu, Shaoying

    2016-03-01

    The Cricetulus kamensis is endemic to China and is popular as pet. In the present study, the complete mitogenome of C. kamensis was first determined. It was 16,270 bp in length and the composition and arrangement of its genes are analogous to most other mammals. The overall base composition of heavy strand is 33.2% A, 26.8% T, 27.2% C and 12.7% G. The sequence is highly G-C poor (∼40%) and A is the most numerous nucleotide followed by T >C >G, which is similar to other mammalian mitochondrial genomes. It is notable that three extra bases "CAT" were inserted in cytb at the 3' end position and no stop codon was found for this coding region. The mitogenome sequence of C. kamensis could contribute to a better solution of its phylogenetic position and phylogenetic relationship within Cricetinae in the future. PMID:24963764

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of Lasiopodomys mandarinus mandarinus (Arvicolinae, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Li, Yangwei; Lu, Jiqi; Wang, Zhenlong

    2016-03-01

    Mandarin voles (Lasiopodomys mandarinus) is a subterranean rodent species that are often used as a model for studying subterranean hypoxic stress in mammals. Its subspecies L. m. mandarinus span in cropland in most area of north China and is regarded as an agricultural pest. In this paper, the complete mitochondrial genome of L. m. mandarinus has been determined. Our results showed that the mitochondrial genome of L. m. mandarinus is a circular molecule of 16 367 bp, which contents 13 protein-coding, 22 tRNAs and 2 rRNAs genes. The overall base composition of the heavy strand is 32.47% A, 27.04% T, 27.01% C, and 13.47% G. with an AT content of 59.51%. PMID:26258511

  8. A glimpse on the pattern of rodent diversification: a phylogenetic approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of phylogenetic methods that do not rely on fossils for the study of evolutionary processes through time have revolutionized the field of evolutionary biology and resulted in an unprecedented expansion of our knowledge about the tree of life. These methods have helped to shed light on the macroevolution of many taxonomic groups such as the placentals (Mammalia). However, despite the increase of studies addressing the diversification patterns of organisms, no synthesis has addressed the case of the most diversified mammalian clade: the Rodentia. Results Here we present a rodent maximum likelihood phylogeny inferred from a molecular supermatrix. It is based on 11 mitochondrial and nuclear genes that covers 1,265 species, i.e., respectively 56% and 81% of the known specific and generic rodent diversity. The inferred topology recovered all Rodentia clades proposed by recent molecular works. A relaxed molecular clock dating approach provided a time framework for speciation events. We found that the Myomorpha clade shows a greater degree of variation in diversification rates than Sciuroidea, Caviomorpha, Castorimorpha and Anomaluromorpha. We identified a number of shifts in diversification rates within the major clades: two in Castorimorpha, three in Ctenohystrica, 6 within the squirrel-related clade and 24 in the Myomorpha clade. The majority of these shifts occurred within the most recent familial rodent radiations: the Cricetidae and Muridae clades. Using the topological imbalances and the time line we discuss the potential role of different diversification factors that might have shaped the rodents radiation. Conclusions The present glimpse on the diversification pattern of rodents can be used for further comparative meta-analyses. Muroid lineages have a greater degree of variation in their diversification rates than any other rodent group. Different topological signatures suggest distinct diversification processes among rodent lineages. In particular, Muroidea and Sciuroidea display widespread distribution and have undergone evolutionary and adaptive radiation on most of the continents. Our results show that rodents experienced shifts in diversification rate regularly through the Tertiary, but at different periods for each clade. A comparison between the rodent fossil record and our results suggest that extinction led to the loss of diversification signal for most of the Paleogene nodes. PMID:22697210

  9. The morphology of the pineal gland of the yellow-toothed cavy (Galea Spixii Wagler, 1831) and red-rumped agouti (Dasyprocta leporina linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Câmara, Felipe Venceslau; Lopes, Igor Renno Guimarães; de Oliveira, Gleidson Benevides; Bezerra, Ferdinando Vinicius Fernandes; de Oliveira, Radan Elvis Matias; Oliveira Júnior, Carlos Magno; Silva, Alexandre Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Moacir Franco

    2015-08-01

    The pineal gland is an endocrine gland found in all mammals. This article describes the morphology of this important gland in two species of Caviideae, namely the yellow-toothed cavy and the red-rumped agouti. Ten adult animals of the two species used in current analysis were retrieved from the Center for the Multiplication of Wild Animals (CEMAS/UFERSA) and euthanized. The glands were removed and photographed in situ and ex situ. They were fixed in a paraformaldehyde solution 4% or glutaraldehyde 2.5% solution and submitted to routine histological techniques respectively for light and scanning electron microscopy. Macroscopically, the pineal gland with its elongated structure may be found between the cerebral hemispheres facing the rostral colliculi. Microscopically, pinealocytes and some glia cells were predominant. Contrastingly, to the cavy's pineal gland, a capsule covered the organ in the agouti, with the emission of incomplete septa to the interior, which divided it into two lobules. Light and scanning electron microscopes failed to show calcareous concretions in the pineal gland. Based on the topography of the cavy's and agouti's pineal gland, it may be classified as supra-callosum and ABC type. PMID:26096491

  10. Two new species of Hymenolepis (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) from murid rodents (Rodentia: Muridae) in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Makarikov, Arseny A; Tkach, Vasyl V; Bush, Sarah E

    2013-10-01

    Two previously unrecognized species of the genus Hymenolepis are described based on specimens obtained from murid rodent species Bullimus luzonicus , Apomys microdon , and Rattus everetti collected on Luzon Island, Philippines. Hymenolepis bicauda n. sp. differs from all known Hymenolepis spp. in relative position of the poral dorsal and ventral osmoregulatory canals, gravid uterus occupying less than half the length of proglottid, relatively few eggs, and the highly characteristic longitudinal split of proglottids at the end of the gravid strobila. Hymenolepis haukisalmii n. sp. differs from all known Hymenolepis spp. in the relative position of both poral and aporal dorsal and ventral osmoregulatory canals and uterus lacking dorsal and ventral diverticula. The shift in the relative position of the dorsal and ventral osmoregulatory canals was not known in Hymenolepis from rodents in other regions of the world and is reminiscent of the situation observed in Hymenolepis erinacei, parasitic in hedgehogs, and members of the genus Talpolepis, parasitic in moles. The cosmopolitan species Hymenolepis diminuta was the only member of the genus previously reported from the Philippines. PMID:23679835

  11. The evolution of bipedalism in jerboas (rodentia: Dipodoidea): origin in humid and forested environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaoyuan; Zhang, Fuchun; Edwards, Scott V; Wu, Wenyu; Ye, Jie; Bi, Shundong; Ni, Xijun; Quan, Cheng; Meng, Jin; Organ, Chris L

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian bipedalism has long been thought to have arisen in response to arid and open environments. Here, we tested whether bipedalism coevolved with environmental changes using molecular and paleontological data from the rodent superfamily Dipodoidea and statistical methods for reconstructing ancestral characteristics and past climates. Our results show that the post-Late Miocene aridification exerted selective pressures on tooth shape, but not on leg length of bipedal jerboas. Cheek tooth crown height has increased since the Late Miocene, but the hind limb/head-body length ratios remained stable and high despite the environmental change from humid and forested to arid and open conditions, rather than increasing from low to high as predicted by the arid-bipedalism hypothesis. The decoupling of locomotor and dental character evolution indicates that bipedalism evolved under selective pressure different from that of dental hypsodonty in jerboas. We reconstructed the habitats of early jerboas using floral and faunal data, and the results show that the environments in which bipedalism evolved were forested. Our results suggest that bipedalism evolved as an adaptation to humid woodlands or forests for vertical jumping. Running at high speeds is likely a by-product of selection for jumping, which became advantageous in open environments later on. PMID:24628052

  12. Predicting the potential distribution of Vexillata (Nematoda: Ornithostrongylidae) and its hosts (Mammalia: Rodentia) within America.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Salazar, E A; Escalante, T; Linaje, M; Falcón-Ordaz, J

    2013-12-01

    Species distribution modelling has been a powerful tool to explore the potential distribution of parasites in wildlife, being the basis of studies on biogeography. Vexillata spp. are intestinal nematodes found in several species of mammalian hosts, such as rodents (Geomyoidea) and hares (Leporidae) in the Nearctic and northern Neotropical regions. In the present study, we modelled the potential distribution of Vexillata spp. and their hosts, using exclusively species from the Geomyidae and Heteromyidae families, in order to identify their distributional patterns. Bioclimatic and topographic variables were used to identify and predict suitable habitats for Vexillata and its hosts. Using these models, we identified that temperature seasonality is a significant environmental factor that influences the distribution of the parasite genus and its host. In particular, the geographical distribution is estimated to be larger than that predicted for its hosts. This suggests that the nematode has the potential to extend its geographical range and also its spectrum of host species. Increasing sample size and geographical coverage will contribute to recommendations for conservation of this host-parasite system. PMID:23046734

  13. Dental microwear patterns of extant and extinct Muridae (Rodentia, Mammalia): ecological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes Rodrigues, Helder; Merceron, Gildas; Viriot, Laurent

    2009-04-01

    Extant species of Muridae occupy a wide array of habitats and have diverse dietary habits. Consequently, their dental microwear patterns represent a potential clue to better understand the paleoecology of their extinct relatives, which are abundant in many Old World Neogene localities. In this study, dental microwear is investigated for specimens of 17 extant species of murine and deomyine rodents in order to test the reliability of this method and infer dietary preferences on the fossil species Saïdomys afarensis. This extinct form comes from a mid-Pliocene site (AL 327) located at the Hadar Formation (Ethiopia) known to have delivered many hominid specimens of Australopithecus afarensis. A significant correlation between microwear patterns and diet is detected. Thus, grass, fruit, and insect eaters display, respectively, high amounts of fine scratches, wide scratches, and large pits. Moreover, some aspects of the paleoecology of S. afarensis, including feeding habits, could be assessed in regard to its dental microwear pattern. Indeed, it probably had feeding habits similar to that of living grass eaters. These results concur with the presence of open to woodland areas covered by an herbaceous vegetal layer, including monocotyledons, in the vicinity of this mid-Pliocene locality.

  14. First Miocene rodent from Lebanon provides the 'missing link' between Asian and African gundis (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae)

    PubMed Central

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Knoll, Fabien; Maksoud, Sibelle; Azar, Dany

    2015-01-01

    Ctenodactylinae (gundis) is a clade of rodents that experienced, in Miocene time, their greatest diversification and widest distribution. They expanded from the Far East, their area of origin, to Africa, which they entered from what would become the Arabian Peninsula. Questions concerning the origin of African Ctenodactylinae persist essentially because of a poor fossil record from the Miocene of Afro-Arabia. However, recent excavations in the Late Miocene of Lebanon have yielded a key taxon for our understanding of these issues. Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp. shares a variety of dental characters with both the most primitive and derived members of the subfamily. A cladistic analysis demonstrates that this species is the sister taxon to a clade encompassing all but one of the African ctenodactylines, plus a southern European species of obvious African extraction. As such, Proafricanomys provides the 'missing link' between the Asian and African gundis. PMID:26250050

  15. Seasonal changes in burrow geometry of the common mole rat (Rodentia: Bathyergidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, H. G.; Scantlebury, M.; Swanepoel, D.; Bateman, P. W.; Bennett, N. C.

    2013-11-01

    Sociality in mole rats has been suggested to have evolved as a response to the widely dispersed food resources and the limited burrowing opportunities that result from sporadic rainfall events. In the most arid regions, individual foraging efficiency is reduced, and energetic constraints increase. In this study, we investigate seasonal differences in burrow architecture of the social Cryptomys hottentotus hottentotus in a mesic region. We describe burrow geometry in response to seasonal weather conditions for two seasons (wet and dry). Interactions occurred between seasons and colony size for the size of the burrow systems, but not the shape of the burrow systems. The fractal dimension values of the burrow systems did not differ between seasons. Thus, the burrow complexity was dependent upon the number of mole rats present in the social group.

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Mongolian gerbil, Meriones unguiculatus (Rodentia: Muridae: Gerbillinae).

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Bae; Lee, Sang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Mongolian gerbil, Meriones unguiculatus, was sequenced. The 16,360 bp long genome has 37 genes typical for rodent mitogenomes, including 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 13 protein-coding genes. The total GC content of the mitochondrial genome is 36.96% with the base composition of 32.61% A, 23.71% C, 13.24% G, and 30.44% T. Translational terminators of three genes (cytb, cox3, and nad4) were generated by the addition of 3' A residues to the mRNA. This novel rodent mitochondrial genome will provide comparable information for understanding the rodent mitochondrial evolution. PMID:25185794

  17. Taxonomic hypotheses regarding the genus Gerbillus (Rodentia, Muridae, Gerbillinae) based on molecular analyses of museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Arame; Tatard, Caroline; Stanley, William; Granjon, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Methodological improvements now allow routine analyses of highly degraded DNA samples as found in museum specimens. Using these methods could be useful in studying such groups as rodents of the genus Gerbillus for which i) the taxonomy is still highly debated, ii) collection of fresh specimens may prove difficult. Here we address precise taxonomic questions using a small portion of the cytochrome b gene obtained from 45 dry skin/skull museum samples (from 1913 to 1974) originating from two African and three Asian countries. The specimens were labelled Gerbillus gerbillus, Gerbillus andersoni, Gerbillus nanus, Gerbillus amoenus, Gerbillus perpallidus and Gerbillus pyramidum, and molecular results mostly confirmed these assignations. The close relationship between Gerbillus nanus (Asian origin) and Gerbillus amoenus (African origin) confirmed that they represent vicariant sibling species which differentiated in allopatry on either side of the Red Sea. In the closely related Gerbillus perpallidus and Gerbillus pyramidum, specimens considered as belonging to one Gerbillus pyramidum subspecies (Gerbillus pyramidum floweri) appeared closer to Gerbillus perpallidus suggesting that they (Gerbillus pyramidum floweri and Gerbillus perpallidus) may represent a unique species, distributed on both sides of the Nile River, for which the correct name should be Gerbillus floweri. Furthermore, the three other Gerbillus pyramidum subspecies grouped together with no apparent genetic structure suggesting that they may not yet represent genetically differentiated lineages. This study confirms the importance of using these methods on museum samples, which can open new perspectives in this particular group as well as in other groups of interest. PMID:27047247

  18. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Pallas's squirrel Callosciurus erythraeus (Rodentia: Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Hu, Lanlin; Peng, Rui; Zou, Fangdong

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Pallas's squirrel (Callosciurus erythraeus) from Sichuan Province was sequenced and characterized in detail. It was 16,550 bp in length and composed of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and 1 control region. The mitochondrial genome of C. erythraeus presented in this report will be useful for species identification, genetic variability and clarifying the controversial taxonomic status of genus Callosciurus. PMID:25319295

  19. Nesting and digging behavior in three species of Calomys (Rodentia; Cricetidae).

    PubMed

    Yunes, R M; Cutrera, R A; Castro-Vázquez, A

    1991-03-01

    Two sets of behaviors relevant for the construction of shelters, nest building and digging, were studied in three con-generic species of South American cricetid rodents. Significant differences were observed among the three species in both sets of behaviors, but not between sexes within the same species. Calomys musculinus built the largest nests, C. laucha showed the highest number of digging bouts and the shortest digging latency, and C. venustus scored low in both nesting and digging behaviors. In general, these observations are consistent with the few, anecdotal records of the shelters used by these species in the field. The low nesting and digging scores of C. venustus are correlated with that species' low thermal conductance, but the marked differences in the nesting and digging scores of C. musculinus and C. laucha cannot be accounted for by differences in their basal metabolic rates or thermal conductances. PMID:2062924

  20. Mitochondrial phylogeny reveals differential modes of chromosomal evolution in the genus Tatera (Rodentia: Gerbillinae) in Africa.

    PubMed

    Colangelo, Paolo; Corti, Marco; Verheyen, Erik; Annesi, Flavia; Oguge, Nicholas; Makundi, Rhodes H; Verheyen, Walter

    2005-06-01

    The African gerbils of the genus Tatera are widespread and abundant throughout sub-Saharan Africa. There is still today a certain controversy concerning the taxonomy of these rodents and very few attempts have been made to assess their systematic relationships. The present paper introduces findings based on the partial sequences of cytochrome b (495 bp) and the 16S rRNA (469 bp) mitochondrial genes of six (T. robusta, T. nigricauda, T. vicina, T. leucogaster, T. valida, and T. kempi) species together with two additional taxa. We also report the karyotypes of T. vicina and T. leucogaster. We propose that T. vicina should be considered as a valid species and show the monophyly of the robusta species group, with the exclusion of T. leucogaster. Our results show there is a different chromosomal evolutionary pattern within the two major lineages, which is recognizable through molecular phylogenetics. One is characterized by karyotype stability and the other by a considerable number of chromosomal rearrangements. The lineage divergence coincides with the formation of the East African Rift. The processes that led to the origin of the East African species seem to be related to the subsequent climatic changes, which caused cyclic contraction and expansion of the savannah biomes. Furthermore, geological activities that characterized East Africa during Plio-Pleistocene may also have contributed to lineage divergence. PMID:15878125

  1. Occurrence of Dermacentor variabilis (Acari: Ixodidae) around a porcupine (Rodentia: Erthethizontidae) carcass at Camp Ripley, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    McNemee, Richard B; Sames, William J; Maloney, Francis A

    2003-01-01

    In May 2000, a dead porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum Culiver) was found on an infrequently traveled dirt road at Camp Ripley, MN. The presence of late instar Calliphoridae suggested that the porcupine died within the past 4 to 7 d. Adult carrion (Silphidae) and rove (Staphylinidae) beetles were observed under the carcass. In June, a large number of adult American dog ticks, Dermacentor variabilis (Say), were observed questing on the porcupine and the surrounding grass. Six zones were established around the carcass, and each zone was sampled for ticks once a month from June through September. Ticks were captured in June and July, and 93% were captured within 2 m of the carcass. Gases released as part of the decomposition process were believed to attract the ticks to the carcass. PMID:12597663

  2. Unique Regulation of the Melatonin Synthetic Pathway in the Retina of Diurnal Female Arvicanthis ansorgei (Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Gianesini, Coralie; Clesse, Daniel; Tosini, Gianluca; Hicks, David; Laurent, Virginie

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge about melatonin synthesis and its potential roles within the retina remains fragmented, especially in mammals where studies have focused on the penultimate enzyme of melatonin synthesis arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT), whereas the final enzyme necessary for melatonin production is hydroxyindole-O-methytransferase (HIOMT). We explored multiple parameters of the melatonin synthetic pathway in the cone-rich retina of a diurnal rodent, Arvicanthis ansorgei, cones being previously implicated as probable reservoirs of melatonin production. We analyzed the temporal and spatial expression of Aa-nat mRNA and AA-NAT protein and enzymatic activity of AA-NAT, HIOMT, as well as the melatonin receptor type 1 and melatonin itself. We report that Aa-nat mRNA was localized principally to cones and ganglion cells (retinal ganglion cell [RGC]) with opposing cyclic expression, being maximal in cones during the night, and maximal in RGC in the daytime. AA-NAT protein was also immunolocalized to these same populations, and was present and active throughout the 24-hour period. HIOMT immunolocalization mirrored that of AA-NAT, but expression levels and activity were extremely low and remained uniform throughout the 24-hour period. MT1 showed a complementary expression pattern to the synthetic enzymes, present in rod photoreceptors, some inner retinal neurons and RGC. Surprisingly, melatonin levels were consistently low throughout the day/night cycle, in accordance with the low activity levels of HIOMT. These data demonstrate that the melatonin synthetic pathway in a diurnal rodent differs from that described for other tissues and species (nocturnal and diurnal), the contrasting phase expression in photoreceptors and RGC, suggesting distinct roles in these populations. PMID:26153723

  3. Are ribosomal DNA clusters rearrangement hotspots? A case study in the genus Mus (Rodentia, Muridae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent advances in comparative genomics have considerably improved our knowledge of the evolution of mammalian karyotype architecture. One of the breakthroughs was the preferential localization of evolutionary breakpoints in regions enriched in repetitive sequences (segmental duplications, telomeres and centromeres). In this context, we investigated the contribution of ribosomal genes to genome reshuffling since they are generally located in pericentromeric or subtelomeric regions, and form repeat clusters on different chromosomes. The target model was the genus Mus which exhibits a high rate of karyotypic change, a large fraction of which involves centromeres. Results The chromosomal distribution of rDNA clusters was determined by in situ hybridization of mouse probes in 19 species. Using a molecular-based reference tree, the phylogenetic distribution of clusters within the genus was reconstructed, and the temporal association between rDNA clusters, breakpoints and centromeres was tested by maximum likelihood analyses. Our results highlighted the following features of rDNA cluster dynamics in the genus Mus: i) rDNA clusters showed extensive diversity in number between species and an almost exclusive pericentromeric location, ii) a strong association between rDNA sites and centromeres was retrieved which may be related to their shared constraint of concerted evolution, iii) 24% of the observed breakpoints mapped near an rDNA cluster, and iv) a substantial rate of rDNA cluster change (insertion, deletion) also occurred in the absence of chromosomal rearrangements. Conclusions This study on the dynamics of rDNA clusters within the genus Mus has revealed a strong evolutionary relationship between rDNA clusters and centromeres. Both of these genomic structures coincide with breakpoints in the genus Mus, suggesting that the accumulation of a large number of repeats in the centromeric region may contribute to the high level of chromosome repatterning observed in this group. However, the elevated rate of rDNA change observed in the chromosomally invariant clade indicates that the presence of these sequences is insufficient to lead to genome instability. In agreement with recent studies, these results suggest that additional factors such as modifications of the epigenetic state of DNA may be required to trigger evolutionary plasticity. PMID:21569527

  4. Cytokine mRNA expression in Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana.

    PubMed

    Loria-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Sosa-Bibiano, Erika Ivett; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole Raymonde; Saldarriaga, Omar Abdul; Melby, Peter C; Andrade-Narvaez, Fernando Jose

    2016-07-01

    Peromyscus yucatanicus, the main reservoir of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana in the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico, reproduces clinical and histological pictures of LCL in human as well as subclinical infection. Thus, we used this rodent as a novel experimental model. In this work, we analyzed cytokine mRNA expression in P. yucatanicus infected with L. (L.) mexicana. Animals were inoculated with either 2.5×10(6) or 1×10(2) promastigotes and cytokine expressions were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR in skin at 4 and 12weeks post-infection (wpi). Independently of the parasite inoculum none of the infected rodents had clinical signs of LCL at 4wpi and all expressed high IFN-γ mRNA. All P. yucatanicus inoculated with 2.5×10(6) promastigotes developed signs of LCL at 12wpi while the mice inoculated with 1×10(2) remained subclinical. At that time, both IFN-γ and IL-10 were expressed in P. yucatanicus with clinical and subclinical infections. Expressions of TNF-α and IL-4 were significantly higher in clinical animals (2.5×10(6)) compared with subclinical ones (1×10(2)). High TGF-β expression was observed in P. yucatanicus with clinical signs when compared with healthy animals. Results suggested that the clinical course of L. (L.) mexicana infection in P. yucatanicus was associated with a specific local pattern of cytokine production at 12wpi. PMID:27155064

  5. Chromosomal variation in Argentine populations of Akodon montensis Thomas, 1913 (Rodentia, Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae)

    PubMed Central

    Malleret, Matías Maximiliano; Labaroni, Carolina Alicia; García, Gabriela Verónica; Ferro, Juan Martín; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Lanzone, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The genus Akodon Meyen, 1833 is one of the most species-rich among sigmodontine rodents and has great chromosome variability. Akodon montensis has a relatively broad distribution in South America, and Argentine populations are located in the southernmost region of its range. Brazilian populations have important chromosomal variability, but cytogenetic data from Argentina are scarce. We performed a chromosome characterization of natural populations of Akodon montensis using conventional staining, C-banding, Ag-NORs and base-specific fluorochromes. A total of 31 specimens from five localities of Misiones Province, in Argentina, were analyzed. The 2n=24 chromosomes was the most frequently observed karyotype. However, five individuals presented 25 chromosomes due to a supernumerary B-chromosome; and one individual had 2n=26 due to one B plus a trisomy for chromosome 11. Additionally, two XY females and two variants of the X chromosomes were found. C-positive centromeric bands occurred in all chromosomes; additional C-bands were observed in some autosomes, the X, Y and B chromosomes. Ag-NORs were observed in five autosomes, and the B chromosome was frequently marked. Fluorochrome banding was similar among karyotypes of the analyzed populations. Comparisons of cytogenetic data among populations of Argentina and Brazil showed the presence of high intraspecific variability in Akodon montensis and some differences among regions. PMID:27186343

  6. Host evolution in Mastomys natalensis (Rodentia: Muridae): An integrative approach using geometric morphometrics and genetics.

    PubMed

    Lalis, Aude; Evin, Allowen; Janier, Marc; Koivogui, Lamine; Denys, Christiane

    2015-11-01

    The commensal rodent Mastomys natalensis is the natural reservoir of Lassa arenavirus (LASV), which causes hemorrhagic fever in West Africa. To study a possible effect of the virus on phenotypic and genotypic variation of its persistently infected host, we compared LASV-positive and non-infected wild-caught M. natalensis. The LASV effects on the phenotypic variation were explored using standard external morphometric measurements, geometric morphometric analyses of the cranial size and shape, and brain case volume. The genetic variability of M. natalensis specimens was assessed using 9 polymorphic microsatellite markers. Independent of sex and age, LASV-infected animals had smaller external body measurements, reproductive organs, skull size and brain case volume. Cranial shape differences between the 2 groups are represented by a lateral constriction of the entire skull. The genetic variability revealed consanguinity only among the LASV-positive rodents. We hypothesize that growth impairment may result in a selective disadvantage for LASV-infected M. natalensis, leading to a preferably commensal lifestyle in areas where the LAVS is endemic and, thereby, increasing the risk of LASV transmission to humans. PMID:26331855

  7. Bots (Diptera: Oestridae) infesting a neotropical forest rodent, Proechimys semispinosus (Rodentia: Echimyidae), in Panama.

    PubMed

    Adler, Gregory H; Davis, Shannon L; Carvajal, Alejandra

    2003-08-01

    Botfly larvae (Cuterebra sp.) infesting spiny rats (Proechimys semispinosus) in 8 small islands in the Panama Canal were studied. Rats were live trapped monthly on each island from January 1991 through February 2000 and visually examined for the presence of bots. Overall, bot prevalence was 4.6% and differed statistically among island rat populations. Rats were simultaneously infested by as many as 4 bots. Overall bot intensity was 1.3 bots per infested rat and did not differ among islands. Mean bot density across all islands was 0.0111 and was greater during the dry seasons than during the rainy seasons, but it did not differ among islands. Bots were found during all the 12 calendar months, suggesting a multivoltine reproductive schedule. Although bot activity varied seasonally, there was little synchrony of bot activity among islands. Bot density was related negatively to rainfall but was not related to host density, suggesting that drier ambient conditions may promote reproduction by adult bot flies in this system. PMID:14533675

  8. The comparative gastrointestinal morphology of Jaculus jaculus (Rodentia) and Paraechinus aethiopicus (Erinaceomorpha).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Daniella L; Walters, Jacklynn; Bennett, Nigel C; Alagaili, Abdulaziz N; Mohammed, Osama B; Kotzé, Sanet H

    2016-05-01

    Jaculus jaculus (Lesser Egyptian jerboa) and Paraechinus aethiopicus (Desert hedgehog) are small mammals which thrive in desert conditions and are found, among others, in the Arabian Peninsula. Jaculus jaculus is omnivorous while P. aethiopicus is described as being insectivorous. The study aims to describe the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) morphology of these animals which differ in diet and phylogeny. The GITs of J. jaculus (n = 8) and P. aethiopicus (n = 7) were weighed, photographed, and the length, basal surface areas, and luminal surface areas of each of the anatomically distinct gastrointestinal segments were determined. The internal aspects of each area were examined and photographed while representative histological sections of each area were processed to wax and stained using haematoxylin and eosin. Both species had a simple unilocular stomach which was confirmed as wholly glandular on histology sections. Paraechinus aethiopicus had a relatively simple GIT which lacked a caecum. The caecum of J. jaculus was elongated, terminating in a narrow cecal appendix which contained lymphoid tissue on histological examination. The internal aspect of the proximal colon of J. jaculus revealed distinct V-shaped folds. Stomach content analysis of J. jaculus revealed mostly plant and seed material and some insects, whereas P. aethiopicus samples showed plant material in addition to insects, indicating omnivorous feeding tendencies in areas where insects may be scarce. J. Morphol. 277:671-679, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26968578

  9. Arterial vascularization of the abdominal and pelvic regions in the degu, Octodon degus (Rodentia, Octodontidae).

    PubMed

    Ventura, J; Gispert, E; López-Fuster, M J

    1996-06-01

    The abdominal and the pelvic arterial supply of the degu, Octodon degus, were described in 19 specimens (10 males and 9 females) from a laboratory strain. Animals were injected through the left ventricle of the heart with coloured latex solution and subsequently dissected under a surgical microscope. The arrangement and variations of the visceral and muscular arteries were described. Comparative analysis among rodents revealed that, even though there was a wide range of interspecific variation in the characters considered, there were several constant anatomical features with phylogenetic value. In this sense, results on the degu and the guinea pig, Cavia porcellus, showed that these hystricognaths share particular features that differentiate them from the sciurognaths analysed to date. The distinguishing characteristics between these two groups of rodents were found in the arrangement of the coeliacomesenteric trunk, and in the cranial abdominal, right gastric, caudal mesenteric, and deep circumflex iliac arteries. The phylogenetic meaning of particular angiological features in rodents were commented. PMID:8712380

  10. Another one bites the dust: bite force and ecology in three caviomorph rodents (Rodentia, Hystricognathi).

    PubMed

    Becerra, Federico; Echeverría, Alejandra Isabel; Casinos, Adrià; Vassallo, Aldo Iván

    2014-04-01

    Mammals have developed sophisticated strategies adapting to particular locomotor modes, feeding habits, and social interactions. Many rodent species have acquired a fossorial, semi-fossorial, or even subterranean life-style, converging on morphological, anatomical, and ecological features but diverging in the final arrangement. These ecological variations partially depend on the functional morphology of their digging tools. Muscular and mechanical features (e.g., lever arms relationship) of the bite force were analyzed in three caviomorph rodents with similar body size but different habits and ecological demands of the jaws. In vivo forces were measured at incisors' tip using a strain gauge load cell force transducer whereas theoretical maximal performance values, mechanical advantages, and particular contribution of each adductor muscle were estimated from dissections in specimens of Ctenomys australis (subterranean, solitary), Octodon degus (semi-fossorial, social), and Chinchilla laniger (ground-dweller, colonial). Our results showed that C. australis bites stronger than expected given its small size and C. laniger exhibited the opposite outcome, while O. degus is close to the expected value based on mammalian bite force versus body mass regressions; what might be associated to the chisel-tooth digging behavior and social interactions. Our key finding was that no matter how diverse these rodents' skulls were, no difference was found in the mechanical advantage of the main adductor muscles. Therefore, interspecific differences in the bite force might be primarily due to differences in the muscular development and force, as shown for the subterranean, solitary and territorial C. australis versus the more gracile, ground-dweller, and colonial C. laniger. PMID:24482421

  11. The evolution of fossoriality and the adaptive role of horns in the Mylagaulidae (Mammalia: Rodentia)

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Samantha S.B

    2005-01-01

    Ceratogaulus, a member of the extinct fossorial rodent clade Mylagaulidae, is the only known rodent with horns and the smallest known horned mammal. The function of the large, dorsally projecting nasal horns on this burrowing animal has been the subject of wide speculation among palaeontologists; suggested uses range from sexual combat to burrowing. Mammals have evolved adaptations for digging repeatedly; horns and other cranial appendages have also evolved numerous times. These two adaptations co-occur in mammals extremely rarely: only two fossil genera (Ceratogaulus and the xenarthran Peltephilus) and no extant mammals are both horned and fossorial. Tracing the evolution of fossoriality in aplodontoid rodents (the larger clade to which Ceratogaulus belongs) reveals that Ceratogaulus descended from ancestors who dug by head-lifting. Whereas this suggests an obvious explanation for the horns of this rodent, evidence from functional morphology, anatomy, phylogeny and geologic context indicates that the horns in Ceratogaulus were used for defence, rather than digging, and evolved to offset increased predation costs associated with spending more time foraging above ground as body size increased. PMID:16087426

  12. Digital dissection of the masticatory muscles of the naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber (Mammalia, Rodentia)

    PubMed Central

    Faulkes, Chris G.

    2014-01-01

    The naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber, of the family Bathyergidae is a subterranean rodent that feeds on underground roots and tubers and digs extensive tunnel systems with its incisors. It is a highly unusual mammal with regard to its social structure, longevity, pain insensitivity and cancer resistance, all of which have made it the subject of a great deal of research in recent years. Yet, much of the basic anatomy of this species remains undocumented. In this paper, we describe the morphology of the jaw-closing musculature of the naked mole-rat, as revealed by contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography. This technique uses an iodine stain to enable the imaging of soft tissues with microCT. The iodine-enhanced scans were used to create 3D reconstructions of the naked mole-rat masticatory muscles from which muscle masses were calculated. The jaw-closing musculature of Heterocephalus glaber is relatively very large compared to other rodents and is dominated by the superficial masseter, the deep masseter and the temporalis. The temporalis in particular is large for a rodent, covering the entirety of the braincase and much of the rear part of the orbit. The morphology of the masseter complex described here differs from two other published descriptions of bathyergid masticatory muscles, but is more similar to the arrangement seen in other rodent families. The zygomaticomandibularis (ZM) muscle does not protrude through the infraorbital foramen on to the rostrum and thus the naked mole-rat should be considered protrogomorphous rather than hystricomorphous, and the morphology is consistent with secondarily lost hystricomorphy as has been previously suggested for Bathyergidae. Overall, the morphology of the masticatory musculature indicates a species with a high bite force and a wide gape–both important adaptations for a life dominated by digging with the incisors. PMID:25024917

  13. Two new species of fossil Leggadina (Rodentia: Muridae) from Northwestern Queensland

    PubMed Central

    Godthelp, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Only three species of fossil murine have been described to date in Australia even though they are often found in fossil deposits and can be highly useful in understanding environmental change over time. Until now the genus Leggadina, a group of short-tailed mice that is particularly well adapted to an arid environment, was only known from two extant species: L. forresti and L. lakedownensis. Here two new fossil species of the genus are described from sites in northwestern Queensland. Leggadina gregoriensis sp. nov. comes from the Early Pleistocene Rackham’s Roost Site in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area and Leggadina macrodonta sp. nov. is from the Plio-Pleistocene Site 5C at Floraville Station. The evolution of the genus Leggadina and the lineage’s response to palaeoecological factors is considered. Taphonomy of the two fossil deposits is examined and shows marked differences in both faunal composition of the assemblages and preservation. Description of L. gregoriensis and L. macrodonta extends the known temporal range of the Leggadina lineage by over 2 million years. PMID:26207193

  14. First Castorid (Mammalia, Rodentia) from the Middle Miocene of Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suraprasit, Kantapon; Chaimanee, Yaowalak; Martin, Thomas; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2011-04-01

    Today and in the Tertiary, the geographical distribution of castorids is limited throughout all of the northern continents. Fossils of the Castoridae genus Steneofiber are abundant in many localities of Eurasia from the late Oligocene to Pliocene period. Recently, Steneofiber fossils were discovered in two localities of northern Thailand, Mae Moh and Chiang Muan coal mines, in layers of late middle Miocene age. These discoveries represent the first records of castorids from Southeast Asia and correspond to their southernmost known range. The focus of this study is to describe this new Thai species of Steneofiber and to define its wear stages from the molar occlusal surfaces by using micro-CT scan analysis. The CT scan technique permits the analysis of the virtual occlusal surface changes from wear, allowing easier comparison to related species of Steneofiber cheek teeth without destroying the teeth. The new species, Steneofiber siamensis n. sp., can be distinguished from the other species of Steneofiber by several distinct characters, longer mesostriid on p4, presence of premesostria and metastria on P4, which are smaller than most of the other known species. The occurrence of this new castorid also supports a subtropical to tropical paleoclimate for these two localities of northern Thailand.

  15. First Miocene rodent from Lebanon provides the 'missing link' between Asian and African gundis (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae).

    PubMed

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Knoll, Fabien; Maksoud, Sibelle; Azar, Dany

    2015-01-01

    Ctenodactylinae (gundis) is a clade of rodents that experienced, in Miocene time, their greatest diversification and widest distribution. They expanded from the Far East, their area of origin, to Africa, which they entered from what would become the Arabian Peninsula. Questions concerning the origin of African Ctenodactylinae persist essentially because of a poor fossil record from the Miocene of Afro-Arabia. However, recent excavations in the Late Miocene of Lebanon have yielded a key taxon for our understanding of these issues. Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp. shares a variety of dental characters with both the most primitive and derived members of the subfamily. A cladistic analysis demonstrates that this species is the sister taxon to a clade encompassing all but one of the African ctenodactylines, plus a southern European species of obvious African extraction. As such, Proafricanomys provides the 'missing link' between the Asian and African gundis. PMID:26250050

  16. Ectoparasites of the critically endangered insular cavy, Cavia intermedia (Rodentia: Caviidae), southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Regolin, André Luis; Furnari, Nina; de Castro Jacinavicius, Fernando; Linardi, Pedro Marcos; de Carvalho-Pinto, Carlos José

    2015-01-01

    Cavia intermedia is a rodent species critically endangered and is found only on a 10 hectare island off the southern Brazilian coast. To identify the ectoparasites of C. intermedia, 27 specimens (14 males and 13 females), representing approximately 65% of the estimated total population, were captured and examined. A total of 1336 chewing lice of two species were collected: Gliricola lindolphoi (Amblycera: Gyropidae) and Trimenopon hispidum (Amblycera: Trimenoponidae). In addition, chiggers Arisocerus hertigi (Acari: Trombiculidae) and Eutrombicula sp. (Acari: Trombiculidae) were collected from the ears of all captured animals. This low species richness compared to those for other Cavia species is expected for island mammals. Although the results presented here are not conclusive about the relationship between C. intermedia and ectoparasites, this low species richness found might be reflected in a low level of investment by the hosts in the basal immune defense, since investments in white blood cell production by mammals are influenced by the diversity of parasites in the environment. Additionally, considering that it might result in host vulnerability to other parasites that might be introduced through exotic or migratory host species, the monitoring of C. intermedia, including parasitological and immunological assessments, is recommended as a key component of conservation efforts. PMID:25830106

  17. Ecology of the interaction between Ixodes loricatus (Acari: Ixodidae) and Akodon azarae (Rodentia: Criceridae).

    PubMed

    Colombo, Valeria C; Nava, Santiago; Antoniazzi, Leandro R; Monje, Lucas D; Racca, Andrea L; Guglielmone, Alberto A; Beldomenico, Pablo M

    2015-10-01

    The present study explores associations of different factors (i.e. host parameters, presence of other ectoparasites and [mainly biotic] environmental factors) with burdens of Ixodes loricatus immature stages in one of its main hosts in Argentina, the rodent Akodon azarae. For 2 years, rodents were trapped and sampled monthly at 16 points located in four different sites in the Parana River Delta region. Data were analysed with generalized linear mixed models with a negative binomial response (counts of larvae or nymphs). The independent variables assessed were (a) environmental: trapping year, presence of cattle, type of vegetation, rodent abundance; (b) host parameters: body length, sex, body condition, blood cell counts, natural antibody titers and (c) co-infestation with other ectoparasites. Two-way interaction terms deemed a priori as relevant were also included in the analysis. Most of the associations investigated were found significant, but in general, the direction and magnitude of the associations were context-dependent. An exception was the presence of cattle, which was consistently negatively associated with both larvae and nymphs independently of all other variables considered and had the strongest effect on tick burdens. Mites, fleas and Amblyomma triste were also significantly associated (mostly positively) with larval and nymph burdens, and in many cases, they influenced associations with environmental or host factors. Our findings strongly support that raising cattle may have a substantial impact on the dynamics of I. loricatus and that interactions within the ectoparasite community may be an important-but generally ignored-driver of tick dynamics. PMID:26122994

  18. The taxonomic position of Tonkinomys daovantieni (Rodentia: Muridae) based on karyological and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Balakirev, Alexander E; Aniskin, Vladimir V; Tien, Tran Quang; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V

    2013-01-01

    Tonkinomys daovantieni was recently described from Northern Vietnam, but very sparse information exists for the taxon. We report for the first time the karyotype of this species and investigate its phylogenetic position in the Dacnomys division using both mitochondrial and nuclear genetic data. The diploid chromosome number of the species is 2n=44. This chromosomal set consists of one submetacentric pair, one metacentric pair, and nineteen pairs of subtelocentric/acrocentric autosomes progressively decreasing in size. The X chromosome is submetacentric and approximately equal in size to the largest subtelocentric autosome. The Y chromosome is metacentric and equal in size to the smallest pair of autosomes. The phylogenetic reconstruction based on the Cyt b COI and GHR genes reveals that Saxotilomys paulinae, a species distributed in the karst formations of the Lao PDR, is the closest relative to T. daovantieni. These two taxa are similar not only in a number of morphological characters, but also in their major ecological preferences (both are petrophylic species associated with limestone karst formations). Based on our data, we can conclude that the similarities among the ecological adaptations, natural conditions and habitat preferences of these species are a reflection of their phylogenetic relationship. PMID:25277936

  19. Genetic diversity and population structure of the Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus, Rodentia, Caviidae) in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Paz, William; Cerón-Muñoz, Mario; Solarte-Portilla, Carlos

    2011-10-01

    The aim was to establish the genetic diversity and population structure of three guinea pig lines, from seven production zones located in Nariño, southwest Colombia. A total of 384 individuals were genotyped with six microsatellite markers. The measurement of intrapopulation diversity revealed allelic richness ranging from 3.0 to 6.56, and observed heterozygosity (Ho) from 0.33 to 0.60, with a deficit in heterozygous individuals. Although statistically significant (p < 0.05), genetic differentiation between population pairs was found to be low. Genetic distance, as well as clustering of guinea-pig lines and populations, coincided with the historical and geographical distribution of the populations. Likewise, high genetic identity between improved and native lines was established. An analysis of group probabilistic assignment revealed that each line should not be considered as a genetically homogeneous group. The findings corroborate the absorption of native genetic material into the improved line introduced into Colombia from Peru. It is necessary to establish conservation programs for native-line individuals in Nariño, and control genealogical and production records in order to reduce the inbreeding values in the populations. PMID:22215979

  20. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Père David's Vole, Eothenomys melanogaster (Rodentia: Arvicolinae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Shunde; Chen, Guiying; Wei, Haixue; Wang, Qiong

    2016-07-01

    The Père David's Vole, Eothenomys melanogaster belongs to subfamily Arvicolinae. It is widespread in south China, and ranges into northern Southeast Asia. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Eothenomys melanogaster was determined. The mitogenome is 16,331 base pairs in length. The nucleotide sequence data of 12 heavy-strand protein-coding genes of E. melanogaster and other 17 rodents were used for phylogenetic analyses. Tree constructed using Bayesian phylogenetic methods demonstrated that E. melanogaster as a sister to E. chinensis, was clustered in subfamily Arvicolinae. The monophyly of the genus Eothenomys was supported as well with Eothenomys sister to the genus Myodes. PMID:26024146

  1. First cytogenetic information for Drymoreomys albimaculatus (Rodentia, Cricetidae), a recently described genus from Brazilian Atlantic Forest

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Villota, Elkin Y.; Di-Nizo, Camilla B.; Neves, Carolina L.; Silva, Maria José de Jesus

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The recently described taxon Drymoreomys albimaculatus is endemic to the Brazilian Atlantic Forest and its biology and genetics are still poorly known. Herein, we present, for the first time, the karyotype of the species using classical and molecular cytogenetics, which showed 2n=62, FN=62, and interstitial telomeric signals at the sex chromosomes. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences from the two karyotyped individuals verify the taxonomic identity as the recently described Drymoreomys albimaculatus and confirm the relationship of the species with other Oryzomyini. Additionally, external morphological information is provided. PMID:23794904

  2. A new metastrongilid species (Nematoda: Metastrongylidae): a lungworm from Akodon montensis (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souza, Joyce G R; Simões, Raquel O; Thiengo, Silvana A R C; Lima, Walter S; Mota, Esther M; Rodrigues-Silva, Rosangela; Lanfredi, Reinalda M; Maldonado, Arnaldo

    2009-12-01

    Angiostrongylus lenzii n. sp. (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) is described and illustrated from the pulmonary artery of the wild rodent Akodon montensis Thomas, 1913, collected in the municipality of Teresopólis, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. It represents the 17th species of the genus and the 2nd in South America as parasites in rodents. This new species is the most similar morphologically to Angiostrongylus vasorum, Angiostrongylus gubernaculatus, Angiostrongylus schmidti, and Angiostrongylus morerai. It can be distinguished from them by the morphology of the caudal bursa, ventral rays 2 and 3 with conspicuous knobs, differences in width and length of lateral and dorsal rays, presence of rays 8, and length of spicules. PMID:19566346

  3. Karyological analysis of Proechimys cuvieri and Proechimys guyannensis (Rodentia, Echimyidae) from central Amazon

    PubMed Central

    e Silva, Carlos Eduardo Faresin; Eler, Eduardo Schmidt; da Silva, Maria Nazareth F.; Feldberg, Eliana

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to characterize the karyotype of rodents of the genus Proechimys from three localities in the central Brazilian Amazon, in the search for new markers that might shed light on our understanding of the taxonomy and evolutionary history of this taxon. Two karyotypes were found, viz., 2n = 28, FN = 46 in individuals from the NRSP (Cuieiras River) and REMAN (Manaus), and 2n = 46, FN = 50 in individuals from the Balbina Hydroelectric Plant. While individuals with the karyotype with 2n = 28 chromosomes were morphologically associated with Proechimys cuvieri, their karyotype shared similarities with those of the same diploid number in two other regions. Although three karyotypes are described for Proechimys cuvieri, no geographic distribution pattern that defined a cline could be identified. Based on the morphological examination of voucher specimens and additional results from molecular analysis, the karyotype with 2n = 46 and FN = 50 could be associated with P. guyannensis. PMID:22481879

  4. A new heligmonellid species (Nematoda) from Oligoryzomys nigripes (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae) in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souza, Joyce G R; Digiani, Maria C; Simões, Raquel O; Luque, José L; Rodrigues-Silva, Rosângela; Maldonado, Arnaldo

    2009-06-01

    Stilestrongylus lanfrediae n. sp. is described from the small intestine of Oligoryzomys nigripes (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) collected in the Atlantic Forest (Rio de Janeiro State, Teresópolis, Brazil). The new species shows some similarities to Stilestrongylus stilesi, Stilestrongylus freitasi, Stilestrongylus inexpectatus, Stilestrongylus moreli, and Stilestrongylus andalgala, but it can be distinguished from these species by the following combination of characters: 26 ridges in males and 25 in females at the mid-body, asymmetrical caudal bursa with a pattern of type 2-2-1, rays 6 markedly shorter than other lateral rays, rays 8 inserted asymmetrically on dorsal trunk and shorter than other species, and a proportion of spicule length in relation to body length (SpL/BL) of 25-29%. The new species is also distinguished from other species of Stilestrongylus by the asymmetry of the branches of the dorsal ray and by having the longest spicules. PMID:19642806

  5. A remarkable autosomal heteromorphism in Pseudoryzomys simplex 2n = 56; FN = 54–55 (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae)

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Camila Nascimento; Di-Nizo, Camilla Bruno; de Jesus Silva, Maria José; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo; Ventura, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Pseudoryzomys simplex, the false rice rat, is a monotypic genus of the Oryzomyini tribe (Sigmodontinae) distributed in part of Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina and Brazil. Its diploid number has been described as 56 acrocentric chromosomes decreasing in size and no karyotype figure has been depicted. Herein, we present karyotypic data on P. simplex, including chromosome banding and molecular fluorescent in situ hybridization using telomeric sequences and the whole X-chromosome of its sister clade Holochilus brasiliensis (HBR) as probes. A case of remarkable autosomal heteromorphism due to the presence of a whole heterochromatic arm leading to the variability of FN is reported, as well as the occurrence of regions of homology between the X and Y chromosomes (pseudoautosomal regions) after chromosome painting with the HBR X probe on P. simplex metaphases. PMID:23885202

  6. Bony labyrinth morphometry indicates locomotor adaptations in the squirrel-related clade (Rodentia, Mammalia).

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Cathrin; Martin, Thomas; Ruf, Irina

    2015-06-22

    The semicircular canals (SCs) of the inner ear detect angular acceleration and are located in the bony labyrinth of the petrosal bone. Based on high-resolution computed tomography, we created a size-independent database of the bony labyrinth of 50 mammalian species especially rodents of the squirrel-related clade comprising taxa with fossorial, arboreal and gliding adaptations. Our sampling also includes gliding marsupials, actively flying bats, the arboreal tree shrew and subterranean species. The morphometric anatomy of the SCs was correlated to the locomotion mode. Even if the phylogenetic signal cannot entirely be excluded, the main significance for functional morphological studies has been found in the diameter of the SCs, whereas the radius of curvature is of minor interest. Additionally, we found clear differences in the bias angle of the canals between subterranean and gliding taxa, but also between sciurids and glirids. The sensitivity of the inner ear correlates with the locomotion mode, with a higher sensitivity of the SCs in fossorial species than in flying taxa. We conclude that the inner ear of flying and gliding mammals is less sensitive due to the large information flow into this sense organ during locomotion. PMID:26019162

  7. [The influence of amplitude modulation on the structure of call spectrum in marmots (Marmota, rodentia, sciuridae)].

    PubMed

    Nikol'skiĭ, A A

    2007-01-01

    A relationship was established between the amplitude modulation and the structure of call spectrum in animals by the example of alarm call in three marmots (Marmota sibirica, M. menzbieri, and M. caudata). In the case of amplitude modulation, side frequencies are produced higher and lower than the carrier frequencies. In the absence of amplitude modulation, no side frequencies are produced. PMID:17966905

  8. Genetic diversity and population structure of the Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus, Rodentia, Caviidae) in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Paz, William; Cerón-Muñoz, Mario; Solarte-Portilla, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to establish the genetic diversity and population structure of three guinea pig lines, from seven production zones located in Nariño, southwest Colombia. A total of 384 individuals were genotyped with six microsatellite markers. The measurement of intrapopulation diversity revealed allelic richness ranging from 3.0 to 6.56, and observed heterozygosity (Ho) from 0.33 to 0.60, with a deficit in heterozygous individuals. Although statistically significant (p < 0.05), genetic differentiation between population pairs was found to be low. Genetic distance, as well as clustering of guinea-pig lines and populations, coincided with the historical and geographical distribution of the populations. Likewise, high genetic identity between improved and native lines was established. An analysis of group probabilistic assignment revealed that each line should not be considered as a genetically homogeneous group. The findings corroborate the absorption of native genetic material into the improved line introduced into Colombia from Peru. It is necessary to establish conservation programs for native-line individuals in Nariño, and control genealogical and production records in order to reduce the inbreeding values in the populations. PMID:22215979

  9. Ectoparasites of the critically endangered insular cavy, Cavia intermedia (Rodentia: Caviidae), southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Regolin, André Luis; Furnari, Nina; de Castro Jacinavicius, Fernando; Linardi, Pedro Marcos; de Carvalho-Pinto, Carlos José

    2015-04-01

    Cavia intermedia is a rodent species critically endangered and is found only on a 10 hectare island off the southern Brazilian coast. To identify the ectoparasites of C. intermedia, 27 specimens (14 males and 13 females), representing approximately 65% of the estimated total population, were captured and examined. A total of 1336 chewing lice of two species were collected: Gliricola lindolphoi (Amblycera: Gyropidae) and Trimenopon hispidum (Amblycera: Trimenoponidae). In addition, chiggers Arisocerus hertigi (Acari: Trombiculidae) and Eutrombicula sp. (Acari: Trombiculidae) were collected from the ears of all captured animals. This low species richness compared to those for other Cavia species is expected for island mammals. Although the results presented here are not conclusive about the relationship between C. intermedia and ectoparasites, this low species richness found might be reflected in a low level of investment by the hosts in the basal immune defense, since investments in white blood cell production by mammals are influenced by the diversity of parasites in the environment. Additionally, considering that it might result in host vulnerability to other parasites that might be introduced through exotic or migratory host species, the monitoring of C. intermedia, including parasitological and immunological assessments, is recommended as a key component of conservation efforts. PMID:25830106

  10. Phylogeography of Peromyscus furvus (Rodentia; muridae) based on cytochrome b sequence data.

    PubMed

    Harris, D; Rogers, D S; Sullivan, J

    2000-12-01

    We conducted phylogenetic analyses of cytochrome b sequence data to assess genetic variation within and among the three allopatric segments of the distribution of Peromyscus furvus from the Sierra Madre Oriental in eastern Mexico. We identified 24 unique haplotypes among the 54 individuals examined and genetic distances ranged up to 0.078 substitutions per site. Populations from the central portion of the range formed a monophyletic unit, whereas samples from the southern distributional unit were polyphyletic. Furthermore, the southernmost population sampled may represent a distinct species. This high degree of genetic differentiation among populations, currently recognized as conspecific, mirrors the result of other genetic studies of highland rodents in Mesoamerica. Together these studies indicate that the region, already considered hyperdiverse on the basis of species diversity and endemism, may contain considerably greater diversity than is currently appreciated. PMID:11123624

  11. Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia: Muridae) Infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum (syn. Le. chagasi) in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Silva, Fabiana de Oliveira; Michalsky, Érika Monteiro; Ferreira, Eduardo de Castro; Lopes, Maria Olímpia Garcia; Pinheiro, Aimara da Costa; Fortes-Dias, Consuelo Latorre; Dias, Edelberto Santos

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we surveyed the fauna of phlebotomine sand flies and small mammals in peridomestic areas from a Brazilian municipality where the American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) is endemic. A total of 608 female phlebotomine sand flies were captured during nine months in 2009 and 2010. Seven different species were represented with 60% of them being Lutzomyia intermedia and Lu. whitmani, both incriminated vectors of ACL. Lu. longipalpis, a proven vector of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) was also captured at high proportion (12.8%). Genomic DNA analysis of 136 species-specific pools of female sand flies followed by molecular genotyping showed the presence of Leishmania infantum DNA in two pools of Lu. longipalpis. The same Leishmania species was found in one blood sample from Rattus norvegicus among 119 blood and tissue samples analysed. This is the first report of Le. infantum in R. norvegicus in the Americas and suggests a possible role for this rodent species in the zoonotic cycle of VL. Our study coincided with the reemergence of VL in Governador Valadares. PMID:24707492

  12. Fleas (Siphonaptera) in the Nests of Dormice (Gliridae: Rodentia) in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Lipatova, I; Stanko, M; Paulauskas, A; Spakovaite, S; Gedminas, V

    2015-05-01

    Negative effects of flea (Siphonaptera) parasitism on the host may be expressed in different ways. The aim of this study was to assess distribution of the flea fauna in nests of dormice in Lithuania. Nests of Glis glis (L.), Dryomys nitedula (Pallas), and Muscardinus avellanarius (L.) were collected from nest boxes in 2012 and 2013. Fleas were collected from nests in the laboratory and put into plastic tubes with 70% ethanol. Flea species were identified using morphological keys. From 400 nest boxes, 112 nests of dormice were collected from eight sites from mixed forests of central Lithuania. Twenty-three nests of G. glis were collected from nest boxes, with 16 of them containing 286 fleas belonging to four species: Ceratophyllus sciurorum (Schrank) (259), C. gallinae (Schrank) (23), Hystrichopsylla talpae (Curtis) (3), and Megabothris turbidus (Rothschild) (1). Fourteen nests of M. avellanarius were collected from nest boxes, 4 of which contained 224 fleas belonging to two species: C. sciurorum (221) and C. gallinae (3). Twenty-four nests of D. nitedula were collected from nest boxes, including 17 containing 207 fleas belonging to two species: C. sciurorum (205) and C. gallinae (2). Fifty-one nests of undetermined dormice species also were collected from nest boxes, 12 of them contained 395 fleas belonging to three species: C. sciurorum (374), Ctenophthalmus agyrtes (Heller) (19), and Ctenophthalmus assimilis (Taschenberg) (2). C. sciurorum was a predominant species in the nests of dormice. The occurrence of C. gallinae was documented in Lithuania for the first time. PMID:26334823

  13. Mitochondrial phylogeny of African wood mice, genus Hylomyscus (Rodentia, Muridae): implications for their taxonomy and biogeography.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, V; Quérouil, S; Verheyen, E; Verheyen, W; Mboumba, J F; Dillen, M; Colyn, M

    2006-03-01

    This paper investigates the usefulness of two mitochondrial genes (16S rRNA and cytochrome b) to solve taxonomical difficulties within the genus Hylomyscus and to infer its evolutionary history. Both genes proved to be suitable molecular markers for diagnosis of Hylomyscus species. Nevertheless the resolving powers of these two genes differ, and with both markers (either analyzed singly or in combination), some nodes remain unresolved. This is probably related to the fact that the species emerged during a rapid diversification event that occurred 2-6 Myr ago (4-5 Myr ago for most divergence events). Our molecular data support the recognition of an "aeta" group, while the "alleni" and "parvus" groups are not fully supported. Based on tree topology and genetic divergence, two taxa generally recognized as subspecies should be elevated at the species level (H. simus and H. cf kaimosae). H. stella populations exhibit ancient haplotype segregation that may represent currently unrecognized allopatric species. The existence of cryptic species within H. parvus is questioned. Finally, three potentially new species may occur in West Central Africa. The Congo and Oubangui Rivers, as well as the Volta and Niger Rivers and/or the Dahomey gap could have formed effective barriers to Hylomyscus species dispersal, favoring their speciation in allopatry. The pronounced shifts in African climate during the late Pliocene and Miocene, which resulted in major changes in the distribution and composition of the vegetation, could have promoted speciation within the genus (refuge theory). Future reports should focus on the geographic distribution of Hylomyscus species in order to get a better understanding of the evolutionary history of the genus. PMID:16414288

  14. [An input of heterochronies to the formation of interspecific differences in wood mice, Sylvaemus (Rodentia)].

    PubMed

    Dzeverin, I I; Lashkova, E I

    2005-01-01

    Difference in adult size and body shape among the closely related species is the result of diversification in morphogenetic processes. We examined age variation in various external and craniometric characters of four Sylvaemus species from Ukrane fauna, S. uralensis, S. arianus, S. sylvaticus, and S. tauricus, using cross-sectional techniques. The intensive growth period occurred to be different in various species. Rapid growth of S. tauricus continues during all life span, while in other species growth rate becomes slower at different stages. This peculiarity of S. tauricus may be the result of prolonged and more intensive production of somatotropin by adenohypophysis. Side effects of adenohypophysis activation are resulted from changes in S. tauricus skull shape and more intensive pigmentation in comparison with three other species. Prolongation of growth could be developmental mechanism for size increasing in evolution of S. tauricus. The independence of body size and pigmentation is principally the same at interspecific and intraspecific level. PMID:15977432

  15. Azithromycin inhibits vertical transmission of Toxoplasma gondii in Calomys callosus (Rodentia: Cricetidae).

    PubMed

    Costa, I N; Angeloni, M B; Santana, L A; Barbosa, B F; Silva, M C P; Rodrigues, A A; Rostkowsa, C; Magalhães, P M; Pena, J D O; Silva, D A O; Mineo, J R; Ferro, E A V

    2009-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection during pregnancy may cause severe consequences to the embryo. Current toxoplasmosis treatment for pregnant women is based on the administration of spiramycin or a drug combination as sulphadiazine-pyrimethamine-folinic acid (SPFA) in cases of confirmed fetal infection. However, these drugs are few tolerated and present many disadvantages due to their toxic effects to the host. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different treatments on the vertical transmission of T. gondii, including azithromycin, Artemisia annua infusion, spiramycin and SPFA in Calomys callosus as model of congenital toxoplasmosis. C. callosus females were perorally infected with 20 cysts of T. gondii ME49 strain at the day that a vaginal plug was observed (1st day of pregnancy - dop). Treatment with azithromycin, A. annua infusion, and spiramycin started at the 4th dop, while the treatment with SPFA started at the 14th dop. Placenta and embryonic tissues were collected for morphological and immunohistochemical analyses, mouse bioassay and PCR from the 15th to 20th dop. No morphological changes were seen in the placenta and embryonic tissues from females treated with azithromycin, spiramycin and SPFA, but embryonic atrophy was observed in animals treated with A. annua infusion. Parasites were found in the placenta and fetal (brain and liver) tissues of animals treated with SPFA, A. annua infusion and spiramycin, although the number of parasites was lower than in non-treated animals. Parasites were also observed in the placenta of animals treated with azithromycin, but not in their embryos. Bioassay and PCR results confirmed the immunohistochemical data. Also, bradyzoite immunostaining was observed only in placental and fetal tissues of animals treated with SPFA. In conclusion, the treatment with azithromycin showed to be more effective, since it was capable to inhibit the vertical transmission of T. gondii in this model of congenital toxoplasmosis. PMID:19703714

  16. Records of Coendouichillus (Rodentia, Erethizontidae) from the Lower Urubamba Region of Peru.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Tremaine; Lunde, Darrin; Zamora-Meza, Hugo Tomás; Carrasco-Rueda, Farah

    2015-01-01

    Coendouichillus was first described in 2001 by Voss and da Silva, with a range from Amazonian Ecuador to Iquitos, Peru. Here, we describe an adult female Coendouichillus specimen collected in a Tomahawk trap in the forest canopy of the Lower Urubamba Region of Peru in October 2013. We also describe pathologies and behaviors observed through 379 camera trapping photo events (2,196 photos) gathered in natural canopy bridges over the course of a year (7,198 trap nights), including information on activity period over the course of the day and over the course of the lunar cycle. We conservatively estimate that 17 individuals were photographed, including one juvenile. Being 900 km away from Iquitos, Peru (the site of the closest record), discovery of this species in the Lower Urubamba constitutes a significant range extension. PMID:26175605

  17. Biting performance in teeth-digging African mole-rats (Fukomys, Bathyergidae, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Van Daele, P A A G; Herrel, Anthony; Adriaens, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Phenotypic variation is channeled by adaptation to local environments and phylogenetic constraints. The morphology of the obligatorily subterranean African mole-rats of the genus Fukomys has been shaped within the context of their underground habitat, posing particular limits on the animals' morphology. Especially the biting apparatus has likely evolved within severe evolutionary constraints, as it is used for feeding on hard geophytes, for digging complex tunnel systems, and for defensive purposes and social interactions in a colony. We studied interspecific differences in bite performance among three taxa, in relation to their skull anatomy and skull shape. Data on biting performance were gathered by in vivo measurements and compared with model simulations. It is shown that the model simulation is a good proxy for in vivo measurement. Scaling of bite force is positively allometric relative to head size. Moreover, differences in biting performance exist between taxa, which may be linked to differences in their ecology. This study will eventually enable us to analyze the evolutionary pattern behind the variation in structure and performance of the biting apparatus in Fukomys mole-rats. PMID:19035771

  18. Mandible shape and dwarfism in squirrels (Mammalia, Rodentia): interaction of allometry and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hautier, Lionel; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Michaux, Jacques

    2009-06-01

    Squirrels include several independent lineages of dwarf forms distributed into two ecological groups: the dwarf tree and flying squirrels. The mandible of dwarf tree squirrels share a highly reduced coronoid process and a condylar process drawn backwards. Dwarf flying squirrels on the other hand, have an elongated coronoid process and a well-differentiated condylar process. To interpret such a difference, Elliptic Fourier Transform was used to evaluate how mandible shape varies with dwarfism in sciurids. The results obtained show that this clear-cut difference cannot be explained by a simple allometric relationship in relation with size decrease. We concluded that the retention of anteriorly positioned eye sockets, in relation with distance estimation, allowed the conservation of a well-differentiated coronoid process in all flying species, despite the trend towards its reduction observed among sciurids as their size decreases.

  19. Use of the paca, Cuniculus paca (Rodentia: Agoutidae) in the Sierra de Tabasco State Park, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gallina, Sonia; Pérez-Torres, Jairo; Guzmán-Aguirre, Carlos César

    2012-09-01

    Cuniculus paca is widely distributed throughout the Neotropics. Known as the paca, it is the largest rodent in the Mexican tropical forests, and one of the most used as a subsistence species for its meat. Since colonial times, this species has been subject of an unreported hunting pressure. For this reason, the aim of this work was to describe the use of the paca by the inhabitants of the Sierra de Tabasco State Park (STSP) using sampling areas in a matrix of vegetation with different degrees of disturbance, and different types of land use. We included both preserved areas: owing to the presence of large continuous areas of fragmented rainforest and areas that are not preserved, with smaller rainforest fragments and more isolated. To obtain information about paca use, we interviewed 176 people (>18 years old) who live in the STSP. All those interviewed had eaten paca meat, and indicated that this species is most frequently observed in the rainforest during the dry season. Hunting and trapping were the most common ways to obtain pacas, rather than gifting or purchasing, and firearms and dogs are used to hunt them. We estimated that these interviewed group had hunted a total of 488 paca in the year prior to the study. PMID:23025103

  20. Nucleolus organizer regions and B-chromosomes of wood mice (mammalia, rodentia, Apodemus)

    SciTech Connect

    Boeskorov, G.G.; Kartavtseva, I.V.; Zagorodnyuk, I.V.; Belyanin, A.N.; Lyapunova, E.A.

    1995-02-01

    Distribution of nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) in karyotypes was studied in 10 species of wood mice, including Apodemus flavicollis, A. sylvaticus, A. uralensis (=A. microps), A. fulvipectus (=A. falzfeini), A. ponticus, A. hyrcanicus, A. mystacinus, A. agrarius, A. peninsulae, and A. speciosus. Peculiarities of NOR location in karyotypes can be used in interspecific diagnostics of wood mice. Intraspecific polymorphism of A. sylvaticus, A. agrarius, and A. peninsulae in terms of the number of NORs and their localization in chromosomes can serve as evidence for karyological differentiation in certain populations of these species. The minimum number of active NORs in mice of the genus Apodemus is two to four. Two A. flavicollis wood mice with karyotypes containing one small acrocentric B-chromosome (2n = 49) were identified among animals captured in Estonia. In A. peninsulae, B-chromosomes were found among animals captured in the following regions: the vicinity of Kyzyl (one mouse with 17 microchromosomes, 2n = 65); the vicinity of Birakan (two mice with one metacentric chromosome each, 2n = 49); and in the Ussuri Nature Reserve (one mouse with five B-chromosomes, including three metacentric and two dotlike chromosomes; 2n = 53). In the latter animal, the presence of NORs on two metacentric B-chromosomes was revealed; this is the first case of identification of active NORs on extra chromosomes of mammals. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Evolutionary Story of a Satellite DNA from Phodopus sungorus (Rodentia, Cricetidae)

    PubMed Central

    Paço, Ana; Adega, Filomena; Meštrović, Nevenka; Plohl, Miroslav; Chaves, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    With the goal to contribute for the understanding of satellite DNA evolution and its genomic involvement, in this work it was isolated and characterized the first satellite DNA (PSUcentSat) from Phodopus sungorus (Cricetidae). Physical mapping of this sequence in P. sungorus showed large PSUcentSat arrays located at the heterochromatic (peri)centromeric region of five autosomal pairs and Y-chromosome. The presence of orthologous PSUcentSat sequences in the genomes of other Cricetidae and Muridae rodents was also verified, presenting however, an interspersed chromosomal distribution. This distribution pattern suggests a PSUcentSat-scattered location in an ancestor of Muridae/Cricetidae families, that assumed afterwards, in the descendant genome of P. sungorus a restricted localization to few chromosomes in the (peri)centromeric region. We believe that after the divergence of the studied species, PSUcentSat was most probably highly amplified in the (peri)centromeric region of some chromosome pairs of this hamster by recombinational mechanisms. The bouquet chromosome configuration (prophase I) possibly displays an important role in this selective amplification, providing physical proximity of centromeric regions between chromosomes with similar size and/or morphology. This seems particularly evident for the acrocentric chromosomes of P. sungorus (including the Y-chromosome), all presenting large PSUcentSat arrays at the (peri)centromeric region. The conservation of this sequence in the studied genomes and its (peri)centromeric amplification in P. sungorus strongly suggests functional significance, possibly displaying this satellite family different functions in the different genomes. The verification of PSUcentSat transcriptional activity in normal proliferative cells suggests that its transcription is not stage-limited, as described for some other satellites. PMID:25336681

  2. Genetic diversity and relatedness within and between species of the genus Oligoryzomys (Rodentia; Sigmodontinae).

    PubMed

    Trott, A; Callegari-Jacques, S M; Oliveira, L F B; Langguth, A; Mattevi, M S

    2007-02-01

    A RAPD analysis on six species of the rodent genus Oligoryzomys trapped in a wide area (ranging from 01 degrees N to 32 degrees S) of Brazilian territory was performed in order to determine the levels of genetic variability within and between its populations and species. One-hundred and ninety-three animals were collected in 13 different sites (corresponding to 17 samples) located at Pampas, Atlantic Rain Forest, Cerrado, and Amazon domains. Oligoryzomys sp., O. nigripes (8 populations), O. flavescens (4 populations), O. moojeni, O. stramineus, and O. fornesi were the taxa analyzed. Of the 20 primers tested, 4 generated a total of 75 polymorphic products simultaneously amplified in 151 specimens. Various diversity estimators analyzed showed considerable differences between species and populations, indicating a great genetic variation occurring in the Oligoryzomys taxa investigated. A cluster analysis was made using Nei's standard genetic distances, however, it did not correlate the genetic heterogeneity of the species and populations with the geographical areas. PMID:17505763

  3. Sequencing and analysis of complete mitochondrial genome of Apodemus draco (Rodentia: Arvicolinae).

    PubMed

    Wei, Haixue; Jia, Qiang; Li, Fengjun; Liu, Yongcheng; Chen, Shunde; Yong, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The genus Apodemus are the most common small rodents in fields. They are also one of the best species for biogeographic study and understanding the environmental changes. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Apodemus draco is determined. The mitogenome is 16 220 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a control region, with a base composition of 35.1% A, 29.0% T, 23.8% C and 12.1% G. The nucleotide sequence data of 12 heavy-strand protein-coding genes of Apodemus draco and other 23 rodents were used for mitochondrial genome phylogenetic analyses. The monophyly of the genus Apodemus was well supported with sister to the genus Mus. Bayesian analysis also suggested that Apodemus draco was a sister to Apodemus latronum. The present study may facilitate further investigation of the molecular evolution and biogeographic study of the genus Apodemus. PMID:27158789

  4. Glaciation Effects on the Phylogeographic Structure of Oligoryzomys longicaudatus (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae) in the Southern Andes

    PubMed Central

    Palma, R. Eduardo; Boric-Bargetto, Dusan; Torres-Pérez, Fernando; Hernández, Cristián E.; Yates, Terry L.

    2012-01-01

    The long-tailed pygmy rice rat Oligoryzomys longicaudatus (Sigmodontinae), the major reservoir of Hantavirus in Chile and Patagonian Argentina, is widely distributed in the Mediterranean, Temperate and Patagonian Forests of Chile, as well as in adjacent areas in southern Argentina. We used molecular data to evaluate the effects of the last glacial event on the phylogeographic structure of this species. We examined if historical Pleistocene events had affected genetic variation and spatial distribution of this species along its distributional range. We sampled 223 individuals representing 47 localities along the species range, and sequenced the hypervariable domain I of the mtDNA control region. Aligned sequences were analyzed using haplotype network, Bayesian population structure and demographic analyses. Analysis of population structure and the haplotype network inferred three genetic clusters along the distribution of O. longicaudatus that mostly agreed with the three major ecogeographic regions in Chile: Mediterranean, Temperate Forests and Patagonian Forests. Bayesian Skyline Plots showed constant population sizes through time in all three clusters followed by an increase after and during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; between 26,000–13,000 years ago). Neutrality tests and the “g” parameter also suggest that populations of O. longicaudatus experienced demographic expansion across the species entire range. Past climate shifts have influenced population structure and lineage variation of O. longicaudatus. This species remained in refugia areas during Pleistocene times in southern Temperate Forests (and adjacent areas in Patagonia). From these refugia, O. longicaudatus experienced demographic expansions into Patagonian Forests and central Mediterranean Chile using glacial retreats. PMID:22396751

  5. Distinct Leishmania Species Infecting Wild Caviomorph Rodents (Rodentia: Hystricognathi) from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cássia-Pires, Renata; Boité, Mariana C.; D'Andrea, Paulo S.; Herrera, Heitor M.; Cupolillo, Elisa; Jansen, Ana Maria; Roque, André Luiz R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Caviomorph rodents, some of the oldest Leishmania spp. hosts, are widely dispersed in Brazil. Despite both experimental and field studies having suggested that these rodents are potential reservoirs of Leishmania parasites, not more than 88 specimens were analyzed in the few studies of natural infection. Our hypothesis was that caviomorph rodents are inserted in the transmission cycles of Leishmania in different regions, more so than is currently recognized. Methodology We investigated the Leishmania infection in spleen fragments of 373 caviomorph rodents from 20 different species collected in five Brazilian biomes in a period of 13 years. PCR reactions targeting kDNA of Leishmania sp. were used to diagnose infection, while Leishmania species identification was performed by DNA sequencing of the amplified products obtained in the HSP70 (234) targeting. Serology by IFAT was performed on the available serum of these rodents. Principal findings In 13 caviomorph rodents, DNA sequencing analyses allowed the identification of 4 species of the subgenus L. (Viannia): L. shawi, L. guyanensis, L. naiffi, and L. braziliensis; and 1 species of the subgenus L. (Leishmania): L. infantum. These include the description of parasite species in areas not previously included in their known distribution: L. shawi in Thrichomys inermis from Northeastern Brazil and L. naiffi in T. fosteri from Western Brazil. From the four other positive rodents, two were positive for HSP70 (234) targeting but did not generate sequences that enabled the species identification, and another two were positive only in kDNA targeting. Conclusions/Significance The infection rate demonstrated by the serology (51.3%) points out that the natural Leishmania infection in caviomorph rodents is much higher than that observed in the molecular diagnosis (4.6%), highlighting that, in terms of the host species responsible for maintaining Leishmania species in the wild, our current knowledge represents only the “tip of the iceberg.” PMID:25503973

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of western Mediterranean mouse, Mus spretus (Rodentia: Muridae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Pengcheng; Li, Jun; Hwang, Daejoon

    2016-05-01

    The western Mediterranean mouse (Mus spretus) is a wide-spread and well-studied small mammal species in Europe. In this study, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of this species for the first time. Data analysis shows that this mitogenome is entirely 16,286 bp in length and has a conservative genomic organization and gene order as most other mice. The overall nucleotide base composition is 34.1% of A, 28.6% of T, 24.6% C, and 12.7% G, with a strong A + T bias of 62.7%. All the genes are encoded on H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and 8 tRNA genes, which are distributed on the L-strand. Totally 13 protein-coding genes initiate with ATN/GTG start codon and terminate with the typical stop codon (TAA/TAG) or a single T (T- -). Most of the transfer RNA genes could fold into the typical clover-leaf structure except for tRNA(Leu) and tRNA(Ser), whose dihydrouridine (DHU) arm are lost. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence reported here will be useful for population genetic and phylogenetic studies in mice. PMID:25418626

  7. First castorid (mammalia, rodentia) from the middle miocene of southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Suraprasit, Kantapon; Chaimanee, Yaowalak; Martin, Thomas; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2011-04-01

    Today and in the Tertiary, the geographical distribution of castorids is limited throughout all of the northern continents. Fossils of the Castoridae genus Steneofiber are abundant in many localities of Eurasia from the late Oligocene to Pliocene period. Recently, Steneofiber fossils were discovered in two localities of northern Thailand, Mae Moh and Chiang Muan coal mines, in layers of late middle Miocene age. These discoveries represent the first records of castorids from Southeast Asia and correspond to their southernmost known range. The focus of this study is to describe this new Thai species of Steneofiber and to define its wear stages from the molar occlusal surfaces by using micro-CT scan analysis. The CT scan technique permits the analysis of the virtual occlusal surface changes from wear, allowing easier comparison to related species of Steneofiber cheek teeth without destroying the teeth. The new species, Steneofiber siamensis n. sp., can be distinguished from the other species of Steneofiber by several distinct characters, longer mesostriid on p4, presence of premesostria and metastria on P4, which are smaller than most of the other known species. The occurrence of this new castorid also supports a subtropical to tropical paleoclimate for these two localities of northern Thailand. PMID:21360164

  8. [Comparative cytogenetics of three species of South American field hamsters of the genus Akodon (Rodentia, Cricetidae)].

    PubMed

    Aniskin, V M; Isaev, S I; Shchipanov, N A

    1996-01-01

    A karyological analysis of three species of South American field mice of the genus Akodon from four different localities of the Department of Tarija, Bolivian Republic, was performed. In Akodon simulator, 2n = 40 - 42, NFa = 42. The variation of the diploid number is caused by a polymorphism of the Robertsonian type involving six pairs of acrocentric chromosomes. Five variants of karyotypes were revealed. The chromosome set of A. sp. has 2n = 36, NFa = 40; in A. toba, 2n = 42 - 43, NFa = 44 - 46. The variation of the diploid number and the number of autosomal arms is caused by the polymorphism of the first autosomal pair. A comparative karyological analysis of A. simulator, A. sp., and A. toba revealed a high level of similarity of all karyotypic elements. Fifteen autosomal pairs of these three species have identical G-banding patterns; the others are involved in formation of larger chromosomes, representing one possible combination of the same chromosomal material. The set of rearrangements is limited only to tandem chromosome fusions. PMID:8647427

  9. Clues on Syntenic Relationship among Some Species of Oryzomyini and Akodontini Tribes (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae).

    PubMed

    Suárez, Pablo; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; Lanzone, Cecilia; Malleret, Matias Maximiliano; O'Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Sigmodontinae rodents represent one of the most diverse and complex components of the mammalian fauna of South America. Among them most species belongs to Oryzomyini and Akodontini tribes. The highly specific diversification observed in both tribes is characterized by diploid complements, which vary from 2n = 10 to 86. Given this diversity, a consistent hypothesis about the origin and evolution of chromosomes depends on the correct establishment of synteny analyzed in a suitable phylogenetic framework. The chromosome painting technique has been particularly useful for identifying chromosomal synteny. In order to extend our knowledge of the homeological relationships between Akodontini and Oryzomyini species, we analyzed the species Akodon montensis (2n = 24) and Thaptomys nigrita (2n = 52) both from the tribe Akodontini, with chromosome probes of Hylaeamys megacephalus (2n = 54) of the tribe Oryzomyini. The results indicate that at least 12 of the 26 autosomes of H. megacephalus show conserved synteny in A. montensis and 14 in T. nigrita. The karyotype of Akodon montensis, as well as some species of the Akodon cursor species group, results from many chromosomal fusions and therefore the syntenic associations observed probably represent synapomorphies. Our finding of a set of such associations revealed by H. megacephalus chromosome probes (6/21; 3/25; 11/16/17; and, 14/19) provides phylogenetic information for both tribes. An extension of these observations to other members of Akodontini and Oryzomyini tribes should improve our knowledge about chromosome evolution in both these groups. PMID:26642204

  10. Taxonomic hypotheses regarding the genus Gerbillus (Rodentia, Muridae, Gerbillinae) based on molecular analyses of museum specimens

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Arame; Tatard, Caroline; Stanley, William; Granjon, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methodological improvements now allow routine analyses of highly degraded DNA samples as found in museum specimens. Using these methods could be useful in studying such groups as rodents of the genus Gerbillus for which i) the taxonomy is still highly debated, ii) collection of fresh specimens may prove difficult. Here we address precise taxonomic questions using a small portion of the cytochrome b gene obtained from 45 dry skin/skull museum samples (from 1913 to 1974) originating from two African and three Asian countries. The specimens were labelled Gerbillus gerbillus, Gerbillus andersoni, Gerbillus nanus, Gerbillus amoenus, Gerbillus perpallidus and Gerbillus pyramidum, and molecular results mostly confirmed these assignations. The close relationship between Gerbillus nanus (Asian origin) and Gerbillus amoenus (African origin) confirmed that they represent vicariant sibling species which differentiated in allopatry on either side of the Red Sea. In the closely related Gerbillus perpallidus and Gerbillus pyramidum, specimens considered as belonging to one Gerbillus pyramidum subspecies (Gerbillus pyramidum floweri) appeared closer to Gerbillus perpallidus suggesting that they (Gerbillus pyramidum floweri and Gerbillus perpallidus) may represent a unique species, distributed on both sides of the Nile River, for which the correct name should be Gerbillus floweri. Furthermore, the three other Gerbillus pyramidum subspecies grouped together with no apparent genetic structure suggesting that they may not yet represent genetically differentiated lineages. This study confirms the importance of using these methods on museum samples, which can open new perspectives in this particular group as well as in other groups of interest. PMID:27047247

  11. Clues on Syntenic Relationship among Some Species of Oryzomyini and Akodontini Tribes (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae)

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Pablo; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; Lanzone, Cecilia; Malleret, Matias Maximiliano; O’Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Sigmodontinae rodents represent one of the most diverse and complex components of the mammalian fauna of South America. Among them most species belongs to Oryzomyini and Akodontini tribes. The highly specific diversification observed in both tribes is characterized by diploid complements, which vary from 2n = 10 to 86. Given this diversity, a consistent hypothesis about the origin and evolution of chromosomes depends on the correct establishment of synteny analyzed in a suitable phylogenetic framework. The chromosome painting technique has been particularly useful for identifying chromosomal synteny. In order to extend our knowledge of the homeological relationships between Akodontini and Oryzomyini species, we analyzed the species Akodon montensis (2n = 24) and Thaptomys nigrita (2n = 52) both from the tribe Akodontini, with chromosome probes of Hylaeamys megacephalus (2n = 54) of the tribe Oryzomyini. The results indicate that at least 12 of the 26 autosomes of H. megacephalus show conserved synteny in A. montensis and 14 in T. nigrita. The karyotype of Akodon montensis, as well as some species of the Akodon cursor species group, results from many chromosomal fusions and therefore the syntenic associations observed probably represent synapomorphies. Our finding of a set of such associations revealed by H. megacephalus chromosome probes (6/21; 3/25; 11/16/17; and, 14/19) provides phylogenetic information for both tribes. An extension of these observations to other members of Akodontini and Oryzomyini tribes should improve our knowledge about chromosome evolution in both these groups. PMID:26642204

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of Stylodipus telum (Rodentia: Dipodidae) and its phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guangjie; Ding, Li; Liao, Jicheng

    2016-07-01

    Stylodipus telum belongs to the genus Stylodipus in the subfamily of Dipodinae. We got its complete genome first and it is 16,696 bp in length, the heavy strand contains 31.0% A, 13.8% G, 27.3% C, 27.9% T. Among them, protein-coding genes take up approximately 67.90% of the complete sequence. Trees constructed through phylogenetic analysis showed S. telum and Jaculus jaculus were clustered in one branch belonging to the family Dipodinae. This conclusion was identical to the former result by the methods of morphological taxonomy, and it would be convenient for further research on S. telum and other jerboa. PMID:26024139

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans in the respiratory tract of squirrels, Callosciurus finlaysonii (Rodentia, Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Iatta, Roberta; Immediato, Davide; Puttilli, Maria Rita; Danesi, Patrizia; Passantino, Giuseppe; Parisi, Antonio; Mallia, Egidio; Otranto, Domenico; Cafarchia, Claudia

    2015-09-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal disease acquired from the environment, for which animals may serve as sentinels for human exposure. The occurrence of Cryptococcus spp. in the respiratory tract of 125 squirrels, Callosciurus finlaysonii, trapped in Southern Italy, was assessed. Upon examination of nasal swabs and lung tissue from each individual, a total of 13 (10.4%) animals scored positive for yeasts, 7 for Cryptococcus neoformans (C.n.) (5.6%) and 6 for other yeasts (4.8%). C.n. was isolated from the nostrils and lungs, with a high population size in nostrils. Two C.n. molecular types, VNI and VNIV, were identified, with C.n. var. grubii VNI the most prevalent. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS+ and URA5 sequences revealed that C.n. isolates were genetically similar to isolates from a range of geographical areas and hosts. Results suggest that C.n. can colonize or infect the respiratory tract of C. finlaysonii. The high occurrence and level of colonization of nasal cavities might be an indicator of environmental exposure to high levels of airborne microorganism. The close phylogenetic relationship of C.n. strains from squirrels with those from human and other animal hosts suggests a potential role for these animals as "sentinels" for human exposure. PMID:26229151

  14. [Genetic structure of a group of capybaras, Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris (Rodentia: Hydrocheridae) in the Colombian Eastern Llanos].

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Chaparro, Adriana; Bernal-Parra, Luz Mery; Forero-Acosta, Gustavo; Ruiz-Garcia, Manuel

    2011-12-01

    The capybaras are the biggest rodents in the world but, however, there are not extensive population genetics studies on them. In the current work, we studied the genetic structure of a troop of 31 capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) sampled in Hato Corozal, Casanare Department at the Colombian Eastern Llanos, by means of five microsatellite markers. The gene diversity was 0.61 and the average allele number was 5.2, which is a medium-low level for markers of this nature. Out five markers employed, three were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium meanwhile one showed a significant homozygote excess and other presented a significant heterozygote excess. There were not significant genetic differences between males and females inside this troop. The application of different procedures to determine possible historical demographic changes (population expansions or bottlenecks) clearly showed that the population analyzed crossed over a very narrow recent bottleneck. The illegal hunt is the possibly cause of this strong genetic bottleneck. PMID:22208092

  15. Reservoir competence of Microtus pennsylvanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markowski, D.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Hyland, K.E.; Hu, R.

    1998-01-01

    The reservoir competence of the meadow vole, Microtus pennsylvanicus Ord, for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Brenner was established on Patience Island, RI. Meadow voles were collected from 5 locations throughout Rhode Island. At 4 of the field sites, M. pennsylvanicus represented only 4.0% (n = 141) of the animals captured. However, on Patience Island, M. pennsylvanicus was the sole small mammal collected (n = 48). Of the larval Ixodes scapularis Say obtained from the meadow voles on Patience Island, 62% (n = 78) was infected with B. burgdorferi. Meadow voles from all 5 locations were successfully infected with B. burgdorferi in the laboratory and were capable of passing the infection to xenodiagnostic I. scapularis larvae for 9 wk. We concluded that M. pennsylvanicus was physiologically capable of maintaining B. burgdorferi infection. However, in locations where Peromyscus leucopus (Rafinesque) is abundant, the role of M. pennsylvanicus as a primary reservoir for B. burgdorferi was reduced.

  16. Late Cenozoic History of the Genus Micromys (Mammalia, Rodentia) in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Horáček, Ivan; Knitlová, Markéta; Wagner, Jan; Kordos, László; Nadachowski, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Molecular phylogeography suggests that Micromys minutus, the sole extant species of the genus, colonized its extensive range quite recently, during the Late Pleistocene-Holocene period. Rich Pliocene and Pleistocene fossil records both from Europe and China suggest rather continuous and gradual in situ phenotype rearrangements from the Pliocene to the Recent periods. To elucidate the discrepancy we reexamined a considerable part of the European fossil record of the genus (14 sites from MN15 to Q3, 0.4–4.2 Ma, including the type series of M. preaminutus from MN15 Csarnóta 2), analyzed them with the aid of detailed morphometric comparisons, and concluded that: (a) The European Pliocene form, M. praeminutus, differs significantly from the extant species; (b) it exhibits a broad phenotypic variation covering the presumptive diagnostic characters of MN16 M. caesaris; (c) despite having smaller dimensions, the Early and Middle Pleistocene forms (MN17-Q3, 2.6–0.4 Ma) seem to be closer to M. praeminutus than to the extant species; (d) the extinction of M. praeminutus during Q3 and the re-occupation of its niche by the recent expansion of M. minutus from E-European – C Asiatic sources (suggested by phylogeographic hypotheses) cannot be excluded. Discussing interpretations of the phylogenetic past of the genus we emphasize the distinct history of the West Palearctic clade (Late Miocene-Early Pleistocene) terminating with M. praeminutus and the East Asiatic clade (chalceus, tedfordi, minutus), and the possible identity of the Western clade with the Late Miocene genus Parapodemus. PMID:23671605

  17. Field evaluation of some bait additives against Indian crested porcupine (Hystrix indica) (Rodentia: Hystricidae).

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Hussain, Iftikhar; Mian, Afsar; Munir, Shahid; Ahmed, Irfan; Khan, Abdul Aziz

    2013-09-01

    This research study evaluated the effect of different additives on the bait consumption by Indian crested porcupine, a serious forest and agricultural pest, under field conditions. Different additives (saccharin, common salt, bone meal, fish meal, peanut butter, egg yolk, egg shell powder, yeast powder, mineral oil and coconut oil) at 2 and 5% each were tested for their relative preference, using groundnut-maize (1:1) as basic bait. All the additives were tested under a no-choice test pattern. For control tests, no additive was mixed with the basic bait. Saccharin at 5% concentration significantly enhanced the consumption of bait over the basic bait, while 2% saccharin supplemented bait resulted in a non-significant bait consumption. All other additives did not enhance the consumption of the bait material; rather, these worked as repellents. However, the repellency was lowest with the common salt, followed by egg yolk, egg shell powder, bone meal, peanut butter, mineral oil, fish meal and yeast powder, while coconut remained the most repellent compound. The present study suggested that groundnut-maize (1:1) supplemented with 5% saccharin was the preferred bait combination, and can be used with different rodenticides for the management of Indian crested porcupine. PMID:24020467

  18. Records of Coendou ichillus (Rodentia, Erethizontidae) from the Lower Urubamba Region of Peru

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Tremaine; Lunde, Darrin; Zamora-Meza, Hugo Tomás; Carrasco-Rueda, Farah

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Coendou ichillus was first described in 2001 by Voss and da Silva, with a range from Amazonian Ecuador to Iquitos, Peru. Here, we describe an adult female Coendou ichillus specimen collected in a Tomahawk trap in the forest canopy of the Lower Urubamba Region of Peru in October 2013. We also describe pathologies and behaviors observed through 379 camera trapping photo events (2,196 photos) gathered in natural canopy bridges over the course of a year (7,198 trap nights), including information on activity period over the course of the day and over the course of the lunar cycle. We conservatively estimate that 17 individuals were photographed, including one juvenile. Being 900 km away from Iquitos, Peru (the site of the closest record), discovery of this species in the Lower Urubamba constitutes a significant range extension. PMID:26175605

  19. Systematics of the genus Sciurocheyla (Acari: Cheyletidae), parasites of tropical squirrels (Rodentia: Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Bochkov, Andre V; O'Connor, Barry M

    2004-05-01

    Two genera of parasitic cheyletid mites, Smileycheles Fain, 1979 (monotypic) and Thryonomycheyla Fain, 1972 (two species), are synonymized with the genus Sciurocheyla Volgin, 1969. An emended diagnosis of the genus Sciurocheyla is provided. Sciurocheyla squamosa (Domrow & Baker, 1963), type species of the genus, and Sciurocheyla camerounensis (Fain, 1979), new combination, are redescribed. Females, males, teleo- and protonymphs of Sciurocheyla funisciurus, new species, collected from Funisciurus pyrrohopus F. Cuvier in tropical Africa are described and illustrated. PMID:15185930

  20. Complete mitochondrial genome of a chipmunk species, Tamias sibiricus (Rodentia: Sciuridae) in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kwang Bae; Cho, Jae Youl; Park, Yung Chul

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome (KF668525) of Tamias sibiricus in South Korea. The mitogenome of the Korean chipmunk T. sibiricus was 16,558 bp long with base composition of 33.8% A, 31.1% T, 22.9% C and 12.2% G. Total nucleotide similarity of T. sibiricus and Marmota himalayana (JX069958) genomes was 80.4% ranging from 66.9% (D-loop region) to 97.3% (tRNA(Leu)((CUN))). The present study will contribute to understanding taxonomic status and genetic divergence of Northeast Asian T. sibiricus populations. PMID:24228685

  1. WEST NILE VIRUS INFECTION IN TREE SQUIRRELS (RODENTIA: SCIURIDAE) IN CALIFORNIA, 2004–2005

    PubMed Central

    PADGETT, KERRY A.; REISEN, WILLIAM K.; KAHL-PURCELL, NICOLE; FANG, YING; CAHOON-YOUNG, BARBARA; CARNEY, RYAN; ANDERSON, NANCY; ZUCCA, LYNDA; WOODS, LESLIE; HUSTED, STAN; KRAMER, VICKI L.

    2007-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) transmission generally involves a mosquito vector and an avian reservoir host, with mammals as incidental hosts. Although most mammalian WNV infections cause low or no morbidity or mortality, tree squirrels are susceptible to WNV-associated neurologic disease with infection prevalence comparable to that in dead birds. Positive species included fox squirrel (Sciurus niger), western gray squirrel (S. griseus), and eastern gray squirrel (S. carolinensis). Kidney tissue (dissected and swabbed), and oropharyngeal (oral) swab samples from tree squirrels submitted by California vector control and rehabilitation agencies were tested by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction; cycle threshold values were similar for all three samples, ranging from 21.9 to 26.5. Kidney tissue was more sensitive than oral swabs for detecting WNV in squirrels. Three of 36 live neurologic tree squirrels had viremia approximately 5 log10 plaque-forming units/mL or greater, similar to WNV-infected birds. Tree squirrels are useful in WNV surveillance and provide localized evidence of WNV transmission to mammals. PMID:17488896

  2. Nutritional influences on in vitro splenic lymphocyte proliferation in Psammomys obesus (Rodentia Gerbillidae).

    PubMed

    Lahfa, F B; Dahmani, Y; Troutaud, D; Deschaux, P

    1995-01-01

    The standard laboratory diet administered to sand rat (Psammomys obesus) induces the following physiological and immunological changes: hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia involving mainly the free fraction of cholesterol, with an elevation of high-density-lipoprotein levels and a decrease in B and T splenic lymphocyte proliferation in the presence of different mitogens PHA-P, Con A and LPS. These results demonstrate the important modification that could be induced in sand rat by the standard laboratory diet as compared with natural diet, and thus the sand rat (P. obesus) appears to be an interesting model for studies on experimental diabetes mellitus. PMID:8867785

  3. Revision of the Wind River faunas, early Eocene of central Wyoming. IX - The oldest known hystricomorphous rodent (Mammalia: Rodentia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Mary R.; Krishtalka, Leonard; Stucky, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    The rostral portion of the skull of a new genus and species of rodent, Armintomys tullbergi, from the earliest middle Eocene of the Wind River Basin (Wyoming) provides the geologically oldest known record of the hystricomorphous zygomasseteric structure. Armintomys also preserves the oldest known occurrence of incisor enamel that is transitional from pauciserial to uniserial. Other dental characters include: anteriorly grooved incisor, small premolars, and relatively primitive sciuravidlike molars. Analysis of this unique combination of characters implies that Armintomys is the oldest known myomorph rodent and the only known representative of a new family. Armintomyidae, which is referred, with question, to the myomorph superfamily Dipodoidea. Armintomys is more primitive, especially in premolar retention and structure, than the Bridgerian zapodid Elymys from Nevada, but adds to evidence from the latter for an early origin and radiation of dipodoid rodents.

  4. Geographic Variation in Skull Morphology of the Large Japanese Field Mice, Apodemus speciosus (Rodentia: Muridae) Revealed by Geometric Morphometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Yuta; Motokawa, Masaharu

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed geographic variation in skull morphology of the large Japanese field mouse (Apodemus speciosus) and determined changes in skull morphology that occurred during the evolutionary history of A. speciosus in relation to the estimated distribution range in the last glacial maximum (LGM). We analyzed 1,416 specimens from 78 localities using geometric morphometric techniques applied to the dorsal side of the cranium and mandible. While large variations within and among the populations in Honshu, Shikoku, and Kyushu were observed, geographic patterns were not observed. Hokkaido and peripheral island populations showed shared differentiation from the Honshu, Shikoku, and Kyushu populations with a larger skull and distinct mandible shape. In addition, these two groups also differed from each other in accumulated random shape variation. Common characteristics found in Hokkaido and peripheral island populations were considered to be the ancestral states, which were retained by geographic isolation from the main islands. Random variations in Hokkaido and the peripheral island populations were formed through stochastic processes in relation to their isolation. Characteristic morphologies widely found in the populations of Honshu, Shikoku, and Kyushu were considered to be derived states that expanded after separation from the peripheral islands. Complex geomorphology and a shift in distribution range related to climate change and altitudinal distribution are suggested to have formed the complex geographic variation in this species. PMID:27032678

  5. Diversity of tuco-tucos (Ctenomys, Rodentia) in the Northeastern wetlands from Argentina: mitochondrial phylogeny and chromosomal evolution.

    PubMed

    Caraballo, Diego A; Abruzzese, Giselle A; Rossi, María Susana

    2012-06-01

    Tuco-tucos (small subterranean rodents of the genus Ctenomys) that inhabit sandy soils of the area under the influence of the second largest wetland of South America, in Northeastern Argentina (Corrientes province), are a complex of species and forms whose taxonomic status were not defined, nor are the evolutionary relationships among them. The tuco-tuco populations of this area exhibit one of the most ample grades of chromosomal variability within the genus. In order to analyze evolutionary relationships within the Corrientes group and its chromosomal variability, we completed the missing karyotypic information and performed a phylogenetic analysis. We obtained partial sequences of three mitochondrial markers: D-loop, cytochrome b and cytochrome oxidase I. The Corrientes group was monophyletic and split into three main clades that grouped related karyomorphs. The phylogeny suggested an ancestral condition of the karyomorph with diploid number (2n) 70 and fundamental number (FN) 84 that has evolved mainly via reductions of the FN although amplifications occurred in certain lineages. We discuss the relationship between patterns of chromosomal variability and species and groups boundaries. From the three main clades the one named iberá exhibited a remarkable karyotypic homogeneity, and could be considered as an independent and cohesive evolutionary lineage. On the contrary, the former recognized species C. dorbignyi is a polyphyletic lineage and hence its systematic classification should be reviewed. PMID:22810419

  6. A new species of Syphacia (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Calomys laucha (Rodentia: Cricetidae) in an agroecosystem of central Argentina.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Elba Juliana Rojas; Miño, Mariela Haydée; Notarnicola, Juliana; Robles, María del Rosario

    2011-08-01

    A new oxyurid nematode Syphacia hodarae n. sp. is described from the cecum and rectum of the cricetid rodent Calomys laucha Fischer, 1814 (Sigmodontinae, Phyllotini), captured in an agroecosystem of central Argentina. The new species is distinguished from other members of the genus mainly by the shape of the cephalic plate, presence of cervical alae in females, absence of lateral alae, and absence of deirids. Some characters are shared with Syphacia carlitosi, a parasite of Akodon azarae from the wetlands in Argentina. However, S. hodarae can be differentiated from this species by the absence of ornamentation on the accessory hook of the gubernaculum, length of spicule and gubernaculum, size of the eggs, and distance to the vulva from the anterior end. This is the first record of a Syphacia species from the tribe Phyllotini in Argentina, and the first time a Syphacia species is reported from C. laucha . PMID:21506826

  7. In the Wake of Invasion: Tracing the Historical Biogeography of the South American Cricetid Radiation (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae)

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Rafael N.; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Almeida, Francisca C.; Werneck, Fernanda P.; Rogers, Duke S.; Weksler, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    The Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI) was greatly influenced by the completion of the Isthmus of Panama and impacted the composition of modern faunal assemblages in the Americas. However, the contribution of preceding events has been comparatively less explored, even though early immigrants in the fossil records are evidence for waif dispersals. The cricetid rodents of the subfamily Sigmodontinae are a classic example of a species-rich South American radiation resulting from an early episode of North American invasion. Here, we provide a temporal and spatial framework to address key aspects of the historical biogeography and diversification of this diverse mammal group by using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA datasets coupled with methods of divergence time estimation, ancestral area reconstruction and comparative phylogenetics. Relaxed-clock time estimates indicate that divergence of the Sigmodontinae began in the middle–late Miocene (ca. 12–9 Ma). Dispersal-vicariance analyses point to the arrival of a single lineage of northern invaders with a widespread ancestral distribution and imply that the initial differentiation between Central and South America gave rise to the most basal groups within the subfamily. These two major clades diversified in the late Miocene followed by the radiation of main tribes until the early Pliocene. Within the Oryzomyalia, tribes diverged initially in eastern South America whereas multiple dispersals into the Andes promoted further diversification of the majority of modern genera. A comparatively uniform background tempo of diversification explains the species richness of sigmodontines across most nodes, except for two akodontine genera with recent increases in diversification rates. The bridging of the Central American seaway and episodes of low sea levels likely facilitated the invasion of South America long before the onset of the post-Isthmian phase of the GABI. PMID:24963664

  8. Comparative glycopattern analysis of mucins in the Brunner's glands of the guinea-pig and the house mouse (Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Scillitani, Giovanni; Mentino, Donatella

    2015-09-01

    The mucins secreted by the Brunner's glands and the duodenal goblet cells of the Guinea-pig and the house mouse were compared by conventional and FITC-conjugated lectin histochemistry. Methylation/saponification and sialidase digestion were performed prior to lectin binding to detect the residues subterminal to sulfated groups and sialic acid, respectively. In the Guinea-pig the Brunner's glands produce class-III stable sulfosialomucins. Sialic acid is mostly 2,6-linked to galactose or to N-acetylgalactosamine and is in part O-acetylated in C7, C8, and C9. Sulfated groups are probably linked to sialic acid and N-acetylgalactosamine. Terminal residuals of N-acetylglucosamine, galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and fucose linked in ?1,2, ?1,3, and ?1,4 are also present. Duodenal goblet cells of the Guinea-pig present a lower number of residuals in respect to the Brunner's glandular ones, with sialic acid and N-acetylgalactosamine subterminal to sulfated groups. In the house mouse the Brunner's glands produce class-III stable neutral mucins, binding to same lectins as in the Guinea-pig except for those specific to sialic acid. A diversity of fucosylated residuals higher than in the Guinea-pig is observed. The mouse duodenal goblet cells lack stable class-III mucins, have little sialic acid and present a lower number of residuals in respect to the correspondent Brunner's glands. Regulation of the acidic intestinal microenvironment, prevention of pathologies and hosting of microflora can explain the observed results and the differences observed between the two rodents. PMID:26105998

  9. Phylogenomics of the genus Mus (Rodentia; Muridae): extensive genome repatterning is not restricted to the house mouse

    PubMed Central

    Veyrunes, Frederic; Dobigny, Gauthier; Yang, Fengtang; O'Brien, Patricia C.M; Catalan, Josette; Robinson, Terence J; Britton-Davidian, Janice

    2006-01-01

    The house mouse (Mus musculus) is universally adopted as the mammalian laboratory model, and it is involved in most studies of large-scale comparative genomics. Paradoxically, this taxon is rarely the index species for evolutionary analyses of genome architecture owing to its highly rearranged karyotype. To unravel the origin and nature of this extensive repatterning genome, we performed a multidirectional chromosome painting study of representative species within the genus Mus. However, the latter includes four extant subgenera (Mus, Coelomys, Nannomys and Pyromys) between which the phylogenetic relationships remain elusive despite the numerous molecular studies. Comparative genomic maps were established using chromosome-specific painting probes of the laboratory mouse and Nannomys minutoides. Hence, by integrating closely related species within Mus, this study allowed us to: (i) unambiguously resolve for the first time the long-standing controversial phylogeny, (ii) trace the evolution of genome organization in the house mouse, (iii) track rearrangements that necessitated new centromere locations, i.e. formation of neocentromere or reactivation of latent centromeres, (iv) reveal an extremely high rate of karyotypic evolution, with a 10- to 30-fold acceleration which was coincidental with subgeneric cladogenesis and (v) highlight genomic areas of interest for high-resolution studies on neocentromere formation and synteny breakpoints. PMID:17015352

  10. Assessment of Three Mitochondrial Genes (16S, Cytb, CO1) for Identifying Species in the Praomyini Tribe (Rodentia: Muridae)

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Violaine; Schaeffer, Brigitte; Missoup, Alain Didier; Kennis, Jan; Colyn, Marc; Denys, Christiane; Tatard, Caroline; Cruaud, Corinne; Laredo, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The Praomyini tribe is one of the most diverse and abundant groups of Old World rodents. Several species are known to be involved in crop damage and in the epidemiology of several human and cattle diseases. Due to the existence of sibling species their identification is often problematic. Thus an easy, fast and accurate species identification tool is needed for non-systematicians to correctly identify Praomyini species. In this study we compare the usefulness of three genes (16S, Cytb, CO1) for identifying species of this tribe. A total of 426 specimens representing 40 species (sampled across their geographical range) were sequenced for the three genes. Nearly all of the species included in our study are monophyletic in the neighbour joining trees. The degree of intra-specific variability tends to be lower than the divergence between species, but no barcoding gap is detected. The success rate of the statistical methods of species identification is excellent (up to 99% or 100% for statistical supervised classification methods as the k-Nearest Neighbour or Random Forest). The 16S gene is 2.5 less variable than the Cytb and CO1 genes. As a result its discriminatory power is smaller. To sum up, our results suggest that using DNA markers for identifying species in the Praomyini tribe is a largely valid approach, and that the CO1 and Cytb genes are better DNA markers than the 16S gene. Our results confirm the usefulness of statistical methods such as the Random Forest and the 1-NN methods to assign a sequence to a species, even when the number of species is relatively large. Based on our NJ trees and the distribution of all intraspecific and interspecific pairwise nucleotide distances, we highlight the presence of several potentially new species within the Praomyini tribe that should be subject to corroboration assessments. PMID:22574186

  11. Genetic Pool Information Reflects Highly Suitable Areas: The Case of Two Parapatric Endangered Species of Tuco-tucos (Rodentia: Ctenomiydae)

    PubMed Central

    Galiano, Daniel; Bernardo-Silva, Jorge; de Freitas, Thales R. O.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation of small mammals requires knowledge of the genetically and ecologically meaningful spatial scales at which species respond to habitat modifications. Conservation strategies can be improved through the use of ecological niche models and genetic data to classify areas of high environmental suitability. In this study, we applied a Maxent model integrated with genetic information (nucleotide diversity, haplotype diversity and Fu's Fs neutrality tests) to evaluate potential genetic pool populations with highly suitable areas for two parapatric endangered species of tuco-tucos (Ctenomys minutus and C. lami). Our results demonstrated that both species were largely influenced by vegetation and soil variables at a landscape scale and inhabit a highly specific niche. Ctenomys minutus was also influenced by the variable altitude; the species was associated with low altitudes (sea level). Our model of genetic data associated with environmental suitability indicate that the genetic pool data were associated with highly suitable areas for C. minutus. This pattern was not evident for C. lami, but this outcome could be a consequence of the restricted range of the species. The preservation of species requires not only detailed knowledge of their natural history and genetic structure but also information on the availability of suitable areas where species can survive, and such knowledge can aid significantly in conservation planning. This finding reinforces the use of these two techniques for planning conservation actions. PMID:24819251

  12. On the Origin and Evolution of the Extant System of B Chromosomes in Oryzomyini Radiation (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae)

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Karen; O’Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; do Nascimento Moreira, Camila; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous supernumerary chromosomes (Bs) are recognized in the oryzomyines Holochilus brasiliensis, Nectomys rattus, N. squamipes, Oligoryzomys flavescens and Sooretamys angouya, representing about 10% of all known B-containing rodent species. They provide an outstanding model for understanding the origin, evolution and diversity of Bs in a phylogenetic context. Therefore, whole chromosome-specific probes were generated from flow-sorted Holochilus brasiliensis (HBR) autosomes 11 and 25+26 and chromosomes X, Y and Bs. Hybridizations were performed on male metaphases of 15 Oryzomyini species of which 3 are B-containing species. The results reveal that among the species sampled, 12 of them, belonging to a monophyletic Oryzomiyini subclade, are positive for an anonymous Oryzomyini shared heterochromatic region (OSHR) on both sex chromosomes. The OSHR is also present on Bs of Holochilus brasiliensis, Nectomys rattus and N. squamipes but not on Bs of O. flavescens and S. angouya. Two distinct additional OSHR/autosome associations are observed on S. angouya. The three species that are OSHR negative belong to an outgroup. Molecular dating suggests that the OSHR originated between 7.8 and 3 Mya on ancestral sex chromosomes. A tentative explanation for the OSHR-positive nature of B regions in three species could be that transposable elements (TEs) from this specific sex chromosome region may have invaded existing B chromosomes. The presence of the OSHR on entire Xp and Yp adjacent to interstitial telomeric sequences at pericentromeric positions, as observed in Drymoreomys albimaculatus, show a similar organization as on B chromosomes in Nectomys squamipes. The diversity of the Oryzomyini Bs in number, size, morphology and genetic content may be explained by the independent origin of B chromosomes in different subgroups of species, with Bs in Holochilus brasiliensis, Nectomys squamipes and N. rattus sharing the OSHR with sex chromosomes, and those in Oligoryzomys flavescens and Sooretamys angouya lacking OSHR in Bs. The species-specific pattern of Bs is probably a consequence of their independent evolutionary origin. PMID:26305702

  13. Population dynamics and bioenergetics of a fossorial herbivore, Thomomys talpoides (Rodentia: Geomyidae), in a spruce-fir sere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Douglas C.; MacMahon, James A.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of the bioenergetics of the northern pocket gopher, Thomomys talpoides, are coupled with data on demography, activity budgets, and microclimates to model the energy requirements of individuals and populations in the Wasatch Mountains of Utah during 1976-1979. Metabolic rates during rest increased linearly with decreasing ambient temperature, but burrowing metabolic rates (16.3 mL O2 • h-1 • g-9.75) were independent of both temperature and physical properties of the soil. Radio-telemetry studies indicated that free-ranging gophers are active =50% of each day. Conservative estimates of true energy consumption were calculated using estimates of habitat-specific minimum daily burrowing requirements. Rates of burrowing measured in the laboratory were either ∞ 0.0 or ∞ 2.0 cm/min. The low burrowing rate was observed when the soil was frozen or saturated with water, as would occur in the field in early winter and in spring, respectively. Gophers burrowed through soil at the study site at an average rate of ∞ 1.5 cm/min. Belowground food energy densities at gopher foraging depth declined from 24.6 to 3.2 J/cm3 along a successional gradient (subalpine forb meadow to Engelmann spruce dominated forest). We conclude that individual gophers are food limited within the climax spruce seral stage. Further, daily energy costs associated with reproduction in females may exceed the belowground energy supply available in intermediate seral stages (aspen and subalpine fir). Reduction of burrowing rates for any reason will affect gophers in the late seral stages proportionately more than those resident in the meadow. The peak gopher densities recorded (from 62 individuals/ha in the meadow to 2 individuals/ha in spruce forest) support these inferences. Detailed demographic information was obtained only in the meadow seral stage. Adult survivorship was lower in winter than in summer and varied greatly between years (0.18-0.70 yr-1). Juvenile survivorship from weaning through the first year was comparable to adult annual rates. The fertility rate was 3.75 young • female-1 • yr-1. The energy supply and demand analyses indicate that the growth of Thomomys talpoides populations in the early seral stages is seldom directly limited by the amount of food present. From our demographic, environmental, and autecological studies we conclude that stochastic events associated with weather affect energy acquisition (burrowing) rates, and thus survivorship. In montane environments, such events may prevent populations from attaining sizes at which territorial behavior would hypothetically limit further increases. The energy flow through the meadow population at moderate to high )1976-1977) densities (at least 1100 MJ • ha-1 • yr-1) indicates that pocket gophers are proficient energy movers relative to non-fossorial small mammals. Subalpine T. talpoides populations appear commonly to attain such densities. More than 30% of the annual primary productivity allocated to belowground parts of meadow forbs may be consumed by gophers.

  14. Masticatory muscle architecture in the Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus (Mammalia, Rodentia): new insights into the evolution of hystricognathy

    PubMed Central

    Hautier, Lionel; Saksiri, Soonchan

    2009-01-01

    We present the first descriptive comparison of the skull, mandible and jaw muscles of the recently recovered Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus. The gross anatomy of five specimens captured in Laos and internal architecture of the jaw musculature were studied using dissections. The following muscles are described: temporal, masseter, pterygoids, digastric, mylohyoid, geniohyoid and transverse mandibular. The description of the masticatory apparatus of L. aenigmamus offers a rare opportunity to assess the order of establishment of the morphological characters during the evolution of Ctenohystrica. Striking convergences have occurred during the evolution of Diatomyidae and L. aenigmamus presents a unique combination of myological features that corresponds to a mixture of sciurognathous and hystricognathous characters. If L. aenigmamus is a sciurognathous rodent, we have to assume that it independently acquired a pars reflexa of the superficial masseter. We show for the first time that the development of this pars reflexa has occurred several times during the evolution of Ctenohystrica and can no longer be considered a synapomorphic feature of ‘Hystricognathi’. These results bring new insights into the evolution of hystricognathy and have profound implications for the interpretation of the fossil record of early hystricognath rodents. PMID:19694873

  15. Phylogeny and biogeography of the Petaurista philippensis complex (Rodentia: Sciuridae), inter- and intraspecific relationships inferred from molecular and morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Farong; Yu, Fahong; Pang, Junfeng; Kilpatrick, C William; McGuire, Peter M; Wang, Yingxiang; Lu, Shunqing; Woods, Charles A

    2006-03-01

    With modified DNA extraction and purification protocols, the complete cytochrome b gene sequences (1140 bp) were determined from degraded museum specimens. Molecular analysis and morphological examination of cranial characteristics of the giant flying squirrels of Petaurista philippensis complex (P. grandis, P. hainana, and P. yunanensis) and other Petaurista species yielded new insights into long-standing controversies in the Petaurista systematics. Patterns of genetic variations and morphological differences observed in this study indicate that P. hainana, P. albiventer, and P. yunanensis can be recognized as distinct species, and P. grandis and P. petaurista are conspecific populations. Phylogenetic relationships reconstructed by using parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian methods reveal that, with P. leucogenys as the basal branch, all Petaurista groups formed two distinct clades. Petaurista philippensis, P. hainana, P. yunanensis, and P. albiventer are clustered in the same clade, while P. grandis shows a close relationship to P. petaurista. Deduced divergence times based on Bayesian analysis and the transversional substitution at the third codon suggest that the retreating of glaciers and upheavals or movements of tectonic plates in the Pliocene-Pleistocene were the major factors responsible for the present geographical distributions of Petaurista groups. PMID:16414285

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete mitochondrial genome of the Korean field mouse Apodemus peninsulae (Rodentia, Murinae) from China.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mi Gyung; Kim, Ji Young; Park, Yung Chul

    2016-07-01

    We sequenced and characterized a complete mitogenome (KP671850) of the Chinese Apodemus peninsulae and compared it with a previously published mitogenome of the Korean A. peninsulae (NC016060). The total length of the Chinese A. peninsulae mitogenome is 16,457 bp. The mitogenome consists of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), two rRNA (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA) genes, 22 tRNA genes, and one D-loop region. The most common start codon was ATG, used in the nine PCGs for initiation. The mitogenomes of Chinese and Korean A. peninsulae showed 98.9% sequence similarity. The intra-/interspecific phylogeny of the Chinese A. peninsulae revealed that the Chinese A. peninsulae was well grouped with the Korean A. peninsulae. The clade of A. peninsulae was sister to that of Apodemus agrarius, Apodemus chejuensis, and Apodemus chevrieri. PMID:26006285

  17. The role of vibrissal sensing in forelimb position control during travelling locomotion in the rat (Rattus norvegicus, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Niederschuh, Sandra J; Witte, Hartmut; Schmidt, Manuela

    2015-02-01

    In the stem lineage of therians, a comprehensive reorganization of limb and body mechanics took place to provide dynamic stability for rapid locomotion in a highly structured environment. At what was probably the same time, mammals developed an active sense of touch in the form of movable mystacial vibrissae. The rhythmic movements of the limbs and vibrissae are controlled by central pattern-generating networks which might interact with each other in sensorimotor control. To test this possible interaction, we studied covariation between the two by investigating speed-dependent adjustments in temporal and spatial parameters of forelimb and vibrissal kinematics in the rat. Furthermore, the possible role of carpal vibrissae in connecting the two oscillating systems was explored. We compared locomotion on continuous and discontinuous substrates in the presence and absence of the mystacial or/and carpal vibrissae across a speed range of 0.2-0.5m/s and found that a close coupling of the kinematics of the two oscillating systems appears to be precluded by their differential dependence on the animal's speed. Speed-related changes in forelimb kinematics mainly occur in temporal parameters, whereas vibrissae change their spatial excursion. However, whisking frequency is always high enough that at least one whisk cycle falls into the swing phase of the limb, which is the maximum critical period for sensing the substrate on which the forepaw will be placed. The influence of tactile cues on forelimb positional control is more subtle than expected. Tactile cues appear to affect the degree of parameter variation but not average parameters or the failure rate of limbs during walking on a perforated treadmill. The carpal vibrissae appear to play a role in sensing the animal's speed by measuring the duration of the stance phase. The absence of this cue significantly reduces speed-related variation in stride frequency and vibrissal protraction. PMID:25547567

  18. Rediscovery of Biswamoyopterus (Mammalia: Rodentia: Sciuridae: Pteromyini) in Asia, with the description of a new species from Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Sanamxay, Daosavanh; Douangboubpha, Bounsavane; Bumrungsri, Sara; Xayavong, Sysouphanh; Xayaphet, Vilakhan; Satasook, Chutamas; Bates, Paul J J

    2013-01-01

    A new species of the flying squirrel genus Biswamoyopterus is described from Lao PDR. It is based on a single specimen collected from a local food market at Ban Thongnami, Pak Kading District, Bolikhamxai Province. The new taxon shows close affinities to Biswamoyopterus biswasi, which is only known from the holotype collected in 1981, 1250 km from the current locality, in Arunachal Pradesh, Northeast India. However, it differs substantially in pelage colour, most particularly on the ventral surfaces of the body, patagia, tail membrane, and tail. The single specimen was found in an area of central Lao PDR, which is characterised by its extensive limestone karst formations and which is home to other rare endemic rodents, including the Khanyou (Laonastes aenigmamus) nd the Lao limestone rat (Saxatilomyspaulinae). PMID:26473234

  19. Shippingport, Kentucky, is the type locality for the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus (Rafinesque, 1818) (Mammalia: Rodentia: Cricetidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodman, Neal

    2015-01-01

    The white-footed mouse, Musculus leucopus Rafinesque, 1818 (= Peromyscus leucopus), is a common small mammal that is widespread in the eastern and central United States. Its abundance in many habitats renders it ecologically important, and its status as a reservoir for hantavirus and Lyme disease gives the species medical and economic significance. The recognition of two cytotypes and up to 17 morphological subspecies of P. leucopus indicates considerable variation in the species, and to understand this variation, it is important that the nominate subspecies be adequately defined so as to act as a standard for comparison. Relevant to this standard for the white-footed mouse is its type locality, which has generally been accepted to be either the vague "pine barrens of Kentucky" or the mouth of the Ohio River. Newly assembled information regarding the life and travels of Constantine S. Rafinesque, the North American naturalist who described P. leucopus, establishes that Rafinesque observed this species in July 1818 while visiting Shippingport, Kentucky, which is now within the city limits of Louisville, Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Shippingport is therefore the actual type locality for this species.

  20. NEW SPECIES OF AROSTRILEPIS (EUCESTODA: HYMENOLEPIDIAE) IN MEMBERS OF CRICETIDAE AND GEOMYIDAE (RODENTIA) FROM THE WESTERN NEARCTIC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specimens originally identified as Arostrilepis horrida from the Nearctic are revised, contributing to the recognition of a complex of cryptic species distributed across the Holarctic region. Previously unrecognized species are described based on specimens in rodents of the families Cricetidae (Neot...

  1. Into Tibet: An Early Pliocene Dispersal of Fossil Zokor (Rodentia: Spalacidae) from Mongolian Plateau to the Hinterland of Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the fossil zokors (Myospalacinae) collected from the lower Pliocene (~4.4 Ma) of Zanda Basin, southwestern Tibet, which is the first record in the hinterland of Tibetan Plateau within the Himalayan Range. Materials include 29 isolated molars belonging to Prosiphneus eriksoni (Schlosser, 1924) by having characters including large size, highly fused roots, upper molars of orthomegodont type, m1 anterior cap small and centrally located, and first pair of m1 reentrants on opposing sides, high crowns, and high value of dentine tract parameters. Based on the cladistics analysis, all seven species of Prosiphneus and P. eriksoni of Zanda form a monophyletic clade. P. eriksoni from Zanda, on the other hand, is nearly the terminal taxon of this clade. The appearance of P. eriksoni in Zanda represents a significant dispersal in the early Pliocene from its center of origin in north China and Mongolian Plateau, possibly via the Hol Xil-Qiangtang hinterland in northern Tibet. The fast evolving zokors are highly adapted to open terrains at a time when regional climates had become increasingly drier in the desert zones north of Tibetan Plateau during the late Miocene to Pliocene. The occurrence of this zokor in Tibet thus suggests a rather open steppe environment. Based on fossils of large mammals, we have formulated an "out of Tibet" hypothesis that suggests earlier and more primitive large mammals from the Pliocene of Tibet giving rise to the Ice Age megafauna. However, fossil records for large mammals are still too poor to evaluate whether they have evolved from lineages endemic to the Tibetan Plateau or were immigrants from outside. The superior record of small mammals is in a better position to address this question. With relatively dense age intervals and numerous localities in much of northern Asia, fossil zokors provide the first example of an "into Tibet" scenario--earlier and more primitive taxa originated from outside of the Tibetan Plateau and the later the lineage became extinct in southwestern Tibet. PMID:26658457

  2. New data on occurrence of Demodex flagellurus (Acari, Demodecidae) - rarely recorded parasite from the house mouse Mus musculus (Rodentia, Muridae).

    PubMed

    Izdebska, Joanna N; Rolbiecki, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Demodex flagellurus Bukva, 1985 is one of two known demodecid mites of the house mouse Mus musculus Linnaeus, 1758, in which it is observed in genital area. Skin fragments of 30 house mice from various regions of Poland (residential buildings in Gdynia and Gdańsk, rural region in Wielkopolska-Kujawska Lowland) were examined. The mites were noted in 25.0% of the mice, with mean intensity of 48.0 and intensity range of 2-103. D. flagellurus demonstrated the differentiated occurrence in host populations. PMID:25911036

  3. First record of Mylagaulid rodents (Rodentia, Mammalia) from the Miocene of Eastern Siberia (Olkhon Island, Baikal Lake, Irkutsk Region, Russia).

    PubMed

    Tesakov, A S; Lopatin, A V

    2015-01-01

    A new genus and species of rodent, Lamugaulus olkhonensis, belonging to the subfamily Promylagaulinae of the family Mylagaulidae, is described on the basis of isolated teeth from the Khalagay Formation of the Lower Miocene Tagay locality (Olkhon island, Lake Baikal, Irkutsk Region). This is the first record of mylagaulids in Eastern Siberia, significantly expanding the data on the distribution of this mainly North American group of rodents in Asia and showing its presence outside the Central Asian arid zone. PMID:25773245

  4. In the wake of invasion: tracing the historical biogeography of the South American cricetid radiation (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae).

    PubMed

    Leite, Rafael N; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Almeida, Francisca C; Werneck, Fernanda P; Rogers, Duke S; Weksler, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    The Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI) was greatly influenced by the completion of the Isthmus of Panama and impacted the composition of modern faunal assemblages in the Americas. However, the contribution of preceding events has been comparatively less explored, even though early immigrants in the fossil records are evidence for waif dispersals. The cricetid rodents of the subfamily Sigmodontinae are a classic example of a species-rich South American radiation resulting from an early episode of North American invasion. Here, we provide a temporal and spatial framework to address key aspects of the historical biogeography and diversification of this diverse mammal group by using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA datasets coupled with methods of divergence time estimation, ancestral area reconstruction and comparative phylogenetics. Relaxed-clock time estimates indicate that divergence of the Sigmodontinae began in the middle-late Miocene (ca. 12-9 Ma). Dispersal-vicariance analyses point to the arrival of a single lineage of northern invaders with a widespread ancestral distribution and imply that the initial differentiation between Central and South America gave rise to the most basal groups within the subfamily. These two major clades diversified in the late Miocene followed by the radiation of main tribes until the early Pliocene. Within the Oryzomyalia, tribes diverged initially in eastern South America whereas multiple dispersals into the Andes promoted further diversification of the majority of modern genera. A comparatively uniform background tempo of diversification explains the species richness of sigmodontines across most nodes, except for two akodontine genera with recent increases in diversification rates. The bridging of the Central American seaway and episodes of low sea levels likely facilitated the invasion of South America long before the onset of the post-Isthmian phase of the GABI. PMID:24963664

  5. Molecular genetic typing of three forms of wood and field mice belonging to a transpalearctic genus (Apodemus, Muridae, Rodentia)

    SciTech Connect

    Chelomina, G.N.; Lyapunova, E.A.; Vorontsov, N.N.

    1995-06-01

    The genomes of three species of wood mouse (Apodemus fulvipectus and A. ponticus from the Caucasus and A. argenteus from Japan) were compared by means of restriction analysis of nuclear DNA. The species are differentiated from each other and from previously studied species. Each species has its species-specific features. Within the genus Apodemus, A. ponticus is most closely related to the European species A. sylvaticus and A. flavicollis. A. fulvipectus has a peculiar type of restriction with EcoR I (specific for dispersed repeats) and Hind III (specific for satDNA). The genome of this species contains three families of EcoR I repeats previously found in various species (European and Asian) of wood mouse and Hind III components characteristic of both wood and field mice. A. argenteus differs from all other forms of Apodemus, the genome of which contains the 375-bp Hind III satellite, by the presence of an EcoR I satDNA fraction consisting of 240-bp repeating units. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Phylogenetic relationships in the Niviventer-Chiromyscus complex (Rodentia, Muridae) inferred from molecular data, with description of a new species

    PubMed Central

    Balakirev, Alexander E.; Abramov, Alexei V.; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Based on molecular data for mitochondrial (Cyt b, COI) and nuclear (IRBP, GHR) genes, and morphological examinations of museum specimens, we examined diversity, species boundaries, and relationships within and between the murine genera Chiromyscus and Niviventer. Phylogenetic patterns recovered demonstrate that Niviventer sensu lato is not monophyletic but instead includes Chiromyscus chiropus, the only previously recognized species of Chiropus. To maintain the genera Niviventer and Chiropus as monophyletic lineages, the scope and definition of the genus Chiromyscus is revised to include at least three distinct species: Chiromyscus chiropus (the type species of Chiromyscus), Chiromyscus langbianis (previously regarded as a species of Niviventer), and a new species, described in this paper under the name Chiromyscus thomasi sp. n. PMID:25493050

  7. Evolutionary and Biological Implications of Dental Mesial Drift in Rodents: The Case of the Ctenodactylidae (Rodentia, Mammalia)

    PubMed Central

    Gomes Rodrigues, Helder; Solé, Floréal; Charles, Cyril; Tafforeau, Paul; Vianey-Liaud, Monique; Viriot, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Dental characters are importantly used for reconstructing the evolutionary history of mammals, because teeth represent the most abundant material available for the fossil species. However, the characteristics of dental renewal are presently poorly used, probably because dental formulae are frequently not properly established, whereas they could be of high interest for evolutionary and developmental issues. One of the oldest rodent families, the Ctenodactylidae, is intriguing in having longstanding disputed dental formulae. Here, we investigated 70 skulls among all extant ctenodactylid genera (Ctenodactylus, Felovia, Massoutiera and Pectinator) by using X-ray conventional and synchrotron microtomography in order to solve and discuss these dental issues. Our study clearly indicates that Massoutiera, Felovia and Ctenodactylus differ from Pectinator not only by a more derived dentition, but also by a more derived eruptive sequence. In addition to molars, their dentition only includes the fourth deciduous premolars, and no longer bears permanent premolars, conversely to Pectinator. Moreover, we found that these premolars are lost during adulthood, because of mesial drift of molars. Mesial drift is a striking mechanism involving migration of teeth allowed by both bone remodeling and dental resorption. This dental innovation is to date poorly known in rodents, since it is only the second report described. Interestingly, we noted that dental drift in rodents is always associated with high-crowned teeth favoring molar size enlargement. It can thus represent another adaptation to withstand high wear, inasmuch as these rodents inhabit desert environments where dust is abundant. A more accurate study of mesial drift in rodents would be very promising from evolutionary, biological and orthodontic points of view. PMID:23185576

  8. Syphacia obvelata (Nematode, Oxyuridae) infecting laboratory mice Mus musculus (Rodentia, Muridae): phylogeny and host-parasite relationship.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gaber, Rewaida

    2016-03-01

    Syphacia obvelata is a pinworm nematode parasite infecting man and laboratory animals in high abundance. This parasitological study was carried out during the period of March 2014-February 2015 to investigate the helminth parasites infecting the laboratory mice Mus musculus in the Animal House at Cairo University, Egypt. The prevalence of S. obvelata in M. musculus was 75.0 %. The extent of infection with S. obvelata is analyzed according to the sex of the host mice. It was shown that the prevalence of male infection was greater than female worms. Morphological characterization revealed that the present Oxyurid species possesses a rounded cephalic end with less developed lips, esophagus divided into cylindrical corpus, and globular bulb supported internally with valvular apparatus; three mamelons are located at the ventral surface with a single chitinized spicule and a gubernaculum provided with an accessory hook in males, and ovijector apparatus opens ventrally by the vulva surrounded by protruded lips in female worms. Body of the male was 0.623-1.130 (0.830 ± 0.11) mm long and 0.092-0.130 (0.110 ± 0.01) mm wide; the esophagus was 0.164-0.280 (0.210 ± 0.01) mm long; the nerve ring and excretory pore are located at 0.035-0.132 (0.073 ± 0.01) and 0.087-0.191 (0.145 ± 0.01) mm from the anterior end, respectively, while the female measured 2.930-4.650 (3.540 ± 0.1) mm long and 0.120-0.232 (0.156 ± 0.001) mm wide; the esophagus was 0.213-0.410 (0.342 ± 0.01) mm long; the nerve ring, excretory pore, and vulval opening are located at 0.026-0.157 (0.121 ± 0.01), 0.134-0.243 (0.195 ± 0.01), and 0.323-0.632 (0.546 ± 0.11) mm from the anterior end, respectively; eggs measured 0.120-0.139 (0.129 ± 0.001) mm long and 0.030-0.052 (0.045 ± 0.001) mm wide. It compared morphometrically with other Syphacia species described previously and showed little differences in measurements. Molecular characterization based on small subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was done to confirm the obtained morphological and morphometric results. A preliminary genetic comparison between SSU rDNA of the present parasite and other species of Oxyuridae places it as a putative sister taxon to other S. obvelata. PMID:26581371

  9. A new species of African mole-rat (Fukomys, Bathyergidae, Rodentia) from the Zaire-Zambezi watershed.

    PubMed

    Van Daele, Paul A A G; Blondé, Pieter; Stjernstedt, Robert; Adriaens, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    A new species of bathyergid mole-rat, Fukomys vandewoestijneae, is described from an area on the Zaïre-Zambezi watershed, centred on the Ikelenge pedicle in the North-Western province of Zambia. It is diagnosed by a unique combination of morphological (size, lack of clear headmarks), chromosomal (2n= 44) and DNA sequence characteristics. This medium-sized species belongs to the Giant mole-rat "F. mechowii" clade, which was hitherto considered monotypic. Its known distribution is limited to the Ikelenge pedicle of Zambia and adjacent areas in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and presumably Angola. Colonies of this social mole-rat were observed in the chanas (dambos), degraded miombo woodland and in villages. Although presumably sympatric in historical times with F. inechowii, no overlap in the species current distribution could be established. This local endemic species adds further evidence to the conservation importance of the two-pedicle region (Ikelenge pedicle (Zambia-Katanga pedicle (DRC)). PMID:26042288

  10. Chronology and causes of the extinction of the Lava Mouse, Malpaisomys insularis (Rodentia: Muridae) from the Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rando, Juan Carlos; Alcover, Josep Antoni; Navarro, Juan Francisco; García-Talavera, Francisco; Hutterer, Rainer; Michaux, Jacques

    2008-09-01

    Understanding late Holocene extinctions on islands requires accurate chronologies for all relevant events, including multiple colonisations by humans and the introduction of alien species. The most widely held hypothesis on the causes of Holocene island vertebrate extinctions incorporates human impacts, although climatic-related hypotheses cannot be excluded. Both hypotheses have been suggested to account for the extinction of the endemic Lava Mouse, Malpaisomys insularis from the Canary Islands. Here we present the first accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) 14C ages from collagen of M. insularis bones from ancient owl pellets collected at Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, eastern Atlantic Ocean). These new dates contribute to an understanding of the extinction of this species. We are able to exclude climatic causes, predation by invasive species, and competition with the house mouse, Mus musculus. The arrival of Europeans in the Canary Islands correlates with the extinction of Malpaisomys. The introduction of rats, Rattus spp., together with their parasites and diseases, emerges as the most reasonable hypothesis explaining the extinction of M. insularis.

  11. On cognitive ecology and the environmental factors that promote Alzheimer disease: lessons from Octodon degus (Rodentia: Octodontidae).

    PubMed

    Rivera, Daniela S; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive ecologist posits that the more efficiently an animal uses information from the biotic and abiotic environment, the more adaptive are its cognitive abilities. Nevertheless, this approach does not test for natural neurodegenerative processes under field or experimental conditions, which may recover animals information processing and decision making and may explain, mechanistically, maladaptive behaviors. Here, we call for integrative approaches to explain the relationship between ultimate and proximate mechanisms behind social behavior. We highlight the importance of using the endemic caviomorph rodent Octodon degus as a valuable natural model for mechanistic studies of social behavior and to explain how physical environments can shape social experiences that might influence impaired cognitive abilities and the onset and progression of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease. We consequently suggest neuroecological approaches to examine how key elements of the environment may affect neural and cognitive mechanisms associated with learning, memory processes and brain structures involved in social behavior. We propose the following three core objectives of a program comprising interdisciplinary research in O. degus, namely: (1) to determine whether diet types provided after weaning can lead to cognitive impairment associated with spatial memory, learning and predisposing to develop Alzheimer disease in younger ages; (2) to examine if early life social experience has long term effects on behavior and cognitive responses and risk for development Alzheimer disease in later life and (3) To determine if an increase of social interactions in adult degu reared in different degree of social stressful conditions alter their behavior and cognitive responses. PMID:26897365

  12. Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Maxomys spp. (Rodentia: Muridae) from Sulawesi and Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Kartika; Hasegawa, Hideo; Fitriana, Yuli Sulistya; Asakawa, Mitsuhiko

    2015-10-01

    The present report describes Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from two species of spiny rats, Maxomys musschenbroekii from Sulawesi and M. whiteheadi from Sumatra. It is characterized by a cephalic plate extending laterally with dorsoventral constriction and stumpy eggs with an operculum rim reaching pole. It is readily distinguishable by the former feature from all of hitherto known representatives of this genus in Indonesia, but it resembles parasites in Murini and Hydromyni rodents in continental Asia and Sahul. This is the first Syphacia species distributed in both the Sunda Shelf and Sulawesi with the exception of Syphacia muris, a cosmopolitan pinworm found in rodents of the of genus Rattus. It is surmised that S. maxomyos is specific to Maxomys and that it was introduced to Sulawesi by dispersal of some Maxomys from the Sunda Shelf. PMID:26062434

  13. A Remarkable Case of Micro-Endemism in Laonastes aenigmamus (Diatomyidae, Rodentia) Revealed by Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Violaine; Herbreteau, Vincent; Couloux, Arnaud; Keovichit, Kham; Douangboupha, Bounneuang; Hugot, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    L. aenigmamus is endemic to the limestone formations of the Khammuan Province (Lao PDR), and is strongly specialized ecologically. From the survey of 137 individuals collected from 38 localities, we studied the phylogeography of this species using one mitochondrial (Cyt b) and two nuclear genes (BFIBR and GHR). Cyt b analyses reveal a strong mtDNA phylogeographical structure: 8 major geographical clades differing by 5–14% sequence divergence were identified, most of them corresponding to distinct karst areas. Nuclear markers display congruent results but with a less genetic structuring. Together, the data strongly suggest an inland insular model for Laonastes population structure. With 8 to 16 evolutionary significant units in a small area (about 200×50 km) this represents an exceptional example of micro-endemism. Our results suggest that L. aenigmamus may represent a complex of species and/or sub-species. The common ancestor of all Laonastes may have been widely distributed within the limestone formations of the Khammuan Province at the end of Miocene/beginning of the Pliocene. Parallel events of karst fragmentation and population isolation would have occurred during the Pleistocene or/and the end of the Pliocene. The limited gene flow detected between populations from different karst blocks restrains the likelihood of survival of Laonastes. This work increases the necessity for a strict protection of this rare animal and its habitat and provides exclusive information, essential to the organization of its protection. PMID:23155377

  14. Demodex castoris sp. nov. (Acari: Demodecidae) parasitizing Castor fiber (Rodentia), and other parasitic arthropods associated with Castor spp.

    PubMed

    Izdebska, Joanna N; Fryderyk, Sławomira; Rolbiecki, Leszek

    2016-02-11

    A new species of demodecid mite, Demodex castoris sp. nov. (Acari: Prostigmata: Demodecidae), is described based on adult stages from the skin of the nasal region of the Eurasian beaver Castor fiber Linnaeus, 1758, collected in Poland. This is the first detection of a representative demodecid mite in rodents of the suborder Castorimorpha and also represents the first detection of a skin mite in Eurasian beavers. The new species is a small skin mite (average 173 µm in length) characterized by sexual dimorphism related to body proportions. D. castoris sp. nov. was observed in 4 out of 6 beavers examined (66.6%), with a mean intensity of 10.8 and an intensity range of 2-23 ind. host(-1). This paper also contains a checklist of parasitic arthropods known from Castor spp. PMID:26865230

  15. Comparative chromosome banding of two South-American species of rice rats of the genus Oligoryzomys (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae).

    PubMed

    Aniskin, V M; Volobouev, V T

    1999-01-01

    Comparative analysis of G- and C-banding patterns in two species of pygmy rice rats, namely Oligoryzomys microtis from Peru (Ucayali and Loreto departments) and O. flavescens from Bolivia (Tarija department) established that the diploid number of the former species is 64 (NFa = 66), whereas, in the latter, it varies between 64 and 66 (NFa = 66-68) due to the presence of 0-2 heterochromatic supernumerary or B chromosomes. The G-banding pattern of the euchromatic part of their karyotypes is similar in spite of differences in morphology of the largest and smallest autosomal pairs caused by a centromeric shift and the presence of heterochromatic arms, respectively. In addition, the total quantity of C-heterochromatin is smaller in the karyotype of O. microtis than in that of O. flavescens, resulting in differences in the number and size of chromosome pairs (including sex chromosomes) bearing C-blocks. It follows from present and previous data that these karyotypic features are stable in each of these species and thus may be used as species-specific markers. PMID:10598571

  16. On the Origin and Evolution of the Extant System of B Chromosomes in Oryzomyini Radiation (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae).

    PubMed

    Ventura, Karen; O'Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; do Nascimento Moreira, Camila; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous supernumerary chromosomes (Bs) are recognized in the oryzomyines Holochilus brasiliensis, Nectomys rattus, N. squamipes, Oligoryzomys flavescens and Sooretamys angouya, representing about 10% of all known B-containing rodent species. They provide an outstanding model for understanding the origin, evolution and diversity of Bs in a phylogenetic context. Therefore, whole chromosome-specific probes were generated from flow-sorted Holochilus brasiliensis (HBR) autosomes 11 and 25+26 and chromosomes X, Y and Bs. Hybridizations were performed on male metaphases of 15 Oryzomyini species of which 3 are B-containing species. The results reveal that among the species sampled, 12 of them, belonging to a monophyletic Oryzomiyini subclade, are positive for an anonymous Oryzomyini shared heterochromatic region (OSHR) on both sex chromosomes. The OSHR is also present on Bs of Holochilus brasiliensis, Nectomys rattus and N. squamipes but not on Bs of O. flavescens and S. angouya. Two distinct additional OSHR/autosome associations are observed on S. angouya. The three species that are OSHR negative belong to an outgroup. Molecular dating suggests that the OSHR originated between 7.8 and 3 Mya on ancestral sex chromosomes. A tentative explanation for the OSHR-positive nature of B regions in three species could be that transposable elements (TEs) from this specific sex chromosome region may have invaded existing B chromosomes. The presence of the OSHR on entire Xp and Yp adjacent to interstitial telomeric sequences at pericentromeric positions, as observed in Drymoreomys albimaculatus, show a similar organization as on B chromosomes in Nectomys squamipes. The diversity of the Oryzomyini Bs in number, size, morphology and genetic content may be explained by the independent origin of B chromosomes in different subgroups of species, with Bs in Holochilus brasiliensis, Nectomys squamipes and N. rattus sharing the OSHR with sex chromosomes, and those in Oligoryzomys flavescens and Sooretamys angouya lacking OSHR in Bs. The species-specific pattern of Bs is probably a consequence of their independent evolutionary origin. PMID:26305702

  17. Comparative chromosome painting in six species of Oligoryzomys (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae) and the karyotype evolution of the genus.

    PubMed

    Di-Nizo, Camilla Bruno; Ventura, Karen; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew; O'Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo; Silva, Maria José de J

    2015-01-01

    Oligoryzomys belongs to the tribe Oryzomyini, and contains about 22 species. Diploid numbers range from 2n = 44 in Oligoryzomys sp. 2 to 2n = 72 in O. utiaritensis and phylogenetic relationships are not well defined. The high morphological convergence leads to misidentification of taxonomic entities and the species are often identified by chromosomal characters. Until now, the genus has been studied only by classical cytogenetic approaches. To understand the chromosomal evolution of Oligoryzomys, we developed chromosome probes from a female of Oligoryzomys moojeni (OMO) with 2n = 70 and hybridized to other five Oligoryzomys species. The probes painted 31 segments on O. fornesi (OFO) with 2n = 62; 32 segments on O. microtis (OMI), 2n = 64; 33 segments on O. nigripes (ONI), 2n = 62 and on O. rupestris (ORU), 2n = 46; and 34 on Oligoryzomys sp. 2 (OSP), 2n = 44. OMO probes 4 and 5 showed a syntenic association in O. fornesi, O. microtis and O. nigripes and were also presented in the same pair, although disrupted, in O. rupestris and Oligoryzomys sp. 2. Concerning O. rupestris and Oligoryzomys sp. 2, species with the lowest diploid numbers of the genus, a total of 8 probes hybridized to 11 segments on the largest pair of ORU 1 and 9 probes hybridized to 12 segments on OSP 1. Also, OMO 6 painted three segments in ORU, corresponding to the proximal segment of ORU 2q, and the whole of ORU 19 and 20. In OSP, the segment corresponding to ORU 20 was homologous to OSP 1p. OMO X showed signals of hybridization in both X and Y chromosomes. Extensive chromosomal rearrangements, that could not be detected by classical cytogenetic techniques, such as pericentric inversions or repositioning of centromeres, Robertsonian rearrangements and tandem fusions/fissions, as well as gain/activation or loss/inactivation of centromeres and telomeric sequences have driven the huge genome reshuffling in these closely related species. PMID:25658766

  18. Comparative Chromosome Painting in Six Species of Oligoryzomys (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae) and the Karyotype Evolution of the Genus

    PubMed Central

    Di-Nizo, Camilla Bruno; Ventura, Karen; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew; O’Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo; Silva, Maria José de J.

    2015-01-01

    Oligoryzomys belongs to the tribe Oryzomyini, and contains about 22 species. Diploid numbers range from 2n = 44 in Oligoryzomys sp. 2 to 2n = 72 in O. utiaritensis and phylogenetic relationships are not well defined. The high morphological convergence leads to misidentification of taxonomic entities and the species are often identified by chromosomal characters. Until now, the genus has been studied only by classical cytogenetic approaches. To understand the chromosomal evolution of Oligoryzomys, we developed chromosome probes from a female of Oligoryzomys moojeni (OMO) with 2n = 70 and hybridized to other five Oligoryzomys species. The probes painted 31 segments on O. fornesi (OFO) with 2n = 62; 32 segments on O. microtis (OMI), 2n = 64; 33 segments on O. nigripes (ONI), 2n = 62 and on O. rupestris (ORU), 2n = 46; and 34 on Oligoryzomys sp. 2 (OSP), 2n = 44. OMO probes 4 and 5 showed a syntenic association in O. fornesi, O. microtis and O. nigripes and were also presented in the same pair, although disrupted, in O. rupestris and Oligoryzomys sp. 2. Concerning O. rupestris and Oligoryzomys sp. 2, species with the lowest diploid numbers of the genus, a total of 8 probes hybridized to 11 segments on the largest pair of ORU 1 and 9 probes hybridized to 12 segments on OSP 1. Also, OMO 6 painted three segments in ORU, corresponding to the proximal segment of ORU 2q, and the whole of ORU 19 and 20. In OSP, the segment corresponding to ORU 20 was homologous to OSP 1p. OMO X showed signals of hybridization in both X and Y chromosomes. Extensive chromosomal rearrangements, that could not be detected by classical cytogenetic techniques, such as pericentric inversions or repositioning of centromeres, Robertsonian rearrangements and tandem fusions/fissions, as well as gain/activation or loss/inactivation of centromeres and telomeric sequences have driven the huge genome reshuffling in these closely related species. PMID:25658766

  19. Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Maxomys spp. (Rodentia: Muridae) from Sulawesi and Sumatra, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    DEWI, Kartika; HASEGAWA, Hideo; FITRIANA, Yuli Sulistya; ASAKAWA, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from two species of spiny rats, Maxomys musschenbroekii from Sulawesi and M. whiteheadi from Sumatra. It is characterized by a cephalic plate extending laterally with dorsoventral constriction and stumpy eggs with an operculum rim reaching pole. It is readily distinguishable by the former feature from all of hitherto known representatives of this genus in Indonesia, but it resembles parasites in Murini and Hydromyni rodents in continental Asia and Sahul. This is the first Syphacia species distributed in both the Sunda Shelf and Sulawesi with the exception of Syphacia muris, a cosmopolitan pinworm found in rodents of the of genus Rattus. It is surmised that S. maxomyos is specific to Maxomys and that it was introduced to Sulawesi by dispersal of some Maxomys from the Sunda Shelf. PMID:26062434

  20. Microcavia australis (Caviidae, Rodentia), a new highly competent host of Trypanosoma cruzi I in rural communities of northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cecere, M Carla; Cardinal, Marta V; Arrabal, Juan P; Moreno, Claudio; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2015-02-01

    Rodents are well-known hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi but little is known on the role of some caviomorph rodents. We assessed the occurrence and prevalence of T. cruzi infection in Microcavia australis ("southern mountain, desert or small cavy") and its infectiousness to the vector Triatoma infestans in four rural communities of Tafí del Valle department, northwestern Argentina. Parasite detection was performed by xenodiagnosis and polymerase chain reaction amplification of the hyper-variable region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles of T. cruzi (kDNA-PCR) from blood samples. A total of 51 cavies was captured in traps set up along cavy paths in peridomestic dry-shrub fences located between 25 and 85 m from the nearest domicile. We document the first record of M. australis naturally infected by T. cruzi. Cavies presented a very high prevalence of infection (46.3%; 95% confidence interval, CI=33.0-59.6%). Only one (4%) of 23 cavies negative by xenodiagnosis was found infected by kDNA-PCR. TcI was the only discrete typing unit identified in 12 cavies with a positive xenodiagnosis. The infectiousness to T. infestans of cavies positive by xenodiagnosis or kDNA-PCR was very high (mean, 55.8%; CI=48.4-63.1%) and exceeded 80% in 44% of the hosts. Cavies are highly-competent hosts of T. cruzi in peridomestic habitats near human dwellings in rural communities of Tucumán province in northwestern Argentina. PMID:25447830

  1. A new form of the mole vole Ellobius tancrei Blasius, 1884 (Mammalia, Rodentia) with the lowest chromosome number.

    PubMed

    Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Romanenko, Svetlana A; Serdukova, Natalia A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Lyapunova, Elena A

    2013-01-01

    The subterranean mole vole, Ellobius tancrei, with aspecific variability in autosomes (2n = 31-54) and unusual sex chromosomes (XX in males and females), represents an amazing model for studying the role of chromosome changes in speciation. New materials from the upper reaches of the Surkhob River in the Pamiro-Alay mountains resulted in the discovery of a new form with 2n = 30. The application of Zoo-FISH and G-banding methods allowed the detection of 13 pairs of autosomes as Robertsonian metacentrics originated after fusions of acrocentrics of an assumed ancestral karyotype of Ellobius tancrei with 2n = 54. The sex chromosomes (XX, in both sexes) and one pair of acrocentric autosomes are the only acrocentrics in this karyotype, and the set with 2n = 30 possesses the lowest possible chromosome number among populations of Ellobius tancrei. PMID:24260698

  2. New data on recently described rodent species Paulina's Limestone Rat Saxatilomys paulinae Musser, Smith, Robinson & Lunde, 2005 (Mammalia: Rodentia)

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nghia Xuan; Ngo, Tuong Xuan; Nguyen, Duy Dinh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Paulina's Limestone Rat Saxatilomys paulinae Musser et al., 2005 was first discovered by Musser et al. (2005) based on specimens from the Khammouane Limestone National Biodiversity Conservation Area (NBCA) in Khammouane Province in central Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR). This tower karst landscape is part of the Central Indochina Limestone massif, which extends eastward into north-central Vietnam in Quang Binh and Quang Tri Provinces. New information In April 2014, we conducted a rodent survey and collected four (4) whole specimens of Saxatilomys paulinae in Quang Binh province. This is the first record of Saxatilomys paulinae in Vietnam. External and craniodental characteristics of all specimens clearly exhibit the characters of Saxatilomys paulinae as described in Musser et al. (2005)​. The rats are of medium size (HB: 160.3 ± 2.03 mm, T: 192.3 ± 6.69 mm) with some specific morpological characteristics. The external and craniodental measurement of the specimens from Vietnam tend to be larger than those of specimens from Lao. However, this needs to be verified by more studies in future. The habitat of Saxatilomys paulinae in Vietnam is characterized by complicated terrain comprising low karst towers (around 400 m) with steep slopes covered under limestone humid evergreen forest. The forest has been affected by selected timber logging in the past, but still has a complex 4-layer structure. The population of Saxatilomys paulinae in Vietnam is threatened by rodent trapping/snaring and habitat disturbance. More status surveys should be conducted to assess the species distributional range and its population status for undertaking relevant conservation measures. PMID:26023285

  3. Distribution and habitat of the Laotian Rock Rat Laonastes aenigmamus Jenkins, Kilpatrick, Robinson & Timmins, 2005 (Rodentia: Diatomyidae) in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nghia Xuan; Nguyen, Duy Dinh; Dinh, Tri Huy; Le, Dinh Thuc; Dinh, Duong Hai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Laotian Rock Rat Laonastes aenigmamus Jenkins, Kilpatrick, Robinson & Timmins, 2005 was originally discovered in Lao People's Democratic Republic in 2005. This species has been recognized as the sole surviving member of the otherwise extinct rodent family Diatomyidae. Laonastes aenigmamus was initially reported only in limestone forests of Khammouane Province, Central Lao. A second population was recently discovered in Phong Nha Ke Bang National Park (PNKB NP), Quang Binh Province, Central Vietnam in 2011. The confirmed distribution range of L. aenigmamus in Vietnam is very small, approximately 150 km2, covering low karst mountains in five communes of Minh Hoa District, Quang Binh Province, at elevations between 250 and 400 m asl. The Laotian Rock Rat inhabits the lower part of steep karst towers with many rock boulders and crevices under tall limestone evergreen forest. They use small rock crevices for their dens. The natural habitat of this species in PNKB NP has been affected by selected timber harvesting, however, a complex 3-4 layer forest structure is retained. The Laotian Rock Rat is omnivorous, feeding on parts (leaves, buds, fruits and roots) of 18 plant species and also some insects (cicada, mantis, grasshopper). The population of this species in PNKB NP is seriously threatened with extinction due to its very restricted distribution, high hunting pressure, and habitat disturbance. Laonastes aenigmamus is listed in the IUCN Red List as endangered and in the Wildlife and Aquatic Red List of Lao, however, this species has not been listed in the Red Data Book or any conservation legislative documents of Vietnam. PMID:25589873

  4. Into Tibet: An Early Pliocene Dispersal of Fossil Zokor (Rodentia: Spalacidae) from Mongolian Plateau to the Hinterland of Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the fossil zokors (Myospalacinae) collected from the lower Pliocene (~4.4 Ma) of Zanda Basin, southwestern Tibet, which is the first record in the hinterland of Tibetan Plateau within the Himalayan Range. Materials include 29 isolated molars belonging to Prosiphneus eriksoni (Schlosser, 1924) by having characters including large size, highly fused roots, upper molars of orthomegodont type, m1 anterior cap small and centrally located, and first pair of m1 reentrants on opposing sides, high crowns, and high value of dentine tract parameters. Based on the cladistics analysis, all seven species of Prosiphneus and P. eriksoni of Zanda form a monophyletic clade. P. eriksoni from Zanda, on the other hand, is nearly the terminal taxon of this clade. The appearance of P. eriksoni in Zanda represents a significant dispersal in the early Pliocene from its center of origin in north China and Mongolian Plateau, possibly via the Hol Xil-Qiangtang hinterland in northern Tibet. The fast evolving zokors are highly adapted to open terrains at a time when regional climates had become increasingly drier in the desert zones north of Tibetan Plateau during the late Miocene to Pliocene. The occurrence of this zokor in Tibet thus suggests a rather open steppe environment. Based on fossils of large mammals, we have formulated an “out of Tibet” hypothesis that suggests earlier and more primitive large mammals from the Pliocene of Tibet giving rise to the Ice Age megafauna. However, fossil records for large mammals are still too poor to evaluate whether they have evolved from lineages endemic to the Tibetan Plateau or were immigrants from outside. The superior record of small mammals is in a better position to address this question. With relatively dense age intervals and numerous localities in much of northern Asia, fossil zokors provide the first example of an “into Tibet” scenario–earlier and more primitive taxa originated from outside of the Tibetan Plateau and the later the lineage became extinct in southwestern Tibet. PMID:26658457

  5. Analysis of meiotic chromosome structure and behavior in Robertsonian heterozygotes of Ellobius tancrei (Rodentia, Cricetidae): a case of monobrachial homology.

    PubMed

    Matveevsky, Sergey; Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Tambovtseva, Valentina; Romanenko, Svetlana; Kolomiets, Oxana

    2015-01-01

    Synaptonemal complex (SC) chains were revealed in semisterile intraspecific F1 hybrids of Ellobius tancrei Blasius, 1884 (2n = 49, NF=56 and 2n=50, NF=56), heterozygous for Robertsonian (Rb) translocations. Chains were formed by Rb submetacentrics with monobrachial homology. Chromosome synapsis in spermatocytes of these hybrids was disturbed, apparently because of the problematic release of the chromosomes from the SC chains. These hybrids suffer from low fertility, and our data support the opinion that this is because a formation of Rb metacentrics with monobrachial homology within different races of the same species might be an initial event for the divergence of chromosomal forms. PMID:26752380

  6. [Comparative FISH analysis of C-positive blocks of centromeric chromosomal regions of pygmy wood mice Sylvaemus uralensis (Rodentia, Muridae)].

    PubMed

    Karamysheva, T V; Bogdanov, A S; Kartavtseva, I V; Likhoshvaĭ, T V; Bochkarev, M N; Kolcheva, N E; Marochkina, V V; Rubtsov, N B

    2010-06-01

    The composition and homology of centromeric heterochromatin DNA has been compared in representatives of the Asian race and two chromosomal forms (Eastern European and Southern European) of the European race of the pygmy wood mouse Sylvaemus uralensis by means of in situ hybridization with metaphase chromosomes of microdissection DNA probes obtained from centromeric C-blocks of mice of the Southern European chromosomal form and the Asian race. Joint hybridization of both DNA probes yielded all possible variants of centromeric regions in terms of the presence of repetitive sequences homologous to those of some or another dissection region, which indicates a diversity of centromeric regions differing in DNA composition. However, most variations of the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) patterns are apparently related to quantitative differences of repetitive elements of the genome. Experiments with the DNA probe obtained from the genome of the Southern European form of the pygmy wood mouse have shown that the number of intense FISH signals roughly corresponds to the number of large C-segments in representatives of the European race, which is characterized by a large amount of the centromeric C-heterochromatin in the karyotype. However, intense signals have been also detected in experiments on hybridization of this probe with chromosomes of representatives of the Asian race, which has no large C-blocks in the karyotype; thus, DNA sequences homologous to heterochromatic ones are also present in nonheterochromatic regions adjacent to C-segments. Despite the variations of the numbers of both intense and weak FISH signals, all chromosomal forms/races of S. uralensis significantly differ from one another in these characters. The number of intense FISH signals in DNA from the samples of pygmy wood mice from eastern Turkmenistan (the Kugitang ridge) and southern Omsk oblast (the vicinity of the Talapker railway station) was intermediate between those in the European and Asian races, which is apparently related to a hybrid origin of these populations (the hybridization having occurred long ago in the former case and recently in the latter case). PMID:20734773

  7. [Taxonomy of ticks of the genus Microtimyobia (Acariformes: Myobiidae: Radfordia) and their distribution on voles (Rodentia: Cricetidae: Arvicolinae)].

    PubMed

    Bochkov, A V; Mironov, S V

    1998-01-01

    A phylogenetic system of the subgenus Microtimyobia (Myobiidae: Radfordia) elaborated for the first time by means of the software HENNIG-86 is proposed. The subgenus Microtimyobia including three species groups, lemnina, hylandi and zibethicalis, was divided for a cladistic analysis into 6 operation units based mainly on a male genital shield structure. The analysis shows, that the zibethicalis group is a polyphyletic, while the hylandi and lemnina groups are monophyletic. Host-parasite associations of myobiid mite taxa with vole taxa (Arvicolinae) and some peculiarities of mite and host taxa distribution are analysed. The zibethicalis group is represented by two species, associated with the North American rodents of the genera Ondatra and Phenacomys respectively. The hylandi group are most widely distributed among Arvicolinae taxa, both in Eurasia and North America. However, R. hylandi occurs on those vole species of the genera Microtus and Pitymys, which are distributed only in central and southern parts of North America and represent descendants of the earlier migration wave of Microtus from the Eurasia. As far as R. hylandi is also found in the pleistocenus of the Yakutia, that means that its areal was wider than in recent period. The lemnina group lives on hosts of 2 subtribes of the tribe Arvicolini (Arvicolina and Clethrionomyina) and is restricted to Eurasian range, except R. lemnina. This species is also mainly distributed on Eurasian vole species, however it occurs on vole species distributed in Alaska and being decendants of the later wave of Microtus migration. As far as R. lemnina and R. hylandi are associated with representatives of different migration waves of Microtus from the Euroasia, it is suggested that mites of the hylandi group are the original myobiid fauna of the Microtus voles. The species of the lemnina group had apparently originated on voles of the subtribe Clethrionomyina and then migrated onto phylogenetically young hosts of the subtribe Arvicolina (Euroasian species of the Microtus and related genera), where they probably eliminated mites of the hylandi group from these hosts in Euroasia. The recent pattern of myobiid species distribution on vole species is a result of both a mite cospeciation with their hosts and a shift of hosts. Five new myobiid mite species are described and distinguished by characters as follows. R. (M.) abramovi sp. n. from Phodopus roborovskii (Cricetidae) is closely related to R. (M.) triton Fain et Lukoschus, 1977. In both sexes of the new species setae cxI 1, 2 are scale-shaped, while in R. (M.) triton these setae (cxI 1, 2) are hair-like. R. (M.) stekolnikovi sp. n. from Chionomys nivalis (type host) and Ch. gud is similar to R. (M.) lemnina (Koch, 1841). Females of new species have setae ra with 2 apical processes; female tritonymphs with long whip-like setae ic4. R. (M.) lemnina females have setae ra with 3 processes; female tritonymphs with short hair-like setae ic4. R. (M.) stenocrani sp. n. from Microtus gregalis is also closely related to R. (M.) lemnina. Females of the new species have setae ra with 2 processes; female tritonymphs with whip-like setae ic3. R. (M.) lemnina females have seate ra with 3 processes, female tritonymph with short hair-like setae ic3. R. (M.) synaptomysi sp. n. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:9813883

  8. Analysis of meiotic chromosome structure and behavior in Robertsonian heterozygotes of Ellobius tancrei (Rodentia, Cricetidae): a case of monobrachial homology

    PubMed Central

    Matveevsky, Sergey; Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Tambovtseva, Valentina; Romanenko, Svetlana; Kolomiets, Oxana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Synaptonemal complex (SC) chains were revealed in semisterile intraspecific F1 hybrids of Ellobius tancrei Blasius, 1884 (2n = 49, NF=56 and 2n=50, NF=56), heterozygous for Robertsonian (Rb) translocations. Chains were formed by Rb submetacentrics with monobrachial homology. Chromosome synapsis in spermatocytes of these hybrids was disturbed, apparently because of the problematic release of the chromosomes from the SC chains. These hybrids suffer from low fertility, and our data support the opinion that this is because a formation of Rb metacentrics with monobrachial homology within different races of the same species might be an initial event for the divergence of chromosomal forms. PMID:26752380

  9. A new species of Syphacia (Seuratoxyuris) (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Sooretamys angouya Fischer, 1814 (Rodentia: Cricetidae) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Robles, María del Rosario; Panisse, Guillermo; Navone, Graciela Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Syphacia (Seuratoxyuris) hugoti n. sp. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) is described from the cecum of Sooretamys angouya (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae: Oryzomyini) captured in Formosa Province, Argentina. The diagnosis of the subgenus is emended, and the new species is separated from eight congeners by the distribution of submedian papillae and amphids, shape of the cephalic plate, presence of deirids, absence of cervical and lateral alae, length of the spicule, structure of the accessory hook of the gubernaculum and distance of excretory pore and vulva from the anterior extremity. The analysis suggests that S. (Se.) oryzomyos should be removed from Seuratoxyuris and redesignated as S. (Syphacia) oryzomyos n. comb. To date, of the species of Syphacia found in South and North American, 7 parasitize Oryzomyini rodents, of which two are distributed in Argentina. The present study constitutes the first record of the subgenus Seuratoxyuris from Argentina and the third record of a Syphacia species from rodents of the tribe Oryzomyini. PMID:24995650

  10. Molecular systematics of sciurognathi (rodentia): the mitochondrial cytochrome b and 12S rRNA genes support the Anomaluroidea (Pedetidae and Anomaluridae).

    PubMed

    Montgelard, Claudine; Bentz, Sophie; Tirard, Claire; Verneau, Olivier; Catzeflis, François M

    2002-02-01

    Nucleotide sequence data from the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and cytochrome b genes were used to analyze phylogenetic relationships among sciurognath rodents. Our sample taxa included representatives of 11 sciurognath and 3 hystricognath families with two marsupial species, Didelphis virginiana and Macropus robustus, as outgroups. The dataset was analyzed using both maximum-parsimony (weighted and unweighted) and likelihood methods. Three suprafamilial groupings are strongly supported: Geomyidae + Heteromyidae (Geomyoidea), Sciuridae + Aplodontidae (Sciuroidea), and Pedetidae + Anomaluridae (Anomaluroidea). Although moderately supported, two sister group relationships were identified between Gliridae and Sciuroidea and between Castor and Geomyoidea. In contrast to previous nuclear DNA evidence, the evolutionary affinities between Ctenodactylidae and Hystricognathi (Ctenohystrica) and between Muridae and Dipodidae (Myodonta) are not supported by the mitochondrial data. Molecular divergence dates based on the combined data were estimated for suprafamilial groupings and are discussed in the light of current morphological and paleontological interpretations of rodent phylogeny. PMID:11820843

  11. Characterization of the Kidney Transcriptome of the Long-Haired Mouse Abrothrix hirta (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae) and Comparison with That of the Olive Mouse A. olivacea

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Lourdes; Giorello, Facundo; Feijoo, Matías; Opazo, Juan C.; Lessa, Enrique P.; Naya, Daniel E.; D’Elía, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    To understand how small mammals cope with the challenge of water homeostasis is a matter of interest for ecologists and evolutionary biologists. Here we take a step towards the understanding of the transcriptomic functional response of kidney using as a model the long–haired mouse (Abrothrix hirta) a species that distributes across Patagonian steppes and Austral temperate rainforests in Argentina and Chile. Specifically, we i) characterize the renal transcriptome of A. hirta, and ii) compare it with that—already available—of the co-generic and co-distributed A. olivacea. Renal mRNA transcripts from 16 specimens of A. hirta from natural populations were analyzed. Over 500 million Illumina paired-end reads were assembled de novo under two approaches, an individual assembly for each specimen, and a single in-silico normalized joint assembly including all reads from all specimens. The total number of annotated genes was similar with both strategies: an average of 14,956 in individual assemblies and 14,410 in the joint assembly. Overall, 15,463 distinct genes express in the kidney of A. hirta. Transcriptomes of A. hirta and A. olivacea were similar in terms of gene abundance and composition: 95.6% of the genes of A. hirta were also found in A. olivacea making their functional profiles also similar. However, differences in the transcriptome of these two species were observed in the set of highly expressed genes, in terms of private genes for each species and the functional profiles of highly expressed genes. As part of the novel transcriptome characterization, we provide distinct gene lists with their functional annotation that would constitute the basis for further research on these or any other species of the subfamily Sigmodontinae, which includes about 400 living species distributed from Tierra del Fuego to southern United States. PMID:25860131

  12. Ectoparasite occurrence associated with males and females of wild rodents Oligoryzomys flavescens (Waterhouse) and Akodon azarae (Fischer) (Rodentia: Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) in the Punta Lara wetlands, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lareschi, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study infestation parameters and indexes of ectoparasites associated with each sex of the wild rodents Oligoryzomys flavescens (Waterhouse) andAkodon azarae (Fischer) in the Punta Lara wetlands, Argentina. A trend towards higher mean abundance (MA) and ectoparasite specific richness was observed in males of O. flavescens whereas those values were similar for both A. azarae sexes. The prevalence of the following ectoparasites was significantly higher on males (P<0.05): Mysolaelaps microspinosus Fonseca (65.2%) and Hoplopleura travassosi Werneck (73.9%) on O. flavescens, and Ixodes loricatus Neumann (71.4%) on A. azarae. Only H. travassosi mean abundance was significantly higher on males (MA=44.1). Since I. loricatus and Hoplopleura spp. are involved in the transmission of pathogens that cause diseases in animals and humans, and whose reservoirs are rodent hosts, these results are epidemiologically important. PMID:21120393

  13. Viscachataenia n. g., with the redescription of V. quadrata (von Linstow, 1904) n. comb. (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) in Lagidium viscacia (Rodentia: Chinchillidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Denegri, G; Dopchiz, M C; Elissondo, M C; Beveridge, I

    2003-02-01

    A new genus, Viscachataenia, is erected to accommodate the anoplocephalid cestode Cittotaenia quadrata von Linstow, 1904, based on a redescription of the species from material collected from the chinchillid rodent Lagidium viscacia in Argentina. The new genus is characterised by paired genitalia, a reticulate uterus and the vagina entering the genital atrium anterior to the cirrus-sac. Viscachataenia therefore has similarities with Monoecocestus Beddard, 1914, a genus which is common in South American rodents but which has a single set of genitalia in each segment. Cittotaenia viscaciae (Spasskii, 1951) and Bertiella findlayi Mazza, Parodi & Fiora, 1932, also from viscachas, are considered synonyms of V. quadrata. PMID:12652061

  14. Evaluation of the fat-tailed gerbil, Pachyuromys duprasi (Rodentia: Gerbillidae), as a new animal model for studies of Leishmania major infection and transmission.

    PubMed

    Hanafi, Hanafi A; Fryauff, David J; Kittell, Cornel E

    2013-09-01

    The fat-tailed gerbil Pachyuromys duprasi is a common burrowing rodent found across the northern Sahara Desert from Morocco to Egypt. There is overlap in the geographical distribution and ecological habitats of P. duprasi, several Old World Leishmania species, and numerous sand fly vectors of Leishmania, but there are no records that document the natural occurrence of this gerbil with any species of Leishmania or phlebotomine sand fly. Experiments were conducted to determine its potential as a natural host and laboratory animal model for Leishmania major. Captive-born P. duprasi were inoculated subcutaneously (s.c.) in the tail with promastigotes or amastigotes of an Egyptian strain of L. major and monitored for signs of infection. Local swelling and erythema was visible 10-12 days after amastigote inoculation, and within 3-4 weeks swelling had increased tail widths by up to 78%. Infections progressed more slowly and less conspicuously following inoculation with promastigotes. Tissue density of amastigotes in the gerbil's tail lesions after inoculating with either stage of L. major was significantly lower than that produced in the footpads of BALB/c mice by the same parasite and incubation period. Laboratory transmission of L. major to P. duprasi by sand fly bite was demonstrated and acquisition of L. major, by bite, from tail lesions of infected P. duprasi to laboratory-reared Phlebotomus papatasi was also achieved with 10% of biting flies developing promastigote infections. The acquisition and development of L. major infections in P. papatasi after biting an infected P. duprasi and the susceptibility of P. duprasi to L. major delivered at low densities by sand fly bites indicate that fat-tailed gerbils could serve as a natural host and reservoir of L. major. PMID:23697770

  15. A new Demodecidae species (Acari) from the yellow-necked mouse Apodemus flavicollis (Rodentia: Muridae)-description with data on parasitism.

    PubMed

    Izdebska, Joanna N

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes morphological characteristics and the occurrence of Demodex corniculatus n. sp., which was found on Apodemus flavicollis in Poland. The yellow-necked murid mouse is a common European rodent; until now, it was parasitized by a single demodectic mite species, Demodex rosus, which occurs in the oral cavity and esophagus. The new species was found in hair follicles, particularly within hairy regions of the head and genital-anal area. Demodex corniculatus occurred in 33% of the yellow-necked mice examined. The new species is small (adult stages 140 μm in length); characteristic features of these mites are massive supracoxal spines (ca. 5-6 μm long) on the dorsal side of the gnathosoma and palps with thick-set, bifurcated terminal spines. This paper also contains a checklist of demodecids in European and cosmopolitan murids. PMID:22694339

  16. Bioregion heterogeneity correlates with extensive mitochondrial DNA diversity in the Namaqua rock mouse, Micaelamys namaquensis (Rodentia: Muridae) from southern Africa - evidence for a species complex

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Intraspecific variation within the diverse southern African murine rodents has not been extensively investigated, yet cryptic diversity is evident in several taxa studied to date. The Namaqua rock mouse, Micaelamys namaquensis Smith, 1834 is a widespread endemic murine rodent from the subregion. Currently, a single species with four subspecies is recognised, but in the past up to 16 subspecies were described. Thus, this species is a good candidate for the investigation of patterns and processes of diversification in a diverse but under-studied mammalian subfamily and geographic region. Here, we report genetic differentiation based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome b (cyt b) sequences among samples collected over an extensive coverage of the species' range. Results Cytochrome b sequences of 360 widely sampled individuals identified 137 unique maternal alleles. Gene tree and phylogeographic analyses of these alleles suggest the presence of at least eight lineages or haplogroups (A-H), with varying degrees of intra-lineage diversity. This differentiation is in contrast with the most recent taxonomic treatment based on cranial morphometrics which only recognised four subspecies. The mtDNA diversity strongly supports earlier views that this taxon may represent a species complex. We further show statistical support for the association of several of these lineages with particular vegetation biomes of southern Africa. The time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) dates to the Pliocene (~5 Mya) whereas coalescent-based divergence time estimates between lineages vary between 813 Kya [0.22 - 1.36] and 4.06 Mya [1.21 - 4.47]. The major diversification within lineages occurred during the Pleistocene. The identification of several regions of sympatry of distinct lineages offers future opportunities for the elucidation of the underlying speciation processes in the suggested species complex. Conclusions Similar to other African murine rodents, M. namaquensis radiated during the Pliocene and Pleistocene coinciding with major periods of aridification and the expansion of savanna habitats. The suggested species complex is represented by at least eight lineages of which the majority are confined to only one or a few neighbouring biomes/bioregions. Contrasting intra-lineage phylogeographic patterns suggest differences in adaptation and responses to Plio-Pleistocene climatic and vegetation changes. The role of ecological factors in driving speciation in the group needs further investigation. PMID:20942924

  17. Chronological context of the first hominin occurrence in southern Europe: the Allophaiomys ruffoi (Arvicolinae, Rodentia, Mammalia) from Pirro 13 (Pirro Nord, Apulia, southwestern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, Juan Manuel; Luzi, Elisa; Berto, Claudio; Peretto, Carlo; Arzarello, Marta

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the arvicoline from the Pirro 13 fissure are described (Pirro Nord, Apulia, southwestern Italy). Due to their wide geographical distributions and rapid evolutionary rates, arvicolines are especially useful for biochronological purposes. The Pirro 13 fissure has yielded one arvicoline species: Allophaiomys ruffoi. The presence of this vole species, along with a comparison of our data with those of other Early Pleistocene sites such as Sierra de Atapuerca and Orce, allows us to determine the age of Pirro 13, which is shown to range from 1.3 to 1.6 Ma, making Pirro 13 the most ancient locality with human evidence currently known in Western Europe.

  18. Similarities and differences among the chromosomes of the wild guinea pig Cavia tschudii and the domestic guinea pig Cavia porcellus (Rodentia, Caviidae).

    PubMed

    Walker, Laura I; Soto, Miguel A; Spotorno, Angel E

    2014-01-01

    Cavia tschudii Fitzinger, 1867 is a wild guinea pig species living in South America that according to the analysis of mitochondrial genes is the closest wild form of the domestic guinea pig. To investigate the genetic divergence between the wild and domestic species of guinea pigs from a cytogenetic perspective, we characterized and compared the C, G and AgNOR banded karyotypes of molecularly identified Cavia tschudii and Cavia porcellus Linnaeus, 1758 specimens for the first time. Both species showed 64 chromosomes of similar morphology, although C. tschudii had four medium size submetacentric pairs that were not observed in the C. porcellus karyotype. Differences in the C bands size and the mean number of AgNOR bands between the karyotypes of the two species were detected. Most of the two species chromosomes showed total G band correspondence, suggesting that they probably represent large syntenic blocks conserved over time. Partial G band correspondence detected among the four submetacentric chromosomes present only in the C. tschudii karyotype and their subtelocentric homologues in C. porcellus may be explained by the occurrence of four pericentric inversions that probably emerged and were fixed in the C. tschudii populations under domestication. The role of the chromosomal and genomic differences in the divergence of these two Cavia species is discussed. PMID:25147626

  19. Development of nine new microsatellite loci for the American beaver, Castor canadensis (Rodentia: Castoridae), and cross-species amplification in the European beaver, Castor fiber

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pelz-Serrano, K.; Munguia-Vega, A.; Piaggio, A.J.; Neubaum, M.; Munclinger, P.; PArtl, A.; van Riper, Charles, III; Culver, M.

    2009-01-01

    We developed nine new nuclear dinucleotide microsatellite loci for Castor canadensis. All loci were polymorphic, except for one. The number of alleles ranged from two to four and from five to 12 in populations from Arizona and Wisconsin, respectively. Average heterozygosity ranged from 0.13 to 0.86 per locus. Since cross-species amplification in Castor fiber was successful only in four loci, we tested also nine recently published C. canadensis loci in the Eurasian species. Eight of the published loci amplified; however, three were monomorphic. The number of alleles was lower in C. fiber than in C. canadensis at all loci tested. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. A new heligmonellid (Nematoda: Heligmonellidae) from Oecomys mamorae (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae) in the Pantanal and new data on the synlophe of Guerrerostrongylus zetta from the Atlantic Forest, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Simões, Raquel; Dos Santos, Michele Maria; Maldonado, Arnaldo

    2012-08-01

    A new species of Heligmonellidae nematode, Guerrerostrongylus gomesae n. sp., is described from specimens collected from the small intestine of the rodent Oecomys mamorae Thomas, 1906 in the Brazilian Pantanal. It differs from the 2 other species of the genus by the number of ridges in the synlophe 35-46 and 40-48 at the midbody in the male and female, respectively, by rays 8 arising at midlength of the dorsal trunk, ending near the margin of the caudal bursa, and the dorsal ray divided at the second-third part into 2 branches, each branch divided into 2 subequal subbranches. In addition, specimens of Guerrerostrongylus zetta Travassos, 1937 collected in Oligoryzomys nigripes Olfers, 1818 contain synlophe with 36-42 cuticular ridges in males and 38-42 in females at the midbody. By the characteristics of the synlophe and caudal bursa, Gerrerostrongylus gomesae n. sp. is considered a new species. We suggest that the number of cuticular ridges for this genus broadens the range of the cuticular ridges to at least 35 at midbody. PMID:22468958

  1. Variation in the helminth community structure of Thrichomys pachyurus (Rodentia: Echimyidae) in two sub-regions of the Brazilian Pantanal: the effects of land use and seasonality.

    PubMed

    Simões, R; Gentile, R; Rademaker, V; D'Andrea, P; Herrera, H; Freitas, T; Lanfredi, R; Maldonado, A

    2010-09-01

    The Pantanal is a large ecosystem located in South America. This preserved area is seasonally flooded due to abundant rainfall during the summer and the subsequent overflow of the Paraguai River. In this paper, we examine the helminth community structure in the wild rodent Thrichomys pachyurus during the wet and dry seasons in two locations of the preserved and cattle ranching areas in the Southern Pantanal. We identified 12 species of helminth, and, although we did not find any differences in species richness between locations within the Pantanal, we found that richness was higher during the wet season. Helminth species were largely aggregated in both farm locations and during seasons. The most common helminth species were more abundant during the dry season than during the wet season, which may have been due to the increased habitat availability and rodent population increase. The intensity of the infection also followed the same pattern for most helminths. The trichostrongylids (Heligmostrongylus crucifer, H. almeidai and Pudica cercomysi) were dominant at both farm locations. The land use of each area was not correlated with helminth diversity. However, species composition of the helminth community of T. pachyurus differed between locations and may be correlated with environmental differences between the habitats. The seasonality of the Pantanal was highly correlated with helminth parasitism in T. pachyurus. PMID:19849884

  2. Thaptomys Thomas 1915 (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae, Akodontini) with karyotypes 2n = 50, FN = 48, and 2n = 52, FN = 52: Two monophyletic lineages recovered by molecular phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A novel karyotype with 2n = 50, FN = 48, was described for specimens of Thaptomys collected at Una, State of Bahia, Brazil, which are morphologically indistinguishable from Thaptomys nigrita, 2n = 52, FN = 52, found in other localities. It was hence proposed that the 2n = 50 karyotype could belong to a distinct species, cryptic of Thaptomys nigrita, once chromosomal rearrangements observed, along with the geographic distance, might represent a reproductive barrier between both forms. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood based on partial cytochrome b sequences with 1077 bp were performed, attempting to establish the relationships among the individuals with distinct karyotypes along the geographic distribution of the genus; the sample comprised 18 karyotyped specimens of Thaptomys, encompassing 15 haplotypes, from eight different localities of the Atlantic Rainforest. The intra-generic relationships corroborated the distinct diploid numbers, once both phylogenetic reconstructions recovered two monophyletic lineages, a northeastern clade grouping the 2n = 50 and a southeastern clade with three subclades, grouping the 2n = 52 karyotype. The sequence divergence observed between their individuals ranged from 1.9% to 3.5%. PMID:21637479

  3. Proechimys (Rodentia, Echimyidae): characterization and taxonomic considerations of a form with a very low diploid number and a multiple sex chromosome system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proechimys is the most diverse genus in family Echimyidae, comprising 25 species (two of which are polytypic) and 39 taxa. Despite the numerous forms of this rodent and their abundance in nature, there are many taxonomic problems due to phenotypic similarities within the genus and high intraspecific variation. Extensive karyotypic variation has been noted, however, with diploid numbers (2n) ranging from 14 to 62 chromosomes. Some heteromorphism can be found, and 57 different karyotypes have been described to date. Results In the present work, we describe a cytotype with a very low 2n. Specimens of Proechimys cf. longicaudatus were collected from two different places in northern Mato Grosso state, Brazil (12°54″S, 52°22″W and 9°51′17″S, 58°14′53″W). The females and males had 16 and 17 chromosomes, respectively; all chromosomes were acrocentric, with the exception of the X chromosome, which was bi-armed. The sex chromosome system was found to be XY1Y2, originating from a Robertsonian rearrangement involving the X and a large acrocentric autosome. Females had two Neo-X chromosomes, and males had one Neo-X and two Y chromosomes. NOR staining was found in the interstitial region of one autosomal pair. Conclusions Comparison of this karyotype with those described in the literature revealed that Proechimys with similar karyotypes had previously been collected from nearby localities. We therefore suggest that this Proechimys belongs to a different taxon, and is either a new species or one that requires reassessment. PMID:23496787

  4. [Spatial distribution of Marmota baibacina and M. sibirica (Marmota, Sciuridae, Rodentia) in a zone of sympatry in Mongolian Altai: bioacoustic analysis].

    PubMed

    Brandler, O V; Nikol'skiĭ, A A; Kolesnikov, V V

    2010-01-01

    The spatial distribution of two marmot species Marmota baibacina and M. sibirica in a zone of coexistence was studied by using their alarm call as a diagnostic trait. It was found that M. baibacina prefers to inhabit bouldery screes, whereas M. sibirica inhabits all suitable biotopes. The difference in biotopic distribution of these species could be explained by M. sibirica forcing M. baibacina out of optimum habitats. Cases of coexistence of both species in one family group sites were registered, which might contribute to the appearance of hybrids. PMID:20583623

  5. Revision of the genus Leopoldamys (Rodentia, Muridae) as inferred from morphological and molecular data, with a special emphasis on the species composition in continental Indochina.

    PubMed

    Balakirev, A E; Abramov, A V; Rozhnov, V V

    2013-01-01

    A revision of the genus Leopoldamys is presented, and both the species composition and distribution in Indochina and Sundaic regions is reinvestigated. The phylogeny of the genus is recovered based on Cyt b, COI, and IRBP gene analyses. Five basal and 16 secondary monophyletic phylogenetic lineages were identified. A taxonomic reassessment of the continental and Sundaic populations is performed based on morphological verification of the genetically defined clades. Six clades were recovered in the phylogenetic analyses and correspond to morphologically defined species: L. revertens (distributed in lowlands of eastern and central Indochina), L. herberti (western and central Indochina, northward to northern Vietnam), L. edwardsi (China and northern Vietnam, northward of 21 degrees N), L. milleti (endemic of Dalat Plateau, southern Vietnam), L. sabanus (Borneo), and L. vociferans (lowlands of the Malacca Peninsula, northward to southwestern Thailand). The absence of proper L. sabanus in continental Indochina is revealed. The substitute name for the species known from the majority of Indochina under the name of L. sabanus should be L. revertens. The name L. neilli, which has been ascribed to populations from Thailand and Vietnam, is a junior synonym of L. herberti. Two related but rather divergent clades are found in Sumatra and the Malacca Peninsula. Based on their considerable genetic distances, these forms should be regarded as separate species from the L. sabanus type-bearing populations of Borneo, or as the members of L. sabanus polytypic superspecies. The substitute name for the lineage-bearing taxon from Malacca should be L. vociferans. The continental populations of Leopoldamys can be distinguished from each other by external and cranial characters and may be subdivided into four species. Two of these species (L. revertens and L. milleti) are well distinguished by external and cranial morphology, whereas the other two species (L. herberti and L. edwardsi) may be treated as sibling species that are difficult to distinguish based on morphological characters. PMID:26000434

  6. Demodex microti n. sp. (Acari: Demodecidae) in Microtus arvalis (Pallas) (Rodentia, Cricetidae) with a checklist of the demodecid mites of cricetids.

    PubMed

    Izdebska, Joanna N; Rolbiecki, Leszek

    2013-10-01

    Demodex microti n. sp. (Acari, Demodecidae) is described from the skin of the genital area of the common vole Microtus arvalis (Pallas) in Poland based on the morphology of the adult and immature stages. The new species appears most similar to D. cricetuli Hurley & Desch, 1994 from the gray dwarf hamster, Cricetulus migratorius (Pallas), but differs in the following features: the supracoxal spines are conical and located at the edge of the gnathosoma, the spines of the terminal segment of palp are three, single-tined, the opisthosomal organ is narrow and elongated in males and bubble-shaped in females, the vulva is located below the incision of the fourth pair of epimeral plates, eggs are oval. The differences also relate to body size and proportions, D. microti n. sp. being smaller and slender. The new species occurred in all of the rodents examined. A checklist of demodecid mites in cricetids world-wide is also provided. PMID:24048750

  7. A new species of Demodex (Acari: Demodecidae) with data on topical specificity and topography of demodectic mites in the striped field mouse Apodemus agrarius (Rodentia: Muridae).

    PubMed

    Izdebska, Joanna N; Rolbiecki, Leszek

    2013-11-01

    This article describes morphological characteristics and the occurrence of Demodex gracilentus sp. nov., which was found in the striped field mouse Apodemus agrarius (Pallas, 1771) in the skin of vibrissae area. D. gracilentus occurred in 36.7% of the rodents examined. D. gracilentus is a relatively large representative of the genus (adult stages on average 292 microm in length), a slender, elongated body; characteristic feature of these mites are conical supracoxal spines on dorsal side of gnathosoma, palps with asymmetric, forked triple spines on palptarsus, and the presence of rhomboidal opisthosomal organ. So far, the occurrence of three specific representatives of the family Demodecidae has been demonstrated in A. agrarius: Demodex apodemi (Hirst, 1918) (= Demodex arvicolae apodemi Hirst, 1918), Demodex agrarii Bukva, 1994, and Demodex huttereri Mertens, Lukoschus et Nutting, 1983. The first one is related to common hair follicles, especially in the skin of the head, while the next one inhabits the external auditory meatus, and the last one occurs in the meibomian glands of the eyelids. PMID:24843923

  8. Panic-like defensive behavior but not fear-induced antinociception is differently organized by dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei of Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia, Muridae)

    PubMed Central

    Biagioni, A.F.; Silva, J.A.; Coimbra, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a forebrain structure critically involved in the organization of defensive responses to aversive stimuli. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic dysfunction in dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei is implicated in the origin of panic-like defensive behavior, as well as in pain modulation. The present study was conducted to test the difference between these two hypothalamic nuclei regarding defensive and antinociceptive mechanisms. Thus, the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (40 ng/0.2 µL) or saline (0.9% NaCl) was microinjected into the dorsomedial or posterior hypothalamus in independent groups. Innate fear-induced responses characterized by defensive attention, defensive immobility and elaborate escape behavior were evoked by hypothalamic blockade of GABAA receptors. Fear-induced defensive behavior organized by the posterior hypothalamus was more intense than that organized by dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei. Escape behavior elicited by GABAA receptor blockade in both the dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamus was followed by an increase in nociceptive threshold. Interestingly, there was no difference in the intensity or in the duration of fear-induced antinociception shown by each hypothalamic division presently investigated. The present study showed that GABAergic dysfunction in nuclei of both the dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamus elicit panic attack-like defensive responses followed by fear-induced antinociception, although the innate fear-induced behavior originates differently in the posterior hypothalamus in comparison to the activity of medial hypothalamic subdivisions. PMID:22437484

  9. Panic-like defensive behavior but not fear-induced antinociception is differently organized by dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei of Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia, Muridae).

    PubMed

    Biagioni, A F; Silva, J A; Coimbra, N C

    2012-04-01

    The hypothalamus is a forebrain structure critically involved in the organization of defensive responses to aversive stimuli. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic dysfunction in dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei is implicated in the origin of panic-like defensive behavior, as well as in pain modulation. The present study was conducted to test the difference between these two hypothalamic nuclei regarding defensive and antinociceptive mechanisms. Thus, the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline (40 ng/0.2 µL) or saline (0.9% NaCl) was microinjected into the dorsomedial or posterior hypothalamus in independent groups. Innate fear-induced responses characterized by defensive attention, defensive immobility and elaborate escape behavior were evoked by hypothalamic blockade of GABA(A) receptors. Fear-induced defensive behavior organized by the posterior hypothalamus was more intense than that organized by dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei. Escape behavior elicited by GABA(A) receptor blockade in both the dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamus was followed by an increase in nociceptive threshold. Interestingly, there was no difference in the intensity or in the duration of fear-induced antinociception shown by each hypothalamic division presently investigated. The present study showed that GABAergic dysfunction in nuclei of both the dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamus elicit panic attack-like defensive responses followed by fear-induced antinociception, although the innate fear-induced behavior originates differently in the posterior hypothalamus in comparison to the activity of medial hypothalamic subdivisions. PMID:22437484

  10. Causes and consequences of change rates in the habitat of the threatened tropical porcupine, Sphiggurus mexicanus (Rodentia: Erethizontidae) in Oaxaca, Mexico: implications for its conservation.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Consuelo; Sántiz, Eugenia C; Navarrete, Darío A; Bolaños, Jorge

    2014-12-01

    Land use changes by human activities have been the main causes of habitats and wildlife population degradation. In the Tehuantepec Isthmus in Oaxaca, the tropical habitat of the porcupine Sphiggurus mexicanus has been subject to vegetation and land use changes, causing its reduction and fragmentation. In this study, we estimated vegetation cover and land use (δn) change rates and assessed habitat availability and potential cor- ridors for possible porcupine movements to avoid its isolation. In the study area, the type of vegetation with the most change rate value was the savanna (δn = -2.9), transformed into induced grasslands. Additionally, we have observed the porcupine (since 2011) in semi-deciduous (δn = -0.87) and tropical dry (δn = -0.89) forests that have been transformed in temporal agriculture and mesquite and induced grasslands. The vegetation inhabited by the porcupine resulted in recording a total of 64 plant species (44 trees, nine vines, seven herbs, four shrubs), of which the vine Bunchosia lanceolata showed the highest importance value (41.85) followed by the trees Guazuma ulmifolia (22.71), Dalbergia glabra (18.05), and Enterolobium cyclocarpum (17.02). The habitat evaluation and potential corridor analysis showed that only 1 501.93ha could be considered as suitable habitats with optimum structural conditions (coverage, surface, and distances to transformed areas) to maintain viable populations of S. mexicanus, and 293.6 ha as corridors. An increasing destruction of the porcupines' habitat has been observed in the study area due to excessive logging, and actions for this species and its habitat conserva- tion and management have to be taken urgently. PMID:25720182

  11. The parasitism of Schistosoma mansoni (Digenea-Trematoda) in a naturally infected population of water rats, Nectomys squamipes (Rodentia-Sigmodontinae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, P S; Maroja, L S; Gentile, R; Cerqueira, R; Maldonado Júnior, A; Rey, L

    2000-06-01

    Schistosomiasis is a health problem in Brazil and the role of rodents in maintaining the schistosome life-cycle requires further clarification. The influence of Schistosoma mansoni on a population of Nectomys squamipes was studied by capture-recapture (1st phase, from June 1991 to November 1995) and removal (2nd phase, from April 1997 to March 1999) studies at Sumidouro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. During both phases coproscopic examinations were performed. At the 2nd phase the rodents were perfused and worms were counted. The population dynamics of parasites was studied. During the 1st phase, female reproductive parameters, longevity, recruitment and survivorship rates and migration patterns were studied in relation to schistosome prevalence. Water contamination (source of miracidia), abundance intermediate host and rodent migration were related to prevalence. The N. squamipes population was not obviously influenced by the infection, as shown by the high number of reproductive infected females, high longevity of infected individuals and the absence of a relationship between recruitment or survivorship rates and the intensity of schistosome infection. The data indicate that N. squamipes can increase transmission of S. mansoni in endemic areas and carry it to non-infected areas. Furthermore, this rodent can be used as an indicator of a transmission focus. PMID:10874720

  12. Heterogeneities of size and sexual dimorphism between the subdomains of the lateral-innervated accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) of Octodon degus (Rodentia: Hystricognathi).

    PubMed

    Suárez, Rodrigo; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2009-03-17

    The vomeronasal system (VNS) of rodents participates in the regulation of a variety of social and sexual behaviours related to semiochemical communication. All rodents studied so far possess two parallel pathways from the vomeronasal organ (VNO) to the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). These segregated afferences express either Gi2 or Go protein alpha-subunits and innervate the rostral or caudal half of the AOB, respectively. In muroid rodents, such as rats and mice, both subdivisions of the AOB are of similar proportions; as there is no anatomical feature indicative of the segregation, histochemical detection has been required to portray its boundary. We studied the AOB of Octodon degus, a diurnal caviomorph rodent endemic to central Chile, and found several distinctive traits not reported in a rodent before: (i) the vomeronasal nerve innervates the AOB from its lateral aspect, in opposition to the medial innervation described in rabbits and muroids, (ii) an indentation that spans all layers delimits the boundary between the rostral and caudal AOB subdivisions (rAOB and cAOB, respectively), (iii) the rAOB is twice the size of the cAOB and features more and larger glomeruli, and (iv) the rAOB, but not the cAOB, shows male-biased sexual dimorphisms in size and number of glomeruli, while the cAOB, but not the rAOB, shows a male-biased dimorphism in mitral cell density. The heterogeneities we describe here within AOB subdomains suggest that these segregated regions may engage in distinct operationalities. We discuss our results in relation to conspecific semiochemical communication in O. degus, and present it as a new animal model for the study of VNS neurobiology and evolution. PMID:19046995

  13. Seasonal occurrence and reproductive status of Opisocrostis bruneri (Siphonaptera: Ceratophyllidae), a flea on Franklin's ground squirrel, Spermophilus franklinii (Rodentia: Sciuridae) near Birds Hill Park, Manitoba.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, T R; Galloway, T D

    1994-01-01

    Eight hundred and forty-nine and 1,503 Opisocrostis bruneri (Baker) were removed from Spermophilus franklinii (Sabine) in 1982 and 1983, respectively. Two discrete peaks in mean intensity of infestation were observed, one in early May and one in late August to early September. Overall prevalence of O. bruneri on S. franlinii was > or = 0.75. The observed biweekly prevalence on adult male and female squirrels was always > or = 0.73 and > or = 0.67, respectively. All juvenile squirrels were infested. Female fleas with undeveloped ovarioles, and with or without sperm in the spermatheca, were predominant during the first 6 wk that squirrels appeared above ground after hibernation. Parous females predominated thereafter. Peaks of nulliparous female fleas were observed in early May and early July. Female fleas were favored in each trapping period except during a 2-wk period from the beginning of May to the end of June. The mean biweekly sex ratio (male/female) of fleas removed from S. franklinii was 0.70 and 0.72 in 1982 and 1983, respectively. Oogenesis in O. bruneri was not dependent upon the estrous cycle of female S. franklinii. It appeared that O. bruneri completed at least two generations per year in Manitoba. PMID:8158613

  14. Lineage-specific responses of tooth shape in murine rodents (murinae, rodentia) to late Miocene dietary change in the Siwaliks of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuri; Jacobs, Louis L; Flynn, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    Past ecological responses of mammals to climate change are recognized in the fossil record by adaptive significance of morphological variations. To understand the role of dietary behavior on functional adaptations of dental morphology in rodent evolution, we examine evolutionary change of tooth shape in late Miocene Siwalik murine rodents, which experienced a dietary shift toward C4 diets during late Miocene ecological change indicated by carbon isotopic evidence. Geometric morphometric analysis in the outline of upper first molars captures dichotomous lineages of Siwalik murines, in agreement with phylogenetic hypotheses of previous studies (two distinct clades: the Karnimata and Progonomys clades), and indicates lineage-specific functional responses to mechanical properties of their diets. Tooth shapes of the two clades are similar at their sympatric origin but deviate from each other with decreasing overlap through time. Shape change in the Karnimata clade is associated with greater efficiency of propalinal chewing for tough diets than in the Progonomys clade. Larger body mass in Karnimata may be related to exploitation of lower-quality food items, such as grasses, than in smaller-bodied Progonomys. The functional and ecophysiological aspects of Karnimata exploiting C4 grasses are concordant with their isotopic dietary preference relative to Progonomys. Lineage-specific selection was differentially greater in Karnimata, and a faster rate of shape change toward derived Karnimata facilitated inclusion of C4 grasses in the diet. Sympatric speciation in these clades is most plausibly explained by interspecific competition on resource utilization between the two, based on comparisons of our results with the carbon isotope data. Interspecific competition with Karnimata may have suppressed morphological innovation of the Progonomys clade. Pairwise analyses of morphological and carbon isotope data can uncover ecological causes of sympatric speciation and define functional adaptations of teeth to resources. PMID:24155885

  15. Two New Species of Demodex (Acari: Demodecidae) with a Redescription of Demodex musculi and Data on Parasitism in Mus musculus (Rodentia: Muridae).

    PubMed

    Izdebska, Joanna N; Rolbiecki, Leszek

    2015-07-01

    This article describes two new skin mite species found on the house mouse Mus musculus L., 1758. Demodex marculus sp. nov. is a very small demodecid mite (adult stages, on average, 99 µm in length) found in mouse skin in the abdomen, back, limbs, and anal area. It is characterized by relatively large bossing hammer-shaped supracoxal spines, embedded in the trapezoidal gnathosoma. Demodex fusiformis sp. nov., in turn, is a little larger (adult stages on average 111 µm in length), with a small oval gnathosoma equipped with fine, knob-like supracoxal spines. It was found in the skin of abdomen, back, and limbs. Moreover, Demodex musculi (Oudemans, 1897) was redescribed, which is small demodecid mite (adult stages on average 142 µm in length) and characterized by relatively large morphological variation and considerable sexual dimorphism. The characteristic feature of this species is the strongly elongated and rectangular gnathosoma equipped with very large wedge-shaped supracoxal spines. D. musculi was found in the skin of various, haired regions of the mice body (head, neck, abdomen, back, limbs, genital-anal region, and tail). Moreover, one more demodecid mite was found in the skin of the examined mice, it was Demodex flagellurus Bukva, 1985, which was found only in the genital area. Overall infection of Mus musculus L. by all species of Demodex was with the prevalence of 100%, mean intensity of 24.0, and range of intensity of 1-109. Despite high infection levels, no symptoms of parasitosis were observed in the hosts. PMID:26335466

  16. A new species of the genus Demodex Owen, 1843 (Acari: Demodecidae) from the ear canals of the house mouse Mus musculus L. (Rodentia: Muridae).

    PubMed

    Izdebska, Joanna N; Rolbiecki, Leszek

    2015-06-01

    A new species Demodex conicus n. sp. is described based on adult and juvenile stages from the ear canals of the house mouse Mus musculus L. in Poland. The new species is most similar to D. auricularis Izdebska, Rolbiecki & Fryderyk, 2014 from the ear canals of the wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus (L.), but differs in the following features: the gnathosoma is triangular, the supracoxal spines (setae elc.p) are conical, the spines on the terminal segment of palp are four, the striation on opisthosoma is fine but dense, the vulva is located at a distance of c.17 µm from posterior level of legs IV, and the male genital opening is located at the level of legs I. The differences also relate to body size and proportions, female D. conicus n. sp. being, on average slightly larger, and male significantly larger than D. auricularis. Males of the new species also have longer and more massive opisthosoma than males of D. auricularis. Demodex conicus n. sp. was found in 17.5% of the mice studied from different locations in Poland. PMID:25962464

  17. Taxonomic revision of the Andean leaf-eared mouse, Phyllotis andium Thomas 1912 (Rodentia: Cricetidae), with the description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Rengifo, Edgardo M; Pacheco, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    The Andean Leaf-eared mouse, Phyllotis andium Thomas 1912, has been considered a widespread medium-size sigmodontine rodent (230 mm of total length and 35 grams approximately) that occurs from Tungurahua, Ecuador, through the Andes, to Lima, Peru. Previous studies performed on Phyllotis noted evidence of morphological geographical variation within the species, which is likely because of the several potential geographical barriers that exist within the distribution range of P. andium. We carried out a taxonomic revision of this species based on qualitative and quantitative morphological analyses of 330 specimens from 92 localities. This included appropriate comparisons with other species of the andium/amicus group and performed molecular analysis based on cytochrome b sequences. As a result, morphologic qualitative analysis suggested the recognition of three different taxa, which are supported by morphologic quantitative and molecular analyses. The three taxa here identified have allopatric distributional ranges separated by important geographic barriers. Following these identification criteria, P. andium is now recognized for the samples from Tungurahua, Ecuador to Huánuco, Peru, and includes melanius and fruticicolus as synonymous; the southern populations from the Ancash and Lima departments, in the western Peruvian Andes, are proposed to represent a new species; and we recognize P. stenops as a valid species with tamborum as a synonym. Finally, we postulate that the diversification of these three species is related to key events in the Andean orogeny. PMID:26624045

  18. First Report on Isolation and Characterization of Leishmania major from Meriones hurrianae (Rodentia: Gerbillidae) of A Rural Cutaneous leishmaniasis Focus in South-Eastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kassiri, Hamid; Naddaf, Saied Reza; Javadian, Ezat–Aldin; Mohebali, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Background Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ZCL) is an endemic health problem in many rural areas of Iran, with doubled number of incidences over the last decade. Different species of rodents serve as natural reservoir host for ZCL. The disease is considered as a major health problem in rural areas of Mirjaveh, Chabahar, and Konarak Counties of Sistan va Baluchistan Province. Objectives This study describes the identity of Leishmania species, isolated from Meriones hurrianae from Chabahar County using RAPD-PCR methodology. Materials and Methods Rodents were entrapped by live traps baited with roasted walnut, tomato, and cucumber during spring and summer. All rodents were identified based on external features including fur color, ears characteristics, tail length, hind feet, body measurements, and internal features of teeth and cranium. Giemsa-stained impressions from rodents’ ears were examined for amastigotes microscopically. The samples from infected rodents were cultured in NNN+LIT medium and then the harvested parasites at the stationary phase were subjected to DNA extraction followed by amplification with RAPD-PCR. Results All the 28 entrapped animals were identified as M. hurrianae. Five animals showed to harbor Leishmania parasite by microscopy. Leishmania DNA isolated from five M. hurrianae produced distinctive bands of L. major with four primers. However, the products that were amplified with primers AB1-07, 327, and 329 were stable and reproducible. This is the first report on the isolation and identification of L. major from M. hurrianae from Iran. Conclusions Regarding infection rate of 17.8%, M. hurrianae seems to play the major role in the maintenance and transmission of disease to humans in this area. PMID:24616787

  19. Description of two new species of Nippostrongylinae (Nematoda: Heligmonellidae) coparasites in three sympatric species of Mastomys spp. (Rodentia: Muridae) from Senegal.

    PubMed

    Durette-Desset, M C; Brouat, C; Diouf, M; Duplantier, J M

    2008-12-01

    Two new species of heligmosomoid Trichostrongylina nematodes belonging to the genera Neoheligmonella Durette-Desset, 1970 and Heligmonina Baylis, 1928 are described. They are parasitic in the small intestine of three species of Mastomys from Senegal living in sympatry: M. natalensis (Smith, 1834), M. erythroleucus (Temminck, 1853) and M. huberti (Wroughton, 1909). Neoheligmonella granjoni n. sp. is closely related to three species from Senegal. They concern: N. bai Diouf & Durette-Desset, 2002 and N. dielmensis Diouf, Bâ & Durette-Desset, 1998, both parasitic in Arvicanthis niloticus Geoffroy, 1903 and N. mastomysi Diouf et al., 1998, a parasite of M. erythroleucus. N. granjoni n. sp. differs from these species by having 15 cuticular ridges at mid-body versus 13, a large carene and spicules taking up 10-15% of body length versus 5.3-7.1%. Heligmonina kanei n. sp. differs from the most related species H. kotoensis Diouf, Daouda & Durette-Desset 2005, a parasite of M. natalensis from Benin in the following features: spicules taking up 11.6% of body length on average versus 16.8%; a female tail three times longer than the distance anus-vulva versus a tail of equivalent size to this distance. In N. granjoni n. sp., where the material is abundant in all three hosts, the infra-specific variations observed (morphological or morphometrical) were not related to the host species. This is the first report of the genera Neoheligmonella and Heligmonina in M. huberti. The relevance of the phenomenon of host capture concerning the evolution of these two genera is confirmed. PMID:19202761

  20. Lineage-Specific Responses of Tooth Shape in Murine Rodents (Murinae, Rodentia) to Late Miocene Dietary Change in the Siwaliks of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuri; Jacobs, Louis L.; Flynn, Lawrence J.

    2013-01-01

    Past ecological responses of mammals to climate change are recognized in the fossil record by adaptive significance of morphological variations. To understand the role of dietary behavior on functional adaptations of dental morphology in rodent evolution, we examine evolutionary change of tooth shape in late Miocene Siwalik murine rodents, which experienced a dietary shift toward C4 diets during late Miocene ecological change indicated by carbon isotopic evidence. Geometric morphometric analysis in the outline of upper first molars captures dichotomous lineages of Siwalik murines, in agreement with phylogenetic hypotheses of previous studies (two distinct clades: the Karnimata and Progonomys clades), and indicates lineage-specific functional responses to mechanical properties of their diets. Tooth shapes of the two clades are similar at their sympatric origin but deviate from each other with decreasing overlap through time. Shape change in the Karnimata clade is associated with greater efficiency of propalinal chewing for tough diets than in the Progonomys clade. Larger body mass in Karnimata may be related to exploitation of lower-quality food items, such as grasses, than in smaller-bodied Progonomys. The functional and ecophysiological aspects of Karnimata exploiting C4 grasses are concordant with their isotopic dietary preference relative to Progonomys. Lineage-specific selection was differentially greater in Karnimata, and a faster rate of shape change toward derived Karnimata facilitated inclusion of C4 grasses in the diet. Sympatric speciation in these clades is most plausibly explained by interspecific competition on resource utilization between the two, based on comparisons of our results with the carbon isotope data. Interspecific competition with Karnimata may have suppressed morphological innovation of the Progonomys clade. Pairwise analyses of morphological and carbon isotope data can uncover ecological causes of sympatric speciation and define functional adaptations of teeth to resources. PMID:24155885

  1. Biome specificity of distinct genetic lineages within the four-striped mouse Rhabdomys pumilio (Rodentia: Muridae) from southern Africa with implications for taxonomy.

    PubMed

    du Toit, Nina; van Vuuren, Bettine Jansen; Matthee, Sonja; Matthee, Conrad A

    2012-10-01

    Within southern Africa, a link between past climatic changes and faunal diversification has been hypothesized for a diversity of taxa. To test the hypothesis that evolutionary divergences may be correlated to vegetation changes (induced by changes in climate), we selected the widely distributed four-striped mouse, Rhabdomys, as a model. Two species are currently recognized, the mesic-adapted R. dilectus and arid-adapted R. pumilio. However, the morphology-based taxonomy and the distribution boundaries of previously described subspecies remain poorly defined. The current study, which spans seven biomes, focuses on the spatial genetic structure of the arid-adapted R. pumilio (521 specimens from 31 localities), but also includes limited sampling of the mesic-adapted R. dilectus (33 specimens from 10 localities) to act as a reference for interspecific variation within the genus. The mitochondrial COI gene and four nuclear introns (Eef1a1, MGF, SPTBN1, Bfib7) were used for the construction of gene trees. Mitochondrial DNA analyses indicate that Rhabdomys consists of four reciprocally monophyletic, geographically structured clades, with three distinct lineages present within the arid-adapted R. pumilio. These monophyletic lineages differ by at least 7.9% (±0.3) and these results are partly confirmed by a multilocus network of the combined nuclear intron dataset. Ecological niche modeling in MaxEnt supports a strong correlation between regional biomes and the distribution of distinct evolutionary lineages of Rhabdomys. A Bayesian relaxed molecular clock suggests that the geographic clades diverged between 3.09 and 4.30Ma, supporting the hypothesis that the radiation within the genus coincides with paleoclimatic changes (and the establishment of the biomes) characterizing the Miocene-Pliocene boundary. Marked genetic divergence at the mitochondrial DNA level, coupled with strong nuclear and mtDNA signals of non-monophyly of R. pumilio, support the notion that a taxonomic revision of the genus is needed. PMID:22728170

  2. Ectoparasites of rodents in Southern Africa: two new species of Laelaps Koch, 1836 (Acari: Laelapidae) ectoparasitic on Rhabdomys pumilio (Sparrman) (Rodentia: Muridae).

    PubMed

    Matthee, Sonja; Ueckermann, Edward A

    2009-05-01

    Laelaps horaki n. sp. and L. radovskyi n. sp. are described from the pelage of the rodent Rhabdomys pumilio (Sparrman) in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. The formal taxonomic description and illustrations are derived from adults (females and males) and deutonymphs. A key to southern African species of Laelaps Koch, 1836 is given. PMID:19337857

  3. Ectoparasites of rodents in Southern Africa: a new species of Androlaelaps Berlese, 1903 (Acari: Parasitiformes: Laelapidae) from Rhabdomys pumilio (Sparrman) (Rodentia: Muridae).

    PubMed

    Matthee, Sonja; Ueckermann, Edward A

    2008-07-01

    Androlaelaps rhabdomysi n. sp. is described from the pelage of the endemic rodent Rhabdomys pumilio (Sparrman) in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. The formal taxonomic description and illustrations are derived from adults (female and male) and deutonymphs. The specimens are similar in appearance to two congeneric species A. dasymys (Radford, 1939) and A. fahrenholzi (Berlese, 1911), but differ in the following features: genital shield long and almost parallel-sided; metapodal shield elongate; and anal shield longer than wide. Furthermore, the pilus dentilis on the fixed cheliceral digit of A. rhabdomysi is a rather broad sausage-shape and slightly constricted medially, whereas in the other two species it has an inflated base and is slender distally. PMID:18535789

  4. Laboratory evaluation of fipronil and imidacloprid topical insecticides for control of the plague vector Oropsylla montana (Siphonaptera: Ceratophyllidae) on california ground squirrels (Rodentia: Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Metzger, Marco E; Rust, Michael K

    2002-01-01

    Two insecticides, fipronil and imidacloprid, were evaluated for efficacy and longevity against Oropsylla montana (Baker), the most important vector of plague in California. Wild-caught California ground squirrels, Spermophilus beecheyi (Richardson), were individually housed in the laboratory to serve as natural hosts to O. montana and for on-animal insecticide trials. Several concentrations oftechnical grade fipronil and imidacloprid in acetone were applied to samples of clean rodent bedding to determine residual activity and longevity against fleas. Immature and adult cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouche), were used as representative fleas for periodic assays in place of less fecund O. montana. Toxicity of treated bedding did not decrease significantly for 1 yr at all applied concentrations. Fipronil provided 100% kill for at least 1 yr at > or = 100 ppm, whereas imidacloprid required 10,000 ppm for similar performance. Laboratory squirrels were treated with topical formulations of fipronil (Frontline Top Spot) and imidacloprid (Advantage Flea Adulticide) at a dosage rate of 15 mg/kg and evaluated for residual activity every 2 wk against adult O. montana. Residual activity was determined by percent recovery of O. montana adults released on treated and untreated animals after 48 h. Frontline provided 100% kill of adult fleas for at least 10 wk, and up to 26 wk on one animal. Advantage failed to provide 100% kill of adult fleas at 2 wk, with complete loss of efficacy by week 6. Concurrent assays with bedding samples from squirrel nest boxes showed negligible toxicity transfer from treated animals to nest bedding. PMID:11931250

  5. MtDNA CytB Structure of Rhombomys opimus (Rodentia: Gerbellidae), the Main Reservoir of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in the Borderline of Iran-Turkmenistan

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshi, Hasan; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Rassi, Yavar; Akhavan, Amir Ahmad; Mohebali, Mehdi; Hajaran, Homa; Mohtarami, Fatemeh; Mirzajani, Hossein; Maleki-Ravasan, Naseh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Great gerbils, Rhombomys opimus, are the main reservoir host of zoonootic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in Iran and neighboring countries. Based on morphological traits two subspecies R. opimus sodalis and R. opimus sargadensis have reported in the country. However, variation in infection rate and signs to Leishmania parasites, phenotype, size, and sexual polymorphisms demand more details to elucidate clearly the role of great gerbils in ZCL epidemiology. Methods: PCR-RFLP and PCR-direct sequencing were used to analyze mitochondrial DNA cytochrome B (mtDNA-cytB) gene structure of R. opimus collected from Golestan and Khorasan-e-Razavi Provinces in 2011 that are neighbor to Turkmenistan Country where ZCL is endemic in both sides of the borderline. Results: All of the specimens (n= 61) were morphologically or genetically similar to the typical R. opimus sodalis. However, there were 9 (1.5%) DNA substitutions throughout the 583 bp of the Cyt b gene of the samples sequenced comprising six DNA haplotypes. Maximum likelihood or neighbor joining phylogenetic trees inferred from the sequences could resolve the populations according to their subspecies as well as geographical origins. Discussion: The DNA polymorphisms in the great gerbils may correspond to the signs and infection rate in the animal. However, further studies are needed to match these six haplotypes with different signs and parasite sustaining following infection with L. major in the great gerbils. PMID:24409443

  6. 16 CFR 301.0 - Fur products name guide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Lepus sp. and Lepus europaeus occidentalis. Jackal Carnivora Canidae Canis aureus and Canis adustus... Rodentia Sciuridae Marmota monax. (Secs. 7, 8, 65 Stat. 179; 15 U.S.C. 69e, 69f) Regulations Source: 17...

  7. 16 CFR 301.0 - Fur products name guide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Lynx Carnivora Felidae Lynx canadensis and Lynx lynx. Marmot Rodentia Scinridae Marmota bobak. Marten, American Carnivora Mustelidae Martes americana and Martes caurina. Marten, Baum ......do ......do Martes martes. Marten, Japanese ......do ......do Martes melampus. Marten, Stone ......do ......do Martes...

  8. 16 CFR 301.0 - Fur products name guide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... Lynx Carnivora Felidae Lynx canadensis and Lynx lynx. Marmot Rodentia Scinridae Marmota bobak. Marten, American Carnivora Mustelidae Martes americana and Martes caurina. Marten, Baum ......do ......do Martes martes. Marten, Japanese ......do ......do Martes melampus. Marten, Stone ......do ......do Martes...

  9. 16 CFR 301.0 - Fur products name guide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Lynx Carnivora Felidae Lynx canadensis and Lynx lynx. Marmot Rodentia Scinridae Marmota bobak. Marten, American Carnivora Mustelidae Martes americana and Martes caurina. Marten, Baum ......do ......do Martes martes. Marten, Japanese ......do ......do Martes melampus. Marten, Stone ......do ......do Martes...

  10. 16 CFR 301.0 - Fur products name guide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Lynx Carnivora Felidae Lynx canadensis and Lynx lynx. Marmot Rodentia Scinridae Marmota bobak. Marten, American Carnivora Mustelidae Martes americana and Martes caurina. Marten, Baum ......do ......do Martes martes. Marten, Japanese ......do ......do Martes melampus. Marten, Stone ......do ......do Martes...

  11. Phylogeny and chronology of the major lineages of New World hystricognath rodents: insights on the biogeography of the Eocene/Oligocene arrival of mammals in South America

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The hystricognath rodents of the New World, the Caviomorpha, are a diverse lineage with a long evolutionary history, and their representation in South American fossil record begins with their occurrence in Eocene deposits from Peru. Debates regarding the origin and diversification of this group represent longstanding issues in mammalian evolution because early hystricognaths, as well as Platyrrhini primates, appeared when South American was an isolated landmass, which raised the possibility of a synchronous arrival of these mammalian groups. Thus, an immediate biogeographic problem is posed by the study of caviomorph origins. This problem has motivated the analysis of hystricognath evolution with molecular dating techniques that relied essentially on nuclear data. However, questions remain about the phylogeny and chronology of the major caviomorph lineages. To enhance the understanding of the evolution of the Hystricognathi in the New World, we sequenced new mitochondrial genomes of caviomorphs and performed a combined analysis with nuclear genes. Results Our analysis supports the existence of two major caviomorph lineages: the (Chinchilloidea + Octodontoidea) and the (Cavioidea + Erethizontoidea), which diverged in the late Eocene. The Caviomorpha/phiomorph divergence also occurred at approximately 43 Ma. We inferred that all family-level divergences of New World hystricognaths occurred in the early Miocene. Conclusion The molecular estimates presented in this study, inferred from the combined analysis of mitochondrial genomes and nuclear data, are in complete agreement with the recently proposed paleontological scenario of Caviomorpha evolution. A comparison with recent studies on New World primate diversification indicate that although the hypothesis that both lineages arrived synchronously in the Neotropics cannot be discarded, the times elapsed since the most recent common ancestor of the extant representatives of both groups are different. PMID:23607317

  12. Redescription of Heligmosomoides neopolygyrus, Asakawa and Ohbayashi, 1986 (Nematoda: Heligmosomidae) from a Chinese Rodent, Apodemus peninsulae (Rodentia: Muridae); with comments on Heligmosomoides polygyrus polygyrus (Dujardin, 1845) and related species in China and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Massoni, J.; Durette-Desset, M.C.; Quéré, J.P.; Audebert, F.

    2012-01-01

    Heligmosomoides neopolygyrus, Asakawa and Ohbayashi, 1986 (Nematoda, Heligmosomoidea) is redescribed from Apodemus peninsulae from Rangtang, Sichuan, China. A morphological review of the Heligmosomoides spp. belonging to the “polygyrus line” proposed by Asakawa (1988) is made using new characters. This enabled us to distinguish two subspecies in Mus musculus (Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri from Japan and H. p. polygyrus from China) and two valid species in Apodemus spp. (H. neopolygyrus from Japan [in A. peninsulae] and from China [in A. agrarius] and H. asakawae from China [in A. uralensis]). Three parasite species of A. agrarius and A. peninsulae, previously identified by Asakawa et al. (1993) as H. neopolygyrus, are considered to be Heligmosomoides incertae sedis. This is the first report of H. neopolygyrus in A. peninsulae from China. PMID:23193521

  13. Involvement of pre- and post-synaptic serotonergic receptors of dorsal raphe nucleus neural network in the control of the sweet-substance-induced analgesia in adult Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia, Muridae).

    PubMed

    Miyase, Cátia Isumi; Kishi, Renato; de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Paz, Denise Amorim; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2005-05-13

    In order to investigate the effects of monoaminergic mechanisms of the dorsal raphe nucleus on the elaboration and control of sweet-substance-induced antinociception, male albino Wistar rats weighing 180-200 g received sucrose solution (250 g/L) for 14 days as their only source of liquid. After the chronic consumption of sucrose solution, each animal was pretreated with unilateral microinjection of methiothepin mesylate (5.0 microg/0.2 microL), or methysergide maleate (5.0 microg/0.2 microL) in the dorsal raphe nucleus. Each rat consumed an average of 15.6g sucrose/day. Their tail withdrawal latencies in the tail-flick test were measured immediately before and after this treatment. An analgesia index was calculated from the withdrawal latencies before and after the pharmacological treatment. The blockade of serotonergic receptor in the dorsal raphe nucleus with methysergide after the chronic intake of sucrose decreased the sweet-induced antinociception. However, microinjections of methiothepin in the dorsal raphe nucleus did not cause a similar effect on the tail-flick latencies after the chronic intake of sucrose solution, increasing the sweet-substance-induced analgesia. These results indicate the involvement of serotonin as a neurotransmitter in the sucrose-produced antinociception. Considering that the blockade of pre-synaptic serotonergic receptors of the neural networks of the dorsal raphe nucleus with methiothepin did not decrease the sweet-substance-induced antinociception, and the central blockade of post-synaptic serotonergic receptors decreased the sucrose-induced analgesia, the modulation of the release of serotonin in the neural substrate of the dorsal raphe nucleus seems to be crucial for the organization of this interesting antinociceptive process. PMID:15843057

  14. Description of a new species of Heligmonina Baylis, 1928 (Nematoda: Heligmonellidae) a parasite of Mastomys natalensis (Rodentia: Muridae) from Swaziland and new data on the synlophe of Heligmonina chabaudi (Desset, 1966).

    PubMed

    Duretre-Desset, M C; Digiani, M C; Mahlaba, T; Behnke, J M

    2007-12-01

    A new species of heligmosomoid nematode belonging to the subfamily Nippostrongylinae Durette-Desset, 1970 is described: Heligmonina wakelini n. sp., a parasite from the small intestine of the commensal rodent Mastomys natalensis (Smith, 1834) from Swaziland. It differs from the most closely related species H. boomkeri Durette-Desset & Digiani, 2005 by the number of the cuticular ridges in the female synlophe (10 vs 12), the width of the left ala, larger than the body diameter in the male, and the inclination of the axis of orientation of the ridges in both sexes (53 degrees vs 70 degrees). New morphological data (head and synlophe) on Heligmonina chabaudi (Desset, 1964), also a parasite of Mastomys natalensis in the Republic of Congo, are provided in order to compare with the new species. PMID:18225415

  15. About rats and jackfruit trees: modeling the carrying capacity of a Brazilian Atlantic Forest spiny-rat Trinomys dimidiatus (Günther, 1877) - Rodentia, Echimyidae - population with varying jackfruit tree (Artocarpus heterophyllus L.) abundances.

    PubMed

    Mello, J H F; Moulton, T P; Raíces, D S L; Bergallo, H G

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a six-year study aimed at evaluating if and how a Brazilian Atlantic Forest small mammal community responded to the presence of the invasive exotic species Artocarpus heterophyllus, the jackfruit tree. In the surroundings of Vila Dois Rios, Ilha Grande, RJ, 18 grids were established, 10 where the jackfruit tree was present and eight were it was absent. Previous results indicated that the composition and abundance of this small mammal community were altered by the presence and density of A. heterophyllus. One observed effect was the increased population size of the spiny-rat Trinomys dimidiatus within the grids where the jackfruit trees were present. Therefore we decided to create a mathematical model for this species, based on the Verhulst-Pearl logistic equation. Our objectives were i) to calculate the carrying capacity K based on real data of the involved species and the environment; ii) propose and evaluate a mathematical model to estimate the population size of T. dimidiatus based on the monthly seed production of jackfruit tree, Artocarpus heterophyllus and iii) determinate the minimum jackfruit tree seed production to maintain at least two T. dimidiatus individuals in one study grid. Our results indicated that the predicted values by the model for the carrying capacity K were significantly correlated with real data. The best fit was found considering 20~35% energy transfer efficiency between trophic levels. Within the scope of assumed premises, our model showed itself to be an adequate simulator for Trinomys dimidiatus populations where the invasive jackfruit tree is present. PMID:25945639

  16. Hymenolepis folkertsi n. sp. (Eucestoda: Hymenolepididae) in the oldfield mouse Peromyscus polionotus (Wagner) (Rodentia: Cricetidae: Neotominae) from the southeastern Nearctic with comments on tapeworm faunal diversity among deer mice.

    PubMed

    Makarikov, Arseny A; Nims, Todd N; Galbreath, Kurt E; Hoberg, Eric P

    2015-06-01

    A previously unrecognized species of hymenolepidid cestode attributable to Hymenolepis is described based on specimens in Peromyscus polionotus, oldfield mouse, from Georgia near the southeastern coast of continental North America. Specimens of Hymenolepis folkertsi n. sp. differ from those attributed to most other species in the genus by having testes arranged in a triangle and a scolex with a prominent rostrum-like protrusion. The newly recognized species is further distinguished by the relative position and length of the cirrus sac, shape of seminal receptacle, and relative size of external seminal vesicle and seminal receptacle. Hymenolepidid cestodes have sporadically been reported among the highly diverse assemblage of Peromyscus which includes 56 distinct species in the Nearctic. Although the host genus has a great temporal duration and is endemic to the Nearctic, current evidence suggests that tapeworm faunal diversity reflects relatively recent assembly through bouts of host switching among other cricetid, murid, and geomyid rodents in sympatry. PMID:25762188

  17. Description of Litomosoides ysoguazu n. sp. (Nematoda, Onchocercidae), a parasite of the tuft-toed rice rat Sooretamys angouya (Fischer) (Rodentia: Cricetidae), and a first record of L. esslingeri Bain, Petit & Berteaux, 1989 in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, Juliana; de la Sancha, Noé Ulises

    2015-06-01

    Paraguay is a small landlocked country whose mammalian fauna is among the least studied in South America, as well as their parasites. As a result of a study of the effects of habitat fragmentation on small mammal biodiversity in eastern Paraguay, we have collected some parasites of cricetid rodents. Herein, we describe a new species of Litomosoides Chandler, 1931 parasitising the body cavity of the tuft-toed rice rat Sooretamys angouya (Fischer) and Litomosoides esslingeri Bain, Petit & Diagne, 1989 parasitising Oligoryzomys nigripes (Olfers), thus expanding its geographical distribution into Paraguay. Litomosoides ysoguazu n. sp. is characterised by the large size of the females (92.2-117.6 mm long) and by having buccal capsule with an anterior widening with rounded edges on the chitinous segment and a rounded widening at the base; male tail with a single pair of adcloacal papillae, three to five pairs of asymmetrical postcloacal papillae, and one or two unpaired papillae in the median ventral line; spicules corresponding to the "sigmodontis" species group; and microfilaria with a sheath stuck to the body and visible in the anterior extremity. We also describe a fourth-stage female larva. Oligoryzomys nigripes is a new host record of L. esslingeri; this enlarges the host record to eight species highlighting the low specificity of this species. PMID:25962465

  18. Testing Synchrony in Historical Biogeography: The Case of New World Primates and Hystricognathi Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Loss-Oliveira, Leticia; Aguiar, Barbara O.; Schrago, Carlos G.

    2012-01-01

    The abrupt appearance of primates and hystricognath rodents in early Oligocene deposits of South America has puzzled mastozoologists for decades. Based on the geoclimatic changes that occurred during the Eocene/Oligocene transition period that may have favoured their dispersal, researchers have proposed the hypothesis that these groups arrived in synchrony. Nevertheless, the hypothesis of synchronous origins of platyrrhine and caviomorph in South America has not been explicitly evaluated. Our aim in this work was to apply a formal test for synchronous divergence times to the Platyrrhini and Caviomorpha splits. We have examined a previous work on platyrrhine and hystricognath origins, applied the test to a case where synchrony is known to occur and conducted simulations to show that it is possible to formally test the age of synchronous nodes. We show that the absolute ages of Platyrrhini/Catarrhini and Caviomorpha/Phiomorpha splits depend on data partitioning and that the test applied consistently detected synchronous events when they were known to have happened. The hypothesis that the arrival of primates and hystricognaths to the New World consisted of a unique event cannot be rejected PMID:22346342

  19. Fossil and molecular evidence constrain scenarios for the early evolutionary and biogeographic history of hystricognathous rodents

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Hesham M.; Seiffert, Erik R.; Steiper, Michael E.; Simons, Elwyn L.

    2009-01-01

    The early evolutionary and paleobiogeographic history of the diverse rodent clade Hystricognathi, which contains Hystricidae (Old World porcupines), Caviomorpha (the endemic South American rodents), and African Phiomorpha (cane rats, dassie rats, and blesmols) is of great interest to students of mammalian evolution, but remains poorly understood because of a poor early fossil record. Here we describe the oldest well-dated hystricognathous rodents from an earliest late Eocene (≈37 Ma) fossil locality in the Fayum Depression of northern Egypt. These taxa exhibit a combination of primitive and derived features, the former shared with Asian “baluchimyine” rodents, and the latter shared with Oligocene phiomorphs and caviomorphs. Phylogenetic analysis incorporating morphological, temporal, geographic, and molecular information places the new taxa as successive sister groups of crown Hystricognathi, and supports an Asian origin for stem Hystricognathi and an Afro-Arabian origin for crown Hystricognathi, stem Hystricidae, and stem Caviomorpha. Molecular dating of early divergences within Hystricognathi, using a Bayesian “relaxed clock” approach and multiple fossil calibrations, suggests that the split between Hystricidae and the phiomorph-caviomorph clade occurred ≈39 Ma, and that phiomorphs and caviomorphs diverged ≈36 Ma. These results are remarkably congruent with our phylogenetic results and the fossil record of hystricognathous rodent evolution in Afro-Arabia and South America. PMID:19805363

  20. Un exemple de corrélation marin continental dans le Priabonien de Roumanie. Remarques sur la Grande CoupureAn example of marine continental correlation in the Priabonian of Romania. Comments on the 'Grande Coupure' event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baciu, Calin; Hartenberger, Jean-Louis

    2001-10-01

    Between the Calata and Turea marine series, some Priabonian continental intercalations with charophytes and mammals were found. The presence of Cricetids (Rodentia, Muroidea), one of the migrants representative of the Grande Coupure event, lead to the conclusion that in this region, like in Southern Germany, the migration of the Asian elements is earlier than in western Europe.

  1. Spot-on Treatments of Diflubenzuron and Permethrin to Control a Guinea Pig Louse, Gliricola Porcelli (Phthiraptera: Gyropidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus (L.)) (Rodentia: Caviidae) are pets and laboratory animals. They can be infested by a chewing louse, Gliricola porcelli (Schrank) (Phthiraptera: Gyropidae), which is fairly common in some animal rearing facilities, pet stores, and on wild guinea pigs. Infestation with G....

  2. Comparative analysis of microsatellite variability in five macaw species (Psittaciformes, Psittacidae): Application for conservation.

    PubMed

    Presti, Flavia T; Oliveira-Marques, Adriana R; Caparroz, Renato; Biondo, Cibele; Miyaki, Cristina Y

    2011-04-01

    Cross-amplification was tested and variability in microsatellite primers (designed for Neotropical parrots) compared, in five macaw species, viz., three endangered blue macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii [extinct in the wild], Anodorhynchus leari [endangered] and Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus [vulnerable]), and two unthreatened red macaws (Ara chloropterus and Ara macao). Among the primers tested, 84.6% successfully amplified products in C. spixii, 83.3% in A. leari, 76.4% in A. hyacinthinus, 78.6% in A. chloropterus and 71.4% in A. macao. The mean expected heterozygosity estimated for each species, and based on loci analyzed in all the five, ranged from 0.33 (A. hyacinthinus) to 0.85 (A. macao). As expected, the results revealed lower levels of genetic variability in threatened macaw species than in unthreatened. The low combined probability of genetic identity and the moderate to high potential for paternity exclusion, indicate the utility of the microsatellite loci set selected for each macaw species in kinship and population studies, thus constituting an aid in planning in-situ and ex-situ conservation. PMID:21734841

  3. Comparative analysis of microsatellite variability in five macaw species (Psittaciformes, Psittacidae): Application for conservation

    PubMed Central

    Presti, Flavia T.; Oliveira-Marques, Adriana R.; Caparroz, Renato; Biondo, Cibele; Miyaki, Cristina Y.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-amplification was tested and variability in microsatellite primers (designed for Neotropical parrots) compared, in five macaw species, viz., three endangered blue macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii [extinct in the wild], Anodorhynchus leari [endangered] and Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus [vulnerable]), and two unthreatened red macaws (Ara chloropterus and Ara macao). Among the primers tested, 84.6% successfully amplified products in C. spixii, 83.3% in A. leari, 76.4% in A. hyacinthinus, 78.6% in A. chloropterus and 71.4% in A. macao. The mean expected heterozygosity estimated for each species, and based on loci analyzed in all the five, ranged from 0.33 (A. hyacinthinus) to 0.85 (A. macao). As expected, the results revealed lower levels of genetic variability in threatened macaw species than in unthreatened. The low combined probability of genetic identity and the moderate to high potential for paternity exclusion, indicate the utility of the microsatellite loci set selected for each macaw species in kinship and population studies, thus constituting an aid in planning in-situ and ex-situ conservation. PMID:21734841

  4. Mites of the genus Schizocarpus Trouessart, 1896 (Acariformes: Chirodiscidae) from the North American beavers (Castor canadensis) in Russia.

    PubMed

    Bochkov, A V; Saveljev, A P

    2014-01-01

    Four native species of parasitic mites belonging to the genus Schizocarpus Trouessart, 1896 (Acariformes: Chirodiscidae) are recorded on the North American beaver Castor canadensis Kuhl, 1820 (Rodentia: Castoridae) from Russia. Totally ten beavers from all three main geographically isolated populations of in Russia (Leningrad Province, Voronezh Biosphere Reserve (beaver farm) and Khabarovsk Territory) were examined. Additionally, in captivity (Voronezh beaver farm) eight species were recorded switched from the Eurasian beaver Castor fiber Linnaeus, 1758 on C. canadensis. PMID:25936168

  5. Comparative genetics of longevity and cancer: insights from long-lived rodents

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei; Zhang, Zhengdong; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Mammals have evolved a dramatic diversity of aging rates. Within the single order of Rodentia maximum lifespans differ from four years in mice to 32 years in naked mole rats. Cancer rates also differ significantly, from cancer-prone mice to virtually cancer-proof naked and blind mole rats. Recent progress in rodent comparative biology, in combination with the emergence of whole genome sequence information, has opened opportunities for the discovery of genetic factors controlling longevity and cancer susceptibility. PMID:24981598

  6. Rodent phylogeny revised: analysis of six nuclear genes from all major rodent clades

    PubMed Central

    Blanga-Kanfi, Shani; Miranda, Hector; Penn, Osnat; Pupko, Tal; DeBry, Ronald W; Huchon, Dorothée

    2009-01-01

    Background Rodentia is the most diverse order of placental mammals, with extant rodent species representing about half of all placental diversity. In spite of many morphological and molecular studies, the family-level relationships among rodents and the location of the rodent root are still debated. Although various datasets have already been analyzed to solve rodent phylogeny at the family level, these are difficult to combine because they involve different taxa and genes. Results We present here the largest protein-coding dataset used to study rodent relationships. It comprises six nuclear genes, 41 rodent species, and eight outgroups. Our phylogenetic reconstructions strongly support the division of Rodentia into three clades: (1) a "squirrel-related clade", (2) a "mouse-related clade", and (3) Ctenohystrica. Almost all evolutionary relationships within these clades are also highly supported. The primary remaining uncertainty is the position of the root. The application of various models and techniques aimed to remove non-phylogenetic signal was unable to solve the basal rodent trifurcation. Conclusion Sequencing and analyzing a large sequence dataset enabled us to resolve most of the evolutionary relationships among Rodentia. Our findings suggest that the uncertainty regarding the position of the rodent root reflects the rapid rodent radiation that occurred in the Paleocene rather than the presence of conflicting phylogenetic and non-phylogenetic signals in the dataset. PMID:19341461

  7. Assessing genotoxic effects in fish from a marine protected area influenced by former mining activities and other stressors.

    PubMed

    Gusso-Choueri, Paloma Kachel; Choueri, Rodrigo Brasil; Santos, Gustavo Souza; de Araújo, Giuliana Seraphim; Cruz, Ana Carolina Feitosa; Stremel, Tatiana; de Campos, Sandro Xavier; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto Oliveira; de Sousa Abessa, Denis Moledo

    2016-03-15

    The goal of the current study was to evaluate different genotoxicity tools in order to assess a marine protected area (MPA) affected by former mining activities and urban settlements. A catfish (Cathorops spixii) was analyzed for genotoxic effects at the (i) molecular and at the (ii) chromosomal levels. Through factor analysis, genotoxicity was found to be linked to levels of metals bioaccumulated and PAH metabolites in the bile. Micronucleus and nuclear alteration were less vulnerable to the effects of confounding factors in mildly contaminated areas since they were more frequently associated with bioaccumulated metals than the DNA analysis. The different genotoxicity responses allowed for the identification of sources of pollution in the MPA. This approach was important for detecting environmental risks related to genotoxic contaminants in a mildly contaminated MPA. PMID:26822909

  8. Pre-Wisconsinan mammals from Jamaica and models of late Quaternary extinction in the greater Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPhee, R. D. E.; Ford, Derek C.; McFarlane, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    The vertebrate fauna recovered from indurated conglomerates at Wallingford Roadside Cave (central Jamaica) is shown to be in excess of 100,000 yr old according to uranium series and electron spin resonance dating. The Wallingford local fauna is therefore pre-Wisconsinan in age, and Roadside Cave is now the oldest radiometrically dated locality in the West Indies containing identifiable species of land mammals. In the absence of a good radiometric record for Quaternary paleontological sites in the Caribbean, there is no satisfactory basis for determining whether most extinct Antillean mammals died out in a "blitzkrieg"-like event immediately following initial human colonization in the mid-Holocene. Fossils of Clidomys (Heptaxodontidae, Caviomorpha), the giant Wallingford rodent, have never been found in situ in sediments of demonstrably Holocene age, and its extinction may antedate the middle Holocene. This is also a possibility for the primate Xenothrix mcgregori, although its remains have been found in loose cave earth. A major, climate-driven bout of terrestrial vertebrate extinction at about 14,000-12,000 yr B.P. has been hypothesized for the West Indies by G. Pregill and S. L. Olson ( Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics12, 75-98, 1981), but at present there is nothing to connect the disappearance of Clidomys with this event either. Quaternary extinctions in the Caribbean may prove to be of critical significance for evaluating the reality of New World blitzkrieg, but not until an effort is mounted to constrain them rigorously using modern radiometric approaches.

  9. Conservation of placentation during the tertiary radiation of mammals in South America.

    PubMed

    Carter, Anthony Michael; Mess, Andrea Maria

    2013-05-01

    The eutherian placenta is considered to possess great plasticity, but it is not clear how this variation reflects adaptation to different ecological niches. Because South America was isolated for most of the Tertiary, it represents a natural laboratory to examine this question. We here describe placentation in three South American groups: Xenarthra have been part of the fauna from at least the mid-Paleocene whereas caviomorph rodents and Neotropical primates are each derived from a single founder that reached South America in the Eocene and Oligocene, respectively. The common ancestor of Xenarthra had a villous, haemochorial placenta, from which the labyrinthine, endotheliochorial placenta of sloths later evolved. Placentation in Caviomorpha follows an extraordinary stable pattern, characterized by a haemomonochorial, labyrinthine and highly lobed structure with specialized growing areas. This pattern was present before arrival of these rodents in South America and enabled a successful radiation especially during the spread of grasslands. Neotropical primates have haemochorial, trabecular placentas with a specialized maternal blood supply; a pattern that contrasts with that of Old World monkeys and may have been present in the founder generation on arrival in South America. In conclusion, there is a dichotomy within Xenarthra but otherwise the ancient South American mammals do not show much variation in principal placental characters. Thus, the successful radiation of these three groups, and their adaptation to diverse ecological niches, did not require substantial alterations in placentation. PMID:23355381

  10. Domestic, peridomestic and wild hosts in the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Caatinga area colonised by Triatoma brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Claudia Mendonça; Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes; de Souza, Rita de Cássia Moreira; Barbosa, Silvia Ermelinda; Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Jansen, Ana Maria; Ramalho, Relrison Dias; Diotaiut, Liléia

    2014-01-01

    The role played by different mammal species in the maintenance of Trypanosoma cruzi is not constant and varies in time and place. This study aimed to characterise the importance of domestic, wild and peridomestic hosts in the transmission of T. cruzi in Tauá, state of Ceará, Caatinga area, Brazil, with an emphasis on those environments colonised by Triatoma brasiliensis. Direct parasitological examinations were performed on insects and mammals, serologic tests were performed on household and outdoor mammals and multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used on wild mammals. Cytochrome b was used as a food source for wild insects. The serum prevalence in dogs was 38% (20/53), while in pigs it was 6% (2/34). The percentages of the most abundantly infected wild animals were as follows: Thrichomys laurentius 74% (83/112) and Kerodon rupestris 10% (11/112). Of the 749 triatomines collected in the household research, 49.3% (369/749) were positive for T. brasiliensis, while 6.8% were infected with T. cruzi (25/369). In captured animals, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with T. laurentius, K. rupestris, Didelphis albiventris, Monodelphis domestica, Galea spixii, Wiedomys pyrrhorhinos, Conepatus semistriatus and Mus musculus. In animals identified via their food source, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with G. spixii, K. rupestris, Capra hircus, Gallus gallus, Tropidurus oreadicus and Tupinambis merianae. The high prevalence of T. cruzi in household and peridomiciliar animals reinforces the narrow relationship between the enzootic cycle and humans in environments with T. brasiliensis and characterises it as ubiquitous. PMID:25410992

  11. Domestic, peridomestic and wild hosts in the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Caatinga area colonised by Triatoma brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Claudia Mendonça; Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes; Souza, Rita de Cássia Moreira de; Barbosa, Silvia Ermelinda; Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Jansen, Ana Maria; Ramalho, Relrison Dias; Diotaiut, Liléia

    2014-11-01

    The role played by different mammal species in the maintenance of Trypanosoma cruzi is not constant and varies in time and place. This study aimed to characterise the importance of domestic, wild and peridomestic hosts in the transmission of T. cruzi in Tauá, state of Ceará, Caatinga area, Brazil, with an emphasis on those environments colonised by Triatoma brasiliensis. Direct parasitological examinations were performed on insects and mammals, serologic tests were performed on household and outdoor mammals and multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used on wild mammals. Cytochrome b was used as a food source for wild insects. The serum prevalence in dogs was 38% (20/53), while in pigs it was 6% (2/34). The percentages of the most abundantly infected wild animals were as follows: Thrichomys laurentius 74% (83/112) and Kerodon rupestris 10% (11/112). Of the 749 triatomines collected in the household research, 49.3% (369/749) were positive for T. brasiliensis, while 6.8% were infected with T. cruzi (25/369). In captured animals, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with T. laurentius, K. rupestris, Didelphis albiventris, Monodelphis domestica, Galea spixii, Wiedomys pyrrhorhinos, Conepatus semistriatus and Mus musculus. In animals identified via their food source, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with G. spixii, K. rupestris, Capra hircus, Gallus gallus, Tropidurus oreadicus and Tupinambis merianae. The high prevalence of T. cruzi in household and peridomiciliar animals reinforces the narrow relationship between the enzootic cycle and humans in environments with T. brasiliensis and characterises it as ubiquitous. PMID:25410992

  12. Why Can’t Rodents Vomit? A Comparative Behavioral, Anatomical, and Physiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Charles C.; Kimball, Bruce A.; Wang, Hong; Kaus, James; Dienel, Samuel; Nagy, Allysa; Gathright, Gordon R.; Yates, Bill J.; Andrews, Paul L. R.

    2013-01-01

    The vomiting (emetic) reflex is documented in numerous mammalian species, including primates and carnivores, yet laboratory rats and mice appear to lack this response. It is unclear whether these rodents do not vomit because of anatomical constraints (e.g., a relatively long abdominal esophagus) or lack of key neural circuits. Moreover, it is unknown whether laboratory rodents are representative of Rodentia with regards to this reflex. Here we conducted behavioral testing of members of all three major groups of Rodentia; mouse-related (rat, mouse, vole, beaver), Ctenohystrica (guinea pig, nutria), and squirrel-related (mountain beaver) species. Prototypical emetic agents, apomorphine (sc), veratrine (sc), and copper sulfate (ig), failed to produce either retching or vomiting in these species (although other behavioral effects, e.g., locomotion, were noted). These rodents also had anatomical constraints, which could limit the efficiency of vomiting should it be attempted, including reduced muscularity of the diaphragm and stomach geometry that is not well structured for moving contents towards the esophagus compared to species that can vomit (cat, ferret, and musk shrew). Lastly, an in situ brainstem preparation was used to make sensitive measures of mouth, esophagus, and shoulder muscular movements, and phrenic nerve activity–key features of emetic episodes. Laboratory mice and rats failed to display any of the common coordinated actions of these indices after typical emetic stimulation (resiniferatoxin and vagal afferent stimulation) compared to musk shrews. Overall the results suggest that the inability to vomit is a general property of Rodentia and that an absent brainstem neurological component is the most likely cause. The implications of these findings for the utility of rodents as models in the area of emesis research are discussed. PMID:23593236

  13. New species and new records of mites of the genus Stigmaeus(Acari: Prostigmata: Stigmaeidae) from Crimea.

    PubMed

    Khaustov, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    Three new species of the genus Stigmaeus Koch, 1836 (Acari: Stigmaeidae) are described from various habitats in Crimea: Stigmaeus kuznetsovi sp. nov. from nests of Microtus socialis (Rodentia: Cricetidae); S. mitrofanovi sp. nov. from galleries of Pityogenes bistridentatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) under the bark of Pinus pallasiana, and S. silvestris sp. nov. from rotten log of Pinus pallasiana. Stigmaeus corticeus Kuznetsov and Wainstein, 1977 and S. maraghehiensis Bagheri and Ueckermann, 2012 are recorded for the first time in Crimea. A key to species of the genus Stigmaeus of Crimea is provided. PMID:24870321

  14. An Examination of the Generation-Time Effect on Molecular Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Tomoko

    1993-11-01

    By using DNA sequences of 17 mammalian genes, the generation-time effect is estimated separately for synonymous substitutions and nonsynonymous substitutions. Star phylogenies composed of rodentia, artiodactyla, and primates are examined. The generation-time effect is found to be more conspicuous for synonymous substitutions than for non-synonymous substitutions, by using the methods of (i) Nei and Gojobori, (ii) Li, and (iii) Ina. The proportion of accepted amino acid substitutions in evolution is estimated to be about twice as large in the primate lineage as in the rodent lineage. This result is in accord with the nearly neutral theory of molecular evolution.

  15. Granulated metrial gland cells and interstitial trophoblast in the uterine wall of the bank vole, Clethrionomys glareolus, in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    STEWART, I. J.; CLARKE, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    The morphology and distribution of granulated metrial gland cells and of interstitial trophoblast cells in the uterine wall was studied in the first half of pregnancy in the bank vole, Clethrionomys glareolus. The morphology and distribution of granulated metrial gland cells was generally similar to that found in other members of the Rodentia, although they were absent from the walls of the arterial vessels passing through the decidua basalis. Interstitial trophoblast invaded the decidualising endometrium mesometrial to, and antimesometrial to, the implanted embryos. There was no apparent spatiotemporal relationship between the distribution of granulated metrial gland cells and interstitial trophoblast cells. PMID:10337962

  16. Taxonomy and review of the coccidian genus Cryptosporidium (protozoa, apicomplexa).

    PubMed

    Levine, N D

    1984-02-01

    Reports of Cryptosporidium in various hosts and cross-transmission experiments are reviewed. Cryptosporidium has been found in mammals (Primates, Artiodactyla, Perissodactyla , Carnivora, Lagomorpha, and Rodentia), birds, reptiles, and fish. The only cross-transmission attempts that have been made have been from mammals to other mammals and to a few birds. Names have been given to 19 "species," but it is concluded that only four of these should be considered valid at present. These are: C. muris Tyzzer, 1907 in mammals, C. meleagridis Slavin , 1955 in birds, C. crotali Triffit , 1925 in reptiles, and C. nasorum Hoover , Hoerr , Carlton , Hinsman & Ferguson, 1981 in fish. PMID:6376791

  17. Lung and hearth nematodes in some Spanish mammals.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, F; Iglesias, R; Bos, J; Rey, J; Sanmartin Durán, M L

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen host species belonging to the orders Rodentia, Insectivora and Carnivora from various localities in Galicia (NW Spain) were examined for heart and lung parasites. The following species were found: Parastrongylus dujardini (5.5%) in Apodemus sylvaticus, Crenosoma striatum in Erinaceus europaeus (83%), Angiostrongylus vasorum, Crenosoma vulpis and Eucoleus aerophilus in Vulpes vulpes (3, 3.46 and 0.50%, respectively), Crenosoma taiga in Putorius putorius (100%) and Crenosoma sp. in Meles meles (25%). In Crocidura russula nematode larvae were found (3.3%). Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Rattus rattus, Talpa caeca, Sorex araneus, Genetta genetta and Canis lupus were not parasitized by lung or heart parasites. PMID:1844789

  18. Clinical aspects of rodent dental anatomy.

    PubMed

    Crossley, D A

    1995-12-01

    The order Rodentia is vast, encompassing a large number of species with significant anatomical variations developed during natural adaptation to differing habitats. Many veterinarians have little knowledge of the anatomy of species other than the commoner domestic large herbivores and small carnivores. Clinicians require a basic knowledge of the relevant anatomy of species they are likely to be asked to treat. This article provides sufficient working knowledge of the oral and dental anatomy of those rodents commonly kept as pets to enable veterinarians to interpret clinical and radiographic findings when investigating suspected dental disease. PMID:9693638

  19. Variance of molecular datings, evolution of rodents and the phylogenetic affinities between Ctenodactylidae and Hystricognathi.

    PubMed Central

    Huchon, D; Catzeflis, F M; Douzery, E J

    2000-01-01

    The von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene has been used to understand the origin and timing of Rodentia evolution in the context of placental phylogeny vWF exon 28 sequences of 15 rodent families and eight non-rodent eutherian clades are analysed with two different molecular dating methods (uniform clock on a linearized tree; quartet dating). Three main conclusions are drawn from the study of this nuclear exon. First, Ctenodactylidae (gundis) and Hystricognathi (e.g. porcupines, guinea-pigs, chinchillas) robustly cluster together in a newly recognized clade, named 'Ctenohystrica'. The Sciurognathi monophyly is subsequently rejected. Pedetidae (springhares) is an independent and early diverging rodent lineage, suggesting a convergent evolution of the multiserial enamel of rodent incisors. Second, molecular date estimates are here more influenced by accuracy and choice of the palaeontological temporal references used to calibrate the molecular clock than by either characters analysed (nucleotides versus amino acids) or species sampling. The caviomorph radiation at 31 million years (Myr) and the pig porpoise split at 63 Myr appear to be reciprocally compatible dates. Third, during the radiation of Rodentia, at least three lineages (Gliridae, Sciuroidea and Ctenohystrica) emerged close to the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, and their common ancestor separated from other placental orders in the Late Cretaceous. PMID:10722222

  20. Species Identification Key of Korean Mammal Hair

    PubMed Central

    LEE, Eunok; CHOI, Tae-Young; WOO, Donggul; MIN, Mi-Sook; SUGITA, Shoei; LEE, Hang

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hair microstructures of Korean terrestrial mammals from 23 species (22 wild and one domestic) were analyzed using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to construct a hair identification key. The hairs were examined using the medulla structures and cuticular scales of guard hairs from the dorsal regions of mature adult animals. All cuticular scale structures in the hair of Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Carnivora and Insectivora showed the petal pattern, and those of Artiodactyla and Chiroptera showed the wave pattern and coronal pattern, respectively. Rodentia, Lagomorpha and Carnivora showed multicellular, and Insectivora and Artiodactyla showed unicellular regular, mesh or columnar in the medulla structures, respectively. Chiroptera did not show the medulla structures in their hair. We found that it is possible to distinguish between species and order based on general appearance, medulla structures and cuticular scales. Thus, we constructed a hair identification key with morphological characteristics from each species. This study suggests that hair identification keys could be useful in fields, such as forensic science, food safety and foraging ecology. PMID:24451929

  1. Feed-through insecticides for the control of the sand fly Phlebotomus argentipes.

    PubMed

    Ingenloff, K; Garlapati, R; Poché, D; Singh, M I; Remmers, J L; Poché, R M

    2013-03-01

    Three rodent feed-through studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of insecticides to control Phlebotomus argentipes (Diptera: Psychodidae). The initial test evaluated diflubenzuron, eprinomectin, fipronil and ivermectin as feed-through treatments in Rattus rattus (Rodentia: Muridae). In the preliminary trial, all four insecticides yielded 100% mortality of P. argentipes larvae within 20 days of exposure to treated rodent faeces. Based upon the initial results, fipronil was evaluated further as a feed-through utilizing Bandicota bengalensis (Rodentia: Muridae). The B. bengalensis trial evaluated fipronil against both adult and larval sandflies at 250 p.p.m., 100 p.p.m. and 50 p.p.m. The results showed the fipronil treatment to have 100% efficacy against larvae up to 20 days post-treatment and over 74% efficacy against adult sandflies presented with B. bengalensis faeces up to 10 days post-treatment at all three dosage levels. The results of the three studies suggest that all four insecticides may be useful tools with which to control Leishmania vector populations. PMID:23278322

  2. New species and records of mites of the superfamily Sarcoptoidea (Acariformes: Psoroptidia) from mammals in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bochkov, Andre V; Valim, Michel P

    2016-01-01

    Sixteen species of the superfamily Sarcoptoidea (Acariformes: Psoroptidia) belonging to 10 genera of the families Atopomelidae, Listrophoridae, Chirodiscidae, and Listropsoralgidae are recorded in Brazil. Among them, three species, Prolistrophorus hylaeamys sp. nov. from Hylaeamys laticeps (Lund, 1840) (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) from Minas Gerais, Lynxacarus serrafreirei sp. nov. from Galictis cuja (Molina, 1782) (Carnivora: Mustelidae) from Rio de Janeiro (Listrophoridae), and Didelphoecius micoureus sp. nov. (Atopomelidae) from Micoureus paraguayanus (Tate, 1931) (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae) from Minas Gerais are described as new for science. Three species of the family Listrophoridae, Prolistrophorus bidentatus Fain et Lukoschus, 1984 from Akodon cursor (Winge, 1887) (Rodentia: Cricetidae) (new host), Prolistrophorus ctenomys Fain, 1970 from Ctenomys torquatus Lichtenstein, 1830 (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae) (new host), and Leporacarus sylvilagi Fain, Whitaker et Lukoschus, 1981 from Sylvilagus brasiliensis (Linnaeus, 1758) (Lagomorpha: Leporidae) (new host) -from Minas Gerais and Rio Grande do Sul, and one species of the family Chirodiscidae, Parakosa tadarida McDaniel and Lawrence, 1962 from Molossus molossus (Pallas, 1766) (Chiroptera: Molossidae) are recorded for the first time in Brazil. The previously unknown female of Didelphoecius validus Fain, Zanatta-Coutinho et Fonseca, 1996 (Atopomelidae) from Metachirus nudicaudatus (Geoffroy, 1803) (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae) from Minas Gerais is described. All data on host-parasite associations of sarcoptoids in Brazil are summarized. Totally, 61 sarcoptoid species of 8 families are recorded in Brazil. PMID:26751869

  3. Seed predation by mammals in forest fragments in Monteverde, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, Federico A

    2009-09-01

    Few studies have evaluated seed predation in fragmented landscapes, in which lower species diversity is expected to modifying ecological interactions. The rates of seed removal by mammals were investigated in a continuous forest and two fragmented patches of Premontane Tropical Moist Forest, in Monteverde, Costa Rica. The composition of mammalian seed-predators in each site was recorded during 16 months. The removal of four native tree species of experimental seeds: Ocotea valeriana and Ocotea whitei (Lauraceae), Panopsis costaricensis (Proteaceae) and Billia colombiana (Hippocastanaceae) in forest understories was followed during two annual fruiting seasons for each species. Results indicated similar species composition of seed-predators between continuous forest, the largest fragment (350 ha). However the smaller fragment (20 ha), had fewer seed predators. In this fragment, the specialized seed predator Heteromys desmarestianus (Rodentia) was more abundant. Unexpectedly, seed-predation in the two forest fragments and the continuous forest did not differ statistically for any of the seed species. Apparently, the higher abundance of small seed-predators in the fragments was compensated by the absence of medium and large seed-predators, like Agouti paca, Dasyprocta punctata (both Rodentia) and Pecari tajacu (Artiodactyla) recorded in continuous forest. Removal of experimentally-placed seeds was higher when the number of naturally occurring seeds in the sites was lower. This result could best be attributed to differential satiation of seed predators rather than differences in richness or abundance of seed predators. PMID:19928478

  4. Assessing pollution in marine protected areas: the role of a multi-biomarker and multi-organ approach.

    PubMed

    Gusso-Choueri, Paloma Kachel; Choueri, Rodrigo Brasil; de Araújo, Giuliana Seraphim; Cruz, Ana Carolina Feitosa; Stremel, Tatiana; Campos, Sandro; Abessa, Denis Moledo de Sousa; Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto Oliveira

    2015-11-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are vulnerable to many pressures, including pollution. However, environmental quality monitoring in these areas traditionally relies on only water chemistry and microbiological parameters. The goal of the current study was to investigate the role of a set of biomarkers in different target organs (liver, kidney, and gills) of fish in order to assess the environmental quality of an MPA (MTs, GPx, GST, GSH, DNA damage, LPO, AChE, and condition index). Chemical analyses were also performed on liver and muscle tissues to evaluate metal body burdens, and PAHs were identified in bile. A demersal fish (Cathorops spixii) that is widely consumed by the local population was used as bioindicator species, and the results were integrated using multivariate analysis. The use of the biomarker approach allowed for the identification of both seasonal and spatial variations in pollution sources around the Environmental Protected Area of Cananéia-Iguape-Peruíbe (APA-CIP). Higher metal body burdens associated with biological responses were found in the sites under the influence of urban areas during the dry season, and they were found in the sites under the influence of the Ribeira de Iguape River (RIR) during the rainy season. The liver was found to be more responsive in terms of its antioxidant responses, whereas gills were found to be more responsive to biomarkers of effect. These results show that this set of biomarker analyses in different organs of fish is a useful tool for assessing chemical pollution in an MPA. PMID:26174980

  5. Total mercury in sediments and in Brazilian Ariidae catfish from two estuaries under different anthropogenic influence.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Juliana S; Braga, Elisabete S; Favaro, Deborah T; Perretti, Adriana R; Rezende, Carlos Eduardo; Souza, Cristina Maria M

    2011-12-01

    Santos-São Vicente estuary, located in São Paulo State, Brazil, has a history of contamination by inorganic chemicals such as mercury (Hg). In the 1980s the Cubatão was considered one of the most polluted sites in the world as a consequence of the intense industrial activities located in the city close to the estuary. To provide data and evaluate the local biota, total mercury (THg) contents were determined in sediments and in fish, Cathorops spixii, from different areas of the Santos-São Vicente estuary. For comparison, samples were also collected in a non-polluted system with similar hydrochemistry characteristics, the Cananeia estuary. The water characteristics and THg levels in sediment and fish samples confirmed a high human influence in the Santos-São Vicente estuary. The lowest THg values, observed in Cananeia, were evidence of low anthropogenic influence. High values observed in Santos-São Vicente show the necessity for a monitoring program. PMID:22030105

  6. Fungi from interior organs of free-living small mammals in Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Hubálek, Z; Rosický, B; Otcenásek, M

    1980-01-01

    A total of 308 fungi was isolated from interior organs (lungs, spleen, liver) of 529 small mammals belonging to 21 species, 7 families and 3 orders (Insectivora, Chiroptera, Rodentia), some of these being potentially pathogenic to vertebrates (e.g. Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus, Geotrichum candidum, Mucor pusillus, Rhizopus arrhizus). In one vole (Microtus arvalis) captured in South Moravia, adiaspiromycosis (Emmonsia crescens) was demonstrated. Comparison of mycoflora of hair and that of interior organs of wild small mammals revealed that out of the total number of isolates the following fungi were represented in a higher proportion from visceral organs than from the hair: Aspergillus (A. amstelodami, A. flavus, A. repens), Aureobasidium (A. pullulans), Candida, Cladosporium (C. herbarum), Cryptococcus, Fusarium, Gliocladium (G. deliquescens), Helminthosporium, Kloeckera, Mucor (M. fragilis, M. hiemalis, M. pusillus), Paecilomyces marquandii, Penicillium (P. purpurogenum), Phoma, Rhizopus arrhizus, Scopulariopsis (S. candida, S. koningii) and Torulopsis. PMID:7419129

  7. Hepatitis B virus lineages in mammalian hosts: Potential for bidirectional cross-species transmission

    PubMed Central

    Bonvicino, Cibele R; Moreira, Miguel A; Soares, Marcelo A

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a cosmopolitan infectious agent currently affecting over 350 million people worldwide, presently accounting for more than two billion infections. In addition to man, other hepatitis virus strains infect species of several mammalian families of the Primates, Rodentia and Chiroptera orders, in addition to birds. The mounting evidence of HBV infection in African, Asian and neotropical primates draws attention to the potential cross-species, zoonotic transmission of these viruses to man. Moreover, recent evidence also suggests the humans may also function as a source of viral infection to other mammals, particularly to domestic animals like poultry and swine. In this review, we list all evidence of HBV and HBV-like infection of nonhuman mammals and discuss their potential roles as donors or recipients of these viruses to humans and to other closely-related species. PMID:24976704

  8. [Incidence of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in arthropods (Arthropoda) and antibodies in vertebrates (Vertebrata)].

    PubMed

    Pokorný, P

    1989-01-01

    The paper summarizes data on hitherto assembled findings of Spirochaeta burgdorferi, the causal agent of Lyme disease in arthropods and the incidence of antibodies in birds and mammals. The authors evaluate some vectors and reservoir animals, incl. possible carriers. Borrelia burgdorferi was found so far in 30 species of Arthropoda, 13 species of mites (Acarina), 15 species of flies(Diptera), two species of fleas (Siphonaptera). The role of insects as vectors was not proved so far. Antibodies were detected in eight species of birds (Aves, Passeriformes) and in 22 mammalian species: one species of marsupiales (Marsupialia), 3 species of carnivores (Carnivora), seven species of rodents (Rodentia), two species of rabbits and hares (Lagomorpha), in 8 species of even-toed ungulates (Artiodactyla) and one species of odd-toed ungulates (Perissodactyla). The great majority of species comes from the non-arctic area. PMID:2646031

  9. The prevalence of Balantidium coli infection in fifty-six mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Nakauchi, K

    1999-01-01

    A total of 375 fecal samples of 56 mammalian species belonging to 17 families of 4 orders were examined for the detection of Balantidium coli from December 1994 to August 1995. As a result, B. coli was found from 6 species belonging to 4 families of 2 orders (Primates and Artiodactyla) of host animals examined. White-handed gibbon (Hylobates lar), squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciurea) and Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) were new hosts for B. coli. All the wild boar (Sus scrofa) and chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) examined were positive. The highest number of B. coli was obtained from a chimpanzee (1,230/g feces). No B. coli was detected from the animals of orders Rodentia and Carnivora including dogs and cats. The rarity of B. coli infection in breeding animals in Japan. suggests that there is no serious problem in controlling infections. PMID:10027167

  10. Sex chromosome drive.

    PubMed

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in two clades, Rodentia and Diptera. Although very little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of drive, epigenetic processes such as chromatin regulation could be involved in many instances. Yet, its evolutionary consequences are far-reaching, from the evolution of mating systems and sex determination to the emergence of new species. PMID:25524548

  11. Flying lemurs – The 'flying tree shrews'? Molecular cytogenetic evidence for a Scandentia-Dermoptera sister clade

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Wenhui; Fu, Beiyuan; O'Brien, Patricia CM; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Tanomtong, Alongkoad; Volobouev, Vitaly; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang

    2008-01-01

    Background Flying lemurs or Colugos (order Dermoptera) represent an ancient mammalian lineage that contains only two extant species. Although molecular evidence strongly supports that the orders Dermoptera, Scandentia, Lagomorpha, Rodentia and Primates form a superordinal clade called Supraprimates (or Euarchontoglires), the phylogenetic placement of Dermoptera within Supraprimates remains ambiguous. Results To search for cytogenetic signatures that could help to clarify the evolutionary affinities within this superordinal group, we have established a genome-wide comparative map between human and the Malayan flying lemur (Galeopterus variegatus) by reciprocal chromosome painting using both human and G. variegatus chromosome-specific probes. The 22 human autosomal paints and the X chromosome paint defined 44 homologous segments in the G. variegatus genome. A putative inversion on GVA 11 was revealed by the hybridization patterns of human chromosome probes 16 and 19. Fifteen associations of human chromosome segments (HSA) were detected in the G. variegatus genome: HSA1/3, 1/10, 2/21, 3/21, 4/8, 4/18, 7/15, 7/16, 7/19, 10/16, 12/22 (twice), 14/15, 16/19 (twice). Reverse painting of G. variegatus chromosome-specific paints onto human chromosomes confirmed the above results, and defined the origin of the homologous human chromosomal segments in these associations. In total, G. variegatus paints revealed 49 homologous chromosomal segments in the HSA genome. Conclusion Comparative analysis of our map with published maps from representative species of other placental orders, including Scandentia, Primates, Lagomorpha and Rodentia, suggests a signature rearrangement (HSA2q/21 association) that links Scandentia and Dermoptera to one sister clade. Our results thus provide new evidence for the hypothesis that Scandentia and Dermoptera have a closer phylogenetic relationship to each other than either of them has to Primates. PMID:18452598

  12. Linking fishery management and conservation in a tropical estuarine lagoon: biological and physical effects of an artisanal fishing gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, M.; Defeo, O.

    2003-04-01

    Information coming from fishery monitoring, surveys and experimental fishing with participation of fishers was employed to determine the impact of an artisanal gear, 'boliche', on the biodiversity of the Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta (CGSM), an estuarine lagoon on the Caribbean coast of Colombia. Fishery monitoring (catch data) included landings before (1968 and 1978) and after (1994-1996) the introduction of the boliche in the CGSM (1985), whereas surveys were conducted seasonally during 1993-1994. Fishing experiments involved evaluating different mesh sizes and the short-term effect of physical disturbance by the boliche. Monitoring suggested potential trophic effects of this fishing gear: the catch of large, long-lived, carnivorous species declined after the introduction of the boliche in the CGSM, whereas catch rates of smaller, shorter-lived, and lower trophic level species increased. Surveys revealed that the boliche retained 41 species. The by-catch made up 62% of the total catch and the remaining 38% involved the three target species Eugerres plumieri, Mugil incilis and Cathorops spixii. Selectivity experiments showed that 2.5 in. stretched mesh size gill nets caught more species than the 3.0-in. mesh. The smaller mesh also increased the risk of a critical reduction in the spawning stock of target species (notably E. plumieri); a situation that could affect the fish community if mesh sizes lower than 2.5 in. were intensively used. Suspended particulate matter significantly increased after fishing activity, with higher resuspension on mud-shells and mud substrata, whereas dissolved oxygen showed no appreciable changes after fishing operations. Notwithstanding, the activity of the boliche would generate sediment resuspension between 382 and 470 t day -1, which could lead to potential cascade impacts on water quality. We propose a framework of redundancy in management measures in order to simultaneously reach management and conservation goals.

  13. Diversity of Micrurus Snake Species Related to Their Venom Toxic Effects and the Prospective of Antivenom Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Gabriela D.; Furtado, Maria de Fátima D.; Portaro, Fernanda C. V.; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo Augusto; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Micrurus snake bites can cause death by muscle paralysis and respiratory arrest, few hours after envenomation. The specific treatment for coral snake envenomation is the intravenous application of heterologous antivenom and, in Brazil, it is produced by horse immunization with a mixture of M. corallinus and M. frontalis venoms, snakes that inhabit the South and Southeastern regions of the country. However, this antivenom might be inefficient, considering the existence of intra- and inter-specific variations in the composition of the venoms. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the toxic properties of venoms from nine species of Micrurus: eight present in different geographic regions of Brazil (M. frontalis, M. corallinus, M. hemprichii, M. spixii, M. altirostris, M. surinamensis, M. ibiboboca, M. lemniscatus) and one (M. fulvius) with large distribution in Southeastern United States and Mexico. This study also analyzed the antigenic cross-reactivity and the neutralizing potential of the Brazilian coral snake antivenom against these Micrurus venoms. Methodology/Principal Findings Analysis of protein composition and toxicity revealed a large diversity of venoms from the nine Micrurus species. ELISA and Western blot assays showed a varied capability of the therapeutic antivenom to recognize the diverse species venom components. In vivo and in vitro neutralization assays indicated that the antivenom is not able to fully neutralize the toxic activities of all venoms. Conclusion These results indicate the existence of a large range of both qualitative and quantitative variations in Micrurus venoms, probably reflecting the adaptation of the snakes from this genus to vastly dissimilar habitats. The data also show that the antivenom used for human therapy in Brazil is not fully able to neutralize the main toxic activities present in the venoms from all Micrurus species occurring in the country. It suggests that modifications in the immunization scheme, with the inclusion of other venoms in the antigenic mixture, should occur in order to generate effective therapeutic coral snake antivenom. PMID:20231886

  14. Multi-species generalist predation on the stochastic harvested clam Tivela mactroides (Mollusca, Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turra, Alexander; Fernandez, Wellington S.; Bessa, Eduardo; Santos, Flavia B.; Denadai, Márcia R.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down control is an important force modulating the abundance of prey and structuring marine communities. The harvested trigonal clam Tivela mactroides is hypothesized to be part of the diet of a variety of marine organisms, with its stock influencing predator abundance and being influenced by them. Here we analyzed the diet of potential predators of T. mactroides in Caraguatatuba Bay, northern coast of São Paulo State, Brazil, to identify the main consumers of this marine resource, and also to address the importance of this clam in the diet of each predator. Samples were taken year-round by trawls; all specimens collected were identified and measured and the food items identified and quantified. Twenty-one species consumed T. mactroides, whose importance in the diet varied greatly in both the volume ingested and the frequency of occurrence (pompano Trachinotus carolinus > blue crab Callinectes danae > starfish Astropecten marginatus). Top-down influence on T. mactroides was also dependent on the abundance of consumers (yellow catfish Cathorops spixii > rake stardrum Stellifer rastrifer > barred grunt Conodon nobilis > A. marginatus). Considering the mean volume ingested, the frequency of occurrence of T. mactroides in the diet, and the relative abundance of consumers, the predators that most influenced T. mactroides were T. carolinus, A. marginatus, and C. danae, in decreasing order. Large numbers of small-sized individuals of T. mactroides (<10 mm) were generally preyed upon by A. marginatus, which may have a stronger effect on clam abundance in comparison to C. danae and T. carolinus, which preyed upon larger clams. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that predators' consumption of T. mactroides in Caraguatatuba Bay can influence its stocks, mainly due to the type and/or abundance of predator species, the volume and number of individuals of T. mactroides preyed upon, and the temporal variations in the abundance of predators.

  15. The use of semen evaluation and assisted reproduction in Spix's macaws in terms of species conservation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Dominik; Neumann, Daniel; Purchase, Cromwell; Bouts, Tim; Meinecke-Tillmann, Sabine; Wehrend, Axel; Lierz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The Spix's macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii) is the rarest parrot on earth. The remaining captive population consists of 79 individuals. Captive propagation is ongoing to increase the number of individuals for future reintroduction back into the wild. Unfortunately, from 2004 to 2012, only 33 chicks hatched from 331 eggs. Semen evaluation and assisted reproduction might help to overcome this problem. Therefore, a recently developed electro-stimulated semen collection technique was used in Spix's macaws. Semen collection was successful in 39 of 78 attempts in 10 out of 17 males. Examination of the semen included evaluation of volume, color, consistency, contaminations and pH, as well as determination of motility, viability, morphology, concentration, and total count of spermatozoa. The median volume of semen samples was 5.6 µl. On average, 34.7 ± 21.9% (median 30%) of the sperm were motile and 23.1 ± 22.1% (median 16.5%) were progressively motile. In addition to spermatozoa, round cells were detected in the samples. Median sperm concentration was 15,500/µl (range 500-97,500/µl) and median viability was 50% (range 5-87%). Morphological examination revealed in 26.5% normal spermatozoa, high numbers of malformations of the head (50.2%) and tail region (20.5%), with 29% of all sperm showing multiple abnormalities. Artificial insemination was performed in three females; two eggs laid after artificial insemination had spermatozoa present on the perivitelline layer, suggesting the possible success of the insemination technique. Although no fertilization could be demonstrated, these preliminary results are promising, as they indicate that assisted reproduction might be a tool for species conservation in the Spix's macaw. PMID:24752991

  16. A Newly Emerged Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Focus in Northern Israel and Two New Reservoir Hosts of Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Faiman, Roy; Abbasi, Ibrahim; Jaffe, Charles; Motro, Yoav; Nasereddin, Abdelmagid; Schnur, Lionel F.; Torem, Moshe; Pratlong, Francine; Dedet, Jean-Pierre; Warburg, Alon

    2013-01-01

    In 2006/7, 18 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) were reported for the first time from Sde Eliyahu (pop. 650), a village in the Beit She'an valley of Israel. Between 2007–2011, a further 88 CL cases were diagnosed bringing the total to 106 (16.3% of the population of Sde Eliyahu). The majority of cases resided in the south-western part of the village along the perimeter fence. The causative parasite was identified as Leishmania major Yakimoff & Schokhor, 1914 (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli), 1786 (Diptera: Psychodidae) was found to be the most abundant phlebotomine species comprising 97% of the sand flies trapped inside the village, and an average of 7.9% of the females were positive for Leishmania ITS1 DNA. Parasite isolates from CL cases and a sand fly were characterized using several methods and shown to be L. major. During a comprehensive survey of rodents 164 Levant voles Microtus guentheri Danford & Alston, 1880 (Rodentia: Cricetidae) were captured in alfalfa fields bordering the village. Of these 27 (16.5%) tested positive for Leishmania ITS1 DNA and shown to be L. major by reverse line blotting. A very high percentage (58.3% - 21/36) of Tristram's jirds Meriones tristrami Thomas, 1892 (Rodentia: Muridae), found further away from the village also tested positive for ITS1 by PCR. Isolates of L. major were successfully cultured from the ear of a wild jird found positive by ITS1 PCR. Although none of the wild PCR-positive voles exhibited external pathology, laboratory-reared voles that were infected by intradermal L. major inoculation, developed patent lesions and sand flies became infected by feeding on the ears of these laboratory-infected voles. This is the first report implicating M. guentheri and M. tristrami as reservoirs of Leishmania. The widespread co-distribution of M. guentheri and P. papatasi, suggests a significant threat from the spread of CL caused by L. major in the Middle East, central Asia and southern Europe. PMID:23437408

  17. An explanation of the relationship between mass, metabolic rate and characteristic length for placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Frasier, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    The Mass, Metabolism and Length Explanation (MMLE) was advanced in 1984 to explain the relationship between metabolic rate and body mass for birds and mammals. This paper reports on a modernized version of MMLE. MMLE deterministically computes the absolute value of Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) and body mass for individual animals. MMLE is thus distinct from other examinations of these topics that use species-averaged data to estimate the parameters in a statistically best fit power law relationship such as BMR = a(bodymass) (b) . Beginning with the proposition that BMR is proportional to the number of mitochondria in an animal, two primary equations are derived that compute BMR and body mass as functions of an individual animal's characteristic length and sturdiness factor. The characteristic length is a measureable skeletal length associated with an animal's means of propulsion. The sturdiness factor expresses how sturdy or gracile an animal is. Eight other parameters occur in the equations that vary little among animals in the same phylogenetic group. The present paper modernizes MMLE by explicitly treating Froude and Strouhal dynamic similarity of mammals' skeletal musculature, revising the treatment of BMR and using new data to estimate numerical values for the parameters that occur in the equations. A mass and length data set with 575 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Perissodactyla and Proboscidea is used. A BMR and mass data set with 436 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla and Carnivora is also used. With the estimated parameter values MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every BMR and mass datum from the BMR and mass data set can be computed exactly. Furthermore MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every body mass and length datum from the mass and length data set can be computed exactly. Whether or not MMLE can calculate a sturdiness factor value so that an individual animal's BMR and body mass can be simultaneously computed given its characteristic length awaits analysis of a data set that simultaneously reports all three of these items for individual animals. However for many of the addressed MMLE homogeneous groups, MMLE can predict the exponent obtained by regression analysis of the BMR and mass data using the exponent obtained by regression analysis of the mass and length data. This argues that MMLE may be able to accurately simultaneously compute BMR and mass for an individual animal. PMID:26355655

  18. An explanation of the relationship between mass, metabolic rate and characteristic length for placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Mass, Metabolism and Length Explanation (MMLE) was advanced in 1984 to explain the relationship between metabolic rate and body mass for birds and mammals. This paper reports on a modernized version of MMLE. MMLE deterministically computes the absolute value of Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) and body mass for individual animals. MMLE is thus distinct from other examinations of these topics that use species-averaged data to estimate the parameters in a statistically best fit power law relationship such as BMR = a(bodymass)b. Beginning with the proposition that BMR is proportional to the number of mitochondria in an animal, two primary equations are derived that compute BMR and body mass as functions of an individual animal’s characteristic length and sturdiness factor. The characteristic length is a measureable skeletal length associated with an animal’s means of propulsion. The sturdiness factor expresses how sturdy or gracile an animal is. Eight other parameters occur in the equations that vary little among animals in the same phylogenetic group. The present paper modernizes MMLE by explicitly treating Froude and Strouhal dynamic similarity of mammals’ skeletal musculature, revising the treatment of BMR and using new data to estimate numerical values for the parameters that occur in the equations. A mass and length data set with 575 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Perissodactyla and Proboscidea is used. A BMR and mass data set with 436 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla and Carnivora is also used. With the estimated parameter values MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every BMR and mass datum from the BMR and mass data set can be computed exactly. Furthermore MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every body mass and length datum from the mass and length data set can be computed exactly. Whether or not MMLE can calculate a sturdiness factor value so that an individual animal’s BMR and body mass can be simultaneously computed given its characteristic length awaits analysis of a data set that simultaneously reports all three of these items for individual animals. However for many of the addressed MMLE homogeneous groups, MMLE can predict the exponent obtained by regression analysis of the BMR and mass data using the exponent obtained by regression analysis of the mass and length data. This argues that MMLE may be able to accurately simultaneously compute BMR and mass for an individual animal. PMID:26355655

  19. Environment-related and host-related factors affecting the occurrence of lice on rodents in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Stanko, Michal; Fričová, Jana; Miklisová, Dana; Khokhlova, Irina S; Krasnov, Boris R

    2015-06-01

    We studied the effects of environment- (habitat, season) and host-related (sex, body mass) factors on the occurrence of four species of lice (Insecta:Phthiraptera:Anoplura) on six rodent species (Rodentia:Muridae). We asked how these factors influence the occurrence of lice on an individual host and whether different rodent-louse associations demonstrate consistent trends in these effects. We found significant effects of at least one environment-related and at least one host-related factor on the louse occurrence in five of six host-louse associations. The effect of habitat was significant in two associations with the occurrence of lice being more frequent in lowland than in mountain habitats. The effect of season was significant in five associations with a higher occurrence of infestation during the warm season in four associations and the cold season in one association. Host sex affected significantly the infestation by lice in three associations with a higher frequency of infestation in males. Host body mass affected the occurrence of lice in all five associations, being negative in wood mice and positive in voles. In conclusion, lice were influenced not only by the host- but also by environment-related factors. The effects of the latter could be mediated via life history parameters of a host. PMID:25651932

  20. Gene conversion between mammalian CCR2 and CCR5 chemokine receptor genes: a potential mechanism for receptor dimerization.

    PubMed

    Vzquez-Salat, Nria; Yuhki, Naoya; Beck, Thomas; O'Brien, Stephen J; Murphy, William J

    2007-08-01

    The chemokine receptor genes of the CCR cluster on human chromosome 3p21 play important roles in humoral and cellular immune responses. Several of these receptors have been shown to influence human immunodeficiency virus infection and progression to AIDS, and their homologues may play a role in feline immunodeficiency virus infection. We report the isolation and sequencing of a 150-kb domestic cat BAC clone containing the feline CCR genes CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, and CCR5 to further analyze these four receptor genes within the family Felidae. Comparative and phylogenetic analyses reveal evidence for historic gene conversion between the adjacent CCR2 and CCR5 genes in the Felidae and in three independent mammalian orders (Primates, Cetartiodactyla, and Rodentia), resulting in higher than expected levels of sequence similarity between the two paralogous genes within each order. The gene conversion was restricted to the structural (transmembrane) domains of the CCR2 and CCR5 genes. We also discovered a recent gene conversion event between the third extracellular loop of CCR2 and CCR5 genes that was fixed in Asian lions and found at low frequency in African lions (Panthera leo), suggesting that this domain may have an important functional role. Our results suggest that ongoing parallel gene conversion between CCR2 and CCR5 promotes receptor heterodimerization in independent evolutionary lineages and offers an effective adaptive strategy for gene editing and coevolution among interactive immune response genes in mammals. PMID:17544254

  1. Guerrerostrongylus marginalis n. sp. (Trichostrongyloidea: Heligmonellidae) from the Guianan arboreal mouse (Oecomys auyantepui) from French Guiana

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Based on the number and arrangement of cuticular ridges and configuration of the dorsal ray, nematode specimens collected from the small intestine of eight Guianan arboreal mice, Oecomys auyantepui (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae), in French Guiana are herein described and characterized. Guerrerostrongylus marginalis n. sp. (Heligmosomoidea: Heligmonellidae) shows a synlophe consisting of more than 40 ridges and a unique bursal arrangement with ray 8 (externo-dorsal) extending to the edge of the bursal margin, and appearing more prominent than the dorsal ray. This bursal arrangement is common in members of Hassalstrongylus Durette-Desset, 1971, but uncommon in the other four species in Guerrerostrongylus Sutton & Durette-Desset, 1991. The placement of the new species in Guerrerostrongylus is based on the number and nature of cuticular ridges and the ray arrangement and symmetry of the caudal bursa. Diagnostic characteristics of Guerrerostrongylus marginalis n. sp. include the length of ray 8 relative to bursal margin, the relative size of the spicules and vestibule, and the number of eggs in the uterus. We propose an amendment to the generic diagnosis of Guerrerostrongylus to modify the characters of the long rays 6 (postero-lateral), rays 8 (externo-dorsal), and dorsal ray as diagnostic, since at least ray 6 appears to be short in two different species in the genus, namely G. ulysi Digiani, Notarnicola & Navone, 2012 and G. marginalis n. sp. PMID:26956220

  2. Checklist of helminths found in Patagonian wild mammals.

    PubMed

    Fugassa, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Using available reports, a checklist of the recorded helminth parasites of wild mammals from Patagonia was generated. Records of parasites found in Patagonia were included, together with records from mammals in áreas outside of Patagonia but whose range extends into Patagonia. Information about the host, localities, and references were also included. A total of 1323 records (224 Cestoda, 167 Trematoda, 894 Nematoda, 34 Acanthocephala, and 4 Pentastomida) belonging to 452 helminth species (77 Cestoda, 76 Trematoda, 277 Nematoda, 21 Acanthocephala, and 1 Pentastomida) found in 57 native mammals (22 Rodentia, 4 Didelphimorphia 1 Microbiotheria, 7 Chiroptera, 5 Cingulata, and 13 Carnivora) were listed. However, only 10.6 % of the reports were conducted on samples from Patagonia and corresponded to 25% of mammals in the region. In addition, many studies were made on a few species and, for example, 52% corresponded to studies made on Lama guanicoe. This suggests the need to increase efforts to know the parasitic fauna in a peculiar region as is the Patagonia. This is the first compilation of the helminth parasites of mammals in Argentine Patagonia and is important for parasitological and paleoparasitological studies. PMID:26623857

  3. Wild and synanthropic reservoirs of Leishmania species in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Roque, André Luiz R; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2014-12-01

    The definition of a reservoir has changed significantly in the last century, making it necessary to study zoonosis from a broader perspective. One important example is that of Leishmania, zoonotic multi-host parasites maintained by several mammal species in nature. The magnitude of the health problem represented by leishmaniasis combined with the complexity of its epidemiology make it necessary to clarify all of the links in transmission net, including non-human mammalian hosts, to develop effective control strategies. Although some studies have described dozens of species infected with these parasites, only a minority have related their findings to the ecological scenario to indicate a possible role of that host in parasite maintenance and transmission. Currently, it is accepted that a reservoir may be one or a complex of species responsible for maintaining the parasite in nature. A reservoir system should be considered unique on a given spatiotemporal scale. In fact, the transmission of Leishmania species in the wild still represents an complex enzootic "puzzle", as several links have not been identified. This review presents the mammalian species known to be infected with Leishmania spp. in the Americas, highlighting those that are able to maintain and act as a source of the parasite in nature (and are thus considered potential reservoirs). These host/reservoirs are presented separately in each of seven mammal orders - Marsupialia, Cingulata, Pilosa, Rodentia, Primata, Carnivora, and Chiroptera - responsible for maintaining Leishmania species in the wild. PMID:25426421

  4. Geographical Distribution and Seasonal Indices of Chigger Mites on Small Mammals Collected on the East Coast of the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Gab-Man; Shin, Ho-Sung

    2016-04-01

    The geographical distributions and relative population densities of scrub typhus vector mites collected from small mammals were determined for 5 locations on the east coast of the Republic of Korea. Collection sites included Goseong, Gangneung, and Hoengseong in Gangwon province and Uljin and Yeongdeok in Gyeongbuk province. A total of 275 small mammals including members of Rodentia (rodents) and Soricomorpha (shrews, such as Crocidura lasiura ) belonging to 4 genera and 4 species were captured in the field from 2012 to 2013. Apodemus agrarius was collected most frequently (220, 80%), followed by C. lasiura (25, 9.1%), Mus musculus (15, 5.5%), and Myodes regulus (15, 5.5%). A total of 23,436 larval chigger mites (Family Trombiculidae) belonging to 3 genera and 8 species (Leptotrombidium pallidum, Leptotrombidium scutellare, Leptotrombidium palpale, Leptotrombidium orientale, Leptotrombidium zetum, Neotrombicula tamiyai, Neotrombicula japonica, and Euschoengastica koreaensis) were collected from the small mammals. The predominant chigger species collected during the spring and fall seasons from A. agrarius were L. pallidum (57.6%), L. palpale (14.5%), and L. scutellare (7.9%). Leptotrombidium scutellare was collected only along the southeastern coast at Yeongdeok, Gyeongbuk province. The geographical distribution of scrub typhus vectors and reservoir hosts are important aspects of understanding the epidemiology of the disease as well as the potential impacts of climate change and health risks. PMID:26653927

  5. [Laboratory and field evaluation of an imidacloprid treated rodent oral bait for a systemic control of Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli, 1786 (Dipetra: Psychodidae)].

    PubMed

    Derbali, M; Chelbi, I; Cherni, S; Barhoumi, W; Boujaâma, A; Raban, R; Poché, R; Zhioua, E

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the systemic insecticidal activity of an imidacloprid-treated rodent oral bait, against Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli, 1786 vector of Leishmania major Yakimoff & Schokhor, 1914 (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae), etiologic agent of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL). Shaw's gerbil Meriones shawi Duvernoy, 1842 (Rodentia, Gerbillidae) were treated with imidacloprid-treated bait (0.05%). In the laboratory, effects on adult and larval of Phlebotomus papatasi fed on treated M. shawi and on its faeces were studied. The effectiveness of this approach was tested under field conditions. In the laboratory, 100% of P. papatasi were killed within 24 hours after blood feeding on Meriones shawi treated up to four weeks prior with a single application of imidacloprid (0.05%) bait. In addition, none of the P. papatasi larvae that consumed feces from M. shawi treated with the imidacloprid bait survived to pupation. In the field, application of the imidacloprid bait resulted in a 90% reduction in the P. papatasi population up to four weeks prior with a single application of imidacloprid (0.05%) bait. This is the first study to demonstrate field efficacy of insecticide-treated rodent baits for P. papatasi control and the first study to evaluate this approach in M. shawi, a principal ZCL reservoir host. These results suggest that insecticide-treated rodent baits could be used to effectively reduce the populations of P. papatasi associated with M. shawi in ZCL endemic areas. PMID:23299949

  6. Spontaneous expression of magnetic compass orientation in an epigeic rodent: the bank vole, Clethrionomys glareolus.

    PubMed

    Oliveriusová, Ludmila; Němec, Pavel; Pavelková, Zuzana; Sedláček, František

    2014-07-01

    Magnetoreception has been convincingly demonstrated in only a few mammalian species. Among rodents, magnetic compass orientation has been documented in four species of subterranean mole rats and two epigeic (i.e. active above ground) species-the Siberian hamster and the C57BL/6J mouse. The mole rats use the magnetic field azimuth to determine compass heading; their directional preference is spontaneous and unimodal, and their magnetic compass is magnetite-mediated. By contrast, the primary component of orientation response is learned in the hamster and the mouse, but both species also exhibit a weak spontaneous bimodal preference in the natural magnetic field. To determine whether the magnetic compass of wild epigeic rodents features the same functional properties as that of laboratory rodents, we investigated magnetic compass orientation in the bank vole Clethrionomys glareolus (Cricetidae, Rodentia). The voles exhibited a robust spontaneous bimodal directional preference, i.e. built nests and slept preferentially along the north-south axis, and deflected their directional preference according to a shift in the direction of magnetic north, clearly indicating that they were deriving directional information from the magnetic field. Thus, bimodal, axially symmetrical directional choice seems to be a common feature shared by epigeic rodents. However, spontaneous directional preference in the bank vole appeared to be more pronounced than that reported in the hamster and the mouse. These findings suggest that bank voles are well suited for future studies investigating the adaptive significance and mechanisms of magnetic orientation in epigeic rodents. PMID:24913128

  7. Coordinated Scaling of Cortical and Cerebellar Numbers of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    While larger brains possess concertedly larger cerebral cortices and cerebella, the relative size of the cerebral cortex increases with brain size, but relative cerebellar size does not. In the absence of data on numbers of neurons in these structures, this discrepancy has been used to dispute the hypothesis that the cerebral cortex and cerebellum function and have evolved in concert and to support a trend towards neocorticalization in evolution. However, the rationale for interpreting changes in absolute and relative size of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum relies on the assumption that they reflect absolute and relative numbers of neurons in these structures across all species – an assumption that our recent studies have shown to be flawed. Here I show for the first time that the numbers of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum are directly correlated across 19 mammalian species of four different orders, including humans, and increase concertedly in a similar fashion both within and across the orders Eulipotyphla (Insectivora), Rodentia, Scandentia and Primata, such that on average a ratio of 3.6 neurons in the cerebellum to every neuron in the cerebral cortex is maintained across species. This coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons provides direct evidence in favor of concerted function, scaling and evolution of these brain structures, and suggests that the common notion that equates cognitive advancement with neocortical expansion should be revisited to consider in its stead the coordinated scaling of neocortex and cerebellum as a functional ensemble. PMID:20300467

  8. Coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons.

    PubMed

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    While larger brains possess concertedly larger cerebral cortices and cerebella, the relative size of the cerebral cortex increases with brain size, but relative cerebellar size does not. In the absence of data on numbers of neurons in these structures, this discrepancy has been used to dispute the hypothesis that the cerebral cortex and cerebellum function and have evolved in concert and to support a trend towards neocorticalization in evolution. However, the rationale for interpreting changes in absolute and relative size of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum relies on the assumption that they reflect absolute and relative numbers of neurons in these structures across all species - an assumption that our recent studies have shown to be flawed. Here I show for the first time that the numbers of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum are directly correlated across 19 mammalian species of four different orders, including humans, and increase concertedly in a similar fashion both within and across the orders Eulipotyphla (Insectivora), Rodentia, Scandentia and Primata, such that on average a ratio of 3.6 neurons in the cerebellum to every neuron in the cerebral cortex is maintained across species. This coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons provides direct evidence in favor of concerted function, scaling and evolution of these brain structures, and suggests that the common notion that equates cognitive advancement with neocortical expansion should be revisited to consider in its stead the coordinated scaling of neocortex and cerebellum as a functional ensemble. PMID:20300467

  9. Frequent expansions of the bitter taste receptor gene repertoire during evolution of mammals in the Euarchontoglires clade.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Takashi; Suzuki-Hashido, Nami; Matsui, Atsushi; Go, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Genome studies of mammals in the superorder Euarchontoglires (a clade that comprises the orders Primates, Dermoptera, Scandentia, Rodentia, and Lagomorpha) are important for understanding the biological features of humans, particularly studies of medical model animals such as macaques and mice. Furthermore, the dynamic ecoevolutionary signatures of Euarchontoglires genomes may be discovered because many species in this clade are characterized by their successful adaptive radiation to various ecological niches. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary trajectory of bitter taste receptor genes (TAS2Rs) in 28 Euarchontoglires species based on homology searches of 39 whole-genome assemblies. The Euarchontoglires species possessed variable numbers of intact TAS2Rs, which ranged from 16 to 40, and their last common ancestor had at least 26 intact TAS2Rs. The gene tree showed that there have been at least seven lineage-specific events involving massive gene duplications. Gene duplications were particularly evident in the ancestral branches of anthropoids (the anthropoid cluster), which may have promoted the adaptive evolution of anthropoid characteristics, such as a trade-off between olfaction and other senses and the development of herbivorous characteristics. Subsequent whole-gene deletions of anthropoid cluster TAS2Rs in hominoid species suggest ongoing ectopic homologous recombination in the anthropoid cluster. These findings provide insights into the roles of adaptive sensory evolution in various ecological niches and important clues related to the molecular mechanisms that underlie taste diversity in Euarchontoglires mammalian species, including humans. PMID:24758778

  10. More Novel Hantaviruses and Diversifying Reservoir Hosts — Time for Development of Reservoir-Derived Cell Culture Models?

    PubMed Central

    Eckerle, Isabella; Lenk, Matthias; Ulrich, Rainer G.

    2014-01-01

    Due to novel, improved and high-throughput detection methods, there is a plethora of newly identified viruses within the genus Hantavirus. Furthermore, reservoir host species are increasingly recognized besides representatives of the order Rodentia, now including members of the mammalian orders Soricomorpha/Eulipotyphla and Chiroptera. Despite the great interest created by emerging zoonotic viruses, there is still a gross lack of in vitro models, which reflect the exclusive host adaptation of most zoonotic viruses. The usually narrow host range and genetic diversity of hantaviruses make them an exciting candidate for studying virus-host interactions on a cellular level. To do so, well-characterized reservoir cell lines covering a wide range of bat, insectivore and rodent species are essential. Most currently available cell culture models display a heterologous virus-host relationship and are therefore only of limited value. Here, we review the recently established approaches to generate reservoir-derived cell culture models for the in vitro study of virus-host interactions. These successfully used model systems almost exclusively originate from bats and bat-borne viruses other than hantaviruses. Therefore we propose a parallel approach for research on rodent- and insectivore-borne hantaviruses, taking the generation of novel rodent and insectivore cell lines from wildlife species into account. These cell lines would be also valuable for studies on further rodent-borne viruses, such as orthopox- and arenaviruses. PMID:24576845

  11. Differentiated evolutionary relationships among chordates from comparative alignments of multiple sequences of MyoD and MyoG myogenic regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Oliani, L C; Lidani, K C F; Gabriel, J E

    2015-01-01

    MyoD and MyoG are transcription factors that have essential roles in myogenic lineage determination and muscle differentiation. The purpose of this study was to compare multiple amino acid sequences of myogenic regulatory proteins to infer evolutionary relationships among chordates. Protein sequences from Mus musculus (P10085 and P12979), human Homo sapiens (P15172 and P15173), bovine Bos taurus (Q7YS82 and Q7YS81), wild pig Sus scrofa (P49811 and P49812), quail Coturnix coturnix (P21572 and P34060), chicken Gallus gallus (P16075 and P17920), rat Rattus norvegicus (Q02346 and P20428), domestic water buffalo Bubalus bubalis (D2SP11 and A7L034), and sheep Ovis aries (Q90477 and D3YKV7) were searched from a non-redundant protein sequence database UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, and subsequently analyzed using the Mega6.0 software. MyoD evolutionary analyses revealed the presence of three main clusters with all mammals branched in one cluster, members of the order Rodentia (mouse and rat) in a second branch linked to the first, and birds of the order Galliformes (chicken and quail) remaining isolated in a third. MyoG evolutionary analyses aligned sequences in two main clusters, all mammalian specimens grouped in different sub-branches, and birds clustered in a second branch. These analyses suggest that the evolution of MyoD and MyoG was driven by different pathways. PMID:26505406

  12. Evolution of hantaviruses: co-speciation with reservoir hosts for more than 100 MYR.

    PubMed

    Plyusnin, Alexander; Sironen, Tarja

    2014-07-17

    The most recent (9th) Report of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) lists 23 established and 30 provisional species in the genus Hantavirus (family Bunyaviridae) (Plyusnin et al., 2012). These virus species are harbored by altogether 51 species of rodents, shrews and moles and thus in most cases it is a relationship of "one hantavirus-one host". Such a tight bond between the two, in combination with the observed association between whole groups of hantaviruses and (sub)families of rodents, helped to develop the widely accepted view of a long-term co-evolution (co-speciation) of these viruses with their hosts. Accumulating evidence of host-switching events, both recent and ancient, however challenged some of the earlier views on hantavirus evolution. In this paper we discuss the concept of hantavirus-host co-speciation and propose a scenario of hantavirus evolution based on the currently available genetic information. This scenario is based on the hypothesis that hantaviruses are very ancient viruses which already existed at the estimated diversification point of major placental clades, of which one includes the ancestors of the order Rodentia and another the ancestors of both orders Eulipotyphla and Chiroptera; the diversification occurred approximately at 90-100 MYA. We also speculate that the evolutionary history of hantaviruses extents even deeper in the past, beyond this time-point, and included the transmission of a (pre)bunyavirus from an insect host to a mammal host. PMID:24463501

  13. Fur mites of the family Listrophoridae (Acariformes: Sarcoptoidea) associated with South American sigmodontine rodents (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae).

    PubMed

    Sikora, Bożena; Bochkov, Andre V

    2012-12-01

    Six species of 3 genera belonging to the fur mite family Listrophoridae were recorded on skins of South American rodents of the cricetid subfamily Sigmodontinae housed in the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology (Munich, Germany). Among them, Amlistrophorus geoxus sp. nov. from Geoxus valdivianus from Chile is described as a new for science, and males of Prolistrophorus amazonicus amazonicus Fain, 1971 are recorded for the first time. The full generic status for the subgenus Amlistrophorus of the genus Prolistrophorus proposed by Fain et al. (1996) is not supported, and Prolistrophorus musculinus Fain, 1973 stat. nov. (formerly a subspecies of P. amazonicus) from Mus musculus (Rodentia: Muridae) from Suriname is raised to species status. New hosts are recorded for the following species: Prolistrophorus argentinus (Hirst, 1921) from Holochilus brasiliensis and H. chacarius from Argentina, P. amazonicus from Calomys callosus from Argentina and Bolivia, C. laucha and C. musculinus from Argentina, P. akodon Fain and Lukoschus, 1982 from Akodon montensis from Argentina, P. nectomys Fain, 1971 from Nectomys palmipes from Peru and Melanomys caliginosus from Panama, and Sclerolistrophorus oxymycteris Fain, 1976 from Oryzomys laticeps from Brazil. PMID:23129199

  14. Implications of Hybridization, NUMTs, and Overlooked Diversity for DNA Barcoding of Eurasian Ground Squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Ermakov, Oleg A.; Simonov, Evgeniy; Surin, Vadim L.; Titov, Sergey V.; Brandler, Oleg V.; Ivanova, Natalia V.; Borisenko, Alex V.

    2015-01-01

    The utility of DNA Barcoding for species identification and discovery has catalyzed a concerted effort to build the global reference library; however, many animal groups of economical or conservational importance remain poorly represented. This study aims to contribute DNA barcode records for all ground squirrel species (Xerinae, Sciuridae, Rodentia) inhabiting Eurasia and to test efficiency of this approach for species discrimination. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene sequences were obtained for 97 individuals representing 16 ground squirrel species of which 12 were correctly identified. Taxonomic allocation of some specimens within four species was complicated by geographically restricted mtDNA introgression. Exclusion of individuals with introgressed mtDNA allowed reaching a 91.6% identification success rate. Significant COI divergence (3.5–4.4%) was observed within the most widespread ground squirrel species (Spermophilus erythrogenys, S. pygmaeus, S. suslicus, Urocitellus undulatus), suggesting the presence of cryptic species. A single putative NUMT (nuclear mitochondrial pseudogene) sequence was recovered during molecular analysis; mitochondrial COI from this sample was amplified following re-extraction of DNA. Our data show high discrimination ability of 100 bp COI fragments for Eurasian ground squirrels (84.3%) with no incorrect assessments, underscoring the potential utility of the existing reference librariy for the development of diagnostic ‘mini-barcodes’. PMID:25617768

  15. Revision of fleas of the genus Plocopsylla belonging to the 'angusticeps-lewisi' complex in the Andean biogeographic region, with the description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, J; Beaucournu, J-C; Lareschi, M

    2015-06-01

    In Argentina, the Andean biogeographic region accommodates the most diverse population of fleas in the country. The Craneopsyllinae (Siphonaptera: Stephanocircidae) represent one of the most commonly found subfamilies in this region and show some endemism and high diversity. Plocopsylla is the most diverse genus of Craneopsyllinae; it includes 10 species mainly distributed in the Patagonian subregion, which parasitize sigmodontine rodents (Rodentia: Cricetidae). We describe and illustrate the morphology of the aedeagus in species of Plocopsylla that belong to the 'angusticeps-lewisi' complex. This character is of diagnostic value in differentiating among species. A new species of this complex, Plocopsylla (Plocopsylla) linardii sp. n., is described and identified by the shape and chaetotaxy of the distal arm of sternite IX, as well as by the shape of the median dorsal lobe of the aedeagus. New host associations for this complex and range extensions for most of its species are reported. Plocopsylla (P.) silewi is recorded for the first time in Argentina. The southern limits of the distributions of Plocopsylla (P.) lewisi and Plocopsylla (P.) wilesi are extended to Santa Cruz Province. The angusticeps-lewisi complex is found for the first time in San Juan Province. The information may be useful in epidemiological studies of flea-borne diseases. PMID:25726809

  16. Energetics in a solitary subterranean rodent, the silvery mole-rat, Heliophobius argenteocinereus, and allometry of RMR in African mole-rats (Bathyergidae).

    PubMed

    Zelov, Jitka; Sumbera, Radim; Sedlcek, Frantisek; Burda, Hynek

    2007-06-01

    Low resting metabolic rate (RMR) in subterranean rodents used to be considered as a physiological adaptation to cope with stresses of the belowground environment. In African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia), RMR was reported to be independent of body mass. This deviation from a general mammalian pattern was considered a precondition for evolution of eusociality, occurring in some bathyergids. We measured metabolic rate and thermoregulation in the silvery mole-rat, Heliophobius argenteocinereus, the only bathyergid genus for which well-supported, comparable data were still missing. Low RMR (154.04 mL O(2) h(-1), which is 82% of the value predicted for a rodent) corresponds to the value expected in a subterranean rodent. Broad range of the thermoneutral zone (25-33 degrees C) and only slightly higher conductance (17.3 mL O(2) h(-1) degrees C(-1), i.e. 112.5% of that predicted for subterranean mammals) indicate that H. argenteocinereus is adapted to lower burrow temperatures rather than to high temperatures. Low RMR in this solitary species, as in other subterranean rodents in general, is probably associated particularly with high energetic cost of foraging. Our results combined with data on other mole-rats show clearly that RMR within the Bathyergidae is mass-dependent. PMID:17337221

  17. Seed predation and fruit damage of Solanum lycocarpum (Solanaceae) by rodents in the cerrado of central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briani and, Denis C., Jr.; Guimarães, Paulo R.

    2007-01-01

    Although neotropical savannas and grasslands, collectively referred to as cerrado, are rich in seed-eating species of rodents, little is known about seed predation and its determinants in this habitat. In this study, we investigated seed predation and damage to fruits of the widespread shrub Solanum lycocarpum. In addition, the influence of two possible determinants (distance from the parental plant and total crop size) on the feeding behaviour of Oryzomys scotti (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae) was also examined. O. scotti were captured more frequently close to the shrubs or on shrub crops, indicating that these rodents were attracted to the shrubs and that seed predation was probably distance-dependent. Moreover, the proportion of damaged fruit on the plant decreased as the total crop size increased; consequently, more productive plants were attacked proportionally less by rodents. This pattern of fruit damage may reflect predator satiation caused by the consumption of a large amount of pulp. Alternatively, secondary metabolites in S. lycocarpum fruits may reduce the pulp consumption per feeding event, thereby limiting the number of fruits damaged.

  18. Characterization of the North American beaver (Castor canadensis) papillomavirus genome.

    PubMed

    Rogovskyy, Artem S; Chen, Zigui; Burk, Robert D; Bankhead, Troy

    2014-01-10

    The papillomaviruses comprise a large group of viruses that cause proliferations of the stratified squamous epithelium of skin and mucosa in a variety of animals. An earlier report identified a novel papillomavirus of the North American beaver, Castor canadensis (CcanPV1) that was associated with cutaneous exophytic lesions. In the current study, we determined the sequence of the complete 7435 basepair genome of CcanPV1. The genome contains an Upstream Regulatory Region located between the end of L1 and the start of E6, and seven canonical papillomavirus open reading frames encoding five early (E6, E7, E1, E2, and E4) and two late (L2 and L1) proteins. No E5 open reading frame was detected. Phylogenetic analysis of the CcanPV1 genome places the virus between the genera Kappapapillomavirus and Mupapillomavirus. Analyses of the papillomavirus genomes detected in different species of the order Rodentia indicate these viruses do not form a monophyletic clade. PMID:24309404

  19. Surprisingly low risk of overheating during digging in two subterranean rodents.

    PubMed

    Okrouhlík, Jan; Burda, Hynek; Kunc, Petr; Knížková, Ivana; Šumbera, Radim

    2015-01-01

    Capacities for and constraints of heat dissipation are considered to be important factors governing maximum intensity and duration of physical activity. Subterranean mammals are endurance diggers, but because of lack of air currents in their burrows, high relative humidity and other physical constraints, the capacity of common mammalian cooling mechanisms underground is very limited. We analyzed surface and body core temperature changes after digging in soft and hard substrates in two species of African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia); the social giant mole-rat Fukomys mechowii and the solitary silvery mole-rat Heliophobius argenteocinereus. As expected, we observed an increase of body core temperature in both species after digging in both substrates. Surprisingly, and contrary to our expectations, we observed remarkable decrease of mole-rats' surface temperature immediately after the end of the digging trials. This decrease was greater in soft and moister soil than that in hard and drier soil. Our results suggest that mole-rats may effectively avoid overheating in burrows by effective cooling while digging, especially in wet soil. This indicates that burrowing in soils moistened by rains could be easier than previously thought contributing thus to mole-rats success in challenging environment of subterranean burrows. PMID:25446207

  20. Parentage analysis of Ansell's mole-rat family groups indicates a high reproductive skew despite relatively relaxed ecological constraints on dispersal.

    PubMed

    Patzenhauerová, Hana; Šklíba, Jan; Bryja, Josef; Šumbera, Radim

    2013-10-01

    To better understand evolutionary pathways leading to eusociality, interspecific comparisons are needed, which would use a common axis, such as that of reproductive skew, to array species. African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia) provide an outstanding model of social evolution because of a wide range of social organizations within a single family; however, their reproductive skew is difficult to estimate, due to their cryptic lifestyle. A maximum skew could theoretically be reached in groups where reproduction is monopolized by a stable breeding pair, but the value could be decreased by breeding-male and breeding-female turnover, shared reproduction and extra-group mating. The frequency of such events should be higher in species or populations inhabiting mesic environments with relaxed ecological constraints on dispersal. To test this prediction, we studied patterns of parentage and relatedness within 16 groups of Ansell's mole-rat (Fukomys anselli) in mesic miombo woodland. Contrary to expectation, there was no shared reproduction (more than one breeder of a particular sex) within the studied groups, and proportion of immigrants and offspring not assigned to current breeding males was low. The within-group parentage and relatedness patterns observed resemble arid populations of 'eusocial' Fukomys damarensis, rather than a mesic population of 'social' Cryptomys hottentotus. As a possible explanation, we propose that the extent ecological conditions affect reproductive skew may be markedly affected by life history and natural history traits of the particular species and genera. PMID:23992451

  1. HIF-1α regulation in mammalian hibernators: role of non-coding RNA in HIF-1α control during torpor in ground squirrels and bats.

    PubMed

    Maistrovski, Yulia; Biggar, Kyle K; Storey, Kenneth B

    2012-08-01

    A potential role for non-coding RNAs, miR-106b and antisense hypoxia inducible transcription factor-1 (HIF-1α), in HIF-1α regulation during mammalian hibernation was investigated in two species, the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) and the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus). Both species showed differential regulation of HIF-1α during hibernation. HIF-1α protein levels increased significantly in skeletal muscle of both species when animals entered torpor, as well as in bat liver. HIF-1α mRNA levels correlated with the protein increase in bat skeletal muscle and liver but not in squirrel skeletal muscle. Antisense HIF-1α transcripts were identified in skeletal muscle of both hibernators. The expression of antisense HIF-1α was reduced in skeletal muscle of torpid bats compared with euthermic controls, suggesting that release of inhibition by the antisense RNA contributes to regulating HIF-1α translation in this tissue during torpor. The expression of miR-106b, a microRNA associated with HIF-1α regulation, also decreased during torpor in both skeletal muscle and liver of bats and in ground squirrel skeletal muscle. These data present the first evidence that non-coding RNA provides novel post-transcriptional mechanisms of HIF-1α regulation when hibernators descend into deep cold torpor, and also demonstrate that these mechanisms are conserved in two divergent mammalian orders (Rodentia and Chiroptera). PMID:22526261

  2. The power of social structure: how we became an intelligent lineage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa António, Marina Resendes; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    New findings pertinent to the human lineage origin (Ardipithecus ramidus) prompt a new analysis of the extrapolation of the social behavior of our closest relatives, the great apes, into human ‘natural social behavior’. With the new findings it becomes clear that human ancestors had very divergent social arrangements from the ones we observe today in our closest genetic relatives. The social structure of chimpanzees and gorillas is characterized by male competition. Aggression and the instigation of fear are common place. The morphology of A. ramidus points in the direction of a social system characterized by female-choice instead of male-male competition. This system tends to be characterized by reduced aggression levels, leading to more stable arrangements. It is postulated here that the social stability with accompanying group cohesion propitiated by this setting is favorable to the investment in more complex behaviors, the development of innovative approaches to solve familiar problems, an increase in exploratory behavior, and eventually higher intelligence and the use of sophisticated tools and technology. The concentration of research efforts into the study of social animals with similar social systems (e.g., New World social monkeys (Callitrichidae), social canids (Canidae) and social rodents (Rodentia)) are likely to provide new insights into the understanding of what factors determined our evolution into an intelligent species capable of advanced technology.

  3. Hystricognathy vs Sciurognathy in the Rodent Jaw: A New Morphometric Assessment of Hystricognathy Applied to the Living Fossil Laonastes (Diatomyidae)

    PubMed Central

    Hautier, Lionel; Lebrun, Renaud; Saksiri, Soonchan; Michaux, Jacques; Vianey-Liaud, Monique; Marivaux, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    While exceptional for an intense diversification of lineages, the evolutionary history of the order Rodentia comprises only a limited number of morphological morphotypes for the mandible. This situation could partly explain the intense debates about the taxonomic position of the latest described member of this clade, the Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus (Diatomyidae). This discovery has re-launched the debate on the definition of the Hystricognathi suborder identified using the angle of the jaw relative to the plane of the incisors. Our study aims to end this ambiguity. For clarity, it became necessary to revisit the entire morphological diversity of the mandible in extant and extinct rodents. However, current and past rodent diversity brings out the limitations of the qualitative descriptive approach and highlights the need for a quantitative approach. Here, we present the first descriptive comparison of the masticatory apparatus within the Ctenohystrica clade, in combining classic comparative anatomy with morphometrical methods. First, we quantified the shape of the mandible in rodents using 3D landmarks. Then, the analysis of osteological features was compared to myological features in order to understand the biomechanical origin of this morphological diversity. Among the morphological variation observed, the mandible of Laonastes aenigmamus displays an intermediate association of features that could be considered neither as sciurognathous nor as hystricognathous. PMID:21490933

  4. Molecular and Paleontological Evidence for a Post-Cretaceous Origin of Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaoyuan; Wu, Wenyu; Zhang, Fuchun; Ye, Jie; Ni, Xijun; Sun, Jimin; Edwards, Scott V.; Meng, Jin; Organ, Chris L.

    2012-01-01

    The timing of the origin and diversification of rodents remains controversial, due to conflicting results from molecular clocks and paleontological data. The fossil record tends to support an early Cenozoic origin of crown-group rodents. In contrast, most molecular studies place the origin and initial diversification of crown-Rodentia deep in the Cretaceous, although some molecular analyses have recovered estimated divergence times that are more compatible with the fossil record. Here we attempt to resolve this conflict by carrying out a molecular clock investigation based on a nine-gene sequence dataset and a novel set of seven fossil constraints, including two new rodent records (the earliest known representatives of Cardiocraniinae and Dipodinae). Our results indicate that rodents originated around 61.7–62.4 Ma, shortly after the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary, and diversified at the intraordinal level around 57.7–58.9 Ma. These estimates are broadly consistent with the paleontological record, but challenge previous molecular studies that place the origin and early diversification of rodents in the Cretaceous. This study demonstrates that, with reliable fossil constraints, the incompatibility between paleontological and molecular estimates of rodent divergence times can be eliminated using currently available tools and genetic markers. Similar conflicts between molecular and paleontological evidence bedevil attempts to establish the origination times of other placental groups. The example of the present study suggests that more reliable fossil calibration points may represent the key to resolving these controversies. PMID:23071573

  5. A new genus and species of demodecid mites from the tongue of a house mouse Mus musculus: description of adult and immature stages with data on parasitism.

    PubMed

    Izdebska, J N; Rolbiecki, L

    2016-06-01

    The study of the parasitofauna of the house mouse Mus musculus (Rodentia: Muridae) Linnaeus is particularly important owing to its multiple relationships with humans - as a cosmopolitan, synanthropic rodent, bred for pets, food for other animals or laboratory animal. This article proposes and describes a new genus and species of the parasitic mite based on adult and immature stages from the house mouse. Glossicodex musculi gen. n., sp. n. is a medium-sized demodecid mite (adult stages on average 199 µm in length) found in mouse tissue of the tongue. It is characterized by two large, hooked claws on each tarsus of the legs; the legs are relatively massive, consisting of large, non-overlapping segments. The palps consist of three slender, clearly separated, relatively narrow segments, wherein their coxal segments are also quite narrow and spaced. Also, segments of the palps of larva and nymphs are clearly isolated, and on the terminal segment, trident claws that resemble legs' claws can be found. On the ventral side, in immature stages, triangular scuta, topped with sclerotized spur, can be also observed. Glossicodex musculi was noted in 10.8% of mice with a mean infection intensity of 2.2 parasites per host. PMID:26991770

  6. Hystricognathy vs sciurognathy in the rodent jaw: a new morphometric assessment of hystricognathy applied to the living fossil Laonastes (Diatomyidae).

    PubMed

    Hautier, Lionel; Lebrun, Renaud; Saksiri, Soonchan; Michaux, Jacques; Vianey-Liaud, Monique; Marivaux, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    While exceptional for an intense diversification of lineages, the evolutionary history of the order Rodentia comprises only a limited number of morphological morphotypes for the mandible. This situation could partly explain the intense debates about the taxonomic position of the latest described member of this clade, the Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus (Diatomyidae). This discovery has re-launched the debate on the definition of the Hystricognathi suborder identified using the angle of the jaw relative to the plane of the incisors. Our study aims to end this ambiguity. For clarity, it became necessary to revisit the entire morphological diversity of the mandible in extant and extinct rodents. However, current and past rodent diversity brings out the limitations of the qualitative descriptive approach and highlights the need for a quantitative approach. Here, we present the first descriptive comparison of the masticatory apparatus within the Ctenohystrica clade, in combining classic comparative anatomy with morphometrical methods. First, we quantified the shape of the mandible in rodents using 3D landmarks. Then, the analysis of osteological features was compared to myological features in order to understand the biomechanical origin of this morphological diversity. Among the morphological variation observed, the mandible of Laonastes aenigmamus displays an intermediate association of features that could be considered neither as sciurognathous nor as hystricognathous. PMID:21490933

  7. Biostratigraphy and biochronology of the Monte Hermoso Formation (early Pliocene) at its type locality, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, Rodrigo L.; Montalvo, Claudia I.; Deschamps, Cecilia M.; Manera, Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The Monte Hermoso Formation, cropping out at its type locality of Farola Monte Hermoso (Buenos Aires Province), is a classical fossiliferous unit of the South American Neogene, highlighted by the abundance and diversity of its vertebrate remains. However, its biostratigraphy and age have been largely debated, and numerous discrepancies and controversies have been stated. In this regard, the result of the analysis of new materials recovered from the different levels of this formation, following a strict control of stratigraphic provenance, is here reported. As well, the provenance of specimens of previous collections has been evaluated. The studied assemblage consists of Osteichthyes, Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves and Mammalia. These latter are the most numerous and belong to the Didelphimorphia, Polydolopimorphia, Rodentia, Notoungulata, Litopterna and Xenarthra. The recorded taxa suggest no important faunistic variations among the different levels of the Monte Hermoso Formation that would imply significant chronological differences, and hence, justify the recognition of two biostratigraphic units. The analysis of the first and last records as well as the taxa considered as exclusive, does not support the validity of the biozones of Trigodon gaudryi and Neocavia depressidens previously proposed. On this basis, a new scheme for the Monte Hermoso Formation at its type locality is proposed, including a new single biostratigraphic unit. This unit is the Eumysops laeviplicatus Range Zone, which represents the biostratigraphic base for the Montehermosan Stage/Age of the early Pliocene.

  8. A novel satellite DNA sequence in the Peromyscus genome (PMSat): Evolution via copy number fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Louzada, Sandra; Vieira-da-Silva, Ana; Mendes-da-Silva, Ana; Kubickova, Svatava; Rubes, Jiri; Adega, Filomena; Chaves, Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Satellite DNAs (satDNA) are tandemly arrayed repeated sequences largely present in eukaryotic genomes, which play important roles in genome evolution and function, and therefore, their analysis is vital. Here, we describe the isolation of a novel satellite DNA family (PMSat) from the rodent Peromyscus eremicus (Cricetidae, Rodentia), which is located in pericentromeric regions and exhibits a typical satellite DNA genome organization. Orthologous PMSat sequences were isolated and characterized from three species belonging to Cricetidae: Cricetus cricetus, Phodopus sungorus and Microtus arvalis. In these species, PMSat is highly conserved, with the absence of fixed species-specific mutations. Strikingly, different numbers of copies of this sequence were found among the species, suggesting evolution by copy number fluctuation. Repeat units of PMSat were also found in the Peromyscus maniculatus bairdii BioProject, but our results suggest that these repeat units are from genome regions outside the pericentromere. The remarkably high evolutionary sequence conservation along with the preservation of a few numbers of copies of this sequence in the analyzed genomes may suggest functional significance but a different sequence nature/organization. Our data highlight that repeats are difficult to analyze due to the limited tools available to dissect genomes and the fact that assemblies do not cover regions of constitutive heterochromatin. PMID:26103000

  9. Analysis of ectoparasites (chigger mites, gamasid mites, fleas and sucking lice) of the Yunnan red-backed vole (Eothenomys miletus) sampled throughout its range in southwest China.

    PubMed

    Peng, P-Y; Guo, X-G; Song, W-Y; Hou, P; Zou, Y-J; Fan, R; He, X-S

    2015-12-01

    The Yunnan red-backed vole Eothenomys miletus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) is an endemic rodent species and reservoir host of zoonoses in southwest China. Based on a large host sample (2463 voles collected from 39 localities between 2001 and 2013), a general analysis of four categories of ectoparasite (fleas, sucking lice, chigger mites and gamasid mites) on E. miletus across its entire range of distribution was made. This analysis identified a total of 71 895 ectoparasites belonging to 320 species (30 species of flea, 9 of sucking louse, 106 of gamasid mite and 175 of chigger mite) with a high prevalence (87%), mean abundance (29.19) and mean intensity (33.69). Of the 18 vector species of zoonoses found on E. miletus, the flea Ctenophthalmus quadratus (Siphonaptera: Hystrichopsyllidae) and chigger mite Leptotrombidium scutellare (Trombidiformes: Trombiculidae) were the dominant species; these are the main vectors of zoonoses in China. All of the dominant parasite species showed an aggregated distribution pattern. Male voles harboured more species of parasite than females. Chigger mites represented the most abundant species group on voles and their prevalence was positively correlated with mean abundance (r = 0.73; P < 0.05). As a single rodent species, E. miletus has a high potential to harbour abundant ectoparasites with high species diversity and high rates of infestation. The sex of the vole affects ectoparasite infestation. PMID:26345365

  10. Evolution of recombination in eutherian mammals: insights into mechanisms that affect recombination rates and crossover interference.

    PubMed

    Segura, Joana; Ferretti, Luca; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastián; Capilla, Laia; Farré, Marta; Reis, Fernanda; Oliver-Bonet, Maria; Fernández-Bellón, Hugo; Garcia, Francisca; Garcia-Caldés, Montserrat; Robinson, Terence J; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2013-11-22

    Recombination allows faithful chromosomal segregation during meiosis and contributes to the production of new heritable allelic variants that are essential for the maintenance of genetic diversity. Therefore, an appreciation of how this variation is created and maintained is of critical importance to our understanding of biodiversity and evolutionary change. Here, we analysed the recombination features from species representing the major eutherian taxonomic groups Afrotheria, Rodentia, Primates and Carnivora to better understand the dynamics of mammalian recombination. Our results suggest a phylogenetic component in recombination rates (RRs), which appears to be directional, strongly punctuated and subject to selection. Species that diversified earlier in the evolutionary tree have lower RRs than those from more derived phylogenetic branches. Furthermore, chromosome-specific recombination maps in distantly related taxa show that crossover interference is especially weak in the species with highest RRs detected thus far, the tiger. This is the first example of a mammalian species exhibiting such low levels of crossover interference, highlighting the uniqueness of this species and its relevance for the study of the mechanisms controlling crossover formation, distribution and resolution. PMID:24068360

  11. Evolution of recombination in eutherian mammals: insights into mechanisms that affect recombination rates and crossover interference

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Joana; Ferretti, Luca; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastián; Capilla, Laia; Farré, Marta; Reis, Fernanda; Oliver-Bonet, Maria; Fernández-Bellón, Hugo; Garcia, Francisca; Garcia-Caldés, Montserrat; Robinson, Terence J.; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    Recombination allows faithful chromosomal segregation during meiosis and contributes to the production of new heritable allelic variants that are essential for the maintenance of genetic diversity. Therefore, an appreciation of how this variation is created and maintained is of critical importance to our understanding of biodiversity and evolutionary change. Here, we analysed the recombination features from species representing the major eutherian taxonomic groups Afrotheria, Rodentia, Primates and Carnivora to better understand the dynamics of mammalian recombination. Our results suggest a phylogenetic component in recombination rates (RRs), which appears to be directional, strongly punctuated and subject to selection. Species that diversified earlier in the evolutionary tree have lower RRs than those from more derived phylogenetic branches. Furthermore, chromosome-specific recombination maps in distantly related taxa show that crossover interference is especially weak in the species with highest RRs detected thus far, the tiger. This is the first example of a mammalian species exhibiting such low levels of crossover interference, highlighting the uniqueness of this species and its relevance for the study of the mechanisms controlling crossover formation, distribution and resolution. PMID:24068360

  12. New Species of Rotundomys (Cricetinae) from the Late Miocene of Spain and Its Bearing on the Phylogeny of Cricetulodon and Rotundomys

    PubMed Central

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Peláez-Campomanes, Pablo; Álvarez-Sierra, Ángeles

    2014-01-01

    The material of Rotundomys (Rodentia, Cricetinae) from the Late Miocene fossiliferous complex of Cerro de los Batallones (Madrid, Spain) is described and compared with all species currently placed in the genera Rotundomys and Cricetulodon. Both the morphology and size variation encompassed in the collection of specimens from Batallones suggest they belong to a single taxon different from the other known species of these genera. A new species Rotundomys intimus sp. nov. is, therefore, named for it. A cladistic analysis, which is the first ever published concernig these taxa, has been conducted to clear up the phylogenetic position of the new species. Our results suggest that Rotundomys intimus sp. nov. inserts between R. mundi and R. sabatieri as a relatively primitive taxon inside the clade Rotundomys. The new taxon is more derived than R. mundi in having a transversal connection between the metalophulid and the anterolophulid on some m1 but more primitive than R. sabatieri and the most evolved species of Rotundomys (R. montisrotuni +R.bressanus) in its less developed lophodonty showing distinct cusps, shallower valleys, and the presence of a subdivided anteroloph on the M1. The species of Cricetulodon do not form a monophyletic group. As a member of Rotundomys, Rotundomys intimus sp. nov. is more derived than all of these taxa in its greater lophodonty and the complete loss of the anterior protolophule, mesolophs, and mesolophids. PMID:25389967

  13. Ecological diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Amazon basin. The main scenaries in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Coura, J R; Junqueira, A C V

    2015-11-01

    The ecological diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Brazilian Amazon region is directly interlinked with the parasite's extensive reservoir, composed of 33 species of wild mammals within the following orders: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Xenarthra, Carnivora and Primates; and of 16 species of wild triatomines, of which ten may be infected with T. cruzi. Four scenarios for the diversity of T. cruzi transmission in the Brazilian Amazon region are evident: (i) T. cruzi transmission between vectors and wild mammals, which is characterized as a wild enzooty encompassing the entire Amazon basin; (ii) accidental T. cruzi transmission from vectors and wild mammals to humans, when they invade the wild ecotope or when these vectors and wild mammals invade human homes; (iii) occupational Chagas disease among piassava (Leopoldinia piassaba) palm fiber gatherers, transmitted by the vector Rhodnius brethesi, for which these palm trees are the specific ecotope; (IV) oral T. cruzi transmission to humans through food contamination, particularly in juices from plants such as assai, which today is considered to be endemic in the Brazilian Amazon region, with more than 1500 cases notified. PMID:26254002

  14. Evolution of spatial cognition: sex-specific patterns of spatial behavior predict hippocampal size.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, L F; Gaulin, S J; Sherry, D F; Hoffman, G E

    1990-01-01

    In a study of two congeneric rodent species, sex differences in hippocampal size were predicted by sex-specific patterns of spatial cognition. Hippocampal size is known to correlate positively with maze performance in laboratory mouse strains and with selective pressure for spatial memory among passerine bird species. In polygamous vole species (Rodentia: Microtus), males range more widely than females in the field and perform better on laboratory measures of spatial ability; both of these differences are absent in monogamous vole species. Ten females and males were taken from natural populations of two vole species, the polygamous meadow vole, M. pennsylvanicus, and the monogamous pine vole, M. pinetorum. Only in the polygamous species do males have larger hippocampi relative to the entire brain than do females. Two-way analysis of variance shows that the ratio of hippocampal volume to brain volume is differently related to sex in these two species. To our knowledge, no previous studies of hippocampal size have linked both evolutionary and psychometric data to hippocampal dimensions. Our controlled comparison suggests that evolution can produce adaptive sex differences in behavior and its neural substrate. PMID:2201026

  15. Genetic differentiation among populations of Myopus schisticolor (the wood lemming)--isozyme variation.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, V B; Fredriksson, R; Fredga, K

    1995-03-01

    To investigate genetic differentiation among populations of the wood lemming Myopus schisticolor (Muridae, Rodentia) isozyme variation in 10 populations from three regions, Fennoscandia, Western and Eastern Siberia, was examined. From 20 loci examined, the two most polymorphic ones, Idh-1 and Pgi-1, were used in the complete survey. The results of hierarchical F-statistics analysis showed significant differentiation among all populations; single locus FPT values agreed well (Idh-1, FPT = 0.20; Pgi-1, FPT = 0.20). However, allele frequencies at each locus demonstrated different patterns of subdivision among populations within regions and between regions. Thus, significant values of F-statistics within (FPR = 0.10) and between (FRT = 0.10) regions were found at Idh-1. Pgi-1 showed no significant differentiation among populations within regions (FPR = 0.01). The subdivision among populations at Pgi-1 was based on differentiation between regions (FRT = 0.19). The lack of differentiation among populations within a geographical region at the Pgi-1 locus is surprising for any rodent species, and the discrepancy between single-locus patterns of subdivision seems likely to result from selection at the Pgi-1 locus. PMID:7706113

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome of lesser long-tailed Hamster Cricetulus longicaudatus (Milne-Edwards, 1867) and phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziqi; Sun, Tong; Kang, Chunlan; Liu, Yang; Liu, Shaoying; Yue, Bisong; Zeng, Tao

    2016-03-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Cricetulus longicaudatus (Rodentia Cricetidae: Cricetinae) was determined and was deposited in GenBank (GenBank accession no. KM067270). The mitochondrial genome of C. longicaudatus was 16,302 bp in length and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes and one control region, with an identical order to that of other rodents' mitochondrial genomes. The phylogenetic analysis was performed with Bayesian inference based on the concatenated nucleotide sequence of 12 protein-coding genes on the heavy strand. The result showed that these species from Cricetidae and its two subfamilies (Cricetinae and Arvicolines) formed solid monophyletic group, respectively. The Cricetulus had close phylogenetic relationship with Tscherskia among three genera (Cricetulus, Cricetulus and Mesocricetus). Neodon irene and Myodes regulus were embedded in Microtus and Eothenomys, respectively. The unusual phylogenetic positions of Neodon irene and Myodes regulus remain further study in the future. PMID:25090399

  17. PREVALENCE AND DIVERSITY OF BARTONELLA SPECIES IN WILD SMALL MAMMALS IN ASIA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Soon; Inoue, Kai; Kabeya, Hidenori; Sato, Shingo; Takada, Tomoe; Pangjai, Decha; Chiu, Shih-Hui; Fujita, Hiromi; Kawabata, Hiroki; Takada, Nobuhiro; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Soichi

    2016-01-01

    We collected 641 small mammals belonging to 17 species of Rodentia and four species of Soricomorpha in Japan, Korea, Russia, Taiwan, and Thailand and investigated the prevalence and genetic diversity of Bartonella species. Apodemus (field mice) and Rattus (rats) were the most-common genera captured, making up 56.0% and 23.1% of the total specimens, respectively. Bartonellae were isolated from 54.6% of the collected animals, and the prevalence varied depending on the host species and the country of origin. The isolates were identified to the species level based on gltA and rpoB sequences. Although most Bartonella species were shared by more than two host species, the distribution patterns of Bartonella species clearly differed among the four most-common host genera: Apodemus, Rattus, Myodes (voles), and Suncus (shrews). The predominant Bartonella species were Bartonella grahamii in Apodemus, Bartonella tribocorum in Rattus, B. grahamii and Bartonella taylorii in Myodes, and an unclassified Bartonella sp. in Suncus. PMID:26528573

  18. Spontaneous expression of magnetic compass orientation in an epigeic rodent: the bank vole, Clethrionomys glareolus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveriusová, Ludmila; Němec, Pavel; Pavelková, Zuzana; Sedláček, František

    2014-07-01

    Magnetoreception has been convincingly demonstrated in only a few mammalian species. Among rodents, magnetic compass orientation has been documented in four species of subterranean mole rats and two epigeic (i.e. active above ground) species—the Siberian hamster and the C57BL/6J mouse. The mole rats use the magnetic field azimuth to determine compass heading; their directional preference is spontaneous and unimodal, and their magnetic compass is magnetite-mediated. By contrast, the primary component of orientation response is learned in the hamster and the mouse, but both species also exhibit a weak spontaneous bimodal preference in the natural magnetic field. To determine whether the magnetic compass of wild epigeic rodents features the same functional properties as that of laboratory rodents, we investigated magnetic compass orientation in the bank vole Clethrionomys glareolus (Cricetidae, Rodentia). The voles exhibited a robust spontaneous bimodal directional preference, i.e. built nests and slept preferentially along the north-south axis, and deflected their directional preference according to a shift in the direction of magnetic north, clearly indicating that they were deriving directional information from the magnetic field. Thus, bimodal, axially symmetrical directional choice seems to be a common feature shared by epigeic rodents. However, spontaneous directional preference in the bank vole appeared to be more pronounced than that reported in the hamster and the mouse. These findings suggest that bank voles are well suited for future studies investigating the adaptive significance and mechanisms of magnetic orientation in epigeic rodents.

  19. Bartonella infection in small mammals and their ectoparasites in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Lipatova, Indre; Paulauskas, Algimantas; Puraite, Irma; Radzijevskaja, Jana; Balciauskas, Linas; Gedminas, Vaclovas

    2015-01-01

    The Bartonella pathogen is an emerging zoonotic agent. Epidemiological studies worldwide have demonstrated that small mammals are reservoir hosts of Bartonella spp. and their ectoparasites are potential vectors. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Bartonella infections in small mammals (Rodentia, Insectivora) and their ectoparasites (fleas and ticks) in Lithuania. A total of 430 small mammals representing nine species were captured with live-traps in Lithuania during 2013-2014. A total of 151 fleas representing eight species were collected from 109 (25.8%) small mammals. Five hundred and seventy ticks (Ixodes ricinus) were collected from 68 (16.1%) small mammals. Bartonella DNA was detected in 102 (23.7%) small mammals, 44 (29.1%) fleas and five (3.7%) pooled tick samples. Sequence analysis of 16S-23S rRNA ITS region showed that sequences were identical or similar to Bartonella grahamii, Bartonella taylorii and Bartonella rochalimae. This study is the first investigating the distribution and diversity of Bartonella species in small mammals and their ectoparasites in Lithuania. B. grahamii, B. taylorii, and B. rochalimae were detected in small mammals and their fleas, and B. grahamii in ticks obtained from small mammals. PMID:26344603

  20. Wild and synanthropic reservoirs of Leishmania species in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Roque, André Luiz R.; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    The definition of a reservoir has changed significantly in the last century, making it necessary to study zoonosis from a broader perspective. One important example is that of Leishmania, zoonotic multi-host parasites maintained by several mammal species in nature. The magnitude of the health problem represented by leishmaniasis combined with the complexity of its epidemiology make it necessary to clarify all of the links in transmission net, including non-human mammalian hosts, to develop effective control strategies. Although some studies have described dozens of species infected with these parasites, only a minority have related their findings to the ecological scenario to indicate a possible role of that host in parasite maintenance and transmission. Currently, it is accepted that a reservoir may be one or a complex of species responsible for maintaining the parasite in nature. A reservoir system should be considered unique on a given spatiotemporal scale. In fact, the transmission of Leishmania species in the wild still represents an complex enzootic “puzzle”, as several links have not been identified. This review presents the mammalian species known to be infected with Leishmania spp. in the Americas, highlighting those that are able to maintain and act as a source of the parasite in nature (and are thus considered potential reservoirs). These host/reservoirs are presented separately in each of seven mammal orders – Marsupialia, Cingulata, Pilosa, Rodentia, Primata, Carnivora, and Chiroptera – responsible for maintaining Leishmania species in the wild. PMID:25426421

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Eurasian flying squirrel Pteromys volans (Sciuromorpha, Sciuridae) and revision of rodent phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Shi Hyun; Kwak, Min Jung; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of the Eurasian flying squirrel Pteromys volans (Rodentia, Sciuromorpha, Sciuridae) was sequenced and characterized in detail. The entire mitochondrial genome of P. volans consisted of 16,513 bp and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes, and two non-coding regions. Its gene arrangement pattern was consistent with the mammalian ground pattern. The overall base composition and AT contents were similar to those of other rodent mitochondrial genomes. The light-strand origin generally identified between tRNA ( Asn ) and tRNA ( Cys ) consisted of a secondary structure with an 11-bp stem and an 11-bp loop. The large control region was constructed of three characteristic domains, ETAS, CD, and CSB without any repeat sequences. Each domain contained ETAS1, subsequences A, B, and C, and CSB1, respectively. In order to examine phylogenetic contentious issues of the monophyly of rodents and phylogenetic relationships among five rodent suborders, here, phylogenetic analyses based on nucleotide sequence data of the 35 rodent and 3 lagomorph mitochondrial genomes were performed using the Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood method. The result strongly supported the rodent monophyly with high node confidence values (BP 100 % in ML and BPP 1.00 in BI) and also monophylies of four rodent suborders (BP 85-100 % in ML and BPP 1.00 in BI), except for Anomalumorpha in which only one species was examined here. Also, phylogenetic relationships among the five rodent suborders were suggested and discussed in detail. PMID:23114915

  2. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Virginia L.; Egerton, Victoria M.; Chamberlain, Andrew T.; Manning, Phillip L.; Buckley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N) and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N). Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification) as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands), chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six 14C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae), recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated 14C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 14C analysis. PMID:26938469

  3. A generic impact-scoring system applied to alien mammals in Europe.

    PubMed

    Nentwig, Wolfgang; Kühnel, Elfi; Bacher, Sven

    2010-02-01

    We present a generic scoring system that compares the impact of alien species among members of large taxonomic groups. This scoring can be used to identify the most harmful alien species so that conservation measures to ameliorate their negative effects can be prioritized. For all alien mammals in Europe, we assessed impact reports as completely as possible. Impact was classified as either environmental or economic. We subdivided each of these categories into five subcategories (environmental: impact through competition, predation, hybridization, transmission of disease, and herbivory; economic: impact on agriculture, livestock, forestry, human health, and infrastructure). We assigned all impact reports to one of these 10 categories. All categories had impact scores that ranged from zero (minimal) to five (maximal possible impact at a location). We summed all impact scores for a species to calculate "potential impact" scores. We obtained "actual impact" scores by multiplying potential impact scores by the percentage of area occupied by the respective species in Europe. Finally, we correlated species' ecological traits with the derived impact scores. Alien mammals from the orders Rodentia, Artiodactyla, and Carnivora caused the highest impact. In particular, the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus), muskrat (Ondathra zibethicus), and sika deer (Cervus nippon) had the highest overall scores. Species with a high potential environmental impact also had a strong potential economic impact. Potential impact also correlated with the distribution of a species in Europe. Ecological flexibility (measured as number of different habitats a species occupies) was strongly related to impact. The scoring system was robust to uncertainty in knowledge of impact and could be adjusted with weight scores to account for specific value systems of particular stakeholder groups (e.g., agronomists or environmentalists). Finally, the scoring system is easily applicable and adaptable to other taxonomic groups. PMID:19604296

  4. Expensive Brains: “Brainy” Rodents have Higher Metabolic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Sobrero, Raúl; May-Collado, Laura J.; Agnarsson, Ingi; Hernández, Cristián E.

    2011-01-01

    Brains are the centers of the nervous system of animals, controlling the organ systems of the body and coordinating responses to changes in the ecological and social environment. The evolution of traits that correlate with cognitive ability, such as relative brain size is thus of broad interest. Brain mass relative to body mass (BM) varies among mammals, and diverse factors have been proposed to explain this variation. A recent study provided evidence that energetics play an important role in brain evolution (Isler and van Schaik, 2006). Using composite phylogenies and data drawn from multiple sources, these authors showed that basal metabolic rate (BMR) correlates with brain mass across mammals. However, no such relationship was found within rodents. Here we re-examined the relationship between BMR and brain mass within Rodentia using a novel species-level phylogeny. Our results are sensitive to parameter evaluation; in particular how species mass is estimated. We detect no pattern when applying an approach used by previous studies, where each species BM is represented by two different numbers, one being the individual that happened to be used for BMR estimates of that species. However, this approach may compromise the analysis. When using a single value of BM for each species, whether representing a single individual, or available species mean, our findings provide evidence that brain mass (independent of BM) and BMR are correlated. These findings are thus consistent with the hypothesis that large brains evolve when the payoff for increased brain mass is greater than the energetic cost they incur. PMID:21811456

  5. A First Generation Comparative Chromosome Map between Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus) and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Romanenko, Svetlana A.; Perelman, Polina L.; Trifonov, Vladimir A.; Serdyukova, Natalia A.; Li, Tangliang; Fu, Beiyuan; O’Brien, Patricia C. M.; Ng, Bee L.; Nie, Wenhui; Liehr, Thomas; Stanyon, Roscoe; Graphodatsky, Alexander S.; Yang, Fengtang

    2015-01-01

    The domesticated guinea pig, Cavia porcellus (Hystricomorpha, Rodentia), is an important laboratory species and a model for a number of human diseases. Nevertheless, genomic tools for this species are lacking; even its karyotype is poorly characterized. The guinea pig belongs to Hystricomorpha, a widespread and important group of rodents; so far the chromosomes of guinea pigs have not been compared with that of other hystricomorph species or with any other mammals. We generated full sets of chromosome-specific painting probes for the guinea pig by flow sorting and microdissection, and for the first time, mapped the chromosomal homologies between guinea pig and human by reciprocal chromosome painting. Our data demonstrate that the guinea pig karyotype has undergone extensive rearrangements: 78 synteny-conserved human autosomal segments were delimited in the guinea pig genome. The high rate of genome evolution in the guinea pig may explain why the HSA7/16 and HSA16/19 associations presumed ancestral for eutherians and the three syntenic associations (HSA1/10, 3/19, and 9/11) considered ancestral for rodents were not found in C. porcellus. The comparative chromosome map presented here is a starting point for further development of physical and genetic maps of the guinea pig as well as an aid for genome assembly assignment to specific chromosomes. Furthermore, the comparative mapping will allow a transfer of gene map data from other species. The probes developed here provide a genomic toolkit, which will make the guinea pig a key species to unravel the evolutionary biology of the Hystricomorph rodents. PMID:26010445

  6. Deterioration of the Gαo Vomeronasal Pathway in Sexually Dimorphic Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Rodrigo; Fernández-Aburto, Pedro; Manger, Paul R.; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, social and sexual behaviours are largely mediated by the vomeronasal system (VNS). The accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) is the first synaptic locus of the VNS and ranges from very large in Caviomorph rodents, small in carnivores and ungulates, to its complete absence in apes, elephants, most bats and aquatic species. Two pathways have been described in the VNS of mammals. In mice, vomeronasal neurons expressing Gαi2 protein project to the rostral portion of the AOB and respond mostly to small volatile molecules, whereas neurons expressing Gαo project to the caudal AOB and respond mostly to large non-volatile molecules. However, the Gαo-expressing pathway is absent in several species (horses, dogs, musk shrews, goats and marmosets) but no hypotheses have been proposed to date to explain the loss of that pathway. We noted that the species that lost the Gαo pathway belong to Laurasiatheria and Primates lineages, both clades with ubiquitous sexual dimorphisms across species. To assess whether similar events of Gαo pathway loss could have occurred convergently in dimorphic species we studied G-protein expression in the AOB of two species that independently evolved sexually dimorphic traits: the California ground squirrel Spermophilus beecheyi (Rodentia; Sciurognathi) and the cape hyrax Procavia capensis (Afrotheria; Hyracoidea). We found that both species show uniform expression of Gαi2-protein throughout AOB glomeruli, while Gαo expression is restricted to main olfactory glomeruli only. Our results suggest that the degeneration of the Gαo-expressing vomeronasal pathway has occurred independently at least four times in Eutheria, possibly related to the emergence of sexual dimorphisms and the ability of detecting the gender of conspecifics at distance. PMID:22039487

  7. Next-Generation Sequencing for Rodent Barcoding: Species Identification from Fresh, Degraded and Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Galan, Maxime; Pagès, Marie; Cosson, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Rodentia is the most diverse order among mammals, with more than 2,000 species currently described. Most of the time, species assignation is so difficult based on morphological data solely that identifying rodents at the specific level corresponds to a real challenge. In this study, we compared the applicability of 100 bp mini-barcodes from cytochrome b and cytochrome c oxidase 1 genes to enable rodent species identification. Based on GenBank sequence datasets of 115 rodent species, a 136 bp fragment of cytochrome b was selected as the most discriminatory mini-barcode, and rodent universal primers surrounding this fragment were designed. The efficacy of this new molecular tool was assessed on 946 samples including rodent tissues, feces, museum samples and feces/pellets from predators known to ingest rodents. Utilizing next-generation sequencing technologies able to sequence mixes of DNA, 1,140 amplicons were tagged, multiplexed and sequenced together in one single 454 GS-FLX run. Our method was initially validated on a reference sample set including 265 clearly identified rodent tissues, corresponding to 103 different species. Following validation, 85.6% of 555 rodent samples from Europe, Asia and Africa whose species identity was unknown were able to be identified using the BLASTN program and GenBank reference sequences. In addition, our method proved effective even on degraded rodent DNA samples: 91.8% and 75.9% of samples from feces and museum specimens respectively were correctly identified. Finally, we succeeded in determining the diet of 66.7% of the investigated carnivores from their feces and 81.8% of owls from their pellets. Non-rodent species were also identified, suggesting that our method is sensitive enough to investigate complete predator diets. This study demonstrates how this molecular identification method combined with high-throughput sequencing can open new realms of possibilities in achieving fast, accurate and inexpensive species identification. PMID:23144869

  8. Adaptive evolution of the matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein in mammals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) belongs to a family of small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs) that play a key role in skeleton development, particularly in mineralization, phosphate regulation and osteogenesis. MEPE associated disorders cause various physiological effects, such as loss of bone mass, tumors and disruption of renal function (hypophosphatemia). The study of this developmental gene from an evolutionary perspective could provide valuable insights on the adaptive diversification of morphological phenotypes in vertebrates. Results Here we studied the adaptive evolution of the MEPE gene in 26 Eutherian mammals and three birds. The comparative genomic analyses revealed a high degree of evolutionary conservation of some coding and non-coding regions of the MEPE gene across mammals indicating a possible regulatory or functional role likely related with mineralization and/or phosphate regulation. However, the majority of the coding region had a fast evolutionary rate, particularly within the largest exon (1467 bp). Rodentia and Scandentia had distinct substitution rates with an increased accumulation of both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations compared with other mammalian lineages. Characteristics of the gene (e.g. biochemical, evolutionary rate, and intronic conservation) differed greatly among lineages of the eight mammalian orders. We identified 20 sites with significant positive selection signatures (codon and protein level) outside the main regulatory motifs (dentonin and ASARM) suggestive of an adaptive role. Conversely, we find three sites under selection in the signal peptide and one in the ASARM motif that were supported by at least one selection model. The MEPE protein tends to accumulate amino acids promoting disorder and potential phosphorylation targets. Conclusion MEPE shows a high number of selection signatures, revealing the crucial role of positive selection in the evolution of this SIBLING member. The selection signatures were found mainly outside the functional motifs, reinforcing the idea that other regions outside the dentonin and the ASARM might be crucial for the function of the protein and future studies should be undertaken to understand its importance. PMID:22103247

  9. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Virginia L; Egerton, Victoria M; Chamberlain, Andrew T; Manning, Phillip L; Buckley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N) and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N). Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification) as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands), chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six 14C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae), recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated 14C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 14C analysis. PMID:26938469

  10. Ecological Niche Modeling of main reservoir hosts of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Iran.

    PubMed

    Gholamrezaei, Mostafa; Mohebali, Mehdi; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi; Shirzadi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-08-01

    Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL), caused by Leishmania major, is a common zoonotic vector-borne disease in Iran. Close contact with infected reservoir hosts increases the probability of transmission of Leishmania parasite infections to susceptible humans. Four gerbil species (Rodentia: Gerbillidae) serve as the main reservoir hosts for ZCL in different endemic foci of Iran. These species include Rhombomys opimus, Meriones libycus, Meriones hurrianae and Tatera indica; while notable infection has been reported in Nesokia indica as well. The purpose of this study is to model the distribution of these reservoirs to identify the risk areas of ZCL. A data bank was developed including all published data during the period of 1970-2015. Maximum entropy model was used to find the most appropriate ecological niches for each species. The areas under curve obtained were 0.961, 0.927, 0.922, 0.997 and 0.899, instead of 1, for training test in R. opimus, M. libycus, T. indica, M. hurrianae and N. indica, respectively. The environmental variable with the highest gain when used in isolation was slope for R. opimus and N. indica, annual mean temperature for M. libycus, and seasonal precipitation for T. indica and M. hurrianae. Summation of presence probabilities for three main species, i.e., R. opimus, M. libycus and T. indica revealed favorable ecological niches in wide areas of 16 provinces. This is the first study to predict the distribution of ZCL reservoir hosts in Iran. Climatology and topography variables had high contributions toward the prediction of potential distribution of the main reservoir species; therefore, as climate changes, the models should be updated periodically with novel data, and the results should be used in disease-monitoring programs. PMID:27150212

  11. New Insights into the Phylogeny and Gene Context Analysis of Binder of Sperm Proteins (BSPs)

    PubMed Central

    Arruga, Diana; Pérez-Pé, Rosaura; Sánchez-Ferrer, Álvaro; Muiño-Blanco, Teresa; Cebrián-Pérez, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Seminal plasma (SP) proteins support the survival of spermatozoa acting not only at the plasma membrane but also by inhibition of capacitation, resulting in higher fertilizing ability. Among SP proteins, BSP (binder of sperm) proteins are the most studied, since they may be useful for the improvement of semen diluents, storage and subsequent fertilization results. However, an updated and detailed phylogenetic analysis of the BSP protein superfamily has not been carried out with all the sequences described in the main databases. The update view shows for the first time an equally distributed number of sequences between the three families: BSP, and their homologs 1 (BSPH1) and 2 (BSPH2). The BSP family is divided in four subfamilies, BSP1 subfamily being the predominant, followed by subfamilies BSP3, BSP5 and BSP2. BSPH proteins were found among placental mammals (Eutheria) belonging to the orders Proboscidea, Primates, Lagomorpha, Rodentia, Chiroptera, Perissodactyla and Cetartiodactyla. However, BSPH2 proteins were also found in the Scandentia order and Metatheria clade. This phylogenetic analysis, when combined with a gene context analysis, showed a completely new evolutionary scenario for the BSP superfamily of proteins with three defined different gene patterns, one for BSPs, one for BSPH1/BSPH2/ELSPBP1 and another one for BSPH1/BSPH2 without ELSPBP1. In addition, the study has permitted to define concise conserved blocks for each family (BSP, BSPH1 and BSPH2), which could be used for a more reliable assignment for the incoming sequences, for data curation of current databases, and for cloning new BSPs, as the one described in this paper, ram seminal vesicle 20 kDa protein (RSVP20, Ovis aries BSP5b). PMID:26333091

  12. Deterioration of the Gαo vomeronasal pathway in sexually dimorphic mammals.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Rodrigo; Fernández-Aburto, Pedro; Manger, Paul R; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, social and sexual behaviours are largely mediated by the vomeronasal system (VNS). The accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) is the first synaptic locus of the VNS and ranges from very large in Caviomorph rodents, small in carnivores and ungulates, to its complete absence in apes, elephants, most bats and aquatic species. Two pathways have been described in the VNS of mammals. In mice, vomeronasal neurons expressing Gαi2 protein project to the rostral portion of the AOB and respond mostly to small volatile molecules, whereas neurons expressing Gαo project to the caudal AOB and respond mostly to large non-volatile molecules. However, the Gαo-expressing pathway is absent in several species (horses, dogs, musk shrews, goats and marmosets) but no hypotheses have been proposed to date to explain the loss of that pathway. We noted that the species that lost the Gαo pathway belong to Laurasiatheria and Primates lineages, both clades with ubiquitous sexual dimorphisms across species. To assess whether similar events of Gαo pathway loss could have occurred convergently in dimorphic species we studied G-protein expression in the AOB of two species that independently evolved sexually dimorphic traits: the California ground squirrel Spermophilus beecheyi (Rodentia; Sciurognathi) and the cape hyrax Procavia capensis (Afrotheria; Hyracoidea). We found that both species show uniform expression of Gαi2-protein throughout AOB glomeruli, while Gαo expression is restricted to main olfactory glomeruli only. Our results suggest that the degeneration of the Gαo-expressing vomeronasal pathway has occurred independently at least four times in Eutheria, possibly related to the emergence of sexual dimorphisms and the ability of detecting the gender of conspecifics at distance. PMID:22039487

  13. Threat Diversity Will Erode Mammalian Phylogenetic Diversity in the Near Future

    PubMed Central

    Jono, Clémentine M. A.; Pavoine, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    To reduce the accelerating rate of phylogenetic diversity loss, many studies have searched for mechanisms that could explain why certain species are at risk, whereas others are not. In particular, it has been demonstrated that species might be affected by both extrinsic threat factors as well as intrinsic biological traits that could render a species more sensitive to extinction; here, we focus on extrinsic factors. Recently, the International Union for Conservation of Nature developed a new classification of threat types, including climate change, urbanization, pollution, agriculture and aquaculture, and harvesting/hunting. We have used this new classification to analyze two main factors that could explain the expected future loss of mammalian phylogenetic diversity: 1. differences in the type of threats that affect mammals and 2. differences in the number of major threats that accumulate for a single species. Our results showed that Cetartiodactyla, Diprotodontia, Monotremata, Perissodactyla, Primates, and Proboscidea could lose a high proportion of their current phylogenetic diversity in the coming decades. In contrast, Chiroptera, Didelphimorphia, and Rodentia could lose less phylogenetic diversity than expected if extinctions were random. Some mammalian clades, including Marsupiala, Chiroptera, and a subclade of Primates, are affected by particular threat types, most likely due solely to their geographic locations and associations with particular habitats. However, regardless of the geography, habitat, and taxon considered, it is not the threat type, but the threat diversity that determines the extinction risk for species and clades. Thus, some mammals might be randomly located in areas subjected to a large diversity of threats; they might also accumulate detrimental traits that render them sensitive to different threats, which is a characteristic that could be associated with large body size. Any action reducing threat diversity is expected to have a significant impact on future mammalian phylogeny. PMID:23029443

  14. Evolution of C, D and S-Type Cystatins in Mammals: An Extensive Gene Duplication in Primates

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa-Pereira, Patrícia; Abrantes, Joana; Pinheiro, Ana; Colaço, Bruno; Vitorino, Rui; Esteves, Pedro J.

    2014-01-01

    Cystatins are a family of inhibitors of cysteine peptidases that comprises the salivary cystatins (D and S-type cystatins) and cystatin C. These cystatins are encoded by a multigene family (CST3, CST5, CST4, CST1 and CST2) organized in tandem in the human genome. Their presence and functional importance in human saliva has been reported, however the distribution of these proteins in other mammals is still unclear. Here, we performed a proteomic analysis of the saliva of several mammals and studied the evolution of this multigene family. The proteomic analysis detected S-type cystatins (S, SA, and SN) in human saliva and cystatin D in rat saliva. The evolutionary analysis showed that the cystatin C encoding gene is present in species of the most representative mammalian groups, i.e. Artiodactyla, Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Carnivora and Primates. On the other hand, D and S-type cystatins are mainly retrieved from Primates, and especially the evolution of S-type cystatins seems to be a dynamic process as seen in Pongo abelii genome where several copies of CST1-like gene (cystatin SN) were found. In Rodents, a group of cystatins previously identified as D and S has also evolved. Despite the high divergence of the amino acid sequence, their position in the phylogenetic tree and their genome organization suggests a common origin with those of the Primates. These results suggest that the D and S type cystatins have emerged before the mammalian radiation and were retained only in Primates and Rodents. Although the mechanisms driving the evolution of cystatins are unknown, it seems to be a dynamic process with several gene duplications evolving according to the birth-and-death model of evolution. The factors that led to the appearance of a group of saliva-specific cystatins in Primates and its rapid evolution remain undetermined, but may be associated with an adaptive advantage. PMID:25329717

  15. Evolution of C, D and S-type cystatins in mammals: an extensive gene duplication in primates.

    PubMed

    de Sousa-Pereira, Patrícia; Abrantes, Joana; Pinheiro, Ana; Colaço, Bruno; Vitorino, Rui; Esteves, Pedro J

    2014-01-01

    Cystatins are a family of inhibitors of cysteine peptidases that comprises the salivary cystatins (D and S-type cystatins) and cystatin C. These cystatins are encoded by a multigene family (CST3, CST5, CST4, CST1 and CST2) organized in tandem in the human genome. Their presence and functional importance in human saliva has been reported, however the distribution of these proteins in other mammals is still unclear. Here, we performed a proteomic analysis of the saliva of several mammals and studied the evolution of this multigene family. The proteomic analysis detected S-type cystatins (S, SA, and SN) in human saliva and cystatin D in rat saliva. The evolutionary analysis showed that the cystatin C encoding gene is present in species of the most representative mammalian groups, i.e. Artiodactyla, Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Carnivora and Primates. On the other hand, D and S-type cystatins are mainly retrieved from Primates, and especially the evolution of S-type cystatins seems to be a dynamic process as seen in Pongo abelii genome where several copies of CST1-like gene (cystatin SN) were found. In Rodents, a group of cystatins previously identified as D and S has also evolved. Despite the high divergence of the amino acid sequence, their position in the phylogenetic tree and their genome organization suggests a common origin with those of the Primates. These results suggest that the D and S type cystatins have emerged before the mammalian radiation and were retained only in Primates and Rodents. Although the mechanisms driving the evolution of cystatins are unknown, it seems to be a dynamic process with several gene duplications evolving according to the birth-and-death model of evolution. The factors that led to the appearance of a group of saliva-specific cystatins in Primates and its rapid evolution remain undetermined, but may be associated with an adaptive advantage. PMID:25329717

  16. A survey of hemoparasite infections in free-ranging mammals and reptiles in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    de Thoisy, B; Michel, J C; Vogel, I; Vié, J C

    2000-10-01

    Blood smears of 1,353 free-ranging mammals (35 species) and 112 reptiles (31 species) from French Guiana were examined for hemoparasites. Parasites from 3 major groups were recorded: Apicomplexa (including hemogregarines, piroplasms, and Plasmodium spp.), Trypanosomatidae, and Filaroidea. Fifty percent of the individuals (86% of the species) were infected by parasites from at least 1 group. Hemogregarines, identified as Hepatozoon sp., infected numerous snakes with high prevalences (30-100%); infection is reported for the first time in 5 host genera of snakes: Clelia, Oxybelis, Pseustes, Rhinobotryum, and Bothriopsis. Infections were also observed in 4 marsupial species and 1 rodent. Hepatozoon spp. recorded in Didelphis albiventris (Marsupialia) and Coendou prehensilis (Rodentia) may be new species. Plasmodium sp. were observed in 2 snake species, Dipsas indica (Colubridae) and Bothrops atrox (Viperidae). Plasmodium brasilianum was recorded in all 5 primate species examined. Piroplasms were observed in all mammal orders except primates. Large terrestrial rodents were the main hosts of members of the Babesidae; 42% of Myoprocta acouchy, 36% of Dasyprocta agouti, and 44% of Agouti paca were infected. Trypanosomes were common in mammals and were recorded in 70% of the examined genera. Trypanosoma cruzi-like infections were reported in 21 mammal species, including sloths, rodents, carnivores, and primates. Microfilariae were also widespread, with higher prevalences in sloths, anteaters, and porcupines (>40% of the individuals infected) and in tamarins (95% infected). This survey highlights some potential anthropozoonotic risks due to the recent further evidence of Plasmodium brasilianum and P. malariae as a single species and to the increased diversity of hosts for Trypanosoma cruzi. PMID:11128476

  17. Spatial and Temporal Activity Patterns of the Free-Living Giant Mole-Rat (Fukomys mechowii), the Largest Social Bathyergid

    PubMed Central

    Lövy, Matěj; Šklíba, Jan; Šumbera, Radim

    2013-01-01

    Despite the considerable attention devoted to the biology of social species of African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia), knowledge is lacking about their behaviour under natural conditions. We studied activity of the largest social bathyergid, the giant mole-rat Fukomys mechowii, in its natural habitat in Zambia using radio-telemetry. We radio-tracked six individuals during three continuous 72-h sessions. Five of these individuals, including a breeding male, belonged to a single family group; the remaining female was probably a solitary disperser. The non-breeders of the family were active (i.e. outside the nest) 5.8 hours per 24h-day with the activity split into 6.5 short bouts. The activity was more concentrated in the night hours, when the animals also travelled longer distances from the nest. The breeding male spent only 3.2 hours per day outside the nest, utilizing less than 20% of the whole family home range. The dispersing female displayed a much different activity pattern than the family members. Her 8.0 hours of outside-nest activity per day were split into 4.6 bouts which were twice as long as in the family non-breeders. Her activity peak in the late afternoon coincided with the temperature maximum in the depth of 10 cm (roughly the depth of the foraging tunnels). Our results suggest that the breeding individuals (at least males) contribute very little to the work of the family group. Nevertheless, the amount of an individual's activity and its daily pattern are probably flexible in this species and can be modified in response to actual environmental and social conditions. PMID:23383166

  18. Threat diversity will erode mammalian phylogenetic diversity in the near future.

    PubMed

    Jono, Clémentine M A; Pavoine, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    To reduce the accelerating rate of phylogenetic diversity loss, many studies have searched for mechanisms that could explain why certain species are at risk, whereas others are not. In particular, it has been demonstrated that species might be affected by both extrinsic threat factors as well as intrinsic biological traits that could render a species more sensitive to extinction; here, we focus on extrinsic factors. Recently, the International Union for Conservation of Nature developed a new classification of threat types, including climate change, urbanization, pollution, agriculture and aquaculture, and harvesting/hunting. We have used this new classification to analyze two main factors that could explain the expected future loss of mammalian phylogenetic diversity: 1. differences in the type of threats that affect mammals and 2. differences in the number of major threats that accumulate for a single species. Our results showed that Cetartiodactyla, Diprotodontia, Monotremata, Perissodactyla, Primates, and Proboscidea could lose a high proportion of their current phylogenetic diversity in the coming decades. In contrast, Chiroptera, Didelphimorphia, and Rodentia could lose less phylogenetic diversity than expected if extinctions were random. Some mammalian clades, including Marsupiala, Chiroptera, and a subclade of Primates, are affected by particular threat types, most likely due solely to their geographic locations and associations with particular habitats. However, regardless of the geography, habitat, and taxon considered, it is not the threat type, but the threat diversity that determines the extinction risk for species and clades. Thus, some mammals might be randomly located in areas subjected to a large diversity of threats; they might also accumulate detrimental traits that render them sensitive to different threats, which is a characteristic that could be associated with large body size. Any action reducing threat diversity is expected to have a significant impact on future mammalian phylogeny. PMID:23029443

  19. Distribution and morphology of putative catecholaminergic and serotonergic neurons in the brain of the greater canerat, Thryonomys swinderianus.

    PubMed

    Dwarika, Sarika; Maseko, Busisiwe C; Ihunwo, Amadi O; Fuxe, Kjell; Manger, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    The distribution, morphology and nuclear subdivisions of the putative catecholaminergic and serotonergic systems within the brain of the greater canerat (sometimes spelt cane rat) were identified following immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and serotonin. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible differences in the complement of nuclear subdivisions of these systems when comparing those of the greater canerat with reports of these systems in other rodents. The greater canerat was chosen for investigation as it is a large rodent (around 2.7kg body mass) and has an average brain mass of 13.75g, more than five times larger than that of the laboratory rat. The greater canerats used in the present study were caught from the wild, which is again another contrast to the laboratory rat. While these differences, especially that of size, may lead to the prediction of significant differences in the nuclear complement of these systems, we found that all nuclei identified in both systems in the laboratory rat and other rodents in several earlier studies had direct homologs in the brain of the greater canerat. Moreover, there were no additional nuclei in the brain of the greater canerat that are not found in the laboratory rat or other rodents. It is noted that the locus coeruleus of the laboratory rat differs in appearance to that reported for several other rodent species. The greater canerat is phylogenetically distant from the laboratory rat, but still a member of the order Rodentia. Thus, changes in the nuclear organization of these systems appears to demonstrate a form of constraint related to the phylogenetic level of the order. PMID:17884333

  20. Choline acetyltransferase immunoreactive cortical interneurons do not occur in all rodents: a study of the phylogenetic occurrence of this neural characteristic.

    PubMed

    Bhagwandin, Adhil; Fuxe, Kjell; Manger, Paul R

    2006-12-01

    The present study was designed to provide results aimed at testing whether the interneurons with choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity (ChAT), probably representing GABA interneurons, found in the cerebral cortex of the rat represent a common feature of the order Rodentia. Initially we verified the presence of ChAT immunoreactive bipolar cell bodies, axons and terminal-like fibres in pigmented (Long-Evans) and non-pigmented (Sprague-Dawley) strains of Rattus norvegicus, confirming that the ChAT polyclonal antibodies (AB144P and AB143, Chemicon; VChAT, Sigma) with the immunohistochemical techniques used provided the same staining as previously described for this species. We then examined pigmented (AKR3) and non-pigmented (C3H) strains of Mus musculus, wild caught striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio), bushveld gerbil (Tatera brantsii), greater canerat (Thryonomys swinderianus) and common molerat (Cryptomys hottentotus). The AB144P antibody revealed cortical interneurons in both strains of M. musculus and in R. pumilio, but not in the other species. In all species/strains cortical ChAT immunoreactive axons and terminal-like fibres were localized with the AB144P antibody. In the non-Rattus species/strains there was no evidence for localization of ChAT immunoreactivity in any cortical cell bodies using the AB143 and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VChAT) antibodies despite extensive localization in axons and terminal-like fibres. It is concluded that bipolar cortical GABA interneurons in certain rodent species may develop ChAT immunoreactivity but not VChAT immunoreactivity making the cholinergic relevance of ChAT in the GABA interneurons uncertain and may exclude these neurons from being part of the traditionally defined cholinergic system. PMID:17049807

  1. Quest for Orthologs Entails Quest for Tree of Life: In Search of the Gene Stream

    PubMed Central

    Boeckmann, Brigitte; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Rees, Jonathan A.; Forslund, Kristoffer; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Muffato, Matthieu; Yilmaz, Pelin; Xenarios, Ioannis; Bork, Peer; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Gabaldón, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Quest for Orthologs (QfO) is a community effort with the goal to improve and benchmark orthology predictions. As quality assessment assumes prior knowledge on species phylogenies, we investigated the congruency between existing species trees by comparing the relationships of 147 QfO reference organisms from six Tree of Life (ToL)/species tree projects: The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) taxonomy, Opentree of Life, the sequenced species/species ToL, the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) database, and trees published by Ciccarelli et al. (Ciccarelli FD, et al. 2006. Toward automatic reconstruction of a highly resolved tree of life. Science 311:1283–1287) and by Huerta-Cepas et al. (Huerta-Cepas J, Marcet-Houben M, Gabaldon T. 2014. A nested phylogenetic reconstruction approach provides scalable resolution in the eukaryotic Tree Of Life. PeerJ PrePrints 2:223) Our study reveals that each species tree suggests a different phylogeny: 87 of the 146 (60%) possible splits of a dichotomous and rooted tree are congruent, while all other splits are incongruent in at least one of the species trees. Topological differences are observed not only at deep speciation events, but also within younger clades, such as Hominidae, Rodentia, Laurasiatheria, or rosids. The evolutionary relationships of 27 archaea and bacteria are highly inconsistent. By assessing 458,108 gene trees from 65 genomes, we show that consistent species topologies are more often supported by gene phylogenies than contradicting ones. The largest concordant species tree includes 77 of the QfO reference organisms at the most. Results are summarized in the form of a consensus ToL (http://swisstree.vital-it.ch/species_tree) that can serve different benchmarking purposes. PMID:26133389

  2. Localized versus generalist phenotypes in a broadly distributed tropical mammal: how is intraspecific variation distributed across disparate environments?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The extent of phenotypic differentiation in response to local environmental conditions is a key component of species adaptation and persistence. Understanding the structuring of phenotypic diversity in response to local environmental pressures can provide important insights into species evolutionary dynamics and responses to environmental change. This work examines the influence of steep environmental gradients on intraspecific phenotypic variation and tests two hypotheses about how the tropical soft grass mouse, Akodon mollis (Cricetidae, Rodentia), contends with the disparate environmental conditions encompassed by its broad distribution. Specifically, we test if the species expresses a geographically unstructured, or generalist, phenotype throughout its range or if it shows geographically localized morphological differentiation across disparate environments. Results Using geometric morphometric and ecomorphological analyses of skull shape variation we found that despite distinct environmental conditions, geographically structured morphological variation is limited, with the notable exception of a distinct morphological disjunction at the high-elevation forest-grassland transition in the southern portion of A. mollis distribution. Based on genetic analyses, geographic isolation alone does not explain this localized phenotype, given that similar levels of genetic differentiation were also observed among individuals inhabiting other ecosystems that are nonetheless not distinct morphologically. Conclusions Instead of phenotypic specialization across environments in these tropical mountains, there was limited differentiation of skull shape and size across the broad range of A. mollis, with the exception of individuals from the puna, the highest-elevation ecosystem. The high morphological variance among individuals, together with a weak association with local environmental conditions, not only highlights the flexibility of A. mollis’ skull, but also highlights the need for further study to understand what maintains the observed morphological patterns. The work also indicates that mechanisms other than processes linked to local ecological specialization as a driver of diversification may contribute to the high diversity of this tropical region. PMID:23899319

  3. A First Generation Comparative Chromosome Map between Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus) and Humans.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Svetlana A; Perelman, Polina L; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Serdyukova, Natalia A; Li, Tangliang; Fu, Beiyuan; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ng, Bee L; Nie, Wenhui; Liehr, Thomas; Stanyon, Roscoe; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2015-01-01

    The domesticated guinea pig, Cavia porcellus (Hystricomorpha, Rodentia), is an important laboratory species and a model for a number of human diseases. Nevertheless, genomic tools for this species are lacking; even its karyotype is poorly characterized. The guinea pig belongs to Hystricomorpha, a widespread and important group of rodents; so far the chromosomes of guinea pigs have not been compared with that of other hystricomorph species or with any other mammals. We generated full sets of chromosome-specific painting probes for the guinea pig by flow sorting and microdissection, and for the first time, mapped the chromosomal homologies between guinea pig and human by reciprocal chromosome painting. Our data demonstrate that the guinea pig karyotype has undergone extensive rearrangements: 78 synteny-conserved human autosomal segments were delimited in the guinea pig genome. The high rate of genome evolution in the guinea pig may explain why the HSA7/16 and HSA16/19 associations presumed ancestral for eutherians and the three syntenic associations (HSA1/10, 3/19, and 9/11) considered ancestral for rodents were not found in C. porcellus. The comparative chromosome map presented here is a starting point for further development of physical and genetic maps of the guinea pig as well as an aid for genome assembly assignment to specific chromosomes. Furthermore, the comparative mapping will allow a transfer of gene map data from other species. The probes developed here provide a genomic toolkit, which will make the guinea pig a key species to unravel the evolutionary biology of the Hystricomorph rodents. PMID:26010445

  4. Cholinergic urethral brush cells are widespread throughout placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Deckmann, Klaus; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Rafiq, Amir; Herden, Christine; Wichmann, Judy; Knauf, Sascha; Nassenstein, Christina; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We previously identified a population of cholinergic epithelial cells in murine, human and rat urethrae that exhibits a structural marker of brush cells (villin) and expresses components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade (α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel melanostatin 5 (TRPM5)). These cells serve as sentinels, monitoring the chemical composition of the luminal content for potentially hazardous compounds such as bacteria, and initiate protective reflexes counteracting further ingression. In order to elucidate cross-species conservation of the urethral chemosensory pathway we investigated the occurrence and molecular make-up of urethral brush cells in placental mammals. We screened 11 additional species, at least one in each of the five mammalian taxonomic units primates, carnivora, perissodactyla, artiodactyla and rodentia, for immunohistochemical labeling of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), villin, and taste cascade components (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, TRPM5). Corresponding to findings in previously investigated species, urethral epithelial cells with brush cell shape were immunolabeled in all 11 mammals. In 8 species, immunoreactivities against all marker proteins and ChAT were observed, and double-labeling immunofluorescence confirmed the cholinergic nature of villin-positive and chemosensory (TRPM5-positive) cells. In cat and horse, these cells were not labeled by the ChAT antiserum used in this study, and unspecific reactions of the secondary antiserum precluded conclusions about ChAT-expression in the bovine epithelium. These data indicate that urethral brush cells are widespread throughout the mammalian kingdom and evolved not later than about 64.5millionyears ago. PMID:26044348

  5. Updated Neuronal Scaling Rules for the Brains of Glires (Rodents/Lagomorphs)

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Ribeiro, Pedro; Campos, Leandro; Valotta da Silva, Alexandre; Torres, Laila B.; Catania, Kenneth C.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2011-01-01

    Brain size scales as different functions of its number of neurons across mammalian orders such as rodents, primates, and insectivores. In rodents, we have previously shown that, across a sample of 6 species, from mouse to capybara, the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and the remaining brain structures increase in size faster than they gain neurons, with an accompanying decrease in neuronal density in these structures [Herculano-Houzel et al.: Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2006;103:12138–12143]. Important remaining questions are whether such neuronal scaling rules within an order apply equally to all pertaining species, and whether they extend to closely related taxa. Here, we examine whether 4 other species of Rodentia, as well as the closely related rabbit (Lagomorpha), conform to the scaling rules identified previously for rodents. We report the updated neuronal scaling rules obtained for the average values of each species in a way that is directly comparable to the scaling rules that apply to primates [Gabi et al.: Brain Behav Evol 2010;76:32–44], and examine whether the scaling relationships are affected when phylogenetic relatedness in the dataset is accounted for. We have found that the brains of the spiny rat, squirrel, prairie dog and rabbit conform to the neuronal scaling rules that apply to the previous sample of rodents. The conformity to the previous rules of the new set of species, which includes the rabbit, suggests that the cellular scaling rules we have identified apply to rodents in general, and probably to Glires as a whole (rodents/lagomorphs), with one notable exception: the naked mole-rat brain is apparently an outlier, with only about half of the neurons expected from its brain size in its cerebral cortex and cerebellum. PMID:21985803

  6. Dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) attracted to dung of the largest herbivorous rodent on earth: a comparison with human feces.

    PubMed

    Puker, Anderson; Correa, César M A; Korasaki, Vanesca; Ferreira, Kleyton R; Oliveira, Naiara G

    2013-12-01

    The capybara, Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris (L.) (Rodentia: Caviidae), is the largest herbivorous rodent on Earth and abundant in the Neotropical region, which can provide a stable food source of dung for dung beetle communities (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae). However, the use of capybara dung by dung beetles is poorly known. Here, we present data on the structure of the dung beetle community attracted to capybara dung and compare with the community attracted to human feces. Dung beetles were captured with pitfall traps baited with fresh capybara dung and human feces in pastures with exotic grass (Brachiaria spp.), patches of Brazilian savanna (Cerrado), and points of degraded riparian vegetation along the Aquidauana river in Anastácio and Aquidauana, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. In traps baited with human feces, 13,809 individuals of 31 species were captured, and in those baited with capybara dung 1,027 individuals belonging to 26 species were captured. The average number of individuals and species captured by the traps baited with human feces was greater than for capybara dung in all habitats studied. Composition of the communities attracted to human feces and capybara dung formed distinct groups in all habitats. Despite the smaller number of species and individuals captured in capybara dung when compared with human feces, capybara dung was attractive to dung beetles. In Brazil, the legalization of hunting these rodents has been debated, which would potentially affect the community and consequently the ecological functions performed by dung beetles that use the feces of these animals as a resource. In addition, the knowledge of the communities associated with capybaras may be important in predicting the consequences of future management of their populations. PMID:24468553

  7. Development of Rapidly Evolving Intron Markers to Estimate Multilocus Species Trees of Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Prieto, Ana; Igea, Javier; Castresana, Jose

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the analysis of closely related species, speciation and phylogeography is the identification of variable sequence markers that allow the determination of genealogical relationships in multiple genomic regions using coalescent and species tree approaches. Rodent species represent nearly half of the mammalian diversity, but so far no systematic study has been carried out to detect suitable informative markers for this group. Here, we used a bioinformatic pipeline to extract intron sequences from rodent genomes available in databases and applied a series of filters that allowed the identification of 208 introns that adequately fulfilled several criteria for these studies. The main required characteristics of the introns were that they had the maximum possible mutation rates, that they were part of single-copy genes, that they had an appropriate sequence length for amplification, and that they were flanked by exons with suitable regions for primer design. In addition, in order to determine the validity of this approach, we chose ten of these introns for primer design and tested them in a panel of eleven rodent species belonging to different representative families. We show that all these introns can be amplified in the majority of species and that, overall, 79% of the amplifications worked with minimum optimization of the annealing temperature. In addition, we confirmed for a pair of sister species the relatively high level of sequence divergence of these introns. Therefore, we provide here a set of adequate intron markers that can be applied to different species of Rodentia for their use in studies that require significant sequence variability. PMID:24804779

  8. Faster Speciation and Reduced Extinction in the Tropics Contribute to the Mammalian Latitudinal Diversity Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Jonathan; Condamine, Fabien L.; Jiguet, Frederic; Morlon, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    The increase in species richness from the poles to the tropics, referred to as the latitudinal diversity gradient, is one of the most ubiquitous biodiversity patterns in the natural world. Although understanding how rates of speciation and extinction vary with latitude is central to explaining this pattern, such analyses have been impeded by the difficulty of estimating diversification rates associated with specific geographic locations. Here, we use a powerful phylogenetic approach and a nearly complete phylogeny of mammals to estimate speciation, extinction, and dispersal rates associated with the tropical and temperate biomes. Overall, speciation rates are higher, and extinction rates lower, in the tropics than in temperate regions. The diversity of the eight most species-rich mammalian orders (covering 92% of all mammals) peaks in the tropics, except that of the Lagomorpha (hares, rabbits, and pikas) reaching a maxima in northern-temperate regions. Latitudinal patterns in diversification rates are strikingly consistent with these diversity patterns, with peaks in species richness associated with low extinction rates (Primates and Lagomorpha), high speciation rates (Diprotodontia, Artiodactyla, and Soricomorpha), or both (Chiroptera and Rodentia). Rates of range expansion were typically higher from the tropics to the temperate regions than in the other direction, supporting the “out of the tropics” hypothesis whereby species originate in the tropics and disperse into higher latitudes. Overall, these results suggest that differences in diversification rates have played a major role in shaping the modern latitudinal diversity gradient in mammals, and illustrate the usefulness of recently developed phylogenetic approaches for understanding this famous yet mysterious pattern. PMID:24492316

  9. Landscape ecology of Trypanosoma cruzi in the southern Yucatan Peninsula.

    PubMed

    López-Cancino, Sury Antonio; Tun-Ku, Ezequiel; De la Cruz-Felix, Himmler Keynes; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos Napoleón; Izeta-Alberdi, Amaia; Pech-May, Angélica; Mazariegos-Hidalgo, Carlos Jesús; Valdez-Tah, Alba; Ramsey, Janine M

    2015-11-01

    Landscape interactions of Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) with Triatoma dimidiata (Td) depend on the presence and relative abundance of mammal hosts. This study analyzed a landscape adjacent to the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve, composed of conserved areas, crop and farming areas, and the human community of Zoh Laguna with reported Chagas disease cases. Sylvatic mammals of the Chiroptera, Rodentia, and Marsupialia orders were captured, and livestock and pets were sampled along with T. dimidiata in all habitats. Infection by T. cruzi was analyzed using mtDNA markers, while lineage and DTU was analyzed using the mini-exon. 303 sylvatic specimens were collected, corresponding to 19 species during the rainy season and 114 specimens of 18 species during dry season. Five bats Artibeus jamaicensis, Artibeus lituratus, Sturnira lilium, Sturnira ludovici, Dermanura phaeotis (Dp) and one rodent Heteromys gaumeri were collected in the three habitats. All but Dp, and including Carollia brevicauda and Myotis keaysi, were infected with predominately TcI in the sylvatic habitat and TcII in the ecotone. Sigmodon hispidus was the rodent with the highest prevalence of infection by T. cruzi I and II in ecotone and domestic habitats. Didelphis viginiana was infected only with TcI in both domestic and sylvatic habitats; the only two genotyped human cases were TcII. Two main clades of T. cruzi, lineages I (DTU Ia) and II (DTU VI), were found to be sympatric (all habitats and seasons) in the Zoh-Laguna landscape, suggesting that no species-specific interactions occur between the parasite and any mammal host, in any habitat. We have also found mixed infections of the two principal T. cruzi clades in individuals across modified habitats, particularly in livestock and pets, and in both haplogroups of T. dimidiata. Results are contradictory to the dilution hypothesis, although we did find that most resilient species had an important role as T. cruzi hosts. Our study detected some complex trends in parasite transmission related to lineage sorting within the matrix. Intriguingly, TcIa is dominant in terrestrial small wildlife in the sylvatic habitat and is the only parasite DTU found in D. virginiana in the domestic habitat, although its frequency remained constant in sylvatic and ecotone vectors. Bats have a key role in TcVI dispersal from the sylvatic habitat, while dogs, sheep, and humans are drivers of TcVI between domestic and ecotone habitats. Overall, our results allow us to conclude that T. cruzi transmission is dependent on host availability within a highly permeable landscape in Zoh Laguna. PMID:26219998

  10. Highly Diverse Morbillivirus-Related Paramyxoviruses in Wild Fauna of the Southwestern Indian Ocean Islands: Evidence of Exchange between Introduced and Endemic Small Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Mélade, Julien; Dietrich, Muriel; Ramasindrazana, Beza; Soarimalala, Voahangy; Lagadec, Erwan; le Minter, Gildas; Tortosa, Pablo; Heraud, Jean-Michel; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Goodman, Steven M.; Dellagi, Koussay

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Paramyxoviridae form an increasingly diverse viral family, infecting a wide variety of different hosts. In recent years, they have been linked to disease emergence in many different animal populations and in humans. Bats and rodents have been identified as major animal populations capable of harboring paramyxoviruses, and host shifting between these animals is likely to be an important driving factor in the underlying evolutionary processes that eventually lead to disease emergence. Here, we have studied paramyxovirus circulation within populations of endemic and introduced wild small mammals of the southwestern Indian Ocean region and belonging to four taxonomic orders: Rodentia, Afrosoricida, Soricomorpha, and Chiroptera. We report elevated infection levels as well as widespread paramyxovirus dispersal and frequent host exchange of a newly emerging genus of the Paramyxoviridae, currently referred to as the unclassified morbillivirus-related viruses (UMRVs). In contrast to other genera of the Paramyxoviridae, where bats have been shown to be a key host species, we show that rodents (and, in particular, Rattus rattus) are significant spreaders of UMRVs. We predict that the ecological particularities of the southwestern Indian Ocean, where small mammal species often live in densely packed, multispecies communities, in combination with the increasing invasion of R. rattus and perturbations of endemic animal communities by active anthropological development, will have a major influence on the dynamics of UMRV infection. IMPORTANCE Identification of the infectious agents that circulate within wild animal reservoirs is essential for several reasons: (i) infectious disease outbreaks often originate from wild fauna; (ii) anthropological expansion increases the risk of contact between human and animal populations and, as a result, the risk of disease emergence; (iii) evaluation of pathogen reservoirs helps in elaborating preventive measures to limit the risk of disease emergence. Many paramyxoviruses for which bats and rodents serve as major reservoirs have demonstrated their potential to cause disease in humans and animals. In the context of the biodiversity hot spot of southwestern Indian Ocean islands and their rich endemic fauna, we show that highly diverse UMRVs exchange between various endemic animal species, and their dissemination likely is facilitated by the introduced Rattus rattus. Hence, many members of the Paramyxoviridae appear well adapted for the study of the viral phylodynamics that may be associated with disease emergence. PMID:24829336

  11. Evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 peroxisomal and mitochondrial targeting. A survey of its subcellular distribution in the livers of various representatives of the classes Mammalia, Aves and Amphibia.

    PubMed

    Danpure, C J; Fryer, P; Jennings, P R; Allsop, J; Griffiths, S; Cunningham, A

    1994-08-01

    As part of a wider study on the molecular evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT1) intracellular compartmentalization, we have determined the subcellular distribution of immunoreactive AGT1, using postembedding protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopy, in the livers of various members of the classes Mammalia, Aves, and Amphibia. As far as organellar distribution is concerned, three categories could be distinguished. In members of the first category (type I), all, or nearly all, of the immunoreactive AGT1 was concentrated within the peroxisomes. In the second category (type II), AGT1 was found more evenly distributed in both peroxisomes and mitochondria. In the third category (type III), AGT1 was localized mainly within the mitochondria with much lower, but widely variable, amounts in the peroxisomes. Type I animals include the human, two great apes (gorilla, orangutan), two Old World monkeys (anubis baboon, Japanese macaque), a New World monkey (white-faced Saki monkey), a lago, morph (European rabbit), a bat (Seba's short-tailed fruit bat), two caviomorph rodents (guinea pig, orange-rumped agouti), and two Australian marsupials (koala, Bennett's wallaby). Type II animals include two New World monkeys (common marmoset, cotton-top tamarin), three prosimians (brown lemur, fat-tailed dwarf lemur, pygmy slow loris), five rodents (a hybrid crested porcupine, Colombian ground squirrel, laboratory rat, laboratory mouse, golden hamster), an American marsupial (grey short-tailed opossum), and a bird (raven). Type III animals include the large tree shrew, three insectivores (common Eurasian mole, European hedgehog, house shrew), four carnivores (domestic cat, ocelot, domestic dog, polecat ferret), and an amphibian (common frog). In addition to these categories, some animals (e.g. guinea pig, common frog) possessed significant amounts of cytosolic AGT1. Whereas the subcellular distribution of AGT1 in some orders (e.g. Insectivora and Carnivora) did not appear to vary markedly between the different members, in other orders (e.g. Primates, Rodentia and Marsupialia) it fluctuated widely between the different species. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the subcellular distribution of AGT1 has changed radically on numerous occasions during the evolution of mammals. The new observations presented in this paper are compatible with our previous demonstration of a relationship between AGT1 subcellular distribution and either present or putative ancestral dietary habit, and our previous suggestion that the molecular evolution of the AGT gene has been markedly influenced by dietary selection pressure. PMID:7813517

  12. Hantaan virus surveillance targeting small mammals at nightmare range, a high elevation military training area, Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Klein, Terry A; Kim, Heung-Chul; Chong, Sung-Tae; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Won-Keun; Nunn, Peter V; Song, Jin-Won

    2015-01-01

    Rodent-borne disease surveillance was conducted at Nightmare Range (NM-R), near the demilitarized zone in northeast Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea, to identify hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) risks for a mountainous high-elevation (500 m) military training site. Monthly surveys were conducted from January 2008-December 2009. A total of 1,720 small mammals were captured belonging to the Orders Rodentia [Families, Sciuridae (1 species) and Muridae (7 species)] and Soricomorpha [Family, Soricidae (1species)]. Apodemus agrarius, the primary reservoir for Hantaan virus (HTNV), accounted for 89.9% (1,546) of all small mammals captured, followed by Myodes regulus (4.0%), Crocidura lasiura (3.9%), Micromys minutus (1.4%), Mus musculus (0.3%), Microtus fortis (0.2%), Apodemus peninsulae (0.2%), Tamias sibiricus (0.1%), and Rattus norvegicus (<0.1%). Three species were antibody-positive (Ab+) for hantaviruses: A. agrarius (8.2%), M. minutus (4.2%), and C. lasiura (1.5%). HTNV specific RNA was detected in 93/127 Ab+ A. agrarius, while Imjin virus specific RNA was detected in 1/1 Ab+ C. lasiura. Overall, hantavirus Ab+ rates for A. agrarius increased with weight (age) and were significantly higher among males (10.9%) than females (5.1%) (P<0.0001). High A. agrarius gravid rates during the fall (August-September) were associated with peak numbers of HFRS cases in Korea that followed high gravid rates. From 79 RT-PCR positive A. agrarius, 12 HTNV RNA samples were sequenced and compared phylogenetically based on a 320 nt sequence from the GC glycoprotein-encoding M segment. These results demonstrate that the HTNV isolates from NM-R are distinctly separated from HTNV isolated from the People's Republic of China. These studies provide for improved disease risk assessments that identify military activities, rodent HTNV rates, and other factors associated with the transmission of hantaviruses during field training exercises. PMID:25874643

  13. Evolution of Spatially Coexpressed Families of Type-2 Vomeronasal Receptors in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Simona; Silvotti, Lucia; Ghirardi, Filippo; Catzeflis, François; Percudani, Riccardo; Tirindelli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is an olfactory structure for the detection of pheromones. VNO neurons express three groups of unrelated G-protein-coupled receptors. Type-2 vomeronasal receptors (V2Rs) are specifically localized in the basal neurons of the VNO and are believed to sense protein pheromones eliciting specific reproductive behaviors. In murine species, V2Rs are organized into four families. Family-ABD V2Rs are expressed monogenically and coexpress with family-C V2Rs of either subfamily C1 (V2RC1) or subfamily C2 (V2RC2), according to a coordinate temporal diagram. Neurons expressing the phylogenetically ancient V2RC1 coexpress family-BD V2Rs or a specific group of subfamily-A V2Rs (V2RA8-10), whereas a second neuronal subset (V2RC2-positive) coexpresses a recently expanded group of five subfamily-A V2Rs (V2RA1-5) along with vomeronasal-specific Major Histocompatibility Complex molecules (H2-Mv). Through database mining and Sanger sequencing, we have analyzed the onset, diversification, and expansion of the V2R-families throughout the phylogeny of Rodentia. Our results suggest that the separation of V2RC1 and V2RC2 occurred in a Cricetidae ancestor in coincidence with the evolution of the H2-Mv genes; this phylogenetic event did not correspond with the origin of the coexpressing V2RA1-5 genes, which dates back to an ancestral myomorphan lineage. Interestingly, the evolution of receptors within the V2RA1-5 group may be implicated in the origin and diversification of some of the V2R putative cognate ligands, the exocrine secreting peptides. The establishment of V2RC2, which probably reflects the complex expansion and diversification of family-A V2Rs, generated receptors that have probably acquired a more subtle functional specificity. PMID:25539725

  14. Comparative sacral morphology and the reconstructed tail lengths of five extinct primates: Proconsul heseloni, Epipliopithecus vindobonensis, Archaeolemur edwardsi, Megaladapis grandidieri, and Palaeopropithecus kelyus.

    PubMed

    Russo, Gabrielle A

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between the morphology of the sacrum-the sole bony link between the tail or coccyx and the rest of the body-and tail length (including presence/absence) and function using a comparative sample of extant mammals spanning six orders (Primates, Carnivora, Rodentia, Diprotodontia, Pilosa, Scandentia; N = 472). Phylogenetically-informed regression methods were used to assess how tail length varied with respect to 11 external and internal (i.e., trabecular) bony sacral variables with known or suspected biomechanical significance across all mammals, only primates, and only non-primates. Sacral variables were also evaluated for primates assigned to tail categories ('tailless,' 'nonprehensile short-tailed,' 'nonprehensile long-tailed,' and 'prehensile-tailed'). Compared to primates with reduced tail lengths, primates with longer tails generally exhibited sacra having larger caudal neural openings than cranial neural openings, and last sacral vertebrae with more mediolaterally-expanded caudal articular surfaces than cranial articular surfaces, more laterally-expanded transverse processes, more dorsally-projecting spinous processes, and larger caudal articular surface areas. Observations were corroborated by the comparative sample, which showed that shorter-tailed (e.g., Lynx rufus [bobcat]) and longer-tailed (e.g., Acinonyx jubatus [cheetah]) non-primate mammals morphologically converge with shorter-tailed (e.g., Macaca nemestrina) and longer-tailed (e.g., Macaca fascicularis) primates, respectively. 'Prehensile-tailed' primates exhibited last sacral vertebrae with more laterally-expanded transverse processes and greater caudal articular surface areas than 'nonprehensile long-tailed' primates. Internal sacral variables performed poorly compared to external sacral variables in analyses of extant primates, and were thus deemed less useful for making inferences concerning tail length and function in extinct primates. The tails lengths of five extinct primates were reconstructed from the external sacral variables: Archaeolemur edwardsi had a 'nonprehensile long tail,' Megaladapis grandidieri, Palaeopropithecus kelyus, and Epipliopithecus vindobonensis probably had 'nonprehensile short tails,' and Proconsul heseloni was 'tailless.' PMID:26767965

  15. A New Approach to Testing the Fossorial Rodent Hypothesis of Mima Mound Formation Using Airborne-Based LIDAR and a Diffusive Sediment Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, S. E.; Amundson, R.

    2007-12-01

    Mima mounds are nearly circular soil mounds, found in grassland landscapes. In California, Mima mounds are often associated with vernal pools, seasonal wetlands that harbor rare and endemic plants and animals. The processes that form and maintain the mound-pool complexes have not yet been conclusively identified, even though such information is necessary to understand the effects that land use and climate change may have on the resilience and longevity of these landscapes. One hypothesis for the origin and persistence of Mima mound- vernal pool systems (termed the Fossorial Rodent Hypothesis) proposes that burrowing organisms such as pocket gophers (Rodentia: Geomyidae) maintain and possibly create the mounds by preferentially translocating soils towards mound centers as an adaptive response to high water tables. In order to investigate this hypothesis, the topographic characteristics and aboveground gopher activity of one of the largest remaining Mima mound-vernal pool systems in California were studied. Detailed topographic information for the mound-pool systems was obtained via an airborne-based LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) survey of a 25km2 region near Merced, CA. An object-oriented classification scheme, which combined different scale, shape, and spectral parameters, was employed in order to characterize the mounds. Based on the initial classification results, roughly 275,000 mounds were identified, indicating a mound density of 11,000km-2. Within the larger study area, gopher sediment transport was monitored on a 3507m2 site by conducting periodic surveys of sediment mounds created by gopher activity using a Global Positioning System and mass measurements. Downslope erosion rates (off Mima mounds) were estimated using a mass balance model which incorporates a diffusive sediment transport law. The median calculated net downslope erosion rate was 15 cm of soil per 1000 years, while the measured rate of aboveground gopher sediment movement was approximately 57cm of soil per 1000 years. Assuming that some portion of the gopher sediment movement is in an upslope direction, these results suggest that gopher soil transport may be large enough to compensate for erosion, and this activity may play a dominant role in maintaining Mima mound-vernal pool systems. The results of this study were used to guide the development of a quantitative model of gopher-driven sediment transport on Mima mound-vernal pool landscapes. This model will be used to infer the origin of the landscapes and the rates of processes critical to their continued functioning and will also help to determine, quantitatively, the role of burrowing animals as a "keystone" species on these landscapes.

  16. The Late Pleistocene Duoi U'Oi cave in northern Vietnam: palaeontology, sedimentology, taphonomy and palaeoenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, Anne-Marie; Demeter, F.; Duringer, P.; Helm, C.; Bano, M.; Vu, The Long; Kim Thuy, Nguyen Thi; Antoine, P.-O.; Thi Mai, Bui; Huong, Nguyen Thi Mai; Dodo, Y.; Chabaux, F.; Rihs, S.

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes new fossil materials recovered at the Duoi U'Oi site, in December 2003, by a Vietnamese-French-Japanese team. The Duoi U'Oi cave is located in Man Duc village, 25 km of Hoà Binh city in northern Vietnam. It belongs to a karstic network developed in a dark grey micritic marine limestone dated from the Lower to the Middle Triassic. The sedimentary fill produced a rich mammalian fauna, essentially composed of isolated teeth of middle- to large-sized mammals (Artiodactyla, Perissodactyla, Proboscidea, Carnivora, Rodentia, Primates), and characteristic of Late Pleistocene. The results of the Duoi U'Oi fieldwork are of great interest for the following reasons: (1) the biochronological age of the fauna is consistent with 230Th/ 234U/ 238U dating from the calcitic floors (66±3 ka). The Duoi U'Oi fauna is thus the oldest well-dated modern fauna known for the Southeast Asian mainland; (2) in terms of sedimentology, the analysis of the formation of the fossiliferous breccia and that of the processes of deposits shows a close relation between the karstic deposits inside the cave and the deposits in the alluvial terraces. The observation of three levels of alluvial terraces associated with three caves situated at 62, 10 and 3 m above the present alluvial plain suggests that exokarstic and endokarstic sediments evolved together; (3) in terms of palaeobiogeography, Duoi U'Oi is the continental fauna showing the strongest resemblance with the Late Pleistocene faunas from Indonesian islands (Punung, Gunung Dawung, Lida Ajer, Sibrambang and Djambu caves); this implies that, at the time of Duoi U'Oi, ca 70 ka, the Sundaland was mainly characterised by faunas of modern aspect; (4) the analysis of major taphonomic factors that led to the mammal assemblage reveals a combination of selective agents (selective role of predators and porcupines, selective destruction of age classes for some species, selective preservation of fossils due to the deposition processes in the karstic network), which contribute to the poor representation of the diversity of the fauna; no arguments show that humans, present at Duoi U'Oi, might have a possible role in the taphonomic process; (5) the palaeoenvironmental reconstruction based on the composition of the faunal assemblage suggests a forested area and some open habitats, under warm and humid conditions.

  17. Hantaan Virus Surveillance Targeting Small Mammals at Nightmare Range, a High Elevation Military Training Area, Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Terry A.; Kim, Heung-Chul; Chong, Sung-Tae; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Won-Keun; Nunn, Peter V.; Song, Jin-Won

    2015-01-01

    Rodent-borne disease surveillance was conducted at Nightmare Range (NM-R), near the demilitarized zone in northeast Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea, to identify hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) risks for a mountainous high-elevation (500 m) military training site. Monthly surveys were conducted from January 2008-December 2009. A total of 1,720 small mammals were captured belonging to the Orders Rodentia [Families, Sciuridae (1 species) and Muridae (7 species)] and Soricomorpha [Family, Soricidae (1species)]. Apodemus agrarius, the primary reservoir for Hantaan virus (HTNV), accounted for 89.9% (1,546) of all small mammals captured, followed by Myodes regulus (4.0%), Crocidura lasiura (3.9%), Micromys minutus (1.4%), Mus musculus (0.3%), Microtus fortis (0.2%), Apodemus peninsulae (0.2%), Tamias sibiricus (0.1%), and Rattus norvegicus (<0.1%). Three species were antibody-positive (Ab+) for hantaviruses: A. agrarius (8.2%), M. minutus (4.2%), and C. lasiura (1.5%). HTNV specific RNA was detected in 93/127 Ab+ A. agrarius, while Imjin virus specific RNA was detected in 1/1 Ab+ C. lasiura. Overall, hantavirus Ab+ rates for A. agrarius increased with weight (age) and were significantly higher among males (10.9%) than females (5.1%) (P<0.0001). High A. agrarius gravid rates during the fall (August-September) were associated with peak numbers of HFRS cases in Korea that followed high gravid rates. From 79 RT-PCR positive A. agrarius, 12 HTNV RNA samples were sequenced and compared phylogenetically based on a 320 nt sequence from the GC glycoprotein-encoding M segment. These results demonstrate that the HTNV isolates from NM-R are distinctly separated from HTNV isolated from the People’s Republic of China. These studies provide for improved disease risk assessments that identify military activities, rodent HTNV rates, and other factors associated with the transmission of hantaviruses during field training exercises. PMID:25874643

  18. Effects of mitochondria-targeted plastoquinone derivative antioxidant (SkQ1) on demography of free-breeding Campbell dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli) kept in outdoor conditions. reproduction and lifespan: explanation in the framework of ultimate loads.

    PubMed

    Rogovin, K A; Khrushcheva, A M; Shekarova, O N; Ushakova, M V; Manskikh, V N; Sokolova, O V; Vasilieva, N Yu

    2014-10-01

    We studied demographic effects of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 on free-breeding Campbell dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli, Thomas, 1905, Rodentia, Cricetidae) in an outdoor vivarium with seasonally varying day length and temperatures. The animals were kept in pairs from their young age. We removed litters from parental cages at their age of 25 days. Experimental hamsters received daily 50 nmol/kg SkQ1 with water by oral dosing, whereas control animals received water. SkQ1 had no effect on the lifespan of either males or females in reproductive pairs. Mortality among females was higher than among males irrespective of SkQ1 treatment, this being related to higher costs of reproduction in females. However, SkQ1 accelerated breeding in pairs in the first half of the reproductive period of a year. Although there were no statistical differences in body mass of males and females between experimental and control animals during most of their life, SkQ1-receiving males had higher body mass at the end of their life. The opposite tendency was characteristic for old females. One-year-old males and females of the experimental and control groups showed no difference in intensity of immune response to sheep red blood cells. The dermal hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin (test for T-cell immunity) was significantly higher in SkQ1-treated 1- and 1.5-year-old males. This was not true for females. There was a tendency toward increased density of the neutrophil population in blood in 1-year-old SkQ1-treated males. However, experimental males showed no difference from control males in the activity of the "peroxidase-endogenous hydrogen peroxide system" of neutrophils. The background level of stress estimated by the concentration of cortisol in blood serum was significantly lower in the SkQ1-treated males during autumn adaptive adjustment of the organism. A similar trend was also observed during the January frosts, when the background level of stress was rather high. We observed no differences between cortisol concentration in experimental and control animals during the reproductive period in early spring and mid-summer. We tend to interpret the absence of geroprotective effect of SkQ1 on free-breeding dwarf hamsters by its ability to intensify breeding. We previously demonstrated the ability of SkQ1 to increase the lifespan of non-breeding females. PMID:25519070

  19. Mitogenomic relationships of placental mammals and molecular estimates of their divergences.

    PubMed

    Arnason, Ulfur; Adegoke, Joseph A; Gullberg, Anette; Harley, Eric H; Janke, Axel; Kullberg, Morgan

    2008-09-15

    Molecular analyses of the relationships of placental mammals have shown a progressive congruence between mitogenomic and nuclear phylogenies. Some inconsistencies have nevertheless persisted, notably with respect to basal divergences. The current study has aimed to extend the representation of groups, whose position in the placental tree has been difficult to establish in mitogenomic studies. Both ML (maximum likelihood) and Bayesian analyses identified four basal monophyletic groups, Afroplacentalia (=Afrotheria: Hyracoidea, Proboscidea, Sirenia, Tenrecidea, Tubulidentata, Macroscelidea, Chrysochloridea), Xenarthra, Archontoglires (Primates, Dermoptera, Scandentia, Lagomorpha, Rodentia) and Laurasiaplacentalia (Lipotyphla, Chiroptera, Pholidota, Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, Cetacea). All analyses joined Archontoglires and Laurasiaplacentalia on a common branch (Boreoplacentalia), but the relationship between Afroplacentalia, Xenarthra and Boreoplacentalia was not conclusively resolved. The phylogenomic hypothesis with a sister group relationship between Notoplacentalia (Afroplacentalia/Xenarthra) and Boreoplacentalia served as the basis for estimating the times of placental divergences using paleontologically well-supported mammalian calibration points. These estimates placed the basal placental divergence between Boreoplacentalia and Notoplacentalia at approximately 102 MYA (million years ago). The current estimates of ordinal placental divergences are congruent with recent estimates based on nuclear data, but inconsistent with paleontological notions that have placed the origin of essentially all placental orders within an interval of 5-10 MY in the early Tertiary. Among less deep divergences the estimates placed the split between Gorilla and Pan/Homo at approximately 11.5 MYA and that between Pan and Homo at approximately 8 MYA. As a consequence of these estimates, which are in accord with recent progress in primate paleontology, the earliest divergences among recent humans become placed approximately 270,000 years ago, i.e. approximately 100,000 years earlier than the traditional age of "Mitochondrial Eve". Comparison between the two new mt genomes of Hylomys suillus (short-tailed gymnure) patently demonstrates the inconsistency that may exist between taxonomic designations and molecular difference, as the distance between these two supposedly conspecific genomes exceeds that of the three elephantid genera Elephas, Mammuthus and Loxodonta. In accordance with the progressive use of the term Placentalia for extant orders and extinct taxa falling within this group we forward new proposals for the names of some superordinal clades of placental mammals. PMID:18590805

  20. Chagas disease: control, elimination and eradication. Is it possible?

    PubMed Central

    Coura, José Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    From an epidemiological point of view, Chagas disease and its reservoirs and vectors can present the following characteristics: (i) enzooty, maintained by wild animals and vectors, with broad occurrence from southern United States of America (USA) to southern Argentina and Chile (42ºN 49ºS), (ii) anthropozoonosis, when man invades the wild ecotope and becomes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from wild animals or vectors or when the vectors and wild animals, especially marsupials, invade the human domicile and infect man, (iii) zoonosis-amphixenosis and exchanged infection between animals and humans by domestic vectors in endemic areas and (iv) zooanthroponosis, infection that is transmitted from man to animals, by means of domestic vectors, which is the rarest situation in areas endemic for Chagas disease. The characteristics of Chagas disease as an enzooty of wild animals and as an anthropozoonosis are seen most frequently in the Brazilian Amazon and in the Pan-Amazon region as a whole, where there are 33 species of six genera of wild animals: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Edentata (Xenarthra), Carnivora and Primata and 27 species of triatomines, most of which infected with T. cruzi . These conditions place the resident populations of this area or its visitors - tourists, hunters, fishermen and especially the people whose livelihood involves plant extraction - at risk of being affected by Chagas disease. On the other hand, there has been an exponential increase in the acute cases of Chagas disease in that region through oral transmission of T. cruzi , causing outbreaks of the disease. In four seroepidemiological surveys that were carried out in areas of the microregion of the Negro River, state of Amazonas, in 1991, 1993, 1997 and 2010, we found large numbers of people who were serologically positive for T. cruzi infection. The majority of them and/or their relatives worked in piassava extraction and had come into contact with and were stung by wild triatomines in that area. Finally, a characteristic that is greatly in evidence currently is the migration of people with Chagas disease from endemic areas of Latin America to non-endemic countries. This has created a new dilemma for these countries: the risk of transmission through blood transfusion and the onus of controlling donors and treating migrants with the disease. As an enzooty of wild animals and vectors, and as an anthropozoonosis, Chagas disease cannot be eradicated, but it must be controlled by transmission elimination to man. PMID:24402148

  1. Chagas disease: control, elimination and eradication. Is it possible?

    PubMed

    Coura, José Rodrigues

    2013-12-01

    From an epidemiological point of view, Chagas disease and its reservoirs and vectors can present the following characteristics: (i) enzooty, maintained by wild animals and vectors, with broad occurrence from southern United States of America (USA) to southern Argentina and Chile (42ºN 49ºS), (ii) anthropozoonosis, when man invades the wild ecotope and becomes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from wild animals or vectors or when the vectors and wild animals, especially marsupials, invade the human domicile and infect man, (iii) zoonosis-amphixenosis and exchanged infection between animals and humans by domestic vectors in endemic areas and (iv) zooanthroponosis, infection that is transmitted from man to animals, by means of domestic vectors, which is the rarest situation in areas endemic for Chagas disease. The characteristics of Chagas disease as an enzooty of wild animals and as an anthropozoonosis are seen most frequently in the Brazilian Amazon and in the Pan-Amazon region as a whole, where there are 33 species of six genera of wild animals: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Edentata (Xenarthra), Carnivora and Primata and 27 species of triatomines, most of which infected with T. cruzi . These conditions place the resident populations of this area or its visitors - tourists, hunters, fishermen and especially the people whose livelihood involves plant extraction - at risk of being affected by Chagas disease. On the other hand, there has been an exponential increase in the acute cases of Chagas disease in that region through oral transmission of T. cruzi , causing outbreaks of the disease. In four seroepidemiological surveys that were carried out in areas of the microregion of the Negro River, state of Amazonas, in 1991, 1993, 1997 and 2010, we found large numbers of people who were serologically positive for T. cruzi infection. The majority of them and/or their relatives worked in piassava extraction and had come into contact with and were stung by wild triatomines in that area. Finally, a characteristic that is greatly in evidence currently is the migration of people with Chagas disease from endemic areas of Latin America to non-endemic countries. This has created a new dilemma for these countries: the risk of transmission through blood transfusion and the onus of controlling donors and treating migrants with the disease. As an enzooty of wild animals and vectors, and as an anthropozoonosis, Chagas disease cannot be eradicated, but it must be controlled by transmission elimination to man. PMID:24402148